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Sample records for rotation viscosity pinch

  1. Rotating plasma disks in dense Z-pinch experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, M. J. E-mail: s.lebedev@imperial.ac.uk; Lebedev, S. V. E-mail: s.lebedev@imperial.ac.uk; Suttle, L.; Burdiak, G.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Hare, J.; Swadling, G.; Patankar, S.; Bocchi, M.; Chittenden, J. P.; Smith, R.; Hall, G. N.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E.; Drake, R. P.; Ciardi, A.

    2014-12-15

    We present data from the first z-pinch experiments aiming to simulate aspects of accretion disk physics in the laboratory. Using off axis ablation flows from a wire array z-pinch we demonstrate the formation of a hollow disk structure that rotates at 60 kms{sup −1} for 150 ns. By analysing the Thomson scattered spectrum we make estimates for the ion and electron temperatures as T{sub i} ∼ 60 eV and ZT{sub e} ∼ 150 to 200 eV.

  2. Shape of pinch and swell structures as a viscosity indicator: Application to lower crustal polyphase rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Robyn L.; Piazolo, Sandra; Daczko, Nathan R.

    2016-07-01

    Pinch and swell structures occur where a more competent layer in a weaker matrix is subjected to layer-parallel extension. In this contribution, we use numerical models to explore the use of pinch and swell structure shape symmetry and asymmetry as a determinant of relative viscosity between layers. Maximum asymmetry is attained when the matrix viscosity on one side is subtly weaker than the competent layer, while the other side is significantly weaker. Our numerical results are directly applied to asymmetrically developed pinch and swell structures in exposed lower continental crust. Here, shape geometries observed in a shear zone comprised of plagioclase-dominated, garnet-dominated and mixed amphibole-plagioclase-dominated bands, reveals that the plagioclase-dominated band is the most competent band and is marginally stronger (2×) and significantly stronger (10-40×) than the fine grained garnet-dominated and mixed amphibole-plagioclase-dominated band, respectively. Based on the experimentally determined viscosity of a plagioclase-dominated material and quantitative microstructural analysis, the viscosity range of the natural rock bands is 2.8 × 1015 to 1.1 × 1017 Pa s. Consequently, the assumption that the experimentally-derived plagioclase flow law is an appropriate proxy for the middle to lower continental crust may lead to a viscosity over-estimation by up to forty times.

  3. Pinch-off dynamics, extensional viscosity and relaxation time of dilute and ultradilute aqueous polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioli, Madeleine; Dinic, Jelena; Jimenez, Leidy Nallely; Sharma, Vivek

    Free surface flows and drop formation processes present in printing, jetting, spraying, and coating involve the development of columnar necks that undergo spontaneous surface-tension driven instability, thinning, and pinch-off. Stream-wise velocity gradients that arise within the thinning neck create and extensional flow field, which induces micro-structural changes within complex fluids that contribute elastic stresses, changing the thinning and pinch-off dynamics. In this contribution, we use dripping-onto-substrate (DoS) extensional rheometry technique for visualization and analysis of the pinch-off dynamics of dilute and ultra-dilute aqueous polyethylene oxide (PEO) solutions. Using a range of molecular weights, we study the effect of both elasticity and finite extensibility. Both effective relaxation time and the transient extensional viscosity are found to be strongly concentration-dependent even for highly dilute solutions.

  4. Mixing of a passive scalar by the instability of a differentially rotating axial pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, A.; Gellert, M.; Rüdiger, G.

    2016-04-01

    The mean-field diffusion of passive scalars such as lithium, beryllium or temperature dispersals due to the magnetic Tayler instability of a rotating axial pinch is considered. Our study is carried out within a Taylor-Couette setup for two rotation laws: solid-body quasi-Kepler rotation. The minimum magnetic Prandtl number used is 0.05, and the molecular Schmidt number Sc of the fluid varies between 0.1 and 2. An effective diffusivity coefficient for the mixing is numerically measured by the decay of a prescribed concentration peak located between both cylinder walls. We find that only models with Sc exceeding 0.1 basically provide finite instability-induced diffusivity values. We also find that for quasi-Kepler rotation at a magnetic Mach number Mm ≃ 2, the flow transits from the slow-rotation regime to the fast-rotation regime that is dominated by the Taylor-Proudman theorem. For fixed Reynolds number, the relation between the normalized turbulent diffusivity and the Schmidt number of the fluid is always linear so that also a linear relation between the instability-induced diffusivity and the molecular viscosity results, just in the sense proposed by Schatzman (1977, A&A, 573, 80). The numerical value of the coefficient in this relation reaches a maximum at Mm ≃ 2 and decreases for larger Mm, implying that only toroidal magnetic fields on the order of 1 kG can exist in the solar tachocline.

  5. Sheared E×B flow and plasma turbulence viscosity in a Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Regnoli, G.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    The relationship between electromagnetic turbulence and sheared plasma flow in Reversed Field Pinch configuration is addressed. The momentum balance equation for a compressible plasma is considered and the terms involved are measured in the outer region of Extrap-T2R RFP device. It results that electrostatic fluctuations determine the plasma flow through the electrostatic component of Reynolds Stress tensor. This term involves spatial and temporal scales comparable to those of MHD activity. The derived experimental perpendicular viscosity is consistent with anomalous diffusion, the latter being discussed in terms of electrostatic turbulence background and coherent structures emerging from fluctuations. The results indicate a dynamical interplay between turbulence, anomalous transport and mean E×B profiles. The momentum balance has been studied also in non-stationary condition during the application of Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive, which is known to reduce the amplitude of MHD modes.

  6. Viscosity and Rotation in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Todd A.; Quataert, Eliot; Burrows, Adam

    2005-02-01

    We construct models of core-collapse supernovae in one spatial dimension, including rotation, angular momentum transport, and viscous dissipation employing an α-prescription. We compare the evolution of a fiducial 11 Msolar nonrotating progenitor with its evolution when including a wide range of imposed initial rotation profiles (1.25srotation period of the iron core). This range of P0 covers the region of parameter space from where rotation begins to modify the dynamics (P0~8 s) to where angular velocities at collapse approach Keplerian (P0~1 s). Under the assumption of strict angular momentum conservation, all models in this range leave behind neutron stars with spin periods <~10 ms, shorter than those of most radio pulsars but similar to those expected theoretically for magnetars at birth. A fraction of the gravitational binding energy of collapse is stored in the free energy of differential rotation. This energy source may be tapped by viscous processes, providing a mechanism for energy deposition that is not strongly coupled to the mass accretion rate through the stalled supernova shock. This effect yields qualitatively new dynamics in models of supernovae. We explore several potential mechanisms for viscosity in the core-collapse environment: neutrino viscosity, turbulent viscosity caused by the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and turbulent viscosity by entropy- and composition gradient-driven convection. We argue that the MRI is the most effective. We find for rotation periods in the range P0<~5 s and a range of viscous stresses that the postbounce dynamics is significantly affected by the inclusion of this extra energy deposition mechanism; in several cases we obtain strong supernova explosions.

  7. Investigating plasma viscosity with fast framing photography in the ZaP-HD Flow Z-Pinch experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weed, Jonathan Robert

    The ZaP-HD Flow Z-Pinch experiment investigates the stabilizing effect of sheared axial flows while scaling toward a high-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP > 100 GPa). Stabilizing flows may persist until viscous forces dissipate a sheared flow profile. Plasma viscosity is investigated by measuring scale lengths in turbulence intentionally introduced in the plasma flow. A boron nitride turbulence-tripping probe excites small scale length turbulence in the plasma, and fast framing optical cameras are used to study time-evolved turbulent structures and viscous dissipation. A Hadland Imacon 790 fast framing camera is modified for digital image capture, but features insufficient resolution to study turbulent structures. A Shimadzu HPV-X camera captures the evolution of turbulent structures with great spatial and temporal resolution, but is unable to resolve the anticipated Kolmogorov scale in ZaP-HD as predicted by a simplified pinch model.

  8. Ferrohydrodynamic evaluation of rotational viscosity and relaxation in certain ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajesh

    2012-07-01

    A significant effect of aggregation dynamics for aqueous ferrofluid (AF) and kerosene based ferrofluid (KF) using magnetic field dependent capillary viscosity and magneto-optical relaxation measurements is studied. For better comparison parameters of AF and KF are kept similar. Ferrohydrodynamic equations of chain forming ferrofluids, dilute ferrofluids, and Brownian dynamic simulations are compared. It is observed that the rotational viscosity of AF is larger than that of KF due to field induced aggregates in it and strong dipolar interactions. It is also observed that at Ωτ ~ 0.04 both AF and KF viscosity becomes almost similar, suggesting similar behavior at that shear rate. The magneto-optical relaxation in AF exhibits nonexponential behavior when relaxed from higher magnetic field and follows irreversible thermodynamics, whereas for KF the relaxation is exponential and follows the effective field method. This discrepancy is explained based on aggregation dynamics of magnetic particles. Results are well described by the corresponding theoretical models. PMID:23005542

  9. Effect of temperature on rotational viscosity in magnetic nano fluids.

    PubMed

    Patel, R

    2012-10-01

    Flow behavior of magnetic nano fluids with simultaneous effect of magnetic field and temperature is important for its application for cooling devices such as transformer, loud speakers, electronic cooling and for its efficiency in targeted drug delivery and hyperthermia treatment. Using a specially designed horizontal capillary viscometer, temperature-sensitive and non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nano fluids are studied. In both these case the temperature-dependent rotational viscosity decreases, but follows a quite different mechanism. For temperature-sensitive magnetic nano fluids, the reduction in rotational viscosity is due to the temperature dependence of magnetization. Curie temperature ((T)(c)) and pyromagnetic coefficient are extracted from the study. A fluid with low T(c) and high pyromagnetic coefficient is useful for thermo-sensitive cooling devices and magnetic hyperthermia. For non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nano fluids, reduction in rotational viscosity is due to removal of physisorbed secondary surfactant on the particle because of thermal and frictional effects. This can be a good analogy for removal of drug from the magnetic particles in the case of targeted drug delivery. PMID:23096152

  10. Measuring Lipid Membrane Viscosity Using Rotational and Translational Probe Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormel, Tristan T.; Kurihara, Sarah Q.; Brennan, M. Kathleen; Wozniak, Matthew C.; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-05-01

    The two-dimensional fluidity of lipid bilayers enables the motion of membrane-bound macromolecules and is therefore crucial to biological function. Microrheological methods that measure fluid viscosity via the translational diffusion of tracer particles are challenging to apply and interpret for membranes, due to uncertainty about the local environment of the tracers. Here, we demonstrate a new technique in which determination of both the rotational and translational diffusion coefficients of membrane-linked particles enables quantification of viscosity, measurement of the effective radii of the tracers, and assessment of theoretical models of membrane hydrodynamics. Surprisingly, we find a wide distribution of effective tracer radii, presumably due to a variable number of lipids linked to each tracer particle. Furthermore, we show for the first time that a protein involved in generating membrane curvature, the vesicle trafficking protein Sar1p, dramatically increases membrane viscosity. Using the rheological method presented here, therefore, we are able to reveal a class of previously unknown couplings between protein activity and membrane mechanics.

  11. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF Z-PINCH EXPERIMENTS TO CREATE SUPERSONIC DIFFERENTIALLY ROTATING PLASMA FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Bocchi, M.; Ummels, B.; Chittenden, J. P.; Lebedev, S. V.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E. G.

    2013-04-10

    The physics of accretion disks is of fundamental importance for understanding of a wide variety of astrophysical sources that includes protostars, X-ray binaries, and active galactic nuclei. The interplay between hydrodynamic flows and magnetic fields and the potential for turbulence-producing instabilities is a topic of active research that would benefit from the support of dedicated experimental studies. Such efforts are in their infancy, but in an effort to push the enterprise forward we propose an experimental configuration which employs a modified cylindrical wire array Z-pinch to produce a rotating plasma flow relevant to accretion disks. We present three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations which show how this approach can be implemented. In the simulations, a rotating plasma cylinder or ring is formed, with typical rotation velocity {approx}30 km s{sup -1}, Mach number {approx}4, and Reynolds number in excess of 10{sup 7}. The plasma is also differentially rotating. Implementation of different external magnetic field configurations is discussed. It is found that a modest uniform vertical field of 1 T can affect the dynamics of the system and could be used to study magnetic field entrainment and amplification through differential rotation. A dipolar field potentially relevant to the study of accretion columns is also considered.

  12. Mode- and plasma rotation in a resistive shell reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brzozowski, J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    Mode rotation studies in a resistive shell reversed-field pinch, EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1 (2001)] are presented. The phase relations and nonlinear coupling of the resonant modes are characterized and compared with that expected from modeling based on the hypothesis that mode dynamics can be described by a quasi stationary force balance including electromagnetic and viscous forces. Both m=0 and m=1 resonant modes are studied. The m=1 modes have rotation velocities corresponding to the plasma flow velocity (20-60 km/s) in the core region. The rotation velocity decreases towards the end of the discharge, although the plasma flow velocity does not decrease. A rotating phase locked m=1 structure is observed with a velocity of about 60 km/s. The m=0 modes accelerate throughout the discharges and reach velocities as high as 150-250 km/s. The observed m=0 phase locking is consistent with theory for certain conditions, but there are several conditions when the dynamics are not described. This is not unexpected because the assumption of quasi stationarity for the mode spectra is not fulfilled for many conditions. Localized m=0 perturbations are formed in correlation with highly transient discrete dynamo events. These perturbations form at the location of the m=1 phase locked structure, but rotate with a different velocity as they spread out in the toroidal direction.

  13. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  14. Inward radial transport in differentially rotated plasma discs formed in z-pinch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Sergey; Bennett, M.; Swadling, G. F.; Suttle, L.; Blackman, E.; Burdiak, G.; Chittenden, J. P.; Ciardi, A.; Drake, R. P.; Frank, A.; Hall, G. N.; Hare, J.; Patankar, S.; Smith, R. A.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.

    2014-10-01

    We will present experimental results showing the development of instabilities and an inward transport of matter in a differentially rotating supersonic plasma disc with dimensionless parameters relevant to modeling physics of astrophysical discs. The converging off-axis plasma flow forming the disc is produced by ablation of wires in a cylindrical wire array z-pinch (1.4 MA, 250 ns) combined with a cusp magnetic field, and the rotating disc is supported in equilibrium by the ram pressure of the flow. The radial profile of rotation velocity in the disc is measured using Doppler shifts of the ion feature of Thomson scattering spectra, while the broadening of the spectra yields the plasma temperature. The evolution of the disc structure is observed with multi-frame XUV and optical cameras, and the plasma density is measured using end-on laser interferometry. The Reynolds number in the disc is sufficiently large (>105) to allow development of turbulence on the time-scale of the experiment, and the observed inward transport of matter with the growth of small scale structures suggests that turbulence is responsible for the transport.

  15. Rotational viscosity of fluids composed of linear molecules: An equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. J. D.; Hansen, J. S.; Todd, B. D.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the rotational viscosity for a chlorine fluid and for a fluid composed of small linear molecules by using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The rotational viscosity is calculated over a large range of state points. It is found that the rotational viscosity is almost independent of temperature in the range studied here but exhibits a power-law dependency on density. The rotational viscosity also shows a power-law relationship with the molecular length, and the ratio between the shear and rotational viscosities approaches 0.5 for the longest molecule studied here. By changing the number of atoms or united atomic units per molecule and by keeping the molecule length fixed, we show that fluids composed of molecules which have a rodlike shape have a lower rotational viscosity. We argue that this phenomenon is due to the reduction in intermolecular connectivity, which leads to larger fluctuations around the values possessed by the fluid on average. The conclusions here can be extended to fluids composed of uniaxial molecules of arbitrary length.

  16. Resonance parallel viscosity in the banana regime in poloidally rotating tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Hsu, C.T.; Dominguez, N. )

    1994-05-01

    Parallel viscosity in the banana regime in a poloidally ([bold E][times][bold B]) rotating tokamak plasma is calculated to include the effects of orbit squeezing and to allow the poloidal [bold E][times][bold B] Mach number [ital M][sub [ital p

  17. Time dependent parallel viscosity and relaxation rate of poloidal rotation in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.T.; Shaing, K.C.; Gormley, R. )

    1994-01-01

    Time dependent ion parallel viscous force in the banana regime with arbitrary inverse aspect ratio [epsilon] is calculated using the eigenfunction approach. The flux surface averaged viscosity is then used to study the relaxation process of the poloidal rotation which leads to oscillatory relaxation behavior. The relaxation rate [nu][sub [ital p

  18. Glacial isostatic adjustment and Earth rotation: Refined constraints on the viscosity of the deepest mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, W.R.; Jiang, X.

    1996-02-10

    This report explores the use of the present-day rate and direction of polar wander and the magnitude of the nontidal acceleration of the rate of planetary rotation of the earth to contrain the viscosity of the lower regions of the lower mantle.

  19. Error field assessment from driven rotation of stable external kinks at EXTRAP-T2R reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, F. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.

    2013-04-01

    A new non-disruptive error field (EF) assessment technique not restricted to low density and thus low beta was demonstrated at the EXTRAP-T2R reversed field pinch. Stable and marginally stable external kink modes of toroidal mode number n = 10 and n = 8, respectively, were generated, and their rotation sustained, by means of rotating magnetic perturbations of the same n. Due to finite EFs, and in spite of the applied perturbations rotating uniformly and having constant amplitude, the kink modes were observed to rotate non-uniformly and be modulated in amplitude. This behaviour was used to precisely infer the amplitude and approximately estimate the toroidal phase of the EF. A subsequent scan permitted to optimize the toroidal phase. The technique was tested against deliberately applied as well as intrinsic EFs of n = 8 and 10. Corrections equal and opposite to the estimated error fields were applied. The efficacy of the error compensation was indicated by the increased discharge duration and more uniform mode rotation in response to a uniformly rotating perturbation. The results are in good agreement with theory, and the extension to lower n, to tearing modes and to tokamaks, including ITER, is discussed.

  20. Faster in-plane switching and reduced rotational viscosity characteristics in a graphene-nematic suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Rajratan; Kinnamon, Daniel; Skaggs, Nicole; Womack, James

    2016-05-01

    The in-plane switching (IPS) for a nematic liquid crystal (LC) was found to be considerably faster when the LC was doped with dilute concentrations of monolayer graphene flakes. Additional studies revealed that the presence of graphene reduced the rotational viscosity of the LC, permitting the nematic director to respond quicker in IPS mode on turning the electric field on. The studies were carried out with several graphene concentrations in the LC, and the experimental results coherently suggest that there exists an optimal concentration of graphene, allowing a reduction in the IPS response time and rotational viscosity in the LC. Above this optimal graphene concentration, the rotational viscosity was found to increase, and consequently, the LC no longer switched faster in IPS mode. The presence of graphene suspension was also found to decrease the LC's pretilt angle significantly due to the π-π electron stacking between the LC molecules and graphene flakes. To understand the π-π stacking interaction, the anchoring mechanism of the LC on a CVD grown monolayer graphene film on copper substrate was studied by reflected crossed polarized microscopy. Optical microphotographs revealed that the LC alignment direction depended on monolayer graphene's hexagonal crystal structure and its orientation.

  1. Jeans instability of magnetized quantum plasma: Effect of viscosity, rotation and finite Larmor radius corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Shweta Sharma, Prerana; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2015-07-31

    The Jeans instability of self-gravitating quantum plasma is examined considering the effects of viscosity, finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections and rotation. The analysis is done by normal mode analysis theory with the help of relevant linearized perturbation equations of the problem. The general dispersion relation is obtained using the quantum magneto hydrodynamic model. The modified condition of Jeans instability is obtained and the numerical calculations have been performed to show the effects of various parameters on the growth rate of Jeans instability.

  2. Study of the confinement properties in a reversed-field pinch with mode rotation and gas fuelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Nielsen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Drake, J. R.

    2002-08-01

    An extensive investigation of the global confinement properties in different operating scenarios in the rebuilt EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiment is reported here. In particular, the role of a fast gas puff valve system, used to control plasma density, on confinement is studied. Without gas puffing, the electron density decays below 0.5×1019 m-3. The poloidal beta varies between 5% and 15%, decreasing at large I/N. The energy confinement time ranges from 70 to 225 μs. With gas puffing, the density is sustained at ne≈1.5×1019 m-3. However, a general slight deterioration of the plasma performances is observed for the same values of I/N: the plasma becomes cooler and more radiative. The poloidal beta is comparable to that in the scenarios without puff but the energy confinement time drops ranging from 60 to 130 μs. The fluctuation level and the energy confinement time have been found to scale with the Lundquist number as S-0.05+/-0.07 and S0.5+/-0.1, respectively. Mode rotation is typical for all the discharges and rotation velocity is observed to increase with increasing electron diamagnetic velocity.

  3. The effects of rotational flow, viscosity, thickness, and shape on transonic flutter dip phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, Rakesh; Kaza, Krishna Rao V.

    1988-01-01

    The transonic flutter dip phenomena on thin airfoils, which are employed for propfan blades, is investigated using an integrated Euler/Navier-Stokes code and a two degrees of freedom typical section structural model. As a part of the code validation, the flutter characteristics of the NACA 64A010 airfoil are also investigated. In addition, the effects of artificial dissipation models, rotational flow, initial conditions, mean angle of attack, viscosity, airfoil thickness and shape on flutter are investigated. The results obtained with a Euler code for the NACA 64A010 airfoil are in reasonable agreement with published results obtained by using transonic small disturbance and Euler codes. The two artificial dissipation models, one based on the local pressure gradient scaled by a common factor and the other based on the local pressure gradient scaled by a spectral radius, predicted the same flutter speeds except in the recovery region for the case studied. The effects of rotational flow, initial conditions, mean angle of attack, and viscosity for the Reynold's number studied seem to be negligible or small on the minima of the flutter dip.

  4. Time Evolution of a Rotating Gas Ring around a Black Hole in Presence of Viscosity and Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Kinsuk

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the flow dynamics of a rotating gas ring around a black hole in presence of turbulent viscosity and also cooling. We find that the matter of the initial gas ring starts to move inwards as the viscosity is enhanced. The so called centrifugal pressure supported sub-Keplerian flow with shocks forms in our simulation when the ring starts to disperse with inclusion of relatively small amount of viscosity. But, when the value of viscosity parameter is reasonably large, the accreting matter reaches up to marginally stable orbit which is close to the black hole and the whole disc becomes roughly Keplerian. The variation of shock's nature due to change of the magnitude of viscosity and also the variation of disc nature due the cooling processes may play an important role to study the temporal and spectral properties of the black hole candidates.

  5. Mantle viscosity, J2 and the nontidal acceleration of Earth rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent interpretations of laser ranging for the LAGEOS satellite have rather conclusively established that the observed acceleration in the node of its orbit is just that expected to exist as a residual effect of the last deglaciation event which ended about 6000 years ago. The nontidal acceleration of rotation would be rather different than that observed if there were any significant melting of high latitude continental ice masses currently ongoing. The sensitivity of the expected nontidal acceleration to variations of several elements of the radial viscoelastic structure of the planet is explored using a new normal mode method for the computation of viscoelastic relaxation spectra. These calculations establish that the most important sensitivity is to variations in the mantle viscosity profile. Although the predicted nontidal acceleration does depend upon lithospheric thickness and on the elastic component of the radial structure, the dependence on these components of the structure is much weaker than it is upon mantle viscosity. The observed J sub 2 is therefore a particularly useful determinant of radial variations in the latter parameter.

  6. Shear-thinning and constant viscosity predictions for rotating sphere flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garduño, Isaías E.; Tamaddon-Jahromi, Hamid R.; Webster, Michael F.

    2016-02-01

    The steady motion of a rotating sphere is analysed through two contrasting viscoelastic models, a constant viscosity (FENE-CR) model and a shear-thinning (LPTT) model. Giesekus (Rheol. Acta 9:30-38, 1970) presented an intriguing rotating viscoelastic flow, which to date has not been completely explained. In order to investigate this flow, sets of parameters have been explored to analyse the significant differences introduced with the proposed models, while the momentum-continuity-stress equations are solved through a hybrid finite-element/finite volume numerical scheme. Solutions are discussed for first, sphere angular velocity increase (\\varOmega), and second, through material velocity-scale increase (α). Numerical predictions for different solvent-ratios (β) show significant differences as the sphere angular velocity increases. It is demonstrated that an emerging equatorial anticlockwise vortex emerges in a specific range of \\varOmega. As such, this solution matches closely with the Giesekus experimental findings. Additionally, inside the emerging inertial vortex, a contrasting positive second normal stress-difference (N2 ( dot{γ} ) = τ_{rr} - τ_{θθ}) region is found compared against the negative N2-enveloping layer.

  7. Investigation of sludge viscosity and its effects on the performance of a vacuum rotation membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Komesli, Okan Tarik; Gökçay, Celal Ferdi

    2014-01-01

    Sludge characteristics of a full-scale vacuum rotation membrane (VRM) bioreactor having plate-type membranes with 0.038 microm nominal pore size and 540 m2 surface area were investigated. The VRM plant is composed of an aeration tank and a filtration chamber. The sludge floc size distribution, as determined microscopically, was mainly between 0 and 100 microm in the filter chamber with very little difference in size distribution between summer (20-25 degrees C) and winter (10-15 degrees C) seasons. Small floc size encountered in the filtration chamber was evident due to excessive shear administered by the rotation action and vigorous agitation by the scouring air. The mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) was variable between 5.23 and 14.10 g/L in the VRM tank and sludge behaved plastic. Viscosity ranged between 2.39 and 30 cP in the VRM tank in relation with MLSS concentration and temperature. Above 20 cP inter-plate spaces rapidly clogged leading to major clean-up.

  8. Investigation of sludge viscosity and its effects on the performance of a vacuum rotation membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Komesli, Okan Tarik; Gökçay, Celal Ferdi

    2014-01-01

    Sludge characteristics of a full-scale vacuum rotation membrane (VRM) bioreactor having plate-type membranes with 0.038 microm nominal pore size and 540 m2 surface area were investigated. The VRM plant is composed of an aeration tank and a filtration chamber. The sludge floc size distribution, as determined microscopically, was mainly between 0 and 100 microm in the filter chamber with very little difference in size distribution between summer (20-25 degrees C) and winter (10-15 degrees C) seasons. Small floc size encountered in the filtration chamber was evident due to excessive shear administered by the rotation action and vigorous agitation by the scouring air. The mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) was variable between 5.23 and 14.10 g/L in the VRM tank and sludge behaved plastic. Viscosity ranged between 2.39 and 30 cP in the VRM tank in relation with MLSS concentration and temperature. Above 20 cP inter-plate spaces rapidly clogged leading to major clean-up. PMID:24645444

  9. Effects of Polymers on the Rotational Viscosities of Nematic Liquid Crystals and Dynamics of Field Alignment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Du-Rim

    Many of the important physical phenomena exhibited by the nematic phase, such as its unusual flow properties and its responses to the electric and the magnetic fields, can be discussed regarding it as a continuous medium. The Leslie-Erickson dynamic theory has the six dissipative coefficients from continuum model of liquid crystal. Parodi showed that only five of them are independent, when Onsagar's reciprocal relations are used. One of these, which has no counterpart in the isotropic liquids, is the rotational viscosity coefficient, gamma_1. The main objective of this project is to study the rotational viscosities of selected micellar nematic systems and the effect of dissolved polymers in micellar and thermotropic liquid crystals. We used rotating magnetic field method which allows one to determine gamma _1 and the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility, chi_{a}. For the ionic surfactant liquid crystals of SDS and KL systems used in this study, the rotational viscosity exhibited an extraordinary drop after reaching the highest value gamma_1 as the temperature was lowered. This behavior is not observed in normal liquid crystals. But this phenomena can be attributed to the existence of nematic biaxial phase below the rod-like nematic N_{c} phase. The pretransitional increase in gamma _1 near the disk-like nematic to smectic -A phase transition of the pure CsPFO H_2O systems are better understood with the help of mean-field models of W. L. McMillan. He predicted a critical exponent nu = -{1over 2} for the divergence of gamma_1. The polymer (PEO, molecular weight = 10 ^5) dissolved in CsPFO H_2O system (which has 0.6% critical polymer concentration), suppressed the nematic to lamellar smectic phase transition in concentrated polymer solutions (0.75% and higher). In dilute polymer solutions with lower than 0.3% polyethylene-oxide, a linear increase of gamma_1 is observed, which agrees with Brochard theory. The polymer solutions in thermotropic liquid crystal solvents

  10. Error Field Assessment from Driven Mode Rotation: Results from Extrap-T2R Reversed-Field-Pinch and Perspectives for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, F. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.

    2012-10-01

    A new ITER-relevant non-disruptive error field (EF) assessment technique not restricted to low density and thus low beta was demonstrated at the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch. Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs) were generated and their rotation sustained by rotating magnetic perturbations. In particular, stable modes of toroidal mode number n=8 and 10 and unstable modes of n=1 were used in this experiment. Due to finite EFs, and in spite of the applied perturbations rotating uniformly and having constant amplitude, the RWMs were observed to rotate non-uniformly and be modulated in amplitude (in the case of unstable modes, the observed oscillation was superimposed to the mode growth). This behavior was used to infer the amplitude and toroidal phase of n=1, 8 and 10 EFs. The method was first tested against known, deliberately applied EFs, and then against actual intrinsic EFs. Applying equal and opposite corrections resulted in longer discharges and more uniform mode rotation, indicating good EF compensation. The results agree with a simple theoretical model. Extensions to tearing modes, to the non-uniform plasma response to rotating perturbations, and to tokamaks, including ITER, will be discussed.

  11. Rotational viscosity, dynamic phenomena, and dielectric properties in a long-chain liquid crystal: NMR study and theoretical treatment.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, A V; Dong, R Y

    2001-01-01

    The rotational diffusion constants D(perpendicular) and D(parallel), rotational viscosity coefficients gamma(i) (i=1,2), the orientational correlation times tau(L)mn, and the dielectric permittivities for nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) are investigated. gamma(i) are calculated by a combination of existing statistical-mechanical approach (SMA) and NMR relaxation theory, both based on a rotational diffusion model. In the rotational diffusion model, it is assumed that the reorientation of an individual molecule is a stochastic Brownian motion in a certain potential of mean torque. According to the SMA, gamma(i) are found to be a function of temperature, density, rotational diffusion constant for tumbling motions, and the orientational order parameters. The order parameters and rotational diffusion constant are obtained from an analysis of NMR measurements. Reasonable agreement between the calculated and experimental values of gamma(i) for 4-n-octyloxy-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8OCB) is obtained. The orientational correlation times, and the longitudinal and transverse components of the real chi'(j)(omega) and imaginary chi"(j)(omega) (j= parallel, perpendicular) parts of the complex susceptibility tensor for 8OCB molecules in the nematic phase are also obtained.

  12. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Rotational viscosity of a liquid crystal mixture: a fully atomistic molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ran; Peng, Zeng-Hui; Liu, Yong-Gang; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Xuan, Li

    2009-10-01

    Fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at 293, 303 and 313 K have been performed for the four-component liquid crystal mixture, E7, using the software package Material Studio. Order parameters and orientational time correlation functions (TCFs) were calculated from MD trajectories. The rotational viscosity coefficients (RVCs) of the mixture were calculated using the Nemtsov-Zakharov and Fialkowski methods based on statistical-mechanical approaches. Temperature dependences of RVC and density were discussed in detail. Reasonable agreement between the simulated and experimental values was found.

  13. Optical non-contact localization of liquid-gas interfaces on disk during rotation for measuring flow rates and viscosities.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jochen; Riegger, Lutz; Bundgaard, Frederik; Mark, Daniel; Zengerle, Roland; Ducrée, Jens

    2012-12-21

    We present a novel technique for the spatio-temporally resolved localization of liquid-gas interfaces on centrifugal microfluidic platforms based on total internal reflection (TIR) at the channel wall. The simple setup consists of a line laser and a linear image sensor array mounted in a stationary instrument. Apart from identifying the presence of usually unwanted gas bubbles, the here described online meniscus detection allows to measure liquid volumes with a high precision of 1.9%. Additionally, flow rates and viscosities (range: 1-12 mPa s, precision of 4.3%) can be sensed even during rotation at frequencies up to 30 Hz.

  14. Viscosity structure of Earth's mantle inferred from rotational variations due to GIA process and recent melting events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Masao; Okuno, Jun'ichi; Lambeck, Kurt; Purcell, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    We examine the geodetically derived rotational variations for the rate of change of degree-two harmonics of Earth's geopotential, skew5dot J_2, and true polar wander, combining a recent melting model of glaciers and the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets taken from the IPCC 2013 Report (AR5) with two representative GIA ice models describing the last deglaciation, ICE5G and the ANU model developed at the Australian National University. Geodetically derived observations of skew4dot J_2 are characterized by temporal changes of -(3.7 ± 0.1) × 10-11 yr-1 for the period 1976-1990 and -(0.3 ± 0.1) × 10-11 yr-1 after ˜2000. The AR5 results make it possible to evaluate the recent melting of the major ice sheets and glaciers for three periods, 1900-1990, 1991-2001 and after 2002. The observed skew4dot J_2 and the component of skew4dot J_2 due to recent melting for different periods indicate a long-term change in skew4dot J_2-attributed to the Earth's response to the last glacial cycle-of -(6.0-6.5) × 10-11 yr-1, significantly different from the values adopted to infer the viscosity structure of the mantle in most previous studies. This is a main conclusion of this study. We next compare this estimate with the values of skew4dot J_2 predicted by GIA ice models to infer the viscosity structure of the mantle, and consequently obtain two permissible solutions for the lower mantle viscosity (ηlm), ˜1022 and (5-10) × 1022 Pa s, for both adopted ice models. These two solutions are largely insensitive to the lithospheric thickness and upper mantle viscosity as indicated by previous studies and relatively insensitive to the viscosity structure of the D″ layer. The ESL contributions from the Antarctic ice sheet since the last glacial maximum (LGM) for ICE5G and ANU are about 20 and 30 m, respectively, but glaciological reconstructions of the Antarctic LGM ice sheet have suggested that its ESL contribution may have been less than ˜10 m. The GIA-induced skew4dot J_2 for GIA

  15. Winged inclusions: Pinch-and-swell objects during high-strain simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Dabrowski, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we compare natural examples of isolated pinch-and-swell objects, which have been deformed in simple shear, with results of high-strain numerical models. Such structures, which have geometrical similarities with δ-clast systems and rolling structures, have been called winged inclusions. We suggest a new mechanical explanation for the evolution of winged inclusions, which form when pinch-and-swell shaped objects consisting of a core and pre-existing wings rotate out of the shear plane. The viscosity ratio, the stress exponent, and the shape of the winged inclusion have a significant influence on the rotation rate. The rotational behaviour of winged inclusions differs significantly from the rotational behaviour of simple elliptical objects with comparable aspect ratios. During the early stages of formation, winged inclusions may resemble mirror images of sigmoids and misinterpretations may lead to a wrong determination of the shear sense. During progressive shear to large strains, the structures may be approximately described as consisting of a pulsating rotating core and thinning wings that rotate with different rates. During rotation of the structure, the core of the winged inclusions records an overall decrease of the aspect ratio influencing the rotation rate of the inclusion. The wings are subject to ptygmatic folding, when they rotate through the field of instantaneous shortening and may unfold again in the field of instantaneous stretching. During ongoing shearing, the wings on both sides of the core rotate with the core, may change their positions and finally unfold after rotation about 180° resulting again in a pinch-and-swell shaped object. Therefore, winged inclusions record ambiguous information about the finite strain. Rotating winged inclusions create a significant flow perturbation in the matrix resulting in nucleation of folds, refolding and propagation of shear zones. Rootless intrafolial folds with opposing closures have strong

  16. Characteristics of Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity in NSTX and KSTAR for Rotation Control and the Evaluation of Plasma Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, S. A.; Berkery, J. W.; Park, Y. S.; Bell, R. E.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Goumiri, I.; Evans, T. E.; Ferraro, N.; Jeon, Y. M.; Ko, W.; Shaing, K. C.; Sun, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Three-dimensional magnetic fields producing non-resonant magnetic braking allow control of the plasma rotation profile, ωφ, in tokamaks. Experimental angular momentum alteration created by 3D field configurations with dominant n = 2 and n = 3 components in NSTX is compared to theoretical neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque density profiles, TNTV. Large radial variations of TNTV are typically found when flux surface displacements are computed using ideal MHD assumptions. In contrast, experimentally measured TNTV does not show strong torque localization. This may be explained by ion banana width orbit-averaging effects. A favorable characteristic for ωφ control clearly illustrated by KSTAR experiments is the lack of hysteresis of ωφ when altered by non-resonant NTV. Results from a model-based rotation controller designed using NBI and NTV from the applied 3D field as actuators are shown. The dependence of TNTV on δB2 significantly constrains the allowable field amplification in plasma response models when compared to experiment. Initial analysis shows that the single fluid model in the M3D-C1 resistive MHD code produces a flux surface-averaged δB consistent with the experimentally measured TNTV. Supported by US DOE Contracts DE-FG02-99ER54524 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. Effects of neoclassical toroidal viscosity induced by the intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripple on the toroidal rotation in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. H.; Seol, J.; Ko, W. H.; Terzolo, L.; Aydemir, A. Y.; In, Y.; Ghim, Y.-c.; Lee, S. G.

    2016-08-01

    Effects of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) induced by intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripple on cocurrent toroidal rotation in H-mode tokamak plasmas are investigated. It is expected that large NTV torque can be localized at the edge region through the 1/ν-regime in the vicinity of E r ˜ 0 in the cocurrent rotating H-mode plasma. Numerical simulation on toroidal rotation demonstrates that the edge localized NTV torque determined by the intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripples in the level of most tokamaks can damp the toroidal rotation velocity over the whole region while reducing the toroidal rotation pedestal which is clearly observed in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak. It is found that the NTV torque changes the toroidal rotation gradient in the pedestal region dramatically, but the toroidal rotation profile in the core region responds rigidly without a change in the gradient. On the other hand, it shows that the NTV torque induced by the intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripple in the level of the KSTAR tokamak, which are expected to be smaller than most tokamaks by at least one order of magnitude, is negligible in determining the toroidal rotation velocity profile. Experimental observation on the toroidal rotation change by the externally applied nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields on KSTAR also suggests that NTV torque arising from nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields can damp the toroidal rotation over the whole region while diminishing the toroidal rotation pedestal.

  18. Influence of a low-viscosity layer between rigid inclusion and viscous matrix on inclusion rotation and matrix flow: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Fernando O.; Taborda, R.; Antunes, J.

    2005-09-01

    We have used 2-D finite element modelling to investigate the influence of a permanent low-viscosity layer between matrix and inclusion on matrix flow and inclusion rotation under viscous simple shear flow. Rigid inclusions of different shape (circle, square, ellipse, lozenge, rectangle and skewed rectangles) and aspect ratio ( R) were used. The calculated matrix flow pattern is neither bow tie nor eye-shaped. It is a new flow pattern that we call cat eyes-shaped, which is characterized by: (i) straight streamlines that slightly bend inwards at the inclusion's crests; (ii) elongate eye-shaped streamlines on each side of the inclusion; (iii) stagnation points in the centre of the eyes; (iv) absence of closed streamlines surrounding the inclusion; (v) changes in flow configuration with inclusion orientation; the lines of flow reversal bend and tilt, closed streamline circuits may disappear, and streamlines may bend outwards at the inclusion's crests. Concerning inclusion rotation, the numerical results show that: (i) a low-viscosity layer (LVL) makes inclusions with R = 1 rotate synthetically, but the rotation rate depends upon shape (circle or square) and orientation. Therefore, shape matters in the slipping mode. (ii) All studied shapes with R > 1 rotate antithetically when starting with the greatest principal axis ( e1) parallel to the shear direction ( ϕ = 0°); (iii) rotation is limited because there is a stable equilibrium orientation ( ϕse) for all studied shapes with R > 1. (iii) There is also an unstable equilibrium orientation ( ϕue), and both ϕse and ϕue depend upon inclusion's R and shape. The present numerical results closely agree with previous results of analogue experiments with a permanent low viscosity interface. Only minor deviations related with small shape differences were detected.

  19. Diffusion-viscosity decoupling in solute rotation and solvent relaxation of coumarin153 in ionic liquids containing fluoroalkylphosphate (FAP) anion: a thermophysical and photophysical study.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudhir Kumar; Sahu, Prabhat Kumar; Sarkar, Moloy

    2013-01-17

    Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence behavior of coumarin153 (C153) has been investigated in two ionic liquids (ILs), namely 1-(2-methoxyethyl)-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([MOEMPL][FAP]) and 1-(2-methoxyethyl)-1-methylmorpholinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([MOEMMO][FAP]) in order to find out the viscosity-diffusion decoupling during solvation and rotational relaxation of C153. Thermophysical studies have also been carried out to understand the physicochemical properties of the media. At 293 K, the measured viscosity of [MOEMMO][FAP] is 8 times higher than that of [MOEMPL][FAP]. The data obtained from steady state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements show the deviation of average solvation and rotation times from conventional hydrodynamics. The decoupling of solute and solvent dynamics from medium viscosity is manifested through fractional viscosity dependence (η) of the measured average solvation (<τ(s)>) and rotation (<τ(r)>) times: <τ(x)> [proportionality] (η/T)(p) (x denotes solvation or rotation and T is the temperature) covering the p value 0.69 < p < 0.85 for solvent relaxation and 0.48 < p < 1.10 for solute rotation. The excitation wavelength dependent fluorescence studies have been performed to correlate the experimental findings with the heterogeneity of the medium. While the excitation wavelength dependent time-resolved fluorescence studies of coumarin153 reveal a very similar variation of average solvation time with a change in excitation wavelengths for both the ionic liquids, the steady state excitation wavelength dependent measurements of 2-amino-7-nitrofluorene (ANF) show a higher (630 cm(-1)) shift of the fluorescence maximum for highly viscous ionic liquid as compared to that (430 cm(-1)) of another much less viscous ionic liquid. The recent theoretical (Chem. Phys. Lett.2011, 517, 180) and experimental (J. Chem. Phys.2012, 136, 174503) findings and the outcome of the excitation

  20. Diffusion-Controlled Rotation of Triptycene in a Metal–Organic Framework (MOF) Sheds Light on the Viscosity of MOF-Confined Solvent

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Artificial molecular machines are expected to operate under conditions of very low Reynolds numbers with inertial forces orders of magnitude smaller than viscous forces. While these conditions are relatively well understood in bulk fluids, opportunities to assess the role of viscous forces in confined crystalline media are rare. Here we report one such example of diffusion-controlled rotation in crystals and its application as a probe for viscosity of MOF-confined solvent. We describe the preparation and characterization of three pillared paddlewheel MOFs, with 9,10-bis(4-pyridylethynyl)triptycene 3 as a pillar and molecular rotator, and three axially substituted dicarboxylate linkers with different lengths and steric bulk. The noncatenated structure with a bulky dicarboxylate linker (UCLA-R3) features a cavity filled by 10 molecules of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). Solid-state 2H NMR analysis performed between 293 and 343 K revealed a fast 3-fold rotation of the pillar triptycene group with the temperature dependence consistent with a site exchange process determined by rotator-solvent interactions. The dynamic viscosity of the MOF-confined solvent was estimated to be 13.3 N·s/m2 (or Pa·s), which is 4 orders of magnitude greater than that of bulk DMF (8.2 × 10–4 N·s/m2), and comparable to that of honey. PMID:27725958

  1. Eddy viscosity and flow properties of the solar wind: Co-rotating interaction regions, coronal-mass-ejection sheaths, and solar-wind/magnetosphere coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    2006-05-15

    The coefficient of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) eddy viscosity of the turbulent solar wind is calculated to be {nu}{sub eddy}{approx_equal}1.3x10{sup 17} cm{sup 2}/s: this coefficient is appropriate for velocity shears with scale thicknesses larger than the {approx}10{sup 6} km correlation length of the solar-wind turbulence. The coefficient of MHD eddy viscosity is calculated again accounting for the action of smaller-scale turbulent eddies on smaller scale velocity shears in the solar wind. This eddy viscosity is quantitatively tested with spacecraft observations of shear flows in co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) and in coronal-mass-ejection (CME) sheaths and ejecta. It is found that the large-scale ({approx}10{sup 7} km) shear of the CIR fractures into intense narrow ({approx}10{sup 5} km) slip zones between slabs of differently magnetized plasma. Similarly, it is found that the large-scale shear of CME sheaths also fracture into intense narrow slip zones between parcels of differently magnetized plasma. Using the solar-wind eddy-viscosity coefficient to calculate vorticity-diffusion time scales and comparing those time scales with the {approx}100-h age of the solar-wind plasma at 1 AU, it is found that the slip zones are much narrower than eddy-viscosity theory says they should be. Thus, our concept of MHD eddy viscosity fails testing. For the freestream turbulence effect in solar-wind magnetosphere coupling, the eddy-viscous force of the solar wind on the Earth's magnetosphere is rederived accounting for the action of turbulent eddies smaller than the correlation length, along with other corrections. The improved derivation of the solar-wind driver function for the turbulence effect fails to yield higher correlation coefficients between measurements of the solar-wind driver and measurements of the response of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  2. Hall viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    Viscosity is a transport coefficient relating to transport of momentum, and usually thought of as the analog of friction that occurs in fluids and solids. More formally, it is the response of the stress to the gradients of the fluid velocity field, or to the rate of change of strain (derivatives of displacement from a reference state). In general, viscosity is described by a fourth-rank tensor. Invoking rotation invariance, it reduces to familiar shear and bulk viscosity parts, which describe dissipation, but it can also contain an antisymmetric part, analogous to the Hall conductivity part of the conductivity tensor. In two dimensions this part is a single number, the Hall viscosity. Symmetry of the system under time reversal (or, in two dimensions, reflections) forces it to vanish. In quantum fluids with a gap in the bulk energy spectrum and which lack both time reversal and reflection symmetries the Hall viscosity can be nonzero even at zero temperature. For integer quantum Hall states, it was first calculated by Avron, Seiler, and Zograf, using a Berry curvature approach, analogous to the Chern number for Hall conductivity. In 2008 this was extended by the present author to fractional quantum Hall states and to BCS states in two dimensions. I found that the general result is given by a simple formula ns / 2 , where n is the particle number density, and s is the ``orbital spin'' per particle. The spin s is also related to the shift S, which enters the relation between particle number and magnetic flux needed to put the ground state on a surface of non-trivial topology with introducing defect excitations, by S = 2 s ; the connection was made by Wen and Zee. The values of s and S are rational numbers, and are robust--unchanged under perturbations that do not cause the bulk energy gap to collapse--provided rotation as well as translation symmetry are maintained. Hall viscosity can be measured in principle, though a simple way to do so is lacking. It enters various

  3. STABILIZED PINCH MACHINE

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1962-04-24

    A device for heating and confining a high temperature gas or plasma utilizing the linear pinch effect is described. The pinch discharge produced is the form of an elongated cylinder. The electrical discharge current is returned in parallel along an axial and a concentric conductor whereby the magnetic field of the conductors compresses and stabilizes the pinch discharge against lateral instability. (AEC)

  4. RETRACTION: Unsteady flow and heat transfer of viscous incompressible fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity due to a rotating disc in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, H. A.

    2007-04-01

    It has come to the attention of the Institute of Physics that this article should not have been submitted for publication owing to its plagiarism of an earlier paper (Hossain A, Hossain M A and Wilson M 2001 Unsteady flow of viscous incompressible fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity due to a rotating disc in presence of transverse magnetic field and heat transfer Int. J. Therm. Sci. 40 11-20). Therefore this article has been retracted by the Institute of Physics and by the author, Hazem Ali Attia.

  5. Effects of edge-localized mode-induced neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque on the toroidal intrinsic rotation in the EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, H.; Xu, G. S.; Sun, Y.; Wan, B. N.; Yan, N.; Wang, H. Q.; Wang, F. D.; Naulin, V.

    2013-12-01

    Intrinsic rotation has been observed in lower hybrid current-driven (LHCD) H-mode plasmas with type-III edge-localized modes (ELMs) on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), and it is found that the edge toroidal rotation accelerated before the onset of the ELM burst. Magnetic perturbation analysis shows there is a perturbation amplitude growth below 30 kHz corresponding to the edge rotation acceleration. Using the filament model, the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) code shows there is a co-current NTV torque at the edge, which may be responsible for the edge rotation acceleration. For maximum displacement ∼1 cm and toroidal mode number n=15, the calculated torque density is ∼0.44 N/m2, comparable with the average edge toroidal angular momentum change rate ∼1.24 N/m2. Here, the 1 cm maximum magnetic surface displacement estimated from the experimental observation corresponds to a maximum magnetic perturbation ∼ 10-3-10-2 T, in accordance with magnetic perturbation measurements during ELMs. By varying n from 10 to 20, the magnitude of the edge NTV torque density is mainly ∼0.1-1 N/m2. This significant co-current torque indicates that the NTV theory may be important in rotation problems during ELMs in H-mode plasmas. To better illuminate the problem, magnetic surface deformation obtained from other codes is desired for a more accurate calculation.

  6. Strain localization in ductile rocks: A comparison of natural and simulated pinch-and-swell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Max; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    We study pinch-and-swell structures in order to uncover the onset of strain localization and the change of deformation mechanisms in layered ductile rocks. To this end, boudinaged monomineralic veins embedded in an ultramylonitic matrix are analyzed quantitatively. The swells are built up by relatively undeformed original calcite grains, showing twinning and minor subgrain rotation recrystallization (SGR). Combined with progressive formation of high-angle misorientations between grains, indicative of SGR, severe grain size reduction defines the transition to the pinches. Accordingly, dynamically recrystallized grains have a strong crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Toward the necks, further grain size reduction, increasingly random misorientations, nucleation of new grains, and a loss of the CPO occur. We postulate that this microstructure marks the transition from dislocation to diffusion creep induced by strain localization. We confirm that the development of boudins is insensitive to original grain sizes and single-crystal orientations. In order to test these microstructural interpretations, a self-consistent numerical grain size evolution is implemented, based on thermo-mechanical principles, end-member flow laws and microphysical processes. Applying constant velocity and isothermal boundary conditions to a 3-layer finite element pure shear box, pinch-and-swell structures emerge out of the homogeneous layer through grain size softening at a critical state. Viscosity weakening due to elevated strain rates and dissipated heat from grain size reduction promotes strain rate weakening until a critical grain size is reached. At this point, a switch from dislocation to diffusion creep occurs. This state locks in at local steady states and is microstructurally expressed in pinches and swells, respectively. Thus, boudinage is identified as an energy attractor, identifying the high-energy steady state of an extending layered structure. We conclude from the

  7. Helical-D pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    A stabilized pinch configuration is described, consisting of a D-shaped plasma cross section wrapped tightly around a guiding axis. The {open_quotes}helical-D{close_quotes} geometry produces a very large axial (toroidal) transform of magnetic line direction that reverses the pitch of the magnetic lines without the need of azimuthal (poloidal) plasma current. Thus, there is no need of a {open_quotes}dynamo{close_quotes} process and its associated fluctuations. The resulting configuration has the high magnetic shear and pitch reversal of the reversed field pinch (RFP). (Pitch = P = qR, where R = major radius). A helical-D pinch might demonstrate good confinement at q << 1.

  8. Current redistribution and generation of kinetic energy in the stagnated Z pinch.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Anderson, A A; Papp, D; Astanovitskiy, A L; Talbot, B R; Chittenden, J P; Niasse, N

    2013-07-01

    The structure of magnetic fields was investigated in stagnated wire-array Z pinches using a Faraday rotation diagnostic at the wavelength of 266 nm. The distribution of current in the pinch and trailing material was reconstructed. A significant part of current can switch from the main pinch to the trailing plasma preheated by x-ray radiation of the pinch. Secondary implosions of trailing plasma generate kinetic energy and provide enhanced heating and radiation of plasma at stagnation. Hot spots in wire-array Z pinches also provide enhanced radiation of the Z pinch. A collapse of a single hot spot radiates 1%-3% of x-ray energy of the Z pinch with a total contribution of hot spots of 10%-30%.

  9. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  10. LDX and the Density Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, J.; Michael, P.; Woskov, P.; Davis, M.; Garnier, D.; Mauel, M.

    2010-11-01

    We observe in LDX a strong, turbulence driven densityootnotetextA. Boxer et al., Nature-Physics 6 (2010) 207. and the resulting stationary density profile. A turbulent pinch is predicted by both MHD and kinetic theory. A turbulent pinch is also observed in tokamaksootnotetextD. Baker, M. Rosenbluth, PoP 5 (1998) 2936., but the effect is particularly strong in a dipole because the magnetic field falls strongly (B1/R^3), there is no rotational transform (and therefore no ``passing'' particles) and the turbulent modes are interchange-like. As a result, whereas for a tokamak the stationary density tends to fall as ˜1/q (i.e. a factor ˜3), in LDX the peak can rise a factor of ˜30 above the edge density. The stationary profiles are robust, as seen in experiments with a modulation of the heating power or of the edge fueling. Low frequency fluctuations are observed, both at the outer plasma edge and as core chordal measurements. Quasi-coherent fluctuations are also observed under the condition of low gas feed and in this circumstance the density can diverge from the stationary profile.

  11. Viscosities of the Gay-Berne Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smondyrev, A. M.; Loriot, George B.; Pelcovits, Robert A.

    1995-09-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation measurements of the viscosities of the Gay-Berne phenomenological model of liquid crystals in the nematic and isotropic phases. The temperature dependence of the rotational and shear viscosities, including the nonmonotonic behavior of one shear viscosity, are in good agreement with experimental data. The bulk viscosities are significantly larger than the shear viscosities, again in agreement with experiment.

  12. Hybrid X-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Mishin, S. A.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Tilikin, I. N.; Knapp, P. F.; Cahill, A. D.; Hoyt, C. L.; Hammer, D. A.

    2012-05-15

    Results from experimental studies of a hybrid X-pinch with an initial configuration in the form of a high-current diode with conical tungsten electrodes spaced by 1-2 mm and connected to one another with 20- to 100-{mu}m-diameter wires are presented. The experiments were carried out at four facilities with a current amplitude from 200 to 1000 kA and front duration from 45 to 200 ns. It is shown that, in spite of their simpler configuration, hybrid X-pinches with a short rise time of the current pulse (50-100 ns) are highly competitive with standard X-pinches in the generated soft X-ray power and the formation of a single hot spot in them is much more stable, while hard X-ray emission is almost absent. The possibility of using hybrid X-pinches as soft X-ray sources for point projection X-ray imaging of plasma objects is considered.

  13. Diffuse-interface approach to rotating Hele-Shaw flows.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Huang, Yu-Sheng; Miranda, José A

    2011-10-01

    When two fluids of different densities move in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell, the interface between them becomes centrifugally unstable and deforms. Depending on the viscosity contrast of the system, distinct types of complex patterns arise at the fluid-fluid boundary. Deformations can also induce the emergence of interfacial singularities and topological changes such as droplet pinch-off and self-intersection. We present numerical simulations based on a diffuse-interface model for this particular two-phase displacement that capture a variety of pattern-forming behaviors. This is implemented by employing a Boussinesq Hele-Shaw-Cahn-Hilliard approach, considering the whole range of possible values for the viscosity contrast, and by including inertial effects due to the Coriolis force. The role played by these two physical contributions on the development of interface singularities is illustrated and discussed. PMID:22181256

  14. Z-Pinch Fusion Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernik, Janie

    2011-01-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Shorter trips are better for humans in the harmful radiation environment of deep space. Nuclear propulsion and power plants can enable high Ispand payload mass fractions because they require less fuel mass. Fusion energy research has characterized the Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method. (1) Lightning is form of pinched plasma electrical discharge phenomena. (2) Wire array Z-Pinch experiments are commonly studied and nuclear power plant configurations have been proposed. (3) Used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects (NWE) testing in the defense industry, nuclear weapon x-rays are simulated through Z-Pinch phenomena.

  15. Turbulent equipartition theory of toroidal momentum pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T. S.; Rewoldt, G.; Diamond, P. H.; Gurcan, O. D.

    2008-05-15

    The mode-independent part of the magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TurCo) pinch of the angular momentum density [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 072302 (2007)], which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of 'magnetically weighted angular momentum density', nm{sub i}U{sub parallel}R/B{sup 2}, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustrated that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms that exist in a simpler geometry.

  16. Turbulent Equipartition Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    T.S. Hahm, P.H. Diamond, O.D. Gurcan, and G. Rewaldt

    2008-01-31

    The mode-independet part of magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TuroCo) pinch of the angular momentum density [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14,072302 (2007)] which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of "magnetically weighted angular momentum density," nmi U|| R/B2, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustratd that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms which exist in a simpler geometry.

  17. PINCHED PLASMA REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, J.A.; Suydam, R.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-07-01

    BS>A plasma confining and heating reactor is described which has the form of a torus with a B/sub 2/ producing winding on the outside of the torus and a helical winding of insulated overlapping tunns on the inside of the torus. The inner helical winding performs the double function of shielding the plasma from the vitreous container and generating a second B/sub z/ field in the opposite direction to the first B/sub z/ field after the pinch is established.

  18. X-pinch. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S. A. Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-06-15

    Results of experimental studies of the X-pinch since its invention and implementation in 1982 at the Lebedev Physical Institute are presented. The review consists of two parts. The first part briefly outlines the history of creation and studies of X-pinches, describes the diagnostic techniques and devices developed during these studies, and presents the main results obtained in studying the physical processes occurring in the X-pinch. The second part is devoted to the results of detailed studies of the spatial, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the X-pinch hot spot—the region where the highest plasma parameters are achieved and which is a source of X-ray emission with extreme parameters. Some results of X-pinch simulations are also presented.

  19. X-pinch. Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S. A. Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-04-15

    Results of experimental studies of the X-pinch since its invention and implementation in 1982 at the Lebedev Physical Institute are presented. The concept of the X-pinch arose in the course of innovative experiments on studying the generation of hot dense plasma in nanosecond Z-pinches. The main idea was to localize the region occupied by the plasma and stabilize the moment of its formation. This was achieved by using a load in the form of crossed wires. The resulting plasma object turned out to be so interesting that a new scientific direction appeared in plasma physics. At present, studies in this direction are being performed in many laboratories worldwide. The term X-pinch became conventional, and sections devoted to its study are always present at plasma conferences. X-pinch is not only a very interesting scientific object, but also a unique source of X-ray emission with extreme parameters. The use of X-pinches for point-projection X-ray radiography of high-energy-density objects provided many new experimental results. In some cases, the concepts of the processes occurring in matter upon fast energy deposition changed dramatically. The review consists of two parts. The first part briefly outlines the history of creation and studies of X-pinches, describes the diagnostic techniques and devices developed during these studies, and presents the main results obtained in studying the physical processes occurring in the X-pinch. The second part is devoted to the results of detailed studies of the X-pinch hot spot—the region where the highest plasma parameters are achieved and which is a source of X-ray emission with extreme parameters. Some results of X-pinch simulations are also presented.

  20. X-pinch. Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Results of experimental studies of the X-pinch since its invention and implementation in 1982 at the Lebedev Physical Institute are presented. The concept of the X-pinch arose in the course of innovative experiments on studying the generation of hot dense plasma in nanosecond Z-pinches. The main idea was to localize the region occupied by the plasma and stabilize the moment of its formation. This was achieved by using a load in the form of crossed wires. The resulting plasma object turned out to be so interesting that a new scientific direction appeared in plasma physics. At present, studies in this direction are being performed in many laboratories worldwide. The term X-pinch became conventional, and sections devoted to its study are always present at plasma conferences. X-pinch is not only a very interesting scientific object, but also a unique source of X-ray emission with extreme parameters. The use of X-pinches for point-projection X-ray radiography of high-energy-density objects provided many new experimental results. In some cases, the concepts of the processes occurring in matter upon fast energy deposition changed dramatically. The review consists of two parts. The first part briefly outlines the history of creation and studies of X-pinches, describes the diagnostic techniques and devices developed during these studies, and presents the main results obtained in studying the physical processes occurring in the X-pinch. The second part is devoted to the results of detailed studies of the X-pinch hot spot—the region where the highest plasma parameters are achieved and which is a source of X-ray emission with extreme parameters. Some results of X-pinch simulations are also presented.

  1. Linking natural microstructures with numerical modeling of pinch-and-swell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Max; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    For a variety of geological problems, the change from homogeneous to localized deformation and the establishment of steady-state conditions are equally important. Here, we show that pinch-and-swell structures are ideal candidates for the study of the switch in deformation style and mechanism during ductile creep. We present an interdisciplinary approach to the onset of pinch-and-swell structures and to the flow conditions during pre- to post-localization stages in ductile rocks. For this reason, naturally boudinaged calcite veins, embedded in a calc-mylonite, and their microfabrics were investigated quantitatively. Remnants of slightly deformed calcite hosts build up the swells, showing twinning and minor dislocation glide as crystal plastic deformation mechanisms which are accompanied by subgrain rotation recrystallization (SGR). Towards the pinches, we find a gradient of severe grain size reduction through progressive SGR, developing a characteristic dislocation creep crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Along this gradient, the finest recrystallized calcite grains appear randomly oriented, expressed by a "smearing-out" of the CPO and missing systematics of misorientation angles in the most extended areas. We interpret this microstructure as a switch from dislocation dominated creep to grain boundary sliding processes. Further, we show that the onset of boudinage is independent on both the original orientation and grain size of calcite hosts. We implemented these microstructural observations into a layered elasto-visco-plastic finite element framework, tracing variations in grain size (Peters et al., 2015). We base the microstructural evolution on thermo-mechanical-chemical principles and end-member flow laws (Herwegh et al., 2014). The simulated pinch-and-swell structures indicate that low strain rates in the swells favor dislocation creep, whereas accelerated rates provoke continuous grain size reduction allowing strain accommodation by diffusion creep

  2. Gas Bubble Pinch-off in Viscous and Inviscid Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborek, P.

    2005-11-01

    We have used high-speed video to analyze pinch-off of nitrogen gas bubbles in fluids with a wide range of viscosity. If the external fluid is highly viscous (ηext>100 cP), the radius is proportional to the time before break, τ, and decreases smoothly to zero. If the external fluid has low viscosity (ηext<10 cP), the neck radius scales as &1/2circ; until an instability develops in the gas bubble which causes the neck to rupture and tear apart. Finally, if the viscosity of the external fluid is in an intermediate range, an elongated thread is formed which breaks apart into micron-sized bubbles. 100,000 frame-per-second videos will be presented which illustrate each of these flow regimes.

  3. Scaling and Instabilities in Bubble Pinch-Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, J. C.; Waldrep, R.; Taborek, P.

    2005-05-01

    We have used a 100 000 frame-per-second video to analyze the pinch-off of nitrogen gas bubbles in fluids with a wide range of viscosity. If the external fluid is highly viscous (ηext>100 cP), the bubble neck radius is proportional to the time before break, τ, and decreases smoothly to zero. If the external fluid has low viscosity (ηext<10 cP), the radius scales as τ1/2 until an instability develops in the gas bubble, which causes the neck to rupture and tear apart. Finally, if the viscosity of the external fluid is in an intermediate range, an elongated thread is formed, which breaks apart into micron-sized bubbles.

  4. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Anisotropy of ion temperature in a reversed-field-pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, K.; Hörling, P.; Fall, T.; Brzozowski, J. H.; Brunsell, P.; Hokin, S.; Tennfors, E.; Sallander, J.; Drake, J. R.; Inoue, N.; Morikawa, J.; Ogawa, Y.; Yoshida, Z.

    1997-03-01

    Anomalous heating of ions has been observed in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field-pinch (RFP) plasma. Ions are heated primarily in the parallel direction (with respect to the magnetic field), resulting in an appreciable anisotropy of the ion temperature. This observation suggests that the magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations are dissipated primarily by the ion viscosity.

  5. Reversed field pinch diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    The Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is a toroidal, axisymmetric magnetic confinement configuration characterized by a magnetic field configuration in which the toroidal magnetic field is of similar strength to the poloidal field, and is reversed at the edge compared to the center. The RFP routinely operates at high beta, and is a strong candidate for a compact fusion device. Relevant attributes of the configuration will be presented, together with an overview of present and planned experiments and their diagnostics. RFP diagnostics are in many ways similar to those of other magnetic confinement devices (such as tokamaks); these lectures will point out pertinent differences, and will present some diagnostics which provide special insights into unique attributes of the RFP.

  6. Nonlinear kink mode dynamics in circular and noncircular pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlberg, C. )

    1992-06-01

    It is shown that the global (free-boundary) {ital m}=1 kink instability of the ideal, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) sharp boundary (surface current) pinch is stabilized by nonlinear effects, provided {ital B}{sub {ital e}}{approx lt}1 and {beta}{sub {ital p}}{lt}1, where {beta}{sub {ital p}}=1+{ital B}{sup 2}{sub {ital e}}{minus}{ital B}{sup 2}{sub {ital i}} and {ital B}{sub {ital i}} and {ital B}{sub {ital e}} denote, respectively, the internal and external axial magnetic fields of the pinch, normalized to the poloidal magnetic field. The stabilization has to do with the bending of the interior, frozen'' field lines and associated volume currents induced in the pinch, and does not occur in a pure surface current model, which neglects these currents and only conserves the total magnetic flux through the pinch. It is suggested that the global, helical {ital m}=1 structures observed in various pinch experiments may have to do with the stabilizing mechanism above. The nonlinear stability has been calculated by means of a new approach to the bifurcated equilibria of the helical {ital m}=1 mode, and the method should also be useful in connection with other nonlinear, ideal MHD phenomena. The regime of nonlinear stability above corresponds to intermediate or short wavelengths of the marginal mode ({ital ka}{approx gt}1). In the opposite, long-wavelength regime, the ideal MHD model and the pure surface current model give similar results, predicting nonlinear instability for, e.g., the nearly marginal Kruskal--Shafranov mode in tokamaks, in agreement with previous theories. Effects of mode rotation as well as of a noncircular cross section of the pinch, modeling the Extrap (Fusion Technol. {bold 16}, 7 (1989)) configuration, have also been considered, extending the results of a previous, linear investigation (Phys. Fluids B {bold 2}, 1601 (1990)) to the nonlinear regime.

  7. Magnetic Field Measurements in Wire-Array Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Wasif; Hammer, David; Lipson, Michal

    2006-10-01

    Understanding the evolution of the magnetic field topology and magnitude in the high energy density plasmas produced by wire-array Z-pinches is of critical importance for their ultimate application to stockpile stewardship and inertial confinement fusion^1. A method to determine the magnetic field profile in megampere level wire-array Z-pinches with high spatial and temporal resolution is under development. An ideal method would be passive and non-perturbing, such as Faraday rotation of laser light. We are developing a method involving temporally-resolved Faraday rotation through a sensing waveguide placed in the vicinity of, and eventually in, a wire-array Z-pinch^2. We present measurements of the magnetic field outside of a wire-array, and progress on measurements within the array. Our ideal device is a ``thin film waveguide'' coupled to an optical fiber system. While these sensing devices may not survive for long in a dense Z-pinch, they may provide useful information for a significant fraction of the current pulse. We present preliminary theoretical and experimental results. 1. M. Keith Matzen, M. A. Sweeney, R. G. Adams et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055503 (2005). 2. W. Syed, D. A. Hammer, M. Lipson, R. B. van Dover, AIP Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches, University of Oxford, UK, July 25-28, 2005. *This research was sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliances program through DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-F03-02NA00057.

  8. Pinch technology improves olefin heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.

    1989-02-01

    Pyrolysis of naphthas or gas oils to provide ethylene and propylene for polymers is gaining in popularity in many countries. Pyrolysis takes place at the comparatively high temperatures of 800 to 850/sup 0/C. The very common solution of pyrolysis gas heat recovery in an ethylene unit is shown. Pinch technology allows finding the temperature point (the pinch) that divides the temperature scale in a process into two parts. If there is a pinch in a process (not every process has a pinch), heat from external sources must be supplied to the process at temperatures above the pinch, and must be taken from the system by cooling media at temperatures below the pinch only. If minimum consumption of energy for heating and cooling from external sources is desired, matching process streams across the pinch and adding heat to the system from external sources below the pinch temperature is not allowed.

  9. Fluid pinch-off in superfluid and normal {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J. C.; Rutledge, J. E.; Taborek, P.

    2007-03-15

    We present frames from high-speed videos of the pinch-off of liquid {sup 4}He droplets. The temperature of the fluid droplets ranged from 1.33 K to 4.8 K, and the size of the drops was proportional to the temperature-dependent capillary length. We observed no qualitative difference between pinch-off in the normal and superfluid states. In both cases, the shape of the fluid in the final stages of pinch-off resembles a cone piercing a sphere, which is typical of other low-viscosity fluids. The evolution of the minimum neck radius r{sub min} can be characterized by power laws r{sub min}{proportional_to}{tau}{sup n}, where {tau} is the time remaining until pinch-off occurs. In the regime near pinch-off, the data from image analysis are consistent with n=2/3. The data at the beginning of the pinch process when the neck is of the order of the capillary length are also described by n=2/3, but with a different proportionality factor. There is an intermediate crossover regime characterized by n=2/5.

  10. Viscous Heating At Stagnation In Z-Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, M. G.

    2009-01-21

    The viscous heating associated with m = 0 MHD instabilities in the stagnated Z-pinch is developed further. It would appear that the larger numerical (Neumann) viscosity plus De Bar corrections in simulation codes to yield energy conservation might be another way of representing viscous heating, but in this case the viscosity is inserted to smooth shock discontinuities. However the viscous heating per unit volume appears to be independent of the coefficient of viscosity itself because the fastest growing MHD mode is itself determined by the viscous damping. Therefore it could be argued that, though the correct physics is not in the codes, the resulting heating is not sensitive to the fact that numerical viscosity instead is employed. In addition, by chance, the model of magnetic bubbles first introduced by Lovberg et al. and Riley et al., and later by Rudakov et al. to explain phenomenologically extra heating of the ions leads to the same heating rate as in Haines et al. For the stainless steel array in which T{sub i} was predicted and measured to be >200 KeV while T{sub e} = 3 KeV the ion viscous heating is dominant. However, for the low current experiment by Kroupp et al. in which the ion kinematic viscosity is much smaller than the resistive diffusivity there is resistive damping of MHD modes, and no ions viscous heating should be expected.

  11. Study of magnetic fields and current in the Z pinch at stagnation

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V. V.; Anderson, A. A.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Nalajala, V.; Dmitriev, O.; Papp, D.

    2015-09-15

    The structure of magnetic fields in wire-array Z pinches at stagnation was studied using a Faraday rotation diagnostic at the wavelength of 266 nm. The electron plasma density and the Faraday rotation angle in plasma were calculated from images of the three-channel polarimeter. The magnetic field was reconstructed with Abel transform, and the current was estimated using a simple model. Several shots with wire-array Z pinches at 0.5–1.5 MA were analyzed. The strength of the magnetic field measured in plasma of the stagnated pinch was in the range of 1–2 MG. The magnetic field and current profile in plasma near the neck on the pinch were reconstructed, and the size of the current-carrying plasma was estimated. It was found that current flowed in the large-size trailing plasma near the dense neck. Measurements of the magnetic field near the bulge on the pinch also showed current in trailing plasma. A distribution of current in the large-size trailing plasma can prevent the formation of multi-MG fields in the Z pinch.

  12. Study of magnetic fields and current in the Z pinch at stagnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Anderson, A. A.; Papp, D.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Nalajala, V.; Dmitriev, O.

    2015-09-01

    The structure of magnetic fields in wire-array Z pinches at stagnation was studied using a Faraday rotation diagnostic at the wavelength of 266 nm. The electron plasma density and the Faraday rotation angle in plasma were calculated from images of the three-channel polarimeter. The magnetic field was reconstructed with Abel transform, and the current was estimated using a simple model. Several shots with wire-array Z pinches at 0.5-1.5 MA were analyzed. The strength of the magnetic field measured in plasma of the stagnated pinch was in the range of 1-2 MG. The magnetic field and current profile in plasma near the neck on the pinch were reconstructed, and the size of the current-carrying plasma was estimated. It was found that current flowed in the large-size trailing plasma near the dense neck. Measurements of the magnetic field near the bulge on the pinch also showed current in trailing plasma. A distribution of current in the large-size trailing plasma can prevent the formation of multi-MG fields in the Z pinch.

  13. Development of novel techniques to study the magnetic field evolution in wire array Z-pinches and X pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Wasif

    Understanding the magnetic field topology in wire-array Z-pinches is of great significance for their ultimate application to stockpile stewardship and inertial confinement fusion. We have developed and tested several novel techniques involving material-based sensors to measure magnetic fields as a function of space and time in high energy density plasmas on pulsed power machines. We first briefly introduce a technique that was used to measure a lower limit of the maximum magnetic field of a sub-microsecond duration pulse using magnetic reversal in CoPt thin films. The time-varying magnetic field was generated by an exploding wire array plasma called an X pinch produced on the 0.5 MA, 100 ns pulse duration, XP pulsed power generator. We then introduce a technique based on Faraday rotation that was used to measure magnetic fields in wire-array Z-pinches produced on the 1 MA, 100 ns rise time, COBRA pulsed power generator as well as on the XP generator. This technique measures magnetic fields as a function of space and time using Faraday rotation of a single longitudinal mode (SLM) laser through a magneto-optically active bulk waveguide, multicomponent terbium borate glass, placed adjacent to, or within, the wire array. We have measured fields > 10 T with 100 ns rise times outside of a wire-array Z-pinch for the entire duration (˜250 ns) of the current pulse and as much as ˜2 T inside a wire-array for ˜40 ns from the start of current. This is the first time that such rapidly varying and large fields have been measured using the terbium borate glass. The third method, also based on Faraday rotation of SLM laser light utilized an integrated optical fiber sensor (a fiber-sensor-fiber assembly) on the XP pulsed power generator that also yielded a measurement of the magnetic field of a wire-array Z-pinch for part of the current pulse. Finally, we repeated the third method by fabricating a "thin film waveguide" of terbium borate glass to increase the spatial resolution

  14. Pinch and swell structures: evidence for brittle-viscous behaviour in the middle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, R.; Piazolo, S.; Daczko, N.

    2015-04-01

    The flow properties of middle to lower crustal rocks are commonly represented by viscous flow. However, examples of pinch and swell structures found in a mid-crustal high strain zone at St. Anne Point (Fiordland, New Zealand) suggest pinch and swell structures are initiated by brittle failure of the more competent layer in conjunction with material softening. On this basis we develop a flexible numerical model using brittle-viscous flow where Mohr-Coulomb failure is utilised to initiate pinch and swell structure development. Results show that pinch and swell structures develop in a competent layer in both Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow provided the competent layer has enough viscosity contrast and initially fails brittlely. The degree of material softening after initial failure is shown to impact pinch and swell characteristics with high rates of material softening causing the formation of thick necks between swells by limiting the successful localisation of strain. The flow regime and yielding characteristics of the matrix do not impact pinch and swell structure formation itself, so long as the matrix is less competent. To aid analysis of the structures and help derive the flow properties of rocks in the field, we define three stages of pinch and swell development and offer suggestions for measurements to be made in the field. Our study suggests that Mohr-Coulomb behaviour combined with viscous flow is an appropriate way to represent the heterogeneous rocks of the middle to lower crust. This type of mid-crustal rheological behaviour has significant influence on the localization of strain at all scales. For example, inclusion of Mohr-Coulomb brittle failure with viscous flow in just some mid-crustal layers within a crustal scale model will result in strain localisation throughout the whole crustal section allowing the development of through-going high strain structures from the upper crust into the middle and lower crust. This localization then has a significant

  15. Z-Pinch Fusion for Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    SPIELMAN,RICK B.

    2000-01-01

    Z pinches, the oldest fusion concept, have recently been revisited in light of significant advances in the fields of plasma physics and pulsed power engineering. The possibility exists for z-pinch fusion to play a role in commercial energy applications. We report on work to develop z-pinch fusion concepts, the result of an extensive literature search, and the output for a congressionally-mandated workshop on fusion energy held in Snowmass, Co July 11-23,1999.

  16. Nested X Pinches on the COBRA Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; McBride, R. D.; Knapp, P. F.; Wilhelm, H.; Hammer, D. A.; Sinars, D. B.

    2009-01-21

    Recent results of X pinch studies on the COBRA generator at Cornell University (peak current up to 1.2 MA and rise time of 100 ns) are presented. Using an initial configuration of wires before their twisting, similar to nested cylindrical wire arrays enables the assembly of a symmetric configuration at the X pinch crossing region. It also enables an investigation of multilayered X pinches. X pinches with different configurations, including with different materials in the inner and outer wire layers, were tested.

  17. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Shumlak, U. Golingo, R. P. Nelson, B. A. Bowers, C. A. Doty, S. A. Forbes, E. G. Hughes, M. C. Kim, B. Knecht, S. D. Lambert, K. K. Lowrie, W. Ross, M. P. Weed, J. R.

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  18. Reduction of viscosity in suspension of swimming bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of the shear viscosity in suspensions of swimming Bacillus subtilis in free-standing liquid films have revealed that the viscosity can decrease by up to a factor of 7 compared to the viscosity of the same liquid without bacteria or with nonmotile bacteria. The reduction in viscosity is observed in two complementary experiments: one studying the decay of a large vortex induced by a moving probe and another measuring the viscous torque on a rotating magnetic particle immersed in the film. The viscosity depends on the concentration and swimming speed of the bacteria.

  19. Reduction of viscosity in suspension of swimming bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Sokolov, A.; Chen, L.; Jin, Q.; Materials Science Division

    2009-09-29

    Measurements of the shear viscosity in suspensions of swimming Bacillus subtilis in free-standing liquid films have revealed that the viscosity can decrease by up to a factor of 7 compared to the viscosity of the same liquid without bacteria or with nonmotile bacteria. The reduction in viscosity is observed in two complementary experiments: one studying the decay of a large vortex induced by a moving probe and another measuring the viscous torque on a rotating magnetic particle immersed in the film. The viscosity depends on the concentration and swimming speed of the bacteria.

  20. Anisotropic eddy viscosity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Cabot, W.

    1996-01-01

    A general discussion on the structure of the eddy viscosity tensor in anisotropic flows is presented. The systematic use of tensor symmetries and flow symmetries is shown to reduce drastically the number of independent parameters needed to describe the rank 4 eddy viscosity tensor. The possibility of using Onsager symmetries for simplifying further the eddy viscosity is discussed explicitly for the axisymmetric geometry.

  1. Numerical experiments on the theta pinch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volosevich, P. P.; Zukakishyili, G. G.

    1979-01-01

    Numerical calculation of theta pinch problems are presented. Physical processes in theta pinch systems are considered in a one dimensional, two temperature magnetohydrodynamic, approximation with allowance for end losses by longitudinal heat conductivity. The numerical calculations are compared with results of earlier experiments.

  2. Pinch Experiments in a Table Top Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, Jose; Soto, Leopoldo; Tarifeno, Ariel

    2009-01-21

    The design and construction of a table top multipurpose capacitor bank of hundred of Joules and hundred of kiloAmperes conceived to be used in small scale Z-pinch experiments is reported. A recent result on a Z-pinch gas embedded discharge using hollow conical electrodes done in a similar table top generator is also presented.

  3. Capillary breakup of suspensions near pinch-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathues, Wouter; McIlroy, Claire; Harlen, Oliver G.; Clasen, Christian

    2015-09-01

    We present new findings on how the presence of particles alters the pinch-off dynamics of a liquid bridge. For moderate concentrations, suspensions initially behave as a viscous liquid with dynamics determined by the bulk viscosity of the suspension. Close to breakup, however, the filament loses its homogeneous shape and localised accelerated breakup is observed. This paper focuses on quantifying these final thinning dynamics for different sized particles with radii between 3 μm and 20 μm in a Newtonian matrix with volume fractions ranging from 0.02 to 0.40. The dynamics of these capillary breakup experiments are very well described by a one-dimensional model that correlates changes in thinning dynamics with the particle distribution in the filament. For all samples, the accelerated dynamics are initiated by increasing particle-density fluctuations that generate locally diluted zones. The onset of these concentration fluctuations is described by a transition radius, which scales with the particle radius and volume fraction. The thinning rate continues to increase and reaches a maximum when the interstitial fluid is thinning between two particle clusters. Contrary to previous experimental studies, we observe that the final thinning dynamics are dominated by a deceleration, where the interstitial fluid appears not to be disturbed by the presence of the particles. By rescaling the experimental filament profiles, it is shown that the pinching dynamics return to the self-similar scaling of a viscous Newtonian liquid bridge in the final moments preceding breakup.

  4. Pinch technology/process optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Improved process efficiency is of great importance to electric utilities and their industrial customers. It enhances company profitability, thereby fostering load retention and strategic load growth. Moreover, the technical means of achieving improved efficiency can significantly impact utility load shapes. By understanding the energy use patterns and options in an industrial facility, the utility and industrial user can work together to define mutually beneficial investment and operating decisions and to clarify how the decisions might be impacted by existing or alternative energy prices. Efforts to achieve such understanding are facilitated by using pinch technology, an innovative and highly effective methodology for systematically analyzing total industrial sites. This report documents a series of twelve industrial process optimization case studies. The studies were carried out using pinch technology. '' Each study was cosponsored by the industrial site's local electric utility. The twelve studies are follows: (1) pulp and paper, (2) refinery, (3) refinery, (4) yeast, (5) soups/sauces, (6) cellulose- acetate, (7) refinery, (8) chemicals, (9) gelatin-capsules, (10) refinery, (11) brewery, (12) cereal grains.

  5. Numerical estimates for the bulk viscosity of ideal gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, M. S.

    2012-06-01

    We estimate the bulk viscosity of a selection of well known ideal gases. A relatively simple formula is combined with published values of rotational and vibrational relaxation times. It is shown that the bulk viscosity can take on a wide variety of numerical values and variations with temperature. Several fluids, including common diatomic gases, are seen to have bulk viscosities which are hundreds or thousands of times larger than their shear viscosities. We have also provided new estimates for the bulk viscosity of water vapor in the range 380-1000 K. We conjecture that the variation of bulk viscosity with temperature will have a local maximum for most fluids. The Lambert-Salter correlation is used to argue that the vibrational contribution to the bulk viscosities of a sequence of fluids having a similar number of hydrogen atoms at a fixed temperature will increase with the characteristic temperature of the lowest vibrational mode.

  6. Pinch-off of microfluidic droplets with oscillatory velocity of inner phase flow

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pingan; Tang, Xin; Tian, Ye; Wang, Liqiu

    2016-01-01

    When one liquid is introduced into another immiscible one, it ultimately fragments due to hydrodynamic instability. In contrast to neck pinch-off without external actuation, the viscous two-fluid system subjected to an oscillatory flow demonstrates higher efficiency in breaking fluid threads. However, the underlying dynamics of this process is less well understood. Here we show that the neck-thinning rate is accelerated by the amplitude of oscillation. By simply evaluating the momentum transfer from external actuation, we derive a dimensionless pre-factor to quantify the accelerated pinch-off. Our data ascribes the acceleration to the non-negligible inner fluid inertia, which neutralizes the inner phase viscous stress that retards the pinch-off. Moreover, we characterize an equivalent neck-thinning behavior between an actuated system and its unactuated counterpart with decreased viscosity ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that oscillation is capable of modulating satellite droplet formation by shifting the pinch-off location. Our study would be useful for manipulating fluids at microscale by external forcing. PMID:27511300

  7. Pinch-off of microfluidic droplets with oscillatory velocity of inner phase flow.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pingan; Tang, Xin; Tian, Ye; Wang, Liqiu

    2016-01-01

    When one liquid is introduced into another immiscible one, it ultimately fragments due to hydrodynamic instability. In contrast to neck pinch-off without external actuation, the viscous two-fluid system subjected to an oscillatory flow demonstrates higher efficiency in breaking fluid threads. However, the underlying dynamics of this process is less well understood. Here we show that the neck-thinning rate is accelerated by the amplitude of oscillation. By simply evaluating the momentum transfer from external actuation, we derive a dimensionless pre-factor to quantify the accelerated pinch-off. Our data ascribes the acceleration to the non-negligible inner fluid inertia, which neutralizes the inner phase viscous stress that retards the pinch-off. Moreover, we characterize an equivalent neck-thinning behavior between an actuated system and its unactuated counterpart with decreased viscosity ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that oscillation is capable of modulating satellite droplet formation by shifting the pinch-off location. Our study would be useful for manipulating fluids at microscale by external forcing. PMID:27511300

  8. Pinch-off of microfluidic droplets with oscillatory velocity of inner phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Pingan; Tang, Xin; Tian, Ye; Wang, Liqiu

    2016-08-01

    When one liquid is introduced into another immiscible one, it ultimately fragments due to hydrodynamic instability. In contrast to neck pinch-off without external actuation, the viscous two-fluid system subjected to an oscillatory flow demonstrates higher efficiency in breaking fluid threads. However, the underlying dynamics of this process is less well understood. Here we show that the neck-thinning rate is accelerated by the amplitude of oscillation. By simply evaluating the momentum transfer from external actuation, we derive a dimensionless pre-factor to quantify the accelerated pinch-off. Our data ascribes the acceleration to the non-negligible inner fluid inertia, which neutralizes the inner phase viscous stress that retards the pinch-off. Moreover, we characterize an equivalent neck-thinning behavior between an actuated system and its unactuated counterpart with decreased viscosity ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that oscillation is capable of modulating satellite droplet formation by shifting the pinch-off location. Our study would be useful for manipulating fluids at microscale by external forcing.

  9. Why Magnetically Confined Plasmas Rotate and Why it is Important

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Stanley

    2012-03-01

    Rotation in tokamak and spherical tokamak magnetic confinement devices has been found to be critical to enhancing the plasma stability to both the electron and ion gyroradius scale-turbulence as well to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes whose characteristic scales can be of order the device size. Suppression of these modes leads to reduced energy and particle transport losses in these plasmas, thus increasing the potential fusion power production. Rotation can also lead to the avoidance of catastrophic MHD events known as ``disruptions.'' This strong impact of the rotation underscores the importance of developing the knowledge of how rotation is generated in these devices and how the momentum is transported through the plasma. Rotation in these plasmas is generated by a number of different torques, including external momentum input from neutral beam injection, and magnetic torques (toroidal viscosity) resulting from a non-axisymmetric magnetic field structure. One leading theory suggests that rotation can also be self-generated from microturbulence. In this strongly coupled, predator-prey-like system, the plasma can self-organize from a turbulent state to one with directed flow in directions both parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. The rotation in the perpendicular direction is often seen to have radial structure and is analogous to the Zonal Flows observed in planetary atmospheres. The self-generated, or intrinsic, rotation that flows mainly along the magnetic field, has been measured on virtually all experimental devices. The theory suggests that the intrinsic torque generating the intrinsic rotation is due to long-wavelength (of order the ion gyroradius) modes, and experimental measurements of intrinsic torque and rotation generally follow the trends predicted by theory. Values of the momentum diffusivity and convective pinch term have been determined from perturbation experiments, and their trends indicate that the same modes that drive intrinsic

  10. Study of micro-pinches in wire-array Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V. V.; Papp, D.; Anderson, A. A.; Talbot, B. R.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Nalajala, V.; Dmitriev, O.; Chittenden, J. P.; Niasse, N.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.

    2013-11-15

    Bright and hot areas with a high plasma density and temperature are observed in all kinds of Z pinches. We studied bright radiating spots produced by micro-pinches in cylindrical and planar wire-arrays at the 1 MA Zebra pulsed power generator using an x-ray streak camera synchronized with laser diagnostics, x-ray time-gated pinhole camera, and spectroscopy. Hot spots with extremely dense and relatively hot plasma arise during the collapse of the micro-pinches. These hot spots radiate a continuum spectrum with energy >2.5 keV. Typical micro-pinches in Al wire arrays generate x-ray bursts with durations of 0.4–1 ns in the soft x-ray range and 0.1–0.4 ns in the keV range. UV two-frame shadowgraphy shows spatial correlation of hot spots with the collapse and explosion of micro-pinches. Micro-pinches typically occur at the necks of the Z pinch, but can demonstrate a variety of parameters and different dynamics. An analysis of x-ray streak images shows that micro-pinches can generate >20% of the x-ray energy in some types of wire-array Z pinches.

  11. Viscosity and Solvation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses theories underlying the phenomena of solution viscosities, involving the Jones and Dole equation, B-coefficient determination, and flickering cluster model. Indicates that viscosity measurements provide a basis for the study of the structural effects of ions in aqueous solutions and are applicable in teaching high school chemistry. (CC)

  12. Viscosity measuring using microcantilevers

    DOEpatents

    Oden, Patrick Ian

    2001-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the viscosity of a fluid uses a micromachined cantilever mounted on a moveable base. As the base is rastered while in contact with the fluid, the deflection of the cantilever is measured and the viscosity determined by comparison with standards.

  13. Viscosity of pure hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Knapstad, B.; Skjolsvik, P.A.; Oye, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate viscosity measurements have been performed on eight pure hydrocarbons at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range 20-150/sup 0/C, or up to approximately 20/sup 0/C below the boiling point of the hydrocarbon, by use of an absolute oscillating viscometer. The hydrocarbons are cyclohexane and benzene and the n-alkanes of hexane, heptane, octane, decane, dodecane, and tetradecane. The viscosities are described with a modified Arrhenius equation, and the deviation in fit is 0.12% or less. The accuracy is estimated to be 0.33-0.56%. The lowest viscosities are assumed to have the highest deviation. Literature data reported by Dymond and Young normally fit our viscosities within our estimated accuracy. Other literature viscosities tend to be higher than our results, especially for the n-alkanes.

  14. Apparatus and method for measuring viscosity

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, R.J. Jr.

    1986-02-25

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the viscosity of a fluid. This apparatus and method is particularly useful for the measurement of the viscosity of a liquid in a harsh environment characterized by high temperature and the presence of corrosive or deleterious gases and vapors which adversely affect conventional ball or roller bearings. The apparatus and method of the present invention employ one or more flexural or torsional bearings to suspend a bob capable of limited angular motion within a rotatable sleeve suspended from a stationary frame. 7 figs.

  15. Apparatus and method for measuring viscosity

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Jr., Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the viscosity of a fluid. This apparatus and method is particularly useful for the measurement of the viscosity of a liquid in a harsh environment characterized by high temperature and the presence of corrosive or deleterious gases and vapors which adversely affect conventional ball or roller bearings. The apparatus and method of the present invention employ one or more flexural or torsional bearings to suspend a bob capable of limited angular motion within a rotatable sleeve suspended from a stationary frame.

  16. The Physics of Fast Z Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    RYUTOV,D.D.; DERZON,MARK S.; MATZEN,M. KEITH

    1999-10-25

    The spectacular progress made during the last few years in reaching high energy densities in fast implosions of annular current sheaths (fast Z pinches) opens new possibilities for a broad spectrum of experiments, from x-ray generation to controlled thermonuclear fusion and astrophysics. Presently Z pinches are the most intense laboratory X ray sources (1.8 MJ in 5 ns from a volume 2 mm in diameter and 2 cm tall). Powers in excess of 200 TW have been obtained. This warrants summarizing the present knowledge of physics that governs the behavior of radiating current-carrying plasma in fast Z pinches. This survey covers essentially all aspects of the physics of fast Z pinches: initiation, instabilities of the early stage, magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the implosion phase, formation of a transient quasi-equilibrium near the stagnation point, and rebound. Considerable attention is paid to the analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities governing the implosion symmetry. Possible ways of mitigating these instabilities are discussed. Non-magnetohydrodynamic effects (anomalous resistivity, generation of particle beams, etc.) are summarized. Various applications of fast Z pinches are briefly described. Scaling laws governing development of more powerful Z pinches are presented. The survey contains 36 figures and more than 300 references.

  17. The physics of fast Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D.D.; Derzon, M.S.; Matzen, M.K.

    1998-07-01

    The spectacular progress made during the last few years in reaching high energy densities in fast implosions of annular current sheaths (fast Z pinches) opens new possibilities for a broad spectrum of experiments, from x-ray generation to controlled thermonuclear fusion and astrophysics. Presently Z pinches are the most intense laboratory X ray sources (1.8 MJ in 5 ns from a volume 2 mm in diameter and 2 cm tall). Powers in excess of 200 TW have been obtained. This warrants summarizes the present knowledge of physics that governs the behavior of radiating current-carrying plasma in fast Z-pinches. This survey covers essentially all aspects of the physics of fast Z pinches: initiation, instabilities of the early stage, magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the implosion phase, formation of a transient quasi-equilibrium near the stagnation point, and rebound. Considerable attention is paid to the analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities governing the implosion symmetry. Possible ways of mitigating these instabilities are discussed. Non-magnetohydrodynamic effects (anomalous resistivity, generation of particle beams, etc.) are summarized. Various applications of fast Z pinches are briefly described. Scaling laws governing development of more powerful Z pinches are presented. The survey contains 52 figures and nearly 300 references.

  18. The bumpy Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, T. H.; Chu, M. S.

    1981-06-01

    The 'bumpy Z-pinch' is a magnetic configuration with potential usefulness for fusion reactors. A conceptually simple version of the configuration is axisymmetric. It contains regions of closed and open field lines. In the region of closed field lines, the field line topology is much like that of a tokamak; these regions link the region of open field lines around the axis of symmetry. Assuming that the plasma spontaneously maintains an equilibrium as described by Taylor (1974), it is possible to maintain indefinitely the regions of closed field lines by driving an axial current through the plasma in the region of open field lines. The ratio between the total axial driven current and the total poloidal current in each of the tokamak-like regions can, in principle, be made arbitrarily small, which means that the load impedance can be arbitrarily large. In addition, the configuration has the inherent virtue similar to that of the spheromak that the tokamak-like part of the plasma does not link any material coils.

  19. Nuclear viscosity and viscosity to entropy ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dani; Mekjian, Aram

    2010-11-01

    Both a classical and a quantum mechanical evaluation of the shear viscosity of hadronic matter is developed and compared. The classical evaluation involves the scattering angle produced by a potential while a quantum description is based on phase shifts from this potential. A hard sphere potential and an attractive square well potential are considered. The classical evaluation of the scattering angle can be cast into a form that has the structure of Snell's refraction law for an attractive potential. The limit of a large index of refraction gives the hard sphere result. The high wave number limit of the quantum result for a hard sphere has a scaling law associated with it. This scaling law is similar to a result which gives a factor of two increase of the hard sphere geometric scattering cross section. This increase is associated with diffraction of the wave around the sphere. The quantum mechanical evaluation is discussed in the unitary limit of infinite scattering length. In the limit of large scattering length the effective range to quantum thermal wavelength appears as a limiting scale. The viscosity to entropy density ratio is developed. Results are compared with the string theory limit for this ratio involving Planck's constant.

  20. ROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, K.; Hammel, J.E.; Longmire, C.L.; Nagle, D.E.; Ribe, F.L.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-10-24

    ABS>A method and device are described for obtaining fusion reactions. The basic concept is that of using crossed electric and magnetic fields to induce a plasma rotation in which the ionized particles follow a circumferential drift orbit on wldch a cyclotron mode of motion is superimposed, the net result being a cycloidal motion about the axis of symmetry. The discharge tube has a radial electric field and a longitudinal magnetic field. Mirror machine geometry is utilized. The device avoids reliance on the pinch effect and its associated instability problems. (AEC)

  1. Turbulent Equipartition Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, T. S.

    2007-11-01

    The turbulent convective flux (pinch) of the toroidal angular momentum density is derived using the nonlinear toroidal gyrokinetic equation which conserves phase space density and energy[1], and a novel pinch mechanism which originates from the symmetry breaking due to the magnetic field curvature is identified. A net parallel momentum transfer from the waves to the ion guiding centers is possible when the fluctuation intensity varies on the flux surface, resulting in imperfect cancellation of the curvature drift contribution to the parallel acceleration. This pinch velocity of the angular momentum density can also be understood as a manifestation of a tendency to homogenize the profile of ``magnetically weighted angular momentum density,'' nmiRU/B^2. This part of the pinch flux is mode-independent (whether it's TEM driven or ITG driven), and radially inward for fluctuations peaked at the low-B-field side, with a pinch velocity typically, V^TEPAng˜- 2 χφ/R0. We compare and contrast the pinch of toroidal angular momentum with the now familiar ``turbulent equipartition'' (TEP) mechanism for the particle pinch[2] which exhibit some relevance in various L-mode plasmas in tokamaks. In our theoretical model[3], the TEP momentum pinch is shown to arise from the fact that, in a low-β tokamak equilibrium, B^2uE= cB x∇ δφ is approximately incompressible, so that the magnetically weighted angular momentum density (minU/B^3 minUR/B^2) is locally advected by fluctuating E xB velocities, to the lowest order in O(a/R). As a consequence minUR/B^2 is mixed or homogenized, so that ψ minUR/B^2 ->0. [1] T.S. Hahm, Phys. Fluids 31, 2670 (1988) [2] V.V. Yankov, JETP Lett. 60, 171 (1994); M.B. Isichenko et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 4436 (1995); X. Garbet et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 082511 (2005). [3] T.S. Hahm, P.H. Diamond, O. Gurcan, and G. Rewoldt, Phys. Plasmas 14, 072302 (2007).

  2. Z-pinch equilibrium and instability analysis with digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M. P.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Golingo, R. P.; Hughes, M. C.; Claveau, E. L.; Weed, J. R.; Forbes, E. G.; Doty, S. A.; Kim, B.

    2015-11-01

    The ZaP-HD Flow Z-Pinch project generates flow shear stabilized Z-pinches, providing a platform to explore how such plasmas could scale to HEDP and fusion reactor conditions. To scale up the plasma's density and temperature, it must be compressed to a smaller size making measurements more difficult. Digital holographic interferometry (DHI) employing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser and consumer DSLR camera can spatially resolve the plasma's electron density. The Fresnel reconstruction method allows expedient numerical data reconstruction. Obtaining electron density radial profiles relies on applying an Abel inversion to convert measured line-integrated density, and the inversion process provides an independent measure of plasma symmetry. Entire Z-pinch equilibria (n, P, T, and B profiles) can be computed by applying physical models to the density data. Tracking the time evolution of pressure and density can reveal the presence of non-adiabatic heating mechanisms. Imaging the size scales of instabilities enables relative measures of viscosity at different positions and times. Error estimation of measured density profiles is presented along with observed asymmetric instabilities. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration.

  3. Fusion in a staged Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, F. J.; Rahman, H. U.; Ney, P.; Valenzuela, J.; Beg, F.; McKee, E.; Darling, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper is dedicated to Norman Rostoker, our (FJW and HUR) mentor and long-term collaborator, who will always be remembered for the incredible inspiration that he has provided us. Norman's illustrious career dealt with a broad range of fundamental-physics problems and we were fortunate to have worked with him on many important topics: intense-charged-particle beams, field-reversed configurations, and Z-pinches. Rostoker 's group at the University of CA, Irvine was well known for having implemented many refinements to the Z-pinch, that make it more stable, scalable, and efficient, including the development of: the gas-puff Z-pinch [1], which provides for the use of an expanded range of pinch-load materials; the gas-mixture Z-pinch [2], which enhances the pinch stability and increases its radiation efficiency; e-beam pre-ionization [3], which enhances the uniformity of the initial-breakdown process in a gas pinch; magnetic-flux-compression [4, 5], which allows for the amplification of an axial-magnetic field Bz; the Z-θ pinch [6], which predicts fusion in a pinch-on-fiber configuration; the Staged Z-pinch (SZP) [7], which allows for the amplification of the pinch self-magnetic field, Bθ , in addition to a Bz, and leads to a stable implosion and high-gain fusion [8, 9, 10]. This paper describes the physical basis for a magneto-inertial compression in a liner-on-target SZP [11]. Initially a high-atomic-number liner implodes under the action of the J →×B → , Lorentz Force. As the implosion becomes super Alfvénic, magnetosonic waves form, transporting current and magnetic field through the liner toward the interface of the low-atomic-number target. The target implosion remains subsonic with its surface bounded by a stable-shock front. Shock waves that pass into the target provide a source of target plasma pre-heat. At peak compression the assembly is compressed by liner inertia, with flux compression producing an intense-magnetic field near the target

  4. Failure analysis of pinch-torsion tests as a thermal runaway risk evaluation method of Li-Ion Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yuzhi; Li, Dr. Tianlei; Ren, Prof. Fei; Gao, Yanfei; Wang, Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Recently a pinch-torsion test is developed for safety testing of Li-ion batteries (Ren et al., J. Power Source, 2013). It has been demonstrated that this test can generate small internal short-circuit spots in the separator in a controllable and repeatable manner. In the current research, the failure mechanism is examined by numerical simulations and comparisons to experimental observations. Finite element models are developed to evaluate the deformation of the separators under both pure pinch and pinch-torsion loading conditions. It is discovered that the addition of the torsion component significantly increased the maximum principal strain, which is believed to induce the internal short circuit. In addition, the applied load in the pinch-torsion test is significantly less than in the pure pinch test, thus dramatically improving the applicability of this method to ultra-thick batteries which otherwise require heavy load in excess of machine capability. It is further found that the separator failure is achieved in the early stage of torsion (within a few degree of rotation). Effect of coefficient of friction on the maximum principal strain is also examined.

  5. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  6. General process improvements through pinch technology

    SciTech Connect

    Linnhoff, B.; Polley, G.T.; Sahdev, V.

    1988-06-01

    Over the last ten years pinch technology has emerged as somewhat of a ''maverick'' development in the process design and energy conservation scene. Running contrary to general trends by taking the computer out of the loop and putting the engineer back in control, it has been questioned by some and welcomed by others. Regardless of persuasion, however, critics and advocates alike have largely failed to notice that pinch technology is more than an energy conservation tool. This is probably because soon after the advent of pinch technology in the 1970s, the process design scene became dominated by the oil crisis. Energy savings became the primary task of process designers and, therefore, the primary focus of the technology. Application during this period typically demonstrated energy cost savings in the range of 20 to 50 percent and payback periods of one year or less. Only recently have the other benefits of the technology reemerged. While it is true that pinch technology is essentially a heat-flow-based technique it is also true that it can be used to address a very diverse range of objectives.

  7. Magnetic pinch compression of silica glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    SiO2 glass has been irreversibly densified by pressures up to 250 kbar produced in a magnetic pinch apparatus. The threshold for significant densification was about 60 kbar. The recovered densities agree better with published shock wave results than with static results.

  8. The Pinch Pot Technique and Raku.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demery, Marie

    Since the 16th century, the small Japanese raku tea bowl has reflected the merged cultural influences of art, religion, and other countries on the art of Japanese pottery. Artistically, the bowl is a combination of ceramics (pinching) and sculpture (carving). The dictates of the Zen Buddhist tea masters determine its sculptural process and steps,…

  9. Spectroscopic study in Z-pinch discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Garamoon, A.A.; Saudy, A.H.; Shark, W.

    1995-12-31

    The temporal variation of the emitted line intensity has been investigated, and thus an important information about the dynamic ionization stages in the Z-pinch discharge has been studied. Also the electron temperature Te, has been deduced by using a spectroscopic technique.

  10. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Shear thirning will cause a normally viscous fluid -- such as pie filling or whipped cream -- to deform and flow more readily under high shear conditions. In shear thinning, a pocket of fluid will deform and move one edge forward, as depicted here.

  11. Polytropic scaling of a flow Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, M. C.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Golingo, R. P.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.; Weed, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch project investigates the use of velocity shear to mitigate MHD instabilities. The ZaP-HD experiment produces 50 cm long pinches of varying radii. The power to the experiment is split between the plasma formation and acceleration process and the pinch assembly and compression process. Once the pinch is formed, low magnetic fluctuations indicate a quiescent, long-lived pinch. The split power supply allows more control of the pinch current than previous machine iterations, with a designed range from 50 to 150 kA. Radial force balance leads to the Bennett relation which indicates that as the pinch compresses due to increasing currents, the plasma pressure and/or linear density must change. Through ion spectroscopy and digital holographic interferometry coupled with magnetic measurements of the pinch current, the components of the Bennett relation can be fully measured. A scaling relation is then assumed to follow a polytrope as the pinch pressure, initially approximately 250 kPa, increases from an initially formed state to much higher values, approaching 100 MPa. A preliminary analysis of pinch scaling is shown corroborating with other diagnostics on the machine along with extrapolations to required currents for an HEDLP machine. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration.

  12. Magnetic effect in viscosity of magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, H. A.; Gonzalez, E.; Restrepo, J.; Parra, C. A.; Ortiz, C.

    2016-02-01

    In this work the study of viscosity is presented for a magnetorheological fluid made from iron oxides micrometre, under an external magnetic field. The material was characterized by magnetic loops in a vibrating sample magnetometer and its crystal structure by X-ray diffraction. The results show that saturation magnetization and coercive field have dependence with the powder size. The material has different crystal structure which lattice parameters were determined by Rietveld refinement. The viscosity of the magnetorheological fluid was measured by a viscometer with rotational symmetry with and without external field. This result evidence a dependency on the size, percentage iron oxide and the applied magnetic field, it is due to the hydrodynamic volume of iron oxide interacts with the external magnetic field, increasing the flow resistance.

  13. Quark-hadron duality: Pinched kernel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, C. A.; Hernandez, L. A.; Schilcher, K.; Spiesberger, H.

    2016-08-01

    Hadronic spectral functions measured by the ALEPH collaboration in the vector and axial-vector channels are used to study potential quark-hadron duality violations (DV). This is done entirely in the framework of pinched kernel finite energy sum rules (FESR), i.e. in a model independent fashion. The kinematical range of the ALEPH data is effectively extended up to s = 10 GeV2 by using an appropriate kernel, and assuming that in this region the spectral functions are given by perturbative QCD. Support for this assumption is obtained by using e+ e‑ annihilation data in the vector channel. Results in both channels show a good saturation of the pinched FESR, without further need of explicit models of DV.

  14. Toggle mechanism for pinching metal tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengard, E. O. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A toggle mechanism pinches a metal tube and maintains the tube in a pinched condition, without fracturing. The toggle mechanism includes a plunger translatable along a longitudinal axis, as well as a pair of links pivoted about a common axis extending through an end of the plunger. One of the links also pivots about a fixed axis. A free end of the other link carries a push link which the other link translates at right angles to the plunger longitudinal axis. First and second sides of the tube bear against a first stop block and are engaged by the push link when a compression spring, attached to the plunger, is suddenly released to irreversibly drive the plunger along its longitudinal axis so the pivot point of the two links is driven to an over travel position.

  15. Strategic energy assessment using Pinch analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, M.A. ); Pretty, B.L. )

    1994-01-01

    The use of Process Integration techniques, such as Pinch Technology, have been widely accepted in the process industries. However in many situations in the US, the capital available for implementation of energy cost reduction projects is very limited. Therefore efforts to reduce energy costs have been limited to those which can be achieved with little or no capital investment. Despite this lack of capital, cost reduction still remains very important in the oil refining industry. Besides the cost of crude, energy is the largest cost which can be influenced by improved operation and/or capital investment, and has therefore become a primary focus. At the same time this renewed interest in energy reduction has occurred in the US, new methods have been developed in the field of Pinch Technology which allows the scope of a project to be expanded from an individual process unit, such as the crude unit, to the entire refinery site. A Site Assessment, which is the first step in a site analysis using Pinch Technology, allows an overview of the complete site to: focus future activities into areas where the most potential exists, evaluate on-going projects for improved design, identify potential improvements in the utility system. At the conclusion of such an activity, this knowledge of the site can be used to merge potential improvements with refinery plans. This paper introduces some of these new uses of Pinch Technology as applied to long range planning, describes the approach used in achieving such a plan, and finally reviews a case study which shows how the technique is used in a strategic way to focus the use of limited resources within the refinery.

  16. Z pinches: the past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, M. A.; Yonas, G.

    1998-11-01

    Intense electron and light ion beam and z pinch research is based on pulsed power capabilities developed at the Atomic Weapons Establishment in the early 1960s to test the resistance of weapon components to radiation bursts by using short-duration bremsstrahlung sources. Research at Sandia and at the Kurchatov Institute in the 1970s led to an electron beam approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The electron approach ended in 1979 when it was realized that the bremsstrahlung could significantly degrade the fuel compression. ICF research on a more promising approach, light ions, began in the late 1970s with the discovery, at Cornell, Sandia, and the Naval Research Laboratory, of efficient ways to produce intense beams of light ions. At the same time as emergence of the ion approach, z pinches that had produced copious keV x rays since the early 1970s were examined as a way to generate lower-voltage x rays to drive an ICF capsule. In this poster we review the research paths that led to these changes and predict what the future may hold for the z-pinch technology being pursued at Sandia.

  17. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The sample cell at the heart of CVX-2 will sit inside a thermostat providing three layers of insulation. The cell itself comprises a copper body that conducts heat efficiently and smoothes out thermal variations that that would destroy the xenon's uniformity. Inside the cell, the oscillating screen viscometer element is supported between two pairs of electrodes that deflect the screen and then measure screen motion.

  18. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Because xenon near the critical point will collapse under its own weight, experiments on Earth (green line) are limited as they get closer (toward the left) to the critical point. CVX in the microgravity of space (red line) moved into unmeasured territory that scientists had not been able to reach.

  19. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. This is a detail view of MSFC 0100143.

  20. Physics issues relevant during stagnation phase of the Z pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Edmund

    2006-10-01

    Wire-array Z pinches are the most powerful laboratory x-ray sources. However, the physics driving the stagnation phase, during which the pinch collapses on axis and subsequently radiates, remains somewhat mysterious. In particular the stagnated pinch resists undergoing radiative collapse, and the radiated energy is several times the kinetic energy of the imploding plasma. In recent years, a number of theories, as well as direct 3D numerical simulation, have been developed to address these phenomena. This work will highlight some of the physics issues relevant during this complicated phase of the Z pinch. Possibilities for future work will be discussed, and, with a little luck, performed.

  1. PINCH Expression and Its Clinicopathological Significance in Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhen-Long; Yan, Bao-Yong; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Yan-Hong; Wang, Zheng-Min; Zhang, Hong-Zhen; Wang, Ming-Wei; Zhang, Xiang-Hong; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine rich protein (PINCH) is an important component of the local adhesion complexes and upregulated in several types of malignancies, and involved in the incidence and development of tumours. PINCH expression is also independently correlated with poorer survival in patients with colorectal cancer. However, there is no study of PINCH in gastric cancer, therefore, the aim of this project was to investigate PINCH expression and its clinicopathological significance in gastric adenocarcinoma. Patients and methods: PINCH expression was immunohistochemically examined in normal gastric mucous (n = 30) and gastric adenocarcinoma (n = 73), from gastric cancer patients. Results: PINCH expression in the associated-stroma of gastric cancers was heterogeneous, and its positive rate (75%) was higher than that of normal gastric mucosa (43%, X2 = 9.711, p = 0.002). The stronger staining was observed at the invasive edge of tumour when compared to the inner area of tumour. The rate of positive PINCH (88%) in the cases with lymph node metastasis was higher than that (52%) in the cases without metastasis (X2 = 11.151, p = 0.001). PINCH expression was not correlated with patients’ gender, age, tumour size, differentiation and invasion depth (p > 0.05). Comclusion: PINCH protein might play an important role in the tumourigenesis and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:22976000

  2. Hall Viscosity I: Linear Response Theory for Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradlyn, Barry; Goldstein, Moshe; Read, Nicholas

    2012-02-01

    In two dimensional systems with broken time-reversal symmetry, there can exist a non-dissipative viscosity coefficient [1,2,3]. This Hall viscosity is similar in nature to the non-dissipative Hall conductivity. In order to investigate this phenomenon further, we develop a linear response formalism for viscosity. We derive a Kubo formula for the frequency dependent viscosity tensor in the long wavelength limit. We compute the viscosity tensor for the free electron gas, integer quantum Hall systems, and two-dimensional paired superfluids. In the zero frequency limit, we show how the known results [3,4] for the Hall viscosity are recovered.[4pt] [1] J. Avron, R. Seiler, and P. Zograf, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 697 (1995).[0pt] [2] P. Levay, J. Math. Phys. 36, 2792 (1995).[0pt] [3] N. Read, Phys. Rev. B 79, 045308 (2009).[0pt] [4] N. Read and E. Rezayi, Phys. Rev. B 84, 085316 (2011).

  3. Viscosity of the earth's core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the viscosity of the core at the boundary of the inner and outer core. It is assumed that this boundary is a melting transition and the viscosity limits of the Andrade (1934,1952) hypothesis (3.7 to 18.5 cp) are adopted. The corresponding kinematic viscosities are such that the precessional system explored by Malkus (1968) would be unstable. Whether it would be sufficiently unstable to overcome a severely subadiabatic temperature gradient cannot be determined.

  4. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of liquid xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Resembling a tiny bit of window screen, the oscillator at the heart of CVX-2 will vibrate between two pairs of paddle-like electrodes. The slight bend in the shape of the mesh has no effect on the data. What counts are the mesh's displacement in the xenon fluid and the rate at which the displacement dampens. The unit shown here is encased in a small test cell and capped with a sapphire windown to contain the xenon at high pressure.

  5. Methods of Viscosity Measurements in Sealed Ampoules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    1999-01-01

    Viscosity of semiconductor and metallic melts is usually measured by oscillating cup method. This method utilizes the melts contained in vacuum sealed silica ampoules, thus the problems related to volatility, contamination, and high temperature and pressure can be alleviated. In a typical design, the time required for a single measurement is of the order of one hour. In order to reduce this time to a minute range, a high resolution (0.05 arc.sec) angular detection system is implemented in our design of the viscometer. Furthermore, an electromagnet generating a rotational magnetic field (RMF) is incorporated into the apparatus. This magnetic field can be used to remotely and non intrusively measure the electrical conductivity of the melt. It can also be used to induce a well controlled rotational flow in the system. The transient behavior of this flow can potentially yield the viscosity of the fluid. Based on RMF implementation, two novel viscometry methods are proposed in this work: a) the transient torque method, b) the resonance method. A unified theoretical approach to the three methods (oscillating cup, transient torque, and resonance) is presented along with the initial test results of the constructed apparatus. Advantages of each of the method are discussed.

  6. Characteristic Differences Between Wire and Foil X-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Gilbert; Valenzuela, Julio; Krasheninnikov, Igor; Beg, Farhat; Wei, Mingsheng

    2015-11-01

    We conducted X-pinch experiments using laser-cut Ni and Cu foils on the 250kA GenASIS current driver at UC San Diego. General Atomics' Laser Micro-Machining (LMM) Center manufactured the X's. To characterize the foil X-pinches, we measured and compared the evolution, emission spectra, yield, and source size of these new arrays to that of comparably massed wire X-pinches on the same driver. Diagnostics included Si PN diodes and diamond PCDs, optical probing, X-ray spectroscopy, an XUV framing camera, a slit-wire camera, and current probes. We used novel structures machined into the crosspoint in an effort to better understand the effects of the initial geometry on the final pinch and to spatially confine the source location. Some designs entirely prohibited pinching. In other designs, when pinching occurred, the sources were comparable to ideal wire shots on GenASIS both in size (at or less than five microns) and X-ray flux (5-10 MW @ 1-10 keV). The data collected here also show considerable differences between successful foil and wire pinches. The X-ray spectra are not identical, and we find that the foil X's produce a single >2.5 keV emission pulse with none of the additional later and longer-lasting hard emission pulses found in wire X-pinches.

  7. Investigation on the pinch point position in heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lisheng; Shi, Weixiu

    2016-06-01

    The pinch point is important for analyzing heat transfer in thermodynamic cycles. With the aim to reveal the importance of determining the accurate pinch point, the research on the pinch point position is carried out by theoretical method. The results show that the pinch point position depends on the parameters of the heat transfer fluids and the major fluid properties. In most cases, the pinch point locates at the bubble point for the evaporator and the dew point for the condenser. However, the pinch point shifts to the supercooled liquid state in the near critical conditions for the evaporator. Similarly, it shifts to the superheated vapor state with the condensing temperature approaching the critical temperature for the condenser. It even can shift to the working fluid entrance of the evaporator or the supercritical heater when the heat source fluid temperature is very high compared with the absorbing heat temperature. A wrong position for the pinch point may generate serious mistake. In brief, the pinch point should be founded by the iterative method in all conditions rather than taking for granted.

  8. Nonlocal Transport in the Reversed Field Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Spizzo, G.; White, R. B.; Cappello, S.; Marrelli, L.

    2009-09-21

    Several heuristic models for nonlocal transport in plasmas have been developed, but they have had a limited possibility of detailed comparision with experimental data. Nonlocal aspects introduced by the existence of a known spectrum of relatively stable saturated tearing modes in a low current reversed field pinch offers a unique possibility for such a study. A numerical modelling of the magnetic structure and associated particle transport is carried out for the reversed-field pinch experiment at the Consorzio RFX, Padova, Italy. A reproduction of the tearing mode spectrum with a guiding center code1 reliably reproduces the observed soft X-ray tomography. Following particle trajectories in the stochastic magnetic field shows the transport across the unperturbed flux surfaces to be due to a spectrum of Levy flights, with the details of the spectrum position dependent. The resulting transport is subdiffusive, and cannot be described by Rechester-Rosenbluth diffusion, which depends on a random phase approximation. If one attempts to fit the local transport phenomenologically, the subdiffusion can be fit with a combination of diffusion and inward pinch2. It is found that whereas passing particles explore the stochastic field and hence participate in Levy flights, the trapped particles experience normal neoclassical diffusion. A two fluid nonlocal Montroll equation is used to model this transport, with a Levy flight defined as the motion of an ion during the period that the pitch has one sign. The necessary input to the Montroll equation consists of a time distribution for the Levy flights, given by the pitch angle scattering operator, and a distribution of the flight distances, determined numerically using a guiding center code. Results are compared to experiment. The relation of this formulation to fractional kinetics is also described.

  9. Filamentation instability of a self-pinched hollow electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, H.S.; Hughes, T.P.

    1986-09-01

    Filamentation stability properties of a self-pinched hollow electron beam propagating through a collisional plasma channel are investigated within the framework of linearized Vlasov--Maxwell equations, assuming that the beam is thin and that the equilibrium and perturbed space-charge fields are neutralized by background plasma. It is further assumed that the perturbations are well tuned with k-italic..beta../sub b-italic/c-italic+l-italic..omega../sub b-italic/ and satisfy l-italica-italic<rotational frequency of the beam, and 2a-italic and R-italic/sub 0/ are the thickness and mean radius of the beam. From the stability analysis, two distinctive unstable mechanisms are identified: the return-current driven instability and the resistively driven instability. It is also found that high-l-italic-mode perturbations are easily stabilized by a spread in the canonical angular momentum. Making use of a linearized particle-in-cell code, numerical simulations are performed. The agreement between the analytical results and those of simulations is excellent.

  10. Effective viscosity of magnetic nanofluids through capillaries.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajesh

    2012-02-01

    The simultaneous effect of magnetic field and temperature on the capillary viscosity of magnetic nanofluid is an important parameter for a new class of applications such as nanoduct flow, nanomotors, micro- and nanofluidic devices, for transformer cooling, magnetic targeted drug delivery, etc. The effective viscosity of a nanofluid is explained based on the rotation of the particles and the effect of torque on it due to an externally applied magnetic field. Two types of fluids are used here, temperature-sensitive and non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids. In both types of fluids, decrease in effective viscosity with temperature is observed, but in both cases the mechanism for the decrement is quite different. One is due to temperature dependence of the magnetic moment and the other is due to removal of the secondary surfactant. For temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids, a Curie temperature of ~80 °C is extracted from this study. For non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids ~65% of the secondary surfactant is removed for a change in temperature, ΔT = 40 °C. This is analogous with removal of a drug from magnetic particles for targeted drug delivery. Further, a linear dependence of effective viscosity with different capillary size and ξ (angle between magnetic field and flow direction, ξε[0,π/2]) is also observed. This linear dependence can also be a good approximation for the study of magnetic drug targeting, as in the human body the capillaries are of different sizes, and the externally applied magnetic field is not always parallel or perpendicular to the drug flow direction.

  11. What is a Reversed Field Pinch?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escande, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Short description * Usefulness of the RFP configuration for fusion science and dynamo physics * Attractivity of the RFP configuration for a reactor * Challenges ahead * Lawson criterion * Intuitive model of magnetic self-reversal * Intuitive description of the dynamo * Necessity of a helical deformation * MHD simulations * From single to multiple helicity * Single helicity * Multiple helicity * Quasi single helicity * Experimental results * Multiple helicity * Quasi single helicity * Upgrade of the RFX device * From double to single magnetic axis * Analytical description of the single helicity RFP * Helical Grad-Shafranov equation * Parallel Ohm's law * Pinch-stellarator equation * Single helicity ohmic RFP states * Calculation of the dynamo * Conclusion * Acknowledgments * References

  12. Confinement dynamics in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, K.F.

    1988-01-01

    The study of basic transport and confinement dynamics is central to the development of the reversed field pinch (RFP) as a confinement concept. Thus, the goal of RFP research is to understand the connection between processes that sustain the RFP configuration and related transport/confinement properties. Recently, new insights into confinement have emerged from a detailed investigation of RFP electron and ion physics. These insights derive from the recognition that both magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and electron kinetic effects play an important and strongly coupled role in RFP sustainment and confinement dynamics. In this paper, we summarize the results of these studies on the ZT-40M experiment. 8 refs.

  13. Supersonic gas shell for puff pinch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. S., III; Doggett, W. O.; Roth, I.; Stallings, C.

    1982-09-01

    An easy-to-fabricate, conical, annular supersonic nozzle has been developed for use in high-power, puff gas z-pinch experiments. A fast responding conical pressure probe has also been developed as an accurate supersonic gas flow diagnostic for evaluating the transient gas jet formed by the nozzle. Density profile measurements show that the magnitude and radial position of the gas annulus are fairly constant with distance from the nozzle, but the gas density in the center of the annulus increases with distance from the nozzle.

  14. Reversed field pinch: Progress and promise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprott, J. C.

    1985-05-01

    The Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is a fusion reactor concept which, like the tokamak, confines the reacting plasma by the magnetic field produced in part by electrical currents flowing in the toroidally-confined plasma. Unlike the tokamak, the RFP requires very little externally-applied magnetic field, and thus offers the promise of a compact reactor with high power density which can be ohmically heated to ignition using non-superconducting magnet coils. Recent progress worldwide in RFP performance and physics understanding offers the promise of a new generation of devices which approach reactor conditions.

  15. Effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation on force of finger pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagaki, Masato; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Hiwaki, Osamu

    2009-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is used to explore many aspects of brain function, and to treat neurological disorders. Cortical motor neuronal activation by TMS over the primary motor cortex (M1) produces efferent signals that pass through the corticospinal tracts. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) are observed in muscles innervated by the stimulated motor cortex. TMS can cause a silent period (SP) following MEP in voluntary electromyography (EMG). The present study examined the effects of TMS eliciting MEP and SP on the force of pinching using two fingers. Subjects pinched a wooden block with the thumb and index finger. TMS was applied to M1 during the pinch task. EMG of first dorsal interosseous muscles and pinch forces were measured. Force output increased after the TMS, and then oscillated. The results indicated that the motor control system to keep isotonic forces of the muscles participated in the finger pinch was disrupted by the TMS.

  16. Z-Pinch Discharge in Laser Produced Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, E.; Lunney, J. G.

    2010-10-08

    A fast coaxial electrical discharge, with relatively low current, was used to produce a Z-pinch effect in a laser produced aluminum plasma. The ion flux in the laser plasma was monitored with a Langmuir ion probe. The line density in the plasma column was controlled by using an aperture to select the portion of the laser plasma which enters the discharge cell. The Z-pinch dynamics were recorded using time-resolved imaging of the visible self-emission; the plasma was pinched to about one-third of the initial radius. Both the laser and Z-pinch plasmas were diagnosed using time-and space-resolved spectroscopy; substantial heating was observed. The measured behaviour of the pinch was compared with predictions of the slug model.

  17. Structural Basis of Competition Between PINCH1 and PINCH2 for Binding to the Ankyrin Repeat Domain of Integrin-linked Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Chiswell, B.; Steigler, A; Razinia, Z; Nalibotski, E; Boggon, T; Calderwood, D

    2010-01-01

    Formation of a heterotrimeric IPP complex composed of integrin-linked kinase (ILK), the LIM domain protein PINCH, and parvin is important for signaling through integrin adhesion receptors. Mammals possess two PINCH genes that are expressed simultaneously in many tissues. PINCH1 and PINCH2 have overlapping functions and can compensate for one another in many settings; however, isoform-specific functions have been reported and it is proposed that association with a PINCH1- or PINCH2-containing IPP complex may provide a bifurcation point in integrin signaling promoting different cellular responses. Here we report that the LIM1 domains of PINCH1 and PINCH2 directly compete for the same binding site on the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) of ILK. We determined the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the PINCH2 LIM1 domain complexed with the ARD of ILK, and show that disruption of this interface by point mutagenesis reduces binding in vitro and alters localization of PINCH2 in cells. These studies provide further evidence for the role of the PINCH LIM1 domain in association with ILK and highlight direct competition as one mechanism for regulating which PINCH isoform predominates in IPP complexes. Differential regulation of PINCH1 and PINCH2 expression may therefore provide a means for altering cellular integrin signaling pathways.

  18. Effective Viscosity Coefficient of Nanosuspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.; Egorov, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    Systematic calculations of the effective viscosity coefficient of nanosuspensions have been performed using the molecular dynamics method. It is established that the viscosity of a nanosuspension depends not only on the volume concentration of the nanoparticles but also on their mass and diameter. Differences from Einstein's relation are found even for nanosuspensions with a low particle concentration.

  19. Volatiles Which Increase Magma Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.

    2015-12-01

    The standard model of an erupting volcano is one in which the viscosity of a decompressing magma increases as the volatiles leave the melt structure to form bubbles. It has now been observed that the addition of the "volatiles" P, Cl and F result in an increase in silicate melt viscosity. This observation would mean that the viscosity of selected degassing magmas would decrease rather than increase. Here we look at P, Cl and F as three volatiles which increase viscosity through different structural mechanisms. In all three cases the volatiles increase the viscosity of peralkaline composition melts, but appear to always decrease the viscosity of peraluminous melts. Phosphorus causes the melt to unmix into a Na-P rich phase and a Na-poor silicate phase. Thus as the network modifying Na (or Ca) are removed to the phosphorus-rich melt, the matrix melt viscosity increases. With increasing amounts of added phosphorus (at network modifying Na ~ P) the addition of further phosphorus causes a decrease in viscosity. The addition of chlorine to Fe-free aluminosilicate melts results in an increase in viscosity. NMR data on these glass indicates that the chlorine sits in salt-like structures surrounded by Na and/or Ca. Such structures would remove network-modifying atoms from the melt structure and thus result in an increase in viscosity. The NMR spectra of fluorine-bearing glasses shows that F takes up at least 5 different structural positions in peralkaline composition melts. Three of these positions should result in a decrease in viscosity due to the removal of bridging oxygens. Two of the structural positons of F, however, should result in an increase in viscosity as they require the removal of network-modifying atoms from the melt structure (with one of the structures being that observed for Cl). This would imply that increasing amounts of F might result in an increase in viscosity. This proposed increase in viscosity with increasing F has now been experimentally confirmed.

  20. Conservative smoothing versus artificial viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, C.; Hicks, D.L.; Swegle, J.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report was stimulated by some recent investigations of S.P.H. (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method). Solid dynamics computations with S.P.H. show symptoms of instabilities which are not eliminated by artificial viscosities. Both analysis and experiment indicate that conservative smoothing eliminates the instabilities in S.P.H. computations which artificial viscosities cannot. Questions were raised as to whether conservative smoothing might smear solutions more than artificial viscosity. Conservative smoothing, properly used, can produce more accurate solutions than the von Neumann-Richtmyer-Landshoff artificial viscosity which has been the standard for many years. The authors illustrate this using the vNR scheme on a test problem with known exact solution involving a shock collision in an ideal gas. They show that the norms of the errors with conservative smoothing are significantly smaller than the norms of the errors with artificial viscosity.

  1. Fusion Propulsion Z-Pinch Engine Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernik, J.; Statham, G.; Fabisinski, L.; Maples, C. D.; Adams, R.; Polsgrove, T.; Fincher, S.; Cassibry, J.; Cortez, R.; Turner, M.; Percy, T.

    2011-01-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Due to the great distances between the planets of our solar system and the harmful radiation environment of interplanetary space, high specific impulse (Isp) propulsion in vehicles with high payload mass fractions must be developed to provide practical and safe vehicles for human spaceflight missions. The Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method is a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) approach that may potentially lead to a small, low cost fusion reactor/engine assembly1. Recent advancements in experimental and theoretical understanding of this concept suggest favorable scaling of fusion power output yield 2. The magnetic field resulting from the large current compresses the plasma to fusion conditions, and this process can be pulsed over short timescales (10(exp -6 sec). This type of plasma formation is widely used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects testing in the defense industry, as well as in fusion energy research. A Decade Module 2 (DM2), approx.500 KJ pulsed-power is coming to the RSA Aerophysics Lab managed by UAHuntsville in January, 2012. A Z-Pinch propulsion concept was designed for a vehicle based on a previous fusion vehicle study called "Human Outer Planet Exploration" (HOPE), which used Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) 3 propulsion. The reference mission is the transport of crew and cargo to Mars and back, with a reusable vehicle.

  2. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, Thomas H.; Ono, Masayuki

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  3. Age-Related and Sex-Related Differences in Hand and Pinch Grip Strength in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puh, Urska

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to quantify age-related changes in hand grip strength and three types of pinch grip strength (key pinch, tip pinch, and palmar pinch) among male and female participants. The study included 199 healthy participants (100 females, 99 males) aged 20-79 years, who were divided into four age groups. The Baseline Hydraulic…

  4. Plasma viscosity increase with progression of peripheral arterial atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Poredos, P; Zizek, B

    1996-03-01

    Increased blood and plasma viscosity has been described in patients with coronary and peripheral arterial disease. However, the relation of viscosity to the extent of arterial wall deterioration--the most important determinant of clinical manifestation and prognosis of the disease--is not well known. Therefore, the authors studied plasma viscosity as one of the major determinants of blood viscosity in patients with different stages of arterial disease of lower limbs (according to Fontaine) and its relation to the presence of some risk factors of atherosclerosis. The study encompassed four groups of subjects: 19 healthy volunteers (group A), 18 patients with intermittent claudication up to 200 m (stage II; group B), 15 patients with critical ischemia of lower limbs (stage III and IV; group C), and 16 patients with recanalization procedures on peripheral arteries. Venous blood samples were collected from an antecubital vein without stasis for the determination of plasma viscosity (with a rotational capillary microviscometer, PAAR), fibrinogen, total cholesterol, alpha-2-macroglobulin, and glucose concentrations. In patients with recanalization procedure local plasma viscosity was also determined from blood samples taken from a vein on the dorsum of the foot. Plasma viscosity was most significantly elevated in the patients with critical ischemia (1.78 mPa.sec) and was significantly higher than in the claudicants (1.68 mPa.sec), and the claudicants also had significantly higher viscosity than the controls (1.58 mPa.sec). In patients in whom a recanalization procedure was performed, no differences in systemic and local plasma viscosity were detected, neither before nor after recanalization of the diseased artery. In all groups plasma viscosity was correlated with fibrinogen concentration (r=0.70, P < 0.01) and total cholesterol concentration (r=0.24, P < 0.05), but in group C (critical ischemia) plasma viscosity was most closely linked to the concentration of alpha-2

  5. Progress in Z-pinch inertial fusion energy.

    SciTech Connect

    Weed, John Woodruff

    2010-03-01

    The goal of z-pinch inertial fusion energy (IFE) is to extend the single-shot z-pinch inertial confinement fusion (ICF) results on Z to a repetitive-shot z-pinch power plant concept for the economical production of electricity. Z produces up to 1.8 MJ of x-rays at powers as high as 230 TW. Recent target experiments on Z have demonstrated capsule implosion convergence ratios of 14-21 with a double-pinch driven target, and DD neutron yields up to 8x10exp10 with a dynamic hohlraum target. For z-pinch IFE, a power plant concept is discussed that uses high-yield IFE targets (3 GJ) with a low rep-rate per chamber (0.1 Hz). The concept includes a repetitive driver at 0.1 Hz, a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the driver to the target, high-yield targets, and a thick-liquid wall chamber. Recent funding by a U.S. Congressional initiative for $4M for FY04 is supporting research on RTLs, repetitive pulsed power drivers, shock mitigation, full RTL cycle planned experiments, high-yield IFE targets, and z-pinch power plant technologies. Recent results of research in all of these areas are discussed, and a Road Map for Z-Pinch IFE is presented.

  6. Linear pinch driven by a moving compact torus

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, C.W.; Hammer, J.H.; Eddleman, J.L.

    1984-04-25

    In principle, a Z-pinch of sufficiently large aspect ratio can provide arbitrarily high magnetic field intensity for the confinement of plasma. In practice, however, achievable field intensities and timescales are limited by parasitic inductances, pulse driver power, current, voltage, and voltage standoff of nearby insulating surfaces or surrounding gas. Further, instabilities may dominate to prevent high fields (kink mode) or enhance them (sausage mode) but in a nonuniform and uncontrollable way. In this paper we discuss an approach to producing a high-field-intensity pinch using a moving compact torus. The moving torus can serve as a very high power driver and may be used to compress a pre-established pinch field, switch on an accelerating pinch field, or may itself be reconfigured to form an intense pinch. In any case, the high energy, high energy density, and high velocity possible with an accelerated compact torus can provide extremely high power to overcome, by a number of orders of magnitude, the limitations to pinch formation described earlier. In this paper we will consider in detail pinches formed by reconfiguration of the compact torus.

  7. ZBLAN Viscosity Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William

    2001-01-01

    The past year's contribution from Dr. Kaukler's experimental effort consists of these 5 parts: a) Construction and proof-of-concept testing of a novel shearing plate viscometer designed to produce small shear rates and operate at elevated temperatures; b) Preparing nonlinear polymeric materials to serve as standards of nonlinear Theological behavior; c) Measurements and evaluation of above materials for nonlinear rheometric behavior at room temperature using commercial spinning cone and plate viscometers available in the lab; d) Preparing specimens from various forms of pitch for quantitative comparative testing in a Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer, Thermal Mechanical Analyzer; and Archeological Analyzer; e) Arranging to have sets of pitch specimens tested using the various instruments listed above, from different manufacturers, to form a baseline of the viscosity variation with temperature using the different test modes offered by these instruments by compiling the data collected from the various test results. Our focus in this project is the shear thinning behavior of ZBLAN glass over a wide range of temperature. Experimentally, there are no standard techniques to perform such measurements on glasses, particularly at elevated temperatures. Literature reviews to date have shown that shear thinning in certain glasses appears to occur, but no data is available for ZBLAN glass. The best techniques to find shear thinning behavior require the application of very low rates of shear. In addition, because the onset of the thinning behavior occurs at an unknown elevated temperature, the instruments used in this study must provide controlled low rates of shear and do so for temperatures approaching 600 C. In this regard, a novel shearing parallel plate viscometer was designed and a prototype built and tested.

  8. Critical Viscosity of Xenon investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Dr. Robert F. Berg (right), principal investigator and Dr. Micheal R. Moldover (left), co-investigator, for the Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX/CVX-2) experiment. They are with the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of chemicals.

  9. Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronaut Mike Fincke places droplets of honey onto the strings for the Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) investigation onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The FMVM experiment measures the time it takes for two individual highly viscous fluid droplets to coalesce or merge into one droplet. Different fluids and droplet size combinations were tested in the series of experiments. By using the microgravity environment, researchers can measure the viscosity or 'thickness' of fluids without the influence of containers and gravity using this new technique. Understanding viscosity could help scientists understand industrially important materials such as paints, emulsions, polymer melts and even foams used to produce pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic products.

  10. Viscosity Depressants for Coal Liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalfayan, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed process modification incorporates viscosity depressants to prevent coal from solidifying during liquefaction. Depressants reduce amount of heat needed to liquefy coal. Possible depressants are metallic soaps, such as stearate, and amides, such as stearamide and dimer acid amides.

  11. Pinching solutions of slender cylindrical jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.; Orellana, Oscar

    1993-01-01

    Simplified equations for slender jets are derived for a circular jet of one fluid flowing into an ambient second fluid, the flow being confined in a circular tank. Inviscid flows are studied which include both surface tension effects and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. For slender jets a coupled nonlinear system of equations is found for the jet shape and the axial velocity jump across it. The equations can break down after a finite time and similarity solutions are constructed, and studied analytically and numerically. The break-ups found pertain to the jet pinching after a finite time, without violation of the slender jet ansatz. The system is conservative and admissible singular solutions are those which conserve the total energy, mass, and momentum. Such solutions are constructed analytically and numerically, and in the case of vortex sheets with no surface tension certain solutions are given in closed form.

  12. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors.

  13. Nonlinear Particle Pinch in Collisionless Trapped Electron Mode Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, P. W.; Gatto, R.

    2005-10-01

    Collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence is shown to have an anomalous particle pinch fundamentally unlike pinches identified previously. It arises from a nonlinear fluctuation eigenmode, placing it outside the purview of quasilinear theory. The nonlinear eigenmode develops because the nonlinearity excites a damped linear eigenmode, changing the density- potential correlation. The flux is solved from spectrum balance equations in a complete basis spanning the fluctuation space under a joint expansion in collision frequency and instability threshold parameter. The solution accounts for saturation by anisotropic energy transfer to zonal wavenumbers of the damped eigenmode. To lowest order the pinch is a convective-like flux driven by temperature gradient. It arises from the damped eigenmode energy and the real part of the correlation between damped and growing eigenmodes. The pinch is slightly smaller than the outwardly directed flux associated with the growing eigenmode, making the flux a small fraction of the quasilinear value. Work supported by US DOE.

  14. A Z-Pinch Driven Fusion Reactor Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derzon, Mark; Rochau, Gregory; Spielman, Rick; Slutz, Stephen; Rochau, G. E.; Peterson, R. R.; Peterson, P. F.

    1999-11-01

    Recent z-pinch target physics progress has encouraged us to consider how a power reactor could be configured based on a fast z-pinch driver. Initial cost estimates show that recyclable transmission lines (RTLs) are economically viable. Providing 'standoff' between the primary power supply and the target, which is what disposable RTLs provide, has historically been the main obstacle to the consideration of pinches as fusion drivers. We will be introducing basic reactor scaling in terms of shot rate, yield, tritium breeding and neutron flux, etc. This concept has advantages in that z-pinches provide a robust mechanical environment, as well as a chamber which does not require low-pressure pumping between shots and the wall lifetime is expected to be limited factors other than neutron damage. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Timing of x-ray burst from X-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Shen; Zhang, Ran; Zhu, Xinlei; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Xinxin

    2015-06-15

    The x-ray burst timings of X-pinches, T{sub XB}, made using eight different wires for different current were measured. The results showed that a higher current makes a shorter T{sub XB} for a given X-pinch wire. In other words, T{sub XB} scales linearly with the line mass density for a given current. Based on the snow-plow model for Z-pinch plasma, it was derived that for a given X-pinch wire the integral of the current over time from zero to T{sub XB} is constant, i.e., ∫{sub 0}{sup T{sub X}{sub B}}i(t)⋅dt=const.. This theoretically derived relation was confirmed by our experiments.

  16. Thermonuclear fusion in a staged Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Drie, Alan David

    2001-05-01

    The Staged Z-Pinch idea was born out of trying to understand the enhanced X-ray yield from shell onto target Z-Pinches I performed in the late 1980s as an undergraduate student at UCI [1]. The idea was further matured through later successes of multi-shell implosions demonstrated at UCI, the Ecole Polytechnique in France, and the Kurchatov Institute in Russia. The Staged Z-Pinch is based upon a hybrid of a Z-Z and Z- Θ Pinch, i.e., an outer Z-Pinch drives Z and Θ currents on a separate coaxial inner target, through compression of axial and azimuthal magnetic fields trapped between the two. These fields provide magnetic shear stabilization. The load configurations tested were: 4 cm dia. Kr hollow gas shell liner with a 1.7 cm dia. D2 hollow gas shell and solid D2 gas jet targets. It is experimentally and computationally observed, that the Kr liner achieves a spectrum of high charge states, which peels off and accelerates ahead of the bulk of the liner. As this Kr implodes onto the deuterium core, it compresses the axial and azimuthal magnetic fields trapped in the liner-target gap, driving the target as a Staged Z-Pinch. In addition, axial current is constantly transferring from the liner to the deuterium target, and eventually dominates over the staged z-pinching of the target and instead drives it as a Z-Pinch. Even without any initial axial Bz field both the peeling and implosion of the target appear RT stable. I call this type of load configuration a Peeled Pinch. For our Staged Z-Pinch experiments, I designed and assembled a mega-ampere, μ s-class pulsed-power driver [2]. This would drive the Kr liner at current levels of 1.2 MA with implosion times of about 150 ns. To study the pinch I developed and installed neutron, optical, and x-ray diagnostics. For neutrons this includes: Ag activation, bubble and TOF detectors. For optical this includes: a N2 laser schlieren and a streak camera diagnostics. For x-rays this includes: a pinhole camera, XRDS and PINs.

  17. Slow light effect in pinch waveguide in photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Preeti; Kalra, Yogita; Sinha, R. K.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a design for slow light effect in pinch photonic crystal waveguide. The design consists of two dimensional triangular arrangements of air holes in silicon on insulator substrate. From the calculations it has been found out that for the proposed structure the group index is high and group velocity dispersion is low. The confinement of light in the pinch waveguide with slow light effect can be a strong candidate for sensor applications.

  18. Experimental study of the neck formation in an X pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyomov, A. P.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Fedunin, A. V.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Oreshkin, V. I.

    2014-11-01

    X-pinch experiments have been performed on a compact 250 kA, 180 ns pulsed power generator specially designed for this purpose at the Institute of High Current Electronics (Tomsk, Russia). The X pinches were composed of two molybdenum wires of diameter 25 μm making an angle of 36° with the z-axis. The X-pinch dynamics was recorded with a 3 ns exposure time using an HSFC Pro four-frame camera. Axial plasma jets propagating toward both the anode and the cathode were observed. The jets became noticeable within 10 ns after the onset of current flow, which approximately corresponded to the time at which the electrical explosion of the X-pinch wires occurred. The velocity of the anode-directed jet reached 107 cm/s, which was about 1.5 times the velocity of the cathode-directed jet. These high jet velocities are inconsistent with the plasma temperature resulting from the wire explosion. Hence, these jets seem to develop due to implosion of the light plasma layer stripped by magnetic forces from the wire surface, and the increase in their velocities is perhaps due to cumulative effects taking place at the X-pinch axis. The X-pinch neck formed as a rule above the initial wire cross point (closer to the anode). In this region, the plasma diameter gradually increased with time and then drastically decreased 10-15 ns prior to the x-ray pulse. Immediately before the x-ray pulse, in the (250-300 μm long) plasma neck, a lower scale constriction developed, forming a "hot spot". It has been confirmed that the anode-directed plasma jet could take some part of the X-pinch wire current because of the evident jet pinching in the anode region. This process seems to determine the neck length.

  19. Rotating reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1991-01-01

    Undesired gravitational effects such as convection or sedimentation in a fluid can sometimes be avoided or decreased by the use of a closed chamber uniformly rotated about a horizontal axis. In a previous study, the spiral orbits of a heavy or buoyant particle in a uniformly rotating fluid were determined. The particles move in circles, and spiral in or out under the combined effects of the centrifugal force and centrifugal buoyancy. A optimization problem for the rotation rate of a cylindrical reactor rotated about its axis and containing distributed particles was formulated and solved. Related studies in several areas are addressed. A computer program based on the analysis was upgraded by correcting some minor errors, adding a sophisticated screen-and-printer graphics capability and other output options, and by improving the automation. The design, performance, and analysis of a series of experiments with monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in water were supported to test the theory and its limitations. The theory was amply confirmed at high rotation rates. However, at low rotation rates (1 rpm or less) the assumption of uniform solid-body rotation of the fluid became invalid, and there were increasingly strong secondary motions driven by variations in the mean fluid density due to variations in the particle concentration. In these tests the increase in the mean fluid density due to the particles was of order 0.015 percent. To a first approximation, these flows are driven by the buoyancy in a thin crescent-shaped depleted layer on the descending side of the rotating reactor. This buoyancy distribution is balanced by viscosity near the walls, and by the Coriolis force in the interior. A full analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Secondary flows are likely to be stronger for buoyant particles, which spiral in towards the neutral point near the rotation axis under the influence of their centrifugal buoyancy. This is because the depleted layer is

  20. Pinch-off Scaling Law of Soap Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John; Ryu, Sangjin

    2014-11-01

    Three common interfacial phenomena that occur daily are liquid drops in gas, gas bubbles in liquid and thin-film bubbles. One aspect that has been studied for these phenomena is the formation or pinch-off of the drop/bubble from the liquid/gas threads. In contrast to the formation of liquid drops in gas and gas bubbles in liquid, thin-film bubble pinch-off has not been well documented. Having thin-film interfaces may alter the pinch-off process due to the limiting factor of the film thickness. We observed the pinch-off of one common thin-film bubble, soap bubbles, in order to characterize its pinch-off behavior. We achieved this by constructing an experimental model replicating the process of a human producing soap bubbles. Using high-speed videography and image processing, we determined that the minimal neck radius scaled with the time left till pinch-off, and that the scaling law exponent was 2/3, similar to that of liquid drops in gas.

  1. Theoretical z -pinch scaling relations for thermonuclear-fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Stygar, W A; Cuneo, M E; Vesey, R A; Ives, H C; Mazarakis, M G; Chandler, G A; Fehl, D L; Leeper, R J; Matzen, M K; McDaniel, D H; McGurn, J S; McKenney, J L; Muron, D J; Olson, C L; Porter, J L; Ramirez, J J; Seamen, J F; Speas, C S; Spielman, R B; Struve, K W; Torres, J A; Waisman, E M; Wagoner, T C; Gilliland, T L

    2005-08-01

    We have developed wire-array z -pinch scaling relations for plasma-physics and inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) experiments. The relations can be applied to the design of z -pinch accelerators for high-fusion-yield (approximately 0.4 GJ/shot) and inertial-fusion-energy (approximately 3 GJ/shot) research. We find that (delta(a)/delta(RT)) proportional (m/l)1/4 (Rgamma)(-1/2), where delta(a) is the imploding-sheath thickness of a wire-ablation-dominated pinch, delta(RT) is the sheath thickness of a Rayleigh-Taylor-dominated pinch, m is the total wire-array mass, l is the axial length of the array, R is the initial array radius, and gamma is a dimensionless functional of the shape of the current pulse that drives the pinch implosion. When the product Rgamma is held constant the sheath thickness is, at sufficiently large values of m/l, determined primarily by wire ablation. For an ablation-dominated pinch, we estimate that the peak radiated x-ray power P(r) proportional (I/tau(i))(3/2)Rlphigamma, where I is the peak pinch current, tau(i) is the pinch implosion time, and phi is a dimensionless functional of the current-pulse shape. This scaling relation is consistent with experiment when 13 MA < or = I < or = 20 MA, 93 ns < or = tau(i) < or = 169 ns, 10 mm < or = R < or = 20 mm, 10 mm < or = l < or = 20 mm, and 2.0 mg/cm < or = m/l < or = 7.3 mg/cm. Assuming an ablation-dominated pinch and that Rlphigamma is held constant, we find that the x-ray-power efficiency eta(x) congruent to P(r)/P(a) of a coupled pinch-accelerator system is proportional to (tau(i)P(r)(7/9 ))(-1), where P(a) is the peak accelerator power. The pinch current and accelerator power required to achieve a given value of P(r) are proportional to tau(i), and the requisite accelerator energy E(a) is proportional to tau2(i). These results suggest that the performance of an ablation-dominated pinch, and the efficiency of a coupled pinch-accelerator system, can be improved substantially by decreasing the

  2. Viscosities of aqueous blended amines

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.H.; Li, M.H.

    1997-07-01

    Solutions of alkanolamines are an industrially important class of compounds used in the natural gas, oil refineries, petroleum chemical plants, and synthetic ammonia industries for the removal of acidic components like CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S from gas streams. The viscosities of aqueous mixtures of diethanolamine (DEA) + N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), DEA + 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP), and monoethanolamine (MEA) + 2-piperidineethanol (2-PE) were measured from 30 C to 80 C. A Redlich-Kister equation for the viscosity deviation was applied to represent the viscosity. On the basis of the available viscosity data for five ternary systems, MEA + MDEA + H{sub 2}O, MEA + AMP + H{sub 2}O, DEA + MDEA + H{sub 2}O, DEA + AMP + H{sub 2}O, and MEA + 2-PE + H{sub 2}O, a generalized set of binary parameters were determined. For the viscosity calculation of the systems tested, the overall average absolute percent deviation is about 1.0% for a total of 499 data points.

  3. Z-Pinch Pulsed Plasma Propulsion Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polsgrove, Tara; Adams, Robert B.; Fabisinski, Leo; Fincher, Sharon; Maples, C. Dauphne; Miernik, Janie; Percy, Tom; Statham, Geoff; Turner, Matt; Cassibry, Jason; Cortez, Ross; Santarius, John

    2010-01-01

    Fusion-based propulsion can enable fast interplanetary transportation. Magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is an approach which has been shown to potentially lead to a low cost, small reactor for fusion break even. The Z-Pinch/dense plasma focus method is an MIF concept in which a column of gas is compressed to thermonuclear conditions by an axial current (I approximates 100 MA). Recent advancements in experiments and the theoretical understanding of this concept suggest favorable scaling of fusion power output yield as I(sup 4). This document presents a conceptual design of a Z-Pinch fusion propulsion system and a vehicle for human exploration. The purpose of this study is to apply Z-Pinch fusion principles to the design of a propulsion system for an interplanetary spacecraft. This study took four steps in service of that objective; these steps are identified below. 1. Z-Pinch Modeling and Analysis: There is a wealth of literature characterizing Z-Pinch physics and existing Z-Pinch physics models. In order to be useful in engineering analysis, simplified Z-Pinch fusion thermodynamic models are required to give propulsion engineers the quantity of plasma, plasma temperature, rate of expansion, etc. The study team developed these models in this study. 2. Propulsion Modeling and Analysis: While the Z-Pinch models characterize the fusion process itself, propulsion models calculate the parameters that characterize the propulsion system (thrust, specific impulse, etc.) The study team developed a Z-Pinch propulsion model and used it to determine the best values for pulse rate, amount of propellant per pulse, and mixture ratio of the D-T and liner materials as well as the resulting thrust and specific impulse of the system. 3. Mission Analysis: Several potential missions were studied. Trajectory analysis using data from the propulsion model was used to determine the duration of the propulsion burns, the amount of propellant expended to complete each mission considered. 4

  4. Magnetic Field Measurements in Wire-Array Z-Pinches using Magneto-Optically Active Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Wasif; Blesener, Isaac; Hammer, David A.; Lipson, Michal

    2009-01-21

    Understanding the magnetic field topology in wire-array Z-pinches as a function of time is of great significance to understanding these high-energy density plasmas especially for their ultimate application to stockpile stewardship and inertial confinement fusion. We are developing techniques to measure magnetic fields as a function of space and time using Faraday rotation of a single longitudinal mode (SLM) laser through a magneto-optically active bulk waveguide (multicomponent terbium borate glass) placed adjacent to, or within, the wire array in 1 MA experiments. We have measured fields >10 T with 100 ns rise times outside of a wire-array for the entire duration of the current pulse and as much as {approx}2 T inside a wire-array for {approx}40 ns from the start of current. This is the first time that such rapidly varying and large fields have been measured using these materials. In a dense Z-pinch, these sensing devices may not survive for long but may provide the magnetic field at the position of the sensor that can be used to corroborate magnetic probes, with which we compare our results.

  5. Magnetic Field Measurements in Wire-Array Z-Pinches using Magneto-Optically Active Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Wasif; Hammer, David; Lipson, Michal

    2007-11-01

    Understanding the magnetic field topology in wire-array Z-pinches as a function of time is of great significance to understanding these high-energy density plasmas. We are developing techniques to measure magnetic fields as a function of space and time using Faraday rotation of a single longitudinal mode (SLM) laser through a magneto-optically active bulk waveguide (terbium borate glass) placed adjacent to, or within, the wire array in experiments on the COBRA pulsed power generator [1]. We have measured fields >10 T with 100 ns rise times outside of a wire-array for the entire duration of the current pulse and as much as ˜2 T inside a wire-array for ˜40 ns from the start of current. This is the first time that such rapidly varying and large fields have been measured using these materials. We will also present our progress on field measurements using an optical fiber sensor and a very small ``thin film waveguide'' coupled to a fiber optic system. In a dense Z-pinch, these sensing devices may not survive for long but may provide the magnetic field at the position of the sensor for a greater fraction of the current pulse than magnetic probes, with which we compare our results. This research was sponsored by NNSA under SSAA program via DOE Coop Agreement DE-F03-02NA00057. [1] W. Syed, D. A. Hammer, & M. Lipson, 34^th ICOPS & 16^th PPPS, Albuquerque, NM, June 2007.

  6. Magnetic Field Measurements in Wire-Array Z-Pinches using Magneto-Optically Active Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Wasif; Blesener, Isaac; Hammer, David A.; Lipson, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the magnetic field topology in wire-array Z-pinches as a function of time is of great significance to understanding these high-energy density plasmas especially for their ultimate application to stockpile stewardship and inertial confinement fusion. We are developing techniques to measure magnetic fields as a function of space and time using Faraday rotation of a single longitudinal mode (SLM) laser through a magneto-optically active bulk waveguide (multicomponent terbium borate glass) placed adjacent to, or within, the wire array in 1 MA experiments. We have measured fields >10 T with 100 ns rise times outside of a wire-array for the entire duration of the current pulse and as much as ˜2 T inside a wire-array for ˜40 ns from the start of current. This is the first time that such rapidly varying and large fields have been measured using these materials. In a dense Z-pinch, these sensing devices may not survive for long but may provide the magnetic field at the position of the sensor that can be used to corroborate magnetic probes, with which we compare our results.

  7. Methods of viscosity measurements in sealed ampoules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    1999-07-01

    Viscosity of semiconductors and metallic melts is usually measured by oscillating cup method. This method utilizes the melts contained in vacuum sealed silica ampoules, thus the problems related to volatility, contamination, and high temperature and pressure can be alleviate. In a typical design, the time required for a single measurement is of the order of one hour. In order to reduce this time to a minute range, a high resolution angular detection system is implemented in our design of the viscometer. Furthermore, an electromagnet generating a rotational magnetic field (RMF) is incorporated into the apparatus. This magnetic field can be used to remotely and nonintrusively measure the electrical conductivity of the melt. It can also be used to induce a well controlled rotational flow in the system. The transient behavior of this flow can potentially yield of the fluid. Based on RMF implementation, two novel viscometry methods are proposed in this work: a) the transient torque method, b) the resonance method. A unified theoretical approach to the three methods is presented along with the initial test result of the constructed apparatus. Advantages of each of the method are discussed.

  8. Pinch Me - I'm Fusing!

    SciTech Connect

    DERZON,MARK S.

    2000-07-19

    The process of combining nuclei (the protons and neutrons inside an atomic nucleus) together with a release of kinetic energy is called fusion. This process powers the Sun, it contributes to the world stockpile of weapons of mass destruction and may one day generate safe, clean electrical power. Understanding the intricacies of fusion power, promised for 50 years, ,is sometimes difficult because there are a number of ways of doing it. There is hot fusion, cold fusion and con-fusion. Hot fusion is what powers suns through the conversion of mass energy to kinetic energy. Cold fusion generates con-fusion and nobody really knows what it is. Honestly - this is true. There does seem to be something going on here; I just don't know what. Apparently some experimenters get energy out of a process many call cold fission but no one seems to know what it is, or how to do it reliably. It is not getting much attention from the mainline physics community. Even so, no one is generating electrical power for you and me with either method. In this article 1 will point out some basic features of the mainstream approaches taken to hot fusion power, as well as describe why z pinches are worth pursuing as a driver for a power reactor and may one day generate electrical power for mankind.

  9. Differential rotation in solar convective dynamo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuhong; Fang, Fang

    2016-10-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan and Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  10. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-15

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≫ 1, where τ{sub R} and τ{sub V} represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  11. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-01

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τR/τV ≫ 1, where τR and τV represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τR/τV ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  12. Plasma viscosity in spherical ICF implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, E.; Joglekar, A.; Ortega, M.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.; Molvig, K.

    2016-05-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hydrodynamic codes often ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates plasma viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. A Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport, and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation, is used to study differences between ICF implosions with and without plasma viscosity and to examine the role of artificial viscosity in a Lagrangian implosion simulation. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, fuel compression, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and this study suggests that artificial viscosity may provide an unphysical stability in implosion simulations.

  13. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  14. Digit mechanics in relation to endpoint compliance during precision pinch.

    PubMed

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-02-26

    This study investigates the mechanics of the thumb and index finger in relation to compliant endpoint forces during precision pinch. The objective was to gain insight into how individuals modulate motor output at the digit endpoints and joints according to compliance-related sensory feedback across the digits. Thirteen able-bodied subjects performed precision pinch upon elastic resistance bands of a customized apparatus instrumented with six degree-of-freedom load-cells. Compliance levels were discretely adjusted according to the number of bands connected. Subjects were provided visual feedback to control the rate of force application. Fifteen repetitions of low-to-moderate force (<20N) pinches were analyzed at each of five compliance levels, during which force and motion data were collected. Joint angles and moments normalized by pinch force magnitude were computed. Second-order polynomials were used to characterize joint mechanics as a function of compliance. The joint degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) at the finger showed greater dependence on compliance for angular position while the thumb joint DOFs demonstrated greater dependence for normalized joint moment. The digits also adjusted coordination of their endpoint forces according to compliance. Overall, the finger may be altering its position to increase load to the joints of the thumb with changing compliance. These findings describe naturally emergent changes in digit mechanics for compliant precision pinch, which involves motor execution in response to endpoint sensory feedback. Identifying and understanding these motor patterns may provide theoretical basis for restoring and rehabilitating sensorimotor pathologies of the hand.

  15. Scaling of X pinches from 1 MA to 6 MA.

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, Simon Nicholas; McBride, Ryan D.; Wenger, David Franklin; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Pikuz, Sergei A.; Harding, Eric; Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Yu, Edmund P.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2010-09-01

    This final report for Project 117863 summarizes progress made toward understanding how X-pinch load designs scale to high currents. The X-pinch load geometry was conceived in 1982 as a method to study the formation and properties of bright x-ray spots in z-pinch plasmas. X-pinch plasmas driven by 0.2 MA currents were found to have source sizes of 1 micron, temperatures >1 keV, lifetimes of 10-100 ps, and densities >0.1 times solid density. These conditions are believed to result from the direct magnetic compression of matter. Physical models that capture the behavior of 0.2 MA X pinches predict more extreme parameters at currents >1 MA. This project developed load designs for up to 6 MA on the SATURN facility and attempted to measure the resulting plasma parameters. Source sizes of 5-8 microns were observed in some cases along with evidence for high temperatures (several keV) and short time durations (<500 ps).

  16. Models for silicate melt viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, D.; Russell, K.; Moretti, R.; Mangiacapra, A.; Potuzak, M.; Romano, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2004-12-01

    The prediction of viscosity in silicate liquids, over the range of temperatures and compositions encountered in nature, remains one of the most challenging and elusive goals in Earth Sciences. Recent work has demonstrated that there are now sufficient experimental measurements of melt viscosity to create new viscosity models to replace previous Arrhenian models [1],[2] and extend the compositional range of more recent non-Arrhenian models [3]. Most recently, [4] have developed an empirical strategy for accurately predicting viscosities over a very wide range of anhydrous silicate melt compositions (e.g., rhyolite to basanite). Future models that improve upon this work, will probably extend the composition range of the model to consider, at least, H2O and other volatile components and may utilize a compositional basis that reflects melt structure. In preparation for the next generation model, we explore the attributes of the three most common equations that could be used to model the non-Arrhenian viscosity of multicomponent silicate melts. The equations for the non-Arrhenian temperature dependence of viscosity (η ) include: a) Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT): log η = A + B/(T - C) b) Adam and Gibbs (AG): log η = A + B/[T log (T/C)], and c) Avramov (Av): log η = A + [B/T]α We use an experimental database of approximately 900 high-quality viscosity measurements on silicate melts to test the ability of each equation to capture the experimental data. These equations have different merits [5]. VFT is purely empirical in nature. The AG model has a quasi-theoretical basis that links macroscopic transport properties directly to thermodynamic properties via the configurational entropy. Lastly, the model proposed by Avramov adopts a form designed to relate the fit parameter (α ) to the fragility of the melt. [1] Shaw, H.R., 1972. Am J Science, 272, 438-475. [2] Bottinga Y. and Weill, D., 1972. Am J Science, 272, 438-475. [3] Hess, K.U. and Dingwell, D.B, 1996, Am Min, 81

  17. Capillary blood viscosity in microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Cortinovis, A; Crippa, A; Cavalli, R; Corti, M; Cattaneo, L

    2006-01-01

    As known, at the arteriolar level there is the highest resistance to the flow due to the section and to the velocity with an average pressure fall of 50 mmHg (from 85 to 35 mmHg). This resistance is expressed in sec(-1) by the ratio W/2r. This ratio is very high with an average value of 332 sec(-1) and viscosity at this high shear-rate is negligible. At the capillary level the pressure fall is 11.5 mmHg but the vascular resistance W/2r is much lower, on average 32 sec(-1). We can say that if a resistance of 333 sec(-1) corresponds with a pressure fall of 50 mmHg, then a resistance of 32 sec(-1) should correspond with a pressure fall of 4.8 mmHg. The highest pressure fall is due to another kind of resistance which we can define as "Capillary Blood Viscosity" because it depends on the rheological and structural characteristics of the blood. Our instrument reproduces the structure of the capillary district in an experimental model and measures the General Blood Viscosity (GBV) and the Capillary Blood Viscosity (CBV) at the same shear-rate and in particular at the low shear-rate when in non-Newtonian fluids the highest increase in viscosity appears. Consequently, at the capillary, viscosity is dominant with respect to the other geometric and physical resistances. Moreover, the percentage ratio between the GBV and the CBV gives a physical measure of erythrocyte deformability. Knowing viscosity at shear-rate present in the circulatory system, we can obtain the size of RBCs aggregates in the different circulatory districts and their characteristics expressed like "aggregation bond". Changes in CBV are the only possibility in clinical practice to improve the circulatory flow in the capillary district because it is not sure that changes in the arteriolar section can improve the capillary flow or rather open arterio-venous anastomosis. Moreover, in the systemic circulation the aggregate size allows us to point out the phenomenon of cell adhesion because the presence of

  18. Effective viscosity of non-gravitactic Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii microswimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussler, Matthias; Rafaï, Salima; Peyla, Philippe; Wagner, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Active microswimmers are known to affect the macroscopic viscosity of suspensions in a more complex manner than passive particles. For puller-like microswimmers an increase in the viscosity has been observed. It has been suggested that the persistence of the orientation of the microswimmers hinders the rotation that is normally caused by the vorticity. It was previously shown that some sorts of algae are bottom-heavy swimmers, i.e., their centre of mass is not located in the centre of the body. In this way, the algae affect the vorticity of the flow when they are perpendicularly oriented to the axis of gravity. This orientation of gravity to vorticity is given in a rheometer that is equipped with a cone-plate geometry. Here we present measurements of the viscosity both in a cone-plate and a Taylor-Couette cell. The two set-ups yielded the same increase in viscosity although the axis of gravitation in the Taylor-Couette cell is parallel to the direction of vorticity. In a complementary experiment we tested the orientation of the direction of swimming through microscopic observation of single Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and could not identify a preferred orientation, i.e., our specific strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are not bottom-heavy swimmers. We thus conclude that bottom heaviness is not a prerequisite for the increase of viscosity and that the effect of gravity on the rheology of our strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is negligible. This finding reopens the question of whether the origin of persistence in the orientation of cells is actually responsible for the increased viscosity of the suspension.

  19. Viscosity Relaxation in Molten HgZnTe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Kim, Yeong Woo; Baird, James K.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rotating cup measurements of the viscosity of the pseudo-binary melt, HgZnTe have shown that the isothermal liquid with zinc mole fraction 0.16 requires tens of hours of equilibration time before a steady viscous state can be achieved. Over this relaxation period, the viscosity at 790 C increases by a factor of two, while the viscosity at 810 C increases by 40%. Noting that the Group VI elements tend to polymerize when molten, we suggest that the viscosity of the melt is enhanced by the slow formation of Te atom chains. To explain the build-up of linear Te n-mers, we propose a scheme, which contains formation reactions with second order kinetics that increase the molecular weight, and decomposition reactions with first order kinetics that inactivate the chains. The resulting rate equations can be solved for the time dependence of each molecular weight fraction. Using these molecular weight fractions, we calculate the time dependence of the average molecular weight. Using the standard semi-empirical relation between polymer average molecular weight and viscosity, we then calculate the viscosity relaxation curve. By curve fitting, we find that the data imply that the rate constant for n-mer formation is much smaller than the rate constant for n-mer deactivation, suggesting that Te atoms only weakly polymerize in molten HgZnTe. The steady state toward which the melt relaxes occurs as the rate of formation of an n-mer becomes exactly balanced by the sum of the rate for its deactivation and the rate for its polymerization to form an (n+1)-mer.

  20. Experiments and modelling of active quasi-single helicity regime generation in a reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2009-07-01

    The interaction of a static resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) with a tearing mode (TM) is becoming a relevant topic in fusion plasma physics. RMPs can be generated by active coils and then used to affect the properties of TMs and of the corresponding magnetic islands. This paper shows how the feedback system of the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch (RFP) can produce a RMP that affects a rotating TM and stimulate the transition to the so-called quasi-single helicity (QSH) regime, a RFP plasma state characterized by a magnetic island surrounded by low magnetic chaos. The application of the RMP can increase the QSH probability up to 10% and enlarge the size of the corresponding island. Part of the experimental results are supported by a theoretical study that models the effect of the active coils on the magnetic island.

  1. Low viscosity in the aqueous domain of cell cytoplasm measured by picosecond polarization microfluorimetry

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Information about the rheological characteristics of the aqueous cytoplasm can be provided by analysis of the rotational motion of small polar molecules introduced into the cell. To determine fluid-phase cytoplasmic viscosity in intact cells, a polarization microscope was constructed for measurement of picosecond anisotropy decay of fluorescent probes in the cell cytoplasm. We found that the rotational correlation time (tc) of the probes, 2,7-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6- )carboxyfluorescein (BCECF), 6-carboxyfluorescein, and 8-hydroxypyrene- 1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS) provided a direct measure of fluid-phase cytoplasmic viscosity that was independent of probe binding. In quiescent Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, tc values were 20-40% longer than those in water, indicating that the fluid-phase cytoplasm is only 1.2- 1.4 times as viscous as water. The activation energy of fluid-phase cytoplasmic viscosity was 4 kcal/mol, which is similar to that of water. Fluid-phase cytoplasmic viscosity was altered by less than 10% upon addition of sucrose to decrease cell volume, cytochalasin B to disrupt cell cytoskeleton, and vasopressin to activate phospholipase C. Nucleoplasmic and peripheral cytoplasmic viscosities were not different. Our results establish a novel method to measure fluid-phase cytoplasmic viscosity, and indicate that fluid-phase cytoplasmic viscosity in fibroblasts is similar to that of free water. PMID:1993739

  2. Viscosity of deeply supercooled water and its coupling to molecular diffusion.

    PubMed

    Dehaoui, Amine; Issenmann, Bruno; Caupin, Frédéric

    2015-09-29

    The viscosity of a liquid measures its resistance to flow, with consequences for hydraulic machinery, locomotion of microorganisms, and flow of blood in vessels and sap in trees. Viscosity increases dramatically upon cooling, until dynamical arrest when a glassy state is reached. Water is a notoriously poor glassformer, and the supercooled liquid crystallizes easily, making the measurement of its viscosity a challenging task. Here we report viscosity of water supercooled close to the limit of homogeneous crystallization. Our values contradict earlier data. A single power law reproduces the 50-fold variation of viscosity up to the boiling point. Our results allow us to test the Stokes-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein-Debye relations that link viscosity, a macroscopic property, to the molecular translational and rotational diffusion, respectively. In molecular glassformers or liquid metals, the violation of the Stokes-Einstein relation signals the onset of spatially heterogeneous dynamics and collective motions. Although the viscosity of water strongly decouples from translational motion, a scaling with rotational motion remains, similar to canonical glassformers. PMID:26378128

  3. Viscosity of deeply supercooled water and its coupling to molecular diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Dehaoui, Amine; Issenmann, Bruno; Caupin, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The viscosity of a liquid measures its resistance to flow, with consequences for hydraulic machinery, locomotion of microorganisms, and flow of blood in vessels and sap in trees. Viscosity increases dramatically upon cooling, until dynamical arrest when a glassy state is reached. Water is a notoriously poor glassformer, and the supercooled liquid crystallizes easily, making the measurement of its viscosity a challenging task. Here we report viscosity of water supercooled close to the limit of homogeneous crystallization. Our values contradict earlier data. A single power law reproduces the 50-fold variation of viscosity up to the boiling point. Our results allow us to test the Stokes–Einstein and Stokes–Einstein–Debye relations that link viscosity, a macroscopic property, to the molecular translational and rotational diffusion, respectively. In molecular glassformers or liquid metals, the violation of the Stokes–Einstein relation signals the onset of spatially heterogeneous dynamics and collective motions. Although the viscosity of water strongly decouples from translational motion, a scaling with rotational motion remains, similar to canonical glassformers. PMID:26378128

  4. The effect of sweeteners on perceived viscosity.

    PubMed

    Theunissen, M J; Kroeze, J H

    1995-08-01

    Two different sweeteners, sucrose and aspartame, were matched in perceived sweetness intensity. These solutions were thickened with carboxymethylcellulose to six different viscosity levels. Sucrose and aspartame appeared to decrease perceived viscosity of the solutions at a specific sweetener concentration, at all viscosity levels. However, in a second similar experiment with three viscosity levels and seven sucrose concentrations no effect of sucrose concentration on perceived viscosity was found. Reasons for these conflicting results are discussed. No definite conclusions about the effect of sweeteners on perceived viscosity can as yet be drawn.

  5. Rotating Bondi Accretion Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myeong-Gu; Han, Du-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of accretion flow onto a black hole are determined by the physical condition of gas at large radius. When the gas has no angular momentum and is polytropic, the accretion flow becomes the classic Bondi flow. The mass accretion rate in such case is an eigenvalue and uniquely determined by the density and the temperature of the surrounding gas for a given black hole mass. When the gas has angular momentum above some critical value, the angular momentum of the gas should be removed by viscosity to reach the black hole horizon. We study, within the slim disk approximation, rotating polytropic accretion flow with alpha viscosity as an an extension of the Bondi flow. The characteristics of the accretion flow are now determined by the temperature, density, and angular momentum of the gas at the outer boundary. We explore the effects of the viscosity parameter and the outer boundary radius on the physical characteristic of the flow, especially on the mass accretion rate, and compare the result with previous works of Park (2009) and Narayan & Fabian (2011).

  6. Canards and curvature: nonsmooth approximation by pinching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desroches, M.; Jeffrey, M. R.

    2011-05-01

    In multiple time-scale (singularly perturbed) dynamical systems, canards are counterintuitive solutions that evolve along both attracting and repelling invariant manifolds. In two dimensions, canards result in periodic oscillations whose amplitude and period grow in a highly nonlinear way: they are slowly varying with respect to a control parameter, except for an exponentially small range of values where they grow extremely rapidly. This sudden growth, called a canard explosion, has been encountered in many applications ranging from chemistry to neuronal dynamics, aerospace engineering and ecology. Canards were initially studied using nonstandard analysis, and later the same results were proved by standard techniques such as matched asymptotics, invariant manifold theory and parameter blow-up. More recently, canard-like behaviour has been linked to surfaces of discontinuity in piecewise-smooth dynamical systems. This paper provides a new perspective on the canard phenomenon by showing that the nonstandard analysis of canard explosions can be recast into the framework of piecewise-smooth dynamical systems. An exponential coordinate scaling is applied to a singularly perturbed system of ordinary differential equations. The scaling acts as a lens that resolves dynamics across all time-scales. The changes of local curvature that are responsible for canard explosions are then analysed. Regions where different time-scales dominate are separated by hypersurfaces, and these are pinched together to obtain a piecewise-smooth system, in which curvature changes manifest as discontinuity-induced bifurcations. The method is used to classify canards in arbitrary dimensions, and to derive the parameter values over which canards form either small cycles (canards without head) or large cycles (canards with head).

  7. Resolving microstructures in Z pinches with intensity interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, J. P.; Kroupp, E.; Maron, Y.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.

    2014-03-15

    Nearly 60 years ago, Hanbury Brown and Twiss [R. Hanbury Brown and R. Q. Twiss, Nature 178, 1046 (1956)] succeeded in measuring the 30 nrad angular diameter of Sirius using a new type of interferometry that exploited the interference of photons independently emitted from different regions of the stellar disk. Its basis was the measurement of intensity correlations as a function of detector spacing, with no beam splitting or preservation of phase information needed. Applied to Z pinches, X pinches, or laser-produced plasmas, this method could potentially provide spatial resolution under one micron. A quantitative analysis based on the work of Purcell [E. M. Purcell, Nature 178, 1449 (1956)] reveals that obtaining adequate statistics from x-ray interferometry of a Z-pinch microstructure would require using the highest-current generators available. However, using visible light interferometry would reduce the needed photon count and could enable its use on sub-MA machines.

  8. MHD Simulation of the Inverse Pinch Plasma Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Esaulov, A; Bauer, B; Lindemuth, I; Makhin, V; Presura, R; Ryutov, D

    2004-07-01

    A wall confined plasma in an inverse pinch configuration holds potential as a plasma target for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) as well as the simple geometry to study wall-confined plasma. An experiment is planned to study the inverse pinch configuration using the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). The dynamics of the discharge formation have been analyzed using analytic models and numerical methods. Strong heating occurs by thermalization of directed energy when an outward moving current sheet (the inverse pinch effect) collides with the outer wall of the experimental chamber. Two dimensional MHD simulations show Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov -like modes of instability, as expected because of the shock acceleration during plasma formation phase. The instabilities are not disruptive, but give rise to a mild level of turbulence. The conclusion from this work is that an interesting experiment relevant to wall confinement for MTF could be done using existing equipment at UNR.

  9. Measuring membrane rigidity and viscosity: New methods, and new insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-03-01

    Lipid membranes are remarkable materials: flexible, two-dimensional fluids whose physical properties guide cellular function. Bending rigidity and viscosity are two of the key mechanical parameters that characterize membranes. Both, however, are challenging to measure. I describe improvements in experimental techniques to quantify the bending modulus and the two-dimensional viscosity of lipid membranes. First, I show that using selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM, also known as light sheet fluorescence microscopy) to image the thermal fluctuations of freely suspended giant lipid vesicles enables straightforward measurements of membrane rigidity, and also provides insights into changes in rigidity induced by cargo trafficking proteins. Second, I show that tracking both the rotational and translational diffusion of membrane-anchored tracer particles allows quantification of membrane viscosity, measurement of the effective radii of the tracers, and assessment of theoretical models of membrane hydrodynamics. Surprisingly, we find a wide distribution of effective tracer sizes, due presumably to a wide variety of couplings to the membrane. I also provide an example of protein-mediated changes in lipid viscosity.

  10. ELECTROSTATIC MODE ASSOCIATED WITH PINCH VELOCITY IN RFPS

    SciTech Connect

    DELZANNO, GIAN LUCA; FINN, JOHN M.; CHACON, LUIS

    2007-02-08

    The existence of a new electrostatic instability is shown for RFP (reversed field pinch) equilibria. This mode arises due to the non-zero equilibrium radial flow (pinch flow). In RFP simulations with no-stress boundary conditions on the tangential velocity at the radial wall, this electrostatic mode is unstable and dominates the nonlinear dynamics, even in the presence of the MHD modes typically responsible for the reversal of the axial magnetic field at edge. Nonlinearly, this mode leads to two beams moving azimuthally towards each other, which eventually collide. The electrostatic mode can be controlled by using Dirichlet (no-slip) boundary conditions on the azimuthal velocity at the radial wall.

  11. Reversed field pinch current drive with oscillating helical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Farengo, Ricardo; Clemente, Roberto Antonio

    2006-04-15

    The use of oscillating helical magnetic fields to produce and sustain the toroidal and poloidal currents in a reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated. A simple physical model that assumes fixed ions, massless electrons, and uniform density and resistivity is employed. Thermal effects are neglected in Ohm's law and helical coordinates are introduced to reduce the number of coupled nonlinear equations that must be advanced in time. The results show that it is possible to produce RFP-like magnetic field profiles with pinch parameters close to the experimental values. The efficiencies obtained for moderate resistivity, and the observed scaling, indicate that this could be a very attractive method for high temperature plasmas.

  12. Polycrystalline diamond based detector for Z-pinch plasma diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Linyue; Zhao Jizhen; Chen Liang; Ouyang Xiaoping; Wang Lan

    2010-08-15

    A detector setup based on polycrystalline chemical-vapor-deposition diamond film is developed with great characteristics: low dark current (lower than 60 pA within 3 V/{mu}m), fast pulsed response time (rise time: 2-3 ns), flat spectral response (3-5 keV), easy acquisition, low cost, and relative large sensitive area. The characterizing data on Qiangguang-I accelerator show that this detector can satisfy the practical requirements in Z-pinch plasma diagnosis very well, which offers a promising prototype for the x-ray detection in Z-pinch diagnosis.

  13. {alpha} Heating in a Stagnated Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbe, Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2009-01-21

    A computational investigation of a scheme for magneto-inertial confinement fusion in a Z-pinch is carried out. In the scheme implosion of a deuterium-tritium fuel mass is preceded by formation of a hotspot containing warm, dense plasma on axis. The presence of the hotspot increases energy yield. Compression of the hotspot by the main fuel mass initiates thermonuclear burn. There is significant heating of the plasma by thermonuclear {alpha} particles which are confined by the strong magnetic field of the Z-pinch.

  14. Explosive instabilities of reaction-diffusion equations including pinch effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsson, H. Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Ionises, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Universite Paris VII, Tour centrale, 3 etage, 2 place Jussieu, Paris CEDEX 05 )

    1993-01-01

    Particular solutions of reaction-diffusion equations for temperature are obtained for explosively unstable situations. As a result of the interplay between inertial, diffusion, pinch, and source processes, certain bell-shaped'' distributions may grow explosively in time while preserving the shape of the spatial distribution. The effect of the pinch, which requires a density inhomogeneity, is found to diminish the effect of diffusion, or inversely to support the inertial and source processes in creating the explosion. The results may be described in terms of elliptic integrals or, more simply, by means of expansions in the spatial coordinate. An application is the temperature evolution of a burning fusion plasma.

  15. Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in fast Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Aaron R.

    2009-03-15

    A simplified analytic model is presented to describe the implosion of a plasma column by an azimuthal magnetic field of sufficient magnitude to drive a strong shock wave into the plasma. This model is employed together with buoyancy-drag-based models of nonlinear single-mode and turbulent multimode Rayleigh-Taylor growth to investigate the mixing process in such fast Z pinches. These models give predictions that characterize limitations the instability can impose on the implosion in terms of maximum convergence ratios attainable for an axially coherent pinch. Both the implosion and instability models are validated with results from high-resolution numerical simulations.

  16. Rotating Vesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronomers combined 146 exposures taken by NASA's Hubble SpaceTelescope to make this 73-frame movie of the asteroid Vesta's rotation.Vesta completes a rotation every 5.34 hours.› Asteroid and...

  17. Rotational moulding.

    PubMed

    Crawford, R J; Kearns, M P

    2003-10-01

    Rotational moulding promises designers attractive economics and a low-pressure process. The benefits of rotational moulding are compared here with other manufacturing methods such as injection and blow moulding. PMID:14603714

  18. Viscosity Index Improvers and Thickeners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, R. L.; Kinker, B. G.

    The viscosity index of an oil or an oil formulation is an important physical parameter. Viscosity index improvers, VIIs, are comprised of five main classes of polymers: polymethylmethacrylates (PMAs), olefin copolymers (OCPs), hydrogenated poly(styrene-co-butadiene or isoprene) (HSD/SIP/HRIs), esterified polystyrene-co-maleic anhydride (SPEs) and a combination of PMA/OCP systems. The chemistry, manufacture, dispersancy and utility of each class are described. The comparative functions, properties, thickening ability, dispersancy and degradation of VIIs are discussed. Permanent and temporary shear thinning of VII-thickened formulations are described and compared. The end-use performance and choice of VI improvers is discussed in terms of low- and high-temperature viscosities, journal bearing oil film thickness, fuel economy, oil consumption, high-temperature pumping efficiency and deposit control. Discussion of future developments concludes that VI improvers will evolve to meet new challenges of increased thermal-oxidative degradation from increased engine operating temperatures, different base stocks of either synthetic base oils or vegetable oil-based, together with alcohol- or vegetable oil-based fuels. VI improvers must also evolve to deal with higher levels of fuel dilution and new types of sludge and also enhanced low-temperature requirements.

  19. Density and viscosity of lipids under pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a lack of data for the viscosity of lipids under pressure. The current report is a part of the effort to fill this gap. The viscosity, density, and elastohydrodynamic film thicknesses of vegetable oil (HOSuO) were investigated. Pressure–viscosity coefficients (PVC) of HOSuO at different tem...

  20. General relativistic hydrodynamics with viscosity: Contraction, catastrophic collapse, and disk formation in hypermassive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duez, Matthew D.; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Stephens, Branson C.

    2004-05-01

    Viscosity and magnetic fields drive differentially rotating stars toward uniform rotation, and this process has important consequences in many astrophysical contexts. For example, merging binary neutron stars can form a “hypermassive” remnant, i.e., a differentially rotating star with a mass greater than would be possible for a uniformly rotating star. The removal of the centrifugal support provided by differential rotation can lead to delayed collapse of the remnant to a black hole, accompanied by a delayed burst of gravitational radiation. Both magnetic fields and viscosity alter the structure of differentially rotating stars on secular time scales, and tracking this evolution presents a strenuous challenge to numerical hydrodynamic codes. Here, we present the first evolutions of rapidly rotating stars with shear viscosity in full general relativity. We self-consistently include viscosity in our relativistic hydrodynamic code by solving the fully relativistic Navier-Stokes equations. We perform these calculations both in axisymmetry and in full 3+1 dimensions. In axisymmetry, the resulting reduction in computational costs allows us to follow secular evolution with high resolution over dozens of rotation periods (thousands of M). We find that viscosity operating in a hypermassive star generically leads to the formation of a compact, uniformly rotating core surrounded by a low-density disk. These uniformly rotating cores are often unstable to gravitational collapse. We follow the collapse in such cases and determine the mass and the spin of the final black hole and ambient disk. However, viscous braking of differential rotation in hypermassive neutron stars does not always lead to catastrophic collapse, especially when viscous heating is substantial. The stabilizing influences of viscous heating, which generates enhanced thermal pressure, and centrifugal support prevent collapse in some cases, at least until the star cools. In all cases studied, the rest mass

  1. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-10-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters.

  2. PINCH proteins regulate cardiac contractility by modulating integrin-linked kinase-protein kinase B signaling.

    PubMed

    Meder, Benjamin; Huttner, Inken G; Sedaghat-Hamedani, Farbod; Just, Steffen; Dahme, Tillman; Frese, Karen S; Vogel, Britta; Köhler, Doreen; Kloos, Wanda; Rudloff, Jessica; Marquart, Sabine; Katus, Hugo A; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is an essential component of the cardiac mechanical stretch sensor and is bound in a protein complex with parvin and PINCH proteins, the so-called ILK-PINCH-parvin (IPP) complex. We have recently shown that inactivation of ILK or β-parvin activity leads to heart failure in zebrafish via reduced protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) activation. Here, we show that PINCH proteins localize at sarcomeric Z disks and costameres in the zebrafish heart and skeletal muscle. To investigate the in vivo role of PINCH proteins for IPP complex stability and PKB signaling within the vertebrate heart, we inactivated PINCH1 and PINCH2 in zebrafish. Inactivation of either PINCH isoform independently leads to instability of ILK, loss of stretch-responsive anf and vegf expression, and progressive heart failure. The predominant cause of heart failure in PINCH morphants seems to be loss of PKB activity, since PKB phosphorylation at serine 473 is significantly reduced in PINCH-deficient hearts and overexpression of constitutively active PKB reconstitutes cardiac function in PINCH morphants. These findings highlight the essential function of PINCH proteins in controlling cardiac contractility by granting IPP/PKB-mediated signaling.

  3. On the effective viscosity of nanosuspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.; Egorov, V. V.

    2009-08-01

    The effective viscosity of nanosuspensions is simulated using the molecular dynamics method. It is found that viscosity is controlled not only by the volume concentration of nanoparticles, by also by their mass and diameter. The viscosity of even strongly rarefied nanosuspensions (with a low concentration of nanoparticles) cannot be described by the Einstein relation. This means that the mechanism responsible for the increase in the viscosity of the medium is not of hydrodynamic origin. It is shown that the formation of viscosity of nanosuspensions is associated to a considerable extent with nonequilibrium microfluctuations of density and velocity of the carrier medium, which are induced by the motion of nanoparticles.

  4. 9th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Bott-Suzuki, Simon

    2015-08-31

    DOE OFES supported the 9th International Conference on Z-Pinches (DZP 2014) held in Napa, CA in August 2014. Funds were used to support travel for several US students, and to disseminate information through the publication of a proceedings volume.

  5. Pinch technique and the Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binosi, Daniele; Papavassiliou, Joannis

    2002-07-01

    In this paper we take the first step towards a nondiagrammatic formulation of the pinch technique. In particular we proceed into a systematic identification of the parts of the one-loop and two-loop Feynman diagrams that are exchanged during the pinching process in terms of unphysical ghost Green's functions; the latter appear in the standard Slavnov-Taylor identity satisfied by the tree-level and one-loop three-gluon vertex. This identification allows for the consistent generalization of the intrinsic pinch technique to two loops, through the collective treatment of entire sets of diagrams, instead of the laborious algebraic manipulation of individual graphs, and sets up the stage for the generalization of the method to all orders. We show that the task of comparing the effective Green's functions obtained by the pinch technique with those computed in the background field method Feynman gauge is significantly facilitated when employing the powerful quantization framework of Batalin and Vilkovisky. This formalism allows for the derivation of a set of useful nonlinear identities, which express the background field method Green's functions in terms of the conventional (quantum) ones and auxiliary Green's functions involving the background source and the gluonic antifield; these latter Green's functions are subsequently related by means of a Schwinger-Dyson type of equation to the ghost Green's functions appearing in the aforementioned Slavnov-Taylor identity.

  6. Comment on Turbulent Equipartition Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T. S.; Diamond, P. H.; Gurcan, O. D.; Rewoldt, G.

    2009-03-12

    This response demonstrates that the comment by Peeters et al. contains an incorrect and misleading interpretation of our paper [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 055902 (2008)] regarding the density gradient dependence of momentum pinch and the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory.

  7. X-rays from a microsecond X-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Appartaim, R. K.

    2013-08-28

    The characteristics of x-rays emitted by X-pinches driven by discharging a current of ∼320 kA with a quarter period of 1 μs in crossed 25 μm wires have been investigated. The x-ray emissions are studied using filtered silicon photodiodes, diamond radiation detectors, and pinhole cameras. The results show that predominantly x-rays from the microsecond X-pinch tend to be emitted in two distinct sets of bursts. The first is predominantly “soft,” i.e., with photon energy hν < 5 keV, followed by a second set of bursts beginning up to 100 ns following the initial bursts, and usually consisting of higher photon energies. Our results show, however, that the x-ray emissions do not contain a significant component with hν > 10 keV as might be expected from electron beam activity within the plasma or from the X-pinch diode. High-resolution images obtained with the observed x-rays suggest a well-defined small source of soft x-rays that demonstrates the potential of the microsecond X-pinch.

  8. X-rays from a microsecond X-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appartaim, R. K.

    2013-08-01

    The characteristics of x-rays emitted by X-pinches driven by discharging a current of ˜320 kA with a quarter period of 1 μs in crossed 25 μm wires have been investigated. The x-ray emissions are studied using filtered silicon photodiodes, diamond radiation detectors, and pinhole cameras. The results show that predominantly x-rays from the microsecond X-pinch tend to be emitted in two distinct sets of bursts. The first is predominantly "soft," i.e., with photon energy hν < 5 keV, followed by a second set of bursts beginning up to 100 ns following the initial bursts, and usually consisting of higher photon energies. Our results show, however, that the x-ray emissions do not contain a significant component with hν > 10 keV as might be expected from electron beam activity within the plasma or from the X-pinch diode. High-resolution images obtained with the observed x-rays suggest a well-defined small source of soft x-rays that demonstrates the potential of the microsecond X-pinch.

  9. MHD simulation studies of z-pinch shear flow stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschiv, I.; Bauer, B. S.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Makhin, V.; Siemon, R. E.

    2003-10-01

    The development of the m=0 instability in a z-pinch in the presence of sheared plasma flows is investigated with the aid of a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation code (MHRDR). The linear growth rates are compared to the results obtained by solving the ideal MHD linearized equations [1] and to the results obtained using a 3D hybrid simulation code [2]. The instability development is followed into the nonlinear regime where its growth and saturation are examined. [1] V.I. Sotnikov, I. Paraschiv, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, J.-N. Leboeuf, and J.M. Dawson, "Linear analysis of sheared flow stabilization of global magnetohydrodynamic instabilities based on the Hall fluid mode", Phys. Plasmas 9, 913 (2002). [2] V.I. Sotnikov, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, P. Hellinger, P. Travnicek, V. Fiala, J.-N. Leboeuf, "Hybrid Simulations of Current-Carrying Instabilities in Z-pinch Plasmas with Sheared Axial Flow", AIP Conference Proceedings, Volume 651, Dense Z-Pinches: 5th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches, edited by J. Davis et al., page 396, June 2002.

  10. Z-pinch experiments on Saturn at 30 TW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielman, R. B.; Dukart, R. J.; Hanson, D. L.; Hammel, B. A.; Hsing, W. W.; Matzen, M. K.; Porter, J. L.

    We have recently completed the first gas-puff z-pinch on Saturn (32 TW, 1.4 MJ, 1.9 MV, 40-ns FWHM, and 0.11 ohm). These experiments used the most powerful driver to date for fast z-pinch experiments. Saturn, a 36 module accelerator, uses a double post-hole vacuum convolute to deliver the total machine current to the load. The 10-nH Saturn z-pinch diode is capable of delivering a peak current of 10.5 MA. We diagnosed the current using segmented Rogowski coils at the insulator, resistive shunts in the vacuum transmission lines, and B-dot loops and piezoelectric pressure gauges near the load. On most shots electrical losses in the vacuum convolute were minimal with nearly complete current delivery to the z-pinch load. We have conducted experiments with deuterium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon gas puffs. A maximum total radiation yield of 505 + or - 25 kJ was obtained with xenon. The peak keV X-ray yields were 100 + or - 5 kJ for neon K-shell radiation, 30 + or - 4 kJ for krypton L-shell radiation, and 39 + or - 4 kJ for argon K-shell radiation.

  11. Z-pinch experiments on Saturn at 30 TW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielman, R. B.; Dukart, R. J.; Hanson, D. L.; Hammel, B. A.; Hsing, W. W.; Matzen, M. K.; Porter, J. L.

    1989-12-01

    We have recently completed the first gas-puff Z-pinch experiments on Saturn (32 TW, 1.4 MJ, 1.9 MV, 40-ns FWHM, and 0.11 Ω). These experiments used the most powerful driver to date for fast Z-pinch experiments. Saturn, a 36 module accelerator, uses a double post-hole vacuum convolute to deliver the total machine current to the load. The 10-nH Saturn Z-pinch diode is capable of delivering a peak current of 10.5 MA. We diagnosed the current using segmented Rogowski coils at the insulator, resistive shunts in the vacuum transmission lines, and B-dot loops and piezoelectric pressure gauges near the load. On most shots electrical losses in the vacuum convolute were minimal with nearly complete current delivery to the Z-pinch load. We have conducted experiments with deuterium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon gas puffs. A maximum total radiation yield of 505+/-25 kJ was obtained with xenon. The peak keV x-ray yields were 100+/-5 kJ for neon L-shell radiation, 30+/-4 kJ for krypton l-shell radiation, and 39+/-4 kJ for argon K-shell radiation.

  12. Viscosities of implantable biomaterials in vocal fold augmentation surgery.

    PubMed

    Chan, R W; Titze, I R

    1998-05-01

    Vocal fold vibration depends critically on the viscoelasticity of vocal fold tissues. For instance, phonation threshold pressure, a measure of the "ease" of phonation, has been shown to be directly related to the viscosity of the vibrating mucosa. Various implantable biomaterials have been used in vocal fold augmentation surgery, with implantation sites sometimes close to or inside the mucosa. Yet their viscosities or other mechanical properties are seldom known. This study attempts to provide data on viscosities of commonly used phonosurgical biomaterials. Using a parallel-plate rotational rheometer, oscillatory shear experiments were performed on implantable polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon or Polytef; Mentor Inc., Hingham, MA), collagen (Zyderm; Collagen Corp., Palo Alto, CA), glutaraldehyde crosslinked (GAX) collagen (Phonagel or Zyplast; Collagen Corp.), absorbable gelatin (Gelfoam; Upjohn Co., Kalamazoo, MI), and human abdominal subcutaneous fat. Samples of human vocal fold mucosal tissues were also tested. Under sinusoidal oscillatory shear at 10 Hz and at 37 degrees C, the dynamic viscosity was 116 Pascal-seconds (Pa-s) for polytetrafluoroethylene, 21 Pa-s for gelatin, 8-13 Pa-s for the two types of collagen, 3 Pa-s for fat, and 1 to 3 Pa-s for vocal fold mucosa. Results extrapolated to 100 Hz also show similar differences among the biomaterials, but all values are an order of magnitude lower because of the typical inverse frequency relation (shear thinning effect) for polymeric and biologic materials. The data suggest that the use of fat for vocal fold augmentation may be more conducive to the "ease" of phonation because of its relatively low viscosity, which is closest to physiologic levels. This implication is probably the most relevant in predicting initial outcome of the postoperative voice before there is any significant assimilation (e.g., resorption and fibrosis) of the implanted biomaterial. PMID:9591554

  13. Low Viscosity Zone and Mantle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Hansen, U.

    2005-12-01

    We use a three-dimensional mantle convection model to explore the influence of rheological properties on variations in viscosity and mantle dynamics. In particular the interaction of a temperature-, pressure- and stress-dependent viscosity has been studied. In temperature- and stress-dependent viscosity convection, a stagnant lid mode of convection arises if the viscosity is strongly dominated by temperature. This is linked to a strong viscosity drop over the top boundary layer with little further viscosity variations with depth. An almost constant viscosity-depth profile with only a maximum at mid-depth is obtained, if the system is strongly influenced by the stress dependence. This is coupled to a mobilised surface which takes part in the convective process. A low viscosity zone (LVZ) at shallow depths and a viscosity peak at mid-depth have been obtained for the balanced combination of the temperature and stress dependence of the viscosity. The appearance of both zones correlates with the appearance of plate-like motion. Small rigid surface pieces sink into the interior. But subduction is faster than the new creation of plates leading only to an occassional occurrence of the features. Additional pressure dependence of the viscosity helps to slow down subduction speed, so that plates and the LVZ exist over long times. Further the long-wavelength flow resulting in convection with depth-dependent properties leads to extended plates and a more global LVZ.

  14. Superparamagnetic nanoparticle-based viscosity test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kai; Liu, Jinming; Wang, Yi; Ye, Clark; Feng, Yinglong; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2015-08-01

    Hyperviscosity syndrome is triggered by high blood viscosity in the human body. This syndrome can result in retinopathy, vertigo, coma, and other unanticipated complications. Serum viscosity is one of the important factors affecting whole blood viscosity, which is regarded as an indicator of general health. In this letter, we propose and demonstrate a Brownian relaxation-based mixing frequency method to test human serum viscosity. This method uses excitatory and detection coils and Brownian relaxation-dominated superparamagnetic nanoparticles, which are sensitive to variables of the liquid environment such as viscosity and temperature. We collect the harmonic signals produced by magnetic nanoparticles and estimate the viscosity of unknown solutions by comparison to the calibration curves. An in vitro human serum viscosity test is performed in less than 1.5 min.

  15. Rotational testing.

    PubMed

    Furman, J M

    2016-01-01

    The natural stimulus for the semicircular canals is rotation of the head, which also might stimulate the otolith organs. Vestibular stimulation usually induces eye movements via the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). The orientation of the subject with respect to the axis of rotation and the orientation of the axis of rotation with respect to gravity together determine which labyrinthine receptors are stimulated for particular motion trajectories. Rotational testing usually includes the measurement of eye movements via a video system but might use a subject's perception of motion. The most common types of rotational testing are whole-body computer-controlled sinusoidal or trapezoidal stimuli during earth-vertical axis rotation (EVAR), which stimulates primarily the horizontal semicircular canals bilaterally. Recently, manual impulsive rotations, known as head impulse testing (HIT), have been developed to assess individual horizontal semicircular canals. Most types of rotational stimuli are not used routinely in the clinical setting but may be used in selected research environments. This chapter will discuss clinically relevant rotational stimuli and several types of rotational testing that are used primarily in research settings. PMID:27638070

  16. Theory and Simulation of A Novel Viscosity Measurement Method for High Temperature Semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rose; Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The properties of molten semiconductors are good indicators for material structure transformation and hysteresis under temperature variations. Viscosity, as one of the most important properties, is difficult to measure because of high temperature, high pressure, and vapor toxicity of melts. Recently, a novel method was developed by applying a rotating magnetic field to the melt sealed in a suspended quartz ampoule, and measuring the transient torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall. The method was designed to measure viscosity in short time period, which is essential for evaluating temperature hysteresis. This paper compares the theoretical prediction of melt flow and ampoule oscillation with the experimental data. A theoretical model was established and the coupled fluid flow and ampoule torsional vibration equations were solved numerically. The simulation results showed a good agreement with experimental data. The results also showed that both electrical conductivity and viscosity could be calculated by fitting the theoretical results to the experimental data. The transient velocity of the melt caused by the rotating magnetic field was found reach equilibrium in about half a minute, and the viscosity of melt could be calculated from the altitude of oscillation. This would allow the measurement of viscosity in a minute or so, in contrast to the existing oscillation cup method, which requires about an hour for one measurement.

  17. Critical Viscosity of Xenon team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure (at left) that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister (right) holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

  18. Critical Viscosity of Xenon team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure (at left) that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister (right) holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (left) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

  19. Formation of a pinched electron beam and an intense x-ray source in radial foil rod-pinch diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Low-impedance rod-pinch diode experiments were performed on the MIG generator at Institute of High Current Electronics using an aluminum foil placed between concentric electrodes of a rod-pinch diode. The J × B force accelerates the foil plasma in the axial and radial directions. After the foil plasma is pushed beyond the tip of the rod, a vacuum gap and a pinched electron beam form. The anode and cathode plasmas expansion and the following plasmas sweeping up by the J × B force can result in repetitive gap formations and closures, which are evident in the several successive intense x-ray pulses. A 0.7-mm-size point-like x-ray source was realized using a 1-mm-diameter tungsten rod, tapered to a point over the last 10 mm. The results of experiments show that the foil-shorted rod-pinch diode configuration has the potential to form low-impedance diodes, to shorten x-ray pulse duration and to realize submillimeter spot-size x-ray sources.

  20. Research on pinching characteristics of electron beams emitted from different cathode surfaces of a rod-pinch diode

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yi; Qiu Aici; Zhang Zhong; Zhang Pengfei; Wang Zhiguo; Yang Hailiang

    2010-07-15

    The particle-in-cell code UNIPIC is used to simulate the working process of a rod-pinch diode and investigate the pinching characteristics of electron beams emitted from different cathode surfaces. The simulation results indicate that the electron beam emitted from the upstream surface pinches better than from other surfaces when all the three surfaces emit electrons. The charge-density deposition on the anode surface peaks at the rod tip while the deposited charge density is approximately uniform over the first 15 mm of the rod before rapidly increasing over the last 3 mm, indicating a large axial extent of electron deposition. For the case of single-surface emission, the pinching quality of the electron beam emitted from the downstream surface is better than those from other surfaces. The charge-density deposition peaks at the rod tip and decreases rapidly off the tip. Based on the relationship of Larmor radius, beam's self-magnetic field, and the spatial current distribution, the above simulation results are analyzed theoretically. The experiments are performed on the inductive voltage adder to examine the simulations. By comparing the axial distribution of the radiation on the anode rod measured with the pinhole camera and the on-axis forward x-ray dose measured with the LiF thermoluminescent detectors, the simulation results are verified. The electron emission suppression method and the impedance change for each case are investigated or discussed in this paper.

  1. Research on pinching characteristics of electron beams emitted from different cathode surfaces of a rod-pinch diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Qiu, Aici; Zhang, Zhong; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Zhiguo; Yang, Hailiang

    2010-07-01

    The particle-in-cell code UNIPIC is used to simulate the working process of a rod-pinch diode and investigate the pinching characteristics of electron beams emitted from different cathode surfaces. The simulation results indicate that the electron beam emitted from the upstream surface pinches better than from other surfaces when all the three surfaces emit electrons. The charge-density deposition on the anode surface peaks at the rod tip while the deposited charge density is approximately uniform over the first 15 mm of the rod before rapidly increasing over the last 3 mm, indicating a large axial extent of electron deposition. For the case of single-surface emission, the pinching quality of the electron beam emitted from the downstream surface is better than those from other surfaces. The charge-density deposition peaks at the rod tip and decreases rapidly off the tip. Based on the relationship of Larmor radius, beam's self-magnetic field, and the spatial current distribution, the above simulation results are analyzed theoretically. The experiments are performed on the inductive voltage adder to examine the simulations. By comparing the axial distribution of the radiation on the anode rod measured with the pinhole camera and the on-axis forward x-ray dose measured with the LiF thermoluminescent detectors, the simulation results are verified. The electron emission suppression method and the impedance change for each case are investigated or discussed in this paper.

  2. Elements of Neoclassical Theory and Plasma Rotation in a Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyakov, A.

    2015-12-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Quasineutrality condition * Diffusion in fully ionized magnetized plasma and automatic ambipolarity * Toroidal geometry and neoclassical diffusion * Diffusion and ambipolarity in toroidal plasmas * Ambipolarity and equilibrium poloidal rotation * Ambipolarity paradox and damping of poloidal rotation * Neoclassical plasma inertia * Oscillatory modes of poloidal plasma rotation * Dynamics of the toroidal momentum * Momentum diffusion in strongly collisional, short mean free path regime * Diffusion of toroidal momentum in the weak collision (banana) regime * Toroidal momentum diffusion and momentum damping from drift-kinetic theory and fluid moment equations * Comments on non-axisymmetric effects * Summary * Acknowledgments * Appendix: Trapped (banana) particles and collisionality regimes in a tokamak * Appendix: Hierarchy of moment equations * Appendix: Plasma viscosity tensor in the magnetic field: parallel viscosity, gyroviscosity, and perpendicular viscosity * Appendix: Closure relations for the flux surface averaged parallel viscosity in neoclassical (banana and plateau) regimes * References

  3. Viscosity profile and Quasi Periodic Oscillation frequency of few transient black hole candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Santanu; Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Jana, Arghajit; Chatterjee, Debjit; Molla, Aslam Ali

    2016-07-01

    Matters enter into the potential well formed by the compact objects due to the transport of angular momentum by viscosity. We compute the amount of viscosity during the outburst time of the transient sources. In the progressive days as the viscosity increases inner edge of the Keplerian disc moves closer to the black holes. Thus the size of the Compton cloud reduces and the frequency of the Quasi Periodic Oscillations increases. We also compute the Compton cooling day by day, which is responsible for the movement of the shock both in rising and declining phases of the outburst. Our viscosity value rises/decays monotonically during the rising/declining phases of the outburst, well within the range proposed by magneto-rotational instability. For that we solve the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions and derive the condition of shock formation in presence of Compton cooling.

  4. A formula for the Shakura-Sunyaev turbulent viscosity parameter. [for modeling of accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Goldman, I.; Hubickyj, O.

    1984-01-01

    A formula for the Shakura-Suniaev alpha parameter is proposed in terms of the growth rate of the unstable modes of the physical mechanisms that generates turbulence. Turbulent convection is discussed as a particular example. The effect of rotation on turbulent viscosity is considered, and some remarks are made on convective fluxes, disk stability, and other types of instabilities.

  5. Effective shear viscosity and dynamics of suspensions of micro-swimmers from small to moderate concentrations.

    SciTech Connect

    Gyrya, V.; Lipnikov, K.; Aranson, I.; Berlyand, L.

    2011-05-01

    Recently, there has been a number of experimental studies convincingly demonstrating that a suspension of self-propelled bacteria (microswimmers in general) may have an effective viscosity significantly smaller than the viscosity of the ambient fluid. This is in sharp contrast with suspensions of hard passive inclusions, whose presence always increases the viscosity. Here we present a 2D model for a suspension of microswimmers in a fluid and analyze it analytically in the dilute regime (no swimmer-swimmer interactions) and numerically using a Mimetic Finite Difference discretization. Our analysis shows that in the dilute regime (in the absence of rotational diffusion) the effective shear viscosity is not affected by self-propulsion. But at the moderate concentrations (due to swimmer-swimmer interactions) the effective viscosity decreases linearly as a function of the propulsion strength of the swimmers. These findings prove that (i) a physically observable decrease of viscosity for a suspension of self-propelled microswimmers can be explained purely by hydrodynamic interactions and (ii) self-propulsion and interaction of swimmers are both essential to the reduction of the effective shear viscosity. We also performed a number of numerical experiments analyzing the dynamics of swimmers resulting from pairwise interactions. The numerical results agree with the physically observed phenomena (e.g., attraction of swimmer to swimmer and swimmer to the wall). This is viewed as an additional validation of the model and the numerical scheme.

  6. The linear model and experimentally observed resonant field amplification in tokamaks and reversed field pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2011-01-15

    A review is given of the experimentally observed effects related to the resonant field amplification (RFA) and the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) instability in tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFPs). This includes the feedback rotation of RWM in RFX-mod RFP, dependence of the RWM growth rate on the plasma-wall separation observed in JT-60U, appearance of the slowly growing RWM precursors in JT-60U and similar phenomena in other devices. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions based on the model comprising the Maxwell equations, Ohm's law for the conducting wall, the boundary conditions and assumption of linear plasma response to the external magnetic perturbations. The model describes the plasma reaction to the error field as essentially depending on two factors: the plasma proximity to the RWM stability threshold and the natural rotation frequency of the plasma mode. The linear response means that these characteristics are determined by the plasma equilibrium parameters only. It is shown that the mentioned effects in different devices under different conditions can be described on a common basis with only assumption that the plasma behaves as a linear system. To extend the range of the model validation, some predictions are derived with proposals for experimental studies of the RFA dynamics.

  7. Advanced feedback control methods in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Paccagnella, R.

    2006-07-01

    Previous experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch device have shown the possibility of suppression of multiple resistive wall modes (RWM). A feedback system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R having 100% coverage of the toroidal surface by the active coil array. Predictions based on theory and the previous experimental results show that the number of active coils should be sufficient for independent stabilization of all unstable RWMs in the EXTRAP T2R. Experiments using different feedback schemes are performed, comparing the intelligent shell, the fake rotating shell, and the mode control with complex feedback gains. Stabilization of all unstable RWMs throughout the discharge duration of td≈10τw is seen using the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Mode rotation and the control of selected Fourier harmonics is obtained simultaneously using the mode control scheme with complex gains. Different sensor signals are studied. A feedback system with toroidal magnetic field sensors could have an advantage of lower feedback gain needed for the RWM suppression compared to the system with radial magnetic field sensors. In this study, RWM suppression is demonstrated, using also the toroidal field component as a sensor signal in the feedback system.

  8. Acoustic streaming flows and sample rotation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Eugene

    1998-11-01

    Levitated drops in a gas can be driven into rotation by altering their surrounding convective environment. When these drops are placed in an acoustic resonant chamber, the symmetry characteristics of the steady streaming flows in the vicinity of the drops determine the rotational motion of the freely suspended fluid particles. Using ultrasonic standing waves around 22 kHz and millimeter-size electrostatically levitated drops, we have investigated the correlation between the convective flow characteristics and their rotational behavior. The results show that accurate control of the drop rotation axis and rate can be obtained by carefully modifying the symmetry characteristics of the chamber, and that the dominant mechanism for rotation drive is the drag exerted by the air flow over the drop surface. In addition, we found that the rotational acceleration depends on the drop viscosity, suggesting that this torque is initially strongly influenced by differential flows within the drop itself. [Work sponsored by NASA].

  9. Transient Torque Method: A Fast and Nonintrusive Technique to Simultaneously Determine Viscosity and Electrical Conductivity of Semiconducting and Metallic Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.; Scripa, R. N.; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Zhu, S.

    2004-01-01

    A transient torque method was developed to rapidly and simultaneously determine the viscosity and electrical conductivity of liquid metals and molten semiconductors. The experimental setup of the transient torque method is similar to that of the oscillation cup method. The melt sample is sealed inside a fused silica ampoule, and the ampoule is suspended by a long quartz fiber to form a torsional oscillation system. A rotating magnetic field is used to induce a rotating flow in the conductive melt, which causes the ampoule to rotate around its vertical axis. A sensitive angular detector is used to measure the deflection angle of the ampoule. Based on the transient behavior of the deflection angle as the rotating magnetic field is applied, the electrical conductivity and viscosity of the melt can be obtained simultaneously by numerically fitting the data to a set of governing equations. The transient torque viscometer was applied successfully to measure the viscosity and electrical conductivity of high purity mercury at 53.4 C. The results were in excellent agreement with published data. The method is nonintrusive; capable of rapid measurement of the viscosity of toxic, high vapor pressure melts at elevated temperatures. In addition, the transient torque viscometer can also be operated as an oscillation cup viscometer to measure just the viscosity of the melt or as a rotating magnetic field method to determine the electrical conductivity of a melt or a solid if desired.

  10. Viscosity dictates metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber

    PubMed Central

    Borić, Maja; Danevčič, Tjaša; Stopar, David

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about metabolic activity of bacteria, when viscosity of their environment changes. In this work, bacterial metabolic activity in media with viscosity ranging from 0.8 to 29.4 mPas was studied. Viscosities up to 2.4 mPas did not affect metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber. On the other hand, at 29.4 mPas respiration rate and total dehydrogenase activity increased 8 and 4-fold, respectively. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) increased up to 13-fold at higher viscosities. However, intensified metabolic activity did not result in faster growth rate. Increased viscosity delayed the onset as well as the duration of biosynthesis of prodigiosin. As an adaptation to viscous environment V. ruber increased metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and reduced synthesis of a secondary metabolite. In addition, V. ruber was able to modify the viscosity of its environment. PMID:22826705

  11. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  12. Holographic viscosity of fundamental matter.

    PubMed

    Mateos, David; Myers, Robert C; Thomson, Rowan M

    2007-03-01

    A holographic dual of a finite-temperature SU(Nc) gauge theory with a small number of flavors Nfviscosity to entropy ratio in these theories saturates the conjectured universal bound eta/s> or =1/4pi. Given the known results for the entropy density, the contribution of the fundamental matter eta fund is therefore enhanced at strong 't Hooft coupling lambda; for example, eta fund approximately lambda NcNfT3 in four dimensions. Other transport coefficients are analogously enhanced. These results hold with or without a baryon number chemical potential. PMID:17358523

  13. Viscosity modification of high-oleic sunflower oil with polymeric additives for the design of new biolubricant formulations.

    PubMed

    Quinchia, L A; Delgado, M A; Valencia, C; Franco, J M; Gallegos, C

    2009-03-15

    Although most common lubricants contain mineral or synthetic oils as basestocks, new environmental regulations are demanding environmentally friendly lubricants. In this sense, vegetable oils represent promising alternatives to mineral-based lubricants because of their high biodegradability, good lubricity, and low volatility. However, their poor thermooxidative stability and the small range of viscosity represent a clear disadvantage to be used as suitable biolubricants. The main objective of this work was to develop new environmentally friendly lubricant formulations with improved kinematic viscosity values and viscosity thermal susceptibility. With this aim, a high-oleic sunflower oil (HOSO) was blended with polymeric additives, such as ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) copolymers, at different concentrations (0.5-5% w/w). Dynamic viscosity and density measurements were performed in a rotational rheometer and capillary densimeter, respectively, in a temperature range between 25 and 120 degrees C. An Arrhenius-like equation fits the evolution of viscosity with temperature fairly well. Both EVA and SBS copolymers may be satisfactorily used as additives to increase the viscosity of HOSO, thus improving the low viscosity values of this oil. HOSO viscosity increases with polymer concentration. Specifically, EVA/HOSO blends exhibit higher viscosity values, which are needed for applications such as lubrication of bearings and four-stroke engines. On the other hand, viscositythermal susceptibility of HOSO samples increases with EVA or SBS concentration.

  14. Seeded perturbations in wire array z-pinches.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Allen Conrad; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Wunsch, Scott Edward; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Lebedev, Sergey V.; Safronova, Alla S.; Maxwell, J.; McKenney, John Lee; Ampleford, David J.; Rapley, J.; Bott, S. C.; Palmer, J. B. A.; Bland, Simon Nicholas; Jones, Brent Manley; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Garasi, Christopher Joseph; Hall, Gareth Neville; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Deeney, Christopher

    2004-11-01

    The impact of 3D structure on wire array z-pinch dynamics is a topic of current interest, and has been studied by the controlled seeding of wire perturbations. First, Al wires were etched at Sandia, creating 20% radial perturbations with variable axial wavelength. Observations of magnetic bubble formation in the etched regions during experiments on the MAGPIE accelerator are discussed and compared to 3D MHD modeling. Second, thin NaF coatings of 1 mm axial extent were deposited on Al wires and fielded on the Zebra accelerator. Little or no axial transport of the NaF spectroscopic dopant was observed in spatially resolved K-shell spectra, which places constraints on particle diffusivity in dense z-pinch plasmas. Finally, technology development for seeding perturbations is discussed.

  15. Simplified scaling model for the THETA-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, K. J.; Thomson, D. B.

    1982-02-01

    A simple ID scaling model for the fast THETA-pinch was developed and written as a code that would be flexible, inexpensive in computer time, and readily available for use with the Los Alamos explosive-driven high-magnetic-field program. The simplified model uses three successive separate stages: (1) a snowplow-like radial implosion, (2) an idealized resistive annihilation of reverse bias field, and (3) an adiabatic compression stage of a BETA = 1 plasma for which ideal pressure balance is assumed to hold. The code uses one adjustable fitting constant whose value was first determined by comparison with results from the Los Alamos Scylla III, Scyllacita, and Scylla IA THETA-pinches.

  16. Terahertz pinch harmonics enabled by single nano rods.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeong-Ryeol; Bahk, Young-Mi; Choe, Jong Ho; Han, Sanghoon; Choi, Seong Soo; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Park, Namkyoo; Park, Q-Han; Kim, Dai-Sik

    2011-11-21

    A pinch harmonic (or guitar harmonic) is a musical note produced by lightly pressing the thumb of the picking hand upon the string immediately after it is picked [J. Chem. Educ. 84, 1287 (2007)]. This technique turns off the fundamental and all overtones except those with a node at that location. Here we present a terahertz analogue of pinch harmonics, whereby a metallic nano rod placed at a harmonic node on a terahertz nanoresonator suppresses the fundamental mode, making the higher harmonics dominant. Strikingly, a skin depth-wide nano rod placed at the mid-point turns off all resonances. Our work demonstrates that terahertz electromagnetic waves can be tailored by nanoparticles strategically positioned, paving important path towards terahertz switching and detection applications.

  17. Terahertz pinch harmonics enabled by single nano rods.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeong-Ryeol; Bahk, Young-Mi; Choe, Jong Ho; Han, Sanghoon; Choi, Seong Soo; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Park, Namkyoo; Park, Q-Han; Kim, Dai-Sik

    2011-11-21

    A pinch harmonic (or guitar harmonic) is a musical note produced by lightly pressing the thumb of the picking hand upon the string immediately after it is picked [J. Chem. Educ. 84, 1287 (2007)]. This technique turns off the fundamental and all overtones except those with a node at that location. Here we present a terahertz analogue of pinch harmonics, whereby a metallic nano rod placed at a harmonic node on a terahertz nanoresonator suppresses the fundamental mode, making the higher harmonics dominant. Strikingly, a skin depth-wide nano rod placed at the mid-point turns off all resonances. Our work demonstrates that terahertz electromagnetic waves can be tailored by nanoparticles strategically positioned, paving important path towards terahertz switching and detection applications. PMID:22109504

  18. Tungsten Z-Pinch Long Implosions on the Saturn Generator

    SciTech Connect

    DOUGLAS,MELISSA R.; DEENEY,CHRISTOPHER; SPIELMAN,RICK B.; COVERDALE,CHRISTINE A.; RODERICK,N.F.; HAINES,M.G.

    1999-11-05

    Recent success on the Saturn and Z accelerators at Sandia National Laboratories have demonstrated the ability to scale z-pinch parameters to increasingly larger current pulsed power facilities. Next generation machines will require even larger currents (>20 MA), placing further demands on pulsed power technology. To this end, experiments have been carried out on Saturn operating in a long pulse mode, investigating the potential of lower voltages and longer implosion times while still maintaining pinch fidelity. High wire number, 25 mm diameter tungsten arrays were imploded with implosion times ranging from 130 to 240 ns. The results were comparable to those observed in the Saturn short pulse mode, with risetimes on the order of 4.5 to 6.5 ns. Experimental data will be presented, along with two dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations used to explain and reproduce the experiment.

  19. Light detonation wave in a cylindrical Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupaliev, U.; Sysoev, N. N.; Shuteev, S. A.; Elenskii, V. G.

    2015-09-01

    A secondary compression wave previously observed by other researchers in a cylindrical Z-pinch has been identified in this work as a light detonation wave. It appears on the inner surface of a discharge chamber under the action of the intense ultraviolet radiation from a plasma pinch at the stage of its maximum compression. The condition of the light detonation wave has been determined experimentally. The dependence of its Mach number on a generalized dimensionless variable has been determined taking into account the conservation laws for the light detonation wave including the pressure of the gas, expenses on the formation of the surface plasma, and the energy of ionization of the gas involved in the wave. An analogy with the laser-supported detonation wave created by intense laser radiation has been revealed. The indicated dependence is within the error of measurement in agreement with the experimental data for light detonation waves created by both methods.

  20. Transport and Measurements of High-Current Electron Beams from X pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Agafonov, Alexey V.; Mingaleev, Albert R.; Romanova, Vera M.; Tarakanov, Vladimir P.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Blesener, Isaac C.; Kusse, Bruce R.; Hammer, David A.

    2009-01-21

    Generation of electron beams is an unavoidable property of X-pinches and other pulsed-power-driven pinches of different geometry. Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups with different geometry's are discussed. Of particular interest is the partially neutralized nature of the beam propagating from the X-pinch to a diagnostic system. Two scenarios of electron beam propagation from X-pinch to Faraday cup are analyzed by means of computer simulation using the PIC-code KARAT. The first is longitudinal neutralization by ions extracted from plasma at an output window of the X-pinch diode; the second is the beam transport through a plasma background between the diode and a diagnostic system.

  1. Density peaking and turbulent pinch in DIII-D discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-07-15

    A study of density peaking and particle flow in low confinement (L-mode) DIII-D discharges [G. R. McKee, C. C. Petty, R. E. Waltz et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1235 (2001)], using global gyrokinetic simulations, is presented. It is found that under experimental conditions, in particular when realistic collisionality is included, a turbulent pinch driven by electron temperature and density gradients can occur.

  2. Prospects for fusion applications of reversed-field pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathke, C. G.; Krakowski, R. A.; Hagenson, R. L.

    1985-11-01

    The applicability of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) as a source of fusion neutrons for use in developing key fusion nuclear technologies is examined. This Fusion Test Facility (FTF) would emphasize high neutron wall loading, small plasma volume, low fusion and driver powers, and steady-state operation. Both parametric tradeoffs based on present-day physics understanding and a conceptual design based on an approx. 1-MW/m (neutron) driven operation are reported.

  3. A Lagrangian approach to identifying vortex pinch-off.

    PubMed

    O'Farrell, Clara; Dabiri, John O

    2010-03-01

    A criterion for identifying vortex ring pinch-off based on the Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) in the flow is proposed and demonstrated for a piston-cylinder arrangement with a piston stroke to diameter (L/D) ratio of approximately 12. It is found that the appearance of a new disconnected LCS and the termination of the original LCS are indicative of the initiation of vortex pinch-off. The subsequent growth of new LCSs, which tend to roll into spirals, indicates the formation of new vortex cores in the trailing shear layer. Using this criterion, the formation number is found to be 4.1+/-0.1, which is consistent with the predicted formation number of approximately 4 of Gharib et al. [Gharib et al. J. Fluid Mech. 360, 121 (1998)]. The results obtained using the proposed LCS criterion are compared with those obtained using the circulation criterion of Gharib et al. and are found to be in excellent agreement. The LCS approach is also compared against other metrics, both Lagrangian and Eulerian, and is found to yield insight into the pinch-off process that these do not. Furthermore, the LCS analysis reveals a consistent pattern of coalescing or "pairing" of adjacent vortices in the trailing shear layer, a process which has been extensively documented in circular jets. Given that LCSs are objective and insensitive to local errors in the velocity field, the proposed criterion has the potential to be a robust tool for pinch-off identification. In particular, it may prove useful in the study of unsteady and low Reynolds number flows, where conventional methods based on vorticity prove difficult to use. PMID:20370303

  4. Radiating Shock Properties in the Z-pinch Dynamic Hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, Gregory A.; Bailey, J. E.; Chandler, G.; Lemke, R.; Peterson, K.; Slutz, S.; Maron, Y.; Fisher, V.; Stambulchik, E.; MacFarlane, J.

    2009-09-10

    The Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum is a high-power x-ray source used for a variety of high energy-density physics applications including high temperature opacity measurements and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The system consists of a tungsten wire-array Z pinch that implodes onto a low-density CH{sub 2} foam launching a radiating shock that heats the hohlraum to radiation temperatures >200 eV. The temperature and density evolution of this shock have been inferred through the measurement of time- and space-resolved line emission from Si atoms locally doped in the CH{sub 2} foam. The observed emission spectra are analyzed through comparison to collisional-radiative calculations that include a detailed treatment of line-shapes and the effect of non-local radiation on the atomic level populations. As a complement to the detailed spectral data, the radial and azimuthal distribution of the axially directed shock emission is recorded with time-gated x-ray pinhole images that provide information on the spatial profile of the shock conditions. Together with broadband x-ray power measurements, these data provide a comprehensive suite of information to determine the shock dynamics and associated energetics of the Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum.

  5. Effects of EVA spacesuit glove on grasping and pinching tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appendino, Silvia; Battezzato, Alessandro; Chen Chen, Fai; Favetto, Alain; Mousavi, Mehdi; Pescarmona, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    The human hand has a wide range of degrees of freedom, allowing a great variety of movements, and is also one of the most sensitive parts of the human body. Due to these characteristics, it is the most important tool for astronauts to perform extravehicular activities (EVA). However, astronauts must wear mandatory EVA equipment to be protected from the harsh conditions in space and this strongly reduces hand performance, in particular as regards dexterity, tactile perception, mobility and fatigue. Several studies have been conducted to determine the influence of the EVA glove on manual capabilities, both in the past and more recently. This study presents experimental data regarding the performance decline occurring in terms of force and fatigue in the execution of grasping and pinching tasks when wearing an EVA glove, in pressurized and unpressurized conditions, compared with barehanded potential. Results show that wearing the unpressurized EVA glove hinders grip and lateral pinch performances, dropping exerted forces to about 50-70%, while it barely affects two- and three-finger pinch performances. On the other hand, wearing the pressurized glove worsens performances in all cases, reducing forces to about 10-30% of barehanded potential. The results are presented and compared with the previous literature.

  6. Diagnostics for Z-pinch implosion experiments on PTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X. D.; Huang, X. B.; Zhou, S. T.; Zhang, S. Q.; Dan, J. K.; Li, J.; Cai, H. C.; Wang, K. L.; Ouyang, K.; Xu, Q.; Duan, S. C.; Chen, G. H.; Wang, M.; Feng, S. P.; Yang, L. B.; Xie, W. P.; Deng, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The preliminary experiments of wire array implosion were performed on PTS, a 10 MA z-pinch driver with a 70 ns rise time. A set of diagnostics have been developed and fielded on PTS to study pinch physics and implosion dynamics of wire array. Radiated power measurement for soft x-rays was performed by multichannel filtered x-ray diode array, and flat spectral responses x-ray diode detector. Total x-ray yield was measured by a calibrated, unfiltered nickel bolometer which was also used to obtain pinch power. Multiple time-gated pinhole cameras were used to produce spatial-resolved images of x-ray self-emission from plasmas. Two time-integrated pinhole cameras were used respectively with 20-μm Be filter and with multilayer mirrors to record images produced by >1-keV and 277±5 eV self-emission. An optical streak camera was used to produce radial implosion trajectories, and an x-ray streak camera paired with a horizontal slit was used to record a continuous time-history of emission with one-dimensional spatial resolution. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) was used to produce four frame laser shadowgraph images with 6 ns time interval. We will briefly describe each of these diagnostics and present some typical results from them.

  7. Diagnostics for Z-pinch implosion experiments on PTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X. D. Huang, X. B. Zhou, S. T. Zhang, S. Q. Dan, J. K. Li, J. Cai, H. C. Wang, K. L. Ouyang, K. Xu, Q. Duan, S. C. Chen, G. H. Wang, M. Feng, S. P. Yang, L. B. Xie, W. P. Deng, J. J.

    2014-12-15

    The preliminary experiments of wire array implosion were performed on PTS, a 10 MA z-pinch driver with a 70 ns rise time. A set of diagnostics have been developed and fielded on PTS to study pinch physics and implosion dynamics of wire array. Radiated power measurement for soft x-rays was performed by multichannel filtered x-ray diode array, and flat spectral responses x-ray diode detector. Total x-ray yield was measured by a calibrated, unfiltered nickel bolometer which was also used to obtain pinch power. Multiple time-gated pinhole cameras were used to produce spatial-resolved images of x-ray self-emission from plasmas. Two time-integrated pinhole cameras were used respectively with 20-μm Be filter and with multilayer mirrors to record images produced by >1-keV and 277±5 eV self-emission. An optical streak camera was used to produce radial implosion trajectories, and an x-ray streak camera paired with a horizontal slit was used to record a continuous time-history of emission with one-dimensional spatial resolution. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) was used to produce four frame laser shadowgraph images with 6 ns time interval. We will briefly describe each of these diagnostics and present some typical results from them.

  8. Characterization of Plasmas in Negative Polarity Rod Pinch Diodes*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark; Oliver, Bryan; Leckbee, Joshua; Welch, Dale; Droemer, Darryl; Crain, Marlon

    2009-11-01

    Experiments at SNL are underway to investigate plasma formation in rod pinch diodes fielded in negative polarity on the RITS-6 accelerator (7.5MV and 180kA at 40 Ohms). The rod pinch diode consists of a small diameter metal rod which extends through a larger diameter metal cathode plate. Electrons formed at the cathode accelerate across the gap, become self-insulated, and are focused at the rod tip, generating x-rays used for flash radiography. Most of the previous rod pinch work has been performed in positive polarity; however, there is an interest in operating this diode in negative polarity at higher voltages, allowing more flexibility and incorporation into a wider variety of pulsed power devices. In an effort to better understand the basic physics, and the role ions play in the impedance behavior, a series of shots were taken looking at plasma formation in the diode. Diagnostics include optical imaging and spectroscopy using nanosecond gated ICCD cameras, streak cameras, and photodiode arrays. *Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Characterization of Z-Pinch Driven Hohlraum Radiation Sources*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, J. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Deeney, C.; Fehl, D. L.; Noack, D. D.; Olson, R. E.; Ruggles, L. E.; Seaman, J. F.; Spielman, R. B.; Torres, J. A.; Vargas, M. F.; Bartlett, R. J.; Benage, J. F., Jr.; Idzorek, G. C.

    1996-11-01

    We have developed a z-pinch-driven soft x-ray radiation source that is near-Planckian in spectral shape and very uniform over spatial dimensions of several millimeters. We create this radiation source by surrounding a z-pinch implosion with a high-Z radiation case (a hohlraum). This experimental arrangement is referred to as the =B3vacuum hohlraum=B2 configuration. We have measured hohlraum temperatures of greater than 75 eV which last for 10=B9s of nanoseconds using the 7-MA Saturn accelerator. We will begin z-pinch experiments this fall using the 16-MA PBFA-Z accelerator. The PBFA-Z driver will be able to produce hohlraums with radiation temperatures well in excess of 100 eV. In this presentation we will describe measurements of the time history of the x-ray power, spectrum, and spatial uniformity of hohlraums produced using the Saturn accelerator. We will also present preliminary measurements of the radiation temperature of hohlraums created using the recently commissioned PBFA-Z accelerator. *This work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Pinch Related Research At Institute For Plasma Research, India

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, Anurag

    2006-01-05

    Several pinch related experiment, their drivers and related diagnostics are being developed in our laboratory. The first set of experiments is to investigate various aspects of magnetized target fusion (MTF/MAGO). To drive the liner, in Z or theta pinch configuration, a 1.2 MJ, 3.6 MA capacitor bank is developed. For liner diagnostics flash radiography, VISAR and pyrometery are being developed. To produce magnetized (target) plasma a 120 kJ, 3 MA and several other banks are developed. Hot magnetized Plasma will be diagnosed by optical schlieren, interferometery and X-Ray spectrometry. A terra-watt system consisting of a Marx bank and water line delivering 800 kA at 1.6 MV will be commissioned, soon. The device will be used to study different pinch (wire array) configurations for production of electro-magnetic radiations. Smaller pulsed power systems, consisting of 1MV/500 kV Marx bank/tesla transformer and than water or solid state (cables) pulse forming network (coax) are also being developed for capillary discharge and other experiments. Two plasma foci experiments are also being conducted. The effort is produce a repetitively operating compact plasma focus.

  11. The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch Project - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shumlak, Uri; Nelson, Brian A.

    2013-12-31

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch Project is a project to extend the performance of the flow Z-pinch experiment at the University of Washington to investigate and isolate the relevant physics of the stabilizing effect of plasma flow. Experimental plasmas have exhibited an enhanced stability under certain operating parameters which generate a flow state (axial flows in Z-pinches and VH mode in tokamaks). Flow has also been suggested as the stabilizing mechanism in astrophysical jets.

  12. An Empirical Viscosity Model for Coal Slags

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Cooley, Scott K.; Sundaram, S. K.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Edmondson, Autumn B.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.

    2008-10-25

    Slags of low viscosity readily penetrate the refractory lining in slagging gasifiers, causing rapid and severe corrosion called spalling. In addition, a low-viscosity slag that flows down the gasifier wall forms a relatively thin layer of slag on the refractory surface, allowing the corrosive gases in the gasifier to participate in the chemical reactions between the refractory and the slag. In contrast, a slag viscosity of <25 Pa•s at 1400°C is necessary to minimize the possibility of plugging the slag tap. There is a need to predict and optimize slag viscosity so slagging gasifiers can operate continuously at temperatures ranging from 1300 to 1650°C. The approach adopted in this work was to statistically design and prepare simulated slags, measure the viscosity as a function of temperature, and develop a model to predict slag viscosity based on slag composition and temperature. Statistical design software was used to select compositions from a candidate set of all possible vertices that will optimally represent the composition space for 10 main components. A total of 21 slag compositions were generated, including 5 actual coal slag compositions. The Arrhenius equation was applied to measured viscosity versus temperature data of tested slags, and the Arrhenius coefficients (A and B in ln(vis) = A + B/T) were expressed as linear functions of the slag composition. The viscosity model was validated using 1) data splitting approach, and 2) viscosity/temperature data of selected slag compositions from the literature that were formulated and melted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The capability of the model to predict the viscosity of coal slags was compared with the model developed by Browning et al. because this model can predict the viscosity of slags from coal ash better than the most commonly used empirical models found in the literature.

  13. Electromagnetic analysis of arbitrarily shaped pinched carpets

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, Guillaume; Guenneau, Sebastien; Enoch, Stefan

    2010-09-15

    We derive the expressions for the anisotropic heterogeneous tensors of permittivity and permeability associated with two-dimensional and three-dimensional carpets of an arbitrary shape. In the former case, we map a segment onto smooth curves whereas in the latter case we map an arbitrary region of the plane onto smooth surfaces. Importantly, these carpets display no singularity of the permeability and permeability tensor components. Moreover, a reduced set of parameters leads to nonmagnetic two-dimensional carpets in p polarization (i.e., for a magnetic field orthogonal to the plane containing the carpet). Such an arbitrarily shaped carpet is shown to work over a finite bandwidth when it is approximated by a checkerboard with 190 homogeneous cells of piecewise constant anisotropic permittivity. We finally perform some finite element computations in the full vector three-dimensional case for a plane wave in normal incidence and a Gaussian beam in oblique incidence. The latter requires perfectly matched layers set in a rotated coordinate axis which exemplifies the role played by geometric transforms in computational electromagnetism.

  14. Monitoring viscosity in asphalt binders using an ultrasonic guided wave approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haser, Alexandra N.; McGovern, Megan E.; Behnia, Behzad; Buttlar, William; Reis, Henrique

    2015-03-01

    A pulse-echo ultrasonic guided wave approach capable of monitoring the viscosity of asphalt binders as function of temperature is presented. The method consists of sending a torsional wave from one end of a cylindrical steel rod embedded in asphalt binder and receiving the reflected signals. Experiments were performed on several binders of different performance grades, at temperatures ranging from 25 to 1800C. First, the viscosity of the binders was measured using a rotational viscometer in accordance with ASTM standards. The change in signal strength of the end-of-waveguide reflection of the guided wave was also monitored for the same binders over the same range of temperatures. It was observed that the values obtained using the guided wave approach correlates well with the viscosity values obtained using the rotational viscometer. The method also appears capable of monitoring changes in viscosity due to aging of the binders. The method has the advantage of having no moving parts, which makes it attractive for the development of a system that is capable of monitoring viscosity in asphalt binders in the asphalt industry. Industrial applications examples are briefly summarized.

  15. Developing models for simulation of pinched-beam dynamics in heavy ion fusion. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.K.; Mark, J.W.K.; Sharp, W.M.; Yu, S.S.

    1984-02-22

    For heavy-ion fusion energy applications, Mark and Yu have derived hydrodynamic models for numerical simulation of energetic pinched-beams including self-pinches and external-current pinches. These pinched-beams are applicable to beam propagation in fusion chambers and to the US High Temperature Experiment. The closure of the Mark-Yu model is obtained with adiabatic assumptions mathematically analogous to those of Chew, Goldberger, and Low for MHD. Features of this hydrodynamic beam model are compared with a kinetic treatment.

  16. Use of spherically bent crystals to diagnose wire array z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Shelkovenko, T.A.; Pikuz, S.A.; Hammer, D.A.; Ampleford, D.J.; Bland, S.N.; Bott, S.C.; Chittenden, J.P.; Lebedev, S.V.

    2004-10-01

    Spherically bent mica and quartz crystals have provided time-integrated spectra and monochromatic images in self-radiation of wire array z-pinch implosions on the MAGPIE generator (1 MA, 240 ns) at Imperial College. Diagnostics based on spherically bent crystals offer higher efficiencies than those based on flat or convex dispersion elements, allowing positioning far from the pinch with good debris shielding. A mica crystal spectrometer produced an image of the pinch in each emission line with about 100 {mu}m axial resolution. Combining the results of monochromatic imaging and spectra confirmed the presence of bright spots, probably generated by energetic electrons inside the pinch.

  17. Rotational Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Keith

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates several objects rolling down a slope to explain the energy transition among potential energy, translational kinetic energy, and rotational kinetic energy. Contains a problem from Galileo's rolling ball experiment. (YP)

  18. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  19. Surface dilatational viscosity of Langmuir monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Vogel, Michael; Hirsa, Amir

    2003-11-01

    With increased interest in microfluidic systems, interfacial phenomena is receiving more attention. As the length scales of fluid problems decrease, the surface to volume ratio increases and the coupling between interfacial flow and bulk flow becomes increasingly dominated by effects due to intrinsic surface viscosities (shear and dilatational), in comparison to elastic effects (due to surface tension gradients). The surface shear viscosity is well-characterized, as cm-scale laboratory experiments are able to isolate its effects from other interfacial processes (e.g., in the deep-channel viscometer). The same is not true for the dilatational viscosity, because it acts in the direction of surface tension gradients. Their relative strength scale with the capillary number, and for cm-scale laboratory flows, surface tension effects tend to dominate. In microfluidic scale flows, the scaling favors viscosity. We have devised an experimental apparatus which is capable of isolating and enhancing the effects of dilatational viscosity at the cm scales by driving the interface harmonically in time, while keeping the interface flat. In this talk, we shall present both the theory for how this works as well as experimental measurements of surface velocity from which we deduce the dilatational viscosity of several monolayers on the air-water interface over a substantial range of surface concentrations. Anomalous behavior over some range of concentration, which superficially indicates negative viscosity, maybe explained in terms of compositional effects due to large spatial and temporal variations in concentration and corresponding viscosity.

  20. Low shear viscosity due to Anderson localization

    SciTech Connect

    Giannakis, Ioannis; Hou Defu; Ren Haicang; Li Jiarong

    2008-01-15

    We study the Anderson localization effect on the shear viscosity in a system with random medium by Kubo formula. We show that this effect can suppress nonperturbatively the shear viscosity and other transport coefficients. The possible relevancy of such a suppression to the near perfect fluid behavior of the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

  1. Reducing blood viscosity with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.; Huang, K.

    2011-07-01

    Blood viscosity is a major factor in heart disease. When blood viscosity increases, it damages blood vessels and increases the risk of heart attacks. Currently, the only method of treatment is to take drugs such as aspirin, which has, however, several unwanted side effects. Here we report our finding that blood viscosity can be reduced with magnetic fields of 1 T or above in the blood flow direction. One magnetic field pulse of 1.3 T lasting ˜1 min can reduce the blood viscosity by 20%-30%. After the exposure, in the absence of magnetic field, the blood viscosity slowly moves up, but takes a couple of hours to return to the original value. The process is repeatable. Reapplying the magnetic field reduces the blood viscosity again. By selecting the magnetic field strength and duration, we can keep the blood viscosity within the normal range. In addition, such viscosity reduction does not affect the red blood cells’ normal function. This technology has much potential for physical therapy.

  2. Measuring the Shear Viscosity at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, Sean; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed

    2006-11-17

    Measurements of transverse momentum fluctuations can be used to determine the shear viscosity. We use current data to estimate the viscosity-to-entropy ratio in the range from 0.08 to 0.3, and discuss how future measurements can reduce this uncertainty.

  3. Brief introduction to viscosity in hadron physics

    SciTech Connect

    Dobado, Antonio; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.

    2010-12-28

    We introduce the concept of viscosity (both shear and bulk) in the context of hadron physics and in particular the meson gas, highlighting the current theoretical efforts to connect possible measurements of the viscosities to underlying physics such as a phase transition or the trace anomaly.

  4. Self-pinched transport of intense ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, P.F.; Neri, J.M.; Stephanakis, S.J.

    1999-07-01

    Electron beams with substantial net currents have been routinely propagated in the self-pinched mode for the past two decades. However, as the physics of gas breakdown and beam neutralization is different for ion beams, previous predictions indicated insufficient net current for pinching so that ion beam self-pinched transport (SPT) was assumed impossible. Nevertheless, recent numerical simulations using the IPROP code have suggested that ion SPT is possible. These results have prompted initial experiments to investigate SPT of ion beams. A 100-kA, 1.2-MeV, 3-cm-radius proton beam, generated on the Gamble II pulsed-power accelerator at NRL, has been injected into helium in the 30- to 250-mTorr regime to study this phenomenon. Evidence of self-pinched ion beam transport was observed in the 35- to 80-mTorr SPT pressure window predicted by IPROP. Measured signals from a time- and space-resolved scattered proton diagnostic and a time-integrated Li(Cu) nuclear activation diagnostic, both of which measure protons striking a 10-cm diameter target 50 cm into the transport region, are significantly larger in this pressure window than expected for ballistic transport. These results are consistent with significant self-magnetic fields and self-pinching of the ion beam. On the other hand, time-integrated signals from these same two diagnostics are consistent with ballistic transport at pressures above and below the SPT window. Interferometric electron line-density measurements, acquired during beam injection into the helium gas, show insignificant ionization below 35 mTorr, a rapidly rising ionization fraction with pressure in the SPT window, and a plateau in ionization fraction at about 2% for pressures above 80 mTorr. These and other results are consistent with the physical picture for SPT. IPROP simulations, which closely model the Gamble II experimental conditions, produce results that are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results. The advantages of SPT for

  5. Effects of bulk viscosity at freezeout

    SciTech Connect

    Monnai, Akihiko; Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2009-11-15

    We investigate particle spectra and elliptic flow coefficients in relativistic heavy-ion collisions by taking into account the distortion of phase space distributions by bulk viscosity at freezeout. We first calculate the distortion of phase space distributions in a multicomponent system with Grad's 14-moment method. We find some subtle issues when macroscopic variables are matched with microscopic momentum distributions in a multicomponent system, and we develop a consistent procedure to uniquely determine the corrections to the phase space distributions. Next, we calculate particle spectra by using the Cooper-Frye formula to see the effect of the bulk viscosity. Despite the relative smallness of the bulk viscosity, we find that it is likely to have a visible effect on particle spectra and elliptic flow coefficients. This indicates the importance of taking into account bulk viscosity together with shear viscosity to constrain the transport coefficients with better accuracy from comparison with experimental data.

  6. Viscosity of Common Seed and Vegetable Oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wes Fountain, C.; Jennings, Jeanne; McKie, Cheryl K.; Oakman, Patrice; Fetterolf, Monty L.

    1997-02-01

    Viscosity experiments using Ostwald-type gravity flow viscometers are not new to the physical chemistry laboratory. Several physical chemistry laboratory texts (1 - 3) contain at least one experiment studying polymer solutions or other well-defined systems. Several recently published articles (4 - 8) indicated the continued interest in using viscosity measurements in the teaching lab to illustrate molecular interpretation of bulk phenomena. Most of these discussions and teaching experiments are designed around an extensive theory of viscous flow and models of molecular shape that allow a full data interpretation to be attempted. This approach to viscosity experiments may not be appropriate for all teaching situations (e.g., high schools, general chemistry labs, and nonmajor physical chemistry labs). A viscosity experiment is presented here that is designed around common seed and vegetable oils. With the importance of viscosity to foodstuffs (9) and the importance of fatty acids to nutrition (10), an experiment using these common, recognizable oils has broad appeal.

  7. Plasma viscosity elevations with simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. G.; Convertino, V. A.; Goldwater, D.; Ferguson, E. W.; Schoomaker, E. B.

    1986-01-01

    A hypothesis correlating an increase in blood viscosity during bed rest to a decrease in aerobic capacity during simulated weightlessness is tested. Eight human subjects were studied on the sixth day of bed rest during two consecutive 10-d bed rest periods separated by a 14-d recovery interval designed to simulate the flight-layover schedule of Shuttle astronauts. Plasma viscosity and volume were measured, together with maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max). An increase in hematocrit, plasma protein, and fibrinogen concentrations was found, contributing to an elevation in plasma viscosity. VO2max decreased significantly in the first, but not the second bed rest cycle, and though many individuals exhibited a decrease in plasma volume and aerobic capacity coupled with elevated plasma viscosity, correlations between these variables were lacking. It is concluded that the decrease in VO2max observed following simulated weightlessness cannot be attributed to alterations in muscle blood flow resulting from increased blood viscosity.

  8. Influence of Molecular Coherence on Surface Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Adding small fractions of cholesterol decreases the interfacial viscosity of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) monolayers by an order of magnitude per wt %. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction shows that cholesterol at these small fractions does not mix ideally with DPPC but rather induces nanophase separated structures of an ordered, primarily DPPC phase bordered by a line-active, disordered, mixed DPPC-cholesterol phase. We propose that the free area in the classic Cohen and Turnbull model of viscosity is inversely proportional to the number of molecules in the coherence area, or product of the two coherence lengths. Cholesterol significantly reduces the coherence area of the crystals as well as the interfacial viscosity. Using this free area collapses the surface viscosity data for all surface pressures and cholesterol fractions to a universal logarithmic relation. The extent of molecular coherence appears to be a fundamental factor in determining surface viscosity in ordered monolayers. PMID:24991992

  9. Both protein adsorption and aggregation contribute to shear yielding and viscosity increase in protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Pathak, Jai A; Colby, Ralph H

    2014-01-01

    A combination of sensitive rotational rheometry and surface rheometry with a double-wall ring were used to identify the origins of the viscosity increase at low shear rates in protein solutions. The rheology of two high molecular weight proteins is discussed: Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) in a Phosphate Buffered Saline solution and an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in a formulation buffer containing small quantities of a non-ionic surfactant. For surfactant-free BSA solutions, the interfacial viscosity dominates the low shear viscosity measured in rotational rheometers, while the surfactant-laden mAb solution has an interfacial viscosity that is small compared to that from aggregation in the bulk. A viscoelastic film forms at the air/water interface in the absence of surfactant, contributing to an apparent yield stress (thus a low shear viscosity increase) in conventional bulk rheology measurements. Addition of surfactant eliminates the interfacial yield stress. Evidence of a bulk yield stress arising from protein aggregation is presented, and correlated with results from standard characterization techniques used in the bio-pharmaceutical industry. The protein film at the air/water interface and bulk aggregates both lead to an apparent viscosity increase and their contributions are quantified using a dimensionless ratio of the interfacial and total yield stress. While steady shear viscosities at shear rates below ∼1 s(-1) contain rich information about the stability of protein solutions, embodied in the measured yield stress, such low shear rate data are regrettably often not measured and reported in the literature.

  10. Calculations of rotational flows using stream function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.; Yam, C.; Tang, K.; Dwyer, H.

    1989-01-01

    The stream function equation is solved for steady two-dimensional (and axisymmetric) rotational flows. Both finite differences and finite volumes discretization techniques are studied, using generalized body fitted coordinates and unstructured staggered grids, respectively. For inviscid transonic flows, a new artificial viscosity scheme which does not produce any artificial vorticity is introduced, for the stability of the mixed flow calculations and for capturing shocks. The solution of Euler equations, in primitive variables, are also considered. The effects of the artificial viscosity and numerical boundary conditions on the total enthalpy and the vorticity distributions are demonstrated.

  11. A three-dimensional model for the effective viscosity of bacterial suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, B. M.; Sokolov, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Berlyand, L.; Karpeev, D. A.; Pennsylvania State Univ.; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2009-01-01

    We derive the effective viscosity of dilute suspensions of swimming bacteria from the microscopic details of the interaction of an elongated body with the background flow. An individual bacterium propels itself forward by rotating its flagella and reorients itself randomly by tumbling. Due to the bacterium's asymmetric shape, interactions with a prescribed generic (such as planar shear or straining) background flow cause the bacteria to preferentially align in directions in which self-propulsion produces a significant reduction in the effective viscosity, in agreement with recent experiments on suspensions of Bacillus subtilis.

  12. Computation of shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions by SRD-MD.

    PubMed

    Laganapan, A M K; Videcoq, A; Bienia, M; Ala-Nissila, T; Bochicchio, D; Ferrando, R

    2015-04-14

    The behaviour of sheared colloidal suspensions with full hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) is numerically studied. To this end, we use the hybrid stochastic rotation dynamics-molecular dynamics (SRD-MD) method. The shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions is computed for different volume fractions, both for dilute and concentrated cases. We verify that HIs help in the collisions and the streaming of colloidal particles, thereby increasing the overall shear viscosity of the suspension. Our results show a good agreement with known experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies. This work demonstrates the ability of SRD-MD to successfully simulate transport coefficients that require correct modelling of HIs.

  13. Computation of shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions by SRD-MD

    SciTech Connect

    Laganapan, A. M. K.; Videcoq, A. Bienia, M.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Bochicchio, D.; Ferrando, R.

    2015-04-14

    The behaviour of sheared colloidal suspensions with full hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) is numerically studied. To this end, we use the hybrid stochastic rotation dynamics-molecular dynamics (SRD-MD) method. The shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions is computed for different volume fractions, both for dilute and concentrated cases. We verify that HIs help in the collisions and the streaming of colloidal particles, thereby increasing the overall shear viscosity of the suspension. Our results show a good agreement with known experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies. This work demonstrates the ability of SRD-MD to successfully simulate transport coefficients that require correct modelling of HIs.

  14. Eruptive viscosity and volcano morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posin, Seth B.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial central volcanoes formed predominantly from lava flows were classified as shields, stratovolcanoes, and domes. Shield volcanoes tend to be large in areal extent, have convex slopes, and are characterized by their resemblance to inverted hellenic war shields. Stratovolcanoes have concave slopes, whereas domes are smaller and have gentle convex slopes near the vent that increase near the perimeter. In addition to these differences in morphology, several other variations were observed. The most important is composition: shield volcanoes tend to be basaltic, stratovolcanoes tend to be andesitic, and domes tend to be dacitic. However, important exceptions include Fuji, Pico, Mayon, Izalco, and Fuego which have stratovolcano morphologies but are composed of basaltic lavas. Similarly, Ribkwo is a Kenyan shield volcano composed of trachyte and Suswa and Kilombe are shields composed of phonolite. These exceptions indicate that eruptive conditions, rather than composition, may be the primary factors that determine volcano morphology. The objective of this study is to determine the relationships, if any, between eruptive conditions (viscosity, erupted volume, and effusion rate) and effusive volcano morphology. Moreover, it is the goal of this study to incorporate these relationships into a model to predict the eruptive conditions of extraterrestrial (Martian) volcanoes based on their morphology.

  15. Thermal conductivity and viscosity measurements of ethylene glycol-based Al2O3 nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastoriza-Gallego, María José; Lugo, Luis; Legido, José Luis; Piñeiro, Manuel M.

    2011-12-01

    The dispersion and stability of nanofluids obtained by dispersing Al2O3 nanoparticles in ethylene glycol have been analyzed at several concentrations up to 25% in mass fraction. The thermal conductivity and viscosity were experimentally determined at temperatures ranging from 283.15 K to 323.15 K using an apparatus based on the hot-wire method and a rotational viscometer, respectively. It has been found that both thermal conductivity and viscosity increase with the concentration of nanoparticles, whereas when the temperature increases the viscosity diminishes and the thermal conductivity rises. Measured enhancements on thermal conductivity (up to 19%) compare well with literature values when available. New viscosity experimental data yield values more than twice larger than the base fluid. The influence of particle size on viscosity has been also studied, finding large differences that must be taken into account for any practical application. These experimental results were compared with some theoretical models, as those of Maxwell-Hamilton and Crosser for thermal conductivity and Krieger and Dougherty for viscosity.

  16. Thermal conductivity and viscosity measurements of ethylene glycol-based Al2O3 nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The dispersion and stability of nanofluids obtained by dispersing Al2O3 nanoparticles in ethylene glycol have been analyzed at several concentrations up to 25% in mass fraction. The thermal conductivity and viscosity were experimentally determined at temperatures ranging from 283.15 K to 323.15 K using an apparatus based on the hot-wire method and a rotational viscometer, respectively. It has been found that both thermal conductivity and viscosity increase with the concentration of nanoparticles, whereas when the temperature increases the viscosity diminishes and the thermal conductivity rises. Measured enhancements on thermal conductivity (up to 19%) compare well with literature values when available. New viscosity experimental data yield values more than twice larger than the base fluid. The influence of particle size on viscosity has been also studied, finding large differences that must be taken into account for any practical application. These experimental results were compared with some theoretical models, as those of Maxwell-Hamilton and Crosser for thermal conductivity and Krieger and Dougherty for viscosity. PMID:21711737

  17. Thermal conductivity and viscosity measurements of ethylene glycol-based Al2O3 nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Pastoriza-Gallego, María José; Lugo, Luis; Legido, José Luis; Piñeiro, Manuel M

    2011-03-15

    The dispersion and stability of nanofluids obtained by dispersing Al2O3 nanoparticles in ethylene glycol have been analyzed at several concentrations up to 25% in mass fraction. The thermal conductivity and viscosity were experimentally determined at temperatures ranging from 283.15 K to 323.15 K using an apparatus based on the hot-wire method and a rotational viscometer, respectively. It has been found that both thermal conductivity and viscosity increase with the concentration of nanoparticles, whereas when the temperature increases the viscosity diminishes and the thermal conductivity rises. Measured enhancements on thermal conductivity (up to 19%) compare well with literature values when available. New viscosity experimental data yield values more than twice larger than the base fluid. The influence of particle size on viscosity has been also studied, finding large differences that must be taken into account for any practical application. These experimental results were compared with some theoretical models, as those of Maxwell-Hamilton and Crosser for thermal conductivity and Krieger and Dougherty for viscosity.

  18. Electrically rotating suspended films of polar liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirsavar, R.; Amjadi, A.; Tonddast-Navaei, A.; Ejtehadi, M. R.

    2011-02-01

    Controlled rotation of a suspended soap water film, simply generated by applying an electric field, has been reported recently. The film rotates when the applied electric field exceeds a certain threshold. In this study, we investigate the phenomenon in films made of a number of other liquids with various physical and chemical properties. Our measurements show that the intrinsic electrical dipole moments of the liquid molecules seems to be vital for the corresponding film rotation. All the investigated rotating liquids have a molecular electric dipole moment of above 1 Debye, while weakly polar liquids do not rotate. However, the liquids investigated here cover a wide range of physical parameters (e.g. viscosity, density, conductivity, etc.). So far, no significant correlation has been observed between the electric field thresholds and macroscopic properties of the liquids.

  19. Tail pinch induces fos immunoreactivity within several regions of the male rat brain: effects of age.

    PubMed

    Smith, W J; Stewart, J; Pfaus, J G

    1997-05-01

    Brief, intermittent stressors, such as low-level foot shock or tail pinch, induce a general excitement and autonomic arousal in rats that increases their sensitivity to external incentives. Such stimulation can facilitate a variety of behaviors, including feeding, aggression, sexual activity, parental behavior, and drug taking if the appropriate stimuli exist in the environment. However, the ability of tail pinch to induce general arousal and incentive motivation appears to diminish with age. Here we report on the ability of tail pinch to induce Fos immunoreactivity within several brain regions as a function of age. Young (2-3 months) and middle-aged (12-13 months) male rats were administered either five tail pinches (one every 2 min), one tail pinch, or zero (sham) tail pinches (n = 4 per stimulation condition). Rats were sacrificed 75 min following the onset of stimulation, and their brains were prepared for immunocytochemical detection of Fos protein. Fos immunoreactivity was induced by one and five tail pinches in several brain regions, including the anterior medial preoptic area (mPOA), paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PV-Thal), medial amygdala (MEA), basolateral amygdala (BLA), lateral habenula (LHab), and ventral tegmental area (VTA), of young rats compared with those that received zero tail pinches. In contrast to young rats, middle-aged rats had significantly less Fos induced by one and five tail pinches in the mPOA, PVN, MEA, BLA, and VTA, but an equivalent amount induced in the LHab. Fos immunoreactivity was not found within the medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, striatum, lateral septum, or locus coeruleus in either young or old rats. Tail pinch appears to activate regions of the brain known to be involved in behavioral responses to both incentive cues and stressors. The lower level of cellular reactivity to tail pinch in middle-aged rats suggests a diminished neural responsiveness to

  20. MODELING OF DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION IN RAPIDLY ROTATING SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, H.; Yokoyama, T.

    2011-10-10

    We investigate differential rotation in rapidly rotating solar-type stars by means of an axisymmetric mean field model that was previously applied to the Sun. This allows us to calculate the latitudinal entropy gradient with a reasonable physical basis. Our conclusions are as follows. (1) Differential rotation approaches the Taylor-Proudman state when stellar rotation is faster than solar rotation. (2) Entropy gradient generated by the attached subadiabatic layer beneath the convection zone becomes relatively small with a large stellar angular velocity. (3) Turbulent viscosity and turbulent angular momentum transport determine the spatial difference of angular velocity {Delta}{Omega}. (4) The results of our mean field model can explain observations of stellar differential rotation.

  1. Viscosity measurement techniques in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study two main groups of viscosity measurement techniques are used to measure the viscosity of a simple fluid using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, DPD. In the first method, a microscopic definition of the pressure tensor is used in equilibrium and out of equilibrium to measure the zero-shear viscosity and shear viscosity, respectively. In the second method, a periodic Poiseuille flow and start-up transient shear flow is used and the shear viscosity is obtained from the velocity profiles by a numerical fitting procedure. Using the standard Lees-Edward boundary condition for DPD will result in incorrect velocity profiles at high values of the dissipative parameter. Although this issue was partially addressed in Chatterjee (2007), in this work we present further modifications (Lagrangian approach) to the original LE boundary condition (Eulerian approach) that will fix the deviation from the desired shear rate at high values of the dissipative parameter and decrease the noise to signal ratios in stress measurement while increases the accessible low shear rate window. Also, the thermostat effect of the dissipative and random forces is coupled to the dynamic response of the system and affects the transport properties like the viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We investigated thoroughly the dependency of viscosity measured by both Eulerian and Lagrangian methodologies, as well as numerical fitting procedures and found that all the methods are in quantitative agreement.

  2. Dynamical influences on the moment of inertia tensor from lateral viscosity variations inferred from seismic tomographic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Shuxia; Yuen, David A.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the influences of lateral variations of viscosity on the moment of inertia tensor from viscous flows due to the density anomalies in the mantle inferred from seismic tomographic models. The scaling relations between the density and the seismic anomalies is taken as either a constant or a function increasing with depth in accord with the recent high-pressure experimental studies. The viscosity is taken as an exponential function of the 3D density anomaly. In models with an isoviscous background, the effects on the perturbed moment of inertia tensor from the lateral viscosity variations are smaller than those due to variations in the radial viscosity profiles. In mantle models with a background viscosity increasing with depth, the influences of the lateral viscosity variations are significant. The most striking feature in the latter case is that the two off-diagonal elements delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz) in the inertia tensor exhibit greatest sensitivity to lateral variations of the viscosity. While the other elements of the inertia change by only about a few tens of percent in the range of lateral viscosity contrast considered (less than 300), delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz) can vary up to 40 times even with a change in sign, depending on the radial viscosity stratification and the location of the strongest lateral variations. The increase in the velocity-density scaling relation with depth can reduce the influences of the lateral viscosity variations, but it does not change the overall sensitive nature of delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz). This study demonstrates clearly that the lateral viscosity variations, especially in the upper mantle, must be considered in the determination of long-term polar wander, since the variations in the delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz) terms are directly responsible for exciting rotational movements.

  3. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  4. Viscosity studies of water based magnetite nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anu, K.; Hemalatha, J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetite nanofluids of various concentrations have been synthesized through co-precipitation method. The structural and topographical studies made with the X-Ray Diffractometer and Atomic Force Microscope are presented in this paper. The density and viscosity studies for the ferrofluids of various concentrations have been made at room temperature. The experimental viscosities are compared with theoretical values obtained from Einstein, Batchelor and Wang models. An attempt to modify the Rosensweig model is made and the modified Rosensweig equation is reported. In addition, new empirical correlation is also proposed for predicting viscosity of ferrofluid at various concentrations.

  5. Viscosity of high-temperature iodine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Steve H.; Kunc, Joseph A.

    1991-01-01

    The viscosity coefficient of iodine in the temperature range 500 - 3000 K is calculated. Because of the low dissociation energy of the I2 molecules, the dissociation degree of the gas increases quickly with temperature, and I + I2 and I + I collisions must be taken into account in calculation of viscosity at temperatures greater than 1000 deg. Several possible channels for atom-atom interaction are considered, and the resulting collision integrals are averaged over all the important channels. It is also shown that the rigid-sphere model is inaccurate in predictions of the viscosity.

  6. Viscoseal performance with rarefied-gas sealant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    A fundamental study of viscoseals having a rarefied gas as the sealant was conducted. Both experimental and analytical investigations are reported. Three different analytical models were formulated and are described in detail. An experimental investigation was conducted on multiple grooved two-inch diameter viscoseals over a wide range of gas densities and shaft speeds up to 30,000 rpm. Comparisons are presented between actual viscoseal performance and the theoretical predictions for both sealing coefficient and net leakage parameters as functions of the degree of gas rarefication. Recommendations are presented for the use of the analytical models.

  7. Viscoseal performance with rarefied-gas sealant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, M. W.

    1971-01-01

    A fundamental study of viscoseals having a rarefied gas as the sealant has been conducted. Both experimental and analytical investigations are reported. Three different analytical models have been formulated and are described in detail. An experimental investigation has been conducted on multiple grooved two-inch diameter viscoseals over a wide range of gas densities and shaft speeds up to 30,000 rpm. Comparisons are presented between actual viscoseal performance and the theoretical predictions for both sealing coefficient and net leakage parameters as functions of the degree of gas rarefication. Recommendations are presented for the use of the analytical models.

  8. Shear viscosity from effective couplings of gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Nie Zhangyu; Sun Yawen

    2008-12-15

    We calculate the shear viscosity of field theories with gravity duals using Kubo formula by calculating the Green function of dual transverse gravitons and confirm that the value of the shear viscosity is fully determined by the effective coupling of transverse gravitons on the horizon. We calculate the effective coupling of transverse gravitons for Einstein and Gauss-Bonnet gravities coupled with matter fields, respectively. Then we apply the resulting formula to the case of AdS Gauss-Bonnet gravity with F{sup 4} term corrections of Maxwell field and discuss the effect of F{sup 4} terms on the ratio of the shear viscosity to entropy density.

  9. Bulk viscosity of superfluid hyperon stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gusakov, Mikhail E.; Kantor, Elena M.

    2008-10-15

    We calculate the bulk viscosity due to nonequilibrium weak processes in superfluid nucleon-hyperon matter of neutron stars. For that, the dissipative relativistic hydrodynamics, formulated eariler [M. E. Gusakov, Phys. Rev. D 76, 083001 (2007).] for superfluid mixtures, is extended to the case when both nucleons and hyperons are superfluid. It is demonstrated that in the most general case (when neutrons, protons, {lambda}, and {sigma}{sup -} hyperons are superfluid), nonequilibrium weak processes generate 16 bulk viscosity coefficients, with only three of them being independent. In addition, we correct an inaccuracy in a widely used formula for the bulk viscosity of nonsuperfluid nucleon-hyperon matter.

  10. Blood viscosity: influence of erythrocyte aggregation.

    PubMed

    Chien, S; Usami, S; Dellenback, R J; Gregersen, M I; Nanninga, L B; Guest, M M

    1967-08-18

    The addition of purified canine or bovine fibrinogen to suspensions of canine erythocytes in Ringer solution caused an increase in viscosity and the formation of aggregates of erythocytes. Both of these effects became increasingly pronounced as the fibrinogen concentration was raised, and they approached plateaus with 1 gram of fibrinogen per 100 milliliters. An increase in shear rate (or shear stress) reduced both the effect on viscosity and the aggregate size. The data suggest that fibrinogen causes an increase in blood viscosity and a departure from Newtonian behavior by interacting with erythrocytes to form cell aggregates which can be dispersed by shear stress. PMID:17842794

  11. Shear viscosity in the postquasistatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Peralta, C.; Rosales, L.; Rodriguez-Mueller, B.; Barreto, W.

    2010-05-15

    We apply the postquasistatic approximation, an iterative method for the evolution of self-gravitating spheres of matter, to study the evolution of anisotropic nonadiabatic radiating and dissipative distributions in general relativity. Dissipation is described by viscosity and free-streaming radiation, assuming an equation of state to model anisotropy induced by the shear viscosity. We match the interior solution, in noncomoving coordinates, with the Vaidya exterior solution. Two simple models are presented, based on the Schwarzschild and Tolman VI solutions, in the nonadiabatic and adiabatic limit. In both cases, the eventual collapse or expansion of the distribution is mainly controlled by the anisotropy induced by the viscosity.

  12. Bulk viscosity of a pion gas

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Egang; Moore, Guy D.

    2011-04-15

    We compute the bulk viscosity of a gas of pions at temperatures below the QCD crossover temperature, for the physical value of m{sub {pi}}, to lowest order in chiral perturbation theory. Bulk viscosity is controlled by number-changing processes which become exponentially slow at low temperatures when the pions become exponentially dilute, leading to an exponentially large bulk viscosity {zeta}{approx}(F{sub 0}{sup 8}/m{sub {pi}}{sup 5})exp(2m{sub {pi}}/T), where F{sub 0}{approx_equal}93 MeV is the pion decay constant.

  13. Drag reduction by a linear viscosity profile.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Elisabetta; Casciola, Carlo M; L'vov, Victor S; Pomyalov, Anna; Procaccia, Itamar; Tiberkevich, Vasil

    2004-11-01

    Drag reduction by polymers in turbulent flows raises an apparent contradiction: the stretching of the polymers must increase the viscosity, so why is the drag reduced? A recent theory proposed that drag reduction, in agreement with experiments, is consistent with the effective viscosity growing linearly with the distance from the wall. With this self-consistent solution the reduction in the Reynolds stress overwhelms the increase in viscous drag. In this Rapid Communication we show, using direct numerical simulations, that a linear viscosity profile indeed reduces the drag in agreement with the theory and in close correspondence with direct simulations of the FENE-P model at the same flow conditions.

  14. In-flight surface tension and viscosity measurements of inkjet printed droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staat, Hendrik; van der Bos, Arjan; van den Berg, Marc; Reinten, Hans; Wijshoff, Herman; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    In modern drop-on-demand inkjet printing, the jetted liquid is a mixture of solvents, pigments and surfactants. In order to predict the droplet formation process, it is of importance to know the liquid properties. Surface tension is not constant at the timescale of droplet formation for a liquid that contains surfactants, making it non-trivial to determine the surface tension of the ink directly. Therefore we developed a technique to measure the surface tension of liquids during inkjet printing. We use high speed imaging to record the shape oscillation of a microdroplet within the first few hundred microseconds after droplet pinch-off. The frequency of oscillation depends on the surface tension, so by determining this frequency, we can measure the surface tension. The decay of oscillation amplitude is set by the viscosity, so we can also determine the viscosity with this technique. We use this technique to study the effect of surfactants on the surface tension of ink during the inkjet printing process.

  15. Universal pinch off of rods by capillarity-driven surface diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.; Miksis, M.J.; Voorhees, P.W.; Davis, S.H.

    1998-06-05

    Interfacial energy is a central factor in setting the morphology of phases and in determining the stability of equilibrium morphologies. here the authors examine the morphological evolution of a rod via capillary-driven surface diffusion as it both approaches and departs the topological singularity of pinch off. During the final stages of pinching the neck radius approaches zero, and self-similar solutions are sought. The authors have derived local similarity solutions for the axisymmetric pinch off of rods when the morphological evolution is by capillarity-driven surface diffusion. These local solutions describe the approach to and departure from the topological singularity where a rod pinches into two separate bodies. During pinching, the self-similar surface profile far away from the neck approaches two opposing cones with a unique half-cone angle of 46.04{degree}. It is thus likely that all rods must pinch off with this cone angle. This assertion is supported by several numerical simulations. After pinch off, the smoothening of the cone tip is again self-similar. The results obtained here for rods also apply to the pinch off of cylindrical pore channels.

  16. Anomalous current pinch of a toroidal axisymmetric plasma with stochastic magnetic field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaojie

    2016-07-01

    Anomalous current pinch, in addition to the anomalous diffusion due to stochastic magnetic perturbations, is theoretically found, which may qualitatively explain the recent DIII-D experiment on resonant magnetic field perturbation. The anomalous current pinch, which may resolve the long-standing issue of seed current in a fully bootstrapped tokamak, is also discussed for the electrostatic turbulence.

  17. A microfluidic device for simultaneous measurement of viscosity and flow rate of blood in a complex fluidic network

    PubMed Central

    Jun Kang, Yang; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Blood viscosity has been considered as one of important biophysical parameters for effectively monitoring variations in physiological and pathological conditions of circulatory disorders. Standard previous methods make it difficult to evaluate variations of blood viscosity under cardiopulmonary bypass procedures or hemodialysis. In this study, we proposed a unique microfluidic device for simultaneously measuring viscosity and flow rate of whole blood circulating in a complex fluidic network including a rat, a reservoir, a pinch valve, and a peristaltic pump. To demonstrate the proposed method, a twin-shaped microfluidic device, which is composed of two half-circular chambers, two side channels with multiple indicating channels, and one bridge channel, was carefully designed. Based on the microfluidic device, three sequential flow controls were applied to identify viscosity and flow rate of blood, with label-free and sensorless detection. The half-circular chamber was employed to achieve mechanical membrane compliance for flow stabilization in the microfluidic device. To quantify the effect of flow stabilization on flow fluctuations, a formula of pulsation index (PI) was analytically derived using a discrete fluidic circuit model. Using the PI formula, the time constant contributed by the half-circular chamber is estimated to be 8 s. Furthermore, flow fluctuations resulting from the peristaltic pumps are completely removed, especially under periodic flow conditions within short periods (T < 10 s). For performance demonstrations, the proposed method was applied to evaluate blood viscosity with respect to varying flow rate conditions [(a) known blood flow rate via a syringe pump, (b) unknown blood flow rate via a peristaltic pump]. As a result, the flow rate and viscosity of blood can be simultaneously measured with satisfactory accuracy. In addition, the proposed method was successfully applied to identify the viscosity of rat blood, which circulates in a

  18. A microfluidic device for simultaneous measurement of viscosity and flow rate of blood in a complex fluidic network.

    PubMed

    Jun Kang, Yang; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Blood viscosity has been considered as one of important biophysical parameters for effectively monitoring variations in physiological and pathological conditions of circulatory disorders. Standard previous methods make it difficult to evaluate variations of blood viscosity under cardiopulmonary bypass procedures or hemodialysis. In this study, we proposed a unique microfluidic device for simultaneously measuring viscosity and flow rate of whole blood circulating in a complex fluidic network including a rat, a reservoir, a pinch valve, and a peristaltic pump. To demonstrate the proposed method, a twin-shaped microfluidic device, which is composed of two half-circular chambers, two side channels with multiple indicating channels, and one bridge channel, was carefully designed. Based on the microfluidic device, three sequential flow controls were applied to identify viscosity and flow rate of blood, with label-free and sensorless detection. The half-circular chamber was employed to achieve mechanical membrane compliance for flow stabilization in the microfluidic device. To quantify the effect of flow stabilization on flow fluctuations, a formula of pulsation index (PI) was analytically derived using a discrete fluidic circuit model. Using the PI formula, the time constant contributed by the half-circular chamber is estimated to be 8 s. Furthermore, flow fluctuations resulting from the peristaltic pumps are completely removed, especially under periodic flow conditions within short periods (T < 10 s). For performance demonstrations, the proposed method was applied to evaluate blood viscosity with respect to varying flow rate conditions [(a) known blood flow rate via a syringe pump, (b) unknown blood flow rate via a peristaltic pump]. As a result, the flow rate and viscosity of blood can be simultaneously measured with satisfactory accuracy. In addition, the proposed method was successfully applied to identify the viscosity of rat blood, which circulates in a

  19. Shear-Limited Diffusion and Viscosity: Experiments and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, C. Fred

    2001-10-01

    Experiments and theory on collisional diffusion and viscosity demonstrate enhanced transport in the 2D bounce-averaged regime, limited by shear in the plasma rotation. The experiments are performed on relatively quiescent pure-ion or pure electron plasma columns, where the shear in the drift rotation ωE (r) can be controlled accurately. For long plasma columns, we measure test particle diffusion(F. Anderegg, et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 2128 (1997). and bulk viscosity(J.M. Kriesel and C.F. Driscoll, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. (2001).) coefficients which quantitatively agree with recent 3D theories(D.H.E. Dubin, Phys. Plasmas 5), 1688 (1998). of E × B drift collisions with impact parameters in the range rc < ρ < λ_D. In general, this transport is substantially greater than would be expected for velocity-scattering collisions with ρ < r_c. For finite plasma length L_p, thermal particles may bounce axially many times before rotational shear separates them in θ and this number of bounces Nb ≡ ( barv / 2L_p) / (r ; partial ωE / partial r) characterizes the approach to the 2D bounce-averaged regime. Experiments measuring electron viscosity coefficients and separate experiments measuring tagged ion diffusion coefficients each show transport enhancements up to 100×, scaling quantitatively as Nb over the range 1 < Nb < 10^2. In the zero-shear limit of Nb arrow ∞ , theory treats the particles as z-averaged rods of charge undergoing 2D E × B drift dynamics. For this case, Taylor and McNamara showed that Bohm-like diffusion results from large-scale thermally-excited ``Dawson-Okuda'' vortices. More recently, Dubin(D.H.E. Dubin and D.Z. Jin, Phys. Lett. A 284), 112 (2001). analyzed the 2D test-particle diffusion with applied background shear, showing that the particle diffusion decreases with increasing shear. Overall, this new theory gives fair quantitative agreement with the diffusion experiments from the 3D (or high shear) regime with Nb <= 1 to the 2D (or

  20. Liner Compression of a MAGO / Inverse-Pinch Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Siemon, R E; Atchison, W L; Awe, T; Bauer, B S; Buyko, A M; Chernyshev, V K; Cowan, T E; Degnan, J H; Faehl, R J; Fuelling, S; Garanin, S F; Goodrich, T; Ivanovsky, A V; Lindemuth, I R; Makhin, V; Mokhov, V N; Reinovsky, R E; Ryutov, D D; Scudder, D W; Taylor, T; Yakubov, V B

    2005-05-18

    In the ''metal liner'' approach to Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), a preheated magnetized plasma target is compressed to thermonuclear temperature and high density by externally driving the implosion of a flux conserving metal enclosure, or liner, which contains the plasma target. As in inertial confinement fusion, the principle fusion fuel heating mechanism is pdV work by the imploding enclosure, called a pusher in ICF. One possible MTF target, the hard-core diffuse z pinch, has been studied in MAGO experiments at VNIIEF, and is one possible target being considered for experiments on the Atlas pulsed power facility. Numerical MHD simulations show two intriguing and helpful features of the diffuse z pinch with respect to compressional heating. First, in two-dimensional simulations the m=0 interchange modes, arising from an unstable pressure profile, result in turbulent motions and self-organization into a stable pressure profile. The turbulence also gives rise to convective thermal transport, but the level of turbulence saturates at a finite level, and simulations show substantial heating during liner compression despite the turbulence. The second helpful feature is that pressure profile evolution during compression tends towards improved stability rather than instability when analyzed according to the Kadomtsev criteria. A liner experiment is planned for Atlas to study compression of magnetic flux without plasma as a first step. The Atlas geometry is compatible with a diffuse z pinch, and simulations of possible future experiments show that keV temperatures and useful neutron production for diagnostic purposes should be possible if a suitable plasma injector is added to the Atlas facility.

  1. Theta-Pinch Thruster for Piloted Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Mike R.; Reddy, Dhanireddy (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A new high-power propulsion concept that combines a rapidly pulsed theta-pinch discharge with upstream particle reflection by a magnetic mirror was evaluated under a Phase 1 grant awarded through the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts. Analytic and numerical models were developed to predict the performance of a theta-pinch thruster operated over a wide range of initial gas pressures and discharge periods. The models indicate that a 1 m radius, 10 m long thruster operated with hydrogen propellant could provide impulse-bits ranging from 1 N-s to 330 N-s with specific impulse values of 7,500 s to 2,500 s, respectively. A pulsed magnetic field strength of 2 T is required to compress and heat the preionized hydrogen over a 10(exp -3) second discharge period, with about 60% of the heated plasma exiting the chamber each period to produce thrust. The unoptimized thruster efficiency is low, peaking at approximately 16% for an initial hydrogen chamber pressure of 100 Torr. The specific impulse and impulse-bit at this operating condition are 3,500 s and 90 N-s, respectively, and the required discharge energy is approximately 9x10(exp 6) J. For a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, the engine would produce an average thrust of 900 N at 3,500 s specific impulse. Combined with the electrodeless nature of the device, these performance parameters indicate that theta-pinch thrusters could provide unique, long-life propulsion systems for piloted deep space mission applications.

  2. Fast Z - Pinch Study in Russia and Related Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabovskii, E. V.

    2002-12-01

    The fast Z pinches are considered as a perspective source of powerful soft x-ray emission for the ICF pellet ignition. The physical phenomena which take place in process fast of Z-pinch implosion are under investigation in the TRINITI (Troisk), in the RSC Kurchatov Institute (KI, Moscow) and the HCEI (Tomsk). In the KI the possibility of terawatt electrical power transfer in small volume hohlraum during nanosecond time duration is studied. In the TRINITI the physics of multi wire arrays implosion, the rate of plasma production in current-driven wire arrays, the conversion of pulsed power energy into x-ray emission are studied. In the HCEI (Tomsk) the stability of double gas puff implosion and the influence of gas puff regime and current pulse duration on the implosion and emitted x-ray spectrum are under investigation. The HCEI develops the new components of pulse power multi spark switches and the generators of impulse currents (LTD) with duration of an energy supply less than 100 ns. As available way to get the pulsed power generator with multi tens megaampere current the joint team of scientists from the laboratories of the TRINITI, the Efremov Institute, RFNC VNIITF (Snezinsk) have developed the concept of the Baikal facility. The KI designs, creates and tests the plasma erosion switches for the module of the Baikal facility. The inductive storage, the systems of magnetic field compression and the explosive open switches are developed in the TRINITI and the Efremov Institute. The development of new design of the pulse power generators and physics of fast Z-pinch implosion aims to create next advanced generation of powerful driver for ICF.

  3. Z-Pinch fusion-based nuclear propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, J.; Statham, G.; Fabisinski, L.; Maples, C. D.; Adams, R.; Polsgrove, T.; Fincher, S.; Cassibry, J.; Cortez, R.; Turner, M.; Percy, T.

    2013-02-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Due to the great distances between the planets of our solar system and the harmful radiation environment of interplanetary space, high specific impulse (Isp) propulsion in vehicles with high payload mass fractions must be developed to provide practical and safe vehicles for human space flight missions. The Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method is a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) approach that may potentially lead to a small, low cost fusion reactor/engine assembly [1]. Recent advancements in experimental and theoretical understanding of this concept suggest favorable scaling of fusion power output yield [2]. The magnetic field resulting from the large current compresses the plasma to fusion conditions, and this process can be pulsed over short timescales (10-6 s). This type of plasma formation is widely used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects testing in the defense industry, as well as in fusion energy research. A Z-Pinch propulsion concept was designed for a vehicle based on a previous fusion vehicle study called "Human Outer Planet Exploration" (HOPE), which used Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) [3] propulsion. The reference mission is the transport of crew and cargo to Mars and back, with a reusable vehicle. The analysis of the Z-Pinch MIF propulsion system concludes that a 40-fold increase of Isp over chemical propulsion is predicted. An Isp of 19,436 s and thrust of 3812 N s/pulse, along with nearly doubling the predicted payload mass fraction, warrants further development of enabling technologies.

  4. Feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in a reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.

    2005-09-01

    An array of saddle coils having Nc=16 equally spaced positions along the toroidal direction has been installed for feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsaker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)]. Using feedback, multiple nonresonant RWMs are simultaneously suppressed for three to four wall times. Feedback stabilization of RWMs results in a significant prolongation of the discharge duration. This is linked to a better sustainment of the plasma and tearing mode toroidal rotation with feedback. Due to the limited number of coils in the toroidal direction, pairs of modes with toroidal mode numbers n ,n' that fulfill the condition ∣n-n'∣=Nc are coupled by the feedback action from the discrete coil array. With only one unstable mode in a pair of coupled modes, the suppression of the unstable mode is successful. If two modes are unstable in a coupled pair, two possibilities exist: partial suppression of both modes or, alternatively, complete stabilization of one target mode while the other is left unstable.

  5. Reversed field pinch operation with intelligent shell feedback control in EXTRAP T2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Menmuir, S.; Cecconello, M.; Hedqvist, A.; Yadikin, D.; Drake, J. R.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-11-01

    Discharges in the thin shell reversed field pinch (RFP) device EXTRAP T2R without active feedback control are characterized by growth of non-resonant m = 1 unstable resistive wall modes (RWMs) in agreement with linear MHD theory. Resonant m = 1 tearing modes (TMs) exhibit initially fast rotation and the associated perturbed radial fields at the shell are small, but eventually TMs wall-lock and give rise to a growing radial field. The increase in the radial field at the wall due to growing RWMs and wall-locked TMs is correlated with an increase in the toroidal loop voltage, which leads to discharge termination after 3-4 wall times. An active magnetic feedback control system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R. A two-dimensional array of 128 active saddle coils (pair-connected into 64 independent m = 1 coils) is used with intelligent shell feedback control to suppress the m = 1 radial field at the shell. With feedback control, active stabilization of the full toroidal spectrum of 16 unstable m = 1 non-resonant RWMs is achieved, and TM wall locking is avoided. A three-fold extension of the pulse length, up to the power supply limit, is observed. Intelligent shell feedback control is able to maintain the plasma equilibrium for 10 wall times, with plasma confinement parameters sustained at values comparable to those obtained in thick shell devices of similar size.

  6. Viscosity and Shear Flows in Magnetized Dusty Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Bates, E. M.; Birmingham, W. J.; Rivera, W. F.; Takeno, J.; Knop, S.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetized dusty plasma experiments are planned at the Dusty Plasma Laboratory of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), to investigate E x B rotation with dust of at least 500 nm in diameter. At this size, individual particles can be tracked and viscosity, shear flow, and temperature can be measured directly using a methodology similar to that used for linear shear flow configurations [Feng et al. PRL 109, 185002 (2012)]. The experiments are planned with a specially designed Bitter-type magnet that can be configured to achieve up to 10 T for at least 10 seconds, to minutes, with much longer operation times at lower fields also possible. At the highest field, the dust will be fully magnetized and thus we aim to achieve direct E x B rotation of the dust (and not just by ion drag). The motivation for these experiments comes from observations of electron and ion temperatures in excess of 100 eV in E x B rotating plasmas [R. Reid et al. Phys. Plasmas 21, 063305 (2014)]. The experimental setup and planned diagnostics for the magnetized dusty plasma are presented.

  7. Radiating Shock Measurements in the Z-Pinch Dynamic Hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Chandler, G. A.; Lemke, R. W.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Maron, Y.; Fisher, D. V.; Fisher, V. I.; Stambulchik, E.; Dunham, G. S.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Schroen, D. G.

    2008-03-28

    The Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum is an x-ray source for high energy-density physics studies that is heated by a radiating shock to radiation temperatures >200 eV. The time-dependent 300-400 eV electron temperature and 15-35 mg/cc density of this shock have been measured for the first time using space-resolved Si tracer spectroscopy. The shock x-ray emission is inferred from these measurements to exceed 50 TW, delivering >180 kJ to the hohlraum.

  8. COMPARISON OF AIR AND DEUTERIUM ON PINCH WELD BOND APPEARANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P

    2005-10-11

    The effect that air and deuterium internal atmospheres have on the pinch weld bond quality was evaluated by conducting a scoping study using type 304L stainless steel LF-7 test stems that were fabricated for an associated study. Welds were made under cool, yet nominal conditions to exacerbate the influence of the atmosphere. The bond quality of the welds was directly related to the internal atmosphere with the air atmosphere welds being of lower quality than the deuterium atmosphere welds for nominally identical welding conditions.

  9. Neoclassical Transport in the Helical Reversed-Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbin, M.; Spizzo, G.; Marrelli, L.; White, R. B.

    2010-11-01

    Test particle evaluation of the diffusion coefficient in a fusion plasma in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration shows distinct similarities with stellarators when the plasma spontaneously evolves towards a helical shape. The almost total absence of superbanana particles at the levels of helical deformation seen in experiment (Bh/B=10%) causes transport to be proportional to collision frequency (at low collisions). This fact excludes the possibility that the minimum conceivable transport could be inversely proportional to collision frequency, which is typical of unoptimized stellarators. This result strengthens the perspectives of the helical RFP as a fusion configuration.

  10. Anode-plasma expansion in pinch-reflex diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Colombant, D.G.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1983-10-24

    Anode-plasma expansion in pinch-reflex diodes is investigated with use of a one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model. Early in time, the plasma undergoes thermal expansion and its front is slowed down as a result of j x B. After the current has reached its maximum and for small radius where j and B are larger, j x B may accelerate the bulk of the anode plasma to large velocities. Good qualitative agreement is obtained with observations of the time dependence of the plasma velocity as well as its radial profile. The maximum expansion velocities reach tens of centimeters per microsecond.

  11. Electron Bernstein Wave Experiments in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. K.; Cengher, M.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Forest, C. B.; Carter, M.; Harvey, R. W.; Pinsker, R. I.; Smirnov, A. P.

    2003-12-01

    A system to heat electrons in the Madison Symmetric Torus through the electron Bernstein wave is currently being developed. This is an attractive heating scheme for the overdense reversed field pinch plasma, where electron cyclotron heating and current drive are inaccessible. Low power experiments (˜ 1 watt) have shown that a significant fraction of launched electromagnetic power successfully couples to the electron Bernstein wave. Furthermore, these experiments have found an optimized launch with finite n⊥. Initial results from experiments at moderate power (˜ 150 kW for several milliseconds, driven by a pair of S-band traveling wave tube amplifiers) are presented.

  12. Turbulence, flow and transport: hints from reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2006-04-01

    The interplay between sheared E × B flows and turbulence has been experimentally investigated in the edge region of the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment. Electrostatic fluctuations are found to rule the momentum balance equation representing the main driving term for sheared flows which counterbalances anomalous viscous damping. The driving role of electrostatic fluctuations is proved by the spatial structure of the Reynolds stress and by the time behaviour of the mean energy production term which supports the existence of an energy exchange from the small scales of turbulence to the larger scales of the mean flow.

  13. Stability of a diffuse linear pinch with axial boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Einaudi, G.; Van Hoven, G.

    1981-01-01

    A formulation of the stability behavior of a finite-length pinch is presented. A general initial perturbation is expressed as a uniformly convergent sum over a complete discrete k set. A variational calculation is then performed, based on the energy principle, in which the end-boundary conditions appear as constraints. The requisite Lagrange multipliers mutually couple the elemental periodic excitations. The resulting extended form of delta-W still admits a proper second-variation treatment so that the minimization and stability considerations of Newcomb remain applicable. Comparison theorems are discussed as is the relevance of this end-effect model to the stability of solar coronal loops.

  14. Collision and average velocity effects on the ratchet pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, M.; Benkadda, S.

    2008-03-15

    A ratchet-type average velocity V{sup R} appears for test particles moving in a stochastic potential and a magnetic field that is space dependent. This model is developed by including particle collisions and an average velocity. We show that these components of the motion can destroy the ratchet velocity but they also can produce significant increase of V{sup R}, depending on the parameters. The amplification of the ratchet pinch is a nonlinear effect that appears in the presence of trajectory eddying.

  15. OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR FILL STEM MANUFACTURINGAND PINCH WELD PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P; Karl Arnold, K

    2006-09-06

    A statistically designed experiment was conducted as part of a six sigma project for Fill Stem Manufacturing and Pinch Weld Processing. This multi-year/multi-site project has successfully completed a screening study and used those results as inputs to this optimization study. Eleven welds were made using fairly tight current and cycle range. The welds demonstrate increased burst strength, longer closure length, more net displacement, and improved bond rating with increased current. However, excessive melting remains a concern from a processing viewpoint and may cause adverse metallurgical interactions. Therefore, the highest current levels specified cannot be utilized. A Validation Study is proposed for the Defense Programs Inert Facility.

  16. Infinitesimal structure of inverse pinch effect cylindrical MHD shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Roy S; Stanescu, Dan; Tucker, Don H

    2008-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is used to derive the relationships between the jump functions for density, pressure, velocity and magnetic field within a diverging cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic shock caused by the inverse pinch effect. The shock is assumed to have infinitesimal thickness. The obtained relationships allow explicit numerical constructions of the shock structure once the variation in one variable, here chosen to be the density, is specified. The shapes thus constructed offer additional insight into the physics of such shock waves from a perspective which would be extremely difficult to investigate experimentally.

  17. Bubble pinch-off and scaling during liquid drop impact on liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Bahni; Biswas, Gautam; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2012-08-01

    Simulations are performed to show entrapment of air bubble accompanied by high speed upward and downward water jets when a water drop impacts a pool of water surface. A new bubble entrapment zone characterised by small bubble pinch-off and long thick jet is found. Depending on the bubble and jet behaviour, the bubble entrapment zone is subdivided into three sub-regimes. The entrapped bubble size and jet height depends on the crater shape and its maximum depth. During the bubble formation, bubble neck develops an almost singular shape as it pinches off. The final pinch-off shape and the power law governing the pinching, rneck ∝ A(t0 - t)αvaries with the Weber number. Weber dependence of the function describing the radius of the bubble during the pinch-off only affects the coefficient A and not the power exponent α.

  18. The Rheological Properties of Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Gels from Rotational Viscometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Glenn A.; Bella, Malika; Salzmann, Christoph G.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was developed to follow the gelation of a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) solution upon addition of borax by using rotational viscometry. The rheological properties of the gel were examined, measuring the dependence of viscosity and shear stress on the shear rate. Time-dependent studies were also conducted in which the viscosity of…

  19. A phenomenological treatment of rotating turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    The strong similarity between the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and initially isotropic turbulence subject to rotation is noted. We then apply the MHD phenomenologies of Kraichnan and Matthaeus & Zhou to rotating turbulence. When the turbulence is subject to a strong rotation, the energy spectrum is found to scale as E(k) = C(sub Omega)(Omega(sub epsilon))(sup 1/2)k(sup -2), where Omega is the rotation rate, k is the wavenumber, and epsilon is the dissipation rate. This spectral form is consistent with a recent letter by Zeman. However, here the constant C(sub Omega) is found to be related to the Kolmogorov constant and is estimated in the range 1.22 - 1.87 for the typical values of the latter constant. A 'rule' that relates spectral transfer times to the eddy turnover time and the time scale for decay of the triple correlations is deduced. A hypothesis for the triple correlation decay rate leads to the spectral law which varies between the '-5/3' (without rotation) and '-2' laws (with strong rotation). For intermediate rotation rates, the spectrum varies according to the value of a dimensionless parameter that measures the strength of the rotation wavenumber k(sub Omega) = (Omega(sup 3)/epsiolon)(sup 1/2) relative to the wavenumber k. An eddy viscosity is derived with an explicit dependence on the rotation rate.

  20. Measurement of DWPF glass viscosity - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J.R.

    2000-02-17

    This report details the results of a scoping study funded by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for the measurement of melt viscosities for simulated glasses representative of Macrobatch 2 (Tank 42/51 feed).

  1. Second coefficient of viscosity in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Zheng, Zhonquan

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic attenuation measurements in air were analyzed in order to estimate the second coefficient of viscosity. Data over a temperature range of 11 C to 50 C and at relative humidities between 6 percent and 91 percent were used. This analysis showed that the second coefficient of viscosity varied between 1900 and 20,000 times larger than the dynamic or first coefficient of viscosity over the temperature and humidity range of the data. In addition, the data showed that the molecular relaxation effects, which are responsible for the magnitude of the second coefficient of viscosity, place severe limits on the use of time-independent, thermodynamic equations of state. Compressible flows containing large streamwise velocity gradients, like shock waves, which cause significant changes in particle properties to occur during time intervals shorter than hundredths of seconds, must be modeled using dynamic equations of state. The dynamic model approach is described briefly.

  2. Viscosity of Sheared Helical filament Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartucci, Matthew; Urbach, Jeff; Blair, Dan; Schwenger, Walter

    The viscosity of suspensions can be dramatically affected by high aspect ratio particles. Understanding these systems provides insight into key biological functions and can be manipulated for many technological applications. In this talk, the viscosity as a function of shear rate of suspensions of helical filaments is compared to that of suspensions of straight rod-like filaments. Our goal is to determine the impact of filament geometry on low volume fraction colloidal suspensions in order to identify strategies for altering viscosity with minimal volume fraction. In this research, the detached flagella of the bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium are used as a model system of helical filaments and compared to mutated straight flagella of the Salmonella. We compare rheological measurements of the suspension viscosity in response to shear flow and use a combination of the rheology and fluorescence microscopy to identify the microstructural changes responsible for the observed rheological response.

  3. Quartz resonator fluid density and viscosity monitor

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Stephen J.; Wiczer, James J.; Cernosek, Richard W.; Frye, Gregory C.; Gebert, Charles T.; Casaus, Leonard; Mitchell, Mary A.

    1998-01-01

    A pair of thickness-shear mode resonators, one smooth and one with a textured surface, allows fluid density and viscosity to be independently resolved. A textured surface, either randomly rough or regularly patterned, leads to trapping of liquid at the device surface. The synchronous motion of this trapped liquid with the oscillating device surface allows the device to weigh the liquid; this leads to an additional response that depends on liquid density. This additional response enables a pair of devices, one smooth and one textured, to independently resolve liquid density and viscosity; the difference in responses determines the density while the smooth device determines the density-viscosity product, and thus, the pair determines both density and viscosity.

  4. Blood viscosity: influence of erythrocyte deformation.

    PubMed

    Chien, S; Usami, S; Dellenback, R J; Gregersen, M I

    1967-08-18

    Suspensions of canine and human erythocytes hardened with acetaldehyde differ from the suspensions of normal erythrocytes with respect to their rheological behavior. Normal erythrocytes can be packed by centrifugation so that the sediment volume is nearly 100 percent cells, but the hardened erythrocytes (RBC's) can be packed only to approximately 60 percent cells. At the same cell percentage the viscosity of the hardened RBC suspension is higher than that of the suspension of normal erythocytes. An increase in shear stress deforms the normal erythocytes and lowers the suspension viscosity, but has no influence on the viscosity of the hardened cell suspension. In blood with high cell percentages, the shear deformation of normal RBC's plays an important role in reducing viscosity and facilitating flow at high shear stresses. PMID:17842793

  5. The importance of EBIT data for Z-pinch plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, A S; Kantsyrev, V L; Neill, P; Safronova, U I; Fedin, D A; Ouart, N D; Yilmaz, M F; Osborne, G; Shrestha, I; Williamson, K; Hoppe, T; Harris, C; Beiersdorfer, P; Hansen, S

    2007-04-04

    The results from the last six years of x-ray spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry of high energy density Z-pinch plasmas complemented by experiments with the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are presented. The two topics discussed are the development of M-shell x-ray W spectroscopic diagnostics and K-shell Ti spectropolarimetry of Z-pinch plasmas. The main focus is on radiation from a specific load configuration called an 'X-pinch'. X-pinches are excellent sources for testing new spectral diagnostics and for atomic modelling because of the high density and temperature of the pinch plasmas, which scale from a few {micro}m to several mm in size. They offer a variety of load configurations, which differ in wire connections, number of wires, and wire materials. In this work the study of X-pinches with tungsten wires combined with wires from other, lower-Z materials is reported. Utilizing data produced with the LLNL EBIT at different energies of the electron beam the theoretical prediction of line positions and intensity of M-shell W spectra were tested and calibrated. Polarization-sensitive X-pinch experiments at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) provide experimental evidence for the existence of strong electron beams in Ti and Mo X-pinch plasmas and motivate the development of x-ray spectropolarimetry of Z-pinch plasmas. This diagnostic is based on the measurement of spectra recorded simultaneously by two spectrometers with different sensitivity to the linear polarization of the observed lines and compared with theoretical models of polarization-dependent spectra. Polarization-dependent K-shell spectra from Ti X-pinches are presented and compared with model calculations and with spectra generated by a quasi-Maxwellian electron beam at the LLNL EBIT-II electron beam ion trap.

  6. Viscosity distribution in the mantle convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubitsyn, V. P.

    2016-09-01

    Viscosity is a fundamental property of the mantle which determines the global geodynamical processes. According to the microscopic theory of defects and laboratory experiments, viscosity exponentially depends on temperature and pressure, with activation energy and activation volume being the parameters. The existing laboratory measurements are conducted with much higher strain rates than in the mantle and have significant uncertainty. The data on postglacial rebound only allow the depth distributions of viscosity to be reconstructed. Therefore, spatial distributions (along the depth and lateral) are as of now determined from the models of mantle convection which are calculated by the numerical solution of the convection equations, together with the viscosity dependences on pressure and temperature ( PT-dependences). The PT-dependences of viscosity which are presently used in the numerical modeling of convection give a large scatter in the estimates for the lower mantle, which reaches several orders of magnitude. In this paper, it is shown that it is possible to achieve agreement between the calculated depth distributions of viscosity throughout the entire mantle and the postglacial rebound data. For this purpose, the values of the volume and energy of activation for the upper mantle can be taken from the laboratory experiments, and for the lower mantle, the activation volume should be reduced twice at the 660-km phase transition boundary. Next, the reduction in viscosity by an order of magnitude revealed at the depths below 2000 km by the postglacial rebound data can be accounted for by the presence of heavy hot material at the mantle bottom in the LLSVP zones. The models of viscosity spatial distribution throughout the entire mantle with the lithospheric plates are presented.

  7. Shear viscosity in SU(2) lattice gluodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braguta, V. V.; Kotov, A. Yu

    2015-05-01

    The calculation of the gluon plasma viscosity has been performed by lattice simulations in the SU(2) gluodynamics at T/Tc = 1.2 on the supercomputers. The evaluation is based on the Kubo formula that relates viscosity to the spectral function of the correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor. For the extraction of the spectral function from the Euclidean correlator the linear method is applied.

  8. Eddy viscosity measurements in a rectangular jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, David H.; Morrison, Gerald L.

    1988-01-01

    The flow field of a rectangular jet with a 2:1 aspect ratio was studied at a Reynolds number of 100,000 (Mach number 0.09) using three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Velocity gradients, Reynolds stress tensor components, and scalar eddy viscosities are presented for the major and minor axis planes of the jet. The eddy viscosity model was found to be applicable only in the direction of maximum mean velocity gradient.

  9. Resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brunsell, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Observations of resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell (τw=6 ms) reversed field pinch are described. A nonresonant mode (m=1,n=-10) with the same handedness as the internal field grows nearly exponentially with an average growth time of about 2.6 ms (less than 1/2 of the shell time) consistent with linear stability theory. The externally nonresonant unstable modes (m=1,n>0), predicted by linear stability theory, are observed to have only low amplitudes (in the normal low-Θ operation mode of the device). The radial field of the dominant internally resonant tearing modes (m=1,n=-15 to n=-12) remain low due to spontaneous fast mode rotation, corresponding to angular phase velocities up to 280 krad/s. Phase aligned mode structures are observed to rotate toroidally with an average angular velocity of 40 krad/s, in the opposite direction of the plasma current. Toward the end of the discharge, the radial field of the internally resonant modes grows as the modes slow down and become wall-locked, in agreement with nonlinear computations. Fast rotation of the internally resonant modes has been observed only recently and is attributed to a change of the front-end system (vacuum vessel, shell, and TF coil) of the device.

  10. A Simple BODIPY-Based Viscosity Probe for Imaging of Cellular Viscosity in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Gao, Nengyue; Xu, Qing-Hua; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that indicates the functioning of cells. In this work, we developed a simple boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based probe, BTV, for cellular mitochondria viscosity imaging by coupling a simple BODIPY rotor with a mitochondria-targeting unit. The BTV exhibited a significant fluorescence intensity enhancement of more than 100-fold as the solvent viscosity increased. Also, the probe showed a direct linear relationship between the fluorescence lifetime and the media viscosity, which makes it possible to trace the change of the medium viscosity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that BTV could achieve practical applicability in the monitoring of mitochondrial viscosity changes in live cells through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).

  11. A Simple BODIPY-Based Viscosity Probe for Imaging of Cellular Viscosity in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Gao, Nengyue; Xu, Qing-Hua; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that indicates the functioning of cells. In this work, we developed a simple boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based probe, BTV, for cellular mitochondria viscosity imaging by coupling a simple BODIPY rotor with a mitochondria-targeting unit. The BTV exhibited a significant fluorescence intensity enhancement of more than 100-fold as the solvent viscosity increased. Also, the probe showed a direct linear relationship between the fluorescence lifetime and the media viscosity, which makes it possible to trace the change of the medium viscosity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that BTV could achieve practical applicability in the monitoring of mitochondrial viscosity changes in live cells through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). PMID:27589762

  12. A Simple BODIPY-Based Viscosity Probe for Imaging of Cellular Viscosity in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Gao, Nengyue; Xu, Qing-Hua; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that indicates the functioning of cells. In this work, we developed a simple boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based probe, BTV, for cellular mitochondria viscosity imaging by coupling a simple BODIPY rotor with a mitochondria-targeting unit. The BTV exhibited a significant fluorescence intensity enhancement of more than 100-fold as the solvent viscosity increased. Also, the probe showed a direct linear relationship between the fluorescence lifetime and the media viscosity, which makes it possible to trace the change of the medium viscosity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that BTV could achieve practical applicability in the monitoring of mitochondrial viscosity changes in live cells through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). PMID:27589762

  13. Ultraspinning instability of rotating black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, Oscar J. C.; Figueras, Pau; Monteiro, Ricardo; Santos, Jorge E.

    2010-11-15

    Rapidly rotating Myers-Perry black holes in d{>=}6 dimensions were conjectured to be unstable by Emparan and Myers. In a previous publication, we found numerically the onset of the axisymmetric ultraspinning instability in the singly spinning Myers-Perry black hole in d=7, 8, 9. This threshold also signals a bifurcation to new branches of axisymmetric solutions with pinched horizons that are conjectured to connect to the black ring, black Saturn and other families in the phase diagram of stationary solutions. We firmly establish that this instability is also present in d=6 and in d=10, 11. The boundary conditions of the perturbations are discussed in detail for the first time, and we prove that they preserve the angular velocity and temperature of the original Myers-Perry black hole. This property is fundamental to establishing a thermodynamic necessary condition for the existence of this instability in general rotating backgrounds. We also prove a previous claim that the ultraspinning modes cannot be pure gauge modes. Finally we find new ultraspinning Gregory-Laflamme instabilities of rotating black strings and branes that appear exactly at the critical rotation predicted by the aforementioned thermodynamic criterium. The latter is a refinement of the Gubser-Mitra conjecture.

  14. Axial Instability Growth in Tungsten Wire Array Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Adam; Knapp, Patrick; Greenly, John; Pikuz, Sergei; Shelkovenko, Tania; Hammer, David

    2010-11-01

    The individual exploding wires in wire array z-pinches have been shown to suffer from axially non-uniformity beginning from the moment of plasma formation. This non-uniformity grows in amplitude and wavelength until it reaches what appears to be a material dependent wavelength at the time array implosion begins. Previous work by Knapp et al. [1] studied the temporal evolution of this instability in aluminum wire arrays. We have extended that work to include the evolution of tungsten wire array instabilities. Time gated laser shadowgraphy is used to track wavelength and amplitude over a series of shots to develop a record of the instability's growth. We attempt to identify array parameters which significantly contribute to the growth of this instability. [4pt] [1] Knapp, P. F., J. B. Greenly, P. A. Gourdain, C. L. Hoyt, M. R. Martin, S. A. Pikuz, C. E. Seyler, T. A. Shelkovenko, and D. A. Hammer. ``Growth and Saturation of the Axial Instability in Low Wire Number Wire Array Z Pinches.'' Physics of Plasmas 17 (2010). Web.

  15. Simulation of Wire-Array Z Pinches with ALEGRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantrenne, Sophie; Bliss, David; Cochrane, Kyle; Coverdale, Christine; Deeney, Chris; Hall, Clint; Haill, Thomas; Jones, Brent; Lepell, Paul; Oliver, Bryan; Sinars, Daniel

    2006-10-01

    Wire-array z pinches provide the x-ray radiation drive for Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments at Sandia National Laboratories. A physical understanding of the physics of wire-array z pinches is important in providing a future radiation source capable of driving high-yield fusion capsules. Modeling of wire-array implosions on the Z machine were performed using the 2-D radiation MHD code Alegra. These new calculations use more accurate initial conditions that are more representative of the experimental data, allowing us to model the implosion through stagnation, to avoid radiation collapse, and to generate a radiation pulse that compares well with data. Code predictions will be compared with tungsten & aluminum wire-array data from Z. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04- 94AL85000. a Ktech Corporation, 1300 Eubank Blvd. S.E., Albuquerque, NM 87123-3336

  16. Self-pinched transport of an intense proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, P. F.; Young, F. C.; Stephanakis, S. J.; Rose, D. V.; Neri, J. M.; Weber, B. V.; Myers, M. C.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Mosher, D.; Olson, C. L.

    2000-01-01

    Ion beam self-pinched transport (SPT) experiments have been carried out using a 1.1-MeV, 100-kA proton beam. A Rutherford scattering diagnostic and a LiF nuclear activation diagnostic measured the number of protons within a 5 cm radius at 50 cm into the transport region that was filled with low-pressure helium. Time-integrated signals from both diagnostics indicate self-pinching of the ion beam in a helium pressure window between 35 and 80 mTorr. Signals from these two diagnostics are consistent with ballistic transport at pressures above and below this SPT pressure window. Interferometric measurements of electron densities during beam injection into vacuum are consistent with ballistic transport with co-moving electrons. Interferometric measurements for beam injection into helium show that the electron density increases quadratically with pressure through the SPT window and roughly linearly with pressure above the SPT window. The ionization fraction of the helium plateaus at about 1.5% for pressures above 80 mTorr. In the SPT window, the electron density is 3 to 20 times the beam density. Numerical simulations of these beam transport experiments produce results that are in qualitative agreement with the experimental measurements. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  17. D-D fusion experiments using fast z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, R.B.; Baldwin, G.T.; Cooper, G.

    1994-04-01

    The development of high current (I > 10 MA) drivers provides us with a new tool for the study of neutron-producing plasmas in the thermal regime. The imploded deuterium mass (or collisionality) increases as I{sup 2} and the ability of the driver to heat the plasma to relevant fusion temperatures improves as the power of the driver increases. Additionally, fast (< 100 ns) implosions are more stable to the usual MHD instabilities that plagued the traditional slower implosions. We describe experiments in which deuterium gas puffs or CD{sub 2} fiber arrays were imploded in a fast z-pinch configuration on Sandia`s Saturn facility generating up to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} D-D neutrons. These experiments were designed to explore the physics of neutron-generating plasmas in a z-pinch geometry. Specifically, we intended to produce neutrons from a nearly thermal plasma where the electrons and ions have a nearly Maxwellian distribution. This is to be clearly differentiated from the more usual D-D beam-target neutrons generated in many dense plasma focus (DPF) devices.

  18. Ion Acceleration by Magnetic Pinch Instabilities- Powerful Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna; Li, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Since the 1950s pinch discharges with deuterium gas have been known to produce large neutron bursts. During these early quests for laboratory fusion it was initially believed that the heat produced in the pinch led to sufficently high temperatures that these neutrons resulted from thermonuclear (TN) burn. However, a series of careful measurements led by Stirling Colgate was carried out to show that these neutrons did not result form TN burn. Rather, they resulted from an m = 0 sausage mode instability that accelerated the ions, causing beam-target interactions. Today, this same mechanism is used in dense plasma focus machines to generate intense neutron pulses for neutron activation experiments. One such experiment, to test the citicality of aging plutonium, is currently being planned at the Nevada Test Site. Helping to characterize the neutrons from the dense palsma focus to be used in this large experiment was the last applied physics project that Stirling work on. In this talk we will summarize the physics issues involved both in the original discovery in the 1950s and in today's experiments.

  19. D-D fusion experiments using fast Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, R.B.; Baldwin, G.T.; Cooper, G.

    1998-03-01

    The development of high current (I > 10 MA) drivers provides the authors with a new tool for the study of neutron-producing plasmas in the thermal regime. The imploded deuterium mass (or collisionality) increases as I{sup 2} and the ability of the driver to heat the plasma to relevant fusion temperatures improves as the power of the driver increases. Additionally, fast (<100 ns) implosions are more stable to the usual MHD instabilities that plagued the traditional slower implosions. The authors describe experiments in which deuterium gas puffs or CD{sub 2} fiber arrays were imploded in a fast z-pinch configuration on Sandia`s Saturn facility generating up to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} D-D neutrons. These experiments were designed to explore the physics of neutron-generating plasmas in a z-pinch geometry. Specifically, the authors intended to produce neutrons from a nearly thermal plasma where the electrons and ions have a nearly Maxwellian distribution. This is to be clearly differentiated from the more usual D-D beam-target neutrons generated in many dense plasma focus (DPF) devices.

  20. Study of gas-puff Z-pinches on COBRA

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, N.; Rosenberg, E. W.; Gourdain, P. A.; Grouchy, P. W. L. de; Kusse, B. R.; Hammer, D. A.; Bell, K. S.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Potter, W. M.; Atoyan, L.; Cahill, A. D.; Evans, M.; Greenly, J. B.; Hoyt, C. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Schrafel, P. C.; Kroupp, E.; Fisher, A.; Maron, Y.

    2014-11-15

    Gas-puff Z-pinch experiments were conducted on the 1 MA, 200 ns pulse duration Cornell Beam Research Accelerator (COBRA) pulsed power generator in order to achieve an understanding of the dynamics and instability development in the imploding and stagnating plasma. The triple-nozzle gas-puff valve, pre-ionizer, and load hardware are described. Specific diagnostics for the gas-puff experiments, including a Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence system for measuring the radial neutral density profiles along with a Laser Shearing Interferometer and Laser Wavefront Analyzer for electron density measurements, are also described. The results of a series of experiments using two annular argon (Ar) and/or neon (Ne) gas shells (puff-on-puff) with or without an on- (or near-) axis wire are presented. For all of these experiments, plenum pressures were adjusted to hold the radial mass density profile as similar as possible. Initial implosion stability studies were performed using various combinations of the heavier (Ar) and lighter (Ne) gasses. Implosions with Ne in the outer shell and Ar in the inner were more stable than the opposite arrangement. Current waveforms can be adjusted on COBRA and it was found that the particular shape of the 200 ns current pulse affected on the duration and diameter of the stagnated pinched column and the x-ray yield.

  1. Technique for Determining the Viscosity and Electrical Conductivity of Semiconducting Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Scripa, R. N.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.; Su, C. H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Feth, S.; Zhu, S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel apparatus for determining the viscosity and electrical conductivity of semiconducting liquids has been developed at NASA/MSFC. The apparatus is based on the transient torque technique and utilizes a 125 micrometer diameter quartz fiber as a torsion wire and a sensitive angular detector to measure the deflection angle of the crucible containing the liquid. A rotating flow is induced in the semiconducting melt by the application of a rotating magnetic field and measurement of the magnitude and transient behavior of the induced deflection angle allows the simultaneous determination of the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt. Measurements at room temperature and up to 900 C were made on high purity melts.

  2. Transient Torque Technique for Viscosity and Electrical Conductivity Determination of Semiconducting Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Scripa, R. N.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Feth, S.; Zhu, S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel apparatus based on transient torque technique is constructed in MSFC/NASA. The apparatus uses a 125um diameter quartz fiber as torsion wire. A high sensitive angular detector is implemented to measure the deflection angle of the crucible containing the liquid. A rotating magnetic field (RMF) is used to induce a rotating flow of a conducting or semiconducting melts. By measuring the magnitude and transient behavior of the induced deflection angle, the electrical conductivity and viscosity of the melt can be measured simultaneously. High purity elements namely Hg, Ga, Zn and Te are tested at room temperature and high temperature up to 900 C.

  3. On the similarity of variable viscosity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voivenel, L.; Danaila, L.; Varea, E.; Renou, B.; Cazalens, M.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent mixing is ubiquitous in both nature and industrial applications. Most of them concern different fluids, therefore with variable physical properties (density and/or viscosity). The focus here is on variable viscosity flows and mixing, involving density-matched fluids. The issue is whether or not these flows may be self-similar, or self-preserving. The importance of this question stands on the predictability of these flows; self-similar dynamical systems are easier tractable from an analytical viewpoint. More specifically, self-similar analysis is applied to the scale-by-scale energy transport equations, which represent the transport of energy at each scale and each point of the flow. Scale-by-scale energy budget equations are developed for inhomogeneous and anisotropic flows, in which the viscosity varies as a result of heterogeneous mixture or temperature variations. Additional terms are highlighted, accounting for the viscosity gradients, or fluctuations. These terms are present at both small and large scales, thus rectifying the common belief that viscosity is a small-scale quantity. Scale-by-scale energy budget equations are then adapted for the particular case of a round jet evolving in a more viscous host fluid. It is further shown that the condition of self-preservation is not necessarily satisfied in variable-viscosity jets. Indeed, the jet momentum conservation, as well as the constancy of the Reynolds number in the central region of the jet, cannot be satisfied simultaneously. This points to the necessity of considering less stringent conditions (with respect to classical, single-fluid jets) when analytically tackling these flows and reinforces the idea that viscosity variations must be accounted for when modelling these flows.

  4. Viscosity of Xenon Examined in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Why does water flow faster than honey? The short answer, that honey has a greater viscosity, merely rephrases the question. The fundamental answer is that viscosity originates in the interactions between a fluid s molecules. These interactions are so complicated that, except for low-density gases, the viscosity of a fluid cannot be accurately predicted. Progress in understanding viscosity has been made by studying moderately dense gases and, more recently, fluids near the critical point. Modern theories predict a universal behavior for all pure fluids near the liquid-vapor critical point, and they relate the increase in viscosity to spontaneous fluctuations in density near this point. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX) experiment tested these theories with unprecedented precision when it flew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-85) in August 1997. Near the critical point, xenon is a billion times more compressible than water, yet it has about the same density. Because the fluid is so "soft," it collapses under its own weight when exposed to the force of Earth s gravity - much like a very soft spring. Because the CVX experiment is conducted in microgravity, it achieves a very uniform fluid density even very close to the critical point. At the heart of the CVX experiment is a novel viscometer built around a small nickel screen. An oscillating electric field forces the screen to oscillate between pairs of electrodes. Viscosity, which dampens the oscillations, can be calculated by measuring the screen motion and the force applied to the screen. So that the fluid s delicate state near the critical point will not be disrupted, the screen oscillations are set to be both slow and small.

  5. Flow-induced agitations create a granular fluid: Effective viscosity and fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, Kiri; van Hecke, Martin

    2012-06-01

    We fluidize a granular medium with localized stirring in a split-bottom shear cell. We probe the mechanical response of quiescent regions far from the main flow by observing the vertical motion of cylindrical probes rising, sinking, and floating in the grains. First, we find that the probe motion suggests that the granular material behaves in a liquid-like manner: high-density probes sink and low-density probes float at the depth given by Archimedes’ law. Second, we observe that the drag force on moving probes scales linearly with their velocity, which allows us to define an effective viscosity for the system. This effective viscosity is inversely proportional to the rotation rate of the disk which drives the split bottom flow. Moreover, the apparent viscosity depends on radius and mass of the probe: despite the linear dependence of the drag forces on sinking speed of the probe, the granular medium is not simply Newtonian, but exhibits a more complex rheology. The decrease of viscosity with filling height of the cell, combined with the poor correlation between local strain rate and viscosity, suggests that the fluid-like character of the material is set by agitations generated in the stirred region: the relation between applied stress and observed strain rate in one location depends on the strain rate in another location. We probe the nature of the granular fluctuations that we believe mediates these nonlocal interactions by characterizing the small and random up and down motion that the probe experiences. These Gaussian fluctuations exhibit a mix of diffusive and subdiffusive behavior at short times and saturate at a value of roughly 1/10th of a grain diameter longer times, consistent with the picture of a random walker in a potential well. The product of crossover time and effective viscosity is constant, evidencing a direct link between fluctuations and viscosity.

  6. Viscosity, relaxation time, and dynamics within a model asphalt of larger molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Derek D.; Greenfield, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics properties of a new "next generation" model asphalt system that represents SHRP AAA-1 asphalt using larger molecules than past models is studied using molecular simulation. The system contains 72 molecules distributed over 12 molecule types that range from nonpolar branched alkanes to polar resins and asphaltenes. Molecular weights range from 290 to 890 g/mol. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations conducted at six temperatures from 298.15 to 533.15 K provide a wealth of correlation data. The modified Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts equation was regressed to reorientation time correlation functions and extrapolated to calculate average rotational relaxation times for individual molecules. The rotational relaxation rate of molecules decreased significantly with increasing size and decreasing temperature. Translational self-diffusion coefficients followed an Arrhenius dependence. Similar activation energies of ˜42 kJ/mol were found for all 12 molecules in the model system, while diffusion prefactors spanned an order of magnitude. Viscosities calculated directly at 533.15 K and estimated at lower temperatures using the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relationship were consistent with experimental data for asphalts. The product of diffusion coefficient and rotational relaxation time showed only small changes with temperature above 358.15 K, indicating rotation and translation that couple self-consistently with viscosity. At lower temperatures, rotation slowed more than diffusion.

  7. Viscosity, relaxation time, and dynamics within a model asphalt of larger molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Derek D.; Greenfield, Michael L.

    2014-01-21

    The dynamics properties of a new “next generation” model asphalt system that represents SHRP AAA-1 asphalt using larger molecules than past models is studied using molecular simulation. The system contains 72 molecules distributed over 12 molecule types that range from nonpolar branched alkanes to polar resins and asphaltenes. Molecular weights range from 290 to 890 g/mol. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations conducted at six temperatures from 298.15 to 533.15 K provide a wealth of correlation data. The modified Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts equation was regressed to reorientation time correlation functions and extrapolated to calculate average rotational relaxation times for individual molecules. The rotational relaxation rate of molecules decreased significantly with increasing size and decreasing temperature. Translational self-diffusion coefficients followed an Arrhenius dependence. Similar activation energies of ∼42 kJ/mol were found for all 12 molecules in the model system, while diffusion prefactors spanned an order of magnitude. Viscosities calculated directly at 533.15 K and estimated at lower temperatures using the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relationship were consistent with experimental data for asphalts. The product of diffusion coefficient and rotational relaxation time showed only small changes with temperature above 358.15 K, indicating rotation and translation that couple self-consistently with viscosity. At lower temperatures, rotation slowed more than diffusion.

  8. The analytical model for vortex ring pinch-off process based on the energy extremum principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yang; Liu, Hong; Qin, Suyang; Wang, Fuxin

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of vortex ring pinch-off is greatly helpful for us to understand the mechanism of optimal vortex formation, which further implies the optimal biological propulsion for animals. The vortex ring pinch-off implies its limiting formation and is dominated by the energy extremum principle. However, it is found that vortex ring pinch-off is a continuous process rather than a transient timescale. Therefore, we are wondering that how to identify the onset and end of pinch-off process. Based on the Kelvin-Benjamin variational principle, a dimensionless energy number is adopted to characterize the energy evolution of vortex rings. The vortex ring flow fields are obtained by DPIV with the piston-cylinder setup, and their geometric structures are identified using its Lagrangian coherent structures. The results show that the dimensionless energy numbers with the steady translating vortex rings share a critical value. It is then demonstrated that the dimensionless energy number dominates the onset and the end of pinch-off process. Besides, the onset and end of pinch-off can also be identified using LCSs. Additionally, based on the dimensionless energy number or LCSs, the corresponding vortex ring formation times(L/D) for the onset or the end of pinch-off are consistent.

  9. Suppression of the n=2 rotational instability in field-reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Alan L.; Slough, J.; Harding, Dennis G.

    1983-06-01

    Compact toroid plasmas formed in field-reversed theta pinches are generally destroyed after 30-50 μsec by a rotating n=2 instability. In the reported experiment, instability is controlled, and the plasma destruction is avoided in the TRX-1 theta pinch through the application of octopole magnetic fields. The decay times for loss of poloidal flux and particles are unaffected by the octopole fields. These decay times are about 100 μsec based on inferences from interferometry and excluded flux measurements. The weak, rotating elliptical disturbance (controlled n=2 mode) also made possible a novel determination of the density profile near the separatrix using single-chord interferometry. The local density gradient scale length in this region is found to be about one ion gyrodiameter.

  10. Measurement of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and viscosity of TiO{sub 2}-water nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Duangthongsuk, Weerapun; Wongwises, Somchai

    2009-04-15

    Nanofluid is an innovative heat transfer fluid with superior potential for enhancing the heat transfer performance of conventional fluids. Many attempts have been made to investigate its thermal conductivity and viscosity, which are important thermophysical properties. No definitive agreements have emerged, however, about these properties. This article reports the thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity of nanofluids experimentally. TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles dispersed in water with volume concentration of 0.2-2 vol.% are used in the present study. A transient hot-wire apparatus is used for measuring the thermal conductivity of nanofluids whereas the Bohlin rotational rheometer (Malvern Instrument) is used to measure the viscosity of nanofluids. The data are collected for temperatures ranging from 15 C to 35 C. The results show that the measured viscosity and thermal conductivity of nanofluids increased as the particle concentrations increased and are higher than the values of the base liquids. Furthermore, thermal conductivity of nanofluids increased with increasing nanofluid temperatures and, conversely, the viscosity of nanofluids decreased with increasing temperature of nanofluids. Moreover, the measured thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids are quite different from the predicted values from the existing correlations and the data reported by other researchers. Finally, new thermophysical correlations are proposed for predicting the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids. (author)

  11. Viscosity Measurement Using Drop Coalescence in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.; Ethridge, Edwin C.; Maxwell, Daniel; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present in here validation studies of a new method for application in microgravity environment which measures the viscosity of highly viscous undercooled liquids using drop coalescence. The method has the advantage of avoiding heterogeneous nucleation at container walls caused by crystallization of undercooled liquids during processing. Homogeneous nucleation can also be avoided due to the rapidity of the measurement using this method. The technique relies on measurements from experiments conducted in near zero gravity environment as well as highly accurate analytical formulation for the coalescence process. The viscosity of the liquid is determined by allowing the computed free surface shape relaxation time to be adjusted in response to the measured free surface velocity for two coalescing drops. Results are presented from two sets of validation experiments for the method which were conducted on board aircraft flying parabolic trajectories. In these tests the viscosity of a highly viscous liquid, namely glycerin, was determined at different temperatures using the drop coalescence method described in here. The experiments measured the free surface velocity of two glycerin drops coalescing under the action of surface tension alone in low gravity environment using high speed photography. The liquid viscosity was determined by adjusting the computed free surface velocity values to the measured experimental data. The results of these experiments were found to agree reasonably well with the known viscosity for the test liquid used.

  12. Predicting slag viscosity from coal ash composition

    SciTech Connect

    Laumb, J.; Benson, S.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; Schwalbe, R.; McCollor, D.P.

    1999-07-01

    Management of slag flow from cyclone-fired utility boilers requires accurate prediction of viscosity. Cyclones tend to build up slag when the cyclone combustion temperature is less than the temperature required to melt and tap the ash from the coal being fired. Cyclone-fired boilers designed for lignite are equipped with predry systems, which remove 6-9% of the moisture from the coal. Cyclones tend to slag when the as-received heating value of the fuel is less than 6350 Btu/lb and T250 (temperature where viscosity equals 250 poise) is greater than 2350 F. The T250 value, as well as the rest of the viscosity-temperature relationship, can be predicted using models based on coal ash composition. The focus of this work is to evaluate several models in terms of their agreement with measured viscosities. Viscosity measurements were made for ten samples, including nine lignite coals and one lignite-derived slag. Model performance is related to the SiO{sub 2}, CaO, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents of the slag. The Sage and McIlroy and Kalmanovitch models worked best for high SiO{sub 2} and low Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} fuels. The Senior model worked best when Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content was moderate to high.

  13. Viscosity of confined inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junfang; Todd, B. D.; Travis, Karl P.

    2004-12-01

    We use the nonlocal linear hydrodynamic constitutive model, proposed by Evans and Morriss [Statistical Mechanics of Nonequilibrium Liquids (Academic, London, 1990)], for computing an effective spatially dependent shear viscosity of inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids. The model is applied to a simple atomic fluid undergoing planar Poiseuille flow in a confined channel of several atomic diameters width. We compare the spatially dependent viscosity with a local generalization of Newton's law of viscosity and the Navier-Stokes viscosity, both of which are known to suffer extreme inaccuracies for highly inhomogeneous systems. The nonlocal constitutive model calculates effective position dependent viscosities that are free from the notorious singularities experienced by applying the commonly used local constitutive model. It is simple, general, and has widespread applicability in nanofluidics where experimental measurement of position dependent transport coefficients is currently inaccessible. In principle the method can be used to predict approximate flow profiles of any arbitrary inhomogeneous system. We demonstrate this by predicting the flow profile for a simple fluid undergoing planar Couette flow in a confined channel of several atomic diameters width.

  14. Effect of viscosity on learned satiation.

    PubMed

    Mars, M; Hogenkamp, P S; Gosses, A M; Stafleu, A; De Graaf, C

    2009-08-01

    A higher viscosity of a food leads to a longer orosensory stimulation. This may facilitate the learned association between sensory signals and metabolic consequences. In the current study we investigated the effect of viscosity on learned satiation. In two intervention groups a low viscosity (LV) yogurt (n=24) and a high viscosity (HV) yogurt (n=22) was offered ad libitum for breakfast. In a learning period of 4 weeks, subjects consumed ad libitum a novel flavoured high energy density (HED) yogurt (150 kcal/100 g) or low energy density (LED) yogurt (50 kcal/100 g), with 10 exposures to each yogurt on alternate days. Over the repeated exposures, an interaction effect of exposure timeenergyviscosity on intake was seen (F(1,771)=4.12; p=0.04). In the HV intervention group a borderline significant interaction between exposure and energy density was observed (F(1,369)=3.61; p=0.06); after 10 exposures, the LED yogurt resulted in a 46+/-16 g higher intake compared with the HED yogurt. In the LV group, no significant interaction between exposure and energy density was seen (F(1,401)=1.04; p=0.31); after 10 exposures intake difference between the LED and HED yogurts was only 1.5+/-15 g. These results suggest that a higher viscosity facilitates learned satiation.

  15. Entropy viscosity method applied to Euler equations

    SciTech Connect

    Delchini, M. O.; Ragusa, J. C.; Berry, R. A.

    2013-07-01

    The entropy viscosity method [4] has been successfully applied to hyperbolic systems of equations such as Burgers equation and Euler equations. The method consists in adding dissipative terms to the governing equations, where a viscosity coefficient modulates the amount of dissipation. The entropy viscosity method has been applied to the 1-D Euler equations with variable area using a continuous finite element discretization in the MOOSE framework and our results show that it has the ability to efficiently smooth out oscillations and accurately resolve shocks. Two equations of state are considered: Ideal Gas and Stiffened Gas Equations Of State. Results are provided for a second-order time implicit schemes (BDF2). Some typical Riemann problems are run with the entropy viscosity method to demonstrate some of its features. Then, a 1-D convergent-divergent nozzle is considered with open boundary conditions. The correct steady-state is reached for the liquid and gas phases with a time implicit scheme. The entropy viscosity method correctly behaves in every problem run. For each test problem, results are shown for both equations of state considered here. (authors)

  16. The Study of a Fibre Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klir, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    This thesis presents the results of fibre Z-pinch experiments carried out on the Z-150 device at the CTU in Prague. The generator that was used to drive the experiments consisted of one capacitor of 3e-6 F capacitance. In the case of 20 kV charging voltage, the current was peaking at 80 kA with a 850 ns quarter period. The Z-pinch was formed from carbon fibres of 15 micrometer diameter and 1 cm length. The discharge was observed by a large number of diagnostic tools. This comprehensive set of diagnostics enabled us to describe the gross dynamics of the Z-pinch. It was found out that after the breakdown a low density coronal plasma was formed while the fibre diameter remained almost unchanged. This low density corona was carrying almost all the current of the order of 10 kA. When the current had built up, the implosion of the corona onto the central fibre occurred. The implosion velocity approached the value of 2e5 m/s. When the imploded corona had reached the fibre, the dip in dI/dt, voltage peak up to 10 kV, and XUV pulse of a 10-30 ns width were observed. XUV radiation was emitted from several bright spots which corresponded to the interaction of m=0 instability necks with the dense core. The electron temperature and density were approximately 80 eV and 10e25 per cubic meter, respectively. Although the presence of a fibre did not significantly suppress MHD instabilities, they were not disruptive. After the fibre ablation, i.e. after 500 ns, material evaporated from electrodes started to play a dominant role. The observed plasma column seemed to be MHD unstable and when m=0 instabilities had developed, X-ray pulses were emitted from several hot spots, particularly near the anode. At that time the voltage peak of up to 30 kV was detected.

  17. Braking due to non-resonant magnetic perturbations and comparison with neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque in EXTRAP T2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassinetti, L.; Sun, Y.; Fridström, R.; Menmuir, S.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Khan, M. W. M.; Liang, Y.; Drake, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    The non-resonant magnetic perturbation (MP) braking is studied in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (RFP) and the experimental braking torque is compared with the torque expected by the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) theory. The EXTRAP T2R active coils can apply magnetic perturbations with a single harmonic, either resonant or non-resonant. The non-resonant MP produces velocity braking with an experimental torque that affects a large part of the core region. The experimental torque is clearly related to the plasma displacement, consistent with a quadratic dependence as expected by the NTV theory. The work show a good qualitative agreement between the experimental torque in a RFP machine and NTV torque concerning both the torque density radial profile and the dependence on the non-resonant MP harmonic.

  18. One atmosphere viscosity measurements of MORBs from ODP Leg 206, Hole 1256D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Nakamura, H.; Ishibashi, H.

    2009-12-01

    We carried out viscosity measurements of MORBs from ODP Leg 206, Hole 1256D at one atmosphere both in hyperliquidus and subliquidus conditions. Three samples examined are #1 (core 39R1), #2(core 27R19) and #3 (core 3R4). They are typical MORBs but have different Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratios of 0.60, 0.48, and 0.42. Viscosity measurements were carried out mostly after the method of Sato (2005, J. Mineral. Petrol. Sci),. The oxygen fugacity of the furnace was controlled by mixed gas of CO2:H2(400/20ml/min), at FMQ buffer conditions. Rotational viscometer was connected to a ceramic rod of 6 mm diameter, the end of which immersed in the sample crucible 30 mm inner diameter and 60 mm high. The system is calibrated with standard viscosity oils for different depths. The samples were initially melted at ca. 50 C higher temperature than liquidus, and kept for 3 days before viscometry and sampling. After the viscometry and sampling, the furnace temperature was decreased by 5 to 30 C, and kept for 1-3 days before another viscometry and sampling. These steps are repeated until the high viscosity of the melt precluded the measurements. The quenched samples were analayzed for phase chemistry and textural features. Sample #1 crystallized plagioclase and olivine at 1215 C, followed by augite at 1205 C. Total crystal content increased to 29 vol% at 1185 C. Sample #2 crystallized plagioclase and pigeonite at 1175 C, followed by olivine and augite at 1165 C. Total crystal content increased up to 25 vol% at 1152 C. Sample #3 crystallized plagioclase, pigeonite and olivine at 1155 C. Total crystal content increased up to 25 vol% at 1133 C. Bulk viscosity increased from 46 to 74 Pa s at hyperliquidus temperatures of 1240 to 1210 C, whereas it increased up to 2908 Pa s in subliquidus temperatures of 1185 C in the sample #1. In the sample #2, bulk viscosity also increased slowly from 42 Pa s at 1232 C to 79 Pa s at 1172 C, then increased much rapidly to 3422 Pa s at 1152 C. Similarly, the sample #3

  19. Diffusion, Viscosity and Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myerson, Allan S.

    1996-01-01

    The diffusivity of TriGlycine Sulfate (TGS), Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP), Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate (ADF) and other compounds of interest to microgravity crystal growth, in supersaturated solutions as a function of solution concentration, 'age' and 'history was studied experimentally. The factors that affect the growth of crystals from water solutions in microgravity have been examined. Three non-linear optical materials have been studied, potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) and triglycine sulfate (TGC). The diffusion coefficient and viscosity of supersaturated water solutions were measured. Also theoretical model of diffusivity and viscosity in a metastable state, model of crystal growth from solution including non-linear time dependent diffusivity and viscosity effect and computer simulation of the crystal growth process which allows simulation of the microgravity crystal growth were developed.

  20. Viscosity jump in Earth's mid-mantle.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Maxwell L; Lekić, Vedran; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2015-12-11

    The viscosity structure of Earth's deep mantle affects the thermal evolution of Earth, the ascent of mantle plumes, settling of subducted oceanic lithosphere, and the mixing of compositional heterogeneities in the mantle. Based on a reanalysis of the long-wavelength nonhydrostatic geoid, we infer viscous layering of the mantle using a method that allows us to avoid a priori assumptions about its variation with depth. We detect an increase in viscosity at 800- to 1200-kilometers depth, far greater than the depth of the mineral phase transformations that define the mantle transition zone. The viscosity increase is coincident in depth with regions where seismic tomography has imaged slab stagnation, plume deflection, and changes in large-scale structure and offers a simple explanation of these phenomena.

  1. Polyfunctional dispersants for controlling viscosity of phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2006-07-25

    This invention provides phyllosilicates and polyfunctional dispersants which can be manipulated to selectively control the viscosity of phyllosilicate slurries. The polyfunctional dispersants used in the present invention, which include at least three functional groups, increase the dispersion and exfoliation of phyllosilicates in polymers and, when used in conjunction with phyllosilicate slurries, significantly reduce the viscosity of slurries having high concentrations of phyllosilicates. The functional groups of the polyfunctional dispersants are capable of associating with multivalent metal cations and low molecular weight organic polymers, which can be manipulated to substantially increase or decrease the viscosity of the slurry in a concentration dependent manner. The polyfunctional dispersants of the present invention can also impart desirable properties on the phyllosilicate dispersions including corrosion inhibition and enhanced exfoliation of the phyllosilicate platelets.

  2. Viscosity near Earth's solid inner core

    PubMed

    Smylie

    1999-04-16

    Anomalous splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of oscillation of Earth's solid inner core is used to estimate the effective viscosity just outside its boundary. Superconducting gravimeter observations give periods of 3.5822 +/- 0.0012 (retrograde) and 4.0150 +/- 0.0010 (prograde) hours. With the use of Ekman layer theory to estimate viscous drag forces, an inferred single viscosity of 1.22 x 10(11) Pascal seconds gives calculated periods of 3.5839 and 4.0167 hours for the two modes, close to the observed values. The large effective viscosity is consistent with a fluid, solid-liquid mixture surrounding the inner core associated with the "compositional convection" that drives Earth's geodynamo. PMID:10205048

  3. Viscosity of Fluids in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audétat, Andreas; Keppler, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The viscosities of aqueous fluids with 10 to 80 weight percent dissolved silicates have been measured at 600° to 950°C and 1.0 to 2.0 gigapascals by in situ observation of falling spheres in the diamond anvil cell. The viscosities at 800°C range from 10-4 to 100.5 pascal seconds. The combination of low viscosities with a favorable wetting angle makes silicate-rich fluid an efficient agent for material transport at low-volume fractions. Our results therefore suggest that there may be a direct relationship between the position of the volcanic front and the onset of complete miscibility between water and silicate melt in the subducting slab.

  4. Viscosity of fluids in subduction zones.

    PubMed

    Audétat, Andreas; Keppler, Hans

    2004-01-23

    The viscosities of aqueous fluids with 10 to 80 weight percent dissolved silicates have been measured at 600 degrees to 950 degrees C and 1.0 to 2.0 gigapascals by in situ observation of falling spheres in the diamond anvil cell. The viscosities at 800 degrees C range from 10(-4) to 10(0.5) pascal seconds. The combination of low viscosities with a favorable wetting angle makes silicate-rich fluid an efficient agent for material transport at low-volume fractions. Our results therefore suggest that there may be a direct relationship between the position of the volcanic front and the onset of complete miscibility between water and silicate melt in the subducting slab. PMID:14739456

  5. Generalized correlation for viscosity of binary eutectics

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.K.; Wanchoo, R.K.; Gupta, R.; Jotshi, C.K.

    1995-12-31

    Heat and mass transfer plays an important role during phase transformation process involving phase change materials. These processes are greatly influenced by thermophysical properties of the material, such as, viscosity, density, thermal conductivity, etc. Viscosity is one of the prime factors which controls the crystal growth rate during crystallization/cooling process of the phase change material. It directs the movement of convection currents arising due to concentration gradient, near the interface of the growing crystal. Eutectics are the compounds having sharp transition temperatures corresponding to specific composition and do not suffer from phase segregation, a major problem in incongruent and semi-congruent melting salt hydrates. The viscometric behavior of the following five binary eutectics in the temperature range of 313--363 K has been studied: Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}; MgNO{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O-MgCl{sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O; CO(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}; CO(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}-NH{sub 4}Br and CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2}-NaBr. An empirical correlation between reduced viscosity and reduced temperature for molten binary eutectics showing Arrhenius behavior above their melting points has been reported. The correlation predicts the temperature dependence of the eutectic viscosity to within {+-}6. Consistency tests for viscosity data using reduced parameters have been reported. The empirical correlation developed from this study predicts very well, the viscosity of the molten eutectics and salt hydrates to within {+-}6% of the experimental values.

  6. Viscosity Meaurement Technique for Metal Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, Heng; Kennedy, Rory

    2015-02-09

    Metallic fuels have exceptional transient behavior, excellent thermal conductivity, and a more straightforward reprocessing path, which does not separate out pure plutonium from the process stream. Fabrication of fuel containing minor actinides and rare earth (RE) elements for irradiation tests, for instance, U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.0RE-15Zr samples at the Idaho National Laboratory, is generally done by melt casting in an inert atmosphere. For the design of a casting system and further scale up development, computational modeling of the casting process is needed to provide information on melt flow and solidification for process optimization. Therefore, there is a need for melt viscosity data, the most important melt property that controls the melt flow. The goal of the project was to develop a measurement technique that uses fully sealed melt sample with no Americium vapor loss to determine the viscosity of metallic melts and at temperatures relevant to the casting process. The specific objectives of the project were to: develop mathematical models to establish the principle of the measurement method, design and build a viscosity measurement prototype system based on the established principle, and calibrate the system and quantify the uncertainty range. The result of the project indicates that the oscillation cup technique is applicable for melt viscosity measurement. Detailed mathematical models of innovative sample ampoule designs were developed to not only determine melt viscosity, but also melt density under certain designs. Measurement uncertainties were analyzed and quantified. The result of this project can be used as the initial step toward the eventual goal of establishing a viscosity measurement system for radioactive melts.

  7. Pinch me - I'm fusing! Fusion Power - what is it? What is a z pinch? And why are z-pinches a promising fusion power technology?

    SciTech Connect

    DERZON,MARK S.

    2000-03-01

    The process of combining nuclei (the protons and neutrons inside an atomic nucleus) together with a release of kinetic energy is called fusion. This process powers the Sun, it contributes to the world stockpile of weapons of mass destruction and may one day generate safe, clean electrical power. Understanding the intricacies of fusion power, promised for 50 years, is sometimes difficult because there are a number of ways of doing it. There is hot fusion, cold fusion and con-fusion. Hot fusion is what powers suns through the conversion of mass energy to kinetic energy. Cold fusion generates con-fusion and nobody really knows what it is. Even so, no one is generating electrical power for you and me with either method. In this article the author points out some basic features of the mainstream approaches taken to hot fusion power, as well as describe why z pinches are worth pursuing as a driver for a power reactor and how it may one day generate electrical power for mankind.

  8. Restoration of pinch in intrinsic muscles of the hand.

    PubMed

    Lee, Steve K; Wisser, Jamie R

    2012-02-01

    The primary intrinsic muscles responsible for key and tip pinch are the adductor pollicis, first dorsal interosseous and flexor pollicis brevis muscles. Numerous conditions can lead to their dysfunction. Non-operative treatment consists of exercises of the compensating extensor pollicis longus and flexor pollicis longus muscles and use of adaptive devices, such as larger grips. Operative treatments include tendon transfers and joint fusions. The most common tendon transfer procedures include transfering of the extensor carpi radialis brevis to the adductor pollicis muscle or transfering of the abductor pollicis longus to the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Both require use of extension tendon grafts. In cases of joint instability or arthrosis, arthrodesis of the thumb and index finger MP or IP joints, alone or in combination, may be indicated. PMID:22117923

  9. Physics of reversed-field pinch profile sustainment

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    A description of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) is given, emphasizing the necessity of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) or kinetic process to sustain field reversal. Three sustainment mechanisms are reviewed: the MHD dynamo, the tangled discharge model, and nonlocal resistivity. A slab model of steady (ohmic) states is described. A relationship between ohmic state wave numbers and the minimum amplitude of nonsymmetric field components is given. If ohmic states are the sole source of the sustainment process, their wave lengths are probably much longer than the minor diameter of the plasma. Otherwise field asymmetries would exceed those observed in experiments. It is noted that internal field data are still limited, restricting the generality of our comments.

  10. A kind of fast shutter for Z pinch diagnosis device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liangping; Zhang, Xinjun; Sun, Tieping; Mao, Wentin

    2016-09-01

    A kind of fast shutter for protecting the diagnosis devices in Z pinch experiments is introduced in this paper. The shutter is composed of a pulling rod, a magnetic core, and a solenoid. Different from the traditional coils which were used at the voltage of 220 V, the solenoid we used must endure the high voltage of 5-10 kV and the deformation which maybe caused by the 5-10 T intense magnetic field. A creative configuration for the solenoid is developed including the winding guide, insulating sleeve, and stainless-steel sleeve. The experimental results show that the configuration of the solenoid is effective. The velocity of the valve is nearly 19 m/s and the time jitter of the shutdown is within 75 μs.

  11. Experimental astrophysics with high power lasers and Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Drake, R P; Ryutov, D D

    2004-12-10

    With the advent of high energy density (HED) experimental facilities, such as high-energy lasers and fast Z-pinch, pulsed-power facilities, mm-scale quantities of matter can be placed in extreme states of density, temperature, and/or velocity. This has enabled the emergence of a new class of experimental science, HED laboratory astrophysics, wherein the properties of matter and the processes that occur under extreme astrophysical conditions can be examined in the laboratory. Areas particularly suitable to this class of experimental astrophysics include the study of opacities relevant to stellar interiors; equations of state relevant to planetary interiors; strong shock driven nonlinear hydrodynamics and radiative dynamics, relevant to supernova explosions and subsequent evolution; protostellar jets and high Mach-number flows; radiatively driven molecular clouds and nonlinear photoevaporation front dynamics; and photoionized plasmas relevant to accretion disks around compact objects, such as black holes and neutron stars.

  12. Spectroscopic study of z-pinch stagnation on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, Yitzhak; Weingarten, L.; Starobinets, A.; Fisher, V.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Bailey, James E.; Yu, Edmund P.; Bernshtam, V.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Rochau, Gregory Alan; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2010-11-01

    Fast z-pinches provide intense 1-10 keV photon energy radiation sources. Here, we analyze time-, space-, and spectrally-resolved {approx}2 keV K-shell emissions from Al (5% Mg) wire array implosions on Sandia's Z machine pulsed power driver. The stagnating plasma is modeled as three separate radial zones, and collisional-radiative modeling with radiation transport calculations are used to constrain the temperatures and densities in these regions, accounting for K-shell line opacity and Doppler effects. We discuss plasma conditions and dynamics at the onset of stagnation, and compare inferences from the atomic modeling to three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic simulations.

  13. Coherent structures and anomalous transport in reversed field pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, V.; Drake, J. R.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Bergsåker, H.; Cavazzana, R.; Cecconello, M.; Martines, E.; Serianni, G.

    2006-02-01

    The results leading to the identification of coherent structures emerging from the background turbulence in the edge region of the reversed field pinch experiments EXTRAP-T2R and RFX are reviewed. These structures have traits of vortices in velocity field and blobs in density, and the reconstruction of their spatial structure and of their time evolution is discussed focusing on the analysis tools applied. The role of these structures in the particle anomalous transport is addressed, showing that their collisions can contribute up to 50% the total particle losses.This process is shown to be responsible for bursts in particle flux and it is found to set a characteristic collision time, which is in agreement with the statistical properties of laminar times for particle flux bursts.

  14. Instability Control in a Staged Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    WESSEL, Frank J

    2011-04-22

    A \\Staged Z-Pinch is a fusion-energy concept in which stored-electric energy is first converted into plasma-liner-kinetic energy, and then transferred to a coaxialtarget plasma [H. U. Rahman, F. J. Wessel, and N. Rostoker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, p. 714(1996)]. Proper choice of the liner and target materials, and their initial radii and mass densities, leads to dynamic stabilization, current amplification, and shock heating of the target. Simulations suggest that this configuration has merit as a alternative inertial-confinement-fusion concept, and may provide an energy release exceeding thermonuclear break-even, if tested on one of many newer pulsed power systems, for example those located at Sandia National Laboratories.

  15. Axial laser heating of three meter theta pinch plasma columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A. L.; Lowenthal, D. D.

    1980-10-01

    A 3-m long plasma column formed and confined by a fast rising solenoidal field was irradiated from one end by a powerful pulsed CO2 laser. It was found that beam trapping density minima could be maintained for the length of the laser pulse if the plasma diameter exceeded about 1.5 cm. The erosion of the density minimum was governed by classical diffusion processes. Three meter long plasmas in 2.6 cm bore plasma tubes could be fairly uniformly heated by 3.0 kJ of CO2 laser irradiation. Best results were obtained when heating began before or during the theta pinch implosion phase and the plasma fill pressure exceeded 1.0 torr H2. Plasma line energies of about 1 kJ/m could be obtained in a magnetic field rising to 6 T in 4.7 microseconds.

  16. Lower hybrid accessibility in a large, hot reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Dziubek, R.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Hokin, S.A.; Uchimoto, E.

    1995-11-01

    Accessibility and damping of the slow wave in a reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma is investigated theoretically, using projected Reversed Field Experiment (RFX) plasma parameters. By numerically solving the hot plasma dispersion relation, regions of propagation are found and the possibility of mode conversion is analyzed. If the parallel index of refraction of the wave is chosen judiciously at the edge of the plasma, the slow wave is accessible to a target region located just inside the reversal surface without mode conversion. Landau damping is also optimized in this region. A representative fast electron population is then added in order to determine its effect on accessibility and damping. The presence of these electrons, whose parameters were estimated by extrapolation of Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) data, does not affect the accessibility of the wave. However, the initial phase velocity of the wave needs to be increased somewhat in order to maintain optimal damping in the target zone.

  17. Anomalous transport theory for the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.; Hegna, C.C; Sovinec, C.R.

    1996-09-01

    Physically motivated transport models with predictive capabilities and significance beyond the reversed field pinch (RFP) are presented. It is shown that the ambipolar constrained electron heat loss observed in MST can be quantitatively modeled by taking account of the clumping in parallel streaming electrons and the resultant self-consistent interaction with collective modes; that the discrete dynamo process is a relaxation oscillation whose dependence on the tearing instability and profile relaxation physics leads to amplitude and period scaling predictions consistent with experiment; that the Lundquist number scaling in relaxed plasmas driven by magnetic turbulence has a weak S{sup {minus}1/4} scaling; and that radial E{times}B shear flow can lead to large reductions in the edge particle flux with little change in the heat flux, as observed in the RFP and tokamak. 24 refs.

  18. Thrust Stand Measurements of the Conical Theta Pinch FARAD Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    It is found that the impulse of a pulsed inductive plasma thruster utilizing preionization is maximized for a particular ratio of the stored energy in the capacitor to the injected propellant mass. The fact that the impulse depends on the ratio of the initial stored energy to injected propellant mass agrees with previous current sheet studies, supporting the idea that a Townsend-like breakdown process strongly influences current sheet formation, and in turn, current sheet formation strongly affects the operational efficiency of the device. The optimum in half cone angle of the inductive coil can be explained in terms of a balance between the direct axial acceleration and the radial pinching contribution to thrust. From the trends in these data we conclude that operation at the correct ratio of capacitor energy to propellant mass is essential for efficient operation of pulsed inductive plasma thrusters employing a preionized propellant.

  19. Conceptual Design of a Z-Pinch Fusion Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert; Polsgrove, Tara; Fincher, Sharon; Fabinski, Leo; Maples, Charlotte; Miernik, Janie; Stratham, Geoffrey; Cassibry, Jason; Cortez, Ross; Turner, Matthew; Santarius, John; Percy, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a project that aims to develop a conceptual design for a Z-pinch thruster, that could be applied to develop advanced thruster designs which promise high thrust/high specific impulse propulsion. Overviews shows the concept of the design, which use annular nozzles with deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel and a Lithium mixture as a cathode, Charts show the engine performance as a function of linear mass, nozzle performance (i.e., plasma segment trajectories), and mission analysis for possible Mars and Jupiter missions using this concept for propulsion. Slides show views of the concepts for the vehicle configuration, thrust coil configuration, the power management system, the structural analysis of the magnetic nozzle, the thermal management system, and the avionics suite,

  20. Slim accretion discs with different viscosity prescriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szuszkiewicz, Ewa

    1990-05-01

    The variability of X-ray sources powered by accretion may be connected to thermal instabilities in the innermost parts of slim disks. The time-scales of variability predicted by the theory with the standard alpha-viscosity prescription agree with those observed in a wide range of sources. The amplitudes (3-4 orders of magnitude in luiminosity) are correctly predicted for X-ray transient sources, but in general are too big for quasars, Seyferts, galactic blackhole candidates and LMXBs. It is shown that a slight modification of the viscosity prescription can offer a much better agreement with observations.

  1. Viscosity of a nanoconfined liquid during compression

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Shah H.; Kramkowski, Edward L.; Ochs, Peter J.; Wilson, David M.; Hoffmann, Peter M.

    2014-01-13

    The viscous behavior of liquids under nanoconfinement is not well understood. Using a small-amplitude atomic force microscope, we found bulk-like viscosity in a nanoconfined, weakly interacting liquid. A further decrease in viscosity was observed at confinement sizes of a just few molecular layers. Overlaid over the continuum viscous behavior, we measured non-continuum stiffness and damping oscillations. The average stiffness of the confined liquid was found to scale linearly with the size of the confining tip, while the damping scales with the radius of curvature of the tip end.

  2. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, H. P. Thakor, P. B. Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.

    2015-05-15

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

  3. Measuring Viscosities of Gases at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Hoshang, Chegini

    1987-01-01

    Variant of general capillary method for measuring viscosities of unknown gases based on use of thermal mass-flowmeter section for direct measurement of pressure drops. In technique, flowmeter serves dual role, providing data for determining volume flow rates and serving as well-characterized capillary-tube section for measurement of differential pressures across it. New method simple, sensitive, and adaptable for absolute or relative viscosity measurements of low-pressure gases. Suited for very complex hydrocarbon mixtures where limitations of classical theory and compositional errors make theoretical calculations less reliable.

  4. Shear Viscosity in a Gluon Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2008-05-02

    The relation of the shear viscosity coefficient to the recently introduced transport rate is derived within relativistic kinetic theory. We calculate the shear viscosity over entropy ratio {eta}/s for a gluon gas, which involves elastic gg{yields}gg perturbative QCD (PQCD) scatterings as well as inelastic gg{r_reversible}ggg PQCD bremsstrahlung. For {alpha}{sub s}=0.3 we find {eta}/s=0.13 and for {alpha}{sub s}=0.6, {eta}/s=0.076. The small {eta}/s values, which suggest strongly coupled systems, are due to the gluon bremsstrahlung incorporated.

  5. Viscosity profile of the lower mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, K.; Schubert, G.; Sammis, C. G.

    1985-01-01

    The viscosity of the earth's mantle is an important factor in studies of mantle convection and other problems in geodynamics. The present investigation is concerned with a determination of the variation of effective viscosity across the lower mantle from models of the Gibb's free energy of activation G(asterisk) and the adiabatic temperature profile. The variation of G(asterisk) with depth is calculated using both an elastic strain energy model, in which G(asterisk) is related to the seismic velocities, and a model which assumes G(asterisk) is proportional to the melting temperature.

  6. A Theory of Solvation Effects on Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakita, Tomofumi; Yoshimori, Akira

    2015-04-01

    We formulate a theory for calculating the viscosity of a dilute solution, considering the solute-solvent interaction. We consider an inhomogeneous density distribution of solvent particles caused by the interaction, using the equilibrium solute-solvent radial distribution function. The theory is a microscopic extension of Einstein's viscosity formula. We formulate the theory by a perturbation expansion, assuming that a solvent particle is much smaller than a solute particle. From the perturbation theory, we obtain hydrodynamic equations with new boundary conditions on the surface of the solute. The theory is applied to a system with a simple radial distribution function.

  7. Shock capturing by the spectral viscosity method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, Eitan

    1989-01-01

    A main disadvantage of using spectral methods for nonlinear conservation laws lies in the formation of Gibbs phenomenon, once spontaneous shock discontinuities appear in the solution. The global nature of spectral methods than pollutes the unstable Gibbs oscillations overall the computational domain, and the lack of entropy dissipation prevents convergences in these cases. The Spectral Viscosity method, which is based on high frequency dependent vanishing viscosity regularization of the classical spectral methods is discussed. It is shown that this method enforces the convergence of nonlinear spectral approximations without sacrificing their overall spectral accuracy.

  8. Shear viscosity of a unitary Fermi gas.

    PubMed

    Wlazłowski, Gabriel; Magierski, Piotr; Drut, Joaquín E

    2012-07-13

    We present an ab initio determination of the shear viscosity η of the unitary Fermi gas, based on finite temperature quantum Monte Carlo calculations and the Kubo linear-response formalism. We determine the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity-to-entropy density ratio η/s. The minimum of η/s appears to be located above the critical temperature for the superfluid-to-normal phase transition with the most probable value being (η/s)min≈0.2ℏ/k(B), which is close the Kovtun-Son-Starinets universal value ℏ/(4πk(B)).

  9. Shear viscosity in a gluon gas.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2008-05-01

    The relation of the shear viscosity coefficient to the recently introduced transport rate is derived within relativistic kinetic theory. We calculate the shear viscosity over entropy ratio eta/s for a gluon gas, which involves elastic gg-->gg perturbative QCD (PQCD) scatterings as well as inelastic gg<-->ggg PQCD bremsstrahlung. For alpha_{s}=0.3 we find eta/s=0.13 and for alpha_{s}=0.6, eta/s=0.076. The small eta/s values, which suggest strongly coupled systems, are due to the gluon bremsstrahlung incorporated.

  10. X-Pinch And Its Applications In X-ray Radiograph

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Xiaobing; Wang Xinxin; Liu Rui; Zhao Tong; Zeng Naigong; Zhao Yongchao; Du Yanqiang

    2009-07-07

    An X-pinch device and the related diagnostics of x-ray emission from X-pinch were briefly described. The time-resolved x-ray measurements with photoconducting diodes show that the x-ray pulse usually consists of two subnanosecond peaks with a time interval of about 0.5 ns. Being consistent with these two peaks of the x-ray pulse, two point x-ray sources of size ranging from 100 mum to 5 mum and depending on cut-off x-ray photon energy were usually observed on the pinhole pictures. The x-pinch was used as x-ray source for backlighting of the electrical explosion of single wire and the evolution of X-pinch, and for phase-contrast imaging of soft biological objects such as a small shrimp and a mosquito.

  11. Theoretical and numerical stability analysis of the liquid metal pinch using the shallow water approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zienicke, E.; Li, Ben-Wen; Thess, A.; Kräzschmar, A.; Terhoeven, P.

    2008-09-01

    The pinch instability for a cylindrical jet of liquid metal passed through by an axial electrical current is investigated. Besides the pinch effect originating from surface tension, the Lorentz force, created by the axial current density and the corresponding azimuthal magnetic field, causes an electromagnetic pinch effect. This effect has drawn attention in electrical engineering, because it can be used in the construction of liquid metal current limiters with self-healing properties. In this paper a simple model is derived using the shallow water approximation: the equations describing the full system are reduced to two one-dimensional evolution equations for the axial velocity and the radius of the jet. A stability analysis for this reduced system is carried out yielding critical current density and the growth rate for the instability. To investigate the nonlinear behaviour of the pinch instability for finite perturbations simulations, the shallow water model are performed.

  12. Method for plasma formation for extreme ultraviolet lithography-theta pinch

    DOEpatents

    Hassanein, Ahmed; Konkashbaev, Isak; Rice, Bryan

    2007-02-20

    A device and method for generating extremely short-wave ultraviolet electromagnetic wave, utilizing a theta pinch plasma generator to produce electromagnetic radiation in the range of 10 to 20 nm. The device comprises an axially aligned open-ended pinch chamber defining a plasma zone adapted to contain a plasma generating gas within the plasma zone; a means for generating a magnetic field radially outward of the open-ended pinch chamber to produce a discharge plasma from the plasma generating gas, thereby producing a electromagnetic wave in the extreme ultraviolet range; a collecting means in optical communication with the pinch chamber to collect the electromagnetic radiation; and focusing means in optical communication with the collecting means to concentrate the electromagnetic radiation.

  13. A source of hard X-ray radiation based on hybrid X pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Hoyt, C. L.; Cahill, A. D.; Atoyan, L.; Hammer, D. A.; Tilikin, I. N.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Romanova, V. M.; Agafonov, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    X pinches are well known to produce very small, dense plasma pinches ("hot spots") that emit sub-nanosecond bursts of 1-8 keV radiation. Hard X-ray radiation in the range from 8 to 300 keV or more is also emitted, and only a small portion of which is associated with the X-pinch hot spot. In hybrid X-pinches (HXP), the 10 ns hard X-ray pulse is terminated by fast closure of the gap between the two conical electrodes of the HXP by rapidly expanding electrode plasmas. The temporal, spectral, and spatial properties of this higher energy radiation have been studied. This radiation was used for point-projection imaging with magnification between 1.5 and 6, and spatial resolution of 20-100 μm was demonstrated.

  14. Beam heated linear theta-pinch device for producing hot plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Bohachevsky, Ihor O.

    1981-01-01

    A device for producing hot plasmas comprising a single turn theta-pinch coil, a fast discharge capacitor bank connected to the coil, a fuel element disposed along the center axis of the coil, a predetermined gas disposed within the theta-pinch coil, and a high power photon, electron or ion beam generator concentrically aligned to the theta-pinch coil. Discharge of the capacitor bank generates a cylindrical plasma sheath within the theta-pinch coil which heats the outer layer of the fuel element to form a fuel element plasma layer. The beam deposits energy in either the cylindrical plasma sheath or the fuel element plasma layer to assist the implosion of the fuel element to produce a hot plasma.

  15. Exploring Ways to Improve Predictive Capability of Z-Pinch Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Matuska, W.; Aubrey, J.; Bowers, R.; Lee, H.; Peterson, D.; Deeney, C.; Derzon, M.; Nash, T.

    1998-10-19

    For some time 2-dimensional RMHD (radiation magneto-hydrodynamic) calculations of radiating z-pinches have been made to agree with integral data (current wave form, yield and power). For these calculations, the agreement with detailed data, such as time-resolved x-ray images, is generally not as good. Correctly modeling the physics of z-pinches, including detailed data, is needed to have true predictive capability. To address this problem, the authors first determine which integral data are most sensitive to the details in the models. With this information, they investigate aspects of the pinch, to which the data is sensitive, using non-standard techniques. For example, the pinch is calculated in (x,y)-geometry to investigate how a non-symmetric implosion affects the simulated data.

  16. Analytical and phenomenological studies of rotating turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalov, Alex; Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    A framework, which combines mathematical analysis, closure theory, and phenomenological treatment, is developed to study the spectral transfer process and reduction of dimensionality in turbulent flows that are subject to rotation. First, we outline a mathematical procedure that is particularly appropriate for problems with two disparate time scales. The approach which is based on the Green's method leads to the Poincare velocity variables and the Poincare transformation when applied to rotating turbulence. The effects of the rotation are now reflected in the modifications to the convolution of a nonlinear term. The Poincare transformed equations are used to obtain a time-dependent analog of the Taylor-Proudman theorem valid in the asymptotic limit when the non-dimensional parameter mu is identical to Omega(t) approaches infinity (Omega is the rotation rate and t is the time). The 'split' of the energy transfer in both direct and inverse directions is established. Secondly, we apply the Eddy-Damped-Quasinormal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure to the Poincare transformed Euler/Navier-Stokes equations. This closure leads to expressions for the spectral energy transfer. In particular, an unique triple velocity decorrelation time is derived with an explicit dependence on the rotation rate. This provides an important input for applying the phenomenological treatment of Zhou. In order to characterize the relative strength of rotation, another non-dimensional number, a spectral Rossby number, which is defined as the ratio of rotation and turbulence time scales, is introduced. Finally, the energy spectrum and the spectral eddy viscosity are deduced.

  17. Shear-rate-dependent viscosities of nematic and disc-like particles perfectly aligned in arbitrary relative directions to the shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Hyearn-Maw

    2016-07-01

    The shear-rate-dependent viscosity coefficients of hard ellipsoids are derived for arbitrary relative orientations to the shear flow geometry. Each of the nine components of the coefficients scaled by the Newtonian shear viscosity agrees with the previous result for the viscosity in the zero-shear-rate limit. Among the components, the shear viscosity is graphically displayed for nematic ellipsoids with an axis ratio greater than 1 and for disc-like ellipsoids with an axis ratio less than 1 over the whole range of relative orientations of the axis of ellipsoid to the plane shear layer. As the primary axis of the ellipsoid rotates from the x-axis to the y-axis in the x-y plane, the shear viscosity increases or decreases for nematic or disc-like ellipsolids, respectively.

  18. Rotational Viscometers--A Subject for Student Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Three variants of the rotational viscometer employing a dc motor are considered. The viscometers are highly suitable for liquids of high viscosity, such as glycerol or oils (that is, for [eta] in the range 10-1000 mPa s). The set-ups are very simple and can serve as a first step to designing devices that are more complicated. Experimentation with…

  19. Optimized Minimal Inductance Transmission Line Configuration for Z-Pinch Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O

    2003-10-16

    Successful dynamic Z-pinch experiments generally require good current delivery to the target load. Power flow losses through highly inductive transmission line configurations reduce the current available to the load. In this Brief Report, a variational calculus technique is used to determine the transmission line configuration that produces the least possible inductance and therefore the best possible current delivery for Z-pinch experiments.

  20. Control of x-ray spectrum emitted from a gas-puff Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Takasugi, Keiichi; Miyamoto, Tetsu; Tatsumi, Katsuhiro; Igusa, Takehito

    1997-05-05

    The axial magnetic field is applied to an annular gas-puff z-pinch for the control of radial dynamics and x-ray emission from the pinched plasma. K-shell and L-shell radiations of Ar ions are detected separately, and only the K-shell radiation is suppressed significantly by the axial field. The radial motion of the plasma is analyzed assuming a simple circuit model. The characteristic radius of the plasma increased with increasing the axial field.

  1. Confirmation of bistable stellar differential rotation profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.; Brandenburg, A.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Solar-like differential rotation is characterized by a rapidly rotating equator and slower poles. However, theoretical models and numerical simulations can also result in a slower equator and faster poles when the overall rotation is slow. Aims: We study the critical rotational influence under which differential rotation flips from solar-like (fast equator, slow poles) to an anti-solar one (slow equator, fast poles). We also estimate the non-diffusive (Λ effect) and diffusive (turbulent viscosity) contributions to the Reynolds stress. Methods: We present the results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of mildly turbulent convection in spherical wedge geometry. Here we apply a fully compressible setup which would suffer from a prohibitive time step constraint if the real solar luminosity was used. To avoid this problem while still representing the same rotational influence on the flow as in the Sun, we increase the luminosity by a factor of roughly 106 and the rotation rate by a factor of 102. We regulate the convective velocities by varying the amount of heat transported by thermal conduction, turbulent diffusion, and resolved convection. Results: Increasing the efficiency of resolved convection leads to a reduction of the rotational influence on the flow and a sharp transition from solar-like to anti-solar differential rotation for Coriolis numbers around 1.3. We confirm the recent finding of a large-scale flow bistability: contrasted with running the models from an initial condition with unprescribed differential rotation, the initialization of the model with certain kind of rotation profile sustains the solution over a wider parameter range. The anti-solar profiles are found to be more stable against perturbations in the level of convective turbulent velocity than the solar-type solutions. Conclusions: Our results may have implications for real stars that start their lives as rapid rotators implying solar-like rotation in the early main

  2. Commensurability Effects in Viscosity of Nanoconfined Water.

    PubMed

    Neek-Amal, Mehdi; Peeters, Francois M; Grigorieva, Irina V; Geim, Andre K

    2016-03-22

    The rate of water flow through hydrophobic nanocapillaries is greatly enhanced as compared to that expected from macroscopic hydrodynamics. This phenomenon is usually described in terms of a relatively large slip length, which is in turn defined by such microscopic properties as the friction between water and capillary surfaces and the viscosity of water. We show that the viscosity of water and, therefore, its flow rate are profoundly affected by the layered structure of confined water if the capillary size becomes less than 2 nm. To this end, we study the structure and dynamics of water confined between two parallel graphene layers using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the shear viscosity is not only greatly enhanced for subnanometer capillaries, but also exhibits large oscillations that originate from commensurability between the capillary size and the size of water molecules. Such oscillating behavior of viscosity and, consequently, the slip length should be taken into account in designing and studying graphene-based and similar membranes for desalination and filtration.

  3. Viscosity Measurement using Drop Coalescence in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.; Ethridge, Edwin; Maxwell, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    We present in here details of a new method, using drop coalescence, for application in microgravity environment for determining the viscosity of highly viscous undercooled liquids. The method has the advantage of eliminating heterogeneous nucleation at container walls caused by crystallization of undercooled liquids during processing. Also, due to the rapidity of the measurement, homogeneous nucleation would be avoided. The technique relies on both a highly accurate solution to the Navier-Stokes equations as well as on data gathered from experiments conducted in near zero gravity environment. The liquid viscosity is determined by allowing the computed free surface shape relaxation time to be adjusted in response to the measured free surface velocity of two coalescing drops. Results are presented from two validation experiments of the method which were conducted recently on board the NASA KC-135 aircraft. In these tests the viscosity of a highly viscous liquid, such as glycerine at different temperatures, was determined to reasonable accuracy using the liquid coalescence method. The experiments measured the free surface velocity of two glycerine drops coalescing under the action of surface tension alone in low gravity environment using high speed photography. The free surface velocity was then compared with the computed values obtained from different viscosity values. The results of these experiments were found to agree reasonably well with the calculated values.

  4. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  5. Pressure viscosity coefficient of vegetable oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) pressure viscosity coefficient (PVC) of ten vegetable oils from commodity and new crops, and two petroleum-based oils, polyalphaolefin (PAO) and hexadecane, were investigated. PVC was measured using three different methods: the So and Klaus (S-K) procedure from oil visco...

  6. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives.

  7. Electron perpendicular viscosity in Braginskii's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S. K.; Chan, V. S.

    2013-07-15

    The viscosity coefficient of the electron perpendicular stress tensor in Braginskii's theory is corrected by the addition of a term of the same order of magnitude, through the inclusion of a term beyond pitch angle scattering in the mass-ratio expansion of the electron-ion collision operator.

  8. Viscosity in a lepton-photon universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husdal, Lars

    2016-08-01

    We look at viscosity production in a universe consisting purely of leptons and photons. This is quite close to what the universe actually look like when the temperature was between 10^{10} K and 10^{12} K (1-100 MeV). By taking the strong force and the hadronic particles out of the equation, we can examine how the viscous forces behave with all the 12 leptons present. By this we study how shear- and (more interestingly) bulk viscosity is affected during periods with particle annihilation. We use the theory given by Hoogeveen et al. from 1986, replicate their 9-particle results and expanded it to include the muon and tau particles as well. This will impact the bulk viscosity immensely for high temperatures. We will show that during the beginning of the lepton era, when the temperature is around 100 MeV, the bulk viscosity will be roughly 100 million times larger with muons included in the model compared to a model without.

  9. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-01

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a "heat flux viscosity," is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  10. Sensor for Viscosity and Shear Strength Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, J.; Moore, J.E. Jr.; Ebadian, M.A.; Jones, W.K.

    1998-10-20

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. The work for this project will be performed in three phases. The first phase, carried out in FY96, involved (1) an evaluation of acoustic and other methods for viscosity measurement; (2) measurement of the parameters of slurries over the range of percent solids found in tanks and transport systems; (3) a comparison of physical properties (e.g., viscosity and density) to percent solids found composition; and (4) the design of a prototype sensor. The second phase (FY97) will involve the fabrication of a prototype hybrid sensor to measure the viscosity and mechanical properties of slurries in remote, high-radiation environments. Two different viscometer designs are being investigated in this study: a magnetostrictive pulse wave guide viscometer; an oscillating cylinder viscometer. In FY97, the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), which has printed circuit, thick film, thin film, and co-fired ceramic fabrication capability, will fabricate five probes for demonstration after technology selection and evaluation.

  11. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives. PMID:26513350

  12. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  13. From Stopping to Viscosity in Nuclear Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Danielewicz, Pawel; Barker, Brent; Shi Lijun

    2009-05-07

    Data on stopping in intermediate-energy central heavy-ion collisions are analyzed following transport theory based on the Boltzmann equation. In consequence, values of nuclear shear viscosity are inferred. The inferred values are significantly larger than obtained for free nucleon dispersion relations and free nucleon-nucleon cross sections.

  14. Development of laser-based diagnostics for 1-MA z-pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Hakel, P.; Mancini, R. C.; Wiewior, P.; Presura, R.; Kindel, J. M.; Shevelko, A. P.; Chalyy, O.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Haboub, A.; Altemara, S. D.; Papp, D.; Durmaz, T.

    2009-11-01

    The 50 TW Leopard laser coupled with the 1-MA Zebra generator was used for development of new diagnostics of z-pinch plasmas. Two plasma diagnostics are presented: an x-ray broadband backlighting for z-pinch absorption spectroscopy and parametric two-plasmon decay of the laser beam in dense z-pinch plasma. Implementation of new diagnostics on the Zebra generator and the first results are discussed. The absorption spectroscopy is based on backlighting of z-pinch plasma with a broadband x-ray radiation from a Sm laser plasma. Detailed analysis of the absorption spectra yields the electron temperature and density of z-pinch plasma at the non-radiative stage. The parametric two-plasmon decay of intensive laser radiation generates 3/2φ and 1/2φ harmonics. These harmonics can be used to derive a temperature of z-pinch plasma with the electron density near the quarter of critical plasma density.

  15. Effect of driver impedance on dense plasma focus Z-pinch neutron yield

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Jason E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Link, Anthony E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Schmidt, Andrea E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Welch, Dale

    2014-12-15

    The Z-pinch phase of a dense plasma focus (DPF) heats the plasma by rapid compression and accelerates ions across its intense electric fields, producing neutrons through both thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. Driver characteristics have empirically been shown to affect performance, as measured by neutron yield per unit of stored energy. We are exploring the effect of driver characteristics on DPF performance using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a kJ scale DPF. In this work, our PIC simulations are fluid for the run-down phase and transition to fully kinetic for the pinch phase, capturing kinetic instabilities, anomalous resistivity, and beam formation during the pinch. The anode-cathode boundary is driven by a circuit model of the capacitive driver, including system inductance, the load of the railgap switches, the guard resistors, and the coaxial transmission line parameters. It is known that the driver impedance plays an important role in the neutron yield: first, it sets the peak current achieved at pinch time; and second, it affects how much current continues to flow through the pinch when the pinch inductance and resistance suddenly increase. Here we show from fully kinetic simulations how total neutron yield depends on the impedance of the driver and the distributed parameters of the transmission circuit. Direct comparisons between the experiment and simulations enhance our understanding of these plasmas and provide predictive design capability for neutron source applications.

  16. Current halo structures in high-current plasma experiments: {theta}-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, Yu. V.

    2007-03-15

    Experimental data elucidating mechanisms for halo formation in {theta}-pinch discharges are presented and discussed. The experiments were performed with different gases (H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, He, and Ar) in a theta-pinch device with a porcelain vacuum chamber and an excitation coil 15 cm in diameter and 30 cm in length. The stored energy, the current in the excitation coil, and the current half-period were W = 10 kJ, I = 400 kA, and T/2 = 14 {mu}s, respectively. It is found that the plasma rings (halos) surrounding the pinch core arise as a result of coaxial pinch stratification due to both the excitation of closed currents (inductons) inside the pinch and the radial convergence of the plasma current sheaths produced after the explosion of T-layers formed near the wall in the initial stage of the discharge. It is concluded that halo structures observed in pinches, tokamaks, and other high-current devices used in controlled fusion research have the same nature.

  17. Application of 2-D simulations to hollow z-pinch implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.L.; Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.

    1997-12-01

    The application of simulations of z-pinch implosions should have at least two goals: first, to properly model the most important physical processes occurring in the pinch allowing for a better understanding of the experiments and second, provide a design capability for future experiments. Beginning with experiments fielded at Los Alamos on the Pegasus 1 and Pegasus 2 capacitor banks, the authors have developed a methodology for simulating hollow z-pinches in two dimensions which has reproduced important features of the measured experimental current drive, spectrum, radiation pulse shape, peak power and total radiated energy. This methodology employs essentially one free parameter, the initial level of the random density perturbations imposed at the beginning of the 2-D simulation, but in general no adjustments to other parameters are required. Currently the authors are applying this capability to the analysis of recent Saturn and PBFA-Z experiments. The code results provide insight into the nature of the pinch plasma prior to arrival on-axis, during thermalization and development after peak pinch time. Among other things, the simulation results provide an explanation for the production of larger amounts of radiated energy than would be expected from a simple slug-model kinetic energy analysis and the appearance of multiple peaks in the radiation power. The 2-D modeling has also been applied to the analysis of Saturn dynamic hohlraum experiments and is being used in the design of this and other Z-Pinch applications on PBFA-Z.

  18. Effect of driver impedance on dense plasma focus Z-pinch neutron yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Jason; Link, Anthony; Schmidt, Andrea; Welch, Dale

    2014-12-01

    The Z-pinch phase of a dense plasma focus (DPF) heats the plasma by rapid compression and accelerates ions across its intense electric fields, producing neutrons through both thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. Driver characteristics have empirically been shown to affect performance, as measured by neutron yield per unit of stored energy. We are exploring the effect of driver characteristics on DPF performance using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a kJ scale DPF. In this work, our PIC simulations are fluid for the run-down phase and transition to fully kinetic for the pinch phase, capturing kinetic instabilities, anomalous resistivity, and beam formation during the pinch. The anode-cathode boundary is driven by a circuit model of the capacitive driver, including system inductance, the load of the railgap switches, the guard resistors, and the coaxial transmission line parameters. It is known that the driver impedance plays an important role in the neutron yield: first, it sets the peak current achieved at pinch time; and second, it affects how much current continues to flow through the pinch when the pinch inductance and resistance suddenly increase. Here we show from fully kinetic simulations how total neutron yield depends on the impedance of the driver and the distributed parameters of the transmission circuit. Direct comparisons between the experiment and simulations enhance our understanding of these plasmas and provide predictive design capability for neutron source applications.

  19. ZaP-HD: High Energy Density Z-Pinch Plasmas using Sheared Flow Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Hughes, M. C.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.; Weed, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The ZaP-HD flow Z-pinch project investigates scaling the flow Z-pinch to High Energy Density Plasma, HEDP, conditions by using sheared flow stabilization. ZaP used a single power supply to produce 100 cm long Z-pinches that were quiescent for many radial Alfven times and axial flow-through times. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve HED plasmas, which are dimensionally large and persist for extended durations. The ZaP-HD device replaces the single power supply from ZaP with two separate power supplies to independently control the plasma flow and current in the Z-pinch. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements of the density with interferometry and digital holography, the plasma flow and temperature with passive spectroscopy, the magnetic field with surface magnetic probes, and plasma emission with optical imaging. The diagnostics fully characterize the plasma from its initiation in the coaxial accelerator, through the pinch, and exhaust from the assembly region. The plasma evolution is modeled with high resolution codes: Mach2, WARPX, and NIMROD. Experimental results and scaling analyses are presented. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration.

  20. PBFA Z: A 20-MA z-pinch driver for plasma radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, R.B.; Breeze, S.F.; Deeney, C.

    1996-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing a major modification to the PBFA-II facility. PBFA Z will be a z-pinch driver capable of delivering up to 20 MA to a z-pinch load. It optimizes the electrical coupling to the implosion energy of z pinches at implosion velocities of {approximately} 40 cm/{mu}s. Design constraints resulted in an accelerator with a 0.12-{Omega} impedance, a 10.25-nH inductance, and a 120-ns pulse width. The design required new water transmission lines, insulator stack, and vacuum power feeds. Current is delivered to the z-pinch load through four, self-magnetically-insulated vacuum transmission lines and a double post-hole convolute. A variety of design codes are used to model the power flow. These predict a peak current of 20 MA to a z-pinch load having a 2-cm length, a 2-cm radius, and a 15--mg mass, coupling 1.5 MJ into kinetic energy. We present 2-D Rad-Hydro calculations showing MJ x-ray outputs from tungsten wire-array z pinches.

  1. The pinch of cold ions from recycling in the tokamak edge pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Weigang; Parker, Scott E.; Chen Yang; Park, Gun-Young; Chang, Choong-Seock; Stotler, Daren

    2011-05-15

    We apply the ''natural fueling mechanism'' [W. Wan, S. E. Parker, Y. Chen, and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 17, 040701 (2010)] to the edge pedestal. The natural fueling mechanism is where cold ions naturally pinch radially inward for a heat-flux dominated plasma. It is shown from neoclassical-neutral transport coupled simulations that the recycling neutrals and the associated source ions are colder than the main ions in the edge pedestal. These recycling source ions will pinch radially inward due to microturbulence. Gyrokinetic turbulence simulations indicate that near the top of the pedestal, the pinch velocity of the recycling source ions is much higher than the main ion outgoing flow velocity. The turbulent pinch of the recycling source ions may play a role in the edge pedestal transport and dynamics. The cold ion temperature significantly enhances the pinch velocity of the recycling source ions near to the pedestal top. Neoclassical calculations show a cold ion pinch in the pedestal as well.

  2. Self-similar pinch-off mechanism and scaling of ferrofluid drops.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao F; Li, Huai Z

    2015-12-01

    The pinch off of heterogeneous ferrofluid drops at a nozzle in air was experimentally investigated with a magnetic field (downward or upward) and without a magnetic field. Compared to homogeneous drops, the self-similarity and universal scaling law were verified through modifying the initial conditions, such as the nozzle diameter, flow rate, and magnitude and direction of the magnetic fields. Two pinch-off points were observed, and the two consecutive pinch-off dynamics were characterized through scaling laws. Here our scaling exponent remains within the scope of (0.70-0.80) for the primary whereas it remains within the scope of (0.60-0.70) for the secondary pinch off, respectively, comparable to the classic range from 2/3 to 1 for homogeneous drops. The gravity-compensating and gravity-superimposing magnetic fields display a negligible effect on the exponent but determine the sequence of double pinch offs. The universal character of the self-similar pinch off is extended to a heterogeneous fluid. PMID:26764624

  3. Scaling the Shear-flow Stabilized Z-pinch to Reactor Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, H. S.; Schmidt, A.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Golingo, R. P.; Cleveau, E.

    2015-11-01

    We present a conceptual design along with scaling calculations for a pulsed fusion reactor based on the shear-flow-stabilized Z-pinch device. Experiments performed on the ZaP device, at the University of Washington, have demonstrated stable operation for durations of 20 usec at ~100kA discharge current for pinches that are ~1 cm in diameter and 100 cm long. The inverse of the pinch diameter and plasma energy density scale strongly with pinch current and calculations show that maintaining stabilization durations of ~7 usec for increased discharge current (~15x) in a shortened pinch (10 cm) results in a pinch diameter of ~200 um and plasma conditions that approach those needed to support significant fusion burn and energy gain (Ti ~ 30keV, density ~ 3e26/m3, ntau ~1.4e20 sec/m3). Compelling features of the concept include operation at modest discharge current (1.5 MA) and voltage (40kV) along with direct adoption of liquid metals for at least one electrode--technological capabilities that have been proven in existing, commercial, pulse power devices such as large ignitrons. LLNL-ABS-674920. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy ARPAe ALPHA Program by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Self-similar pinch-off mechanism and scaling of ferrofluid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao F.; Li, Huai Z.

    2015-12-01

    The pinch off of heterogeneous ferrofluid drops at a nozzle in air was experimentally investigated with a magnetic field (downward or upward) and without a magnetic field. Compared to homogeneous drops, the self-similarity and universal scaling law were verified through modifying the initial conditions, such as the nozzle diameter, flow rate, and magnitude and direction of the magnetic fields. Two pinch-off points were observed, and the two consecutive pinch-off dynamics were characterized through scaling laws. Here our scaling exponent remains within the scope of (0.70-0.80) for the primary whereas it remains within the scope of (0.60-0.70) for the secondary pinch off, respectively, comparable to the classic range from 2/3 to 1 for homogeneous drops. The gravity-compensating and gravity-superimposing magnetic fields display a negligible effect on the exponent but determine the sequence of double pinch offs. The universal character of the self-similar pinch off is extended to a heterogeneous fluid.

  5. Bulk viscosity, r-modes, and the early evolution of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisenegger, A.; Bonacic, A.

    2003-07-01

    We discuss the effect of nonlinear bulk viscosity and the associated reheating on the evolution of newly born, rapidly rotating neutron stars with r-modes destabilized through the Chandrasekhar-Friedman-Schutz (CFS) mechanism. Bulk viscosity in these stars is due to the adjustment of the relative abundances of different particle species as the density of a fluid element is perturbed. It becomes nonlinear when the chemical potential difference delta mu, measuring the chemical imbalance in the fluid element, becomes larger than the temperature T, which is generally much smaller than the Fermi energy. From this scale on, the bulk viscosity increases much faster with delta mu than predicted by the usual, linear approximation. This provides a potential saturation mechanism for stellar oscillation modes at a small to moderate amplitude. In addition, bulk viscosity dissipates energy, which can lead to neutrino emission, reheating of the star, or both. This is the first study to explicitly consider these effects in the evolution of the r-mode instability. For stars with little or no hyperon bulk viscosity, these effects are not strong enough to prevent the r-modes from growing to amplitudes alpha ~ 1 or higher, so other saturation mechanisms will probably set in earlier. The reheating effect makes spin-down occur at a higher temperature than would otherwise be the case, in this way possibly avoiding complications associated with a solid crust or a core superfluid. On the other hand, stars with a substantial hyperon bulk viscosity and a moderate magnetic field saturate their mode amplitude at a low value, which makes them gravitational radiators for hundreds of years, while they lose angular momentum through gravitational waves and magnetic braking.

  6. Shape anisotropy induces rotations in optically trapped red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambardekar, Kapil; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A.; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K.; Yamada, Toshihoro; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi; Sharma, Shobhona; Mathur, Deepak

    2010-07-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study is carried out to probe the rotational behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in a single beam optical trap. We induce shape changes in RBCs by altering the properties of the suspension medium in which live cells float. We find that certain shape anisotropies result in the rotation of optically trapped cells. Indeed, even normal (healthy) RBCs can be made to rotate using linearly polarized trapping light by altering the osmotic stress the cells are subjected to. Hyperosmotic stress is found to induce shape anisotropies. We also probe the effect of the medium's viscosity on cell rotation. The observed rotations are modeled using a Langevin-type equation of motion that takes into account frictional forces that are generated as RBCs rotate in the medium. We observe good correlation between our measured data and calculated results.

  7. Viscous effects in rapidly rotating stars with application to white-dwarf models. I, II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    A general approximate numerical technique is proposed for constructing evolutionary sequences of rapidly rotating axisymmetric barytropic equilibrium configurations, with allowance for angular momentum transfer by a nonconstant isotropic viscosity. The principal physical assumption involved is the constancy of the angular momentum per unit mass on cylinders about the axis of rotation. Rapidly rotating nonmagnetic white-dwarf models with a zero-temperature degenerate-electron equation of state are considered as a particular application. The viscosity used in the analysis is that of the degenerate electrons.

  8. A boundary-integral model for drop deformation between two parallel plates with non-unit viscosity ratio drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, P. J. A.; Anderson, P. D.

    2008-10-01

    A boundary-integral method is presented for drop deformation between two parallel walls for non-unit viscosity ratio systems. To account for the effect of the walls the Green's functions are modified and all terms for the double-layer potential are derived. The full three-dimensional implementation is validated, and the model is shown to be accurate and consistent. The method is applied to study drop deformation in shear flow. An excellent match with small-deformation theory is found at low capillary numbers, and our results match with other BIM simulations for pressure-driven flows. For shear flow with moderate capillary numbers, we see that the behavior of a low-viscosity drop is similar to that of drop with a viscosity ratio of unity. High-viscosity drops, on the other hand, are prevented from rotating in shear flow, which results in a larger deformation, but less overshoot in the drop axes is observed. In contrast with unconfined flow, high-viscosity drops can be broken in shear flow between parallel plates; for low-viscosity drops the critical capillary number is higher in confined situations.

  9. Measurement and calculation of the viscosity of metals—a review of the current status and developing trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J.; Gröbner, J.; Hort, N.; Kainer, K. U.; Schmid-Fetzer, R.

    2014-06-01

    Viscosity is an important rheological property of metals in casting because it controls the rate of transport of liquid metals, which may lead to casting defects such as hot tearing and porosity. The measurement methods and numerical models of the viscosity of liquid and semi-solid state metals that have been published to date are reviewed in this paper. Most experimental measurements have been performed with rotational and oscillatory viscometers, which offer advantages at low viscosities in particular. Besides these two traditional methods for measuring viscosities, a couple of studies also introduced the technique of isothermal compression for alloys in the semi-solid state, and even an optical basicity method for the viscosity of slags. As to numerical models, most published results show that the viscosity of liquid and semi-solid state metals can be described by the Arrhenius, Andrade, Kaptay or Budai-Bemkő-Kaptay equations. In addition, there are some alternative models, such as the power model and the isothermal stress-strain model.

  10. Stand-off energy sources for Z-pinch implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D; Toor, A

    1999-07-12

    An issue of stand-off energy sources is in an early stage of development. Several concepts have been identified as potential solution of the problem. Those based on the total disconnection between the target assembly and the primary energy source have an obvious advantage in that they allow one to relatively easily protect the permanent part. Indeed, a fast projectile travelling at the velocity of 10 km/s covers the distance of 10 m in 1 ms, the time that is sufficient to mechanically shield the line of site. Auxiliary power supply in the form of an electron beam can be protected by using a magnetic wiggling in the transport channel in the permanent part of the facility. Of some help is also the fact that this auxiliary source operates 10 or so microseconds before the fusion energy release occurs. Another advantage of this approach is related to its compatibility with high rep-rate mode, up to tens pulses per second (because there is no need to insert heavy large-volume parts into the reaction chamber). An obvious disadvantage is that the assembly should contain a more or less complex on-board circuitry. Those concepts that are based on the direct mechanical connection between the external pulse-forming line and the disposable inner part of the transmission line (connected in turn to the Z-pinch diode) have an obvious advantage in eliminating any intermediate steps in delivering the energy to the pinch. They work essentially as the presently used Z-pinch devices and should provide the same high efficiency. A difficulty of this approach is related to the presence of the insulating slot in the walls of the reaction chamber that directly links the disposable inner part of the energy transmission system and permanent external energy source. The slot is vulnerable to mechanical perturbations and neutron irradiation that may propagate into the permanent part of the source and cause a damage to it. Mechanical damage could be reduced by the technique of hydrodynamic

  11. Immobilization of soluble protein complexes in MAS solid-state NMR: Sedimentation versus viscosity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Mainz, Andi; Busi, Baptiste; Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Kranz, Maximilian; Hofmann, Thomas; Reif, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, MAS solid-state NMR has emerged as a technique for the investigation of soluble protein complexes. It was found that high molecular weight complexes do not need to be crystallized in order to obtain an immobilized sample for solid-state NMR investigations. Sedimentation induced by sample rotation impairs rotational diffusion of proteins and enables efficient dipolar coupling based cross polarization transfers. In addition, viscosity contributes to the immobilization of the molecules in the sample. Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents (NADES) have very high viscosities, and can replace water in living organisms. We observe a considerable amount of cross polarization transfers for NADES solvents, even though their molecular weight is too low to yield significant sedimentation. We discuss how viscosity and sedimentation both affect the quality of the obtained experimental spectra. The FROSTY/sedNMR approach holds the potential to study large protein complexes, which are otherwise not amenable for a structural characterization using NMR. We show that using this method, backbone assignments of the symmetric proteasome activator complex (1.1MDa), and high quality correlation spectra of non-symmetric protein complexes such as the prokaryotic ribosome 50S large subunit binding to trigger factor (1.4MDa) are obtained. PMID:27017576

  12. Immobilization of soluble protein complexes in MAS solid-state NMR: Sedimentation versus viscosity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Mainz, Andi; Busi, Baptiste; Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Kranz, Maximilian; Hofmann, Thomas; Reif, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, MAS solid-state NMR has emerged as a technique for the investigation of soluble protein complexes. It was found that high molecular weight complexes do not need to be crystallized in order to obtain an immobilized sample for solid-state NMR investigations. Sedimentation induced by sample rotation impairs rotational diffusion of proteins and enables efficient dipolar coupling based cross polarization transfers. In addition, viscosity contributes to the immobilization of the molecules in the sample. Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents (NADES) have very high viscosities, and can replace water in living organisms. We observe a considerable amount of cross polarization transfers for NADES solvents, even though their molecular weight is too low to yield significant sedimentation. We discuss how viscosity and sedimentation both affect the quality of the obtained experimental spectra. The FROSTY/sedNMR approach holds the potential to study large protein complexes, which are otherwise not amenable for a structural characterization using NMR. We show that using this method, backbone assignments of the symmetric proteasome activator complex (1.1MDa), and high quality correlation spectra of non-symmetric protein complexes such as the prokaryotic ribosome 50S large subunit binding to trigger factor (1.4MDa) are obtained.

  13. Rotational reorientation dynamics at high pressures: rhodamine 6G in ethanol from 1 bar to 6 kbar

    SciTech Connect

    Philips, L.A.; Webb, S.P.; Yeh, S.W.; Clark, J.H.

    1985-01-03

    Picosecond, time-resolved fluorescence depolarization spectroscopy has been used to measure the rotational reorientation time (tau/sub or/) of electronically excited rhodamine 6G. When the dependence of tau/sub or/ on solvent viscosity for a series of linear alcohols is compared with that for ethanol as a function of pressure over the range from 1 bar to 6 kbar, substantially different rotational reorientation dynamics are found for identical macroscopic viscosities. 31 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Study of a non-equilibrium plasma pinch with application for microwave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Agry, Ahmad Farouk

    The Non-Equilibrium Plasma Pinch (NEPP), also known as the Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) is well known as a source of energetic ions, relativistic electrons and neutrons as well as electromagnetic radiation extending from the infrared to X-ray. In this dissertation, the operation of a 15 kJ, Mather type, NEPP machine is studied in detail. A large number of experiments are carried out to tune the machine parameters for best performance using helium and hydrogen as filling gases. The NEPP machine is modified to be able to extract the copious number of electrons generated at the pinch. A hollow anode with small hole at the flat end, and a mock magnetron without biasing magnetic field are built. The electrons generated at the pinch are very difficult to capture, therefore a novel device is built to capture and transport the electrons from the pinch to the magnetron. The novel cup-rod-needle device successfully serves the purpose to capture and transport electrons to monitor the pinch current. Further, the device has the potential to field emit charges from its needle end acting as a pulsed electron source for other devices such as the magnetron. Diagnostics tools are designed, modeled, built, calibrated, and implemented in the machine to measure the pinch dynamics. A novel, UNLV patented electromagnetic dot sensors are successfully calibrated, and implemented in the machine. A new calibration technique is developed and test stands designed and built to measure the dot's ability to track the impetus signal over its dynamic range starting and ending in the noise region. The patented EM-dot sensor shows superior performance over traditional electromagnetic sensors, such as Rogowski coils. On the other hand, the cup-rod structure, when grounded on the rod side, serves as a diagnostic tool to monitor the pinch current by sampling the actual current, a quantity that has been always very challenging to measure without perturbing the pinch. To the best of our knowledge, this method

  15. X-ray results from a modified nozzle and double gas puff z pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.; Fisher, A.; Van Drie, A. )

    1991-03-15

    The nozzle and the anode of the UCI (University of California, Irvine) {ital z}-pinch facility were modified to study the influence of the anode-cathode geometrical structure on the stability of the pinch and the x-ray yield of the pinch. The anode was modified from a honey-comb to a hollow cylinder with a 4-cm diameter and a {similar to}3.5-mm wall thickness, placed 2 cm below the cathode. The cavity in the center of the cathode was enlarged from 6-mm diameter to 36 mm. The design of the cathode and the anode showed a marked improvement of the pinch stability over the previous design. Both zirconium and carbon-carbon nozzle were used for the Kr and Ne {ital z} pinches. After a few tens of shots the Zr nozzle was melted at the edge and the pinch degraded, while the carbon-carbon nozzle did not sustain any damage for more than 300 shots. Some shots showed the {ital di}/{ital dt} at the implosion is {similar to}5 times higher than the {ital di}/{ital dt} at the beginning of the discharge, this has never been obtained at UCI before. This ratio of the initial {ital di}/{ital dt} to pinch {ital di}/{ital dt} is a measure of the pinch quality. By serendipity it was found that double gas puff {ital z} pinch increased the hard x-ray ({gt}1 keV) output by about an order of magnitude. The nozzle was then modified to allow double puff operation. A 3.4-mm-diam hole was opened at the center of the nozzle and a plunger was inserted from the top to control the mass of the gas entering the hole. The diagnostics include {ital di}/{ital dt} coil, soft, and hard x-ray diodes. Soft and hard x-ray emission are both enhanced by the double gas puff {ital z} pinch.

  16. Local viscoelasticity of living cells measured by rotational magnetic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berret, J.-F.

    2016-01-01

    When submitted to a magnetic field, micron-size wires with superparamagnetic properties behave as embedded rheometers and represent interesting sensors for microrheology. Here we use rotational magnetic spectroscopy to measure the shear viscosity of the cytoplasm of living cells. We address the question of whether the cytoplasm is a viscoelastic liquid or an elastic gel. The main result of the study is the observation of a rotational instability between a synchronous and an asynchronous regime of rotation, found for murine fibroblasts and human cancer cells. For wires of susceptibility 3.6, the transition occurs in the range 0.01-1 rad s-1. The determination of the shear viscosity (10-100 Pa s) and elastic modulus (5-20 Pa) confirms the viscoelastic character of the cytoplasm. In contrast to earlier studies, it is concluded that the interior of living cells can be described as a viscoelastic liquid, and not as an elastic gel.

  17. Molten Composition B Viscosity at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, David K.; Núñez, Marcel P.; Zucker, Jonathan M.

    2016-10-01

    A shear-thinning viscosity model is developed for molten Composition B at elevated temperature from analysis of falling ball viscometer data. Results are reported with the system held at 85, 110, and 135°C. Balls of densities of 2.7, 8.0, and 15.6 g/cm3 are dropped to generate a range of strain rates in the material. Analysis of video recordings gives the speed at which the balls fall. Computer simulation of the viscometer is used to determine parameters for a non-Newtonian model calibrated to measured speeds. For the first time, viscosity is shown to be a function of temperature and strain rate-dependent maximum RDX (cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine) particle volume fraction.

  18. Prediction of viscosity of dense fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royal, Damian D.; Vesovic, Velisa; Trusler, J. P. Martin; Wakeham, William. A.

    The Vesovic-Wakeham (VW) method of predicting the viscosity of dense fluid mixtures has been improved by implementing new mixing rules based on the rigid sphere formalism. The proposed mixing rules are based on both Lebowitz's solution of the Percus-Yevick equation and on the Carnahan-Starling equation. The predictions of the modified VW method have been compared with experimental viscosity data for a number of diverse fluid mixtures: natural gas, hexane + hheptane, hexane + octane, cyclopentane + toluene, and a ternary mixture of hydrofluorocarbons (R32 + R125 + R134a). The results indicate that the proposed improvements make possible the extension of the original VW method to liquid mixtures and to mixtures containing polar species, while retaining its original accuracy.

  19. Hall viscosity revealed via density response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biao

    2015-06-01

    Quantum Hall systems have recently been shown to possess a quantity sensitive to the spatial geometry and topology of the system, dubbed the Hall viscosity ηH. Despite the extensive theoretical discussions on its properties, the question of how to measure ηH still poses a challenge. In this paper, we present a general relation between Hall viscosity and susceptibility for systems with Galilean invariance. Thus, it allows for determination of ηH through density response signatures. The relations are verified in the integer quantum Hall example and are further illustrated in an effective hydrodynamic analysis. Since the derivation is based on Kubo formulas and assumes no more than conservation laws and translational symmetry, the results are applicable to a wide range of systems.

  20. Low temperature viscosity in elongated ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcón, T.; Pérez-Madrid, A.; Rubí, J. M.

    1997-12-01

    We have studied the relaxation and transport properties of a ferrofluid in an elongational flow. These properties are influenced by the bistable nature of the potential energy. Bistability comes from the irrotational character of the flow together with the symmetry of the dipoles. Additionally, the presence of a constant magnetic field destroys the symmetry of the potential energy magnetizing the system. We have shown that at a moderate temperature, compared to the height of the energy barrier, the viscosity decreases with respect to the value it would have if the potential were stable. This phenomenon is known as the "negative viscosity" effect. Thermal motion induces jumps of the magnetic moment between the two stable states of the system leading to the aforementioned lowered dissipation effect.

  1. Non-Newtonian viscosity of Escherichia coli suspensions.

    PubMed

    Gachelin, Jérémie; Miño, Gastón; Berthet, Hélène; Lindner, Anke; Rousselet, Annie; Clément, Eric

    2013-06-28

    The viscosity of an active suspension of E. coli bacteria is determined experimentally as a function of the shear rate using a Y-shaped microfluidic channel. From the relative suspension viscosity, we identify rheological thickening and thinning regimes as well as situations at low shear rate where the viscosity of the bacteria suspension can be lower than the viscosity of the suspending fluid. In addition, bacteria concentration and velocity profiles in the bulk are directly measured in the microchannel.

  2. Quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ren, Y.; Solomon, W.; Bell, R. E.; Candy, J.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Yuh, H.

    2016-05-11

    This paper presents quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch for low aspect-ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) H-modes where previous experimental measurements were focused. Local, linear calculations predict that in the region of interest (just outside the mid-radius) of these relatively high-beta plasmas, profiles are most unstable to microtearing modes that are only effective in transporting electron energy. However, sub-dominant electromagnetic and electrostaticballooning modes are also unstable, which are effective at transporting energy, particles, and momentum. The quasi-linear prediction of transport from these weaker ballooning modes, assuming they contribute transport in addition to that from microtearing modes inmore » a nonlinear turbulent state, leads to a very small or outward convection of momentum, inconsistent with the experimentally measured inward pinch, and opposite to predictions in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. Additional predictions of a low beta L-mode plasma, unstable to more traditional electrostatic ion temperature gradient-trapped electron mode instability, show that the Coriolis pinch is inward but remains relatively weak and insensitive to many parameter variations. The weak or outward pinch predicted in NSTX plasmas appears to be at least partially correlated to changes in the parallel mode structure that occur at a finite beta and low aspect ratio, as discussed in previous theories. The only conditions identified where a stronger inward pinch is predicted occur either in the purely electrostatic limit or if the aspect ratio is increased. Lastly, as the Coriolis pinch cannot explain the measured momentum pinch, additional theoretical momentum transport mechanisms are discussed that may be potentially important.« less

  3. The quest for a z-pinch based fusion energy source—a historical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethian, John

    1997-05-01

    Ever since 1958, when Oscar Anderson observed copious neutrons emanating from a "magnetically self-constricted column of deuterium plasma," scientists have attempted to develop the simple linear pinch into a fusion power source. After all, simple calculations show that if one can pass a current of slightly less than 2 million amperes through a stable D-T plasma, then one could achieve not just thermonuclear break-even, but thermonuclear gain. Moreover, several reactor studies have shown that a simple linear pinch could be the basis for a very attractive fusion system. The problem is, of course, that the seemingly simple act of passing 2 MA through a stable pinch has proven to be quite difficult to accomplish. The pinch tends to disrupt due to instabilities, either by the m=0 (sausage) or m=1 (kink) modes. Curtailing the growth of these instabilities has been the primary thrust of z-pinch fusion research, and over the years a wide variety of formation techniques have been tried. The early pinches were driven by relatively slow capacitive discharges and were formed by imploding a plasma column. The advent of fast pulsed power technology brought on a whole new repertoire of formation techniques, including: fast implosions, laser or field-enhanced breakdown in a uniform volume of gas, a discharge inside a small capillary, a frozen deuterium fiber isolated by vacuum, and staged concepts in which one pinch implodes upon another. And although none of these have yet to be successful, some have come tantalizingly close. This paper will review the history of this four-decade long quest for fusion power.

  4. Quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ren, Y.; Solomon, W.; Bell, R. E.; Candy, J.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Yuh, H.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch for low aspect-ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) H-modes where previous experimental measurements were focused. Local, linear calculations predict that in the region of interest (just outside the mid-radius) of these relatively high-beta plasmas, profiles are most unstable to microtearing modes that are only effective in transporting electron energy. However, sub-dominant electromagnetic and electrostatic ballooning modes are also unstable, which are effective at transporting energy, particles, and momentum. The quasi-linear prediction of transport from these weaker ballooning modes, assuming they contribute transport in addition to that from microtearing modes in a nonlinear turbulent state, leads to a very small or outward convection of momentum, inconsistent with the experimentally measured inward pinch, and opposite to predictions in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. Additional predictions of a low beta L-mode plasma, unstable to more traditional electrostatic ion temperature gradient-trapped electron mode instability, show that the Coriolis pinch is inward but remains relatively weak and insensitive to many parameter variations. The weak or outward pinch predicted in NSTX plasmas appears to be at least partially correlated to changes in the parallel mode structure that occur at a finite beta and low aspect ratio, as discussed in previous theories. The only conditions identified where a stronger inward pinch is predicted occur either in the purely electrostatic limit or if the aspect ratio is increased. As the Coriolis pinch cannot explain the measured momentum pinch, additional theoretical momentum transport mechanisms are discussed that may be potentially important.

  5. RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

  6. Hall viscosity of hierarchical quantum Hall states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremling, Mikael; Hansson, Thors Hans; Suorsa, Juha

    2015-03-01

    We construct model wave functions on a torus for all chiral states in the abelian quantum Hall hierarchy. These functions have no variational parameters, and they transform under the modular group in the same way as the multicomponent generalizations of the Laughlin wave functions. Assuming the absence of Berry phases upon adiabatic variations of the modular parameter τ, we calculate the quantum Hall viscosity and find it to be in agreement with the formula, given by Read, which relates the viscosity to the average orbital spin of the electrons. For the filling factor ν = 2 / 5 Jain state, which is at the second level in the hierarchy, we compare our model wave function with the numerically obtained ground state of the Coulomb interaction Hamiltonian in the lowest Landau level, and find very good agreement in a large region of the complex τ-plane. For the same example, we also numerically compute the Hall viscosity and find good agreement with the analytical result for both the model wave function and the numerically obtained Coulomb wave function. We argue that this supports the notion of a generalized plasma analogy that would ensure that wave functions obtained using conformal field theory methods do not acquire Berry phases upon adiabatic evolution.

  7. Rotator Cuff Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors because of a rotator cuff problem. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your shoulder. This means ... or more of the rotator cuff tendons is torn, the tendon no longer fully attaches to the ...

  8. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation Through the ZR Z-Pinch Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.; Madrid, E. A.; Miller, C. L.; Clark, R. E.; Stygar, W. A.; Struve, K.; Corcoran, P. A.; Whitney, B.

    2009-01-21

    A fully three-dimensional electromagnetic model of the major pulsed power components of the 26-MA ZR accelerator is presented. This large-scale simulation model tracks the evolution of electromagnetic waves through the intermediate storage capacitors, laser-triggered gas switches, pulse-forming lines, water switches, tri-plate transmission lines, and water convolute to the vacuum insulator stack. The plates at the insulator stack are coupled to a transmission line circuit model of the four-level magnetically-insulated transmission line section and post-hole convolutes. The vacuum section circuit model is terminated by either a short-circuit load or dynamic models of imploding z-pinch loads. The simulations results are compared with electrical measurements made throughout the ZR accelerator and good agreement is found, especially for times before and up to peak load power. This modeling effort represents new opportunities for modeling existing and future large-scale pulsed power systems used in a variety of high energy density physics and radiographic applications.

  9. Equilibrium and transport for quasi-helical reversed field pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappello, S.; Bonfiglio, D.; Escande, D. F.; Guo, S. C.; Predebon, I.; Sattin, F.; Veranda, M.; Zanca, P.; Angioni, C.; Chacón, L.; Dong, J. Q.; Garbet, X.; Liu, S. F.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents the most recent results in theoretical/numerical studies on the physics of the quasi-helical regime in reversed field pinch (RFP) configurations. Such regime systematically characterizes RFX-mod experiments at high currents (Ip > 1.2 MA), producing clear internal electron transport barriers. Several approaches, ranging from a macroscopic (MHD) to a microscopic (transport) description, have been used to tackle the related complex physics. From the macroscopic point of view, we derive analytically the electrostatic velocity field consistent with a generic helical ohmic equilibrium. We also provide the first MHD initial-value simulation results in toroidal geometry obtained with the PIXIE3D code. Concerning transport, the effect of magnetic chaos healing by mode separatrix expulsion, believed to favour the formation of transport barriers, is discussed. Results indicate that helical equilibria originated by non-resonant modes are more resilient to chaos formation. Finally, gyrofluid and gyrokinetic tools have been used towards a first assessment of the role of microturbulence in the RFP. Concerning the electrostatic branches, ion temperature gradient mode stability is robustly improved in RFP with respect to tokamaks, due to stronger Landau damping effects, and the marginality condition is estimated to be only spottily reached in present experimental regimes, unless the effects of impurities are considered. Impurities, which in RFX-mod accumulate in the edge, may also significantly impact the stability of the impurity-driven modes. On the electromagnetic side, microtearing turbulence is found to probably play a role at the transport barriers.

  10. Measuring Fast Ion Losses in a Reversed Field Pinch Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonofiglo, P. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Almagri, A. F.; Kim, J.; Clark, J.; Capecchi, W.; Sears, S. H.

    2015-11-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) provides a unique environment to study fast ion confinement and transport. The RFP's weak toroidal field, strong magnetic shear, and ability to enter a 3D state provide a wide range of dynamics to study fast ions. Core-localized, 25 keV fast ions are sourced into MST by a tangentially injected hydrogen/deuterium neutral beam. Neutral particle analysis and measured fusion neutron flux indicate enhanced fast ion transport in the plasma core. Past experiments point to a dynamic loss of fast ions associated with the RFP's transition to a 3D state and with beam-driven, bursting magnetic modes. Consequently, fast ion transport and losses in the RFP have garnered recent attention. Valuable information on fast-ion loss, such as energy and pitch distributions, are sought to provide a better understanding of the transport mechanisms at hand. We have constructed and implemented two fast ion loss detectors (FILDs) for use on MST. The FILDs have two, independent, design concepts: collecting particles as a function of v⊥ or with pitch greater than 0.8. In this work, we present our preliminary findings and results from our FILDs on MST. This research is supported by US DOE.

  11. Relaxation models for single helical reversed field pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paccagnella, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a relaxation theory for plasmas where a single dominant mode is present [Bhattacharjee et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 347 (1980)], is revisited. The solutions of a related eigenvalue problem are numerically calculated and discussed. Although these solutions can reproduce well, the magnetic fields measured in experiments, there is no way within the theory to determine the dominant mode, whose pitch is a free parameter in the model. To find the preferred helical perturbation, a procedure is proposed that minimizes the "distance" of the relaxed state from a state which is constructed as a two region generalization of the Taylor's relaxation model [Taylor, Phys. Rev. Lett. 33, 1139 (1974); Rev. Mod. Phys. 58, 751 (1986)] and that allows current discontinuities. It is found that this comparison is able to predict the observed scaling with the aspect ratio and reversal parameter for the dominant mode in the Single Helical states. The aspect ratio scaling alone is discussed in a previous paper [Paccagnella, Nucl. Fusion 56, 046010 (2016)] in terms of the efficient response of a toroidal shell to specific modes (leaving a sign undetermined), showing that the ideal wall boundary condition, a key ingredient in relaxation theories, is particularly well matched for them. Therefore, the present paper altogether [Paccagnella, Nucl. Fusion 56, 046010 (2016)] can give a new and satisfactory explanation of some robust and reproducible experimental facts observed in the Single Helical Reversed Field Pinch plasmas and never explained before.

  12. Dense plasma focus production in a hypocycloidal pinch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Mcfarland, D. R.; Hohl, F.

    1975-01-01

    A type of high-power pinch apparatus consisting of disk electrodes was developed, and diagnostic measurements to study its mechanism of dense plasma production were made. The collapse fronts of the current sheets are well organized, and dense plasma focuses are produced on the axis with radial stability in excess of 5 microns. A plasma density greater than 10 to the 18th power/cubic cm was determined with Stark broadening and CO2 laser absorption. A plasma temperature of approximately 1 keV was measured with differential transmission of soft X-rays through thin foils. Essentially complete absorption of a high-energy CO2 laser beam was observed. The advantages of this apparatus over the coaxial plasma focus are in (1) the plasma volume, (2) the stability, (3) the containment time, (4) the easy access to additional heating by laser or electron beams, and (5) the possibility of scaling up to a multiple array for high-power operation.

  13. Overview of results from the MST reversed field pinch experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarff, J. S.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Borchardt, M.; Cappechi, W.; Carmody, D.; Caspary, K.; Chapman, B. E.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Duff, J.; Eilerman, S.; Falkowski, A.; Forest, C. B.; Galante, M.; Goetz, J. A.; Holly, D. J.; Koliner, J.; Kumar, S.; Lee, J. D.; Liu, D.; McCollam, K. J.; McGarry, M.; Mirnov, V. V.; Morton, L.; Munaretto, S.; Nornberg, M. D.; Nonn, P. D.; Oliva, S. P.; Parke, E.; Pueschel, M. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Sauppe, J.; Seltzman, A.; Sovinec, C. R.; Stone, D.; Theucks, D.; Thomas, M.; Triana, J.; Terry, P. W.; Waksman, J.; Whelan, G. C.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L.; Demers, D. R.; Fimognari, P.; Titus, J.; Auriemma, F.; Cappello, S.; Franz, P.; Innocente, P.; Lorenzini, R.; Martines, E.; Momo, B.; Piovesan, P.; Puiatti, M.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D.; Zanca, P.; Davydenko, V. I.; Deichuli, P.; Ivanov, A. A.; Polosatkin, S.; Stupishin, N. V.; Spong, D.; Craig, D.; Stephens, H.; Harvey, R. W.; Cianciosa, M.; Hanson, J. D.; Breizman, B. N.; Li, M.; Zheng, L. J.

    2015-10-01

    An overview of recent results from the MST reversed field pinch programme is presented. With neutral beam injection, bursty energetic particle (EP) modes are observed. The profiles of the magnetic and density fluctuations associated with these EP modes are measured using a far infrared interferometer-polarimeter. Equilibrium reconstructions of the quasi-single-helicity 3D helical state are provided by the V3FIT code that now incorporates several of MST's advanced diagnostics. The orientation of the helical structure is controlled using a new resonant magnetic perturbation technique. Gyrokinetic simulations based on experimental equilibria predict unstable trapped-electron modes (TEMs), and small-scale density fluctuations are detected in improved-confinement plasmas with TEM-like features. Upgraded pellet injection permits study of density and beta limits over MST's full range of operation, and an MST-record line-average density of 0.9 × 1020 m3 (n/nG = 1.4) has been obtained. Impurity ion temperature measurements reveal a charge-to-mass-ratio dependence in the rapid heating that occurs during a sawtooth crash. Runaway of NBI-born fast ions during the impulsive sawtooth event agrees with test-particle theory. Magnetic self-organization studies include measurements of the dynamo emf with an applied ac inductive electric field using oscillating field current drive.

  14. Reversed-field pinch studies in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Hokin, S.; Almagri, A.; Cekic, M.; Chapman, B.; Crocker, N.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Fiksel, G.; Henry, J.; Ji, H.; Prager, S.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1993-04-03

    Studies of large-size (R = 1.5 m, a = 0.5 m), moderate current (I < 750 kA) reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas are carried out in the Madison Symmetric Torus in order to evaluate and improve RFP confinement, study general toroidal plasma MHD issues, determine the mechanism of the RFP dynamo, and measure fluctuation-induced transport and anomalous ion heating. MST confinement has been improved by reduction of magnetic field errors with correction coils in the primary circuit and reduction of impurities using boronization; high densities have been achieved with hydrogen pellet injection. MHD tearing modes with poloidal mode number m = 1 and toroidal mode numbers n = 5--7 are prevalent and nonlinearly couple to produce sudden relaxations akin to tokamak sawteeth. Edge fluctuation-induced transport has been measured with a variety of insertable probes. Ions exhibit anomalous heating, with increases of ion temperature occuring during strong MHD relaxation. The RFP dynamo has been studied with attention to various possible mechanisms, including motion-EMF drive, the Hall effect, and superthermal electrons. Initial profile control experiments have begun using insertable biased probes and plasma guns. The toroidal field capacity of MST will be upgraded during Summer, 1993 to allow low-current tokamak operation as well as improved RFP operation.

  15. Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Embrechts, M.J.; Schnurr, N.M.; Battat, M.E.; LaBauve, R.J.; Davidson, J.W.

    1984-08-01

    The unique confinement physics of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) projects to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor that promises a significant reduction in the cost of electricity. The compact reactor also promises a factor-of-two reduction in the fraction of total cost devoted to the reactor plant equipment (i.e., fusion power core (FPC) plus support systems). In addition to operational and developmental benefits, these physically smaller systems can operate economically over a range of total power output. After giving an extended background and rationale for the compact fusion approaches, key FPC subsystems for the Compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR) are developed, designed, and integrated for a minimum-cost, 1000-MWe(net) system. Both the problems and promise of the compact, high-power-density fusion reactor are quantitatively evaluated on the basis of this conceptual design. The material presented in this report both forms a framework for a broader, more expanded conceptual design as well as suggests directions and emphases for related research and development.

  16. Analytic model for the dynamic Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Piriz, A. R. Sun, Y. B.; Tahir, N. A.

    2015-06-15

    A model is presented for describing the cylindrical implosion of a shock wave driven by an accelerated piston. It is based in the identification of the acceleration of the shocked mass with the acceleration of the piston. The model yields the separate paths of the piston and the shock. In addition, by considering that the shocked region evolves isentropically, the approximate profiles of all the magnitudes in the shocked region are obtained. The application to the dynamic Z-pinch is presented and the results are compared with the well known snowplow and slug models which are also derived as limiting cases of the present model. The snowplow model is seen to yield a trajectory in between those of the shock and the piston. Instead, the neglect of the inertial effects in the slug model is seen to produce a too fast implosion, and the pressure uniformity is shown to lead to an unphysical instantaneous piston stopping when the shock arrives to the axis.

  17. Opacity test using a neon-seeded theta pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, D.B.

    1980-02-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission from a neon-seeded high-density theta-pinch has been observed for comparison with theoretical radiation emission calculations. The plasma was created in a 25-cm-long theta-coil with 90-kG field having a 3.0-..mu..s quarter period. A gas fill of 1 torr of helium + 2% neon was used. Observation of the HeII 4686 line/continuum ratio gave an electron temperature of 25 +- 4 eV. Shadowgraphs of the plasma radius, taken with a ruby laser, gave an electron density of 0.9 +- 0.09 x 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/. The VUV emission was observed in radial view and with time resolution with a 2.2-m grazing-incidence monochromator equipped with a photomultiplier and p-terphenyl scintillator. Thin foils of carbon and aluminum were used as filters to absorb stray light and pass emission in the 44- to 100-A region.

  18. Implicit XMHD Modeling of Fast Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Matthew

    2013-10-01

    The numerical modeling of fast Z-Pinches as applied to magnetically driven inertial confinement fusion concepts is typically performed under the resistive- magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. We derive the limitations of this model as currently applied to modeling such targets and present numerical test problems that demonstrate the physical error introduced through the approximations inherent in resistive-MHD. We then compare the resistive-MHD model to simulations utilizing new implicit algorithms for the efficient solution of the extended-magnetohydrodynamic (XMHD) system of equations. Herein we define XMHD as a quasi-neutral electro-magnetic two-fluid model. We present specific examples where the XMHD system of equations is required for modeling magnetically driven ICF targets if large physical errors are to be avoided in the numerical solution of the system. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Pellet injection in the RFP (Reversed Field Pinch)

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A.; Weber, P.G.; Munson, C.P.; Cayton, T.E.; Bunting, C.A.; Carolan, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Observation of pellets injected into the ZT-40M Reversed Field Pinch has allowed a new twist on the usual tokamak ablation physics modeling. The RFP provides a strong ohmic heating regime with relatively high electron drift parameter (xi/sub drift/ /approximately/ 0.2), in the presence of a highly sheared magnetic field geometry. In situ photos of the pellet ablation cloud using a grated-intensified CCD camera, as well as two-view integrated photos of the pellet trajectory show substantial modification of the original pellet trajectory, in both direction and speed. Depending on the launch geometry, increases in the initial 500 m/s pellet speed by 50% have been observed, and a ski jump deflector plate in the launch port has been used to counteract strong poloidal curvature. In contrast to the tokamak, the D/sub ..cap alpha../ light signature is strongest near the edge, and weaker in the plasma center. Additional information on ion temperature response to pellet injection with 20 ..mu..sec time resolution has been obtained using a 5-channel neutral particle analyzer (NPA). The energy confinement is transiently degraded while the beta is largely unchanged. This may be indicative of pellet injection into a high-beta plasma operating at fixed beta. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  20. If it’s pinched it’s a memristor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Leon

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents an in-depth review of the memristor from a rigorous circuit-theoretic perspective, independent of the material the device is made of. From an experimental perspective, a memristor is best defined as any two-terminal device that exhibits a pinched hysteresis loop in the voltage-current plane when driven by any periodic voltage or current signal that elicits a periodic response of the same frequency. This definition greatly broadens the scope of memristive devices to encompass even non-semiconductor devices, both organic and inorganic, from many unrelated disciplines, including biology, botany, brain science, etc. For pedagogical reasons, the broad terrain of memristors is partitioned into three classes of increasing generality, dubbed Ideal Memristors, Generic Memristors, and Extended Memristors. Each class is distinguished from the others via unique fingerprints and signatures. This paper clarifies many confusing issues, such as non-volatility, dc V-I curves, high-frequency v-i curves, local activity, as well as nonlinear dynamical and bifurcation phenomena that are the hallmarks of memristive devices. Above all, this paper addresses several fundamental issues and questions that many memristor researchers do not comprehend but are afraid to ask.

  1. Models of self-pinched ion beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, P.F.; Rose, D.V. |; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.

    1998-12-31

    Ion-beam-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) requires the efficient transport of intense, focused ion beams over distances of many meters to an ICF target. The self-pinch transport (SPT) scheme utilizes the incomplete current neutralization of an ion beam propagating in a low pressure background gas to radially confine the beam. Experiments and theoretical investigations are presently underway to assess the feasibility of this beam transport mechanism. Simulations of SPT are being carried out using the 3-D hybrid particle-in-cell code, IPROP. For this work, an intense ion beam is injected into different background gas pressures of argon and helium in order to determine the optimum gas pressure for SPT. In addition, simulations will be carried out that examine the effect on beam confinement of changing the ratio of the beam injection radius to the gas chamber wall radius, using different beam injection angles, and changing the beam current rise time. Along with the PIC simulations, several analytic models are being investigated and further developed for understanding the important physics of SPT and scaling for various applications. Available results are presented.

  2. Liquid viscosity sensing using nonlinear vibration of a fiberoptic sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Liu, Chao-Shih

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the nonlinear dynamic motion of a vibrating optical fiber viscosity sensor through representative cases of primary and super-harmonic resonance. The results show that a nonlinear effect drastically improves the sensitivity of the viscosity measurement by nearly an order of magnitude from the previously developed linear systems. Experimental results and several applications of the viscosity sensor are also presented.

  3. Soft x-ray measurement of the toroidal pinch experiment RX reversed field pinch plasma using transition edge sensor calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozaki, Keisuke; Hoshino, Akio; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Morita, Umeyo; Ohashi, Takaya; Mihara, Tatehiro; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Keiichi; Yagi, Yasuyuki; Koguchi, Haruhisa; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime

    2006-04-15

    A superconductive transition edge sensor (TES) calorimeter is for the first time applied for the diagnostics of the reversed field pinch plasma produced in the toroidal pinch experiment RX (TPE-RX), and the instrumental system is fully described. The first result from the soft x-ray spectroscopy in 0.2-3 keV with an energy resolution {approx}50 eV are also presented. The TES calorimeter is made of a thin bilayer film of titanium and gold with a transition temperature of 151 mK and its best energy resolution at our laboratory is 6.4 eV, while it was significantly degraded by about a factor of eight during the plasma operation. The TES microcalorimeter was installed in a portable adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR), which is originally designed for a rocket experiment. The detector box is carefully designed to shield the strong magnetic field produced by the ADR and TPE-RX. The ADR was directly connected to TPE-RX with a vacuum duct in the sideway configuration, and cooled down to 125 mK stabilized with an accuracy of 10 {mu}K rms using an improved proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control method. Thin aluminized Toray Lumirror or Parylene-N films were used for the IR to UV blocking filters of the incident x-ray window to allow soft x-rays coming into the detector with good efficiency. TPE-RX was operated with the plasma current of I{sub p}=220 kA, and the wave forms of the TES output for every plasma shot lasting {approx}80 ms were obtained with a digital oscilloscope. The wave forms were analyzed with the optimal filtering method, and x-ray signals were extracted. A total of 3472 counts of x-ray signals were detected for 210 plasma shots during the flat-top phase of t=35-70 ms. Combined with the data measured with a lithium drifted silicon detector in the 1.3-8 keV range, spectral features are investigated using a spectral fitting package XSPEC. The obtained spectrum is well explained by thermal plasma emission, although an impurity iron-L line

  4. Cellulose degradation and monitoring of viscosity decrease in cultures of Cellulomonas uda grown on printed newspaper

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, P.; Reng, H.; Hempel, D.M.; Wagner, F.

    1984-10-01

    The rheological behavior of cultures of Cellulomonas uda with shredded printed newspaper as the carbon source was studied. The initial substrate concentrations ranged from 23 to 60 g/l. The changes in apparent viscosity were followed on-line by applying a commercially available process viscometer and discretely using a rotational viscometer with an anchor impeller. During the time of highest cellulose degradation, the broths exhibited a pseudoplastic behaviour which could be explained satisfactorily by the power-law model. At the end of cultivation when cellulose degradation slowed down, the broths became Newtonian in behaviour. Endo-1, 4-..beta..-glucanase, 1,4-..beta..-xylanase, ..beta..-glucosidase, and ..beta..-xylosidase activities were also determined during cultivation as well as cellulose degradation and cell mass production. The beginning of endoglucanase formation and the start of the final viscosity decrease of the bacterial paper pulp suspensions could be correlated.

  5. Measurement of the microscopic viscosities of microfluids with a dynamic optical tweezers system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuquan; Wu, Xiaojing; Wang, Yijia; Zhu, Siwei; Gao, Bruce Z; Yuan, X-C

    2016-01-01

    Viscosity coefficients of microfluids—Newtonian and non-Newtonian—were explored through the rotational motion of a particle trapped by optical tweezers in a microflute. Unlike conventional methods based on viscometers, our microfluidic system employs samples of less than 30 µl to complete a measurement. Viscosity coefficients of ethanol and fetal bovine serum, as typical examples of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, were obtained experimentally, and found to be in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Additionally, a practical application to a DNA solution with incremental ethidium bromide content was employed and the results are consistent with clinical data, indicating that our system provides a potentially important complementary tool for use in such biological and medical applications. PMID:27087769

  6. Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Eckhard; Span, Roland; Herrmann, Sebastian

    2015-12-15

    A new representation of the viscosity for the fluid phase of ethane includes a zero-density correlation and a contribution for the critical enhancement, initially both developed separately, but based on experimental data. The higher-density contributions are correlated as a function of the reduced density δ = ρ/ρ{sub c} and of the reciprocal reduced temperature τ = T{sub c}/T (ρ{sub c}—critical density and T{sub c}—critical temperature). The final formulation contains 14 coefficients obtained using a state-of-the-art linear optimization algorithm. The evaluation and choice of the selected primary data sets is reviewed, in particular with respect to the assessment used in earlier viscosity correlations. The new viscosity surface correlation makes use of the reference equation of state for the thermodynamic properties of ethane by Bücker and Wagner [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 35, 205 (2006)] and is valid in the fluid region from the melting line to temperatures of 675 K and pressures of 100 MPa. The viscosity in the limit of zero density is described with an expanded uncertainty of 0.5% (coverage factor k = 2) for temperatures 290 < T/K < 625, increasing to 1.0% at temperatures down to 212 K. The uncertainty of the correlated values is 1.5% in the range 290 < T/K < 430 at pressures up to 30 MPa on the basis of recent measurements judged to be very reliable as well as 4.0% and 6.0% in further regions. The uncertainty in the near-critical region (1.001 < 1/τ < 1.010 and 0.8 < δ < 1.2) increases with decreasing temperature up to 3.0% considering the available reliable data. Tables of the viscosity calculated from the correlation are listed in an appendix for the single-phase region, for the vapor–liquid phase boundary, and for the near-critical region.

  7. Shear dependence of field-induced contributions to the viscosity of magnetic fluids at low shear rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenbach, S.; Störk, H.

    1998-03-01

    Viscoelastic properties of ferrofluids are an upcoming field of scientific interest, since the magnetic control of the related fluid behavior would give rise to new applications as well as for new possibilities in basic research concerning viscoelasticity. We have constructed a specialized rheometer for the investigation of fluids under the influence of magnetic fields, to examine such effects in stable suspensions of magnetic particles. In particular we will report the change of field-induced increase of viscosity due to variation of the shear rate applied to the fluid. The results show that the available theoretical approach, namely the concept of rotational viscosity, is not valid for the description of the field-induced increase of viscosity in concentrated fluids at low shear rates.

  8. Application of Proton Deflectometry to Z-Pinch Plasma Systems at the Mega-Ampere Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariscal, Derek; McGuffey, Chris; Valenzuela, Julio; Wei, Mingsheng; Beg, Farhat; Presura, Radu; Haque, Showera; Arias, Angel; Covington, Aaron; Sawada, Hiroshi; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2013-10-01

    Measuring magnetic fields in z-pinch plasmas is challenging. Typical laser-probing diagnostics are limited by the critical density and large density gradients, while electrical diagnostics have limited spatial resolution. We report the first demonstration of proton deflectometry of z-pinch plasma systems at the mega-ampere scale. The proton beam was produced using the 10J 0.3ps Leopard laser and coupled to z-pinch plasma produced by Zebra, a 1MA pulsed-power driver at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. The magnetic field distorted the proton beam profile, which was recorded on radiochromic film. The experimental data was compared against integrated modeling using the resistive MHD code, Gorgon, for Z-pinch plasmas, in combination with the hybrid PIC code, LSP, for proton-beam trajectory tracking. This comparison provided the field and current configuration for various plasma loads, including wire and foil z-pinches. Funded by the NSF/DoE Partnership in Basic Plasma Scienceand En- gineering under contracts DE-SC-0001992 / PHY-0903876. Use of the Nevada Terawatt Facility was supported by the US DOE, NNSA, under Contract No. DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  9. Development of the 50 TW laser for joint experiments with 1 MA z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiewior, P. P.; Ivanov, V. V.; Chalyy, O.

    2010-08-01

    A 50 TW high-intensity laser (aka "Leopard" laser) was developed for experiments with the 1 MA z-pinch generator at the University of Nevada, Reno. The laser produces short pulses of 0.35 ps; energy is 15 J. Long pulses are 1 ns; energy is 30 J. The output beam diameter is 80 mm. The Leopard laser applies chirped pulse amplification technology. The laser is based on the 130 fs Ti:Sapphire oscillator, Öffner-type stretcher, Ti:Sapphire regenerative amplifier, mixed Nd:glass rod and disk amplifiers, and vacuum grating compressor. An adaptive optics system ameliorates focusing ability and augments the repetition rate. Two beam terminals are available for experiments: in the vacuum chamber of the z-pinch generator (aka "Zebra"), and a laser-only vacuum chamber (aka "Phoenix" chamber). The Leopard laser coupled to the Zebra z-pinch generator is a powerful diagnostic tool for dense z-pinch plasma. We outline the status, design, architecture and parameters of the Leopard laser, and its coupling to Zebra. We present the methods of laser-based z-pinch plasma diagnostics, which are under development at the University of Nevada, Reno.

  10. Predictive Fully Kinetic Modeling of kJ and MJ Dense Plasma Focus Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, A.; Ellsworth, J.; Falabella, S.; McLean, H.; Rusnak, B.; Schmidt, A.; Sears, J.; Tang, V.; Welch, D.

    2013-10-01

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinches are compact devices capable of producing MeV ion beams, x-rays, and (for D or DT gas fill) neutrons but the details of the mechanisms which give rise to these strong accelerating gradients are not well understood. We report on progress in developing predictive, fully kinetic simulations of DPF Z-Pinches using the particle-in-cell code LSP. These simulations include full-scale electrodes; both run-in and pinch phases; and post-pinch behavior. Here we present a comparison between simulations and experiments conducted on the LLNL 4 kJ tabletop DPF. Diagnostics allow us to measure neutron yield, plasma oscillations arising from instabilities, DPF ion beam energies, and the acceleration of an externally injected ion probe beam in the pinch region, which can be compared with simulations. We will further report on the initial work to extend these simulations from kJ to MJ-class devices. LLNL-ABS-640759. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (11-ERD-063) at LLNL.

  11. The design and implementation of a windowing interface pinch force measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tze-Yee; Chen, Yuanu-Joan; Chung, Chin-Teng; Hsiao, Ming-Heng

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a novel windowing interface pinch force measurement system that is basically based on an USB (Universal Series Bus) microcontroller which mainly processes the sensing data from the force sensing resistance sensors mounted on five digits. It possesses several friendly functions, such as the value and curve trace of the applied force by a hand injured patient displayed in real time on a monitoring screen, consequently, not only the physician can easily evaluate the effect of hand injury rehabilitation, but also the patients get more progressive during the hand physical therapy by interacting with the screen of pinch force measurement. In order to facilitate the pinch force measurement system and make it friendly, the detail hardware design and software programming flowchart are described in this paper. Through a series of carefully and detailed experimental tests, first of all, the relationship between the applying force and the FSR sensors are measured and verified. Later, the different type of pinch force measurements are verified by the oscilloscope and compared with the corresponding values and waveform traces in the window interface display panel to obtain the consistency. Finally, a windowing interface pinch force measurement system based on the USB microcontroller is implemented and demonstrated. The experimental results show the verification and feasibility of the designed system.

  12. The influence of the self-consistent mode structure on the Coriolis pinch effect

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, A. G.; Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.; Hornsby, W. A.; Snodin, A. P.; Angioni, C.; Strintzi, D.

    2009-06-15

    This paper discusses the effect of the mode structure on the Coriolis pinch effect [A. G. Peeters, C. Angioni, and D. Strintzi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265003 (2007)]. It is shown that the Coriolis drift effect can be compensated for by a finite parallel wave vector, resulting in a reduced momentum pinch velocity. Gyrokinetic simulations in full toroidal geometry reveal that parallel dynamics effectively removes the Coriolis pinch for the case of adiabatic electrons, while the compensation due to the parallel dynamics is incomplete for the case of kinetic electrons, resulting in a finite pinch velocity. The finite flux in the case of kinetic electrons is interpreted to be related to the electron trapping, which prevents a strong asymmetry in the electrostatic potential with respect to the low field side position. The physics picture developed here leads to the discovery and explanation of two unexpected effects: First the pinch velocity scales with the trapped particle fraction (root of the inverse aspect ratio), and second there is no strong collisionality dependence. The latter is related to the role of the trapped electrons, which retain some symmetry in the eigenmode, but play no role in the perturbed parallel velocity.

  13. Impedance Dynamics in the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) Diode on the RITS-6 Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, Timothy; Johnston, Mark; Leckbee, Joshua; Webb, Timothy; Mazarakis, Michael; Kiefer, Mark; Bennett, Nichelle

    2014-10-01

    The RITS-6 inductive voltage adder (IVA) accelerator (3.5-8.5 MeV) at Sandia National Laboratories produces high-power (TW) focused electron beams (<3 mm diameter) for flash x-ray radiography applications. The Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode utilizes a hollowed metal cathode to produce a pinched focus onto a high Z metal converter. The electron flow from the IVA driver into the load region complicates understanding of diode evolution. There is growing evidence that reducing cathode size below some ``optimum'' value in order to achieve desired spot size reduction results in pinch instabilities leading to either reduced dose-rate, early radiation power termination, or both. We are studying evolving pinch dynamics with current and x-ray monitors, optical diagnostics, and spectroscopy, as well as with LSP [1] code simulations. We are also planning changes to anode-cathode materials as well as changes to the diode aspect ratio in an attempt to mitigate the above trends and improve pinch stability while achieving simultaneous spot size reduction. Experiments are ongoing, and latest results will be reported [1]. LSP is a software product of ATK Mission Research, Albuquerque, NM. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Adminis-tration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Hybrid X-pinch Experiments on a MA Linear Transformer Driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, S. G.; Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Jordan, N. M.; Chalenski, D. A.; Lau, Y. Y.

    2013-10-01

    X-pinch experiments have been conducted on the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) at the University of Michigan. The x-pinch consists of a single wire separated by conical electrodes between two current return plates. The LTD was charged to +/-70 kV resulting in approximately 0.5 MA passing through a 35 μm Al wire. Multiple, short x-ray bursts were detected over the 400 ns current pulse. Ultimately the x-pinch will be located in parallel with a planar foil in order to backlight the Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A smaller 100 kA driver is also in development and may be used to independently energize the x-pinch. The x-pinch chamber has been constructed and the results of these experiments will be presented. This work was supported by DoE award number DE-SC0002590, NSF grant number PHY 0903340, and US DoE through Sandia National Labs award numbers 240985 and 76822 to the U of Michigan. S.G Patel and A.M Steiner are supported by NPSC funded by Sandia National Labs. D.A. Yager-Elorriaga is supported by an NSF fellowship under grant number DGE 1256260.

  15. X-ray Thomson Scattering using the Hybrid X-pinch X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, Cad; Pikuz, Sergei; Shelkovenko, Tania; Hammer, Dave

    2013-10-01

    Stringent photometric and bandwidth requirements have historically relegated X-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) probe sources to high energy laser plasma sources or free electron lasers. Standard x-pinch configurations in which two or more fine wires cross and subtend an angle of about 30° forming an ``X'' between the anode and cathode of a pulsed power generatorcan produce extremely bright, subnanosecond bursts of continuum and line radiation from micron-scale sources. The hybrid x-pinch is a new configuration based on conical W-Cu alloy electrodes with a short 1-2 mm gap that is bridged by a fine wire resulting in an easier to load setup with improved performance characteristics. We explore the possibility of utilizing the hybid x-pinch as a novel XRTS probe source by examining certain spectral and temporal attributes of a range of materials in a hybrid x-pinch configuration on the XP (500 kA, 50 ns) and COBRA(1MA, 100ns) pulsed power generators. We find that a Ti hybrid x-pinch produces >1012 photons/sr in Ti He-alpha radiation and satisfies the noncollective scattering bandwidth requirement. Measurements of photon fluence, bandwidth and applicability to the relevant scattering regime and initial scattering results will be presented.

  16. Toroidal pinch experiments. Annual progress report, November 24, 1992--November 23, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, S.

    1994-01-24

    The effect of boundary conditions on plasma confinement in the reversed field pinch (RFP) was studied. Early theoretical studies of the magnetohydrodynamic stability of the reversed field pinch had shown that the pinch was unstable unless it was surrounded by a conducting shell which prevented the penetration of the magnetic field during the lifetime of the pinch. The presence of the sheer, however, complicated construction and prevented control of the plasma equilibrium by feedback systems. This research project was undertaken to determine the effect on confinement of varying the magnetic penetration time of the shell. A reversed field pinch, the Reversatron, was constructed so that shells of varying thickness could be installed. Shells were made with magnetic penetration times both longer and shorter than the duration of the plasma discharge. These shells allowed the performance to be determined as a function of the magnetic penetration time of the shell. This research showed that a shell with a short penetration time degraded the discharges. Diagnostic measurements showed reductions in plasma current, discharge duration, and the Doppler temperature of impurity ions and showed increases in the plasma resistivity and loop voltage. The greater power input and lower temperature implied a reduced energy confinement time. Magnetic diagnostics showed that two classes of MHD instabilities with poloidal mode number m = 1 were responsible for the degraded confinement. These were the dynamo modes resonant on the magentic axis (with toroidal mode numbers -9, -10, -11, -12) and the external kink modes (with toroidal mode numbers 3, 4, 5, and 6).

  17. 2-D LSP Simulations of the Self Magnetic Pinch Radiographic Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threadgold, J.; Crotch, I.; Rose, D. V.

    2003-10-01

    The Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) UK has a number of Pulsed Power driven flash X-ray machines which are used to take transmission radiographs of hydrodynamic experiments. Some of the lower voltage x-ray machines (< 2 MV) use the Self Magnetic (SM) Pinch diode for their source. The SM pinch diode has proved to be a reliable source for providing small diameter radiographic spot sizes. With an emphasis on reduction of the x-ray spot size at higher voltages, one part of the diode research project has been to field SM pinch diodes at higher voltages. The SM pinch diode relies upon the magnitude of its own electron current (> 50 kA) to pinch the electron beam to a small diameter onto a high Z converter target. An electromagnetic PIC code, LSP, has been used to carry out 2-D simulations of the diode to support this project. The code has been used to investigate the effect of different target materials within the diode and to investigate the resultant electron trajectories onto the target. Results of these code simulations will be compared to experimental data The simulations show good agreement with measured experimental data on diode performance. The simulations suggest further improvements in spot size reduction could be achieved with changes in the diode geometry.

  18. Gas Puff Z-Pinches at 1-MA and 200-ns on COBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, David; Qi, Niansheng; Rosenberg, Elliott; Atoyan, Levon; Potter, William; Blesener, Kate; Cahill, Adam; Gourdain, Pierre-Alexandre; Greenly, John; Hoyt, Cad; Kusse, Bruce; Pikuz, Sergei; Schrafel, Peter; Shelkovenko, Tatiana

    2013-10-01

    We report 6-cm diameter, double-shell gas puff Z-pinch experiments at 1 MA on the COBRA pulsed power generator, in which the implosion dynamics in puff-on-puff load configurations with and without a wire on the pinch axis were studied. Diagnostics used included: Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence Analyzer for measuring initial density profiles of the gas puff; a Laser Shearing Interferometer and a Laser Wavefront Analyzer for density profiles in the implosion and pinch phases; fiber-coupled, gated visible-light spectrometers for radially resolved imploding plasma spectra; gated XUV cameras for implosion dynamics; filtered pinhole x-ray cameras for imaging x-ray emission; and a double-crystal x-ray spectrometer for axially resolved pinch plasma densities and temperatures. From these, we derived the implosion velocity, ion charge states and then the imploding plasma temperatures, obtained the time evolution of the imploding plasma sheath structure and Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and observed the most stable implosion with light-ions (Ne) imploding on heavy-ions (Ar), unstable implosions with heavy-ions (Ar) imploding on light-ions (Ne), and tighter, denser and less hot pinch plasma with a wire on axis. Details of the results will be presented. Supported by NNSA under DOE Coop. Agreement DE- NA0001836.

  19. The role of viscosity in TATB hot spot ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Laurence E.; Zepeda-Ruis, Luis; Howard, W. Michael; Najjar, Fady; Reaugh, John E.

    2012-03-01

    The role of dissipative effects, such as viscosity, in the ignition of high explosive pores is investigated using a coupled chemical, thermal, and hydrodynamic model. Chemical reactions are tracked with the Cheetah thermochemical code coupled to the ALE3D hydrodynamic code. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine the viscosity of liquid TATB. We also analyze shock wave experiments to obtain an estimate for the shock viscosity of TATB. Using the lower bound liquid-like viscosities, we find that the pore collapse is hydrodynamic in nature. Using the upper bound viscosity from shock wave experiments, we find that the pore collapse is closest to the viscous limit.

  20. The Role of Viscosity in TATB Hot Spot Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E; Zepeda-Ruis, L; Howard, W M; Najjar, F; Reaugh, J E

    2011-08-02

    The role of dissipative effects, such as viscosity, in the ignition of high explosive pores is investigated using a coupled chemical, thermal, and hydrodynamic model. Chemical reactions are tracked with the Cheetah thermochemical code coupled to the ALE3D hydrodynamic code. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine the viscosity of liquid TATB. We also analyze shock wave experiments to obtain an estimate for the shock viscosity of TATB. Using the lower bound liquid-like viscosities, we find that the pore collapse is hydrodynamic in nature. Using the upper bound viscosity from shock wave experiments, we find that the pore collapse is closest to the viscous limit.

  1. Ion acoustic shocks in magneto rotating Lorentzian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S.; Akhtar, N.; Hasnain, H.

    2014-12-15

    Ion acoustic shock structures in magnetized homogeneous dissipative Lorentzian plasma under the effects of Coriolis force are investigated. The dissipation in the plasma system is introduced via dynamic viscosity of inertial ions. The electrons are following the kappa distribution function. Korteweg-de Vries Burger (KdVB) equation is derived by using reductive perturbation technique. It is shown that spectral index, magnetic field, kinematic viscosity of ions, rotational frequency, and effective frequency have significant impact on the propagation characteristic of ion acoustic shocks in such plasma system. The numerical solution of KdVB equation is also discussed and transition from oscillatory profile to monotonic shock for different plasma parameters is investigated.

  2. Density distribution of a rotating plasma in Tornado magnetic confinement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.M.; Pakhomov, A.B.; Rusakov, A.I.

    1984-12-01

    The density distribution of a rotating plasma in a Tornado magnetic confinement system is calculated under the assumption that the plasma rotates at constant angular velocity throughout the region bounded by the separatrix. The component of the centrifugal inertial force parallel to the magnetic force lines is shown to pinch the plasma toward the equatorial plane of the system. The density distribution depends on the ratio v/T of the plasma drift velocity and temperature. The experimentally measured density distribution can be used to determine v/T and thus to analyze the rotating plasma. If v is known for the rotating plasma then T can be calculated from v, and vice versa.

  3. Decoupling of rotational and translational diffusion in supercooled colloidal fluids

    PubMed Central

    Edmond, Kazem V.; Elsesser, Mark T.; Hunter, Gary L.; Pine, David J.; Weeks, Eric R.

    2012-01-01

    We use confocal microscopy to directly observe 3D translational and rotational diffusion of tetrahedral clusters, which serve as tracers in colloidal supercooled fluids. We find that as the colloidal glass transition is approached, translational and rotational diffusion decouple from each other: Rotational diffusion remains inversely proportional to the growing viscosity whereas translational diffusion does not, decreasing by a much lesser extent. We quantify the rotational motion with two distinct methods, finding agreement between these methods, in contrast with recent simulation results. The decoupling coincides with the emergence of non-Gaussian displacement distributions for translation whereas rotational displacement distributions remain Gaussian. Ultimately, our work demonstrates that as the glass transition is approached, the sample can no longer be approximated as a continuum fluid when considering diffusion. PMID:23071311

  4. Microinstabilities and turbulent transport in the reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmody, Daniel Richard

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with addressing the nature of drift wave microturbulence in the reversed field pinch (RFP). Microturbulence is an important phenomenon and contributor to heat and particle transport in tokamaks, where it has been studied for several decades, but its role in the RFP is a rather new topic of study. As such, the nature of RFP drift waves and their relationship to their tokamak counterparts is still developing, and many of the results in this work are focused on addressing this challenge. Fundamental advances in microturbulence research have been made in recent decades through two parallel developments: the theoretical framework encompassed in the gyrokinetic model, and the computational power offered by massively-parallel, high-performance computing systems. Gyrokinetics is a formulation of kinetic theory in such a way that the fast timescale gyromotion of particles around magnetic field lines is averaged out. The implementation and use of RFP equilibrium models in gyrokinetic codes constitutes the bulk of this thesis. A simplified analytic equilibrium, the toroidal Bessel function model (TBFM), is used in the gyrokinetic code GYRO to explore the fundamental scaling properties of drift waves in the RFP geometry. Two drift wave instabilities, the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode and the microtearing mode (MTM) are found to occur, and the relationship of their critical threshold in driving gradients and plasma beta is explored. The critical values in these parameters are found to be above those of similar tokamak cases by roughly a factor of the flux surface aspect ratio. The MTM is found to be stabilized by increasing the RFP pinch parameter theta, making it unlikely for it to unstable in the high-theta improved confinement pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) discharges. Efforts are also made to address microinstabilities in specific experimental discharges of the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). A semi

  5. Anomalous pinch of turbulent plasmas driven by the magnetic-drift-induced Lorentz force through the Stokes-Einstein relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaojie

    2016-07-01

    It is found that the Lorentz force generated by the magnetic drift drives a generic plasma pinch flux of particle, energy and momentum through the Stokes-Einstein relation. The proposed theoretical model applies for both electrons and ions, trapped particles, and passing particles. An anomalous parallel current pinch due to the electrostatic turbulence with long parallel wave-length is predicted.

  6. A Brief Review of the Relationships Between Monolayer Viscosity, Phase Behavior, Surface Pressure and Temperature Using a Simple Monolayer Viscometer

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Coralie

    2008-01-01

    The two-dimensional surface shear viscosity, η, of fatty acid monolayers of different chain lengths, measured using a simple magnetic needle viscometer, strongly correlates with the molecular organization in condensed phases and the absolute temperature. η can increase by orders of magnitude at phase boundaries associated with tilted to untilted molecular order, providing the underlying order is semi-crystalline. Hence, untilted, long-range ordered CS phases are the most viscous films. However, despite being untilted, the LS rotator phase is less viscous than certain laterally ordered tilted phases, suggesting a decrease of the Van der Waals interactions due to molecular rotation. In certain regions of the L2 phase, η reaches a maximum before the L2-LS transition, an anomalous behavior correlated with the change in the lattice symmetry of the head group. Surface shear viscosity, even when measured with a macroscopic probe, is particularly sensitive to the microscopic organization of monolayers. PMID:17078656

  7. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor study is a multi-institutional research effort to determine the technical feasibility and key developmental issues of an RFP fusion reactor, especially at high power density, and to determine the potential economics, operations, safety, and environmental features of high-mass-power-density fusion systems. The TITAN conceptual designs are DT burning, 1000 MWe power reactors based on the RFP confinement concept. The designs are compact, have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m{sup 2} and a mass power density of 700 kWe/tonne. The inherent characteristics of the RFP confinement concept make fusion reactors with such a high mass power density possible. Two different detailed designs have emerged: the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium design, incorporating the integrated-blanket-coil concept; and the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design with ferritic steel structure. This report contains a collection of 16 papers on the results of the TITAN study which were presented at the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology. This collection describes the TITAN research effort, and specifically the TITAN-I and TITAN-II designs, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions and recommendations. Overall, the basic conclusions are that high-mass power-density fusion reactors appear to be technically feasible even with neutron wall loadings up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}; that single-piece maintenance of the FPC is possible and advantageous; that the economics of the reactor is enhanced by its compactness; and the safety and environmental features need not to be sacrificed in high-power-density designs. The fact that two design approaches have emerged, and others may also be possible, in some sense indicates the robustness of the general findings.

  8. Fusion burn dynamics in dense Z-pinch (DZP)

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1990-04-01

    The fusion burn dynamics and energy yield of the dense Z-pinch (DZP) are examined using a profile-averaged, zero-dimensional, time dependent model. A range of conditions (fuel, line density, voltage, fusion-product heating, enthalpy endloss, density and temperature profiles, current rise rate, electrode impurities) are examined. Magneto-hydrodynamic stability is assumed, and initial conditions are based on those ideally existing after the melting and ionization of a solid fiber of fusion fuel. Plasma conditions required of neutron sources for materials testing ({dot S}{sub n} {ge} 10{sup 19} n/s) and for possible commercial power production (ratio of fusion energy yield to energy input, Q{sub p} {approx equal} 15, lower values if reversible recovery of a fraction of the magnetic energy is possible) are described. If f{sub B} {approx gt} 0.8 fractional fuel burnup is possible in a nominal 800-ns DT discharge (200-ns current-rise phase at 20 MV/m followed by a 500-ns constant-current crowbarred phase), reactor-relevant values of Q{sub p} may be possible. For the simpler (and shorter) constant-voltage discharge (e.g., no voltage crowbar) the value of Q{sub p} is in the range 5--10 for discharges below 200-ns duration. Smaller levels of fuel burnup, shorter discharges, or generally lower levels of Q{sub p} will require a reversible energy transfer system to meet reactor energy-balance requirements. Imposition of a plasma current rise-time constraint that may be needed for stable plasma operation (e.g., I > 10{sup 12} A/s) will burnup, Q{sub p} and discharge time to an extent where reversible energy/transfer system will be required to meet reactor energy- balance requirements. 25 refs.

  9. INPIStron switched pulsed power for dense plasma pinches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Lee, Ja H.

    1993-01-01

    The inverse plasma switch INPIStron was employed for 10kJ/40kV capacitor bank discharge system to produce focused dense plasmas in hypocycloidal-pinch (HCP) devices. A single unit and an array of multiple HCP's were coupled as the load of the pulsed power circuit. The geometry and switching plasma dynamics were found advantageous and convenient for commutating the large current pulse from the low impedance transmission line to the low impedance plasma load. The pulse power system with a single unit HCP, the system A, was used for production of high temperature plasma focus and its diagnostics. The radially running down plasma dynamics, revealed in image converter photographs, could be simulated by a simple snow-plow model with a correction for plasma resistivity. The system B with an array of 8-HCP units which forms a long coaxial discharge chamber was used for pumping a Ti-sapphire laser. The intense UV emission from the plasma was frequency shifted with dye-solution jacket to match the absorption band of the Ti crystal laser near 500 nm. An untuned laser pulse energy of 0.6 J/pulse was obtained for 6.4 kJ/40 kV discharge, or near 103 times of the explosion limit of conventional flash lamps. For both systems the advantages of the INPIStron were well demonstrated: a single unit is sufficient for a large current (greater than 50 kA) without increasing the system impedance, highly reliable and long life operation and implied scalability for the high power ranges above I(sub peak) = 1 MA and V(sub hold) = 100 kV.

  10. Solvent viscosity dependence for enzymatic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnitsky, A. E.

    2008-09-01

    A mechanism for relationship of solvent viscosity with reaction rate constant at enzyme action is suggested. It is based on fluctuations of electric field in enzyme active site produced by thermally equilibrium rocking (crankshaft motion) of the rigid plane (in which the dipole moment ≈3.6 D lies) of a favourably located and oriented peptide group (or may be a few of them). Thus the rocking of the plane leads to fluctuations of the electric field of the dipole moment. These fluctuations can interact with the reaction coordinate because the latter in its turn has transition dipole moment due to separation of charges at movement of the reacting system along it. The rocking of the plane of the peptide group is sensitive to the microviscosity of its environment in protein interior and the latter is a function of the solvent viscosity. Thus we obtain an additional factor of interrelationship for these characteristics with the reaction rate constant. We argue that due to the properties of the crankshaft motion the frequency spectrum of the electric field fluctuations has a sharp resonance peak at some frequency and the corresponding Fourier mode can be approximated as oscillations. We employ a known result from the theory of thermally activated escape with periodic driving to obtain the reaction rate constant and argue that it yields reliable description of the pre-exponent where the dependence on solvent viscosity manifests itself. The suggested mechanism is shown to grasp the main feature of this dependence known from the experiment and satisfactorily yields the upper limit of the fractional index of a power in it.

  11. A viscosity model of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Bode, H J

    1979-08-01

    In current theories of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the idea prevails that molecular sieving relies on different accessibility of volume fractions and of cross-sectional area fractions (denoted "pores") to different-sized ions due to the effect of "geometric exclusion". This correlates with the assumption that all elements of a polyacrylamide network occupy fixed and unchangeable positions thus forcing colliding macro-ions to diffuse laterally in order to find an "accessible pore" and to resume motion in direction of the electrical field. However, the alternative conception would be equally well justified, i.e. the assumption that polyacrylamide chains represent smooth obstacles cleared aside under the electrokinetic pressure of a macro-ion. This explanation would even be preferable with respect to the molecular sieving effects occurring in solutions of "liquid polyacrylamide". Yet no theory exists as to describe such effects in quantitative terms. In the present article, a parameter is defined and discussed, which can be estimated by experiment, and which seems to be apt to characterize local resistivity of polymer structures against dislocation and deformation: the "fractional specific resistance". Definition of this parameter is based on the model of a "viscosity-emulsion" composed of two interpenetrating liquid compartments which are characterized by different levels of hydrodynamic friction and the spatial dimensions of which are inferred from Ogston's theory. This concept of "localized viscosity" may also serve as a link between theories of molecular sieving and of "macroscopic viscosity" of flexible polymers. The data of Morris, formerly taken as verifications of the "rigid-pore" concept, are now interpreted in terms of four factors responsible for sizediscrimination: collision frequency, duration of single contacts, size-dependent frictional force, and the extent of cooperation among fibres, due to crosslinking and to simultanous contacts of several

  12. The First Pulsed-Power Z-Pinch Liner-On-Target Hydrodynamics Experiment Diagnosed with Proton Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, C. L.; Reass, W. A.; Oro, D. M.; Griego, J. R.; Turchi, P. J.; Reinovsky, R. E.; Saunders, A.; Mariam, F. G.; Morris, C.

    2014-10-01

    The first pulse-power driven, dynamic, liner-on-target experiment was successfully conducted at the Los Alamos proton radiography (pRad) facility. 100% data return was achieved on this experiment including a 21-image pRad movie. The experiment was driven with the PHELIX pulsed-power machine that utilizes a high-efficiency (k ~ 0.93) transformer to couple a small capacitor bank (U ~ 300 kJ) to a low inductance condensed-matter experimental load in a Z-pinch configuration. The current pulse (Ipeak = 3.7 MA, δt ~10 μs) was measured via a fiber optic Faraday rotation diagnostic. The experimental load consisted of a cylindrical Al liner (6 cm diam, 3 cm tall, 0.8 mm thick) and a cylindrical Al target (3 cm diam, 3 cm tall, 0.1 mm thick) that was coated with a thin (0.1 mm) uniform layer of tungsten powder (1 micron diam). It is observed that the shock-launched powder layer fully detaches from the target into a spatially correlated, radially converging (vr ~ 800 m/s) ring. The powder distribution is highly modulated in azimuth indicating particle interactions are significant. Results are compared to MHD simulations. Work supported by United States-DOE under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  13. A Gas Embedded Z-pinch Driven by SPEED2 Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Leopoldo; Moreno, Jose; Sylvester, Gustavo; Silva, Patricio; Zambra, Marcelo; Pavez, Cristian; Clausse, Alejandro

    2006-12-04

    A gas embedded Z-pinch has been implemented using the SPEED2 generator (4.1 {mu}F equivalent Marx generator capacity, 300 kV, 4 MA in short circuit, 187 kJ, 400 ns rise time, dI/dt{approx}1013 A/s). Initial conditions to produce a gas embedded z-pinch with enhanced stability by means resistive effects and by finite Larmor radius effects were obtained and electrodes were constructed in order to obtain a double column Z-pinch and a hollow discharge. Experiments were carried out in deuterium at mega amperes currents. Current derivative and voltage signals have been obtained. In addition interferograms have been obatined using a pulse Nd-YAG laser (8ns FWMH at 532nm). Preliminary results on neutron emission were also obtained.

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the basis of hybrid X-pinch radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tilikin, I. N. Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    Results of experiments on X-ray absorption spectroscopy carried out at the BIN (270 kA, 100 ns) and XP (450 kA, 45 ns) facilities are presented. Continuum radiation of a Mo hybrid X-pinch was used as probing radiation, against which absorption lines of the plasma of exploded Al wires placed in the return current circuit of a hybrid X-pinch, as well as in a two- and four-wire array, were observed. The experiments have demonstrated that the radiation of a hybrid X-pinch hot spot can be used as probing radiation for X-ray absorption spectroscopy and that, in many parameters, such a source surpasses those on the basis of laser-produced plasma. The plasma parameters in arrays made of two and four Al wires were studied experimentally.

  15. A spin-liquid with pinch-line singularities on the pyrochlore lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benton, Owen; Jaubert, L. D. C.; Yan, Han; Shannon, Nic

    2016-05-01

    The mathematics of gauge theories lies behind many of the most profound advances in physics in the past 200 years, from Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism to Einstein's theory of general relativity. More recently it has become clear that gauge theories also emerge in condensed matter, a prime example being the spin-ice materials which host an emergent electromagnetic gauge field. In spin-ice, the underlying gauge structure is revealed by the presence of pinch-point singularities in neutron-scattering measurements. Here we report the discovery of a spin-liquid where the low-temperature physics is naturally described by the fluctuations of a tensor field with a continuous gauge freedom. This gauge structure underpins an unusual form of spin correlations, giving rise to pinch-line singularities: line-like analogues of the pinch points observed in spin-ice. Remarkably, these features may already have been observed in the pyrochlore material Tb2Ti2O7.

  16. Biomechanical analysis of subjective pinching effort based on tendon-skeletal model.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Yuichi; Onoue, Takehiro; Ikeda, Atsutoshi; Ogasawara, Tsukasa

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of the finger posture on the subjective effort during pinching motion is investigated by using a tendon-skeletal finger model. The experimental results show that the subjective effort human feels is affected by the size of the object he/she pinches, and the subjective effort correlates with the finger length. The simulation results show that the pattern of the tendon forces is similar to that of the EMG activity measured in the experiment, and the positive correlation was observed between the finger length and the object size where the summation of the tendon forces becomes the minimum. These results suggest that the reason why subjective pinching effort is influenced by the finger posture is the difference in the efficiency of the force transmission from the muscles.

  17. Soft X-Ray Measurements of Z-Pinch-Driven Vacuum Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K.L.; Porter, J.L.; Ruggles, L.E.; Chandler, G.A.; Deeney, Chris; Varas, M.; Moats, Ann; Struve, Ken; Torres, J.; McGurn, J.; Simpson, W.W.; Fehl, D.L.; Chrien, R.E.; Matuska, W.; Idzorek, G.C.

    1999-07-21

    This article reports the experimental characterization of a z-pinch driven-vacuum hohlraum. The authors have measured soft x-ray fluxes of 5 x 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} radiating from the walls of hohlraums which are 2.4--2.5 cm in diameter by 1 cm tall. The x-ray source used to drive these hohlraums was a z-pinch consisting of a 300 wire tungsten array driven by a 2 MA, 100 ns current pulse. In this hohlraum geometry, the z-pinch x-ray source can produce energies in excess of 800 kJ and powers in excess of 100 TW to drive these hohlraums. The x-rays released in these hohlraums represent greater than a factor of 25 in energy and more than a factor of three in x-ray power over previous laboratory-driven hohlraums.

  18. Pinched weights and duality violation in QCD sum rules: A critical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Alonso, Martin; Pich, Antonio; Prades, Joaquim

    2010-07-01

    We analyze the so-called pinched weights, that are generally thought to reduce the violation of quark-hadron duality in finite-energy sum rules. After showing how this is not true in general, we explain how to address this question for the left-right correlator and any particular pinched weight, taking advantage of our previous work [1], where the possible high-energy behavior of the left-right spectral function was studied. In particular, we show that the use of pinched weights allows to determine with high accuracy the dimension six and eight contributions in the operator-product expansion, O{sub 6}=(-4.3{sub -0.7}{sup +0.9})x10{sup -3} GeV{sup 6} and O{sub 8}=(-7.2{sub -5.3}{sup +4.2})x10{sup -3} GeV{sup 8}.

  19. A spin-liquid with pinch-line singularities on the pyrochlore lattice.

    PubMed

    Benton, Owen; Jaubert, L D C; Yan, Han; Shannon, Nic

    2016-05-26

    The mathematics of gauge theories lies behind many of the most profound advances in physics in the past 200 years, from Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism to Einstein's theory of general relativity. More recently it has become clear that gauge theories also emerge in condensed matter, a prime example being the spin-ice materials which host an emergent electromagnetic gauge field. In spin-ice, the underlying gauge structure is revealed by the presence of pinch-point singularities in neutron-scattering measurements. Here we report the discovery of a spin-liquid where the low-temperature physics is naturally described by the fluctuations of a tensor field with a continuous gauge freedom. This gauge structure underpins an unusual form of spin correlations, giving rise to pinch-line singularities: line-like analogues of the pinch points observed in spin-ice. Remarkably, these features may already have been observed in the pyrochlore material Tb2Ti2O7.

  20. Study of the stability of Z-pinch implosions with different initial density profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Batrakov, A. V.; Baksht, R. B.

    2014-05-15

    Stability of metal-puff Z pinches was studied experimentally. Experiments were carried out on a facility producing a load current up to 450 kA with a rise time of 450 ns. In a metal-puff Z pinch, the plasma shell is produced due to evaporation of the electrode material during the operation of a vacuum arc. In the experiment to be reported, a single-shell and a shell-on-jet pinch load with magnesium electrodes were used. Two-dimensional, 3 ns gated, visible-light images were taken at different times during the implosion. When the shell was formed from a collimated plasma flow with small radial divergence, Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) instability typical of gas-puff implosions was recorded. The RT instability was completely suppressed in a mode where the initial density distribution of the shell approached a tailored density profile [A. L. Velikovich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 853 (1996)].