Science.gov

Sample records for rotational image acquisition

  1. Image acquisition device of inspection robot based on adaptive rotation regulation of polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Maoqi; Wang, Xingguang; Liang, Tao; Yang, Guoqing; Zhang, Chuangyou; Gao, Faqin

    2017-12-01

    An image processing device of inspection robot with adaptive polarization adjustment is proposed, that the device includes the inspection robot body, the image collecting mechanism, the polarizer and the polarizer automatic actuating device. Where, the image acquisition mechanism is arranged at the front of the inspection robot body for collecting equipment image data in the substation. Polarizer is fixed on the automatic actuating device of polarizer, and installed in front of the image acquisition mechanism, and that the optical axis of the camera vertically goes through the polarizer and the polarizer rotates with the optical axis of the visible camera as the central axis. The simulation results show that the system solves the fuzzy problems of the equipment that are caused by glare, reflection of light and shadow, and the robot can observe details of the running status of electrical equipment. And the full coverage of the substation equipment inspection robot observation target is achieved, which ensures the safe operation of the substation equipment.

  2. Rotating single-shot acquisition (RoSA) with composite reconstruction for fast high-resolution diffusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qiuting; Kodiweera, Chandana; Dale, Brian M; Shivraman, Giri; Wu, Yu-Chien

    2018-01-01

    To accelerate high-resolution diffusion imaging, rotating single-shot acquisition (RoSA) with composite reconstruction is proposed. Acceleration was achieved by acquiring only one rotating single-shot blade per diffusion direction, and high-resolution diffusion-weighted (DW) images were reconstructed by using similarities of neighboring DW images. A parallel imaging technique was implemented in RoSA to further improve the image quality and acquisition speed. RoSA performance was evaluated by simulation and human experiments. A brain tensor phantom was developed to determine an optimal blade size and rotation angle by considering similarity in DW images, off-resonance effects, and k-space coverage. With the optimal parameters, RoSA MR pulse sequence and reconstruction algorithm were developed to acquire human brain data. For comparison, multishot echo planar imaging (EPI) and conventional single-shot EPI sequences were performed with matched scan time, resolution, field of view, and diffusion directions. The simulation indicated an optimal blade size of 48 × 256 and a 30 ° rotation angle. For 1 × 1 mm 2 in-plane resolution, RoSA was 12 times faster than the multishot acquisition with comparable image quality. With the same acquisition time as SS-EPI, RoSA provided superior image quality and minimum geometric distortion. RoSA offers fast, high-quality, high-resolution diffusion images. The composite image reconstruction is model-free and compatible with various diffusion computation approaches including parametric and nonparametric analyses. Magn Reson Med 79:264-275, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Highly accelerated acquisition and homogeneous image reconstruction with rotating RF coil array at 7T-A phantom based study.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyan; Zuo, Zhentao; Jin, Jin; Xue, Rong; Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2014-03-01

    Parallel imaging (PI) is widely used for imaging acceleration by means of coil spatial sensitivities associated with phased array coils (PACs). By employing a time-division multiplexing technique, a single-channel rotating radiofrequency coil (RRFC) provides an alternative method to reduce scan time. Strategically combining these two concepts could provide enhanced acceleration and efficiency. In this work, the imaging acceleration ability and homogeneous image reconstruction strategy of 4-element rotating radiofrequency coil array (RRFCA) was numerically investigated and experimental validated at 7T with a homogeneous phantom. Each coil of RRFCA was capable of acquiring a large number of sensitivity profiles, leading to a better acceleration performance illustrated by the improved geometry-maps that have lower maximum values and more uniform distributions compared to 4- and 8-element stationary arrays. A reconstruction algorithm, rotating SENSitivity Encoding (rotating SENSE), was proposed to provide image reconstruction. Additionally, by optimally choosing the angular sampling positions and transmit profiles under the rotating scheme, phantom images could be faithfully reconstructed. The results indicate that, the proposed technique is able to provide homogeneous reconstructions with overall higher and more uniform signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) distributions at high reduction factors. It is hoped that, by employing the high imaging acceleration and homogeneous imaging reconstruction ability of RRFCA, the proposed method will facilitate human imaging for ultra high field MRI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Image Acquisition Context

    PubMed Central

    Bidgood, W. Dean; Bray, Bruce; Brown, Nicolas; Mori, Angelo Rossi; Spackman, Kent A.; Golichowski, Alan; Jones, Robert H.; Korman, Louis; Dove, Brent; Hildebrand, Lloyd; Berg, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To support clinically relevant indexing of biomedical images and image-related information based on the attributes of image acquisition procedures and the judgments (observations) expressed by observers in the process of image interpretation. Design: The authors introduce the notion of “image acquisition context,” the set of attributes that describe image acquisition procedures, and present a standards-based strategy for utilizing the attributes of image acquisition context as indexing and retrieval keys for digital image libraries. Methods: The authors' indexing strategy is based on an interdependent message/terminology architecture that combines the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) standard, the SNOMED (Systematized Nomenclature of Human and Veterinary Medicine) vocabulary, and the SNOMED DICOM microglossary. The SNOMED DICOM microglossary provides context-dependent mapping of terminology to DICOM data elements. Results: The capability of embedding standard coded descriptors in DICOM image headers and image-interpretation reports improves the potential for selective retrieval of image-related information. This favorably affects information management in digital libraries. PMID:9925229

  5. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: Preliminary Experiences with Rotational Acquisitions and 3D Reconstructions for Therapy Control

    SciTech Connect

    Hodek-Wuerz, Roman; Martin, Jean-Baptiste; Wilhelm, Kai

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is carried out under fluoroscopic control in most centers. The exclusion of implant leakage and the assessment of implant distribution might be difficult to assess based on two-dimensional radiographic projection images only. We evaluated the feasibility of performing a follow-up examination after PVP with rotational acquisitions and volumetric reconstructions in the angio suite. Twenty consecutive patients underwent standard PVP procedures under fluoroscopic control. Immediate postprocedure evaluation of the implant distribution in the angio suite (BV 3000; Philips, The Netherlands) was performed using rotational acquisitions (typical parameters for the image acquisition included a 17-cm field-of-view, 200 acquired imagesmore » for a total angular range of 180{sup o}). Postprocessing of acquired volumetric datasets included multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), maximum intensity projection (MIP), and volume rendering technique (VRT) images that were displayed as two-dimensional slabs or as entire three-dimensional volumes. Image evaluation included lesion and implant assessment with special attention given to implant leakage. Findings from rotational acquisitions were compared to findings from postinterventional CT. The time to perform and to postprocess the rotational acquisitions was in all cases less then 10 min. Assessment of implant distribution after PVP using rotational image acquisition methods and volumetric reconstructions was possible in all patients. Cement distribution and potential leakage sites were visualized best on MIP images presented as slabs. From a total of 33 detected leakages with CT, 30 could be correctly detected by rotational image acquisition. Rotational image acquisitions and volumetric reconstruction methods provided a fast method to control radiographically the result of PVP in our cases.« less

  6. Rotation covariant image processing for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Skibbe, Henrik; Reisert, Marco

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of novel biomedical 3D image acquisition techniques, the efficient and reliable analysis of volumetric images has become more and more important. The amount of data is enormous and demands an automated processing. The applications are manifold, ranging from image enhancement, image reconstruction, and image description to object/feature detection and high-level contextual feature extraction. In most scenarios, it is expected that geometric transformations alter the output in a mathematically well-defined manner. In this paper we emphasis on 3D translations and rotations. Many algorithms rely on intensity or low-order tensorial-like descriptions to fulfill this demand. This paper proposes a general mathematical framework based on mathematical concepts and theories transferred from mathematical physics and harmonic analysis into the domain of image analysis and pattern recognition. Based on two basic operations, spherical tensor differentiation and spherical tensor multiplication, we show how to design a variety of 3D image processing methods in an efficient way. The framework has already been applied to several biomedical applications ranging from feature and object detection tasks to image enhancement and image restoration techniques. In this paper, the proposed methods are applied on a variety of different 3D data modalities stemming from medical and biological sciences.

  7. Rotation Covariant Image Processing for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reisert, Marco

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of novel biomedical 3D image acquisition techniques, the efficient and reliable analysis of volumetric images has become more and more important. The amount of data is enormous and demands an automated processing. The applications are manifold, ranging from image enhancement, image reconstruction, and image description to object/feature detection and high-level contextual feature extraction. In most scenarios, it is expected that geometric transformations alter the output in a mathematically well-defined manner. In this paper we emphasis on 3D translations and rotations. Many algorithms rely on intensity or low-order tensorial-like descriptions to fulfill this demand. This paper proposes a general mathematical framework based on mathematical concepts and theories transferred from mathematical physics and harmonic analysis into the domain of image analysis and pattern recognition. Based on two basic operations, spherical tensor differentiation and spherical tensor multiplication, we show how to design a variety of 3D image processing methods in an efficient way. The framework has already been applied to several biomedical applications ranging from feature and object detection tasks to image enhancement and image restoration techniques. In this paper, the proposed methods are applied on a variety of different 3D data modalities stemming from medical and biological sciences. PMID:23710255

  8. Colony image acquisition and segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. X.

    2007-12-01

    For counting of both colonies and plaques, there is a large number of applications including food, dairy, beverages, hygiene, environmental monitoring, water, toxicology, sterility testing, AMES testing, pharmaceuticals, paints, sterile fluids and fungal contamination. Recently, many researchers and developers have made efforts for this kind of systems. By investigation, some existing systems have some problems. The main problems are image acquisition and image segmentation. In order to acquire colony images with good quality, an illumination box was constructed as: the box includes front lightning and back lightning, which can be selected by users based on properties of colony dishes. With the illumination box, lightning can be uniform; colony dish can be put in the same place every time, which make image processing easy. The developed colony image segmentation algorithm consists of the sub-algorithms: (1) image classification; (2) image processing; and (3) colony delineation. The colony delineation algorithm main contain: the procedures based on grey level similarity, on boundary tracing, on shape information and colony excluding. In addition, a number of algorithms are developed for colony analysis. The system has been tested and satisfactory.

  9. Comparison of rotation algorithms for digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starovoitov, Valery V.; Samal, Dmitry

    1999-09-01

    The paper presents a comparative study of several algorithms developed for digital image rotation. No losing generality we studied gray scale images. We have tested methods preserving gray values of the original images, performing some interpolation and two procedures implemented into the Corel Photo-paint and Adobe Photoshop soft packages. By the similar way methods for rotation of color images may be evaluated also.

  10. Golden-ratio rotated stack-of-stars acquisition for improved volumetric MRI.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ziwu; Han, Fei; Yan, Lirong; Wang, Danny J J; Hu, Peng

    2017-12-01

    To develop and evaluate an improved stack-of-stars radial sampling strategy for reducing streaking artifacts. The conventional stack-of-stars sampling strategy collects the same radial angle for every partition (slice) encoding. In an undersampled acquisition, such an aligned acquisition generates coherent aliasing patterns and introduces strong streaking artifacts. We show that by rotating the radial spokes in a golden-angle manner along the partition-encoding direction, the aliasing pattern is modified, resulting in improved image quality for gridding and more advanced reconstruction methods. Computer simulations were performed and phantom as well as in vivo images for three different applications were acquired. Simulation, phantom, and in vivo experiments confirmed that the proposed method was able to generate images with less streaking artifact and sharper structures based on undersampled acquisitions in comparison with the conventional aligned approach at the same acceleration factors. By combining parallel imaging and compressed sensing in the reconstruction, streaking artifacts were mostly removed with improved delineation of fine structures using the proposed strategy. We present a simple method to reduce streaking artifacts and improve image quality in 3D stack-of-stars acquisitions by re-arranging the radial spoke angles in the 3D partition direction, which can be used for rapid volumetric imaging. Magn Reson Med 78:2290-2298, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Faraday rotation dispersion microscopy imaging of diamagnetic and chiral liquids with pulsed magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Masayori; Nakano, Yusuke; Tsukahara, Satoshi; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2013-05-21

    We have constructed an experimental setup for Faraday rotation dispersion imaging and demonstrated the performance of a novel imaging principle. By using a pulsed magnetic field and a polarized light synchronized to the magnetic field, quantitative Faraday rotation images of diamagnetic organic liquids in glass capillaries were observed. Nonaromatic hydrocarbons, benzene derivatives, and naphthalene derivatives were clearly distinguished by the Faraday rotation images due to the difference in Verdet constants. From the wavelength dispersion of the Faraday rotation images in the visible region, it was found that the resonance wavelength in the UV region, which was estimated based on the Faraday B-term, could be used as characteristic parameters for the imaging of the liquids. Furthermore, simultaneous acquisition of Faraday rotation image and natural optical rotation image was demonstrated for chiral organic liquids.

  12. MONSOON Image Acquisition System | CTIO

    Science.gov Websites

    Visitor's Computer Guidelines Network Connection Request Instruments Instruments by Telescope IR Instruments flexible solution for the acquisition of pixel data from scientific CDD and IR detectors. The architecture requirements for both IR and CCD large focal planes that NOAO developed for instrumentation efforts in the

  13. Image Acquisition in Real Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In 1995, Carlos Jorquera left NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to focus on erasing the growing void between high-performance cameras and the requisite software to capture and process the resulting digital images. Since his departure from NASA, Jorquera s efforts have not only satisfied the private industry's cravings for faster, more flexible, and more favorable software applications, but have blossomed into a successful entrepreneurship that is making its mark with improvements in fields such as medicine, weather forecasting, and X-ray inspection. Formerly a JPL engineer who constructed imaging systems for spacecraft and ground-based astronomy projects, Jorquera is the founder and president of the three-person firm, Boulder Imaging Inc., based in Louisville, Colorado. Joining Jorquera to round out the Boulder Imaging staff are Chief Operations Engineer Susan Downey, who also gained experience at JPL working on space-bound projects including Galileo and the Hubble Space Telescope, and Vice President of Engineering and Machine Vision Specialist Jie Zhu Kulbida, who has extensive industrial and research and development experience within the private sector.

  14. Acquisition and Retaining Granular Samples via a Rotating Coring Bit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    This device takes advantage of the centrifugal forces that are generated when a coring bit is rotated, and a granular sample is entered into the bit while it is spinning, making it adhere to the internal wall of the bit, where it compacts itself into the wall of the bit. The bit can be specially designed to increase the effectiveness of regolith capturing while turning and penetrating the subsurface. The bit teeth can be oriented such that they direct the regolith toward the bit axis during the rotation of the bit. The bit can be designed with an internal flute that directs the regolith upward inside the bit. The use of both the teeth and flute can be implemented in the same bit. The bit can also be designed with an internal spiral into which the various particles wedge. In another implementation, the bit can be designed to collect regolith primarily from a specific depth. For that implementation, the bit can be designed such that when turning one way, the teeth guide the regolith outward of the bit and when turning in the opposite direction, the teeth will guide the regolith inward into the bit internal section. This mechanism can be implemented with or without an internal flute. The device is based on the use of a spinning coring bit (hollow interior) as a means of retaining granular sample, and the acquisition is done by inserting the bit into the subsurface of a regolith, soil, or powder. To demonstrate the concept, a commercial drill and a coring bit were used. The bit was turned and inserted into the soil that was contained in a bucket. While spinning the bit (at speeds of 600 to 700 RPM), the drill was lifted and the soil was retained inside the bit. To prove this point, the drill was turned horizontally, and the acquired soil was still inside the bit. The basic theory behind the process of retaining unconsolidated mass that can be acquired by the centrifugal forces of the bit is determined by noting that in order to stay inside the interior of the bit, the

  15. Comparison null imaging ellipsometry using polarization rotator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungmo; Kim, Eunsung; Kim, Jiwon; An, Ilsin

    2018-05-01

    In this study, two-reflection imaging ellipsometry is carried out to compare the changes in polarization states between two samples. By using a polarization rotator, the parallel and perpendicular components of polarization are easily switched between the two samples being compared. This leads to an intensity image consisting of null and off-null points depending on the difference in optical characteristics between the two samples. This technique does not require any movement of optical elements for nulling and can be used to detect defects or surface contamination for quality control of samples.

  16. Material appearance acquisition from a single image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Cui, Shulin; Cui, Hanwen; Yang, Lin; Wu, Tao

    2017-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to present a method of material appearance acquisition(MAA) from a single image. In this paper, material appearance is represented by spatially varying bidirectional reflectance distribution function(SVBRDF). Therefore, MAA can be reduced to the problem of recovery of each pixel's BRDF parameters from an original input image, which include diffuse coefficient, specular coefficient, normal and glossiness based on the Blinn-Phone model. In our method, the workflow of MAA includes five main phases: highlight removal, estimation of intrinsic images, shape from shading(SFS), initialization of glossiness and refining SVBRDF parameters based on IPOPT. The results indicate that the proposed technique can effectively extract the material appearance from a single image.

  17. Controlling Data Collection to Support SAR Image Rotation

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Cordaro, J. Thomas; Burns, Bryan L.

    2008-10-14

    A desired rotation of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image can be facilitated by adjusting a SAR data collection operation based on the desired rotation. The SAR data collected by the adjusted SAR data collection operation can be efficiently exploited to form therefrom a SAR image having the desired rotational orientation.

  18. Optical image acquisition system for colony analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weixing; Jin, Wenbiao

    2006-02-01

    For counting of both colonies and plaques, there is a large number of applications including food, dairy, beverages, hygiene, environmental monitoring, water, toxicology, sterility testing, AMES testing, pharmaceuticals, paints, sterile fluids and fungal contamination. Recently, many researchers and developers have made efforts for this kind of systems. By investigation, some existing systems have some problems since they belong to a new technology product. One of the main problems is image acquisition. In order to acquire colony images with good quality, an illumination box was constructed as: the box includes front lightning and back lightning, which can be selected by users based on properties of colony dishes. With the illumination box, lightning can be uniform; colony dish can be put in the same place every time, which make image processing easy. A digital camera in the top of the box connected to a PC computer with a USB cable, all the camera functions are controlled by the computer.

  19. Applications Of Digital Image Acquisition In Anthropometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolford, Barbara; Lewis, James L.

    1981-10-01

    Anthropometric data on reach and mobility have traditionally been collected by time consuming and relatively inaccurate manual methods. Three dimensional digital image acquisition promises to radically increase the speed and ease of data collection and analysis. A three-camera video anthropometric system for collecting position, velocity, and force data in real time is under development for the Anthropometric Measurement Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The use of a prototype of this system for collecting data on reach capabilities and on lateral stability is described. Two extensions of this system are planned.

  20. Image acquisition system for traffic monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auty, Glen; Corke, Peter I.; Dunn, Paul; Jensen, Murray; Macintyre, Ian B.; Mills, Dennis C.; Nguyen, Hao; Simons, Ben

    1995-03-01

    An imaging system for monitoring traffic on multilane highways is discussed. The system, named Safe-T-Cam, is capable of operating 24 hours per day in all but extreme weather conditions and can capture still images of vehicles traveling up to 160 km/hr. Systems operating at different remote locations are networked to allow transmission of images and data to a control center. A remote site facility comprises a vehicle detection and classification module (VCDM), an image acquisition module (IAM) and a license plate recognition module (LPRM). The remote site is connected to the central site by an ISDN communications network. The remote site system is discussed in this paper. The VCDM consists of a video camera, a specialized exposure control unit to maintain consistent image characteristics, and a 'real-time' image processing system that processes 50 images per second. The VCDM can detect and classify vehicles (e.g. cars from trucks). The vehicle class is used to determine what data should be recorded. The VCDM uses a vehicle tracking technique to allow optimum triggering of the high resolution camera of the IAM. The IAM camera combines the features necessary to operate consistently in the harsh environment encountered when imaging a vehicle 'head-on' in both day and night conditions. The image clarity obtained is ideally suited for automatic location and recognition of the vehicle license plate. This paper discusses the camera geometry, sensor characteristics and the image processing methods which permit consistent vehicle segmentation from a cluttered background allowing object oriented pattern recognition to be used for vehicle classification. The image capture of high resolution images and the image characteristics required for the LPRMs automatic reading of vehicle license plates, is also discussed. The results of field tests presented demonstrate that the vision based Safe-T-Cam system, currently installed on open highways, is capable of producing automatic

  1. Algorithmic support for graphic images rotation in avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniga, E. V.; Gurjanov, A. V.; Shukalov, A. V.; Zharinov, I. O.

    2018-05-01

    The avionics device designing has an actual problem of development and research algorithms to rotate the images which are being shown in the on-board display. The image rotation algorithms are a part of program software of avionics devices, which are parts of the on-board computers of the airplanes and helicopters. Images to be rotated have the flight location map fragments. The image rotation in the display system can be done as a part of software or mechanically. The program option is worse than the mechanic one in its rotation speed. The comparison of some test images of rotation several algorithms is shown which are being realized mechanically with the program environment Altera QuartusII.

  2. The image acquisition system design of floor grinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang-jiang; Liu, Wei; Liu, Hui-qin

    2018-01-01

    Based on linear CCD, high resolution image real-time acquisition system serves as designing a set of image acquisition system for floor grinder through the calculation of optical imaging system. The entire image acquisition system can collect images of ground before and after the work of the floor grinder, and the data is transmitted through the Bluetooth system to the computer and compared to realize real-time monitoring of its working condition. The system provides technical support for the design of unmanned ground grinders.

  3. Graphical user interface for image acquisition and processing

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2002-01-01

    An event-driven GUI-based image acquisition interface for the IDL programming environment designed for CCD camera control and image acquisition directly into the IDL environment where image manipulation and data analysis can be performed, and a toolbox of real-time analysis applications. Running the image acquisition hardware directly from IDL removes the necessity of first saving images in one program and then importing the data into IDL for analysis in a second step. Bringing the data directly into IDL creates an opportunity for the implementation of IDL image processing and display functions in real-time. program allows control over the available charge coupled device (CCD) detector parameters, data acquisition, file saving and loading, and image manipulation and processing, all from within IDL. The program is built using IDL's widget libraries to control the on-screen display and user interface.

  4. In vivo sensitivity estimation and imaging acceleration with rotating RF coil arrays at 7 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingyan; Jin, Jin; Zuo, Zhentao; Liu, Feng; Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Zhuo, Yan; Xue, Rong; Crozier, Stuart

    2015-03-01

    Using a new rotating SENSitivity Encoding (rotating-SENSE) algorithm, we have successfully demonstrated that the rotating radiofrequency coil array (RRFCA) was capable of achieving a significant reduction in scan time and a uniform image reconstruction for a homogeneous phantom at 7 Tesla. However, at 7 Tesla the in vivo sensitivity profiles (B1-) become distinct at various angular positions. Therefore, sensitivity maps at other angular positions cannot be obtained by numerically rotating the acquired ones. In this work, a novel sensitivity estimation method for the RRFCA was developed and validated with human brain imaging. This method employed a library database and registration techniques to estimate coil sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position. The estimated sensitivity maps were then compared to the acquired sensitivity maps. The results indicate that the proposed method is capable of accurately estimating both magnitude and phase of sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position, which enables us to employ the rotating-SENSE algorithm to accelerate acquisition and reconstruct image. Compared to a stationary coil array with the same number of coil elements, the RRFCA was able to reconstruct images with better quality at a high reduction factor. It is hoped that the proposed rotation-dependent sensitivity estimation algorithm and the acceleration ability of the RRFCA will be particularly useful for ultra high field MRI.

  5. In vivo sensitivity estimation and imaging acceleration with rotating RF coil arrays at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyan; Jin, Jin; Zuo, Zhentao; Liu, Feng; Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Zhuo, Yan; Xue, Rong; Crozier, Stuart

    2015-03-01

    Using a new rotating SENSitivity Encoding (rotating-SENSE) algorithm, we have successfully demonstrated that the rotating radiofrequency coil array (RRFCA) was capable of achieving a significant reduction in scan time and a uniform image reconstruction for a homogeneous phantom at 7 Tesla. However, at 7 Tesla the in vivo sensitivity profiles (B1(-)) become distinct at various angular positions. Therefore, sensitivity maps at other angular positions cannot be obtained by numerically rotating the acquired ones. In this work, a novel sensitivity estimation method for the RRFCA was developed and validated with human brain imaging. This method employed a library database and registration techniques to estimate coil sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position. The estimated sensitivity maps were then compared to the acquired sensitivity maps. The results indicate that the proposed method is capable of accurately estimating both magnitude and phase of sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position, which enables us to employ the rotating-SENSE algorithm to accelerate acquisition and reconstruct image. Compared to a stationary coil array with the same number of coil elements, the RRFCA was able to reconstruct images with better quality at a high reduction factor. It is hoped that the proposed rotation-dependent sensitivity estimation algorithm and the acceleration ability of the RRFCA will be particularly useful for ultra high field MRI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reproducible high-resolution multispectral image acquisition in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Gardiazabal, José; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2015-07-01

    Multispectral image acquisitions are increasingly popular in dermatology, due to their improved spectral resolution which enables better tissue discrimination. Most applications however focus on restricted regions of interest, imaging only small lesions. In this work we present and discuss an imaging framework for high-resolution multispectral imaging on large regions of interest.

  7. Age of Acquisition and Imageability: A Cross-Task Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploetz, Danielle M.; Yates, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has reported an imageability effect on visual word recognition. Words that are high in imageability are recognised more rapidly than are those lower in imageability. However, later researchers argued that imageability was confounded with age of acquisition. In the current research, these two factors were manipulated in a…

  8. Accelerated dynamic EPR imaging using fast acquisition and compressive recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L.

    2016-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) allows quantitative imaging of tissue redox status, which provides important information about ischemic syndromes, cancer and other pathologies. For continuous wave EPR imaging, however, poor signal-to-noise ratio and low acquisition efficiency limit its ability to image dynamic processes in vivo including tissue redox, where conditions can change rapidly. Here, we present a data acquisition and processing framework that couples fast acquisition with compressive sensing-inspired image recovery to enable EPR-based redox imaging with high spatial and temporal resolutions. The fast acquisition (FA) allows collecting more, albeit noisier, projections in a given scan time. The composite regularization based processing method, called spatio-temporal adaptive recovery (STAR), not only exploits sparsity in multiple representations of the spatio-temporal image but also adaptively adjusts the regularization strength for each representation based on its inherent level of the sparsity. As a result, STAR adjusts to the disparity in the level of sparsity across multiple representations, without introducing any tuning parameter. Our simulation and phantom imaging studies indicate that a combination of fast acquisition and STAR (FASTAR) enables high-fidelity recovery of volumetric image series, with each volumetric image employing less than 10 s of scan. In addition to image fidelity, the time constants derived from FASTAR also match closely to the ground truth even when a small number of projections are used for recovery. This development will enhance the capability of EPR to study fast dynamic processes that cannot be investigated using existing EPR imaging techniques.

  9. A novel rotational invariants target recognition method for rotating motion blurred images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Jinhui; Gong, Meiling; Dong, Mingwei; Zeng, Yiliang; Zhang, Yuzhen

    2017-11-01

    The imaging of the image sensor is blurred due to the rotational motion of the carrier and reducing the target recognition rate greatly. Although the traditional mode that restores the image first and then identifies the target can improve the recognition rate, it takes a long time to recognize. In order to solve this problem, a rotating fuzzy invariants extracted model was constructed that recognizes target directly. The model includes three metric layers. The object description capability of metric algorithms that contain gray value statistical algorithm, improved round projection transformation algorithm and rotation-convolution moment invariants in the three metric layers ranges from low to high, and the metric layer with the lowest description ability among them is as the input which can eliminate non pixel points of target region from degenerate image gradually. Experimental results show that the proposed model can improve the correct target recognition rate of blurred image and optimum allocation between the computational complexity and function of region.

  10. Rotating Interns' Images of Practitioners of Five Medical Specialties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sangal, Rahul

    1979-01-01

    A study of rotating interns' images of medical practitioners focuses on what images the interns have of obstetrician-gynecologists, pediatricians, internists, psychiatrists, and surgeons, and seeks to determine whether these images differ according to choice of specialty for postgraduate work. (JMD)

  11. Rotator Cuff Tear Arthropathy: Pathophysiology, Imaging Characteristics, and Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Eajazi, Alireza; Kussman, Steve; LeBedis, Christina; Guermazi, Ali; Kompel, Andrew; Jawa, Andrew; Murakami, Akira M

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the biomechanical properties of the rotator cuff and glenohumeral joint and the pathophysiology, imaging characteristics, and treatment options of rotator cuff tear arthropathy (RCTA). Although multiple pathways have been proposed as causes of RCTA, the exact cause remains unclear. Increasing knowledge about the clinical diagnosis, imaging features, and indicators of severity improves recognition and treatment of this pathologic condition.

  12. Detection of Sound Image Movement During Horizontal Head Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Kagesho; Iwaya, Yukio; Suzuki, Yôiti

    2016-01-01

    Movement detection for a virtual sound source was measured during the listener’s horizontal head rotation. Listeners were instructed to do head rotation at a given speed. A trial consisted of two intervals. During an interval, a virtual sound source was presented 60° to the right or left of the listener, who was instructed to rotate the head to face the sound image position. Then in one of a pair of intervals, the sound position was moved slightly in the middle of the rotation. Listeners were asked to judge the interval in a trial during which the sound stimuli moved. Results suggest that detection thresholds are higher when listeners do head rotation. Moreover, this effect was found to be independent of the rotation velocity. PMID:27698993

  13. Simultaneous acquisition of differing image types

    DOEpatents

    Demos, Stavros G

    2012-10-09

    A system in one embodiment includes an image forming device for forming an image from an area of interest containing different image components; an illumination device for illuminating the area of interest with light containing multiple components; at least one light source coupled to the illumination device, the at least one light source providing light to the illumination device containing different components, each component having distinct spectral characteristics and relative intensity; an image analyzer coupled to the image forming device, the image analyzer decomposing the image formed by the image forming device into multiple component parts based on type of imaging; and multiple image capture devices, each image capture device receiving one of the component parts of the image. A method in one embodiment includes receiving an image from an image forming device; decomposing the image formed by the image forming device into multiple component parts based on type of imaging; receiving the component parts of the image; and outputting image information based on the component parts of the image. Additional systems and methods are presented.

  14. Gamma Imaging using Rotational Modulation Collimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    c © Commonwealth of...in Table A1. 4 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED DSTO–TR–2946 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 C O U N T S...P E R S E C O N D MASK ROTATION ANGLE (DEGREES) Co-60 shielded by lead 44 mm Cs-137 in storage container (lead 59 mm) Figure 3.2: RMC

  15. Image acquisition in the Pi-of-the-Sky project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jegier, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Poźniak, K.; Sokołowski, M.

    2006-10-01

    Modern astronomical image acquisition systems dedicated for sky surveys provide large amount of data in a single measurement session. During one session that lasts a few hours it is possible to get as much as 100 GB of data. This large amount of data needs to be transferred from camera and processed. This paper presents some aspects of image acquisition in a sky survey image acquisition system. It describes a dedicated USB linux driver for the first version of the "Pi of The Sky" CCD camera (later versions have also Ethernet interface) and the test program for the camera together with a driver-wrapper providing core device functionality. Finally, the paper contains description of an algorithm for matching several images based on image features, i.e. star positions and their brightness.

  16. Image acquisition unit for the Mayo/IBM PACS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Frank J.; Salutz, James R.

    1991-07-01

    The Mayo Clinic and IBM Rochester, Minnesota, have jointly developed a picture archiving, distribution and viewing system for use with Mayo's CT and MRI imaging modalities. Images are retrieved from the modalities and sent over the Mayo city-wide token ring network to optical storage subsystems for archiving, and to server subsystems for viewing on image review stations. Images may also be retrieved from archive and transmitted back to the modalities. The subsystems that interface to the modalities and communicate to the other components of the system are termed Image Acquisition Units (LAUs). The IAUs are IBM Personal System/2 (PS/2) computers with specially developed software. They operate independently in a network of cooperative subsystems and communicate with the modalities, archive subsystems, image review server subsystems, and a central subsystem that maintains information about the content and location of images. This paper provides a detailed description of the function and design of the Image Acquisition Units.

  17. Image acquisition optimization of a limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system for lung radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yawei; Deng, Xinchen; Yin, Fang-Fang; Ren, Lei

    2018-01-01

    Limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) has been previously developed for four-dimensional (4D) intrafraction target verification either during arc delivery or between three-dimensional (3D)/IMRT beams. Preliminary studies showed that LIVE can accurately estimate the target volume using kV/MV projections acquired over orthogonal view 30° scan angles. Currently, the LIVE imaging acquisition requires slow gantry rotation and is not clinically optimized. The goal of this study is to optimize the image acquisition parameters of LIVE for different patient respiratory periods and gantry rotation speeds for the effective clinical implementation of the system. Limited-angle intrafraction verification imaging acquisition was optimized using a digital anthropomorphic phantom (XCAT) with simulated respiratory periods varying from 3 s to 6 s and gantry rotation speeds varying from 1°/s to 6°/s. LIVE scanning time was optimized by minimizing the number of respiratory cycles needed for the four-dimensional scan, and imaging dose was optimized by minimizing the number of kV and MV projections needed for four-dimensional estimation. The estimation accuracy was evaluated by calculating both the center-of-mass-shift (COMS) and three-dimensional volume-percentage-difference (VPD) between the tumor in estimated images and the ground truth images. The robustness of LIVE was evaluated with varied respiratory patterns, tumor sizes, and tumor locations in XCAT simulation. A dynamic thoracic phantom (CIRS) was used to further validate the optimized imaging schemes from XCAT study with changes of respiratory patterns, tumor sizes, and imaging scanning directions. Respiratory periods, gantry rotation speeds, number of respiratory cycles scanned and number of kV/MV projections acquired were all positively correlated with the estimation accuracy of LIVE. Faster gantry rotation speed or longer respiratory period allowed less respiratory cycles to be scanned and less kV/MV projections

  18. Rotational-translational fourier imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention has the ability to create Fourier-based images with only two grid pairs. The two grid pairs are manipulated in a manner that allows (1) a first grid pair to provide multiple real components of the Fourier-based image and (2) a second grid pair to provide multiple imaginary components of the Fourier-based image. The novelty of this invention resides in the use of only two grid pairs to provide the same imaging information that has been traditionally collected with multiple grid pairs.

  19. Accelerated dynamic EPR imaging using fast acquisition and compressive recovery.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L

    2016-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) allows quantitative imaging of tissue redox status, which provides important information about ischemic syndromes, cancer and other pathologies. For continuous wave EPR imaging, however, poor signal-to-noise ratio and low acquisition efficiency limit its ability to image dynamic processes in vivo including tissue redox, where conditions can change rapidly. Here, we present a data acquisition and processing framework that couples fast acquisition with compressive sensing-inspired image recovery to enable EPR-based redox imaging with high spatial and temporal resolutions. The fast acquisition (FA) allows collecting more, albeit noisier, projections in a given scan time. The composite regularization based processing method, called spatio-temporal adaptive recovery (STAR), not only exploits sparsity in multiple representations of the spatio-temporal image but also adaptively adjusts the regularization strength for each representation based on its inherent level of the sparsity. As a result, STAR adjusts to the disparity in the level of sparsity across multiple representations, without introducing any tuning parameter. Our simulation and phantom imaging studies indicate that a combination of fast acquisition and STAR (FASTAR) enables high-fidelity recovery of volumetric image series, with each volumetric image employing less than 10 s of scan. In addition to image fidelity, the time constants derived from FASTAR also match closely to the ground truth even when a small number of projections are used for recovery. This development will enhance the capability of EPR to study fast dynamic processes that cannot be investigated using existing EPR imaging techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Recurrent rotator cuff tear: is ultrasound imaging reliable?

    PubMed

    Gilat, Ron; Atoun, Ehud; Cohen, Ornit; Tsvieli, Oren; Rath, Ehud; Lakstein, Dror; Levy, Ofer

    2018-02-02

    The diagnostic workup of the painful shoulder after rotator cuff repair (RCR) can be quite challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of ultrasonography (US) for the detection of recurrent rotator cuff tears in patients with shoulder pain after RCR. We hypothesized that US for the diagnosis of recurrent rotator cuff tear after RCR would not prove to be reliable when compared with surgical arthroscopic confirmation (gold standard). In this cohort study (diagnosis), we retrospectively analyzed the data of 39 patients with shoulder pain after arthroscopic RCR who had subsequently undergone US, followed by revision arthroscopy. The rotator cuff was evaluated first using US for the presence of retears. Thereafter, revision arthroscopy was performed, and the diagnosis was either established or disproved. The sensitivity and specificity of US were assessed in reference to revision arthroscopy (gold standard). A rotator cuff retear was indicated by US in 21 patients (54%) and by revision arthroscopy in 26 patients (67%). US showed a sensitivity of 80.8% and specificity of 100% in the diagnosis of rotator cuff retears. Omission of partial rotator cuff retears resulted in a spike in sensitivity to 94.7%, with 100% specificity remaining. US imaging is a highly sensitive and specific test for the detection of recurrent rotator cuff tears, as confirmed by revision arthroscopy, in patients with a painful shoulder after primary RCR. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A robust color image watermarking algorithm against rotation attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shao-cheng; Yang, Jin-feng; Wang, Rui; Jia, Gui-min

    2018-01-01

    A robust digital watermarking algorithm is proposed based on quaternion wavelet transform (QWT) and discrete cosine transform (DCT) for copyright protection of color images. The luminance component Y of a host color image in YIQ space is decomposed by QWT, and then the coefficients of four low-frequency subbands are transformed by DCT. An original binary watermark scrambled by Arnold map and iterated sine chaotic system is embedded into the mid-frequency DCT coefficients of the subbands. In order to improve the performance of the proposed algorithm against rotation attacks, a rotation detection scheme is implemented before watermark extracting. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed watermarking scheme shows strong robustness not only against common image processing attacks but also against arbitrary rotation attacks.

  2. Multidirectional Image Sensing for Microscopy Based on a Rotatable Robot.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yajing; Wan, Wenfeng; Zhang, Lijun; Yong, Li; Lu, Haojian; Ding, Weili

    2015-12-15

    Image sensing at a small scale is essentially important in many fields, including microsample observation, defect inspection, material characterization and so on. However, nowadays, multi-directional micro object imaging is still very challenging due to the limited field of view (FOV) of microscopes. This paper reports a novel approach for multi-directional image sensing in microscopes by developing a rotatable robot. First, a robot with endless rotation ability is designed and integrated with the microscope. Then, the micro object is aligned to the rotation axis of the robot automatically based on the proposed forward-backward alignment strategy. After that, multi-directional images of the sample can be obtained by rotating the robot within one revolution under the microscope. To demonstrate the versatility of this approach, we view various types of micro samples from multiple directions in both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and panoramic images of the samples are processed as well. The proposed method paves a new way for the microscopy image sensing, and we believe it could have significant impact in many fields, especially for sample detection, manipulation and characterization at a small scale.

  3. Translation and Rotation Invariant Multiscale Image Registration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    be computed without human interaction. This allows for the automation of image registration [16]. According to Tashakkori et al [35], the correlation...Intelligence, 21 (10):1074– 1081 (October 1999). 34. Strang, G. and T. Nguyen. Wavelets and Filter Banks . Wellesley, Cambridge, 1996. 35. Tashakkori

  4. Image Acquisition and Quality in Digital Radiography.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    Medical imaging has undergone dramatic changes and technological breakthroughs since the introduction of digital radiography. This article presents information on the development of digital radiography and types of digital radiography systems. Aspects of image quality and radiation exposure control are highlighted as well. In addition, the article includes related workplace changes and medicolegal considerations in the digital radiography environment. ©2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  5. A design of camera simulator for photoelectric image acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guanghui; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Xin

    2015-02-01

    In the process of developing the photoelectric image acquisition equipment, it needs to verify the function and performance. In order to make the photoelectric device recall the image data formerly in the process of debugging and testing, a design scheme of the camera simulator is presented. In this system, with FPGA as the control core, the image data is saved in NAND flash trough USB2.0 bus. Due to the access rate of the NAND, flash is too slow to meet the requirement of the sytsem, to fix the problem, the pipeline technique and the High-Band-Buses technique are applied in the design to improve the storage rate. It reads image data out from flash in the control logic of FPGA and output separately from three different interface of Camera Link, LVDS and PAL, which can provide image data for photoelectric image acquisition equipment's debugging and algorithm validation. However, because the standard of PAL image resolution is 720*576, the resolution is different between PAL image and input image, so the image can be output after the resolution conversion. The experimental results demonstrate that the camera simulator outputs three format image sequence correctly, which can be captured and displayed by frame gather. And the three-format image data can meet test requirements of the most equipment, shorten debugging time and improve the test efficiency.

  6. High dynamic range image acquisition based on multiplex cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hairui; Sun, Huayan; Zhang, Tinghua

    2018-03-01

    High dynamic image is an important technology of photoelectric information acquisition, providing higher dynamic range and more image details, and it can better reflect the real environment, light and color information. Currently, the method of high dynamic range image synthesis based on different exposure image sequences cannot adapt to the dynamic scene. It fails to overcome the effects of moving targets, resulting in the phenomenon of ghost. Therefore, a new high dynamic range image acquisition method based on multiplex cameras system was proposed. Firstly, different exposure images sequences were captured with the camera array, using the method of derivative optical flow based on color gradient to get the deviation between images, and aligned the images. Then, the high dynamic range image fusion weighting function was established by combination of inverse camera response function and deviation between images, and was applied to generated a high dynamic range image. The experiments show that the proposed method can effectively obtain high dynamic images in dynamic scene, and achieves good results.

  7. Hierarchical Factoring Based On Image Analysis And Orthoblique Rotations.

    PubMed

    Stankov, L

    1979-07-01

    The procedure for hierarchical factoring suggested by Schmid and Leiman (1957) is applied within the framework of image analysis and orthoblique rotational procedures. It is shown that this approach necessarily leads to correlated higher order factors. Also, one can obtain a smaller number of factors than produced by typical hierarchical procedures.

  8. Spatial arrangement of color filter array for multispectral image acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Raju; Hardeberg, Jon Y.; Khan, Rahat

    2011-03-01

    In the past few years there has been a significant volume of research work carried out in the field of multispectral image acquisition. The focus of most of these has been to facilitate a type of multispectral image acquisition systems that usually requires multiple subsequent shots (e.g. systems based on filter wheels, liquid crystal tunable filters, or active lighting). Recently, an alternative approach for one-shot multispectral image acquisition has been proposed; based on an extension of the color filter array (CFA) standard to produce more than three channels. We can thus introduce the concept of multispectral color filter array (MCFA). But this field has not been much explored, particularly little focus has been given in developing systems which focuses on the reconstruction of scene spectral reflectance. In this paper, we have explored how the spatial arrangement of multispectral color filter array affects the acquisition accuracy with the construction of MCFAs of different sizes. We have simulated acquisitions of several spectral scenes using different number of filters/channels, and compared the results with those obtained by the conventional regular MCFA arrangement, evaluating the precision of the reconstructed scene spectral reflectance in terms of spectral RMS error, and colorimetric ▵E*ab color differences. It has been found that the precision and the the quality of the reconstructed images are significantly influenced by the spatial arrangement of the MCFA and the effect will be more and more prominent with the increase in the number of channels. We believe that MCFA-based systems can be a viable alternative for affordable acquisition of multispectral color images, in particular for applications where spatial resolution can be traded off for spectral resolution. We have shown that the spatial arrangement of the array is an important design issue.

  9. Temperature measurements on fast-rotating objects using a thermographic camera with an optomechanical image derotator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, Bettina; Pape, Christian; Reithmeier, Eduard

    2017-08-01

    Increasing requirements concerning the quality and lifetime of machine components in industrial and automotive applications require comprehensive investigations of the components in conditions close to the application. Irregularities in heating of mechanical parts reveal regions with increased loading of pressure, draft or friction. In the long run this leads to damage and total failure of the machine. Thermographic measurements of rotating objects, e.g., rolling bearings, brakes, and clutches provide an approach to investigate those defects. However, it is challenging to measure fast-rotating objects accurately. Currently one contact-free approach is performing stroboscopic measurements using an infrared sensor. The data acquisition is triggered so that the image is taken once per revolution. This leads to a huge loss of information on the majority of the movement and to motion blur. The objective of this research is showing the potential of using an optomechanical image derotator together with a thermographic camera. The derotator follows the rotation of the measurement object so that quasi-stationary thermal images during motion can be acquired by the infrared sensor. Unlike conventional derotators which use a glass prism to achieve this effect, the derotator within this work is equipped with a sophisticated reflector assembly. These reflectors are made of aluminum to transfer infrared radiation emitted by the rotating object. Because of the resulting stationary thermal image, the operation can be monitored continuously even for fast-rotating objects. The field of view can also be set to a small off-axis region of interest which then can be investigated with higher resolution or frame rate. To depict the potential of this approach, thermographic measurements on a rolling bearings in different operating states are presented.

  10. Rotation invariant deep binary hashing for fast image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lai; Liu, Jianming; Jiang, Aiwen

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we study how to compactly represent image's characteristics for fast image retrieval. We propose supervised rotation invariant compact discriminative binary descriptors through combining convolutional neural network with hashing. In the proposed network, binary codes are learned by employing a hidden layer for representing latent concepts that dominate on class labels. A loss function is proposed to minimize the difference between binary descriptors that describe reference image and the rotated one. Compared with some other supervised methods, the proposed network doesn't have to require pair-wised inputs for binary code learning. Experimental results show that our method is effective and achieves state-of-the-art results on the CIFAR-10 and MNIST datasets.

  11. 3D GRASE PROPELLER: improved image acquisition technique for arterial spin labeling perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huan; Hoge, W Scott; Hamilton, Craig A; Günther, Matthias; Kraft, Robert A

    2011-07-01

    Arterial spin labeling is a noninvasive technique that can quantitatively measure cerebral blood flow. While traditionally arterial spin labeling employs 2D echo planar imaging or spiral acquisition trajectories, single-shot 3D gradient echo and spin echo (GRASE) is gaining popularity in arterial spin labeling due to inherent signal-to-noise ratio advantage and spatial coverage. However, a major limitation of 3D GRASE is through-plane blurring caused by T(2) decay. A novel technique combining 3D GRASE and a periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction trajectory (PROPELLER) is presented to minimize through-plane blurring without sacrificing perfusion sensitivity or increasing total scan time. Full brain perfusion images were acquired at a 3 × 3 × 5 mm(3) nominal voxel size with pulsed arterial spin labeling preparation sequence. Data from five healthy subjects was acquired on a GE 1.5T scanner in less than 4 minutes per subject. While showing good agreement in cerebral blood flow quantification with 3D gradient echo and spin echo, 3D GRASE PROPELLER demonstrated reduced through-plane blurring, improved anatomical details, high repeatability and robustness against motion, making it suitable for routine clinical use. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Should image rotation be addressed during routine cone-beam CT quality assurance?

    PubMed

    Ayan, Ahmet S; Lin, Haibo; Yeager, Caitlyn; Deville, Curtiland; McDonough, James; Zhu, Timothy C; Anderson, Nathan; Bar Ad, Voichita; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Both, Stefan

    2013-02-21

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether quality assurance (QA) for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image rotation is necessary in order to ensure the accuracy of CBCT based image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). Misregistration of angular coordinates during CBCT acquisition may lead to a rotated reconstructed image. If target localization is performed based on this image, an under- or over-dosage of the target volume (TV) and organs at risk (OARs) may occur. Therefore, patient CT image sets were rotated by 1° up to 3° and the treatment plans were recalculated to quantify changes in dose-volume histograms. A computer code in C++ was written to model the TV displacement and overlap area of an ellipse shape at the target and dose prescription levels corresponding to the image rotation. We investigated clinical scenarios in IGRT and ART in order to study the implications of image rotation on dose distributions for: (1) lateral TV and isocenter (SBRT), (2) central TV and isocenter (IMRT), (3) lateral TV and isocenter (IMRT). Mathematical analysis showed the dose coverage of TV depends on its shape, size, location, and orientation relative to the isocenter. Evaluation of three first scenario for θ = 1° showed variations in TV D95 in the context of IGRT and ART when compared to the original plan were within 2.7 ± 2.6% and 7.7 ± 6.9% respectively while variations in the second and third scenarios were less significant (<0.5%) for the angular range evaluated. However a larger degree of variation was found in terms of minimum and maximum doses for target and OARs. The rotation of CBCT image data sets may have significant dosimetric consequences in IGRT and ART. The TV's location relative to isocenter and shape determine the extent of alterations in dose indicators. Our findings suggest that a CBCT QA criterion of 1° would be a reasonable action level to ensure accurate dose delivery.

  13. Should image rotation be addressed during routine cone-beam CT quality assurance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayan, Ahmet S.; Lin, Haibo; Yeager, Caitlyn; Deville, Curtiland; McDonough, James; Zhu, Timothy C.; Anderson, Nathan; Bar Ad, Voichita; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Both, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether quality assurance (QA) for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image rotation is necessary in order to ensure the accuracy of CBCT based image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). Misregistration of angular coordinates during CBCT acquisition may lead to a rotated reconstructed image. If target localization is performed based on this image, an under- or over-dosage of the target volume (TV) and organs at risk (OARs) may occur. Therefore, patient CT image sets were rotated by 1° up to 3° and the treatment plans were recalculated to quantify changes in dose-volume histograms. A computer code in C++ was written to model the TV displacement and overlap area of an ellipse shape at the target and dose prescription levels corresponding to the image rotation. We investigated clinical scenarios in IGRT and ART in order to study the implications of image rotation on dose distributions for: (1) lateral TV and isocenter (SBRT), (2) central TV and isocenter (IMRT), (3) lateral TV and isocenter (IMRT). Mathematical analysis showed the dose coverage of TV depends on its shape, size, location, and orientation relative to the isocenter. Evaluation of three first scenario for θ = 1° showed variations in TV D95 in the context of IGRT and ART when compared to the original plan were within 2.7 ± 2.6% and 7.7 ± 6.9% respectively while variations in the second and third scenarios were less significant (<0.5%) for the angular range evaluated. However a larger degree of variation was found in terms of minimum and maximum doses for target and OARs. The rotation of CBCT image data sets may have significant dosimetric consequences in IGRT and ART. The TV's location relative to isocenter and shape determine the extent of alterations in dose indicators. Our findings suggest that a CBCT QA criterion of 1° would be a reasonable action level to ensure accurate dose delivery.

  14. Automatic image acquisition processor and method

    DOEpatents

    Stone, W.J.

    1984-01-16

    A computerized method and point location system apparatus is disclosed for ascertaining the center of a primitive or fundamental object whose shape and approximate location are known. The technique involves obtaining an image of the object, selecting a trial center, and generating a locus of points having a predetermined relationship with the center. Such a locus of points could include a circle. The number of points overlying the object in each quadrant is obtained and the counts of these points per quadrant are compared. From this comparison, error signals are provided to adjust the relative location of the trial center. This is repeated until the trial center overlies the geometric center within the predefined accuracy limits.

  15. Automatic image acquisition processor and method

    DOEpatents

    Stone, William J.

    1986-01-01

    A computerized method and point location system apparatus is disclosed for ascertaining the center of a primitive or fundamental object whose shape and approximate location are known. The technique involves obtaining an image of the object, selecting a trial center, and generating a locus of points having a predetermined relationship with the center. Such a locus of points could include a circle. The number of points overlying the object in each quadrant is obtained and the counts of these points per quadrant are compared. From this comparison, error signals are provided to adjust the relative location of the trial center. This is repeated until the trial center overlies the geometric center within the predefined accuracy limits.

  16. The rotational dynamics of Titan from Cassini RADAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriggiola, Rachele; Iess, Luciano; Stiles, Bryan. W.; Lunine, Jonathan. I.; Mitri, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Between 2004 and 2009 the RADAR instrument of the Cassini mission provided 31 SAR images of Titan. We tracked the position of 160 surface landmarks as a function of time in order to monitor the rotational dynamics of Titan. We generated and processed RADAR observables using a least squares fit to determine the updated values of the rotational parameters. We provide a new rotational model of Titan, which includes updated values for spin pole location, spin rate, precession and nutation terms. The estimated pole location is compatible with the occupancy of a Cassini state 1. We found a synchronous value of the spin rate (22.57693 deg/day), compatible at a 3-σ level with IAU predictions. The estimated obliquity is equal to 0.31°, incompatible with the assumption of a rigid body with fully-damped pole and a moment of inertia factor of 0.34, as determined by gravity measurements.

  17. Imaging and Data Acquisition in Clinical Trials for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    FitzGerald, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Fitzgerald@umassmed.edu; Bishop-Jodoin, Maryann; Followill, David S.

    2016-02-01

    Cancer treatment evolves through oncology clinical trials. Cancer trials are multimodal and complex. Assuring high-quality data are available to answer not only study objectives but also questions not anticipated at study initiation is the role of quality assurance. The National Cancer Institute reorganized its cancer clinical trials program in 2014. The National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) was formed and within it was established a Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance Organization. This organization is Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core, the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group, consisting of 6 quality assurance centers that provide imaging and radiation therapy qualitymore » assurance for the NCTN. Sophisticated imaging is used for cancer diagnosis, treatment, and management as well as for image-driven technologies to plan and execute radiation treatment. Integration of imaging and radiation oncology data acquisition, review, management, and archive strategies are essential for trial compliance and future research. Lessons learned from previous trials are and provide evidence to support diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy data acquisition in NCTN trials.« less

  18. Networks for image acquisition, processing and display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The human visual system comprises layers of networks which sample, process, and code images. Understanding these networks is a valuable means of understanding human vision and of designing autonomous vision systems based on network processing. Ames Research Center has an ongoing program to develop computational models of such networks. The models predict human performance in detection of targets and in discrimination of displayed information. In addition, the models are artificial vision systems sharing properties with biological vision that has been tuned by evolution for high performance. Properties include variable density sampling, noise immunity, multi-resolution coding, and fault-tolerance. The research stresses analysis of noise in visual networks, including sampling, photon, and processing unit noises. Specific accomplishments include: models of sampling array growth with variable density and irregularity comparable to that of the retinal cone mosaic; noise models of networks with signal-dependent and independent noise; models of network connection development for preserving spatial registration and interpolation; multi-resolution encoding models based on hexagonal arrays (HOP transform); and mathematical procedures for simplifying analysis of large networks.

  19. Applications of digital image acquisition in anthropometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, B.; Lewis, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of a video kinesimeter, a device for the automatic real-time collection of kinematic and dynamic data. Based on the detection of a single bright spot by three TV cameras, the system provides automatic real-time recording of three-dimensional position and force data. It comprises three cameras, two incandescent lights, a voltage comparator circuit, a central control unit, and a mass storage device. The control unit determines the signal threshold for each camera before testing, sequences the lights, synchronizes and analyzes the scan voltages from the three cameras, digitizes force from a dynamometer, and codes the data for transmission to a floppy disk for recording. Two of the three cameras face each other along the 'X' axis; the third camera, which faces the center of the line between the first two, defines the 'Y' axis. An image from the 'Y' camera and either 'X' camera is necessary for determining the three-dimensional coordinates of the point.

  20. Recognition of rotated images using the multi-valued neuron and rotation-invariant 2D Fourier descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizenberg, Evgeni; Bigio, Irving J.; Rodriguez-Diaz, Eladio

    2012-03-01

    The Fourier descriptors paradigm is a well-established approach for affine-invariant characterization of shape contours. In the work presented here, we extend this method to images, and obtain a 2D Fourier representation that is invariant to image rotation. The proposed technique retains phase uniqueness, and therefore structural image information is not lost. Rotation-invariant phase coefficients were used to train a single multi-valued neuron (MVN) to recognize satellite and human face images rotated by a wide range of angles. Experiments yielded 100% and 96.43% classification rate for each data set, respectively. Recognition performance was additionally evaluated under effects of lossy JPEG compression and additive Gaussian noise. Preliminary results show that the derived rotation-invariant features combined with the MVN provide a promising scheme for efficient recognition of rotated images.

  1. Acquisition and visualization techniques for narrow spectral color imaging.

    PubMed

    Neumann, László; García, Rafael; Basa, János; Hegedüs, Ramón

    2013-06-01

    This paper introduces a new approach in narrow-band imaging (NBI). Existing NBI techniques generate images by selecting discrete bands over the full visible spectrum or an even wider spectral range. In contrast, here we perform the sampling with filters covering a tight spectral window. This image acquisition method, named narrow spectral imaging, can be particularly useful when optical information is only available within a narrow spectral window, such as in the case of deep-water transmittance, which constitutes the principal motivation of this work. In this study we demonstrate the potential of the proposed photographic technique on nonunderwater scenes recorded under controlled conditions. To this end three multilayer narrow bandpass filters were employed, which transmit at 440, 456, and 470 nm bluish wavelengths, respectively. Since the differences among the images captured in such a narrow spectral window can be extremely small, both image acquisition and visualization require a novel approach. First, high-bit-depth images were acquired with multilayer narrow-band filters either placed in front of the illumination or mounted on the camera lens. Second, a color-mapping method is proposed, using which the input data can be transformed onto the entire display color gamut with a continuous and perceptually nearly uniform mapping, while ensuring optimally high information content for human perception.

  2. Acquisition and Post-Processing of Immunohistochemical Images.

    PubMed

    Sedgewick, Jerry

    2017-01-01

    Augmentation of digital images is almost always a necessity in order to obtain a reproduction that matches the appearance of the original. However, that augmentation can mislead if it is done incorrectly and not within reasonable limits. When procedures are in place for insuring that originals are archived, and image manipulation steps reported, scientists not only follow good laboratory practices, but avoid ethical issues associated with post processing, and protect their labs from any future allegations of scientific misconduct. Also, when procedures are in place for correct acquisition of images, the extent of post processing is minimized or eliminated. These procedures include white balancing (for brightfield images), keeping tonal values within the dynamic range of the detector, frame averaging to eliminate noise (typically in fluorescence imaging), use of the highest bit depth when a choice is available, flatfield correction, and archiving of the image in a non-lossy format (not JPEG).When post-processing is necessary, the commonly used applications for correction include Photoshop, and ImageJ, but a free program (GIMP) can also be used. Corrections to images include scaling the bit depth to higher and lower ranges, removing color casts from brightfield images, setting brightness and contrast, reducing color noise, reducing "grainy" noise, conversion of pure colors to grayscale, conversion of grayscale to colors typically used in fluorescence imaging, correction of uneven illumination (flatfield correction), merging color images (fluorescence), and extending the depth of focus. These corrections are explained in step-by-step procedures in the chapter that follows.

  3. PSF Rotation with Changing Defocus and Applications to 3D Imaging for Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, S.; Kumar, R.

    2013-09-01

    For a clear, well corrected imaging aperture in space, the point-spread function (PSF) in its Gaussian image plane has the conventional, diffraction-limited, tightly focused Airy form. Away from that plane, the PSF broadens rapidly, however, resulting in a loss of sensitivity and transverse resolution that makes such a traditional best-optics approach untenable for rapid 3D image acquisition. One must scan in focus to maintain high sensitivity and resolution as one acquires image data, slice by slice, from a 3D volume with reduced efficiency. In this paper we describe a computational-imaging approach to overcome this limitation, one that uses pupil-phase engineering to fashion a PSF that, although not as tight as the Airy spot, maintains its shape and size while rotating uniformly with changing defocus over many waves of defocus phase at the pupil edge. As one of us has shown recently [1], the subdivision of a circular pupil aperture into M Fresnel zones, with the mth zone having an outer radius proportional to m and impressing a spiral phase profile of form m? on the light wave, where ? is the azimuthal angle coordinate measured from a fixed x axis (the dislocation line), yields a PSF that rotates with defocus while keeping its shape and size. Physically speaking, a nonzero defocus of a point source means a quadratic optical phase in the pupil that, because of the square-root dependence of the zone radius on the zone number, increases on average by the same amount from one zone to the next. This uniformly incrementing phase yields, in effect, a rotation of the dislocation line, and thus a rotated PSF. Since the zone-to-zone phase increment depends linearly on defocus to first order, the PSF rotates uniformly with changing defocus. For an M-zone pupil, a complete rotation of the PSF occurs when the defocus-induced phase at the pupil edge changes by M waves. Our recent simulations of reconstructions from image data for 3D image scenes comprised of point sources at

  4. Image acquisition context: procedure description attributes for clinically relevant indexing and selective retrieval of biomedical images.

    PubMed

    Bidgood, W D; Bray, B; Brown, N; Mori, A R; Spackman, K A; Golichowski, A; Jones, R H; Korman, L; Dove, B; Hildebrand, L; Berg, M

    1999-01-01

    To support clinically relevant indexing of biomedical images and image-related information based on the attributes of image acquisition procedures and the judgments (observations) expressed by observers in the process of image interpretation. The authors introduce the notion of "image acquisition context," the set of attributes that describe image acquisition procedures, and present a standards-based strategy for utilizing the attributes of image acquisition context as indexing and retrieval keys for digital image libraries. The authors' indexing strategy is based on an interdependent message/terminology architecture that combines the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) standard, the SNOMED (Systematized Nomenclature of Human and Veterinary Medicine) vocabulary, and the SNOMED DICOM microglossary. The SNOMED DICOM microglossary provides context-dependent mapping of terminology to DICOM data elements. The capability of embedding standard coded descriptors in DICOM image headers and image-interpretation reports improves the potential for selective retrieval of image-related information. This favorably affects information management in digital libraries.

  5. Tissue discrimination in magnetic resonance imaging of the rotator cuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschino, G. J.; Comas, D. S.; González, M. A.; Capiel, C.; Ballarin, V. L.

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation and diagnosis of diseases of the muscles within the rotator cuff can be done using different modalities, being the Magnetic Resonance the method more widely used. There are criteria to evaluate the degree of fat infiltration and muscle atrophy, but these have low accuracy and show great variability inter and intra observer. In this paper, an analysis of the texture features of the rotator cuff muscles is performed to classify them and other tissues. A general supervised classification approach was used, combining forward-search as feature selection method with kNN as classification rule. Sections of Magnetic Resonance Images of the tissues of interest were selected by specialist doctors and they were considered as Gold Standard. Accuracies obtained were of 93% for T1-weighted images and 92% for T2-weighted images. As an immediate future work, the combination of both sequences of images will be considered, expecting to improve the results, as well as the use of other sequences of Magnetic Resonance Images. This work represents an initial point for the classification and quantification of fat infiltration and muscle atrophy degree. From this initial point, it is expected to make an accurate and objective system which will result in benefits for future research and for patients’ health.

  6. Q-ball imaging with PROPELLER EPI acquisition.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ming-Chung; Huang, Teng-Yi; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Hsieh, Tsyh-Jyi; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2013-12-01

    Q-ball imaging (QBI) is an imaging technique that is capable of resolving intravoxel fiber crossings; however, the signal readout based on echo-planar imaging (EPI) introduces geometric distortions in the presence of susceptibility gradients. This study proposes an imaging technique that reduces susceptibility distortions in QBI by short-axis PROPELLER EPI acquisition. Conventional QBI and PROPELLER QBI data were acquired from two 3T MR scans of the brains of five healthy subjects. Prior to the PROPELLER reconstruction, residual distortions in single-blade low-resolution b0 and diffusion-weighted images (DWIs) were minimized by linear affine and nonlinear diffeomorphic demon registrations. Subsequently, the PROPELLER keyhole reconstruction was applied to the corrected DWIs to obtain high-resolution PROPELLER DWIs. The generalized fractional anisotropy and orientation distribution function maps contained fewer distortions in PROPELLER QBI than in conventional QBI, and the fiber tracts more closely matched the brain anatomy depicted by turbo spin-echo (TSE) T2-weighted imaging (T2WI). Furthermore, for fixed T(E), PROPELLER QBI enabled a shorter scan time than conventional QBI. We conclude that PROPELLER QBI can reduce susceptibility distortions without lengthening the acquisition time and is suitable for tracing neuronal fiber tracts in the human brain. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Stable image acquisition for mobile image processing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Kai-Fabian; Fritze, Alexander; Gillich, Eugen; Mönks, Uwe; Lohweg, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Today, mobile devices (smartphones, tablets, etc.) are widespread and of high importance for their users. Their performance as well as versatility increases over time. This leads to the opportunity to use such devices for more specific tasks like image processing in an industrial context. For the analysis of images requirements like image quality (blur, illumination, etc.) as well as a defined relative position of the object to be inspected are crucial. Since mobile devices are handheld and used in constantly changing environments the challenge is to fulfill these requirements. We present an approach to overcome the obstacles and stabilize the image capturing process such that image analysis becomes significantly improved on mobile devices. Therefore, image processing methods are combined with sensor fusion concepts. The approach consists of three main parts. First, pose estimation methods are used to guide a user moving the device to a defined position. Second, the sensors data and the pose information are combined for relative motion estimation. Finally, the image capturing process is automated. It is triggered depending on the alignment of the device and the object as well as the image quality that can be achieved under consideration of motion and environmental effects.

  8. General equations for optimal selection of diagnostic image acquisition parameters in clinical X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoming

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to examine the effects of relationship functions between diagnostic image quality and radiation dose on the governing equations for image acquisition parameter variations in X-ray imaging. Various equations were derived for the optimal selection of peak kilovoltage (kVp) and exposure parameter (milliAmpere second, mAs) in computed tomography (CT), computed radiography (CR), and direct digital radiography. Logistic, logarithmic, and linear functions were employed to establish the relationship between radiation dose and diagnostic image quality. The radiation dose to the patient, as a function of image acquisition parameters (kVp, mAs) and patient size (d), was used in radiation dose and image quality optimization. Both logistic and logarithmic functions resulted in the same governing equation for optimal selection of image acquisition parameters using a dose efficiency index. For image quality as a linear function of radiation dose, the same governing equation was derived from the linear relationship. The general equations should be used in guiding clinical X-ray imaging through optimal selection of image acquisition parameters. The radiation dose to the patient could be reduced from current levels in medical X-ray imaging.

  9. Imaging the Effects of Rotation in Altair and Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, D. M.; Hummel, C. A.; Pauls, T. A.; Armstrong, J. T.; Benson, J. A.; Gilbreath, C. G.; Hindsley, R. B.; Hutter, D. J.; Johnston, K. J.; Mozurkewich, D.

    After a brief review of rotation among upper main sequence stars and von Zeipel's vZ24 theory for the interiors, we describe our interferometric measurements of two bright A stars, Altair and Vega. The Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (jointly operated by the US Naval Observatory, the Naval Research Laboratory and Lowell Observatory) which works at visible wavelengths has implemented baselines of sufficient length to initiate true imaging of the disks of the brightest A stars. We report here measurements of Altair, the third brightest A star in the sky. "Closure phase" techniques show that Altair deviates dramatically from a normal limb-darkened isk, indicating a strongly asymmetric intensity distribution. A oche model provides a good fit to the data, indicating that Altair is rotating at about 90% of its breakup (angular) velocity. We find that a gravity darkening law exponent appropriate for a radiative star is required by the observations and we describe the potential of this object for testing the assumption of solid body rotation throughout its envelope. We will also describe recent measurements of Vega which confirm the proposed interpretation of spectral line measurements indicating that this star is also rapidly rotating, but seen nearly pole on.

  10. Rotational imaging optical coherence tomography for full-body mouse embryonic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chen; Sudheendran, Narendran; Singh, Manmohan; Larina, Irina V.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been widely used to study mammalian embryonic development with the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolutions and without the need for any contrast enhancement probes. However, the limited imaging depth of traditional OCT might prohibit visualization of the full embryonic body. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a new methodology to enhance the imaging range of OCT in embryonic day (E) 9.5 and 10.5 mouse embryos using rotational imaging. Rotational imaging OCT (RI-OCT) enables full-body imaging of mouse embryos by performing multiangle imaging. A series of postprocessing procedures was performed on each cross-section image, resulting in the final composited image. The results demonstrate that RI-OCT is able to improve the visualization of internal mouse embryo structures as compared to conventional OCT. PMID:26848543

  11. Plant phenomics: an overview of image acquisition technologies and image data analysis algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Sanz, Fernando; Navarro, Pedro J

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The study of phenomes or phenomics has been a central part of biology. The field of automatic phenotype acquisition technologies based on images has seen an important advance in the last years. As with other high-throughput technologies, it addresses a common set of problems, including data acquisition and analysis. In this review, we give an overview of the main systems developed to acquire images. We give an in-depth analysis of image processing with its major issues and the algorithms that are being used or emerging as useful to obtain data out of images in an automatic fashion. PMID:29048559

  12. Plant phenomics: an overview of image acquisition technologies and image data analysis algorithms.

    PubMed

    Perez-Sanz, Fernando; Navarro, Pedro J; Egea-Cortines, Marcos

    2017-11-01

    The study of phenomes or phenomics has been a central part of biology. The field of automatic phenotype acquisition technologies based on images has seen an important advance in the last years. As with other high-throughput technologies, it addresses a common set of problems, including data acquisition and analysis. In this review, we give an overview of the main systems developed to acquire images. We give an in-depth analysis of image processing with its major issues and the algorithms that are being used or emerging as useful to obtain data out of images in an automatic fashion. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Breast cancer detection in rotational thermography images using texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Sheeja V.; Sasikala, M.; Bhavani Bharathi, G.; Jaipurkar, Sandeep D.

    2014-11-01

    Breast cancer is a major cause of mortality in young women in the developing countries. Early diagnosis is the key to improve survival rate in cancer patients. Breast thermography is a diagnostic procedure that non-invasively images the infrared emissions from breast surface to aid in the early detection of breast cancer. Due to limitations in imaging protocol, abnormality detection by conventional breast thermography, is often a challenging task. Rotational thermography is a novel technique developed in order to overcome the limitations of conventional breast thermography. This paper evaluates this technique's potential for automatic detection of breast abnormality, from the perspective of cold challenge. Texture features are extracted in the spatial domain, from rotational thermogram series, prior to and post the application of cold challenge. These features are fed to a support vector machine for automatic classification of normal and malignant breasts, resulting in a classification accuracy of 83.3%. Feature reduction has been performed by principal component analysis. As a novel attempt, the ability of this technique to locate the abnormality has been studied. The results of the study indicate that rotational thermography holds great potential as a screening tool for breast cancer detection.

  14. An automated system for whole microscopic image acquisition and analysis.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Gloria; Déniz, Oscar; Fernández-Carrobles, María Del Milagro; Vállez, Noelia; Salido, Jesús

    2014-09-01

    The field of anatomic pathology has experienced major changes over the last decade. Virtual microscopy (VM) systems have allowed experts in pathology and other biomedical areas to work in a safer and more collaborative way. VMs are automated systems capable of digitizing microscopic samples that were traditionally examined one by one. The possibility of having digital copies reduces the risk of damaging original samples, and also makes it easier to distribute copies among other pathologists. This article describes the development of an automated high-resolution whole slide imaging (WSI) system tailored to the needs and problems encountered in digital imaging for pathology, from hardware control to the full digitization of samples. The system has been built with an additional digital monochromatic camera together with the color camera by default and LED transmitted illumination (RGB). Monochrome cameras are the preferred method of acquisition for fluorescence microscopy. The system is able to digitize correctly and form large high resolution microscope images for both brightfield and fluorescence. The quality of the digital images has been quantified using three metrics based on sharpness, contrast and focus. It has been proved on 150 tissue samples of brain autopsies, prostate biopsies and lung cytologies, at five magnifications: 2.5×, 10×, 20×, 40×, and 63×. The article is focused on the hardware set-up and the acquisition software, although results of the implemented image processing techniques included in the software and applied to the different tissue samples are also presented. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Colony image acquisition and genetic segmentation algorithm and colony analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. X.

    2012-01-01

    Colony anaysis is used in a large number of engineerings such as food, dairy, beverages, hygiene, environmental monitoring, water, toxicology, sterility testing. In order to reduce laboring and increase analysis acuracy, many researchers and developers have made efforts for image analysis systems. The main problems in the systems are image acquisition, image segmentation and image analysis. In this paper, to acquire colony images with good quality, an illumination box was constructed. In the box, the distances between lights and dishe, camra lens and lights, and camera lens and dishe are adjusted optimally. In image segmentation, It is based on a genetic approach that allow one to consider the segmentation problem as a global optimization,. After image pre-processing and image segmentation, the colony analyses are perfomed. The colony image analysis consists of (1) basic colony parameter measurements; (2) colony size analysis; (3) colony shape analysis; and (4) colony surface measurements. All the above visual colony parameters can be selected and combined together, used to make a new engineeing parameters. The colony analysis can be applied into different applications.

  16. UTOFIA: an underwater time-of-flight image acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driewer, Adrian; Abrosimov, Igor; Alexander, Jonathan; Benger, Marc; O'Farrell, Marion; Haugholt, Karl Henrik; Softley, Chris; Thielemann, Jens T.; Thorstensen, Jostein; Yates, Chris

    2017-10-01

    In this article the development of a newly designed Time-of-Flight (ToF) image sensor for underwater applications is described. The sensor is developed as part of the project UTOFIA (underwater time-of-flight image acquisition) funded by the EU within the Horizon 2020 framework. This project aims to develop a camera based on range gating that extends the visible range compared to conventional cameras by a factor of 2 to 3 and delivers real-time range information by means of a 3D video stream. The principle of underwater range gating as well as the concept of the image sensor are presented. Based on measurements on a test image sensor a pixel structure that suits best to the requirements has been selected. Within an extensive characterization underwater the capability of distance measurements in turbid environments is demonstrated.

  17. Post-image acquisition processing approaches for coherent backscatter validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Christopher A.; Belichki, Sara B.; Coffaro, Joseph T.; Panich, Michael G.; Andrews, Larry C.; Phillips, Ronald L.

    2014-10-01

    Utilizing a retro-reflector from a target point, the reflected irradiance of a laser beam traveling back toward the transmitting point contains a peak point of intensity known as the enhanced backscatter (EBS) phenomenon. EBS is dependent on the strength regime of turbulence currently occurring within the atmosphere as the beam propagates across and back. In order to capture and analyze this phenomenon so that it may be compared to theory, an imaging system is integrated into the optical set up. With proper imaging established, we are able to implement various post-image acquisition techniques to help determine detection and positioning of EBS which can then be validated with theory by inspection of certain dependent meteorological parameters such as the refractive index structure parameter, Cn2 and wind speed.

  18. Modeling the target acquisition performance of active imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinola, Richard L.; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Halford, Carl E.; Vollmerhausen, Richard; Tofsted, David H.

    2007-04-01

    Recent development of active imaging system technology in the defense and security community have driven the need for a theoretical understanding of its operation and performance in military applications such as target acquisition. In this paper, the modeling of active imaging systems, developed at the U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate, is presented with particular emphasis on the impact of coherent effects such as speckle and atmospheric scintillation. Experimental results from human perception tests are in good agreement with the model results, validating the modeling of coherent effects as additional noise sources. Example trade studies on the design of a conceptual active imaging system to mitigate deleterious coherent effects are shown.

  19. Modeling the target acquisition performance of active imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Espinola, Richard L; Jacobs, Eddie L; Halford, Carl E; Vollmerhausen, Richard; Tofsted, David H

    2007-04-02

    Recent development of active imaging system technology in the defense and security community have driven the need for a theoretical understanding of its operation and performance in military applications such as target acquisition. In this paper, the modeling of active imaging systems, developed at the U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate, is presented with particular emphasis on the impact of coherent effects such as speckle and atmospheric scintillation. Experimental results from human perception tests are in good agreement with the model results, validating the modeling of coherent effects as additional noise sources. Example trade studies on the design of a conceptual active imaging system to mitigate deleterious coherent effects are shown.

  20. Quantification of lung tumor rotation with automated landmark extraction using orthogonal cine MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganelli, Chiara; Lee, Danny; Greer, Peter B.; Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco; Keall, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The quantification of tumor motion in sites affected by respiratory motion is of primary importance to improve treatment accuracy. To account for motion, different studies analyzed the translational component only, without focusing on the rotational component, which was quantified in a few studies on the prostate with implanted markers. The aim of our study was to propose a tool able to quantify lung tumor rotation without the use of internal markers, thus providing accurate motion detection close to critical structures such as the heart or liver. Specifically, we propose the use of an automatic feature extraction method in combination with the acquisition of fast orthogonal cine MRI images of nine lung patients. As a preliminary test, we evaluated the performance of the feature extraction method by applying it on regions of interest around (i) the diaphragm and (ii) the tumor and comparing the estimated motion with that obtained by (i) the extraction of the diaphragm profile and (ii) the segmentation of the tumor, respectively. The results confirmed the capability of the proposed method in quantifying tumor motion. Then, a point-based rigid registration was applied to the extracted tumor features between all frames to account for rotation. The median lung rotation values were  -0.6   ±   2.3° and  -1.5   ±   2.7° in the sagittal and coronal planes respectively, confirming the need to account for tumor rotation along with translation to improve radiotherapy treatment.

  1. A novel method for rotation invariant palm print image stitching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Shishir Paramathma; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos S.

    2017-05-01

    Although not as popular as fingerprint biometrics, palm prints have garnered interest in scientific community for the rich amount of distinctive information available on the palm. In this paper, a novel method for touchless palm print stitching to increase the effective area is presented. The method is not only rotation invariant but also able to robustly handle many distortions of touchless systems like illumination variations, pose variations etc. The proposed method also can handle partial palmprints, which have a high chance of occurrence in a scene of crime, by stitching them together to produce a much larger-to-full size palmprint for authentication purpose. Experiment results are shown for IIT-D palmprint database, from which pseudo partial palmprints were generated by cropping and randomly rotating them. Furthermore, the quality of stitching algorithm is determined by extensive computer simulations and visual analysis of the stitched image. Experimental results also show that the stitching significantly increases the area of palm image for feature point detection and hence provides a way to increase the accuracy and reliability of detection.

  2. Quantitative Doppler Analysis Using Conventional Color Flow Imaging Acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Karabiyik, Yucel; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Eik-Nes, Sturla H; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2018-05-01

    Interleaved acquisitions used in conventional triplex mode result in a tradeoff between the frame rate and the quality of velocity estimates. On the other hand, workflow becomes inefficient when the user has to switch between different modes, and measurement variability is increased. This paper investigates the use of power spectral Capon estimator in quantitative Doppler analysis using data acquired with conventional color flow imaging (CFI) schemes. To preserve the number of samples used for velocity estimation, only spatial averaging was utilized, and clutter rejection was performed after spectral estimation. The resulting velocity spectra were evaluated in terms of spectral width using a recently proposed spectral envelope estimator. The spectral envelopes were also used for Doppler index calculations using in vivo and string phantom acquisitions. In vivo results demonstrated that the Capon estimator can provide spectral estimates with sufficient quality for quantitative analysis using packet-based CFI acquisitions. The calculated Doppler indices were similar to the values calculated using spectrograms estimated on a commercial ultrasound scanner.

  3. Three-dimensional image orientation through only one rotation applied to image processing in engineering.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Jaime; Martín, María T; Herráez, José; Arias, Pedro

    2008-12-10

    Photogrammetry is a science with many fields of application in civil engineering where image processing is used for different purposes. In most cases, the use of multiple images simultaneously for the reconstruction of 3D scenes is commonly used. However, the use of isolated images is becoming more and more frequent, for which it is necessary to calculate the orientation of the image with respect to the object space (exterior orientation), which is usually made through three rotations through known points in the object space (Euler angles). We describe the resolution of this problem by means of a single rotation through the vanishing line of the image space and completely external to the object, to be more precise, without any contact with it. The results obtained appear to be optimal, and the procedure is simple and of great utility, since no points over the object are required, which is very useful in situations where access is difficult.

  4. SPECT data acquisition and image reconstruction in a stationary small animal SPECT/MRI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingyan; Chen, Si; Yu, Jianhua; Meier, Dirk; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2010-04-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate data acquisition strategies and image reconstruction methods for a stationary SPECT insert that can operate inside an MRI scanner with a 12 cm bore diameter for simultaneous SPECT/MRI imaging of small animals. The SPECT insert consists of 3 octagonal rings of 8 MR-compatible CZT detectors per ring surrounding a multi-pinhole (MPH) collimator sleeve. Each pinhole is constructed to project the field-of-view (FOV) to one CZT detector. All 24 pinholes are focused to a cylindrical FOV of 25 mm in diameter and 34 mm in length. The data acquisition strategies we evaluated were optional collimator rotations to improve tomographic sampling; and the image reconstruction methods were iterative ML-EM with and without compensation for the geometric response function (GRF) of the MPH collimator. For this purpose, we developed an analytic simulator that calculates the system matrix with the GRF models of the MPH collimator. The simulator was used to generate projection data of a digital rod phantom with pinhole aperture sizes of 1 mm and 2 mm and with different collimator rotation patterns. Iterative ML-EM reconstruction with and without GRF compensation were used to reconstruct the projection data from the central ring of 8 detectors only, and from all 24 detectors. Our results indicated that without GRF compensation and at the default design of 24 projection views, the reconstructed images had significant artifacts. Accurate GRF compensation substantially improved the reconstructed image resolution and reduced image artifacts. With accurate GRF compensation, useful reconstructed images can be obtained using 24 projection views only. This last finding potentially enables dynamic SPECT (and/or MRI) studies in small animals, one of many possible application areas of the SPECT/MRI system. Further research efforts are warranted including experimentally measuring the system matrix for improved geometrical accuracy, incorporating the co

  5. Motion-gated acquisition for in vivo optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gioux, Sylvain; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Hutteman, Merlijn; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Wide-field continuous wave fluorescence imaging, fluorescence lifetime imaging, frequency domain photon migration, and spatially modulated imaging have the potential to provide quantitative measurements in vivo. However, most of these techniques have not yet been successfully translated to the clinic due to challenging environmental constraints. In many circumstances, cardiac and respiratory motion greatly impair image quality and∕or quantitative processing. To address this fundamental problem, we have developed a low-cost, field-programmable gate array–based, hardware-only gating device that delivers a phase-locked acquisition window of arbitrary delay and width that is derived from an unlimited number of pseudo-periodic and nonperiodic input signals. All device features can be controlled manually or via USB serial commands. The working range of the device spans the extremes of mouse electrocardiogram (1000 beats per minute) to human respiration (4 breaths per minute), with timing resolution ⩽0.06%, and jitter ⩽0.008%, of the input signal period. We demonstrate the performance of the gating device, including dramatic improvements in quantitative measurements, in vitro using a motion simulator and in vivo using near-infrared fluorescence angiography of beating pig heart. This gating device should help to enable the clinical translation of promising new optical imaging technologies. PMID:20059276

  6. Payload Configurations for Efficient Image Acquisition - Indian Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samudraiah, D. R. M.; Saxena, M.; Paul, S.; Narayanababu, P.; Kuriakose, S.; Kiran Kumar, A. S.

    2014-11-01

    The world is increasingly depending on remotely sensed data. The data is regularly used for monitoring the earth resources and also for solving problems of the world like disasters, climate degradation, etc. Remotely sensed data has changed our perspective of understanding of other planets. With innovative approaches in data utilization, the demands of remote sensing data are ever increasing. More and more research and developments are taken up for data utilization. The satellite resources are scarce and each launch costs heavily. Each launch is also associated with large effort for developing the hardware prior to launch. It is also associated with large number of software elements and mathematical algorithms post-launch. The proliferation of low-earth and geostationary satellites has led to increased scarcity in the available orbital slots for the newer satellites. Indian Space Research Organization has always tried to maximize the utility of satellites. Multiple sensors are flown on each satellite. In each of the satellites, sensors are designed to cater to various spectral bands/frequencies, spatial and temporal resolutions. Bhaskara-1, the first experimental satellite started with 2 bands in electro-optical spectrum and 3 bands in microwave spectrum. The recent Resourcesat-2 incorporates very efficient image acquisition approach with multi-resolution (3 types of spatial resolution) multi-band (4 spectral bands) electro-optical sensors (LISS-4, LISS-3* and AWiFS). The system has been designed to provide data globally with various data reception stations and onboard data storage capabilities. Oceansat-2 satellite has unique sensor combination with 8 band electro-optical high sensitive ocean colour monitor (catering to ocean and land) along with Ku band scatterometer to acquire information on ocean winds. INSAT- 3D launched recently provides high resolution 6 band image data in visible, short-wave, mid-wave and long-wave infrared spectrum. It also has 19 band

  7. Chemical Applications of a Programmable Image Acquisition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogren, Paul J.; Henry, Ian; Fletcher, Steven E. S.; Kelly, Ian

    2003-06-01

    Image analysis is widely used in chemistry, both for rapid qualitative evaluations using techniques such as thin layer chromatography (TLC) and for quantitative purposes such as well-plate measurements of analyte concentrations or fragment-size determinations in gel electrophoresis. This paper describes a programmable system for image acquisition and processing that is currently used in the laboratories of our organic and physical chemistry courses. It has also been used in student research projects in analytical chemistry and biochemistry. The potential range of applications is illustrated by brief presentations of four examples: (1) using well-plate optical transmission data to construct a standard concentration absorbance curve; (2) the quantitative analysis of acetaminophen in Tylenol and acetylsalicylic acid in aspirin using TLC with fluorescence detection; (3) the analysis of electrophoresis gels to determine DNA fragment sizes and amounts; and, (4) using color change to follow reaction kinetics. The supplemental material in JCE Online contains information on two additional examples: deconvolution of overlapping bands in protein gel electrophoresis, and the recovery of data from published images or graphs. The JCE Online material also presents additional information on each example, on the system hardware and software, and on the data analysis methodology.

  8. Rotations

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; Wayne D. Shepperd

    1985-01-01

    The rotation, in forestry, is the planned number of years between formation of a crop or stand and its final harvest at a specified stage of maturity (Ford-Robertson 1971). The rotation used for many species is the age of culmination of mean usable volume growth [net mean annual increment (MAI)]. At that age, usable volume divided by age reaches its highest level. That...

  9. Silhouette-based approach of 3D image reconstruction for automated image acquisition using robotic arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, N.; Saad, W. H. M.; Manap, N. A.; Saad, N. M.; Syafeeza, A. R.

    2017-06-01

    This study presents the approach of 3D image reconstruction using an autonomous robotic arm for the image acquisition process. A low cost of the automated imaging platform is created using a pair of G15 servo motor connected in series to an Arduino UNO as a main microcontroller. Two sets of sequential images were obtained using different projection angle of the camera. The silhouette-based approach is used in this study for 3D reconstruction from the sequential images captured from several different angles of the object. Other than that, an analysis based on the effect of different number of sequential images on the accuracy of 3D model reconstruction was also carried out with a fixed projection angle of the camera. The effecting elements in the 3D reconstruction are discussed and the overall result of the analysis is concluded according to the prototype of imaging platform.

  10. A novel online didactic curriculum helps improve knowledge acquisition among non-emergency medicine rotating residents.

    PubMed

    Branzetti, Jeremy B; Aldeen, Amer Z; Foster, Andrew W; Courtney, D Mark

    2011-01-01

    Rotating residents represent a significant proportion of housestaff in academic emergency departments (EDs), yet they rarely receive targeted didactic education during their emergency medicine (EM) rotations. The goals of this study were: 1) to determine the effectiveness of an online didactic curriculum in improving EM knowledge among rotating residents and 2) to assess rotating resident satisfaction with this curriculum. The authors created an online lecture series of six EM subject areas targeted to rotating residents called the Northwestern University Rotating Resident Curriculum (NURRC). All rotating residents at the study site were eligible, written consent was obtained, and the study was approved by the institutional review board. Consenting participants were pretested with a 42-question multiple-choice examination and then randomized to two groups: one with access to the NURRC during the first 2 weeks of the rotation (experimental) and one without (control). Halfway through the rotation, all participants were post-tested with a different multiple-choice examination, and the controls were then granted NURRC access. The primary outcome was the difference between pretest and posttest scores (score delta). The t-test was used to compare mean scores, and a linear regression model was used to determine the association of NURRC access on score delta after adjustment for pretest type and resident type. A postintervention survey was administered at the end of the rotation to assess satisfaction with the NURRC and collect suggestions for improvement. Fifty-four rotating residents were enrolled: 29 in the experimental group and 25 in the control group. There was no significant difference in pretest scores between the two groups. Mean score delta was 17.3% in the experimental group and 1.6% in the control group, an absolute difference of 15.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]=10% to 22%). After adjustment for resident type and pretest type, the only variable positively

  11. Metal artefacts severely hamper magnetic resonance imaging of the rotator cuff tendons after rotator cuff repair with titanium suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Femke F; Huis In't Veld, Rianne; den Otter, Lydia A; van Raak, Sjoerd M; Ten Haken, Bennie; Vochteloo, Anne J H

    2018-04-01

    The rate of retear after rotator cuff surgery is 17%. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are used for confirmative diagnosis of retear. However, because of the presence of titanium suture anchors, metal artefacts on the MRI are common. The present study evaluated the diagnostic value of MRI after rotator cuff tendon surgery with respect to assessing the integrity as well as the degeneration and atrophy of the rotator cuff tendons when titanium anchors are in place. Twenty patients who underwent revision surgery of the rotator cuff as a result of a clinically suspected retear between 2013 and 2015 were included. The MRI scans of these patients were retrospectively analyzed by four specialized shoulder surgeons and compared with intra-operative findings (gold standard). Sensitivity and interobserver agreement among the surgeons in assessing retears as well as the Goutallier and Warner classification were examined. In 36% (range 15% to 50%) of the pre-operative MRI scans, the observers could not review the rotator cuff tendons. When the rotator cuff tendons were assessable, a diagnostic accuracy with a mean sensitivity of 0.84 (0.70 to 1.0) across the surgeons was found, with poor interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.12). Metal artefacts prevented accurate diagnosis from MRI scans of rotator cuff retear in 36% of the patients studied.

  12. An Ibm PC/AT-Based Image Acquisition And Processing System For Quantitative Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongmin; Alexander, Thomas

    1986-06-01

    In recent years, a large number of applications have been developed for image processing systems in the area of biological imaging. We have already finished the development of a dedicated microcomputer-based image processing and analysis system for quantitative microscopy. The system's primary function has been to facilitate and ultimately automate quantitative image analysis tasks such as the measurement of cellular DNA contents. We have recognized from this development experience, and interaction with system users, biologists and technicians, that the increasingly widespread use of image processing systems, and the development and application of new techniques for utilizing the capabilities of such systems, would generate a need for some kind of inexpensive general purpose image acquisition and processing system specially tailored for the needs of the medical community. We are currently engaged in the development and testing of hardware and software for a fairly high-performance image processing computer system based on a popular personal computer. In this paper, we describe the design and development of this system. Biological image processing computer systems have now reached a level of hardware and software refinement where they could become convenient image analysis tools for biologists. The development of a general purpose image processing system for quantitative image analysis that is inexpensive, flexible, and easy-to-use represents a significant step towards making the microscopic digital image processing techniques more widely applicable not only in a research environment as a biologist's workstation, but also in clinical environments as a diagnostic tool.

  13. A Method to Recognize Anatomical Site and Image Acquisition View in X-ray Images.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiao; Mazur, Thomas; Li, H Harold; Yang, Deshan

    2017-12-01

    A method was developed to recognize anatomical site and image acquisition view automatically in 2D X-ray images that are used in image-guided radiation therapy. The purpose is to enable site and view dependent automation and optimization in the image processing tasks including 2D-2D image registration, 2D image contrast enhancement, and independent treatment site confirmation. The X-ray images for 180 patients of six disease sites (the brain, head-neck, breast, lung, abdomen, and pelvis) were included in this study with 30 patients each site and two images of orthogonal views each patient. A hierarchical multiclass recognition model was developed to recognize general site first and then specific site. Each node of the hierarchical model recognized the images using a feature extraction step based on principal component analysis followed by a binary classification step based on support vector machine. Given two images in known orthogonal views, the site recognition model achieved a 99% average F1 score across the six sites. If the views were unknown in the images, the average F1 score was 97%. If only one image was taken either with or without view information, the average F1 score was 94%. The accuracy of the site-specific view recognition models was 100%.

  14. NOTE: A method for controlling image acquisition in electronic portal imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendinning, A. G.; Hunt, S. G.; Bonnett, D. E.

    2001-02-01

    Certain types of camera-based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) which initiate image acquisition based on sensing a change in video level have been observed to trigger unreliably at the beginning of dynamic multileaf collimation sequences. A simple, novel means of controlling image acquisition with an Elekta linear accelerator (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) is proposed which is based on illumination of a photodetector (ORP-12, Silonex Inc., Plattsburgh, NY, USA) by the electron gun of the accelerator. By incorporating a simple trigger circuit it is possible to derive a beam on/off status signal which changes at least 100 ms before any dose is measured by the accelerator. The status signal does not return to the beam-off state until all dose has been delivered and is suitable for accelerator pulse repetition frequencies of 50-400 Hz. The status signal is thus a reliable means of indicating the initiation and termination of radiation exposure, and thus controlling image acquisition of such EPIDs for this application.

  15. Biometric iris image acquisition system with wavefront coding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Sheng-Hsun; Yang, Hsi-Wen; Huang, Shao-Hung; Li, Yung-Hui; Tien, Chung-Hao

    2013-09-01

    Biometric signatures for identity recognition have been practiced for centuries. Basically, the personal attributes used for a biometric identification system can be classified into two areas: one is based on physiological attributes, such as DNA, facial features, retinal vasculature, fingerprint, hand geometry, iris texture and so on; the other scenario is dependent on the individual behavioral attributes, such as signature, keystroke, voice and gait style. Among these features, iris recognition is one of the most attractive approaches due to its nature of randomness, texture stability over a life time, high entropy density and non-invasive acquisition. While the performance of iris recognition on high quality image is well investigated, not too many studies addressed that how iris recognition performs subject to non-ideal image data, especially when the data is acquired in challenging conditions, such as long working distance, dynamical movement of subjects, uncontrolled illumination conditions and so on. There are three main contributions in this paper. Firstly, the optical system parameters, such as magnification and field of view, was optimally designed through the first-order optics. Secondly, the irradiance constraints was derived by optical conservation theorem. Through the relationship between the subject and the detector, we could estimate the limitation of working distance when the camera lens and CCD sensor were known. The working distance is set to 3m in our system with pupil diameter 86mm and CCD irradiance 0.3mW/cm2. Finally, We employed a hybrid scheme combining eye tracking with pan and tilt system, wavefront coding technology, filter optimization and post signal recognition to implement a robust iris recognition system in dynamic operation. The blurred image was restored to ensure recognition accuracy over 3m working distance with 400mm focal length and aperture F/6.3 optics. The simulation result as well as experiment validates the proposed code

  16. Improvement of sidestream dark field imaging with an image acquisition stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Balestra, Gianmarco M; Bezemer, Rick; Boerma, E Christiaan; Yong, Ze-Yie; Sjauw, Krishan D; Engstrom, Annemarie E; Koopmans, Matty; Ince, Can

    2010-07-13

    In the present study we developed, evaluated in volunteers, and clinically validated an image acquisition stabilizer (IAS) for Sidestream Dark Field (SDF) imaging. The IAS is a stainless steel sterilizable ring which fits around the SDF probe tip. The IAS creates adhesion to the imaged tissue by application of negative pressure. The effects of the IAS on the sublingual microcirculatory flow velocities, the force required to induce pressure artifacts (PA), the time to acquire a stable image, and the duration of stable imaging were assessed in healthy volunteers. To demonstrate the clinical applicability of the SDF setup in combination with the IAS, simultaneous bilateral sublingual imaging of the microcirculation were performed during a lung recruitment maneuver (LRM) in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients. One SDF device was operated handheld; the second was fitted with the IAS and held in position by a mechanic arm. Lateral drift, number of losses of image stability and duration of stable imaging of the two methods were compared. Five healthy volunteers were studied. The IAS did not affect microcirculatory flow velocities. A significantly greater force had to applied onto the tissue to induced PA with compared to without IAS (0.25 +/- 0.15 N without vs. 0.62 +/- 0.05 N with the IAS, p < 0.001). The IAS ensured an increased duration of a stable image sequence (8 +/- 2 s without vs. 42 +/- 8 s with the IAS, p < 0.001). The time required to obtain a stable image sequence was similar with and without the IAS. In eight mechanically ventilated patients undergoing a LRM the use of the IAS resulted in a significantly reduced image drifting and enabled the acquisition of significantly longer stable image sequences (24 +/- 5 s without vs. 67 +/- 14 s with the IAS, p = 0.006). The present study has validated the use of an IAS for improvement of SDF imaging by demonstrating that the IAS did not affect microcirculatory perfusion in the microscopic field of view

  17. Acquisition of STEM Images by Adaptive Compressive Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Weiyi; Feng, Qianli; Srinivasan, Ramprakash

    Compressive Sensing (CS) allows a signal to be sparsely measured first and accurately recovered later in software [1]. In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), it is possible to compress an image spatially by reducing the number of measured pixels, which decreases electron dose and increases sensing speed [2,3,4]. The two requirements for CS to work are: (1) sparsity of basis coefficients and (2) incoherence of the sensing system and the representation system. However, when pixels are missing from the image, it is difficult to have an incoherent sensing matrix. Nevertheless, dictionary learning techniques such as Beta-Process Factor Analysis (BPFA) [5]more » are able to simultaneously discover a basis and the sparse coefficients in the case of missing pixels. On top of CS, we would like to apply active learning [6,7] to further reduce the proportion of pixels being measured, while maintaining image reconstruction quality. Suppose we initially sample 10% of random pixels. We wish to select the next 1% of pixels that are most useful in recovering the image. Now, we have 11% of pixels, and we want to decide the next 1% of “most informative” pixels. Active learning methods are online and sequential in nature. Our goal is to adaptively discover the best sensing mask during acquisition using feedback about the structures in the image. In the end, we hope to recover a high quality reconstruction with a dose reduction relative to the non-adaptive (random) sensing scheme. In doing this, we try three metrics applied to the partial reconstructions for selecting the new set of pixels: (1) variance, (2) Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence using a Radial Basis Function (RBF) kernel, and (3) entropy. Figs. 1 and 2 display the comparison of Peak Signal-to-Noise (PSNR) using these three different active learning methods at different percentages of sampled pixels. At 20% level, all the three active learning methods underperform the original CS without active learning

  18. Acquisition of Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry System for Investigation of Unsteady Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The objective of the project titled “Acquisition of Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (S-PIV) System for...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 30-04-2016 1-Feb-2015 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Acquisition of Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry System For...ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Particle Image Velocimetry REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  19. Clinical application of Half Fourier Acquisition Single Shot Turbo Spin Echo (HASTE) imaging accelerated by simultaneous multi-slice acquisition.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Jenni; P Marques, José; Ter Telgte, Annemieke; van Dorst, Anouk; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Meijer, Frederick J A; Norris, David G

    2018-01-01

    As a single-shot sequence with a long train of refocusing pulses, Half-Fourier Acquisition Single-Shot Turbo-Spin-Echo (HASTE) suffers from high power deposition limiting use at high resolutions and high field strengths, particularly if combined with acceleration techniques such as simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) imaging. Using a combination of multiband (MB)-excitation and PINS-refocusing pulses will effectively accelerate the acquisition time while staying within the SAR limitations. In particular, uncooperative and young patients will profit from the speed of the MB-PINS HASTE sequence, as clinical diagnosis can be possible without sedation. Materials and MethodsMB-excitation and PINS-refocusing pulses were incorporated into a HASTE-sequence with blipped CAIPIRINHA and TRAPS including an internal FLASH reference scan for online reconstruction. Whole brain MB-PINS HASTE data were acquired on a Siemens 3T-Prisma system from 10 individuals and compared to a clinical HASTE protocol. ResultsThe proposed MB-PINS HASTE protocol accelerates the acquisition by about a factor 2 compared to the clinical HASTE. The diagnostic image quality proved to be comparable for both sequences for the evaluation of the overall aspect of the brain, the detection of white matter changes and areas of tissue loss, and for the evaluation of the CSF spaces although artifacts were more frequently encountered with MB-PINS HASTE. ConclusionsMB-PINS HASTE enables acquisition of slice accelerated highly T2-weighted images and provides good diagnostic image quality while reducing acquisition time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. An imaging method of wavefront coding system based on phase plate rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Rigui; Chen, Xi; Dong, Liquan; Liu, Ming; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Xiaohua

    2018-01-01

    Wave-front coding has a great prospect in extending the depth of the optical imaging system and reducing optical aberrations, but the image quality and noise performance are inevitably reduced. According to the theoretical analysis of the wave-front coding system and the phase function expression of the cubic phase plate, this paper analyzed and utilized the feature that the phase function expression would be invariant in the new coordinate system when the phase plate rotates at different angles around the z-axis, and we proposed a method based on the rotation of the phase plate and image fusion. First, let the phase plate rotated at a certain angle around the z-axis, the shape and distribution of the PSF obtained on the image surface remain unchanged, the rotation angle and direction are consistent with the rotation angle of the phase plate. Then, the middle blurred image is filtered by the point spread function of the rotation adjustment. Finally, the reconstruction images were fused by the method of the Laplacian pyramid image fusion and the Fourier transform spectrum fusion method, and the results were evaluated subjectively and objectively. In this paper, we used Matlab to simulate the images. By using the Laplacian pyramid image fusion method, the signal-to-noise ratio of the image is increased by 19% 27%, the clarity is increased by 11% 15% , and the average gradient is increased by 4% 9% . By using the Fourier transform spectrum fusion method, the signal-to-noise ratio of the image is increased by 14% 23%, the clarity is increased by 6% 11% , and the average gradient is improved by 2% 6%. The experimental results show that the image processing by the above method can improve the quality of the restored image, improving the image clarity, and can effectively preserve the image information.

  1. An acquisition system for CMOS imagers with a genuine 10 Gbit/s bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérin, C.; Mahroug, J.; Tromeur, W.; Houles, J.; Calabria, P.; Barbier, R.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a high data throughput acquisition system for pixel detector readout such as CMOS imagers. This CMOS acquisition board offers a genuine 10 Gbit/s bandwidth to the workstation and can provide an on-line and continuous high frame rate imaging capability. On-line processing can be implemented either on the Data Acquisition Board or on the multi-cores workstation depending on the complexity of the algorithms. The different parts composing the acquisition board have been designed to be used first with a single-photon detector called LUSIPHER (800×800 pixels), developed in our laboratory for scientific applications ranging from nano-photonics to adaptive optics. The architecture of the acquisition board is presented and the performances achieved by the produced boards are described. The future developments (hardware and software) concerning the on-line implementation of algorithms dedicated to single-photon imaging are tackled.

  2. Methods of measurement signal acquisition from the rotational flow meter for frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsulski, Dariusz; Hanus, Robert; Zych, Marcin; Petryka, Leszek

    One of the simplest and commonly used instruments for measuring the flow of homogeneous substances is the rotational flow meter. The main part of such a device is a rotor (vane or screw) rotating at a speed which is the function of the fluid or gas flow rate. A pulse signal with a frequency proportional to the speed of the rotor is obtained at the sensor output. For measurements in dynamic conditions, a variable interval between pulses prohibits the analysis of the measuring signal. Therefore, the authors of the article developed a method involving the determination of measured values on the basis of the last inter-pulse interval preceding the moment designated by the timing generator. For larger changes of the measured value at a predetermined time, the value can be determined by means of extrapolation of the two adjacent interpulse ranges, assuming a linear change in the flow. The proposed methods allow analysis which requires constant spacing between measurements, allowing for an analysis of the dynamics of changes in the test flow, eg. using a Fourier transform. To present the advantages of these methods simulations of flow measurement were carried out with a DRH-1140 rotor flow meter from the company Kobold.

  3. SU-E-J-13: A Study to Establish the Effect of CBCT Image Rotational Displacement on IGRT and ART Lung SBRT Treatments.

    PubMed

    Yeager, C; Lin, H; Ayan, A; McDonough, J; Both, S

    2012-06-01

    To determine whether the accuracy of CBCT based IGRT and ART lung SBRT treatments may require extra quality assurance (QA) steps. During CBCT Rando phantom acquisition we detected an unexpected ∼2° image rotation when comparing the CW and CCW acquired scans. Misregistered angular coordinates may Result in a rotated reconstructed image and the target localization may lead to an under- or over-dosage of the target volume (TV) and organs at risk (OARs). The effect of image rotation on CBCT-guided lung SBRT was retrospectively examined in a group of six patients treated at our institution. Patient CT sets were rotated by 1,2, and 3°. Treatment plans were recalculated using these rotated images to examine changes of dose-volume histogram indicators for IGRT and ART guided treatments. C++ simulations were run to evaluate the effect of CBCT image rotation. We determined through mathematical analysis that the dose coverage of the TV is dependent on its shape, location and orientation relative to isocenter. Dosimetric evaluation of lung SBRT patients showed that even for 1< Ñ 2 <3°, changes in D95 to the PTV were from 2.3 ± 2.1 to 11.5 ± 3.9% for IGRT and from 8.5 ± 8.4 to 16.6 ± 8.0% for ART. Significant changes were also detected at critical structure level. When IGRT and ART are employed for lung SBRT treatments, significant dosimetric changes may Result from the rotation of CBCT image data sets. The extent of alterations in dose indicators depends on both the shape of the TV and its relative location to isocenter. Based on our results, angular alignment of CBCT to <1° is essential in maintaining accurate dose delivery of IGRT and ART based lung SBRT treatments. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Complications of rotator cuff surgery—the role of post-operative imaging in patient care

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, R S; Thakkar, S C; Srikumaran, U; Fayad, L M

    2014-01-01

    When pain or disability occurs after rotator cuff surgery, post-operative imaging is frequently performed. Post-operative complications and expected post-operative imaging findings in the shoulder are presented, with a focus on MRI, MR arthrography (MRA) and CT arthrography. MR and CT techniques are available to reduce image degradation secondary to surgical distortions of native anatomy and implant-related artefacts and to define complications after rotator cuff surgery. A useful approach to image the shoulder after surgery is the standard radiography, followed by MRI/MRA for patients with low “metal presence” and CT for patients who have a higher metal presence. However, for the assessment of patients who have undergone surgery for rotator cuff injuries, imaging findings should always be correlated with the clinical presentation because post-operative imaging abnormalities do not necessarily correlate with symptoms. PMID:24734935

  5. Femur rotation and patellofemoral joint kinematics: a weight-bearing magnetic resonance imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Richard B; Draper, Christie E; Fredericson, Michael; Powers, Christopher M

    2010-05-01

    Controlled laboratory study using a cross-sectional design. To compare patellofemoral joint kinematics, femoral rotation, and patella rotation between females with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and pain-free controls using weight-bearing kinematic magnetic resonance imaging. Recently, it has been recognized that patellofemoral malalignment may be the result of femoral motion as opposed to patella motion. Fifteen females with PFP and 15 pain-free females between the ages of 18 and 45 years participated in this study. Kinematic imaging of the patellofemoral joint was performed using a vertically open magnetic resonance imaging system. Axial-oblique images were obtained using a fast gradient-echo pulse sequence. Images were acquired at a rate of 1 image per second while subjects performed a single-limb squat. Measures of femur and patella rotation (relative to the image field of view), lateral patella tilt, and lateral patella displacement were made from images obtained at 45 degrees , 30 degrees , 15 degrees , and 0 degrees of knee flexion. Group differences were assessed using a mixed-model analysis of variance with repeated measures. When compared to the control group, females with PFP demonstrated significantly greater lateral patella displacement at all angles evaluated and significantly greater lateral patella tilt at 30 degrees , 15 degrees , and 0 degrees of knee flexion. Similarly, greater medial femoral rotation was observed in the PFP group at 45 degrees , 15 degrees , and 0 degrees of knee flexion when compared to the control group. No group differences in patella rotation were found. Altered patellofemoral joint kinematics in females with PFP appears to be related to excessive medial femoral rotation, as opposed to lateral patella rotation. Our results suggest that the control of femur rotation may be important in restoring normal patellofemoral joint kinematics. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2010;40(5):277-285, Epub 12 March 2010. doi:10.2519/jospt.2010.3215.

  6. What can be seen after rotator cuff repair: a brief review of diagnostic imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Barile, A; Bruno, F; Mariani, S; Arrigoni, F; Reginelli, A; De Filippo, M; Zappia, M; Splendiani, A; Di Cesare, E; Masciocchi, C

    2017-03-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays an important role in the postoperative evaluation of the rotator cuff, as pain and disability may occur or persist after treatment. Postoperative imaging is therefore of paramount importance for clinicians before planning additional treatments. Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder includes radiography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR arthrography, computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, and ultrasound. Correct interpretation of imaging findings of the postoperative shoulder necessitates that the radiologist be familiar with the various treatment strategies, their possible complications and sources of failure, knowledge of normal and abnormal postoperative findings, and awareness of the advantages and weaknesses of the different imaging techniques. Imaging findings, however, should always be correlated with the clinical presentation because postoperative imaging abnormalities do not necessarily correlate with symptoms. This manuscript is a review of some of the most common treatment strategies for rotator cuff pathology, with a focus on expected postoperative imaging findings and postoperative complications.

  7. Multiplex Mass Spectrometric Imaging with Polarity Switching for Concurrent Acquisition of Positive and Negative Ion Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, Andrew R.; Lee, Young Jin

    2013-06-01

    We have recently developed a multiplex mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) method which incorporates high mass resolution imaging and MS/MS and MS3 imaging of several compounds in a single data acquisition utilizing a hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (Perdian and Lee, Anal. Chem. 82, 9393-9400, 2010). Here we extend this capability to obtain positive and negative ion MS and MS/MS spectra in a single MS imaging experiment through polarity switching within spiral steps of each raster step. This methodology was demonstrated for the analysis of various lipid class compounds in a section of mouse brain. This allows for simultaneous imaging of compounds that are readily ionized in positive mode (e.g., phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins) and those that are readily ionized in negative mode (e.g., sulfatides, phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylserines). MS/MS imaging was also performed for a few compounds in both positive and negative ion mode within the same experimental set-up. Insufficient stabilization time for the Orbitrap high voltage leads to slight deviations in observed masses, but these deviations are systematic and were easily corrected with a two-point calibration to background ions.

  8. Research on remote sensing image pixel attribute data acquisition method in AutoCAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Sun, Guangtong; Liu, Jun; Liu, Hui

    2013-07-01

    The remote sensing image has been widely used in AutoCAD, but AutoCAD lack of the function of remote sensing image processing. In the paper, ObjectARX was used for the secondary development tool, combined with the Image Engine SDK to realize remote sensing image pixel attribute data acquisition in AutoCAD, which provides critical technical support for AutoCAD environment remote sensing image processing algorithms.

  9. Image registration under translation and rotation in two-dimensional planes using Fourier slice theorem.

    PubMed

    Pohit, M; Sharma, J

    2015-05-10

    Image recognition in the presence of both rotation and translation is a longstanding problem in correlation pattern recognition. Use of log polar transform gives a solution to this problem, but at a cost of losing the vital phase information from the image. The main objective of this paper is to develop an algorithm based on Fourier slice theorem for measuring the simultaneous rotation and translation of an object in a 2D plane. The algorithm is applicable for any arbitrary object shift for full 180° rotation.

  10. Architecture and data processing alternatives for the tse computer. Volume 4: Image rotation using tse operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, M. H.; Bodenheimer, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The tse computer's capability of achieving image congruence between temporal and multiple images with misregistration due to rotational differences is reported. The coordinate transformations are obtained and a general algorithms is devised to perform image rotation using tse operations very efficiently. The details of this algorithm as well as its theoretical implications are presented. Step by step procedures of image registration are described in detail. Numerous examples are also employed to demonstrate the correctness and the effectiveness of the algorithms and conclusions and recommendations are made.

  11. On the direct acquisition of beam’s-eye-view images in MRI for integration with external beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachowicz, K.; Murray, B.; Fallone, B. G.

    2018-06-01

    The recent interest in the integration of external beam radiotherapy with a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging unit offers the potential for real-time adaptive tumour tracking during radiation treatment. The tracking of large tumours which follow a rapid trajectory may best be served by the generation of a projection image from the perspective of the beam source, or ‘beam’s eye view’ (BEV). This type of image projection represents the path of the radiation beam, thus enabling rapid compensations for target translations, rotations and deformations, as well time-dependent critical structure avoidance. MR units have been traditionally incapable of this type of imaging except through lengthy 3D acquisitions and ray tracing procedures. This work investigates some changes to the traditional MR scanner architecture that would permit the direct acquisition of a BEV image suitable for integration with external beam radiotherapy. Based on the theory presented in this work, a phantom was imaged with nonlinear encoding-gradient field patterns to demonstrate the technique. The phantom was constructed with agarose gel tubes spaced two cm apart at their base and oriented to converge towards an imaginary beam source 100 cm away. A corresponding virtual phantom was also created and subjected to the same encoding technique as in the physical demonstration, allowing the method to be tested without hardware limitations. The experimentally acquired and simulated images indicate the feasibility of the technique, showing a substantial amount of blur reduction in a diverging phantom compared to the conventional imaging geometry, particularly with the nonlinear gradients ideally implemented. The theory is developed to demonstrate that the method can be adapted in a number of different configurations to accommodate all proposed integration schemes for MR units and radiotherapy sources. Depending on the configuration, the implementation of this technique will require between two and

  12. Garnet film rotator applied in polarizing microscope for domain image modulation (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, K.; Numata, T.; Inokuchi, S.

    1991-04-01

    A garnet film polarization rotator placed before the analyzer in a polarizing microscope was investigated to obtain the difference image of a positive and a negative one of magnetic domain in real time along with an image processor. In the difference image, a nonmagnetic image can be reduced and hence the weak magnetic contrast enhanced. Theoretical calculation of S/N and contrast C of the domain image as a function of the rotation shows they take maxima at the rotation angle of 2.6° and 0.1°, respectively, with the extinction ratio of e=4×10-6 of a polarizing microscope. Thus, since the thickness of the garnet film required is 1 μm or so, the absorption by the garnet rotator does not bring a serious problem even in a visible region for the domain observation. The optimum rotation of the rotator for a high quality observation was obtained by a quantitative study of images obtained experimentally as well as by a visual evaluation. A magnetically unsaturated garnet film with perpendicular magnetization (i.e., multidomain) was employed as a rotator, in which the polarization rotation angle θm of the undeflected beam with respect to the light diffraction could be continuously varied by an applied magnetic field. The dependences of S/N and C on θm were measured, resulting in a well agreement between the measured and the calculated. The visually best image was obtained at θm=0.5° which made the product of S/N and C maximum. The domain image of the Kerr rotation angle of θk=0.22° was observed in S/N=47 dB and C=0.4 when Ar+ laser (λ=515 nm) of tenths of a watt was employed as a light source. Since the domain image with 47 dB S/N does not need an image summation for a noise reduction, a garnet film rotator makes it possible to invert the contrast of a domain image in a real time for an improved domain observation.

  13. Experimental single-chip color HDTV image acquisition system with 8M-pixel CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamoto, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Takayuki; Funatsu, Ryohei; Mitani, Kohji; Nojiri, Yuji

    2006-02-01

    We have developed an experimental single-chip color HDTV image acquisition system using 8M-pixel CMOS image sensor. The sensor has 3840 × 2160 effective pixels and is progressively scanned at 60 frames per second. We describe the color filter array and interpolation method to improve image quality with a high-pixel-count single-chip sensor. We also describe an experimental image acquisition system we used to measured spatial frequency characteristics in the horizontal direction. The results indicate good prospects for achieving a high quality single chip HDTV camera that reduces pseudo signals and maintains high spatial frequency characteristics within the frequency band for HDTV.

  14. Parameter Estimation and Image Reconstruction of Rotating Targets with Vibrating Interference in the Terahertz Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qi; Deng, Bin; Wang, Hongqiang; Qin, Yuliang

    2017-07-01

    Rotation is one of the typical micro-motions of radar targets. In many cases, rotation of the targets is always accompanied with vibrating interference, and it will significantly affect the parameter estimation and imaging, especially in the terahertz band. In this paper, we propose a parameter estimation method and an image reconstruction method based on the inverse Radon transform, the time-frequency analysis, and its inverse. The method can separate and estimate the rotating Doppler and the vibrating Doppler simultaneously and can obtain high-quality reconstructed images after vibration compensation. In addition, a 322-GHz radar system and a 25-GHz commercial radar are introduced and experiments on rotating corner reflectors are carried out in this paper. The results of the simulation and experiments verify the validity of the methods, which lay a foundation for the practical processing of the terahertz radar.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the rotator cuff muscles after baseball pitching.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, O; Niitsu, M; Takahashi, H; Itai, Y

    2003-12-01

    The purposes of present study were to investigate quantitatively using functional MR imaging the effect of a series of throwing activities on rotator cuff muscles and to compare the effect of pitching with that of all-out shoulder external rotator exercise as the targeted external rotator muscle group (the infraspinatus and the teres minor). MRI measurements after 135 baseball pitches or all-out shoulder external rotator exercise (concentric mode) in each subject's nondominant shoulder. 6 amateur baseball pitchers. serial T2-weighted images of rotator cuff muscles were obtained before pitching (or shoulder exercise) and immediately, 30, 60 min, 24, 48, 96 hrs after pitching (or shoulder exercise). T2 relaxation times (T2) at each measurement time were calculated for the rotator cuff muscles. Both the supraspinatus and the external rotator muscle group showed significant T2 elevations until 96 hrs after pitching. The subscapularis also showed significantly increased T2 until postpitching 48 hrs. On the other hand, a significant T2 elevation continued until 60 min after shoulder exercise, but thereafter returned towards the value at rest over the next 24 hrs. Long lasting T2 elevations in rotator cuff muscles would be associated with an increase in each intramuscular water content, and may be attributed to the muscle damage that resulted from eccentric contraction during pitching. This information should serve as a useful complement to shoulder injury prevention for baseball pitchers.

  16. Rotationally Invariant Image Representation for Viewing Direction Classification in Cryo-EM

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhizhen; Singer, Amit

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new rotationally invariant viewing angle classification method for identifying, among a large number of cryo-EM projection images, similar views without prior knowledge of the molecule. Our rotationally invariant features are based on the bispectrum. Each image is denoised and compressed using steerable principal component analysis (PCA) such that rotating an image is equivalent to phase shifting the expansion coefficients. Thus we are able to extend the theory of bispectrum of 1D periodic signals to 2D images. The randomized PCA algorithm is then used to efficiently reduce the dimensionality of the bispectrum coefficients, enabling fast computation of the similarity between any pair of images. The nearest neighbors provide an initial classification of similar viewing angles. In this way, rotational alignment is only performed for images with their nearest neighbors. The initial nearest neighbor classification and alignment are further improved by a new classification method called vector diffusion maps. Our pipeline for viewing angle classification and alignment is experimentally shown to be faster and more accurate than reference-free alignment with rotationally invariant K-means clustering, MSA/MRA 2D classification, and their modern approximations. PMID:24631969

  17. Cardiac imaging with multi-sector data acquisition in volumetric CT: variation of effective temporal resolution and its potential clinical consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Hsieh, Jiang; Taha, Basel H.; Vass, Melissa L.; Seamans, John L.; Okerlund, Darin R.

    2009-02-01

    With increasing longitudinal detector dimension available in diagnostic volumetric CT, step-and-shoot scan is becoming popular for cardiac imaging. In comparison to helical scan, step-and-shoot scan decouples patient table movement from cardiac gating/triggering, which facilitates the cardiac imaging via multi-sector data acquisition, as well as the administration of inter-cycle heart beat variation (arrhythmia) and radiation dose efficiency. Ideally, a multi-sector data acquisition can improve temporal resolution at a factor the same as the number of sectors (best scenario). In reality, however, the effective temporal resolution is jointly determined by gantry rotation speed and patient heart beat rate, which may significantly lower than the ideal or no improvement (worst scenario). Hence, it is clinically relevant to investigate the behavior of effective temporal resolution in cardiac imaging with multi-sector data acquisition. In this study, a 5-second cine scan of a porcine heart, which cascades 6 porcine cardiac cycles, is acquired. In addition to theoretical analysis and motion phantom study, the clinical consequences due to the effective temporal resolution variation are evaluated qualitative or quantitatively. By employing a 2-sector image reconstruction strategy, a total of 15 (the permutation of P(6, 2)) cases between the best and worst scenarios are studied, providing informative guidance for the design and optimization of CT cardiac imaging in volumetric CT with multi-sector data acquisition.

  18. Rotation-invariant image and video description with local binary pattern features.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guoying; Ahonen, Timo; Matas, Jiří; Pietikäinen, Matti

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach to compute rotation-invariant features from histograms of local noninvariant patterns. We apply this approach to both static and dynamic local binary pattern (LBP) descriptors. For static-texture description, we present LBP histogram Fourier (LBP-HF) features, and for dynamic-texture recognition, we present two rotation-invariant descriptors computed from the LBPs from three orthogonal planes (LBP-TOP) features in the spatiotemporal domain. LBP-HF is a novel rotation-invariant image descriptor computed from discrete Fourier transforms of LBP histograms. The approach can be also generalized to embed any uniform features into this framework, and combining the supplementary information, e.g., sign and magnitude components of the LBP, together can improve the description ability. Moreover, two variants of rotation-invariant descriptors are proposed to the LBP-TOP, which is an effective descriptor for dynamic-texture recognition, as shown by its recent success in different application problems, but it is not rotation invariant. In the experiments, it is shown that the LBP-HF and its extensions outperform noninvariant and earlier versions of the rotation-invariant LBP in the rotation-invariant texture classification. In experiments on two dynamic-texture databases with rotations or view variations, the proposed video features can effectively deal with rotation variations of dynamic textures (DTs). They also are robust with respect to changes in viewpoint, outperforming recent methods proposed for view-invariant recognition of DTs.

  19. An evaluation on CT image acquisition method for medical VR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seong-wook; Ko, Junho; Yoo, Yon-sik; Kim, Yoonsang

    2017-02-01

    Recent medical virtual reality (VR) applications to minimize re-operations are being studied for improvements in surgical efficiency and reduction of operation error. The CT image acquisition method considering three-dimensional (3D) modeling for medical VR applications is important, because the realistic model is required for the actual human organ. However, the research for medical VR applications has focused on 3D modeling techniques and utilized 3D models. In addition, research on a CT image acquisition method considering 3D modeling has never been reported. The conventional CT image acquisition method involves scanning a limited area of the lesion for the diagnosis of doctors once or twice. However, the medical VR application is required to acquire the CT image considering patients' various postures and a wider area than the lesion. A wider area than the lesion is required because of the necessary process of comparing bilateral sides for dyskinesia diagnosis of the shoulder, pelvis, and leg. Moreover, patients' various postures are required due to the different effects on the musculoskeletal system. Therefore, in this paper, we perform a comparative experiment on the acquired CT images considering image area (unilateral/bilateral) and patients' postures (neutral/abducted). CT images are acquired from 10 patients for the experiments, and the acquired CT images are evaluated based on the length per pixel and the morphological deviation. Finally, by comparing the experiment results, we evaluate the CT image acquisition method for medical VR applications.

  20. Dynamic autofocus for continuous-scanning time-delay-and-integration image acquisition in automated microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Zanoguera, Miguel E; Laris, Casey A; Nguyen, Lam K; Oliva, Mike; Price, Jeffrey H

    2007-01-01

    Efficient image cytometry of a conventional microscope slide means rapid acquisition and analysis of 20 gigapixels of image data (at 0.3-microm sampling). The voluminous data motivate increased acquisition speed to enable many biomedical applications. Continuous-motion time-delay-and-integrate (TDI) scanning has the potential to speed image acquisition while retaining sensitivity, but the challenge of implementing high-resolution autofocus operating simultaneously with acquisition has limited its adoption. We develop a dynamic autofocus system for this need using: 1. a "volume camera," consisting of nine fiber optic imaging conduits to charge-coupled device (CCD) sensors, that acquires images in parallel from different focal planes, 2. an array of mixed analog-digital processing circuits that measure the high spatial frequencies of the multiple image streams to create focus indices, and 3. a software system that reads and analyzes the focus data streams and calculates best focus for closed feedback loop control. Our system updates autofocus at 56 Hz (or once every 21 microm of stage travel) to collect sharply focused images sampled at 0.3x0.3 microm(2)/pixel at a stage speed of 2.3 mms. The system, tested by focusing in phase contrast and imaging long fluorescence strips, achieves high-performance closed-loop image-content-based autofocus in continuous scanning for the first time.

  1. High Resolution Digital Radar Imaging of Rotating Objects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    associated with it is called motion compensation. 1.2. Problem Description Consider a rigid body as shown in figure 1.1 rotating with its axis normal to the...vector of an arbitrary point B on the target referenced to the target reference point C as shown in Fig. 3.1.1. The entire rigid body is moving with...relationships. Since x is a vector on a rigid body , its tangential velocity (ixx-) is the only velocity component it has. Hence, Ad _T X. Also from

  2. Design of a Remote Infrared Images and Other Data Acquisition Station for outdoor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béland, M.-A.; Djupkep, F. B. D.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.; Ferrarini, G.; Bison, P.; Grinzato, E.

    2013-05-01

    The Infrared Images and Other Data Acquisition Station enables a user, who is located inside a laboratory, to acquire visible and infrared images and distances in an outdoor environment with the help of an Internet connection. This station can acquire data using an infrared camera, a visible camera, and a rangefinder. The system can be used through a web page or through Python functions.

  3. Comparison of a multimedia simulator to a human model for teaching FAST exam image interpretation and image acquisition.

    PubMed

    Damewood, Sara; Jeanmonod, Donald; Cadigan, Beth

    2011-04-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of a multimedia ultrasound (US) simulator to normal human models during the practical portion of a course designed to teach the skills of both image acquisition and image interpretation for the Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) exam. This was a prospective, blinded, controlled education study using medical students as an US-naïve population. After a standardized didactic lecture on the FAST exam, trainees were separated into two groups to practice image acquisition on either a multimedia simulator or a normal human model. Four outcome measures were then assessed: image interpretation of prerecorded FAST exams, adequacy of image acquisition on a standardized normal patient, perceived confidence of image adequacy, and time to image acquisition. Ninety-two students were enrolled and separated into two groups, a multimedia simulator group (n = 44), and a human model group (n = 48). Bonferroni adjustment factor determined the level of significance to be p = 0.0125. There was no difference between those trained on the multimedia simulator and those trained on a human model in image interpretation (median 80 of 100 points, interquartile range [IQR] 71-87, vs. median 78, IQR 62-86; p = 0.16), image acquisition (median 18 of 24 points, IQR 12-18 points, vs. median 16, IQR 14-20; p = 0.95), trainee's confidence in obtaining images on a 1-10 visual analog scale (median 5, IQR 4.1-6.5, vs. median 5, IQR 3.7-6.0; p = 0.36), or time to acquire images (median 3.8 minutes, IQR 2.7-5.4 minutes, vs. median = 4.5 minutes, IQR = 3.4-5.9 minutes; p = 0.044). There was no difference in teaching the skills of image acquisition and interpretation to novice FAST examiners using the multimedia simulator or normal human models. These data suggest that practical image acquisition skills learned during simulated training can be directly applied to human models. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  4. Infrared imagery acquisition process supporting simulation and real image training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, John

    2012-05-01

    The increasing use of infrared sensors requires development of advanced infrared training and simulation tools to meet current Warfighter needs. In order to prepare the force, a challenge exists for training and simulation images to be both realistic and consistent with each other to be effective and avoid negative training. The US Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate has corrected this deficiency by developing and implementing infrared image collection methods that meet the needs of both real image trainers and real-time simulations. The author presents innovative methods for collection of high-fidelity digital infrared images and the associated equipment and environmental standards. The collected images are the foundation for US Army, and USMC Recognition of Combat Vehicles (ROC-V) real image combat ID training and also support simulations including the Night Vision Image Generator and Synthetic Environment Core. The characteristics, consistency, and quality of these images have contributed to the success of these and other programs. To date, this method has been employed to generate signature sets for over 350 vehicles. The needs of future physics-based simulations will also be met by this data. NVESD's ROC-V image database will support the development of training and simulation capabilities as Warfighter needs evolve.

  5. Efficient image acquisition design for a cancer detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dung; Roehrig, Hans; Borders, Marisa H.; Fitzpatrick, Kimberly A.; Roveda, Janet

    2013-09-01

    Modern imaging modalities, such as Computed Tomography (CT), Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) or Magnetic Resonance Tomography (MRT) are able to acquire volumetric images with an isotropic resolution in micrometer (um) or millimeter (mm) range. When used in interactive telemedicine applications, these raw images need a huge storage unit, thereby necessitating the use of high bandwidth data communication link. To reduce the cost of transmission and enable archiving, especially for medical applications, image compression is performed. Recent advances in compression algorithms have resulted in a vast array of data compression techniques, but because of the characteristics of these images, there are challenges to overcome to transmit these images efficiently. In addition, the recent studies raise the low dose mammography risk on high risk patient. Our preliminary studies indicate that by bringing the compression before the analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) stage is more efficient than other compression techniques after the ADC. The linearity characteristic of the compressed sensing and ability to perform the digital signal processing (DSP) during data conversion open up a new area of research regarding the roles of sparsity in medical image registration, medical image analysis (for example, automatic image processing algorithm to efficiently extract the relevant information for the clinician), further Xray dose reduction for mammography, and contrast enhancement.

  6. Acquisition of multiple image stacks with a confocal laser scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuschratter, Werner; Steffen, Thomas; Braun, Katharina; Herzog, Andreas; Michaelis, Bernd; Scheich, Henning

    1998-06-01

    Image acquisition at high magnification is inevitably correlated with a limited view over the entire tissue section. To overcome this limitation we designed software for multiple image-stack acquisition (3D-MISA) in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The system consists of a 4 channel Leica CLSM equipped with a high resolution z- scanning stage mounted on a xy-monitorized stage. The 3D- MISA software is implemented into the microscope scanning software and uses the microscope settings for the movements of the xy-stage. It allows storage and recall of 70 xyz- positions and the automatic 3D-scanning of image arrays between selected xyz-coordinates. The number of images within one array is limited only by the amount of disk space or memory available. Although for most applications the accuracy of the xy-scanning stage is sufficient for a precise alignment of tiled views, the software provides the possibility of an adjustable overlap between two image stacks by shifting the moving steps of the xy-scanning stage. After scanning a tiled image gallery of the extended focus-images of each channel will be displayed on a graphic monitor. In addition, a tiled image gallery of individual focal planes can be created. In summary, the 3D-MISA allows 3D-image acquisition of coherent regions in combination with high resolution of single images.

  7. Effects of Resolution, Range, and Image Contrast on Target Acquisition Performance.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Justin G; Terhaar, Phil; Pavlovic, Nada J

    2018-05-01

    We sought to determine the joint influence of resolution, target range, and image contrast on the detection and identification of targets in simulated naturalistic scenes. Resolution requirements for target acquisition have been developed based on threshold values obtained using imaging systems, when target range was fixed, and image characteristics were determined by the system. Subsequent work has examined the influence of factors like target range and image contrast on target acquisition. We varied the resolution and contrast of static images in two experiments. Participants (soldiers) decided whether a human target was located in the scene (detection task) or whether a target was friendly or hostile (identification task). Target range was also varied (50-400 m). In Experiment 1, 30 participants saw color images with a single target exemplar. In Experiment 2, another 30 participants saw monochrome images containing different target exemplars. The effects of target range and image contrast were qualitatively different above and below 6 pixels per meter of target for both tasks in both experiments. Target detection and identification performance were a joint function of image resolution, range, and contrast for both color and monochrome images. The beneficial effects of increasing resolution for target acquisition performance are greater for closer (larger) targets.

  8. High efficient optical remote sensing images acquisition for nano-satellite-framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Xin, Lei; Liu, Yang; Fu, Jie; Liu, Yuhong; Guo, Yi

    2017-09-01

    It is more difficult and challenging to implement Nano-satellite (NanoSat) based optical Earth observation missions than conventional satellites because of the limitation of volume, weight and power consumption. In general, an image compression unit is a necessary onboard module to save data transmission bandwidth and disk space. The image compression unit can get rid of redundant information of those captured images. In this paper, a new image acquisition framework is proposed for NanoSat based optical Earth observation applications. The entire process of image acquisition and compression unit can be integrated in the photo detector array chip, that is, the output data of the chip is already compressed. That is to say, extra image compression unit is no longer needed; therefore, the power, volume, and weight of the common onboard image compression units consumed can be largely saved. The advantages of the proposed framework are: the image acquisition and image compression are combined into a single step; it can be easily built in CMOS architecture; quick view can be provided without reconstruction in the framework; Given a certain compression ratio, the reconstructed image quality is much better than those CS based methods. The framework holds promise to be widely used in the future.

  9. Design of area array CCD image acquisition and display system based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Ning; Li, Tianting; Pan, Yue; Dai, Yuming

    2014-09-01

    With the development of science and technology, CCD(Charge-coupled Device) has been widely applied in various fields and plays an important role in the modern sensing system, therefore researching a real-time image acquisition and display plan based on CCD device has great significance. This paper introduces an image data acquisition and display system of area array CCD based on FPGA. Several key technical challenges and problems of the system have also been analyzed and followed solutions put forward .The FPGA works as the core processing unit in the system that controls the integral time sequence .The ICX285AL area array CCD image sensor produced by SONY Corporation has been used in the system. The FPGA works to complete the driver of the area array CCD, then analog front end (AFE) processes the signal of the CCD image, including amplification, filtering, noise elimination, CDS correlation double sampling, etc. AD9945 produced by ADI Corporation to convert analog signal to digital signal. Developed Camera Link high-speed data transmission circuit, and completed the PC-end software design of the image acquisition, and realized the real-time display of images. The result through practical testing indicates that the system in the image acquisition and control is stable and reliable, and the indicators meet the actual project requirements.

  10. Effects of Orientation and Anisometry of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Acquisitions on Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Structural Connectomes.

    PubMed

    Tudela, Raúl; Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; López-Gil, Xavier; Soria, Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) quantifies water molecule diffusion within tissues and is becoming an increasingly used technique. However, it is very challenging as correct quantification depends on many different factors, ranging from acquisition parameters to a long pipeline of image processing. In this work, we investigated the influence of voxel geometry on diffusion analysis, comparing different acquisition orientations as well as isometric and anisometric voxels. Diffusion-weighted images of one rat brain were acquired with four different voxel geometries (one isometric and three anisometric in different directions) and three different encoding orientations (coronal, axial and sagittal). Diffusion tensor scalar measurements, tractography and the brain structural connectome were analyzed for each of the 12 acquisitions. The acquisition direction with respect to the main magnetic field orientation affected the diffusion results. When the acquisition slice-encoding direction was not aligned with the main magnetic field, there were more artifacts and a lower signal-to-noise ratio that led to less anisotropic tensors (lower fractional anisotropic values), producing poorer quality results. The use of anisometric voxels generated statistically significant differences in the values of diffusion metrics in specific regions. It also elicited differences in tract reconstruction and in different graph metric values describing the brain networks. Our results highlight the importance of taking into account the geometric aspects of acquisitions, especially when comparing diffusion data acquired using different geometries.

  11. Working Papers in Acquisition of Knowledge for Image Understanding Research,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-15

    Rmvt 112,7,P IM Y. K3p ’Of’ z4-" odK zw Mw; OW, ev 6 "ONO T;I 11; "VI lip, IA wo 44 jo . ... . ...... I I WORKING PAPERS IN ACQUISITION OF...paradigm than any other. They have collected protocolt on subjects verbally describing scenes, after examining them visually. The control variable they... collection of Elements of Control Flow (ECF). To avoid creation of either file, the user presses the return key without typing a name to the respective

  12. Accelerating acquisition strategies for low-frequency conductivity imaging using MREIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yizhuang; Seo, Jin Keun; Chauhan, Munish; Indahlastari, Aprinda; Ashok Kumar, Neeta; Sadleir, Rosalind

    2018-02-01

    We sought to improve efficiency of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography data acquisition so that fast conductivity changes or electric field variations could be monitored. Undersampling of k-space was used to decrease acquisition times in spin-echo-based sequences by a factor of two. Full MREIT data were reconstructed using continuity assumptions and preliminary scans gathered without current. We found that phase data were reconstructed faithfully from undersampled data. Conductivity reconstructions of phantom data were also possible. Therefore, undersampled k-space methods can potentially be used to accelerate MREIT acquisition. This method could be an advantage in imaging real-time conductivity changes with MREIT.

  13. Image acquisition system using on sensor compressed sampling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Pravir Singh; Choi, Gwan Seong

    2018-01-01

    Advances in CMOS technology have made high-resolution image sensors possible. These image sensors pose significant challenges in terms of the amount of raw data generated, energy efficiency, and frame rate. This paper presents a design methodology for an imaging system and a simplified image sensor pixel design to be used in the system so that the compressed sensing (CS) technique can be implemented easily at the sensor level. This results in significant energy savings as it not only cuts the raw data rate but also reduces transistor count per pixel; decreases pixel size; increases fill factor; simplifies analog-to-digital converter, JPEG encoder, and JPEG decoder design; decreases wiring; and reduces the decoder size by half. Thus, CS has the potential to increase the resolution of image sensors for a given technology and die size while significantly decreasing the power consumption and design complexity. We show that it has potential to reduce power consumption by about 23% to 65%.

  14. Effects of Scene Modulation Image Blur and Noise Upon Human Target Acquisition Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    AFRL-HE-WP-TR-1998-0012 UNITED STATES AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY EFFECTS OF SCENE MODULATION IMAGE BLUR AND NOISE UPON HUMAN TARGET...COVERED INTERIM (July 1996 - August 1996) TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effects of Scene Modulation Image Blur and Noise Upon Human Target Acquisition...dilemma in image transmission and display is that we must compromise between die conflicting constraints of dynamic range and noise . Three target

  15. Fundamentals of image acquisition and processing in the digital era.

    PubMed

    Farman, A G

    2003-01-01

    To review the historic context for digital imaging in dentistry and to outline the fundamental issues related to digital imaging modalities. Digital dental X-ray images can be achieved by scanning analog film radiographs (secondary capture), with photostimulable phosphors, or using solid-state detectors (e.g. charge-coupled device and complementary metal oxide semiconductor). There are four characteristics that are basic to all digital image detectors; namely, size of active area, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast resolution and the spatial resolution. To perceive structure in a radiographic image, there needs to be sufficient difference between contrasting densities. This primarily depends on the differences in the attenuation of the X-ray beam by adjacent tissues. It is also depends on the signal received; therefore, contrast tends to increase with increased exposure. Given adequate signal and sufficient differences in radiodensity, contrast will be sufficient to differentiate between adjacent structures, irrespective of the recording modality and processing used. Where contrast is not sufficient, digital images can sometimes be post-processed to disclose details that would otherwise go undetected. For example, cephalogram isodensity mapping can improve soft tissue detail. It is concluded that it could be a further decade or two before three-dimensional digital imaging systems entirely replace two-dimensional analog films. Such systems need not only to produce prettier images, but also to provide a demonstrable evidence-based higher standard of care at a cost that is not economically prohibitive for the practitioner or society, and which allows efficient and effective workflow within the business of dental practice.

  16. Quantitative assessment of the impact of biomedical image acquisition on the results obtained from image analysis and processing.

    PubMed

    Koprowski, Robert

    2014-07-04

    Dedicated, automatic algorithms for image analysis and processing are becoming more and more common in medical diagnosis. When creating dedicated algorithms, many factors must be taken into consideration. They are associated with selecting the appropriate algorithm parameters and taking into account the impact of data acquisition on the results obtained. An important feature of algorithms is the possibility of their use in other medical units by other operators. This problem, namely operator's (acquisition) impact on the results obtained from image analysis and processing, has been shown on a few examples. The analysed images were obtained from a variety of medical devices such as thermal imaging, tomography devices and those working in visible light. The objects of imaging were cellular elements, the anterior segment and fundus of the eye, postural defects and others. In total, almost 200'000 images coming from 8 different medical units were analysed. All image analysis algorithms were implemented in C and Matlab. For various algorithms and methods of medical imaging, the impact of image acquisition on the results obtained is different. There are different levels of algorithm sensitivity to changes in the parameters, for example: (1) for microscope settings and the brightness assessment of cellular elements there is a difference of 8%; (2) for the thyroid ultrasound images there is a difference in marking the thyroid lobe area which results in a brightness assessment difference of 2%. The method of image acquisition in image analysis and processing also affects: (3) the accuracy of determining the temperature in the characteristic areas on the patient's back for the thermal method - error of 31%; (4) the accuracy of finding characteristic points in photogrammetric images when evaluating postural defects - error of 11%; (5) the accuracy of performing ablative and non-ablative treatments in cosmetology - error of 18% for the nose, 10% for the cheeks, and 7% for the

  17. Simultaneous dual contrast weighting using double echo rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) imaging.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Katharina; Hezel, Fabian; Klix, Sabrina; Mekle, Ralf; Wuerfel, Jens; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-12-01

    This work proposes a dual contrast rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) variant (2in1-RARE), which provides simultaneous proton density (PD) and T2 * contrast in a single acquisition. The underlying concept of 2in1-RARE is the strict separation of spin echoes and stimulated echoes. This approach offers independent weighting of spin echoes and stimulated echoes. 2in1-RARE was evaluated in phantoms including signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and point spread function assessment. 2in1-RARE was benchmarked versus coherent RARE and a split-echo RARE variant. The applicability of 2in1-RARE for brain imaging was demonstrated in a small cohort of healthy subjects (n = 10) and, exemplary, a multiple sclerosis patient at 3 Tesla as a precursor to a broader clinical study. 2in1-RARE enables the simultaneous acquisition of dual contrast weighted images without any significant image degradation and without sacrificing SNR versus split-echo RARE. This translates into a factor of two speed gain over multi-contrast, sequential split-echo RARE. A 15% broadening of the point spread function was observed in 2in1-RARE. T1 relaxation effects during the mixing time can be neglected for brain tissue. 2in1-RARE offers simultaneous acquisition of images of anatomical (PD) and functional (T2 *) contrast. It presents an alternative to address scan time constraints frequently encountered during sequential acquisition of T2 * or PD-weighted RARE. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. 3D image acquisition by fiber-based fringe projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Tilo; Driessen, Sascha

    2005-02-01

    In macroscopic production processes several measuring methods are used to assure the quality of 3D parts. Definitely, one of the most widespread techniques is the fringe projection. It"s a fast and accurate method to receive the topography of a part as a computer file which can be processed in further steps, e.g. to compare the measured part to a given CAD file. In this article it will be shown how the fringe projection method is applied to a fiber-optic system. The fringes generated by a miniaturized fringe projector (MiniRot) are first projected onto the front-end of an image guide using special optics. The image guide serves as a transmitter for the fringes in order to get them onto the surface of a micro part. A second image guide is used to observe the micro part. It"s mounted under an angle relating to the illuminating image guide so that the triangulation condition is fulfilled. With a CCD camera connected to the second image guide the projected fringes are recorded and those data is analyzed by an image processing system.

  19. Featured Image: Making a Rapidly Rotating Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    These stills from a simulation show the evolution (from left to right and top to bottom) of a high-mass X-ray binary over 1.1 days, starting after the star on the right fails to explode as a supernova and then collapses into a black hole. Many high-mass X-ray binaries like the well-known Cygnus X-1, the first source widely accepted to be a black hole host rapidly spinning black holes. Despite our observations of these systems, however, were still not sure how these objects end up with such high rotation speeds. Using simulations like that shown above, a team of scientists led by Aldo Batta (UC Santa Cruz) has demonstrated how a failed supernova explosion can result in such a rapidly spinning black hole. The authors work shows that in a binary where one star attempts to explode as a supernova and fails it doesnt succeed in unbinding the star the large amount of fallback material can interact with the companion star and then accrete onto the black hole, spinning it up in the process. You can read more about the authors simulations and conclusions in the paper below.CitationAldo Batta et al 2017 ApJL 846 L15. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aa8506

  20. Fault Diagnosis for Rotating Machinery: A Method based on Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chen; Wang, Yang; Ragulskis, Minvydas; Cheng, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Rotating machinery is one of the most typical types of mechanical equipment and plays a significant role in industrial applications. Condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotating machinery has gained wide attention for its significance in preventing catastrophic accident and guaranteeing sufficient maintenance. With the development of science and technology, fault diagnosis methods based on multi-disciplines are becoming the focus in the field of fault diagnosis of rotating machinery. This paper presents a multi-discipline method based on image-processing for fault diagnosis of rotating machinery. Different from traditional analysis method in one-dimensional space, this study employs computing method in the field of image processing to realize automatic feature extraction and fault diagnosis in a two-dimensional space. The proposed method mainly includes the following steps. First, the vibration signal is transformed into a bi-spectrum contour map utilizing bi-spectrum technology, which provides a basis for the following image-based feature extraction. Then, an emerging approach in the field of image processing for feature extraction, speeded-up robust features, is employed to automatically exact fault features from the transformed bi-spectrum contour map and finally form a high-dimensional feature vector. To reduce the dimensionality of the feature vector, thus highlighting main fault features and reducing subsequent computing resources, t-Distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding is adopt to reduce the dimensionality of the feature vector. At last, probabilistic neural network is introduced for fault identification. Two typical rotating machinery, axial piston hydraulic pump and self-priming centrifugal pumps, are selected to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results show that the proposed method based on image-processing achieves a high accuracy, thus providing a highly effective means to fault diagnosis for rotating machinery.

  1. Fault Diagnosis for Rotating Machinery: A Method based on Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chen; Wang, Yang; Ragulskis, Minvydas; Cheng, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Rotating machinery is one of the most typical types of mechanical equipment and plays a significant role in industrial applications. Condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotating machinery has gained wide attention for its significance in preventing catastrophic accident and guaranteeing sufficient maintenance. With the development of science and technology, fault diagnosis methods based on multi-disciplines are becoming the focus in the field of fault diagnosis of rotating machinery. This paper presents a multi-discipline method based on image-processing for fault diagnosis of rotating machinery. Different from traditional analysis method in one-dimensional space, this study employs computing method in the field of image processing to realize automatic feature extraction and fault diagnosis in a two-dimensional space. The proposed method mainly includes the following steps. First, the vibration signal is transformed into a bi-spectrum contour map utilizing bi-spectrum technology, which provides a basis for the following image-based feature extraction. Then, an emerging approach in the field of image processing for feature extraction, speeded-up robust features, is employed to automatically exact fault features from the transformed bi-spectrum contour map and finally form a high-dimensional feature vector. To reduce the dimensionality of the feature vector, thus highlighting main fault features and reducing subsequent computing resources, t-Distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding is adopt to reduce the dimensionality of the feature vector. At last, probabilistic neural network is introduced for fault identification. Two typical rotating machinery, axial piston hydraulic pump and self-priming centrifugal pumps, are selected to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results show that the proposed method based on image-processing achieves a high accuracy, thus providing a highly effective means to fault diagnosis for rotating machinery. PMID

  2. Imaging Algorithms for Evaluating Suspected Rotator Cuff Disease: Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound Consensus Conference Statement

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Jon A.; Benson, Carol B.; Bancroft, Laura W.; Bedi, Asheesh; McShane, John M.; Miller, Theodore T.; Parker, Laurence; Smith, Jay; Steinbach, Lynne S.; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Thiele, Ralf G.; Tuite, Michael J.; Wise, James N.; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound convened a panel of specialists from a variety of medical disciplines to reach a consensus about the recommended imaging evaluation of painful shoulders with clinically suspected rotator cuff disease. The panel met in Chicago, Ill, on October 18 and 19, 2011, and created this consensus statement regarding the roles of radiography, ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography. The consensus panel consisted of two co-moderators, a facilitator, a statistician and health care economist, and 10 physicians who have specialty expertise in shoulder pain evaluation and/or treatment. Of the 13 physicians on the panel, nine were radiologists who were chosen to represent a broad range of skill sets in diagnostic imaging, different practice types (private and academic), and different geographical regions of the United States. Five of the radiologists routinely performed musculoskeletal US as part of their practice and four did not. There was also one representative from each of the following clinical specialties: rheumatology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, orthopedic surgery, and nonoperative sports medicine. The goal of this conference was to construct several algorithms with which to guide the imaging evaluation of suspected rotator cuff disease in patients with a native rotator cuff, patients with a repaired rotator cuff, and patients who have undergone shoulder replacement. The panel hopes that these recommendations will lead to greater uniformity in rotator cuff imaging and more cost-effective care for patients suspected of having rotator cuff abnormality. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23401583

  3. Optical derotator alignment using image-processing algorithm for tracking laser vibrometer measurements of rotating objects.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hossam; Kim, Dongkyu; Jo, Youngjoon; Park, Kyihwan

    2017-06-01

    An optical component called a Dove prism is used to rotate the laser beam of a laser-scanning vibrometer (LSV). This is called a derotator and is used for measuring the vibration of rotating objects. The main advantage of a derotator is that it works independently from an LSV. However, this device requires very specific alignment, in which the axis of the Dove prism must coincide with the rotational axis of the object. If the derotator is misaligned with the rotating object, the results of the vibration measurement are imprecise, owing to the alteration of the laser beam on the surface of the rotating object. In this study, a method is proposed for aligning a derotator with a rotating object through an image-processing algorithm that obtains the trajectory of a landmark attached to the object. After the trajectory of the landmark is mathematically modeled, the amount of derotator misalignment with respect to the object is calculated. The accuracy of the proposed method for aligning the derotator with the rotating object is experimentally tested.

  4. Possibility of Cloudless Optical Remote Sensing Images Acquisition Study by Using Meteorological Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Lei, B.; Hu, Y.; Liu, K.; Gan, Y.

    2018-04-01

    Optical remote sensing images have been widely used in feature interpretation and geo-information extraction. All the fundamental applications of optical remote sensing, are greatly influenced by cloud coverage. Generally, the availability of cloudless images depends on the meteorological conditions for a given area. In this study, the cloud total amount (CTA) products of the Fengyun (FY) satellite were introduced to explore the meteorological changes in a year over China. The cloud information of CTA products were tested by using ZY-3 satellite images firstly. CTA products from 2006 to 2017 were used to get relatively reliable results. The window period of cloudless images acquisition for different areas in China was then determined. This research provides a feasible way to get the cloudless images acquisition window by using meteorological observations.

  5. System and method for optical fiber based image acquisition suitable for use in turbine engines

    DOEpatents

    Baleine, Erwan; A V, Varun; Zombo, Paul J.; Varghese, Zubin

    2017-05-16

    A system and a method for image acquisition suitable for use in a turbine engine are disclosed. Light received from a field of view in an object plane is projected onto an image plane through an optical modulation device and is transferred through an image conduit to a sensor array. The sensor array generates a set of sampled image signals in a sensing basis based on light received from the image conduit. Finally, the sampled image signals are transformed from the sensing basis to a representation basis and a set of estimated image signals are generated therefrom. The estimated image signals are used for reconstructing an image and/or a motion-video of a region of interest within a turbine engine.

  6. Active imaging system performance model for target acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinola, Richard L.; Teaney, Brian; Nguyen, Quang; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Halford, Carl E.; Tofsted, David H.

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate has developed a laser-range-gated imaging system performance model for the detection, recognition, and identification of vehicle targets. The model is based on the established US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD sensor performance models of the human system response through an imaging system. The Java-based model, called NVLRG, accounts for the effect of active illumination, atmospheric attenuation, and turbulence effects relevant to LRG imagers, such as speckle and scintillation, and for the critical sensor and display components. This model can be used to assess the performance of recently proposed active SWIR systems through various trade studies. This paper will describe the NVLRG model in detail, discuss the validation of recent model components, present initial trade study results, and outline plans to validate and calibrate the end-to-end model with field data through human perception testing.

  7. Research of aerial imaging spectrometer data acquisition technology based on USB 3.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junze; Wang, Yueming; He, Daogang; Yu, Yanan

    2016-11-01

    With the emergence of UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) platform for aerial imaging spectrometer, research of aerial imaging spectrometer DAS(data acquisition system) faces new challenges. Due to the limitation of platform and other factors, the aerial imaging spectrometer DAS requires small-light, low-cost and universal. Traditional aerial imaging spectrometer DAS system is expensive, bulky, non-universal and unsupported plug-and-play based on PCIe. So that has been unable to meet promotion and application of the aerial imaging spectrometer. In order to solve these problems, the new data acquisition scheme bases on USB3.0 interface.USB3.0 can provide guarantee of small-light, low-cost and universal relying on the forward-looking technology advantage. USB3.0 transmission theory is up to 5Gbps.And the GPIF programming interface achieves 3.2Gbps of the effective theoretical data bandwidth.USB3.0 can fully meet the needs of the aerial imaging spectrometer data transmission rate. The scheme uses the slave FIFO asynchronous data transmission mode between FPGA and USB3014 interface chip. Firstly system collects spectral data from TLK2711 of high-speed serial interface chip. Then FPGA receives data in DDR2 cache after ping-pong data processing. Finally USB3014 interface chip transmits data via automatic-dma approach and uploads to PC by USB3.0 cable. During the manufacture of aerial imaging spectrometer, the DAS can achieve image acquisition, transmission, storage and display. All functions can provide the necessary test detection for aerial imaging spectrometer. The test shows that system performs stable and no data lose. Average transmission speed and storage speed of writing SSD can stabilize at 1.28Gbps. Consequently ,this data acquisition system can meet application requirements for aerial imaging spectrometer.

  8. Combined Néel and Brown rotational Langevin dynamics in magnetic particle imaging, sensing, and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Daniel B.; Weaver, John B.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been studied intensely because of their possible uses in biomedical applications. Biosensing using the rotational freedom of particles has been used to detect biomarkers for cancer, hyperthermia therapy has been used to treat tumors, and magnetic particle imaging is a promising new imaging modality that can spatially resolve the concentration of nanoparticles. There are two mechanisms by which the magnetization of a nanoparticle can rotate, a fact that poses a challenge for applications that rely on precisely one mechanism. The challenge is exacerbated by the high sensitivity of the dominant mechanism to applied fields. Here, we demonstrate stochastic Langevin equation simulations for the combined rotation in magnetic nanoparticles exposed to oscillating applied fields typical to these applications to both highlight the existing relevant theory and quantify which mechanism should occur in various parameter ranges.

  9. A spiral-based volumetric acquisition for MR temperature imaging.

    PubMed

    Fielden, Samuel W; Feng, Xue; Zhao, Li; Miller, G Wilson; Geeslin, Matthew; Dallapiazza, Robert F; Elias, W Jeffrey; Wintermark, Max; Butts Pauly, Kim; Meyer, Craig H

    2018-06-01

    To develop a rapid pulse sequence for volumetric MR thermometry. Simulations were carried out to assess temperature deviation, focal spot distortion/blurring, and focal spot shift across a range of readout durations and maximum temperatures for Cartesian, spiral-out, and retraced spiral-in/out (RIO) trajectories. The RIO trajectory was applied for stack-of-spirals 3D imaging on a real-time imaging platform and preliminary evaluation was carried out compared to a standard 2D sequence in vivo using a swine brain model, comparing maximum and mean temperatures measured between the two methods, as well as the temporal standard deviation measured by the two methods. In simulations, low-bandwidth Cartesian trajectories showed substantial shift of the focal spot, whereas both spiral trajectories showed no shift while maintaining focal spot geometry. In vivo, the 3D sequence achieved real-time 4D monitoring of thermometry, with an update time of 2.9-3.3 s. Spiral imaging, and RIO imaging in particular, is an effective way to speed up volumetric MR thermometry. Magn Reson Med 79:3122-3127, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Full-field wrist pulse signal acquisition and analysis by 3D Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yuan; Su, Yong; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Xiaohai; Gao, Zeren; Wu, Shangquan; Zhang, Qingchuan; Wu, Xiaoping

    2017-11-01

    Pulse diagnosis is an essential part in four basic diagnostic methods (inspection, listening, inquiring and palpation) in traditional Chinese medicine, which depends on longtime training and rich experience, so computerized pulse acquisition has been proposed and studied to ensure the objectivity. To imitate the process that doctors using three fingertips with different pressures to feel fluctuations in certain areas containing three acupoints, we established a five dimensional pulse signal acquisition system adopting a non-contacting optical metrology method, 3D digital image correlation, to record the full-field displacements of skin fluctuations under different pressures. The system realizes real-time full-field vibration mode observation with 10 FPS. The maximum sample frequency is 472 Hz for detailed post-processing. After acquisition, the signals are analyzed according to the amplitude, pressure, and pulse wave velocity. The proposed system provides a novel optical approach for digitalizing pulse diagnosis and massive pulse signal data acquisition for various types of patients.

  11. High-resolution, continuous field-of-view (FOV), non-rotating imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance L. (Inventor); Stirbl, Robert C. (Inventor); Aghazarian, Hrand (Inventor); Padgett, Curtis W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A high resolution CMOS imaging system especially suitable for use in a periscope head. The imaging system includes a sensor head for scene acquisition, and a control apparatus inclusive of distributed processors and software for device-control, data handling, and display. The sensor head encloses a combination of wide field-of-view CMOS imagers and narrow field-of-view CMOS imagers. Each bank of imagers is controlled by a dedicated processing module in order to handle information flow and image analysis of the outputs of the camera system. The imaging system also includes automated or manually controlled display system and software for providing an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) that displays a full 360-degree field of view and allows the user or automated ATR system to select regions for higher resolution inspection.

  12. Adaptive panoramic tomography with a circular rotational movement for the formation of multifocal image layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. S.; Cho, H. S.; Park, Y. O.; Je, U. K.; Hong, D. K.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.

    2012-02-01

    Panoramic radiography with which only structures within a certain image layer are in focus and others out of focus on the panoramic image has become a popular imaging technique especially in dentistry. However, the major drawback to the technique is a mismatch between the structures to be focused and the predefined image layer mainly due to the various shapes and sizes of dental arches and/or to malpositioning of the patient. These result in image quality typically inferior to that obtained using intraoral radiographic techniques. In this paper, to overcome these difficulties, we suggest a new panoramic reconstruction algorithm, the so-called adaptive panoramic tomography ( APT), capable of reconstructing multifocal image layers with no additional exposure. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, we performed systematic simulation studies with a circular rotational movement and investigated the image performance.

  13. 2D imaging and 3D sensing data acquisition and mutual registration for painting conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Raffaella; Gambino, Maria Chiara; Greco, Marinella; Marras, Luciano; Pampaloni, Enrico M.; Pelagotti, Anna; Pezzati, Luca; Poggi, Pasquale

    2004-12-01

    We describe the application of 2D and 3D data acquisition and mutual registration to the conservation of paintings. RGB color image acquisition, IR and UV fluorescence imaging, together with the more recent hyperspectral imaging (32 bands) are among the most useful techniques in this field. They generally are meant to provide information on the painting materials, on the employed techniques and on the object state of conservation. However, only when the various images are perfectly registered on each other and on the 3D model, no ambiguity is possible and safe conclusions may be drawn. We present the integration of 2D and 3D measurements carried out on two different paintings: "Madonna of the Yarnwinder" by Leonardo da Vinci, and "Portrait of Lionello d'Este", by Pisanello, both painted in the XV century.

  14. 2D imaging and 3D sensing data acquisition and mutual registration for painting conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Raffaella; Gambino, Maria Chiara; Greco, Marinella; Marras, Luciano; Pampaloni, Enrico M.; Pelagotti, Anna; Pezzati, Luca; Poggi, Pasquale

    2005-01-01

    We describe the application of 2D and 3D data acquisition and mutual registration to the conservation of paintings. RGB color image acquisition, IR and UV fluorescence imaging, together with the more recent hyperspectral imaging (32 bands) are among the most useful techniques in this field. They generally are meant to provide information on the painting materials, on the employed techniques and on the object state of conservation. However, only when the various images are perfectly registered on each other and on the 3D model, no ambiguity is possible and safe conclusions may be drawn. We present the integration of 2D and 3D measurements carried out on two different paintings: "Madonna of the Yarnwinder" by Leonardo da Vinci, and "Portrait of Lionello d'Este", by Pisanello, both painted in the XV century.

  15. Contrast medium administration and image acquisition parameters in renal CT angiography: what radiologists need to know.

    PubMed

    Saade, Charbel; Deeb, Ibrahim Alsheikh; Mohamad, Maha; Al-Mohiy, Hussain; El-Merhi, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, exponential advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have resulted in improved spatial and temporal resolution. Faster image acquisition enabled renal CT angiography to become a viable and effective noninvasive alternative in diagnosing renal vascular pathologies. However, with these advances, new challenges in contrast media administration have emerged. Poor synchronization between scanner and contrast media administration have reduced the consistency in image quality with poor spatial and contrast resolution. Comprehensive understanding of contrast media dynamics is essential in the design and implementation of contrast administration and image acquisition protocols. This review includes an overview of the parameters affecting renal artery opacification and current protocol strategies to achieve optimal image quality during renal CT angiography with iodinated contrast media, with current safety issues highlighted.

  16. Contrast medium administration and image acquisition parameters in renal CT angiography: what radiologists need to know

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Charbel; Deeb, Ibrahim Alsheikh; Mohamad, Maha; Al-Mohiy, Hussain; El-Merhi, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, exponential advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have resulted in improved spatial and temporal resolution. Faster image acquisition enabled renal CT angiography to become a viable and effective noninvasive alternative in diagnosing renal vascular pathologies. However, with these advances, new challenges in contrast media administration have emerged. Poor synchronization between scanner and contrast media administration have reduced the consistency in image quality with poor spatial and contrast resolution. Comprehensive understanding of contrast media dynamics is essential in the design and implementation of contrast administration and image acquisition protocols. This review includes an overview of the parameters affecting renal artery opacification and current protocol strategies to achieve optimal image quality during renal CT angiography with iodinated contrast media, with current safety issues highlighted. PMID:26728701

  17. Patient-Adaptive Reconstruction and Acquisition in Dynamic Imaging with Sensitivity Encoding (PARADISE)

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Behzad; Derbyshire, J. Andrew; Faranesh, Anthony Z.; Bresler, Yoram

    2010-01-01

    MR imaging of the human heart without explicit cardiac synchronization promises to extend the applicability of cardiac MR to a larger patient population and potentially expand its diagnostic capabilities. However, conventional non-gated imaging techniques typically suffer from low image quality or inadequate spatio-temporal resolution and fidelity. Patient-Adaptive Reconstruction and Acquisition in Dynamic Imaging with Sensitivity Encoding (PARADISE) is a highly-accelerated non-gated dynamic imaging method that enables artifact-free imaging with high spatio-temporal resolutions by utilizing novel computational techniques to optimize the imaging process. In addition to using parallel imaging, the method gains acceleration from a physiologically-driven spatio-temporal support model; hence, it is doubly accelerated. The support model is patient-adaptive, i.e., its geometry depends on dynamics of the imaged slice, e.g., subject’s heart-rate and heart location within the slice. The proposed method is also doubly adaptive as it adapts both the acquisition and reconstruction schemes. Based on the theory of time-sequential sampling, the proposed framework explicitly accounts for speed limitations of gradient encoding and provides performance guarantees on achievable image quality. The presented in-vivo results demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the PARADISE method for high resolution non-gated cardiac MRI during a short breath-hold. PMID:20665794

  18. MR imaging of ore for heap bioleaching studies using pure phase encode acquisition methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, Marijke A.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Johns, Michael L.

    2012-03-01

    Various MRI techniques were considered with respect to imaging of aqueous flow fields in low grade copper ore. Spin echo frequency encoded techniques were shown to produce unacceptable image distortions which led to pure phase encoded techniques being considered. Single point imaging multiple point acquisition (SPI-MPA) and spin echo single point imaging (SESPI) techniques were applied. By direct comparison with X-ray tomographic images, both techniques were found to be able to produce distortion-free images of the ore packings at 2 T. The signal to noise ratios (SNRs) of the SESPI images were found to be superior to SPI-MPA for equal total acquisition times; this was explained based on NMR relaxation measurements. SESPI was also found to produce suitable images for a range of particles sizes, whereas SPI-MPA SNR deteriorated markedly as particles size was reduced. Comparisons on a 4.7 T magnet showed significant signal loss from the SPI-MPA images, the effect of which was accentuated in the case of unsaturated flowing systems. Hence it was concluded that SESPI was the most robust imaging method for the study of copper ore heap leaching hydrology.

  19. Electronically rotated and translated field-free line generation for open bore magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Top, Can Barış; Ilbey, Serhat; Güven, Hüseyin Emre

    2017-12-01

    We propose a coil arrangement for open bore field-free line (FFL) magnetic particle imaging (MPI) system, which is suitable for accessing the subject from the sides. The purpose of this study is twofold, to show that the FFL can be rotated and translated electronically in a volume of interest with this arrangement and to analyze the current, voltage and power requirements for a 1 T/m gradient human sized scanner for a 200 mm diameter × 200 mm height cylindrical field of view (FOV). We used split coils side by side with alternating current directions to generate a field-free line. Employing two of these coil groups, one of which is rotated 90 degrees with respect to the other, a rotating FFL was generated. We conducted numerical simulations to show the feasibility of this arrangement for three-dimensional (3D) electronical scan of the FFL. Using simulations, we obtained images of a two-dimensional (2D) in silico dot phantom for a human size scanner with system matrix-based reconstruction. Simulations showed that the FFL can be generated and rotated in one plane and can be translated in two axes, allowing for 3D imaging of a large subject with the proposed arrangement. Human sized scanner required 63-215 kW power for the selection field coils to scan the focus inside the FOV. The proposed setup is suitable for FFL MPI imaging with an open bore configuration without the need for mechanical rotation, which is preferable for clinical usage in terms of imaging time and patient access. Further studies are necessary to determine the limitations imposed by peripheral nerve stimulation, and to optimize the system parameters and the sequence design. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. 3D GRASE PROPELLER: Improved Image Acquisition Technique for Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Huan; Hoge, W. Scott; Hamilton, Craig A.; Günther, Matthias; Kraft, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a non-invasive technique that can quantitatively measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). While traditionally ASL employs 2D EPI or spiral acquisition trajectories, single-shot 3D GRASE is gaining popularity in ASL due to inherent SNR advantage and spatial coverage. However, a major limitation of 3D GRASE is through-plane blurring caused by T2 decay. A novel technique combining 3D GRASE and a PROPELLER trajectory (3DGP) is presented to minimize through-plane blurring without sacrificing perfusion sensitivity or increasing total scan time. Full brain perfusion images were acquired at a 3×3×5mm3 nominal voxel size with Q2TIPS-FAIR as the ASL preparation sequence. Data from 5 healthy subjects was acquired on a GE 1.5T scanner in less than 4 minutes per subject. While showing good agreement in CBF quantification with 3D GRASE, 3DGP demonstrated reduced through-plane blurring, improved anatomical details, high repeatability and robustness against motion, making it suitable for routine clinical use. PMID:21254211

  1. Assessment of tibial rotation and meniscal movement using kinematic magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective This work aimed to assess tibial rotations, meniscal movements, and morphological changes during knee flexion and extension using kinematic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Thirty volunteers with healthy knees were examined using kinematic MRI. The knees were imaged in the transverse plane with flexion and extension angles from 0° to 40° and 40° to 0°, respectively. The tibial interior and exterior rotation angles were measured, and the meniscal movement range, height change, and side movements were detected. Results The tibia rotated internally (11.55° ± 3.20°) during knee flexion and rotated externally (11.40° ± 3.0°) during knee extension. No significant differences were observed between the internal and external tibial rotation angles (P > 0.05), between males and females (P > 0.05), or between the left and right knee joints (P > 0.05). The tibial rotation angle with a flexion angle of 0° to 24° differed significantly from that with a flexion angle of 24° to 40° (P < 0.01). With knee flexion, the medial and lateral menisci moved backward and the height of the meniscus increased. The movement range was greater in the anterior horn than in the posterior horn and greater in the lateral meniscus than in the medial meniscus (P < 0.01). During backward movements of the menisci, the distance between the anterior and posterior horns decreased, with the decrease more apparent in the lateral meniscus (P < 0.01). The side movements of the medial and lateral menisci were not obvious, and a smaller movement range was found than that of the forward and backward movements. Conclusion Knee flexion and extension facilitated internal and external tibial rotations, which may be related to the ligament and joint capsule structure and femoral condyle geometry. PMID:25142267

  2. Rotating Scheimpflug Imaging Indices in Different Grades of Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate accuracy of various Keratoconus (KC) screening indices, in relation to Topographic Keratoconus (TKC) grading. Setting. Al Watany Eye Hospital, Cairo, Egypt. Methods. Data of 103 normal (group 1) and 73 KC eyes (group 2), imaged by Pentacam (branded as Allegro Oculyzer), were analysed. Group 2 was divided into 2a: 14 eyes (TKC = 1, early KC), 2b: 25 eyes (TKC = 1 to 2 or 2, moderate KC), and 2c: 34 eyes (TKC = 2 to 3 up to 4, severe KC). Participants were followed up for six years to confirm diagnosis. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) was calculated for evaluated curvature, elevation, and pachymetry indices with various reference shapes at different diameters. Results. When comparing normal to KC eyes, ten indices had significantly higher AUROC. Only five of them had significantly higher AUROC in early KC compared to normal corneas: Pachymetry Progression Index- (PPI-) Maximum (Max), Ambrósio's Relational Thickness- (ART-) Max, PPI-Max minus PPI-Minimum (Min), central corneal thickness (CCT), and diagonal decentration of thinnest point from the apex (AUROC = 0.690, 0.690, 0.687, 0.683, and 0.674, resp.). Conclusion. Generally, ten pachymetry and elevation-based indices had significantly higher AUROC. Five indices had statistically significant high AUROC when comparing early KC to normal corneas. PMID:27579178

  3. Mobile Stroke Unit Reduces Time to Image Acquisition and Reporting.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, E M; Cox, J R; Kowalski, R G; Duarte, D V; Schimpf, B; Jones, W J

    2018-05-17

    Timely administration of thrombolytic therapy is critical to maximizing the likelihood of favorable outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Although emergency medical service activation overall improves the timeliness of acute stroke treatment, the time from emergency medical service dispatch to hospital arrival unavoidably decreases the timeliness of thrombolytic administration. Our mobile stroke unit, a new-generation ambulance with on-board CT scanning capability, reduces key imaging time metrics and facilitates in-the-field delivery of IV thrombolytic therapy. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  4. A Real-Time Image Acquisition And Processing System For A RISC-Based Microcomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckman, Adrian J.; Allinson, Nigel M.

    1989-03-01

    A low cost image acquisition and processing system has been developed for the Acorn Archimedes microcomputer. Using a Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) architecture, the ARM (Acorn Risc Machine) processor provides instruction speeds suitable for image processing applications. The associated improvement in data transfer rate has allowed real-time video image acquisition without the need for frame-store memory external to the microcomputer. The system is comprised of real-time video digitising hardware which interfaces directly to the Archimedes memory, and software to provide an integrated image acquisition and processing environment. The hardware can digitise a video signal at up to 640 samples per video line with programmable parameters such as sampling rate and gain. Software support includes a work environment for image capture and processing with pixel, neighbourhood and global operators. A friendly user interface is provided with the help of the Archimedes Operating System WIMP (Windows, Icons, Mouse and Pointer) Manager. Windows provide a convenient way of handling images on the screen and program control is directed mostly by pop-up menus.

  5. Do Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characteristics of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears Correlate With Sleep Disturbance?

    PubMed

    Reyes, Bryan A; Hull, Brandon R; Kurth, Alexander B; Kukowski, Nathan R; Mulligan, Edward P; Khazzam, Michael S

    2017-11-01

    Many patients with rotator cuff tears suffer from nocturnal shoulder pain, resulting in sleep disturbance. To determine whether rotator cuff tear size correlated with sleep disturbance in patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients with a diagnosis of unilateral full-thickness rotator cuff tears (diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), a visual analog scale (VAS) quantifying their shoulder pain, and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) questionnaire. Shoulder MRI scans were analyzed for anterior-posterior tear size (mm), tendon retraction (mm), Goutallier grade (0-4), number of tendons involved (1-4), muscle atrophy (none, mild, moderate, or severe), and humeral head rise (present or absent). Bivariate correlations were calculated between the MRI characteristics and baseline survey results. A total of 209 patients with unilateral full-thickness rotator cuff tears were included in this study: 112 (54%) female and 97 (46%) male (mean age, 64.1 years). On average, shoulder pain had been present for 24 months. The mean PSQI score was 9.8, and the mean VAS score was 5.0. No significant correlations were found between any of the rotator cuff tear characteristics and sleep quality. Only tendon retraction had a significant correlation with pain. Although rotator cuff tears are frequently associated with nocturnal pain and sleep disruption, this study demonstrated that morphological characteristics of full-thickness rotator cuff tears, such as size and tendon retraction, do not correlate with sleep disturbance and have little to no correlation with pain levels.

  6. Ship detection based on rotation-invariant HOG descriptors for airborne infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guojing; Wang, Jinyan; Qi, Shengxiang

    2018-03-01

    Infrared thermal imagery is widely used in various kinds of aircraft because of its all-time application. Meanwhile, detecting ships from infrared images attract lots of research interests in recent years. In the case of downward-looking infrared imagery, in order to overcome the uncertainty of target imaging attitude due to the unknown position relationship between the aircraft and the target, we propose a new infrared ship detection method which integrates rotation invariant gradient direction histogram (Circle Histogram of Oriented Gradient, C-HOG) descriptors and the support vector machine (SVM) classifier. In details, the proposed method uses HOG descriptors to express the local feature of infrared images to adapt to changes in illumination and to overcome sea clutter effects. Different from traditional computation of HOG descriptor, we subdivide the image into annular spatial bins instead of rectangle sub-regions, and then Radial Gradient Transform (RGT) on the gradient is applied to achieve rotation invariant histogram information. Considering the engineering application of airborne and real-time requirements, we use SVM for training ship target and non-target background infrared sample images to discriminate real ships from false targets. Experimental results show that the proposed method has good performance in both the robustness and run-time for infrared ship target detection with different rotation angles.

  7. Imaging a non-singular rotating black hole at the center of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, F.; Gourgoulhon, E.; Paumard, T.; Vincent, F. H.

    2018-06-01

    We show that the rotating generalization of Hayward’s non-singular black hole previously studied in the literature is geodesically incomplete, and that its straightforward extension leads to a singular spacetime. We present another extension, which is devoid of any curvature singularity. The obtained metric depends on three parameters and, depending on their values, yields an event horizon or not. These two regimes, named respectively regular rotating Hayward black hole and naked rotating wormhole, are studied both numerically and analytically. In preparation for the upcoming results of the Event Horizon Telescope, the images of an accretion torus around Sgr A*, the supermassive object at the center of the Galaxy, are computed. These images contain, even in the absence of a horizon, a central faint region which bears a resemblance to the shadow of Kerr black holes and emphasizes the difficulty of claiming the existence of an event horizon from the analysis of strong-field images. The frequencies of the co- and contra-rotating orbits at the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) in this geometry are also computed, in the hope that quasi-periodic oscillations may permit to compare this model with Kerr’s black hole on observational grounds.

  8. [Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with focal umeral osteolysis. Imaging features].

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, V V; Morais, F; Marques, H; Guerra, A; Carpinteiro, E; Gaspar, A

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. The authors report two cases of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, and MR findings. The importance of considering this diagnosis when evaluating lytic lesions of the humerus and the imaging differential diagnosis of calcifying tendinitis and cortical erosion are discussed.

  9. Evaluation of endoscopic entire 3D image acquisition of the digestive tract using a stereo endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Watabe, Kenji; Fujinaga, Tetsuji; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takahashi, Hideya; Takehara, Tetsuo; Yamada, Kenji

    2017-02-01

    Because the view angle of the endoscope is narrow, it is difficult to get the whole image of the digestive tract at once. If there are more than two lesions in the digestive tract, it is hard to understand the 3D positional relationship among the lesions. Virtual endoscopy using CT is a present standard method to get the whole view of the digestive tract. Because the virtual endoscopy is designed to detect the irregularity of the surface, it cannot detect lesions that lack irregularity including early cancer. In this study, we propose a method of endoscopic entire 3D image acquisition of the digestive tract using a stereo endoscope. The method is as follows: 1) capture sequential images of the digestive tract by moving the endoscope, 2) reconstruct 3D surface pattern for each frame by stereo images, 3) estimate the position of the endoscope by image analysis, 4) reconstitute the entire image of the digestive tract by combining the 3D surface pattern. To confirm the validity of this method, we experimented with a straight tube inside of which circles were allocated at equal distance of 20 mm. We captured sequential images and the reconstituted image of the tube revealed that the distance between each circle was 20.2 +/- 0.3 mm (n=7). The results suggest that this method of endoscopic entire 3D image acquisition may help us understand 3D positional relationship among the lesions such as early esophageal cancer that cannot be detected by virtual endoscopy using CT.

  10. Optimized image acquisition for breast tomosynthesis in projection and reconstruction space.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Amarpreet S; Lo, Joseph Y; Baker, Jay A; Samei, Ehsan

    2009-11-01

    Breast tomosynthesis has been an exciting new development in the field of breast imaging. While the diagnostic improvement via tomosynthesis is notable, the full potential of tomosynthesis has not yet been realized. This may be attributed to the dependency of the diagnostic quality of tomosynthesis on multiple variables, each of which needs to be optimized. Those include dose, number of angular projections, and the total angular span of those projections. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of these acquisition parameters on the overall diagnostic image quality of breast tomosynthesis in both the projection and reconstruction space. Five mastectomy specimens were imaged using a prototype tomosynthesis system. 25 angular projections of each specimen were acquired at 6.2 times typical single-view clinical dose level. Images at lower dose levels were then simulated using a noise modification routine. Each projection image was supplemented with 84 simulated 3 mm 3D lesions embedded at the center of 84 nonoverlapping ROIs. The projection images were then reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm at different combinations of acquisition parameters to investigate which of the many possible combinations maximizes the performance. Performance was evaluated in terms of a Laguerre-Gauss channelized Hotelling observer model-based measure of lesion detectability. The analysis was also performed without reconstruction by combining the model results from projection images using Bayesian decision fusion algorithm. The effect of acquisition parameters on projection images and reconstructed slices were then compared to derive an optimization rule for tomosynthesis. The results indicated that projection images yield comparable but higher performance than reconstructed images. Both modes, however, offered similar trends: Performance improved with an increase in the total acquisition dose level and the angular span. Using a constant dose level and angular

  11. Image Quality and Radiation Exposure Comparison of a Double High-Pitch Acquisition for Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Versus Standard Retrospective Spiral Acquisition in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Prazeres, Carlos Eduardo Elias Dos; Magalhães, Tiago Augusto; de Castro Carneiro, Adriano Camargo; Cury, Roberto Caldeira; de Melo Moreira, Valéria; Bello, Juliana Hiromi Silva Matsumoto; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo

    The aim of this study was to compare image quality and radiation dose of coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography performed with dual-source CT scanner using 2 different protocols in patients with atrial fibrillation. Forty-seven patients with AF underwent 2 different acquisition protocols: double high-pitch (DHP) spiral acquisition and retrospective spiral acquisition. The image quality was ranked according to a qualitative score by 2 experts: 1, no evident motion; 2, minimal motion not influencing coronary artery luminal evaluation; and 3, motion with impaired luminal evaluation. A third expert solved any disagreement. A total of 732 segments were evaluated. The DHP group (24 patients, 374 segments) showed more segments classified as score 1 than the retrospective spiral acquisition group (71.3% vs 37.4%). Image quality evaluation agreement was high between observers (κ = 0.8). There was significantly lower radiation exposure for the DHP group (3.65 [1.29] vs 23.57 [10.32] mSv). In this original direct comparison, a DHP spiral protocol for coronary CT angiography acquisition in patients with atrial fibrillation resulted in lower radiation exposure and superior image quality compared with conventional spiral retrospective acquisition.

  12. Rotation of the vermis as a cause of enlarged cisterna magna on prenatal imaging.

    PubMed

    Zalel, Y; Gilboa, Y; Gabis, L; Ben-Sira, L; Hoffman, C; Wiener, Y; Achiron, R

    2006-05-01

    Dandy-Walker complex is a continuum of developmental anomalies of the posterior fossa which includes vermian rotation. However, vermian rotation alone may be benign. The aim of this study was to describe our experience with sagittal-plane prenatal ultrasound in the diagnosis of rotation of the vermis in cases of suspected enlarged cisterna magna on routine antenatal imaging, and to describe the follow-up of these patients. Seven women, who were referred to our ultrasound unit for evaluation of an enlarged fetal cisterna magna and suspected agenesis of the vermis on axial-plane imaging, underwent further multiplanar studies of the posterior fossa and measurements of the vermis. The mean maternal age was 27 (range, 20-33) years and the mean gestational age at diagnosis was 19.5 (range, 18-31) weeks. The standard axial plane image showed a 'direct communication' between the cisterna magna and the fourth ventricle. In the mid-sagittal plane, the vermis was clearly delineated, with posterosuperior rotation. Vermis size was within normal limits for gestational age in all cases. Findings were confirmed by prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in two cases and postnatal MRI and/or sonography in five. During a mean follow-up of 4.5 (range, 1-7.5) years, all children developed normally, with no neurological complications. The finding of an enlarged cisterna magna on standard- (axial-)plane ultrasound should be evaluated further in the sagittal plane to determine whether the cause is rotation of a normal vermis. This may spare patients unnecessary tests, anxiety and, in some cases, pregnancy termination. Copyright 2006 ISUOG

  13. Plexus structure imaging with thin slab MR neurography: rotating frames, fly-throughs, and composite projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, David T.; McIntee, Diane; Tsuruda, Jay S.; Colletti, Patrick; Tatevossian, Raymond; Frazier, James

    2006-03-01

    We explored multiple image processing approaches by which to display the segmented adult brachial plexus in a three-dimensional manner. Magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) 1.5-Tesla scans with STIR sequences, which preferentially highlight nerves, were performed in adult volunteers to generate high-resolution raw images. Using multiple software programs, the raw MRN images were then manipulated so as to achieve segmentation of plexus neurovascular structures, which were incorporated into three different visualization schemes: rotating upper thoracic girdle skeletal frames, dynamic fly-throughs parallel to the clavicle, and thin slab volume-rendered composite projections.

  14. Rotational-translational fourier imaging system requiring only one grid pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The sky contains many active sources that emit X-rays, gamma rays, and neutrons. Unfortunately hard X-rays, gamma rays, and neutrons cannot be imaged by conventional optics. This obstacle led to the development of Fourier imaging systems. In early approaches, multiple grid pairs were necessary in order to create rudimentary Fourier imaging systems. At least one set of grid pairs was required to provide multiple real components of a Fourier derived image, and another set was required to provide multiple imaginary components of the image. It has long been recognized that the expense associated with the physical production of the numerous grid pairs required for Fourier imaging was a drawback. Herein one grid pair (two grids), with accompanying rotation and translation, can be used if one grid has one more slit than the other grid, and if the detector is modified.

  15. Rotation-robust math symbol recognition and retrieval using outer contours and image subsampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Siyu; Hu, Lei; Zanibbi, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an unified recognition and retrieval system for isolated offline printed mathematical symbols for the first time. The system is based on nearest neighbor scheme and uses modified Turning Function and Grid Features to calculate the distance between two symbols based on Sum of Squared Difference. An unwrap process and an alignment process are applied to modify Turning Function to deal with the horizontal and vertical shift caused by the changing of staring point and rotation. This modified Turning Function make our system robust against rotation of the symbol image. The system obtains top-1 recognition rate of 96.90% and 47.27% Area Under Curve (AUC) of precision/recall plot on the InftyCDB-3 dataset. Experiment result shows that the system with modified Turning Function performs significantly better than the system with original Turning Function on the rotated InftyCDB-3 dataset.

  16. Rotator cuff disorders: How to write a surgically relevant magnetic resonance imaging report?

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Ahmed M; El-Morsy, Ahmad; Badran, Mohamed Aboelnour

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of rotator cuff is a common indication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning of the shoulder. Conventional MRI is the most commonly used technique, while magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is reserved for certain cases. Rotator cuff disorders are thought to be caused by a combination of internal and external mechanisms. A well-structured MRI report should comment on the relevant anatomic structures including the acromial type and orientation, the presence of os acromiale, acromio-clavicular degenerative spurs and fluid in the subacromial subdeltoid bursa. In addition, specific injuries of the rotator cuff tendons and the condition of the long head of biceps should be accurately reported. The size and extent of tendon tears, tendon retraction and fatty degeneration or atrophy of the muscles are all essential components of a surgically relevant MRI report. PMID:24976930

  17. Invariant correlation to position and rotation using a binary mask applied to binary and gray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Borrego, Josué; Solorza, Selene; Bueno-Ibarra, Mario A.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper more alternative ways to generate the binary ring masks are studied and a new methodology is presented when in the analysis the image come with some distortion due to rotation. This new algorithm requires low computational cost. Signature vectors of the target so like signature vectors of the object to be recognized in the problem image are obtained using a binary ring mask constructed in accordance with the real or the imaginary part of their Fourier transform analyzing two different conditions in each one. In this manner, each image target or problem image, will have four unique binary ring masks. The four ways are analyzed and the best is chosen. In addition, due to any image with rotation include some distortion, the best transect is chosen in the Fourier plane in order to obtain the best signature through the different ways to obtain the binary mask. This methodology is applied to two cases: to identify different types of alphabetic letters in Arial font and to identify different fossil diatoms images. Considering the great similarity between diatom images the results obtained are excellent.

  18. Automated system for acquisition and image processing for the control and monitoring boned nopal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luevano, E.; de Posada, E.; Arronte, M.; Ponce, L.; Flores, T.

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a system for acquisition and image processing to control the removal of thorns nopal vegetable (Opuntia ficus indica) in an automated machine that uses pulses of a laser of Nd: YAG. The areolas, areas where thorns grow on the bark of the Nopal, are located applying segmentation algorithms to the images obtained by a CCD. Once the position of the areolas is known, coordinates are sent to a motors system that controls the laser to interact with all areolas and remove the thorns of the nopal. The electronic system comprises a video decoder, memory for image and software storage, and digital signal processor for system control. The firmware programmed tasks on acquisition, preprocessing, segmentation, recognition and interpretation of the areolas. This system achievement identifying areolas and generating table of coordinates of them, which will be send the motor galvo system that controls the laser for removal

  19. Evaluation of Parallel and Fan-Beam Data Acquisition Geometries and Strategies for Myocardial SPECT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yujin; Tsui, B. M. W.; Gilland, K. L.; Frey, E. C.; Gullberg, G. T.

    2004-06-01

    This study evaluates myocardial SPECT images obtained from parallel-hole (PH) and fan-beam (FB) collimator geometries using both circular-orbit (CO) and noncircular-orbit (NCO) acquisitions. A newly developed 4-D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom was used to simulate the /sup 99m/Tc-sestamibi uptakes in human torso with myocardial defects in the left ventricular (LV) wall. Two phantoms were generated to simulate patients with thick and thin body builds. Projection data including the effects of attenuation, collimator-detector response and scatter were generated using SIMSET Monte Carlo simulations. A large number of photon histories were generated such that the projection data were close to noise free. Poisson noise fluctuations were then added to simulate the count densities found in clinical data. Noise-free and noisy projection data were reconstructed using the iterative OS-EM reconstruction algorithm with attenuation compensation. The reconstructed images from noisy projection data show that the noise levels are lower for the FB as compared to the PH collimator due to increase in detected counts. The NCO acquisition method provides slightly better resolution and small improvement in defect contrast as compared to the CO acquisition method in noise-free reconstructed images. Despite lower projection counts the NCO shows the same noise level as the CO in the attenuation corrected reconstruction images. The results from the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) study show that FB collimator is superior to PH collimator in myocardial defect detection, but the NCO shows no statistical significant difference from the CO for either PH or FB collimator. In conclusion, our results indicate that data acquisition using NCO makes a very small improvement in the resolution over CO for myocardial SPECT imaging. This small improvement does not make a significant difference on myocardial defect detection. However, an FB collimator provides better defect detection than a

  20. Sparse-sampling with time-encoded (TICO) stimulated Raman scattering for fast image acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakert, Hubertus; Eibl, Matthias; Karpf, Sebastian; Huber, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Modern biomedical imaging modalities aim to provide researchers a multimodal contrast for a deeper insight into a specimen under investigation. A very promising technique is stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, which can unveil the chemical composition of a sample with a very high specificity. Although the signal intensities are enhanced manifold to achieve a faster acquisition of images if compared to standard Raman microscopy, there is a trade-off between specificity and acquisition speed. Commonly used SRS concepts either probe only very few Raman transitions as the tuning of the applied laser sources is complicated or record whole spectra with a spectrometer based setup. While the first approach is fast, it reduces the specificity and the spectrometer approach records whole spectra -with energy differences where no Raman information is present-, which limits the acquisition speed. Therefore, we present a new approach based on the TICO-Raman concept, which we call sparse-sampling. The TICO-sparse-sampling setup is fully electronically controllable and allows probing of only the characteristic peaks of a Raman spectrum instead of always acquiring a whole spectrum. By reducing the spectral points to the relevant peaks, the acquisition time can be greatly reduced compared to a uniformly, equidistantly sampled Raman spectrum while the specificity and the signal to noise ratio (SNR) are maintained. Furthermore, all laser sources are completely fiber based. The synchronized detection enables a full resolution of the Raman signal, whereas the analogue and digital balancing allows shot noise limited detection. First imaging results with polystyrene (PS) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads confirm the advantages of TICO sparse-sampling. We achieved a pixel dwell time as low as 35 μs for an image differentiating both species. The mechanical properties of the applied voice coil stage for scanning the sample currently limits even faster acquisition.

  1. Evaluation of the influence of acquisition parameters of microtomography in image quality applied by carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, T. M. P.; Machado, A. S.; Araújo, O. M. O.; Ferreira, C. G.; Lopes, R. T.

    2018-03-01

    X-ray computed microtomography is a powerful nondestructive technique for 2D and 3D structure analysis. However, parameters used in acquisition promote directs influence in qualitative and quantitative results in characterization of samples, due image resolution. The aim of this study is value the influence of theses parameters in results through of tests changing these parameters in different situations and system characterization. Results demonstrate those pixel size and detector matrixes are the main parameters that influence in resolution and image quality. Microtomography was considered an excellent technique for characterization using the best image resolution possible.

  2. A digital data acquisition scheme for SPECT and PET small animal imaging detectors for Theranostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, M.; Fysikopoulos, E.; Loudos, G.

    2017-11-01

    Nanoparticle based drug delivery is considered as a new, promising technology for the efficient treatment of various diseases. When nanoparticles are radiolabelled it is possible to image them, using molecular imaging techniques. The use of magnetic nanoparticles in hyperthermia is one of the most promising nanomedicine directions and requires the accurate, non-invasive, monitoring of temperature increase and drug release. The combination of imaging and therapy has opened the very promising Theranostics domain. In this work, we present a digital data acquisition scheme for nuclear medicine dedicated detectors for Theranostic applications.

  3. Rapid anatomical brain imaging using spiral acquisition and an expanded signal model.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Lars; Engel, Maria; Barmet, Christoph; Haeberlin, Maximilian; Wilm, Bertram J; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Schmid, Thomas; Gross, Simon; Brunner, David O; Stephan, Klaas E; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2018-03-01

    We report the deployment of spiral acquisition for high-resolution structural imaging at 7T. Long spiral readouts are rendered manageable by an expanded signal model including static off-resonance and B 0 dynamics along with k-space trajectories and coil sensitivity maps. Image reconstruction is accomplished by inversion of the signal model using an extension of the iterative non-Cartesian SENSE algorithm. Spiral readouts up to 25 ms are shown to permit whole-brain 2D imaging at 0.5 mm in-plane resolution in less than a minute. A range of options is explored, including proton-density and T 2 * contrast, acceleration by parallel imaging, different readout orientations, and the extraction of phase images. Results are shown to exhibit competitive image quality along with high geometric consistency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A simple acquisition strategy to avoid off-resonance blurring in spiral imaging with redundant spiral-in/out k-space trajectories.

    PubMed

    Fielden, Samuel W; Meyer, Craig H

    2015-02-01

    The major hurdle to widespread adoption of spiral trajectories has been their poor off-resonance performance. Here we present a self-correcting spiral k-space trajectory that avoids much of the well-known spiral blurring during data acquisition. In comparison with a traditional spiral-out trajectory, the spiral-in/out trajectory has improved off-resonance performance. By combining two spiral-in/out acquisitions, one rotated 180° in k-space compared with the other, multishot spiral-in/out artifacts are eliminated. A phantom was scanned with the center frequency manually tuned 20, 40, 80, and 160 Hz off-resonance with both a spiral-out gradient echo sequence and the redundant spiral-in/out sequence. The phantom was also imaged in an oblique orientation in order to demonstrate improved concomitant gradient field performance of the sequence. Additionally, the trajectory was incorporated into a spiral turbo spin echo sequence for brain imaging. Phantom studies with manually tuned off-resonance agree well with theoretical calculations, showing that moderate off-resonance is well-corrected by this acquisition scheme. Blur due to concomitant fields is reduced, and good results are obtained in vivo. The redundant spiral-in/out trajectory results in less image blur for a given readout length than a traditional spiral-out scan, reducing the need for complex off-resonance correction algorithms. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A simple acquisition strategy to avoid off-resonance blurring in spiral imaging with redundant spiral-in/out k-space trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Fielden, Samuel W.; Meyer, Craig H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The major hurdle to widespread adoption of spiral trajectories has been their poor off-resonance performance. Here we present a self-correcting spiral k-space trajectory that avoids much of the well-known spiral blurring during data acquisition. Theory and Methods In comparison with a traditional spiral-out trajectory, the spiral-in/out trajectory has improved off-resonance performance. By combining two spiral-in/out acquisitions, one rotated 180° in k-space compared to the other, multi-shot spiral-in/out artifacts are eliminated. A phantom was scanned with the center frequency manually tuned 20, 40, 80, and 160 Hz off-resonance with both a spiral-out gradient echo sequence and the redundant spiral-in/out sequence. The phantom was also imaged in an oblique orientation in order to demonstrate improved concomitant gradient field performance of the sequence, and was additionally incorporated into a spiral turbo spin echo sequence for brain imaging. Results Phantom studies with manually-tuned off-resonance agree well with theoretical calculations, showing that moderate off-resonance is well-corrected by this acquisition scheme. Blur due to concomitant fields is reduced, and good results are obtained in vivo. Conclusion The redundant spiral-in/out trajectory results in less image blur for a given readout length than a traditional spiral-out scan, reducing the need for complex off-resonance correction algorithms. PMID:24604539

  6. Automated 100-Position Specimen Loader and Image Acquisition System for Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lefman, Jonathan; Morrison, Robert; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2007-01-01

    We report the development of a novel, multi-specimen imaging system for high-throughput transmission electron microscopy. Our cartridge-based loading system, called the “Gatling”, permits the sequential examination of as many as 100 specimens in the microscope for room temperature electron microscopy using mechanisms for rapid and automated specimen exchange. The software for the operation of the Gatling and automated data acquisition has been implemented in an updated version of our in-house program AutoEM. In the current implementation of the system, the time required to deliver 95 specimens into the microscope and collect overview images from each is about 13 hours. Regions of interest are identified from a low magnification atlas generation from each specimen and an unlimited number of higher magnifications images can be subsequently acquired from these regions using fully automated data acquisition procedures that can be controlled from a remote interface. We anticipate that the availability of the Gatling will greatly accelerate the speed of data acquisition for a variety of applications in biology, materials science and nanotechnology that require rapid screening and image analysis of multiple specimens. PMID:17240161

  7. A time-efficient acquisition protocol for multipurpose diffusion-weighted microstructural imaging at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Sepehrband, Farshid; O'Brien, Kieran; Barth, Markus

    2017-12-01

    Several diffusion-weighted MRI techniques have been developed and validated during the past 2 decades. While offering various neuroanatomical inferences, these techniques differ in their proposed optimal acquisition design, preventing clinicians and researchers benefiting from all potential inference methods, particularly when limited time is available. This study reports an optimal design that enables for a time-efficient diffusion-weighted MRI acquisition scheme at 7 Tesla. The primary audience of this article is the typical end user, interested in diffusion-weighted microstructural imaging at 7 Tesla. We tested b-values in the range of 700 to 3000 s/mm 2 with different number of angular diffusion-encoding samples, against a data-driven "gold standard." The suggested design is a protocol with b-values of 1000 and 2500 s/mm 2 , with 25 and 50 samples, uniformly distributed over two shells. We also report a range of protocols in which the results of fitting microstructural models to the diffusion-weighted data had high correlation with the gold standard. We estimated minimum acquisition requirements that enable diffusion tensor imaging, higher angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging, neurite orientation dispersion, and density imaging and white matter tract integrity across whole brain with isotropic resolution of 1.8 mm in less than 11 min. Magn Reson Med 78:2170-2184, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Quantitative metrics for evaluating parallel acquisition techniques in diffusion tensor imaging at 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Ardekani, Siamak; Selva, Luis; Sayre, James; Sinha, Usha

    2006-11-01

    Single-shot echo-planar based diffusion tensor imaging is prone to geometric and intensity distortions. Parallel imaging is a means of reducing these distortions while preserving spatial resolution. A quantitative comparison at 3 T of parallel imaging for diffusion tensor images (DTI) using k-space (generalized auto-calibrating partially parallel acquisitions; GRAPPA) and image domain (sensitivity encoding; SENSE) reconstructions at different acceleration factors, R, is reported here. Images were evaluated using 8 human subjects with repeated scans for 2 subjects to estimate reproducibility. Mutual information (MI) was used to assess the global changes in geometric distortions. The effects of parallel imaging techniques on random noise and reconstruction artifacts were evaluated by placing 26 regions of interest and computing the standard deviation of apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy along with the error of fitting the data to the diffusion model (residual error). The larger positive values in mutual information index with increasing R values confirmed the anticipated decrease in distortions. Further, the MI index of GRAPPA sequences for a given R factor was larger than the corresponding mSENSE images. The residual error was lowest in the images acquired without parallel imaging and among the parallel reconstruction methods, the R = 2 acquisitions had the least error. The standard deviation, accuracy, and reproducibility of the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy in homogenous tissue regions showed that GRAPPA acquired with R = 2 had the least amount of systematic and random noise and of these, significant differences with mSENSE, R = 2 were found only for the fractional anisotropy index. Evaluation of the current implementation of parallel reconstruction algorithms identified GRAPPA acquired with R = 2 as optimal for diffusion tensor imaging.

  9. System and method for improving ultrasound image acquisition and replication for repeatable measurements of vascular structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, Robert H. (Inventor); Hodis, Howard N. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    High resolution B-mode ultrasound images of the common carotid artery are obtained with an ultrasound transducer using a standardized methodology. Subjects are supine with the head counter-rotated 45 degrees using a head pillow. The jugular vein and carotid artery are located and positioned in a vertical stacked orientation. The transducer is rotated 90 degrees around the centerline of the transverse image of the stacked structure to obtain a longitudinal image while maintaining the vessels in a stacked position. A computerized methodology assists operators to accurately replicate images obtained over several spaced-apart examinations. The methodology utilizes a split-screen display in which the arterial ultrasound image from an earlier examination is displayed on one side of the screen while a real-time live ultrasound image from a current examination is displayed next to the earlier image on the opposite side of the screen. By viewing both images, whether simultaneously or alternately, while manually adjusting the ultrasound transducer, an operator is able to bring into view the real-time image that best matches a selected image from the earlier ultrasound examination. Utilizing this methodology, measurement of vascular dimensions such as carotid arterial IMT and diameter, the coefficient of variation is substantially reduced to values approximating from about 1.0% to about 1.25%. All images contain anatomical landmarks for reproducing probe angulation, including visualization of the carotid bulb, stacking of the jugular vein above the carotid artery, and initial instrumentation settings, used at a baseline measurement are maintained during all follow-up examinations.

  10. Investigation of sagittal image acquisition for 4D-MRI with body area as respiratory surrogate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yilin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Chang, Zheng; Czito, Brian G; Palta, Manisha; Bashir, Mustafa R; Qin, Yujiao; Cai, Jing

    2014-10-01

    The authors have recently developed a novel 4D-MRI technique for imaging organ respiratory motion employing cine acquisition in the axial plane and using body area (BA) as a respiratory surrogate. A potential disadvantage associated with axial image acquisition is the space-dependent phase shift in the superior-inferior (SI) direction, i.e., different axial slice positions reach the respiratory peak at different respiratory phases. Since respiratory motion occurs mostly in the SI and anterior-posterior (AP) directions, sagittal image acquisition, which embeds motion information in these two directions, is expected to be more robust and less affected by phase-shift than axial image acquisition. This study aims to develop and evaluate a 4D-MRI technique using sagittal image acquisition. The authors evaluated axial BA and sagittal BA using both 4D-CT images (11 cancer patients) and cine MR images (6 healthy volunteers and 1 cancer patient) by comparing their corresponding space-dependent phase-shift in the SI direction (δSPS (SI)) and in the lateral direction (δSPS (LAT)), respectively. To evaluate sagittal BA 4D-MRI method, a motion phantom study and a digital phantom study were performed. Additionally, six patients who had cancer(s) in the liver were prospectively enrolled in this study. For each patient, multislice sagittal MR images were acquired for 4D-MRI reconstruction. 4D retrospective sorting was performed based on respiratory phases. Single-slice cine MRI was also acquired in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes across the tumor center from which tumor motion trajectories in the SI, AP, and medial-lateral (ML) directions were extracted and used as references from comparison. All MR images were acquired in a 1.5 T scanner using a steady-state precession sequence (frame rate ∼ 3 frames/s). 4D-CT scans showed that δSPS (SI) was significantly greater than δSPS (LAT) (p-value: 0.012); the median phase-shift was 16.9% and 7.7%, respectively. Body surface

  11. Partition-based acquisition model for speed up navigated beta-probe surface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monge, Frédéric; Shakir, Dzhoshkun I.; Navab, Nassir; Jannin, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Although gross total resection in low-grade glioma surgery leads to a better patient outcome, the in-vivo control of resection borders remains challenging. For this purpose, navigated beta-probe systems combined with 18F-based radiotracer, relying on activity distribution surface estimation, have been proposed to generate reconstructed images. The clinical relevancy has been outlined by early studies where intraoperative functional information is leveraged although inducing low spatial resolution in reconstruction. To improve reconstruction quality, multiple acquisition models have been proposed. They involve the definition of attenuation matrix for designing radiation detection physics. Yet, they require high computational power for efficient intraoperative use. To address the problem, we propose a new acquisition model called Partition Model (PM) considering an existing model where coefficients of the matrix are taken from a look-up table (LUT). Our model is based upon the division of the LUT into averaged homogeneous values for assigning attenuation coefficients. We validated our model using in vitro datasets, where tumors and peri-tumoral tissues have been simulated. We compared our acquisition model with the o_-the-shelf LUT and the raw method. Acquisition models outperformed the raw method in term of tumor contrast (7.97:1 mean T:B) but with a difficulty of real-time use. Both acquisition models reached the same detection performance with references (0.8 mean AUC and 0.77 mean NCC), where PM slightly improves the mean tumor contrast up to 10.1:1 vs 9.9:1 with the LUT model and more importantly, it reduces the mean computation time by 7.5%. Our model gives a faster solution for an intraoperative use of navigated beta-probe surface imaging system, with improved image quality.

  12. Bone surface enhancement in ultrasound images using a new Doppler-based acquisition/processing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Tang, Songyuan; Tasciotti, Ennio; Righetti, Raffaella

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging has long been considered as a potential aid in orthopedic surgeries. US technologies are safe, portable and do not use radiations. This would make them a desirable tool for real-time assessment of fractures and to monitor fracture healing. However, image quality of US imaging methods in bone applications is limited by speckle, attenuation, shadow, multiple reflections and other imaging artifacts. While bone surfaces typically appear in US images as somewhat ‘brighter’ than soft tissue, they are often not easily distinguishable from the surrounding tissue. Therefore, US imaging methods aimed at segmenting bone surfaces need enhancement in image contrast prior to segmentation to improve the quality of the detected bone surface. In this paper, we present a novel acquisition/processing technique for bone surface enhancement in US images. Inspired by elastography and Doppler imaging methods, this technique takes advantage of the difference between the mechanical and acoustic properties of bones and those of soft tissues to make the bone surface more easily distinguishable in US images. The objective of this technique is to facilitate US-based bone segmentation methods and improve the accuracy of their outcomes. The newly proposed technique is tested both in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The results of these preliminary experiments suggest that the use of the proposed technique has the potential to significantly enhance the detectability of bone surfaces in noisy ultrasound images.

  13. Bone surface enhancement in ultrasound images using a new Doppler-based acquisition/processing method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xu; Tang, Songyuan; Tasciotti, Ennio; Righetti, Raffaella

    2018-01-17

    Ultrasound (US) imaging has long been considered as a potential aid in orthopedic surgeries. US technologies are safe, portable and do not use radiations. This would make them a desirable tool for real-time assessment of fractures and to monitor fracture healing. However, image quality of US imaging methods in bone applications is limited by speckle, attenuation, shadow, multiple reflections and other imaging artifacts. While bone surfaces typically appear in US images as somewhat 'brighter' than soft tissue, they are often not easily distinguishable from the surrounding tissue. Therefore, US imaging methods aimed at segmenting bone surfaces need enhancement in image contrast prior to segmentation to improve the quality of the detected bone surface. In this paper, we present a novel acquisition/processing technique for bone surface enhancement in US images. Inspired by elastography and Doppler imaging methods, this technique takes advantage of the difference between the mechanical and acoustic properties of bones and those of soft tissues to make the bone surface more easily distinguishable in US images. The objective of this technique is to facilitate US-based bone segmentation methods and improve the accuracy of their outcomes. The newly proposed technique is tested both in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The results of these preliminary experiments suggest that the use of the proposed technique has the potential to significantly enhance the detectability of bone surfaces in noisy ultrasound images.

  14. Image movement of the Elekta EPID during gantry rotation: Effects on the verification of dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Köhn, J; Licher, J; Mielke, M; Loutfi-Krauss, B; Blümer, N; Heine, B; Rödel, C; Scherf, C; Ramm, U

    2017-02-01

    The use of Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) to acquire dosimetric information, especially for 3D-back-projection, has been increasingly extended. For a precise back-projection, the accurate knowledge of the movement characteristics of the EPID during gantry rotation is an essential requirement. Measurements were conducted with different alignments of steel balls, which were mounted on the treatment table to avoid secondary effects such as the mechanical sag of gantry or jaws. The image movement of the EPID was determined by comparing the predicted projections of the phantoms with the EPID acquired image. Effects on dosimetric verifications were evaluated by γ-evaluation. The measurement results showed that the shift of the EPID image is larger in Y direction than in X direction. A maximum rotation of 0.3° and nodding of 2.4° of the detector was calculated. Changes in SDD were found up to 10mm. The angles of nodding are overall higher at discrete gantry angles in comparison to images detected for continuous rotation. Using these results we were able to correct the EPID images used for verification measurements. γ-evaluation revealed a significantly improved agreement between planned and measured EPID signal values. The measurement methods and algorithms introduced in this study are simple and comprehensive. Using these methods and algorithms we were able to quantify the major effects on geometrical and dosimetric characteristics. This allows the correction of EPID signal measurements for these effects related to the gantry angle, leading to an improved γ-evaluation for treatment plans. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Rotating Scatter Mask for Inexpensive Gamma-Ray Imaging in Orphan Source Search: Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FitzGerald, Jack G. M.

    2015-02-01

    The Rotating Scatter Mask (RSM) system is an inexpensive retrofit that provides imaging capabilities to scintillating detectors. Unlike traditional collimator systems that primarily absorb photons in order to form an image, this system primarily scatters the photons. Over a single rotation, there is a unique, smooth response curve for each defined source position. Testing was conducted using MCNPX simulations. Image reconstruction was performed using a chi-squared reconstruction technique. A simulated 100 uCi, Cs-137 source at 10 meters was detected after a single, 50-second rotation when a uniform terrestrial background was present. A Cs-137 extended source was also tested. The RSM field-of-view is 360 degrees azimuthally as well as 54 degrees above and 54 degrees below the horizontal plane. Since the RSM is built from polyethylene, the overall cost and weight of the system is low. The system was designed to search for lost or stolen radioactive material, also known as the orphan source problem.

  16. Computer simulation of schlieren images of rotationally symmetric plasma systems: a simple method.

    PubMed

    Noll, R; Haas, C R; Weikl, B; Herziger, G

    1986-03-01

    Schlieren techniques are commonly used methods for quantitative analysis of cylindrical or spherical index of refraction profiles. Many schlieren objects, however, are characterized by more complex geometries, so we have investigated the more general case of noncylindrical, rotationally symmetric distributions of index of refraction n(r,z). Assuming straight ray paths in the schlieren object we have calculated 2-D beam deviation profiles. It is shown that experimental schlieren images of the noncylindrical plasma generated by a plasma focus device can be simulated with these deviation profiles. The computer simulation allows a quantitative analysis of these schlieren images, which yields, for example, the plasma parameters, electron density, and electron density gradients.

  17. Retaining a Resilient and Enduring Workforce: Examination of Duty/Position Rotational Assignments for Civilian Acquisition Positions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-12

    decrease the number of errors due to fatigue” and improve production and efficiency ( Ivancevich , Konopaske, & Matteson, 2014, p. 151). “There are...Services, Ford, and Deloitte Services LP have utilized different forms of job rotation strategy” ( Ivancevich et al., 2014, p. 151). Further research...L. (2005, July). Job rotation. Credit Union Management, 28(7), 50–53. Ivancevich , J. M., Konopaske, R., & Matteson, M. T. (2014). Organizational

  18. An automatic detection method for the boiler pipe header based on real-time image acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yi; Liu, YunLong; Qin, Yongliang; Yang, XiangWei; Li, DengKe; Shen, DingJie

    2017-06-01

    Generally, an endoscope is used to test the inner part of the thermal power plants boiler pipe header. However, since the endoscope hose manual operation, the length and angle of the inserted probe cannot be controlled. Additionally, it has a big blind spot observation subject to the length of the endoscope wire. To solve these problems, an automatic detection method for the boiler pipe header based on real-time image acquisition and simulation comparison techniques was proposed. The magnetic crawler with permanent magnet wheel could carry the real-time image acquisition device to complete the crawling work and collect the real-time scene image. According to the obtained location by using the positioning auxiliary device, the position of the real-time detection image in a virtual 3-D model was calibrated. Through comparing of the real-time detection images and the computer simulation images, the defects or foreign matter fall into could be accurately positioning, so as to repair and clean up conveniently.

  19. Exploitation of realistic computational anthropomorphic phantoms for the optimization of nuclear imaging acquisition and processing protocols.

    PubMed

    Loudos, George K; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis G; Kagadis, George C

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations play a crucial role in nuclear medical imaging since they can provide the ground truth for clinical acquisitions, by integrating and quantifing all physical parameters that affect image quality. The last decade a number of realistic computational anthropomorphic models have been developed to serve imaging, as well as other biomedical engineering applications. The combination of MC techniques with realistic computational phantoms can provide a powerful tool for pre and post processing in imaging, data analysis and dosimetry. This work aims to create a global database for simulated Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) exams and the methodology, as well as the first elements are presented. Simulations are performed using the well validated GATE opensource toolkit, standard anthropomorphic phantoms and activity distribution of various radiopharmaceuticals, derived from literature. The resulting images, projections and sinograms of each study are provided in the database and can be further exploited to evaluate processing and reconstruction algorithms. Patient studies using different characteristics are included in the database and different computational phantoms were tested for the same acquisitions. These include the XCAT, Zubal and the Virtual Family, which some of which are used for the first time in nuclear imaging. The created database will be freely available and our current work is towards its extension by simulating additional clinical pathologies.

  20. Robust Depth Image Acquisition Using Modulated Pattern Projection and Probabilistic Graphical Models

    PubMed Central

    Kravanja, Jaka; Žganec, Mario; Žganec-Gros, Jerneja; Dobrišek, Simon; Štruc, Vitomir

    2016-01-01

    Depth image acquisition with structured light approaches in outdoor environments is a challenging problem due to external factors, such as ambient sunlight, which commonly affect the acquisition procedure. This paper presents a novel structured light sensor designed specifically for operation in outdoor environments. The sensor exploits a modulated sequence of structured light projected onto the target scene to counteract environmental factors and estimate a spatial distortion map in a robust manner. The correspondence between the projected pattern and the estimated distortion map is then established using a probabilistic framework based on graphical models. Finally, the depth image of the target scene is reconstructed using a number of reference frames recorded during the calibration process. We evaluate the proposed sensor on experimental data in indoor and outdoor environments and present comparative experiments with other existing methods, as well as commercial sensors. PMID:27775570

  1. Multimodality animal rotation imaging system (Mars) for in vivo detection of intraperitoneal tumors.

    PubMed

    Pizzonia, John; Holmberg, Jennie; Orton, Sean; Alvero, Ayesha; Viteri, Oscar; McLaughlin, William; Feke, Gil; Mor, Gil

    2012-01-01

    PROBLEM Ovarian cancer stem cells (OCSCs) have been postulated as the potential source of recurrence and chemoresistance. Therefore identification of OvCSC and their complete removal is a pivotal stage for the treatment of ovarian cancer. The objective of the following study was to develop a new in vivo imaging model that allows for the detection and monitoring of OCSCs. METHOD OF STUDY  OCSCs were labeled with X-Sight 761 Nanospheres and injected intra-peritoneally (i.p.) and sub-cutaneously (s.c.) to Athymic nude mice. The Carestream In-Vivo Imaging System FX was used to obtain X-ray and, concurrently, near-infrared fluorescence images. Tumor images in the mouse were observed from different angles by automatic rotation of the mouse. RESULTS  X-Sight 761 Nanospheres labeled almost 100% of the cells. No difference on growth rate was observed between labeled and unlabeled cells. Tumors were observed and monitoring revealed strong signaling up to 21 days. CONCLUSION  We describe the use of near-infrared nanoparticle probes for in vivo imaging of metastatic ovarian cancer models. Visualization of multiple sites around the animals was enhanced with the use of the Carestream Multimodal Animal Rotation System. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Knowledge Acquisition, Validation, and Maintenance in a Planning System for Automated Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve A.

    1996-01-01

    A key obstacle hampering fielding of AI planning applications is the considerable expense of developing, verifying, updating, and maintainting the planning knowledge base (KB). Planning systems must be able to compare favorably in terms of software lifecycle costs to other means of automation such as scripts or rule-based expert systems. This paper describes a planning application of automated imaging processing and our overall approach to knowledge acquisition for this application.

  3. High-resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging for large rotation angle targets based on segmented processing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Zhang, Xinggan; Bai, Yechao; Tang, Lan

    2017-01-01

    In inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging, the migration through resolution cells (MTRCs) will occur when the rotation angle of the moving target is large, thereby degrading image resolution. To solve this problem, an ISAR imaging method based on segmented preprocessing is proposed. In this method, the echoes of large rotating target are divided into several small segments, and every segment can generate a low-resolution image without MTRCs. Then, each low-resolution image is rotated back to the original position. After image registration and phase compensation, a high-resolution image can be obtained. Simulation and real experiments show that the proposed algorithm can deal with the radar system with different range and cross-range resolutions and significantly compensate the MTRCs.

  4. Histogram-based normalization technique on human brain magnetic resonance images from different acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaofei; Shi, Lin; Luo, Yishan; Yang, Wei; Li, Hongpeng; Liang, Peipeng; Li, Kuncheng; Mok, Vincent C T; Chu, Winnie C W; Wang, Defeng

    2015-07-28

    Intensity normalization is an important preprocessing step in brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) analysis. During MR image acquisition, different scanners or parameters would be used for scanning different subjects or the same subject at a different time, which may result in large intensity variations. This intensity variation will greatly undermine the performance of subsequent MRI processing and population analysis, such as image registration, segmentation, and tissue volume measurement. In this work, we proposed a new histogram normalization method to reduce the intensity variation between MRIs obtained from different acquisitions. In our experiment, we scanned each subject twice on two different scanners using different imaging parameters. With noise estimation, the image with lower noise level was determined and treated as the high-quality reference image. Then the histogram of the low-quality image was normalized to the histogram of the high-quality image. The normalization algorithm includes two main steps: (1) intensity scaling (IS), where, for the high-quality reference image, the intensities of the image are first rescaled to a range between the low intensity region (LIR) value and the high intensity region (HIR) value; and (2) histogram normalization (HN),where the histogram of low-quality image as input image is stretched to match the histogram of the reference image, so that the intensity range in the normalized image will also lie between LIR and HIR. We performed three sets of experiments to evaluate the proposed method, i.e., image registration, segmentation, and tissue volume measurement, and compared this with the existing intensity normalization method. It is then possible to validate that our histogram normalization framework can achieve better results in all the experiments. It is also demonstrated that the brain template with normalization preprocessing is of higher quality than the template with no normalization processing. We have proposed

  5. Super-global distortion correction for a rotational C-arm x-ray image intensifier.

    PubMed

    Liu, R R; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D R

    1999-09-01

    Image intensifier (II) distortion changes as a function of C-arm rotation angle because of changes in the orientation of the II with the earth's or other stray magnetic fields. For cone-beam computed tomography (CT), distortion correction for all angles is essential. The new super-global distortion correction consists of a model to continuously correct II distortion not only at each location in the image but for every rotational angle of the C arm. Calibration bead images were acquired with a standard C arm in 9 in. II mode. The super-global (SG) model is obtained from the single-plane global correction of the selected calibration images with given sampling angle interval. The fifth-order single-plane global corrections yielded a residual rms error of 0.20 pixels, while the SG model yielded a rms error of 0.21 pixels, a negligibly small difference. We evaluated the accuracy dependence of the SG model on various factors, such as the single-plane global fitting order, SG order, and angular sampling interval. We found that a good SG model can be obtained using a sixth-order SG polynomial fit based on the fifth-order single-plane global correction, and that a 10 degrees sampling interval was sufficient. Thus, the SG model saves processing resources and storage space. The residual errors from the mechanical errors of the x-ray system were also investigated, and found comparable with the SG residual error. Additionally, a single-plane global correction was done in the cylindrical coordinate system, and physical information about pincushion distortion and S distortion were observed and analyzed; however, this method is not recommended due to a lack of calculational efficiency. In conclusion, the SG model provides an accurate, fast, and simple correction for rotational C-arm images, which may be used for cone-beam CT.

  6. The Power of Imageability: How the Acquisition of Inflected Forms Is Facilitated in Highly Imageable Verbs and Nouns in Czech Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smolík, Filip; Kríž, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Imageability is the ability of words to elicit mental sensory images of their referents. Recent research has suggested that imageability facilitates the processing and acquisition of inflected word forms. The present study examined whether inflected word forms are acquired earlier in highly imageable words in Czech children. Parents of 317…

  7. Multi-channel pre-beamformed data acquisition system for research on advanced ultrasound imaging methods.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Chris C P; Yu, Alfred C H; Salimi, Nazila; Yiu, Billy Y S; Tsang, Ivan K H; Kerby, Benjamin; Azar, Reza Zahiri; Dickie, Kris

    2012-02-01

    The lack of open access to the pre-beamformed data of an ultrasound scanner has limited the research of novel imaging methods to a few privileged laboratories. To address this need, we have developed a pre-beamformed data acquisition (DAQ) system that can collect data over 128 array elements in parallel from the Ultrasonix series of research-purpose ultrasound scanners. Our DAQ system comprises three system-level blocks: 1) a connector board that interfaces with the array probe and the scanner through a probe connector port; 2) a main board that triggers DAQ and controls data transfer to a computer; and 3) four receiver boards that are each responsible for acquiring 32 channels of digitized raw data and storing them to the on-board memory. This system can acquire pre-beamformed data with 12-bit resolution when using a 40-MHz sampling rate. It houses a 16 GB RAM buffer that is sufficient to store 128 channels of pre-beamformed data for 8000 to 25 000 transmit firings, depending on imaging depth; corresponding to nearly a 2-s period in typical imaging setups. Following the acquisition, the data can be transferred through a USB 2.0 link to a computer for offline processing and analysis. To evaluate the feasibility of using the DAQ system for advanced imaging research, two proof-of-concept investigations have been conducted on beamforming and plane-wave B-flow imaging. Results show that adaptive beamforming algorithms such as the minimum variance approach can generate sharper images of a wire cross-section whose diameter is equal to the imaging wavelength (150 μm in our example). Also, planewave B-flow imaging can provide more consistent visualization of blood speckle movement given the higher temporal resolution of this imaging approach (2500 fps in our example).

  8. Quantitative outcome measures for systemic sclerosis-related Microangiopathy - Reliability of image acquisition in Nailfold Capillaroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dinsdale, Graham; Moore, Tonia; O'Leary, Neil; Berks, Michael; Roberts, Christopher; Manning, Joanne; Allen, John; Anderson, Marina; Cutolo, Maurizio; Hesselstrand, Roger; Howell, Kevin; Pizzorni, Carmen; Smith, Vanessa; Sulli, Alberto; Wildt, Marie; Taylor, Christopher; Murray, Andrea; Herrick, Ariane L

    2017-09-01

    Nailfold capillaroscopic parameters hold increasing promise as outcome measures for clinical trials in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Their inclusion as outcomes would often naturally require capillaroscopy images to be captured at several time points during any one study. Our objective was to assess repeatability of image acquisition (which has been little studied), as well as of measurement. 41 patients (26 with SSc, 15 with primary Raynaud's phenomenon) and 10 healthy controls returned for repeat high-magnification (300×) videocapillaroscopy mosaic imaging of 10 digits one week after initial imaging (as part of a larger study of reliability). Images were assessed in a random order by an expert blinded observer and 4 outcome measures extracted: (1) overall image grade and then (where possible) distal vessel locations were marked, allowing (2) vessel density (across the whole nailfold) to be calculated (3) apex width measurement and (4) giant vessel count. Intra-rater, intra-visit and intra-rater inter-visit (baseline vs. 1week) reliability were examined in 475 and 392 images respectively. A linear, mixed-effects model was used to estimate variance components, from which intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were determined. Intra-visit and inter-visit reliability estimates (ICCs) were (respectively): overall image grade, 0.97 and 0.90; vessel density, 0.92 and 0.65; mean vessel width, 0.91 and 0.79; presence of giant capillary, 0.68 and 0.56. These estimates were conditional on each parameter being measurable. Within-operator image analysis and acquisition are reproducible. Quantitative nailfold capillaroscopy, at least with a single observer, provides reliable outcome measures for clinical studies including randomised controlled trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Asynchronous data acquisition and on-the-fly analysis of dose fractionated cryoEM images by UCSFImage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueming; Zheng, Shawn; Agard, David A.; Cheng, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Newly developed direct electron detection cameras have a high image output frame rate that enables recording dose fractionated image stacks of frozen hydrated biological samples by electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM). Such novel image acquisition schemes provide opportunities to analyze cryoEM data in ways that were previously impossible. The file size of a dose fractionated image stack is 20 ~ 60 times larger than that of a single image. Thus, efficient data acquisition and on-the-fly analysis of a large number of dose-fractionated image stacks become a serious challenge to any cryoEM data acquisition system. We have developed a computer-assisted system, named UCSFImage4, for semi-automated cryo-EM image acquisition that implements an asynchronous data acquisition scheme. This facilitates efficient acquisition, on-the-fly motion correction, and CTF analysis of dose fractionated image stacks with a total time of ~60 seconds/exposure. Here we report the technical details and configuration of this system. PMID:26370395

  10. A comparison of peripheral imaging technologies for bone and muscle quantification: a technical review of image acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Wong, A.K.O.

    2016-01-01

    The choice of an appropriate imaging technique to quantify bone, muscle, or muscle adiposity needs to be guided by a thorough understanding of its competitive advantages over other modalities balanced by its limitations. This review details the technical machinery and methods behind peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), high-resolution (HR)-pQCT, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that drive successful depiction of bone and muscle morphometry, densitometry, and structure. It discusses a number of image acquisition settings, the challenges associated with using one versus another, and compares the risk-benefits across the different modalities. Issues related to all modalities including partial volume artifact, beam hardening, calibration, and motion assessment are also detailed. The review further provides data and images to illustrate differences between methods to better guide the reader in selecting an imaging method strategically. Overall, investigators should be cautious of the impact of imaging parameters on image signal or contrast-to-noise-ratios, and the need to report these settings in future publications. The effect of motion should be assessed on images and a decision made to exclude prior to segmentation. A more standardized approach to imaging bone and muscle on pQCT and MRI could enhance comparability across studies and could improve the quality of meta-analyses. PMID:27973379

  11. A comparison of peripheral imaging technologies for bone and muscle quantification: a technical review of image acquisition.

    PubMed

    Wong, A K

    2016-12-14

    The choice of an appropriate imaging technique to quantify bone, muscle, or muscle adiposity needs to be guided by a thorough understanding of its competitive advantages over other modalities balanced by its limitations. This review details the technical machinery and methods behind peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), high-resolution (HR)-pQCT, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that drive successful depiction of bone and muscle morphometry, densitometry, and structure. It discusses a number of image acquisition settings, the challenges associated with using one versus another, and compares the risk-benefits across the different modalities. Issues related to all modalities including partial volume artifact, beam hardening, calibration, and motion assessment are also detailed. The review further provides data and images to illustrate differences between methods to better guide the reader in selecting an imaging method strategically. Overall, investigators should be cautious of the impact of imaging parameters on image signal or contrast-to-noise-ratios, and the need to report these settings in future publications. The effect of motion should be assessed on images and a decision made to exclude prior to segmentation. A more standardized approach to imaging bone and muscle on pQCT and MRI could enhance comparability across studies and could improve the quality of meta-analyses.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of the rotator cuff: is it really accurate?

    PubMed

    Wnorowski, D C; Levinsohn, E M; Chamberlain, B C; McAndrew, D L

    1997-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used increasingly for evaluating the rotator cuff. This study of 39 shoulders (38 patients) compared the accuracy of MRI interpretation of rotator cuff integrity by a group of community hospital radiologists (clinical community scenario, CCS) with that of a musculoskeletal radiologist (experienced specialist scenario, ESS), relative to arthroscopy. For the CCS subgroup, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PV), negative PV, and accuracy for partial tears were: 0%, 68%, 0%, 82%, and 59%, respectively; for complete tears: 56%, 73%, 36%, 86%, and 69%, respectively; and for all tears combined: 85%, 52%, 50%, 87%, and 64%, respectively. For the ESS subgroup, the respective values for partial tears were: 20%, 88%, 20%, 88%, and 79%, respectively; for complete tears: 78%, 83%, 58%, 92%, and 82%, respectively; and for all tears: 71%, 71%, 59%, 81%, and 71%, respectively. We concluded that MRI assessment of the rotator cuff was not accurate relative to arthroscopy. MRI was most helpful if the result was negative, and MRI diagnosis of partial tear was of little value. Considering the high cost of shoulder MRI, this study has significant implications for the evaluation of patients with possible rotator cuff pathology.

  13. Accuracy in identifying the elbow rotation axis on simulated fluoroscopic images using a new anatomical landmark.

    PubMed

    Wiggers, J K; Snijders, R M; Dobbe, J G G; Streekstra, G J; den Hartog, D; Schep, N W L

    2017-11-01

    External fixation of the elbow requires identification of the elbow rotation axis, but the accuracy of traditional landmarks (capitellum and trochlea) on fluoroscopy is limited. The relative distance (RD) of the humerus may be helpful as additional landmark. The first aim of this study was to determine the optimal RD that corresponds to an on-axis lateral image of the elbow. The second aim was to assess whether the use of the optimal RD improves the surgical accuracy to identify the elbow rotation axis on fluoroscopy. CT scans of elbows from five volunteers were used to simulate fluoroscopy; the actual rotation axis was calculated with CT-based flexion-extension analysis. First, three observers measured the optimal RD on simulated fluoroscopy. The RD is defined as the distance between the dorsal part of the humerus and the projection of the posteromedial cortex of the distal humerus, divided by the anteroposterior diameter of the humerus. Second, eight trauma surgeons assessed the elbow rotation axis on simulated fluoroscopy. In a preteaching session, surgeons used traditional landmarks. The surgeons were then instructed how to use the optimal RD as additional landmark in a postteaching session. The deviation from the actual rotation axis was expressed as rotational and translational error (±SD). Measurement of the RD was robust and easily reproducible; the optimal RD was 45%. The surgeons identified the elbow rotation axis with a mean rotational error decreasing from 7.6° ± 3.4° to 6.7° ± 3.3° after teaching how to use the RD. The mean translational error decreased from 4.2 ± 2.0 to 3.7 ± 2.0 mm after teaching. The humeral RD as additional landmark yielded small but relevant improvements. Although fluoroscopy-based external fixator alignment to the elbow remains prone to error, it is recommended to use the RD as additional landmark.

  14. Evaluation of Acquisition Strategies for Image-Based Construction Site Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttas, S.; Braun, A.; Borrmann, A.; Stilla, U.

    2016-06-01

    Construction site monitoring is an essential task for keeping track of the ongoing construction work and providing up-to-date information for a Building Information Model (BIM). The BIM contains the as-planned states (geometry, schedule, costs, ...) of a construction project. For updating, the as-built state has to be acquired repeatedly and compared to the as-planned state. In the approach presented here, a 3D representation of the as-built state is calculated from photogrammetric images using multi-view stereo reconstruction. On construction sites one has to cope with several difficulties like security aspects, limited accessibility, occlusions or construction activity. Different acquisition strategies and techniques, namely (i) terrestrial acquisition with a hand-held camera, (ii) aerial acquisition using a Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and (iii) acquisition using a fixed stereo camera pair at the boom of the crane, are tested on three test sites. They are assessed considering the special needs for the monitoring tasks and limitations on construction sites. The three scenarios are evaluated based on the ability of automation, the required effort for acquisition, the necessary equipment and its maintaining, disturbance of the construction works, and on the accuracy and completeness of the resulting point clouds. Based on the experiences during the test cases the following conclusions can be drawn: Terrestrial acquisition has the lowest requirements on the device setup but lacks on automation and coverage. The crane camera shows the lowest flexibility but the highest grade of automation. The UAV approach can provide the best coverage by combining nadir and oblique views, but can be limited by obstacles and security aspects. The accuracy of the point clouds is evaluated based on plane fitting of selected building parts. The RMS errors of the fitted parts range from 1 to a few cm for the UAV and the hand-held scenario. First results show that the crane camera

  15. Development of a hemispherical rotational modulation collimator system for imaging spatial distribution of radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, M.; Lee, S.; Kim, G.; Kim, H. S.; Rho, J.; Ok, J. G.

    2017-12-01

    Detecting and mapping the spatial distribution of radioactive materials is of great importance for environmental and security issues. We design and present a novel hemispherical rotational modulation collimator (H-RMC) system which can visualize the location of the radiation source by collecting signals from incident rays that go through collimator masks. The H-RMC system comprises a servo motor-controlled rotating module and a hollow heavy-metallic hemisphere with slits/slats equally spaced with the same angle subtended from the main axis. In addition, we also designed an auxiliary instrument to test the imaging performance of the H-RMC system, comprising a high-precision x- and y-axis staging station on which one can mount radiation sources of various shapes. We fabricated the H-RMC system which can be operated in a fully-automated fashion through the computer-based controller, and verify the accuracy and reproducibility of the system by measuring the rotational and linear positions with respect to the programmed values. Our H-RMC system may provide a pivotal tool for spatial radiation imaging with high reliability and accuracy.

  16. Rotation and scale invariant shape context registration for remote sensing images with background variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jie; Zhang, Shumei; Cao, Shixiang

    2015-01-01

    Multitemporal remote sensing images generally suffer from background variations, which significantly disrupt traditional region feature and descriptor abstracts, especially between pre and postdisasters, making registration by local features unreliable. Because shapes hold relatively stable information, a rotation and scale invariant shape context based on multiscale edge features is proposed. A multiscale morphological operator is adapted to detect edges of shapes, and an equivalent difference of Gaussian scale space is built to detect local scale invariant feature points along the detected edges. Then, a rotation invariant shape context with improved distance discrimination serves as a feature descriptor. For a distance shape context, a self-adaptive threshold (SAT) distance division coordinate system is proposed, which improves the discriminative property of the feature descriptor in mid-long pixel distances from the central point while maintaining it in shorter ones. To achieve rotation invariance, the magnitude of Fourier transform in one-dimension is applied to calculate angle shape context. Finally, the residual error is evaluated after obtaining thin-plate spline transformation between reference and sensed images. Experimental results demonstrate the robustness, efficiency, and accuracy of this automatic algorithm.

  17. Point-and-stare operation and high-speed image acquisition in real-time hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Richard D.; Bannon, David P.; Ciccone, Domenic; Hill, Sam L.

    2010-04-01

    The design and optical performance of a small-footprint, low-power, turnkey, Point-And-Stare hyperspectral analyzer, capable of fully automated field deployment in remote and harsh environments, is described. The unit is packaged for outdoor operation in an IP56 protected air-conditioned enclosure and includes a mechanically ruggedized fully reflective, aberration-corrected hyperspectral VNIR (400-1000 nm) spectrometer with a board-level detector optimized for point and stare operation, an on-board computer capable of full system data-acquisition and control, and a fully functioning internal hyperspectral calibration system for in-situ system spectral calibration and verification. Performance data on the unit under extremes of real-time survey operation and high spatial and high spectral resolution will be discussed. Hyperspectral acquisition including full parameter tracking is achieved by the addition of a fiber-optic based downwelling spectral channel for solar illumination tracking during hyperspectral acquisition and the use of other sensors for spatial and directional tracking to pinpoint view location. The system is mounted on a Pan-And-Tilt device, automatically controlled from the analyzer's on-board computer, making the HyperspecTM particularly adaptable for base security, border protection and remote deployments. A hyperspectral macro library has been developed to control hyperspectral image acquisition, system calibration and scene location control. The software allows the system to be operated in a fully automatic mode or under direct operator control through a GigE interface.

  18. Self-gated 4D multiphase, steady-state imaging with contrast enhancement (MUSIC) using rotating cartesian K-space (ROCK): Validation in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Han, Fei; Zhou, Ziwu; Han, Eric; Gao, Yu; Nguyen, Kim-Lien; Finn, J Paul; Hu, Peng

    2017-08-01

    To develop and validate a cardiac-respiratory self-gating strategy for the recently proposed multiphase steady-state imaging with contrast enhancement (MUSIC) technique. The proposed SG strategy uses the ROtating Cartesian K-space (ROCK) sampling, which allows for retrospective k-space binning based on motion surrogates derived from k-space center line. The k-space bins are reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm. Ten pediatric patients underwent cardiac MRI for clinical reasons. The original MUSIC and 2D-CINE images were acquired as a part of the clinical protocol, followed by the ROCK-MUSIC acquisition, all under steady-state intravascular distribution of ferumoxytol. Subjective scores and image sharpness were used to compare the images of ROCK-MUSIC and original MUSIC. All scans were completed successfully without complications. The ROCK-MUSIC acquisition took 5 ± 1 min, compared to 8 ± 2 min for the original MUSIC. Image scores of ROCK-MUSIC were significantly better than original MUSIC at the ventricular outflow tracts (3.9 ± 0.3 vs. 3.3 ± 0.6, P < 0.05). There was a strong trend toward superior image scores for ROCK-MUSIC in the other anatomic locations. ROCK-MUSIC provided images of equal or superior image quality compared to original MUSIC, and this was achievable with 40% savings in scan time and without the need for physiologic signal. Magn Reson Med 78:472-483, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. High speed CMOS acquisition system based on FPGA embedded image processing for electro-optical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosu-Hamzescu, Mihnea; Polonschii, Cristina; Oprea, Sergiu; Popescu, Dragos; David, Sorin; Bratu, Dumitru; Gheorghiu, Eugen

    2018-06-01

    Electro-optical measurements, i.e., optical waveguides and plasmonic based electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (P-EIS), are based on the sensitive dependence of refractive index of electro-optical sensors on surface charge density, modulated by an AC electrical field applied to the sensor surface. Recently, P-EIS has emerged as a new analytical tool that can resolve local impedance with high, optical spatial resolution, without using microelectrodes. This study describes a high speed image acquisition and processing system for electro-optical measurements, based on a high speed complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor and a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) board. The FPGA is used to configure CMOS parameters, as well as to receive and locally process the acquired images by performing Fourier analysis for each pixel, deriving the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier coefficients for the AC field frequencies. An AC field generator, for single or multi-sine signals, is synchronized with the high speed acquisition system for phase measurements. The system was successfully used for real-time angle-resolved electro-plasmonic measurements from 30 Hz up to 10 kHz, providing results consistent to ones obtained by a conventional electrical impedance approach. The system was able to detect amplitude variations with a relative variation of ±1%, even for rather low sampling rates per period (i.e., 8 samples per period). The PC (personal computer) acquisition and control software allows synchronized acquisition for multiple FPGA boards, making it also suitable for simultaneous angle-resolved P-EIS imaging.

  20. Does successful rotator cuff repair improve muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff? A retrospective magnetic resonance imaging study performed shortly after surgery as a reference.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Noritaka; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Shitara, Hitoshi; Ichinose, Tsuyoshi; Shimoyama, Daisuke; Sasaki, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Kakuta, Yohei; Osawa, Toshihisa; Takagishi, Kenji

    2017-06-01

    Muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration in the rotator cuff muscles are often observed in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears. The recovery from these conditions has not been clarified. Ninety-four patients were included in this study. The improvement in muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration in successfully repaired rotator cuff tears was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging at 1 year and 2 years after surgery and was compared with muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration observed on magnetic resonance imaging at 2 weeks after surgery to discount any changes due to the medial retraction of the torn tendon. The patients' muscle strength was evaluated in abduction and external rotation. Muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus were significantly improved at 2 years after surgery in comparison to 2 weeks after surgery. The subjects' abduction and external rotation strength was also significantly improved at 2 years after surgery in comparison to the preoperative values. Patients whose occupation ratio was improved had a better abduction range of motion, stronger abduction strength, and higher Constant score. Patients whose fatty infiltration was improved had a better range of motion in flexion and abduction, whereas the improvements of muscle strength and the Constant score were similar in the group that showed an improvement of fatty infiltration and the group that did not. Muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration can improve after rotator cuff repair. The strengths of abduction and external rotation were also improved at 2 years after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Region-based multifocus image fusion for the precise acquisition of Pap smear images.

    PubMed

    Tello-Mijares, Santiago; Bescós, Jesús

    2018-05-01

    A multifocus image fusion method to obtain a single focused image from a sequence of microscopic high-magnification Papanicolau source (Pap smear) images is presented. These images, captured each in a different position of the microscope lens, frequently show partially focused cells or parts of cells, which makes them unpractical for the direct application of image analysis techniques. The proposed method obtains a focused image with a high preservation of original pixels information while achieving a negligible visibility of the fusion artifacts. The method starts by identifying the best-focused image of the sequence; then, it performs a mean-shift segmentation over this image; the focus level of the segmented regions is evaluated in all the images of the sequence, and best-focused regions are merged in a single combined image; finally, this image is processed with an adaptive artifact removal process. The combination of a region-oriented approach, instead of block-based approaches, and a minimum modification of the value of focused pixels in the original images achieve a highly contrasted image with no visible artifacts, which makes this method especially convenient for the medical imaging domain. The proposed method is compared with several state-of-the-art alternatives over a representative dataset. The experimental results show that our proposal obtains the best and more stable quality indicators. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  2. Image-based tracking system for vibration measurement of a rotating object using a laser scanning vibrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dongkyu, E-mail: akein@gist.ac.kr; Khalil, Hossam; Jo, Youngjoon

    2016-06-28

    An image-based tracking system using laser scanning vibrometer is developed for vibration measurement of a rotating object. The proposed system unlike a conventional one can be used where the position or velocity sensor such as an encoder cannot be attached to an object. An image processing algorithm is introduced to detect a landmark and laser beam based on their colors. Then, through using feedback control system, the laser beam can track a rotating object.

  3. Critical object recognition in millimeter-wave images with robustness to rotation and scale.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzade, Hoda; Ghojogh, Benyamin; Faezi, Sina; Shabany, Mahdi

    2017-06-01

    Locating critical objects is crucial in various security applications and industries. For example, in security applications, such as in airports, these objects might be hidden or covered under shields or secret sheaths. Millimeter-wave images can be utilized to discover and recognize the critical objects out of the hidden cases without any health risk due to their non-ionizing features. However, millimeter-wave images usually have waves in and around the detected objects, making object recognition difficult. Thus, regular image processing and classification methods cannot be used for these images and additional pre-processings and classification methods should be introduced. This paper proposes a novel pre-processing method for canceling rotation and scale using principal component analysis. In addition, a two-layer classification method is introduced and utilized for recognition. Moreover, a large dataset of millimeter-wave images is collected and created for experiments. Experimental results show that a typical classification method such as support vector machines can recognize 45.5% of a type of critical objects at 34.2% false alarm rate (FAR), which is a drastically poor recognition. The same method within the proposed recognition framework achieves 92.9% recognition rate at 0.43% FAR, which indicates a highly significant improvement. The significant contribution of this work is to introduce a new method for analyzing millimeter-wave images based on machine vision and learning approaches, which is not yet widely noted in the field of millimeter-wave image analysis.

  4. Near-equinox spectro-imaging of Uranus aurorae sampling two planetary rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, Laurent

    2012-10-01

    A quarter of century after their discovery by Voyager 2 in 1986, HST sucessfully re-detected Uranus aurorae in 2011 {and also in 1998}, providing the first images of these emissions. Overall, they differ from other well-known planetary aurorae, and their characteristics vary at very different timescales, from minutes to decades. These results have provided the first insights on the poorly known Uranian magnetosphere in 26 years, and opened a rich field of investigation, together with a set of open questions. In addition, while solstice conditions prevailed in 1986, Uranus lay close to equinox in 2011, with the S and N magnetic poles alternately facing the Sun every half a rotation. This unique configuration of an asymmetric magnetosphere, extremely variable over a single rotation, had never been investigated before and deserved to be fully analyzed. New observations of the Uranian aurorae are therefore vital for our understanding of planetary magnetospheres, and HST is the only tool able to remotely investigate these emissions. We thus propose to re-observe Uranus with STIS spectro-imaging at next opposition {29 Sept. 2012} over two planetary rotations, in order to enlarge the set of positive detections and to sample the rotational dynamics of auroral processes and magnetosphere/solar wind interaction. To increase the probability of any possible auroral brightening triggered by magnetospheric compressions, observations will be scheduled in advance during active solar wind conditions at Uranus, near the maximum of solar cycle 24. Additional objectives will include the characterization of the extended neutral corona and the spectral response of atmospheric species.

  5. The impact of cine EPID image acquisition frame rate on markerless soft-tissue tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Stephen, E-mail: syip@lroc.harvard.edu; Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor autotracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87 Hz with an amorphous silicon portal imager (AS1000, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The maximum frame rate of 12.87 Hz is imposed by the EPID. Low frame rate images were obtained bymore » continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for autotracking. The difference between the programmed and autotracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at 11 field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise are correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the autotracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29 Hz. Above 4.29 Hz, changes in errors were negligible withδ < 1.60 mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R = 0.94) and patient studies (R = 0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R −0.58 and −0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusions: Cine

  6. Three-dimensional image acquisition and reconstruction system on a mobile device based on computer-generated integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Erdenebat, Munkh-Uchral; Kim, Byeong-Jun; Piao, Yan-Ling; Park, Seo-Yeon; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Piao, Mei-Lan; Yoo, Kwan-Hee; Kim, Nam

    2017-10-01

    A mobile three-dimensional image acquisition and reconstruction system using a computer-generated integral imaging technique is proposed. A depth camera connected to the mobile device acquires the color and depth data of a real object simultaneously, and an elemental image array is generated based on the original three-dimensional information for the object, with lens array specifications input into the mobile device. The three-dimensional visualization of the real object is reconstructed on the mobile display through optical or digital reconstruction methods. The proposed system is implemented successfully and the experimental results certify that the system is an effective and interesting method of displaying real three-dimensional content on a mobile device.

  7. New developments in electron microscopy for serial image acquisition of neuronal profiles.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshiyuki

    2015-02-01

    Recent developments in electron microscopy largely automate the continuous acquisition of serial electron micrographs (EMGs), previously achieved by laborious manual serial ultrathin sectioning using an ultramicrotome and ultrastructural image capture process with transmission electron microscopy. The new systems cut thin sections and capture serial EMGs automatically, allowing for acquisition of large data sets in a reasonably short time. The new methods are focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy, ultramicrotome/serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, automated tape-collection ultramicrotome/scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope camera array. In this review, their positive and negative aspects are discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-21

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ~45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  9. Dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Static whole body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole body PET acquisition protocol of ~45min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6-min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (6 passes x 7 bed positions, each scanned for 45sec). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares (OLS) Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of 10 different clinically

  10. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ˜15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ˜45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  11. Task-based data-acquisition optimization for sparse image reconstruction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yujia; Lou, Yang; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2017-03-01

    Conventional wisdom dictates that imaging hardware should be optimized by use of an ideal observer (IO) that exploits full statistical knowledge of the class of objects to be imaged, without consideration of the reconstruction method to be employed. However, accurate and tractable models of the complete object statistics are often difficult to determine in practice. Moreover, in imaging systems that employ compressive sensing concepts, imaging hardware and (sparse) image reconstruction are innately coupled technologies. We have previously proposed a sparsity-driven ideal observer (SDIO) that can be employed to optimize hardware by use of a stochastic object model that describes object sparsity. The SDIO and sparse reconstruction method can therefore be "matched" in the sense that they both utilize the same statistical information regarding the class of objects to be imaged. To efficiently compute SDIO performance, the posterior distribution is estimated by use of computational tools developed recently for variational Bayesian inference. Subsequently, the SDIO test statistic can be computed semi-analytically. The advantages of employing the SDIO instead of a Hotelling observer are systematically demonstrated in case studies in which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data acquisition schemes are optimized for signal detection tasks.

  12. Retaining a Resilient and Enduring Workforce: Examination of Duty/Position Rotational Assignments for Civilian Acquisition Positions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-12

    the Defense Acquisition Workforce becomes increasingly volatile due to reduced resources, an aging workforce, limitations imposed by the BCA, and...development frameworks is visualized in Figures 3 through 6. “[S]enior leaders in the military are expected to yield a ‘ rich array of career...selectively at mid-grade ranks, so that a base of deep understanding is built before these leaders become senior in position and are expected to shape and

  13. Evidence for non-synchronous rotation of Europa. Galileo Imaging Team.

    PubMed

    Geissler, P E; Greenberg, R; Hoppa, G; Helfenstein, P; McEwen, A; Pappalardo, R; Tufts, R; Ockert-Bell, M; Sullivan, R; Greeley, R; Belton, M J; Denk, T; Clark, B; Burns, J; Veverka, J

    1998-01-22

    Non-synchronous rotation of Europa was predicted on theoretical grounds, by considering the orbitally averaged torque exerted by Jupiter on the satellite's tidal bulges. If Europa's orbit were circular, or the satellite were comprised of a frictionless fluid without tidal dissipation, this torque would average to zero. However, Europa has a small forced eccentricity e approximately 0.01 , generated by its dynamical interaction with Io and Ganymede, which should cause the equilibrium spin rate of the satellite to be slightly faster than synchronous. Recent gravity data suggest that there may be a permanent asymmetry in Europa's interior mass distribution which is large enough to offset the tidal torque; hence, if non-synchronous rotation is observed, the surface is probably decoupled from the interior by a subsurface layer of liquid or ductile ice. Non-synchronous rotation was invoked to explain Europa's global system of lineaments and an equatorial region of rifting seen in Voyager images. Here we report an analysis of the orientation and distribution of these surface features, based on initial observations made by the Galileo spacecraft. We find evidence that Europa spins faster than the synchronous rate (or did so in the past), consistent with the possibility of a global subsurface ocean.

  14. Optimization of a shorter variable-acquisition time for legs to achieve true whole-body PET/CT images.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Takuro; Miwa, Kenta; Murata, Taisuke; Miyaji, Noriaki; Wagatsuma, Kei; Motegi, Kazuki; Terauchi, Takashi; Koizumi, Mitsuru

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate PET images as a function of acquisition time for various leg sizes, and to optimize a shorter variable-acquisition time protocol for legs to achieve better qualitative and quantitative accuracy of true whole-body PET/CT images. The diameters of legs to be modeled as phantoms were defined based on data derived from 53 patients. This study analyzed PET images of a NEMA phantom and three plastic bottle phantoms (diameter, 5.68, 8.54 and 10.7 cm) that simulated the human body and legs, respectively. The phantoms comprised two spheres (diameters, 10 and 17 mm) containing fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose solution with sphere-to-background ratios of 4 at a background radioactivity level of 2.65 kBq/mL. All PET data were reconstructed with acquisition times ranging from 10 to 180, and 1200 s. We visually evaluated image quality and determined the coefficient of variance (CV) of the background, contrast and the quantitative %error of the hot spheres, and then determined two shorter variable-acquisition protocols for legs. Lesion detectability and quantitative accuracy determined based on maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) in PET images of a patient using the proposed protocols were also evaluated. A larger phantom and a shorter acquisition time resulted in increased background noise on images and decreased the contrast in hot spheres. A visual score of ≥ 1.5 was obtained when the acquisition time was ≥ 30 s for three leg phantoms, and ≥ 120 s for the NEMA phantom. The quantitative %errors of the 10- and 17-mm spheres in the leg phantoms were ± 15 and ± 10%, respectively, in PET images with a high CV (scan < 30 s). The mean SUV max of three lesions using the current fixed-acquisition and two proposed variable-acquisition time protocols in the clinical study were 3.1, 3.1 and 3.2, respectively, which did not significantly differ. Leg acquisition time per bed position of

  15. Reduced administered activity, reduced acquisition time, and preserved image quality for the new CZT camera.

    PubMed

    Oddstig, Jenny; Hedeer, Fredrik; Jögi, Jonas; Carlsson, Marcus; Hindorf, Cecilia; Engblom, Henrik

    2013-02-01

    For a 1-day myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) the recommendations for administered activity stated in the EANM guidelines results in an effective dose of up to 16 mSv per patient. Recently, a gamma camera system, based on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) technology, was introduced. This technique has the potential to reduce the effective dose and scan time compared to the conventional NaI gamma camera. The aim of this study was to investigate if the effective dose can be reduced with a preserved image quality using CZT technology in MPS. In total, 150 patients were included in the study. All underwent a 1-day (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin stress-rest protocol and were divided into three subgroups (n = 50 in each group) with 4, 3, and 2.5 MBq/kg body weight of administered activity in the stress examination, respectively. The acquisition time was increased in proportion to the decrease in administered activity. All examinations were analyzed for image quality by visual grading on a 4-point scale (1 = poor, 2 = adequate, 3 = good, 4 = excellent), by two expert readers. The total effective dose (stress + rest) decreased from 9.3 to 5.8 mSv comparing 4 to 2.5 MBq/kg body weight. For the patients undergoing stress examination only (35%) the effective dose, administrating 2.5 MBq/kg, was 1.4 mSv. The image acquisition times for 2.5 MBq/kg body weight were 475 and 300 seconds (stress and rest) compared to 900 seconds for each when using conventional MPS. The average image quality was 3.7 ± 0.5, 3.8 ± 0.5, and 3.8 ± 0.4 for the stress images and 3.5 ± 0.6, 3.6 ± 0.6, and 3.5 ± 0.6 for the rest images and showed no statistically significant difference (P = .62) among the 4, 3, and 2.5 MBq/kg groups. The new CZT technology can be used to considerably decrease the effective dose and acquisition time for MPS with preserved high image quality.

  16. MO-DE-BRA-06: 3D Image Acquisition and Reconstruction Explained with Online Animations

    SciTech Connect

    Kesner, A

    Purpose: Understanding the principles of 3D imaging and image reconstruction is fundamental to the field of medical imaging. Clinicians, technologists, physicists, patients, students, and inquisitive minds all stand to benefit from greater comprehension of the supporting technologies. To help explain the basic principles of 3D imaging, we developed multi-frame animations that convey the concepts of tomographic imaging. The series of free (gif) animations are accessible online, and provide a multimedia introduction to the main concepts of image reconstruction. Methods: Text and animations were created to convey the principles of analytic tomography in CT, PET, and SPECT. Specific topics covered included:more » principles of sinograms/image data storage, forward projection, principles of PET acquisitions, and filtered backprojection. A total of 8 animations were created and presented for CT, PET, and digital phantom formats. In addition, a free executable is also provided to allow users to create their own tomographic animations – providing an opportunity for interaction and personalization to help foster user interest. Results: Tutorial text and animations have been posted online, freely available to view or download. The animations are in first position in a google search of “image reconstruction animations”. The website currently receives approximately 200 hits/month, from all over the world, and the usage is growing. Positive feedback has been collected from users. Conclusion: We identified a need for improved teaching tools to help visualize the (temporally variant) concepts of image reconstruction, and have shown that animations can be a useful tool for this aspect of education. Furthermore, posting animations freely on the web has shown to be a good way to maximize their impact in the community. In future endeavors, we hope to expand this animated content, to cover principles of iterative reconstruction, as well as other phenomena relating to imaging.« less

  17. Design and DSP implementation of star image acquisition and star point fast acquiring and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guohui; Wang, Xiaodong; Hao, Zhihang

    2006-02-01

    Star sensor is a special high accuracy photoelectric sensor. Attitude acquisition time is an important function index of star sensor. In this paper, the design target is to acquire 10 samples per second dynamic performance. On the basis of analyzing CCD signals timing and star image processing, a new design and a special parallel architecture for improving star image processing are presented in this paper. In the design, the operation moving the data in expanded windows including the star to the on-chip memory of DSP is arranged in the invalid period of CCD frame signal. During the CCD saving the star image to memory, DSP processes the data in the on-chip memory. This parallelism greatly improves the efficiency of processing. The scheme proposed here results in enormous savings of memory normally required. In the scheme, DSP HOLD mode and CPLD technology are used to make a shared memory between CCD and DSP. The efficiency of processing is discussed in numerical tests. Only in 3.5ms is acquired the five lightest stars in the star acquisition stage. In 43us, the data in five expanded windows including stars are moved into the internal memory of DSP, and in 1.6ms, five star coordinates are achieved in the star tracking stage.

  18. Acquisition performance of LAPAN-A3/IPB multispectral imager in real-time mode of operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim, P. R.; Permala, R.; Jayani, A. P. S.

    2018-05-01

    LAPAN-A3/IPB satellite was launched in June 2016 and its multispectral imager has been producing Indonesian coverage images. In order to improve its support for remote sensing application, the imager should produce images with high quality and quantity. To improve the quantity of LAPAN-A3/IPB multispectral image captured, image acquisition could be executed in real-time mode from LAPAN ground station in Bogor when the satellite passes west Indonesia region. This research analyses the performance of LAPAN-A3/IPB multispectral imager acquisition in real-time mode, in terms of image quality and quantity, under assumption of several on-board and ground segment limitations. Results show that with real-time operation mode, LAPAN-A3/IPB multispectral imager could produce twice as much as image coverage compare to recorded mode. However, the images produced in real-time mode will have slightly degraded quality due to image compression process involved. Based on several analyses that have been done in this research, it is recommended to use real-time acquisition mode whenever it possible, unless for some circumstances that strictly not allow any quality degradation of the images produced.

  19. Variability of textural features in FDG PET images due to different acquisition modes and reconstruction parameters.

    PubMed

    Galavis, Paulina E; Hollensen, Christian; Jallow, Ngoneh; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Jeraj, Robert

    2010-10-01

    Characterization of textural features (spatial distributions of image intensity levels) has been considered as a tool for automatic tumor segmentation. The purpose of this work is to study the variability of the textural features in PET images due to different acquisition modes and reconstruction parameters. Twenty patients with solid tumors underwent PET/CT scans on a GE Discovery VCT scanner, 45-60 minutes post-injection of 10 mCi of [(18)F]FDG. Scans were acquired in both 2D and 3D modes. For each acquisition the raw PET data was reconstructed using five different reconstruction parameters. Lesions were segmented on a default image using the threshold of 40% of maximum SUV. Fifty different texture features were calculated inside the tumors. The range of variations of the features were calculated with respect to the average value. Fifty textural features were classified based on the range of variation in three categories: small, intermediate and large variability. Features with small variability (range ≤ 5%) were entropy-first order, energy, maximal correlation coefficient (second order feature) and low-gray level run emphasis (high-order feature). The features with intermediate variability (10% ≤ range ≤ 25%) were entropy-GLCM, sum entropy, high gray level run emphsis, gray level non-uniformity, small number emphasis, and entropy-NGL. Forty remaining features presented large variations (range > 30%). Textural features such as entropy-first order, energy, maximal correlation coefficient, and low-gray level run emphasis exhibited small variations due to different acquisition modes and reconstruction parameters. Features with low level of variations are better candidates for reproducible tumor segmentation. Even though features such as contrast-NGTD, coarseness, homogeneity, and busyness have been previously used, our data indicated that these features presented large variations, therefore they could not be considered as a good candidates for tumor

  20. Variability of textural features in FDG PET images due to different acquisition modes and reconstruction parameters

    PubMed Central

    GALAVIS, PAULINA E.; HOLLENSEN, CHRISTIAN; JALLOW, NGONEH; PALIWAL, BHUDATT; JERAJ, ROBERT

    2014-01-01

    Background Characterization of textural features (spatial distributions of image intensity levels) has been considered as a tool for automatic tumor segmentation. The purpose of this work is to study the variability of the textural features in PET images due to different acquisition modes and reconstruction parameters. Material and methods Twenty patients with solid tumors underwent PET/CT scans on a GE Discovery VCT scanner, 45–60 minutes post-injection of 10 mCi of [18F]FDG. Scans were acquired in both 2D and 3D modes. For each acquisition the raw PET data was reconstructed using five different reconstruction parameters. Lesions were segmented on a default image using the threshold of 40% of maximum SUV. Fifty different texture features were calculated inside the tumors. The range of variations of the features were calculated with respect to the average value. Results Fifty textural features were classified based on the range of variation in three categories: small, intermediate and large variability. Features with small variability (range ≤ 5%) were entropy-first order, energy, maximal correlation coefficient (second order feature) and low-gray level run emphasis (high-order feature). The features with intermediate variability (10% ≤ range ≤ 25%) were entropy-GLCM, sum entropy, high gray level run emphsis, gray level non-uniformity, small number emphasis, and entropy-NGL. Forty remaining features presented large variations (range > 30%). Conclusion Textural features such as entropy-first order, energy, maximal correlation coefficient, and low-gray level run emphasis exhibited small variations due to different acquisition modes and reconstruction parameters. Features with low level of variations are better candidates for reproducible tumor segmentation. Even though features such as contrast-NGTD, coarseness, homogeneity, and busyness have been previously used, our data indicated that these features presented large variations, therefore they could not be

  1. Four-channel surface coil array for sequential CW-EPR image acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Ayano; Emoto, Miho; Fujii, Hirotada; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    This article describes a four-channel surface coil array to increase the area of visualization for continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging. A 776-MHz surface coil array was constructed with four independent surface coil resonators and three kinds of switches. Control circuits for switching the resonators were also built to sequentially perform EPR image acquisition for each resonator. The resonance frequencies of the resonators were shifted using PIN diode switches to decouple the inductively coupled coils. To investigate the area of visualization with the surface coil array, three-dimensional EPR imaging was performed using a glass cell phantom filled with a solution of nitroxyl radicals. The area of visualization obtained with the surface coil array was increased approximately 3.5-fold in comparison to that with a single surface coil resonator. Furthermore, to demonstrate the applicability of this surface coil array to animal imaging, three-dimensional EPR imaging was performed in a living mouse with an exogenously injected nitroxyl radical imaging agent.

  2. Target recognition and phase acquisition by using incoherent digital holographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Munseob; Lee, Byung-Tak

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we proposed the Incoherent Digital Holographic Imaging (IDHI) for recognition and phase information of dedicated target. Although recent development of a number of target recognition techniques such as LIDAR, there have limited success in target discrimination, in part due to low-resolution, low scanning speed, and computation power. In the paper, the proposed system consists of the incoherent light source, such as LED, Michelson interferometer, and digital CCD for acquisition of four phase shifting image. First of all, to compare with relative coherence, we used a source as laser and LED, respectively. Through numerical reconstruction by using the four phase shifting method and Fresnel diffraction method, we recovered the intensity and phase image of USAF resolution target apart from about 1.0m distance. In this experiment, we show 1.2 times improvement in resolution compared to conventional imaging. Finally, to confirm the recognition result of camouflaged targets with the same color from background, we carry out to test holographic imaging in incoherent light. In this result, we showed the possibility of a target detection and recognition that used three dimensional shape and size signatures, numerical distance from phase information of obtained holographic image.

  3. Imaging acquisition display performance: an evaluation and discussion of performance metrics and procedures.

    PubMed

    Silosky, Michael S; Marsh, Rebecca M; Scherzinger, Ann L

    2016-07-08

    When The Joint Commission updated its Requirements for Diagnostic Imaging Services for hospitals and ambulatory care facilities on July 1, 2015, among the new requirements was an annual performance evaluation for acquisition workstation displays. The purpose of this work was to evaluate a large cohort of acquisition displays used in a clinical environment and compare the results with existing performance standards provided by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Measurements of the minimum luminance, maximum luminance, and luminance uniformity, were performed on 42 acquisition displays across multiple imaging modalities. The mean values, standard deviations, and ranges were calculated for these metrics. Additionally, visual evaluations of contrast, spatial resolution, and distortion were performed using either the Society of Motion Pictures and Television Engineers test pattern or the TG-18-QC test pattern. Finally, an evaluation of local nonuniformities was performed using either a uniform white display or the TG-18-UN80 test pattern. Displays tested were flat panel, liquid crystal displays that ranged from less than 1 to up to 10 years of use and had been built by a wide variety of manufacturers. The mean values for Lmin and Lmax for the displays tested were 0.28 ± 0.13 cd/m2 and 135.07 ± 33.35 cd/m2, respectively. The mean maximum luminance deviation for both ultrasound and non-ultrasound displays was 12.61% ± 4.85% and 14.47% ± 5.36%, respectively. Visual evaluation of display performance varied depending on several factors including brightness and contrast settings and the test pattern used for image quality assessment. This work provides a snapshot of the performance of 42 acquisition displays across several imaging modalities in clinical use at a large medical center. Comparison with existing performance standards reveals that changes in display technology and the move from cathode ray

  4. Extracting Information about the Rotator Cuff from Magnetic Resonance Images Using Deterministic and Random Techniques

    PubMed Central

    De Los Ríos, F. A.; Paluszny, M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider some methods to extract information about the rotator cuff based on magnetic resonance images; the study aims to define an alternative method of display that might facilitate the detection of partial tears in the supraspinatus tendon. Specifically, we are going to use families of ellipsoidal triangular patches to cover the humerus head near the affected area. These patches are going to be textured and displayed with the information of the magnetic resonance images using the trilinear interpolation technique. For the generation of points to texture each patch, we propose a new method that guarantees the uniform distribution of its points using a random statistical method. Its computational cost, defined as the average computing time to generate a fixed number of points, is significantly lower as compared with deterministic and other standard statistical techniques. PMID:25650281

  5. Rotational multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound: bimodal system for intravascular applications

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Marcu, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We report the development and validation of a hybrid intravascular diagnostic system combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for cardiovascular imaging applications. A prototype FLIm system based on fluorescence pulse sampling technique providing information on artery biochemical composition was integrated with a commercial IVUS system providing information on artery morphology. A customized 3-Fr bimodal catheter combining a rotational side-view fiberoptic and a 40-MHz IVUS transducer was constructed for sequential helical scanning (rotation and pullback) of tubular structures. Validation of this bimodal approach was conducted in pig heart coronary arteries. Spatial resolution, fluorescence detection efficiency, pulse broadening effect, and lifetime measurement variability of the FLIm system were systematically evaluated. Current results show that this system is capable of temporarily resolving the fluorescence emission simultaneously in multiple spectral channels in a single pullback sequence. Accurate measurements of fluorescence decay characteristics from arterial segments can be obtained rapidly (e.g., 20 mm in 5 s), and accurate co-registration of fluorescence and ultrasound features can be achieved. The current finding demonstrates the compatibility of FLIm instrumentation with in vivo clinical investigations and its potential to complement conventional IVUS during catheterization procedures. PMID:24898604

  6. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Cardiology Practice: A Concise Guide to Image Acquisition and Clinical Interpretation.

    PubMed

    Valbuena-López, Silvia; Hinojar, Rocío; Puntmann, Valentina O

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance plays an increasingly important role in routine cardiology clinical practice. It is a versatile imaging modality that allows highly accurate, broad and in-depth assessment of cardiac function and structure and provides information on pertinent clinical questions in diseases such as ischemic heart disease, nonischemic cardiomyopathies, and heart failure, as well as allowing unique indications, such as the assessment and quantification of myocardial iron overload or infiltration. Increasing evidence for the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance, together with the spread of knowledge and skill outside expert centers, has afforded greater access for patients and wider clinical experience. This review provides a snapshot of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in modern clinical practice by linking image acquisition and postprocessing with effective delivery of the clinical meaning. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Neurologic 3D MR Spectroscopic Imaging with Low-Power Adiabatic Pulses and Fast Spiral Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Gagoski, Borjan A.; Sorensen, A. Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To improve clinical three-dimensional (3D) MR spectroscopic imaging with more accurate localization and faster acquisition schemes. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval and patient informed consent were obtained. Data were acquired with a 3-T MR imager and a 32-channel head coil in phantoms, five healthy volunteers, and five patients with glioblastoma. Excitation was performed with localized adiabatic spin-echo refocusing (LASER) by using adiabatic gradient-offset independent adiabaticity wideband uniform rate and smooth truncation (GOIA-W[16,4]) pulses with 3.5-msec duration, 20-kHz bandwidth, 0.81-kHz amplitude, and 45-msec echo time. Interleaved constant-density spirals simultaneously encoded one frequency and two spatial dimensions. Conventional phase encoding (PE) (1-cm3 voxels) was performed after LASER excitation and was the reference standard. Spectra acquired with spiral encoding at similar and higher spatial resolution and with shorter imaging time were compared with those acquired with PE. Metabolite levels were fitted with software, and Bland-Altman analysis was performed. Results: Clinical 3D MR spectroscopic images were acquired four times faster with spiral protocols than with the elliptical PE protocol at low spatial resolution (1 cm3). Higher-spatial-resolution images (0.39 cm3) were acquired twice as fast with spiral protocols compared with the low-spatial-resolution elliptical PE protocol. A minimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 5 was obtained with spiral protocols under these conditions and was considered clinically adequate to reliably distinguish metabolites from noise. The apparent SNR loss was not linear with decreasing voxel sizes because of longer local T2* times. Improvement of spectral line width from 4.8 Hz to 3.5 Hz was observed at high spatial resolution. The Bland-Altman agreement between spiral and PE data is characterized by narrow 95% confidence intervals for their differences (0.12, 0.18 of their

  8. High spatial resolution diffusion weighted imaging on clinical 3 T MRI scanners using multislab spiral acquisitions

    PubMed Central

    Holtrop, Joseph L.; Sutton, Bradley P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. A diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) approach that is signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficient and can be applied to achieve sub-mm resolutions on clinical 3 T systems was developed. The sequence combined a multislab, multishot pulsed gradient spin echo diffusion scheme with spiral readouts for imaging data and navigators. Long data readouts were used to keep the number of shots, and hence total imaging time, for the three-dimensional acquisition short. Image quality was maintained by incorporating a field-inhomogeneity-corrected image reconstruction to remove distortions associated with long data readouts. Additionally, multiple shots were required for the high-resolution images, necessitating motion induced phase correction through the use of efficiently integrated navigator data. The proposed approach is compared with two-dimensional (2-D) acquisitions that use either a spiral or a typical echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisition to demonstrate the improved SNR efficiency. The proposed technique provided 71% higher SNR efficiency than the standard 2-D EPI approach. The adaptability of the technique to achieve high spatial resolutions is demonstrated by acquiring diffusion tensor imaging data sets with isotropic resolutions of 1.25 and 0.8 mm. The proposed approach allows for SNR-efficient sub-mm acquisitions of DWI data on clinical 3 T systems. PMID:27088107

  9. A Parallel Distributed-Memory Particle Method Enables Acquisition-Rate Segmentation of Large Fluorescence Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Yaser; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.

    2016-01-01

    Modern fluorescence microscopy modalities, such as light-sheet microscopy, are capable of acquiring large three-dimensional images at high data rate. This creates a bottleneck in computational processing and analysis of the acquired images, as the rate of acquisition outpaces the speed of processing. Moreover, images can be so large that they do not fit the main memory of a single computer. We address both issues by developing a distributed parallel algorithm for segmentation of large fluorescence microscopy images. The method is based on the versatile Discrete Region Competition algorithm, which has previously proven useful in microscopy image segmentation. The present distributed implementation decomposes the input image into smaller sub-images that are distributed across multiple computers. Using network communication, the computers orchestrate the collectively solving of the global segmentation problem. This not only enables segmentation of large images (we test images of up to 1010 pixels), but also accelerates segmentation to match the time scale of image acquisition. Such acquisition-rate image segmentation is a prerequisite for the smart microscopes of the future and enables online data compression and interactive experiments. PMID:27046144

  10. A Parallel Distributed-Memory Particle Method Enables Acquisition-Rate Segmentation of Large Fluorescence Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Yaser; Sbalzarini, Ivo F

    2016-01-01

    Modern fluorescence microscopy modalities, such as light-sheet microscopy, are capable of acquiring large three-dimensional images at high data rate. This creates a bottleneck in computational processing and analysis of the acquired images, as the rate of acquisition outpaces the speed of processing. Moreover, images can be so large that they do not fit the main memory of a single computer. We address both issues by developing a distributed parallel algorithm for segmentation of large fluorescence microscopy images. The method is based on the versatile Discrete Region Competition algorithm, which has previously proven useful in microscopy image segmentation. The present distributed implementation decomposes the input image into smaller sub-images that are distributed across multiple computers. Using network communication, the computers orchestrate the collectively solving of the global segmentation problem. This not only enables segmentation of large images (we test images of up to 10(10) pixels), but also accelerates segmentation to match the time scale of image acquisition. Such acquisition-rate image segmentation is a prerequisite for the smart microscopes of the future and enables online data compression and interactive experiments.

  11. Design of multi-mode compatible image acquisition system for HD area array CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Sui, Xiubao

    2014-11-01

    Combining with the current development trend in video surveillance-digitization and high-definition, a multimode-compatible image acquisition system for HD area array CCD is designed. The hardware and software designs of the color video capture system of HD area array CCD KAI-02150 presented by Truesense Imaging company are analyzed, and the structure parameters of the HD area array CCD and the color video gathering principle of the acquisition system are introduced. Then, the CCD control sequence and the timing logic of the whole capture system are realized. The noises of the video signal (KTC noise and 1/f noise) are filtered by using the Correlated Double Sampling (CDS) technique to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the system. The compatible designs in both software and hardware for the two other image sensors of the same series: KAI-04050 and KAI-08050 are put forward; the effective pixels of these two HD image sensors are respectively as many as four million and eight million. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is adopted as the key controller of the system to perform the modularization design from top to bottom, which realizes the hardware design by software and improves development efficiency. At last, the required time sequence driving is simulated accurately by the use of development platform of Quartus II 12.1 combining with VHDL. The result of the simulation indicates that the driving circuit is characterized by simple framework, low power consumption, and strong anti-interference ability, which meet the demand of miniaturization and high-definition for the current tendency.

  12. Parallel image-acquisition in continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance imaging with a surface coil array: Proof-of-concept experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Ayano; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    This article describes a feasibility study of parallel image-acquisition using a two-channel surface coil array in continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging. Parallel EPR imaging was performed by multiplexing of EPR detection in the frequency domain. The parallel acquisition system consists of two surface coil resonators and radiofrequency (RF) bridges for EPR detection. To demonstrate the feasibility of this method of parallel image-acquisition with a surface coil array, three-dimensional EPR imaging was carried out using a tube phantom. Technical issues in the multiplexing method of EPR detection were also clarified. We found that degradation in the signal-to-noise ratio due to the interference of RF carriers is a key problem to be solved.

  13. Rotation and direction judgment from visual images head-slaved in two and three degrees-of-freedom.

    PubMed

    Adelstein, B D; Ellis, S R

    2000-03-01

    The contribution to spatial awareness of adding a roll degree-of-freedom (DOF) to telepresence camera platform yaw and pitch was examined in an experiment where subjects judged direction and rotation of stationary target markers in a remote scene. Subjects viewed the scene via head-slaved camera images in a head-mounted display. Elimination of the roll DOF affected rotation judgment, but only at extreme yaw and pitch combinations, and did not affect azimuth and elevation judgement. Systematic azimuth overshoot occurred regardless of roll condition. Observed rotation misjudgments are explained by kinematic models for eye-head direction of gaze.

  14. Tissue velocity imaging of coronary artery by rotating-type intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Akira; Owada, Naoki; Akino, Yoshihisa; Nitta, Shinichi

    2004-04-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) provides not only the dimensions of coronary artery but the information of tissue components. In catheterization laboratory, soft and hard plaques are classified by visual inspection of echo intensity. So-called soft plaque contains lipid core or thrombus and it is believed to be more vulnerable than a hard plaque. However, it is not simple to analyze the echo signals quantitatively. When we look at a reflection signal, the intensity is affected by the distance of the object, the medium between transducer and objects and the fluctuation caused by rotation of IVUS probe. The time of flight is also affected by the sound speed of the medium and Doppler shift caused by tissue motion but usually those can be neglected. Thus, the analysis of RF signal in time domain can be more quantitative than intensity of RF signal. In the present study, a novel imaging technique called "intravascular tissue velocity imaging" was developed for searching a vulnerable plaque. Radio-frequency (RF) signal from a clinically used IVUS apparatus was digitized at 500 MSa/s and stored in a workstation. First, non-uniform rotation was corrected by maximizing the correlation coefficient of circumferential RF signal distribution in two consecutive frames. Then, the correlation and displacement were calculated by analyzing the radial difference of RF signal. Tissue velocity was determined by the displacement and the frame rate. The correlation image of normal and atherosclerotic coronary arteries clearly showed the internal and external borders of arterial wall. Soft plaque with low echo area in the intima showed high velocity while the calcified lesion showed the very low tissue velocity. This technique provides important information on tissue character of coronary artery.

  15. Limited diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and clinical tests for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Brockmeyer, Matthias; Schmitt, Cornelia; Haupert, Alexander; Kohn, Dieter; Lorbach, Olaf

    2017-12-01

    The reliable diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff is still elusive in clinical practise. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging and clinical tests for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff as well as the combination of these parameters. 334 consecutive shoulder arthroscopies for rotator cuff pathologies performed during the time period between 2010 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively for the findings of common clinical signs for rotator cuff lesions and preoperative MR imaging. These were compared with the intraoperative arthroscopic findings as "gold standard". The reports of the MR imaging were evaluated with regard to the integrity of the rotator cuff. The Ellman Classification was used to define partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff in accordance with the arthroscopic findings. Descriptive statistics, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value were calculated. MR imaging showed 80 partial-thickness and 70 full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. The arthroscopic examination confirmed 64 partial-thickness tears of which 52 needed debridement or refixation of the rotator cuff. Sensitivity for MR imaging to identify partial-thickness tears was 51.6%, specificity 77.2%, positive predictive value 41.3% and negative predictive value 83.7%. For the Jobe-test, sensitivity was 64.1%, specificity 43.2%, positive predictive value 25.9% and negative predictive value 79.5%. Sensitivity for the Impingement-sign was 76.7%, specificity 46.6%, positive predictive value 30.8% and negative predictive value 86.5%. For the combination of MR imaging, Jobe-test and Impingement-sign sensitivity was 46.9%, specificity 85.4%, positive predictive value 50% and negative predictive value 83.8%. The diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging and clinical tests (Jobe-test and Impingement-sign) alone is limited for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Additionally

  16. Design of a short nonuniform acquisition protocol for quantitative analysis in dynamic cardiac SPECT imaging - a retrospective 123 I-MIBG animal study.

    PubMed

    Zan, Yunlong; Long, Yong; Chen, Kewei; Li, Biao; Huang, Qiu; Gullberg, Grant T

    2017-07-01

    Our previous works have found that quantitative analysis of 123 I-MIBG kinetics in the rat heart with dynamic single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offers the potential to quantify the innervation integrity at an early stage of left ventricular hypertrophy. However, conventional protocols involving a long acquisition time for dynamic imaging reduce the animal survival rate and thus make longitudinal analysis difficult. The goal of this work was to develop a procedure to reduce the total acquisition time by selecting nonuniform acquisition times for projection views while maintaining the accuracy and precision of estimated physiologic parameters. Taking dynamic cardiac imaging with 123 I-MIBG in rats as an example, we generated time activity curves (TACs) of regions of interest (ROIs) as ground truths based on a direct four-dimensional reconstruction of experimental data acquired from a rotating SPECT camera, where TACs represented as the coefficients of B-spline basis functions were used to estimate compartmental model parameters. By iteratively adjusting the knots (i.e., control points) of B-spline basis functions, new TACs were created according to two rules: accuracy and precision. The accuracy criterion allocates the knots to achieve low relative entropy between the estimated left ventricular blood pool TAC and its ground truth so that the estimated input function approximates its real value and thus the procedure yields an accurate estimate of model parameters. The precision criterion, via the D-optimal method, forces the estimated parameters to be as precise as possible, with minimum variances. Based on the final knots obtained, a new protocol of 30 min was built with a shorter acquisition time that maintained a 5% error in estimating rate constants of the compartment model. This was evaluated through digital simulations. The simulation results showed that our method was able to reduce the acquisition time from 100 to 30 min for the cardiac study

  17. Increased Speed and Image Quality for Pelvic Single-Shot Fast Spin-Echo Imaging with Variable Refocusing Flip Angles and Full-Fourier Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Litwiller, Daniel V.; Saranathan, Manojkumar; Vasanawala, Shreyas S.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess image quality and speed improvements for single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) with variable refocusing flip angles and full-Fourier acquisition (vrfSSFSE) pelvic imaging via a prospective trial performed in the context of uterine leiomyoma evaluation. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. vrfSSFSE and conventional SSFSE sagittal and coronal oblique acquisitions were performed in 54 consecutive female patients referred for 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) evaluation of known or suspected uterine leiomyomas. Two radiologists who were blinded to the image acquisition technique semiquantitatively scored images on a scale from −2 to 2 for noise, image contrast, sharpness, artifacts, and perceived ability to evaluate uterine, ovarian, and musculoskeletal structures. The null hypothesis of no significant difference between pulse sequences was assessed with a Wilcoxon signed rank test by using a Holm-Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Results Because of reductions in specific absorption rate, vrfSSFSE imaging demonstrated significantly increased speed (more than twofold, P < .0001), with mean repetition times compared with conventional SSFSE imaging decreasing from 1358 to 613 msec for sagittal acquisitions and from 1494 to 621 msec for coronal oblique acquisitions. Almost all assessed image quality and perceived diagnostic capability parameters were significantly improved with vrfSSFSE imaging. These improvements included noise, sharpness, and ability to evaluate the junctional zone, myometrium, and musculoskeletal structures for both sagittal acquisitions (mean values of 0.56, 0.63, 0.42, 0.56, and 0.80, respectively; all P values < .0001) and coronal oblique acquisitions (mean values of 0.81, 1.09, 0.65, 0.93, and 1.12, respectively; all P values < .0001). For evaluation of artifacts, there was an insufficient number of cases with differences to allow statistical testing. Conclusion

  18. Acquisition and Processing Protocols for Uav Images: 3d Modeling of Historical Buildings Using Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtiyoso, A.; Koehl, M.; Grussenmeyer, P.; Freville, T.

    2017-08-01

    Photogrammetry has seen an increase in the use of UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) for both large and smaller scale cartography. The use of UAVs is also advantageous because it may be used for tasks requiring quick response, including in the case of the inspection and monitoring of buildings. The objective of the project is to study the acquisition and processing protocols which exist in the literature and to adapt them for UAV projects. This implies a study on the calibration of the sensors, flight planning, comparison of software solutions, data management, and analysis on the different products of a UAV project. Two historical buildings of the city of Strasbourg were used as case studies: a part of the Rohan Palace façade and the St-Pierre-le-Jeune Catholic church. In addition, a preliminary test was performed on the Josephine Pavilion. Two UAVs were used in this research; namely the Sensefly Albris and the DJI Phantom 3 Professional. The experiments have shown that the calibration parameters tend to be unstable for small sensors. Furthermore, the dense matching of images remains a particular problem to address in a close range photogrammetry project, more so in the presence of noise on the images. Data management in cases where the number of images is high is also very important. The UAV is nevertheless a suitable solution for the surveying and recording of historical buildings because it is able to take images from points of view which are normally inaccessible to classical terrestrial techniques.

  19. Radial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a rotating radiofrequency (RF) coil at 9.4 T.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyan; Weber, Ewald; Jin, Jin; Hugger, Thimo; Tesiram, Yasvir; Ullmann, Peter; Stark, Simon; Fuentes, Miguel; Junge, Sven; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2018-02-01

    The rotating radiofrequency coil (RRFC) has been developed recently as an alternative approach to multi-channel phased-array coils. The single-element RRFC avoids inter-channel coupling and allows a larger coil element with better B 1 field penetration when compared with an array counterpart. However, dedicated image reconstruction algorithms require accurate estimation of temporally varying coil sensitivities to remove artefacts caused by coil rotation. Various methods have been developed to estimate unknown sensitivity profiles from a few experimentally measured sensitivity maps, but these methods become problematic when the RRFC is used as a transceiver coil. In this work, a novel and practical radial encoding method is introduced for the RRFC to facilitate image reconstruction without the measurement or estimation of rotation-dependent sensitivity profiles. Theoretical analyses suggest that the rotation-dependent sensitivities of the RRFC can be used to create a uniform profile with careful choice of sampling positions and imaging parameters. To test this new imaging method, dedicated electronics were designed and built to control the RRFC speed and hence positions in synchrony with imaging parameters. High-quality phantom and animal images acquired on a 9.4 T pre-clinical scanner demonstrate the feasibility and potential of this new RRFC method. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Security Analysis of Image Encryption Based on Gyrator Transform by Searching the Rotation Angle with Improved PSO Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sang, Jun; Zhao, Jun; Xiang, Zhili; Cai, Bin; Xiang, Hong

    2015-08-05

    Gyrator transform has been widely used for image encryption recently. For gyrator transform-based image encryption, the rotation angle used in the gyrator transform is one of the secret keys. In this paper, by analyzing the properties of the gyrator transform, an improved particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm was proposed to search the rotation angle in a single gyrator transform. Since the gyrator transform is continuous, it is time-consuming to exhaustedly search the rotation angle, even considering the data precision in a computer. Therefore, a computational intelligence-based search may be an alternative choice. Considering the properties of severe local convergence and obvious global fluctuations of the gyrator transform, an improved PSO algorithm was proposed to be suitable for such situations. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed improved PSO algorithm can significantly improve the efficiency of searching the rotation angle in a single gyrator transform. Since gyrator transform is the foundation of image encryption in gyrator transform domains, the research on the method of searching the rotation angle in a single gyrator transform is useful for further study on the security of such image encryption algorithms.

  1. The effects of center of rotation errors on cardiac SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chuanyong; Shao, Ling; Ye, Jinghan; Durbin, M.

    2003-10-01

    In SPECT imaging, center of rotation (COR) errors lead to the misalignment of projection data and can potentially degrade the quality of the reconstructed images. In this work, we study the effects of COR errors on cardiac SPECT imaging using simulation, point source, cardiac phantom, and patient studies. For simulation studies, we generate projection data using a uniform MCAT phantom first without modeling any physical effects (NPH), then with the modeling of detector response effect (DR) alone. We then corrupt the projection data with simulated sinusoid and step COR errors. For other studies, we introduce sinusoid COR errors to projection data acquired on SPECT systems. An OSEM algorithm is used for image reconstruction without detector response correction, but with nonuniform attenuation correction when needed. The simulation studies show that, when COR errors increase from 0 to 0.96 cm: 1) sinusoid COR errors in axial direction lead to intensity decrease in the inferoapical region; 2) step COR errors in axial direction lead to intensity decrease in the distal anterior region. The intensity decrease is more severe in images reconstructed from projection data with NPH than with DR; and 3) the effects of COR errors in transaxial direction seem to be insignificant. In other studies, COR errors slightly degrade point source resolution; COR errors of 0.64 cm or above introduce visible but insignificant nonuniformity in the images of uniform cardiac phantom; COR errors up to 0.96 cm in transaxial direction affect the lesion-to-background contrast (LBC) insignificantly in the images of cardiac phantom with defects, and COR errors up to 0.64 cm in axial direction only slightly decrease the LBC. For the patient studies with COR errors up to 0.96 cm, images have the same diagnostic/prognostic values as those without COR errors. This work suggests that COR errors of up to 0.64 cm are not likely to change the clinical applications of cardiac SPECT imaging when using

  2. The Efffect of Image Apodization on Global Mode Parameters and Rotational Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Tim; Schou, Jesper

    2016-10-01

    It has long been known that certain systematic errors in the global mode analysis of data from both MDI and HMI depend on how the input images were apodized. Recently it has come to light, while investigating a six-month period in f-mode frequencies, that mode coverage is highest when B0 is maximal. Recalling that the leakage matrix is calculated in the approximation that B0=0, it comes as a surprise that more modes are fitted when the leakage matrix is most incorrect. It is now believed that the six-month oscillation has primarily to do with what portion of the solar surface is visible. Other systematic errors that depend on the part of the disk used include high-latitude anomalies in the rotation rate and a prominent feature in the normalized residuals of odd a-coefficients. Although the most likely cause of all these errors is errors in the leakage matrix, extensive recalculation of the leaks has not made any difference. Thus we conjecture that another effect may be at play, such as errors in the noise model or one that has to do with the alignment of the apodization with the spherical harmonics. In this poster we explore how differently shaped apodizations affect the results of inversions for internal rotation, for both maximal and minimal absolute values of B0.

  3. Acquisition of a Surface Plasmon Resonance Imager, Digital Microscope, and Peristaltic Pumps for Defense-Based Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-05

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The goal of this proposal is to purchase the GWC Technologies, Inc. Horizontal Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRi...Unlimited UU UU UU UU 05-05-2016 1-Feb-2014 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Acquisition of a Surface Plasmon Resonance Imager, Digital Microscope, and...S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Surface Plasmon Resonance Imager, Digital

  4. SNR-optimized phase-sensitive dual-acquisition turbo spin echo imaging: a fast alternative to FLAIR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunyeol; Park, Jaeseok

    2013-07-01

    Phase-sensitive dual-acquisition single-slab three-dimensional turbo spin echo imaging was recently introduced, producing high-resolution isotropic cerebrospinal fluid attenuated brain images without long inversion recovery preparation. Despite the advantages, the weighted-averaging-based technique suffers from noise amplification resulting from different levels of cerebrospinal fluid signal modulations over the two acquisitions. The purpose of this work is to develop a signal-to-noise ratio-optimized version of the phase-sensitive dual-acquisition single-slab three-dimensional turbo spin echo. Variable refocusing flip angles in the first acquisition are calculated using a three-step prescribed signal evolution while those in the second acquisition are calculated using a two-step pseudo-steady state signal transition with a high flip-angle pseudo-steady state at a later portion of the echo train, balancing the levels of cerebrospinal fluid signals in both the acquisitions. Low spatial frequency signals are sampled during the high flip-angle pseudo-steady state to further suppress noise. Numerical simulations of the Bloch equations were performed to evaluate signal evolutions of brain tissues along the echo train and optimize imaging parameters. In vivo studies demonstrate that compared with conventional phase-sensitive dual-acquisition single-slab three-dimensional turbo spin echo, the proposed optimization yields 74% increase in apparent signal-to-noise ratio for gray matter and 32% decrease in imaging time. The proposed method can be a potential alternative to conventional fluid-attenuated imaging. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Graph-based retrospective 4D image construction from free-breathing MRI slice acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Mong, Andrew; Campbell, Robert M.

    2014-03-01

    4D or dynamic imaging of the thorax has many potential applications [1, 2]. CT and MRI offer sufficient speed to acquire motion information via 4D imaging. However they have different constraints and requirements. For both modalities both prospective and retrospective respiratory gating and tracking techniques have been developed [3, 4]. For pediatric imaging, x-ray radiation becomes a primary concern and MRI remains as the de facto choice. The pediatric subjects we deal with often suffer from extreme malformations of their chest wall, diaphragm, and/or spine, as such patient cooperation needed by some of the gating and tracking techniques are difficult to realize without causing patient discomfort. Moreover, we are interested in the mechanical function of their thorax in its natural form in tidal breathing. Therefore free-breathing MRI acquisition is the ideal modality of imaging for these patients. In our set up, for each coronal (or sagittal) slice position, slice images are acquired at a rate of about 200-300 ms/slice over several natural breathing cycles. This produces typically several thousands of slices which contain both the anatomic and dynamic information. However, it is not trivial to form a consistent and well defined 4D volume from these data. In this paper, we present a novel graph-based combinatorial optimization solution for constructing the best possible 4D scene from such data entirely in the digital domain. Our proposed method is purely image-based and does not need breath holding or any external surrogates or instruments to record respiratory motion or tidal volume. Both adult and children patients' data are used to illustrate the performance of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the reconstructed 4D scenes are smooth and consistent spatially and temporally, agreeing with known shape and motion of the lungs.

  6. High efficient optical remote sensing images acquisition for nano-satellite: reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Feng; Xin, Lei; Fu, Jie; Huang, Puming

    2017-10-01

    Large amount of data is one of the most obvious features in satellite based remote sensing systems, which is also a burden for data processing and transmission. The theory of compressive sensing(CS) has been proposed for almost a decade, and massive experiments show that CS has favorable performance in data compression and recovery, so we apply CS theory to remote sensing images acquisition. In CS, the construction of classical sensing matrix for all sparse signals has to satisfy the Restricted Isometry Property (RIP) strictly, which limits applying CS in practical in image compression. While for remote sensing images, we know some inherent characteristics such as non-negative, smoothness and etc.. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to present a novel measurement matrix that breaks RIP. The new sensing matrix consists of two parts: the standard Nyquist sampling matrix for thumbnails and the conventional CS sampling matrix. Since most of sun-synchronous based satellites fly around the earth 90 minutes and the revisit cycle is also short, lots of previously captured remote sensing images of the same place are available in advance. This drives us to reconstruct remote sensing images through a deep learning approach with those measurements from the new framework. Therefore, we propose a novel deep convolutional neural network (CNN) architecture which takes in undersampsing measurements as input and outputs an intermediate reconstruction image. It is well known that the training procedure to the network costs long time, luckily, the training step can be done only once, which makes the approach attractive for a host of sparse recovery problems.

  7. Can Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predict the Reparability of Massive Rotator Cuff Tears?

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Youn; Park, Ji Seon; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2017-06-01

    Numerous studies have shown preoperative fatty infiltration of rotator cuff muscles to be strongly negatively correlated with the successful repair of massive rotator cuff tears (RCTs). To assess the association between factors identified on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially infraspinatus fatty infiltration, and the reparability of massive RCTs. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. We analyzed a total of 105 patients with massive RCTs for whom MRI was performed ≤6 months before arthroscopic procedures. The mean age of the patients was 62.7 years (range, 46-83 years), and 46 were men. Among them, complete repair was possible in 50 patients (48%) and not possible in 55 patients (52%). The tangent sign, fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff, and Patte classification were evaluated as predictors of reparability. Using the receiver operating characteristic curve and the area under the curve (AUC), the prediction accuracy of each variable and combinations of variables were measured. Reparability was associated with fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus ( P = .0045) and infraspinatus ( P < .001) muscles, the tangent sign ( P = .0033), and the Patte classification ( P < .001) but not with fatty infiltration of the subscapularis and teres minor ( P = .425 and .132, respectively). The cut-off values for supraspinatus and infraspinatus fatty infiltration were grade >3 and grade >2, respectively. The examination of single variables revealed that infraspinatus fatty infiltration showed the highest AUC value (0.812; sensitivity: 0.86; specificity: 0.76), while the tangent sign showed the lowest AUC value (0.626; sensitivity: 0.38; specificity: 0.87). Among 2-variable combinations, the combination of infraspinatus fatty infiltration and the Patte classification showed the highest AUC value (0.874; sensitivity: 0.54; specificity: 0.96). The combination of 4 variables, that is, infraspinatus and supraspinatus fatty infiltration, the tangent sign

  8. Reliability of magnetic resonance imaging assessment of rotator cuff: the ROW study.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nitin B; Collins, Jamie; Newman, Joel S; Katz, Jeffrey N; Losina, Elena; Higgins, Laurence D

    2015-03-01

    Physiatrists encounter patients with rotator cuff disorders, and imaging is frequently an important component of their diagnostic assessment. However, there is a paucity of literature on the reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment between shoulder specialists and musculoskeletal radiologists. We assessed inter- and intrarater reliability of MRI characteristics of the rotator cuff. Cross-sectional secondary analyses in a prospective cohort study. Academic tertiary care centers. Subjects with shoulder pain were recruited from orthopedic and physiatry clinics. Two shoulder-fellowship-trained physicians (a physiatrist and a shoulder surgeon) jointly performed a blinded composite MRI review by consensus of 31 subjects with shoulder pain. Subsequently, MRI was reviewed by one fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist. We calculated the Cohen kappa coefficients and percentage agreement among the 2 reviews (composite review of 2 shoulder specialists versus that of the musculoskeletal radiologist). Intrarater reliability was assessed among the shoulder specialists by performing a repeated blinded composite MRI review. In addition to this repeated composite review, only one of the physiatry shoulder specialists performed an additional review. Interrater reliability (shoulder specialists versus musculoskeletal radiologist) was substantial for the presence or absence of tear (kappa 0.90 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.72-1.00]), tear thickness (kappa 0.84 [95% CI, 0.70-0.99]), longitudinal size of tear (kappa 0.75 [95% CI, 0.44-1.00]), fatty infiltration (kappa 0.62 [95% CI, 0.45-0.79]), and muscle atrophy (kappa 0.68 [95% CI, 0.50-0.86]). There was only fair interrater reliability of the transverse size of tear (kappa 0.20 [95% CI, 0.00-0.51]). The kappa for intrarater reliability was high for tear thickness (0.88 [95% CI, 0.72-1.00]), longitudinal tear size (0.61 [95% CI, 0.22-0.99]), fatty infiltration (0.89 [95% CI, 0.80,-0.98]), and muscle atrophy

  9. Dosimetric consequences of translational and rotational errors in frame-less image-guided radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate geometric and dosimetric accuracy of frame-less image-guided radiosurgery (IG-RS) for brain metastases. Methods and materials Single fraction IG-RS was practiced in 72 patients with 98 brain metastases. Patient positioning and immobilization used either double- (n = 71) or single-layer (n = 27) thermoplastic masks. Pre-treatment set-up errors (n = 98) were evaluated with cone-beam CT (CBCT) based image-guidance (IG) and were corrected in six degrees of freedom without an action level. CBCT imaging after treatment measured intra-fractional errors (n = 64). Pre- and post-treatment errors were simulated in the treatment planning system and target coverage and dose conformity were evaluated. Three scenarios of 0 mm, 1 mm and 2 mm GTV-to-PTV (gross tumor volume, planning target volume) safety margins (SM) were simulated. Results Errors prior to IG were 3.9 mm ± 1.7 mm (3D vector) and the maximum rotational error was 1.7° ± 0.8° on average. The post-treatment 3D error was 0.9 mm ± 0.6 mm. No differences between double- and single-layer masks were observed. Intra-fractional errors were significantly correlated with the total treatment time with 0.7mm±0.5mm and 1.2mm±0.7mm for treatment times ≤23 minutes and >23 minutes (p<0.01), respectively. Simulation of RS without image-guidance reduced target coverage and conformity to 75% ± 19% and 60% ± 25% of planned values. Each 3D set-up error of 1 mm decreased target coverage and dose conformity by 6% and 10% on average, respectively, with a large inter-patient variability. Pre-treatment correction of translations only but not rotations did not affect target coverage and conformity. Post-treatment errors reduced target coverage by >5% in 14% of the patients. A 1 mm safety margin fully compensated intra-fractional patient motion. Conclusions IG-RS with online correction of translational errors achieves high geometric and dosimetric accuracy

  10. Hyperspectral data acquisition and analysis in imaging and real-time active MIR backscattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Jan; Haertelt, Marko; Hugger, Stefan; Butschek, Lorenz; Fuchs, Frank; Ostendorf, Ralf; Wagner, Joachim; Beyerer, Juergen

    2017-04-01

    In this work we present data analysis algorithms for detection of hazardous substances in hyperspectral observations acquired using active mid-infrared (MIR) backscattering spectroscopy. We present a novel background extraction algorithm based on the adaptive target generation process proposed by Ren and Chang called the adaptive background generation process (ABGP) that generates a robust and physically meaningful set of background spectra for operation of the well-known adaptive matched subspace detection (AMSD) algorithm. It is shown that the resulting AMSD-ABGP detection algorithm competes well with other widely used detection algorithms. The method is demonstrated in measurement data obtained by two fundamentally different active MIR hyperspectral data acquisition devices. A hyperspectral image sensor applicable in static scenes takes a wavelength sequential approach to hyperspectral data acquisition, whereas a rapid wavelength-scanning single-element detector variant of the same principle uses spatial scanning to generate the hyperspectral observation. It is shown that the measurement timescale of the latter is sufficient for the application of the data analysis algorithms even in dynamic scenarios.

  11. Clinical evaluation of reducing acquisition time on single-photon emission computed tomography image quality using proprietary resolution recovery software.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Matthew D; Waddington, Wendy W; Dickson, John C; Prakash, Vineet; Ell, Peter J; Bomanji, Jamshed B

    2013-11-01

    A three-dimensional model-based resolution recovery (RR) reconstruction algorithm that compensates for collimator-detector response, resulting in an improvement in reconstructed spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images, was tested. The software is said to retain image quality even with reduced acquisition time. Clinically, any improvement in patient throughput without loss of quality is to be welcomed. Furthermore, future restrictions in radiotracer supplies may add value to this type of data analysis. The aims of this study were to assess improvement in image quality using the software and to evaluate the potential of performing reduced time acquisitions for bone and parathyroid SPECT applications. Data acquisition was performed using the local standard SPECT/CT protocols for 99mTc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate bone and 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile parathyroid SPECT imaging. The principal modification applied was the acquisition of an eight-frame gated data set acquired using an ECG simulator with a fixed signal as the trigger. This had the effect of partitioning the data such that the effect of reduced time acquisitions could be assessed without conferring additional scanning time on the patient. The set of summed data sets was then independently reconstructed using the RR software to permit a blinded assessment of the effect of acquired counts upon reconstructed image quality as adjudged by three experienced observers. Data sets reconstructed with the RR software were compared with the local standard processing protocols; filtered back-projection and ordered-subset expectation-maximization. Thirty SPECT studies were assessed (20 bone and 10 parathyroid). The images reconstructed with the RR algorithm showed improved image quality for both full-time and half-time acquisitions over local current processing protocols (P<0.05). The RR algorithm improved image quality compared with local processing

  12. Uav Photogrammetry with Oblique Images: First Analysis on Data Acquisition and Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aicardi, I.; Chiabrando, F.; Grasso, N.; Lingua, A. M.; Noardo, F.; Spanò, A.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, many studies revealed the advantages of using airborne oblique images for obtaining improved 3D city models (e.g. including façades and building footprints). Expensive airborne cameras, installed on traditional aerial platforms, usually acquired the data. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the possibility of acquire and use oblique images for the 3D reconstruction of a historical building, obtained by UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) and traditional COTS (Commercial Off-the-Shelf) digital cameras (more compact and lighter than generally used devices), for the realization of high-level-of-detail architectural survey. The critical issues of the acquisitions from a common UAV (flight planning strategies, ground control points, check points distribution and measurement, etc.) are described. Another important considered aspect was the evaluation of the possibility to use such systems as low cost methods for obtaining complete information from an aerial point of view in case of emergency problems or, as in the present paper, in the cultural heritage application field. The data processing was realized using SfM-based approach for point cloud generation: different dense image-matching algorithms implemented in some commercial and open source software were tested. The achieved results are analysed and the discrepancies from some reference LiDAR data are computed for a final evaluation. The system was tested on the S. Maria Chapel, a part of the Novalesa Abbey (Italy).

  13. Phase incremented echo train acquisition applied to magnetic resonance pore imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, S. A.; Galvosas, P.

    2017-02-01

    Efficient phase cycling schemes remain a challenge for NMR techniques if the pulse sequences involve a large number of rf-pulses. Especially complex is the Carr Purcell Meiboom Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence where the number of rf-pulses can range from hundreds to several thousands. Our recent implementation of Magnetic Resonance Pore Imaging (MRPI) is based on a CPMG rf-pulse sequence in order to refocus the effect of internal gradients inherent in porous media. While the spin dynamics for spin- 1 / 2 systems in CPMG like experiments are well understood it is still not straight forward to separate the desired pathway from the spectrum of unwanted coherence pathways. In this contribution we apply Phase Incremented Echo Train Acquisition (PIETA) to MRPI. We show how PIETA offers a convenient way to implement a working phase cycling scheme and how it allows one to gain deeper insights into the amplitudes of undesired pathways.

  14. Results of shuttle EMU thermal vacuum tests incorporating an infrared imaging camera data acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James E.; Tepper, Edward H.; Trevino, Louis A.

    1991-01-01

    Manned tests in Chamber B at NASA JSC were conducted in May and June of 1990 to better quantify the Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit's (EMU) thermal performance in the cold environmental extremes of space. Use of an infrared imaging camera with real-time video monitoring of the output significantly added to the scope, quality and interpretation of the test conduct and data acquisition. Results of this test program have been effective in the thermal certification of a new insulation configuration and the '5000 Series' glove. In addition, the acceptable thermal performance of flight garments with visually deteriorated insulation was successfully demonstrated, thereby saving significant inspection and garment replacement cost. This test program also established a new method for collecting data vital to improving crew thermal comfort in a cold environment.

  15. In-situ Image Acquisition Strategy on Asteroid Surface by MINERVA Rover in HAYABUSA Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimitsu, T.; Sasaki, S.; Yanagisawa, M.

    Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) has launched the engineering test spacecraft ``HAYABUSA'' (formerly called ``MUSES-C'') to the near Earth asteroid ``ITOKAWA (1998SF36)'' on May 9, 2003. HAYABUSA will go to the target asteroid after two years' interplanetary cruise and will descend onto the asteroid surface in 2005 to acquire some fragments, which will be brought back to the Earth in 2007. A tiny rover called ``MINERVA'' has boarded the HAYABUSA spacecraft. MINERVA is the first asteroid rover in the world. It will be deployed onto the surface immediately before the spacecraft touches the asteroid to acquire some fragments. Then it will autonomously move over the surface by hopping for a couple of days and the obtained data on multiple places are transmitted to the Earth via the mother spacecraft. Small cameras and thermometers are installed in the rover. This paper describes the image acquisition strategy by the cameras installed in the rover.

  16. A digital receiver module with direct data acquisition for magnetic resonance imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weinan; Sun, Hongyu; Wang, Weimin

    2012-10-01

    A digital receiver module for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with detailed hardware implementations is presented. The module is based on a direct sampling scheme using the latest mixed-signal circuit design techniques. A single field-programmable gate array chip is employed to perform software-based digital down conversion for radio frequency signals. The modular architecture of the receiver allows multiple acquisition channels to be implemented on a highly integrated printed circuit board. To maintain the phase coherence of the receiver and the exciter in the context of direct sampling, an effective phase synchronization method was proposed to achieve a phase deviation as small as 0.09°. The performance of the described receiver module was verified in the experiments for both low- and high-field (0.5 T and 1.5 T) MRI scanners and was compared to a modern commercial MRI receiver system.

  17. Recovery of phase inconsistencies in continuously moving table extended field of view magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Kruger, David G; Riederer, Stephen J; Rossman, Phillip J; Mostardi, Petrice M; Madhuranthakam, Ananth J; Hu, Houchun H

    2005-09-01

    MR images formed using extended FOV continuously moving table data acquisition can have signal falloff and loss of lateral spatial resolution at localized, periodic positions along the direction of table motion. In this work we identify the origin of these artifacts and provide a means for correction. The artifacts are due to a mismatch of the phase of signals acquired from contiguous sampling fields of view and are most pronounced when the central k-space views are being sampled. Correction can be performed using the phase information from a periodically sampled central view to adjust the phase of all other views of that view cycle, making the net phase uniform across each axial plane. Results from experimental phantom and contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA studies show that the correction technique substantially eliminates the artifact for a variety of phase encode orders. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Chemical exchange rotation transfer imaging of intermediate-exchanging amines at 2 ppm.

    PubMed

    Zu, Zhongliang; Louie, Elizabeth A; Lin, Eugene C; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Does, Mark D; Gore, John C; Gochberg, Daniel F

    2017-10-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging of amine protons exchanging at intermediate rates and whose chemical shift is around 2 ppm may provide a means of mapping creatine. However, the quantification of this effect may be compromised by the influence of overlapping CEST signals from fast-exchanging amines and hydroxyls. We aimed to investigate the exchange rate filtering effect of a variation of CEST, named chemical exchange rotation transfer (CERT), as a means of isolating creatine contributions at around 2 ppm from other overlapping signals. Simulations were performed to study the filtering effects of CERT for the selection of transfer effects from protons of specific exchange rates. Control samples containing the main metabolites in brain, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and egg white albumen (EWA) at their physiological concentrations and pH were used to study the ability of CERT to isolate molecules with amines at 2 ppm that exchange at intermediate rates, and corresponding methods were used for in vivo rat brain imaging. Simulations showed that exchange rate filtering can be combined with conventional filtering based on chemical shift. Studies on samples showed that signal contributions from creatine can be separated from those of other metabolites using this combined filter, but contributions from protein amines may still be significant. This exchange filtering can also be used for in vivo imaging. CERT provides more specific quantification of amines at 2 ppm that exchange at intermediate rates compared with conventional CEST imaging. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Thermal Imaging of the Waccasassa Bay Preserve: Image Acquisition and Processing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raabe, Ellen A.; Bialkowska-Jelinska, Elzbieta

    2010-01-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) imagery was acquired along coastal Levy County, Florida, in March 2009 with the goal of identifying groundwater-discharge locations in Waccasassa Bay Preserve State Park (WBPSP). Groundwater discharge is thermally distinct in winter when Floridan aquifer temperature, 71-72 degrees F, contrasts with the surrounding cold surface waters. Calibrated imagery was analyzed to assess temperature anomalies and related thermal traces. The influence of warm Gulf water and image artifacts on small features was successfully constrained by image evaluation in three separate zones: Creeks, Bay, and Gulf. Four levels of significant water-temperature anomalies were identified, and 488 sites of interest were mapped. Among the sites identified, at least 80 were determined to be associated with image artifacts and human activity, such as excavation pits and the Florida Barge Canal. Sites of interest were evaluated for geographic concentration and isolation. High site densities, indicating interconnectivity and prevailing flow, were located at Corrigan Reef, No. 4 Channel, Winzy Creek, Cow Creek, Withlacoochee River, and at excavation sites. In other areas, low to moderate site density indicates the presence of independent vents and unique flow paths. A directional distribution assessment of natural seep features produced a northwest trend closely matching the strike direction of regional faults. Naturally occurring seeps were located in karst ponds and tidal creeks, and several submerged sites were detected in Waccasassa River and Bay, representing the first documentation of submarine vents in the Waccasassa region. Drought conditions throughout the region placed constraints on positive feature identification. Low discharge or displacement by landward movement of saltwater may have reduced or reversed flow during this season. Approximately two-thirds of seep locations in the overlap between 2009 and 2005 TIR night imagery were positively re-identified in 2009

  20. "MASSIVE" brain dataset: Multiple acquisitions for standardization of structural imaging validation and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Froeling, Martijn; Tax, Chantal M W; Vos, Sjoerd B; Luijten, Peter R; Leemans, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we present the MASSIVE (Multiple Acquisitions for Standardization of Structural Imaging Validation and Evaluation) brain dataset of a single healthy subject, which is intended to facilitate diffusion MRI (dMRI) modeling and methodology development. MRI data of one healthy subject (female, 25 years) were acquired on a clinical 3 Tesla system (Philips Achieva) with an eight-channel head coil. In total, the subject was scanned on 18 different occasions with a total acquisition time of 22.5 h. The dMRI data were acquired with an isotropic resolution of 2.5 mm 3 and distributed over five shells with b-values up to 4000 s/mm 2 and two Cartesian grids with b-values up to 9000 s/mm 2 . The final dataset consists of 8000 dMRI volumes, corresponding B 0 field maps and noise maps for subsets of the dMRI scans, and ten three-dimensional FLAIR, T 1 -, and T 2 -weighted scans. The average signal-to-noise-ratio of the non-diffusion-weighted images was roughly 35. This unique set of in vivo MRI data will provide a robust framework to evaluate novel diffusion processing techniques and to reliably compare different approaches for diffusion modeling. The MASSIVE dataset is made publically available (both unprocessed and processed) on www.massive-data.org. Magn Reson Med 77:1797-1809, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. Determinants of image quality of rotational angiography for on-line assessment of frame geometry after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Olivares, Ramón; El Faquir, Nahid; Rahhab, Zouhair; Maugenest, Anne-Marie; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Schultz, Carl; Lauritsch, Guenter; de Jaegere, Peter P T

    2016-07-01

    To study the determinants of image quality of rotational angiography using dedicated research prototype software for motion compensation without rapid ventricular pacing after the implantation of four commercially available catheter-based valves. Prospective observational study including 179 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with either the Medtronic CoreValve (MCS), Edward-SAPIEN Valve (ESV), Boston Sadra Lotus (BSL) or Saint-Jude Portico Valve (SJP) in whom rotational angiography (R-angio) with motion compensation 3D image reconstruction was performed. Image quality was evaluated from grade 1 (excellent image quality) to grade 5 (strongly degraded). Distinction was made between good (grades 1, 2) and poor image quality (grades 3-5). Clinical (gender, body mass index, Agatston score, heart rate and rhythm, artifacts), procedural (valve type) and technical variables (isocentricity) were related with the image quality assessment. Image quality was good in 128 (72 %) and poor in 51 (28 %) patients. By univariable analysis only valve type (BSL) and the presence of an artefact negatively affected image quality. By multivariate analysis (in which BMI was forced into the model) BSL valve (Odds 3.5, 95 % CI [1.3-9.6], p = 0.02), presence of an artifact (Odds 2.5, 95 % CI [1.2-5.4], p = 0.02) and BMI (Odds 1.1, 95 % CI [1.0-1.2], p = 0.04) were independent predictors of poor image quality. Rotational angiography with motion compensation 3D image reconstruction using a dedicated research prototype software offers good image quality for the evaluation of frame geometry after TAVI in the majority of patients. Valve type, presence of artifacts and higher BMI negatively affect image quality.

  2. Hepatic lesions: improved image quality and detection with the periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction technique--evaluation of SPIO-enhanced T2-weighted MR images.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Yuusuke; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Maetani, Yoji S; Arizono, Shigeki; Shimada, Kotaro; Okada, Tomohisa; Shibata, Toshiya; Togashi, Kaori

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) technique for superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-enhanced T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with respiratory compensation with the prospective acquisition correction (PACE) technique in the detection of hepatic lesions. The institutional human research committee approved this prospective study, and all patients provided written informed consent. Eighty-one patients (mean age, 58 years) underwent hepatic 1.5-T MR imaging. Fat-saturated T2-weighted turbo spin-echo images were acquired with the PACE technique and with and without the PROPELLER method after administration of SPIO. Images were qualitatively evaluated for image artifacts, depiction of liver edge and intrahepatic vessels, overall image quality, and presence of lesions. Three radiologists independently assessed these characteristics with a five-point confidence scale. Diagnostic performance was assessed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Quantitative analysis was conducted by measuring the liver signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The Wilcoxon signed rank test and two-tailed Student t test were used, and P < .05 indicated a significant difference. MR imaging with the PROPELLER and PACE techniques resulted in significantly improved image quality, higher sensitivity, and greater area under the ROC curve for hepatic lesion detection than did MR imaging with the PACE technique alone (P < .001). The mean liver SNR and the lesion-to-liver CNR were higher with the PROPELLER technique than without it (P < .001). T2-weighted MR imaging with the PROPELLER and PACE technique and SPIO enhancement is a promising method with which to improve the detection of hepatic lesions. (c) RSNA, 2009.

  3. Data acquisition in a high-speed rotating frame for New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology liquid sodium αω dynamo experiment.

    PubMed

    Si, Jiahe; Colgate, Stirling A; Li, Hui; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David

    2013-10-01

    New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology liquid sodium αω-dynamo experiment models the magnetic field generation in the universe as discussed in detail by Colgate, Li, and Pariev [Phys. Plasmas 8, 2425 (2001)]. To obtain a quasi-laminar flow with magnetic Reynolds number R(m) ~ 120, the dynamo experiment consists of two co-axial cylinders of 30.5 cm and 61 cm in diameter spinning up to 70 Hz and 17.5 Hz, respectively. During the experiment, the temperature of the cylinders must be maintained to 110 °C to ensure that the sodium remains fluid. This presents a challenge to implement a data acquisition (DAQ) system in such high temperature, high-speed rotating frame, in which the sensors (including 18 Hall sensors, 5 pressure sensors, and 5 temperature sensors, etc.) are under the centrifugal acceleration up to 376g. In addition, the data must be transmitted and stored in a computer 100 ft away for safety. The analog signals are digitized, converted to serial signals by an analog-to-digital converter and a field-programmable gate array. Power is provided through brush/ring sets. The serial signals are sent through ring/shoe sets capacitively, then reshaped with cross-talk noises removed. A microcontroller-based interface circuit is used to decode the serial signals and communicate with the data acquisition computer. The DAQ accommodates pressure up to 1000 psi, temperature up to more than 130 °C, and magnetic field up to 1000 G. First physics results have been analyzed and published. The next stage of the αω-dynamo experiment includes the DAQ system upgrade.

  4. Comparison of helical and cine acquisitions for 4D-CT imaging with multislice CT.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tinsu

    2005-02-01

    We proposed a data sufficiency condition (DSC) for four-dimensional-CT (4D-CT) imaging on a multislice CT scanner, designed a pitch factor for a helical 4D-CT, and compared the acquisition time, slice sensitivity profile (SSP), effective dose, ability to cope with an irregular breathing cycle, and gating technique (retrospective or prospective) of the helical 4D-CT and the cine 4D-CT on the General Electric (GE) LightSpeed RT (4-slice), Plus (4-slice), Ultra (8-slice) and 16 (16-slice) multislice CT scanners. To satisfy the DSC, a helical or cine 4D-CT acquisition has to collect data at each location for the duration of a breathing cycle plus the duration of data acquisition for an image reconstruction. The conditions for the comparison were 20 cm coverage in the cranial-caudal direction, a 4 s breathing cycle, and half-scan reconstruction. We found that the helical 4D-CT has the advantage of a shorter scan time that is 10% shorter than that of the cine 4D-CT, and the disadvantages of 1.8 times broadening of SSP and requires an additional breathing cycle of scanning to ensure an adequate sampling at the start and end locations. The cine 4D-CT has the advantages of maintaining the same SSP as slice collimation (e.g., 8 x 2.5 mm slice collimation generates 2.5 mm SSP in the cine 4D-CT as opposed to 4.5 mm in the helical 4D-CT) and a lower dose by 4% on the 8- and 16-slice systems, and 8% on the 4-slice system. The advantage of faster scanning in the helical 4D-CT will diminish if a repeat scan at the location of a breathing irregularity becomes necessary. The cine 4D-CT performs better than the helical 4D-CT in the repeat scan because it can scan faster and is more dose efficient.

  5. An additional reference axis improves femoral rotation alignment in image-free computer navigation assisted total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Inui, Hiroshi; Taketomi, Shuji; Nakamura, Kensuke; Sanada, Takaki; Tanaka, Sakae; Nakagawa, Takumi

    2013-05-01

    Few studies have demonstrated improvement in accuracy of rotational alignment using image-free navigation systems mainly due to the inconsistent registration of anatomical landmarks. We have used an image-free navigation for total knee arthroplasty, which adopts the average algorithm between two reference axes (transepicondylar axis and axis perpendicular to the Whiteside axis) for femoral component rotation control. We hypothesized that addition of another axis (condylar twisting axis measured on a preoperative radiograph) would improve the accuracy. One group using the average algorithm (double-axis group) was compared with the other group using another axis to confirm the accuracy of the average algorithm (triple-axis group). Femoral components were more accurately implanted for rotational alignment in the triple-axis group (ideal: triple-axis group 100%, double-axis group 82%, P<0.05). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. High-performance electronic image stabilisation for shift and rotation correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Steve C. J.; Hickman, D. L.; Wu, F.

    2014-06-01

    A novel low size, weight and power (SWaP) video stabiliser called HALO™ is presented that uses a SoC to combine the high processing bandwidth of an FPGA, with the signal processing flexibility of a CPU. An image based architecture is presented that can adapt the tiling of frames to cope with changing scene dynamics. A real-time implementation is then discussed that can generate several hundred optical flow vectors per video frame, to accurately calculate the unwanted rigid body translation and rotation of camera shake. The performance of the HALO™ stabiliser is comprehensively benchmarked against the respected Deshaker 3.0 off-line stabiliser plugin to VirtualDub. Eight different videos are used for benchmarking, simulating: battlefield, surveillance, security and low-level flight applications in both visible and IR wavebands. The results show that HALO™ rivals the performance of Deshaker within its operating envelope. Furthermore, HALO™ may be easily reconfigured to adapt to changing operating conditions or requirements; and can be used to host other video processing functionality like image distortion correction, fusion and contrast enhancement.

  7. Quantification of intensity variations in functional MR images using rotated principal components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backfrieder, W.; Baumgartner, R.; Sámal, M.; Moser, E.; Bergmann, H.

    1996-08-01

    In functional MRI (fMRI), the changes in cerebral haemodynamics related to stimulated neural brain activity are measured using standard clinical MR equipment. Small intensity variations in fMRI data have to be detected and distinguished from non-neural effects by careful image analysis. Based on multivariate statistics we describe an algorithm involving oblique rotation of the most significant principal components for an estimation of the temporal and spatial distribution of the stimulated neural activity over the whole image matrix. This algorithm takes advantage of strong local signal variations. A mathematical phantom was designed to generate simulated data for the evaluation of the method. In simulation experiments, the potential of the method to quantify small intensity changes, especially when processing data sets containing multiple sources of signal variations, was demonstrated. In vivo fMRI data collected in both visual and motor stimulation experiments were analysed, showing a proper location of the activated cortical regions within well known neural centres and an accurate extraction of the activation time profile. The suggested method yields accurate absolute quantification of in vivo brain activity without the need of extensive prior knowledge and user interaction.

  8. Characterization of spatial and spectral resolution of a rotating prism chromotomographic hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostick, Randall L.; Perram, Glen P.; Tuttle, Ronald

    2009-05-01

    The Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) has built a rotating prism chromotomographic hyperspectral imager (CTI) with the goal of extending the technology to exploit spatially extended sources with quickly varying (> 10 Hz) phenomenology, such as bomb detonations and muzzle flashes. This technology collects successive frames of 2-D data dispersed at different angles multiplexing spatial and spectral information which can then be used to reconstruct any arbitrary spectral plane(s). In this paper, the design of the AFIT instrument is described and then tested against a spectral target with near point source spatial characteristics to measure spectral and spatial resolution. It will be shown that, in theory, the spectral and spatial resolution in the 3-D spectral image cube is the nearly the same as a simple prism spectrograph with the same design. However, error in the knowledge of the prism linear dispersion at the detector array as a function of wavelength and projection angle will degrade resolution without further corrections. With minimal correction for error and use of a simple shift-and-add reconstruction algorithm, the CTI is able to produce a spatial resolution of about 2 mm in the object plane (234 μrad IFOV) and is limited by chromatic aberration. A spectral resolution of less than 1nm at shorter wavelengths is shown, limited primarily by prism dispersion.

  9. A Rotatable Quality Control Phantom for Evaluating the Performance of Flat Panel Detectors in Imaging Moving Objects.

    PubMed

    Haga, Yoshihiro; Chida, Koichi; Inaba, Yohei; Kaga, Yuji; Meguro, Taiichiro; Zuguchi, Masayuki

    2016-02-01

    As the use of diagnostic X-ray equipment with flat panel detectors (FPDs) has increased, so has the importance of proper management of FPD systems. To ensure quality control (QC) of FPD system, an easy method for evaluating FPD imaging performance for both stationary and moving objects is required. Until now, simple rotatable QC phantoms have not been available for the easy evaluation of the performance (spatial resolution and dynamic range) of FPD in imaging moving objects. We developed a QC phantom for this purpose. It consists of three thicknesses of copper and a rotatable test pattern of piano wires of various diameters. Initial tests confirmed its stable performance. Our moving phantom is very useful for QC of FPD images of moving objects because it enables visual evaluation of image performance (spatial resolution and dynamic range) easily.

  10. In-flight measurements of aircraft propeller deformation by means of an autarkic fast rotating imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasicki, Boleslaw; Boden, Fritz

    2015-03-01

    The non-intrusive in-flight measurement of the deformation and pitch of the aircraft propeller is a demanding task. The idea of an imaging system integrated and rotating with the aircraft propeller has been presented on the 30th International Congress on High-Speed Imaging and Photonics (ICHSIP30) in 2012. Since then this system has been constructed and tested in the laboratory as well as on the real aircraft. In this paper we outline the principle of Image Pattern Correlation Technique (IPCT) based on Digital Image Correlation (DIC) and describe the construction of a dedicated autarkic 3D camera system placed on the investigated propeller and rotating at its full speed. Furthermore, the results of the first ground and in-flight tests are shown and discussed. This development has been found by the European Commission within the 7th frame project AIM2 (contract no. 266107).

  11. Triaxial ellipsoid dimensions and rotational poles of seven asteroids from Lick Observatory adaptive optics images, and of Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Jack; Christou, Julian

    2008-10-01

    Seven main belt asteroids, 2 Pallas, 3 Juno, 4 Vesta, 16 Psyche, 87 Sylvia, 324 Bamberga, and 707 Interamnia, were imaged with the adaptive optics system on the 3 m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory in the near infrared, and their triaxial ellipsoid dimensions and rotational poles have been determined with parametric blind deconvolution. In addition, the dimensions and pole for 1 Ceres are derived from resolved images at multiple epochs, even though it is an oblate spheroid.

  12. Global rotational motion and displacement estimation of digital image stabilization based on the oblique vectors matching algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fei; Hui, Mei; Zhao, Yue-jin

    2009-08-01

    The image block matching algorithm based on motion vectors of correlative pixels in oblique direction is presented for digital image stabilization. The digital image stabilization is a new generation of image stabilization technique which can obtains the information of relative motion among frames of dynamic image sequences by the method of digital image processing. In this method the matching parameters are calculated from the vectors projected in the oblique direction. The matching parameters based on the vectors contain the information of vectors in transverse and vertical direction in the image blocks at the same time. So the better matching information can be obtained after making correlative operation in the oblique direction. And an iterative weighted least square method is used to eliminate the error of block matching. The weights are related with the pixels' rotational angle. The center of rotation and the global emotion estimation of the shaking image can be obtained by the weighted least square from the estimation of each block chosen evenly from the image. Then, the shaking image can be stabilized with the center of rotation and the global emotion estimation. Also, the algorithm can run at real time by the method of simulated annealing in searching method of block matching. An image processing system based on DSP was used to exam this algorithm. The core processor in the DSP system is TMS320C6416 of TI, and the CCD camera with definition of 720×576 pixels was chosen as the input video signal. Experimental results show that the algorithm can be performed at the real time processing system and have an accurate matching precision.

  13. Model-based estimation of breast percent density in raw and processed full-field digital mammography images from image-acquisition physics and patient-image characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Nathan, Diane L.; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2012-03-01

    Breast percent density (PD%), as measured mammographically, is one of the strongest known risk factors for breast cancer. While the majority of studies to date have focused on PD% assessment from digitized film mammograms, digital mammography (DM) is becoming increasingly common, and allows for direct PD% assessment at the time of imaging. This work investigates the accuracy of a generalized linear model-based (GLM) estimation of PD% from raw and postprocessed digital mammograms, utilizing image acquisition physics, patient characteristics and gray-level intensity features of the specific image. The model is trained in a leave-one-woman-out fashion on a series of 81 cases for which bilateral, mediolateral-oblique DM images were available in both raw and post-processed format. Baseline continuous and categorical density estimates were provided by a trained breast-imaging radiologist. Regression analysis is performed and Pearson's correlation, r, and Cohen's kappa, κ, are computed. The GLM PD% estimation model performed well on both processed (r=0.89, p<0.001) and raw (r=0.75, p<0.001) images. Model agreement with radiologist assigned density categories was also high for processed (κ=0.79, p<0.001) and raw (κ=0.76, p<0.001) images. Model-based prediction of breast PD% could allow for a reproducible estimation of breast density, providing a rapid risk assessment tool for clinical practice.

  14. Signal displacement in spiral-in acquisitions: simulations and implications for imaging in SFG regions.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Kimberly D; Rioux, James A; Klassen, Martyn; Bowen, Chris V; Beyea, Steven D

    2012-07-01

    Susceptibility field gradients (SFGs) cause problems for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in regions like the orbital frontal lobes, leading to signal loss and image artifacts (signal displacement and "pile-up"). Pulse sequences with spiral-in k-space trajectories are often used when acquiring fMRI in SFG regions such as inferior/medial temporal cortex because it is believed that they have improved signal recovery and decreased signal displacement properties. Previously postulated theories explain differing reasons why spiral-in appears to perform better than spiral-out; however it is clear that multiple mechanisms are occurring in parallel. This study explores differences in spiral-in and spiral-out images using human and phantom empirical data, as well as simulations consistent with the phantom model. Using image simulations, the displacement of signal was characterized using point spread functions (PSFs) and target maps, the latter of which are conceptually inverse PSFs describing which spatial locations contribute signal to a particular voxel. The magnitude of both PSFs and target maps was found to be identical for spiral-out and spiral-in acquisitions, with signal in target maps being displaced from distant regions in both cases. However, differences in the phase of the signal displacement patterns that consequently lead to changes in the intervoxel phase coherence were found to be a significant mechanism explaining differences between the spiral sequences. The results demonstrate that spiral-in trajectories do preserve more total signal in SFG regions than spiral-out; however, spiral-in does not in fact exhibit decreased signal displacement. Given that this signal can be displaced by significant distances, its recovery may not be preferable for all fMRI applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Micro-MRI-based image acquisition and processing system for assessing the response to therapeutic intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilić, B.; Ladinsky, G. A.; Saha, P. K.; Wehrli, F. W.

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is the cause of over 1.5 million bone fractures annually. Most of these fractures occur in sites rich in trabecular bone, a complex network of bony struts and plates found throughout the skeleton. The three-dimensional structure of the trabecular bone network significantly determines mechanical strength and thus fracture resistance. Here we present a data acquisition and processing system that allows efficient noninvasive assessment of trabecular bone structure through a "virtual bone biopsy". High-resolution MR images are acquired from which the trabecular bone network is extracted by estimating the partial bone occupancy of each voxel. A heuristic voxel subdivision increases the effective resolution of the bone volume fraction map and serves a basis for subsequent analysis of topological and orientational parameters. Semi-automated registration and segmentation ensure selection of the same anatomical location in subjects imaged at different time points during treatment. It is shown with excerpts from an ongoing clinical study of early post-menopausal women, that significant reduction in network connectivity occurs in the control group while the structural integrity is maintained in the hormone replacement group. The system described should be suited for large-scale studies designed to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic intervention in subjects with metabolic bone disease.

  16. Hardware Timestamping for an Image Acquisition System Based on FlexRIO and IEEE 1588 v2 Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquembri, S.; Sanz, D.; Barrera, E.; Ruiz, M.; Bustos, A.; Vega, J.; Castro, R.

    2016-02-01

    Current fusion devices usually implement distributed acquisition systems for the multiple diagnostics of their experiments. However, each diagnostic is composed by hundreds or even thousands of signals, including images from the vessel interior. These signals and images must be correctly timestamped, because all the information will be analyzed to identify plasma behavior using temporal correlations. For acquisition devices without synchronization mechanisms the timestamp is given by another device with timing capabilities when signaled by the first device. Later, each data should be related with its timestamp, usually via software. This critical action is unfeasible for software applications when sampling rates are high. In order to solve this problem this paper presents the implementation of an image acquisition system with real-time hardware timestamping mechanism. This is synchronized with a master clock using the IEEE 1588 v2 Precision Time Protocol (PTP). Synchronization, image acquisition and processing, and timestamping mechanisms are implemented using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and a timing card -PTP v2 synchronized. The system has been validated using a camera simulator streaming videos from fusion databases. The developed architecture is fully compatible with ITER Fast Controllers and has been integrated with EPICS to control and monitor the whole system.

  17. Multi-Rate Acquisition for Dead Time Reduction in Magnetic Resonance Receivers: Application to Imaging With Zero Echo Time.

    PubMed

    Marjanovic, Josip; Weiger, Markus; Reber, Jonas; Brunner, David O; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Wilm, Bertram J; Froidevaux, Romain; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2018-02-01

    For magnetic resonance imaging of tissues with very short transverse relaxation times, radio-frequency excitation must be immediately followed by data acquisition with fast spatial encoding. In zero-echo-time (ZTE) imaging, excitation is performed while the readout gradient is already on, causing data loss due to an initial dead time. One major dead time contribution is the settling time of the filters involved in signal down-conversion. In this paper, a multi-rate acquisition scheme is proposed to minimize dead time due to filtering. Short filters and high output bandwidth are used initially to minimize settling time. With increasing time since the signal onset, longer filters with better frequency selectivity enable stronger signal decimation. In this way, significant dead time reduction is accomplished at only a slight increase in the overall amount of output data. Multi-rate acquisition was implemented with a two-stage filter cascade in a digital receiver based on a field-programmable gate array. In ZTE imaging in a phantom and in vivo, dead time reduction by multi-rate acquisition is shown to improve image quality and expand the feasible bandwidth while increasing the amount of data collected by only a few percent.

  18. Comparison between electromagnetic transponders and radiographic imaging for prostate localization: A pelvic phantom study with rotations and translations.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Daniel G; McKenzie, Dean P; Perkins, Anne E

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in target localization between Calypso ® , kV orthogonal imaging and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for combined translations and rotations of an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom. The phantom was localized using all three systems in 50 different positions, with applied translational and rotational offsets randomly sampled from representative normal distributions of prostate motion. Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (ρc) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to assess the agreement between the localization systems. Mean differences and difference vectors between the three systems were also calculated. Agreement between systems for lateral, vertical, and longitudinal translations was excellent, with ρc values of greater than 0.98 between all three systems in all axes. There was excellent agreement between the systems for rotations around the lateral axis (pitch) (ρc > 0.99), and around the vertical axis (yaw) (ρc > 0.97). However, somewhat poorer agreement for rotations around the longitudinal axis (roll) was observed, with the lowest correlation observed between Calypso and kV orthogonal imaging (ρc = 0.895). Mean differences between the phantom position reported by Calypso and the radiographic systems were less than 1 mm and 1° for all translations and rotations. The results for translations are consistent with the publications of previous authors. There is no comparable published data for rotations. While there is lower correlation between the three systems for roll than for the other angles, the mean differences in reported rotations are not clinically significant. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  19. Feasibility of Rotational Scan Ultrasound Imaging by an Angled High Frequency Transducer for the Posterior Segment of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Paeng, Dong-Guk; Chang, Jin Ho; Chen, Ruimin; Humayun, Mark S.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2009-01-01

    High frequency ultrasound over 40 MHz has been used to image the anterior segment of the eye, but it is not suitable for the posterior segment due to the frequency-dependent attenuation of ultrasound and thus the limitation of penetration depth. This paper proposes a novel scan method to image the posterior segment of the eye with an angled high frequency (beyond 40 MHz) ultrasound needle transducer. In this method, the needle transducer is inserted into the eye through a small incision hole (∼1 mm in diameter) and rotated around the axial direction to form a cone-shaped imaging plane, allowing the spatial information of retinal vessels and diagnosis of their occlusion to be displayed. The feasibility of this novel technique was tested with images of a wire phantom, a polyimide tube, and an excised pig eye obtained by manually rotating a 40-MHz PMN-PT needle transducer with a beveled tip of 45°. From the results, we believe that rotational scan imaging will help expand the minimally invasive applications of high frequency ultrasound to other areas due to the capability of increased closeness of an angled needle transducer to structures of interest buried in other tissues. PMID:19411226

  20. Feasibility of rotational scan ultrasound imaging by an angled high frequency transducer for the posterior segment of the eye.

    PubMed

    Paeng, Dong-Guk; Chang, Jin Ho; Chen, Ruimin; Humayun, Mark S; Shung, K Kirk

    2009-03-01

    High frequency ultrasound over 40 MHz has been used to image the anterior segment of the eye, but it is not suitable for the posterior segment due to the frequency dependent attenuation of ultrasound and thus the limitation of penetration depth. This paper proposes a novel scan method to image the posterior segment of the eye with an angled high frequency (beyond 40 MHz) ultrasound needle transducer. In this method, the needle transducer is inserted into the eye through a small incision hole (approximately 1 mm in diameter) and rotated around the axial direction to form a cone-shaped imaging plane, allowing the spatial information of retinal vessels and diagnosis of their occlusion to be displayed. The feasibility of this novel technique was tested with images of a wire phantom, a polyimide tube, and an excised pig eye obtained by manually rotating a 40-MHz PMN-PT needle transducer with a beveled tip of 45 degrees . From the results, we believe that rotational scan imaging will help expand the minimally invasive applications of high frequency ultrasound to other areas due to the capability of increased closeness of an angled needle transducer to structures of interest buried in other tissues.

  1. Delayed rotation of the cerebellar vermis: a pitfall in early second-trimester fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Pinto, J; Paladini, D; Severino, M; Morana, G; Pais, R; Martinetti, C; Rossi, A

    2016-07-01

    We describe two cases in which delayed rotation of the cerebellar vermis simulated a Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) on early second-trimester magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two pregnant women with suspected fetal posterior fossa anomaly on ultrasound examination underwent fetal MRI at 21 (Case 1) and 19 (Case 2) weeks' gestation. In both cases, upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis was noted; on midsagittal imaging, the brainstem-vermis angle was 28° and 43°, respectively, while cerebellar morphometry showed a reduced vermian anteroposterior diameter compared to reference data. The posterior fossa appeared to be mildly enlarged, while all other findings were normal. Follow-up MRI at 28 + 3 weeks' gestation (Case 1) and at 1 postnatal year (Case 2) showed completely normal findings. Both children had normal psychomotor development and neurological examinations at 1 year of age. Incomplete rotation of the cerebellar vermis can be a physiological finding on early second-trimester fetal MRI examination and can simulate DWM or other forms of cerebellar hypoplasia. Embryologically, delayed permeabilization of Blake's pouch could account for the delayed vermian rotation. Follow-up imaging at a later gestational age is crucial to ensure that this condition is not over-reported and to avoid the potential risk of unnecessary pregnancy interruption. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Measurement of fluid rotation, dilation, and displacement in particle image velocimetry using a Fourier–Mellin cross-correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Giarra, Matthew N.; Charonko, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    Traditional particle image velocimetry (PIV) uses discrete Cartesian cross correlations (CCs) to estimate the displacements of groups of tracer particles within small subregions of sequentially captured images. However, these CCs fail in regions with large velocity gradients or high rates of rotation. In this paper, we propose a new PIV correlation method based on the Fourier–Mellin transformation (FMT) that enables direct measurement of the rotation and dilation of particle image patterns. In previously unresolvable regions of large rotation, our algorithm significantly improves the velocity estimates compared to traditional correlations by aligning the rotated and stretched particle patterns prior to performingmore » Cartesian correlations to estimate their displacements. Furthermore, our algorithm, which we term Fourier–Mellin correlation (FMC), reliably measures particle pattern displacement between pairs of interrogation regions with up to ±180° of angular misalignment, compared to 6–8° for traditional correlations, and dilation/compression factors of 0.5–2.0, compared to 0.9–1.1 for a single iteration of traditional correlations.« less

  3. Measurement of fluid rotation, dilation, and displacement in particle image velocimetry using a Fourier–Mellin cross-correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Giarra, Matthew N.; Charonko, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2015-02-05

    Traditional particle image velocimetry (PIV) uses discrete Cartesian cross correlations (CCs) to estimate the displacements of groups of tracer particles within small subregions of sequentially captured images. However, these CCs fail in regions with large velocity gradients or high rates of rotation. In this paper, we propose a new PIV correlation method based on the Fourier–Mellin transformation (FMT) that enables direct measurement of the rotation and dilation of particle image patterns. In previously unresolvable regions of large rotation, our algorithm significantly improves the velocity estimates compared to traditional correlations by aligning the rotated and stretched particle patterns prior to performingmore » Cartesian correlations to estimate their displacements. Furthermore, our algorithm, which we term Fourier–Mellin correlation (FMC), reliably measures particle pattern displacement between pairs of interrogation regions with up to ±180° of angular misalignment, compared to 6–8° for traditional correlations, and dilation/compression factors of 0.5–2.0, compared to 0.9–1.1 for a single iteration of traditional correlations.« less

  4. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Lumbar Nerve Roots: Comparison Between Fast Readout-Segmented and Selective-Excitation Acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Manoliu, Andrei; Ho, Michael; Nanz, Daniel; Piccirelli, Marco; Dappa, Evelyn; Klarhöfer, Markus; Del Grande, Filippo; Kuhn, Felix Pierre

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the quality of recently emerged advanced diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques with conventional single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) in a functional assessment of lumbar nerve roots. The institutional review board approved the study including 12 healthy volunteers. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed at 3 T (MAGNETOM Skyra; Siemens Healthcare) with b-values of 0 and 700 s/mm and an isotropic spatial resolution for subsequent multiplanar reformatting. The nerve roots L2 to S1 were imaged in coronal orientation with readout-segmented EPI (rs-DTI) and selective-excitation EPI (sTX-DTI) with an acquisition time of 5 minutes each, and in axial orientation with single-shot EPI (ss-DTI) with an acquisition time of 12 minutes (scan parameters as in recent literature). Two independent readers qualitatively and quantitatively assessed image quality. The interobserver reliability ranged from "substantial" to "almost perfect" for all examined parameter and all 3 sequences (κ = 0.70-0.94). Overall image quality was rated higher, and artifact levels were scored lower for rs-DTI and sTX-DTI than for ss-DTI (P = 0.007-0.027), while fractional anisotropy and signal-to-noise ratio values were similar for all sequences (P ≥ 0.306 and P ≥ 0.100, respectively). Contrast-to-noise ratios were significantly higher for rs-DTI and ss-DTI than for sTX-DTI (P = 0.004-0.013). Despite shorter acquisition times, rs-DTI and sTX-DTI produced images of higher quality with smaller geometrical distortions than the current standard of reference, ss-DTI. Thus, DTI acquisitions in the coronal plane, requiring fewer slices for full coverage of exiting nerve roots, may allow for functional neurography in scan times suitable for routine clinical practice.

  5. Patient-specific optimisation of administered activity and acquisition times for 18F-FDG PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Wickham, Fred; McMeekin, Helena; Burniston, Maria; McCool, Daniel; Pencharz, Deborah; Skillen, Annah; Wagner, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify a method for optimising the administered activity and acquisition time for 18 F-FDG PET imaging, yielding images of consistent quality for patients with varying body sizes and compositions, while limiting radiation doses to patients and staff. Patients referred for FDG scans had bioimpedance measurements. They were injected with 3 MBq/kg of 18 F up to 370 MBq and scanned on a Siemens Biograph mCT at 3 or 4 min per bed position. Data were rebinned to simulate 2- and 1-min acquisitions. Subjective assessments of image quality made by an experienced physician were compared with objective measurements based on signal-to-noise ratio and noise equivalent counts (NEC). A target objective measure of image quality was identified. The activity and acquisition time required to achieve this were calculated for each subject. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify expressions for the activity and acquisition time required in terms of easily measurable patient characteristics. One hundred and eleven patients were recruited, and subjective and objective assessments of image quality were compared for 321 full and reduced time scans. NEC-per-metre was identified as the objective measure which best correlated with the subjective assessment (Spearman rank correlation coefficient 0.77) and the best discriminator for images with a subjective assessment of "definitely adequate" (area under the ROC curve 0.94). A target of 37 Mcount/m was identified. Expressions were identified in terms of patient sex, height and weight for the activity and acquisition time required to achieve this target. Including measurements of body composition in these expressions was not useful. Using these expressions would reduce the mean activity administered to this patient group by 66 MBq compared to the current protocol. Expressions have been identified for the activity and acquisition times required to achieve consistent image quality in FDG imaging

  6. Diffractive imaging of a rotational wavepacket in nitrogen molecules with femtosecond megaelectronvolt electron pulses

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Jie; Guehr, Markus; Vecchione, Theodore; ...

    2016-04-05

    Imaging changes in molecular geometries on their natural femtosecond timescale with sub-Angström spatial precision is one of the critical challenges in the chemical sciences, as the nuclear geometry changes determine the molecular reactivity. For photoexcited molecules, the nuclear dynamics determine the photoenergy conversion path and efficiency. Here we report a gas-phase electron diffraction experiment using megaelectronvolt (MeV) electrons, where we captured the rotational wavepacket dynamics of nonadiabatically laser-aligned nitrogen molecules. We achieved a combination of 100 fs root-mean-squared temporal resolution and sub-Angstrom (0.76 Å) spatial resolution that makes it possible to resolve the position of the nuclei within the molecule.more » In addition, the diffraction patterns reveal the angular distribution of the molecules, which changes from prolate (aligned) to oblate (anti-aligned) in 300 fs. Lastly, our results demonstrate a significant and promising step towards making atomically resolved movies of molecular reactions.« less

  7. Axial rotation of sliding actin filaments revealed by single-fluorophore imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sase, Ichiro; Miyata, Hidetake; Ishiwata, Shin’ichi; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    1997-01-01

    In the actomyosin motor, myosin slides along an actin filament that has a helical structure with a pitch of ≈72 nm. Whether myosin precisely follows this helical track is an unanswered question bearing directly on the motor mechanism. Here, axial rotation of actin filaments sliding over myosin molecules fixed on a glass surface was visualized through fluorescence polarization imaging of individual tetramethylrhodamine fluorophores sparsely bound to the filaments. The filaments underwent one revolution per sliding distance of ≈1 μm, which is much greater than the 72 nm pitch. Thus, myosin does not “walk” on the helical array of actin protomers; rather it “runs,” skipping many protomers. Possible mechanisms involving sequential interaction of myosin with successive actin protomers are ruled out at least for the preparation described here in which the actin filaments ran rather slowly compared with other in vitro systems. The result also indicates that each “kick” of myosin is primarily along the axis of the actin filament. The successful, real-time observation of the changes in the orientation of a single fluorophore opens the possibility of detecting a conformational change(s) of a single protein molecule at the moment it functions. PMID:9159126

  8. Pulse-coupled neural nets: translation, rotation, scale, distortion, and intensity signal invariance for images.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J L

    1994-09-10

    The linking-field neural network model of Eckhorn et al. [Neural Comput. 2, 293-307 (1990)] was introduced to explain the experimentally observed synchronous activity among neural assemblies in the cat cortex induced by feature-dependent visual activity. The model produces synchronous bursts of pulses from neurons with similar activity, effectively grouping them by phase and pulse frequency. It gives a basic new function: grouping by similarity. The synchronous bursts are obtained in the limit of strong linking strengths. The linking-field model in the limit of moderate-to-weak linking characterized by few if any multiple bursts is investigated. In this limit dynamic, locally periodic traveling waves exist whose time signal encodes the geometrical structure of a two-dimensional input image. The signal can be made insensitive to translation, scale, rotation, distortion, and intensity. The waves transmit information beyond the physical interconnect distance. The model is implemented in an optical hybrid demonstration system. Results of the simulations and the optical system are presented.

  9. Axial rotation of sliding actin filaments revealed by single-fluorophore imaging.

    PubMed

    Sase, I; Miyata, H; Ishiwata, S; Kinosita, K

    1997-05-27

    In the actomyosin motor, myosin slides along an actin filament that has a helical structure with a pitch of approximately 72 nm. Whether myosin precisely follows this helical track is an unanswered question bearing directly on the motor mechanism. Here, axial rotation of actin filaments sliding over myosin molecules fixed on a glass surface was visualized through fluorescence polarization imaging of individual tetramethylrhodamine fluorophores sparsely bound to the filaments. The filaments underwent one revolution per sliding distance of approximately 1 microm, which is much greater than the 72 nm pitch. Thus, myosin does not "walk" on the helical array of actin protomers; rather it "runs," skipping many protomers. Possible mechanisms involving sequential interaction of myosin with successive actin protomers are ruled out at least for the preparation described here in which the actin filaments ran rather slowly compared with other in vitro systems. The result also indicates that each "kick" of myosin is primarily along the axis of the actin filament. The successful, real-time observation of the changes in the orientation of a single fluorophore opens the possibility of detecting a conformational change(s) of a single protein molecule at the moment it functions.

  10. Estimation of Spatiotemporal Sensitivity Using Band-limited Signals with No Additional Acquisitions for k-t Parallel Imaging.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Hidenori; Saitoh, Kanako; Nitta, Shuhei; Shiodera, Taichiro; Takeguchi, Tomoyuki; Bannae, Shuhei; Kuhara, Shigehide

    2018-03-13

    Dynamic MR techniques, such as cardiac cine imaging, benefit from shorter acquisition times. The goal of the present study was to develop a method that achieves short acquisition times, while maintaining a cost-effective reconstruction, for dynamic MRI. k - t sensitivity encoding (SENSE) was identified as the base method to be enhanced meeting these two requirements. The proposed method achieves a reduction in acquisition time by estimating the spatiotemporal (x - f) sensitivity without requiring the acquisition of the alias-free signals, typical of the k - t SENSE technique. The cost-effective reconstruction, in turn, is achieved by a computationally efficient estimation of the x - f sensitivity from the band-limited signals of the aliased inputs. Such band-limited signals are suitable for sensitivity estimation because the strongly aliased signals have been removed. For the same reduction factor 4, the net reduction factor 4 for the proposed method was significantly higher than the factor 2.29 achieved by k - t SENSE. The processing time is reduced from 4.1 s for k - t SENSE to 1.7 s for the proposed method. The image quality obtained using the proposed method proved to be superior (mean squared error [MSE] ± standard deviation [SD] = 6.85 ± 2.73) compared to the k - t SENSE case (MSE ± SD = 12.73 ± 3.60) for the vertical long-axis (VLA) view, as well as other views. In the present study, k - t SENSE was identified as a suitable base method to be improved achieving both short acquisition times and a cost-effective reconstruction. To enhance these characteristics of base method, a novel implementation is proposed, estimating the x - f sensitivity without the need for an explicit scan of the reference signals. Experimental results showed that the acquisition, computational times and image quality for the proposed method were improved compared to the standard k - t SENSE method.

  11. Rapid dark-blood carotid vessel-wall imaging with random bipolar gradients in a radial SSFP acquisition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Yu; Flask, Chris A; Dale, Brian M; Duerk, Jeffrey L

    2007-06-01

    To investigate and evaluate a new rapid dark-blood vessel-wall imaging method using random bipolar gradients with a radial steady-state free precession (SSFP) acquisition in carotid applications. The carotid artery bifurcations of four asymptomatic volunteers (28-37 years old, mean age = 31 years) were included in this study. Dark-blood contrast was achieved through the use of random bipolar gradients applied prior to the signal acquisition of each radial projection in a balanced SSFP acquisition. The resulting phase variation for moving spins established significant destructive interference in the low-frequency region of k-space. This phase variation resulted in a net nulling of the signal from flowing spins, while the bipolar gradients had a minimal effect on the static spins. The net effect was that the regular SSFP signal amplitude (SA) in stationary tissues was preserved while dark-blood contrast was achieved for moving spins. In this implementation, application of the random bipolar gradient pulses along all three spatial directions nulled the signal from both in-plane and through-plane flow in phantom and in vivo studies. In vivo imaging trials confirmed that dark-blood contrast can be achieved with the radial random bipolar SSFP method, thereby substantially reversing the vessel-to-lumen contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of a conventional rectilinear SSFP "bright-blood" acquisition from bright blood to dark blood with only a modest increase in TR (approximately 4 msec) to accommodate the additional bipolar gradients. Overall, this sequence offers a simple and effective dark-blood contrast mechanism for high-SNR SSFP acquisitions in vessel wall imaging within a short acquisition time.

  12. Simultaneous acquisition of perfusion image and dynamic MR angiography using time‐encoded pseudo‐continuous ASL

    PubMed Central

    Helle, Michael; Koken, Peter; Van Cauteren, Marc; van Osch, Matthias J. P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Both dynamic magnetic resonance angiography (4D‐MRA) and perfusion imaging can be acquired by using arterial spin labeling (ASL). While 4D‐MRA highlights large vessel pathology, such as stenosis or collateral blood flow patterns, perfusion imaging provides information on the microvascular status. Therefore, a complete picture of the cerebral hemodynamic condition could be obtained by combining the two techniques. Here, we propose a novel technique for simultaneous acquisition of 4D‐MRA and perfusion imaging using time‐encoded pseudo‐continuous arterial spin labeling. Methods The time‐encoded pseudo‐continuous arterial spin labeling module consisted of a first subbolus that was optimized for perfusion imaging by using a labeling duration of 1800 ms, whereas the other six subboli of 130 ms were used for encoding the passage of the labeled spins through the arterial system for 4D‐MRA acquisition. After the entire labeling module, a multishot 3D turbo‐field echo‐planar‐imaging readout was executed for the 4D‐MRA acquisition, immediately followed by a single‐shot, multislice echo‐planar‐imaging readout for perfusion imaging. The optimal excitation flip angle for the 3D turbo‐field echo‐planar‐imaging readout was investigated by evaluating the image quality of the 4D‐MRA and perfusion images as well as the accuracy of the estimated cerebral blood flow values. Results When using 36 excitation radiofrequency pulses with flip angles of 5 or 7.5°, the saturation effects of the 3D turbo‐field echo‐planar‐imaging readout on the perfusion images were relatively moderate and after correction, there were no statistically significant differences between the obtained cerebral blood flow values and those from traditional time‐encoded pseudo‐continuous arterial spin labeling. Conclusions This study demonstrated that simultaneous acquisition of 4D‐MRA and perfusion images can be achieved by using time‐encoded pseudo

  13. Sagittal fresh blood imaging with interleaved acquisition of systolic and diastolic data for improved robustness to motion.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Iliyana P; Kim, Daniel; Storey, Pippa; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Lim, Ruth P; Lee, Vivian S

    2013-02-01

    To improve robustness to patient motion of "fresh blood imaging" (FBI) for lower extremity noncontrast MR angiography. In FBI, two sets of three-dimensional fast spin echo images are acquired at different cardiac phases and subtracted to generate bright-blood angiograms. Routinely performed with a single coronal slab and sequential acquisition of systolic and diastolic data, FBI is prone to subtraction errors due to patient motion. In this preliminary feasibility study, FBI was implemented with two sagittal imaging slabs, and the systolic and diastolic acquisitions were interleaved to minimize sensitivity to motion. The proposed technique was evaluated in volunteers and patients. In 10 volunteers, imaged while performing controlled movements, interleaved FBI demonstrated better tolerance to subject motion than sequential FBI. In one patient with peripheral arterial disease, interleaved FBI offered better depiction of collateral flow by reducing sensitivity to inadvertent motion. FBI with interleaved acquisition of diastolic and systolic data in two sagittal imaging slabs offers improved tolerance to patient motion. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Diagnosis of long head of biceps tendinopathy in rotator cuff tear patients: correlation of imaging and arthroscopy data.

    PubMed

    Rol, Morgane; Favard, Luc; Berhouet, Julien

    2018-06-01

    The goal of this prospective study was to assess the reliability of pre-operative cross-sectional imaging for the diagnosis of long head of biceps (LHB) tendinopathy in patients with a rotator cuff tear. Cross-sectional imaging with MRI or CT arthrography data from 25 patients operated upon because of a rotator cuff tear between 1 October 2015 and 1 April 2016 was analysed by one experienced orthopaedic surgeon, one experienced radiologist and one orthopaedic resident. The analysis consisted of determining whether the LHB was present, the extrinsic tendon abnormalities (dislocation, tendon coverage) and intrinsic abnormalities (fraying, inflammation, degeneration). These findings were then compared to intra-operative arthroscopy findings, which were used as the benchmark. The interobserver correlation between the three different examiners for the cross-sectional imaging analysis as well as the correlation between the imaging and arthroscopy data were determined. The correlation between the imaging and arthroscopy data was the highest (80%) for the determination of LHB dislocation from the bicipital groove. The other diagnostic elements (subluxation, coverage and tendon degeneration) were difficult to discern with preoperative imaging, and correlated poorly with the arthroscopy findings (45% to 65%). The interobserver correlation was moderate to strong for the diagnosis of extrinsic tendon abnormalities. It was low to moderate for intrinsic abnormalities. Except for LHB dislocation, pre-operative imaging is not sufficient to make a reliable diagnosis of LHB tendinopathy. Arthroscopy remains the gold standard for the management of LHB tendinopathy, as diagnosed intra-operatively.

  15. Rotational X-ray angiography: a method for intra-operative volume imaging of the left-atrium and pulmonary veins for atrial fibrillation ablation guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzke, R.; Zagorchev, L.; d'Avila, A.; Thiagalingam, A.; Reddy, V. Y.; Chan, R. C.

    2007-03-01

    Catheter-based ablation in the left atrium and pulmonary veins (LAPV) for treatment of atrial fibrillation in cardiac electrophysiology (EP) are complex and require knowledge of heart chamber anatomy. Electroanatomical mapping (EAM) is typically used to define cardiac structures by combining electromagnetic spatial catheter localization with surface models which interpolate the anatomy between EAM point locations in 3D. Recently, the incorporation of pre-operative volumetric CT or MR data sets has allowed for more detailed maps of LAPV anatomy to be used intra-operatively. Preoperative data sets are however a rough guide since they can be acquired several days to weeks prior to EP intervention. Due to positional and physiological changes, the intra-operative cardiac anatomy can be different from that depicted in the pre-operative data. We present an application of contrast-enhanced rotational X-ray imaging for CT-like reconstruction of 3D LAPV anatomy during the intervention itself. Depending on the heart size a single or two selective contrastenhanced rotational acquisitions are performed and CT-like volumes are reconstructed with 3D filtered back projection. In case of dual injection, the two volumes depicting the left and right portions of the LAPV are registered and fused. The data sets are visualized and segmented intra-procedurally to provide anatomical data and surface models for intervention guidance. Our results from animal and human experiments indicate that the anatomical information from intra-operative CT-like reconstructions compares favorably with preacquired imaging data and can be of sufficient quality for intra-operative guidance.

  16. Iris recognition and what is next? Iris diagnosis: a new challenging topic for machine vision from image acquisition to image interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perner, Petra

    2017-03-01

    Molecular image-based techniques are widely used in medicine to detect specific diseases. Look diagnosis is an important issue but also the analysis of the eye plays an important role in order to detect specific diseases. These topics are important topics in medicine and the standardization of these topics by an automatic system can be a new challenging field for machine vision. Compared to iris recognition has the iris diagnosis much more higher demands for the image acquisition and interpretation of the iris. One understands by iris diagnosis (Iridology) the investigation and analysis of the colored part of the eye, the iris, to discover factors, which play an important role for the prevention and treatment of illnesses, but also for the preservation of an optimum health. An automatic system would pave the way for a much wider use of the iris diagnosis for the diagnosis of illnesses and for the purpose of individual health protection. With this paper, we describe our work towards an automatic iris diagnosis system. We describe the image acquisition and the problems with it. Different ways are explained for image acquisition and image preprocessing. We describe the image analysis method for the detection of the iris. The meta-model for image interpretation is given. Based on this model we show the many tasks for image analysis that range from different image-object feature analysis, spatial image analysis to color image analysis. Our first results for the recognition of the iris are given. We describe how detecting the pupil and not wanted lamp spots. We explain how to recognize orange blue spots in the iris and match them against the topological map of the iris. Finally, we give an outlook for further work.

  17. Dependency of image quality on acquisition protocol and image processing in chest tomosynthesis-a visual grading study based on clinical data.

    PubMed

    Jadidi, Masoud; Båth, Magnus; Nyrén, Sven

    2018-04-09

    To compare the quality of images obtained with two different protocols with different acquisition time and the influence from image post processing in a chest digital tomosynthesis (DTS) system. 20 patients with suspected lung cancer were imaged with a chest X-ray equipment with tomosynthesis option. Two examination protocols with different acquisition times (6.3 and 12 s) were performed on each patient. Both protocols were presented with two different image post-processing (standard DTS processing and more advanced processing optimised for chest radiography). Thus, 4 series from each patient, altogether 80 series, were presented anonymously and in a random order. Five observers rated the quality of the reconstructed section images according to predefined quality criteria in three different classes. Visual grading characteristics (VGC) was used to analyse the data and the area under the VGC curve (AUC VGC ) was used as figure-of-merit. The 12 s protocol and the standard DTS processing were used as references in the analyses. The protocol with 6.3 s acquisition time had a statistically significant advantage over the vendor-recommended protocol with 12 s acquisition time for the classes of criteria, Demarcation (AUC VGC = 0.56, p = 0.009) and Disturbance (AUC VGC = 0.58, p < 0.001). A similar value of AUC VGC was found also for the class Structure (definition of bone structures in the spine) (0.56) but it could not be statistically separated from 0.5 (p = 0.21). For the image processing, the VGC analysis showed a small but statistically significant advantage for the standard DTS processing over the more advanced processing for the classes of criteria Demarcation (AUC VGC = 0.45, p = 0.017) and Disturbance (AUC VGC = 0.43, p = 0.005). A similar value of AUC VGC was found also for the class Structure (0.46), but it could not be statistically separated from 0.5 (p = 0.31). The study indicates that the protocol with 6.3 s acquisition time yields slightly better image

  18. An evaluation of inexpensive methods for root image acquisition when using rhizotrons.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Awaz; Monnier, Yogan; Mao, Zhun; Lobet, Guillaume; Maeght, Jean-Luc; Ramel, Merlin; Stokes, Alexia

    2017-01-01

    Belowground processes play an essential role in ecosystem nutrient cycling and the global carbon budget cycle. Quantifying fine root growth is crucial to the understanding of ecosystem structure and function and in predicting how ecosystems respond to climate variability. A better understanding of root system growth is necessary, but choosing the best method of observation is complex, especially in the natural soil environment. Here, we compare five methods of root image acquisition using inexpensive technology that is currently available on the market: flatbed scanner, handheld scanner, manual tracing, a smartphone application scanner and a time-lapse camera. Using the five methods, root elongation rate (RER) was measured for three months, on roots of hybrid walnut ( Juglans nigra  ×  Juglans regia L.) in rhizotrons installed in agroforests. When all methods were compared together, there were no significant differences in relative cumulative root length. However, the time-lapse camera and the manual tracing method significantly overestimated the relative mean diameter of roots compared to the three scanning methods. The smartphone scanning application was found to perform best overall when considering image quality and ease of use in the field. The automatic time-lapse camera was useful for measuring RER over several months without any human intervention. Our results show that inexpensive scanning and automated methods provide correct measurements of root elongation and length (but not diameter when using the time-lapse camera). These methods are capable of detecting fine roots to a diameter of 0.1 mm and can therefore be selected by the user depending on the data required.

  19. Rotator cuff repair with all-suture anchors: a midterm magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of repair integrity and cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Van der Bracht, Hans; Van den Langenbergh, Tom; Pouillon, Marc; Verhasselt, Skrallan; Verniers, Philippe; Stoffelen, Danny

    2018-05-22

    This study investigated the feasibility and safety of all-suture anchors in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. All patients were diagnosed with a rotator cuff tear by ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with partial tears, massive tears, subscapularis tears, or previous shoulder surgery, were excluded. MRI and clinical outcome were investigated in all patients at 1.58 years (range, 1.0-2.0 years) after rotator cuff repair with all-suture anchors (prospective case series). Integrity of the cuff repair, cyst formation (encapsulated fluid signal around the anchor), ingrowth of the bone into the anchor, and integrity of the bone tunnel border were evaluated for 47 anchors. Clinical results were evaluated using the Constant-Murley score. An MRI evaluation was performed in 20 patients at 1.58 years (range, 1.0-2.0 years) after rotator cuff repair with all-suture anchors. MRI evaluation showed a very small rim of fluid around 10% of the anchors. None of the anchors showed cyst formation with fluid diameter more than twice the anchor diameter. In approximately 90% of the anchors, no fluid could be detected between the anchors and the edge of the bony tunnel. Full rotator cuff integrity was seen in 19 patients. Only 1 patient sustained a retear. Clinical results comparable with an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using classic anchors were seen. This prospective clinical cohort study shows promising early radiographic and clinical results after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using all-suture anchors. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Correction of Motion Artifacts From Shuttle Mode Computed Tomography Acquisitions for Body Perfusion Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Payel; Chandler, Adam G; Altinmakas, Emre; Rong, John; Ng, Chaan S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of shuttle-mode computed tomography (CT) technology for body perfusion applications by quantitatively assessing and correcting motion artifacts. Noncontrast shuttle-mode CT scans (10 phases, 2 nonoverlapping bed locations) were acquired from 4 patients on a GE 750HD CT scanner. Shuttling effects were quantified using Euclidean distances (between-phase and between-bed locations) of corresponding fiducial points on the shuttle and reference phase scans (prior to shuttle mode). Motion correction with nonrigid registration was evaluated using sum-of-squares differences and distances between centers of segmented volumes of interest on shuttle and references images. Fiducial point analysis showed an average shuttling motion of 0.85 ± 1.05 mm (between-bed) and 1.18 ± 1.46 mm (between-phase), respectively. The volume-of-interest analysis of the nonrigid registration results showed improved sum-of-squares differences from 2950 to 597, between-bed distance from 1.64 to 1.20 mm, and between-phase distance from 2.64 to 1.33 mm, respectively, averaged over all cases. Shuttling effects introduced during shuttle-mode CT acquisitions can be computationally corrected for body perfusion applications.

  1. SPR platform based on image acquisition for HER2 antigen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Johny P.; Predabon, Sheila M.; Bonafé, Elton G.; Martins, Alessandro F.; Brolo, Alexandre G.; Radovanovic, Eduardo; Girotto, Emerson M.

    2017-01-01

    HER2 antigen is a marker used for breast cancer diagnosis and prevention. Its determination has great importance since breast cancer is one of the most insidious types of cancer in women. HER2 antigen assessment in human serum is traditionally achieved by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method), but it has some disadvantages, such as suppressing the thermodynamic-kinetic studies regarding the antibody-antigen interaction, and the use of labeled molecules that can promote false positive responses. Biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are sensitive optical techniques widely applied on bioassays. The plasmonic devices do not operate with labeled molecules, overcoming conventional immunoassay limitations, and enabling a direct detection of target analytes. In this way, a new SPR biosensor to assess HER2 antigen has been proposed, using nanohole arrays on a gold thin film by signal transduction of transmitted light measurements from array image acquisitions. These metallic nanostructures may couple the light directly on surface plasmons using a simple collinear arrangement. The proposed device reached an average sensitivity for refractive index (RI) variation on a metal surface of 4146 intensity units/RIU (RIU = RI units). The device feasibility on biomolecular assessment was evaluated. For this, 3 ng ml-1 known HER2 antigen concentration was efficiently flowed (using a microfluidic system) and detected from aqueous solutions. This outcome shows that the device may be a powerful apparatus for bioassays, particularly toward breast cancer diagnosis and prognosis.

  2. 3D imaging acquisition, modeling, and prototyping for facial defects reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Trebeschi, Marco; Cavagnini, Gianluca; Gastaldi, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    A novel approach that combines optical three-dimensional imaging, reverse engineering (RE) and rapid prototyping (RP) for mold production in the prosthetic reconstruction of facial prostheses is presented. A commercial laser-stripe digitizer is used to perform the multiview acquisition of the patient's face; the point clouds are aligned and merged in order to obtain a polygonal model, which is then edited to sculpture the virtual prothesis. Two physical models of both the deformed face and the 'repaired' face are obtained: they differ only in the defect zone. Depending on the material used for the actual prosthesis, the two prototypes can be used either to directly cast the final prosthesis or to fabricate the positive wax pattern. Two case studies are presented, referring to prostetic reconstructions of an eye and of a nose. The results demonstrate the advantages over conventional techniques as well as the improvements with respect to known automated manufacturing techniques in the mold construction. The proposed method results into decreased patient's disconfort, reduced dependence on the anaplasthologist skill, increased repeatability and efficiency of the whole process.

  3. Optimization of image quality and acquisition time for lab-based X-ray microtomography using an iterative reconstruction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qingyang; Andrew, Matthew; Thompson, William; Blunt, Martin J.; Bijeljic, Branko

    2018-05-01

    Non-invasive laboratory-based X-ray microtomography has been widely applied in many industrial and research disciplines. However, the main barrier to the use of laboratory systems compared to a synchrotron beamline is its much longer image acquisition time (hours per scan compared to seconds to minutes at a synchrotron), which results in limited application for dynamic in situ processes. Therefore, the majority of existing laboratory X-ray microtomography is limited to static imaging; relatively fast imaging (tens of minutes per scan) can only be achieved by sacrificing imaging quality, e.g. reducing exposure time or number of projections. To alleviate this barrier, we introduce an optimized implementation of a well-known iterative reconstruction algorithm that allows users to reconstruct tomographic images with reasonable image quality, but requires lower X-ray signal counts and fewer projections than conventional methods. Quantitative analysis and comparison between the iterative and the conventional filtered back-projection reconstruction algorithm was performed using a sandstone rock sample with and without liquid phases in the pore space. Overall, by implementing the iterative reconstruction algorithm, the required image acquisition time for samples such as this, with sparse object structure, can be reduced by a factor of up to 4 without measurable loss of sharpness or signal to noise ratio.

  4. Optimal Anesthetic Regime for Motionless Three-Dimensional Image Acquisition During Longitudinal Studies of Adult Nonpigmented Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Nicola; Parker, Jennifer; Wilson, Carole; Frankel, Paul

    2017-04-01

    With many live imaging techniques, it is crucial that a deep level of anesthesia is reached and maintained throughout image acquisition without reducing zebrafish viability. This is particularly true for three-dimensional tomographic imaging modalities. Currently, the most commonly used anesthetic in the zebrafish community, MS-222 (tricaine methanesulfonate), does not allow this. We show, using a combination of both MS-222 and isoflurane, that we can significantly improve the anesthetic regime required for motionless image acquisition of live adult zebrafish. We have benchmarked this against the requirements of our novel quantitative imaging platform, compressive sensing optical projection tomography. Using nonpigmented transgenic zebrafish, we show that a combination of 175 ppm of both anesthetics improves the maintenance of deep anesthesia for prolonged periods of time and it can be used repeatedly to enable longitudinal imaging. Importantly, it does not affect the health or viability of the adult zebrafish. We also show that nonpigmented fish, with a mutated form of the gene transparent, took significantly longer to reach deep anesthesia. The anesthetic regime presented in this study should lead to significant improvements in accuracy and information achievable from imaging live adult zebrafish and in its application to longitudinal studies.

  5. Real-time compound sonography of the rotator-cuff: evaluation of artefact reduction and image definition.

    PubMed

    De Candia, Alessandro; Doratiotto, Stefsano; Paschina, Elio; Segatto, Enrica; Pelizzo, Francesco; Bazzocchi, Massimo

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare real time compound sonography with conventional sonography in the evaluation of rotator cuff tears. A prospective study was performed on 50 supraspinatus tendons in 101 patients treated by surgical acromioplasty. The surgeon described 33 (66%) full-thickness tears and 17 (34%) partial-thickness tears. All tendons were examined by conventional sonography and real time compound sonography on the day before surgery. The techniques were compared by evaluating the images for freedom from artefacts, contrast resolution and overall image definition. Real time compound sonography proved to be superior to conventional sonography as regards freedom from artefacts in 50 cases out of 50 (100%). It was superior to conventional sonography in evaluating the image contrast resolution in 45 cases out of 50 (90%), and superior to conventional sonography in overall image definition in 45 out of 50 cases (90%). Real-time compound sonography reduces the intrinsic artefacts of conventional sonography and allows better overall image definition. In particular, the digital technique allowed us to study the rotator cuff with better contrast resolution and sharper and more detailed images than did conventional sonography.

  6. SU-F-I-49: Vendor-Independent, Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction On a Rotating Grid with Coordinate-Descent Optimization for CT Imaging Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Young, S; Hoffman, J; McNitt-Gray, M

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction methods show promise for improving image quality and lowering the dose in helical CT. We aim to develop a novel model-based reconstruction method that offers potential for dose reduction with reasonable computation speed and storage requirements for vendor-independent reconstruction from clinical data on a normal desktop computer. Methods: In 2012, Xu proposed reconstructing on rotating slices to exploit helical symmetry and reduce the storage requirements for the CT system matrix. Inspired by this concept, we have developed a novel reconstruction method incorporating the stored-system-matrix approach together with iterative coordinate-descent (ICD) optimization. A penalized-least-squares objective function with amore » quadratic penalty term is solved analytically voxel-by-voxel, sequentially iterating along the axial direction first, followed by the transaxial direction. 8 in-plane (transaxial) neighbors are used for the ICD algorithm. The forward problem is modeled via a unique approach that combines the principle of Joseph’s method with trilinear B-spline interpolation to enable accurate reconstruction with low storage requirements. Iterations are accelerated with multi-CPU OpenMP libraries. For preliminary evaluations, we reconstructed (1) a simulated 3D ellipse phantom and (2) an ACR accreditation phantom dataset exported from a clinical scanner (Definition AS, Siemens Healthcare). Image quality was evaluated in the resolution module. Results: Image quality was excellent for the ellipse phantom. For the ACR phantom, image quality was comparable to clinical reconstructions and reconstructions using open-source FreeCT-wFBP software. Also, we did not observe any deleterious impact associated with the utilization of rotating slices. The system matrix storage requirement was only 4.5GB, and reconstruction time was 50 seconds per iteration. Conclusion: Our reconstruction method shows potential for furthering research in low

  7. Sagittal Fresh Blood Imaging with Interleaved Acquisition of Systolic and Diastolic Data for Improved Robustness to Motion

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Iliyana P.; Kim, Daniel; Storey, Pippa; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Lim, Ruth P.; Lee, Vivian S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To improve robustness to patient motion of ‘fresh blood imaging’ (FBI) for lower extremity non-contrast MRA. Methods In FBI, two sets of 3D fast spin echo images are acquired at different cardiac phases and subtracted to generate bright-blood angiograms. Routinely performed with a single coronal slab and sequential acquisition of systolic and diastolic data, FBI is prone to subtraction errors due to patient motion. In this preliminary feasibility study, FBI was implemented with two sagittal imaging slabs, and the systolic and diastolic acquisitions were interleaved to minimize sensitivity to motion. The proposed technique was evaluated in volunteers and patients. Results In ten volunteers, imaged while performing controlled movements, interleaved FBI demonstrated better tolerance to subject motion than sequential FBI. In one patient with peripheral arterial disease, interleaved FBI offered better depiction of collateral flow by reducing sensitivity to inadvertent motion. Conclusions FBI with interleaved acquisition of diastolic and systolic data in two sagittal imaging slabs offers improved tolerance to patient motion. PMID:23300129

  8. MRI diffusion tensor reconstruction with PROPELLER data acquisition.

    PubMed

    Cheryauka, Arvidas B; Lee, James N; Samsonov, Alexei A; Defrise, Michel; Gullberg, Grant T

    2004-02-01

    MRI diffusion imaging is effective in measuring the diffusion tensor in brain, cardiac, liver, and spinal tissue. Diffusion tensor tomography MRI (DTT MRI) method is based on reconstructing the diffusion tensor field from measurements of projections of the tensor field. Projections are obtained by appropriate application of rotated diffusion gradients. In the present paper, the potential of a novel data acquisition scheme, PROPELLER (Periodically Rotated Overlapping ParallEL Lines with Enhanced Reconstruction), is examined in combination with DTT MRI for its capability and sufficiency for diffusion imaging. An iterative reconstruction algorithm is used to reconstruct the diffusion tensor field from rotated diffusion weighted blades by appropriate rotated diffusion gradients. DTT MRI with PROPELLER data acquisition shows significant potential to reduce the number of weighted measurements, avoid ambiguity in reconstructing diffusion tensor parameters, increase signal-to-noise ratio, and decrease the influence of signal distortion.

  9. Retrospective 4D MR image construction from free-breathing slice Acquisitions: A novel graph-based approach.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C; Wu, Caiyun; McDonough, Joseph M; Mong, David A; Campbell, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic or 4D imaging of the thorax has many applications. Both prospective and retrospective respiratory gating and tracking techniques have been developed for 4D imaging via CT and MRI. For pediatric imaging, due to radiation concerns, MRI becomes the de facto modality of choice. In thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS), patients often suffer from extreme malformations of the chest wall, diaphragm, and/or spine with inability of the thorax to support normal respiration or lung growth (Campbell et al., 2003, Campbell and Smith, 2007), as such patient cooperation needed by some of the gating and tracking techniques are difficult to realize without causing patient discomfort and interference with the breathing mechanism itself. Therefore (ventilator-supported) free-breathing MRI acquisition is currently the best choice for imaging these patients. This, however, raises a question of how to create a consistent 4D image from such acquisitions. This paper presents a novel graph-based technique for compiling the best 4D image volume representing the thorax over one respiratory cycle from slice images acquired during unencumbered natural tidal-breathing of pediatric TIS patients. In our approach, for each coronal (or sagittal) slice position, images are acquired at a rate of about 200-300ms/slice over several natural breathing cycles which yields over 2000 slices. A weighted graph is formed where each acquired slice constitutes a node and the weight of the arc between two nodes defines the degree of contiguity in space and time of the two slices. For each respiratory phase, an optimal 3D spatial image is constructed by finding the best path in the graph in the spatial direction. The set of all such 3D images for a given respiratory cycle constitutes a 4D image. Subsequently, the best 4D image among all such constructed images is found over all imaged respiratory cycles. Two types of evaluation studies are carried out to understand the behavior of this algorithm and in

  10. Relationship between diverse patient body size- and image acquisition-related factors, and quantitative and qualitative image quality in coronary computed tomography angiography: a multicenter observational study.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Awai, Kazuo; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Ichikawa, Tomoaki; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Kim, Tonsok; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of patient- and image acquisition-related factors on the image quality in coronary CT angiography (CCTA). We enrolled 1197 patients (728 men; 65 ± 12 years). All underwent CCTA under the routine scan protocol in 23 participating hospitals. The subjective image quality (3-point Likert scale: excellent, good, and poor) and the attenuation of the left and right coronary artery (LCA, RCA) were recorded; the effects of patient and image acquisition-related factors on vascular attenuation were then compared. The mean LCA attenuation was 515.2 ± 65.8 (excellent), 401.4 ± 63.4 (good), and 319.5 ± 47.6 HU (poor). The corresponding RCA attenuation was 496.6 ± 67.6, 390.5 ± 58.5, and 308.5 ± 50.7 HU, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed significant associations between sufficient coronary attenuation (> 400 HU) and the age, gender, body surface area (BSA), number of detectors, contrast synchronization, scan mode, and the fractional contrast dose. Multivariate analysis revealed that the bolus tracking method, prospective electrocardiogram gating, and fractional contrast dose were significantly associated with sufficient coronary enhancement. BSA and fractional contrast dose are the most important patient- and image acquisition-related factors for sufficient coronary attenuation in CCTA.

  11. A novel neural network based image reconstruction model with scale and rotation invariance for target identification and classification for Active millimetre wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Smriti; Bisht, Amit Singh; Singh, Dharmendra; Pathak, Nagendra Prasad

    2014-12-01

    Millimetre wave imaging (MMW) is gaining tremendous interest among researchers, which has potential applications for security check, standoff personal screening, automotive collision-avoidance, and lot more. Current state-of-art imaging techniques viz. microwave and X-ray imaging suffers from lower resolution and harmful ionizing radiation, respectively. In contrast, MMW imaging operates at lower power and is non-ionizing, hence, medically safe. Despite these favourable attributes, MMW imaging encounters various challenges as; still it is very less explored area and lacks suitable imaging methodology for extracting complete target information. Keeping in view of these challenges, a MMW active imaging radar system at 60 GHz was designed for standoff imaging application. A C-scan (horizontal and vertical scanning) methodology was developed that provides cross-range resolution of 8.59 mm. The paper further details a suitable target identification and classification methodology. For identification of regular shape targets: mean-standard deviation based segmentation technique was formulated and further validated using a different target shape. For classification: probability density function based target material discrimination methodology was proposed and further validated on different dataset. Lastly, a novel artificial neural network based scale and rotation invariant, image reconstruction methodology has been proposed to counter the distortions in the image caused due to noise, rotation or scale variations. The designed neural network once trained with sample images, automatically takes care of these deformations and successfully reconstructs the corrected image for the test targets. Techniques developed in this paper are tested and validated using four different regular shapes viz. rectangle, square, triangle and circle.

  12. Intratympanic Iodine Contrast Injection Diffuses Across the Round Window Membrane Allowing for Perilymphatic CT Volume Acquisition Imaging.

    PubMed

    Abt, Nicholas B; Lehar, Mohamed; Guajardo, Carolina Trevino; Penninger, Richard T; Ward, Bryan K; Pearl, Monica S; Carey, John P

    2016-04-01

    Whether the round window membrane (RWM) is permeable to iodine-based contrast agents (IBCA) is unknown; therefore, our goal was to determine if IBCAs could diffuse through the RWM using CT volume acquisition imaging. Imaging of hydrops in the living human ear has attracted recent interest. Intratympanic (IT) injection has shown gadolinium's ability to diffuse through the RWM, enhancing the perilymphatic space. Four unfixed human cadaver temporal bones underwent intratympanic IBCA injection using three sequentially studied methods. The first method was direct IT injection. The second method used direct RWM visualization via tympanomeatal flap for IBCA-soaked absorbable gelatin pledget placement. In the third method, the middle ear was filled with contrast after flap elevation. Volume acquisition CT images were obtained immediately postexposure, and at 1-, 6-, and 24-hour intervals. Postprocessing was accomplished using color ramping and subtraction imaging. After the third method, positive RWM and perilymphatic enhancement were observed with endolymph sparing. Gray scale and color ramp multiplanar reconstructions displayed increased signal within the cochlea compared with precontrast imaging. The cochlea was measured for attenuation differences compared with pure water, revealing a preinjection average of -1,103 HU and a postinjection average of 338 HU. Subtraction imaging shows enhancement remaining within the cochlear space, Eustachian tube, middle ear epithelial lining, and mastoid. Iohexol iodine contrast is able to diffuse across the RWM. Volume acquisition CT imaging was able to detect perilymphatic enhancement at 0.5-mm slice thickness. The clinical application of IBCA IT injection seems promising but requires further safety studies.

  13. Intratympanic Iodine Contrast Injection Diffuses Across the Round Window Membrane Allowing for Perilymphatic CT Volume Acquisition Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Nicholas B.; Lehar, Mohamed; Guajardo, Carolina Trevino; Penninger, Richard T.; Ward, Bryan K.; Pearl, Monica S.; Carey, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothesis Whether the RWM is permeable to iodine-based contrast agents (IBCA) is unknown; therefore, our goal was to determine if IBCAs could diffuse through the RWM using CT volume acquisition imaging. Introduction Imaging of hydrops in the living human ear has attracted recent interest. Intratympanic (IT) injection has shown gadolinium's ability to diffuse through the round window membrane (RWM), enhancing the perilymphatic space. Methods Four unfixed human cadaver temporal bones underwent intratympanic IBCA injection using three sequentially studied methods. The first method was direct IT injection. The second method used direct RWM visualization via tympanomeatal flap for IBCA-soaked absorbable gelatin pledget placement. In the third method, the middle ear was filled with contrast after flap elevation. Volume acquisition CT images were obtained immediately post-exposure, and at 1, 6, and 24 hour intervals. Post-processing was accomplished using color ramping and subtraction imaging. Results Following the third method, positive RWM and perilymphatic enhancement were seen with endolymph sparing. Gray scale and color ramp multiplanar reconstructions displayed increased signal within the cochlea compared to pre-contrast imaging. The cochlea was measured for attenuation differences compared to pure water, revealing a pre-injection average of −1,103 HU and a post-injection average of 338 HU. Subtraction imaging shows enhancement remaining within the cochlear space, Eustachian tube, middle ear epithelial lining, and mastoid. Conclusions Iohexol iodine contrast is able to diffuse across the RWM. Volume acquisition CT imaging was able to detect perilymphatic enhancement at 0.5mm slice thickness. The clinical application of IBCA IT injection appears promising but requires further safety studies. PMID:26859543

  14. Location of Rotator Cuff Tear Initiation: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of 191 Shoulders.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jeung Yeol; Min, Seul Ki; Park, Keun Min; Park, Yong Bok; Han, Kwang Joon; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2018-03-01

    Degenerative rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are generally thought to originate at the anterior margin of the supraspinatus tendon. However, a recent ultrasonography study suggested that they might originate more posteriorly than originally thought, perhaps even from the isolated infraspinatus (ISP) tendon, and propagate toward the anterior supraspinatus. Hypothesis/Purpose: It was hypothesized that this finding could be reproduced with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose was to determine the most common location of degenerative RCTs by using 3-dimensional multiplanar MRI reconstruction. It was assumed that the location of the partial-thickness tears would identify the area of the initiation of full-thickness tears. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A retrospective analysis was conducted including 245 patients who had RCTs (nearly full- or partial-thickness tears) at the outpatient department between January 2011 and December 2013. RCTs were measured on 3-dimensional multiplanar reconstruction MRI with OsiriX software. The width and distance from the biceps tendon to the anterior margin of the tear were measured on T2-weighted sagittal images. In a spreadsheet, columns of consecutive numbers represented the size of each tear (anteroposterior width) and their locations with respect to the biceps brachii tendon. Data were pooled to graphically represent the width and location of all tears. Frequency histograms of the columns were made to visualize the distribution of tears. The tears were divided into 2 groups based on width (group A, <10 mm; group B, <20 and ≥10 mm) and analyzed for any differences in location related to size. The mean width of all RCTs was 11.9 ± 4.1 mm, and the mean length was 11.1 ± 5.0 mm. Histograms showed the most common location of origin to be 9 to 10 mm posterior to the biceps tendon. The histograms of groups A and B showed similar tear location distributions, indicating that the region approximately 10 mm posterior to

  15. Rapid 3D Refractive‐Index Imaging of Live Cells in Suspension without Labeling Using Dielectrophoretic Cell Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Habaza, Mor; Kirschbaum, Michael; Guernth‐Marschner, Christian; Dardikman, Gili; Barnea, Itay; Korenstein, Rafi; Duschl, Claus

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge in the field of optical imaging of live cells is achieving rapid, 3D, and noninvasive imaging of isolated cells without labeling. If successful, many clinical procedures involving analysis and sorting of cells drawn from body fluids, including blood, can be significantly improved. A new label‐free tomographic interferometry approach is presented. This approach provides rapid capturing of the 3D refractive‐index distribution of single cells in suspension. The cells flow in a microfluidic channel, are trapped, and then rapidly rotated by dielectrophoretic forces in a noninvasive and precise manner. Interferometric projections of the rotated cell are acquired and processed into the cellular 3D refractive‐index map. Uniquely, this approach provides full (360°) coverage of the rotation angular range around any axis, and knowledge on the viewing angle. The experimental demonstrations presented include 3D, label‐free imaging of cancer cells and three types of white blood cells. This approach is expected to be useful for label‐free cell sorting, as well as for detection and monitoring of pathological conditions resulting in cellular morphology changes or occurrence of specific cell types in blood or other body fluids. PMID:28251046

  16. Enhancement of multimodality texture-based prediction models via optimization of PET and MR image acquisition protocols: a proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallières, Martin; Laberge, Sébastien; Diamant, André; El Naqa, Issam

    2017-11-01

    Texture-based radiomic models constructed from medical images have the potential to support cancer treatment management via personalized assessment of tumour aggressiveness. While the identification of stable texture features under varying imaging settings is crucial for the translation of radiomics analysis into routine clinical practice, we hypothesize in this work that a complementary optimization of image acquisition parameters prior to texture feature extraction could enhance the predictive performance of texture-based radiomic models. As a proof of concept, we evaluated the possibility of enhancing a model constructed for the early prediction of lung metastases in soft-tissue sarcomas by optimizing PET and MR image acquisition protocols via computerized simulations of image acquisitions with varying parameters. Simulated PET images from 30 STS patients were acquired by varying the extent of axial data combined per slice (‘span’). Simulated T 1-weighted and T 2-weighted MR images were acquired by varying the repetition time and echo time in a spin-echo pulse sequence, respectively. We analyzed the impact of the variations of PET and MR image acquisition parameters on individual textures, and we investigated how these variations could enhance the global response and the predictive properties of a texture-based model. Our results suggest that it is feasible to identify an optimal set of image acquisition parameters to improve prediction performance. The model constructed with textures extracted from simulated images acquired with a standard clinical set of acquisition parameters reached an average AUC of 0.84 +/- 0.01 in bootstrap testing experiments. In comparison, the model performance significantly increased using an optimal set of image acquisition parameters (p = 0.04 ), with an average AUC of 0.89 +/- 0.01 . Ultimately, specific acquisition protocols optimized to generate superior radiomics measurements for a given clinical problem could be developed

  17. A Monte Carlo simulation study for the gamma-ray/neutron dual-particle imager using rotational modulation collimator (RMC).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Suk; Choi, Hong Yeop; Lee, Gyemin; Ye, Sung-Joon; Smith, Martin B; Kim, Geehyun

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a gamma-ray/neutron dual-particle imager, based on rotational modulation collimators (RMCs) and pulse shape discrimination (PSD)-capable scintillators, for possible applications for radioactivity monitoring as well as nuclear security and safeguards. A Monte Carlo simulation study was performed to design an RMC system for the dual-particle imaging, and modulation patterns were obtained for gamma-ray and neutron sources in various configurations. We applied an image reconstruction algorithm utilizing the maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization method based on the analytical modeling of source-detector configurations, to the Monte Carlo simulation results. Both gamma-ray and neutron source distributions were reconstructed and evaluated in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, showing the viability of developing an RMC-based gamma-ray/neutron dual-particle imager using PSD-capable scintillators.

  18. A new strategy for fast radiofrequency CW EPR imaging: Direct detection with rapid scan and rotating gradients

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sankaran; Koscielniak, Janusz W.; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Pursley, Randall H.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Krishna, Murali C.

    2007-01-01

    Rapid field scan on the order of T/s using high frequency sinusoidal or triangular sweep fields superimposed on the main Zeeman field, was used for direct detection of signals without low-frequency field modulation. Simultaneous application of space-encoding rotating field gradients have been employed to perform fast CW EPR imaging using direct detection that could, in principle, approach the speed of pulsed FT EPR imaging. The method takes advantage of the well-known rapid-scan strategy in CW NMR and EPR that allows arbitrarily fast field sweep and the simultaneous application of spinning gradients that allows fast spatial encoding. This leads to fast functional EPR imaging and, depending on the spin concentration, spectrometer sensitivity and detection band width, can provide improved temporal resolution that is important to interrogate dynamics of spin perfusion, pharmacokinetics, spectral spatial imaging, dynamic oxymetry, etc. PMID:17350865

  19. Measurement of eye lens dose for Varian On-Board Imaging with different cone-beam computed tomography acquisition techniques

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sudesh; Dhote, Deepak; Thakur, Kalpna; Pawar, Amol; Kumar, Rajesh; Kumar, Munish; Kulkarni, M. S.; Sharma, S. D.; Kannan, V.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to measure patient eye lens dose for different cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition protocols of Varian's On-Board Imaging (OBI) system using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) and to study the variation in eye lens dose with patient geometry and distance of isocenter to the eye lens. During the experimental measurements, OSLD was placed on the patient between the eyebrows of both eyes in line of nose during CBCT image acquisition to measure eye lens doses. The eye lens dose measurements were carried out for three different cone-beam acquisition protocols (standard dose head, low-dose head [LDH], and high-quality head [HQH]) of Varian OBI. Measured doses were correlated with patient geometry and distance between isocenter and eye lens. Measured eye lens doses for standard head and HQH protocols were in the range of 1.8–3.2 mGy and 4.5–9.9 mGy, respectively. However, the measured eye lens dose for the LDH protocol was in the range of 0.3–0.7 mGy. The measured data indicate that eye lens dose to patient depends on the selected imaging protocol. It was also observed that eye lens dose does not depend on patient geometry but strongly depends on distance between eye lens and treatment field isocenter. However, undoubted advantages of imaging system should not be counterbalanced by inappropriate selection of imaging protocol, especially for very intense imaging protocol. PMID:27651564

  20. Asteroid (16) Psyche: Triaxial Ellipsoid Dimensions and Rotational Pole from Keck II NIRC2 AO Images and Keck I OSIRIS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Jack D.; Conrad, Al; Reddy, Vishnu; de Kleer, Katherine R.; Adamkovics, Mate; de Pater, Imke; Merline, William J.; Tamblyn, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) images of asteroid (16) Psyche obtained at 4 epochs with the NIRC2 camera at the 10m W. M. Keck Observatory (Keck II) on UT 2015 December 25 lead to triaxial ellipsoid diameters of 279±4 x 230±2 x 195±14 km, and a rotational pole at RA=29° and Dec=-2°. Adding 6 more epochs obtained nearly simultaneously with the OSIRIS system at Keck I, as well as two more epochs from Keck II in 2009, yields diameters of 273±2 x 232±2 x 165±3 km, and a pole at RA=37° and Dec=+1°. (Errors are formal fit parameter uncertainties; an additional 4% uncertainty is possible from systematic biases.) The differing perspectives between 2015 (sub-Earth latitude Θ=-50°) and 2009 (Θ=-6°) improves primarily the c dimension and the location of the rotational pole, but illustrates how well images from even a single night can determine the size, shape, and pole of an asteroid. The 2015 observations were obtained as part of a campaign to study Psyche with many techniques over a few months, including radar from Arecibo and images from Magellan.These handful of images show the same rugged outline as the radius vector model available on the DAMIT website, constructed from many lightcurves and scaled by previous Keck AO images. In fact Psyche has rotated some 125,350 times between the first lightcurve in 1955 and our 2015 AO images, exactly 60 years apart to the day. Since the asteroid has such a high obliquity, these lightcurves have scanned well into both northern and southern hemispheres. The difference between the pole derived from our images and the radius vector model pole is only 7°, and the mean diameters of Psyche are 219 and 211 km, respectively.

  1. MR arthrography including abduction and external rotation images in the assessment of atraumatic multidirectional instability of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Waldt, Simone; Bauer, Jan S; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Haller, Bernhard; Schröder, Michael; Rummeny, Ernst J; Imhoff, Andreas B; Woertler, Klaus

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate diagnostic signs and measurements in the assessment of capsular redundancy in atraumatic multidirectional instability (MDI) of the shoulder on MR arthrography (MR-A) including abduction/external rotation (ABER) images. Twenty-one MR-A including ABER position of 20 patients with clinically diagnosed MDI and 17 patients without instability were assessed by three radiologists. On ABER images, presence of a layer of contrast between the humeral head (HH) and the anteroinferior glenohumeral ligament (AIGHL) (crescent sign) and a triangular-shaped space between the HH, AIGHL and glenoid (triangle sign) were evaluated; centring of the HH was measured. Anterosuperior herniation of the rotator interval (RI) capsule and glenoid version were determined on standard imaging planes. The crescent sign had a sensitivity of 57 %/62 %/48 % (observers 1/2/3) and specificity of 100 %/100 %/94 % in the diagnosis of MDI. The triangle sign had a sensitivity of 48 %/57 %/48 % and specificity of 94 %/94 %/100 %. The combination of both signs had a sensitivity of 86 %/90 %/81 % and specificity of 94 %/94 %/94 %. A positive triangle sign was significantly associated with decentring of the HH. Measurements of RI herniation, RI width and glenoid were not significantly different between both groups. Combined assessment of redundancy signs on ABER position MR-A allows for accurate differentiation between patients with atraumatic MDI and patients with clinically stable shoulders; measurements on standard imaging planes appear inappropriate. MR arthrography has the possibility to accurately identify patients with atraumatic MDI. Imaging of the shoulder in abduction and external rotation provides additive information. Capsular enlargement of the shoulder can be diagnosed on MR arthrography.

  2. The effect of sagittal rotation of the glenoid on axial glenoid width and glenoid version in computed tomography scan imaging.

    PubMed

    Gross, Daniel J; Golijanin, Petar; Dumont, Guillaume D; Parada, Stephen A; Vopat, Bryan G; Reinert, Steven E; Romeo, Anthony A; Provencher, C D R Matthew T

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scans of the shoulder are often not well aligned to the axis of the scapula and glenoid. The purpose of this paper was to determine the effect of sagittal rotation of the glenoid on axial measurements of anterior-posterior (AP) glenoid width and glenoid version attained by standard CT scan. In addition, we sought to define the angle of rotation required to correct the CT scan to optimal positioning. A total of 30 CT scans of the shoulder were reformatted using OsiriX software multiplanar reconstruction. The uncorrected (UNCORR) and corrected (CORR) CT scans were compared for measurements of both (1) axial AP glenoid width and (2) glenoid version at 5 standardized axial cuts. The mean difference in glenoid version was 2.6% (2° ± 0.1°; P = .0222) and the mean difference in AP glenoid width was 5.2% (1.2 ± 0.42 mm; P = .0026) in comparing the CORR and UNCORR scans. The mean angle of correction required to align the sagittal plane was 20.1° of rotation (range, 9°-39°; standard error of mean, 1.2°). These findings demonstrate that UNCORR CT scans of the glenohumeral joint do not correct for the sagittal rotation of the glenoid, and this affects the characteristics of the axial images. Failure to align the sagittal image to the 12-o'clock to 6-o'clock axis results in measurement error in both glenoid version and AP glenoid width. Use of UNCORR CT images may have notable implications for decision-making and surgical treatment. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Performing Quantitative Imaging Acquisition, Analysis and Visualization Using the Best of Open Source and Commercial Software Solutions.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Shailesh M

    2016-07-01

    A challenge in any imaging laboratory, especially one that uses modern techniques, is to achieve a sustainable and productive balance between using open source and commercial software to perform quantitative image acquisition, analysis and visualization. In addition to considering the expense of software licensing, one must consider factors such as the quality and usefulness of the software's support, training and documentation. Also, one must consider the reproducibility with which multiple people generate results using the same software to perform the same analysis, how one may distribute their methods to the community using the software and the potential for achieving automation to improve productivity.

  4. Scatter correction in cone-beam CT via a half beam blocker technique allowing simultaneous acquisition of scatter and image information

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ho; Xing Lei; Lee, Rena

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: X-ray scatter incurred to detectors degrades the quality of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and represents a problem in volumetric image guided and adaptive radiation therapy. Several methods using a beam blocker for the estimation and subtraction of scatter have been proposed. However, due to missing information resulting from the obstruction of the blocker, such methods require dual scanning or dynamically moving blocker to obtain a complete volumetric image. Here, we propose a half beam blocker-based approach, in conjunction with a total variation (TV) regularized Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm, to correct scatter-induced artifacts by simultaneously acquiring image and scatter information frommore » a single-rotation CBCT scan. Methods: A half beam blocker, comprising lead strips, is used to simultaneously acquire image data on one side of the projection data and scatter data on the other half side. One-dimensional cubic B-Spline interpolation/extrapolation is applied to derive patient specific scatter information by using the scatter distributions on strips. The estimated scatter is subtracted from the projection image acquired at the opposite view. With scatter-corrected projections where this subtraction is completed, the FDK algorithm based on a cosine weighting function is performed to reconstruct CBCT volume. To suppress the noise in the reconstructed CBCT images produced by geometric errors between two opposed projections and interpolated scatter information, total variation regularization is applied by a minimization using a steepest gradient descent optimization method. The experimental studies using Catphan504 and anthropomorphic phantoms were carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme. Results: The scatter-induced shading artifacts were markedly suppressed in CBCT using the proposed scheme. Compared with CBCT without a blocker, the nonuniformity value was reduced from 39.3% to 3.1%. The root mean square error

  5. Image gathering, coding, and processing: End-to-end optimization for efficient and robust acquisition of visual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.; Fales, Carl L.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers are concerned with the end-to-end performance of image gathering, coding, and processing. The applications range from high-resolution television to vision-based robotics, wherever the resolution, efficiency and robustness of visual information acquisition and processing are critical. For the presentation at this workshop, it is convenient to divide research activities into the following two overlapping areas: The first is the development of focal-plane processing techniques and technology to effectively combine image gathering with coding, with an emphasis on low-level vision processing akin to the retinal processing in human vision. The approach includes the familiar Laplacian pyramid, the new intensity-dependent spatial summation, and parallel sensing/processing networks. Three-dimensional image gathering is attained by combining laser ranging with sensor-array imaging. The second is the rigorous extension of information theory and optimal filtering to visual information acquisition and processing. The goal is to provide a comprehensive methodology for quantitatively assessing the end-to-end performance of image gathering, coding, and processing.

  6. Acquiring 4D Thoracic CT Scans Using Ciné CT Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Daniel

    One method for acquiring 4D thoracic CT scans is to use ciné acquisition. Ciné acquisition is conducted by rotating the gantry and acquiring x-ray projections while keeping the couch stationary. After a complete rotation, a single set of CT slices, the number corresponding to the number of CT detector rows, is produced. The rotation period is typically sub second so each image set corresponds to a single point in time. The ciné image acquisition is repeated for at least one breathing cycle to acquire images throughout the breathing cycle. Once the images are acquired at a single couch position, the couch is moved to the abutting position and the acquisition is repeated. Post-processing of the images sets typically resorts the sets into breathing phases, stacking images from a specific phase to produce a thoracic CT scan at that phase. Benefits of the ciné acquisition protocol include, the ability to precisely identify the phase with respect to the acquired image, the ability to resort images after reconstruction, and the ability to acquire images over arbitrarily long times and for arbitrarily many images (within dose constraints).

  7. Validation of early image acquisitions following Tc-99 m sestamibi injection using a semiconductors camera of cadmium-zinc-telluride.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Celine; Weinmann, Pierre

    2017-08-01

    Cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) cameras allow to decrease significantly the acquisition time of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), but the duration of the examination is still long. Therefore, this study was performed to test the feasibility of early imaging following injection of Tc-99 m sestamibi using a CZT camera. Seventy patients underwent both an early and a delayed image acquisition after exercise stress test (n = 30), dipyridamole stress test (n = 20), and at rest (n = 20). After injection of Tc-99 m sestamibi, the early image acquisition started on average within 5 minutes for the exercise and rest groups, and 3 minutes 30 seconds for the dipyridamole group. Two independent observers evaluated image quality and extracardiac uptake on four-point scales. The difference between early and later images for each patient was scored on a five-point scale. The image quality and extracardiac uptake of early and delayed image acquisitions were not different for the three groups (P > .05). There was no significant difference between early and delayed image acquisitions in the exercise, dipyridamole, and rest groups, respectively, in 63%, 40%, and 80% of cases. In the exercise group and rest group, a defect was only present in early MPI, respectively, in 13% and 20% of cases. A defect was only present in delayed images in 10% of cases in the exercise group and in 45% of cases in the dipyridamole group. There was no difference between early and later image acquisitions in terms of quality. This protocol reduces the length of the procedure for the patient. Beginning with early image acquisitions may help to overcome the artifacts that are observed at the delayed time.

  8. Split-screen display system and standardized methods for ultrasound image acquisition and multi-frame data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, Robert H. (Inventor); Hodis, Howard N. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A standardized acquisition methodology assists operators to accurately replicate high resolution B-mode ultrasound images obtained over several spaced-apart examinations utilizing a split-screen display in which the arterial ultrasound image from an earlier examination is displayed on one side of the screen while a real-time "live" ultrasound image from a current examination is displayed next to the earlier image on the opposite side of the screen. By viewing both images, whether simultaneously or alternately, while manually adjusting the ultrasound transducer, an operator is able to bring into view the real-time image that best matches a selected image from the earlier ultrasound examination. Utilizing this methodology, dynamic material properties of arterial structures, such as IMT and diameter, are measured in a standard region over successive image frames. Each frame of the sequence has its echo edge boundaries automatically determined by using the immediately prior frame's true echo edge coordinates as initial boundary conditions. Computerized echo edge recognition and tracking over multiple successive image frames enhances measurement of arterial diameter and IMT and allows for improved vascular dimension measurements, including vascular stiffness and IMT determinations.

  9. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality: a digital phantom study.

    PubMed

    Bernatowicz, K; Keall, P; Mishra, P; Knopf, A; Lomax, A; Kipritidis, J

    2015-01-01

    Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on accurate estimates of lung volume and structure. To determine the impact of gated 4D CT on thoracic image quality, the authors developed a novel simulation framework incorporating a realistic deformable digital phantom driven by patient tumor motion patterns. Based on this framework, the authors test the hypothesis that respiratory-gated 4D CT can significantly reduce lung imaging artifacts. Our simulation framework synchronizes the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom with tumor motion data in a quasi real-time fashion, allowing simulation of three 4D CT acquisition modes featuring different levels of respiratory feedback: (i) "conventional" 4D CT that uses a constant imaging and couch-shift frequency, (ii) "beam paused" 4D CT that interrupts imaging to avoid oversampling at a given couch position and respiratory phase, and (iii) "respiratory-gated" 4D CT that triggers acquisition only when the respiratory motion fulfills phase-specific displacement gating windows based on prescan breathing data. Our framework generates a set of ground truth comparators, representing the average XCAT anatomy during beam-on for each of ten respiratory phase bins. Based on this framework, the authors simulated conventional, beam-paused, and respiratory-gated 4D CT images using tumor motion patterns from seven lung cancer patients across 13 treatment fractions, with a simulated 5.5 cm(3) spherical lesion. Normal lung tissue image quality was quantified by comparing simulated and ground truth images in terms of overall mean square error (MSE) intensity difference, threshold-based lung volume error, and fractional false positive/false negative rates. Averaged across all simulations and phase bins

  10. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality: A digital phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Bernatowicz, K., E-mail: kingab@student.ethz.ch; Knopf, A.; Lomax, A.

    Purpose: Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on accurate estimates of lung volume and structure. To determine the impact of gated 4D CT on thoracic image quality, the authors developed a novel simulation framework incorporating a realistic deformable digital phantom driven by patient tumor motion patterns. Based on this framework, the authors test the hypothesis that respiratory-gated 4D CTmore » can significantly reduce lung imaging artifacts. Methods: Our simulation framework synchronizes the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom with tumor motion data in a quasi real-time fashion, allowing simulation of three 4D CT acquisition modes featuring different levels of respiratory feedback: (i) “conventional” 4D CT that uses a constant imaging and couch-shift frequency, (ii) “beam paused” 4D CT that interrupts imaging to avoid oversampling at a given couch position and respiratory phase, and (iii) “respiratory-gated” 4D CT that triggers acquisition only when the respiratory motion fulfills phase-specific displacement gating windows based on prescan breathing data. Our framework generates a set of ground truth comparators, representing the average XCAT anatomy during beam-on for each of ten respiratory phase bins. Based on this framework, the authors simulated conventional, beam-paused, and respiratory-gated 4D CT images using tumor motion patterns from seven lung cancer patients across 13 treatment fractions, with a simulated 5.5 cm{sup 3} spherical lesion. Normal lung tissue image quality was quantified by comparing simulated and ground truth images in terms of overall mean square error (MSE) intensity difference, threshold-based lung volume error, and fractional false positive/false negative rates

  11. Temporal optimisation of image acquisition for land cover classification with Random Forest and MODIS time-series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitze, Ingmar; Barrett, Brian; Cawkwell, Fiona

    2015-02-01

    The analysis and classification of land cover is one of the principal applications in terrestrial remote sensing. Due to the seasonal variability of different vegetation types and land surface characteristics, the ability to discriminate land cover types changes over time. Multi-temporal classification can help to improve the classification accuracies, but different constraints, such as financial restrictions or atmospheric conditions, may impede their application. The optimisation of image acquisition timing and frequencies can help to increase the effectiveness of the classification process. For this purpose, the Feature Importance (FI) measure of the state-of-the art machine learning method Random Forest was used to determine the optimal image acquisition periods for a general (Grassland, Forest, Water, Settlement, Peatland) and Grassland specific (Improved Grassland, Semi-Improved Grassland) land cover classification in central Ireland based on a 9-year time-series of MODIS Terra 16 day composite data (MOD13Q1). Feature Importances for each acquisition period of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) and Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) were calculated for both classification scenarios. In the general land cover classification, the months December and January showed the highest, and July and August the lowest separability for both VIs over the entire nine-year period. This temporal separability was reflected in the classification accuracies, where the optimal choice of image dates outperformed the worst image date by 13% using NDVI and 5% using EVI on a mono-temporal analysis. With the addition of the next best image periods to the data input the classification accuracies converged quickly to their limit at around 8-10 images. The binary classification schemes, using two classes only, showed a stronger seasonal dependency with a higher intra-annual, but lower inter-annual variation. Nonetheless anomalous weather conditions, such as the cold winter of

  12. Rotator cuff tear shape characterization: a comparison of two-dimensional imaging and three-dimensional magnetic resonance reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Beltran, Luis S; Gibbs, Kevin; Jazrawi, Laith; Berman, Phillip; Babb, James; Meislin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to see if 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could improve our understanding of rotator cuff tendon tear shapes. We believed that 3D MRI would be more accurate than two-dimensional (2D) MRI for classifying tear shapes. We performed a retrospective review of MRI studies of patients with arthroscopically proven full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Two orthopedic surgeons reviewed the information for each case, including scope images, and characterized the shape of the cuff tear into crescent, longitudinal, U- or L-shaped longitudinal, and massive type. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed the corresponding MRI studies independently and blind to the arthroscopic findings and characterized the shape on the basis of the tear's retraction and size using 2D MRI. The 3D reconstructions of each cuff tear were reviewed by each radiologist to characterize the shape. Statistical analysis included 95% confidence intervals and intraclass correlation coefficients. The study reviewed 34 patients. The accuracy for differentiating between crescent-shaped, longitudinal, and massive tears using measurements on 2D MRI was 70.6% for reader 1 and 67.6% for reader 2. The accuracy for tear shape characterization into crescent and longitudinal U- or L-shaped using 3D MRI was 97.1% for reader 1 and 82.4% for reader 2. When further characterizing the longitudinal tears as massive or not using 3D MRI, both readers had an accuracy of 76.9% (10 of 13). The overall accuracy of 3D MRI was 82.4% (56 of 68), significantly different (P = .021) from 2D MRI accuracy (64.7%). Our study has demonstrated that 3D MR reconstructions of the rotator cuff improve the accuracy of characterizing rotator cuff tear shapes compared with current 2D MRI-based techniques. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  14. Live dynamic OCT imaging of cardiac structure and function in mouse embryos with 43 Hz direct volumetric data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shang; Singh, Manmohan; Lopez, Andrew L.; Wu, Chen; Raghunathan, Raksha; Schill, Alexander; Li, Jiasong; Larin, Kirill V.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-03-01

    Efficient phenotyping of cardiac dynamics in live mouse embryos has significant implications on understanding of early mammalian heart development and congenital cardiac defects. Recent studies established optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a powerful tool for live embryonic heart imaging in various animal models. However, current four-dimensional (4D) OCT imaging of the beating embryonic heart largely relies on gated data acquisition or postacquisition synchronization, which brings errors when cardiac cycles lack perfect periodicity and is time consuming and computationally expensive. Here, we report direct 4D OCT imaging of the structure and function of cardiac dynamics in live mouse embryos achieved by employing a Fourier domain mode-locking swept laser source that enables ~1.5 MHz A-line rate. Through utilizing both forward and backward scans of a resonant mirror, we obtained a ~6.4 kHz frame rate, which allows for a direct volumetric data acquisition speed of ~43 Hz, around 20 times of the early-stage mouse embryonic heart rate. Our experiments were performed on mouse embryos at embryonic day 9.5. Time-resolved 3D cardiodynamics clearly shows the heart structure in motion. We present analysis of cardiac wall movement and its velocity from the primitive atrium and ventricle. Our results suggest that the combination of ultrahigh-speed OCT imaging with live embryo culture could be a useful embryonic heart phenotyping approach for mouse mutants modeling human congenital heart diseases.

  15. Development of an acquisition protocol and a segmentation algortihm for wounds of cutaneous Leishmaniasis in digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Kristians; Castañeda, Benjamín; Miranda, César; Lavarello, Roberto; Llanos, Alejandro

    2010-03-01

    We developed a protocol for the acquisition of digital images and an algorithm for a color-based automatic segmentation of cutaneous lesions of Leishmaniasis. The protocol for image acquisition provides control over the working environment to manipulate brightness, lighting and undesirable shadows on the injury using indirect lighting. Also, this protocol was used to accurately calculate the area of the lesion expressed in mm2 even in curved surfaces by combining the information from two consecutive images. Different color spaces were analyzed and compared using ROC curves in order to determine the color layer with the highest contrast between the background and the wound. The proposed algorithm is composed of three stages: (1) Location of the wound determined by threshold and mathematical morphology techniques to the H layer of the HSV color space, (2) Determination of the boundaries of the wound by analyzing the color characteristics in the YIQ space based on masks (for the wound and the background) estimated from the first stage, and (3) Refinement of the calculations obtained on the previous stages by using the discrete dynamic contours algorithm. The segmented regions obtained with the algorithm were compared with manual segmentations made by a medical specialist. Broadly speaking, our results support that color provides useful information during segmentation and measurement of wounds of cutaneous Leishmaniasis. Results from ten images showed 99% specificity, 89% sensitivity, and 98% accuracy.

  16. Nonintrusive iris image acquisition system based on a pan-tilt-zoom camera and light stripe projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Soweon; Jung, Ho Gi; Park, Kang Ryoung; Kim, Jaihie

    2009-03-01

    Although iris recognition is one of the most accurate biometric technologies, it has not yet been widely used in practical applications. This is mainly due to user inconvenience during the image acquisition phase. Specifically, users try to adjust their eye position within small capture volume at a close distance from the system. To overcome these problems, we propose a novel iris image acquisition system that provides users with unconstrained environments: a large operating range, enabling movement from standing posture, and capturing good-quality iris images in an acceptable time. The proposed system has the following three contributions compared with previous works: (1) the capture volume is significantly increased by using a pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) camera guided by a light stripe projection, (2) the iris location in the large capture volume is found fast due to 1-D vertical face searching from the user's horizontal position obtained by the light stripe projection, and (3) zooming and focusing on the user's irises at a distance are accurate and fast using the estimated 3-D position of a face by the light stripe projection and the PTZ camera. Experimental results show that the proposed system can capture good-quality iris images in 2.479 s on average at a distance of 1.5 to 3 m, while allowing a limited amount of movement by the user.

  17. Dynamic half Fourier acquisition, single shot turbo spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging for evaluating the female pelvis.

    PubMed

    Gousse, A E; Barbaric, Z L; Safir, M H; Madjar, S; Marumoto, A K; Raz, S

    2000-11-01

    We assessed the merit of dynamic half Fourier acquisition, single shot turbo spin-echo sequence T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating pelvic organ prolapse and all other female pelvic pathology by prospectively correlating clinical with imaging findings. From September 1997 to April 1998, 100 consecutive women 23 to 88 years old with (65) and without (35) pelvic organ prolapse underwent half Fourier acquisition, single shot turbo spin-echo sequence dynamic pelvic T2-weighted MRI at our institution using a 1.5 Tesla magnet with phased array coils. Mid sagittal and parasagittal views with the patient supine, relaxed and straining were obtained using no pre-examination preparation or instrumentation. We evaluated the anterior vaginal wall, bladder, urethra, posterior vaginal wall, rectum, pelvic floor musculature, perineum, uterus, vaginal cuff, ovaries, ureters and intraperitoneal organs for all pathological conditions, including pelvic prolapse. Patients underwent a prospective physical examination performed by a female urologist, and an experienced radiologist blinded to pre-imaging clinical findings interpreted all studies. Physical examination, MRI and intraoperative findings were statistically correlated. Total image acquisition time was 2.5 minutes, room time 10 minutes and cost American $540. Half Fourier acquisition, single shot turbo spin-echo T2-weighted MRI revealed pathological entities other than pelvic prolapse in 55 cases, including uterine fibroids in 11, ovarian cysts in 9, bilateral ureteronephrosis in 3, nabothian cyst in 7, Bartholin's gland cyst in 4, urethral diverticulum in 3, polytetrafluoroethylene graft abscess in 3, bladder diverticulum in 2, sacral spinal abnormalities in 2, bladder tumor in 1, sigmoid diverticulosis in 1 and other in 9. Intraoperative findings were considered the gold standard against which physical examination and MRI were compared. Using these criteria the sensitivity, specificity and positive

  18. Optimizing Uas Image Acquisition and Geo-Registration for Precision Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearst, A. A.; Cherkauer, K. A.; Rainey, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UASs) can acquire imagery of crop fields in various spectral bands, including the visible, near-infrared, and thermal portions of the spectrum. By combining techniques of computer vision, photogrammetry, and remote sensing, these images can be stitched into precise, geo-registered maps, which may have applications in precision agriculture and other industries. However, the utility of these maps will depend on their positional accuracy. Therefore, it is important to quantify positional accuracy and consider the tradeoffs between accuracy, field site setup, and the computational requirements for data processing and analysis. This will enable planning of data acquisition and processing to obtain the required accuracy for a given project. This study focuses on developing and evaluating methods for geo-registration of raw aerial frame photos acquired by a small fixed-wing UAS. This includes visual, multispectral, and thermal imagery at 3, 6, and 14 cm/pix resolutions, respectively. The study area is 10 hectares of soybean fields at the Agronomy Center for Research and Education (ACRE) at Purdue University. The dataset consists of imagery from 6 separate days of flights (surveys) and supporting ground measurements. The Direct Sensor Orientation (DiSO) and Integrated Sensor Orientation (InSO) methods for geo-registration are tested using 16 Ground Control Points (GCPs). Subsets of these GCPs are used to test for the effects of different numbers and spatial configurations of GCPs on positional accuracy. The horizontal and vertical Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) is used as the primary metric of positional accuracy. Preliminary results from 1 of the 6 surveys show that the DiSO method (0 GCPs used) achieved an RMSE in the X, Y, and Z direction of 2.46 m, 1.04 m, and 1.91 m, respectively. InSO using 5 GCPs achieved an RMSE of 0.17 m, 0.13 m, and 0.44 m. InSO using 10 GCPs achieved an RMSE of 0.10 m, 0.09 m, and 0.12 m. Further analysis will identify

  19. Impact of the timing of a SAR image acquisition on the calibration of a flood inundation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobeyn, Sacha; Van Wesemael, Alexandra; Neal, Jeffrey; Lievens, Hans; Eerdenbrugh, Katrien Van; De Vleeschouwer, Niels; Vernieuwe, Hilde; Schumann, Guy J.-P.; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Baets, Bernard De; Bates, Paul D.; Verhoest, Niko E. C.

    2017-02-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data have proven to be a very useful source of information for the calibration of flood inundation models. Previous studies have focused on assigning uncertainties to SAR images in order to improve flood forecast systems (e.g. Giustarini et al. (2015) and Stephens et al. (2012)). This paper investigates whether the timing of a SAR acquisition of a flood has an important impact on the calibration of a flood inundation model. As no suitable time series of SAR data exists, we generate a sequence of consistent SAR images through the use of a synthetic framework. This framework uses two available ERS-2 SAR images of the study area, one taken during the flood event of interest, the second taken during a dry reference period. The obtained synthetic observations at different points in time during the flood event are used to calibrate the flood inundation model. The results of this study indicate that the uncertainty of the roughness parameters is lower when the model is calibrated with an image taken before rather than during or after the flood peak. The results also show that the error on the modelled extent is much lower when the model is calibrated with a pre-flood peak image than when calibrated with a near-flood peak or a post-flood peak image. It is concluded that the timing of the SAR image acquisition of the flood has a clear impact on the model calibration and consequently on the precision of the predicted flood extent.

  20. dAcquisition setting optimization and quantitative imaging for 124I studies with the Inveon microPET-CT system.

    PubMed

    Anizan, Nadège; Carlier, Thomas; Hindorf, Cecilia; Barbet, Jacques; Bardiès, Manuel

    2012-02-13

    Noninvasive multimodality imaging is essential for preclinical evaluation of the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of radionuclide therapy and for monitoring tumor response. Imaging with nonstandard positron-emission tomography [PET] isotopes such as 124I is promising in that context but requires accurate activity quantification. The decay scheme of 124I implies an optimization of both acquisition settings and correction processing. The PET scanner investigated in this study was the Inveon PET/CT system dedicated to small animal imaging. The noise equivalent count rate [NECR], the scatter fraction [SF], and the gamma-prompt fraction [GF] were used to determine the best acquisition parameters for mouse- and rat-sized phantoms filled with 124I. An image-quality phantom as specified by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU 4-2008 protocol was acquired and reconstructed with two-dimensional filtered back projection, 2D ordered-subset expectation maximization [2DOSEM], and 3DOSEM with maximum a posteriori [3DOSEM/MAP] algorithms, with and without attenuation correction, scatter correction, and gamma-prompt correction (weighted uniform distribution subtraction). Optimal energy windows were established for the rat phantom (390 to 550 keV) and the mouse phantom (400 to 590 keV) by combining the NECR, SF, and GF results. The coincidence time window had no significant impact regarding the NECR curve variation. Activity concentration of 124I measured in the uniform region of an image-quality phantom was underestimated by 9.9% for the 3DOSEM/MAP algorithm with attenuation and scatter corrections, and by 23% with the gamma-prompt correction. Attenuation, scatter, and gamma-prompt corrections decreased the residual signal in the cold insert. The optimal energy windows were chosen with the NECR, SF, and GF evaluation. Nevertheless, an image quality and an activity quantification assessment were required to establish the most suitable reconstruction algorithm and

  1. Impact of the Timing of a SAR Image Acquisition on the Calibration of a Flood Inundation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gobeyn, Sacha; Van Wesemael, Alexandra; Neal, Jeffrey; Lievens, Hans; Van Eerdenbrugh, Katrien; De Vleeschouwer, Niels; Vernieuwe, Hilde; Schumann, Guy J.-P.; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; De Baets, Bernard; hide

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data have proven to be a very useful source of information for the calibration of flood inundation models. Previous studies have focused on assigning uncertainties to SAR images in order to improve flood forecast systems (e.g. Giustarini et al. (2015) and Stephens et al. (2012)). This paper investigates whether the timing of a SAR acquisition of a flood has an important impact on the calibration of a flood inundation model. As no suitable time series of SAR data exists, we generate a sequence of consistent SAR images through the use of a synthetic framework. This framework uses two available ERS-2 SAR images of the study area, one taken during the flood event of interest, the second taken during a dry reference period. The obtained synthetic observations at different points in time during the flood event are used to calibrate the flood inundation model. The results of this study indicate that the uncertainty of the roughness parameters is lower when the model is calibrated with an image taken before rather than during or after the flood peak. The results also show that the error on the modeled extent is much lower when the model is calibrated with a pre-flood peak image than when calibrated with a near-flood peak or a post-flood peak image. It is concluded that the timing of the SAR image acquisition of the flood has a clear impact on the model calibration and consequently on the precision of the predicted flood extent.

  2. Automatic elastic image registration by interpolation of 3D rotations and translations from discrete rigid-body transformations.

    PubMed

    Walimbe, Vivek; Shekhar, Raj

    2006-12-01

    We present an algorithm for automatic elastic registration of three-dimensional (3D) medical images. Our algorithm initially recovers the global spatial mismatch between the reference and floating images, followed by hierarchical octree-based subdivision of the reference image and independent registration of the floating image with the individual subvolumes of the reference image at each hierarchical level. Global as well as local registrations use the six-parameter full rigid-body transformation model and are based on maximization of normalized mutual information (NMI). To ensure robustness of the subvolume registration with low voxel counts, we calculate NMI using a combination of current and prior mutual histograms. To generate a smooth deformation field, we perform direct interpolation of six-parameter rigid-body subvolume transformations obtained at the last subdivision level. Our interpolation scheme involves scalar interpolation of the 3D translations and quaternion interpolation of the 3D rotational pose. We analyzed the performance of our algorithm through experiments involving registration of synthetically deformed computed tomography (CT) images. Our algorithm is general and can be applied to image pairs of any two modalities of most organs. We have demonstrated successful registration of clinical whole-body CT and positron emission tomography (PET) images using this algorithm. The registration accuracy for this application was evaluated, based on validation using expert-identified anatomical landmarks in 15 CT-PET image pairs. The algorithm's performance was comparable to the average accuracy observed for three expert-determined registrations in the same 15 image pairs.

  3. Thermal Neutron Point Source Imaging using a Rotating Modulation Collimator (RMC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Source Details.........................................................................................37 3.5 Simulation of RMC in MCNP ...passed through the masks at each rotation angle. ................................. 42 19. Figure 19: MCNP Generate Modulation Profile for Cadmium. The...Cadmium. The multi-energetic neutron source simulation from MCNP is used for this plot. The energy is values are shown per energy bin. The

  4. Mesquite cover responses in rotational grazing/prescribed fire management systems: Landscape assessment using aerial images

    Treesearch

    R. J. Ansley; W. E. Pinchak; W. R. Teague

    2007-01-01

    Prescribed fire is used to reduce rate of mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) encroachment and dominance on grassland ecosystems, but is difficult to apply in continuousgrazed systems because of the difficulty in accumulating sufficient herbaceous biomass (that is, ‘fine fuel’) that is needed to fuel fire. We evaluated the potential of rotationally...

  5. SPLASSH: Open source software for camera-based high-speed, multispectral in-vivo optical image acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ryan; Bouchard, Matthew B.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.

    2010-01-01

    Camera-based in-vivo optical imaging can provide detailed images of living tissue that reveal structure, function, and disease. High-speed, high resolution imaging can reveal dynamic events such as changes in blood flow and responses to stimulation. Despite these benefits, commercially available scientific cameras rarely include software that is suitable for in-vivo imaging applications, making this highly versatile form of optical imaging challenging and time-consuming to implement. To address this issue, we have developed a novel, open-source software package to control high-speed, multispectral optical imaging systems. The software integrates a number of modular functions through a custom graphical user interface (GUI) and provides extensive control over a wide range of inexpensive IEEE 1394 Firewire cameras. Multispectral illumination can be incorporated through the use of off-the-shelf light emitting diodes which the software synchronizes to image acquisition via a programmed microcontroller, allowing arbitrary high-speed illumination sequences. The complete software suite is available for free download. Here we describe the software’s framework and provide details to guide users with development of this and similar software. PMID:21258475

  6. The low-order wavefront control system for the PICTURE-C mission: high-speed image acquisition and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewawasam, Kuravi; Mendillo, Christopher B.; Howe, Glenn A.; Martel, Jason; Finn, Susanna C.; Cook, Timothy A.; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2017-09-01

    The Planetary Imaging Concept Testbed Using a Recoverable Experiment - Coronagraph (PICTURE-C) mission will directly image debris disks and exozodiacal dust around nearby stars from a high-altitude balloon using a vector vortex coronagraph. The PICTURE-C low-order wavefront control (LOWC) system will be used to correct time-varying low-order aberrations due to pointing jitter, gravity sag, thermal deformation, and the gondola pendulum motion. We present the hardware and software implementation of the low-order ShackHartmann and reflective Lyot stop sensors. Development of the high-speed image acquisition and processing system is discussed with the emphasis on the reduction of hardware and computational latencies through the use of a real-time operating system and optimized data handling. By characterizing all of the LOWC latencies, we describe techniques to achieve a framerate of 200 Hz with a mean latency of ˜378 μs

  7. TestSTORM: Simulator for optimizing sample labeling and image acquisition in localization based super-resolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sinkó, József; Kákonyi, Róbert; Rees, Eric; Metcalf, Daniel; Knight, Alex E.; Kaminski, Clemens F.; Szabó, Gábor; Erdélyi, Miklós

    2014-01-01

    Localization-based super-resolution microscopy image quality depends on several factors such as dye choice and labeling strategy, microscope quality and user-defined parameters such as frame rate and number as well as the image processing algorithm. Experimental optimization of these parameters can be time-consuming and expensive so we present TestSTORM, a simulator that can be used to optimize these steps. TestSTORM users can select from among four different structures with specific patterns, dye and acquisition parameters. Example results are shown and the results of the vesicle pattern are compared with experimental data. Moreover, image stacks can be generated for further evaluation using localization algorithms, offering a tool for further software developments. PMID:24688813

  8. ICA-based artefact and accelerated fMRI acquisition for improved Resting State Network imaging

    PubMed Central

    Griffanti, Ludovica; Salimi-Khorshidi, Gholamreza; Beckmann, Christian F.; Auerbach, Edward J.; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Sexton, Claire E.; Zsoldos, Enikő; Ebmeier, Klaus P; Filippini, Nicola; Mackay, Clare E.; Moeller, Steen; Xu, Junqian; Yacoub, Essa; Baselli, Giuseppe; Ugurbil, Kamil; Miller, Karla L.; Smith, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of resting state networks (RSNs) and the quantification of their functional connectivity in resting-state fMRI (rfMRI) are seriously hindered by the presence of artefacts, many of which overlap spatially or spectrally with RSNs. Moreover, recent developments in fMRI acquisition yield data with higher spatial and temporal resolutions, but may increase artefacts both spatially and/or temporally. Hence the correct identification and removal of non-neural fluctuations is crucial, especially in accelerated acquisitions. In this paper we investigate the effectiveness of three data-driven cleaning procedures, compare standard against higher (spatial and temporal) resolution accelerated fMRI acquisitions, and investigate the combined effect of different acquisitions and different cleanup approaches. We applied single-subject independent component analysis (ICA), followed by automatic component classification with FMRIB’s ICA-based X-noiseifier (FIX) to identify artefactual components. We then compared two first-level (within-subject) cleaning approaches for removing those artefacts and motion-related fluctuations from the data. The effectiveness of the cleaning procedures were assessed using timeseries (amplitude and spectra), network matrix and spatial map analyses. For timeseries and network analyses we also tested the effect of a second-level cleaning (informed by group-level analysis). Comparing these approaches, the preferable balance between noise removal and signal loss was achieved by regressing out of the data the full space of motion-related fluctuations and only the unique variance of the artefactual ICA components. Using similar analyses, we also investigated the effects of different cleaning approaches on data from different acquisition sequences. With the optimal cleaning procedures, functional connectivity results from accelerated data were statistically comparable or significantly better than the standard (unaccelerated) acquisition

  9. SU-E-J-112: The Impact of Cine EPID Image Acquisition Frame Rate On Markerless Soft-Tissue Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, S; Rottmann, J; Berbeco, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine EPID acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor auto-tracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87Hz on an AS1000 portal imager. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for auto-tracking. The difference between the programmed and auto-tracked positions of a Las Vegas phantommore » moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at eleven field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise were correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the auto-tracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29Hz. Above 4.29Hz, changes in errors were negligible with δ<1.60mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R=0.94) and patient studies (R=0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R -0.58 and -0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusion: An image acquisition frame rate of at least 4.29Hz is recommended for cine EPID tracking. Motion blurring in images with frame rates below 4.39Hz can substantially

  10. Simultaneous acquisition of multislice PET and MR images: initial results with a MR-compatible PET scanner.

    PubMed

    Catana, Ciprian; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J; Cherry, Simon R

    2006-12-01

    PET and MRI are powerful imaging techniques that are largely complementary in the information they provide. We have designed and built a MR-compatible PET scanner based on avalanche photodiode technology that allows simultaneous acquisition of PET and MR images in small animals. The PET scanner insert uses magnetic field-insensitive, position-sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) detectors coupled, via short lengths of optical fibers, to arrays of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillator crystals. The optical fibers are used to minimize electromagnetic interference between the radiofrequency and gradient coils and the PET detector system. The PET detector module components and the complete PET insert assembly are described. PET data were acquired with and without MR sequences running, and detector flood histograms were compared with the ones generated from the data acquired outside the magnet. A uniform MR phantom was also imaged to assess the effect of the PET detector on the MR data acquisition. Simultaneous PET and MRI studies of a mouse were performed ex vivo. PSAPDs can be successfully used to read out large numbers of scintillator crystals coupled through optical fibers with acceptable performance in terms of energy and timing resolution and crystal identification. The PSAPD-LSO detector performs well in the 7-T magnet, and no visible artifacts are detected in the MR images using standard pulse sequences. The first images from the complete system have been successfully acquired and reconstructed, demonstrating that simultaneous PET and MRI studies are feasible and opening up interesting possibilities for dual-modality molecular imaging studies.

  11. Methods of Hematoxylin and Erosin Image Information Acquisition and Optimization in Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Woong Bae; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Kwang Gi; Choi, Yongdoo; Chang, Hee Jin; Sohn, Dae Kyung

    2016-07-01

    We produced hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining-like color images by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), which can obtain the same or more information in comparison to conventional tissue staining. We improved images by using several image converting techniques, including morphological methods, color space conversion methods, and segmentation methods. An image obtained after image processing showed coloring very similar to that in images produced by H&E staining, and it is advantageous to conduct analysis through fluorescent dye imaging and microscopy rather than analysis based on single microscopic imaging. The colors used in CLSM are different from those seen in H&E staining, which is the method most widely used for pathologic diagnosis and is familiar to pathologists. Computer technology can facilitate the conversion of images by CLSM to be very similar to H&E staining images. We believe that the technique used in this study has great potential for application in clinical tissue analysis.

  12. Influence of gantry rotation time and scan mode on image quality in ultra-high-resolution CT system.

    PubMed

    Honda, Osamu; Yanagawa, Masahiro; Hata, Akinori; Kikuchi, Noriko; Miyata, Tomo; Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Uranishi, Ayumi; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the image quality of helical scan (HS) mode and non-helical scan (non-HS) mode on ultra-high-resolution CT in different gantry rotation time. non-HS with 0.35 s/rot (non-HS200 mA/0.35 s). Three observers compared each non-HS image with HS image, and scored non-HS images by using 3-point scale, paying attention to normal findings, abnormal findings, noise, streak artifact, and overall image quality. Statistical analysis was performed with Steel-Dwass test. Overall image quality (score: 2.45) and noise (score: 2.42) of non-HS 200 mA/1.5s was statistically best (p < 0.0005). Overall Image quality and noise of non-HS200 mA/0.75 s (score: 2.0) was comparable to that of HS200 mA/1.5 s. CTDIvol of HS200 mA/1.5 s is 23.2 mGy. CTDIvol of non-HS200 mA/1.5 s, non-HS200 mA/0.75 s, non-HS200 mA/0.35 s is 19.2 mGy, 9.8 mGy, 4.7 mGy. Overall image quality and noise of non-helical scan is better than that of helical scan in the same rotation time. Overall Image quality of non-HS200 mA/0.75 s is comparable to that of HS200 mA/1.5 s, though the radiation dose of non-HS200 mA/0.75 s is lower than that of HS200 mA/1.5 s. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. EMOTIONS AND IMAGES IN LANGUAGE--A LEARNING ANALYSIS OF THEIR ACQUISITION AND FUNCTION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STAATS, ARTHUR W.

    THIS ARTICLE PRESENTED THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSES CONCERNING IMPORTANT ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE. IT WAS SUGGESTED THAT A LEARNING THEORY WHICH INEGRATES INSTRUMENTAL AND CLASSICAL CONDITIONING, CUTTING ACROSS THEORETICAL LINES, COULD SERVE AS THE BASIS FOR A COMPREHENSIVE THEORY OF LANGUAGE ACQUISITION AND FUNCTION. THE PAPER ILLUSTRATED THE…

  14. Revisiting Age-of-Acquisition Effects in Spanish Visual Word Recognition: The Role of Item Imageability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Maximiliano A.; Cuetos, Fernando; Davies, Rob; Burani, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Word age-of-acquisition (AoA) affects reading. The mapping hypothesis predicts AoA effects when input--output mappings are arbitrary. In Spanish, the orthography-to-phonology mappings required for word naming are consistent; therefore, no AoA effects are expected. Nevertheless, AoA effects have been found, motivating the present investigation of…

  15. Motor-symptom laterality affects acquisition in Parkinson's disease: A cognitive and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei; Tan, Yu-Yan; Liu, Dong-Qiang; Herzallah, Mohammad M; Lapidow, Elizabeth; Wang, Ying; Zang, Yu-Feng; Gluck, Mark A; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2017-07-01

    Asymmetric onset of motor symptoms in PD can affect cognitive function. We examined whether motor-symptom laterality could affect feedback-based associative learning and explored its underlying neural mechanism by functional magnetic resonance imaging in PD patients. We recruited 63 early-stage medication-naïve PD patients (29 left-onset medication-naïve patients, 34 right-onset medication-naïve patients) and 38 matched normal controls. Subjects completed an acquired equivalence task (including acquisition, retention, and generalization) and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Learning accuracy and response time in each phase of the task were recorded for behavioral measures. Regional homogeneity was used to analyze resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data, with regional homogeneity lateralization to evaluate hemispheric functional asymmetry in the striatum. Left-onset patients made significantly more errors in acquisition (feedback-based associative learning) than right-onset patients and normal controls, whereas right-onset patients performed as well as normal controls. There was no significant difference among these three groups in the accuracy of either retention or generalization phase. The three groups did not show significant differences in response time. In the left-onset group, there was an inverse relationship between acquisition errors and regional homogeneity in the right dorsal rostral putamen. There were no significant regional homogeneity changes in either the left or the right dorsal rostral putamen in right-onset patients when compared to controls. Motor-symptom laterality could affect feedback-based associative learning in PD, with left-onset medication-naïve patients being selectively impaired. Dysfunction in the right dorsal rostral putamen may underlie the observed deficit in associative learning in patients with left-sided onset.© 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017

  16. Accelerated T1ρ acquisition for knee cartilage quantification using compressed sensing and data-driven parallel imaging: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Prachi; Rivoire, Julien; King, Kevin; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative T1ρ imaging is beneficial for early detection for osteoarthritis but has seen limited clinical use due to long scan times. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of accelerated T1ρ mapping for knee cartilage quantification using a combination of compressed sensing (CS) and data-driven parallel imaging (ARC-Autocalibrating Reconstruction for Cartesian sampling). A sequential combination of ARC and CS, both during data acquisition and reconstruction, was used to accelerate the acquisition of T1ρ maps. Phantom, ex vivo (porcine knee), and in vivo (human knee) imaging was performed on a GE 3T MR750 scanner. T1ρ quantification after CS-accelerated acquisition was compared with non CS-accelerated acquisition for various cartilage compartments. Accelerating image acquisition using CS did not introduce major deviations in quantification. The coefficient of variation for the root mean squared error increased with increasing acceleration, but for in vivo measurements, it stayed under 5% for a net acceleration factor up to 2, where the acquisition was 25% faster than the reference (only ARC). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first implementation of CS for in vivo T1ρ quantification. These early results show that this technique holds great promise in making quantitative imaging techniques more accessible for clinical applications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Fluorescence Imaging of Rotational and Vibrational Temperature in a Shock Tunnel Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palma, Philip C.; Danehy, Paul M.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2003-01-01

    Two-dimensional rotational and vibrational temperature measurements were made at the nozzle exit of a free-piston shock tunnel using planar laser-induced fluorescence. The Mach 7 flow consisted predominantly of nitrogen with a trace quantity of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide was employed as the probe species and was excited at 225 nm. Nonuniformities in the distribution of nitric oxide in the test gas were observed and were concluded to be due to contamination of the test gas by driver gas or cold test gas.The nozzle-exit rotational temperature was measured and is in reasonable agreement with computational modeling. Nonlinearities in the detection system were responsible for systematic errors in the measurements. The vibrational temperature was measured to be constant with distance from the nozzle exit, indicating it had frozen during the nozzle expansion.

  18. Tailoring four-dimensional cone-beam CT acquisition settings for fiducial marker-based image guidance in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; van Wieringen, Niek; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; Bel, Arjan; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2018-04-01

    Use of four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) and fiducial markers for image guidance during radiation therapy (RT) of mobile tumors is challenging due to the trade-off among image quality, imaging dose, and scanning time. This study aimed to investigate different 4D-CBCT acquisition settings for good visibility of fiducial markers in 4D-CBCT. Using these 4D-CBCTs, the feasibility of marker-based 4D registration for RT setup verification and manual respiration-induced motion quantification was investigated. For this, we applied a dynamic phantom with three different breathing motion amplitudes and included two patients with implanted markers. Irrespective of the motion amplitude, for a medium field of view (FOV), marker visibility was improved by reducing the imaging dose per projection and increasing the number of projection images; however, the scanning time was 4 to 8 min. For a small FOV, the total imaging dose and the scanning time were reduced (62.5% of the dose using a medium FOV, 2.5 min) without losing marker visibility. However, the body contour could be missing for a small FOV, which is not preferred in RT. The marker-based 4D setup verification was feasible for both the phantom and patient data. Moreover, manual marker motion quantification can achieve a high accuracy with a mean error of [Formula: see text].

  19. Data Acquisition System for Silicon Ultra Fast Cameras for Electron and Gamma Sources in Medical Applications (sucima Imager)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czermak, A.; Zalewska, A.; Dulny, B.; Sowicki, B.; Jastrząb, M.; Nowak, L.

    2004-07-01

    The needs for real time monitoring of the hadrontherapy beam intensity and profile as well as requirements for the fast dosimetry using Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) forced the SUCIMA collaboration to the design of the unique Data Acquisition System (DAQ SUCIMA Imager). The DAQ system has been developed on one of the most advanced XILINX Field Programmable Gate Array chip - VERTEX II. The dedicated multifunctional electronic board for the detector's analogue signals capture, their parallel digital processing and final data compression as well as transmission through the high speed USB 2.0 port has been prototyped and tested.

  20. Posterior Displacement of Supraspinatus Central Tendon Observed on Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Useful Preoperative Indicator of Rotator Cuff Tear Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Updegrove, Gary F; Armstrong, April D; Mosher, Timothy J; Kim, H Mike

    2015-11-01

    To characterize the orientation of the normal supraspinatus central tendon and describe the displacement patterns of the central tendon in rotator cuff tears using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based method. We performed a retrospective MRI and chart review of 183 patients with a rotator cuff tear (cuff tear group), 52 with a labral tear but no rotator cuff tear (labral tear group), and 74 with a normal shoulder (normal group). The orientation of the supraspinatus central tendon relative to the bicipital groove was evaluated based on axial MRI and was numerically represented by the shortest distance from the lateral extension line of the central tendon to the bicipital groove. Tear size, fatty degeneration, and involvement of the anterior supraspinatus were evaluated to identify the factors associated with orientation changes. The mean distance from the bicipital groove to the central tendon line was 0.7 mm and 1.3 mm in the normal group and labral tear group, respectively. Full-thickness cuff tears involving the anterior supraspinatus showed a significantly greater distance (17.7 mm) than those sparing the anterior supraspinatus (4.9 mm, P = .001). Fatty degeneration of the supraspinatus was significantly correlated with the distance (P = .006). Disruption of the anterior supraspinatus and fatty degeneration of the supraspinatus were independent predictors of posterior displacement. The supraspinatus central tendon has a constant orientation toward the bicipital groove in normal shoulders, and the central tendon is frequently displaced posteriorly in full-thickness rotator cuff tears involving the anterior leading edge of the supraspinatus. The degree of posterior displacement is proportional to tear size and severity of fatty degeneration of the supraspinatus muscle. A simple and quick assessment of the central tendon orientation on preoperative MRI can be a useful indicator of tear characteristics, potentially providing insight into the intraoperative

  1. Assessment of the rotation motion at the papillary muscle short-axis plane with normal subjects by two-dimensional speckle tracking imaging: a basic clinical study.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xian-Da; Huang, Jun; Hu, Yuan-Ping; Xu, Rui; Yang, Wei-Yu; Zhou, Li-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the rotation patterns at the papillary muscle plane in the Left Ventricle(LV) with normal subjects using two-dimensional speckle tracking imaging(2D-STI). We acquired standard of the basal, the papillary muscle and the apical short-axis images of the LV in 64 subjects to estimate the LV rotation motion by 2D-STI. The rotational degrees at the papillary muscle short-axis plane were measured at 15 different time points in the analysis of two heart cycles. There were counterclockwise rotation, clockwise rotation, and counterclockwise to clockwise rotation at the papillary muscle plane in the LV with normal subjects, respectively. The ROC analysis of the rotational degrees was performed at the papillary muscle short-axis plane at the peak LV torsion for predicting whether the turnaround point of twist to untwist motion pattern was located at the papillary muscle level. Sensitivity and specificity were 97% and 67%, respectively, with a cut-off value of 0.34°, and an area under the ROC curve of 0.8. At the peak LV torsion, there was no correlation between the rotational degrees at the papillary muscle short-axis plane and the LVEF in the normal subjects(r = 0.000, p = 0.998). In the study, we conclude that there were three rotation patterns at the papillary muscle short-axis levels, and the transition from basal clockwise rotation to apical counterclockwise rotation is located at the papillary muscle level.

  2. Assessment of the Rotation Motion at the Papillary Muscle Short-Axis Plane with Normal Subjects by Two-Dimensional Speckle Tracking Imaging: A Basic Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xian-Da; Huang, Jun; Hu, Yuan-Ping; Xu, Rui; Yang, Wei-Yu; Zhou, Li-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to observe the rotation patterns at the papillary muscle plane in the Left Ventricle(LV) with normal subjects using two-dimensional speckle tracking imaging(2D-STI). Methods We acquired standard of the basal, the papillary muscle and the apical short-axis images of the LV in 64 subjects to estimate the LV rotation motion by 2D-STI. The rotational degrees at the papillary muscle short-axis plane were measured at 15 different time points in the analysis of two heart cycles. Results There were counterclockwise rotation, clockwise rotation, and counterclockwise to clockwise rotation at the papillary muscle plane in the LV with normal subjects, respectively. The ROC analysis of the rotational degrees was performed at the papillary muscle short-axis plane at the peak LV torsion for predicting whether the turnaround point of twist to untwist motion pattern was located at the papillary muscle level. Sensitivity and specificity were 97% and 67%, respectively, with a cut-off value of 0.34°, and an area under the ROC curve of 0.8. At the peak LV torsion, there was no correlation between the rotational degrees at the papillary muscle short-axis plane and the LVEF in the normal subjects(r = 0.000, p = 0.998). Conclusions In the study, we conclude that there were three rotation patterns at the papillary muscle short-axis levels, and the transition from basal clockwise rotation to apical counterclockwise rotation is located at the papillary muscle level. PMID:24376634

  3. 3D Cones Acquisition of Human Extremity Imaging Using a 1.5T Superconducting Magnet and an Unshielded Gradient Coil Set.

    PubMed

    Setoi, Ayana; Kose, Katsumi

    2018-05-16

    We developed ultrashort echo-time (UTE) imaging sequences with 3D Cones trajectories for a home-built compact MRI system using a 1.5T superconducting magnet and an unshielded gradient coil set. We achieved less than 7 min imaging time and obtained clear in vivo images of a human forearm with a TE of 0.4 ms. We concluded that UTE imaging using 3D Cones acquisition was successfully implemented in our 1.5T MRI system.

  4. VPI - VIBRATION PATTERN IMAGER: A CONTROL AND DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM FOR SCANNING LASER VIBROMETERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Vibration Pattern Imager (VPI) system was designed to control and acquire data from laser vibrometer sensors. The PC computer based system uses a digital signal processing (DSP) board and an analog I/O board to control the sensor and to process the data. The VPI system was originally developed for use with the Ometron VPI Sensor (Ometron Limited, Kelvin House, Worsley Bridge Road, London, SE26 5BX, England), but can be readily adapted to any commercially available sensor which provides an analog output signal and requires analog inputs for control of mirror positioning. VPI's graphical user interface allows the operation of the program to be controlled interactively through keyboard and mouse-selected menu options. The main menu controls all functions for setup, data acquisition, display, file operations, and exiting the program. Two types of data may be acquired with the VPI system: single point or "full field". In the single point mode, time series data is sampled by the A/D converter on the I/O board at a user-defined rate for the selected number of samples. The position of the measuring point, adjusted by mirrors in the sensor, is controlled via a mouse input. In the "full field" mode, the measurement point is moved over a user-selected rectangular area with up to 256 positions in both x and y directions. The time series data is sampled by the A/D converter on the I/O board and converted to a root-mean-square (rms) value by the DSP board. The rms "full field" velocity distribution is then uploaded for display and storage. VPI is written in C language and Texas Instruments' TMS320C30 assembly language for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. The program requires 640K of RAM for execution, and a hard disk with 10Mb or more of disk space is recommended. The program also requires a mouse, a VGA graphics display, a Four Channel analog I/O board (Spectrum Signal Processing, Inc.; Westborough, MA), a break-out box and a Spirit-30 board (Sonitech

  5. Biomarkers and Biological Spectral Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-23

    Image t iZ ~ Rotator SSteping r De m oo ontroler Frmegabe (single ams) ... Software -= • . ... PCCm ue Data acquisition Rotator control PC Co puterImage...the depth of bum injury", Bums, 7, pp. 197-202, 1981. 7. R. A. De Blasi, M. Cope, C. Elwell, F. Safoue and M. Ferrari, "Noninvasive measurement of...nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and porphyrins. A number of studies have shown that the measured

  6. apART: system for the acquisition, processing, archiving, and retrieval of digital images in an open, distributed imaging environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Uwe; Strack, Ruediger

    1992-04-01

    apART reflects the structure of an open, distributed environment. According to the general trend in the area of imaging, network-capable, general purpose workstations with capabilities of open system image communication and image input are used. Several heterogeneous components like CCD cameras, slide scanners, and image archives can be accessed. The system is driven by an object-oriented user interface where devices (image sources and destinations), operators (derived from a commercial image processing library), and images (of different data types) are managed and presented uniformly to the user. Browsing mechanisms are used to traverse devices, operators, and images. An audit trail mechanism is offered to record interactive operations on low-resolution image derivatives. These operations are processed off-line on the original image. Thus, the processing of extremely high-resolution raster images is possible, and the performance of resolution dependent operations is enhanced significantly during interaction. An object-oriented database system (APRIL), which can be browsed, is integrated into the system. Attribute retrieval is supported by the user interface. Other essential features of the system include: implementation on top of the X Window System (X11R4) and the OSF/Motif widget set; a SUN4 general purpose workstation, inclusive ethernet, magneto optical disc, etc., as the hardware platform for the user interface; complete graphical-interactive parametrization of all operators; support of different image interchange formats (GIF, TIFF, IIF, etc.); consideration of current IPI standard activities within ISO/IEC for further refinement and extensions.

  7. Real-time estimation of prostate tumor rotation and translation with a kV imaging system based on an iterative closest point algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehi Tehrani, Joubin; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Rugaard Poulsen, Per; Keall, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that during cancer radiotherapy a small translation or rotation of the tumor can lead to errors in dose delivery. Current best practice in radiotherapy accounts for tumor translations, but is unable to address rotation due to a lack of a reliable real-time estimate. We have developed a method based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm that can compute rotation from kilovoltage x-ray images acquired during radiation treatment delivery. A total of 11 748 kilovoltage (kV) images acquired from ten patients (one fraction for each patient) were used to evaluate our tumor rotation algorithm. For each kV image, the three dimensional coordinates of three fiducial markers inside the prostate were calculated. The three dimensional coordinates were used as input to the ICP algorithm to calculate the real-time tumor rotation and translation around three axes. The results show that the root mean square error was improved for real-time calculation of tumor displacement from a mean of 0.97 mm with the stand alone translation to a mean of 0.16 mm by adding real-time rotation and translation displacement with the ICP algorithm. The standard deviation (SD) of rotation for the ten patients was 2.3°, 0.89° and 0.72° for rotation around the right-left (RL), anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior (SI) directions respectively. The correlation between all six degrees of freedom showed that the highest correlation belonged to the AP and SI translation with a correlation of 0.67. The second highest correlation in our study was between the rotation around RL and rotation around AP, with a correlation of -0.33. Our real-time algorithm for calculation of rotation also confirms previous studies that have shown the maximum SD belongs to AP translation and rotation around RL. ICP is a reliable and fast algorithm for estimating real-time tumor rotation which could create a pathway to investigational clinical treatment studies requiring real

  8. Real-time estimation of prostate tumor rotation and translation with a kV imaging system based on an iterative closest point algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; O'Brien, Ricky T; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Keall, Paul

    2013-12-07

    Previous studies have shown that during cancer radiotherapy a small translation or rotation of the tumor can lead to errors in dose delivery. Current best practice in radiotherapy accounts for tumor translations, but is unable to address rotation due to a lack of a reliable real-time estimate. We have developed a method based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm that can compute rotation from kilovoltage x-ray images acquired during radiation treatment delivery. A total of 11 748 kilovoltage (kV) images acquired from ten patients (one fraction for each patient) were used to evaluate our tumor rotation algorithm. For each kV image, the three dimensional coordinates of three fiducial markers inside the prostate were calculated. The three dimensional coordinates were used as input to the ICP algorithm to calculate the real-time tumor rotation and translation around three axes. The results show that the root mean square error was improved for real-time calculation of tumor displacement from a mean of 0.97 mm with the stand alone translation to a mean of 0.16 mm by adding real-time rotation and translation displacement with the ICP algorithm. The standard deviation (SD) of rotation for the ten patients was 2.3°, 0.89° and 0.72° for rotation around the right-left (RL), anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior (SI) directions respectively. The correlation between all six degrees of freedom showed that the highest correlation belonged to the AP and SI translation with a correlation of 0.67. The second highest correlation in our study was between the rotation around RL and rotation around AP, with a correlation of -0.33. Our real-time algorithm for calculation of rotation also confirms previous studies that have shown the maximum SD belongs to AP translation and rotation around RL. ICP is a reliable and fast algorithm for estimating real-time tumor rotation which could create a pathway to investigational clinical treatment studies requiring real

  9. A New Acquisition and Imaging System for Environmental Measurements: An Experience on the Italian Cultural Heritage

    PubMed Central

    Leccese, Fabio; Cagnetti, Marco; Calogero, Andrea; Trinca, Daniele; di Pasquale, Stefano; Giarnetti, Sabino; Cozzella, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    A new acquisition system for remote control of wall paintings has been realized and tested in the field. The system measures temperature and atmospheric pressure in an archeological site where a fresco has been put under control. The measuring chain has been designed to be used in unfavorable environments where neither electric power nor telecommunication infrastructures are available. The environmental parameters obtained from the local monitoring are then transferred remotely allowing an easier management by experts in the field of conservation of cultural heritage. The local acquisition system uses an electronic card based on microcontrollers and sends the data to a central unit realized with a Raspberry-Pi. The latter manages a high quality camera to pick up pictures of the fresco. Finally, to realize the remote control at a site not reached by internet signals, a WiMAX connection based on different communication technologies such as WiMAX, Ethernet, GPRS and Satellite, has been set up. PMID:24859030

  10. A new acquisition and imaging system for environmental measurements: an experience on the Italian cultural heritage.

    PubMed

    Leccese, Fabio; Cagnetti, Marco; Calogero, Andrea; Trinca, Daniele; di Pasquale, Stefano; Giarnetti, Sabino; Cozzella, Lorenzo

    2014-05-23

    A new acquisition system for remote control of wall paintings has been realized and tested in the field. The system measures temperature and atmospheric pressure in an archeological site where a fresco has been put under control. The measuring chain has been designed to be used in unfavorable environments where neither electric power nor telecommunication infrastructures are available. The environmental parameters obtained from the local monitoring are then transferred remotely allowing an easier management by experts in the field of conservation of cultural heritage. The local acquisition system uses an electronic card based on microcontrollers and sends the data to a central unit realized with a Raspberry-Pi. The latter manages a high quality camera to pick up pictures of the fresco. Finally, to realize the remote control at a site not reached by internet signals, a WiMAX connection based on different communication technologies such as WiMAX, Ethernet, GPRS and Satellite, has been set up.

  11. Nonsubsampled rotated complex wavelet transform (NSRCxWT) for medical image fusion related to clinical aspects in neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Satishkumar S; Mahajan, Abhishek; Talbar, Sanjay N; Desai, Subhash; Thakur, Meenakshi; D'cruz, Anil

    2017-02-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasite infection caused by the tapeworm Taenia solium in its larvae stage which affects the central nervous system of the human body (a definite host). It results in the formation of multiple lesions in the brain at different locations during its various stages. During diagnosis of such symptomatic patients, these lesions can be better visualized using a feature based fusion of Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This paper presents a novel approach to Multimodality Medical Image Fusion (MMIF) used for the analysis of the lesions for the diagnostic purpose and post treatment review of NCC. The MMIF presented here is a technique of combining CT and MRI data of the same patient into a new slice using a Nonsubsampled Rotated Complex Wavelet Transform (NSRCxWT). The forward NSRCxWT is applied on both the source modalities separately to extract the complementary and the edge related features. These features are then combined to form a composite spectral plane using average and maximum value selection fusion rules. The inverse transformation on this composite plane results into a new, visually better, and enriched fused image. The proposed technique is tested on the pilot study data sets of patients infected with NCC. The quality of these fused images is measured using objective and subjective evaluation metrics. Objective evaluation is performed by estimating the fusion parameters like entropy, fusion factor, image quality index, edge quality measure, mean structural similarity index measure, etc. The fused images are also evaluated for their visual quality using subjective analysis with the help of three expert radiologists. The experimental results on 43 image data sets of 17 patients are promising and superior when compared with the state of the art wavelet based fusion algorithms. The proposed algorithm can be a part of computer-aided detection and diagnosis (CADD) system which assists the radiologists in

  12. Optimization of fluorescent imaging in the operating room through pulsed acquisition and gating to ambient background cycling

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Kristian J.; Zhao, Yan; Davis, Scott C.; Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W.

    2017-01-01

    The design of fluorescence imaging instruments for surgical guidance is rapidly evolving, and a key issue is to efficiently capture signals with high ambient room lighting. Here, we introduce a novel time-gated approach to fluorescence imaging synchronizing acquisition to the 120 Hz light of the room, with pulsed LED excitation and gated ICCD detection. It is shown that under bright ambient room light this technique allows for the detection of physiologically relevant nanomolar fluorophore concentrations, and in particular reduces the light fluctuations present from the room lights, making low concentration measurements more reliable. This is particularly relevant for the light bands near 700nm that are more dominated by ambient lights. PMID:28663895

  13. Volumetric Arterial Spin-labeled Perfusion Imaging of the Kidneys with a Three-dimensional Fast Spin Echo Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Robson, Philip M; Madhuranthakam, Ananth J; Smith, Martin P; Sun, Maryellen R M; Dai, Weiying; Rofsky, Neil M; Pedrosa, Ivan; Alsop, David C

    2016-02-01

    Renal perfusion measurements using noninvasive arterial spin-labeled (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging techniques are gaining interest. Currently, focus has been on perfusion in the context of renal transplant. Our objectives were to explore the use of ASL in patients with renal cancer, and to evaluate three-dimensional (3D) fast spin echo (FSE) acquisition, a robust volumetric imaging method for abdominal applications. We evaluate 3D ASL perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in the kidneys compared to two-dimensional (2D) ASL in patients and healthy subjects. Isotropic resolution (2.6 × 2.6 × 2.8 mm(3)) 3D ASL using segmented FSE was compared to 2D single-shot FSE. ASL used pseudo-continuous labeling, suppression of background signal, and synchronized breathing. Quantitative perfusion values and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were compared between 3D and 2D ASL in four healthy volunteers and semiquantitative assessments were made by four radiologists in four patients with known renal masses (primary renal cell carcinoma). Renal cortex perfusion in healthy subjects was 284 ± 21 mL/100 g/min, with test-retest repeatability of 8.8%. No significant differences were found between the quantitative perfusion value and SNR in volunteers between 3D ASL and 2D ASL, or in 3D ASL with synchronized or free breathing. In patients, semiquantitative assessment by radiologists showed no significant difference in image quality between 2D ASL and 3D ASL. In one case, 2D ASL missed a high perfusion focus in a mass that was seen by 3D ASL. 3D ASL renal perfusion imaging provides isotropic-resolution images, with comparable quantitative perfusion values and image SNR in similar imaging time to single-slice 2D ASL. Copyright © 2015 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid acquisition of magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder using three-dimensional fast spin echo sequence with compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Young Han; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of 3D fast spin-echo (FSE) imaging with compressed sensing (CS) for the assessment of shoulder. Twenty-nine patients who underwent shoulder MRI including image sets of axial 3D-FSE sequence without CS and with CS, using an acceleration factor of 1.5, were included. Quantitative assessment was performed by calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) and structural similarity index (SSIM). Two musculoskeletal radiologists compared image quality of 3D-FSE sequences without CS and with CS, and scored the qualitative agreement between sequences, using a five-point scale. Diagnostic agreement for pathologic shoulder lesions between the two sequences was evaluated. The acquisition time of 3D-FSE MRI was reduced using CS (3min 23s vs. 2min 22s). Quantitative evaluations showed a significant correlation between the two sequences (r=0.872-0.993, p<0.05) and SSIM was in an acceptable range (0.940-0.993; mean±standard deviation, 0.968±0.018). Qualitative image quality showed good to excellent agreement between 3D-FSE images without CS and with CS. Diagnostic agreement for pathologic shoulder lesions between the two sequences was very good (κ=0.915-1). The 3D-FSE sequence with CS is feasible in evaluating the shoulder joint with reduced scan time compared to 3D-FSE without CS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Helium-3 MR q-space imaging with radial acquisition and iterative highly constrained back-projection.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Rafael L; Holmes, James H; Wu, Yu-Chien; Alexander, Andrew; Fain, Sean B

    2010-01-01

    An undersampled diffusion-weighted stack-of-stars acquisition is combined with iterative highly constrained back-projection to perform hyperpolarized helium-3 MR q-space imaging with combined regional correction of radiofrequency- and T1-related signal loss in a single breath-held scan. The technique is tested in computer simulations and phantom experiments and demonstrated in a healthy human volunteer with whole-lung coverage in a 13-sec breath-hold. Measures of lung microstructure at three different lung volumes are evaluated using inhaled gas volumes of 500 mL, 1000 mL, and 1500 mL to demonstrate feasibility. Phantom results demonstrate that the proposed technique is in agreement with theoretical values, as well as with a fully sampled two-dimensional Cartesian acquisition. Results from the volunteer study demonstrate that the root mean squared diffusion distance increased significantly from the 500-mL volume to the 1000-mL volume. This technique represents the first demonstration of a spatially resolved hyperpolarized helium-3 q-space imaging technique and shows promise for microstructural evaluation of lung disease in three dimensions. Copyright (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. High-Speed Data Acquisition and Digital Signal Processing System for PET Imaging Techniques Applied to Mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, J. D.; Benlloch, J. M.; Cerda, J.; Lerche, Ch. W.; Pavon, N.; Sebastia, A.

    2004-06-01

    This paper is framed into the Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) project, whose aim is to develop an innovative gamma ray sensor for early breast cancer diagnosis. Currently, breast cancer is detected using low-energy X-ray screening. However, functional imaging techniques such as PET/FDG could be employed to detect breast cancer and track disease changes with greater sensitivity. Furthermore, a small and less expensive PET camera can be utilized minimizing main problems of whole body PET. To accomplish these objectives, we are developing a new gamma ray sensor based on a newly released photodetector. However, a dedicated PEM detector requires an adequate data acquisition (DAQ) and processing system. The characterization of gamma events needs a free-running analog-to-digital converter (ADC) with sampling rates of more than 50 Ms/s and must achieve event count rates up to 10 MHz. Moreover, comprehensive data processing must be carried out to obtain event parameters necessary for performing the image reconstruction. A new generation digital signal processor (DSP) has been used to comply with these requirements. This device enables us to manage the DAQ system at up to 80 Ms/s and to execute intensive calculi over the detector signals. This paper describes our designed DAQ and processing architecture whose main features are: very high-speed data conversion, multichannel synchronized acquisition with zero dead time, a digital triggering scheme, and high throughput of data with an extensive optimization of the signal processing algorithms.

  17. Methods of Hematoxylin and Erosin Image Information Acquisition and Optimization in Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Woong Bae; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Kwang Gi; Choi, Yongdoo; Chang, Hee Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We produced hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining-like color images by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), which can obtain the same or more information in comparison to conventional tissue staining. Methods We improved images by using several image converting techniques, including morphological methods, color space conversion methods, and segmentation methods. Results An image obtained after image processing showed coloring very similar to that in images produced by H&E staining, and it is advantageous to conduct analysis through fluorescent dye imaging and microscopy rather than analysis based on single microscopic imaging. Conclusions The colors used in CLSM are different from those seen in H&E staining, which is the method most widely used for pathologic diagnosis and is familiar to pathologists. Computer technology can facilitate the conversion of images by CLSM to be very similar to H&E staining images. We believe that the technique used in this study has great potential for application in clinical tissue analysis. PMID:27525165

  18. Single-pixel non-imaging object recognition by means of Fourier spectrum acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huichao; Shi, Jianhong; Liu, Xialin; Niu, Zhouzhou; Zeng, Guihua

    2018-04-01

    Single-pixel imaging has emerged over recent years as a novel imaging technique, which has significant application prospects. In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a scheme that can achieve single-pixel non-imaging object recognition by acquiring the Fourier spectrum. In an experiment, a four-step phase-shifting sinusoid illumination light is used to irradiate the object image, the value of the light intensity is measured with a single-pixel detection unit, and the Fourier coefficients of the object image are obtained by a differential measurement. The Fourier coefficients are first cast into binary numbers to obtain the hash value. We propose a new method of perceptual hashing algorithm, which is combined with a discrete Fourier transform to calculate the hash value. The hash distance is obtained by calculating the difference of the hash value between the object image and the contrast images. By setting an appropriate threshold, the object image can be quickly and accurately recognized. The proposed scheme realizes single-pixel non-imaging perceptual hashing object recognition by using fewer measurements. Our result might open a new path for realizing object recognition with non-imaging.

  19. Microdose acquisition in adolescent leg length discrepancy using a low-dose biplane imaging system.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Janni; Mussmann, Bo R; Hjarbæk, John; Al-Aubaidi, Zaid; Pedersen, Niels W; Gerke, Oke; Torfing, Trine

    2017-09-01

    Background Children with leg length discrepancy often undergo repeat imaging. Therefore, every effort to reduce radiation dose is important. Using low dose preview images and noise reduction software rather than diagnostic images for length measurements might contribute to reducing dose. Purpose To compare leg length measurements performed on diagnostic images and low dose preview images both acquired using a low-dose bi-planar imaging system. Material and Methods Preview and diagnostic images from 22 patients were retrospectively collected (14 girls, 8 boys; mean age, 12.8 years; age range, 10-15 years). All images were anonymized and measured independently by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Three sets of measurements were performed on all images; the mechanical axis lines of the femur and the tibia as well as the anatomical line of the entire extremity. Statistical significance was tested with a paired t-test. Results No statistically significant difference was found between measurements performed on the preview and on the diagnostic image. The mean tibial length difference between the observers was -0.06 cm (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.12 to 0.01) and -0.08 cm (95% CI, -0.21 to 0.05), respectively; 0.10 cm (95% CI, 0.02-0.17) and 0.06 cm (95% CI, -0.02 to 0.14) for the femoral measurements and 0.12 cm (95% CI, -0.05 to 0.26) and 0.08 cm (95% CI, -0.02 to 0.19) for total leg length discrepancy. ICCs were >0.99 indicating excellent inter- and intra-rater reliability. Conclusion The data strongly imply that leg length measurements performed on preview images from a low-dose bi-planar imaging system are comparable to measurements performed on diagnostic images.

  20. Fast, label-free super-resolution live-cell imaging using rotating coherent scattering (ROCS) microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jünger, Felix; Olshausen, Philipp v.; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Living cells are highly dynamic systems with cellular structures being often below the optical resolution limit. Super-resolution microscopes, usually based on fluorescence cell labelling, are usually too slow to resolve small, dynamic structures. We present a label-free microscopy technique, which can generate thousands of super-resolved, high contrast images at a frame rate of 100 Hertz and without any post-processing. The technique is based on oblique sample illumination with coherent light, an approach believed to be not applicable in life sciences because of too many interference artefacts. However, by circulating an incident laser beam by 360° during one image acquisition, relevant image information is amplified. By combining total internal reflection illumination with dark-field detection, structures as small as 150 nm become separable through local destructive interferences. The technique images local changes in refractive index through scattered laser light and is applied to living mouse macrophages and helical bacteria revealing unexpected dynamic processes. PMID:27465033

  1. Fast, label-free super-resolution live-cell imaging using rotating coherent scattering (ROCS) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jünger, Felix; Olshausen, Philipp V.; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Living cells are highly dynamic systems with cellular structures being often below the optical resolution limit. Super-resolution microscopes, usually based on fluorescence cell labelling, are usually too slow to resolve small, dynamic structures. We present a label-free microscopy technique, which can generate thousands of super-resolved, high contrast images at a frame rate of 100 Hertz and without any post-processing. The technique is based on oblique sample illumination with coherent light, an approach believed to be not applicable in life sciences because of too many interference artefacts. However, by circulating an incident laser beam by 360° during one image acquisition, relevant image information is amplified. By combining total internal reflection illumination with dark-field detection, structures as small as 150 nm become separable through local destructive interferences. The technique images local changes in refractive index through scattered laser light and is applied to living mouse macrophages and helical bacteria revealing unexpected dynamic processes.

  2. Fast Acquisition and Reconstruction of Optical Coherence Tomography Images via Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shutao; McNabb, Ryan P.; Nie, Qing; Kuo, Anthony N.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel technique, based on compressive sensing principles, for reconstruction and enhancement of multi-dimensional image data. Our method is a major improvement and generalization of the multi-scale sparsity based tomographic denoising (MSBTD) algorithm we recently introduced for reducing speckle noise. Our new technique exhibits several advantages over MSBTD, including its capability to simultaneously reduce noise and interpolate missing data. Unlike MSBTD, our new method does not require an a priori high-quality image from the target imaging subject and thus offers the potential to shorten clinical imaging sessions. This novel image restoration method, which we termed sparsity based simultaneous denoising and interpolation (SBSDI), utilizes sparse representation dictionaries constructed from previously collected datasets. We tested the SBSDI algorithm on retinal spectral domain optical coherence tomography images captured in the clinic. Experiments showed that the SBSDI algorithm qualitatively and quantitatively outperforms other state-of-the-art methods. PMID:23846467

  3. A Quantitative Three-Dimensional Image Analysis Tool for Maximal Acquisition of Spatial Heterogeneity Data.

    PubMed

    Allenby, Mark C; Misener, Ruth; Panoskaltsis, Nicki; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques provide spatial insight into environmental and cellular interactions and are implemented in various fields, including tissue engineering, but have been restricted by limited quantification tools that misrepresent or underutilize the cellular phenomena captured. This study develops image postprocessing algorithms pairing complex Euclidean metrics with Monte Carlo simulations to quantitatively assess cell and microenvironment spatial distributions while utilizing, for the first time, the entire 3D image captured. Although current methods only analyze a central fraction of presented confocal microscopy images, the proposed algorithms can utilize 210% more cells to calculate 3D spatial distributions that can span a 23-fold longer distance. These algorithms seek to leverage the high sample cost of 3D tissue imaging techniques by extracting maximal quantitative data throughout the captured image.

  4. Can a Single Sagittal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Slice Represent Whole Fatty Infiltration in Chronic Rotator Cuff Tears at the Supraspinatus?

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Beom; Yang, Cheol-Jung; Li, Cheng Zhen; Zhuan, Zhong; Kwon, Seung-Cheol; Noh, Kyu-Cheol

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether fatty infiltration (FI) measured on a single sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slice can represent FI of the whole supraspinatus muscle. This study retrospectively reviewed the MRIs of 106 patients (age 50-79 years) divided into three rotator cuff tear-size groups: medium, large, and massive. Fat mass and muscle mass on all T1-weighted sagittal MRI scans (FA and MA) were measured. Of the total MRI scans, the Y-view was defined as the most lateral image of the junction of the scapular spine with the scapular body on the oblique sagittal T1-weighted image. Fat mass and muscle mass seen on this Y-view single slice were recorded as F1 and M1, respectively. Fat mass and muscle mass were also assessed on MRI scans lateral and medial to the Y-view. The means of fat mass and muscle mass on these three slices were recorded as F3 and M3, respectively. Average FI ratios (fat mass/muscle mass) of the three assessment methods (F1/M1, FA/MA, and F3/M3) were compared. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated for inter- and intraobserver reliability. ICCs showed higher reliability (> 0.8) for all measurements. F1/M1 values were not statistically different from FA/MA and F3/M3 values ( p > 0.05), except in males with medium and large tears. F3/M3 and FA/MA were not statistically different. The difference between F1/M1 and FA/MA did not exceed 2%. A single sagittal MRI slice can represent the whole FI in chronic rotator cuff tears, except in some patient groups. We recommend measurement of FI using a single sagittal MRI slice, given the effort required for repeated measurements.

  5. Can a Single Sagittal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Slice Represent Whole Fatty Infiltration in Chronic Rotator Cuff Tears at the Supraspinatus?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Beom; Yang, Cheol-Jung; Li, Cheng Zhen; Zhuan, Zhong; Kwon, Seung-Cheol

    2018-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate whether fatty infiltration (FI) measured on a single sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slice can represent FI of the whole supraspinatus muscle. Methods This study retrospectively reviewed the MRIs of 106 patients (age 50–79 years) divided into three rotator cuff tear-size groups: medium, large, and massive. Fat mass and muscle mass on all T1-weighted sagittal MRI scans (FA and MA) were measured. Of the total MRI scans, the Y-view was defined as the most lateral image of the junction of the scapular spine with the scapular body on the oblique sagittal T1-weighted image. Fat mass and muscle mass seen on this Y-view single slice were recorded as F1 and M1, respectively. Fat mass and muscle mass were also assessed on MRI scans lateral and medial to the Y-view. The means of fat mass and muscle mass on these three slices were recorded as F3 and M3, respectively. Average FI ratios (fat mass/muscle mass) of the three assessment methods (F1/M1, FA/MA, and F3/M3) were compared. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated for inter- and intraobserver reliability. Results ICCs showed higher reliability (> 0.8) for all measurements. F1/M1 values were not statistically different from FA/MA and F3/M3 values (p > 0.05), except in males with medium and large tears. F3/M3 and FA/MA were not statistically different. The difference between F1/M1 and FA/MA did not exceed 2%. Conclusions A single sagittal MRI slice can represent the whole FI in chronic rotator cuff tears, except in some patient groups. We recommend measurement of FI using a single sagittal MRI slice, given the effort required for repeated measurements. PMID:29564048

  6. A new post-phase rotation based dynamic receive beamforming architecture for smartphone-based wireless ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Minsuk; Kang, Jeeun; Lee, Gunho; Kim, Min; Song, Tai-Kyong

    2016-04-01

    Recently, a portable US imaging system using smart devices is highlighted for enhancing the portability of diagnosis. Especially, the system combination can enhance the user experience during whole US diagnostic procedures by employing the advanced wireless communication technology integrated in a smart device, e.g., WiFi, Bluetooth, etc. In this paper, an effective post-phase rotation-based dynamic receive beamforming (PRBF-POST) method is presented for wireless US imaging device integrating US probe system and commercial smart device. In conventional, the frame rate of conventional PRBF (PRBF-CON) method suffers from the large amount of calculations for the bifurcated processing paths of in-phase and quadrature signal components as the number of channel increase. Otherwise, the proposed PRBF-POST method can preserve the frame rate regardless of the number of channels by firstly aggregating the baseband IQ data along the channels whose phase quantization levels are identical ahead of phase rotation and summation procedures on a smart device. To evaluate the performance of the proposed PRBF-POST method, the pointspread functions of PRBF-CON and PRBF-POST methods were compared each other. Also, the frame rate of each PRBF method was measured 20-times to calculate the average frame rate and its standard deviation. As a result, the PRBFCON and PRBF-POST methods indicates identical beamforming performance in the Field-II simulation (correlation coefficient = 1). Also, the proposed PRBF-POST method indicates the consistent frame rate for varying number of channels (i.e., 44.25, 44.32, and 44.35 fps for 16, 64, and 128 channels, respectively), while the PRBF-CON method shows the decrease of frame rate as the number of channel increase (39.73, 13.19, and 3.8 fps). These results indicate that the proposed PRBF-POST method can be more advantageous for implementing the wireless US imaging system than the PRBF-CON method.

  7. Acquisition of a full-resolution image and aliasing reduction for a spatially modulated imaging polarimeter with two snapshots

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Yuan, Changan; Huang, Guohua; Zhao, Yinjun; Ren, Wenyi; Cao, Qizhi; Li, Jianying; Jin, Mingwu

    2018-01-01

    A snapshot imaging polarimeter using spatial modulation can encode four Stokes parameters allowing instantaneous polarization measurement from a single interferogram. However, the reconstructed polarization images could suffer a severe aliasing signal if the high-frequency component of the intensity image is prominent and occurs in the polarization channels, and the reconstructed intensity image also suffers reduction of spatial resolution due to low-pass filtering. In this work, a method using two anti-phase snapshots is proposed to address the two problems simultaneously. The full-resolution target image and the pure interference fringes can be obtained from the sum and the difference of the two anti-phase interferograms, respectively. The polarization information reconstructed from the pure interference fringes does not contain the aliasing signal from the high-frequency component of the object intensity image. The principles of the method are derived and its feasibility is tested by both computer simulation and a verification experiment. This work provides a novel method for spatially modulated imaging polarization technology with two snapshots to simultaneously reconstruct a full-resolution object intensity image and high-quality polarization components. PMID:29714224

  8. Combined CT-based and image-free navigation systems in TKA reduces postoperative outliers of rotational alignment of the tibial component.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Shota; Akamatsu, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Hideo; Kusayama, Yoshihiro; Kumagai, Ken; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2018-02-01

    Rotational malpositioning of the tibial component can lead to poor functional outcome in TKA. Although various surgical techniques have been proposed, precise rotational placement of the tibial component was difficult to accomplish even with the use of a navigation system. The purpose of this study is to assess whether combined CT-based and image-free navigation systems replicate accurately the rotational alignment of tibial component that was preoperatively planned on CT, compared with the conventional method. We compared the number of outliers for rotational alignment of the tibial component using combined CT-based and image-free navigation systems (navigated group) with those of conventional method (conventional group). Seventy-two TKAs were performed between May 2012 and December 2014. In the navigated group, the anteroposterior axis was prepared using CT-based navigation system and the tibial component was positioned under control of the navigation. In the conventional group, the tibial component was placed with reference to the Akagi line that was determined visually. Fisher's exact probability test was performed to evaluate the results. There was a significant difference between the two groups with regard to the number of outliers: 3 outliers in the navigated group compared with 12 outliers in the conventional group (P < 0.01). We concluded that combined CT-based and image-free navigation systems decreased the number of rotational outliers of tibial component, and was helpful for the replication of the accurate rotational alignment of the tibial component that was preoperatively planned.

  9. 48 CFR 52.223-13 - Acquisition of EPEAT®-Registered Imaging Equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Facsimile machine (fax machine)—A commercially available imaging product whose primary functions are... available imaging product with a sole function of the production of hard copy duplicates from graphic hard... functionally integrated components, that performs two or more of the core functions of copying, printing...

  10. The influence of the microscope lamp filament colour temperature on the process of digital images of histological slides acquisition standardization.

    PubMed

    Korzynska, Anna; Roszkowiak, Lukasz; Pijanowska, Dorota; Kozlowski, Wojciech; Markiewicz, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the digital images of the tissue biopsy captured with optical microscope using bright field technique under various light conditions. The range of colour's variation in immunohistochemically stained with 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine and Haematoxylin tissue samples is immense and coming from various sources. One of them is inadequate setting of camera's white balance to microscope's light colour temperature. Although this type of error can be easily handled during the stage of image acquisition, it can be eliminated with use of colour adjustment algorithms. The examination of the dependence of colour variation from microscope's light temperature and settings of the camera is done as an introductory research to the process of automatic colour standardization. Six fields of view with empty space among the tissue samples have been selected for analysis. Each field of view has been acquired 225 times with various microscope light temperature and camera white balance settings. The fourteen randomly chosen images have been corrected and compared, with the reference image, by the following methods: Mean Square Error, Structural SIMilarity and visual assessment of viewer. For two types of backgrounds and two types of objects, the statistical image descriptors: range, median, mean and its standard deviation of chromaticity on a and b channels from CIELab colour space, and luminance L, and local colour variability for objects' specific area have been calculated. The results have been averaged for 6 images acquired in the same light conditions and camera settings for each sample. The analysis of the results leads to the following conclusions: (1) the images collected with white balance setting adjusted to light colour temperature clusters in certain area of chromatic space, (2) the process of white balance correction for images collected with white balance camera settings not matched to the light temperature moves image descriptors into proper

  11. Image acquisitions, processing and analysis in the process of obtaining characteristics of horse navicular bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaborowicz, M.; Włodarek, J.; Przybylak, A.; Przybył, K.; Wojcieszak, D.; Czekała, W.; Ludwiczak, A.; Boniecki, P.; Koszela, K.; Przybył, J.; Skwarcz, J.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was investigate the possibility of using methods of computer image analysis for the assessment and classification of morphological variability and the state of health of horse navicular bone. Assumption was that the classification based on information contained in the graphical form two-dimensional digital images of navicular bone and information of horse health. The first step in the research was define the classes of analyzed bones, and then using methods of computer image analysis for obtaining characteristics from these images. This characteristics were correlated with data concerning the animal, such as: side of hooves, number of navicular syndrome (scale 0-3), type, sex, age, weight, information about lace, information about heel. This paper shows the introduction to the study of use the neural image analysis in the diagnosis of navicular bone syndrome. Prepared method can provide an introduction to the study of non-invasive way to assess the condition of the horse navicular bone.

  12. Image analysis in modern ophthalmology: from acquisition to computer assisted diagnosis and telemedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrugo, Andrés G.; Millán, María S.; Cristóbal, Gabriel; Gabarda, Salvador; Sorel, Michal; Sroubek, Filip

    2012-06-01

    Medical digital imaging has become a key element of modern health care procedures. It provides visual documentation and a permanent record for the patients, and most important the ability to extract information about many diseases. Modern ophthalmology thrives and develops on the advances in digital imaging and computing power. In this work we present an overview of recent image processing techniques proposed by the authors in the area of digital eye fundus photography. Our applications range from retinal image quality assessment to image restoration via blind deconvolution and visualization of structural changes in time between patient visits. All proposed within a framework for improving and assisting the medical practice and the forthcoming scenario of the information chain in telemedicine.

  13. Optimization of Scan Parameters to Reduce Acquisition Time for Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging at 1.5T.

    PubMed

    Yokosawa, Suguru; Sasaki, Makoto; Bito, Yoshitaka; Ito, Kenji; Yamashita, Fumio; Goodwin, Jonathan; Higuchi, Satomi; Kudo, Kohsuke

    2016-01-01

    To shorten acquisition of diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) in 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, we investigated the effects of the number of b-values, diffusion direction, and number of signal averages (NSA) on the accuracy of DKI metrics. We obtained 2 image datasets with 30 gradient directions, 6 b-values up to 2500 s/mm(2), and 2 signal averages from 5 healthy volunteers and generated DKI metrics, i.e., mean, axial, and radial kurtosis (MK, K∥, and K⊥) maps, from various combinations of the datasets. These maps were estimated by using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) with those from the full datasets. The MK and K⊥ maps generated from the datasets including only the b-value of 2500 s/mm(2) showed excellent agreement (ICC, 0.96 to 0.99). Under the same acquisition time and diffusion directions, agreement was better of MK, K∥, and K⊥ maps obtained with 3 b-values (0, 1000, and 2500 s/mm(2)) and 4 signal averages than maps obtained with any other combination of numbers of b-value and varied NSA. Good agreement (ICC > 0.6) required at least 20 diffusion directions in all the metrics. MK and K⊥ maps with ICC greater than 0.95 can be obtained at 1.5T within 10 min (b-value = 0, 1000, and 2500 s/mm(2); 20 diffusion directions; 4 signal averages; slice thickness, 6 mm with no interslice gap; number of slices, 12).

  14. Comparison of prostate contours between conventional stepping transverse imaging and Twister-based sagittal imaging in permanent interstitial prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Shogo; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Satoh, Takefumi; Tsumura, Hideyasu; Sekiguchi, Akane; Takenaka, Kouji; Tabata, Ken-Ichi; Iwamura, Masatsugu; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2017-08-01

    To compare prostate contours on conventional stepping transverse image acquisitions with those on twister-based sagittal image acquisitions. Twenty prostate cancer patients who were planned to have permanent interstitial prostate brachytherapy were prospectively accrued. A transrectal ultrasonography probe was inserted, with the patient in lithotomy position. Transverse images were obtained with stepping movement of the transverse transducer. In the same patient, sagittal images were also obtained through rotation of the sagittal transducer using the "Twister" mode. The differences of prostate size among the two types of image acquisitions were compared. The relationships among the difference of the two types of image acquisitions, dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters on the post-implant computed tomography (CT) analysis, as well as other factors were analyzed. The sagittal image acquisitions showed a larger prostate size compared to the transverse image acquisitions especially in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction ( p < 0.05). Interestingly, relative size of prostate apex in AP direction in sagittal image acquisitions compared to that in transverse image acquisitions was correlated to DVH parameters such as D 90 ( R = 0.518, p = 0.019), and V 100 ( R = 0.598, p = 0.005). There were small but significant differences in the prostate contours between the transverse and the sagittal planning image acquisitions. Furthermore, our study suggested that the differences between the two types of image acquisitions might correlated to dosimetric results on CT analysis.

  15. USE OF A NOVEL BOARD GAME IN A CLINICAL ROTATION FOR LEARNING THORACIC DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSES IN VETERINARY MEDICAL IMAGING.

    PubMed

    Ober, Christopher P

    2017-03-01

    When confronted with various findings on thoracic radiographs, fourth-year veterinary students often have difficulty generating appropriate lists of differential diagnoses. The purpose of this one-group, pretest, posttest experimental study was to determine if a game could be used as an adjunct teaching method to improve students' understanding of connections between imaging findings and differential diagnoses. A novel board game focusing on differential diagnoses in thoracic radiography was developed. One hundred fourth-year veterinary students took a brief pretest, played the board game, and took a brief posttest as a part of their respective clinical radiology rotations. Pretest results were compared to posttest results using a paired t-test to determine if playing the game impacted student understanding. Students' mean scores on the posttest were significantly higher than mean pretest scores (P < 0.0001). Thus, results indicate that playing the board game resulted in improved short-term understanding of thoracic differential diagnoses by fourth-year students, and use of the board game on a clinical rotation seems to be a beneficial part of the learning process. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  16. Ultra-low dose quantitative CT myocardial perfusion imaging with sparse-view dynamic acquisition and image reconstruction: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Enjilela, Esmaeil; Lee, Ting-Yim; Hsieh, Jiang; Wisenberg, Gerald; Teefy, Patrick; Yadegari, Andrew; Bagur, Rodrigo; Islam, Ali; Branch, Kelley; So, Aaron

    2018-03-01

    We implemented and validated a compressed sensing (CS) based algorithm for reconstructing dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT images of the heart from sparsely sampled X-ray projections. DCE CT imaging of the heart was performed on five normal and ischemic pigs after contrast injection. DCE images were reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and CS from all projections (984-view) and 1/3 of all projections (328-view), and with CS from 1/4 of all projections (246-view). Myocardial perfusion (MP) measurements with each protocol were compared to those with the reference 984-view FBP protocol. Both the 984-view CS and 328-view CS protocols were in good agreements with the reference protocol. The Pearson correlation coefficients of 984-view CS and 328-view CS determined from linear regression analyses were 0.98 and 0.99 respectively. The corresponding mean biases of MP measurement determined from Bland-Altman analyses were 2.7 and 1.2ml/min/100g. When only 328 projections were used for image reconstruction, CS was more accurate than FBP for MP measurement with respect to 984-view FBP. However, CS failed to generate MP maps comparable to those with 984-view FBP when only 246 projections were used for image reconstruction. DCE heart images reconstructed from one-third of a full projection set with CS were minimally affected by aliasing artifacts, leading to accurate MP measurements with the effective dose reduced to just 33% of conventional full-view FBP method. The proposed CS sparse-view image reconstruction method could facilitate the implementation of sparse-view dynamic acquisition for ultra-low dose CT MP imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Acquisition and Analysis of Dynamic Responses of a Historic Pedestrian Bridge using Video Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Byrne, Michael; Ghosh, Bidisha; Schoefs, Franck; O'Donnell, Deirdre; Wright, Robert; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2015-07-01

    Video based tracking is capable of analysing bridge vibrations that are characterised by large amplitudes and low frequencies. This paper presents the use of video images and associated image processing techniques to obtain the dynamic response of a pedestrian suspension bridge in Cork, Ireland. This historic structure is one of the four suspension bridges in Ireland and is notable for its dynamic nature. A video camera is mounted on the river-bank and the dynamic responses of the bridge have been measured from the video images. The dynamic response is assessed without the need of a reflector on the bridge and in the presence of various forms of luminous complexities in the video image scenes. Vertical deformations of the bridge were measured in this regard. The video image tracking for the measurement of dynamic responses of the bridge were based on correlating patches in time-lagged scenes in video images and utilisinga zero mean normalisedcross correlation (ZNCC) metric. The bridge was excited by designed pedestrian movement and by individual cyclists traversing the bridge. The time series data of dynamic displacement responses of the bridge were analysedto obtain the frequency domain response. Frequencies obtained from video analysis were checked against accelerometer data from the bridge obtained while carrying out the same set of experiments used for video image based recognition.

  18. Acquisition and Analysis of Dynamic Responses of a Historic Pedestrian Bridge using Video Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Byrne, Michael; Ghosh, Bidisha; Schoefs, Franck; O'Donnell, Deirdre; Wright, Robert; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2015-07-01

    Video based tracking is capable of analysing bridge vibrations that are characterised by large amplitudes and low frequencies. This paper presents the use of video images and associated image processing techniques to obtain the dynamic response of a pedestrian suspension bridge in Cork, Ireland. This historic structure is one of the four suspension bridges in Ireland and is notable for its dynamic nature. A video camera is mounted on the river-bank and the dynamic responses of the bridge have been measured from the video images. The dynamic response is assessed without the need of a reflector on the bridge and in the presence of various forms of luminous complexities in the video image scenes. Vertical deformations of the bridge were measured in this regard. The video image tracking for the measurement of dynamic responses of the bridge were based on correlating patches in time-lagged scenes in video images and utilisinga zero mean normalised cross correlation (ZNCC) metric. The bridge was excited by designed pedestrian movement and by individual cyclists traversing the bridge. The time series data of dynamic displacement responses of the bridge were analysedto obtain the frequency domain response. Frequencies obtained from video analysis were checked against accelerometer data from the bridge obtained while carrying out the same set of experiments used for video image based recognition.

  19. Hybrid MRI-Ultrasound acquisitions, and scannerless real-time imaging.

    PubMed

    Preiswerk, Frank; Toews, Matthew; Cheng, Cheng-Chieh; Chiou, Jr-Yuan George; Mei, Chang-Sheng; Schaefer, Lena F; Hoge, W Scott; Schwartz, Benjamin M; Panych, Lawrence P; Madore, Bruno

    2017-09-01

    To combine MRI, ultrasound, and computer science methodologies toward generating MRI contrast at the high frame rates of ultrasound, inside and even outside the MRI bore. A small transducer, held onto the abdomen with an adhesive bandage, collected ultrasound signals during MRI. Based on these ultrasound signals and their correlations with MRI, a machine-learning algorithm created synthetic MR images at frame rates up to 100 per second. In one particular implementation, volunteers were taken out of the MRI bore with the ultrasound sensor still in place, and MR images were generated on the basis of ultrasound signal and learned correlations alone in a "scannerless" manner. Hybrid ultrasound-MRI data were acquired in eight separate imaging sessions. Locations of liver features, in synthetic images, were compared with those from acquired images: The mean error was 1.0 pixel (2.1 mm), with best case 0.4 and worst case 4.1 pixels (in the presence of heavy coughing). For results from outside the bore, qualitative validation involved optically tracked ultrasound imaging with/without coughing. The proposed setup can generate an accurate stream of high-speed MR images, up to 100 frames per second, inside or even outside the MR bore. Magn Reson Med 78:897-908, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Cardiac multidetector computed tomography: basic physics of image acquisition and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Bardo, Dianna M E; Brown, Paul

    2008-08-01

    Cardiac MDCT is here to stay. And, it is more than just imaging coronary arteries. Understanding the differences in and the benefits of one CT scanner from another will help you to optimize the capabilities of the scanner, but requires a basic understanding of the MDCT imaging physics.This review provides key information needed to understand the differences in the types of MDCT scanners, from 64 - 320 detectors, flat panels, single and dual source configurations, step and shoot prospective and retrospective gating, and how each factor influences radiation dose, spatial and temporal resolution, and image noise.

  1. Alignment Solution for CT Image Reconstruction using Fixed Point and Virtual Rotation Axis.

    PubMed

    Jun, Kyungtaek; Yoon, Seokhwan

    2017-01-25

    Since X-ray tomography is now widely adopted in many different areas, it becomes more crucial to find a robust routine of handling tomographic data to get better quality of reconstructions. Though there are several existing techniques, it seems helpful to have a more automated method to remove the possible errors that hinder clearer image reconstruction. Here, we proposed an alternative method and new algorithm using the sinogram and the fixed point. An advanced physical concept of Center of Attenuation (CA) was also introduced to figure out how this fixed point is applied to the reconstruction of image having errors we categorized in this article. Our technique showed a promising performance in restoring images having translation and vertical tilt errors.

  2. Millimeter wave radar system on a rotating platform for combined search and track functionality with SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulenbacher, Uwe; Rech, Klaus; Sedlmeier, Johannes; Pratisto, Hans; Wellig, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Ground based millimeter wave radar sensors offer the potential for a weather-independent automatic ground surveillance at day and night, e.g. for camp protection applications. The basic principle and the experimental verification of a radar system concept is described, which by means of an extreme off-axis positioning of the antenna(s) combines azimuthal mechanical beam steering with the formation of a circular-arc shaped synthetic aperture (SA). In automatic ground surveillance the function of search and detection of moving ground targets is performed by means of the conventional mechanical scan mode. The rotated antenna structure designed as a small array with two or more RX antenna elements with simultaneous receiver chains allows to instantaneous track multiple moving targets (monopulse principle). The simultaneously operated SAR mode yields areal images of the distribution of stationary scatterers. For ground surveillance application this SAR mode is best suited for identifying possible threats by means of change detection. The feasibility of this concept was tested by means of an experimental radar system comprising of a 94 GHz (W band) FM-CW module with 1 GHz bandwidth and two RX antennas with parallel receiver channels, placed off-axis at a rotating platform. SAR mode and search/track mode were tested during an outdoor measurement campaign. The scenery of two persons walking along a road and partially through forest served as test for the capability to track multiple moving targets. For SAR mode verification an image of the area composed of roads, grassland, woodland and several man-made objects was reconstructed from the measured data.

  3. Imaging MS Methodology for More Chemical Information in Less Data Acquisition Time Utilizing a Hybrid Linear Ion Trap-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, D. C.; Lee, Young Jin

    2010-11-15

    A novel mass spectrometric imaging method is developed to reduce the data acquisition time and provide rich chemical information using a hybrid linear ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer. In this method, the linear ion trap and orbitrap are used in tandem to reduce the acquisition time by incorporating multiple linear ion trap scans during an orbitrap scan utilizing a spiral raster step plate movement. The data acquisition time was decreased by 43-49% in the current experiment compared to that of orbitrap-only scans; however, 75% or more time could be saved for higher mass resolution and with a higher repetition rate laser.more » Using this approach, a high spatial resolution of 10 {micro}m was maintained at ion trap imaging, while orbitrap spectra were acquired at a lower spatial resolution, 20-40 {micro}m, all with far less data acquisition time. Furthermore, various MS imaging methods were developed by interspersing MS/MS and MSn ion trap scans during orbitrap scans to provide more analytical information on the sample. This method was applied to differentiate and localize structural isomers of several flavonol glycosides from an Arabidopsis flower petal in which MS/MS, MSn, ion trap, and orbitrap images were all acquired in a single data acquisition.« less

  4. Digital live-tracking 3-dimensional minisensors for recording head orientation during image acquisition.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Leonardo Koerich; Ackerman, James L; Carvalho, Felipe de Assis Ribeiro; Eidson, Lindsey; Cevidanes, Lucia Helena Soares

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to test the value of minisensors for recording unrestrained head position with 6 degrees of freedom during 3-dimensional stereophotogrammetry. Four 3-dimensional pictures (3dMD, Atlanta, Ga) were taken of 20 volunteers as follows: (1) in unrestrained head position, (2) a repeat of picture 1, (3) in unrestrained head position wearing a headset with 3-dimensional live tracking sensors (3-D Guidance trackSTAR; Ascension Technology, Burlington, Vt), and (4) a repeat of picture 3. The sensors were used to track the x, y, and z coordinates (pitch, roll, and yaw) of the head in space. The patients were seated in front of a mirror and asked to stand and take a walk between each acquisition. Eight landmarks were identified in each 3-dimensional picture (nasion, tip of nose, subnasale, right and left lip commissures, midpoints of upper and lower lip vermilions, soft-tissue B-point). The distances between correspondent landmarks were measured between pictures 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 with software. The Student t test was used to test differences between unrestrained head position with and without sensors. Interlandmark distances for pictures 1 and 2 (head position without the sensors) and pictures 3 and 4 (head position with sensors) were consistent for all landmarks, indicating that roll, pitch, and yaw of the head are controlled independently of the sensors. However, interlandmark distances were on average 17.34 ± 0.32 mm between pictures 1 and 2. Between pictures 3 and 4, the distances averaged 6.17 ± 0.15 mm. All interlandmark distances were significantly different between the 2 methods (P <0.001). The use of 3-dimensional live-tracking sensors aids the reproducibility of patient head positioning during repeated or follow-up acquisitions of 3-dimensional stereophotogrammetry. Even with sensors, differences in spatial head position between acquisitions still require additional registration procedures. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists

  5. Radiology/Imaging. Clinical Rotation. Instructor's Packet and Student Study Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Extension Instruction and Materials Center.

    The instructor's packet, the first of two packets, is one of a series of materials designed to help students who are investigating the activities within a radiology department or considering any of the imaging technologies as a career. The material is designed to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. This packet…

  6. A data acquisition system for coincidence imaging using a conventional dual head gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewellen, T. K.; Miyaoka, R. S.; Jansen, F.; Kaplan, M. S.

    1997-06-01

    A low cost data acquisition system (DAS) was developed to acquire coincidence data from an unmodified General Electric Maxxus dual head scintillation camera. A high impedance pick-off circuit provides position and energy signals to the DAS without interfering with normal camera operation. The signals are pulse-clipped to reduce pileup effects. Coincidence is determined with fast timing signals derived from constant fraction discriminators. A charge-integrating FERA 16 channel ADC feeds position and energy data to two CAMAC FERA memories operated as ping-pong buffers. A Macintosh PowerPC running Labview controls the system and reads the CAMAC memories. A CAMAC 12-channel scaler records singles and coincidence rate data. The system dead-time is approximately 10% at a coincidence rate of 4.0 kHz.

  7. Morphology enabled dipole inversion (MEDI) from a single-angle acquisition: comparison with COSMOS in human brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Liu, Jing; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Spincemaille, Pascal; Khalidov, Ildar; Ledoux, James Robert; Wang, Yi

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic susceptibility varies among brain structures and provides insights into the chemical and molecular composition of brain tissues. However, the determination of an arbitrary susceptibility distribution from the measured MR signal phase is a challenging, ill-conditioned inverse problem. Although a previous method named calculation of susceptibility through multiple orientation sampling (COSMOS) has solved this inverse problem both theoretically and experimentally using multiple angle acquisitions, it is often impractical to carry out on human subjects. Recently, the feasibility of calculating the brain susceptibility distribution from a single-angle acquisition was demonstrated using morphology enabled dipole inversion (MEDI). In this study, we further improved the original MEDI method by sparsifying the edges in the quantitative susceptibility map that do not have a corresponding edge in the magnitude image. Quantitative susceptibility maps generated by the improved MEDI were compared qualitatively and quantitatively with those generated by calculation of susceptibility through multiple orientation sampling. The results show a high degree of agreement between MEDI and calculation of susceptibility through multiple orientation sampling, and the practicality of MEDI allows many potential clinical applications. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Three-dimensional rotational angiography fused with multimodal imaging modalities for targeted endomyocardial injections in the ischaemic heart.

    PubMed

    Dauwe, Dieter Frans; Nuyens, Dieter; De Buck, Stijn; Claus, Piet; Gheysens, Olivier; Koole, Michel; Coudyzer, Walter; Vanden Driessche, Nina; Janssens, Laurens; Ector, Joris; Dymarkowski, Steven; Bogaert, Jan; Heidbuchel, Hein; Janssens, Stefan

    2014-08-01

    Biological therapies for ischaemic heart disease require efficient, safe, and affordable intramyocardial delivery. Integration of multiple imaging modalities within the fluoroscopy framework can provide valuable information to guide these procedures. We compared an anatomo-electric method (LARCA) with a non-fluoroscopic electromechanical mapping system (NOGA(®)). LARCA integrates selective three-dimensional-rotational angiograms with biplane fluoroscopy. To identify the infarct region, we studied LARCA-fusion with pre-procedural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), dedicated CT, or (18)F-FDG-PET/CT. We induced myocardial infarction in 20 pigs by 90-min LAD occlusion. Six weeks later, we compared peri-infarct delivery accuracy of coloured fluospheres using sequential NOGA(®)- and LARCA-MRI-guided vs. LARCA-CT- and LARCA-(18)F-FDG-PET/CT-guided intramyocardial injections. MRI after 6 weeks revealed significant left ventricular (LV) functional impairment and remodelling (LVEF 31 ± 3%, LVEDV 178 ± 15 mL, infarct size 17 ± 2% LV mass). During NOGA(®)-procedures, three of five animals required DC-shock for major ventricular arrhythmias vs. one of ten during LARCA-procedures. Online procedure time was shorter for LARCA than NOGA(®) (77 ± 6 vs. 130 ± 3 min, P < 0.0001). Absolute distance of injection spots to the infarct border was similar for LARCA-MRI (4.8 ± 0.5 mm) and NOGA(®) (5.4 ± 0.5 mm). LARCA-CT-integration allowed closer approximation of the targeted border zone than LARCA-PET (4.0 ± 0.5 mm vs. 6.2 ± 0.6 mm, P < 0.05). Three-dimensional -rotational angiography fused with multimodal imaging offers a new, cost-effective, and safe strategy to guide intramyocardial injections. Endoventricular procedure times and arrhythmias compare favourably to NOGA(®), without compromising injection accuracy. LARCA-based fusion imaging is a promising enabling technology for cardiac biological therapies. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All

  9. Two-View Gravity Stress Imaging Protocol for Nondisplaced Type II Supination External Rotation Ankle Fractures: Introducing the Gravity Stress Cross-Table Lateral View.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Collier, Rachel C; Gervais, Samuel J

    Assessing ankle stability in nondisplaced Lauge-Hansen supination external rotation type II injuries requires stress imaging. Gravity stress mortise imaging is routinely used as an alternative to manual stress imaging to assess deltoid integrity with the goal of differentiating type II from type IV injuries in cases without a posterior or medial fracture. A type II injury with a nondisplaced fibula fracture is typically treated with cast immobilization, and a type IV injury is considered unstable and often requires operative repair. The present case series (two patients) highlights a standardized 2-view gravity stress imaging protocol and introduces the gravity stress cross-table lateral view. The gravity stress cross-table lateral view provides a more thorough evaluation of the posterior malleolus owing to the slight external rotation and posteriorly directed stress. External rotation also creates less bony overlap between the tibia and fibula, allowing for better visualization of the fibula fracture. Gravity stress imaging confirmed medial-sided injury in both cases, confirming the presence of supination external rotation type IV or bimalleolar equivalent fractures. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed, and both patients achieved radiographic union. No further treatment was required at 21 and 33 months postoperatively. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sinusoidal echo-planar imaging with parallel acquisition technique for reduced acoustic noise in auditory fMRI.

    PubMed

    Zapp, Jascha; Schmitter, Sebastian; Schad, Lothar R

    2012-09-01

    To extend the parameter restrictions of a silent echo-planar imaging (sEPI) sequence using sinusoidal readout (RO) gradients, in particular with increased spatial resolution. The sound pressure level (SPL) of the most feasible configurations is compared to conventional EPI having trapezoidal RO gradients. We enhanced the sEPI sequence by integrating a parallel acquisition technique (PAT) on a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. The SPL was measured for matrix sizes of 64 × 64 and 128 × 128 pixels, without and with PAT (R = 2). The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was examined for both sinusoidal and trapezoidal RO gradients. Compared to EPI PAT, the SPL could be reduced by up to 11.1 dB and 5.1 dB for matrix sizes of 64 × 64 and 128 × 128 pixels, respectively. The SNR of sinusoidal RO gradients is lower by a factor of 0.96 on average compared to trapezoidal RO gradients. The sEPI PAT sequence allows for 1) increased resolution, 2) expanded RO frequency range toward lower frequencies, which is in general beneficial for SPL, or 3) shortened TE, TR, and RO train length. At the same time, it generates lower SPL compared to conventional EPI for a wide range of RO frequencies while having the same imaging parameters. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. High-contrast 3D image acquisition using HiLo microscopy with an electrically tunable lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Katrin; Smolarski, André; Fischer, Andreas; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Stürmer, Moritz; Wallrabe, Ulricke; Czarske, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We present a HiLo microscope with an electrically tunable lens for high-contrast three-dimensional image acquisition. HiLo microscopy combines wide field and speckled illumination images to create optically sectioned images. Additionally, the depth-of-field is not fixed, but can be adjusted between wide field and confocal-like axial resolution. We incorporate an electrically tunable lens in the HiLo microscope for axial scanning, to obtain three-dimensional data without the need of moving neither the sample nor the objective. The used adaptive lens consists of a transparent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane into which an annular piezo bending actuator is embedded. A transparent fluid is filled between the membrane and the glass substrate. When actuated, the piezo generates a pressure in the lens which deflects the membrane and thus changes the refractive power. This technique enables a large tuning range of the refractive power between 1/f = (-24 . . . 25) 1/m. As the NA of the adaptive lens is only about 0.05, a fixed high-NA lens is included in the setup to provide high resolution. In this contribution, the scan properties and capabilities of the tunable lens in the HiLo microscope are analyzed. Eventually, exemplary measurements are presented and discussed.

  12. High-speed multi-frame dynamic transmission electron microscope image acquisition system with arbitrary timing

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W.; DeHope, William J.; Huete, Glenn; LaGrange, Thomas B.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.

    2016-02-23

    An electron microscope is disclosed which has a laser-driven photocathode and an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) laser system ("laser"). The laser produces a train of temporally-shaped laser pulses each being of a programmable pulse duration, and directs the laser pulses to the laser-driven photocathode to produce a train of electron pulses. An image sensor is used along with a deflector subsystem. The deflector subsystem is arranged downstream of the target but upstream of the image sensor, and has a plurality of plates. A control system having a digital sequencer controls the laser and a plurality of switching components, synchronized with the laser, to independently control excitation of each one of the deflector plates. This allows each electron pulse to be directed to a different portion of the image sensor, as well as to enable programmable pulse durations and programmable inter-pulse spacings.

  13. A new system for digital image acquisition, storage and presentation in an accident and emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, G; Roebuck, S; Steedman, D

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To develop a computer based storage system for clinical images—radiographs, photographs, ECGs, text—for use in teaching, training, reference and research within an accident and emergency (A&E) department. Exploration of methods to access and utilise the data stored in the archive. Methods—Implementation of a digital image archive using flatbed scanner and digital camera as capture devices. A sophisticated coding system based on ICD 10. Storage via an "intelligent" custom interface. Results—A practical solution to the problems of clinical image storage for teaching purposes. Conclusions—We have successfully developed a digital image capture and storage system, which provides an excellent teaching facility for a busy A&E department. We have revolutionised the practice of the "hand-over meeting". PMID:11435357

  14. High-speed multiframe dynamic transmission electron microscope image acquisition system with arbitrary timing

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W.; DeHope, William J.; Huete, Glenn; LaGrange, Thomas B.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.

    2015-10-20

    An electron microscope is disclosed which has a laser-driven photocathode and an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) laser system ("laser"). The laser produces a train of temporally-shaped laser pulses of a predefined pulse duration and waveform, and directs the laser pulses to the laser-driven photocathode to produce a train of electron pulses. An image sensor is used along with a deflector subsystem. The deflector subsystem is arranged downstream of the target but upstream of the image sensor, and has two pairs of plates arranged perpendicular to one another. A control system controls the laser and a plurality of switching components synchronized with the laser, to independently control excitation of each one of the deflector plates. This allows each electron pulse to be directed to a different portion of the image sensor, as well as to be provided with an independently set duration and independently set inter-pulse spacings.

  15. High-speed multiframe dynamic transmission electron microscope image acquisition system with arbitrary timing

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W.; Dehope, William J; Huete, Glenn; LaGrange, Thomas B.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M

    2016-06-21

    An electron microscope is disclosed which has a laser-driven photocathode and an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) laser system ("laser"). The laser produces a train of temporally-shaped laser pulses of a predefined pulse duration and waveform, and directs the laser pulses to the laser-driven photocathode to produce a train of electron pulses. An image sensor is used along with a deflector subsystem. The deflector subsystem is arranged downstream of the target but upstream of the image sensor, and has two pairs of plates arranged perpendicular to one another. A control system controls the laser and a plurality of switching components synchronized with the laser, to independently control excitation of each one of the deflector plates. This allows each electron pulse to be directed to a different portion of the image sensor, as well as to be provided with an independently set duration and independently set inter-pulse spacings.

  16. Usefulness of the dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with simultaneous acquisition of coronal and sagittal planes for detection of pituitary microadenomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Bee; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Keon Ha; Jeon, Pyoung; Byun, Hong Sik; Choi, Jin Wook

    2012-03-01

    Does dynamic gadolinium-enhanced imaging with simultaneous acquisition of coronal and sagittal planes improve diagnostic accuracy of pituitary microadenomas compared with coronal images alone? Fifty-six patients underwent 3-T sella MRI including dynamic simultaneous acquisition of coronal and sagittal planes after gadolinium injection. According to conspicuity, lesions were divided into four scores (0, no; 1, possible; 2, probable; 3, definite delayed enhancing lesion). Additional information on supplementary sagittal images compared with coronal ones was evaluated with a 4-point score (0, no; 1, possible; 2, probable; 3, definite additional information). Accuracy of tumour detection was calculated. Average scores for lesion detection of a combination of two planes, coronal, and sagittal images were 2.59, 2.32, and 2.18. 6/10 lesions negative on coronal images were detected on sagittal ones. Accuracy of a combination of two planes, of coronal and of sagittal images was 92.86%, 82.14% and 75%. Six patients had probable or definite additional information on supplementary sagittal images compared with coronal ones alone (10.71%). Dynamic MRI with combined coronal and sagittal planes was more accurate for detection of pituitary microadenomas than routinely used coronal images. Simultaneous dynamic enhanced acquisition can make study time fast and costs low. We present a new dynamic MRI technique for evaluating pituitary microadenomas • This technique provides simultaneous acquisition of contrast enhanced coronal and sagittal images. • This technique makes the diagnosis more accurate and reduces the examination time. • Such MR imaging only requires one single bolus of contrast agent.

  17. Implementation of a rotational ultrasound biomicroscopy system equipped with a high-frequency angled needle transducer--ex vivo ultrasound imaging of porcine ocular posterior tissues.

    PubMed

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Juho; Bae, Jinho; Lee, Chong Hyun; Paeng, Dong-Guk

    2014-09-24

    The mechanical scanning of a single element transducer has been mostly utilized for high-frequency ultrasound imaging. However, it requires space for the mechanical motion of the transducer. In this paper, a rotational scanning ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) system equipped with a high-frequency angled needle transducer is designed and implemented in order to minimize the space required. It was applied to ex vivo ultrasound imaging of porcine posterior ocular tissues through a minimal incision hole of 1 mm in diameter. The retina and sclera for the one eye were visualized in the relative rotating angle range of 270°~330° and at a distance range of 6~7 mm, whereas the tissues of the other eye were observed in relative angle range of 160°~220° and at a distance range of 7.5~9 mm. The layer between retina and sclera seemed to be bent because the distance between the transducer tip and the layer was varied while the transducer was rotated. Certin features of the rotation system such as the optimal scanning angle, step angle and data length need to be improved for ensure higher accuracy and precision. Moreover, the focal length should be considered for the image quality. This implementation represents the first report of a rotational scanning UBM system.

  18. Implementation of a Rotational Ultrasound Biomicroscopy System Equipped with a High-Frequency Angled Needle Transducer — Ex Vivo Ultrasound Imaging of Porcine Ocular Posterior Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Juho; Bae, Jinho; Lee, Chong Hyun; Paeng, Dong-Guk

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical scanning of a single element transducer has been mostly utilized for high-frequency ultrasound imaging. However, it requires space for the mechanical motion of the transducer. In this paper, a rotational scanning ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) system equipped with a high-frequency angled needle transducer is designed and implemented in order to minimize the space required. It was applied to ex vivo ultrasound imaging of porcine posterior ocular tissues through a minimal incision hole of 1 mm in diameter. The retina and sclera for the one eye were visualized in the relative rotating angle range of 270° ∼ 330° and at a distance range of 6 ∼ 7 mm, whereas the tissues of the other eye were observed in relative angle range of 160° ∼ 220° and at a distance range of 7.5 ∼ 9 mm. The layer between retina and sclera seemed to be bent because the distance between the transducer tip and the layer was varied while the transducer was rotated. Certin features of the rotation system such as the optimal scanning angle, step angle and data length need to be improved for ensure higher accuracy and precision. Moreover, the focal length should be considered for the image quality. This implementation represents the first report of a rotational scanning UBM system. PMID:25254305

  19. Respiratory Motion-Resolved Compressed Sensing Reconstruction of Free-Breathing Radial Acquisition for Dynamic Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chandarana, Hersh; Feng, Li; Ream, Justin; Wang, Annie; Babb, James S; Block, Kai Tobias; Sodickson, Daniel K; Otazo, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate feasibility of free-breathing radial acquisition with respiratory motion-resolved compressed sensing reconstruction [extra-dimensional golden-angle radial sparse parallel imaging (XD-GRASP)] for multiphase dynamic gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced liver imaging, and to compare image quality to compressed sensing reconstruction with respiratory motion-averaging (GRASP) and prior conventional breath-held Cartesian-sampled data sets [BH volume interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE)] in same patients. In this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant prospective study, 16 subjects underwent free-breathing continuous radial acquisition during Gd-EOB-DTPA injection and had prior BH-VIBE available. Acquired data were reconstructed using motion-averaging GRASP approach in which consecutive 84 spokes were grouped in each contrast-enhanced phase for a temporal resolution of approximately 14 seconds. Additionally, respiratory motion-resolved reconstruction was performed from the same k-space data by sorting each contrast-enhanced phase into multiple respiratory motion states using compressed sensing algorithm named XD-GRASP, which exploits sparsity along both the contrast-enhancement and respiratory-state dimensions.Contrast-enhanced dynamic multiphase XD-GRASP, GRASP, and BH-VIBE images were anonymized, pooled together in a random order, and presented to 2 board-certified radiologists for independent evaluation of image quality, with higher score indicating more optimal examination. The XD-GRASP reconstructions had significantly (all P < 0.05) higher overall image quality scores compared to GRASP for early arterial (reader 1: 4.3 ± 0.6 vs 3.31 ± 0.6; reader 2: 3.81 ± 0.8 vs 3.38 ± 0.9) and late arterial (reader 1: 4.5 ± 0.6 vs 3.63 ± 0.6; reader 2: 3.56 ± 0.5 vs 2.88 ± 0.7) phases of enhancement for both readers. The XD-GRASP also had higher overall image

  20. Roughness Estimation from Point Clouds - A Comparison of Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Image Matching by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutzinger, Martin; Bremer, Magnus; Ragg, Hansjörg

    2013-04-01

    Recently, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and matching of images acquired by unmanned arial vehicles (UAV) are operationally used for 3D geodata acquisition in Geoscience applications. However, the two systems cover different application domains in terms of acquisition conditions and data properties i.e. accuracy and line of sight. In this study we investigate the major differences between the two platforms for terrain roughness estimation. Terrain roughness is an important input for various applications such as morphometry studies, geomorphologic mapping, and natural process modeling (e.g. rockfall, avalanche, and hydraulic modeling). Data has been collected simultaneously by TLS using an Optech ILRIS3D and a rotary UAV using an octocopter from twins.nrn for a 900 m² test site located in a riverbed in Tyrol, Austria (Judenbach, Mieming). The TLS point cloud has been acquired from three scan positions. These have been registered using iterative closest point algorithm and a target-based referencing approach. For registration geometric targets (spheres) with a diameter of 20 cm were used. These targets were measured with dGPS for absolute georeferencing. The TLS point cloud has an average point density of 19,000 pts/m², which represents a point spacing of about 5 mm. 15 images where acquired by UAV in a height of 20 m using a calibrated camera with focal length of 18.3 mm. A 3D point cloud containing RGB attributes was derived using APERO/MICMAC software, by a direct georeferencing approach based on the aircraft IMU data. The point cloud is finally co-registered with the TLS data to guarantee an optimal preparation in order to perform the analysis. The UAV point cloud has an average point density of 17,500 pts/m², which represents a point spacing of 7.5 mm. After registration and georeferencing the level of detail of roughness representation in both point clouds have been compared considering elevation differences, roughness and representation of different grain

  1. Dynamic Torsional and Cyclic Fracture Behavior of ProFile Rotary Instruments at Continuous or Reciprocating Rotation as Visualized with High-speed Digital Video Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Daisuke; Ebihara, Arata; Miyara, Kana; Okiji, Takashi

    2017-08-01

    This study examined the dynamic fracture behavior of nickel-titanium rotary instruments in torsional or cyclic loading at continuous or reciprocating rotation by means of high-speed digital video imaging. The ProFile instruments (size 30, 0.06 taper; Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) were categorized into 4 groups (n = 7 in each group) as follows: torsional/continuous (TC), torsional/reciprocating (TR), cyclic/continuous (CC), and cyclic/reciprocating (CR). Torsional loading was performed by rotating the instruments by holding the tip with a vise. For cyclic loading, a custom-made device with a 38° curvature was used. Dynamic fracture behavior was observed with a high-speed camera. The time to fracture was recorded, and the fractured surface was examined with scanning electron microscopy. The TC group initially exhibited necking of the file followed by the development of an initial crack line. The TR group demonstrated opening and closing of a crack according to its rotation in the cutting and noncutting directions, respectively. The CC group separated without any detectable signs of deformation. In the CR group, initial crack formation was recognized in 5 of 7 samples. The reciprocating rotation exhibited a longer time to fracture in both torsional and cyclic fatigue testing (P < .05). The scanning electron microscopic images showed a severely deformed surface in the TR group. The dynamic fracture behavior of NiTi rotary instruments, as visualized with high-speed digital video imaging, varied between the different modes of rotation and different fatigue testing. Reciprocating rotation induced a slower crack propagation and conferred higher fatigue resistance than continuous rotation in both torsional and cyclic loads. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Recovering the dynamics of root growth and development using novel image acquisition and analysis methods

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Darren M.; French, Andrew P.; Naeem, Asad; Ishaq, Omer; Traini, Richard; Hijazi, Hussein; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Pridmore, Tony P.

    2012-01-01

    Roots are highly responsive to environmental signals encountered in the rhizosphere, such as nutrients, mechanical resistance and gravity. As a result, root growth and development is very plastic. If this complex and vital process is to be understood, methods and tools are required to capture the dynamics of root responses. Tools are needed which are high-throughput, supporting large-scale experimental work, and provide accurate, high-resolution, quantitative data. We describe and demonstrate the efficacy of the high-throughput and high-resolution root imaging systems recently developed within the Centre for Plant Integrative Biology (CPIB). This toolset includes (i) robotic imaging hardware to generate time-lapse datasets from standard cameras under infrared illumination and (ii) automated image analysis methods and software to extract quantitative information about root growth and development both from these images and via high-resolution light microscopy. These methods are demonstrated using data gathered during an experimental study of the gravitropic response of Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:22527394

  3. Recovering the dynamics of root growth and development using novel image acquisition and analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Wells, Darren M; French, Andrew P; Naeem, Asad; Ishaq, Omer; Traini, Richard; Hijazi, Hussein I; Hijazi, Hussein; Bennett, Malcolm J; Pridmore, Tony P

    2012-06-05

    Roots are highly responsive to environmental signals encountered in the rhizosphere, such as nutrients, mechanical resistance and gravity. As a result, root growth and development is very plastic. If this complex and vital process is to be understood, methods and tools are required to capture the dynamics of root responses. Tools are needed which are high-throughput, supporting large-scale experimental work, and provide accurate, high-resolution, quantitative data. We describe and demonstrate the efficacy of the high-throughput and high-resolution root imaging systems recently developed within the Centre for Plant Integrative Biology (CPIB). This toolset includes (i) robotic imaging hardware to generate time-lapse datasets from standard cameras under infrared illumination and (ii) automated image analysis methods and software to extract quantitative information about root growth and development both from these images and via high-resolution light microscopy. These methods are demonstrated using data gathered during an experimental study of the gravitropic response of Arabidopsis thaliana.

  4. Teaching the Dance Class: Strategies to Enhance Skill Acquisition, Mastery and Positive Self-Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainwaring, Lynda M.; Krasnow, Donna H.

    2010-01-01

    Effective teaching of dance skills is informed by a variety of theoretical frameworks and individual teaching and learning styles. The purpose of this paper is to present practical teaching strategies that enhance the mastery of skills and promote self-esteem, self-efficacy, and positive self-image. The predominant thinking and primary research…

  5. Multi-image acquisition-based distance sensor using agile laser spot beam.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; Amin, M Junaid

    2014-09-01

    We present a novel laser-based distance measurement technique that uses multiple-image-based spatial processing to enable distance measurements. Compared with the first-generation distance sensor using spatial processing, the modified sensor is no longer hindered by the classic Rayleigh axial resolution limit for the propagating laser beam at its minimum beam waist location. The proposed high-resolution distance sensor design uses an electronically controlled variable focus lens (ECVFL) in combination with an optical imaging device, such as a charged-coupled device (CCD), to produce and capture different laser spot size images on a target with these beam spot sizes different from the minimal spot size possible at this target distance. By exploiting the unique relationship of the target located spot sizes with the varying ECVFL focal length for each target distance, the proposed distance sensor can compute the target distance with a distance measurement resolution better than the axial resolution via the Rayleigh resolution criterion. Using a 30 mW 633 nm He-Ne laser coupled with an electromagnetically actuated liquid ECVFL, along with a 20 cm focal length bias lens, and using five spot images captured per target position by a CCD-based Nikon camera, a proof-of-concept proposed distance sensor is successfully implemented in the laboratory over target ranges from 10 to 100 cm with a demonstrated sub-cm axial resolution, which is better than the axial Rayleigh resolution limit at these target distances. Applications for the proposed potentially cost-effective distance sensor are diverse and include industrial inspection and measurement and 3D object shape mapping and imaging.

  6. Description and interpretation of the bracts epidermis of Gramineae (Poaceae) with rotated image with maximum average power spectrum (RIMAPS) technique.

    PubMed

    Favret, Eduardo A; Fuentes, Néstor O; Molina, Ana M; Setten, Lorena M

    2008-10-01

    During the last few years, RIMAPS technique has been used to characterize the micro-relief of metallic surfaces and recently also applied to biological surfaces. RIMAPS is an image analysis technique which uses the rotation of an image and calculates its average power spectrum. Here, it is presented as a tool for describing the morphology of the trichodium net found in some grasses, which is developed on the epidermal cells of the lemma. Three different species of grasses (herbarium samples) are analyzed: Podagrostis aequivalvis (Trin.) Scribn. & Merr., Bromidium hygrometricum (Nees) Nees & Meyen and Bromidium ramboi (Parodi) Rúgolo. Simple schemes representing the real microstructure of the lemma are proposed and studied. RIMAPS spectra of both the schemes and the real microstructures are compared. These results allow inferring how similar the proposed geometrical schemes are to the real microstructures. Each geometrical pattern could be used as a reference for classifying other species. Finally, this kind of analysis is used to determine the morphology of the trichodium net of Agrostis breviculmis Hitchc. As the dried sample had shrunk and the microstructure was not clear, two kinds of morphology are proposed for the trichodium net of Agrostis L., one elliptical and the other rectilinear, the former being the most suitable.

  7. Rotation-invariant features for multi-oriented text detection in natural images.

    PubMed

    Yao, Cong; Zhang, Xin; Bai, Xiang; Liu, Wenyu; Ma, Yi; Tu, Zhuowen

    2013-01-01

    Texts in natural scenes carry rich semantic information, which can be used to assist a wide range of applications, such as object recognition, image/video retrieval, mapping/navigation, and human computer interaction. However, most existing systems are designed to detect and recognize horizontal (or near-horizontal) texts. Due to the increasing popularity of mobile-computing devices and applications, detecting texts of varying orientations from natural images under less controlled conditions has become an important but challenging task. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm to detect texts of varying orientations. Our algorithm is based on a two-level classification scheme and two sets of features specially designed for capturing the intrinsic characteristics of texts. To better evaluate the proposed method and compare it with the competing algorithms, we generate a comprehensive dataset with various types of texts in diverse real-world scenes. We also propose a new evaluation protocol, which is more suitable for benchmarking algo