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Sample records for rotational liquid drop

  1. Bifurcation of rotating liquid drops: Results from USML-1 experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G.; Anilkumar, A. V.; Lee, C. P.; Lin, K. C.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments on rotational bifurcation of liquid drops, in which the drops were levitated and spun using acoustic fields in a low-gravity environment, were conducted during the first United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1) Space Shuttle flight. The experiments have successfully resolved the discrepancies existing between the previous experimental results and the theoretical predictions. In the case of a spherical drop, for which theory exists, the results agree well with the predictions. In the case of flattened drops, the experiments have extablished a family of curves, with the spherical drop as the limiting case.

  2. On the Poincaré instability of a rotating liquid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyuk, F. A.; Pomorski, K.

    2013-05-01

    The stability of a rotating nuclear liquid drop against pear-like deformations is studied within the optimal shape theory of Strutinsky et al (1963 Nucl. Phys. 46 639). It is found that such a break-up of reflection symmetric shapes appears in light nuclei at high angular momenta when non-axial degrees of freedom are taken into account.

  3. Liquid metal drop ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khuri-Yakub, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this project was to demonstrate the possibility of ejecting liquid metals using drop on demand printing technology. The plan was to make transducers for operation in the 100 MHz frequency range and to use these transducers to demonstrate the ability to eject drops of liquid metals such as gallium. Two transducers were made by indium bonding piezoelectric lithium niobate to quartz buffer rods. The lithium niobate plates were thinned by mechanical polishing to a thickness of 37 microns for operation at 100 MHz. Hemispherical lenses were polished in the opposite ends of the buffer rods. The lenses, which focus the sound waves in the liquid metal, had an F-number equals 1. A mechanical housing was made to hold the transducers and to allow precise control over the liquid level above the lens. We started by demonstrating the ability to eject drops of water on demand. The drops of water had a diameter of 15 microns which corresponds to the wavelength of the sound wave in the water. A videotape of this ejection was made. We then used a mixture of Gallium and Indium (used to lower the melting temperature of the Gallium) to demonstrate the ejection of liquid metal drops. This proved to be difficult because of the oxide skin which forms on the surface of the liquid. In some instances, we were able to eject metal drops, however, this was not consistent and reproducible. An experiment was set up at NASA-Lewis to stabilize the process of drop on demand liquid metal ejection. The object was to place the transducer and liquid metal in a vacuum station so that no oxide would form on the surface. We were successful in demonstrating that liquid metals could be ejected on demand and that this technology could be used for making sheet metal in space.

  4. Coalescence of Liquid Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Wei-Jun

    2003-01-01

    When two liquid drops come into contact, a neck forms between them and grows rapidly. We are interested in the very early stage of the coalescence process, which can be characterized by the time dependence of the radius of the neck. The functional dependence of the size of the neck on time depends on the properties of the liquid. Experimentally, we are investigating a liquid in Stokes flow regime where the viscosity provides the principal retarding force to the surface tension. Recently, it has been predicted that the neck radius should change as t ln|t| in this regime. Theoretically, we have studied the situation when the velocity at each point on the surface is proportional to the local curvature and directed normal to the surface. This is the case that should be applicable to superfluid helium at low temperature when the mean free path of the thermal excitations are comparable to the size of liquid drops. For this system, the radius of the neck is found to be proportional to t(sup 1/3). We are able to find a simple expression for the shape of the interface in the vicinity of the neck.

  5. Axisymmetric Liquid Hanging Drops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meister, Erich C.; Latychevskaia, Tatiana Yu

    2006-01-01

    The geometry of drops hanging on a circular capillary can be determined by numerically solving a dimensionless differential equation that is independent on any material properties, which enables one to follow the change of the height, surface area, and contact angle of drops hanging on a particular capillary. The results show that the application…

  6. Liquid drops impacting superamphiphobic coatings.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xu; Schellenberger, Frank; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-06-25

    The dynamics of liquid drops impacting superamphiphobic coatings is studied by high-speed video microscopy. Superamphiphobic coatings repel water and oils. The coating consists of a fractal-like hydrophobized silica network. Mixtures of ethanol-water and glycerin-water are chosen to investigate the influence of interfacial tension and viscosity on spreading and retraction dynamics. Drop spreading is dominated by inertia. At low impact velocity, the drops completely rebound. However, the contact time increases with impact velocity, whereas the restitution coefficient decreases. We suggest that the drop temporarily impales the superamphiphobic coating, although the drop completely rebounds. From an estimate of the pressure, it can be concluded that impalement is dominated by depinning rather than sagging. With increasing velocity, the drops partially pin, and an increasing amount of liquid remains on the coating. A time-resolved study of the retraction dynamics reveals two well-separated phases: a fast inertia-dominated phase followed by a slow decrease of the contact diameter of the drop. The crossover occurs when the diameter of the retracting drop matches the diameter of the drop before impact. We suggest that the depth of impalement increases with impact velocity, where impalement is confined to the initial impact zone of the drop. If the drop partially pins on the coating, the depth of impalement exceeds a depth, preventing the whole drop from being removed during the retraction phase.

  7. Liquid Metal Drop Impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Judy; Han, Jaehoon; Tryggvason, Gretar; Ceccio, Steven

    1996-11-01

    "Ballistic Partical Manufacturing" is a process in which individual drops are layered to form a part. We examine how metal drops deform and solidify, and how the solidification rate affects the material microstructure using both numerical simulations and experiments. A single set of equations governing the conservation of mass, energy, and momentum are written for all phases involved, and the phase boundary is treated as an imbedded interface by adding the appropriate source terms. We have simulated single drops colliding with a surface using a simple model which assumes that a melt solidifies below the melting point. Although simple, this model captures many aspects of the fluid flow and solidification. The experimental apparatus creates a single drop of prescribed size and propels it toward a cooled substrate. Favorable comparisons of experimental and numerical results have been achieved.

  8. On the Stability of Rotating Drops

    PubMed Central

    Nurse, A. K.; Coriell, S. R.; McFadden, G. B.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the equilibrium and stability of rotating axisymmetric fluid drops by appealing to a variational principle that characterizes the equilibria as stationary states of a functional containing surface energy and rotational energy contributions, augmented by a volume constraint. The linear stability of a drop is determined by solving the eigenvalue problem associated with the second variation of the energy functional. We compute equilibria corresponding to both oblate and prolate shapes, as well as toroidal shapes, and track their evolution with rotation rate. The stability results are obtained for two cases: (i) a prescribed rotational rate of the system (“driven drops”), or (ii) a prescribed angular momentum (“isolated drops”). For families of axisymmetric drops instabilities may occur for either axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric perturbations; the latter correspond to bifurcation points where non-axisymmetric shapes are possible. We employ an angle-arc length formulation of the problem which allows the computation of equilibrium shapes that are not single-valued in spherical coordinates. We are able to illustrate the transition from spheroidal drops with a strong indentation on the rotation axis to toroidal drops that do not extend to the rotation axis. Toroidal drops with a large aspect ratio (major radius to minor radius) are subject to azimuthal instabilities with higher mode numbers that are analogous to the Rayleigh instability of a cylindrical interface. Prolate spheroidal shapes occur if a drop of lower density rotates within a denser medium; these drops appear to be linearly stable. This work is motivated by recent investigations of toroidal tissue clusters that are observed to climb conical obstacles after self-assembly [Nurse et al., Journal of Applied Mechanics 79 (2012) 051013]. PMID:26958440

  9. Binary drop coalescence in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungyong

    Experiments on binary drop collisions within an index-matched liquid were conducted for Weber numbers (We) of 1-50 and collision angles of 15-80° below the horizontal. Drop pairs of water/glycerin mixture were injected into silicone oil and, due to gravitational effects, traveled on downward trajectories before colliding. A dual-field high-speed PIV measurement system was employed to quantify drop trajectories and overall collision conditions while simultaneously examining detailed velocity fields near the collision interface. In the We range examined, for equal size drops, both rebounding and coalescing behavior occurred. The drops coalesced for We > 10 and rebounded for We < 10, and this boundary was found to be insensitive to collision angle. Coalescence was found to result from a combination of vortical flow within drops and strong drop deformation characteristic of higher We. Flow through the centers of opposing ring vortices, strengthened by drop deformation, enhanced drainage of the thin film in the impact region, leading to film rupture and coalescence. The collision angle affected the eventual location of film rupture, with the rupture location moving higher in the thin film region as the collision angle increased. The film rupture location correlated closely with the location of maximum downward velocity in the thin film. The time between collision and rupture increases with We until We = 30. For We > 30, the time decreases as We increases. Unequal size drop collisions with drop size ratios (Ds/D L) of 0.7 and 0.5 were also examined. Coalescence occurs above We* = 11 similar to equal size drops. As drop size ratio decreases, the intervening film deforms more. If the velocity ratio uL/u s < 1, the deformed interface becomes flat before coalescence. The rupture location varies due to the asymmetry of the drops. As collision offset increases (B > 0), the film rupture time is shortened and mixing of the fluid from both drops is enhanced after coalescence

  10. Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator

    DOEpatents

    Botts, Thomas E.; Powell, James R.; Lenard, Roger

    1986-01-01

    A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting rgy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.

  11. Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator

    DOEpatents

    Botts, T.E.; Powell, J.R.; Lenard, R.

    1984-12-10

    A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting energy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.

  12. Nonlinear Oscillations of Two-Dimensional, Rotating Inviscid Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzek, T. W.; Basaran, O. A.; Benner, R. E.; Scriven, L. E.

    1995-01-01

    We examine the nonlinear response of a drop, rotating as a rigid body at fixed angular velocity, to two-dimensional finite-amplitude disturbances. With these restrictions, the liquid velocity becomes a superposition of the solid-body rotation and the gradient of a velocity potential. To find the drop motion, we solve an integro-differential Bernoulli's equation for the drop shape and Laplace's equation for the velocity potential field within the drop. The integral part of Bernoulli's equation couples all parts of the drop's surface and sets this problem apart from that of the oscillations of nonrotating drops. We use Galerkin's weighted residual method with finite element basis functions which are deployed on a mesh that deforms in proportion to the deformation of the free surface. To alleviate the roundoff error in the initial conditions of the drop motion, we use a Fourier filter which turns off as soon as the highest resolved oscillation mode grows above the machine noise level. The results include sequences of drop shapes, Fourier analysis of oscillation frequencies, and evolution in time of the components of total mechanical energy of the drop. The Fourier power spectral analysis of large-amplitude oscillations of the drop reveals frequency shifts similar to those of the nonrotating free drops. Constant drop volume, total energy, and angular momentum as well as vanishing mass flow across the drop surface are the standards of accuracy against which we test the nonlinear motion of the drop over tens or hundreds of oscillation periods. Finally, we demonstrate that our finite element method has superior stability, accuracy, and computational efficiency over several boundary element algorithms that have previously appeared in the literature.

  13. Electrostatic Liquid-Drop-Levitation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won Kyu; Chung, San Kun; Hyson, Michael T.; Elleman, Daniel D.

    1988-01-01

    Electrostatic levitator has levitated drops of liquid up to 4 mm in diameter while maintaining spherical drop shapes. Stable levitation of spherical drops valuable in experiments involving super-cooling, solidification, and crystal growth.

  14. Rotating drops of axion dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Sacha; Schwetz, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    We consider how QCD axions produced by the misalignment mechanism could form galactic dark matter halos. We recall that stationary, gravitationally stable axion field configurations have the size of an asteroid with masses of order 10-13M⊙ (because gradient pressure is insufficient to support a larger object). We call such field configurations "drops." We explore whether rotating drops could be larger, and find that their mass could increase by a factor ˜10 . This mass is comparable to the mass of miniclusters generated from misalignment axions in the scenario where the axion is born after inflation. We speculate that misalignment axions today are in the form of drops, contributing to dark matter like a distribution of asteroids (and not as a coherent oscillating background field). We consider some observational signatures of the drops, which seem consistent with a galactic halo made of axion dark matter.

  15. The dynamics of free liquid drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Trinh, E. H.; Croonquist, A. P.; Elleman, D. D.

    1988-01-01

    The behavior of rotating and oscillating free liquid drops was studied by many investigators theoretically for many years. More recent numerical treatments have yielded predictions which are yet to be verified experimentally. The purpose is to report the results of laboratory work as well as that of the experiments carried out in space during the flight of Spacelab 3, and to compare it with the existing theoretical studies. Ground-based experiments were attempted as a first approximation to the ideal boundary conditions used by the theoretical treatments by neutralizing the overwhelming effects of the Earth's gravitational field with an outside supporting liquid and with the use of levitation technology. The viscous and inertial loading of such a suspending fluid was found to profoundly effect the results, but the information thus gathered has emphasized the uniqueness of the experimental data obtained in the low-gravity environment of space.

  16. Nonmonotonic Response of Drop Impacting Liquid Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Saha, Abhishek; Zhu, Delin; Sun, Chao; Law, Chung K.

    2015-11-01

    Drop impact on liquid film is ubiquitous in both natural phenomena and industrial applications. The dynamics of the gas layer trapped between the drop and the deformed liquid surface play a crucial role in determining the impact outcomes. However, a quantitative measurement of this gas layer dynamics is extremely challenging because it is hidden behind the deformed liquid film. In this study, high-speed white light interferometry enables the measurement of the gas layer dynamics during the drop impact with high resolutions and is complemented by side view shadowgraphy to observe the penetration process below the liquid surface. Drop impacting with different inertia onto liquid film with various thicknesses is systematically studied to obtain a phase diagram of different outcomes in the h/R-We space, where h/R is the liquid thickness normalized by drop radius, and We is the drop Weber number. It is observed that there exists a critical WeC beyond which the drop always merges with the liquid film. However, for `subcritical' conditions, there exists a merging peninsula in otherwise globally bouncing region. Across this peninsula, as the liquid film thickness increases, the impact outcome transits from bouncing to merging and to bouncing again. The merging time within this peninsula is longer compared to its `supercritical' counterpart, indicating different merging mechanisms. Based on scaling analysis, the boundaries between different zones are identified and compared with experiments.

  17. Leidenfrost drops on a heated liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maquet, L.; Sobac, B.; Darbois-Texier, B.; Duchesne, A.; Brandenbourger, M.; Rednikov, A.; Colinet, P.; Dorbolo, S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that a volatile liquid drop placed at the surface of a nonvolatile liquid pool warmer than the boiling point of the drop can be held in a Leidenfrost state even for vanishingly small superheats. Such an observation points to the importance of the substrate roughness, negligible in the case considered here, in determining the threshold Leidenfrost temperature. A theoretical model based on the one proposed by Sobac et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 053011 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.053011] is developed in order to rationalize the experimental data. The shapes of the drop and of the liquid substrate are analyzed. The model notably provides scalings for the vapor film thickness profile. For small drops, these scalings appear to be identical to the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For large drops, in contrast, they are different, and no evidence of chimney formation has been observed either experimentally or theoretically in the range of drop sizes considered in this study. Concerning the evaporation dynamics, the radius is shown to decrease linearly with time whatever the drop size, which differs from the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For high superheats, the characteristic lifetime of the drops versus the superheat follows a scaling law that is derived from the model, but, at low superheats, it deviates from this scaling by rather saturating.

  18. Electro-hydrodynamic propulsion of counter-rotating Pickering drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommersnes, P.; Mikkelsen, A.; Fossum, J. O.

    2016-07-01

    Insulating particles or drops suspended in carrier liquids may start to rotate with a constant frequency when subjected to a uniform DC electric field. This is known as the Quincke rotation electro-hydrodynamic instability. A single isolated rotating particle exhibit no translational motion at low Reynolds number, however interacting rotating particles may move relative to one another. Here we present a simple system consisting of two interacting and deformable Quincke rotating particle covered drops, i.e. deformable Pickering drops. The drops attract one another and spontaneously form a counter-rotating pair that exhibits electro-hydrodynamic driven propulsion at low Reynolds number flow.

  19. Leidenfrost drops on liquid baths: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobac, Benjamin; Rednikov, Alexei; Maquet, Laurent; Darbois-Texier, Baptiste; Duchesne, Alexis; Brandenbourger, Martin; Dorbolo, Stéphane; Colinet, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that a liquid drop released over a very hot surface generally does not contact the surface nor boils but rather levitates over a thin vapor film generated by its own evaporation (Leidenfrost effect). In particular, the case of a hot (and flat) solid substrate has been extensively studied in recent years. In contrast, we here focus on Leidenfrost drops over a superheated liquid bath, addressing the problem theoretically and comparing our predictions with experimental results, detailed in a separate talk. We predict the geometry of the drop and of the liquid bath, based on the hydrostatic Young-Laplace and lubrication equations. A good agreement is observed with the available experimental data concerning the deformation of the liquid bath. The modeling also yields a rather complete insight into the shape of the drop. As in the case of a solid substrate, the vapor layer generally appears to be composed of a vapor pocket surrounded by a circular neck. The influences of the superheat and of the drop size are parametrically investigated. A number of scaling laws are established. Unlike the case of a solid substrate, no chimney instability was found in the range of drop size studied.

  20. Rotation of ultrasonically levitated glycerol drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, A.; Leung, E. W.; Trinh, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic levitation is used to suspend single millimeter-size glycerol drops in a rectangular chamber. Audio-frequency laterally standing waves set up in the chamber are used to torque the suspended drops. The shape evolution of the drop under the combined effect of centrifugal forces and the acoustic radiation stress, along with its angular velocity are monitored, using video imaging and light scattering techniques. The results show good qualitative agreement with the theoretically predicted shape evolution as a function of angular velocity.

  1. Micro coulometric titration in a liquid drop.

    PubMed

    Kanyanee, Tinakorn; Fuekhad, Pongwasin; Grudpan, Kate

    2013-10-15

    Miniaturized coulometric titration in a liquid drop has been investigated. Assays of ascorbic acid and thiosulfate with iodine titration were chosen as models. Constant volumes of falling liquid drops containing sample or reagent are manipulated via gravimetrical force to move along a slope hydrophobic path and directed to stop or to move out from an electrode. Such manipulation is useful for delivery of sample and reagents, in a way of flow without tubing. Electrochemical generation of titrant, in this case, iodine, is started at the electrode and micro coulometric titration can be performed in a drop by applying constant current. Timing in the titration can be made via naked eye with a stopwatch or via recording with a webcam camera connecting to a computer to detect the change due to the blue color complex of the excess iodine and starch.

  2. Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids. The present invention includes the use of two closely spaced transducers, or one transducer and a closely spaced reflector plate, to form an interferometer suitable for ultrasonic characterization of droplet-size and smaller samples without the need for a container. The droplet is held between the interferometer elements, whose distance apart may be adjusted, by surface tension. The surfaces of the interferometer elements may be readily cleansed by a stream of solvent followed by purified air when it is desired to change samples. A single drop of liquid is sufficient for high-quality measurement. Examples of samples which may be investigated using the apparatus and method of the present invention include biological specimens (tear drops; blood and other body fluid samples; samples from tumors, tissues, and organs; secretions from tissues and organs; snake and bee venom, etc.) for diagnostic evaluation, samples in forensic investigations, and detection of drugs in small quantities.

  3. Micro coulometric titration in a liquid drop.

    PubMed

    Kanyanee, Tinakorn; Fuekhad, Pongwasin; Grudpan, Kate

    2013-10-15

    Miniaturized coulometric titration in a liquid drop has been investigated. Assays of ascorbic acid and thiosulfate with iodine titration were chosen as models. Constant volumes of falling liquid drops containing sample or reagent are manipulated via gravimetrical force to move along a slope hydrophobic path and directed to stop or to move out from an electrode. Such manipulation is useful for delivery of sample and reagents, in a way of flow without tubing. Electrochemical generation of titrant, in this case, iodine, is started at the electrode and micro coulometric titration can be performed in a drop by applying constant current. Timing in the titration can be made via naked eye with a stopwatch or via recording with a webcam camera connecting to a computer to detect the change due to the blue color complex of the excess iodine and starch. PMID:24054589

  4. Drop size measurement of liquid aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. Y. H.; Pui, D. Y. H.; Xian-Qing, Wang

    The factor B = D/ D' relating the diameter D of a spherical liquid drop to the diameter, D˜, of the same drop collected on a microscope slide has been measured for DOP (di-octyl phthalate) and oleic acid aerosols. The microscope slide was coated with a fluorocarbon, oleophobic surfactant (L-1428, 3M Co., St. Paul, MN). The ratio was found to be independent of drop diameter in the 2-50 μm range and the mean value of B was found to be 0.700 for oleic acid and 0.690 for DOP. Similar measurements for oleic acid and DOP drops collected on a clean, uncoated slide resulted in the values of 0.419 and 0.303, respectively. The experimental values of B were compared with the theoretical values based on contact angle measurements. Good agreement was obtained.

  5. Solid drop based liquid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Sobhi, Hamid Reza; Farahani, Hadi; Norouzi, Parviz; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Kashtiaray, Amir

    2010-04-16

    Solid drop based liquid-phase microextraction (SDLPME) is a novel sample preparation technique possessing obvious advantages of simple operation with a high pre-concentration factor, low cost and low consumption of organic solvent. SDLPME coupled with gas chromatography (GC), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) has been widely applied to the analyses of a different variety of samples. The basic principles, parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, and the latest applications of SDLPME are reviewed in this article. PMID:19962710

  6. Equilibrium of an elastically confined liquid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Min; Kim, Ho-Young; Puëll, Jérôme; Mahadevan, L.

    2008-05-01

    When a liquid drop is confined between an elastic plate and a rigid substrate, it spreads spontaneously due to the effects of interfacial forces, eventually reaching an equilibrium shape determined by the balance between elastic and capillary effects. We provide an analytical theory for the static shape of the sheet and the extent of liquid spreading and show that our experiments are quantitatively consistent with the theory. The theory is relevant for the first step of painting when a brush is brought down on to canvas. More mundanely, it allows us to understand the stiction of microcantilevers to wafer substrates occurring in microelectromechanical fabrication processes.

  7. Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.

    1998-04-14

    Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids is disclosed. The present invention includes the use of two closely spaced transducers, or one transducer and a closely spaced reflector plate, to form an interferometer suitable for ultrasonic characterization of droplet-size and smaller samples without the need for a container. The droplet is held between the interferometer elements, whose distance apart may be adjusted, by surface tension. The surfaces of the interferometer elements may be readily cleansed by a stream of solvent followed by purified air when it is desired to change samples. A single drop of liquid is sufficient for high-quality measurement. Examples of samples which may be investigated using the apparatus and method of the present invention include biological specimens (tear drops; blood and other body fluid samples; samples from tumors, tissues, and organs; secretions from tissues and organs; snake and bee venom, etc.) for diagnostic evaluation, samples in forensic investigations, and detection of drugs in small quantities. 5 figs.

  8. Drop Impact on to Moving Liquid Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Beatriz Natividad; Castrejón-Pita, José Rafael; Castrejón-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Hutchings, Ian M.

    2014-11-01

    The deposition of droplets on to moving liquid substrates is an omnipresent situation both in nature and industry. A diverse spectrum of phenomena emerges from this simple process. In this work we present a parametric experimental study that discerns the dynamics of the impact in terms of the physical properties of the fluid and the relative velocity between the impacting drop and the moving liquid pool. The behaviour ranges from smooth coalescence (characterized by little mixing) to violent splashing (generation of multiple satellite droplets and interfacial vorticity). In addition, transitional regimes such as bouncing and surfing are also found. We classify the system dynamics and show a parametric diagram for the conditions of each regime. This work was supported by the EPSRC (Grant EP/H018913/1), the Royal Society, Becas Santander Universidades and the International Relationships Office of the University of Extremadura.

  9. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semirigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers. This paper will also highlight the interactions between academia and small businesses in developing new products and processes.

  10. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Stevenson, Paige; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers advantages of low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semi-rigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers.

  11. Impact dynamics of oxidized liquid metal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qin; Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2013-04-01

    With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number We is employed that uses an effective surface tension factoring in the yield stress. In contrast, no influence on spreading from different oxidations conditions is observed for high impact velocity. This suggests that the initial kinetic energy is mostly damped by bulk viscous dissipation. Results from both regimes can be collapsed in an impact phase diagram controlled by two variables, the maximum spreading factor Pm=R0/Rm, given by the ratio of initial to maximum drop radius, and the impact number K=We/Re4/5, which scales with the effective Weber number We as well as the Reynolds number Re. The data exhibit a transition from capillary to viscous behavior at a critical impact number Kc≈0.1.

  12. Rotating Molten Metallic Drops and Their Applications for Surface Tension Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Ishikawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    Shapes and stability of rotating molten metal drops carrying net surface electric charges are experimentally investigated, and the feasibility of measureing surface tension based on drop rotation is examined.

  13. Flow visualization and characterization of evaporating liquid drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F. (Inventor); Zhang, Nengli (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An optical system, consisting of drop-reflection image, reflection-refracted shadowgraphy and top-view photography, is used to measure the spreading and instant dynamic contact angle of a volatile-liquid drop on a non-transparent substrate. The drop-reflection image and the shadowgraphy is shown by projecting the images of a collimated laser beam partially reflected by the drop and partially passing through the drop onto a screen while the top view photograph is separately viewed by use of a camera video recorder and monitor. For a transparent liquid on a reflective solid surface, thermocapillary convection in the drop, induced by evaporation, can be viewed nonintrusively, and the drop real-time profile data are synchronously recorded by video recording systems. Experimental results obtained from this technique clearly reveal that evaporation and thermocapillary convection greatly affect the spreading process and the characteristics of dynamic contact angle of the drop.

  14. Inverse Leidenfrost Effect: Levitating Drops on Liquid Nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Adda-Bedia, M; Kumar, S; Lechenault, F; Moulinet, S; Schillaci, M; Vella, D

    2016-05-01

    We explore the interaction between a liquid drop (initially at room temperature) and a bath of liquid nitrogen. In this scenario, heat transfer occurs through film-boiling: a nitrogen vapor layer develops that may cause the drop to levitate at the bath surface. We report the phenomenology of this inverse Leidenfrost effect, investigating the effect of the drop size and density by using an aqueous solution of a tungsten salt to vary the drop density. We find that (depending on its size and density) a drop either levitates or instantaneously sinks into the bulk nitrogen. We begin by measuring the duration of the levitation as a function of the radius R and density ρd of the liquid drop. We find that the levitation time increases roughly linearly with drop radius but depends weakly on the drop density. However, for sufficiently large drops, R ≥ Rc(ρd), the drop sinks instantaneously; levitation does not occur. This sinking of a (relatively) hot droplet induces film-boiling, releasing a stream of vapor bubbles for a well-defined length of time. We study the duration of this immersed-drop bubbling finding similar scalings (but with different prefactors) to the levitating drop case. With these observations, we study the physical factors limiting the levitation and immersed-film-boiling times, proposing a simple model that explains the scalings observed for the duration of these phenomena, as well as the boundary of (R,ρd) parameter space that separates them. PMID:27054550

  15. (abstract) Production and Levitation of Free Drops of Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paine, C. G.; Petrac, D.; Rhim, W. K.

    1995-01-01

    We are interested in the nucleation and behavior of quantized vorticies and surface excitations in free drops of superfluid helium. We have constructed an apparatus to maintain liquid helium drops isolated from any material container in the Earth's gravitational field, and have investigated two techniques for generating and introducing liquid drops into the region of confinement. The levitation apparatus utilizes the electrostatic force acting upon a charged liquid drop to counteract the gravitational force, with drop position stability provided by a static magnetic field acting upon the helium diamagnetic moment. Electrically neutral superfluid drops have been produced with a miniature thermomechanical pump; for a given configuration the liquid initial velocity has been varied up to several centimeters per second. Liquid drops carrying either net positive or negative charge are produced by an electrode which generates a flow of ionized liquid from the bulk liquid surface. Potentials of less than one thousand volts to several thousand volts are required. The mass flow is controlled by varying duration of the ionizing voltage pulse; drops as small as 30 micrometers diameter, charged to near the Rayleigh limit, have been observed.

  16. Nucleation of Quantized Vortices from Rotating Superfluid Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.

    2001-01-01

    The long-term goal of this project is to study the nucleation of quantized vortices in helium II by investigating the behavior of rotating droplets of helium II in a reduced gravity environment. The objective of this ground-based research grant was to develop new experimental techniques to aid in accomplishing that goal. The development of an electrostatic levitator for superfluid helium, described below, and the successful suspension of charged superfluid drops in modest electric fields was the primary focus of this work. Other key technologies of general low temperature use were developed and are also discussed.

  17. Ultrasonic atomization of liquids in drop-chain acoustic fountains

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    When focused ultrasound waves of moderate intensity in liquid encounter an air interface, a chain of drops emerges from the liquid surface to form what is known as a drop-chain fountain. Atomization, or the emission of micro-droplets, occurs when the acoustic intensity exceeds a liquid-dependent threshold. While the cavitation-wave hypothesis, which states that atomization arises from a combination of capillary-wave instabilities and cavitation bubble oscillations, is currently the most accepted theory of atomization, more data on the roles of cavitation, capillary waves, and even heat deposition or boiling would be valuable. In this paper, we experimentally test whether bubbles are a significant mechanism of atomization in drop-chain fountains. High-speed photography was used to observe the formation and atomization of drop-chain fountains composed of water and other liquids. For a range of ultrasonic frequencies and liquid sound speeds, it was found that the drop diameters approximately equalled the ultrasonic wavelengths. When water was exchanged for other liquids, it was observed that the atomization threshold increased with shear viscosity. Upon heating water, it was found that the time to commence atomization decreased with increasing temperature. Finally, water was atomized in an overpressure chamber where it was found that atomization was significantly diminished when the static pressure was increased. These results indicate that bubbles, generated by either acoustic cavitation or boiling, contribute significantly to atomization in the drop-chain fountain. PMID:25977591

  18. Acoustic forcing of a liquid drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyell, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of systems such as acoustic levitation chambers will allow for the positioning and manipulation of material samples (drops) in a microgravity environment. This provides the capability for fundamental studies in droplet dynamics as well as containerless processing work. Such systems use acoustic radiation pressure forces to position or to further manipulate (e.g., oscillate) the sample. The primary objective was to determine the effect of a viscous acoustic field/tangential radiation pressure forcing on drop oscillations. To this end, the viscous acoustic field is determined. Modified (forced) hydrodynamic field equations which result from a consistent perturbation expansion scheme are solved. This is done in the separate cases of an unmodulated and a modulated acoustic field. The effect of the tangential radiation stress on the hydrodynamic field (drop oscillations) is found to manifest as a correction to the velocity field in a sublayer region near the drop/host interface. Moreover, the forcing due to the radiation pressure vector at the interface is modified by inclusion of tangential stresses.

  19. Liquid drops on vertical and inclined surfaces; I. An experimental study of drop geometry.

    PubMed

    ElSherbini, A I; Jacobi, A M

    2004-05-15

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate the geometric parameters necessary to describe the shapes of liquid drops on vertical and inclined plane surfaces. Two liquids and eight surfaces have been used to study contact angles, contact lines, profiles, and volumes of drops of different sizes for a range of surface conditions. The results show the contact-angle variation along the circumference of a drop to be best fit by a third-degree polynomial in the azimuthal angle. This contact-angle function is expressed in terms of the maximum and minimum contact angles of the drop, which are determined for various conditions. The maximum contact angle, thetamax, is approximately equal to the advancing contact angle, thetaA, of the liquid on the surface. As the Bond number, Bo, increases from 0 to a maximum, the minimum contact angle, thetamin, decreases almost linearly from the advancing to the receding angle. A general relation is found between thetamin/thetaA and Bo for different liquid-surface combinations. The drop contour can be described by an ellipse, with the aspect ratio increasing with Bo. These experimental results are valuable in modeling drop shape, as presented in Part II of this work.

  20. Electrically rotating suspended films of polar liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirsavar, R.; Amjadi, A.; Tonddast-Navaei, A.; Ejtehadi, M. R.

    2011-02-01

    Controlled rotation of a suspended soap water film, simply generated by applying an electric field, has been reported recently. The film rotates when the applied electric field exceeds a certain threshold. In this study, we investigate the phenomenon in films made of a number of other liquids with various physical and chemical properties. Our measurements show that the intrinsic electrical dipole moments of the liquid molecules seems to be vital for the corresponding film rotation. All the investigated rotating liquids have a molecular electric dipole moment of above 1 Debye, while weakly polar liquids do not rotate. However, the liquids investigated here cover a wide range of physical parameters (e.g. viscosity, density, conductivity, etc.). So far, no significant correlation has been observed between the electric field thresholds and macroscopic properties of the liquids.

  1. Experimental investigation of the aerodynamic breakup of liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzba, A.; Takayama, K.

    1988-11-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the deformation and the mechanism of stripping-type breakup of liquid drops. Experiments were conducted in a 60 x 150 mm cross-sectional shock tube equipped with pulsed laser holographic interferometry. Water drops having diameters of 1030 and 4300 microns were examined for shock wave Mach numbers from 1.3 to 1.5 in atmospheric air. The Weber and Reynolds numbers under these conditions were in the range of 600 to 7600 and 13,800-104,000, respectively. The purpose of the present work is, by using holographic interferometry, to reexamine the classical problem of the stripping-type breakup of liquid drops. As a result, a four-stage mechanism of the stripping-type breakup of liquid drops was established.

  2. Rotating Molten Metallic Drops and Related Phenomena: A New Approach to the Surface Tension Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Ishikawa, Takehiko

    2000-01-01

    Molten aluminum and tin drops were levitated in a high vacuum by controlled electric fields, and they were systematically rotated by applying by a rotating magnetic field. When the evolution of the drop shape was measured as a function of rotation frequency, it agreed quantitatively well with the Brown and Scriven's theoretical prediction. The normalized rotation frequencies at the bifurcation point agreed with the predicted value 0.559, within 2%. An anomalous phenomenon which totally deviated from the prediction was observed in rotating molten tin drops when they were kept in a high rotation rate for several hours. No anomaly was observed in aluminum drops when they underwent similar condition. It was speculated that under the strong centrifugal force in the drop the tin isotopes must be separating. Since Al-27 is essentially the only naturally abundant isotope in the aluminum drops, the same anomaly is not expected. Based on the shape deformation of a rotating drop, an alternate approach to the surface tension measurement was verified. This new surface tension measurement technique was applied to a glassforming alloy, Zr(41.2)Ti(13.8)Cu(12.5)Ni(10.0)Be(22.5) in its highly viscous states. Also demonstrated in the paper was a use of a molten aluminum drop to verify the Busse's prediction of the influence of the drop rotation on the drop oscillation frequency.

  3. Oscillations of a deformed liquid drop in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Tao; Apfel, Robert E.

    1995-07-01

    The oscillations of an axially symmetric liquid drop in an acoustic standing wave field in air have been studied using the boundary integral method. The interaction between the drop oscillation and sound field has been included in this analysis. Our computations focus on the frequency shift of small-amplitude oscillations of an acoustically deformed drop typical of a drop levitated in air. In the presence or absence of gravity, the trend and the magnitude of the frequency shift have been given in terms of drop size, drop deformation, and the strength of the sound field. Our calculations are compared with experiments performed on the United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1) and with ground-based measurements, and are found to be in good agreement within the accuracy of the experimental data.

  4. Impact of a single drop on a flowing liquid film.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuan; Li, Ri

    2015-11-01

    The impact of a single liquid drop on a flowing liquid film is experimentally and theoretically studied. The drop impact produces a crownlike rising liquid sheet, which radially expands. Small droplets can be formed from the crown sheet, resulting in splash. The present study results in three major contributions. (1) A theoretical model is developed to predict the expansion of the crown base. The model with an introduced energy loss factor is shown to be in satisfactory agreement with our experimental observations of drop impact on both stationary and flowing films. The energy loss factor is correlated to the properties of the film and drop. (2) Analysis is conducted to derive an equation for evaluating the stretching rate of the rising crown sheet, which is the local gradient of the rising velocity at the top edge of the crown sheet. It shows that the highest stretching rate appears where the drop spreading flow is right opposite to the film flow, which helps explain why the same location is most probable for splash to take place. (3) A parameter as a function of modified Weber and Reynolds numbers is defined to predict splash and nonsplash of drop impact on flowing films. The two nondimensional numbers evaluate the competition of the two flows (drop and film) against viscosity and surface tension effects. A threshold value of the parameter is found for the occurrence of splash impact on flowing films. PMID:26651777

  5. A comparative flow visualization study of thermocapillary flow in drops in liquid-liquid systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Rashidnia, N.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments are performed to visualize thermocapillary flow in drops in an immiscible host liquid. The host liquid used is silicone oil. Drops of three different liquids are used, viz, vegetable oil, water-methanol mixture anad pure methanol. Clear evidence of thermocapillary flow is seen in vegetable oil drops. For a mixture of water and methanol (approximately 50-50 by weight), natural convection is seen to dominate the flow outside the drop. Pure methanol drops exhibit thermocapillary flow, but dissolve in silicone oil. A small amount of water added to pure methanol significantly reduces the dissolution. Flow oscillations occur in this system for both isothermal and non-isothermal conditions.

  6. Liquid drops attract or repel by the inverted Cheerios effect.

    PubMed

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Pandey, Anupam; Lubbers, Luuk A; Weijs, Joost H; Botto, Lorenzo; Das, Siddhartha; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2016-07-01

    Solid particles floating at a liquid interface exhibit a long-ranged attraction mediated by surface tension. In the absence of bulk elasticity, this is the dominant lateral interaction of mechanical origin. Here, we show that an analogous long-range interaction occurs between adjacent droplets on solid substrates, which crucially relies on a combination of capillarity and bulk elasticity. We experimentally observe the interaction between droplets on soft gels and provide a theoretical framework that quantitatively predicts the interaction force between the droplets. Remarkably, we find that, although on thick substrates the interaction is purely attractive and leads to drop-drop coalescence, for relatively thin substrates a short-range repulsion occurs, which prevents the two drops from coming into direct contact. This versatile interaction is the liquid-on-solid analog of the "Cheerios effect." The effect will strongly influence the condensation and coarsening of drops on soft polymer films, and has potential implications for colloidal assembly and mechanobiology.

  7. Drop interaction with solid boundaries in liquid/liquid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoloi, Ankur Deep

    The present experimental work was motivated primarily by the CO 2 sequestration process. In a possible scenario during this process, gravity driven CO2 bubbles coalesce at an interface near the rock surface. In another scenario, trapped CO2 fluid may escape from a porous matrix overcoming interfacial force inside a pore. Based on these potential scenarios, the current research was divided into two broad experimental studies. In the first part, coalescence at a quiescent interface of two analogous fluids (silicone oil and water/glycerin mixture) was investigated for water/glycerin drops with Bond number (Bo) ~7 and Ohnesorge number ~ 0.01 using high-speed imaging and time-resolved tomographic PIV. Two perturbation cases with a solid particle wetted in oil and water/glycerin placed adjacent to the coalescing drop were considered. The results were compared with coalescence of a single drop and that of a drop neighBored by a second drop of equivalent size. Each perturbing object caused an initial tilting of the drop, influencing its rupture location, subsequent film retraction and eventual collapse behavior. Once tilted, drops typically ruptured near their lowest vertical position which was located either toward or away from the perturbing object depending on the case. The trends in local retraction speed of the ruptured film and the overall dynamics of the collapsing drops were discussed in detail. In the second part, the motion of gravity driven drops (B o~0.8-11) through a confining orifice d/D<1) was studied using high speed imaging and planar PIV. Drops of water/glycerin, surrounded by silicone oil, fall toward and encounter the orifice plate after reaching terminal speed. The effects of surface wettability were investigated for Both round-edged and sharp-edged orifices. For the round-edged case, a thin film of surrounding oil prevented the drop fluid from contacting the orifice surface, such that the flow outcomes of the drops were independent of surface

  8. A liquid drop model for embedded atom method cluster energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, C. W.; Abel, P. B.; Ferrante, J.

    1996-01-01

    Minimum energy configurations for homonuclear clusters containing from two to twenty-two atoms of six metals, Ag, Au, Cu, Ni, Pd, and Pt have been calculated using the Embedded Atom Method (EAM). The average energy per atom as a function of cluster size has been fit to a liquid drop model, giving estimates of the surface and curvature energies. The liquid drop model gives a good representation of the relationship between average energy and cluster size. As a test the resulting surface energies are compared to EAM surface energy calculations for various low-index crystal faces with reasonable agreement.

  9. Dynamics of a liquid drop in porous medium saturated by another liquid under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantsov, A. O.; Lyubimova, T. P.

    2016-02-01

    The work deals with numerical simulations of settling or ascension process of a liquid drop in porous media saturated by another liquid. The calculations were carried out using the Darcy model by Level set method with adaptive mesh refinement algorithm that dynamically refines computational mesh near interface. It is shown that the drop is unstable and the finger instability develops at the forefront of moving drop for any ratio of the viscosities of liquids. Under modulated pressure gradient small-scale perturbations of interface are suppressed and in the case of modulation with large enough intensity drop becomes stable.

  10. Multiphase flow of miscible liquids: jets and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Travis W.; Logia, Alison N.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2015-05-01

    Drops and jets of liquids that are miscible with the surrounding bulk liquid are present in many processes from cleaning surfaces with the aid of liquid soaps to the creation of biocompatible implants for drug delivery. Although the interactions of immiscible drops and jets show similarities to miscible systems, the small, transient interfacial tension associated with miscible systems create distinct outcomes such as intricate droplet shapes and breakup resistant jets. Experiments have been conducted to understand several basic multiphase flow problems involving miscible liquids. Using high-speed imaging of the morphological evolution of the flows, we have been able to show that these processes are controlled by interfacial tensions. Further multiphase flows include investigating miscible jets, which allow the creation of fibers from inelastic materials that are otherwise difficult to process due to capillary breakup. This work shows that stabilization from the diminishing interfacial tensions of the miscible jets allows various elongated morphologies to be formed.

  11. Drop impact on thin liquid films using TIRM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Min; Ying Sun Team

    2015-11-01

    Drop impact on thin liquid films is relevant to a number of industrial processes such as pesticide spraying and repellent surface research such as self-cleaning applications. In this study, we systematically investigate the drop impact dynamics on thin liquid films on plain glass substrates by varying the film thickness, viscosity and impact velocity. High speed imaging is used to track the droplet morphology and trajectory over time as well as observing instability developments at high Weber number impacts. Moreover, the air layer between the drop and thin film upon drop impact is probed by total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) where the grayscale intensity is used to measure the air layer thickness and spreading radius over time. For low We impact on thick films (We ~ 10), the effect of the air entrainment is pronounced where the adhesion of the droplet to the wall is delayed by the air depletion and liquid film drainage, whereas for high We impact (We >100) the air layer is no longer formed and instead, the drop contact with the wall is limited only to the film drainage for all film thicknesses. In addition, the maximum spreading radius of the droplet is analyzed for varying thin film thickness and viscosity.

  12. A liquid drop RC filter apparatus for detection.

    PubMed

    Nanayakkara, Yasith S; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2011-11-01

    A new analytical detector based on a liquid drop resistor-capacitor (RC) filter is described, in which transformed gain vs. frequency curves are used to analyze compounds. This detector can be used to detect either charged or neutral species (that are dielectrically different) which are dissolved in a liquid (e.g., water, alcohol, solvent mixtures, etc.). This device was fabricated by modifying an electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD)-based experimental setup. When a liquid drop is placed on a dielectric surface, the system acts as a RC filter. At a given frequency, gain is a function of conductivity, surface tension, dielectric constant, double-layer thickness of the solid-liquid drop interface, as well as the applied voltage. Since different liquids and solutions have different physical properties, each liquid/solution has a unique curve (peak) in gain vs. frequency plot. This is the basic principle behind the detector. Different amounts of zinc chloride dissolved in water, benzalkonium chloride in water, 1-methylimidazole in water, cetyltrimethyl-ammonium chloride (CTAC) in water, and CTAC dissolved in ethylene glycol solutions were tested with the detector as proof of principle. The device can be used as a stand-alone detector or can easily be coupled with droplet based microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems such as EWOD-based microfluidic chips.

  13. Trapped liquid drop at the end of capillary.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengjia; Yen, Hung-Yu; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2013-10-01

    The liquid drop captured at the capillary end, which is observed in capillary valve and pendant drop technique, is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Because of contact line pinning of the lower meniscus, the lower contact angle is able to rise from the intrinsic contact angle (θ*) so that the external force acting on the drop can be balanced by the capillary force. In the absence of contact angle hysteresis (CAH), the upper contact angle remains at θ*. However, in the presence of CAH, the upper contact angle can descend to provide more capillary force. The coupling between the lower and upper contact angles determines the equilibrium shape of the captured drop. In a capillary valve, the pinned contact line can move across the edge as the pressure difference exceeds the valving pressure, which depends on the geometrical characteristic and wetting property of the valve opening. When CAH is considered, the valving pressure is elevated because the capillary force is enhanced by the receding contact angle. For a pendant drop under gravity, the maximal capillary force is achieved as the lower contact angle reaches 180° in the absence of CAH. However, in the presence of CAH, four regimes can be identified by three critical drop volumes. The lower contact angle can exceed 180°, and therefore the drop takes on the shape of a light bulb, which does not exist in the absence of CAH. The comparisons between Surface Evolver simulations and experiments are quite well. PMID:24004041

  14. Drop coalescence and liquid flow in a single Plateau border.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexandre; Fraysse, Nathalie; Raufaste, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    We report a comprehensive study of the flow of liquid triggered by injecting a droplet into a liquid foam microchannel, also called a Plateau border. This drop-injected experiment reveals an intricate dynamics for the liquid redistribution, with two contrasting regimes observed, ruled either by inertia or viscosity. We devoted a previous study [A. Cohen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 218303 (2014)] to the inertial imbibition regime, unexpected at such small length scales. Here we report other features of interest of the drop-injected experiment, related to the coalescence of the droplet with the liquid microchannel, to both the inertial and viscous regimes, and to the occurrence of liquid flow through the soap films as well as effects of the interfacial rheology. The transition between the two regimes is investigated and qualitatively accounted for. The relevance of our results to liquid foam drainage is tackled by considering the flow of liquid at the nodes of the network of interconnected microchannels. Extensions of our study to liquid foams are discussed. PMID:26066250

  15. Drop coalescence and liquid flow in a single Plateau border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Alexandre; Fraysse, Nathalie; Raufaste, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    We report a comprehensive study of the flow of liquid triggered by injecting a droplet into a liquid foam microchannel, also called a Plateau border. This drop-injected experiment reveals an intricate dynamics for the liquid redistribution, with two contrasting regimes observed, ruled either by inertia or viscosity. We devoted a previous study [A. Cohen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 218303 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.218303] to the inertial imbibition regime, unexpected at such small length scales. Here we report other features of interest of the drop-injected experiment, related to the coalescence of the droplet with the liquid microchannel, to both the inertial and viscous regimes, and to the occurrence of liquid flow through the soap films as well as effects of the interfacial rheology. The transition between the two regimes is investigated and qualitatively accounted for. The relevance of our results to liquid foam drainage is tackled by considering the flow of liquid at the nodes of the network of interconnected microchannels. Extensions of our study to liquid foams are discussed.

  16. Inkjet printing - the physics of manipulating liquid jets and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G. D.; Hoath, S. D.; Hutchings, I. M.

    2008-03-01

    Over the last 30 years inkjet printing technology has been developed for many applications including: product date codes, mailing shots, desktop printing, large-area graphics and, most recently, the direct writing of materials to form electronic, biological, polymeric and metallic devices. The new non-graphical applications require higher print rates, better resolution and higher reliability while printing more complex, non-Newtonian and heavily solids-loaded liquids. This makes the understanding of the physics involved in the precise manipulation of liquid jets and drops ever more important. The proper understanding and control of jet formation and subsequent motion of the jetted materials requires physical studies into material properties at very high shear rates, acoustic modes in print heads, instabilities of jets, drop formation, drop motion, stretching of fluid ligaments, the role of polymers in jet break up, electrical charging of drops and the aerodynamic and electrostatic interaction of jets and drops in flight. Techniques for observation, measurement and analysis are evolving to assist these studies. This paper presents some examples of the application of physics to understanding and implementing inkjet printing, including recent work at the Cambridge Inkjet Research Centre.

  17. Vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop

    SciTech Connect

    Inci, Levent; Bowles, Richard K.

    2013-12-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of miscible and partially miscible binary Lennard–Jones mixtures are used to study the dynamics and thermodynamics of vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop in the canonical ensemble. When the system volume is large, the driving force for condensation is low and only a submonolayer of the solvent is adsorbed onto the liquid drop. A small degree of mixing of the solvent phase into the core of the particles occurs for the miscible system. At smaller volumes, complete film formation is observed and the dynamics of film growth are dominated by cluster-cluster coalescence. Mixing into the core of the droplet is also observed for partially miscible systems below an onset volume suggesting the presence of a solubility transition. We also develop a non-volatile liquid drop model, based on the capillarity approximations, that exhibits a solubility transition between small and large drops for partially miscible mixtures and has a hysteresis loop similar to the one observed in the deliquescence of small soluble salt particles. The properties of the model are compared to our simulation results and the model is used to study the formulation of classical nucleation theory for systems with low free energy barriers.

  18. Distinguishing between microscale gaseous bubbles and liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Beng Hau; An, Hongjie; Chan, Chon U.; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, there has been strong research interest in decorating surfaces with tiny bubbles and drops due to their potential applications in reducing slippage in micro and nanofluidic devices. Both nanobubbles and nanodrops are typically nucleated by exchanging fluids over a suitable substrate. However, the nucleation experiments present many challenges, such as reproducibility and the possibility of contamination. The use of one-use plastic syringes and needle cannulas in nucleation experiments can introduce polymeric contamination. A contaminated experiment may nucleate bubbles, drops or both. Moreover, it is surprisingly difficult to distinguish between bubbles and drops under the usual atomic force microscopy or optical techniques. Here we present an experimental study comparing bubbles and oil (PDMS) drops on an atomically smooth surface (HOPG). Instead of nucleating the objects via solvent exchange, we directly introduced bubbles via electrolysis, and oil drops by injecting a dilute solution. Contrary to previous reports, we find that under careful AFM characterisation, liquid drops and gaseous bubbles respond differently to a change in imaging force, and moreover present different characteristic force curves.

  19. Liquid drops attract or repel by the inverted Cheerios effect.

    PubMed

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Pandey, Anupam; Lubbers, Luuk A; Weijs, Joost H; Botto, Lorenzo; Das, Siddhartha; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2016-07-01

    Solid particles floating at a liquid interface exhibit a long-ranged attraction mediated by surface tension. In the absence of bulk elasticity, this is the dominant lateral interaction of mechanical origin. Here, we show that an analogous long-range interaction occurs between adjacent droplets on solid substrates, which crucially relies on a combination of capillarity and bulk elasticity. We experimentally observe the interaction between droplets on soft gels and provide a theoretical framework that quantitatively predicts the interaction force between the droplets. Remarkably, we find that, although on thick substrates the interaction is purely attractive and leads to drop-drop coalescence, for relatively thin substrates a short-range repulsion occurs, which prevents the two drops from coming into direct contact. This versatile interaction is the liquid-on-solid analog of the "Cheerios effect." The effect will strongly influence the condensation and coarsening of drops on soft polymer films, and has potential implications for colloidal assembly and mechanobiology. PMID:27298348

  20. A Partial Equilibrium Theory for Drops and Capillary Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Searcy, Alan W.; Beruto, Dario T.; Barberis, Fabrizio

    2006-10-26

    The two-century old theory of Young and Laplace retains apowerful influence on surface and interface studies because itquantitatively predicts the height of rise of capillary liquids from thecontact angles of drops. But the classical theory does not acknowledgethat equilibrium requires separate minimization of partial free energiesof one-component liquids bonded to immiscible solids. We generalize atheorem of Gibbs and Curie to obtain a partial equilibrium (PE) theorythat does so and that also predicts the height of capillary rise fromcontact angles of drops. Published observations and our own measurementsof contact angles of water bonded to glass and Teflon surfaces supportthe conclusion of PE theory that contact angles of meniscuses and ofdrops are different dependent variables. PE theory provides thermodynamicand kinetic guidance to nanoscale processes that the classical theoryobscures, as illustrated by examples in our concludingsection.

  1. Active structuring of colloidal armour on liquid drops

    PubMed Central

    Dommersnes, Paul; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Mikkelsen, Alexander; Castberg, Rene; Kjerstad, Knut; Hersvik, Kjetil; Otto Fossum, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Adsorption and assembly of colloidal particles at the surface of liquid droplets are at the base of particle-stabilized emulsions and templating. Here we report that electrohydrodynamic and electro-rheological effects in leaky-dielectric liquid drops can be used to structure and dynamically control colloidal particle assemblies at drop surfaces, including electric-field-assisted convective assembly of jammed colloidal ‘ribbons’, electro-rheological colloidal chains confined to a two-dimensional surface and spinning colloidal domains on that surface. In addition, we demonstrate the size control of ‘pupil’-like openings in colloidal shells. We anticipate that electric field manipulation of colloids in leaky dielectrics can lead to new routes of colloidosome assembly and design for ‘smart armoured’ droplets. PMID:23811716

  2. Capillary Spreading of Liquid Drops on Prewetted Solid Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chebbi

    1999-03-15

    A description of the entire configuration of liquid drops spreading over a previously wetted solid surface is given in the case of negligible evaporation and small Bond and Weber numbers. Two solutions are developed: an outer one which is valid in the bulk of the drop and an inner solution which applies in the vicinity of the macroscopic boundary of the drop. The model accounts for deviations from the constant-curvature profile for the outer solution and, in addition, for deviations of the inner solution from the asymptotic approximation of V. V. Kalinin and V. M. Starov (1986, Colloid J. USSR (English tr.) 48, 907). Both solutions are shown to present an inflexion point. Its location is shown to be very sensitive to one parameter which fully determines the inner solution. The value of this parameter, and the spreading laws for the drop radius, the apex height, and the dynamic contact angle are determined by matching the inner and outer solutions. Results show deviations from the power laws used in the literature. These deviations are discussed in relation to the results obtained by V. M. Starov et al. (1994, Adv. Colloid Interface Sci. 50, 187), and R. Chebbi and M. S. Selim (1997, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 195, 66), compared with the experimental data presented by V. M. Starov et al. for spreading over dry smooth solid surfaces. Moreover, the present analysis allows description of the entire drop configuration and slope and curvature variations. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10049539

  3. Coalescence of Immiscible Liquid Metal Drop on Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Li, Jie; Wang, Long; Duan, Yunrui; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the wetting and coalescence of liquid Al and Pb drops on four carbon-based substrates. We highlight the importance of the microstructure and surface topography of substrates in the coalescence process. Our results show that the effect of substrate on coalescence is achieved by changing the wettability of the Pb metal. Additionally, we determine the critical distance between nonadjacent Al and Pb films required for coalescence. These findings improve our understanding of the coalescence of immiscible liquid metals at the atomistic level. PMID:27667589

  4. Planar equilibrium shapes of a liquid drop on a membrane.

    PubMed

    Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand

    2015-12-14

    The equilibrium shape of a small liquid drop on a smooth rigid surface is governed by the minimization of energy with respect to the change in configuration, represented by the well-known Young's equation. In contrast, the equilibrium shape near the line separating three immiscible fluid phases is determined by force balance, represented by Neumann's Triangle. These two are limiting cases of the more general situation of a drop on a deformable, elastic substrate. Specifically, we have analyzed planar equilibrium shapes of a liquid drop on a deformable membrane. We show that to determine its equilibrium shape one must simultaneously satisfy configurational energy and mechanical force balance along with a constraint on the liquid volume. The first condition generalizes Young's equation to include changes in stored elastic energy upon changing the configuration. The second condition generalizes the force balance conditions by relating tensions to membrane stretches via their constitutive elastic behavior. The transition from Young's equation to Neumann's triangle is governed by the value of the elasto-capillary number, β = TRo/μh, where TRo is twice the surface tension of the solid-vapor interface, μ is the shear modulus of the membrane, and h is its thickness.

  5. Laser capillary spectrophotometric acquisition of bivariate drop size and concentration data for liquid-liquid dispersion

    DOEpatents

    Tavlarides, L.L.; Bae, J.H.

    1991-12-24

    A laser capillary spectrophotometric technique measures real time or near real time bivariate drop size and concentration distribution for a reactive liquid-liquid dispersion system. The dispersion is drawn into a precision-bore glass capillary and an appropriate light source is used to distinguish the aqueous phase from slugs of the organic phase at two points along the capillary whose separation is precisely known. The suction velocity is measured, as is the length of each slug from which the drop free diameter is calculated. For each drop, the absorptivity at a given wavelength is related to the molar concentration of a solute of interest, and the concentration of given drops of the organic phase is derived from pulse heights of the detected light. This technique permits on-line monitoring and control of liquid-liquid dispersion processes. 17 figures.

  6. Laser capillary spectrophotometric acquisition of bivariate drop size and concentration data for liquid-liquid dispersion

    DOEpatents

    Tavlarides, Lawrence L.; Bae, Jae-Heum

    1991-01-01

    A laser capillary spectrophotometric technique measures real time or near real time bivariate drop size and concentration distribution for a reactive liquid-liquid dispersion system. The dispersion is drawn into a precision-bore glass capillary and an appropriate light source is used to distinguish the aqueous phase from slugs of the organic phase at two points along the capillary whose separation is precisely known. The suction velocity is measured, as is the length of each slug from which the drop free diameter is calculated. For each drop, the absorptivity at a given wavelength is related to the molar concentration of a solute of interest, and the concentration of given drops of the organic phase is derived from pulse heights of the detected light. This technique permits on-line monitoring and control of liquid-liquid dispersion processes.

  7. Liquid drops attract or repel by the inverted Cheerios effect

    PubMed Central

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Pandey, Anupam; Lubbers, Luuk A.; Weijs, Joost H.; Botto, Lorenzo; Das, Siddhartha; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2016-01-01

    Solid particles floating at a liquid interface exhibit a long-ranged attraction mediated by surface tension. In the absence of bulk elasticity, this is the dominant lateral interaction of mechanical origin. Here, we show that an analogous long-range interaction occurs between adjacent droplets on solid substrates, which crucially relies on a combination of capillarity and bulk elasticity. We experimentally observe the interaction between droplets on soft gels and provide a theoretical framework that quantitatively predicts the interaction force between the droplets. Remarkably, we find that, although on thick substrates the interaction is purely attractive and leads to drop–drop coalescence, for relatively thin substrates a short-range repulsion occurs, which prevents the two drops from coming into direct contact. This versatile interaction is the liquid-on-solid analog of the “Cheerios effect.” The effect will strongly influence the condensation and coarsening of drops on soft polymer films, and has potential implications for colloidal assembly and mechanobiology. PMID:27298348

  8. A perspective on the interfacial properties of nanoscopic liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Jackson, George

    2012-11-01

    The structural and interfacial properties of nanoscopic liquid drops are assessed by means of mechanical, thermodynamical, and statistical mechanical approaches that are discussed in detail, including original developments at both the macroscopic level and the microscopic level of density functional theory (DFT). With a novel analysis we show that a purely macroscopic (static) mechanical treatment can lead to a qualitatively reasonable description of the surface tension and the Tolman length of a liquid drop; the latter parameter, which characterizes the curvature dependence of the tension, is found to be negative and has a magnitude of about a half of the molecular dimension. A mechanical slant cannot, however, be considered satisfactory for small finite-size systems where fluctuation effects are significant. From the opposite perspective, a curvature expansion of the macroscopic thermodynamic properties (density and chemical potential) is then used to demonstrate that a purely thermodynamic approach of this type cannot in itself correctly account for the curvature correction of the surface tension of liquid drops. We emphasize that any approach, e.g., classical nucleation theory, which is based on a purely macroscopic viewpoint, does not lead to a reliable representation when the radius of the drop becomes microscopic. The description of the enhanced inhomogeneity exhibited by small drops (particularly in the dense interior) necessitates a treatment at the molecular level to account for finite-size and surface effects correctly. The so-called mechanical route, which corresponds to a molecular-level extension of the macroscopic theory of elasticity and is particularly popular in molecular dynamics simulation, also appears to be unreliable due to the inherent ambiguity in the definition of the microscopic pressure tensor, an observation which has been known for decades but is frequently ignored. The union of the theory of capillarity (developed in the nineteenth

  9. Liquid drop model of spherical nuclei with account of viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokonov, A. Kh.

    2016-01-01

    In the frame of nuclear liquid drop model an analytical solution for the frequency of capillary oscillations is obtained with taking into account the damping due to viscosity and surrounding medium polarizability. The model has been applied for estimation of even-even spherical nuclei surface tension and viscosity. It has been shown that energy shift of capillary oscillations of even-even spherical nuclei due to viscous dissipation gives viscosities in the interval 4.2- 7.6 MeVfm-2c-1 for nuclei from 10646Pd to 19880Hg.

  10. Analytic Solutions of Liquid-Drop Impact Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, M. B.

    1981-07-01

    The pressure in an impacting liquid drop against both a rigid and an elastic target is calculated for the period when the contact region is expanding faster than the wave speed in the liquid. For very low speed impact a geometrical-acoustics model is shown to give a good representation of the solution, until the edge speed approaches the wave speed. A self-similar solution, that takes account of nonlinear effects, is used in the neighbourhood of the contact edge. Comparisons are made with linear theory and numerical calculations. It is shown that linear theory is totally inadequate in predicting the escape of the shock system from the contact edge and that numerical calculations have used too large a time step to calculate the time of escape correctly. The delay in escape time from the previous theoretical predictions of Heymann (1969) is attributed to the elasticity of the target, an effect that is taken into account in the present work.

  11. Coalescence of surfactant-laden drops in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Emilia; Simmons, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Whilst coalescence of droplets in air is much studied, the mechanism of merging surfactant-laden drops in other liquids is less well understood. The dynamics of the coalescence of droplets in presence of surfactants was investigated focusing on the curvature and progression of the width of the neck that bridges the drops (up to millimetres) as well as the mixing patterns and surface flows driven by Marangoni stresses. Coalescence of different composition droplets revealed difference in the curvature of the meniscus on either side of the growing bridge which was more pronounced for the lower viscosities of the surrounding oils and related to the different local values of the surface tension. With the aid of a dye present in one of the drops, the visualisation of bulk flow was possible and different patterns were observed with increasing viscosity of the surrounding oil that led to formation of `mushroom'-like structures inside the droplets. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  12. Dynamics of liquid drops coalescing in the inertial regime.

    PubMed

    Sprittles, James E; Shikhmurzaev, Yulii D

    2014-06-01

    We examine the dynamics of two coalescing liquid drops in the "inertial regime," where the effects of viscosity are negligible and the propagation of the front of the bridge connecting the drops can be considered as "local." The solution fully computed in the framework of classical fluid mechanics allows this regime to be identified, and the accuracy of the approximating scaling laws proposed to describe the propagation of the bridge to be established. It is shown that the scaling law known for this regime has a very limited region of accuracy, and, as a result, in describing experimental data it has frequently been applied outside its limits of applicability. The origin of the scaling law's shortcoming appears to be the fact that it accounts for the capillary pressure due only to the longitudinal curvature of the free surface as the driving force for the process. To address this deficiency, the scaling law is extended to account for both the longitudinal and azimuthal curvatures at the bridge front, which, fortuitously, still results in an explicit analytic expression for the front's propagation speed. This expression is shown to offer an excellent approximation for both the fully computed solution and for experimental data from a range of flow configurations for a remarkably large proportion of the coalescence process. The derived formula allows one to predict the speed at which drops coalesce for the duration of the inertial regime, which should be useful for the analysis of experimental data. PMID:25019880

  13. Pressure drop and heat transfer rates in forced convection rotating square duct flows at high rotation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallares, J.; Grau, F. X.; Davidson, L.

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents and discusses numerical simulations of forced convection heat transfer in a rotating square duct at high rotation rates. The mean pressure gradient has been kept constant in the simulations that were conducted with a second order finite volume code with a dynamical localized subgrid scale model. The rotation number based on the bulk velocity (Ro=2ΩD/U¯b) was varied from 0.12 to 6.6 and consequently the Reynolds number (Re=U¯bD/ν) ranged from 3900 to 1810 according to the fact that rotation tends to increase the pressure drop in the duct. A model for estimating the velocities and the corresponding friction coefficient has been developed by analytically solving simplified versions of the momentum budgets within the Ekman layers occurring near the opposite two walls of the duct perpendicular to the rotation axis. The model reproduces accurately the velocity profiles of the numerical simulation at high rotation rates and predicts that the boundary layer quantities scale as Ek1/2 (Ek=ν/ΩD2). At Ro >1 the Ekman layers are responsible for most of the pressure drop of the flow while the maximum heat transfer rates are found on the wall where the stratification of the x-momentum is unstable with respect to the Coriolis force. Rotation enhances the differences between the contributions of the local friction coefficients and local Nusselt numbers of the four walls of the duct and considerably increases, in comparison with the non-rotating case, the pressure drop of the flow and the Nusselt number. The overall friction coefficient of the measurements and the simulations existing in the literature, as well as the present numerical predictions, are well correlated with the equation 1.09(Cf/Ek1/2)1.25=Ro in the range Ro ⩾1 for Re ⩽104.

  14. Suspension of Drops of a Liquid in a Column of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Jamil

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration which creates the illusion of violating Archimedes Principle. The procedure involves two liquids with identical densities and produces drops of one liquid suspended in the middle of a column of the second liquid. (DDR)

  15. Drop deformation and breakup in a partially filled horizontal rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Andrew; Pereira, Caroline; Hyacinthe, Hyaquino; Ward, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Drop deformation and breakup due to shear flow has been studied extensively in Couette devices as well as in gravity-driven flows. In these cases shear is generated either by the moving wall or the drop's motion. For such flows the drop shape remains unperturbed at low capillary number (Ca), deforms at moderate Ca , and can experience breakup as Ca --> 1 and larger. Here single drops of NaOH(aq) will be placed in a horizontal cylindrical rotating tank partially filled with vegetable oil resulting in 10-2 < Ca <101 . It will be shown that the reactive vegetable oil-NaOH(aq) system, where surfactants are produced in situ by saponification, can yield lower minimum surface tensions and faster adsorption than non-reactive surfactant systems. Oil films between the wall and drop as well as drop shape will be observed as rotation rates and NaOH(aq) concentration are varied. Results will be presented in the context of previous work on bubble and drop shapes and breakup. NSF CBET #1262718.

  16. Instability of a rotating liquid ring.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sicheng; Tao, Jianjun

    2013-09-01

    It is shown numerically that a rotating inviscid liquid ring has a temporally oscillating state, where the radius of the ring varies periodically because of the competition between the centrifugal force and the centripetal force caused by the surface tension. Stability analysis reveals that an enlarging or shrinking ring is unstable to a varicose-type mode, which is affected by both the radial velocity and the radius ratio between the cross section and the ring. Furthermore, uniform rotation of a ring leads to a traveling unstable mode, whose frequency is determined by a simple sinuous mode, while the surface shape is modulated by the varicose mode and twisted by the rotation-induced Coriolis force. PMID:24125353

  17. Instability of a rotating liquid ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sicheng; Tao, Jianjun

    2013-09-01

    It is shown numerically that a rotating inviscid liquid ring has a temporally oscillating state, where the radius of the ring varies periodically because of the competition between the centrifugal force and the centripetal force caused by the surface tension. Stability analysis reveals that an enlarging or shrinking ring is unstable to a varicose-type mode, which is affected by both the radial velocity and the radius ratio between the cross section and the ring. Furthermore, uniform rotation of a ring leads to a traveling unstable mode, whose frequency is determined by a simple sinuous mode, while the surface shape is modulated by the varicose mode and twisted by the rotation-induced Coriolis force.

  18. Wetting dynamics of thin liquid films and drops under Marangoni and centrifugal forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek; Behringer, Robert

    2009-11-01

    We present results from ongoing experimental studies on thin liquid drops and thin-films under the combined action of centrifugal forces due to rotation and radial Marangoni forces by using a temperature gradient. For thick rotating film in the absence of a temperature gradient, when an initially thick layer of fluid is spun to angular velocities where the classical Newtonian solution is negative, the fluid never dewets for the case of a completely wetting fluid, but leaves a microscopic uniform wet layer in the center. Similar experiments with a radially inward temperature gradient reveal the evolution of a radial height profile given by h(r) = A(t)r α, where A(t) decays logarithmically with time, and α = 0.8. In the case where there is no rotation, small centrally placed drops show novel retraction behavior under a sufficiently strong temperature gradient. This work includes collaboration with Lou Kondic (NJIT), Nebojsa Murisic (UCLA) and Rich Mclaughlin (UNC-Chapel Hill).

  19. Do Liquid Drops on Inclined Surfaces Slide or Roll?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pt, Sumesh; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Adhikari, Ronojoy; Govindarajan, Rama

    2011-11-01

    A solid sphere is likely to roll, while a rectangular box is likely to slide, on an inclined surface. Instead, a liquid drop can exhibit a variety of shapes and complex but interesting dynamics. We obtain global minimum energy static shapes first, for two realistic bases of potential energy, front and back-pinned. We find that the free end always assumes Young's equilibrium angle. Using this clue, simple equations describing the angles and the maximum volume may be derived. Combining the lattice Boltzmann method for hydrodynamics and method of lines for a Cahn-Hilliard equation, a hybrid numerical scheme is developed to study the dynamics of binary fluids on an inclined plate. The contribution of pure translation, and the vorticities associated with rolling and shearing motion are distinguished, using which the motion of the drop can be split into roll and slip. Surprisingly, as gravity increases, the fraction of motion due to roll decreases significantly for certain contact angles. The rolling motion is strongly dependent on the slip length which is in contrast to predictions by the lubrication approximation, where all dependence on the slip length is generally logarithamic.

  20. Analysis of the free-fall behavior of liquid-metal drops in a gaseous atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, J. Kevin; Markworth, Alan J.; Collings, E. W.; Brodkey, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    The free-fall of a liquid-metal drop and heat transfer from the drop to its environment are described for both a gaseous atmosphere and vacuum. A simple model, in which the drop is assumed to fall rectilinearly with behavior like that of a rigid particle, is developed first, then possible causes of deviation from this behavior are discussed. The model is applied to describe solidification of drops in a drop tube. Possible future developments of the model are suggested.

  1. Coupled free vibrations of a cantilever plate with attached liquid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, M.; Miyazawa, T.; Baoyin, H.

    2006-11-01

    Coupled free vibration analysis has been performed on a cantilever thin elastic plate carrying a liquid drop attached on its arbitrary point in a zero-gravity environment. A liquid drop, having slipping edge boundary condition on the plate, has been treated as an inviscid ideal liquid with hemi-spherical shape. By using Rayleigh-Ritz method, coupled hydroelastic problem has been rendered into an eigenvalue problem, from which one can obtain coupled natural frequencies and modes of vibration. Since we have treated an attached drop as an ideal liquid drop not as added rigid mass or 'mass-spring' system, the problem consists of coupled system between a plate and a liquid drop, which have both multi-degrees of freedom. In the numerical calculations, present results have been compared with the results in which a liquid drop have treated as a 'mass-spring' system which has previously been presented by the authors.

  2. Cooling and solidification of liquid-metal drops in a gaseous atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, J. K.; Markworth, A. J.; Collings, E. W.; Brodkey, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    The free fall of a liquid-metal drop, heat transfer from the drop to its environment, and solidification of the drop are described for both gaseous and vacuum atmospheres. A simple model, in which the drop is assumed to fall rectilinearly, with behavior like that of a rigid particle, is developed to describe cooling behavior. Recalescence of supercooled drops is assumed to occur instantaneously when a specified temperature is passed. The effects of solidification and experimental parameters on drop cooling are calculated and discussed. Major results include temperature as a function of time, and of drag, time to complete solidification, and drag as a function of the fraction of the drop solidified.

  3. Stochastic rotation dynamics for nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuang-Wu Mazza, Marco G.

    2015-04-28

    We introduce a new mesoscopic model for nematic liquid crystals (LCs). We extend the particle-based stochastic rotation dynamics method, which reproduces the Navier-Stokes equation, to anisotropic fluids by including a simplified Ericksen-Leslie formulation of nematodynamics. We verify the applicability of this hybrid model by studying the equilibrium isotropic-nematic phase transition and nonequilibrium problems, such as the dynamics of topological defects and the rheology of sheared LCs. Our simulation results show that this hybrid model captures many essential aspects of LC physics at the mesoscopic scale, while preserving microscopic thermal fluctuations.

  4. The Illustrated Topology of Liquid Drops during Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libii, Josue Njock

    2004-01-01

    High-speed photography can show that the shape often used for a newly forming drop is wrong. Knowledge of drop behaviour is important for inkjet printers, and a close look at the formation of drops as given here can enhance critical observation, thinking and analysis.

  5. Drop Dynamics and Speciation in Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes by Reactive Scavenging

    SciTech Connect

    Arne J. Pearlstein; Alexander Scheeline

    2002-08-30

    Computational and experimental studies of the motion and dynamics of liquid drops in gas flows were conducted with relevance to reactive scavenging of metals from atomized liquid waste. Navier-Stoke's computations of deformable drops revealed a range of conditions from which prolate drops are expected, and showed how frajectiones of deformable drops undergoing deceleration can be computed. Experimental work focused on development of emission fluorescence, and scattering diagnostics. The instrument developed was used to image drop shapes, soot, and nonaxisymmetric departures from steady flow in a 22kw combustor

  6. Rheological properties, shape oscillations, and coalescence of liquid drops with surfactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apfel, R. E.; Holt, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    A method was developed to deduce dynamic interfacial properties of liquid drops. The method involves measuring the frequency and damping of free quadrupole oscillations of an acoustically levitated drop. Experimental results from pure liquid-liquid systems agree well with theoretical predictions. Additionally, the effects of surfactants is considered. Extension of these results to a proposed microgravity experiment on the drop physics module (DPM) in USML-1 are discussed. Efforts are also underway to model the time history of the thickness of the fluid layer between two pre-coalescence drops, and to measure the film thickness experimentally. Preliminary results will be reported, along with plans for coalescence experiments proposed for USML-1.

  7. Size Distribution and Velocity of Ethanol Drops in a Rocket Combustor Burning Ethanol and Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1961-01-01

    Single jets of ethanol were studied photomicrographically inside a rocket chamber as they broke up into sprays of drops which underwent simultaneous acceleration and vaporization with chemical reaction occurring in the surrounding combustion gas stream. In each rocket test-firing, liquid oxygen was used as the oxidant. Both drop velocity and drop size distribution data were obtained from photomicrographs of the ethanol drops taken with an ultra-high speed tracking camera developed at NASA, Lewis Research Center.

  8. Analytical and experimental investigation of liquid double drop dynamics: Preliminary design for space shuttle experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The preliminary grant assessed the use of laboratory experiments for simulating low g liquid drop experiments in the space shuttle environment. Investigations were begun of appropriate immiscible liquid systems, design of experimental apparatus and analyses. The current grant continued these topics, completed construction and preliminary testing of the experimental apparatus, and performed experiments on single and compound liquid drops. A continuing assessment of laboratory capabilities, and the interests of project personnel and available collaborators, led to, after consultations with NASA personnel, a research emphasis specializing on compound drops consisting of hollow plastic or elastic spheroids filled with liquids.

  9. Bifurcation analysis of the behavior of partially wetting liquids on a rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Te-Sheng; Rogers, Steven; Tseluiko, Dmitri; Thiele, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the behavior of partially wetting liquids on a rotating cylinder using a model that takes into account the effects of gravity, viscosity, rotation, surface tension, and wettability. Such a system can be considered as a prototype for many other systems where the interplay of spatial heterogeneity and a lateral driving force in the proximity of a first- or second-order phase transition results in intricate behavior. So does a partially wetting drop on a rotating cylinder undergo a depinning transition as the rotation speed is increased, whereas for ideally wetting liquids, the behavior only changes quantitatively. We analyze the bifurcations that occur when the rotation speed is increased for several values of the equilibrium contact angle of the partially wetting liquids. This allows us to discuss how the entire bifurcation structure and the flow behavior it encodes change with changing wettability. We employ various numerical continuation techniques that allow us to track stable/unstable steady and time-periodic film and drop thickness profiles. We support our findings by time-dependent numerical simulations and asymptotic analyses of steady and time-periodic profiles for large rotation numbers.

  10. Drop tower experiment for performance evaluation of gas-liquid equilibrium thruster for small spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motooka, Norizumi; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Mori, Osamu; Okano, Yoshinobu; Kishino, Yoshihiro; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    JAXA/ISAS is developing the gas-liquid equilibrium thruster for a small spacecraft. In small spacecrafts, the thruster system must be simple and its weight must be light. This thruster system uses HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) , a kind of liquefied gas, as propellant because of its harmlessness and ease of handling. And this thruster stores propellant as liquid in the tank and ejects propellant as gas using the gas-liquid equilibrium pressure to produce thrust, so the propellant tank only needs to resist the vapor pressure of propellant. In this thruster system, the porous metal is also equipped in the tank for the following performance advantages: (1) liquid fuel retention: The porous metal reduces sloshing problems which cause bad effects on spacecraft attitude by retaining liquid propellant inside the porous metal: (2) vapor-liquid separation: The porous metal also helps propellant separate gas from liquid by advancing propellant vaporization on its large surface area and retaining liquid propellant using its surface tension. In last autumn, we carried out the experiment to evaluate these two advantages of porous metal under micro gravity condition using 50 meters drop tower in Hokkaido, Japan. The system of this experiment divides into two different systems. The first one evaluates liquid propellant retention performance by adding disturbance to liquid propellant absorbed in porous metal. The disturbance is centrifugal force and angular acceleration worked on the liquid propellant by rotating propellant tank controlled by motor. A high speed camera records the behavior of the liquid propellant. The other one evaluates the ability of gas-liquid separation on the case of propellant ejection. In this evaluation, the parameters are full filling porous metal or some ullage in the tank, nozzle diameters and the filling ratio of liquid propellant in the tank. As for (1) liquid fuel retention, in all conducted cases without propellant ejection, liquid propellant

  11. Drop impact dynamics on liquid-infused superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we present a series of experiments investigating the drop impact dynamics on hydrophobic, air-infused and lubricant-infused superhydrophobic surfaces. To create the superhydrophobic surfaces, smooth Teflon (PTFE) surfaces were roughened by a 240-grit sandpaper. The immiscible and incompressible silicone oils with different viscosities were infused into features of the superhydrophobic surfaces by a skim coating technique. The spreading and retraction dynamics on a series of the tested surfaces will be presented. We will show that the maximal deformation of the drops on lubricant-infused surfaces grows with increasing viscosity ratio between a water drop and the infused oil. We will show that this increase in the maximal deformation with the viscosity ratio is consistent with increasing the velocity and the viscosity of the drops but the rims of the drops destabilize with increasing the drop velocity. Finally, we will demonstrate that increasing the viscosity of the infused oil induces higher viscous force at the contact line, resulting in reduction in the movement of the drops during retraction and corresponding increase in the final drop size.

  12. Liquid drop stability for protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Robert B.; Broom, Beth H.; Snyder, Robert S.; Daniel, Ron

    1987-01-01

    It is possible to grow protein crystals for biomedical research in microgravity by deploying a protein-rich solution from a syringe, forming a drop in which crystallization can occur with the proper degree of supersaturation. Drop stability is critical to the success of this research, due to the large drop sizes which can be achieved in space. In order to determine the type of syringe tips most suitable to support these large drops, tests were performed during brief periods of weightlessness onboard the NASA KC-135 low-gravity simulation aircraft. The drops were analyzed using three simple models in which the samples were approximated by modified pendulum and spring systems. It was concluded that the higher frequency systems were the most stable, indicating that of the syringes utilized, a disk-shaped configuration provided the most stable environment of low-gravity protein crystal growth.

  13. Vertical vibration dynamics of acoustically levitated drop containing two immiscible liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Duyang; Zhai, Zhicong; Li, Lin; Lin, Kejun; Li, Xiaoguang; Geng, Xingguo

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the levitation and oscillation dynamics of complex drops containing two immiscible liquids. Two types of drops, core-shell drop and abnormal-shaped drop, have been obtained depending on the levitation procedures. The oscillation dynamics of the drops have been studied using a high speed camera. It has been found that the oscillation of the abnormal-shaped drop has a longer oscillation period and decays much faster than that of the core-shell drop, which cannot be accounted for by the air resistance itself. The acoustic streaming induced by ultrasound may bring an additional force against the motion of the drop due to the Bernoulli effect. This is responsible for the enhanced damping during the oscillation in acoustic levitation.

  14. Direct Numerical Simulation of Transitional Multicomponent-Species Gaseous and Multicomponent-Liquid Drop-Laden Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selle, Laurent C.; Bellan, Josette

    2006-01-01

    organization depend on the initial gas temperature, this being due to the drop/turbulence coupling. The vapor-composition mean molar mass and standard deviation distributions strongly correlate with the initial liquid-composition PDF; such a correlation only exists for the magnitude of the mean but not for that of the standard deviation. Unlike in pre-transitional situations, regions of large composition standard deviation no longer necessarily coincide with regions of large mean molar mass. The kinetic energy, rotational and composition characteristics, and dissipation are liquid specific and the variation among liquids is amplified with increasing free-stream gas temperature. Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics of gas-phase quantities show that the different. Observation framework may affect the perception of the flow characteristics. The gas composition, of which the first four moments are calculated, is shown to be close to, but distinct from a SGPDF. The PDF of the scalar dissipation rate is calculated for drop-laden layers and is shown to depart more significantly from the typically assumed Gaussian in gaseous flows than experimentally measured gaseous scalar dissipation rates, this being attributed to the increased heterogeneity due to drop/flow interactions.

  15. Evaporation of pure liquid sessile and spherical suspended drops: a review.

    PubMed

    Erbil, H Yildirim

    2012-01-15

    A sessile drop is an isolated drop which has been deposited on a solid substrate where the wetted area is limited by a contact line and characterized by contact angle, contact radius and drop height. Diffusion-controlled evaporation of a sessile drop in an ambient gas is an important topic of interest because it plays a crucial role in many scientific applications such as controlling the deposition of particles on solid surfaces, in ink-jet printing, spraying of pesticides, micro/nano material fabrication, thin film coatings, biochemical assays, drop wise cooling, deposition of DNA/RNA micro-arrays, and manufacture of novel optical and electronic materials in the last decades. This paper presents a review of the published articles for a period of approximately 120 years related to the evaporation of both sessile drops and nearly spherical droplets suspended from thin fibers. After presenting a brief history of the subject, we discuss the basic theory comprising evaporation of micrometer and millimeter sized spherical drops, self cooling on the drop surface and evaporation rate of sessile drops on solids. The effects of drop cooling, resultant lateral evaporative flux and Marangoni flows on evaporation rate are also discussed. This review also has some special topics such as drop evaporation on superhydrophobic surfaces, determination of the receding contact angle from drop evaporation, substrate thermal conductivity effect on drop evaporation and the rate evaporation of water in liquid marbles. PMID:22277832

  16. Evaporation of pure liquid sessile and spherical suspended drops: a review.

    PubMed

    Erbil, H Yildirim

    2012-01-15

    A sessile drop is an isolated drop which has been deposited on a solid substrate where the wetted area is limited by a contact line and characterized by contact angle, contact radius and drop height. Diffusion-controlled evaporation of a sessile drop in an ambient gas is an important topic of interest because it plays a crucial role in many scientific applications such as controlling the deposition of particles on solid surfaces, in ink-jet printing, spraying of pesticides, micro/nano material fabrication, thin film coatings, biochemical assays, drop wise cooling, deposition of DNA/RNA micro-arrays, and manufacture of novel optical and electronic materials in the last decades. This paper presents a review of the published articles for a period of approximately 120 years related to the evaporation of both sessile drops and nearly spherical droplets suspended from thin fibers. After presenting a brief history of the subject, we discuss the basic theory comprising evaporation of micrometer and millimeter sized spherical drops, self cooling on the drop surface and evaporation rate of sessile drops on solids. The effects of drop cooling, resultant lateral evaporative flux and Marangoni flows on evaporation rate are also discussed. This review also has some special topics such as drop evaporation on superhydrophobic surfaces, determination of the receding contact angle from drop evaporation, substrate thermal conductivity effect on drop evaporation and the rate evaporation of water in liquid marbles.

  17. Multimode dynamics of a liquid drop over an inclined surface with a wettability gradient.

    PubMed

    Das, A K; Das, P K

    2010-06-15

    A liquid drop placed over a solid surface with a wettability gradient self-propels to minimize its surface energy. It can also climb an inclined plane if the applied gradient strength is high enough. We investigate the motion of liquid drops over an inclined gradient surface using a unique 3D computational technique. The technique combines diffuse interface in a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation to study the internal fluid structure and the contact line dynamics. Simulation results reveal that drop motion is dependent on its volume, surface inclination, and the strength of the wettability gradient. It has been demonstrated that, depending on these parameters, a drop can experience upward or downward motion or can remain stationary on the inclined plane. Finally, drop mobility maps which give an idea about the regimes of uphill and downhill movement of a drop over gradient surfaces have been proposed.

  18. Computations of the deformation and solidifcation of impinging liquid metal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Judy; Tryggvason, Gretar; Ceccio, Steven

    1997-11-01

    The solidification of individual liquid metal drops impacting a cold wall, as well as the deposition of subsequent drops characterized by drop remelt, coalescence, and solidification, are simulated numerically. The numerical method fully couples fluid flow and heat transfer and is based on a single set of conservation equations written for all phases, allowing for arbitrary changes in material properties. Solidification is modeled as a stable, planar solid-liquid interface, which is valid for both pure and eutectic systems with no initial thermal undercooling. Using this technique, towers have been built by depositing drops on top of one another. Low Weber number simulations produce short, squat towers, while high Weber number cases generate tall, slender towers. Within a tower, each drop takes on a final shape based on the Peclet number and the non- dimensional freezing temperature. In some high Peclet number cases, divots freeze onto a drop's surface forming a pore at the axis of the tower. Supported by NASA.

  19. Evaporation of drops on two parallel fibers: influence of the liquid morphology and fiber elasticity.

    PubMed

    Duprat, Camille; Bick, Alison D; Warren, Patrick B; Stone, Howard A

    2013-06-25

    We investigate experimentally the evaporation of liquid accumulated on a pair of parallel fibers, rigid or flexible. The liquid wetting the fibers can adopt two distinct morphologies: a compact drop shape, whose evaporation dynamics is similar to that of an isolated aerosol droplet, or a long liquid column of constant cross-section, whose evaporation dynamics depends upon the aspect ratio of the column. We thus find that the evaporation rate is constant for drops, while it increases strongly for columns as the interfiber distance decreases, and we propose a model to explain this behavior. When the fibers are flexible, the transition from drops to columns can be induced by the deformation of the fibers because of the capillary forces applied by the drop. Thus, we find that the evaporation rate increases with increasing flexibility. Furthermore, complex morphology transitions occur upon drying, which results in spreading of the drop as it evaporates. PMID:23705986

  20. Evaporation of drops on two parallel fibers: influence of the liquid morphology and fiber elasticity.

    PubMed

    Duprat, Camille; Bick, Alison D; Warren, Patrick B; Stone, Howard A

    2013-06-25

    We investigate experimentally the evaporation of liquid accumulated on a pair of parallel fibers, rigid or flexible. The liquid wetting the fibers can adopt two distinct morphologies: a compact drop shape, whose evaporation dynamics is similar to that of an isolated aerosol droplet, or a long liquid column of constant cross-section, whose evaporation dynamics depends upon the aspect ratio of the column. We thus find that the evaporation rate is constant for drops, while it increases strongly for columns as the interfiber distance decreases, and we propose a model to explain this behavior. When the fibers are flexible, the transition from drops to columns can be induced by the deformation of the fibers because of the capillary forces applied by the drop. Thus, we find that the evaporation rate increases with increasing flexibility. Furthermore, complex morphology transitions occur upon drying, which results in spreading of the drop as it evaporates.

  1. Numerical analysis of decaying nonlinear oscillations of a viscous liquid drop

    SciTech Connect

    Maikov, I. L. Director, L. B.

    2008-06-15

    An adaptive grid numerical model is developed for simulating the dynamics of a viscous liquid drop whose initial shape is strongly disturbed by an external field. Simulated oscillations of a drop in microgravity and on a horizontal surface are compared with available numerical and experimental results.

  2. Parametrically excited sectorial oscillation of liquid drops floating in ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Shen, C L; Xie, W J; Wei, B

    2010-04-01

    We report experiments in which the nonaxisymmetric sectorial oscillations of water drops have been excited using acoustic levitation and an active modulation method. The observed stable sectorial oscillations are up to the seventh mode. These oscillations are excited by parametric resonance. The oblate initial shape of the water drops is essential to this kind of excitations. The oscillation frequency increases with mode number but decreases with equatorial radius for each mode number. The data can be well described by a modified Rayleigh equation, without the use of additional parameters. PMID:20481825

  3. Liquid-metal pin-fin pressure drop by correlation in cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhibi; Kuzay, T.M.; Assoufid, L.

    1994-08-01

    The pin-fin configuration is widely used as a heat transfer enhancement method in high-heat-flux applications. Recently, the pin-fin design with liquid-metal coolant was also applied to synchrotron-radiation beamline devices. This paper investigates the pressure drop in a pin-post design beamline mirror with liquid gallium as the coolant. Because the pin-post configuration is a relatively new concept, information in literature about pin-post mirrors or crystals is rare, and information about the pressure drop in pin-post mirrors with liquid metal as the coolant is even more sparse. Due to this the authors considered the cross flow in cylinder-array geometry, which is very similar to that of the pin-post, to examine the pressure drop correlation with liquid metals over pin fins. The cross flow of fluid with various fluid characteristics or properties through a tube bank was studied so that the results can be scaled to the pin-fin geometry with liquid metal as the coolant. Study lead to two major variables to influence the pressure drop: fluid properties, viscosity and density, and the relative length of the posts. Correlation of the pressure drop between long and short posts and the prediction of the pressure drop of liquid metal in the pin-post mirror and comparison with an existing experiment are addressed.

  4. Liquid drop technique for generation of organic glass and metal shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    It was found that liquid drop techniques are very useful in several diverse areas. For producing very uniform metallic, organic, inorganic and, on particular, glassy shells, the liquid jet method is the most reproducible and exceptionally useful of all the techniques studied. The technique of capillary wave synchronization of the break-up of single and multiple component jets was utilized to produce uniform sized liquid drops and solid particles, and hollow liquid and solid shells. The technique was also used to encapsulate a number of liquids in impermeable spherical shells. Highly uniform glass shells were made by generating uniform drops of glass forming materials in an aqueous solution, subsequently evaporating the water, and then fusing and blowing the remaining solids in a high temperature vertical tube furnace. Experimental results are presented and the critical problems in further research in this field are discussed.

  5. The production of drops by the bursting of a bubble at an air liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrozes, J. S.; Ligneul, P.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental mechanism arising during the bursting of a bubble at an air-liquid interface is described. A single bubble was followed from an arbitrary depth in the liquid, up to the creation and motion of the film and jet drops. Several phenomena were involved and their relative order of magnitude was compared in order to point out the dimensionless parameters which govern each step of the motion. High-speed cinematography is employed. The characteristic bubble radius which separates the creation of jet drops from cap bursting without jet drops is expressed mathematically. The corresponding numerical value for water is 3 mm and agrees with experimental observations.

  6. Measurements of drop size at the spray edge near the nozzle in atomizing liquid jets

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.; Reitz, R.D.; Bracco, F.V.

    1986-04-01

    The drop size distribution was measured from back-lighted spark photographs at the edge of steady sprays in the immediate vicinity of the nozzle exit. The conditions of these liquid-into-gas sprays were such that the outer surface of the liquid jets broke up into small drops at the nozzle exit. The objective was to elucidate the mechanism of breakup. At room temperature, n-hexane and n-tetradecane at pressures from 2.86 to 9.76 MPa were injected into gaseous nitrogen at 1.48 to 2.86 MPa through three straight cylindrical nozzles of different diameters, 127 and 335 ..mu..m, and length-to-diameter ratios, 4 and 10. In all cases, the drop sizes could be fitted satisfactorily with a chi-square distribution with degree of freedom equal to 28. The Sauter mean drop diameter and other average diameters were found to decrease with increasing injection velocity and decreasing liquid surface tension, to be insensitive to nozzle diameter and length, and to increase slightly with increasing gas density. The trends and magnitudes are in agreement with those predicted by the supplemented aerodynamic theory of surface breakup if it is assumed that between the jet surface where the drops are formed, that is not visible, and the edge of the spray, where the measurements were made, drops undergo collisions and coalescence. In this region of dense sprays, drop coalescence leads to a rapid increase in drop size, particularly in high gas densities.

  7. Flow Induced Coalescence of Drops in a Viscous Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, L. Gary

    2002-11-01

    The problem of flow-induced coalescence has been the subject of many experimental and theoretical studies. In recent years, this work has been motivated by the role that this process plays in the formation of polymer blends, which is currently the major route to new polymeric materials with desired macroscopic properties. In order to control this process, we need to understand the conditions for coalescence and their dependence on fluid and flow properties, including the effects of surfactants (known as "compatibilizers" in the polymer blend literature). With a few exceptions, experimental studies have been based upon measurements of the mean drop size (or size distribution) in an emulsion or blend following flow in either blending devices or simple rheometry flows. The four-roll mill, on the other hand, provides an opportunity to study the coalescence process at the scale of individual drops. When such experiments are carried out, we find some surprises vis a vis expectations from simple models of the drop collision/film drainage and rupture process that leads to coalescence. In this talk, we review recent experimental work in this field, and discuss the relationship to present theory

  8. Flow Visualization in Evaporating Liquid Drops and Measurement of Dynamic Contact Angles and Spreading Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Neng-Li; Chao, David F.

    2001-01-01

    A new hybrid optical system, consisting of reflection-refracted shadowgraphy and top-view photography, is used to visualize flow phenomena and simultaneously measure the spreading and instant dynamic contact angle in a volatile-liquid drop on a nontransparent substrate. Thermocapillary convection in the drop, induced by evaporation, and the drop real-time profile data are synchronously recorded by video recording systems. Experimental results obtained from this unique technique clearly reveal that thermocapillary convection strongly affects the spreading process and the characteristics of dynamic contact angle of the drop. Comprehensive information of a sessile drop, including the local contact angle along the periphery, the instability of the three-phase contact line, and the deformation of the drop shape is obtained and analyzed.

  9. Liquid-drop technique for generation of organic glass and metal shells

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-12-23

    We have for several years utilized the technique of capillary wave synchronization of the break-up of single and multiple component jets to produce uniform sized liquid drops and solid particles, and hollow liquid and solid shells. The technique has also been used to encapsulate a number of liquids in impermeable spherical shells. Highly uniform glass shells have been made by generating uniform drops of glass forming materials in an aqueous solution, subsequently evaporating the water, and then fusing and blowing the remaining solids in a high temperature vertical tube furnace. Experimental results will be presented and the critical problems in further research in this field will be discussed.

  10. Assessing the accuracy of contact angle measurements for sessile drops on liquid-repellent surfaces.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Siddarth; McKinley, Gareth H; Cohen, Robert E

    2011-11-15

    Gravity-induced sagging can amplify variations in goniometric measurements of the contact angles of sessile drops on super-liquid-repellent surfaces. The very large value of the effective contact angle leads to increased optical noise in the drop profile near the solid-liquid free surface and the progressive failure of simple geometric approximations. We demonstrate a systematic approach to determining the effective contact angle of drops on super-repellent surfaces. We use a perturbation solution of the Bashforth-Adams equation to estimate the contact angles of sessile drops of water, ethylene glycol, and diiodomethane on an omniphobic surface using direct measurements of the maximum drop width and height. The results and analysis can be represented in terms of a dimensionless Bond number that depends on the maximum drop width and the capillary length of the liquid to quantify the extent of gravity-induced sagging. Finally, we illustrate the inherent sensitivity of goniometric contact angle measurement techniques to drop dimensions as the apparent contact angle approaches 180°. PMID:21923173

  11. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996)10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects-surface charge convection and shape deformation-towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory. PMID:27176410

  12. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects—surface charge convection and shape deformation—towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory.

  13. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996)10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects-surface charge convection and shape deformation-towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory.

  14. Drop Fragmentation at Impact onto a Bath of an Immiscible Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, H.; Sun, C.; Prosperetti, A.; Lohse, D.

    2013-06-01

    The impact of a drop onto a deep bath of an immiscible liquid is studied with emphasis on the drop fragmentation into a collection of noncoalescing daughter drops. At impact the drop flattens and spreads at the surface of the crater it transiently opens in the bath and reaches a maximum deformation, which gets larger with increasing impact velocity, before surface tension drives its recession. This recession can promote the fragmentation by two different mechanisms: At moderate impact velocity, the drop recession converges to the axis of symmetry to form a jet which then fragments by a Plateau-Rayleigh mechanism. At higher velocity the edge of the receding drop destabilizes and shapes into radial ligaments which subsequently fragment. For this latter mechanism the number N∝We3 and the size distribution of the daughter drops p(d)∝d-4 as a function of the impact Weber number We are explained on the basis of the observed spreading of the drop. The universality of this model for the fragmentation of receding liquid sheets might be relevant for other configurations.

  15. Resonance and nonlinear properties of a crack filled with a drop of liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulov, I. N.; Yoon, S. W.

    2000-07-01

    An investigation of the vibroacoustic response of a crack is very important for the development of methods of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Several models of linear and nonlinear elastic properties of a dry crack have been developed earlier. A recently suggested model of the capillary nonlinear elasticity of a crack partially filled in with a drop of liquid (V. E. Nazarov, 1996, 1999) does not take into account inertial properties of the oscillatory motion of the liquid inside a crack. A new crack model filled in with a drop of liquid is proposed and studied in this paper. The model accounts for the oscillatory motion of the liquid in a breathing crack. Both linear and nonlinear elastic properties of such a crack are analytically studied. It is shown that the crack with a drop of non-wetting liquid inside shows resonance behavior while that with a wetting liquid does not. The resonance properties as well as the nonlinear elasticity of a crack filled in with a drop of liquid may find application in NDE of modern materials.

  16. Instabilities and drop formation in cylindrical liquid jets in reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, A. P. R.; Osborne, B. P.; Stoltzfus, J. M.; Howes, T.; Steinberg, T. A.

    2002-10-01

    The effects of convective and absolute instabilities on the formation of drops formed from cylindrical liquid jets of glycerol/water issuing into still air were investigated. Medium-duration reduced gravity tests were conducted aboard NASA's KC-135 and compared to similar tests performed under normal gravity conditions to aid in understanding the drop formation process. In reduced gravity, the Rayleigh-Chandrasekhar Equation was found to accurately predict the transition between a region of absolute and convective instability as defined by a critical Weber number. Observations of the physics of the jet, its breakup, and subsequent drop dynamics under both gravity conditions and the effects of the two instabilities on these processes are presented. All the normal gravity liquid jets investigated, in regions of convective or absolute instability, were subject to significant stretching effects, which affected the subsequent drop and associated geometry and dynamics. These effects were not displayed in reduced gravity and, therefore, the liquid jets would form drops which took longer to form (reduction in drop frequency), larger in size, and more spherical (surface tension effects). Most observed changes, in regions of either absolute or convective instabilities, were due to a reduction in the buoyancy force and an increased importance of the surface tension force acting on the liquid contained in the jet or formed drop. Reduced gravity environments allow better investigations to be performed into the physics of liquid jets, subsequently formed drops, and the effects of instabilities on these systems. In reduced gravity, drops form up to three times more slowly and as a consequence are up to three times larger in volume in the theoretical absolute instability region than in the theoretical convective instability region. This difference was not seen in the corresponding normal gravity tests due to the masking effects of gravity. A drop is shown to be able to form and

  17. Viscous-gravity spreading of time-varying liquid drop volumes on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chebbi, Rachid

    2006-08-15

    Viscous-gravity spreading of liquid drops of time-dependent volume over a solid surface is considered. A self-similar solution for the drop configuration is obtained, in the case the liquid drop volume varies as a power-law function of time, along with the spreading laws in both cases of cylindrical and axisymmetric geometries. Results compare favorably with published experimental results and previous theoretical work. The limitations of the model are discussed, along with a comparison with viscous gravity spreading of oil on water. The validity of using approximate spreading laws is considered, and an approximate method is suggested to provide the dynamics of spreading in the general case where the drop volume does not necessarily vary as a power-law function of time. PMID:16643937

  18. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of evaporation and explosive boiling of liquid drops in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The rapid evaporation and explosive boiling of a van der Waals (vdW) liquid drop in microgravity is simulated numerically in two-space dimensions using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The numerical approach is fully adaptive and incorporates the effects of surface tension, latent heat, mass transfer across the interface, and liquid-vapor interface dynamics. Thermocapillary forces are modeled by coupling the hydrodynamics to a diffuse-interface description of the liquid-vapor interface. The models start from a nonequilibrium square-shaped liquid of varying density and temperature. For a fixed density, the drop temperature is increased gradually to predict the point separating normal boiling at subcritical heating from explosive boiling at the superheat limit for this vdW fluid. At subcritical heating, spontaneous evaporation produces stable drops floating in a vapor atmosphere, while at near-critical heating, a bubble is nucleated inside the drop, which then collapses upon itself, leaving a smaller equilibrated drop embedded in its own vapor. At the superheat limit, unstable bubble growth leads to either fragmentation or violent disruption of the liquid layer into small secondary drops, depending on the liquid density. At higher superheats, explosive boiling occurs for all densities. The experimentally observed wrinkling of the bubble surface driven by rapid evaporation followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the thin liquid layer and the linear growth of the bubble radius with time are reproduced by the simulations. The predicted superheat limit (T(s)≈0.96) is close to the theoretically derived value of T(s)=1 at zero ambient pressure for this vdW fluid.

  19. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of evaporation and explosive boiling of liquid drops in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The rapid evaporation and explosive boiling of a van der Waals (vdW) liquid drop in microgravity is simulated numerically in two-space dimensions using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The numerical approach is fully adaptive and incorporates the effects of surface tension, latent heat, mass transfer across the interface, and liquid-vapor interface dynamics. Thermocapillary forces are modeled by coupling the hydrodynamics to a diffuse-interface description of the liquid-vapor interface. The models start from a nonequilibrium square-shaped liquid of varying density and temperature. For a fixed density, the drop temperature is increased gradually to predict the point separating normal boiling at subcritical heating from explosive boiling at the superheat limit for this vdW fluid. At subcritical heating, spontaneous evaporation produces stable drops floating in a vapor atmosphere, while at near-critical heating, a bubble is nucleated inside the drop, which then collapses upon itself, leaving a smaller equilibrated drop embedded in its own vapor. At the superheat limit, unstable bubble growth leads to either fragmentation or violent disruption of the liquid layer into small secondary drops, depending on the liquid density. At higher superheats, explosive boiling occurs for all densities. The experimentally observed wrinkling of the bubble surface driven by rapid evaporation followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the thin liquid layer and the linear growth of the bubble radius with time are reproduced by the simulations. The predicted superheat limit (Ts≈0.96 ) is close to the theoretically derived value of Ts=1 at zero ambient pressure for this vdW fluid.

  20. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of evaporation and explosive boiling of liquid drops in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The rapid evaporation and explosive boiling of a van der Waals (vdW) liquid drop in microgravity is simulated numerically in two-space dimensions using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The numerical approach is fully adaptive and incorporates the effects of surface tension, latent heat, mass transfer across the interface, and liquid-vapor interface dynamics. Thermocapillary forces are modeled by coupling the hydrodynamics to a diffuse-interface description of the liquid-vapor interface. The models start from a nonequilibrium square-shaped liquid of varying density and temperature. For a fixed density, the drop temperature is increased gradually to predict the point separating normal boiling at subcritical heating from explosive boiling at the superheat limit for this vdW fluid. At subcritical heating, spontaneous evaporation produces stable drops floating in a vapor atmosphere, while at near-critical heating, a bubble is nucleated inside the drop, which then collapses upon itself, leaving a smaller equilibrated drop embedded in its own vapor. At the superheat limit, unstable bubble growth leads to either fragmentation or violent disruption of the liquid layer into small secondary drops, depending on the liquid density. At higher superheats, explosive boiling occurs for all densities. The experimentally observed wrinkling of the bubble surface driven by rapid evaporation followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the thin liquid layer and the linear growth of the bubble radius with time are reproduced by the simulations. The predicted superheat limit (T(s)≈0.96) is close to the theoretically derived value of T(s)=1 at zero ambient pressure for this vdW fluid. PMID:26274283

  1. Slip effect for thin liquid film on a rotating disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Masahiro

    1987-02-01

    A flow for thin liquid films on rotating disks has been theoretically and experimentally studied. Liquid depletion behavior during a spin-coating process is calculated by solving the Navier-Stokes equation, taking into account interface slip between liquid and disk. Excellent agreement is seen between the model prediction and experimental data. According to observed depletion behavior on thin liquid films for various spin-coating parameters, half life falls off at the inverse square of rotational speed, and increases when viscosity increases, although the increasing rate falls off. The interface slip, represented as an external friction coefficient, is thermodynamically explained by the different (Δrc) in critical surface tension (rc) values between the liquid and the disk, which will be proportional to the solubility parameter. An infinite external friction coefficient, representing nonslip flow, may be given, when Δrc is zero. Spin-off experiments for liquids of various rc values, prepared by differing surface treatments, support this consideration.

  2. Granular impact cratering by liquid drops: Understanding raindrop imprints through an analogy to asteroid strikes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Runchen; Zhang, Qianyun; Tjugito, Hendro; Cheng, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    When a granular material is impacted by a sphere, its surface deforms like a liquid yet it preserves a circular crater like a solid. Although the mechanism of granular impact cratering by solid spheres is well explored, our knowledge on granular impact cratering by liquid drops is still very limited. Here, by combining high-speed photography with high-precision laser profilometry, we investigate liquid-drop impact dynamics on granular surface and monitor the morphology of resulting impact craters. Surprisingly, we find that despite the enormous energy and length difference, granular impact cratering by liquid drops follows the same energy scaling and reproduces the same crater morphology as that of asteroid impact craters. Inspired by this similarity, we integrate the physical insight from planetary sciences, the liquid marble model from fluid mechanics, and the concept of jamming transition from granular physics into a simple theoretical framework that quantitatively describes all of the main features of liquid-drop imprints in granular media. Our study sheds light on the mechanisms governing raindrop impacts on granular surfaces and reveals a remarkable analogy between familiar phenomena of raining and catastrophic asteroid strikes. PMID:25548187

  3. Granular impact cratering by liquid drops: Understanding raindrop imprints through an analogy to asteroid strikes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Runchen; Zhang, Qianyun; Tjugito, Hendro; Cheng, Xiang

    2015-01-13

    When a granular material is impacted by a sphere, its surface deforms like a liquid yet it preserves a circular crater like a solid. Although the mechanism of granular impact cratering by solid spheres is well explored, our knowledge on granular impact cratering by liquid drops is still very limited. Here, by combining high-speed photography with high-precision laser profilometry, we investigate liquid-drop impact dynamics on granular surface and monitor the morphology of resulting impact craters. Surprisingly, we find that despite the enormous energy and length difference, granular impact cratering by liquid drops follows the same energy scaling and reproduces the same crater morphology as that of asteroid impact craters. Inspired by this similarity, we integrate the physical insight from planetary sciences, the liquid marble model from fluid mechanics, and the concept of jamming transition from granular physics into a simple theoretical framework that quantitatively describes all of the main features of liquid-drop imprints in granular media. Our study sheds light on the mechanisms governing raindrop impacts on granular surfaces and reveals a remarkable analogy between familiar phenomena of raining and catastrophic asteroid strikes. PMID:25548187

  4. Granular impact cratering by liquid drops: Understanding raindrop imprints through an analogy to asteroid strikes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Runchen; Zhang, Qianyun; Tjugito, Hendro; Cheng, Xiang

    2015-01-13

    When a granular material is impacted by a sphere, its surface deforms like a liquid yet it preserves a circular crater like a solid. Although the mechanism of granular impact cratering by solid spheres is well explored, our knowledge on granular impact cratering by liquid drops is still very limited. Here, by combining high-speed photography with high-precision laser profilometry, we investigate liquid-drop impact dynamics on granular surface and monitor the morphology of resulting impact craters. Surprisingly, we find that despite the enormous energy and length difference, granular impact cratering by liquid drops follows the same energy scaling and reproduces the same crater morphology as that of asteroid impact craters. Inspired by this similarity, we integrate the physical insight from planetary sciences, the liquid marble model from fluid mechanics, and the concept of jamming transition from granular physics into a simple theoretical framework that quantitatively describes all of the main features of liquid-drop imprints in granular media. Our study sheds light on the mechanisms governing raindrop impacts on granular surfaces and reveals a remarkable analogy between familiar phenomena of raining and catastrophic asteroid strikes.

  5. An experiment on the Rayleigh instability of charged liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Chee Sheng; Black, Nathan D.; Kiefer, Peter A.; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2007-06-01

    We describe a simple experiment to observe the fission of an electrically charged liquid droplet. Rayleigh charge instability occurs when the electrostatic repulsion of charges on the surface of a droplet overcomes the droplet surface tension and tears the droplet apart. The experiment requires a low-power laser, simple optics, a CCD camera, and a quadrupole trap, which can be constructed using widely available and relatively straightforward instructions. The experiment was performed primarily by undergraduates as part of their senior research projects and can be implemented readily in an advanced undergraduate physics laboratory course.

  6. Nuclear Matter Properties with the Re-evaluated Coefficients of Liquid Drop Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, P. Roy; Basu, D. N.

    2006-06-01

    The coefficients of the volume, surface, Coulomb, asymmetry and pairing energy terms of the semiempirical liquid drop model mass formula have been determined by furnishing best fit to the observed mass excesses. Slightly different sets of the weighting parameters for liquid drop model mass formula have been obtained from minimizations of \\chi 2 and mean square deviation. The most recent experimental and estimated mass excesses from Audi-Wapstra-Thibault atomic mass table have been used for the least square fitting procedure. Equation of state, nuclear incompressibility, nuclear mean free path and the most stable nuclei for corresponding atomic numbers, all are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Transport Phenomena in Thin Rotating Liquid Films Including: Nucleate Boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faghri, Amir

    2005-01-01

    In this grant, experimental, numerical and analytical studies of heat transfer in a thin liquid film flowing over a rotating disk have been conducted. Heat transfer coefficients were measured experimentally in a rotating disk heat transfer apparatus where the disk was heated from below with electrical resistance heaters. The heat transfer measurements were supplemented by experimental characterization of the liquid film thickness using a novel laser based technique. The heat transfer measurements show that the disk rotation plays an important role on enhancement of heat transfer primarily through the thinning of the liquid film. Experiments covered both momentum and rotation dominated regimes of the flow and heat transfer in this apparatus. Heat transfer measurements have been extended to include evaporation and nucleate boiling and these experiments are continuing in our laboratory. Empirical correlations have also been developed to provide useful information for design of compact high efficiency heat transfer devices. The experimental work has been supplemented by numerical and analytical analyses of the same problem. Both numerical and analytical results have been found to agree reasonably well with the experimental results on liquid film thickness and heat transfer Coefficients/Nusselt numbers. The numerical simulations include the free surface liquid film flow and heat transfer under disk rotation including the conjugate effects. The analytical analysis utilizes an integral boundary layer approach from which

  8. Drop generation from a vibrating nozzle in an immiscible liquid-liquid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrandias, A.; Duval, H.; Casalinho, J.; Giorgi, M. L.

    2016-10-01

    Drop generation from an axially vibrating nozzle exhibits a transition in drop diameter when varying the vibration amplitude. Below a threshold amplitude, forcing has essentially no effect on drop size and drops form in dripping mode. Above the threshold, drop size is controlled by forcing: drops detach at resonance, i.e., when the first eigenfrequency of the growing drop coincides with the forcing frequency. We experimentally study the impact of the nozzle inner diameter, dispersed phase flow rate, interfacial tension, and dispersed phase viscosity on this transition. Drop diameter is well correlated to the mode 1 eigenfrequency of Strani and Sabetta for a drop in partial contact with a spherical bowl. We propose a transient model to describe drop dynamics until detachment. The drop is modelled as a linearly forced harmonic oscillator, with the eigenfrequency of Strani and Sabetta. Since the dispersed phase does not wet the nozzle tip, an additional damping coefficient is introduced to account for the viscous dissipation in the film of continuous phase between the drop and nozzle surface. The model adequately reproduces the effect of the different parameters on the threshold amplitude.

  9. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid.

  10. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid. PMID:25122383

  11. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapp, Jaime; di G Sigalotti, Leonardo; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Pena, Franklin; ININ-IVIC Team; Cinvestav-UAM-A Team

    2014-11-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid. Cinvestav-Abacus.

  12. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid.

  13. Tailored Ink For Piston-Driven Electrostatic Liquid Drop Modulator

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Raymond W.; Breton, Marcel P.; Bedford, Christine E.; Carreira, Leonard M.; Gooray, Arthur M.; Roller, George J.; Zavadil, Kevin; Galambos, Paul; Crowley, Joseph

    2005-04-19

    The present invention relates to an ink composition including water, a solvent, a solvent-soluble dye, and a surfactant, where the ink exhibits a stable liquid microemulsion phase at a first temperature and a second temperature higher than the first temperature and has a conductivity of at most about 200 .mu.S/cm and a dielectric constant of at least about 60, and methods of making such ink compositions. The present invention also relates to a method of making an ink composition for use in a microelectromechanical system-based fluid ejector. The method involves providing a solution or dispersion including a dye or a pigment and adding to the solution or dispersion an additive which includes a material that enhances dielectric permittivity and/or reduces conductivity under conditions effective to produce an ink composition having a conductivity of at most about 200 .mu.S/cm and a dielectric constant of at least about 60.

  14. Viscosity Measurement of Highly Viscous Liquids Using Drop Coalescence in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.; Ethridge, Edwin; Maxwell, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The method of drop coalescence is being investigated for use as a method for determining the viscosity of highly viscous undercooled liquids. Low gravity environment is necessary in this case to minimize the undesirable effects of body forces and liquid motion in levitated drops. Also, the low gravity environment will allow for investigating large liquid volumes which can lead to much higher accuracy for the viscosity calculations than possible under 1 - g conditions. The drop coalescence method is preferred over the drop oscillation technique since the latter method can only be applied for liquids with vanishingly small viscosities. The technique developed relies on both the highly accurate solution of the Navier-Stokes equations as well as on data from experiments conducted in near zero gravity environment. In the analytical aspect of the method two liquid volumes are brought into contact which will coalesce under the action of surface tension alone. The free surface geometry development as well as its velocity during coalescence which are obtained from numerical computations are compared with an analogous experimental model. The viscosity in the numerical computations is then adjusted to bring into agreement of the experimental results with the calculations. The true liquid viscosity is the one which brings the experiment closest to the calculations. Results are presented for method validation experiments performed recently on board the NASA/KC-135 aircraft. The numerical solution for this validation case was produced using the Boundary Element Method. In these tests the viscosity of a highly viscous liquid, in this case glycerine at room temperature, was determined to high degree of accuracy using the liquid coalescence method. These experiments gave very encouraging results which will be discussed together with plans for implementing the method in a shuttle flight experiment.

  15. Effects of surface wettability and liquid viscosity on the dynamic wetting of individual drops.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longquan; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we experimentally investigated the dynamic spreading of liquid drops on solid surfaces. Drop of glycerol water mixtures and pure water that have comparable surface tensions (62.3-72.8 mN/m) but different viscosities (1.0-60.1 cP) were used. The size of the drops was 0.5-1.2 mm. Solid surfaces with different lyophilic and lyophobic coatings (equilibrium contact angle θ(eq) of 0°-112°) were used to study the effect of surface wettability. We show that surface wettability and liquid viscosity influence wetting dynamics and affect either the coefficient or the exponent of the power law that describes the growth of the wetting radius. In the early inertial wetting regime, the coefficient of the wetting power law increases with surface wettability but decreases with liquid viscosity. In contrast, the exponent of the power law does only depend on surface wettability as also reported in literature. It was further found that surface wettability does not affect the duration of inertial wetting, whereas the viscosity of the liquid does. For low viscosity liquids, the duration of inertial wetting corresponds to the time of capillary wave propagation, which can be determined by Lamb's drop oscillation model for inviscid liquids. For relatively high viscosity liquids, the inertial wetting time increases with liquid viscosity, which may due to the viscous damping of the surface capillary waves. Furthermore, we observed a viscous wetting regime only on surfaces with an equilibrium contact angle θ(eq) smaller than a critical angle θ(c) depending on viscosity. A scaling analysis based on Navier-Stokes equations is presented at the end, and the predicted θ(c) matches with experimental observations without any additional fitting parameters.

  16. Turbulent convection in liquid metal with and without rotation.

    PubMed

    King, Eric M; Aurnou, Jonathan M

    2013-04-23

    The magnetic fields of Earth and other planets are generated by turbulent, rotating convection in liquid metal. Liquid metals are peculiar in that they diffuse heat more readily than momentum, quantified by their small Prandtl numbers, Pr < 1. Most analog models of planetary dynamos, however, use moderate Pr fluids, and the systematic influence of reducing Pr is not well understood. We perform rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection experiments in the liquid metal gallium (Pr = 0.025) over a range of nondimensional buoyancy forcing (Ra) and rotation periods (E). Our primary diagnostic is the efficiency of convective heat transfer (Nu). In general, we find that the convective behavior of liquid metal differs substantially from that of moderate Pr fluids, such as water. In particular, a transition between rotationally constrained and weakly rotating turbulent states is identified, and this transition differs substantially from that observed in moderate Pr fluids. This difference, we hypothesize, may explain the different classes of magnetic fields observed on the Gas and Ice Giant planets, whose dynamo regions consist of Pr < 1 and Pr > 1 fluids, respectively.

  17. Turbulent convection in liquid metal with and without rotation

    PubMed Central

    King, Eric M.; Aurnou, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic fields of Earth and other planets are generated by turbulent, rotating convection in liquid metal. Liquid metals are peculiar in that they diffuse heat more readily than momentum, quantified by their small Prandtl numbers, . Most analog models of planetary dynamos, however, use moderate fluids, and the systematic influence of reducing is not well understood. We perform rotating Rayleigh–Bénard convection experiments in the liquid metal gallium over a range of nondimensional buoyancy forcing and rotation periods (E). Our primary diagnostic is the efficiency of convective heat transfer . In general, we find that the convective behavior of liquid metal differs substantially from that of moderate fluids, such as water. In particular, a transition between rotationally constrained and weakly rotating turbulent states is identified, and this transition differs substantially from that observed in moderate fluids. This difference, we hypothesize, may explain the different classes of magnetic fields observed on the Gas and Ice Giant planets, whose dynamo regions consist of and fluids, respectively. PMID:23569262

  18. Measuring g using a rotating liquid mirror: enhancing laboratory learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundström, Andréas; Adawi, Tom

    2016-09-01

    We describe a low-cost yet experimentally challenging method to measure the acceleration of gravity, g, using a liquid in a rotating bowl and a laser pointer. The idea underpinning this novel method is that the rotating liquid surface will form a parabolic reflector which will focus light into a unique focal point. By measuring the height of the focal point, g could be determined to 9.78+/- 0.13 m s‑2. We discuss the pedagogical merits of this method compared to more traditional methods for measuring g, and how it can be implemented as an experimental problem at different educational levels.

  19. Measuring g using a rotating liquid mirror: enhancing laboratory learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundström, Andréas; Adawi, Tom

    2016-09-01

    We describe a low-cost yet experimentally challenging method to measure the acceleration of gravity, g, using a liquid in a rotating bowl and a laser pointer. The idea underpinning this novel method is that the rotating liquid surface will form a parabolic reflector which will focus light into a unique focal point. By measuring the height of the focal point, g could be determined to 9.78+/- 0.13 m s-2. We discuss the pedagogical merits of this method compared to more traditional methods for measuring g, and how it can be implemented as an experimental problem at different educational levels.

  20. Note: A top-view optical approach for observing the coalescence of liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luhai; Zhang, Guifu; Wu, Haiyi; Yang, Jiming; Zhu, Yujian

    2016-02-01

    We developed a new device that is capable of top-view optical examination of the coalescence of liquid drops. The device exhibits great potential for visualization, particularly for the early stage of liquid bridge expansion, owing to the use of a high-speed shadowgraph technique. The fluid densities of the two approaching drops and that of the ambient fluid are carefully selected to be negligibly different, which allows the size of the generated drops to be unlimitedly large in principle. The unique system design allows the point of coalescence between two drops to serve as an undisturbed optical pathway through which to image the coalescence process. The proposed technique extended the dimensionless initial finite radius of the liquid bridge to 0.001, in contrast to 0.01 obtained for conventional optical measurements. An examination of the growth of the bridge radius for a water and oil-tetrachloroethylene system provided results similar to Paulsen's power laws of the inertially limited viscous and inertial regimes. Furthermore, a miniscule shift in the center of the liquid bridge was detected at the point of crossover between the two regimes, which can be scarcely distinguished with conventional side-view techniques.

  1. Pool boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 in. diameter spheres which were immersed in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Additional results are presented for a stationary, 2 inch diameter sphere, quenched in LN2, which were obtained utilizing a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus that will eventually be used for additional rotating sphere experiments. The speed for the rotational tests was varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere. The average Nusselt number over the cooling period was plotted against the rotational Reynolds number. Stationary sphere results included local boiling heat transfer coefficients at different latitudinal locations, for various pressure and subcooling levels.

  2. Studies of rotating liquid floating zones on Skylab IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, J. R.; Gibson, E. G.; Klett, M. G.; Facemire, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid zones of water, soap solution and soap foam were deployed between two aligned circular disks which were free to rotate about the zone axis in the microgravity environment of Skylab IV. Such a configuration is of interest in the containerless handling of melts for possible future space processing crystal growth experiments. Three basic types of zone surface deformation and instability were observed for these rotational conditions; axisymmetric shape changes under single disk rotation, nonaxisymmetric, whirling, C-modes for long zones with equal rotation of both disks, and capillary wave phenomena for short zones with equal rotation of both disks. The sources of these instabilities and the conditions promoting them are analyzed in detail from video tape recordings of the Skylab experiments.

  3. O the Electrohydrodynamics of Drop Extraction from a Conductive Liquid Meniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Graham Scott

    This thesis is concerned with the use of an electric field in the extraction of liquid drops from a capillary orifice or nozzle. The motivating application is ink jet printing. Current drop-on-demand ink jets use pressure pulses to eject drops. Literature on electrostatic spraying suggests that by using an electric field, drops could be produced with a wider range of sizes and speeds than is possible with pressure ejection. Previous efforts to apply electric spraying to printing or similar selective coating tasks have taken an experimental approach based on steady or periodic spraying phenomena, without attempting cycle -by-cycle drop control. The centerpiece of this thesis is a simulation tool developed to explore such possibilities. A simplified analytic model is developed as a preliminary step, yielding formulas for force and time scales that provide an appropriate basis for nondimensionalization of the governing differential equations; important dimensionless parameters are identified. The complete self-consistent model permits simulation of meniscus behavior under time -varying applied voltage or pressure, with the electric field solution continually updated as the surface changes shape. The model uses a quasi-one-dimensional hydrodynamic formulation and a two-dimensional axisymmetric boundary element solution for the electric field. The simulation is checked against experimental results for meniscus stability, resonant modes, and drop emission under electric field. The simulation faithfully captures important qualitative aspects of meniscus behavior and gives reasonable quantitative agreement within the limitations of the model. Insights gained in simulation point the way to a successful laboratory demonstration of drop extraction using a shaped voltage pulse. Drop size control is pursued in simulation using pressure and voltage pulses both alone and in combination, for both light and viscous liquids. Combining pressure and field pulses is shown to be

  4. Chaotic rotations of a liquid-filled solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, A. Y. T.; Kuang, J. L.

    2007-05-01

    The disturbed Hamiltonian equations of a solid filled with a rotating ellipsoidal mass of a liquid and subjected to small-applied moments are revisited using Deprit's variables. We investigate the chaotic dynamics of the orbiting liquid-filled solid and of the liquid-filled solid sliding and rolling on a perfectly smooth plane, in either energy-conservative or energy-dissipative conditions, when appropriately perturbed. Criteria for the judgment of potential chaotic rotations of the perturbed system are formulated by means of Melnikov-Holmes-Marsden (MHM) integrals. Strategies for the solution of heteroclinic orbits of the symmetrical liquid-filled solid under torque-free conditions are outlined theoretically. Physical parameters that will probably trigger the onset of chaotic motions can be determined accordingly. Results from MHM algorithms are crosschecked with Poincare sections together with Lyapunov characteristic exponents.

  5. Coarsening dynamics of binary liquids with active rotation.

    PubMed

    Sabrina, Syeda; Spellings, Matthew; Glotzer, Sharon C; Bishop, Kyle J M

    2015-11-21

    Active matter comprised of many self-driven units can exhibit emergent collective behaviors such as pattern formation and phase separation in both biological (e.g., mussel beds) and synthetic (e.g., colloidal swimmers) systems. While these behaviors are increasingly well understood for ensembles of linearly self-propelled "particles", less is known about the collective behaviors of active rotating particles where energy input at the particle level gives rise to rotational particle motion. A recent simulation study revealed that active rotation can induce phase separation in mixtures of counter-rotating particles in 2D. In contrast to that of linearly self-propelled particles, the phase separation of counter-rotating fluids is accompanied by steady convective flows that originate at the fluid-fluid interface. Here, we investigate the influence of these flows on the coarsening dynamics of actively rotating binary liquids using a phenomenological, hydrodynamic model that combines a Cahn-Hilliard equation for the fluid composition with a Navier-Stokes equation for the fluid velocity. The effect of active rotation is introduced though an additional force within the Navier-Stokes equations that arises due to gradients in the concentrations of clockwise and counter-clockwise rotating particles. Depending on the strength of active rotation and that of frictional interactions with the stationary surroundings, we observe and explain new dynamical behaviors such as "active coarsening" via self-generated flows as well as the emergence of self-propelled "vortex doublets". We confirm that many of the qualitative behaviors identified by the continuum model can also be found in discrete, particle-based simulations of actively rotating liquids. Our results highlight further opportunities for achieving complex dissipative structures in active materials subject to distributed actuation. PMID:26345231

  6. Deformation and breakup of round drops and nonturbulent liquid jets in uniform crossflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalburg, Christian

    2002-09-01

    The deformation and breakup properties of liquid drops and round liquid jets in uniform crossflows were studied computationally, motivated by applications to the behavior of sprays in crossflows found in a variety of power and propulsion systems. The objective of the present investigation was to extend the parameter range of past deformation and breakup studies, by means of numerical computations, to conditions more representative of practical high-pressure spray combustion processes. The time-dependent, incompressible and two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations were solved on a uniform, staggered grid using the projection method of Chorin (1968) and the Level Set method of Sussman et al. (1994). Numerical simulations of the effect of crossflows on the deformation and breakup of drops and round liquid jets were carried out for the following range of parameters to study the independent effects of four dimensionless variables that fully describe the problem: Weber numbers of 0.1--2,000,000, Ohnesorge numbers of 0.001--100, Reynolds numbers of 12.5--200 and liquid/gas density ratios of 2--infinity (the last by Richardson extrapolation). The present results were in good agreement with existing measurements of deformation and breakup properties of both liquid drops and round liquid jets at large liquid/gas density ratios and with wake and drag properties of spheres and cylinders in crossflows. Similar to past experimental observations, remarkable similarities were observed between the breakup properties of round liquid jets and liquid drops. The liquid/gas density ratio was found to have a relatively small effect on deformation and breakup. Effects of Reynolds number variations were also small for conditions where the drag coefficient is relatively independent of the Reynolds number. As the Stokes flow regime is approached, however, the Weber number (We) required for breakup increases significantly due to increased drag coefficients. At large Ohnesorge number (Oh

  7. A computer-controlled apparatus for micrometric drop deposition at liquid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Peña-Polo, Franklin; Trujillo, Leonardo; Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G

    2010-05-01

    A low-cost, automated apparatus has been used to perform micrometric deposition of small pendant drops onto a quiet liquid surface. The approach of the drop to the surface is obtained by means of discrete, micron-scale translations in order to achieve deposition at adiabatically zero velocity. This process is not only widely used in scientific investigations in fluid mechanics and thermal sciences but also in engineering and biomedical applications. The apparatus has been designed to produce accurate deposition onto the surface and minimize the vibrations induced in the drop by the movement of the capillary tip. Calibration tests of the apparatus have shown that a descent of the drop by discrete translational steps of approximately 5.6 microm and duration of 150-200 ms is sufficient to minimize its penetration depth into the liquid when it touches the surface layer and reduce to a level of noise the vibrations transmitted to it by the translation of the dispenser. Different settings of the experimental setup can be easily implemented for use in a variety of other applications, including deposition onto solid surfaces, surface tension measurements of pendant drops, and wire bonding in microelectronics. PMID:20515172

  8. An experimental study of liquid drop - interface coalescence in the presence of surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, Panagiota; Chinaud, Maxime; Li, Kai; Wang, Wei; University College London Team; Beijing Key Laboratory of Urban Oil; Gas Distribution Technology Team

    2014-11-01

    Drop-interface coalescence has been the subject of many studies both theoretical and experimental. It is of particular interest for the oil industries particularly during the transportation of multiphase mixtures where coalescence rates can affect the stability and separation of dispersions. It is well-known that the presence of surfactants can significantly affect the coalescence rates. In this work a silicon oil -water system has been studied in a rectangular coalescence cell. Both rising oil drops and falling water drops coalescing with the water-oil interface have been investigated. A water soluble surfactant, SPAN 80, was used. High speed imaging has been performed to study the coalescence phenomenon and obtain the coalescence time of the drops with the interface with and without the presence of the surfactant. The velocity fields in the bulk fluid and in the liquid film forming between the drop and the interface were studied with shadowgraphy (bright field Particle Image Velocimetry). To increase the spatial resolution particularly in the liquid film microscope lenses were implemented. Results have been compared against existing literature.

  9. A steady state pressure drop model for screen channel liquid acquisition devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, J. W.; Darr, S. R.; McQuillen, J. B.; Rame, E.; Chato, D. J.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the derivation of a simplified one dimensional (1D) steady state pressure drop model for flow through a porous liquid acquisition device (LAD) inside a cryogenic propellant tank. Experimental data is also presented from cryogenic LAD tests in liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) to compare against the simplified model and to validate the model at cryogenic temperatures. The purpose of the experiments was to identify the various pressure drop contributions in the analytical model which govern LAD channel behavior during dynamic, steady state outflow. LH2 pipe flow of LAD screen samples measured the second order flow-through-screen (FTS) pressure drop, horizontal LOX LAD outflow tests determined the relative magnitude of the third order frictional and dynamic losses within the channel, while LH2 inverted vertical outflow tests determined the magnitude of the first order hydrostatic pressure loss and validity of the full 1D model. When compared to room temperature predictions, the FTS pressure drop is shown to be temperature dependent, with a significant increase in flow resistance at LH2 temperatures. Model predictions of frictional and dynamic losses down the channel compare qualitatively with LOX LADs data. Meanwhile, the 1D model predicted breakdown points track the trends in the LH2 inverted outflow experimental results, with discrepancies being due to a non-uniform injection velocity across the LAD screen not accounted for in the model.

  10. Scaling of liquid-drop impact craters in wet granular media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianyun; Gao, Ming; Zhao, Runchen; Cheng, Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Combining high-speed photography with laser profilometry, we study the dynamics and the morphology of liquid-drop impact cratering in wet granular media-a ubiquitous phenomenon relevant to many important geological, agricultural, and industrial processes. By systematically investigating important variables such as impact energy, the size of impinging drops, and the degree of liquid saturation in granular beds, we uncover a scaling law for the size of impact craters. We show that this scaling can be explained by considering the balance between the inertia of impinging drops and the strength of impacted surface. Such a theoretical understanding confirms that the unique energy partition originally proposed for liquid-drop impact cratering in dry granular media also applies for impact cratering in wet granular media. Moreover, we demonstrate that compressive stresses, instead of shear stresses, control the process of granular impact cratering. Our study enriches the picture of generic granular impact cratering and sheds light on the familiar phenomena of raindrop impacts in granular media.

  11. Large charged drop levitation against gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Chung, Sang Kun; Hyson, Michael T.; Trinh, Eugene H.; Elleman, Daniel D.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid electrostatic-acoustic levitator that can levitate and manipulate a large liquid drop in one gravity is presented. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time such large drops (up to 4 mm in diameter in the case of water) have been levitated against 1-gravity. This makes possible, for the first time, many new experiments both in space and in ground-based laboratories, such as 1)supercooling and superheating, 2) containerless crystal growth from various salt solutions or melts, 3) drop dynamics of oscillating or rotating liquid drops, 4) drop evaporation and Rayleigh bursting, and 5) containerless material processing in space. The digital control system, liquid drop launch process, principles of electrode design, and design of a multipurpose room temperature levitation chamber are described. Preliminary results that demonstrate drop oscillation and rotation, and crystal growth from supersaturated salt solutions are presented.

  12. Study of a liquid-gas mixing layer: Shear instability and size of produced drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, Sylvain; Matas, Jean-Philippe; Cartellier, Alain

    2013-01-01

    We study experimentally the atomization of a thick liquid film by a parallel gas flow, in order to understand the conditions of destabilization of the liquid film and the conditions of drop creation. We study in particular the regimes at low M (ratio of gas/liquid dynamic pressures), to test the scaling law proposed and validated in previous studies at large M (M=16). The spatial inviscid stability analysis of the system is carried out with a new velocity profile taking into account the wake of the splitter plate (zero speed at the level of the splitter plate): the influence of liquid velocity on the shear instability frequency turns out to be significantly stronger for this type of velocity profile than for continuous profile. An asymptotic study of the dispersion relation leads to a new scaling law giving the wavenumber of the shear instability as a function of gas velocity Ug, with a corrective term in M. Frequency measurements carried out by a spectral method show a good agreement with this corrected law. We investigate by way of optical probe measurements the size distribution of produced drops downstream. The difficulty of these measurements live in the decrease of the number density flux of drops at low M. Results obtained for the mean chord are consistent with previous studies. Diameter distributions are obtained from chord distributions with a numerical conversion procedure.

  13. Pressure drop in fully developed, duct flow of dispersed liquid-vapor mixture at zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamics of steady, fully developed dispersed liquid-vapor flow in a straight duct at 0-g is simulated by flowing water containing n-butyl benzoate droplets. Water and benzoate are immiscible and have identical density at room temperature. The theoretical basis of the simulation is given. Experiments showed that, for a fixed combined flow rate of water and benzoate, the frictional pressure drop is unaffected by large changes in the volume fraction of benzoate drops and their size distribution. Measured power spectra of the static wall pressure fluctuations induced by the turbulent water-benzoate flow also revealed that their dynamics is essentially unaltered by the presence of the droplets. These experimental findings, together with the theoretical analysis, led to the conclusion that the pressure drop in fully developed, dispersed liquid-vapor flow in straight ducts of constant cross section at 0-g is identical to that due to liquid flowing alone at the same total volumetric flow rate of the liquid-vapor mixture and, therefore, can be readily determined.

  14. Transient dynamics of confined liquid drops in a uniform electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Chaudhury, Kaustav; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the effect of confinement on the transient dynamics of liquid drops, suspended in another immiscible liquid medium, under the influence of an externally applied uniform dc electric field. For our analysis, we adhere to an analytical framework conforming to a Newtonian-leaky-dielectric liquid model in the Stokes flow regime, under the small deformation approximation. We characterize the transient relaxation of the drop shape towards its asymptotic configuration, attributed by the combined confluence of the charge-relaxation time scale and the intrinsic shape-relaxation time scale. While the former appears due to the charge accumulation process on the drop surface over a finite interval of time, the genesis of the latter is found to be intrinsic to the hydrodynamic situation under consideration. In an unbounded condition, the intrinsic shape-relaxation time scale is strongly governed by the viscosity ratio, defined as the ratio of dynamic viscosities of the droplet and the background liquid. However, when the wall effects are brought into consideration, the combined influence of the relative extent of the confinement and the intrinsic viscosity effects, acting in tandem, alter this time scale in a rather complicated and nontrivial manner. We reveal that the presence of confinement may dramatically increase the effective viscosity ratio that could have otherwise been required in an unconfined domain to realize identical time-relaxation characteristics. We also bring out the alterations in the streamline patterns because of the combinations of transient and confinement effects. Thus, our results reveal that the extent of fluidic confinement may provide an elegant alternative towards manipulating the transient dynamics of liquid drops in the presence of an externally applied electric field, bearing far-ranging consequences towards the design and functionalities of several modern-day microfluidic applications.

  15. Janus Gel Fabrication Using Liquid Drop Coalescence and Limited Mixing in the Hele-Shaw Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Brittany; Moran, Alexis; Lee, Donghee; Ryu, Sangjin

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogel substrates of tunable stiffness have been actively utilized for in vitro cell mechanobiology study. Here we present a new method to fabricate Janus polyacrylamide gel based on limited mixing between liquid drops coalescing in the Hele-Shaw geometry. Two pre-polymer drops with different concentrations were sandwiched and squeezed between two parallel glass surfaces. Once the drops coalesced in the decreased gap between the surfaces, gelation was initiated by UV light exposure with various time delays. AFM nano-indentation was utilized to map the Young's modulus of obtained gels. Fabricated Janus gels had two regions of different Young's moduli interfaced by the stiffness gradient zone, and the width of the gradient zone increased with the delay time. We acknowledge support from Bioengineering for Human Health grant from UNL and UNMC, and NSF REU grant for UNL.

  16. Combined single-drop and rotating drum dustiness test of fine to nanosize powders using a small drum.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Thomas; Jensen, Keld Alstrup

    2008-01-01

    A dustiness test has been developed that performs both a single-drop and a continuous rotation test using a 6-g sample. Tests were completed on pigment-grade and ultrafine TiO2, two grades of corundum (Aloxite), yttrium-stabilized zirconia (Y-zirconia) granules, fumed silica, goethite, talc and bentonite. The generated particles were quantified by counting and sizing at 1-s time resolution using the TSI Fast Mobility Particle Sizer and the TSI Aerodynamic Particle Sizer and by collecting the particles on a filter for weighing. The method generated reproducible amounts and size distributions of particles. The size distributions had two more or less separated size modes >0.9 microm and in addition all materials except TiO2 pigment-grade and Aloxite F1200 generated a size mode in the range from approximately 100 to approximately 220 nm. Pigment-grade TiO2 had the lowest dustiness and ultrafine TiO2 the highest dustiness as measured by particle number for both the single-drop and rotation test and as measured by mass for both tests combined. The difference was a factor of approximately 300. Three types of dust generation rate time profiles were observed; brief initial burst (talc, both grades of corundum), decaying rate during rotation period (fumed silica, TiO2 ultrafine and pigment grade, bentonite) and constant rate (Y-zirconia, goethite). These profile types were in agreement with the differences in the ratio of amount of particles generated during the single drop to the amount generated during the single-drop and rotation test combined. The ratio ranged a factor approximately 40. The new test method enables a characterization of dustiness with relevance to different user scenarios. PMID:18056087

  17. Magnetorotational Instability in a Rotating Liquid Metal Annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Hantao Ji; Jeremy Goodman; Akira Kageyama

    2001-03-10

    Although the magnetorotational instability (MRI) has been widely accepted as a powerful accretion mechanism in magnetized accretion disks, it has not been realized in the laboratory. The possibility of studying MRI in a rotating liquid-metal annulus (Couette flow) is explored by local and global stability analysis and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Stability diagrams are drawn in dimensionless parameters, and also in terms of the angular velocities at the inner and outer cylinders. It is shown that MRI can be triggered in a moderately rapidly rotating table-top apparatus, using easy-to-handle metals such as gallium. Practical issues of this proposed experiment are discussed.

  18. The behavior of a liquid drop levitated and drastically flattened by an intense sound field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. P.; Anilkumar, A. V.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1992-01-01

    The deformation and break-up are studied of a liquid drop in levitation through the radiation pressure. Using high-speed photography ripples are observed on the central membrane of the drop, atomization of the membrane by emission of satellite drops from its unstable ripples, and shattering of the drop after upward buckling like an umbrella, or after horizontal expansion like a sheet. These effects are captured on video. The ripples are theorized to be capillary waves generated by the Faraday instability excited by the sound vibration. Atomization occurs whenever the membrane becomes so thin that the vibration is sufficiently intense. The vibration leads to a destabilizing Bernoulli correction in the static pressure. Buckling occurs when an existent equilibrium is unstable to a radial (i.e., tangential) motion of the membrane because of the Bernoulli effect. Besides, the radiation stress at the rim of the drop is a suction stress which can make equilibrium impossible, leading to the horizontal expansion and the subsequent break-up.

  19. Getting in shape: molten wax drop deformation and solidification at an immiscible liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Beesabathuni, Shilpa N; Lindberg, Seth E; Caggioni, Marco; Wesner, Chris; Shen, Amy Q

    2015-05-01

    The controlled production of non-spherical shaped particles is important for many applications such as food processing, consumer goods, adsorbents, drug delivery, and optical sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation and simultaneous solidification of millimeter size molten wax drops as they impacted an immiscible liquid interface of higher density. By varying initial temperature and viscoelasticity of the molten drop, drop size, impact velocity, viscosity and temperature of the bath fluid, and the interfacial tension between the molten wax and bath fluid, spherical molten wax drops impinged on a cooling water bath and were arrested into non-spherical solidified particles in the form of ellipsoid, mushroom, disc, and flake-like shapes. We constructed cursory phase diagrams for the various particle shapes generated over a range of Weber, Capillary, Reynolds, and Stefan numbers, governed by the interfacial, inertial, viscous, and thermal effects. We solved a simplified heat transfer problem to estimate the time required to initiate the solidification at the interface of a spherical molten wax droplet and cooling aqueous bath after impact. By correlating this time with the molten wax drop deformation history captured from high speed imaging experiments, we elucidate the delicate balance of interfacial, inertial, viscous, and thermal forces that determine the final morphology of wax particles.

  20. Rotation of a liquid crystal by the Casimir torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, David A. T.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-03-01

    We present a calculation of the Casimir torque acting on a liquid crystal near a birefringent crystal. In this system, a liquid crystal bulk is uniformly aligned at one surface and is twisted at the other surface by a birefringent crystal, e.g., barium titanate. The liquid crystal is separated from the solid crystal by an isotropic, transparent material such as SiO2. By varying the thickness of the deposited layer, we can observe the effect of retardation on the torque (which differentiates it from the close-range van der Waals torque). We find that a barium titanate slab would cause 5CB (4 -cyano -4 '-pentylbiphenyl) liquid crystal to rotate by 10∘ through its bulk when separated by 35 nm of SiO2. The optical technique for measuring this twist is also outlined.

  1. Nanoparticles at liquid interfaces: Rotational dynamics and angular locking

    SciTech Connect

    Razavi, Sepideh; Kretzschmar, Ilona; Koplik, Joel; Colosqui, Carlos E.

    2014-01-07

    Nanoparticles with different surface morphologies that straddle the interface between two immiscible liquids are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. The methodology employed allows us to compute the interfacial free energy at different angular orientations of the nanoparticle. Due to their atomistic nature, the studied nanoparticles present both microscale and macroscale geometrical features and cannot be accurately modeled as a perfectly smooth body (e.g., spheres and cylinders). Under certain physical conditions, microscale features can produce free energy barriers that are much larger than the thermal energy of the surrounding media. The presence of these energy barriers can effectively “lock” the particle at specific angular orientations with respect to the liquid-liquid interface. This work provides new insights on the rotational dynamics of Brownian particles at liquid interfaces and suggests possible strategies to exploit the effects of microscale features with given geometric characteristics.

  2. Nanoparticles at liquid interfaces: rotational dynamics and angular locking.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Sepideh; Kretzschmar, Ilona; Koplik, Joel; Colosqui, Carlos E

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles with different surface morphologies that straddle the interface between two immiscible liquids are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. The methodology employed allows us to compute the interfacial free energy at different angular orientations of the nanoparticle. Due to their atomistic nature, the studied nanoparticles present both microscale and macroscale geometrical features and cannot be accurately modeled as a perfectly smooth body (e.g., spheres and cylinders). Under certain physical conditions, microscale features can produce free energy barriers that are much larger than the thermal energy of the surrounding media. The presence of these energy barriers can effectively "lock" the particle at specific angular orientations with respect to the liquid-liquid interface. This work provides new insights on the rotational dynamics of Brownian particles at liquid interfaces and suggests possible strategies to exploit the effects of microscale features with given geometric characteristics.

  3. Single-drop impingement onto a wavy liquid film and description of the asymmetrical cavity dynamics.

    PubMed

    van Hinsberg, Nils Paul; Charbonneau-Grandmaison, Marie

    2015-07-01

    The present paper is devoted to an experimental investigation of the cavity formed upon a single-drop impingement onto a traveling solitary surface wave on a deep pool of the same liquid. The dynamics of the cavity throughout its complete expansion and receding phase are analyzed using high-speed shadowgraphy and compared to the outcomes of drop impingements onto steady liquid surface films having equal thickness. The effects of the surface wave velocity, amplitude and phase, drop impingement velocity, and liquid viscosity on the cavity's diameter and depth evolution are accurately characterized at various time instants. The wave velocity induces a distinct and in time increasing inclination of the cavity in the wave propagation direction. In particular for strong waves an asymmetrical distribution of the radial expansion and retraction velocity along the cavity's circumference is observed. A linear dependency between the absolute Weber number and the typical length and time scales associated with the cavity's maximum depth and maximum diameter is reported. PMID:26274267

  4. Single-drop impingement onto a wavy liquid film and description of the asymmetrical cavity dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsberg, Nils Paul; Charbonneau-Grandmaison, Marie

    2015-07-01

    The present paper is devoted to an experimental investigation of the cavity formed upon a single-drop impingement onto a traveling solitary surface wave on a deep pool of the same liquid. The dynamics of the cavity throughout its complete expansion and receding phase are analyzed using high-speed shadowgraphy and compared to the outcomes of drop impingements onto steady liquid surface films having equal thickness. The effects of the surface wave velocity, amplitude and phase, drop impingement velocity, and liquid viscosity on the cavity's diameter and depth evolution are accurately characterized at various time instants. The wave velocity induces a distinct and in time increasing inclination of the cavity in the wave propagation direction. In particular for strong waves an asymmetrical distribution of the radial expansion and retraction velocity along the cavity's circumference is observed. A linear dependency between the absolute Weber number and the typical length and time scales associated with the cavity's maximum depth and maximum diameter is reported.

  5. Liquid-body resonance while contacting a rotating superhydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Chong, Matthew Lai Ho; Cheng, Michael; Katariya, Mayur; Muradoglu, Murat; Cheong, Brandon Huey-Ping; Zahidi, Alifa Afiah Ahmad; Yu, Yang; Liew, Oi Wah; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2015-11-01

    We advance a scheme in which a liquid body on a stationary tip in contact with a rotating superhydrophobic surface is able to maintain resonance primarily from stick-slip events. With tip-to-surface spacing in the range 2.73 ≤ h < 2.45 mm for a volume of 10 μL, the liquid body was found to exhibit resonance independent of the speed of the drum. The mechanics were found to be due to a surface-tension-controlled vibration mode based on the natural frequency values determined. With spacing in the range 2.45 ≤ h < 2.15 mm imposed for a volume of 10 μL, the contact length of the liquid body was found to vary with rotation of the SH drum. This was due to the stick-slip events being able to generate higher energy fluctuations causing the liquid-solid contact areas to vary since the almost oblate spheroid shape of the liquid body had intrinsically higher surface energies. This resulted in the natural frequency perturbations being frequency- and amplitude-modulated over a lower frequency carrier. These findings have positive implications for microfluidic sensing. PMID:26577818

  6. Liquid drops on a surface: using density functional theory to calculate the binding potential and drop profiles and comparing with results from mesoscopic modelling.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adam P; Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J

    2015-02-21

    The contribution to the free energy for a film of liquid of thickness h on a solid surface due to the interactions between the solid-liquid and liquid-gas interfaces is given by the binding potential, g(h). The precise form of g(h) determines whether or not the liquid wets the surface. Note that differentiating g(h) gives the Derjaguin or disjoining pressure. We develop a microscopic density functional theory (DFT) based method for calculating g(h), allowing us to relate the form of g(h) to the nature of the molecular interactions in the system. We present results based on using a simple lattice gas model, to demonstrate the procedure. In order to describe the static and dynamic behaviour of non-uniform liquid films and drops on surfaces, a mesoscopic free energy based on g(h) is often used. We calculate such equilibrium film height profiles and also directly calculate using DFT the corresponding density profiles for liquid drops on surfaces. Comparing quantities such as the contact angle and also the shape of the drops, we find good agreement between the two methods. We also study in detail the effect on g(h) of truncating the range of the dispersion forces, both those between the fluid molecules and those between the fluid and wall. We find that truncating can have a significant effect on g(h) and the associated wetting behaviour of the fluid.

  7. Development of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop for the determination of trace nickel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yukun; Zhang, Jingwen; Zhao, Bin; Du, Xin; Ma, Jingjun; Li, Jingci

    2011-12-01

    A liquid-phase microextraction technique was developed using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry, for the extraction and determination of trace amounts of nickel in water samples. Microextraction efficiency factors, such as the type and volume of extraction and dispersive solvents, pH, extraction time, the chelating agent amount, and ionic strength, were investigated and optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 4.23-250 μg L(-1) with a detection limit of 1.27 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviation for ten replicate measurements of 10 and 100 μg L(-1) of nickel were 3.21% and 2.55%, respectively. The proposed method was assessed through the analysis of certified reference water or recovery experiments. PMID:21598026

  8. Micro-ball lens structure fabrication based on drop on demand printing the liquid mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang; Zhu, Li; Chen, Hejuan; Yang, Lijun; Zhang, Weiyi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrated a simple micro-ball lens array (MBLA) fabrication method using a drop-on-demand (DOD) droplet printing technique and liquid mold. The micro-ball droplet array on the hydrophobic surface is used as the liquid mold to fabricate the MBLA. The ultrahigh adhesion force between the micro-ball droplet and the substrate is ascribed to the Wenzel state of the micro-ball droplet, while the replication process with low position error is attributed to the ultrahigh adhesion force between the micro-ball droplet and the substrate and the high viscosity of the micro-ball droplet and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) liquid. The micro-ball lenses (MBLs) with a contact angle of 120° and 150° were fabricated and the important fabrication details were discussed. The optical performance and scanning electron microscope (SEM) data of the MBLs showed that the MBLs had high quality surface morphology and good optical performance.

  9. Sodium chloride crystallization from thin liquid sheets, thick layers, and sessile drops in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Pietro; Pettit, Donald; Cristoforetti, Samantha

    2015-10-01

    Crystallization from aqueous sodium chloride solutions as thin liquid sheets, 0.2-0.7 mm thick, with two free surfaces supported by a wire frame, thick liquid layers, 4-6 mm thick, with two free surfaces supported by metal frame, and hemispherical sessile drops, 20-32 mm diameter, supported by a flat polycarbonate surface or an initially flat gelatin film, were carried out under microgravity on the International Space Station (ISS). Different crystal morphologies resulted based on the fluid geometry: tabular hoppers, hopper cubes, circular [111]-oriented crystals, and dendrites. The addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG-3350) inhibited the hopper growth resulting in flat-faced surfaces. In sessile drops, 1-4 mm tabular hopper crystals formed on the free surface and moved to the fixed contact line at the support (polycarbonate or gelatin) self-assembling into a shell. Ring formation created by sessile drop evaporation to dryness was observed but with crystals 100 times larger than particles in terrestrially formed coffee rings. No hopper pyramids formed. By choosing solution geometries offered by microgravity, we found it was possible to selectively grow crystals of preferred morphologies.

  10. Collision and coalescence of liquid drops in a dynamically active ambient fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambath, Krishnaraj; Subramani, Hariprasad; Basaran, Osman

    2012-11-01

    The fluid dynamics of the collision and coalescence of liquid drops has intrigued scientists and engineers for more than a century owing to its ubiquitousness in nature, e.g. raindrop coalescence, and industry, e.g. breaking of emulsions in the oil and gas industry. The complexity of the underlying dynamics, e.g. occurrence of hydrodynamic singularities, has required study of the problem at different scales - macroscopic, mesoscopic and molecular - using stochastic and deterministic methods. In this work, we adopt a multiscale, deterministic method to simulate the approach, collision, and eventual coalescence of two drops where the drops as well as the ambient fluid are incompressible, Newtonian fluids. The free boundary problem governing the dynamics consists of the Navier-Stokes system and associated initial and boundary conditions that have been augmented to account for the effects of disjoining pressure as the separation between the drops becomes of the order of a few hundred nanometers. This free boundary problem is solved by a Galerkin finite element-based algorithm. The approach and results to be reported build on earlier work by Leal and coworkers, and are used to identify conditions conducive for coalescence in terms of flow and fluid properties.

  11. Drop Simulation of 6M Drum with Locking-Ring Closure and Liquid Contents

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T

    2006-04-17

    This paper presents the dynamic simulation of the 6M drum with a locking-ring type closure subjected to a 4.9-foot drop. The drum is filled with water to 98 percent of overflow capacity. A three dimensional finite-element model consisting of metallic, liquid and rubber gasket components is used in the simulation. The water is represented by a hydrodynamic material model in which the material's volume strength is determined by an equation of state. The explicit numerical method based on the theory of wave propagation is used to determine the combined structural response to the torque load for tightening the locking-ring closure and to the impact load due to the drop.

  12. Liquid film dynamics in horizontal and tilted tubes: Dry spots and sliding drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, A. A.; Cummings, L. J.; Naire, S.; Jensen, O. E.

    2007-04-01

    Using a model derived from lubrication theory, we consider the evolution of a thin viscous film coating the interior or exterior of a cylindrical tube. The flow is driven by surface tension and gravity and the liquid is assumed to wet the cylinder perfectly. When the tube is horizontal, we use large-time simulations to describe the bifurcation structure of the capillary equilibria appearing at low Bond number. We identify a new film configuration in which an isolated dry patch appears at the top of the tube and demonstrate hysteresis in the transition between rivulets and annular collars as the tube length is varied. For a tube tilted to the vertical, we show how a long initially uniform rivulet can break up first into isolated drops and then annular collars, which subsequently merge. We also show that the speed at which a localized drop moves down the base of a tilted tube is nonmonotonic in tilt angle.

  13. Evaporation of explosively disseminated liquid drops on a sandy soil surface

    SciTech Connect

    Mellsen, S.B.

    1995-12-31

    As methyl salicylate (MS) is often used as a field simulant for chemical agents, knowledge of its evaporative characteristics is therefore necessary. A series of field trials using a chemical simulant was conducted on sandy soil in the Experimental Proving Ground of the Defence Research Establishment Suffield, located near Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada. Seven trials were conducted with methyl salicylate thickened to a zero shear viscosity of six poise. Explosive dissemination was used to provide liquid drops. The measured vapor recovery rate was accurately predicted by means of a previously developed mathematical model, by which the effect of varying wind speed, ground temperature and drop sizes are accounted for. The results of these trials are compared to those of similar trials conducted on prairie grassland. The shapes of the vapor recovery versus time curves are similar, but the time scale is longer for evaporation from sandy soil.

  14. Nonmonotonic response of drop impacting on liquid film: mechanism and scaling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Saha, Abhishek; Law, Chung K; Sun, Chao

    2016-05-18

    Drop impacting on a liquid film with a finite thickness is omnipresent in nature and plays a critical role in numerous industrial processes. The impact can result in either bouncing or merging, which is mainly controlled by the impact inertia of the drop and film thickness. Although it is known that impact with inertia beyond a critical value on a thick film promotes merging through the breakage of the interfacial gas layer, here we demonstrate that for an impact inertia less than that critical value, increasing the film thickness leads to a nonmonotonic transition from merging to bouncing to merging and finally to bouncing again. For the first time, two different merging mechanisms are identified and the scaling laws of the nonmonotonic transitions are developed. These results provide important insights into the role of the film thickness in the impact dynamics, which is critical for optimizing operating conditions for spray or ink-jet systems among others.

  15. Nonmonotonic response of drop impacting on liquid film: mechanism and scaling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Saha, Abhishek; Law, Chung K; Sun, Chao

    2016-05-18

    Drop impacting on a liquid film with a finite thickness is omnipresent in nature and plays a critical role in numerous industrial processes. The impact can result in either bouncing or merging, which is mainly controlled by the impact inertia of the drop and film thickness. Although it is known that impact with inertia beyond a critical value on a thick film promotes merging through the breakage of the interfacial gas layer, here we demonstrate that for an impact inertia less than that critical value, increasing the film thickness leads to a nonmonotonic transition from merging to bouncing to merging and finally to bouncing again. For the first time, two different merging mechanisms are identified and the scaling laws of the nonmonotonic transitions are developed. These results provide important insights into the role of the film thickness in the impact dynamics, which is critical for optimizing operating conditions for spray or ink-jet systems among others. PMID:27021794

  16. Self-similar micron-size and nanosize drops of liquid generated by surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Taller, Daniel; Go, David B; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2012-11-30

    A planar surface acoustic wave on a solid substrate and its radiated sound into a static liquid drop produce time-averaged, exponentially decaying acoustic and electric Maxwell pressures near the contact line. These localized contact-line pressures are shown to generate two sequences of hemispherical satellite droplets at the tens of microns and submicron scales, both obeying self-similar exponential scaling but with distinct exponents that correspond to viscous dissipation and field leakage length scales, respectively. The acoustic pressure becomes dominant when the film thickness exceeds (1/4π) of the surface acoustic wave wavelength and it affects the shape and stability of the mother drop. The Maxwell pressure of the nanodrops, which exceeds ten atmospheres, is sensitive to the contact angle. PMID:23368125

  17. Flow Straightener for a Rotating-Drum Liquid Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Coin, James R.; Converse, David G.; Rethke, Donald W.

    2004-01-01

    A flow straightener has been incorporated into a rotary liquid separator that originally comprised an inlet tube, a shroud plate, an impeller, an inner drum, an outer drum, a housing, a pitot tube, and a hollow shaft motor. As a consequence of the original geometry of the impeller, shroud, inner drum, and hollow shaft, swirl was created in the airflow inside the hollow shaft during operation. The swirl speed was large enough to cause a significant pressure drop. The flow straightener consists of vanes on the back side of the shroud plate. These vanes compartmentalize the inside of the inner drum in such a way as to break up the flow path and thereby stop the air from swirling; as a result, the air enters the hollow shaft with a predominantly axial velocity instead of a swirl. Tests of the rotary liquid separator at an airflow rate of 10 cu ft/min (0.0047 cu m/s) revealed that the dynamic pressure drop was 8 in. of water (approx.=2 kPa) in the absence of the flow straightener and was reduced to 1 in. of water (approx.=0.25 kPa) in the presence of the flow straightener.

  18. Influence of different liquid-drop-based bindings on lighter mass fragments and entropy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rohit; Shivani; Gautam, Sakshi

    2016-04-01

    We study the production of lighter fragments and associated phenomena within the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) model. The Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) method is used to identify the pre-clusters. The final stable fragments were identified by imposing binding energy criteria on the fragments formed using the MST method. The effect of different binding energy criteria was investigated by employing various liquid-drop-based binding energy formulae. Though light clusters show significant effect of different binding energies, their associated phenomenon, i.e. entropy production is insensitive towards different binding energy criteria.

  19. Effect of ice contamination of liquid-nitrogen drops in film boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.; Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Previously reported vaporization time data of liquid nitrogen drops in film boiling on a flat plate are about 30 percent shorter than predicted from standard laminar film boiling theory. This theory, however, had been found to successfully correlate the data for conventional fluids such as water, ethanol, benzene, or carbon tetrachloride. Experimental evidence that some of the discrepancy for cryogenic fluids results from ice contamination due to condensation is presented. The data indicate a fairly linear decrease in droplet evaporation time with the diameter of the ice crystal residue. After correcting the raw data for ice contamination along with convection, a comparison of theory with experiment shows good agreement.

  20. Systematical calculation of α decay half-lives with a generalized liquid drop model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Hongfei; Zhang, Haifei; Royer, G.; Li, Junqing

    2014-01-01

    A systematic calculation of α decay half-lives is presented for even-even nuclei between Te and Z = 118 isotopes. The potential energy governing α decay has been determined within a liquid drop model including proximity effects between the α particle and the daughter nucleus and taking into account the experimental Q value. The α decay half-lives have been deduced from the WKB barrier penetration probability. The α decay half-lives obtained agree reasonably well with the experimental data.

  1. Effect of ice contamination on liquid-nitrogen drops in film boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.; Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Previously reported vaporization time data of liquid nitrogen drops in film boiling on a flat plate are about 30 percent shorter than predicted from standard laminar film boiling theory. This theory, however, had been found to successfully correlate the data for conventional fluids such as water, ethanol, benzene, or carbon tetrachloride. This paper presents experimental evidence that some of the discrepancy for cryogenic fluids results from ice contamination due to condensation. The data indicate a fairly linear decrease in droplet evaporation time with the diameter of the ice crystal residue. After correcting the raw data for ice contamination along with convection, a comparison of theory with experiment shows good agreement.

  2. Pressure drop in fully developed, turbulent, liquid-vapor annular flows in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1992-01-01

    The prediction of frictional pressure drop in fully developed, turbulent, annular liquid-vapor flows in zero gravity using simulation experiments conducted on earth is described. The scheme extends the authors' earlier work on dispersed flows. The simulation experiments used two immiscible liquids of identical density, namely, water and n-butyl benzoate. Because of the lack of rigorous analytical models for turbulent, annular flows, the proposed scheme resorts to existing semiempirical correlations. Results based on two different correlations are presented and compared. Others may be used. It was shown that, for both dispersed and annular flow regimes, the predicted frictional pressure gradients in 0-g are lower than those in 1-g under otherwise identical conditions. The physical basis for this finding is given.

  3. Solid surface tension measured by a liquid drop under a solid film.

    PubMed

    Nadermann, Nichole; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand

    2013-06-25

    We show that a drop of liquid a few hundred microns in diameter placed under a solid, elastic, thin film (∼10 μm thick) causes it to bulge by tens of microns. The deformed shape is governed by equilibrium of tensions exerted by the various interfaces and the solid film, a form of Neumann's triangle. Unlike Young's equation, which specifies the contact angles at the junction of two fluids and a (rigid) solid, and is fundamentally underdetermined, both tensions in the solid film can be determined here if the liquid-vapor surface tension is known independently. Tensions in the solid film have a contribution from elastic stretch and a constant residual component. The residual component, extracted by extrapolation to films of vanishing thickness and supported by analysis of the elastic deformation, is interpreted as the solid-fluid surface tension, demonstrating that compliant thin-film structures can be used to measure solid surface tensions. PMID:23754440

  4. Preliminary drop-tower experiments on liquid-interface geometry in partially filled containers at zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedley, G.

    1990-01-01

    Plexiglass containers with rounded trapezoidal cross sections were designed and built to test the validity of Concus and Finn's existence theorem (1974, 1983) for a bounded free liquid surface at zero gravity. Experiments were carried out at the NASA Lewis two-second drop tower. Dyed ethanol-water solutions and three immiscible liquid pairs, with one liquid dyed, were tested. High-speed movies were used to record the liquid motion. Liquid rose to the top of the smaller end of the containers when the contact angle was small enough, in agreement with the theory. Liquid interface motion demonstrated a strong dependence on physical properties, including surface roughness and contamination.

  5. Carbon dioxide in an ionic liquid: Structural and rotational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Chiara H; Kramer, Patrick L; Yamada, Steven A; Nishida, Jun; Tamimi, Amr; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-03-14

    Ionic liquids (ILs), which have widely tunable structural motifs and intermolecular interactions with solutes, have been proposed as possible carbon capture media. To inform the choice of an optimal ionic liquid system, it can be useful to understand the details of dynamics and interactions on fundamental time scales (femtoseconds to picoseconds) of dissolved gases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO2), within the complex solvation structures present in these uniquely organized materials. The rotational and local structural fluctuation dynamics of CO2 in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EmimNTf2) were investigated by using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy to interrogate the CO2 asymmetric stretch. Polarization-selective pump probe measurements yielded the orientational correlation function of the CO2 vibrational transition dipole. It was found that reorientation of the carbon dioxide occurs on 3 time scales: 0.91 ± 0.03, 8.3 ± 0.1, 54 ± 1 ps. The initial two are attributed to restricted wobbling motions originating from a gating of CO2 motions by the IL cations and anions. The final (slowest) decay corresponds to complete orientational randomization. Two-dimensional infrared vibrational echo (2D IR) spectroscopy provided information on structural rearrangements, which cause spectral diffusion, through the time dependence of the 2D line shape. Analysis of the time-dependent 2D IR spectra yields the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF). Polarization-selective 2D IR experiments conducted on the CO2 asymmetric stretch in the parallel- and perpendicular-pumped geometries yield significantly different FFCFs due to a phenomenon known as reorientation-induced spectral diffusion (RISD), revealing strong vector interactions with the liquid structures that evolve slowly on the (independently measured) rotation time scales. To separate the RISD contribution to the FFCF from the structural spectral

  6. Carbon dioxide in an ionic liquid: Structural and rotational dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giammanco, Chiara H.; Kramer, Patrick L.; Yamada, Steven A.; Nishida, Jun; Tamimi, Amr; Fayer, Michael D.

    2016-03-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs), which have widely tunable structural motifs and intermolecular interactions with solutes, have been proposed as possible carbon capture media. To inform the choice of an optimal ionic liquid system, it can be useful to understand the details of dynamics and interactions on fundamental time scales (femtoseconds to picoseconds) of dissolved gases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO2), within the complex solvation structures present in these uniquely organized materials. The rotational and local structural fluctuation dynamics of CO2 in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EmimNTf2) were investigated by using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy to interrogate the CO2 asymmetric stretch. Polarization-selective pump probe measurements yielded the orientational correlation function of the CO2 vibrational transition dipole. It was found that reorientation of the carbon dioxide occurs on 3 time scales: 0.91 ± 0.03, 8.3 ± 0.1, 54 ± 1 ps. The initial two are attributed to restricted wobbling motions originating from a gating of CO2 motions by the IL cations and anions. The final (slowest) decay corresponds to complete orientational randomization. Two-dimensional infrared vibrational echo (2D IR) spectroscopy provided information on structural rearrangements, which cause spectral diffusion, through the time dependence of the 2D line shape. Analysis of the time-dependent 2D IR spectra yields the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF). Polarization-selective 2D IR experiments conducted on the CO2 asymmetric stretch in the parallel- and perpendicular-pumped geometries yield significantly different FFCFs due to a phenomenon known as reorientation-induced spectral diffusion (RISD), revealing strong vector interactions with the liquid structures that evolve slowly on the (independently measured) rotation time scales. To separate the RISD contribution to the FFCF from the structural spectral

  7. Bubble pinch-off and scaling during liquid drop impact on liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Bahni; Biswas, Gautam; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2012-08-01

    Simulations are performed to show entrapment of air bubble accompanied by high speed upward and downward water jets when a water drop impacts a pool of water surface. A new bubble entrapment zone characterised by small bubble pinch-off and long thick jet is found. Depending on the bubble and jet behaviour, the bubble entrapment zone is subdivided into three sub-regimes. The entrapped bubble size and jet height depends on the crater shape and its maximum depth. During the bubble formation, bubble neck develops an almost singular shape as it pinches off. The final pinch-off shape and the power law governing the pinching, rneck ∝ A(t0 - t)αvaries with the Weber number. Weber dependence of the function describing the radius of the bubble during the pinch-off only affects the coefficient A and not the power exponent α.

  8. Simple Verification of the Parabolic Shape of a Rotating Liquid and a Boat on Its Surface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatka, Z.; Dvorak, L.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive way to create and to verify the parabolic surface of a rotating liquid. The liquid is water. The second part of the article deals with the problem of a boat on the surface of a rotating liquid. (Contains 1 table, 10 figures and 5 footnotes.)

  9. A comprehensive analysis of the evaporation of a liquid spherical drop.

    PubMed

    Sobac, B; Talbot, P; Haut, B; Rednikov, A; Colinet, P

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, a new comprehensive analysis of a suspended drop of a pure liquid evaporating into air is presented. Based on mass and energy conservation equations, a quasi-steady model is developed including diffusive and convective transports, and considering the non-isothermia of the gas phase. The main original feature of this simple analytical model lies in the consideration of the local dependence of the physico-chemical properties of the gas on the gas temperature, which has a significant influence on the evaporation process at high temperatures. The influence of the atmospheric conditions on the interfacial evaporation flux, molar fraction and temperature is investigated. Simplified versions of the model are developed to highlight the key mechanisms governing the evaporation process. For the conditions considered in this work, the convective transport appears to be opposed to the evaporation process leading to a decrease of the evaporation flux. However, this effect is relatively limited, the Péclet numbers happening to be small. In addition, the gas isothermia assumption never appears to be valid here, even at room temperature, due to the large temperature gradient that develops in the gas phase. These two conclusions are explained by the fact that heat transfer from the gas to the liquid appears to be the step limiting the evaporation process. Regardless of the complexity of the developed model, yet excluding extremely small droplets, the square of the drop radius decreases linearly over time (R(2) law). The assumptions of the model are rigorously discussed and general criteria are established, independently of the liquid-gas couple considered.

  10. Not spreading in reverse: The dewetting of a liquid film into a single drop

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Andrew M. J.; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; Newton, Michael I.; Brown, Carl V.; McHale, Glen

    2016-01-01

    Wetting and dewetting are both fundamental modes of motion of liquids on solid surfaces. They are critically important for processes in biology, chemistry, and engineering, such as drying, coating, and lubrication. However, recent progress in wetting, which has led to new fields such as superhydrophobicity and liquid marbles, has not been matched by dewetting. A significant problem has been the inability to study the model system of a uniform film dewetting from a nonwetting surface to a single macroscopic droplet—a barrier that does not exist for the reverse wetting process of a droplet spreading into a film. We report the dewetting of a dielectrophoresis-induced film into a single equilibrium droplet. The emergent picture of the full dewetting dynamics is of an initial regime, where a liquid rim recedes at constant speed and constant dynamic contact angle, followed by a relatively short exponential relaxation of a spherical cap shape. This sharply contrasts with the reverse wetting process, where a spreading droplet follows a smooth sequence of spherical cap shapes. Complementary numerical simulations and a hydrodynamic model reveal a local dewetting mechanism driven by the equilibrium contact angle, where contact line slip dominates the dewetting dynamics. Our conclusions can be used to understand a wide variety of processes involving liquid dewetting, such as drop rebound, condensation, and evaporation. In overcoming the barrier to studying single film-to-droplet dewetting, our results provide new approaches to fluid manipulation and uses of dewetting, such as inducing films of prescribed initial shapes and slip-controlled liquid retraction. PMID:27704042

  11. Energy Budget of Liquid Drop Impact at Maximum Spreading: Numerical Simulations and Experiments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Bong; Derome, Dominique; Dolatabadi, Ali; Carmeliet, Jan

    2016-02-01

    The maximum spreading of an impinging droplet on a rigid surface is studied for low to high impact velocity, until the droplet starts splashing. We investigate experimentally and numerically the role of liquid properties, such as surface tension and viscosity, on drop impact using three liquids. It is found that the use of the experimental dynamic contact angle at maximum spreading in the Kistler model, which is used as a boundary condition for the CFD-VOF calculation, gives good agreement between experimental and numerical results. Analytical models commonly used to predict the boundary layer thickness and time at maximum spreading are found to be less correct, meaning that energy balance models relying on these relations have to be considered with care. The time of maximum spreading is found to depend on both the impact velocity and surface tension, and neither dependency is predicted correctly in common analytical models. The relative proportion of the viscous dissipation in the total energy budget increases with impact velocity with respect to surface energy. At high impact velocity, the contribution of surface energy, even before splashing, is still substantial, meaning that both surface energy and viscous dissipation have to be taken into account, and scaling laws depending only on viscous dissipation do not apply. At low impact velocity, viscous dissipation seems to play an important role in low-surface-tension liquids such as ethanol. PMID:26745364

  12. Quantitative determinations of antipyrine and benzocaine in ear drops by high-pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V D; Sachanandani, S

    1977-06-01

    Antipyrine and benzocaine were determined quantitatively in ear drops by high-pressure liquid chromatography on an octadecyltrichlorosilane permanently bonded to a Si-C column, using 0.02 M KH2PO4 in methanol-water as the mobile phase. Both compounds can be assayed in combination directly without interference from each other or from oxyquinoline sulfate (the preservative). The method is accurate, precise (estimated universe standard deviations of 0.68% for antipyrine and 1.18% for benzocaine), simple, and short (requires 30 min versus 2-3 hr by the NF method). The method was tried on a commercial product with excellent results and can be used in the presence of decomposition products.

  13. Liquid-crystal-on-silicon-based optical add/drop multiplexer for orbital-angular-momentum-multiplexed optical links.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao; Yue, Yang; Yan, Yan; Ahmed, Nisar; Ren, Yongxiong; Tur, Moshe; Willner, Alan E

    2013-12-01

    We designed an optical add/drop multiplexer for orbital-angular-momentum (OAM)-multiplexed data links by taking advantage of the ring-shaped intensity profile of OAM beams. We demonstrated adding/dropping a single OAM beam from three multiplexed OAM beams using liquid-crystal-on-silicon-based diffraction optical elements. For multiplexed OAM beams carrying 100 Gbit/s quadrature phase-shift-keying data, a power penalty of <2 dB is observed to achieve a bit-error rate of 2.0×10(-3) for each channel of the add/drop multiplexer.

  14. Turbulent Convection in a Rotating Sphere Filled With Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataf, H.; Aubert, J.; Cardin, P.; Brito, D.; Masson, J.

    2001-12-01

    Understanding the organization of turbulent convective motions in a rotating sphere would help building more realistic models of the geodynamo and solar dynamo. We have performed laboratory experiments using water and gallium as working fluids. We have examined the convective structures that form by following the time--variation of velocity profiles measured by Doppler ultrasonic velocimetry and investigated their dynamical behaviour by monitoring the amplitude of velocity as a function of the Prandtl, Rayleigh and Ekman numbers. Our most striking result is that a strong zonal flow develops in liquid gallium (Prandtl number of 0.025). It can be 2.5 times stronger than typical convective velocities. We explain this phenomenon by the high Reynolds numbers reached in these experiments, up to 2000, much larger than in the water experiments (less than 250). Our observations for gallium are well accounted for by a quasi--geostrophic inertial model, in which kinetic energy is injected at the convective scale and cascades up to a large zonal flow, whose amplitude is limited by friction on the outer sphere. This model predicts that the convective velocity U becomes independent of the two diffusivities (viscous and thermal) and scales as : $ U ~ D Ω ( (α g Q)/(ρ CP Ω 3 D2) )2/5 where D is the thickness of the liquid shell, \\Omega the rotation rate, Q the heat flux, g the gravity acceleration, and \\alpha, \\rho and C_P$ are the thermal expansion coefficient, the density and the heat capacity of the liquid. The sphericity also introduces a variation of velocity with radius. Both the scaling law and these radial variations are in very good agreement with the measured velocity profiles. In contrast, the zonal velocity does depend upon the viscosity of the liquid through friction on the outer boundary. This behaviour illustrates the crucial role of the spherical boundaries in controlling the organization of turbulence. Nevertheless, the motions remain essentially two

  15. Stationary shapes of confined rotating magnetic liquid droplets.

    PubMed

    Lira, Sérgio A; Miranda, José A; Oliveira, Rafael M

    2010-09-01

    We study the family of steady shapes which arise when a magnetic liquid droplet is confined in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell and subjected to an azimuthal magnetic field. Two different scenarios are considered: first, the magnetic fluid is assumed to be a Newtonian ferrofluid, and then it is taken as a viscoelastic magnetorheological fluid. The influence of the distinct material properties of the fluids on the ultimate morphology of the emerging stationary patterns is investigated by using a vortex-sheet formalism. Some of these exact steady structures are similar to the advanced time patterns obtained by existing time-evolving numerical simulations of the problem. A weakly nonlinear approach is employed to examine this fact and to gain analytical insight about relevant aspects related to the stability of such exact stationary solutions. PMID:21230182

  16. Investigation of wetting states on microstructures after liquid drops contact groove base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Mingming

    Wetting properties of roughness surfaces have attracted a considerable attention because of both the scientific insight and the practical applications. One of the most intriguing topics of wetting is the so-called Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel transition. Recently, theoretical and experimental works have been done to explore this transition on microstructure-formed surfaces. One of the criteria that most commonly used to judge such transition is whether a liquid drop contacts the base of a roughness groove. It is expected that, after the contact, liquid immediately fills the roughness groove, and subsequently the wetting state is changed from Cassie-Baxter state to that of Wenzel. However, this transition criterion does not always hold true in the case of microchannels. Through theoretical and experimental investigations, we show that, when an angle criterion is satisfied, there may exist an intermediate wetting state inside a microchannel after a water drop contacts the bottom of the microchannel. In this wetting state, water does not completely fill the microchannel, and air pockets still exist in its bottom corners. Also, the wetting state is stable in the sense that its energy state is lower than that of the Wenzel model. In addition to microchannels, the aforementioned intermediate state may also exist on a single corner, when the angle criterion is met. Moreover, we demonstrate that the angle criterion also applies to the case of micropillars with circular or polygonal cross-sections. Finally, based on the results achieved in the cases of microchannels and micropillars, we further investigate the applicability of the angle criterion to the cases of microballs and lotus leaf surfaces.

  17. Manipulation of Contact Angles and Interfacial Lengths of Liquid Drops using Electro-Kinetic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Nolte, D. D.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    Traditionally, capillary pressure is determined by increasing or decreasing external fluid pressures to change the immiscible fluid saturation in a porous medium. The resulting saturation and interfacial area are then linked to the capillary pressure through constitutive equations. A key question is whether externally measured pressures are sensitive to changes in distributions that arise from internal changes in contact angles. As a first step in addressing this question, we investigated the effect of electro-kinetic manipulation on interfacial area and contact angles for a fixed saturation. An EWOD (electro-wetting on dielectric) technique was used to alter the contact angle of single 10 μL droplets of a 1M KCl-H2O solution. A liquid droplet was placed on a glass cover slip (18 mm x 18 mm) coated with a layer of silver (100 nm in thickness) to act as an electrode and then spin-coated with polyimide (a dielectric). A platinum wire was inserted into the droplet and connected to an AC voltage source. The glass plate electrode was connected to ground. Measurements were made for Vrms voltages between 0 to 300 V at a frequency of 50 Hz. Two CCD cameras were used to image changes in the shape of a droplet. One camera was placed on a microscope to capture a top view of a drop in order to measure changes in areal extent and the perimeter of the drop. The second camera imaged a drop from the side to measure contact angles and side-view areal extent and perimeter. At low voltages, the cosine of the contact angle, θ, after applying voltage was linearly dependent on Vrms2. Several experiments showed that the slope of the low-voltage relationship of cos θ vs Vrms2 remained constant for all trials. As the voltage increased, the contact angle saturated. From the side-view images, the contact angle and interfacial length decreased with increasing voltage. From the top-view images, the drop shape changed from circular to elliptical-to irregular as the voltage increased

  18. Drop formation, pinch-off dynamics and liquid transfer of simple and complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinic, Jelena; Sharma, Vivek

    Liquid transfer and drop formation processes underlying jetting, spraying, coating, and printing - inkjet, screen, roller-coating, gravure, nanoimprint hot embossing, 3D - often involve formation of unstable columnar necks. Capillary-driven thinning of such necks and their pinchoff dynamics are determined by a complex interplay of inertial, viscous and capillary stresses for simple, Newtonian fluids. Micro-structural changes in response to extensional flow field that arises within the thinning neck give rise to additional viscoelastic stresses in complex, non- Newtonian fluids. Using FLOW-3D, we simulate flows realized in prototypical geometries (dripping and liquid bridge stretched between two parallel plates) used for studying pinch-off dynamics and influence of microstructure and viscoelasticity. In contrast with often-used 1D or 2D models, FLOW-3D allows a robust evaluation of the magnitude of the underlying stresses and extensional flow field (both uniformity and magnitude). We find that the simulated radius evolution profiles match the pinch-off dynamics that are experimentally-observed and theoretically-predicted for model Newtonian fluids and complex fluids.

  19. Determining the Drag Coefficient of Rotational Symmetric Objects Falling through Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    I will propose here a kinematic approach for measuring the drag coefficient of rotational symmetric objects falling through liquids. For this, I will show that one can obtain a measurement of the drag coefficient of a rotational symmetric object by numerically solving the equation of motion describing its fall through a known liquid contained in a…

  20. Effects of Polymers on the Rotational Viscosities of Nematic Liquid Crystals and Dynamics of Field Alignment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Du-Rim

    Many of the important physical phenomena exhibited by the nematic phase, such as its unusual flow properties and its responses to the electric and the magnetic fields, can be discussed regarding it as a continuous medium. The Leslie-Erickson dynamic theory has the six dissipative coefficients from continuum model of liquid crystal. Parodi showed that only five of them are independent, when Onsagar's reciprocal relations are used. One of these, which has no counterpart in the isotropic liquids, is the rotational viscosity coefficient, gamma_1. The main objective of this project is to study the rotational viscosities of selected micellar nematic systems and the effect of dissolved polymers in micellar and thermotropic liquid crystals. We used rotating magnetic field method which allows one to determine gamma _1 and the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility, chi_{a}. For the ionic surfactant liquid crystals of SDS and KL systems used in this study, the rotational viscosity exhibited an extraordinary drop after reaching the highest value gamma_1 as the temperature was lowered. This behavior is not observed in normal liquid crystals. But this phenomena can be attributed to the existence of nematic biaxial phase below the rod-like nematic N_{c} phase. The pretransitional increase in gamma _1 near the disk-like nematic to smectic -A phase transition of the pure CsPFO H_2O systems are better understood with the help of mean-field models of W. L. McMillan. He predicted a critical exponent nu = -{1over 2} for the divergence of gamma_1. The polymer (PEO, molecular weight = 10 ^5) dissolved in CsPFO H_2O system (which has 0.6% critical polymer concentration), suppressed the nematic to lamellar smectic phase transition in concentrated polymer solutions (0.75% and higher). In dilute polymer solutions with lower than 0.3% polyethylene-oxide, a linear increase of gamma_1 is observed, which agrees with Brochard theory. The polymer solutions in thermotropic liquid crystal solvents

  1. Elastic sheet on a liquid drop reveals wrinkling and crumpling as distinct symmetry-breaking instabilities

    PubMed Central

    King, Hunter; Schroll, Robert D.; Davidovitch, Benny; Menon, Narayanan

    2012-01-01

    Smooth wrinkles and sharply crumpled regions are familiar motifs in biological or synthetic sheets, such as rapidly growing plant leaves and crushed foils. Previous studies have addressed both morphological types, but the generic route whereby a featureless sheet develops a complex shape remains elusive. Here we show that this route proceeds through an unusual sequence of distinct symmetry-breaking instabilities. The object of our study is an ultrathin circular sheet stretched over a liquid drop. As the curvature is gradually increased, the surface tension stretching the sheet over the drop causes compression along circles of latitude. The compression is relieved first by a transition into a wrinkle pattern, and then into a crumpled state via a continuous transition. Our data provide conclusive evidence that wrinkle patterns in highly bendable sheets are not described by classical buckling methods, but rather by a theory which assumes that wrinkles completely relax the compressive stress. With this understanding we recognize the observed sequence of transitions as distinct symmetry breakings of the shape and the stress field. The axial symmetry of the shape is broken upon wrinkling but the underlying stress field preserves this symmetry. Thus, the wrinkle-to-crumple transition marks symmetry-breaking of the stress in highly bendable sheets. By contrast, other instabilities of sheets, such as blistering and cracking, break the homogeneity of shape and stress simultaneously. The onset of crumpling occurs when the wrinkle pattern grows to half the sheet’s radius, suggesting a geometric, material-independent origin for this transition. PMID:22679292

  2. Flow pattern and pressure drop of vertical upward gas-liquid flow in sinusoidal wavy channels

    SciTech Connect

    Nilpueng, Kitti; Wongwises, Somchai

    2006-06-15

    Flow patterns and pressure drop of upward liquid single-phase flow and air-water two-phase flow in sinusoidal wavy channels are experimentally studied. The test section is formed by a sinusoidal wavy wall of 1.00 m length with a wave length of 67.20mm, an amplitude of 5.76mm. Different phase shifts between the side walls of the wavy channel of 0{sup o}, 90{sup o} and 180{sup o} are investigated. The flow phenomena, which are bubbly flow, slug flow, churn flow, and dispersed bubbly flow are observed and recorded by high-speed camera. When the phase shifts are increased, the onset of the transition from the bubbly flow to the churn flow shifts to a higher value of superficial air velocity, and the regions of the slug flow and the churn flow are smaller. In other words, the regions of the bubbly flow and the dispersed bubbly flow are larger as the phase shift increases. The slug flow pattern is only found in the test sections with phase shifts of 0{sup o} and 90{sup o}. Recirculating gas bubbles are always found in the troughs of the corrugations. The recirculating is higher when the phase shifts are larger. The relationship between the two-phase multipliers calculated from the measured pressure drops, and the Martinelli parameter is compared with the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation. The correlation in the case of turbulent-turbulent condition is shown to fit the data very well for the phase shift of 0{sup o} but shows greater deviation when the phase shifts are higher. (author)

  3. Modulated exponential films generated by surface acoustic waves and their role in liquid wicking and aerosolization at a pinned drop.

    PubMed

    Taller, Daniel; Go, David B; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2013-05-01

    The exponentially decaying acoustic pressure of scattered surface acoustic waves (SAWs) at the contact line of a liquid film pinned to filter paper is shown to sustain a high curvature conic tip with micron-sized modulations whose dimension grows exponentially from the tip. The large negative capillary pressure in the film, necessary for offsetting the large positive acoustic pressure at the contact line, also creates significant negative hydrodynamic pressure and robust wicking action through the paper. An asymptotic analysis of this intricate pressure matching between the quasistatic conic film and bulk drop shows that the necessary SAW power to pump liquid from the filter paper and aerosolize, expressed in terms of the acoustic pressure scaled by the drop capillary pressure, grows exponentially with respect to twice the acoustic decay constant multiplied by the drop length, with a universal preexponential coefficient. Global rapid aerosolization occurs at a SAW power twice as high, beyond which the wicking rate saturates. PMID:23767617

  4. Creeping motion and deformation of liquid drops in flow through 2D model porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, I. )

    1988-01-01

    The motion, deformation and breakup of immiscible drops suspended in low Reynolds number flow through cylinder arrays has been studied experimentally to assess the applicability of the 2D model as a prototype for 2-phase flow through porous media. Both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid systems are considered. The relationship between key flow and geometric parameters and the critical condition for breakup, the resulting drop site distribution and the drop mobility is investigated. It is observed that the headon impact of a drop with a cylinder is an effective precursor to severe drop deformation and even breakup. The sequence of flow leading to impact is also important in determining the effectiveness of impact to result in breakup. When many drops fragments are present, the interaction between nearby drops strongly influences the final disposition of the fragments. Fluid elasticity appears to enhance the elongation of drops to form strands, but also to stabilize the strand against breakup.

  5. Superdeformed nuclei: Shells-vs-liquid drop, pairing-vs-thermal excitations, triaxial-vs-octupole shapes, super-superdeformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, J.

    1987-01-01

    Mechanisms influencing the behavior of superdeformed nuclei are studied using several well established nuclear structure techniques. In particular: pairing, thermal excitation, shell and liquid-drop mechanisms are considered. The effects of quadrupole and hexadecapole (both axial and non-axial), and octupole deformation degrees of freedom are studied. Most of the results are illustrated using the case of /sup 152/Dy nucleus in which a superdeformed band extending up to I approx. 60 h-bar has been found in experiment. Some comparisons between /sup 152/Dy and the nuclei in the neighborhood are given. Calculations show that pairing ''de-aligns'' typically 6 to 8 units of angular momentum, as compared to the corresponding rigid rotation. This takes place for spins extending up to the highest limit, and thus diminishes the effective moments of inertia. Predicted octupole shape susceptibility is extremely large, significantly stronger than the susceptibilities known in the ground-states of many Actinide nuclei. Consequences of this result for the near-constancy of the dynamical moments of inertia are pointed out. Nuclear level densities calculated in function of spin, excitation energy and deformation explain the ''unusual'' side feeding pattern of the /sup 152/Dy superdeformed states. Predictions of super-superdeformed nuclear states (axis ratio varying between 2:1 and 3:1 or more) are given and exemplified for Erbium nuclei. Finally, the problem of superdeformation stability and the influence of increased collective inertia on a barrier penetration are examined. An analytical expression for the effective inertia parameter is obtained and its derivation outlined. 35 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Encapsulation of liquids using a counter rotating twin screw extruder.

    PubMed

    Tackenberg, Markus W; Krauss, Ralph; Marmann, Andreas; Thommes, Markus; Schuchmann, Heike P; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Until now extrusion is not applied for pharmaceutical encapsulation processes, whereas extrusion is widely used for encapsulation of flavours within food applications. Based on previous mixing studies, a hot melt counter-rotating extrusion process for encapsulation of liquid active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) was investigated. The mixing ratio of maltodextrin to sucrose as matrix material was adapted in first extrusion trials. Then the number of die holes was investigated to decrease expansion and agglutination of extrudates to a minimum. At a screw speed of 180 min(-1) the product temperature was decreased below 142 °C, resulting in extrudates of cylindrical shape with a crystalline content of 9-16%. Volatile orange terpenes and the nonvolatile α-tocopherol were chosen as model APIs. Design of experiments were performed to investigate the influences of barrel temperature, powder feed rate, and API content on the API retentions. A maximum of 9.2% α-tocopherol was encapsulated, while the orange terpene encapsulation rate decreased to 6.0% due to evaporation after leaving the die. During 12 weeks of storage re-crystallization of sucrose occurred; however, the encapsulated orange terpene amount remained unchanged.

  7. Encapsulation of liquids using a counter rotating twin screw extruder.

    PubMed

    Tackenberg, Markus W; Krauss, Ralph; Marmann, Andreas; Thommes, Markus; Schuchmann, Heike P; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Until now extrusion is not applied for pharmaceutical encapsulation processes, whereas extrusion is widely used for encapsulation of flavours within food applications. Based on previous mixing studies, a hot melt counter-rotating extrusion process for encapsulation of liquid active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) was investigated. The mixing ratio of maltodextrin to sucrose as matrix material was adapted in first extrusion trials. Then the number of die holes was investigated to decrease expansion and agglutination of extrudates to a minimum. At a screw speed of 180 min(-1) the product temperature was decreased below 142 °C, resulting in extrudates of cylindrical shape with a crystalline content of 9-16%. Volatile orange terpenes and the nonvolatile α-tocopherol were chosen as model APIs. Design of experiments were performed to investigate the influences of barrel temperature, powder feed rate, and API content on the API retentions. A maximum of 9.2% α-tocopherol was encapsulated, while the orange terpene encapsulation rate decreased to 6.0% due to evaporation after leaving the die. During 12 weeks of storage re-crystallization of sucrose occurred; however, the encapsulated orange terpene amount remained unchanged. PMID:25460584

  8. Effects of Evaporation/Condensation on Spreading and Contact Angle of a Volatile Liquid Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Effects of evaporation/condensation on spreading and contact angle were experimentally studied. A sessile drop of R-113 was tested at different vapor environments to determine the effects of evaporation/condensation on the evolution of contact diameter and contact angle of the drop. Condensation on the drop surface occurs at both the saturated and a nonsaturated vapor environments and promotes the spreading. When the drop is placed in the saturated vapor environment it tends to completely wetting and spreads rapidly. In a nonsaturated vapor environment, the evolution of the sessile drop is divided three stages: condensation-spreading stage, evaporation-retracting stage and rapid contracting stage. In the first stage the drop behaves as in the saturated environment. In the evaporation -retracting stage, the competition between spreading and evaporation of the drop determines the evolution characteristics of the contact diameter and the contact angle. A lower evaporation rate struggles against the spreading power to turn the drop from spreading to retracting with a continuous increase of the contact angle. The drop placed in open air has a much higher evaporation rate. The strong evaporation suppresses the spreading and accelerates the retraction of the drop with a linear decrease of the contact diameter. The contraction of the evaporating drops is gradually accelerated when the contact diameter decreases to 3 min and less till drying up, though the evaporation rate is gradually slowing down.

  9. Solid surface tension measured by a liquid drop under a solid film

    PubMed Central

    Nadermann, Nichole; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand

    2013-01-01

    We show that a drop of liquid a few hundred microns in diameter placed under a solid, elastic, thin film (∼10 μm thick) causes it to bulge by tens of microns. The deformed shape is governed by equilibrium of tensions exerted by the various interfaces and the solid film, a form of Neumann’s triangle. Unlike Young’s equation, which specifies the contact angles at the junction of two fluids and a (rigid) solid, and is fundamentally underdetermined, both tensions in the solid film can be determined here if the liquid–vapor surface tension is known independently. Tensions in the solid film have a contribution from elastic stretch and a constant residual component. The residual component, extracted by extrapolation to films of vanishing thickness and supported by analysis of the elastic deformation, is interpreted as the solid–fluid surface tension, demonstrating that compliant thin-film structures can be used to measure solid surface tensions. PMID:23754440

  10. Crater evolution after the impact of a drop onto a semi-infinite liquid target.

    PubMed

    Bisighini, Alfio; Cossali, Gianpietro E; Tropea, Cameron; Roisman, Ilia V

    2010-09-01

    This paper is devoted to an experimental and theoretical investigation of the crater formed by the impact of a single drop onto a semi-infinite target of the same liquid. The shape of the crater at various time instances after impact has been observed using a high-speed video system and then accurately characterized. A theoretical model for the crater expansion has been developed, which is able to predict the temporal variation of the crater depth for sufficiently high Weber, Froude, and Reynolds numbers. The flow around the crater is approximated by an irrotational velocity field past a moving and expanding sphere. The equations describing the propagation of the surface of the crater have been obtained from the balance of stresses at the crater interface, accounting for inertia, gravity, and surface tension. The temporal evolution of the crater depth has been calculated by numerical solution of the equations of motion. The agreement between the theoretical predictions and experimental data are rather good.

  11. Distant optical detection of small rotations and displacements by means of chiral liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shibaev, Petr V. E-mail: shibayev@fordham.edu; Troisi, Juliana; Reddy, Kathryn; Iljin, Andrey

    2014-01-15

    The paper describes novel chiral viscoelastic liquid crystalline mixtures and their application for the detection of small rotational displacements of two plates confining cholesteric liquid crystals (CLC). The mixtures are characterized by extremely high viscosities and stability of the selective reflection band (SRB) at ambient temperatures. Even a small rotation applied to the chiral liquid crystal (CLC) cell results in dramatic changes of the reflective properties of sandwiched CLC films. The angle and direction of rotation as well as the magnitude of CLC's shear deformation can be determined for a variety of experimental geometries, each of which is characterized by its own response function. The proposed model explains changes in the reflection spectra for different experimental geometries and relates them to the angle of rotation and magnitude of shear. The method was tested for a detection of small rotations from a distance of up to 50 m and allows for resolving small rotations of the order of fractions of degrees.

  12. Profiles of flow discharged from vertical rotating pipes: A contrast between inviscid liquid and granular jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, P. D.; Kubitschek, J. P.; Medina, A.

    2008-11-01

    The stability of viscous rotating liquid columns and their application to rotating viscous liquid jets aligned under gravity is reviewed. Experiments on stable viscous fluid flow discharged from rotating vertical pipes exhibit very weak contraction. We present an elementary liquid jet analysis to understand this phenomenon. Indeed, our inviscid model of a slender rotating inviscid liquid jet shows that rotation suppresses contraction. Next we study the comparable problem for granular flow. Our model for noncohesive granular flow emanating from a vertical pipe rotating about its central axis, valid for sufficiently large rotation rate, shows that the granular profiles blossom rather than contract. The profiles of both the liquid and granular jets depend on the same dimensionless parameters—an exit Froude number Fr0 and an exit swirl parameter χ0. The limitations of both models are discussed. Experimental data for granular jet profiles compare well with the collision-free granular flow model in its range of applicability. A criterion for the rotation rate at which particles adjacent to the inner wall of the rotating pipe cease to flow is also given and compared to experiment.

  13. Isotropic rotation vs. shear relaxation in supercooled liquids with globular cage molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaseman, Derrick C.; Gulbiten, Ozgur; Aitken, Bruce G.; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the rotational dynamics of P4Se3 molecules in the glass-forming molecular liquid P5Se3 is studied using two-dimensional 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Unlike typical molecular glass-forming liquids, the constituent molecules in the P5Se3 liquid perform rapid isotropic rotation without significant translational diffusion in the supercooled regime and this rotational process shows a decoupling in time scale from shear relaxation by nearly six orders of magnitude at the glass transition. This dynamical behavior of liquid-like rotation and localized translation appears to be universal to glass-forming liquids with high-symmetry globular molecules that are characterized by an underlying thermodynamically stable plastic crystal phase.

  14. A comparison of optical measurements of liquid water content and drop size distribution in adiabatic regions of Florida cumuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, R. Paul; Blyth, Alan M.

    Airborne measurements of liquid water content (LWC) and drop size distribution were made in adiabatic regions of small, growing cumulus clouds during the Small Cumulus Microphysics Study (SCMS). A new instrument, the cloud drop spectrometer (CDS), which measures LWC and also drop size from an ensemble of drops, was flown for the first time in the field. Measurements from other sensors, including a Particle Measuring Systems (PMS) forward scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP), the `fast' FSSP (FFSSP) developed by the Centre National De Recherches Meteorologiques (CNRM), and a Gerber Scientific airborne particulate volume monitor (PVM-100A), are compared with the CDS data collected in adiabatic and other regions. The CDS appeared to reliably measure very close to the predicted value of LWC in regions identified as being adiabatic. In addition, the drop size distribution measured by the CDS compared very well with the FSSP and FFSSP measurements, except where the 3-200 μm range of the CDS allowed it to measure larger drops than the nominal 3-45 μm range of the FSSP, and the 2.7 to 38.4 μm range of the FFSSP.

  15. Thermocapillary motion of a liquid drop on a horizontal solid surface.

    PubMed

    Pratap, Vikram; Moumen, Nadjoua; Subramanian, R Shankar

    2008-05-01

    The motion of drops of decane on horizontal poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-coated glass surfaces resulting from a temperature gradient on the surface is studied experimentally, and a theoretical description of the thermocapillary motion of spherical-cap drops on a horizontal solid surface obtained using the lubrication approximation also is presented. The drop size and the applied temperature gradient are varied in the experiments, and the measured velocities of the drops are compared with predictions from the model. The scalings of the velocity with drop size and with the applied temperature gradient are predicted correctly by the theoretical model, even though the actual velocities are smaller than those predicted. The influence of contact angle hysteresis, which leads to a critical drop size below which drops do not move, is found to be minimal. Unlike in previous studies (Chen, J. Z.; Troian, S. M.; Darhuber, A. A.; Wagner, S. J. Appl. Phys. 2005, 97, 014906; Brzoska, J. B.; Brochard-Wyart, F.; Rondelez, F. Langmuir 1993, 9, 2220), this small critical drop size appears to be independent of the applied temperature gradient. Results also are presented on the deformation of the contact lines of the moving drops in the form of an aspect ratio, and correlated with the temperature difference across the footprints of the drops and the capillary number. PMID:18399689

  16. A model to predict the conditions for liquid drop breakup and the resultant mean fragment size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wert, K. L.; Jacobs, H. R.

    1994-01-01

    The potential significance of drop fragmentation in sprays and other propulsion-related multiphase flows has been noted in the literature. This has motivated recent experimental and theoretical works to: better understand the fundamentals of physics of drop breakup processes, and develop models of drop fragmentation suitable for use in multiphase flow codes. The works summarized below aim to contribute to both sides of this two-pronged attack.

  17. Effect of vibration on two-liquid system in rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Nikolai V.; Shuvalova, Darya A.

    2016-10-01

    Behavior of two immiscible liquids of different densities is experimentally investigated in a rotating horizontal cylinder subject to vibrations perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The vibration frequency is comparable to the frequency of rotation. The liquids are centrifuged. The resonant excitation of two-dimensional circular oscillations of light liquid column with respect to the cavity is found. The oscillations can occur both in the direction of the cavity rotation and in the opposite direction and are accompanied, respectively, by a leading or lagging azimuthal motion of the interface relative to the cavity. The existence and direction of the azimuthal motion are determined by the relative frequency of vibrations. The oscillations of the light phase have inertial nature and are caused by the difference in densities of two liquids. The influence of liquids properties on the frequency eigenvalues of circular liquid oscillations and on the intensity of differential rotation is studied. A comparison with the results of other authors who have investigated two-phase cylindrical systems under rotation is made. It is shown that the two-dimensional circular mode of fluid oscillations is typical for rotating two-phase systems as follows from the general character of such parameters as the density ratio and volume ratio.

  18. A new variant for measuring the surface tension of liquid metals and alloys by the oscillating drop method

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefers, K.; Kuppermann, G.; Thiedemann, U.

    1996-09-01

    The theoretical background of the oscillating drop technique for measuring surface tension is briefly presented and the different analysis procedures are cited. A new method is described for obtaining oscillation frequencies by fast fourier transformation (FFT) of the pyrometer voltage signals from temperature measurements at the top of the levitated sample. The results on the first experiments on liquid nickel are in a good agreement with the literature data.

  19. Numerical modelling of the impact of a liquid drop on the surface of a two-phase fluid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochan, Agata; Lamorski, Krzysztof; Bieganowski, Andrzej; Ryżak, Magdalena

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was validation of a numerical model of the impact of a liquid drop on the surface of a two-phase system of immiscible fluids. The drop impact phenomenon was recorded using a high-speed camera (Vision Research MIRO M310) and the data were recorded at 2000 frames per second. The numerical calculations were performed with the Finite Volume Method (FVM) solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for three phases: air and two selected immiscible fluids. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) technique was employed for modelling of the boundaries between the phases. Numerical modelling was done with the Finite Volume Method using an available OpenFOAM software. The experiment was based on three variables: • the height from which the drop of the selected fluids fell (the speed of the drop), • the thickness of the layers of the two selected immiscible fluids (a thin layer of the fluid with a lower density was spread over the higher-density fluid), • the size of the fluid droplet. The velocity and radius of the falling drop was calculated based on the recorded images. The used parameters allowed adequate projection of the impact of fluid droplets on a system of two immiscible liquids. Development of the numerical model of splash may further have practical applications in environmental protection (spraying of hazardous fluids, spread of fuels and other hazardous substances as a result of disasters, spraying (water cooling) of hot surfaces), and in agriculture (prevention of soil erosion). The study was partially funded from the National Science Centre (Poland) based on the decision no. DEC-2012/07/N/ST10/03280.

  20. New applications of liquid-crystal thermography in rotating turbomachinery heat transfer research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, M. F.; Wagner, J. H.; Steuber, G. D.

    1991-01-01

    Two new liquid-crystal thermography techniques developed for use in rotating heat transfer experiments are described. In one experiment steady-state heat transfer data were obtained on the exterior surface of rotating turbine airfoil models. In the second study a transient technique was employed to obtain interior-surface heat transfer data in a rotating turbine blade coolant passage model. Sample data are presented in the form of photographs of the liquid-crystal temperature patterns and as contour maps and distributions of heat transfer on the rotor and coolant passage surfaces.

  1. Determination of the liquid crystals phase transition temperatures using optical rotation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiao-ling; Liu, Wei-guo; Liu, Peng; Cai, Chang-long

    2011-11-01

    Using optical rotation effect, a sensitive, simple optical analytical system is developed for determining the phase transition temperatures of liquid crystals (LCs). When a monochromatic polarized light passes through LCs sample and analyzer, the light intensity changes with temperature. Especially, during the phase transition process, the intensity varies greatly due to optical rotation effect. The variation of light intensity versus variation of temperature curve shows the phase transition temperatures of LCs clearly. The phase transition temperatures of three cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLCs) and a nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) were detected by this method, and compared with those of the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarized light microscope (PLM) methods.

  2. Nonlinear Dynamics of Formation of Drops of Non-Newtonian Liquids from Capillaries: Satellite Formation and Flow Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Ozgur E.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1999-11-01

    Drop formation from capillaries, and the often undesired phenomenon of satellite generation, play a central role in diverse applications including ink-jet printing, biochip processors, and spray coating, where the working fluid is usually non-Newtonian. Although some work has been done in related areas, the phenomenon of formation of drops of non--Newtonian fluids from capillaries has remained largely unexplored. Here a theoretical approach is adopted to study the dripping of axisymmetric drops of non--Newtonian liquids from capillaries. The constitutive equation used accounts for both shear thinning and strain hardening. First, regular perturbation theory is utilized to reduce the spatial dimension of the governing equations to one. The computations rely on Galerkin/finite element analysis with adaptive finite differencing for time integration. The dynamics are followed beyond the first breakup to investigate conditions for occurrence of satellites. Effect of increasing flow rate is also studied to uncover transitions that occur as one moves from a regime of periodic drop formation to one of jetting.

  3. Liquid Motion in a Rotating Tank Experiment (LME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deffenbaugh, D. M.; Dodge, F. T.; Green, S. T.

    1998-01-01

    The Liquid Motion Experiment (LME), which flew on STS 84 in May 1997, was an investigation of liquid motions in spinning, nutating tanks. LME was designed to quantify the effects of such liquid motions on the stability of spinning spacecraft, which are known to be adversely affected by the energy dissipated by the liquid motions. The LME hardware was essentially a spin table which could be forced to nutate at specified frequencies at a constant cone angle, independently of the spin rate. Cylindrical and spherical test tanks, partially filled with liquids of different viscosities, were located at the periphery of the spin table to simulate a spacecraft with off-axis propellant tanks; one set of tanks contained generic propellant management devices (PMDs). The primary quantitative data from the flight tests were the liquid-induced torques exerted on the tanks about radial and tangential axes through the center of the tank. Visual recordings of the liquid oscillations also provided qualitative information. The flight program incorporated two types of tests: sine sweep tests, in which the spin rate was held constant and the nutation frequency varied over a wide range; and sine dwell test, in which both the spin rate and the nutation frequency were held constant. The sine sweep tests were meant to investigate all the prominent liquid resonant oscillations and the damping of the resonances, and the sine dwell tests were meant to quantify the viscous energy dissipation rate of the liquid oscillations for steady state conditions. The LME flight data were compared to analytical results obtained from two companion IR&D programs at Southwest Research Institute. The comparisons indicated that the models predicted the observed liquid resonances, damping, and energy dissipation rates for many test conditions but not for all. It was concluded that improved models and CFD simulations are needed to resolve the differences. This work is ongoing under a current IR&D program.

  4. Nanofluid of zinc oxide nanoparticles in ionic liquid for single drop liquid microextraction of fungicides in environmental waters prior to high performance liquid chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Amde, Meseret; Tan, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Rui; Liu, Jing-Fu

    2015-05-22

    Using a nanofluid obtained by dispersing ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, new single drop microextraction method was developed for simultaneous extraction of three fungicides (chlorothalonil, kresoxim-methyl and famoxadone) in water samples prior to their analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-VWD). The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency such as amount of ZnO NPs in the nanofluid, solvent volume, extraction time, stirring rate, pH and ionic strength of the sample solution were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection were in the range of 0.13-0.19ng/mL, the precision of the method assessed with intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations were <4.82% and <7.04%, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine the three fungicides in real water samples including lake water, river water, as well as effluent and influent of wastewater treatment plant, with recoveries in the range of 74.94-96.11% at 5ng/mL spiking level. Besides to being environmental friendly, the high enrichment factor and the data quality obtained with the proposed method demonstrated its potential for application in multi residue analysis of fungicides in actual water samples.

  5. Nanofluid of zinc oxide nanoparticles in ionic liquid for single drop liquid microextraction of fungicides in environmental waters prior to high performance liquid chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Amde, Meseret; Tan, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Rui; Liu, Jing-Fu

    2015-05-22

    Using a nanofluid obtained by dispersing ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, new single drop microextraction method was developed for simultaneous extraction of three fungicides (chlorothalonil, kresoxim-methyl and famoxadone) in water samples prior to their analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-VWD). The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency such as amount of ZnO NPs in the nanofluid, solvent volume, extraction time, stirring rate, pH and ionic strength of the sample solution were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection were in the range of 0.13-0.19ng/mL, the precision of the method assessed with intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations were <4.82% and <7.04%, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine the three fungicides in real water samples including lake water, river water, as well as effluent and influent of wastewater treatment plant, with recoveries in the range of 74.94-96.11% at 5ng/mL spiking level. Besides to being environmental friendly, the high enrichment factor and the data quality obtained with the proposed method demonstrated its potential for application in multi residue analysis of fungicides in actual water samples. PMID:25857539

  6. A Symmetry Breaking Experiment Aboard Mir and the Stability of Rotating Liquid Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Gomes, D.; McCuan, J.; Weislogel, M.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss results from two parts of our study on the behavior of liquids under low-gravity conditions. The first concerns the Interface Configuration Experiment (ICE) aboard the Space Station Mir on the Mir-21/NASA-2 mission; for a certain 'exotic' container, distinct asymmetric liquid configurations are found as locally stable ones, even though the container itself is rotationally symmetric, in confirmation of mathematical results and numerical computations. The second investigation concerns the behavior of slowly rotating liquids; it is found that a rotating film instability observed previously in a physical experiment in 1-g, scaled to render gravity effects small, does not correspond to mathematical and computational results obtained for low gravity. These latter results are based on the classical equilibrium theory enhanced with a van der Waals potential of adhesion.

  7. HIGH-PRECISION MACLAURIN-BASED MODELS OF ROTATING LIQUID PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W. B.

    2012-09-01

    We present an efficient numerical self-consistent field method for calculating a gravitational model of a rotating liquid planet to spherical harmonic degree {approx}30 and a precision {approx}10{sup -12} in the external gravity field. The method's accuracy is validated by comparing results, for Jupiter rotation parameters, with the exact Maclaurin constant-density solution. The method can be generalized to non-constant density.

  8. Surface tension of liquid ternary Fe-Cu-Mo alloys measured by electromagnetic levitation oscillating drop method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. P.; Luo, B. C.; Qin, T.; Chang, J.; Wei, B.

    2008-09-01

    For the liquid Fe-Cu-Mo ternary system, the surface tensions of three selected alloys, i.e., three typical monotectic alloys, were measured by the electromagnetic levitation oscillating drop method over a broad temperature range, including both superheated and undercooled states. The maximum undercooling attained is up to 173 K. The experimental results show a good linear correlation between the surface tension and the temperature. By applying on the Butler equation, the surface tensions were also calculated and they are in good agreement with the measured ones, except that in the undercooled state, the calculated value is slightly larger than the measured results. Interestingly, both the measured and calculated results indicate that the enriched element on the droplet surface is much more conspicuous than other elements in influencing the surface tension. Besides, the viscosity and the density of the liquid Fe-Cu-Mo ternary alloys are also derived on the grounds of the experimentally measured surface tensions.

  9. Surface tension of liquid ternary Fe-Cu-Mo alloys measured by electromagnetic levitation oscillating drop method.

    PubMed

    Wang, H P; Luo, B C; Qin, T; Chang, J; Wei, B

    2008-09-28

    For the liquid Fe-Cu-Mo ternary system, the surface tensions of three selected alloys, i.e., three typical monotectic alloys, were measured by the electromagnetic levitation oscillating drop method over a broad temperature range, including both superheated and undercooled states. The maximum undercooling attained is up to 173 K. The experimental results show a good linear correlation between the surface tension and the temperature. By applying on the Butler equation, the surface tensions were also calculated and they are in good agreement with the measured ones, except that in the undercooled state, the calculated value is slightly larger than the measured results. Interestingly, both the measured and calculated results indicate that the enriched element on the droplet surface is much more conspicuous than other elements in influencing the surface tension. Besides, the viscosity and the density of the liquid Fe-Cu-Mo ternary alloys are also derived on the grounds of the experimentally measured surface tensions. PMID:19045047

  10. Equilibrium shape and location of a liquid drop acoustically positioned in a resonant rectangular chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.; Shipley, C.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a standing wave field in a rectangular chamber on the shape and location of an acoustically positioned drop or bubble is calculated. The sample deformation and equilibrium position are obtained from an analysis of the spherical harmonic projections of the total surface stress tensor. The method of calculation relies on the assumed condition that the sample is only slightly distorted from a spherical form. The equilibrium location of a levitated drop is combined with a formula introduced by Hasegawa (1979) to calcualte the ka dependence of the radiation force function. The present theory is valid for large as well as small ka values. Calculations in the small ka limit agree with previous theories and experimental results. Examples are presented for nonplane-wave modes as well as plane-wave rectangular modes.

  11. Equilibrium shape and location of a liquid drop acoustically positioned in a resonant rectangular chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.; Shipley, C.

    1988-11-01

    The effect of a standing wave field in a rectangular chamber on the shape and location of an acoustically positioned drop or bubble is calculated. The sample deformation and equilibrium position are obtained from an analysis of the spherical harmonic projections of the total surface stress tensor. The method of calculation relies on the assumed condition that the sample is only slightly distorted from a spherical form. The equilibrium location of a levitated drop is combined with a formula introduced by Hasegawa (1979) to calcualte the ka dependence of the radiation force function. The present theory is valid for large as well as small ka values. Calculations in the small ka limit agree with previous theories and experimental results. Examples are presented for nonplane-wave modes as well as plane-wave rectangular modes.

  12. Interactions between drops of molten Al-Li alloys and liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.; Nelson, L.S.; Duda, P.M.; Hyndman, D.A.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, at the request of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), studied the interactions between single drops of molten aluminum-lithium alloys and water. Most experiments were performed with ``B`` alloy (3.1 w/o Li, balance A1). Objectives were to develop experimental procedures for preparing and delivering the melt drops and diagnostics for characterizing the interactions, measure hydrogen generated by the reaction between melt and water, examine debris recovered after the interaction, determine changes in the aqueous phase produced by the melt-water chemical reactions, and determine whether steam explosions occur spontaneously under the conditions studied. Although many H{sub 2} bubbles were generated after the drops entered the water, spontaneous steam explosions never occurred when globules of the ``B`` alloy at temperatures between 700 and 1000C fell freely through water at room temperature, or upon or during subsequent contact with submerged aluminum or stainless steel surfaces. Total amounts of H{sub 2} (STP) increased from about 2 to 9 cm{sup 3}/per gram of melt as initial melt temperature increased over this range of temperatures.

  13. Behavior of a heavy cylinder in a horizontal cylindrical liquid-filled cavity at modulated rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Nikolai V.; Vlasova, Olga A.

    2016-10-01

    The behavior of a heavy cylindrical solid in a horizontal cylindrical cavity is experimentally investigated. The cavity is filled with a viscous liquid and rotates. Two rotation regimes are considered. The first one is steady rotation. A number of body motion regimes are found depending on the cavity rotation speed. The second regime is a modulated rotation, in which the rotation speed is varying periodically. It can be presented as a sum of steady rotation and librations. On the whole, three different cases of the body repulsion from the cavity wall are observed. In the first case, the repulsion occurs when the body slides over a rotating cavity wall. In the second case, the body being in the centrifuged state—when it rotates with the fluid—detaches from the cavity wall under the action of gravity. In the third case, at librations, the wall performs oscillations and the body is repulsed from the wall due to the nonlinear viscous interaction with the fluid.

  14. A simple expression for pressure drops of water and other low molecular liquids in the flow through micro-orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Tomiichi; Ushida, Akiomi; Narumi, Takatsune

    2015-12-01

    Flows are generally divided into two types: shear flows and shear-free elongational (extensional) flows. Both are necessary for a thorough understanding of the flow properties of a fluid. Shear flows are easy to achieve in practice, for example, through Poiseuille or Couette flows. Shear-free elongational flows are experimentally hard to achieve, resulting in an incomplete understanding of the flow properties of fluids in micro-devices. Nevertheless, flows through micro-orifices are useful for probing the properties of elongational flows at high elongational rates; although these flows exhibit shear and elongation, the elongation is dominant and the shear is negligible in the central region of the flows. We previously reported an anomalous reduction in pressure drops in the flows of water, a 50/50 mixture of glycerol and water, and silicone oils through micro-orifices. In the present paper, we rearrange the data presented in the previous paper and reveal a simple relationship where the pressure drop is proportional to the velocity through the micro-orifices, independent of the orifice diameter and the viscosity of the liquids tested. We explain our observations by introducing a "fluid element" model, in which fluid elements are formed on entering the orifice. The model is based on the idea that low molecular liquids, including water, generate strong elongational stress, similar to a polymer solution, in the flow through micro-orifices.

  15. Nuclear-deformation energies according to a liquid-drop model with a sharp surface

    SciTech Connect

    Blocki, J.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1982-05-01

    We present an atlas of 665 deformation-energy maps and 150 maps of other properties of interest, relevant for nuclear systems idealized as uniformly charged drops endowed with a surface tension. The nuclear shapes are parametrized in terms of two spheres modified by a smoothly fitted quadratic surface of revolution and are specified by three variables: asymmetry, sphere separation, and a neck variable (that goes over into a fragment-deformation variable after scission). The maps and related tables should be useful for the study of macroscopic aspects of nuclear fission and of collisions between any two nuclei in the periodic table.

  16. Acoustofluidics 16: acoustics streaming near liquid-gas interfaces: drops and bubbles.

    PubMed

    Sadhal, S S

    2012-08-21

    In this sixteenth part of the series on "Acoustofluidics-exploiting ultrasonic standing waves forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic systems for cell and particle manipulation," we continue our discussion on the analytical aspects of the streaming phenomenon. In particular, the use of the singular perturbation technique for this class of problems is delineated with a set of examples where fluid-fluid interaction takes place. In this category, we focus on drops and bubbles, and deal specifically with the effect of interfacial mobility on the streaming flow. PMID:22776990

  17. How pinning and contact angle hysteresis govern quasi-static liquid drop transfer.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Tang, T; Zhao, H; Law, K-Y; Amirfazli, A

    2016-02-21

    This paper presents both experimental and numerical simulations of liquid transfer between two solid surfaces with contact angle hysteresis (CAH). Systematic studies on the role of the advancing contact angle (θa), receding contact angle (θr) and CAH in determining the transfer ratio (volume of the liquid transferred onto the acceptor surface over the total liquid volume) and the maximum adhesion force (Fmax) were performed. The transfer ratio was found to be governed by contact line pinning at the end of the transfer process caused by CAH of surfaces. A map based on θr of the two surfaces was generated to identify the three regimes for liquid transfer: (I) contact line pinning occurs only on the donor surface, (II) contact line pinning occurs on both surfaces, and (III) contact line pinning occurs only on the acceptor surface. With this map, an empirical equation is provided which is able to estimate the transfer ratio by only knowing θr of the two surfaces. The value of Fmax is found to be strongly influenced by the contact line pinning in the early stretching stage. For symmetric liquid bridges between two identical surfaces, Fmax may be determined only by θa, only by θr, or by both θa and θr, depending on the magnitude of the contact angles. For asymmetric bridges, Fmax is found to be affected by the period when contact lines are pinned on both surfaces. PMID:26777599

  18. How pinning and contact angle hysteresis govern quasi-static liquid drop transfer.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Tang, T; Zhao, H; Law, K-Y; Amirfazli, A

    2016-02-21

    This paper presents both experimental and numerical simulations of liquid transfer between two solid surfaces with contact angle hysteresis (CAH). Systematic studies on the role of the advancing contact angle (θa), receding contact angle (θr) and CAH in determining the transfer ratio (volume of the liquid transferred onto the acceptor surface over the total liquid volume) and the maximum adhesion force (Fmax) were performed. The transfer ratio was found to be governed by contact line pinning at the end of the transfer process caused by CAH of surfaces. A map based on θr of the two surfaces was generated to identify the three regimes for liquid transfer: (I) contact line pinning occurs only on the donor surface, (II) contact line pinning occurs on both surfaces, and (III) contact line pinning occurs only on the acceptor surface. With this map, an empirical equation is provided which is able to estimate the transfer ratio by only knowing θr of the two surfaces. The value of Fmax is found to be strongly influenced by the contact line pinning in the early stretching stage. For symmetric liquid bridges between two identical surfaces, Fmax may be determined only by θa, only by θr, or by both θa and θr, depending on the magnitude of the contact angles. For asymmetric bridges, Fmax is found to be affected by the period when contact lines are pinned on both surfaces.

  19. Dynamic Study of Liquid Drop Impact on Supercooled Cerium Dioxide: Anti-Icing Behavior.

    PubMed

    Fu, Sin-Pui; Sahu, Rakesh P; Diaz, Estefan; Robles, Jaqueline Rojas; Chen, Chen; Rui, Xue; Klie, Robert F; Yarin, Alexander L; Abiade, Jeremiah T

    2016-06-21

    This work deals with the anti-icing behavior at subfreezing temperatures of CeO2/polyurethane nanocomposite coatings with and without a stearic acid treatment on aluminum alloy substrates. The samples ranged from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic depending on surface morphology and surface functionalization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the surface composition. The anti-icing behavior was studied both by importing fog into a chamber with controlled atmosphere at subzero temperatures and by conducting experiments with drop impact velocities of 1.98, 2.8, 3.83, and 4.95 m/s. It was found that the ice-phobicity of the ceramic/polymer nanocomposite coating was dependent on the surface roughness and surface energy. Water drops were observed to completely rebound from the surface at subfreezing temperatures from superhydrophobic surfaces with small contact angle hysteresis regardless of the impact velocity, thus revealing the anti-icing capability of such surfaces. PMID:27166506

  20. Continuous Rotation of Achiral Nematic Liquid Crystal Droplets Driven by Heat Flux.

    PubMed

    Ignés-Mullol, Jordi; Poy, Guilhem; Oswald, Patrick

    2016-07-29

    Suspended droplets of cholesteric (chiral nematic) liquid crystals spontaneously rotate in the presence of a heat flux due to a temperature gradient, a phenomenon known as the Lehmann effect. So far, it is not clear whether this effect is due to the chirality of the phase and the molecules or only to the chirality of the director field. Here, we report the continuous rotation in a temperature gradient of nematic droplets of a lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal featuring a twisted bipolar configuration. The achiral nature of the molecular components leads to a random handedness of the spontaneous twist, resulting in the coexistence of droplets rotating in the two senses, with speeds proportional to the temperature gradient and inversely proportional to the droplet radius. This result shows that a macroscopic twist of the director field is sufficient to induce a rotation of the droplets, and that the phase and the molecules do not need to be chiral. This suggests that one can also explain the Lehmann rotation in cholesteric liquid crystals without introducing the Leslie thermomechanical coupling-only present in chiral mesophases. An explanation based on the Akopyan and Zeldovich theory of thermomechanical effects in nematics is proposed and discussed. PMID:27517793

  1. Continuous Rotation of Achiral Nematic Liquid Crystal Droplets Driven by Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignés-Mullol, Jordi; Poy, Guilhem; Oswald, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Suspended droplets of cholesteric (chiral nematic) liquid crystals spontaneously rotate in the presence of a heat flux due to a temperature gradient, a phenomenon known as the Lehmann effect. So far, it is not clear whether this effect is due to the chirality of the phase and the molecules or only to the chirality of the director field. Here, we report the continuous rotation in a temperature gradient of nematic droplets of a lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal featuring a twisted bipolar configuration. The achiral nature of the molecular components leads to a random handedness of the spontaneous twist, resulting in the coexistence of droplets rotating in the two senses, with speeds proportional to the temperature gradient and inversely proportional to the droplet radius. This result shows that a macroscopic twist of the director field is sufficient to induce a rotation of the droplets, and that the phase and the molecules do not need to be chiral. This suggests that one can also explain the Lehmann rotation in cholesteric liquid crystals without introducing the Leslie thermomechanical coupling—only present in chiral mesophases. An explanation based on the Akopyan and Zeldovich theory of thermomechanical effects in nematics is proposed and discussed.

  2. Effect of solute transfer and interfacial instabilities on scalar and velocity field around a drop rising in quiescent liquid channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanwale, Makrand A.; Khadamkar, Hrushikesh P.; Mathpati, Channamallikarjun S.

    2015-11-01

    Physics of development of flow structures around the drop rising with solute transfer is highly influenced by the interfacial behaviour and is remarkably different than a particle rising under the same conditions. We report on the use of simultaneous particle image velocimetry-planar laser induced fluorescence technique to measure scalar and velocity fields around a drop rising in a quiescent liquid channel. The selected continuous phase is glycerol, and the drop consists of a mixture of toluene, acetone, and a dye rhodamine-6G, with acetone working as a interfacial tension depressant. The drop lies in the spherical region with Eötvös number, Eo = 1.95, Morton number, M = 78.20 and the particle Reynolds number being, Rep = 0.053. With Rep approaching that of creeping flow, we analyse the effect of interfacial instabilities solely, contrary to other investigations [M. Wegener et al., "Impact of Marangoni instabilities on the fluid dynamic behaviour of organic droplets," Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 52, 2543-2551 (2009); S. Burghoff and E. Y. Kenig, "A CFD model for mass transfer and interfacial phenomena on single droplets," AIChE J. 52, 4071-4078 (2006); J. Wang et al., "Numerical simulation of the Marangoni effect on transient mass transfer from single moving deformable drops," AIChE J. 57, 2670-2683 (2011); R. F. Engberg, M. Wegener, and E. Y. Kenig, "The impact of Marangoni convection on fluid dynamics and mass transfer at deformable single rising droplets—A numerical study," Chem. Eng. Sci. 116, 208-222 (2014)] which account for turbulence as well as interfacial instabilities with Rep in the turbulent range. The velocity and concentration fields obtained are subjected to scale-wise energy decomposition using continuous wavelet transform. Scale-wise probability distribution functions of wavelet coefficients are calculated to check intermittent non-Gaussian behaviour for simultaneous velocity and scalar statistics. Multi-fractal singularity spectra for scalar

  3. On the collective network of ionic liquid/water mixtures. IV. Kinetic and rotational depolarization.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Christian; Sega, Marcello; Schmollngruber, Michael; Gailberger, Elias; Braun, Daniel; Steinhauser, Othmar

    2014-05-28

    Dielectric spectroscopy is a measure of the collective Coulomb interaction in liquid systems. Adding ionic liquids to an aqueous solution results in a decrease of the static value of the generalized dielectric constant which cannot be attributed to kinetic depolarization models characterized by the static conductivity and rotational relaxation constant. However, a dipolar Poisson-Boltzmann model computing the water depolarization in the proximity of ions is not only successful for simple electrolytes but also in case of molecular ionic liquids. Moreover, our simple geometric hydration model is also capable to explain the dielectric depolarization. Both models compute the dielectric constant of water and obtain the overall dielectric constant by averaging the values of its components, water and the ionic liquid, weighted by their volume occupancies. In this sense, aqueous ionic liquid mixtures seem to behave like polar mixtures.

  4. A systematic study of proton, alpha and cluster decays in Rhenium isotopes using the effective liquid drop model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Deepthy Maria; Ashok, Nithu; Joseph, Antony

    2016-01-01

    Employing the effective liquid drop model (ELDM), half-lives of proton and alpha decays and probable cluster decays are computed and analyzed for different proton-rich and neutron-rich isotopes of Rhenium. The investigation fortifies the phenomenon of cluster radioactivity (CR) in rare earth nuclei and also affirms the pivotal role played by neutron magicity in cluster decays. ELDM data is compared with that of universal decay law (UDL) model and found to be more efficient than the latter one. Apparently, cluster emissions slacken as the neutron number of daughter nucleus goes up and the linear nature of Geiger-Nuttall (G-N) plots stays unaltered even if the surface potential is incorporated.

  5. Splat-quench solidification of freely falling liquid-metal drops by impact on a planar substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collings, E. W.; Markworth, A. J.; Mccoy, J. K.; Saunders, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of a study of the splat-quench solidification of small, freely falling liquid drops of the alloy Nitronic 40W, which were allowed to impact on a solid, planar, horizontal substrate. The principal variable was the substrate material, with substrates of copper, alumina and fused quartz being used. The shapes of the solidified splats were correlated with a simplified model for the energetics of the splatting process and with the thermal conductivity of the substrate. The measured results are qualitatively in agreement with theoretical predictions, and suggestions are offered for a more comprehensive model of splat-quench solidification. A relationship between sessile droplet diameter and parent wire diameter is also presented and discussed.

  6. Experimental study of the stability and flow characteristics of floating liquid columns confined between rotating disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowle, A. A.; Soto, L.; Strong, P. F.; Wang, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    A low Bond number simulation technique was used to establish the stability limits of cylindrical and conical floating liquid columns under conditions of isorotation, equal counter rotation, rotation of one end only, and parallel axis offset. The conditions for resonance in cylindrical liquid columns perturbed by axial, sinusoidal vibration of one end face are also reported. All tests were carried out under isothermal conditions with water and silicone fluids of various viscosities. A technique for the quantitative measurement of stream velocity within a floating, isothermal, liquid column confined between rotatable disks was developed. In the measurement, small, light scattering particles were used as streamline markers in common arrangement, but the capability of the measurement was extended by use of stereopair photography system to provide quantitative data. Results of velocity measurements made under a few selected conditions, which established the precision and accuracy of the technique, are given. The general qualitative features of the isothermal flow patterns under various conditions of end face rotation resulting from both still photography and motion pictures are presented.

  7. Ternary drop collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterbichler, Hannes; Planchette, Carole; Brenn, Günter

    2015-10-01

    It has been recently proposed to use drop collisions for producing advanced particles or well-defined capsules, or to perform chemical reactions where the merged drops constitute a micro-reactor. For all these promising applications, it is essential to determine whether the merged drops remain stable after the collision, forming a single entity, or if they break up. This topic, widely investigated for binary drop collisions of miscible and immiscible liquid, is quite unexplored for ternary drop collisions. The current study aims to close this gap by experimentally investigating collisions between three equal-sized drops of the same liquid arranged centri-symmetrically. Three drop generators are simultaneously operated to obtain controlled ternary drop collisions. The collision outcomes are observed via photographs and compared to those of binary collisions. Similar to binary collisions, a regime map is built, showing coalescence and bouncing as well as reflexive and stretching separation. Significant differences are observed in the transitions between these regimes.

  8. Contraction of an inviscid swirling liquid jet: Comparison with results for a rotating granular jet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, P. D.; Kubitschek, J. P.

    2007-11-01

    In honor of the tercentenary of Leonhard Euler, we report a new solution of the Euler equations for the shape of an inviscid rotating liquid jet emanating from a tube of inner radius R0 aligned with gravity. Jet contraction is dependent on the exit swirl parameter χ0 = R0 φ0/U0 where φ0 and U0 are the uniform rotation rate and axial velocity of the liquid at the exit. The results reveal that rotation reduces the rate of jet contraction. In the limit χ0-> 0 one recovers the contraction profile for a non-rotating jet and the limit χ0->∞ gives a jet of constant radius. In contrast, experiments and a kinematic model for a rotating non-cohesive granular jet show that it expands rather than contracts when a certain small angular velocity is exceeded. The blossoming profiles are parabolic in nature. The model predicts a jet of uniform radius for χ0-> 0 and a jet with an initially horizontal trajectory in the limit χ0->∞.

  9. Simple system for measuring optical rotation of glucose solution using liquid-crystal grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Michinori; Uchida, Etsuo; Saito, Hiroo; Harada, Takeshi; Muto, Seiei; Nose, Toshiaki

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate an optical system for measuring the concentrations of optically active media using liquid-crystal polarization gratings (LCPGs). The optical rotation angle is determined by measuring the intensities of two diffracted light beams from an LCPG combined with a quarter-wave plate (QWP). The intensity ratio is used to evaluate the optical rotation angle, minimizing the dependence on changes in light source intensity and wavelength and reducing the influence of temperature-drift-induced LC birefringence shifts. We demonstrate the system by measuring the concentration of a glucose-water solution. The measurement error caused by the slight wavelength dependence of the QWP’s retardation is assessed numerically.

  10. Influence of Solute Charge and Pyrrolidinium Ionic Liquid Alkyl Chain Length on Probe Rotational Reorientation Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianchang; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Baker, Gary A; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Shaw, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the effect of molecular charge on the rotational dynamics of probe solutes in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) has been a subject of growing interest. For the purpose of extending our understanding of charged solute behavior within RTILs, we have studied the rotational dynamics of three illustrative xanthene fluorescent probes within a series of N-alkylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Cnmpyr][Tf2N]) RTILs with different n-alkyl chain lengths (n = 3, 4, 6, 8, or 10) using time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay. The rotational dynamics of the neutral probe rhodamine B dye lies between the stick and slip boundary conditions due to the influence of specific hydrogen bonding interactions. The rotation of the negatively-charged sulforhodamine 640 is slower than that of its positively-charged counterpart rhodamine 6G. An analysis based upon Stokes-Einstein-Debye hydrodynamics indicates that SR640 adheres to stick boundary conditions due to specific interactions, whereas the faster rotation of R6G is attributed to weaker electrostatic interactions. No dependence of the rotational dynamics on the solvent alkyl chain length was observed for any of the three dyes, suggesting that the specific interactions between dyes and RTILs are independent of this solvent parameter.

  11. Experiments on Heat Transfer in a Thin Liquid Film Flowing Over a Rotating Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Subramanian (Technical Monitor); Ozar, B.; Cetegen, B. M.; Faghri, A.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study of heat transfer into a thin liquid film on a rotating heated disk is described. Deionized water was introduced at the center of a heated. horizontal disk with a constant film thickness and uniform radial velocity. Radial distribution of the disk surface temperatures was measured using a thermocouple/slip ring arrangement. Experiments were performed for a range of liquid flow rates between 3.01pm and 15.01pm. The angular speed of the disk was varied from 0 rpm to 500 rpm. The local heat transfer coefficient was determined based on the heat flux supplied to the disk and the temperature difference between the measured disk surface temperature and the liquid entrance temperature onto the disk. The local heat transfer coefficient was seen to increase with increasing flow rate as well as increasing angular velocity of the disk. Effect of rotation on heat transfer was largest for the lower liquid flow rates with the effect gradually decreasing with increasing liquid flow rates. Semi-empirical correlations are presented in this study for the local and average Nusselt numbers.

  12. A SURVEY OF THE PARAMETER SPACE OF THE COMPRESSIBLE LIQUID DROP MODEL AS APPLIED TO THE NEUTRON STAR INNER CRUST

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, W. G.; Gearheart, M.; Li Baoan

    2013-01-15

    We present a systematic survey of the range of predictions of the neutron star inner crust composition, crust-core transition densities and pressures, and density range of the nuclear 'pasta' phases at the bottom of the crust provided by the compressible liquid drop model in light of the current experimental and theoretical constraints on model parameters. Using a Skyrme-like model for nuclear matter, we construct baseline sequences of crust models by consistently varying the density dependence of the bulk symmetry energy at nuclear saturation density, L, under two conditions: (1) that the magnitude of the symmetry energy at saturation density J is held constant, and (2) J correlates with L under the constraint that the pure neutron matter (PNM) equation of state (EoS) satisfies the results of ab initio calculations at low densities. Such baseline crust models facilitate consistent exploration of the L dependence of crustal properties. The remaining surface energy and symmetric nuclear matter parameters are systematically varied around the baseline, and different functional forms of the PNM EoS at sub-saturation densities implemented, to estimate theoretical 'error bars' for the baseline predictions. Inner crust composition and transition densities are shown to be most sensitive to the surface energy at very low proton fractions and to the behavior of the sub-saturation PNM EoS. Recent calculations of the energies of neutron drops suggest that the low-proton-fraction surface energy might be higher than predicted in Skyrme-like models, which our study suggests may result in a greatly reduced volume of pasta in the crust than conventionally predicted.

  13. Relaxation of rotational angular momentum of polar diatomic molecules in simple liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, A.; Perez, J.

    2007-03-15

    The relaxation processes of rotational angular momentum of polar diatomic molecules diluted in simple liquids are analyzed by applying a non-Markovian relaxation theory to the study of the binary time autocorrelation function of the angular momentum. This non-Markovian theory was previously applied to the study of the infrared and Raman spectroscopy, and also to the analysis of the rotational energy relaxation processes. We have obtained non-Markovian evolution equations for the two-time j-level angular momentum correlation components involved in the angular momentum correlation function. In these equations, the time-dependent angular momentum transfer rates and the pure orientational angular transfer rates are given in terms of the binary time autocorrelation function of the diatomic-solvent anisotropic interaction. The non-Markovian evolution equations converge to Markovian ones in the long time limit, reaching the angular momentum transfer rates in the usual time-independent form. Alternative time scales for the angular relaxation processes, relative to the individual rotational processes as well as to the global decay correlations, are introduced and analyzed. The theory is applied to the study of the angular momentum relaxation processes of HCl diluted in liquid SF{sub 6}, a system for which rotational energy relaxation and infrared and Raman spectroscopy was previously analyzed in the scope of the same theory.

  14. A new liquid-phase microextraction method based on solidification of floating organic drop.

    PubMed

    Khalili Zanjani, Mohammad Reza; Yamini, Yadollah; Shariati, Shahab; Jönsson, Jan Ake

    2007-03-01

    In the present study, a new and versatile liquid-phase microextraction method is described. This method requires very simple and cheap apparatus and also a small amount of organic solvent. Eight microliters of 1-undecanol was delivered to the surface of solution containing analytes and solution was stirred for a desired time. Then sample vial was cooled by inserting it into an ice bath for 5 min. The solidified 1-undecanol was transferred into a suitable vial and immediately melted; then, 2 microL of it was injected into a gas chromatograph for analysis. Some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were used as model compounds for developing and evaluating of the method performance. Analysis was carried out by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID). Several factors influencing the microextraction efficiency, such as the nature and volume of organic solvent, the temperature and volume of sample solution, stirring rate and extraction time were investigated and optimized. The applicability of the technique was evaluated by determination of trace amounts of PAHs in environmental samples. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits (LOD) of the method were in the range of 0.07-1.67 microg L(-1) and relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) for 10 microg L(-1) PAHs were <7%. A good linearity (r(2)>0.995) in a calibration range of 0.25-300.00 microg L(-1) was obtained. After 30 min extraction duration, enrichment factors were in the range of 594-1940. Finally, the proposed method was applied to the determination of trace amounts of PAHs in several real water samples, and satisfactory results were resulted. Since very simple devices were used, this new technique is affordable, efficient, and convenient for extraction and determination of low concentrations of PAHs in water samples. PMID:17386676

  15. Controlling the Mobility of the Fluid Interface of Moving Gas Bubbles or Liquid Drops by Using Micellar Solutions of Surfactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maldarelli, Charles; Papageorgiou, Demetrios

    1998-01-01

    Microgravity processes must rely on mechanisms other than buoyancy to move bubbles or droplets from one region to another in a continuous liquid phase. One suggested method is thermocapillary migration in which a temperature gradient is applied to the continuous phase. A significant and as yet unresolved impediment to the use of thermocapillary migration to direct bubble or drop motion is that these migrations can be significantly retarded by the adsorption onto the fluid particle surface of surface active impurities unavoidably present in the continuous or (if the particle is a liquid) droplet phases. The focus of our research was to develop a theory for remobilizing fluid particle interfaces retarded by a surfactant impurity in an effort to make more viable the use of thermocapillary migrations for the management of bubbles and drops in microgravity. We postulated that a surfactant at high bulk concentration which kinetically exchanges rapidly with the surface can restore interface mobility. The scaling arguments along with a discussion of the previous literature is reviewed in the context of the scaling framework. The specific objectives of the research were twofold. The first was to prove the remobilization theory by studying a model problem. As the mechanism for remobilization is independent of the force which drives the particle, the fluid particle shape and the presence of fluid inertia, we chose the simplest model consisting of a spherical bubble rising steadily by buoyancy in creeping flow. We solved the hydrodynamic and surfactant transport equations for rapid kinetic exchange to demonstrate that as the concentration increases, the Marangoni retardation at first increases (the low k behavior) and then decreases (the high k behavior). The second objective was to develop a method to determine the kinetic rate constants of a surfactant molecule, since this information is necessary to select surfactants which will exchange rapidly enough relative to the

  16. Thermocapillary instabilities with crystal and feed rod rotation in laterally heated liquid bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, Laurent Martin; Kahouadji, Lyes; Walker, John S.

    2006-11-01

    Rotation is involved in many industrial processes for crystal growth. The main reason is that heating is usually not uniform in the azimuthal direction. A drawback (or advantage) of rotation is that it modifies the flow originating from thermal or electromagnetic sources. In the needle-eye float-zone process, the optimum angular velocity of the feed rod and crystal is found empirically. The ratio of these velocities is often negative but not always. Early numerical studies focused on the baseflow of the melt and were restricted to axisymmetry. The main finding is that when rotation is large enough the flow is confined toward the periphery as a result of Taylor column effect. More recent research is devoted to the stability of thermocapillary convection to tridimensional disturbances either by direct numerical simulations or by linear analysis but few relate to the effect of rotation. In order to have a better understanding of the effect of rotation rate on the critical Marangoni number for a laterally heated liquid bridge, we have studied the stability of tridimensional perturbation by a linear analysis for various angular velocity ratio. The competition between different azimuthal modes has been explored and some interpretations are given.

  17. Determination of boron in water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic drop coupled with a fluorimetric method.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; He, Qiang; Li, Haifang; Mmereki, Daniel; Lu, Ying; Zheng, Yongzan; Zhong, Zhihui; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a new, rapid and reliable method for the determination of boron in water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) prior to fluorescence spectra analysis was developed. As a result of its complexation with boric acid, the method relies on the enhancement of the fluorescence (λex = 350 nm, λem = 373 nm) of chromotropic acid. The influences of DLLME-SFO parameters, including the extraction solvent type and its volume, pH, the disperser solvent type and its volume, and salt effects were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection was 0.11 ng L(-1), with a preconcentration factor of 86 times. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 0-40 nM. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to analyze real water samples and the relative recoveries of water samples ranged from 86.9 to 93.2%. PMID:26911625

  18. Solid-Phase Extraction Followed by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Based on Solidification of Floating Organic Drop for the Determination of Parabens.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Beshare; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir

    2015-09-01

    A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop method combined with solid-phase extraction (500-mg C18 sorbent) was developed for preconcentration and determination of some parabens. The experimental parameters influencing the extraction efficiency such as the type of extraction and disperser solvents, as well as their volumes, breakthrough volume, flow rate and salt addition were studied and optimized. The optimum experimental conditions found included: sample volume, 100 mL; KCl concentration, 1% (w/v); extraction solvent (1-undecanol) volume, 20 µL and disperser solvent (acetone) volume, 250 µL. Under the optimum experimental conditions, calibration graphs were linear in the range of 1-200 µg L(-1) with limits of detection ranged from 0.3 to 1.7 µg L(-1). The relative standard deviations were in the range of 1.2-3.1% (n = 5). The enrichment factors and absolute recoveries of parabens in different matrices were 245-1886 and 9.0-69.8%, respectively. The method was applied to the simultaneous determination of parabens in different matrices. The relative recoveries from water, shampoo and mouth rinse samples, which have been spiked at different levels of parabens, were 87.83-112.25%, 82.80-108.40% and 90.10-97.60%, respectively. PMID:25716984

  19. Preconcentration of organochlorine pesticides in aqueous samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop after SPE with multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mohammad; Rakh, Mojgan

    2014-01-01

    SPE joined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) as a novel technique combined with GC with electron-capture detection has been developed as a preconcentration technique for the determination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in water samples. Aqueous samples were loaded onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sorbent. After the elution of the desired compounds from the sorbent by using acetone, the DLLME-SFO technique was performed on the obtained solution. Variables affecting the performance of both steps such as sample solution flow rate, breakthrough volume, type and volume of the elution, type and volume of extraction solvent and salt addition were studied and optimized. The new method provided an ultra enrichment factor (8280-28221) for nine OCPs. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.5-1000 ng/L, and the LODs ranged from 0.1-0.39 ng/L. The RSD, for 0.01 μg/L of OCPs, was in the range of 1.39-13.50% (n = 7). The recoveries of method in water samples were 70-113%.

  20. Separation/preconcentration and determination of vanadium with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asadollahi, Tahereh; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji

    2010-06-30

    A novel dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) for separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amount of vanadium and its determination with the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed. The DLLME-SFO behavior of vanadium (V) using N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine (BPHA) as complexing agent was systematically investigated. The factors influencing the complex formation and extraction by DLLME-SFO method were optimized. Under the optimized conditions: 100 microL, 200 microL and 25 mL of extraction solvent (1-undecanol), disperser solvent (acetone) and sample volume, respectively, an enrichment factor of 184, a detection limit (based on 3S(b)/m) of 7 ng L(-1) and a relative standard deviation of 4.6% (at 500 ng L(-1)) were obtained. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for vanadium was linear from 20 to 1000 ng L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996. The method was successfully applied for the determination of vanadium in water and parsley. PMID:20685458

  1. Separation/preconcentration and determination of quercetin in food samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop -flow injection spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Asadollahi, Tahereh; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Amirkavei, Mooud

    2015-02-01

    A new dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFOD)-flow injection spectrophotometry (FI) method for the separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of quercetin was developed. 1-Undecanol and methanol was used as the extraction and disperser solvent, respectively. The factors influencing the extraction by DLLME-SFOD such as the volume of the extraction and disperser solvents, pH and concentration of salt were optimized. The optimal conditions were found to be; volume of the extraction solvent, 80 μL; the volume of the disperser solvent, 100 μL; and the pH of the sample, 3. The linear dynamic range and detection limit were 5.0 × 10(-8)-5.0 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) and 1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) at 6.1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1) level of quercetin (n = 10) was found to be 2.8 %. The method was successfully applied to the determination of quercetin in the apple, grape, onion and tomato samples. Figureᅟ

  2. Solid-Phase Extraction Followed by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Based on Solidification of Floating Organic Drop for the Determination of Parabens.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Beshare; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir

    2015-09-01

    A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop method combined with solid-phase extraction (500-mg C18 sorbent) was developed for preconcentration and determination of some parabens. The experimental parameters influencing the extraction efficiency such as the type of extraction and disperser solvents, as well as their volumes, breakthrough volume, flow rate and salt addition were studied and optimized. The optimum experimental conditions found included: sample volume, 100 mL; KCl concentration, 1% (w/v); extraction solvent (1-undecanol) volume, 20 µL and disperser solvent (acetone) volume, 250 µL. Under the optimum experimental conditions, calibration graphs were linear in the range of 1-200 µg L(-1) with limits of detection ranged from 0.3 to 1.7 µg L(-1). The relative standard deviations were in the range of 1.2-3.1% (n = 5). The enrichment factors and absolute recoveries of parabens in different matrices were 245-1886 and 9.0-69.8%, respectively. The method was applied to the simultaneous determination of parabens in different matrices. The relative recoveries from water, shampoo and mouth rinse samples, which have been spiked at different levels of parabens, were 87.83-112.25%, 82.80-108.40% and 90.10-97.60%, respectively.

  3. Polarity and Nonpolarity of Ionic Liquids Viewed from the Rotational Dynamics of Carbon Monoxide.

    PubMed

    Yasaka, Y; Kimura, Y

    2015-12-17

    The rotational dynamics of carbon monoxide (CO) in a molten salt, ionic liquids (ILs), and alkanes were investigated by (17)O NMR T1 measurements using labeled C(17)O. The molten salt and the studied ILs have the bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anion ([NTf2](-)) in common. In hexane near room temperature, the rotational relaxation times are close to the values predicted from the slip boundary condition in the Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) theory. However, in contradiction to the theoretical prediction, the rotational relaxation times decrease as the value of η/T increases, where η and T are the viscosity and absolute temperature, respectively. In other alkanes and ILs used in this study, the rotational relaxation times are much faster than those predicted by SED, and show a unique dependence on the number of alkyl carbons. For the same value of η/T, the CO rotational relaxation times in ILs composed of short-alkyl-chain-length imidazolium cations (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium) are close to those for a molten salt (Cs[NTf2]). On the other hand, the rotational relaxation times in ILs composed of long-chain-length imidazolium (1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium) and phosphonium (tributylmethylphosphonium and tetraoctylphosphonium) cations are much shorter than the SED predictions. This deviation from theory increases as the alkyl chain length increases. We also found that the rotational relaxation times in dodecane and squalane are similar to those in ILs with a similar number of alkyl carbons. These results are discussed in terms of heterogeneous solvation and in comparison with the translational diffusion of CO in ILs.

  4. Modelling of liquid flow after a hydraulic jump on a rotating disk prior to centrifugal atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. Y.; Dowson, A. L.; Jacobs, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a simplified numerical model which is used to calculate the height distribution, and the radial and tangential velocities of a liquid on a rotating disk after a hydraulic jump and prior to centrifugal atomization. The results obtained from this numerical model are compared with predictions made using previously derived `hydraulic jump' and `analytical' models. Calculations, in conjunction with experimental measurements relating to the trajectory of liquid flow on the atomizing disk, have shown that the numerical model can not only give a reasonable prediction of the hydraulic jump location, but also yields more accurate information regarding the variations in liquid height, and radial and tangential velocities. The model is ideally suited for engineering applications.

  5. Coupling of translational and rotational motion in chiral liquids in electromagnetic and circularly polarised electric fields.

    PubMed

    English, Niall J; Kusalik, Peter G; Woods, Sarah A

    2012-03-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of R and S enantiomers of 1,1-chlorofluoroethane, both for pure liquids and racemic mixtures, have been performed at 298 K in the absence and presence of both electromagnetic (e/m) and circularly polarised electric (CP) fields of varying frequency (100-2200 GHz) and intensity (0.025-0.2 V Å(-1) (rms)). Significant non-thermal field effects were noted in the coupling of rotational and translational motion; for instance, in microwave and far-infrared (MW/IR) e/m fields, marked increases in rotational and translational diffusion vis-à-vis the zero-field case took place at 0.025-0.1 V Å(-1) (rms), with a reduction in translational diffusion vis-à-vis the zero-field case above 0.1 V Å(-1) (rms) above 100 GHz. This was due to enhanced direct coupling of rotational motion with the more intense e/m field at the ideal intrinsic rotational coupling frequency (approximately 700 GHz) leading to such rapidly oscillating rotational motion that extent of translational motion was effectively reduced. In the case of CP fields, rotational and translational diffusion was also enhanced for all intensities, particularly at approximately 700 GHz. For both MW/IR and CP fields, non-linear field effects were evident above around 0.1 V Å(-1) (rms) intensity, in terms of enhancements in translational and rotational motion. Simulation of 90-10 mol. % liquid mixtures of a Lennard-Jones solvent with R and S enantiomer-solutes in MW/IR and CP fields led to more limited promotion of rotational and translational diffusion, due primarily to increased frictional effects. For both e/m and CP fields, examination of the laboratory- and inertial-frame auto- and cross-correlation functions of velocity and angular velocity demonstrated the development of explicit coupling with the external fields at the applied frequencies, especially so in the more intense fields where nonlinear effects come into play. For racemic mixtures, elements of the laboratory

  6. Muscle activity response to external moment during single-leg drop landing in young basketball players: the importance of biceps femoris in reducing internal rotation of knee during landing.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Meguru; Sato, Haruhiko; Takahira, Naonobu

    2012-01-01

    Internal tibial rotation with the knee close to full extension combined with valgus collapse during drop landing generally results in non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between internal rotation of the knee and muscle activity from internal and external rotator muscles, and between the internal rotation of knee and externally applied loads on the knee during landing in collegiate basketball players. Our hypothesis was that the activity of biceps femoris muscle would be an important factor reducing internal knee rotation during landing. The subjects were 10 collegiate basketball students: 5 females and 5 males. The subjects performed a single-leg drop landing from a 25-cm height. Femoral and tibial kinematics were measured using a 3D optoelectronic tracking system during the drop landings, and then the knee angular motions were determined. Ground reaction forces and muscle activation patterns (lateral hamstring and medial hamstring) were simultaneously measured and computed. Results indicated that lower peak internal tibial rotation angle at the time of landing was associated with greater lateral hamstring activity (r = -0.623, p < 0.001). When gender was considered, the statistically significant correlation remained only in females. There was no association between the peak internal tibial rotation angle and the knee internal rotation moment. Control of muscle activity in the lateral to medial hamstring would be an important factor in generating sufficient force to inhibit excessive internal rotation during landing. Strengthening the biceps femoris might mitigate the higher incidence of non-contact ACL injury in female athletes. Key pointsLower activity of the external rotator muscle of the knee, which inhibits internal rotation of the knee, may be the reason why females tend to show a large internal rotation of the knee during drop landing.Externally applied internal rotation moment of

  7. Capabilities and limitations of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic drop for the extraction of organic pollutants from water samples.

    PubMed

    Vera-Avila, Luz E; Rojo-Portillo, Tania; Covarrubias-Herrera, Rosario; Peña-Alvarez, Araceli

    2013-12-17

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) is one of the most interesting sample preparation techniques developed in recent years. Although several applications have been reported, the potentiality and limitations of this simple and rapid extraction technique have not been made sufficiently explicit. In this work, the extraction efficiency of DLLME-SFO for pollutants from different chemical families was determined. Studied compounds include: 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 5 pesticides (chlorophenoxy herbicides and DDT), 8 phenols and 6 sulfonamides, thus, covering a large range of polarity and hydrophobicity (LogKow 0-7, overall). After optimization of extraction conditions using 1-dodecanol as extractant, the procedure was applied for extraction of each family from 10-mL spiked water samples, only adjusting sample pH as required. Absolute recoveries for pollutants with LogKow 3-7 were >70% and recovery values within this group (18 compounds) were independent of structure or hydrophobicity; the precision of recovery was very acceptable (RSD<12%) and linear behavior was observed in the studied concentration range (r(2)>0.995). Extraction recoveries for pollutants with LogKow 1.46-2.8 were in the range 13-62%, directly depending on individual LogKow values; however, good linearity (r(2)>0.993) and precision (RSD<6.5%) were also demonstrated for these polar solutes, despite recovery level. DLLME-SFO with 1-dodecanol completely failed for extraction of compounds with LogKow≤1 (sulfa drugs), other more polar extraction solvents (ionic liquids) should be explored for highly hydrophilic pollutants.

  8. Displacement-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop of trace amounts of palladium in water and road dust samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarian, Maryam; Afzali, Daryoush; Mostafavi, Ali; Fathirad, Fariba

    2013-01-01

    A new displacement-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method based on the solidification of floating organic drop was developed for separation and preconcentration of Pd(ll) in road dust and aqueous samples. This method involves two steps of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification. In Step 1, Cu ions react with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) to form Cu-DDTC complex, which is extracted by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on a solidification procedure using 1-undecanol (extraction solvent) and ethanol (dispersive solvent). In Step 2, the extracted complex is first dispersed using ethanol in a sample solution containing Pd ions, then a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on a solidification procedure is performed creating an organic drop. In this step, Pd(ll) replaces Cu(ll) from the pre-extracted Cu-DDTC complex and goes into the extraction solvent phase. Finally, the Pd(ll)-containing drop is introduced into a graphite furnace using a microsyringe, and Pd(ll) is determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. Several factors that influence the extraction efficiency of Pd and its subsequent determination, such as extraction and dispersive solvent type and volume, pH of sample solution, centrifugation time, and concentration of DDTC, are optimized.

  9. Instant freezing of impacting wax drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarenko, Alexandre; Virot, Emmanuel; Rubinstein, Shmuel

    2015-11-01

    We present the impact of hot liquid drops of wax on surfaces whose temperature is below the solidifying temperature of the drops. During the fall the drops remain mostly liquid, but upon impact, their temperature quickly decreases resulting in the solidification of the drop. Depending on the impact energy, drops size and the temperature difference between the drop and the surface this results in plethora of solid shapes: simple lenses, triangular drops, spherical caps and popped popcorn shapes.

  10. Cuttings-liquid frictional pressure loss model for horizontal narrow annular flow with rotating drillpipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofei, T. N.; Irawan, S.; Pao, W.

    2015-04-01

    During oil and gas drilling operations, frictional pressure loss is experienced as the drilling fluid transports the drilled cuttings from the bottom-hole, through the annulus, to the surface. Estimation of these pressure losses is critical when designing the drilling hydraulic program. Two-phase frictional pressure loss in the annulus is very difficult to predict, and even more complex when there is drillpipe rotation. Accurate prediction will ensure that the correct equivalent circulating density (ECD) is applied in the wellbore to prevent formation fracture, especially in formations with narrow window between the pore pressure and fracture gradient. Few researchers have attempted to propose cuttings-liquid frictional pressure loss models, nevertheless, these models fail when they are applied to narrow wellbores such as in casing- while-drilling and slimhole applications. This study proposes improved cuttings-liquid frictional pressure loss models for narrow horizontal annuli with drillpipe rotation using Dimensional Analysis. Both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids were considered. The proposed model constants were fitted by generated data from a full-scale simulation study using ANSYS-CFX. The models showed improvement over existing cuttings-liquid pressure loss correlations in literature.

  11. Liquid flow on a rotating disk prior to centrifugal atomization and spray deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. Y.; Jacobs, M. H.; Dowson, A. L.

    1998-12-01

    Video observations of the flow patterns that develop on a rotating disk during centrifugal atomization and spray deposition, and subsequent metallographic studies conducted on solid skulls removed from the disk after processing, have indicated a circular discontinuity or hydraulic jump, which is manifested by a rapid increase in the thickness of the liquid metal and by a corresponding decrease in the radial velocity. A mathematical model has been developed that is capable of predicting both the occurrence and location of the jump, and the associated changes in the thickness profile and in the radial and tangential velocities of the liquid metal. Good correlations have been observed between model predictions and the flow patterns observed on the skull after atomization, and the effects of changes in material and operational parameters such as kinematic viscosity, volume flow rate, metallostatic head, and disk rotation speed have been quantified. Liquid metal flow is controlled primarily by the volume flow rate and by the metallostatic head prior to the hydraulic jump and by the centrifugal forces after the jump. The implications of these observations in terms of the atomization process are discussed.

  12. Probing the Structure of Ionic Liquid Surfaces by Rotationally and Electronically Inelastic Scattering of no

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemkiewicz, M. P.; Zutz, A.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL’s) are a highly diverse class of materials with many potential technological applications. They are candidates for use in advanced electrolytes, green solvents, and supported liquid membranes for CO_2 sequestration. We present studies where inelastic scattering of high or low velocity nitric oxide provides insight into the microscopic structure of these complex surfaces. As an open shell diatomic, jet-cooled NO [^2π1/2(J = 0.5)] features both molecular and electronic collision dynamics as seen by probing scattered rotational and spin-orbit distributions respectively. These studies show substantial variation in degree of rotational and electronic excitation as ionic liquid identity is varied. Also, surface heating is found to have a strong effect on scattered spin-orbit branching, possibly due to the dependence of surface structure on temperature. This is discussed in terms of a picture where the electronic degree of freedom may serve as a sensitive measure of the cationic versus anionic nature of the top few layers of this material.

  13. Thermocapillary instabilities in a laterally heated liquid bridge with end wall rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahouadji, L.; Houchens, B. C.; Witkowski, L. Martin

    2011-10-01

    The effect of rotation on the stability of thermocapillary driven flow in a laterally heated liquid bridge is studied numerically using the full-zone model of the floating-zone crystal growth technique. A small Prandtl number (0.02) fluid, relevant for semiconductor melts, is studied with an aspect ratio (height to diameter of the melt) equal to one. Buoyancy is neglected. A linear stability analysis of three-dimensional perturbations is performed and shows that for any ratio of angular velocities, a weak rotation rate has the surprising effect of destabilizing the base flow. By systematically varying the rotation rate and ratio of angular velocities, the critical threshold and azimuthal wave number of the most unstable mode is found over a wide range of this two parameter space. Depending on these parameters, the leading eigenmode is a wave propagating either in the positive or negative azimuthal direction, with kinetic energy typically localized close to one of the end walls. These results are of practical interest for industrial crystal growth applications, where rotation is often used to obtain higher quality crystals.

  14. A link between structure, diffusion and rotations of hydrogen bonding tracers in ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araque, Juan C.; Daly, Ryan P.; Margulis, Claudio J.

    2016-05-01

    When solutes are small compared to the size of the ions in an ionic liquid, energetic heterogeneities associated with charge enhanced (stiff) and charge depleted (soft) nanoenvironments are sampled. In a recent article [J. C. Araque et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119(23), 7015-7029 (2015)], we explored large deviations from Stokes-Einstein translational diffusion caused by such a heterogeneity. The current article is set to explore the effect of soft and stiff solvent environments (i.e., structure) on OH-bond rotations in the case of water and small alcohols in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([" separators="Im1,2 + ][" separators="NTf2- ]). Is solute rotational dynamics heterogeneous? If so, are solute rotations and translations coupled in the sense that stiff and soft solvent environments hinder or speed up both types of dynamics? For the systems studied here, there appears to be a clear connection between translations, rotations, and stiff/soft solvent environments. We also discuss interesting asymmetries of the correlation between solutes with anions and cations.

  15. Operating characteristics of rotating beds

    SciTech Connect

    Keyvani, M.; Gardner, N.C.

    1988-01-01

    Vapor-liquid contacting in high gravitational fields offers prospects for significant reductions in the physical size, capital, and operating costs of packed towers. Pressure drops, power requirements, mass transfer coefficients and liquid residence time distributions are reported for a rotating bed separator. The beds studied were rigid, foamed aluminum, with specific surface areas ranging from 650 to 3000 m{sup 2}/m{sup 2}. Gravitational fields were varied from 50 to 300g.

  16. The flow of a thin liquid film on a stationary and rotating disk. II - Theoretical prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Faghri, A.; Hankey, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    The existing theoretical models are improved and a systematic procedure to compute the free surface flow of a thin liquid film is suggested. The solutions for axisymmetric radial flow on a stationary horizontal disk and for the disk rotating around its axis are presented. The theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental data presented in Part I of this report. The analysis shows results for both supercritical and subcritical flows and the flow structure in the vicinity of a hydraulic jump which isolates these two flow types. The detailed flow structure in a hydraulic jump was computed and shown to contain regions of separation including a 'surface roller'. The effects of surface tension are found to be important near the outer edge of the disk where the fluid experiences a free fall. At other locations, the surface tension is negligible. For a rotating disk, the frictional resistance in the angular direction is found to be as important as that in the radial direction.

  17. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method based on solidification of floating organic drop for extraction of organochlorine pesticides in water samples.

    PubMed

    Leong, Mei-I; Huang, Shang-Da

    2009-11-01

    A new simple and rapid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method has been developed for the extraction and analysis of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in water samples. The method is based on the solidification of a floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) and is combined with gas chromatography/electron capture detection (GC/ECD). Very little solvent is required in this method. The disperser solvent (200microL acetonitrile) containing 10microL hexadecane (HEX) is rapidly injected by a syringe into the 5.0mL water sample. After centrifugation, the fine HEX droplets (6+/-0.5microL) float at the top of the screw-cap test tube. The test tube is then cooled in an ice bath. After 5min, the HEX solvent solidifies and is then transferred into a conical vial, where it melts quickly at room temperature, and 1microL of it is injected into a gas chromatograph for analysis. Under optimum conditions, the enrichment factors and extraction recoveries are high and range between 37-872 and 82.9-102.5%, respectively. The linear range is wide (0.025-20microgL(-1)), and the limits of detection are between 0.011 and 0.11microgL(-1) for most of the analytes. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 1microgL(-1) of OCPs in water was in the range of 5.8-8.8%. The performance of the method was gauged by analyzing samples of lake and tap water.

  18. Foot Drop

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Foot Drop Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Foot Drop? Foot drop describes the inability to raise ...

  19. Equivalent retarder-rotator approach to on-state twisted nematic liquid crystal displays

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, Vicente; Lancis, Jesus; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew

    2006-06-01

    Polarization properties of a twisted nematic liquid crystal cell are fully characterized by an equivalent optical system that consists of a retarder wave plate and a rotator. In this paper we show that this result is of interest to optimize the light-modulation capabilities of a voltage-addressed liquid crystal display (LCD). We provide two examples. First, we demonstrate a calibration method that can be carried out by a standard polarimetric technique with a high degree of precision. Second, we propose an optical device to generate a family of equiazimuth polarization states by adding a quarter-wave plate to the LCD. We find that the design procedure is best described in geometrical terms on the Poincare sphere by use of the equivalent model. Finally, laboratory results corresponding to a commercial LCD are presented.

  20. Liquid-particle dynamics and rate of evaporation in the rotating field of centrifugal compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkus, O.

    1981-01-01

    A model is presented which consists of injecting a liquid coolant into the vapor of centrifugal compressors via slots in the rotating blades. The aim of the injection is to achieve isothermal compression and thus minimal work input. The 3-dimensional analysis determines the relative velocities and trajectories of the liquid particles, and their rate of vaporization as a function of the prevailing flow field and inlet conditions. Inertia, viscous drag, centrifugal and Coriolis forces are all included. The computer-obtained results show that for optimum conditions and to avoid collision with the blades it is desirable that injection occur at the suction side of the blades and close to the hub; that low rather than high initial particle velocities are preferred; and that small droplet sizes are required both to avoid blade erosion and to assure the highest rate of vaporization. The analysis also shows that vaporization levels will remain low unless the compressed vapor is at relatively high temperatures.

  1. Optically driven translational and rotational motions of microrod particles in a nematic liquid crystal

    PubMed Central

    Eremin, Alexey; Hirankittiwong, Pemika; Chattham, Nattaporn; Nádasi, Hajnalka; Stannarius, Ralf; Limtrakul, Jumras; Haba, Osamu; Yonetake, Koichiro; Takezoe, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    A small amount of azo-dendrimer molecules dissolved in a liquid crystal enables translational and rotational motions of microrods in a liquid crystal matrix under unpolarized UV light irradiation. This motion is initiated by a light-induced trans-to-cis conformational change of the dendrimer adsorbed at the rod surface and the associated director reorientation. The bending direction of the cis conformers is not random but is selectively chosen due to the curved local director field in the vicinity of the dendrimer-coated surface. Different types of director distortions occur around the rods, depending on their orientations with respect to the nematic director field. This leads to different types of motions driven by the torques exerted on the particles by the director reorientations. PMID:25624507

  2. Optically driven translational and rotational motions of microrod particles in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Eremin, Alexey; Hirankittiwong, Pemika; Chattham, Nattaporn; Nádasi, Hajnalka; Stannarius, Ralf; Limtrakul, Jumras; Haba, Osamu; Yonetake, Koichiro; Takezoe, Hideo

    2015-02-10

    A small amount of azo-dendrimer molecules dissolved in a liquid crystal enables translational and rotational motions of microrods in a liquid crystal matrix under unpolarized UV light irradiation. This motion is initiated by a light-induced trans-to-cis conformational change of the dendrimer adsorbed at the rod surface and the associated director reorientation. The bending direction of the cis conformers is not random but is selectively chosen due to the curved local director field in the vicinity of the dendrimer-coated surface. Different types of director distortions occur around the rods, depending on their orientations with respect to the nematic director field. This leads to different types of motions driven by the torques exerted on the particles by the director reorientations. PMID:25624507

  3. Ionic liquid-based single drop microextraction combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of manganese in water samples.

    PubMed

    Manzoori, Jamshid L; Amjadi, Mohammad; Abulhassani, Jafar

    2009-02-15

    Room temperature ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C(4)MIM][PF(6)], was used as an alternative to volatile organic solvents in single drop microextraction-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SDME-ETAAS). Manganese was extracted from aqueous solution into a drop of the ionic liquid after complextaion with 1-(2-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol (TAN) and the drop was directly injected into the graphite furnace. Several variables affecting microextraction efficiency and ETAAS signal, such as pyrolysis and atomization temperature, pH, TAN concentration, extraction time, drop volume and stirring rate were investigated and optimized. In the optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection (3s) and the enhancement factor were 0.024 microg L(-1) and 30.3, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for five replicate determinations of 0.5 microg L(-1) Mn(II) was 5.5%. The developed method was validated by the analysis of a certified reference material (NIST SRM 1643e) and applied successfully to the determination of manganese in several natural water samples. PMID:19084676

  4. Low-density solvent-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with single-drop microextraction for the fast determination of chlorophenols in environmental water samples by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyi; Xue, Aifang; Chen, Hao; Li, Shengqing

    2013-03-01

    A new format of fast three-phase microextraction by combining low-density solvent-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and single-drop microextraction (SDME) was for the first time developed for the determination of chlorophenols in environmental water samples. The extraction procedure includes a 2 min DLLME pre-extraction and a 10 min SDME back-extraction. A portion of low-density solvent (toluene) was used as organic phase and injected into the aqueous sample (donor phase) with methanol as disperser. The analytes were pre-extracted into the organic phase within 2 min. A thin layer of the organic phase formed on the top of the aqueous phase by a 2 min centrifugation. Then a drop of acceptor solution was introduced into the upper layer and SDME was carried out for the back-extraction. The stirring step typically involved in SDME and LLLME is avoided with the benefit of the high speed and efficiency of DLLME pre-extraction. After extraction, the acceptor drop was withdrawn and directly injected into a high performance liquid chromatography instrument with ultraviolet detection for analysis. Five chlorophenols, 4-chlorophenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and pentachlorophenol, were selected as model compounds for developing and evaluating the method. Factors affecting extraction efficiency were studied, including the organic solvent, the disperser solvent, the composition of donor phase and acceptor phase, the volume of acceptor microdrop, and the extraction time. At optimal conditions, the method showed low detection limit (0.016-0.084 μg/L) for the five chlorophenols, good linearity (from 0.2-250 to 1.0-250 μg/L, depending on the analytes) and repeatability (RSD below 8.2, n=5). The simple, fast, and efficient feature of the proposed method was demonstrated by the analysis of chlorophenols in environmental water samples.

  5. Computational and experimental investigation of the drag reduction and the components of pressure drop in horizontal slug flow using liquids of different viscosities

    SciTech Connect

    Daas, Mutaz; Bleyle, Derek

    2006-03-01

    Computational and experimental investigation in 10-cm ID horizontal pipes have been carried out utilizing carbon dioxide as the gas phase and two types of oil with different viscosities; namely 0.0025Pas and 0.05Pas, as the liquid phase. The influence of oil viscosity on the magnitude of total pressure drop and each of its components as well as the effectiveness of a drag reducing additive (DRA, CDR WS 500M flow improver) in decreasing the pressure loss was investigated in two-phase oil-gas slug flow. The effects of changing oil viscosity on the contribution of frictional and accelerational components to total pressure drop in slug flow were also examined and analyzed. Computations of accelerational and frictional components of pressure drop were performed. The accelerational component of pressure drop was dominant in the 0.0025Pas oil while the frictional component had significant contributions in the 0.05Pas oil. Despite the fact that the magnitude of drag reduction was higher in the 0.05Pas oil, the DRA was more effective in reducing the total pressure drop and its components in the 0.0025Pas oil. (author)

  6. Experimental analysis and flow visualization of a thin liquid film on a stationary and rotating disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, S.; Faghri, A.; Hankey, W.

    1991-01-01

    The mean thickness of a thin liquid film of deionized water with a free surface on a stationary and rotating horizontal disk has been measured with a nonobtrusive capacitance technique. The measurements were taken when the rotational speed ranged from 0-300 rpm and the flow rate varied from 7.0-15.0 lpm. A flow visualization study of the thin film was also performed to determine the characteristics of the waves on the free surface. When the disk was stationary, a circular hydraulic jump was present on the disk. Upstream from the jump, the film thickness was determined by the inertial and frictional forces on the fluid, and the radial spreading of the film. The surface tension at the edge of the disk affected the film thickness downstream from the jump. For the rotating disk, the film thickness was dependent upon the inertial and frictional forces near the center of the disk and the centrifugal forces near the edge of the disk.

  7. Rotational Dynamics in Ionic Liquids from NMR Relaxation Experiments and Simulations: Benzene and 1-Ethyl-3-Methylimidazolium.

    PubMed

    Rumble, Christopher A; Kaintz, Anne; Yadav, Sharad K; Conway, Brian; Araque, Juan C; Baker, Gary A; Margulis, Claudio; Maroncelli, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Temperature-dependent (2)H longitudinal spin relaxation times (T1) of dilute benzene-d6 in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Im41][BF4]) and two deuterated variants of the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation (Im21(+)-d1 and Im21(+)-d6) in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Im21][Tf2N]), measured at multiple Larmor frequencies, were used to probe rotational dynamics in ionic liquids. Rotational correlation times significantly faster than predicted by slip hydrodynamic calculations were observed for both solutes. Molecular dynamics simulations of these systems enabled extraction of more information about the rotational dynamics from the NMR data than rotation times alone. The multifrequency (2)H T1(T) data could be fit to within uncertainties over a broad region about the T1 minimum using models of the relevant rotational time correlation functions and their viscosity/temperature dependence derived from simulation. Such simulation-guided fitting provided confidence in the semiquantitative accuracy of the simulation models and enabled interpretation of NMR measurements to higher viscosities than previously possible. Simulations of the benzene system were therefore used to explore the nature of solute rotation in ionic liquids and how it might differ from rotation in conventional solvents. Whereas "spinning" about the C6 axis of benzene senses similarly weak solvent friction in both types of solvents, "tumbling" (rotations about in-plane axes) differs significantly in conventional solvents and ionic liquids. In the sluggish environment provided by ionic liquids, orientational caging and the presence of rare but influential large-amplitude (180°) jumps about in-plane axes lead to rotations being markedly nondiffusive, especially below room temperature. PMID:27509215

  8. Sessile Rayleigh drop instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, Paul; Bostwick, Josh

    2012-11-01

    Rayleigh (1879) determined the mode shapes and frequencies of the inviscid motion of a free drop held by surface tension. We study the inviscid motions of a sessile Rayleigh drop - a drop which rests on a planar solid and whose contact-line is free to move. Linear stability analysis gives the modes and frequencies of the droplet motions. In this talk, we focus on the ``walking instability,'' an unstable mode wherein the drop moves across a planar substrate in an inviscid rocking-like motion. The mode shape is non-axisymmetric. Although the experimental literature has hinted at such a mode, this is the first prediction from linear stability analysis, as far as we are aware. The ``walking instability'' of the drop converts energy stored in the liquid shape into the energy of liquid motion - which represents a heretofore unknown pathway of energy conversion of potentially wide significance for a broad range of applications.

  9. Analysis of Hydrodynamics and Heat Transfer in a Thin Liquid Film Flowing over a Rotating Disk by Integral Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, S.; Cetegen, B. M.

    2005-01-01

    An integral analysis of hydrodynamics and heat transfer in a thin liquid film flowing over a rotating disk surface is presented for both constant temperature and constant heat flux boundary conditions. The model is found to capture the correct trends of the liquid film thickness variation over the disk surface and compare reasonably well with experimental results over the range of Reynolds and Rossby numbers covering both inertia and rotation dominated regimes. Nusselt number variation over the disk surface shows two types of behavior. At low rotation rates, the Nusselt number exhibits a radial decay with Nusselt number magnitudes increasing with higher inlet Reynolds number for both constant wall temperature and heat flux cases. At high rotation rates, the Nusselt number profiles exhibit a peak whose location advances radially outward with increasing film Reynolds number or inertia. The results also compare favorably with the full numerical simulation results from an earlier study as well as with the reported experimental results.

  10. Comprehensive quantitative analysis of Chinese patent drug YinHuang drop pill by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tin-Long; An, Ya-Qi; Yan, Bing-Chao; Yue, Rui-Qi; Zhang, Tian-Bo; Ho, Hing-Man; Ren, Tian-Jing; Fung, Hau-Yee; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Liu, Zhong-Liang; Pu, Jian-Xin; Han, Quan-Bin; Sun, Han-Dong

    2016-06-01

    YinHuang drop pill (YHDP) is a new preparation, derived from the traditional YinHuang (YH) decoction. Since drop pills are one of the newly developed forms of Chinese patent drugs, not much research has been done regarding the quality and efficacy. This study aims to establish a comprehensive quantitative analysis of the chemical profile of YHDP. ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS) was used to identify 34 non-sugar small molecules including 15 flavonoids, 9 phenolic acids, 5 saponins, 1 iridoid, and 4 iridoid glycosides in YHDP samples, and 26 of them were quantitatively determined. Sugar composition of YHDP in terms of fructose, glucose and sucrose was examined via a high performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detector on an amide column (HPLC-NH2P-ELSD). Macromolecules were examined by high performance gel permeation chromatography coupled with ELSD (HPGPC-ELSD). The content of the drop pill's skeleton component PEG-4000 was also quantified via ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with charged aerosol detector (UHPLC-CAD). The results showed that up to 73% (w/w) of YHDP could be quantitatively determined. Small molecules accounted for approximately 5%, PEG-4000 represented 68%, while no sugars or macromolecules were found. Furthermore, YHDP showed no significant differences in terms of daily dosage, compared to YinHuang granules and YinHuang oral liquid; however, it has a higher small molecules content compared to YinHuang lozenge. PMID:27131804

  11. Comprehensive quantitative analysis of Chinese patent drug YinHuang drop pill by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tin-Long; An, Ya-Qi; Yan, Bing-Chao; Yue, Rui-Qi; Zhang, Tian-Bo; Ho, Hing-Man; Ren, Tian-Jing; Fung, Hau-Yee; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Liu, Zhong-Liang; Pu, Jian-Xin; Han, Quan-Bin; Sun, Han-Dong

    2016-06-01

    YinHuang drop pill (YHDP) is a new preparation, derived from the traditional YinHuang (YH) decoction. Since drop pills are one of the newly developed forms of Chinese patent drugs, not much research has been done regarding the quality and efficacy. This study aims to establish a comprehensive quantitative analysis of the chemical profile of YHDP. ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS) was used to identify 34 non-sugar small molecules including 15 flavonoids, 9 phenolic acids, 5 saponins, 1 iridoid, and 4 iridoid glycosides in YHDP samples, and 26 of them were quantitatively determined. Sugar composition of YHDP in terms of fructose, glucose and sucrose was examined via a high performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detector on an amide column (HPLC-NH2P-ELSD). Macromolecules were examined by high performance gel permeation chromatography coupled with ELSD (HPGPC-ELSD). The content of the drop pill's skeleton component PEG-4000 was also quantified via ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with charged aerosol detector (UHPLC-CAD). The results showed that up to 73% (w/w) of YHDP could be quantitatively determined. Small molecules accounted for approximately 5%, PEG-4000 represented 68%, while no sugars or macromolecules were found. Furthermore, YHDP showed no significant differences in terms of daily dosage, compared to YinHuang granules and YinHuang oral liquid; however, it has a higher small molecules content compared to YinHuang lozenge.

  12. Ultra-trace determination of lead in water and food samples by using ionic liquid-based single drop microextraction-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Manzoori, Jamshid L; Amjadi, Mohammad; Abulhassani, Jafar

    2009-06-30

    An improved single drop microextraction procedure was developed for the preconcentration of lead prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C4MIM][PF6], was used as an alternative to volatile organic solvents for extraction. Lead was complexed with ammonium pyrroldinedithiocarbamate (APDC) and extracted into a 7-microL ionic liquid drop. The extracted complex was directly injected into the graphite furnace. Several variables affecting microextraction efficiency and ETAAS signal, such as pyrolysis and atomization temperature, pH, APDC concentration, extraction time, drop volume and stirring rate were investigated and optimized. In the optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection (3s) and the enhancement factor were 0.015 microg L(-1) and 76, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for five replicate determinations of 0.2 microg L(-1) Pb was 5.2%. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials and applied successfully to the determination of lead in several real samples. PMID:19463561

  13. Nano-electromechanical rotation of graphene and giant enhancement in dielectric anisotropy in a liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Rajratan Kinnamon, Daniel; Garvey, Alfred

    2015-05-18

    A nematic liquid crystal (LC) is doped with dilute concentrations of pristine monolayer graphene (GP) flakes, and the LC + GP hybrids are found to exhibit a dramatic increase in the dielectric anisotropy. Electric field-dependent conductance studies reveal that the graphene flakes follow the nematic director that mechanically rotates on increasing an applied electric field. Further studies show that the π–π electron stacking, between the graphene's honeycomb structure and the LC's benzene rings, stabilizes pseudo-nematic domains that collectively amplify the dielectric anisotropy by improving the orientational order parameter in the nematic phase. These anisotropic domains interact with the external electric field, resulting in a nonzero dielectric anisotropy in the isotropic phase as well. The enhancement in dielectric anisotropy, due to the LC–graphene coupling, is found to have subsequent positive impacts on the LC's orientational threshold field and elasticity that allows the nematic director to respond quicker on switching the electric field off.

  14. Rotation moléculaire en temps réel dans l'eau liquide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, W.; Lascoux, N.; Gallot, G.; Gale, G.; Pommeret, S.; Leicknam, J.-Ci.; Bratos, S.

    2002-06-01

    La connaissance déjà acquise sur la dynamique de la liaison hydrogène dans l'eau liquide grâce au développement de laser délivrant des impulsions ultra-courtes dans l'infrarouge moyen nous permet de filmer la rotation de molécules HDO dans une solution D2O. L'expérience réalisée au laboratoire est basée sur la technique de spectroscopie pompe sonde résolue en polarisation. L'anisotropie mesurée permet de détecter en temps réel l'angle de déflexion du moment dipolaire de transition dont le point de départ est la direction du faisceau laser de pompe.

  15. Superdeformed states in rotating152Dy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strutinsky, V. M.

    1987-09-01

    The recently observed gamma-spectrum of152Dy at angular momenta 25>~ I>~60 is interpreted in terms of a strongly deformed shape isomer. A pronounced minimum is found for these angular momenta in the sum of liquid-drop energy (including rotational part) and shell-correction (calculated in the Nilsson model) of152Dy. The general criteria for stability of this minimum against rotation are discussed.

  16. Experiments on the Flow of a Thin Liquid Film Over a Horizontal Stationary and Rotating Disk Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozar, B.; Cetegen, B. M.; Faghri, A.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments on characterization of thin liquid films flowing over stationary and rotating disk surfaces are described. The thin liquid film was created by introducing deionized water from a flow collar at the center of an aluminum disk with a known initial film thickness and uniform radial velocity. Radial film thickness distribution was measured using a non-intrusive laser light interface reflection technique that enabled the measurement of the instantaneous film thickness over a finite segment of the disk. Experiments were performed for a range of flow rates between 3.01pm and 15.01pm, corresponding to Reynolds numbers based on the liquid inlet gap height and velocity between 238 and 1,188. The angular speed of the disk was varied from 0 rpm to 300 rpm. When the disk was stationary, a circular hydraulic jump was present in the liquid film. The liquid-film thickness in the subcritical region (down-stream of the hydraulic jump) was an order of magnitude greater than that in the supercritical region (upstream of the hydraulic jump) which was of the order of 0.3 mm. As the Reynolds number increased, the hydraulic jump migrated toward the edge of the disk. In the case of rotation, the liquid-film thickness exhibited a maximum on the disk surface. The liquid-film inertia and friction influenced the inner region where the film thickness progressively increased. The outer region where the film thickness decreased was primarily affected by the centrifugal forces. A flow visualization study of the thin film was also performed to determine the characteristics of the waves on the free surface. At high rotational speeds, spiral waves were observed on the liquid film. It was also determined that the angle of the waves which form on the liquid surface was a function of the ratio of local radial to tangential velocity.

  17. Drag on Sessile Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Nobes, David; Sen, Debjyoti; Amirfazli, Alidad; University of Alberta Mechanical Engineering Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present the first ever direct measurements of the coefficient of drag on sessile drops at Reynolds numbers from the creeping flow regime up to the point of incipient motion, made using a newly developed floating element differential drag sensor. Surfaces of different wettabilities (PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS)), wet by water, hexadecane, and various silicone oils, are used to study the effects of drop shape, and fluid properties on drag. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number (scaled by drop height) varies slightly with liquid-solid system and drop volume with results suggesting the drop experiences increased drag compared to similar shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillation influencing the otherwise laminar flow. Drops adopting more spherical shapes are seen to experience the greatest force at any given airspeed. This indicates that the relative exposed areas of drops is an important consideration in terms of force, with implications for the shedding of drops in applications such as airfoil icing and fuel cell flooding. The measurement technique used in this work can be adapted to measure drag force on other deformable, lightly adhered objects such as dust, sand, snow, vesicles, foams, and biofilms. The authours acknowledge NSERC, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, and the Killam Trusts.

  18. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Dynamics of formation of the liquid-drop phase of laser erosion jets near the surfaces of metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. K.; Kontsevoi, V. L.; Puzyrev, M. V.

    1995-03-01

    An investigation was made of laser erosion jets formed at 0.1-1.5 mm above the surfaces of Pb, Co, Ni, Sn, and Zn targets. A neodymium laser emitting rectangular pulses of 400 μs duration and of energy up to 400 J was used. The diameters, as well as the number density and volume fraction of the metal particles present in the jet, were measured. An analysis of the results showed that the metal liquid drops broke up near the surface and experienced additional evaporation because of their motion opposite to the laser beam.

  19. In-drop capillary spooling of spider capture thread inspires hybrid fibers with mixed solid–liquid mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Elettro, Hervé; Neukirch, Sébastien; Vollrath, Fritz; Antkowiak, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    An essential element in the web-trap architecture, the capture silk spun by ecribellate orb spiders consists of glue droplets sitting astride a silk filament. Mechanically this thread presents a mixed solid–liquid behavior unknown to date. Under extension, capture silk behaves as a particularly stretchy solid, owing to its molecular nanosprings, but it totally switches behavior in compression to now become liquid-like: It shrinks with no apparent limit while exerting a constant tension. Here, we unravel the physics underpinning the unique behavior of this ”liquid wire” and demonstrate that its mechanical response originates in the shape-switching of the silk filament induced by buckling within the droplets. Learning from this natural example of geometry and mechanics, we manufactured programmable liquid wires that present previously unidentified pathways for the design of new hybrid solid–liquid materials. PMID:27185930

  20. In-drop capillary spooling of spider capture thread inspires hybrid fibers with mixed solid–liquid mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elettro, Hervé; Neukirch, Sébastien; Vollrath, Fritz; Antkowiak, Arnaud

    2016-05-01

    An essential element in the web-trap architecture, the capture silk spun by ecribellate orb spiders consists of glue droplets sitting astride a silk filament. Mechanically this thread presents a mixed solid–liquid behavior unknown to date. Under extension, capture silk behaves as a particularly stretchy solid, owing to its molecular nanosprings, but it totally switches behavior in compression to now become liquid-like: It shrinks with no apparent limit while exerting a constant tension. Here, we unravel the physics underpinning the unique behavior of this ”liquid wire” and demonstrate that its mechanical response originates in the shape-switching of the silk filament induced by buckling within the droplets. Learning from this natural example of geometry and mechanics, we manufactured programmable liquid wires that present previously unidentified pathways for the design of new hybrid solid–liquid materials.

  1. In-drop capillary spooling of spider capture thread inspires hybrid fibers with mixed solid-liquid mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elettro, Hervé; Neukirch, Sébastien; Vollrath, Fritz; Antkowiak, Arnaud

    2016-05-01

    An essential element in the web-trap architecture, the capture silk spun by ecribellate orb spiders consists of glue droplets sitting astride a silk filament. Mechanically this thread presents a mixed solid-liquid behavior unknown to date. Under extension, capture silk behaves as a particularly stretchy solid, owing to its molecular nanosprings, but it totally switches behavior in compression to now become liquid-like: It shrinks with no apparent limit while exerting a constant tension. Here, we unravel the physics underpinning the unique behavior of this ”liquid wire” and demonstrate that its mechanical response originates in the shape-switching of the silk filament induced by buckling within the droplets. Learning from this natural example of geometry and mechanics, we manufactured programmable liquid wires that present previously unidentified pathways for the design of new hybrid solid-liquid materials.

  2. In-drop capillary spooling of spider capture thread inspires hybrid fibers with mixed solid-liquid mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Elettro, Hervé; Neukirch, Sébastien; Vollrath, Fritz; Antkowiak, Arnaud

    2016-05-31

    An essential element in the web-trap architecture, the capture silk spun by ecribellate orb spiders consists of glue droplets sitting astride a silk filament. Mechanically this thread presents a mixed solid-liquid behavior unknown to date. Under extension, capture silk behaves as a particularly stretchy solid, owing to its molecular nanosprings, but it totally switches behavior in compression to now become liquid-like: It shrinks with no apparent limit while exerting a constant tension. Here, we unravel the physics underpinning the unique behavior of this "liquid wire" and demonstrate that its mechanical response originates in the shape-switching of the silk filament induced by buckling within the droplets. Learning from this natural example of geometry and mechanics, we manufactured programmable liquid wires that present previously unidentified pathways for the design of new hybrid solid-liquid materials.

  3. Effect of Soluble Surfactants on the Kinetics of Thinning of Liquid Bridges during Drops Formation and on Size of Satellite Droplets.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Nina M; Nowak, Emilia; Simmons, Mark J H

    2016-05-24

    The results of an experimental study on thinning and breakage of liquid bridges during detachment of a drop from the tip of a capillary are presented for a series of surfactant solutions (including cationic, anionic, and nonionic surfactants) over a broad range of molecular masses, values of critical micelle concentration, and concentrations. The used experimental protocol revealed that the kinetics of the bridge thinning depends much more on the dynamics of adsorption at the surface of the drop before it destabilizes, rather than on the depletion of surfactant from the surface of the thinning bridge due to its stretching as the instability develops. The kinetics of the bridge thinning and the size of satellite droplets formed after the bridge breakage depend considerably on the surfactant concentration and the value of critical micelle concentration. It is proposed that the dynamic surface tension on the time scale of the drop formation can be used as an effective surface tension for the description of the bridge kinetics over the broad range of experimental conditions used.

  4. Effect of Soluble Surfactants on the Kinetics of Thinning of Liquid Bridges during Drops Formation and on Size of Satellite Droplets.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Nina M; Nowak, Emilia; Simmons, Mark J H

    2016-05-24

    The results of an experimental study on thinning and breakage of liquid bridges during detachment of a drop from the tip of a capillary are presented for a series of surfactant solutions (including cationic, anionic, and nonionic surfactants) over a broad range of molecular masses, values of critical micelle concentration, and concentrations. The used experimental protocol revealed that the kinetics of the bridge thinning depends much more on the dynamics of adsorption at the surface of the drop before it destabilizes, rather than on the depletion of surfactant from the surface of the thinning bridge due to its stretching as the instability develops. The kinetics of the bridge thinning and the size of satellite droplets formed after the bridge breakage depend considerably on the surfactant concentration and the value of critical micelle concentration. It is proposed that the dynamic surface tension on the time scale of the drop formation can be used as an effective surface tension for the description of the bridge kinetics over the broad range of experimental conditions used. PMID:27148624

  5. The flow of a thin liquid film on a stationary and rotating disk. I - Experimental analysis and flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, S.; Faghri, A.; Hankey, W.

    1990-01-01

    The mean thickness of a thin liquid film of deionized water with a free surface on a stationary and rotating horizontal disk has been measured with a nonobtrusive capacitance technique. The measurements were taken when the rotational speed was 0-300 RPM and the flow rate was 7.0-15.0 LPM. A flow visualization study of the thin film was also performed to determine the characteristics of the waves on the free surface. When the disk was stationary, a circular hydraulic jump was present on the disk. Surface waves were found in the supercritical and subcritical regions at all flow rates studied. When the rotational speed of the disk is low, a standing wave at the edge of the disk was present. As the rotational speed increased, the surface waves changed from the wavy-laminar region to a region in which the waves ran nearly radially across the disk on top of a thin substrate of fluid.

  6. Numerical simulation of fluid flow and heat transfer in a thin liquid film over a rotating disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Faghri, A.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a numerical simulation of the flow field and associated heat transfer coefficient are presented for the free surface flow of a thin liquid film adjacent to a horizontal rotating disk. The computation has been performed for different flow rates and rotational velocities using a three-dimensional boundary-fitted coordinate system. Since the geometry of the free surface is unknown and dependent on flow rate, rate of rotation, and other parameters, an interative procedure had to be used to ascertain its location. The computed film height agreed well with existing experimental measurements. The flow was dominated by inertia near the entrance and close to the free surface, and dominated by centrifugal force at larger radii and adjacent to the disk. The rotation enhanced the heat transfer coefficient by a significant amount.

  7. Summary report for ITER Task-T19: MHD pressure drop and heat transfer study for liquid metal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.B.; Hua, T.Q.; Natesan, K.; Kirillov, I.R.; Vitkovski, I.V.; Anisimov, A.M.

    1995-03-01

    A key feasibility issue for the ITER Vanadium/Lithium breeding blanket is the question of insulator coatings. Design calculations show that an electrically insulating layer is necessary to maintain an acceptably low MHD pressure drop. To begin experimental investigations of the MHD performance of candidate insulator materials and the technology for putting them in place, a new test section was prepared. Aluminum oxide was chosen as the first candidate insulating material because it may be used in combination with NaK in the ITER vacuum vessel and/or the divertor. Details on the methods used to produce the aluminum oxide layer as well as the microstructures of the coating and the aluminide sublayer are presented and discussed. The overall MHD pressure drop, local MHD pressure gradient, local transverse MHD pressure difference, and surface voltage distributions in both the circumferential and the axial directions are reported and discussed. The positive results obtained here for high-temperature NaK have two beneficial implications for ITER. First, since NaK may be used in the vacuum vessel and/or the divertor, these results support the design approach of using electrically insulating coatings to substantially reduce MHD pressure drop. Secondly, while Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SS is not the same coating/base material combination which would be used in the advanced blanket, this work nonetheless shows that it is possible to produce a viable insulating coating which is stable in contact with a high temperature alkali metal coolant.

  8. Flow pattern, pressure drop and void fraction of two-phase gas-liquid flow in an inclined narrow annular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Wongwises, Somchai; Pipathattakul, Manop

    2006-03-01

    Two-phase flow pattern, pressure drop and void fraction in horizontal and inclined upward air-water two-phase flow in a mini-gap annular channel are experimentally studied. A concentric annular test section at the length of 880mm with an outer diameter of 12.5mm and inner diameter of 8mm is used in the experiments. The flow phenomena, which are plug flow, slug flow, annular flow, annular/slug flow, bubbly/plug flow, bubbly/slug-plug flow, churn flow, dispersed bubbly flow and slug/bubbly flow, are observed and recorded by high-speed camera. A slug flow pattern is found only in the horizontal channel while slug/bubbly flow patterns are observed only in inclined channels. When the inclination angle is increased, the onset of transition from the plug flow region to the slug flow region (for the horizontal channel) and from the plug flow region to slug/bubbly flow region (for inclined channels) shift to a lower value of superficial air velocity. Small shifts are found for the transition line between the dispersed bubbly flow and the bubbly/plug flow, the bubbly/plug flow and the bubbly/slug-plug flow, and the bubbly/plug flow and the plug flow. The rest of the transition lines shift to a higher value of superficial air velocity. Considering the effect of flow pattern on the pressure drop in the horizontal tube at low liquid velocity, the occurrence of slug flow stops the rise of pressure drop for a short while, before rising again after the air velocity has increased. However, the pressure does not rise abruptly in the tubes with {theta}=30{sup o} and 60{sup o} when the slug/bubbly flow occurs. At low gas and liquid velocity, the pressure drop increases, when the inclination angles changes from horizontal to 30{sup o} and 60{sup o}. Void fraction increases with increasing gas velocity and decreases with increasing liquid velocity. After increasing the inclination angle from horizontal to {theta}=30{sup o} and 60{sup o}, the void fraction appears to be similar, with a

  9. Magnetic ionic liquid in stirring-assisted drop-breakup microextraction: Proof-of-concept extraction of phenolic endocrine disrupters and acidic pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Chatzimitakos, Theodoros; Binellas, Charalampos; Maidatsi, Katerina; Stalikas, Constantine

    2016-03-01

    The use of magnetic ionic liquids (MILs) is in constant growth due to their switchable properties in the presence of an external magnetic field along with the outstanding properties of ionic liquids. In this study, a novel stirring-assisted drop-breakup microextraction (SADBME) approach is put forward, based on the synthesis and utilization of methyltrioctylammonium tetrachloroferrate (N8 8,8,1[FeCl4]), as a MIL. The proposed procedure complies with the principles of the green chemistry, since it uses low volumes of easily synthesized ILs-based magnetic extracting phases avoiding the use of toxic solvents. To demonstrate its applicability, the proposed microextraction procedure is studied in conjunction with HPLC for the determination of selected phenols and acidic pharmaceuticals in aqueous matrices, taking into account the main experimental variables involved. The results obtained are accurate and highly reproducible, thus making it a good alternative approach for routine analysis of phenols and acidic pharmaceuticals. The low-cost approach is straightforward, environmentally safe and exhibits high enrichment factors and absolute extraction percentages and satisfactory recoveries. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a MIL is used for analytical purposes in a practical, efficient and environmentally friendly drop-breakup microextraction approach for small molecules. PMID:26873468

  10. The motion of bubbles inside drops in containerless processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, N.; Annamalai, P.; Cole, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical model of thermocapillary bubble motion inside a drop, located in a space laboratory, due to an arbitrary axisymmetric temperature distribution on the drop surface was constructed. Typical results for the stream function and temperature fields as well as the migration velocity of the bubble were obtained in the quasistatic limit. The motion of bubbles in a rotating body of liquid was studied experimentally, and an approximate theoretical model was developed. Comparison of the experimental observations of the bubble trajectories and centering times with theoretical predictions lends qualified support to the theory.

  11. Ground Based Studies of Thermocapillary Flows in Levitated Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhal, Satwindar Singh; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-based experiments together with analytical studies are presently being conducted for levitated drops. Both acoustic and electrostatic techniques are being employed to achieve levitation of drops in a gaseous environment. The scientific effort is principally on the thermal and the fluid phenomena associated with the local heating of levitated drops, both at 1-g and at low-g. In particular, the thermocapillary flow associated with local spot heating is being studied. Fairly stable acoustic levitation of drops has been achieved with some exceptions when random rotational motion of the drop persists. The flow visualization has been carried out by light scattering from smoke particles for the exterior flow and fluorescent tracer particles in the drop. The results indicate a lack of axial symmetry in the internal flow even though the apparatus and the heating are symmetric. The theoretical studies for the past year have included fundamental analyses of acoustically levitated spherical drops. The flow associated with a particle near the velocity antinode is being investigated by the singular perturbation technique. As a first step towards understanding the effect of the particle displacement from the antinode, the flow field about the node has been calculated for the first time. The effect of the acoustic field on the interior of a liquid drop has also been investigated. The results predict that the internal flow field is very weak.

  12. Determination of the viscous acoustic field for liquid drop positioning/forcing in an acoustic levitation chamber in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyell, Margaret J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of acoustic levitation systems has provided a technology with which to undertake droplet studies as well as do containerless processing experiments in a microgravity environment. Acoustic levitation chambers utilize radiation pressure forces to position/manipulate the drop. Oscillations can be induced via frequency modulation of the acoustic wave, with the modulated acoustic radiation vector acting as the driving force. To account for tangential as well as radial forcing, it is necessary that the viscous effects be included in the acoustic field. The method of composite expansions is employed in the determination of the acoustic field with viscous effects.

  13. Local heat transfer measurement with liquid crystals on rotating surfaces including non-axisymmetric cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, D. E.; Kim, Y. K.

    1993-01-01

    An overview and summary of test methods and results are given for the problem of measuring local heat transfer on rotating surfaces that model gas turbine engine disks. Disk cavity situations generically similar to those encountered in the high pressure stage disk cooling are considered, with cooling air supplied both at or near the wheel centerline as well as through single or multiple jets impinging outboard on the wheel near the blade attachment region. In some situations provision has been made for ingestion into the disk-cavity from the gas path region radially outboard of the disk. Local heat transfer rates in all cases are determined from the color display from a thin coating of encapsulated liquid crystals sprayed onto the disk, in conjunction with use of a video camera and computer vision system. For cases with axisymmetric disk surfaces, the coated surfaces are illuminated and viewed continuously, and detailed radial distributions of local Nusselt number are obtained. For non-axisymmetric disk surfaces, such as encountered in the vicinity of bolt heads, the disk is illuminated with stroboscopic light, and a method has been developed and used to synchronize the computer frame grabber with the illumination.

  14. Surface-controlled drop oscillations in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, R. Glynn

    2001-05-01

    A series of experiments probing the effects of surfactants was performed by Bob Apfel and his research group in the 1990s. Several laboratory experiments were carried out in uni-axial acoustic levitators. Two experiments were carried out in a triple-axis levitator called the Drop Physics Module, which was carried on Space Shuttle Columbia as part of the First and Second United States Microgravity Laboratory missions. Liquid drops containing aqueous solutions of soluble surfactants were acoustically positioned and deformed (and in some cases rotated) in order to excite shape mode oscillations. The results of these experiments allowed the inference of surface rheological properties (Gibb's elasticity, surface viscosity coefficients) as functions of surfactant type and concentration. The highlights of this effort will be presented in a semi-technical fashion. [Work supported by NASA.

  15. Drop dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The drop dynamics module is a Spacelab-compatible acoustic positioning and control system for conducting drop dynamics experiments in space. It consists basically of a chamber, a drop injector system, an acoustic positioning system, and a data collection system. The principal means of collecting data is by a cinegraphic camera. The drop is positioned in the center of the chamber by forces created by standing acoustic waves generated in the nearly cubical chamber (about 12 cm on a side). The drop can be spun or oscillated up to fission by varying the phse and amplitude of the acoustic waves. The system is designed to perform its experiments unattended, except for start-up and shutdown events and other unique events that require the attention of the Spacelab payload specialist.

  16. Experimental study of the boiling mechanism of a liquid film flowing on the surface of a rotating disc

    SciTech Connect

    Kolokotsa, D.; Yanniotis, S.

    2010-11-15

    The boiling mechanism of a liquid film formed on the surface of a smooth horizontal rotating disc was studied using de-ionised water at 2 l/min flow rate, boiling under vacuum at 40 C and 5-10 C wall superheat. Visualization experiments were carried out and video films were taken for rotational speeds from 0 to 1000 rpm. It was observed that nucleate flow boiling prevails in the case of 0 rpm (stationary disc). Nucleate boiling was also observed at 100 and 200 rpm with the number of bubbles and the diameter of the bubbles decreasing as the rotational speed was increasing. At 600 and 1000 rpm rotational speeds, vapor bubbles were not observed. The results of visual observation were in agreement with bubble growth analysis which showed that at heat flux values of 40 kW/m{sup 2}, conditions for bubble growth are favorable at low rotational speeds (<200 rpm) but are unfavorable at high rotational speeds (1000 rpm). (author)

  17. Rotational viscosity, dynamic phenomena, and dielectric properties in a long-chain liquid crystal: NMR study and theoretical treatment.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, A V; Dong, R Y

    2001-01-01

    The rotational diffusion constants D(perpendicular) and D(parallel), rotational viscosity coefficients gamma(i) (i=1,2), the orientational correlation times tau(L)mn, and the dielectric permittivities for nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) are investigated. gamma(i) are calculated by a combination of existing statistical-mechanical approach (SMA) and NMR relaxation theory, both based on a rotational diffusion model. In the rotational diffusion model, it is assumed that the reorientation of an individual molecule is a stochastic Brownian motion in a certain potential of mean torque. According to the SMA, gamma(i) are found to be a function of temperature, density, rotational diffusion constant for tumbling motions, and the orientational order parameters. The order parameters and rotational diffusion constant are obtained from an analysis of NMR measurements. Reasonable agreement between the calculated and experimental values of gamma(i) for 4-n-octyloxy-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8OCB) is obtained. The orientational correlation times, and the longitudinal and transverse components of the real chi'(j)(omega) and imaginary chi"(j)(omega) (j= parallel, perpendicular) parts of the complex susceptibility tensor for 8OCB molecules in the nematic phase are also obtained.

  18. Constant molecular rotation at the smectic-A to smectic-C* transition in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, F.; Vallerien, S. U.; Kapitza, H.; Zentel, R.; Fischer, E. W.

    1990-09-01

    We present dielectric measurements extended over the frequency range from 106 to 109 Hz on a pure ferroelectric liquid crystal. In clear contrast to the generally attributed origin of the ferroelectricity in liquid crystals arising from a slowing down of the molecular rotation around the long molecular axis, we find by direct observation the corresponding dielectric relaxation unchanged at the smectic-A to smectic-C* transition. This result requires a new interpretation of a recently published degenerate four-wave-mixing experiment by Lalanne et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 3046 (1989)].

  19. Optical non-contact localization of liquid-gas interfaces on disk during rotation for measuring flow rates and viscosities.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jochen; Riegger, Lutz; Bundgaard, Frederik; Mark, Daniel; Zengerle, Roland; Ducrée, Jens

    2012-12-21

    We present a novel technique for the spatio-temporally resolved localization of liquid-gas interfaces on centrifugal microfluidic platforms based on total internal reflection (TIR) at the channel wall. The simple setup consists of a line laser and a linear image sensor array mounted in a stationary instrument. Apart from identifying the presence of usually unwanted gas bubbles, the here described online meniscus detection allows to measure liquid volumes with a high precision of 1.9%. Additionally, flow rates and viscosities (range: 1-12 mPa s, precision of 4.3%) can be sensed even during rotation at frequencies up to 30 Hz.

  20. Ionic-liquid-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction followed by GC-MS for the rapid analysis of essential oil in Dryopteris fragrans.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Zhao, Chun-Jian; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2013-12-01

    A rapid, green and effective miniaturized sample preparation technique, ionic-liquid-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction was developed for the extraction of essential oil from dried Dryopteris fragrans. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate was the optimal ionic liquid as the destruction agent of plant cell walls and microwave absorption was medium. n-Heptadecane (2.0 μL) was adopted as the suspended microdrop solvent in the headspace for the extraction and concentration of essential oil. The optimal parameters of the proposed method were an irradiation power of 300 W, sample mass of 0.9 g, mass ratio of ionic liquids to sample of 2.8, extraction temperature of 79°C, and extraction time of 3.6 min. In comparison to the previous reports, the proposed technique could equally monitor all the essential oil components with no significant differences in a simple way, which was more rapid and required a much lower amount of sample.

  1. Ionic-liquid-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction followed by GC-MS for the rapid analysis of essential oil in Dryopteris fragrans.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Zhao, Chun-Jian; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2013-12-01

    A rapid, green and effective miniaturized sample preparation technique, ionic-liquid-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction was developed for the extraction of essential oil from dried Dryopteris fragrans. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate was the optimal ionic liquid as the destruction agent of plant cell walls and microwave absorption was medium. n-Heptadecane (2.0 μL) was adopted as the suspended microdrop solvent in the headspace for the extraction and concentration of essential oil. The optimal parameters of the proposed method were an irradiation power of 300 W, sample mass of 0.9 g, mass ratio of ionic liquids to sample of 2.8, extraction temperature of 79°C, and extraction time of 3.6 min. In comparison to the previous reports, the proposed technique could equally monitor all the essential oil components with no significant differences in a simple way, which was more rapid and required a much lower amount of sample. PMID:24174124

  2. Automation of static and dynamic non-dispersive liquid phase microextraction. Part 1: Approaches based on extractant drop-, plug-, film- and microflow-formation.

    PubMed

    Alexovič, Michal; Horstkotte, Burkhard; Solich, Petr; Sabo, Ján

    2016-02-01

    Simplicity, effectiveness, swiftness, and environmental friendliness - these are the typical requirements for the state of the art development of green analytical techniques. Liquid phase microextraction (LPME) stands for a family of elegant sample pretreatment and analyte preconcentration techniques preserving these principles in numerous applications. By using only fractions of solvent and sample compared to classical liquid-liquid extraction, the extraction kinetics, the preconcentration factor, and the cost efficiency can be increased. Moreover, significant improvements can be made by automation, which is still a hot topic in analytical chemistry. This review surveys comprehensively and in two parts the developments of automation of non-dispersive LPME methodologies performed in static and dynamic modes. Their advantages and limitations and the reported analytical performances are discussed and put into perspective with the corresponding manual procedures. The automation strategies, techniques, and their operation advantages as well as their potentials are further described and discussed. In this first part, an introduction to LPME and their static and dynamic operation modes as well as their automation methodologies is given. The LPME techniques are classified according to the different approaches of protection of the extraction solvent using either a tip-like (needle/tube/rod) support (drop-based approaches), a wall support (film-based approaches), or microfluidic devices. In the second part, the LPME techniques based on porous supports for the extraction solvent such as membranes and porous media are overviewed. An outlook on future demands and perspectives in this promising area of analytical chemistry is finally given.

  3. Three-dimensional analysis of thermo-mechanically rotating cholesteric liquid crystal droplets under a temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Kuroda, M.; Sano, M.

    2015-02-01

    We studied the rotational motion of cholesteric liquid crystal droplets under a temperature gradient (the Lehmann effect). We found that different surface treatments, planar and homeotropic anchoring, provided three types of droplets with different textures and geometries. The rotational velocity of these droplets depends differently on their size. Determining the three-dimensional structures of these droplets by the fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we propose a phenomenological equation to explain the rotational behavior of these droplets. This result shows that the description by the Ericksen-Leslie theory should be valid in the bulk of the droplet, but we need to take into account the surface torque induced by temperature gradient to fully understand the Lehmann effect.

  4. Dynamics of solvation and rotational relaxation of Coumarin 153 in ionic liquid confined nanometer-sized microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Debdeep; Seth, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Anjan; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2005-03-31

    The effects of confinement of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate on solvation dynamics and rotational relaxation of Coumarin 153 (C-153) in Triton X-100/cyclohexane microemulsions have been explored using steady-state and picosecond time-resolved emission spectroscopy. The steady-state and rotational relaxation data indicate that C-153 molecules are incorporated in the core of the microemulsions. The average rotational relaxation time increases with increase in w ([bmim][BF(4)]/[TX-100]) values. The solvent relaxation in the core of the microemulsion occurs on two different time scales and is almost insensitive to the increase in w values. The solvent relaxation is retarded in the pool of the microemulsions compared to the neat solvent. Though, the retardation is very small compared to several-fold retardation of the solvation time of the conventional solvent inside the pool of the microemulsions. PMID:16851624

  5. Pool impacts of Leidenfrost drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Maquet, Laurent; Dorbolo, Stephane; Dehandschoewercker, Eline; Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    This work concerns the impact of a droplet made of a volatile liquid (typically HFE) on a pool of an other liquid (typically silicone oil) which temperature is above the boiling point of the drop. Depending on the properties of the two liquids and the impacting conditions, four different regimes are observed. For low impacting speeds, the droplet bounces on the surface of the bath and finally levitates above it in a Leidenfrost state. Such a regime occurs as soon as the pool temperature exceeds the boiling point of the drop. This observation means that there is no threshold in temperature for a Leidenfrost effect on a liquid surface contrary to the case of a solid substrate. For intermediate impacting velocities, the pinch-off of the surface of the pool entraps the drop in the liquid bulk. The entrapped drop is separated from the pool by a layer of its own vapour in a similar way of antibulles. For increasing impacting speeds, the vapour layer between the drop and the pool does not hold during the pinch-off event. The contact of the drop with the hot liquid provokes a sudden and intense evaporation. At very large impacting speeds, the drop rapidely contacts the pool, spreads and finally induces a hemi-spherical cavity. In the end, these four different regimes are summarized in a Froud-Weber diagram which boundaries are discussed.

  6. Container-scale hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic modes in liquid metal rotating convection experiments with and without an imposed magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal convection, constrained by rapid rotation and/or large-scale magnetic fields, is observed almost everywhere in the universe: stars, galaxies, and planetary interiors. However, little is known about the essential behaviors of turbulent convection in liquid metals and even less is known about the essential dynamics of planetary cores and stellar convection zones inuenced by background rotation and imposed magnetic fields. To address this decit, we present novel results of a mixed laboratory-numerical investigation of Rayleigh-Benard convection in a cylindrical cavity subject to rotation and/or an imposed magnetic field, using the liquid metal gallium as the working fluid. A broad variety of cell-sized modes are observed experimentally and captured numerically and these modes can be either? steady, oscillatory, or precessing. This work shows that the convection-driven cell-sized modes that can develop in liquid metals are remarkably different from the canonical flows that develop in the fluids used in present day dynamo models.

  7. Beam coupling in hybrid photorefractive inorganic-cholesteric liquid crystal cells: Impact of optical rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Reshetnyak, V. Yu.; Pinkevych, I. P.; Sluckin, T. J.; Cook, G.; Evans, D. R.

    2014-03-14

    We develop a theoretical model to describe two-beam energy exchange in a hybrid photorefractive inorganic-cholesteric cell. A cholesteric layer is placed between two inorganic substrates. One of the substrates is photorefractive (Ce:SBN). Weak and strong light beams are incident on the hybrid cell. The interfering light beams induce a periodic space-charge field in the photorefractive window. This penetrates into the cholesteric liquid crystal (LC), inducing a diffraction grating written on the LC director. In the theory, the flexoelectric mechanism for electric field-director coupling is more important than the LC static dielectric anisotropy coupling. The LC optics is described in the Bragg regime. Each beam induces two circular polarized waves propagating in the cholesteric cell with different velocities. The model thus includes optical rotation in the cholesteric LC. The incident light beam wavelength can fall above, below, or inside the cholesteric gap. The theory calculates the energy gain of the weak beam, as a result of its interaction with the pump beam within the diffraction grating. Theoretical results for exponential gain coefficients are compared with experimental results for hybrid cells filled with cholesteric mixture BL038/CB15 at different concentrations of chiral agent CB15. Reconciliation between theory and experiment requires the inclusion of a phenomenological multiplier in the magnitude of the director grating. This multiplier is cubic in the space-charge field, and we provide a justification of the q-dependence of the multiplier. Within this paradigm, we are able to fit theory to experimental data for cholesteric mixtures with different spectral position of cholesteric gap relative to the wavelength of incident beams, subject to the use of some fitting parameters.

  8. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  9. Nanosecond Time-Resolution Study of Gold Nanorod Rotation at the Liquid-Solid Interface.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Bhanu; Chen, Fang; Wei, Yanli; Fang, Ning; Ligler, Frances S; Wang, Gufeng

    2016-07-18

    Early studies showed that the adsorption of nanorods may start from a special "anchored" state, in which the nanorods lose translational motion but retain rotational freedom. Insight into how the anchored nanorods rotate should provide additional dimensions for understanding particle-surface interactions. Based on conventional time-resolution studies, gold nanorods are thought to continuously rotate following initial interactions with negatively charged glass surfaces. However, this nanosecond time-resolution study reveals that the apparent continuous rotation actually consists of numerous fast, intermittent rotations or transitions between a small number of weakly immobilized states, with the particle resting in the immobilized states most of the time. The actual rotation from one immobilized state to the other happens on a 1 ms timescale, that is, approximately 50 times slower than in the bulk solution.

  10. Orientational dynamics of a ferronematic liquid crystal in a rotating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Boychuk, A. N. Zakhlevnykh, A. N.; Makarov, D. V.

    2015-09-15

    The behavior of the orientational structure of a ferronematic in a rotating uniform magnetic field is investigated using the continual theory. The time-dependent system of equations describing the dynamics of the ferronematic is derived. The dependences of the angles of rotation of the director and of the magnetization of the ferronematic on the velocity of field rotation are determined for various values of the material parameters. Two regimes (synchronous and asynchronous) of rotation of the ferronematic structure are detected. In the synchronous regime, the director rotates with the frequency of the magnetic field and a constant phase delay. The asynchronous regime is characterized by a time-dependent phase delay. The dependence of the critical angular velocity of magnetic field rotation, which determines the boundary between the synchronous and asynchronous regimes, on the magnetic field strength is derived.

  11. Liquid-liquid microextraction methods based on ultrasound-assisted emulsification and single-drop coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for determining strobilurin and oxazole fungicides in juices and fruits.

    PubMed

    Viñas, Pilar; Martínez-Castillo, Nelson; Campillo, Natalia; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2010-10-15

    Two procedures are proposed based on ultrasound-assisted emulsification and single-drop liquid-liquid microextraction for the sensitive determination of seven strobilurin and six oxazole fungicides in fruits and juice samples. Both miniaturized techniques are coupled to gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode, GC-MS(SIM). The procedures use low density organic solvents, and several factors influencing the emulsification, extraction and collection efficiency are optimized. The detection limits obtained at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 are below the MRLs set by the European Commission. Enrichment factors are between 140-1140 for the first technique used and 80-1600 for the latter. The recoveries obtained for spiked samples are satisfactory for all compounds. The methods are validated according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Different fruit and juices are analyzed by the proposed method and none of the samples contained fungicide residues above the detection limits.

  12. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  13. Comparison of short-range-order in liquid- and rotator-phase states of a simple molecular liquid: A reverse Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics analysis of neutron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, Luis Carlos; Tamarit, Josep Lluis; Veglio, Nestor; Bermejo, Francisco Javier; Cuello, Gabriel Julio

    2007-10-01

    The short-range order (SRO) correlations in liquid- and rotator-phase states of carbon tetrachloride are revisited here. The correlation of some angular magnitudes is used to evaluate the positional and orientational correlations in the liquid as well as in the rotator phase. The results show significant similitudes in the relative position of the molecules surrounding a central one but striking differences in their relative orientations, which could explain the changes in SRO between the two phases and the puzzling behavior of the local density in the liquid and rotator phases.

  14. Rapid analysis of Fructus forsythiae essential oil by ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Ma, Dan-Hui; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2013-12-01

    A rapid, green and effective miniaturized sample preparation and analytical technique, i.e. ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction (ILAMD-HS-SDME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the analysis of essential oil (EO) in Fructus forsythiae. In this work, ionic liquids (ILs) were not only used as the absorption medium of microwave irradiation but also as the destruction agent of plant cell walls. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim]OAc) was chosen as the optimal ILs. Moreover, n-heptadecane (2.0 μL) was selected as the appropriate suspended solvent for the extraction and concentration of EO. Extraction conditions of the proposed method were optimized using the relative peak area of EO constituents as the index, and the optimal operational parameters were obtained as follows: irradiation power (300 W), sample mass (0.7 g), mass ratio of ILs to sample (2.4), temperature (78°C) and time (3.4 min). In comparison to previous reports, the proposed method was faster and required smaller sample amount but could equally monitor all EO constituents with no significant differences. PMID:24267075

  15. Automation of static and dynamic non-dispersive liquid phase microextraction. Part 1: Approaches based on extractant drop-, plug-, film- and microflow-formation.

    PubMed

    Alexovič, Michal; Horstkotte, Burkhard; Solich, Petr; Sabo, Ján

    2016-02-01

    Simplicity, effectiveness, swiftness, and environmental friendliness - these are the typical requirements for the state of the art development of green analytical techniques. Liquid phase microextraction (LPME) stands for a family of elegant sample pretreatment and analyte preconcentration techniques preserving these principles in numerous applications. By using only fractions of solvent and sample compared to classical liquid-liquid extraction, the extraction kinetics, the preconcentration factor, and the cost efficiency can be increased. Moreover, significant improvements can be made by automation, which is still a hot topic in analytical chemistry. This review surveys comprehensively and in two parts the developments of automation of non-dispersive LPME methodologies performed in static and dynamic modes. Their advantages and limitations and the reported analytical performances are discussed and put into perspective with the corresponding manual procedures. The automation strategies, techniques, and their operation advantages as well as their potentials are further described and discussed. In this first part, an introduction to LPME and their static and dynamic operation modes as well as their automation methodologies is given. The LPME techniques are classified according to the different approaches of protection of the extraction solvent using either a tip-like (needle/tube/rod) support (drop-based approaches), a wall support (film-based approaches), or microfluidic devices. In the second part, the LPME techniques based on porous supports for the extraction solvent such as membranes and porous media are overviewed. An outlook on future demands and perspectives in this promising area of analytical chemistry is finally given. PMID:26772123

  16. Pool film boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen. [for SSME turbopump ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving a saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 inch diameter spheres which were immersed in LN2. Additional results are presented for a stationary 2 inch diameter sphere quenched in LN2, which were obtained with a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus. The speed of the rotational tests varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere.

  17. Investigations of levitated helium drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Dwight Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    We report on the development of two systems capable of levitating drops of liquid helium. Helium drops of ˜20 mum have been levitated with the radiation pressure from two counter-propagating Nd:YAG laser beams. Drops are produced with a submerged piezoelectric transducer, and could be held for up to three minutes in our optical trap. Calculations show that Brillouin and Raman scattering of the laser light in the liquid helium produces a negligible rate of evaporation of the drop. Evaporation caused by the enhanced vapor pressure of the curved drop surfaces appears to be a significant effect limiting the drop lifetimes. Helium drops as large as 2 cm in diameter have been suspended in the earth's gravitational field with a magnetic field. A commercial superconducting solenoid provides the necessary field, field-gradient product required to levitate the drops. Drops are cooled to 0.5 K with a helium-3 refrigerator, and can be held in the trap indefinitely. We have found that when two or more drops are levitated in the same magnetic trap, the drops often remain in a state of apparent contact without coalescing. This effect is a result of the evaporation of liquid from between the two drops, and is found to occur only for normal fluid drops. We can induce shape oscillations in charged, levitated drops with an applied ac electric field. We have measured the resonance frequencies and damping rates for the l = 2 mode of oscillation as function of temperature. We have also developed a theory to describe the small amplitude shape oscillations of a He II drop surrounded by its saturated vapor. In our theory, we have considered two sets of boundary conditions---one where the drop does not evaporate and another in which the liquid and vapor are in thermodynamic equilibrium. We have found that both solutions give a frequency that agrees well with experiment, but that the data for the damping rate agree better with the solution without evaporation.

  18. Determination of musk fragrances in sewage sludge by pressurized liquid extraction coupled to automated ionic liquid-based headspace single-drop microextraction followed by GC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Vallecillos, Laura; Borrull, Francesc; Pocurull, Eva

    2012-10-01

    A method for the quantitative determination of ten musk fragrances extensively used in personal care products from sewage sludge was developed by using a pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) followed by an automated ionic liquid-based headspace single-drop microextraction and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The influence of main factors on the efficiency of PLE was studied. For all musks, the highest recovery values were achieved using 1 g of pretreated sewage sludge, H(2) O/methanol (1:1) as an extraction solvent, a temperature of 80°C, a pressure of 1500 psi, an extraction time of 5 min, 2 cycles, a 100% flush volume, a purge time of 120 s, and 1 g Florisil as in-cell clean-up extraction sorbent. The use and optimization of an in-cell clean-up sorbent was necessary to remove fatty interferents of the PLE extract that make the subsequent ionic liquid-based headspace single-drop microextraction difficult. Validation parameters, namely LODs and LOQs, ranged from 0.5-1.5 to 2.5-5 ng/g, respectively. Good levels of intra- and interday repeatabilities were obtained analyzing sewage sludge samples spiked at 10 ng/g (n = 3, RSDs < 10%). The method applicability was tested with sewage sludge from different wastewater treatment plants. The analysis revealed the presence of all the polycyclic musks studied at concentrations higher than the LOQs, ranging from 6 to 530 ng/g. However, the nitro musk concentrations were below the LOQs or, in the case of musk xylene, was not detected.

  19. Structure-structure coupling by liquids: Vibration measurements on a rotating disk with self-tracking LDV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weder, Mario; Horisberger, Beat; Monette, Christine; Dual, Jürg

    2016-06-01

    We present an experimental setup to investigate the structure-structure coupling of a stationary and a rotating disk coupled by an intermediate liquid. This coupling mechanism is particularly important in the mechanical design of Francis turbines, where the vibration of the turbine runner is coupled with the adjacent non-rotating structure. The vibration of the disks is measured using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Whereas we could use a standard scanning LDV system to measure the stationary disk, we had to design and implement a polar scan unit based on the self-tracking LDV method. Here we show the design concept of the setup with a closer look on the self-tracking LDV system as well as selected results of the coupled vibration.

  20. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Rotational viscosity of a liquid crystal mixture: a fully atomistic molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ran; Peng, Zeng-Hui; Liu, Yong-Gang; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Xuan, Li

    2009-10-01

    Fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at 293, 303 and 313 K have been performed for the four-component liquid crystal mixture, E7, using the software package Material Studio. Order parameters and orientational time correlation functions (TCFs) were calculated from MD trajectories. The rotational viscosity coefficients (RVCs) of the mixture were calculated using the Nemtsov-Zakharov and Fialkowski methods based on statistical-mechanical approaches. Temperature dependences of RVC and density were discussed in detail. Reasonable agreement between the simulated and experimental values was found.

  1. Effect of the alkyl chain length on the rotational dynamics of nonpolar and dipolar solutes in a series of N-alkyl-N-methylmorpholinium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Khara, Dinesh Chandra; Kumar, Jaini Praveen; Mondal, Navendu; Samanta, Anunay

    2013-05-01

    Rotational dynamics of two dipolar solutes, 4-aminophthalimide (AP) and 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (PRODAN), and a nonpolar solute, anthracene, have been studied in N-alkyl-N-methylmorpholinium (alkyl = ethyl, butyl, hexyl, and octyl) bis(trifluoromethansulfonyl)imide (Tf2N) ionic liquids as a function of temperature and excitation wavelength to probe the microheterogeneous nature of these ionic liquids, which are recently reported to be more structured than the imidazolium ionic liquids (Khara and Samanta, J. Phys. Chem. B2012, 116, 13430-13438). Analysis of the measured rotational time constants of the solutes in terms of the Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) hydrodynamic theory reveals that with increase in the alkyl chain length attached to the cationic component of the ionic liquids, AP shows stick to superstick behavior, PRODAN rotation lies between stick and slip boundary conditions, whereas anthracene exhibits slip to sub slip behavior. The contrasting rotational dynamics of these probe molecules is a reflection of their location in distinct environments of the ionic liquids thus demonstrating the heterogeneity of these ionic liquids. The microheterogeneity of these media, in particular, those with the long alkyl chain, is further evidence from the excitation wavelength dependence study of the rotational diffusion of the dipolar probe molecules.

  2. Comments on `A comparison of optical measurements of liquid water content and drop size distribution in adiabatic regions of Florida cumuli'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, H.

    A recent paper by Lawson and Blyth (1998) [Lawson, R.P., Blyth, A.M., 1998. A comparison of optical measurements of liquid water content and drop size distribution in adiabatic regions of Florida cumuli. Atmos. Res. 47-48, 671-690.] is critiqued for its conclusions dealing with the measurement with several different aircraft microphysics probes of liquid water content (LWC) in `adiabatic cores' of isolated and relatively small cumulus clouds found during the 1995 Small Cumulus Microphysics Study (SCMS) experiment in Florida. The criteria used in that paper to identify the cores were found to be unreliable, leading to identifications of adiabatic cloud cores that contained sub-adiabatic LWC. The analysis in the present paper of 1000-Hz particulate volume monitor (PVM) LWC data for SCMS Cu leads to the following conclusions: (1) A new probe, the cloud droplet spectrometer (CDS), located on the same aircraft and operated at 1 Hz, overestimates maximum LWC in the Cu, and the claim of Lawson and Blyth (1998) that the 1-Hz CDS data show often precisely LWC equivalent to the predicted adiabatic LWC in those Cu is not supportable. (2) The high-frequency PVM data show adiabatic LWC in aircraft passes close to cloud base, and maximum LWC that is slightly sub-adiabatic in small cloud parcels in passes through the active updraft regions of taller Cu. (3) The taller Cu show internally sharp LWC gradients that are interpreted as nonuniform local mixtures of LWC and interfaces resulting from the entrainment process. (4) The understanding of the observed high-resolution LWC structure requires a better understanding of Cu dynamics associated with cloud growth, and entrainment, and mixing processes.

  3. From basic physics to mechanisms of toxicity: the "liquid drop" approach applied to develop predictive classification models for toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sizochenko, Natalia; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Kuz'min, Victor; Puzyn, Tomasz; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-11-21

    Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were established. A new approach for representation of nanoparticles' structure is presented. For description of the supramolecular structure of nanoparticles the "liquid drop" model was applied. It is expected that a novel, proposed approach could be of general use for predictions related to nanomaterials. In addition, in our study fragmental simplex descriptors and several ligand-metal binding characteristics were calculated. The developed nano-QSAR models were validated and reliably predict the toxicity of all studied metal oxide nanoparticles. Based on the comparative analysis of contributed properties in both models the LDM-based descriptors were revealed to have an almost similar level of contribution to toxicity in both cases, while other parameters (van der Waals interactions, electronegativity and metal-ligand binding characteristics) have unequal contribution levels. In addition, the models developed here suggest different mechanisms of nanotoxicity for these two types of cells.

  4. Artificial tektites: an experimental technique for capturing the shapes of spinning drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Tektites are small stones formed from rapidly cooling drops of molten rock ejected from high velocity asteroid impacts with the Earth, that freeze into a myriad of shapes during flight. Many splash-form tektites have an elongated or dumb-bell shape owing to their rotation prior to solidification[1]. Here we present a novel method for creating 'artificial tektites' from spinning drops of molten wax, using diamagnetic levitation to suspend the drops[2]. We find that the solid wax models produced this way are the stable equilibrium shapes of a spinning liquid droplet held together by surface tension. In addition to the geophysical interest in tektite formation, the stable equilibrium shapes of liquid drops have implications for many physical phenomena, covering a wide range of length scales, from nuclear physics (e.g. in studies of rapidly rotating atomic nuclei), to astrophysics (e.g. in studies of the shapes of astronomical bodies such as asteroids, rapidly rotating stars and event horizons of rotating black holes). For liquid drops bound by surface tension, analytical and numerical methods predict a series of stable equilibrium shapes with increasing angular momentum. Slowly spinning drops have an oblate-like shape. With increasing angular momentum these shapes become secularly unstable to a series of triaxial pseudo-ellipsoids that then evolve into a family of two-lobed 'dumb-bell' shapes as the angular momentum is increased still further. Our experimental method allows accurate measurements of the drops to be taken, which are useful to validate numerical models. This method has provided a means for observing tektite formation, and has additionally confirmed experimentally the stable equilibrium shapes of liquid drops, distinct from the equivalent shapes of rotating astronomical bodies. Potentially, this technique could be applied to observe the non-equilibrium dynamic processes that are also important in real tektite formation, involving, e.g. viscoelastic

  5. Incompressible Liquid State of Rapidly Rotating Bosons at Filling Factor 3/2

    SciTech Connect

    Rezayi, E.H.; Read, N.; Cooper, N.R.

    2005-10-14

    Bosons in the lowest Landau level, such as rapidly rotating cold trapped atoms, are investigated numerically in the specially interesting case in which the filling factor (ratio of particle number to vortex number) is 3/2. When a moderate amount of a longer-range (e.g., dipolar) interaction is included, we find clear evidence that the ground state is in a phase constructed earlier by two of us, in which excitations possess non-Abelian statistics.

  6. Simultaneous separation/preconcentration of ultra trace heavy metals in industrial wastewaters by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop prior to determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mohammad; Behzadi, Mansoureh; Abadi, Nasrin Mahmoud; Beizaei, Alieh

    2011-02-28

    In the present work, an efficient microextraction method was applied to separation and preconcentration of Ni(II), Co(II), Pb(II) and Cr(III). This method is dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop, which overcomes the most important problems of each aforementioned technique. The influences of analytical parameters, including pH, extraction solvent volume, disperser solvent type and its volume, concentration of chelating agent, salt effect and extraction time on the quantitative recoveries of nickel, cobalt, lead and chromium ions were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection were 0.2 ng L(-1) for Cr and 1.3 ng L(-1) for Co, Ni and Pb, with a preconcentration factor of 800 times. The relative standard deviations of 6.2% at 6.0 ng L(-1) of Cr and 7.2% at 10 ng L(-1) of Co, Ni and Pb were obtained (n=7). The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of ultra trace metals in water and wastewater samples. PMID:21232852

  7. Simultaneous extraction and determination of albendazole and triclabendazole by a novel syringe to syringe dispersive liquid phase microextraction-solidified floating organic drop combined with high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Mohammad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad

    2016-08-17

    A syringe to syringe dispersive liquid phase microextraction-solidified floating organic drop was introduced and used for the simultaneous extraction of trace amounts of albendazole and triclabendazole from different matrices. The extracted analytes were determined by high performance liquid chromatography along with fluorescence detection. The analytical parameters affecting the microextraction efficiency including the nature and volume of the extraction solvent, sample volume, sample pH, ionic strength and the cycles of extraction were optimized. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.1-30.0 μg L(-1) and 0.2-30.0 μg L(-1) with determination coefficients of 0.9999 and 0.9998 for albendazole and triclabendazole respectively. The detection limits defined as three folds of the signal to noise ratio were found to be 0.02 μg L(-1) for albendazole and 0.06 μg L(-1) for triclabendazole. The inter-day and intra-day precision (RSD%) for both analytes at three concentration levels (0.5, 2.0 and 10.0 μg L(-1)) were in the range of 6.3-10.1% and 5.0-7.5% respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to determine albendazole and triclabendazole in water, cow milk, honey, and urine samples.

  8. Negative vortices: The formation of vortex rings with reversed rotation in viscoelastic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios-Morales, Carlos; Barbosa, Christophe; Solorio, Francisco; Zenit, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    The formation process of vortex rings in a viscoelastic liquid is studied experimentally considering a piston-cylinder arrangement. Initially, a vortex ring begins to form as fluid is injected from the cylinder into the tank in a manner similar to that observed for Newtonian liquids. For later times, when the piston ceases its motion, the flow changes dramatically. A secondary vortex with reversed spinning direction appears and grows to be as large in size as the original one. The formation process is studied by contrasting the evolution with that obtained for Newtonian liquids with equivalent Reynolds numbers and stroke ratios. We argue that the reversing flow, or negative vortex, results from the combined action of shear and extension rates produced during the vortex formation, in a process similar to that observed behind ascending bubbles and falling spheres in viscoelastic media.

  9. Equilibrium shapes of acoustically levitated drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C.-J.

    1986-05-01

    The quantitative determination of the shape of liquid drops levitated in an ultrasonic standing wave has provided experimental data on the radiation pressure-induced deformations of freely suspended liquids. Within the limits of small deviations from the spherical shape and small drop diameter relative to the acoustic wavelength, an existing approximate theory yields a good agreement with experimental evidence. The data were obtained for millimeter and submillimeter drops levitated in air under 1 g, where g is the sea level gravitational acceleration.

  10. Cooperative-Motion-Induced Structural Evolution in Dusty-Plasma Liquids with Microheterogeneity: Rupture, Rotation, Healing, and Growth of Ordered Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chi; Io, Chong-Wai; I, Lin

    2012-11-01

    The cooperative motion induced structural evolution of the liquid with microheterogeneity is investigated in quasi-2D dusty plasma liquids, through direct optical visualization. A novel bond-dynamics analysis is used to further classify the robust cooperative 2D clusters into static, rotating, and drifting patches, beyond the earlier findings of the cooperative hopping strings and bands. The relative motion between two adjacent clusters causes the formation of a fractal network with narrow shear strips along the cluster interface. The rotation of the large ordered patch through rupturing into multiple rotating patches followed by the healing process, and the growth to a larger ordered patch by aligning the different lattice orientations of the adjacent ordered domains through patch rupturing, rotation, drifting, and merging are the key processes for the microstructural evolution.

  11. From basic physics to mechanisms of toxicity: the ``liquid drop'' approach applied to develop predictive classification models for toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizochenko, Natalia; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Kuz'min, Victor; Puzyn, Tomasz; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-10-01

    Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were established. A new approach for representation of nanoparticles' structure is presented. For description of the supramolecular structure of nanoparticles the ``liquid drop'' model was applied. It is expected that a novel, proposed approach could be of general use for predictions related to nanomaterials. In addition, in our study fragmental simplex descriptors and several ligand-metal binding characteristics were calculated. The developed nano-QSAR models were validated and reliably predict the toxicity of all studied metal oxide nanoparticles. Based on the comparative analysis of contributed properties in both models the LDM-based descriptors were revealed to have an almost similar level of contribution to toxicity in both cases, while other parameters (van der Waals interactions, electronegativity and metal-ligand binding characteristics) have unequal contribution levels. In addition, the models developed here suggest different mechanisms of nanotoxicity for these two types of cells.Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were

  12. Electrohydrodynamics of a particle-covered drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouriemi, Malika; Vlahovska, Petia

    2014-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a drop nearly-completely covered with a particle monolayer in a uniform DC electric field. The weakly conducting fluid system consists of a silicon oil drop suspended in castor oil. A broad range of particle sizes, conductivities, and shapes is explored. In weak electric fields, the presence of particles increases drop deformation compared to a particle-free drop and suppresses the electrohydrodynamic flow. Very good agreement is observed between the measured drop deformation and the small deformation theory derived for surfactant-laden drops (Nganguia et al., 2013). In stronger electric fields, where drops are expected to undergo Quincke rotation (Salipante and Vlahovska, 2010), the presence of the particles greatly decreases the threshold for rotation and the stationary tilted drop configuration observed for clean drop is replaced by a spinning drop with either a wobbling inclination or a very low inclination. These behaviors resemble the predicted response of rigid ellipsoids in uniform electric fields. At even stronger electric fields, the particles can form dynamic wings or the drop implodes. The similar behavior of particle-covered and surfactant-laden drops provides new insights into understanding stability of Pickering emulsions. Supported by NSF-CBET 1437545.

  13. Fully automated ionic liquid-based headspace single drop microextraction coupled to GC-MS/MS to determine musk fragrances in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Vallecillos, Laura; Pocurull, Eva; Borrull, Francesc

    2012-09-15

    A fully automated ionic liquid-based headspace single drop microextraction (IL-HS-SDME) procedure has been developed for the first time to preconcentrate trace amounts of ten musk fragrances extensively used in personal care products (six polycyclic musks, three nitro musks and one polycyclic musk degradation product) from wastewater samples prior to analysis by gas chromatography and ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (GC-IT-MS/MS). Due to the low volatility of the ILs, a large internal diameter liner (3.4 mm i.d.) was used to improve the ILs evaporation. Furthermore, a piece of glass wool was introduced into the liner to avoid the entrance of the ILs in the GC column and a guard column was used to prevent analytical column damages. The main factors influencing the IL-HS-SDME were optimized. For all species, the highest enrichments factors were achieved using 1 μL of 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([OMIM][PF(6)]) ionic liquid exposed in the headspace of 10 mL water samples containing 300 g L(-1) of NaCl and stirred at 750 rpm and 60 °C for 45 min. All compounds were determined by direct injection GC-IT-MS/MS with a chromatographic time of 19 min. Method detection limits were found in the low ng mL(-1) range between 0.010 ng mL(-1) and 0.030 ng mL(-1) depending on the target analytes. Also, under optimized conditions, the method gave good levels of intra-day and inter-day repeatabilities in wastewater samples with relative standard deviations varying between 3% and 6% and 5% and 11%, respectively (n=3, 1 ng mL(-1)). The applicability of the method was tested with different wastewater samples from influent and effluent urban wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and one potable treatment plant (PTP). The analysis of influent urban wastewater revealed the presence of galaxolide and tonalide at concentrations of between 2.10 ng mL(-1) and 0.29 ng mL(-1) and 0.32 ng mL(-1) and

  14. Forced Oscillations of Supported Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Edward D.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    Oscillations of supported liquid drops are the subject of wide scientific interest, with applications in areas as diverse as liquid-liquid extraction, synthesis of ceramic powders, growing of pure crystals in low gravity, and measurement of dynamic surface tension. In this research, axisymmetric forced oscillations of arbitrary amplitude of viscous liquid drops of fixed volume which are pendant from or sessile on a rod with a fixed or moving contact line and surrounded by an inviscid ambient gas are induced by moving the rod in the vertical direction sinusiodally in time. In this paper, a preliminary report is made on the computational analysis of the oscillations of supported drops that have 'clean' interfaces and whose contact lines remain fixed throughout their motions. The relative importance of forcing to damping can be increased by either increasing the amplitude of rod motion A or Reynolds number Re. It is shown that as the ratio of forcing to damping rises, for drops starting from an initial rest state a sharp increase in deformation can occur when they are forced to oscillate in the vicinity of their resonance frequencies, indicating the incipience of hysteresis. However, it is also shown that the existence of a second stable limit cycle and the occurrence of hysteresis can be observed if the drop is subjected to a so-called frequency sweep, where the forcing frequency is first increased and then decreased over a suitable range. Because the change in drop deformation response is abrupt in the vicinity of the forcing frequencies where hysteresis occurs, it should be possible to exploit the phenomenon to accurately measure the viscosity and surface tension of the drop liquid.

  15. The Stability of Two Connected Pendant Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slobozhanin, Lev A.; Alexander, J. Iwan

    2004-01-01

    The stability of an equilibrium system of two drops suspended from circular holes is examined. The drop surfaces are disconnected surfaces of a connected liquid body. For holes of equal radii and identical pendant drops axisymmetric perturbations are always the most dangerous. The stability region for two identical drops differs considerably from that for a single drop. Loss of stability leads to a transition from a critical system of identical drops to a stable system of axisymmetric non-identical. This system of non-identical drops reaches its own stability limit (to isochoric or non-isochoric paturbations). For non-identical drops, loss of stability results in dripping or streaming from the holes. Critical volumes for non-identical drops have been calculated as functions of the Bond number, B. For unequal hole radii, stability regions have been constructed for a set of hole radius, K. The dependence of critical volumes on K and B is analyzed.

  16. Dynamic, self-assembled aggregates of magnetized, millimeter-sized objects rotating at the liquid-air interface: macroscopic, two-dimensional classical artificial atoms and molecules.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, B A; Jiang, X; Stone, H A; Whitesides, G M

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes self-assembly of millimeter-sized, magnetized disks floating on a liquid-air interface, and rotating under the influence of a rotating external magnetic field. Spinning of the disks results in hydrodynamic repulsion between them, while the rotating magnetic field produces an average confining potential acting on all disks. The interplay between hydrodynamic and magnetic interactions leads to the formation of patterns. Theoretical analysis of hydrodynamic and magnetic forces indicates that the interactions in this system are similar to those acting in systems of finite numbers of particles behaving classically ("classical artificial atoms"). Macroscopic artificial atoms and molecules are described, and the rules governing their morphologies outlined.

  17. Exponential Decay of the Vorticity in the Steady-State Flow of a Viscous Liquid Past a Rotating Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deuring, Paul; Galdi, Giovanni P.

    2016-07-01

    Consider the flow of a Navier-Stokes liquid past a body rotating with a prescribed constant angular velocity, {ω}, and assume that the motion is steady with respect to a body-fixed frame. In this paper we show that the vorticity field associated to every "weak" solution corresponding to data of arbitrary "size" ( Leray Solution) must decay exponentially fast outside the wake region at sufficiently large distances from the body. Our result improves and generalizes in a non-trivial way famous results by Clark (Indiana Univ Math J 20:633-654, 1971) and Babenko and Vasil'ev (J Appl Math Mech 37:651-665, 1973) obtained in the case {ω=0}.

  18. Coalescence dynamics of viscous conical drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiakai; Fang, Shengyang; Corvalan, Carlos M.

    2016-02-01

    When two oppositely charged drops come into light contact, a liquid meniscus bridge with double-cone geometry forms between the drops. Recent experiments have demonstrated the existence of a critical cone angle above which the meniscus bridge pinches off and the drops do not coalesce. This striking behavior—which has implications for processes ranging from the coarsening of emulsions to electrospray ionization in mass spectrometry—has been studied theoretically and experimentally for inertial liquid drops. Little is known, however, about the influence of the liquid viscosity on the critical cone angle. Here, we use high-fidelity numerical simulations to gain insight into the coalescence dynamics of conical drops at intermediate Reynolds numbers. The simulations, which account for viscous, inertial, and surface tension effects, predict that the critical cone angle increases as the viscosity of the drops decreases. When approaching the inertial regime, however, the predicted critical angle quickly stabilizes at approximately 27∘, as observed in experiments.

  19. Hanging drop crystal growth apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor); Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Bugg, Charles E. (Inventor); Suddath, Fred L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates generally to control systems for controlling crystal growth, and more particularly to such a system which uses a beam of light refracted by the fluid in which crystals are growing to detect concentration of solutes in the liquid. In a hanging drop apparatus, a laser beam is directed onto drop which refracts the laser light into primary and secondary bows, respectively, which in turn fall upon linear diode detector arrays. As concentration of solutes in drop increases due to solvent removal, these bows move farther apart on the arrays, with the relative separation being detected by arrays and used by a computer to adjust solvent vapor transport from the drop. A forward scattering detector is used to detect crystal nucleation in drop, and a humidity detector is used, in one embodiment, to detect relative humidity in the enclosure wherein drop is suspended. The novelty of this invention lies in utilizing angular variance of light refracted from drop to infer, by a computer algorithm, concentration of solutes therein. Additional novelty is believed to lie in using a forward scattering detector to detect nucleating crystallites in drop.

  20. Theoretical analysis of a rotating two-phase detonation in liquid rocket motors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, P. I.-W.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis to study tangential mode shock instabilities in a thin annular chamber is carried out by employing a one dimensional two phase detonation wave as a reaction model. It is assumed that phase change and reaction take place only within the wave, which is treated as a discontinuity. The annulus is unrolled and the flow is considered as two dimensional with the coordinate system fixed on the wave front. Between waves, the flow is assumed to be isentropic with no interaction between droplets and burned gases. Jump conditions across the wave are solved for two phase flow. The average pressure along the injection plate is related to the design chamber pressure by the use of overall conservation equations. The wave strength is written in terms of the design parameters of the chamber. The results compare favorably with existing experiments. Finally, the effects of drop size on the wave strength are discussed and a simple criterion which sets the lower limit of validity for this strong wave analysis, is presented.

  1. Speciation of As(III) and As(V) in water samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after solid phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir; Assadi, Yaghoub; Sadeghi, Marzieh; Sharafi, Kiomars

    2014-12-01

    A solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) method, using diethyldithiphosphate (DDTP) as a proper chelating agent, has been developed as an ultra preconcentration technique for the determination of inorganic arsenic in water samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Variables affecting the performance of both steps were thoroughly investigated. Under optimized conditions, 100mL of As(ΙΙΙ) solution was first concentrated using a solid phase sorbent. The extract was collected in 2.0 mL of acetone and 60.0 µL of 1-undecanol was added into the collecting solvent. The mixture was then injected rapidly into 5.0 mL of pure water for further DLLME-SFO. Total inorganic As(III, V) was extracted similarly after reduction of As(V) to As(III) with potassium iodide and sodium thiosulfate and As(V) concentration was calculated by difference. A mixture of Pd(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2 was used as a chemical modifier in GFAAS. The analytical characteristics of the method were determined. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 10-100 ng L(-1) with detection limit of 2.5 ng L(-1). Repeatability (intra-day) and reproducibility (inter-day) of method based on seven replicate measurements of 80 ng L(-1) of As(ΙΙΙ) were 6.8% and 7.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to speciation of As(III), As(V) and determination of the total amount of As in water samples and in a certified reference material (NIST RSM 1643e). PMID:25159375

  2. Speciation of As(III) and As(V) in water samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after solid phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir; Assadi, Yaghoub; Sadeghi, Marzieh; Sharafi, Kiomars

    2014-12-01

    A solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) method, using diethyldithiphosphate (DDTP) as a proper chelating agent, has been developed as an ultra preconcentration technique for the determination of inorganic arsenic in water samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Variables affecting the performance of both steps were thoroughly investigated. Under optimized conditions, 100mL of As(ΙΙΙ) solution was first concentrated using a solid phase sorbent. The extract was collected in 2.0 mL of acetone and 60.0 µL of 1-undecanol was added into the collecting solvent. The mixture was then injected rapidly into 5.0 mL of pure water for further DLLME-SFO. Total inorganic As(III, V) was extracted similarly after reduction of As(V) to As(III) with potassium iodide and sodium thiosulfate and As(V) concentration was calculated by difference. A mixture of Pd(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2 was used as a chemical modifier in GFAAS. The analytical characteristics of the method were determined. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 10-100 ng L(-1) with detection limit of 2.5 ng L(-1). Repeatability (intra-day) and reproducibility (inter-day) of method based on seven replicate measurements of 80 ng L(-1) of As(ΙΙΙ) were 6.8% and 7.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to speciation of As(III), As(V) and determination of the total amount of As in water samples and in a certified reference material (NIST RSM 1643e).

  3. Spin-Up Instability of a Levitated Molten Drop in MHD-Flow Transition to Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedian, B.; Hyers, R. W.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    When an alternating magnetic field interacts with induced eddy currents in a conducting body, there will be a repulsive force between the body and the driving coil system generating the field. This repulsive force is the basis of electromagnetic levitation, which allows containerless processing of different materials. The eddy currents in the conducting body also generate Joule heating. Axial rotation of electromagnetically levitated objects is a common observation in levitation systems and often an undesirable side effect of such experiments on 1-g and -g. There have been recent efforts to use magnetic damping and suppress this tendency of body rotation. The first report of rotation in EML drops was attributed to a slight asymmetry of the shape and location of the levitation coils could change the axis and speed of rotation. Other theories of sample rotation include a frequency difference in the traveling electromagnetic waves and a phase difference in two different applied fields of the same frequency. All of these different mechanisms share the following characteristics: the torque is small, constant for constant field strength, and very weakly dependent on the sample's temperature and phase (solid or liquid). During experiments on the MSL-1 (First Microgravity Science Laboratory) mission of the Space Shuttle (STS-83 and STS-94, April and July 1997), a droplet of palladium-silicon alloy was electromagnetically levitated for viscosity measurements. For the non-deforming droplet, the resultant MHD flow inside the drop is inferred from motion of impurities on the surface. These observations indicate formation of a pair of co-rotating toroidal flow structures inside the spheroidal levitated drop that undergo secondary flow instabilities. As rise in the fluid temperature rises, the viscosity falls and the internal flow accelerates and becomes oscillatory; and beyond a point in the experiments, the surface impurities exhibit non-coherent chaotic motion signifying

  4. Superconducting electromechanical rotating device having a liquid-cooled, potted, one layer stator winding

    DOEpatents

    Dombrovski, Viatcheslav V.; Driscoll, David I.; Shovkhet, Boris A.

    2001-01-01

    A superconducting electromechanical rotating (SER) device, such as a synchronous AC motor, includes a superconducting field winding and a one-layer stator winding that may be water-cooled. The stator winding is potted to a support such as the inner radial surface of a support structure and, accordingly, lacks hangers or other mechanical fasteners that otherwise would complicate stator assembly and require the provision of an unnecessarily large gap between adjacent stator coil sections. The one-layer winding topology, resulting in the number of coils being equal to half the number of slots or other mounting locations on the support structure, allows one to minimize or eliminate the gap between the inner radial ends of adjacent straight sections of the stator coilswhile maintaining the gap between the coil knuckles equal to at least the coil width, providing sufficient room for electrical and cooling element configurations and connections. The stator winding may be potted to the support structure or other support, for example, by a one-step VPI process relying on saturation of an absorbent material to fill large gaps in the stator winding or by a two-step process in which small gaps are first filled via a VPI or similar operation and larger gaps are then filled via an operation that utilizes the stator as a portion of an on-site mold.

  5. Acoustic streaming flows and sample rotation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Eugene

    1998-11-01

    Levitated drops in a gas can be driven into rotation by altering their surrounding convective environment. When these drops are placed in an acoustic resonant chamber, the symmetry characteristics of the steady streaming flows in the vicinity of the drops determine the rotational motion of the freely suspended fluid particles. Using ultrasonic standing waves around 22 kHz and millimeter-size electrostatically levitated drops, we have investigated the correlation between the convective flow characteristics and their rotational behavior. The results show that accurate control of the drop rotation axis and rate can be obtained by carefully modifying the symmetry characteristics of the chamber, and that the dominant mechanism for rotation drive is the drag exerted by the air flow over the drop surface. In addition, we found that the rotational acceleration depends on the drop viscosity, suggesting that this torque is initially strongly influenced by differential flows within the drop itself. [Work sponsored by NASA].

  6. Exploding Water Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Water has the unusual property that it expands on freezing, so that ice has a specific gravity of 0.92 compared to 1.0 for liquid water. The most familiar demonstration of this property is ice cubes floating in a glass of water. A more dramatic demonstration is the ice bomb shown in Fig. 1. Here a cast iron flask is filled with water and tightly stoppered. The flask is then cooled, either by leaving it outdoors in winter or by immersing it in a cryogenic fluid, until the water freezes. As the water freezes and expands, the pressure inside the flask increases dramatically, eventually becoming sufficient to fracture the metal walls of the enclosure. A related, but much less familiar, phenomenon is the explosive fracturing of small water drops upon freezing. That water drops can fracture in this way has been known for many years, and the phenomenon has been described in detail in the atmospheric sciences literature, where it is seen as relevant to the freezing of raindrops as they fall through cold air. Carefully controlled experiments have been done documenting how the character and frequency of fracture is affected by such variables as drop size, rate of cooling, chemistry of dissolved gases, etc. Here I describe instead a simple demonstration of fracture suitable for video analysis and appropriate for study at the introductory physics level. Readers may also be interested in other characteristics of freezing and fragmenting water drops, for example, charge separation upon fracture and the appearance of spikes and bulges on the surface.

  7. Electrokinetics of isolated electrified drops.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Rohit; Berry, Joseph D; Harvie, Dalton J E; Davidson, Malcolm R

    2016-04-14

    Using a recently developed multiphase electrokinetic model, we simulate the transient electrohydrodynamic response of a liquid drop containing ions, to both small and large values of electric field. The temporal evolution is found to be governed primarily by two dimensionless groups: (i) Ohnesorge number (Oh), a ratio of viscous to inertio-capillary effects, and (ii) inverse dimensionless Debye length (κ), a measure of the diffuse regions of charge that develop in the drop. The effects of dielectric polarization dominate at low Oh, while effects of separated charge gain importance with increase in Oh. For small values of electric field, the deformation behaviour of a drop is shown to be accurately described by a simple analytical expression. At large electric fields, the drops are unstable and eject progeny drops. Depending on Oh and κ this occurs via dripping or jetting; the regime transitions are shown by a Oh-κ phase map. In contrast to previous studies, we find universal scaling relations to predict size and charge of progeny drops. Our simulations suggest charge transport plays a significant role in drop dynamics for 0.1 ≤ Oh ≤ 10, a parameter range of interest in microscale flows.

  8. Rotational and Translational Diffusion of Glass-Forming Ionic Liquids Confined in Nanoporous Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacob, Ciprian; Sangoro, Joshua; Runt, James; Kremer, Friedrich

    2014-03-01

    Charge transport and glassy dynamics of several classes of ionic liquids confined in uni-directional nanoporous silica membranes are investigated in a wide frequency and temperature range by a combination of Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS), Pulsed Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (PFG NMR) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Two opposite effects are observed: (i) surface effects - resulting from strong interactions between the host system (nanoporous silica membrane) and the guest molecules (ILs) lead to slower dynamics - which are significantly reduced upon pore surface modification through silanization of the pores, and (ii) confinement effects - arising from spatial restriction of the molecules in nanometric length-scales - leading to enhancement of molecular dynamics. A model assuming a reduced mobility of the adsorbed layer at the pore wall/IL interface is shown to provide a quantitative explanation for the remarkable decrease of effective transport quantities (such as diffusion coefficient, dc conductivity and consequently, the dielectric loss) of the ILs in non-silanized porous silica membranes.

  9. Rotational Collision Apparatus for Indoor Egg Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halada, Richard

    2003-05-01

    Our units about momentum and energy are richly illustrated with applications to car crashes and explanations of such safety features as airbags and crumple zones. The main lab exercise, however, is an egg crash (car insurance rates being so much higher). Fairly standard rules apply: Students must devise an "egg-protection package" that will keep a teacher-supplied egg intact through two successive impacts. After the test, they must hand in a written analysis of the specific physics principles they employed, modifications they would make after seeing their project's actual performance, and suggestions for applying their protection system to auto safety.

  10. Liquid mixing driven motions of floating macroscopic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ming

    2007-04-01

    Dropping miscible and low-density organic solvents into water generates translational and rotational motions of floating objects including oil droplets, polymer half spheres, and model boats. The moving speed of the boat at different loads and the force produced by solvent drops are measured. In contrast to motions driven by surface tension of monolayer, the liquid mixing driven motion can be dynamically steered without restriction and continued provided the supply is maintained and the amount of water is large enough. Such motions are the result of Marangoni instability in binary liquid-liquid systems with intentionally produced concentration gradients behind the floating objects.

  11. A Different Cone: Bursting Drops in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuanhe

    2013-03-01

    Drops in fluids tend to be spheres--a shape that minimizes surface energy. In thunderstorm clouds, drops can become unstable and emit thin jets when charged beyond certain limits. The instability of electrified drops in gases and liquids has been widely studied and used in applications including ink-jet printing, electrospinning nano-fibers, microfluidics and electrospray ionization. Here we report a different scenario: drops in solids become unstable and burst under sufficiently high electric fields. We find the instability of drops in solids morphologically resembles that in liquids, but the critical electric field for the instability follows a different scaling due to elasticity of solids. Our observations and theoretical models not only advance the fundamental understanding of electrified drops but also suggest a new failure mechanism of high-energy-density dielectric polymers, which have diverse applications ranging from capacitors for power grids and electric vehicles to muscle-like transducers for soft robots and energy harvesting.

  12. Surface-Controlled Drop Oscillations in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, R. Glynn; Tian, Yuren; Janovsky, Joseph; Apfel, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    Large liquid drops were deformed by an acoustic standing wave in a resonant air chanber called the Drop Physics Module, which was carried on Space Shuttle Columbia as part of the second United States Microgravity Laboratory mission. When this deforming force was suddenly reduced, the drops executed free oscillations about a perfect sherical equilibrium. Results are presented for pure water and aqueous solutions of soluble surfactants. [PACS: 43.25.U, 47.55Dz, 68.10.Cr, 83.10.-y].

  13. Experimentally probing the libration of interfacial water: the rotational potential of water is stiffer at the air/water interface than in bulk liquid.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yujin; Kampfrath, Tobias; Campen, R Kramer

    2016-07-21

    Most properties of liquid water are determined by its hydrogen-bond network. Because forming an aqueous interface requires termination of this network, one might expect the molecular level properties of interfacial water to markedly differ from water in bulk. Intriguingly, much prior experimental and theoretical work has found that, from the perspective of their time-averaged structure and picosecond structural dynamics, hydrogen-bonded OH groups at an air/water interface behave the same as hydrogen-bonded OH groups in bulk liquid water. Here we report the first experimental observation of interfacial water's libration (i.e. frustrated rotation) using the laser-based technique vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. We find this mode has a frequency of 834 cm(-1), ≈165 cm(-1) higher than in bulk liquid water at the same temperature and similar to bulk ice. Because libration frequency is proportional to the stiffness of water's rotational potential, this increase suggests that one effect of terminating bulk water's hydrogen bonding network at the air/water interface is retarding rotation of water around intact hydrogen bonds. Because in bulk liquid water the libration plays a key role in stabilizing reaction intermediates and dissipating excess vibrational energy, we expect the ability to probe this mode in interfacial water to open new perspectives on the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions at aqueous interfaces. PMID:27339861

  14. Solidification of Drops in the MSFC Drop Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brush, Lucien N.

    1998-01-01

    Silver drops (99.9%, 7 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through the Marshall Space Flight Center's 105 m drop tube in an He-6% H atmosphere at 170 degrees superheat. The extent of solidification during the approx. 4.6 s of free fall time prior to impact was measured experimentally and computed numerically using a newly developed solidification heat transfer model. Comparison of the experimental observation of the fraction of liquid transformed with the numerical solutions showed reasonable agreement. Possible modifications of the model, in an attempt to close the gap between the experiment and the model comparison are discussed.

  15. Detachment of a single water drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Prokhorov, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    The detachment process of a single water drop from a nozzle made of poorly wetted material is followed using high-speed video equipment. The formation and motion dynamics of various flow components are investigated. These are the drop itself; a liquid bridge (jumper), which connects the drop with the mother liquid; the primary satellite, which is formed from the jumper; and a microsatellite, which is thrown from the satellite and flies to the mother liquid. The strong influence of surface effects, under which the satellite initially moves upward and only at a certain time starts to fall along the ballistic trajectory, is established. Bounce of the microsatellite from the mother liquid, which precedes its absorption, is fixed. It is shown that a stable connection of the formation mechanism of satellites with the jumper dynamics opens the possibility of obtaining uniform-sized drops.

  16. Apfel's superheated drop detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Errico, Francesco

    2001-05-01

    The introduction of new approaches for radiation dosimetry is rare. A similar breakthrough occurred in 1979, when Robert Apfel invented the superheated drop detector, a miniature relative of the bubble chamber. A fundamental in high-energy particle physics, the bubble chamber utilizes a liquid briefly brought to a transient, radiation-sensitive superheated state by reducing its pressure. Mass boiling of the liquid is prevented by cyclic pressurization, drastically limiting the detection efficiency. In Apfel's detector, the liquid is kept in a steady superheated state by fractionating it into droplets and dispersing them in an immiscible host fluid, a perfectly smooth and clean container. The approach extends the lifetime of the metastable droplets to the point that practical application in radiation dosimetry is possible. Bubble formation is measured from the volume of vapor or by detecting individual vaporizations acoustically. Various halocarbons are employed and this permits a wide range of applications. Moderately superheated halocarbons are used for neutron measurements, since they are only nucleated by energetic neutron recoil particles. Highly superheated halocarbons nucleate with much smaller energy deposition and are used to detect photons and electrons. This paper reviews the radiation physics of superheated emulsions and their manifold applications.

  17. Micro-explosion of compound drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Kuei; Lin, Ta-Hui

    2014-08-01

    Introducing water into spray combustion systems, by either water-in-oil emulsification or supplementary water injection, is one of the major techniques for combustion improvement and NOx reduction. Plentiful researches are available on combustion of water-in-oil emulsion fuel drops. The emulsified liquid is a heterogeneous mixture of immiscible liquids. One component forms the continuous phase and the other component forms the discrete phase. The discrete phase consists of globules of the one fluid that are suspended in the continuous phase fluid. Water-in-oil emulsions are commonly considered for combustion applications because emulsions can result in micro-explosion, thereby reducing the average drop diameter to enhance liquid vaporization, and suppressing the formation of soot and NOx. However, the water addition generally does not exceed about 20% for smooth engine operations[!, 21. The combustion characteristics and micro-explosion of emulsion drop were studied by many researchers. The micro-explosion of water in fuel emulsion drops was caused by very fast growth of superheated water vapor bubbles, its superheat limits must be lower than the boiling point temperature of the fuel. These bubbles were primarily governed by the pressure difference between the superheated vapor and the liquid, and by the inertia imparted to the liquid by the motion of the bubble surface[3 6 In this study, we used a coaxial nozzle to generation the multi-component drop. The different type of water-in-oil fuel drops called the compound drops. Unlike an emulsion drop, a compound drop consists of a water core and a fuel shell, which can originate from the phase separation of emulsion[7, 81 or a water drop colliding with a fuel drop[9, 101 Burning and micro-explosion of compound drops have been found to be distinct from those of emulsion drops[9-111 Wang et al.[9 , 101 studied the combustion characteristics of collision merged alkane-water drops. The merged drops appeared in adhesive

  18. Non-coalescence of oppositely charged drops.

    PubMed

    Ristenpart, W D; Bird, J C; Belmonte, A; Dollar, F; Stone, H A

    2009-09-17

    Electric fields induce motion in many fluid systems, including polymer melts, surfactant micelles and colloidal suspensions. Likewise, electric fields can be used to move liquid drops. Electrically induced droplet motion manifests itself in processes as diverse as storm cloud formation, commercial ink-jet printing, petroleum and vegetable oil dehydration, electrospray ionization for use in mass spectrometry, electrowetting and lab-on-a-chip manipulations. An important issue in practical applications is the tendency for adjacent drops to coalesce, and oppositely charged drops have long been assumed to experience an attractive force that favours their coalescence. Here we report the existence of a critical field strength above which oppositely charged drops do not coalesce. We observe that appropriately positioned and oppositely charged drops migrate towards one another in an applied electric field; but whereas the drops coalesce as expected at low field strengths, they are repelled from one another after contact at higher field strengths. Qualitatively, the drops appear to 'bounce' off one another. We directly image the transient formation of a meniscus bridge between the bouncing drops, and propose that this temporary bridge is unstable with respect to capillary pressure when it forms in an electric field exceeding a critical strength. The observation of oppositely charged drops bouncing rather than coalescing in strong electric fields should affect our understanding of any process involving charged liquid drops, including de-emulsification, electrospray ionization and atmospheric conduction. PMID:19759616

  19. Measurement of interfacial tension of immiscible liquid pairs in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.; Neilson, George F.; Baertlein, Carl; Subramanian, R. Shankar; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion is given of a containerless microgravity experiment aimed at measuring the interfacial tension of immiscible liquid pairs using a compound drop rotation method. The reasons for the failure to execute such experiments in microgravity are described. Also, the results of post-flight analyses used to confirm our arguments are presented.

  20. Operating characteristics of rotating beds. Technical progress report for the third quarter 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Keyvani, M.; Gardner, N.C.

    1988-12-31

    Vapor-liquid contacting in high gravitational fields offers prospects for significant reductions in the physical size, capital, and operating costs of packed towers. Pressure drops, power requirements, mass transfer coefficients and liquid residence time distributions are reported for a rotating bed separator. The beds studied were rigid, foamed aluminum, with specific surface areas ranging from 650 to 3000 m{sup 2}/m{sup 2}. Gravitational fields were varied from 50 to 300g.

  1. Alternate drop pulse polarography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, J.H.; Jackson, L.L.; Osteryoung, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The new technique of alternate drop pulse polarography is presented. An experimental evaluation of alternate drop pulse polarography shows complete compensation of the capacitative background due to drop expansion. The capillary response phenomenon was studied in the absence of faradaic reaction and the capillary response current was found to depend on the pulse width to the -0.72 power. Increased signal-to-noise ratios were obtained using alternate drop pulse polarography at shorter drop times.

  2. Rotational and Translational Dynamics of Rhodamine 6G in a Pyrrolidinium Ionic Liquid: A Combined Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy Decay and NMR Study

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianchang; Han, Kee Sung; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Baker, Gary A; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W; Shaw, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay (TRFAD) are two of the most commonly used methods to study solute-solvent interactions. However, only a few studies have been reported to date using a combined NMR and TRFAD approach to systematically investigate the overall picture of diffusional and rotational dynamics of both the solute and solvent. In this paper, we combined NMR and TRFAD to probe fluorescent rhodamine dyes in a pyrrolidinium-based room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), an emergent environmentally-friendly solvent type used in several energy-related applications. A specific interaction of the R6G cation and [Tf2N]- anion was identified, resulting in near-stick boundary condition rotation of R6G in this RTIL. The diffusional rates of the R6G solute and [C4mpyr][Tf2N] solvent derived from 1H NMR suggest the rates are proportional to their corresponding hydrodynamic radii. The 1H and 13C NMR studies of self-rotational dynamics of [C4mpyr][Tf2N] showed that the self-rotational correlation time of [C4mpyr]+ is 47 2 ps at 300 K. At the same temperature, we find that the correlation time for N-CH3 rotation in [C4mpyr]+ is 77 2 ps, comparable to overall molecular reorientation. This slow motion is attributed to properties of the cation structure.

  3. Drop motion induced by vertical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Paolo; Quagliati, Damiano; Varagnolo, Silvia; Pierno, Matteo; Mistura, Giampaolo; Magaletti, Francesco; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the motion of liquid drops on an inclined plate subject to vertical vibrations. The liquids comprised distilled water and different aqueous solutions of glycerol, ethanol and isopropanol spanning the range 1-39 mm2 s-1 in kinematic viscosities and 40-72 mN m-1 in surface tension. At sufficiently low oscillating amplitudes, the drops are always pinned to the surface. Vibrating the plate above a certain amplitude yields sliding of the drop. Further increasing the oscillating amplitude drives the drop upward against gravity. In the case of the most hydrophilic aqueous solutions, this motion is not observed and the drop only slides downward. Images taken with a fast camera show that the drop profile evolves in a different way during sliding and climbing. In particular, the climbing drop experiences a much bigger variation in its profile during an oscillating period. Complementary numerical simulations of 2D drops based on a diffuse interface approach confirm the experimental findings. The overall qualitative behavior is reproduced suggesting that the contact line pinning due to contact angle hysteresis is not necessary to explain the drop climbing.

  4. Diffusion-viscosity decoupling in solute rotation and solvent relaxation of coumarin153 in ionic liquids containing fluoroalkylphosphate (FAP) anion: a thermophysical and photophysical study.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudhir Kumar; Sahu, Prabhat Kumar; Sarkar, Moloy

    2013-01-17

    Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence behavior of coumarin153 (C153) has been investigated in two ionic liquids (ILs), namely 1-(2-methoxyethyl)-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([MOEMPL][FAP]) and 1-(2-methoxyethyl)-1-methylmorpholinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([MOEMMO][FAP]) in order to find out the viscosity-diffusion decoupling during solvation and rotational relaxation of C153. Thermophysical studies have also been carried out to understand the physicochemical properties of the media. At 293 K, the measured viscosity of [MOEMMO][FAP] is 8 times higher than that of [MOEMPL][FAP]. The data obtained from steady state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements show the deviation of average solvation and rotation times from conventional hydrodynamics. The decoupling of solute and solvent dynamics from medium viscosity is manifested through fractional viscosity dependence (η) of the measured average solvation (<τ(s)>) and rotation (<τ(r)>) times: <τ(x)> [proportionality] (η/T)(p) (x denotes solvation or rotation and T is the temperature) covering the p value 0.69 < p < 0.85 for solvent relaxation and 0.48 < p < 1.10 for solute rotation. The excitation wavelength dependent fluorescence studies have been performed to correlate the experimental findings with the heterogeneity of the medium. While the excitation wavelength dependent time-resolved fluorescence studies of coumarin153 reveal a very similar variation of average solvation time with a change in excitation wavelengths for both the ionic liquids, the steady state excitation wavelength dependent measurements of 2-amino-7-nitrofluorene (ANF) show a higher (630 cm(-1)) shift of the fluorescence maximum for highly viscous ionic liquid as compared to that (430 cm(-1)) of another much less viscous ionic liquid. The recent theoretical (Chem. Phys. Lett.2011, 517, 180) and experimental (J. Chem. Phys.2012, 136, 174503) findings and the outcome of the excitation

  5. Drop impact on a fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Gil; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of drop impact on a thin fiber. Using high-speed videography, we analyze the dynamics of droplet collision with a fiber. Based on the systematic experiments, we identify three outcomes of collision: capturing, single drop falling, and splitting. The outcomes are presented in a regime map, where the regime boundaries are explained through a scale analysis of forces. We also measure the liquid retention on the fiber after the droplet impact. By considering a liquid film on the fiber, we develop a mechanical model that predicts the residual water mass. Our model reveals that the residual mass depends critically on the fiber thickness and less on the impact speed. Our study can be extended to predicting the remaining droplet, critical problems in air filtration, water collection, and fiber coating.

  6. Use of volatile organic solvents in headspace liquid-phase microextraction by direct cooling of the organic drop using a simple cooling capsule.

    PubMed

    Ghiasvand, Ali Reza; Yazdankhah, Fatemeh; Hajipour, Somayeh

    2016-08-01

    A low-cost and simple cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction device for the extraction and determination of 2,6,6-trimethyl-1,3 cyclohexadiene-1-carboxaldehyde (safranal) in Saffron samples, using volatile organic solvents, was fabricated and evaluated. The main part of the cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction system was a cooling capsule, with a Teflon microcup to hold the extracting organic solvent, which is able to directly cool down the extraction phase while the sample matrix is simultaneously heated. Different experimental factors such as type of organic extraction solvent, sample temperature, extraction solvent temperature, and extraction time were optimized. The optimal conditions were obtained as: extraction solvent, methanol (10 μL); extraction temperature, 60°C; extraction solvent temperature, 0°C; and extraction time, 20 min. Good linearity of the calibration curve (R(2) = 0.995) was obtained in the concentration range of 0.01-50.0 μg/mL. The limit of detection was 0.001 μg/mL. The relative standard deviation for 1.0 μg/mL of safranal was 10.7% (n = 6). The proposed cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction device was coupled (off-line) to high-performance liquid chromatography and used for the determination of safranal in Saffron samples. Reasonable agreement was observed between the results of the cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction high-performance liquid chromatography method and those obtained by a validated ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction procedure. PMID:27311349

  7. Use of volatile organic solvents in headspace liquid-phase microextraction by direct cooling of the organic drop using a simple cooling capsule.

    PubMed

    Ghiasvand, Ali Reza; Yazdankhah, Fatemeh; Hajipour, Somayeh

    2016-08-01

    A low-cost and simple cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction device for the extraction and determination of 2,6,6-trimethyl-1,3 cyclohexadiene-1-carboxaldehyde (safranal) in Saffron samples, using volatile organic solvents, was fabricated and evaluated. The main part of the cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction system was a cooling capsule, with a Teflon microcup to hold the extracting organic solvent, which is able to directly cool down the extraction phase while the sample matrix is simultaneously heated. Different experimental factors such as type of organic extraction solvent, sample temperature, extraction solvent temperature, and extraction time were optimized. The optimal conditions were obtained as: extraction solvent, methanol (10 μL); extraction temperature, 60°C; extraction solvent temperature, 0°C; and extraction time, 20 min. Good linearity of the calibration curve (R(2) = 0.995) was obtained in the concentration range of 0.01-50.0 μg/mL. The limit of detection was 0.001 μg/mL. The relative standard deviation for 1.0 μg/mL of safranal was 10.7% (n = 6). The proposed cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction device was coupled (off-line) to high-performance liquid chromatography and used for the determination of safranal in Saffron samples. Reasonable agreement was observed between the results of the cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction high-performance liquid chromatography method and those obtained by a validated ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction procedure.

  8. Planar Microfluidic Drop Splitting and Merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collignon, Sean; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie; MAD-LAB Team

    2015-11-01

    Open drop microfluidic platforms offer attractive alternatives to closed microchannel devices, however, to be effective they require efficient schemes for planar drop transport and manipulation. While there are many methods that have been reported for drop transport, it is far more difficult to carry out drop operations of dispensing, merging and splitting. In this work, we introduce a novel alternative to merge and split drops using laterally-offset modulated surface acoustic waves (SAWs). To do so, the energy delivery into the drop is modulated to induce drop stretching. Upon removal of the SAW energy, capillary forces at the center of the elongated drop drain the capillary bridge region towards both ends, resulting in its collapse and consequential splitting of the drop. This occurs only below a critical Ohnesorge number, a balance between the viscous forces that retard the drainage and the sufficiently large capillary forces that cause the liquid bridge to pinch. By this scheme we show the possibility of both reliable symettric splitting of a drop with an average deviation in droplet volumes of only around 4%, and no greater than 10%, as well as asymmetric splitting, by tuning the input energy to the device--thus presenting a comparable alternative to electrowetting.

  9. Computational analysis of drop-on-demand drop formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi; Basaran, Osman A.

    2007-10-01

    Motivated by the desire to improve the theoretical understanding of drop-on-demand (DOD) ink-jet printing, a computational analysis is carried out to simulate the formation of liquid drops of incompressible Newtonian fluids from a simple capillary tube by imposing a transient flow rate upstream of the nozzle exit. Since the flow in a typical ink-jet nozzle is toward the nozzle outlet during part of the time and away from the nozzle outlet at other times, an inflow rate is adopted here that captures the essential physics and is given in dimensionless form by Q =(π√We /2)sinΩt, where We is the Weber number (inertial/surface tension force), Ω is the frequency, and t is time. The dynamics are studied as functions of We, Ω, and the Ohnesorge number Oh (viscous/surface tension force). For a common ink forming from a nozzle of 10μm radius, Oh =0.1. For this typical case, a phase or operability diagram in (We,Ω)-space is developed that shows that three regimes of operation are possible. In the first regime, where We is low, breakup does not occur, and drops remain pendant from the nozzle and undergo time periodic oscillations. Thus, the simulations show that fluid inertia, and hence We, must be large enough if a DOD drop is to form, in accord with intuition. A sufficiently large We causes both drop elongation and onset of drop necking, but flow reversal is also necessary for the complete evacuation of the neck and capillary pinching. In the other two regimes, at a given Ω, We is large enough to cause drop breakup. In the first of these two regimes, where Wec1drops do form but have negative velocities, i.e., they would move toward the nozzle upon breakup, which is undesirable. In the second breakup regime, where We >Wec2, not only are DOD drops formed, but they do so with positive velocities.

  10. Analysis of a Free Surface Film from a Controlled Liquid Impinging Jet over a Rotating Disk Including Conjugate Effects, with and without Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Subramanian (Technical Monitor); Rice, Jeremy; Faghri, Amir; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2005-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the liquid film characteristics and the accompanying heat transfer of a free surface controlled liquid impinging jet onto a rotating disk are presented. The computations were run on a two-dimensional axi-symmetric Eulerian mesh while the free surface was calculated with the volume of fluid method. Flow rates between 3 and 15 1pm with rotational speeds between 50 and 200 rpm are analyzed. The effects of inlet temperature on the film thickness and heat transfer are characterized as well as evaporative effects. The conjugate heating effect is modeled, and was found to effect the heat transfer results the most at both the inner and outer edges of the heated surface. The heat transfer was enhanced with both increasing flow rate and increasing rotational speeds. When evaporative effects were modeled, the evaporation was found to increase the heat transfer at the lower flow rates the most because of a fully developed thermal field that was achieved. The evaporative effects did not significantly enhance the heat transfer at the higher flow rates.

  11. An experimental study of dynamics of drop formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Basaran, O.A.

    1995-06-01

    A liquid being ejected from a nozzle emanates from it as discrete, uniformly sized drops when the flow rate is sufficiently low. In this paper, an experimental study is presented of the dynamics of a viscous liquid drop that is being formed directly at the tip of a vertical tube into ambient air. The evolution in time of the drop shape and volume is monitored with a time resolution of 1/12 to 1 ms. Following the detachment of the previous drop, the profile of the new growing drop at first changes from spherical to pear-shaped. As time advances, the throat of the pear-shaped drop takes on the appearance of a liquid thread that connects the bottom portion of the drop that is about to detach to the rest of the liquid that is pendant from the tube. The focus here is on probing the effects of physical and geometric parameters on the universal features of drop formation, paying special attention to the development, extension, and breakup of the liquid thread and the satellite drops that are formed subsequent to its breakup. The role of surfactants in modifying the dynamics of drop formation is also studied. The effects of finite inertial, capillary, viscous, and gravitational forces are all accounted for to classify drastically different formation dynamics and to elucidate the fate of satellite drops following thread rupture.

  12. Toroidal bubble entrapment under an impacting drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.; Takehara, Kohsei; Etoh, Takeharu Goji

    2012-11-01

    We use ultra-high-speed imaging and numerical simulations (GERRIS, http://gfs.sf.net) to observe and analyze the formation of up to 14 air tori when a water drop impacts on a thin liquid film of water or other miscible liquids. They form during the early contact between the drop and the pool by the vertical oscillations of the ejecta sheet. They then break in micro-bubble rings by the Rayleigh instability. Their formation is associated with the shedding of an axisymmetric vortex street into the liquid from the free surface. These vorticity structures and their dynamics are made apparent by the dynamics of the micro-bubbles, added seed particles and the difference of refractive index for different liquids in the drop and the pool. More robust entrapments are observed for a thin film of ethanol or methanol. We show that while the non-spherical drop shape is not responsible for the toroidal bubble entrapments, the number of rings is increasing for more oblate drops. Individual bubble entrapments are also observed from azimuthal destabilizations of the neck between the drop and the pool.

  13. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ... Loading... Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ...

  14. Attracting Water Drops

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts Cady Coleman and Ron Garan perform the Attracting Water Drops experiment from Chabad Hebrew Academy in San Diego, Calif. This research determines if a free-floating water drop can be att...

  15. Numerical and experimental analysis of a thin liquid film on a rotating disk related to development of a spacecraft absorption cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faghri, Amir; Swanson, Theodore D.

    1989-01-01

    The numerical and experimental analysis of a thin liquid film on a rotating and a stationary disk related to the development of an absorber unit for a high capacity spacecraft absorption cooling system, is described. The creation of artificial gravity by the use of a centrifugal field was focused upon in this report. Areas covered include: (1) One-dimensional computation of thin liquid film flows; (2) Experimental measurement of film height and visualization of flow; (3) Two-dimensional computation of the free surface flow of a thin liquid film using a pressure optimization method; (4) Computation of heat transfer in two-dimensional thin film flow; (5) Development of a new computational methodology for the free surface flows using a permeable wall; (6) Analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a thin film in the presence and absence of gravity; and (7) Comparison of theoretical prediction and experimental data. The basic phenomena related to fluid flow and heat transfer on rotating systems reported here can also be applied to other areas of space systems.

  16. A model for liquid film in steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Amelie; Marcelet, Meryem; Herard, Jean-Marc; Dorey, Jean-Marc; Lance, Michel

    2015-11-01

    Wetness in steam turbines induces losses and erosion. Drops are created due to the fast expansion of the steam (homogeneous nucleation) and the impurities in the steam (heterogeneous nucleation). The droplets grow and some among them settle on the blade leading to a thin liquid film. This film may then be atomized into coarse water drops which crash on the following blades. The liquid film configuration is a thin film on a curved surface, created by the drop deposit and under high steam friction. In steam turbines, the liquid film is subject to high rotational effect (rotor) and/or to negative gravity. Moreover, due to interfacial instabilities, some drops are torn off from the film. The retained approach is an integral formulation of the Navier-Stokes equation (or shallow water equation) with specific terms. The derivation of these equations requires some closure laws for the convection contributions, the Coriolis terms and for terms related to the additional mass coming from the drops deposit. Once chosen, mathematical and mechanical analyses are performed (hyperbolicity, entropy, galilean and rotational invariance). A two-dimensional code has been developed based on finite volume method to simulate numerically this liquid film model for steam turbines.

  17. NMR T{sub 1} relaxation time measurements and calculations with translational and rotational components for liquid electrolytes containing LiBF{sub 4} and propylene carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, P. M. Voice, A. M. Ward, I. M.

    2013-12-07

    Longitudinal relaxation (T{sub 1}) measurements of {sup 19}F, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 1}H in propylene carbonate/LiBF{sub 4} liquid electrolytes are reported. Comparison of T{sub 1} values with those for the transverse relaxation time (T{sub 2}) confirm that the measurements are in the high temperature (low correlation time) limit of the T{sub 1} minimum. Using data from pulsed field gradient measurements of self-diffusion coefficients and measurements of solution viscosity measured elsewhere, it is concluded that although in general there are contributions to T{sub 1} from both translational and rotational motions. For the lithium ions, this is mainly translational, and for the fluorine ions mainly rotational.

  18. Numerical simulation of fluid flow and heat transfer in a thin liquid film over a stationary and rotating disk and comparison with experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faghri, Amir; Swanson, Theodore D.

    1990-01-01

    In the first section, improvements in the theoretical model and computational procedure for the prediction of film height and heat-transfer coefficient of the free surface flow of a radially-spreading thin liquid film adjacent to a flat horizontal surface of finite extent are presented. Flows in the presence and absence of gravity are considered. Theoretical results are compared to available experimental data with good agreement. In the presence of gravity, a hydraulic jump is present, isolating the flow into two regimes: supercritical upstream from the jump and subcritical downstream of it. In this situation, the effects of surface tension are important near the outer edge of the disk where the fluid experiences a free fall. A region of flow separation is present just downstream of the jump. In the absence of gravity, no hydraulic jump or separated flow region is present. The variation of the heat-transfer coefficient for flows in the presence and absence of gravity are also presented. In the second section, the results of a numerical simulation of the flow field and associated heat transfer coefficients are presented for the free surface flow of a thin liquid film adjacent to a horizontal rotating disk. The computation was performed for different flow rates and rotational velocities using a 3-D boundary-fitted coordinate system. Since the geometry of the free surface is unknown and dependent on flow rate, rate of rotation, and other parameters, an iterative procedure had to be used to ascertain its location. The computed film height agreed well with existing experimental measurements. The flow is found to be dominated by inertia near the entrance and close to the free surface and dominated by centrifugal force at larger radii and adjacent to the disk. The rotation enhances the heat transfer coefficient by a significant amount.

  19. Entanglement spectrum: Identification of the transition from vortex-liquid to vortex-lattice state in a weakly interacting rotating Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhao; Guo Hongli; Fan Heng; Vedral, Vlatko

    2011-01-15

    We use entanglement to investigate the transition from vortex-liquid phase to vortex-lattice phase in a weakly interacting rotating Bose-Einstein condensate. For the torus geometry, the ground-state entanglement spectrum is analyzed to distinguish these two phases. The low-lying part of the ground-state entanglement spectrum, as well as the behavior of its lowest level, changes clearly when the transition occurs. For the sphere geometry, the entanglement gap in the conformal limit is also studied. We also show that the decrease in entanglement between particles can be regarded as a signal of the transition.

  20. Fluid dynamics and solidification of levitated drops and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    The fluid dynamic investigaton of simple free liquid drops is described based on ground-based and low-gravity experimental results. The behavior of compound drops and liquid shells as described in recent theoretical and experimental studies is discussed. Experimental investigations using both levitation devices and drop tubes are considered in the case of 1-g laboratory investigations, highlighting the advantages and drawbacks of both techniques.

  1. Directional motion of impacting drops on dual-textured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vaikuntanathan, V; Sivakumar, D

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we analyze the directional movement of impacting liquid drops on dual-textured solid surfaces comprising two different surface morphologies: a textured surface and a smooth surface. The dynamics of liquid drops impacting onto the junction line between the two parts of the dual-textured surfaces is studied experimentally for varying drop impact velocity. The dual-textured surfaces used here featured a variation in their textures' geometrical parameters as well as their surface chemistry. Two types of liquid drop differing in their surface tension were used. The impact process develops a net horizontal drop velocity towards the higher-wettability surface portion and results in a bulk movement of the impacting drop liquid. The final distance moved by the impacting drop from the junction line decreases with increasing impacting drop Weber number We. A fully theoretical model, employing a balance of forces acting at the drop contact line as well as energy conservation, is formulated to determine the variation, with We, of net horizontal drop velocity and subsequent movement of the impacting drop on the dual-textured surfaces.

  2. Bubble, Drop and Particle Unit (BDPU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This section of the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS) publication includes the following articles entitled: (1) Oscillatory Thermocapillary Instability; (2) Thermocapillary Convection in Multilayer Systems; (3) Bubble and Drop Interaction with Solidification Front; (4) A Liquid Electrohydrodynamics Experiment; (5) Boiling on Small Plate Heaters under Microgravity and a Comparison with Earth Gravity; (6) Thermocapillary Migration and Interactions of Bubbles and Drops; and (7) Nonlinear Surface Tension Driven Bubble Migration

  3. Viscosity Measurement Using Drop Coalescence in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.; Ethridge, Edwin C.; Maxwell, Daniel; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present in here validation studies of a new method for application in microgravity environment which measures the viscosity of highly viscous undercooled liquids using drop coalescence. The method has the advantage of avoiding heterogeneous nucleation at container walls caused by crystallization of undercooled liquids during processing. Homogeneous nucleation can also be avoided due to the rapidity of the measurement using this method. The technique relies on measurements from experiments conducted in near zero gravity environment as well as highly accurate analytical formulation for the coalescence process. The viscosity of the liquid is determined by allowing the computed free surface shape relaxation time to be adjusted in response to the measured free surface velocity for two coalescing drops. Results are presented from two sets of validation experiments for the method which were conducted on board aircraft flying parabolic trajectories. In these tests the viscosity of a highly viscous liquid, namely glycerin, was determined at different temperatures using the drop coalescence method described in here. The experiments measured the free surface velocity of two glycerin drops coalescing under the action of surface tension alone in low gravity environment using high speed photography. The liquid viscosity was determined by adjusting the computed free surface velocity values to the measured experimental data. The results of these experiments were found to agree reasonably well with the known viscosity for the test liquid used.

  4. Thermocapillary Convection in Bubbles and Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balassubramaniam; Subramanian, R. Shankar

    2003-01-01

    When bubbles or drops are present in an immiscible liquid in reduced gravity and the temperature of the liquid is non-uniform, a thermocapillary stress is generated at the interface due to the variation of interfacial tension with temperature. The resulting flow propels the drop freely suspended in the liquid towards warmer regions, so as to minimize the interfacial energy. In this presentation, we will focus on the effect of convective transport of momentum and energy, that are characterized by the Reynolds number and the Marangoni number, respectively. The results of asymptotic analyses for the speed of the drop for low and large values of these parameters will be discussed. These predictions as well as those from numerical simulations will be compared with reduced gravity experimental results obtained from experiments performed aboard the space shuttle.

  5. Conically shaped drops in electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Howard A.; Brenner, Michael P.; Lister, John R.

    1996-11-01

    When an electric field is applied to a dielectric liquid containing a suspended immiscible fluid drop, the drop deforms into a prolate ellipsoidal shape. Above a critical field strength the drop develops conical ends, as first observed by Zeleny [Phys. Rev. 10, 1 (1917)] and Wilson & Taylor [Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. 22, 728 (1925)] for, respectively, the case of conducting drops and soap films in air. The case of two dielectric liquids was studied recently using a slender drop approximation by Li, Halsey & Lobkovsky [Europhys. Lett 27, 575 (1994)]. In this presentation we further develop the slender body approximation to obtain coupled ordinary differential equations for the electric field and the drop shape. Analytical formulae are derived which approximately give the cone angle as a function of the dielectric constant ratio between the two fluids, and the minimum applied electric field at which conical tips first form as a function of the dielectric constant ratio. Finally, drops shapes are calculated numerically and compared with the common prolate shape assumption.

  6. Transport Powder and Liquid Samples by Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Louyeh, Sahar

    2009-01-01

    Sample transport is an important requirement for In-situ analysis of samples in NASA planetary exploration missions. Tests have shown that powders or liquid drops on a surface can be transported by surface acoustic waves (SAW) that are generated on the surface using interdigital transducers. The phenomena were investigated experimentally and to generate SAWs interdigital electrodes were deposited on wafers of 128 deg rotated Y-cut LiNbO?. Transporting capability of the SAW device was tested using particles of various sizes and drops of various viscosities liquids. Because of different interaction mechanisms with the SAWs, the powders and the liquid drops were observed to move in opposite directions. In the preliminary tests, a speed of 180 mm/s was achieved for powder transportation. The detailed experimental setup and results are presented in this paper. The transporting mechanism can potentially be applied to miniaturize sample analysis system or " lab-on-chip" devices.

  7. Numerical simulation of direct-contact evaporation of a drop rising in a hot, less volatile immiscible liquid of higher density -- Possibilities and limits of the SOLA-VOF/CSF algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Wohak, M.G.; Beer, H.

    1998-05-08

    A contribution toward the full numerical simulation of direct-contact evaporation of a drop rising in a hot, immiscible and less volatile liquid of higher density is presented. Based on a fixed-grid Eulerian description, the classical SOLA-VOF method is largely extended to incorporate, for example, three incompressible fluids and liquid-vapor phase change. The thorough validation and assessment process covers several benchmark simulations, some which are presented, documenting the multipurpose value of the new code. The direct-contact evaporation simulations reveal severe numerical problems that are closely related to the fixed-grid Euler formulation. As a consequence, the comparison to experiments have to be limited to the initial stage. Potential applications using several design variations can be found in waste heat recovery and reactor cooling. Furthermore, direct contact evaporators may be used in such geothermal power plants where the brines cannot be directly fed into a turbine either because of a high salt load causing severe fouling and corrosion or because of low steam fraction.

  8. Drop splash on a smooth, dry surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riboux, Guillaume; Gordillo, Jose Manuel; Korobkin, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    It is our purpose here to determine the conditions under which a drop of a given liquid with a known radius R impacting against a smooth impermeable surface at a velocity V, will either spread axisymmetrically onto the substrate or will create a splash, giving rise to usually undesired star-shaped patterns. In our experimental setup, drops are generated injecting low viscosity liquids falling under the action of gravity from a stainless steel hypodermic needle. The experimental observations using two high speed cameras operating simultaneously and placed perpendicularly to each other reveal that, initially, the drop deforms axisymmetrically, with A (T) the radius of the wetted area. For high enough values of the drop impact velocity, a thin sheet of liquid starts to be ejected from A (T) at a velocity Vjet > V for instants of time such that T >=Tc . If Vjet is above a certain threshold, which depends on the solid wetting properties as well as on the material properties of both the liquid and the atmospheric gas, the rim of the lamella dewets the solid to finally break into drops. Using Wagner's theory we demonstrate that A (T) =√{ 3 RVT } and our results also reveal that Tc We - 1 / 2 =(ρV2 R / σ) - 1 / 2 and Vjet We 1 / 4 .

  9. Pollination Drop in Juniperus communis: Response to Deposited Material

    PubMed Central

    Mugnaini, Serena; Nepi, Massimo; Guarnieri, Massimo; Piotto, Beti; Pacini, Ettore

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The pollination drop is a liquid secretion produced by the ovule and exposed outside the micropyle. In many gymnosperms, pollen lands on the surface of the pollination drop, rehydrates and enters the ovule as the drop retracts. The objective of this work was to study the formation of the pollination drop in Juniperus communis, its carbohydrate composition and the response to deposition of conspecific pollen, foreign pollen and other particulate material, in an attempt to clarify the mechanism of pollination drop retraction. Method Branches with female cones close to pollination drop secretion were collected. On the first day of pollination drop exposure, an eyelash mounted on a wooden stick with paraffin was used to collect pollen or silica gel particles, which were then deposited by contact with the drop. Volume changes in pollination drops were measured by using a stereomicroscope with a micrometer eyepiece 3 h after deposition. The volume of non-pollinated control drops was also recorded. On the first day of secretion, drops were also collected for sugar analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. Key Results The pollination drop persisted for about 12 d if not pollinated, and formed again after removal for up to four consecutive days. After pollination with viable conspecific pollen, the drop retracted quickly and did not form again. Partial withdrawal occurred after deposition of other biological and non-biological material. Fructose was the dominant sugar; glucose was also present but at a much lower percentage. Conclusions Sugar analysis confirmed the general trend of fructose dominance in gymnosperm pollination drops. Complete pollination drop withdrawal appears to be triggered by a biochemical mechanism resulting from interaction between pollen and drop constituents. The results of particle deposition suggest the existence of a non-specific, particle-size-dependent mechanism that induces partial pollination drop withdrawal

  10. Transformation of the bridge during drop separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Prokhorov, V. E.

    2016-05-01

    The geometry of flows during separation of pendant drops of liquids with significantly different physical properties (alcohol, water, glycerin, oil) has been studied by high-speed video recording. The dynamics of the processes involving the formation of bridges of two characteristic shapes—slightly nonuniform in thickness and with thinning of the upper and lower ends—has been investigated. It has been shown that the shape change of the separated bridge has a number of stages determined by the properties of the liquid. As a result, the bridge is transformed into a small drop—a satellite drop.

  11. A rotating two-phase gas/liquid flow for pressure reduction in underwater plasma arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, H.; Creutz, M.; Mewes, D.; Bartzsch, J.

    1994-12-31

    Plasma arc welding processes are used in off-shore industry for the construction and maintenance in the wet surrounding of underwater structures and pipelines. In greater water depth the density of the plasma gas increase because of the greater hydrostatic pressure. This causes an increase of the conductive heat losses to the wet surrounding. To keep up the energy flux to the workpiece a pressure reduction is favorable against the surrounding. To keep up the energy flux to the workpiece a pressure reduction is favorable against the surrounding. The plasma arc has to burn in a locally dry area. This requirement can be fulfilled by a rotating disc placed above the workpiece. In the gap between the lower end of the cylinder and the workpiece a rotating two-phase flow is maintained. The flow around the rotating disc is experimentally investigated. The rotating disc is placed above the surface of the workpiece which is simulated by a flat plate. Water is forced out of the cylinder due to centrifugal forces set up by the rotating disc and flat plate. The velocity distribution in the flow is measured by Laser-Doppler-Anemometry. The phase distribution in the two-phase flow in the gap is measured by local electrical probes. The static pressure in the gaseous atmosphere is reduced in comparison to the hydrostatic pressure of the surrounding water. The pressure reduction is given by the void fraction, the phase distribution and the volume flow rates of both phases in the gap as well as by the speed of revolution and the design of the disc and the work surface. Apart from the investigations on the fluid dynamics, the method to reduce the pressure was technically proved. Experiments were carried out under water with a plasma MIG welder.

  12. Drop Ejection From an Oscillating Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, E. D.; Basaran, O. A.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of a drop of a Newtonian liquid that is pendant from or sessile on a solid rod that is forced to undergo time-periodic oscillations along its axis is studied theoretically. The free boundary problem governing the time evolution of the shape of the drop and the flow field inside it is solved by a method of lines using a finite element algorithm incorporating an adaptive mesh. When the forcing amplitude is small, the drop approaches a limit cycle at large times and undergoes steady oscillations thereafter. However, drop breakup is the consequence if the forcing amplitude exceeds a critical value. Over a wide range of amplitudes above this critical value, drop ejection from the rod occurs during the second oscillation period from the commencement of rod motion. Remarkably, the shape of the interface at breakup and the volume of the primary drop formed are insensitive to changes in forcing amplitude. The interface shape at times close to and at breakup is a multi-valued function of distance measured along the rod axis and hence cannot be described by recently popularized one-dimensional approximations. The computations show that drop ejection occurs without the formation of a long neck. Therefore, this method of drop formation holds promise of preventing formation of undesirable satellite droplets.

  13. Total Gaussian curvature, drop shapes and the range of applicability of drop shape techniques.

    PubMed

    Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2014-02-01

    Drop shape techniques are used extensively for surface tension measurement. It is well-documented that, as the drop/bubble shape becomes close to spherical, the performance of all drop shape techniques deteriorates. There have been efforts quantifying the range of applicability of drop techniques by studying the deviation of Laplacian drops from the spherical shape. A shape parameter was introduced in the literature and was modified several times to accommodate different drop constellations. However, new problems arise every time a new configuration is considered. Therefore, there is a need for a universal shape parameter applicable to pendant drops, sessile drops, liquid bridges as well as captive bubbles. In this work, the use of the total Gaussian curvature in a unified approach for the shape parameter is introduced for that purpose. The total Gaussian curvature is a dimensionless quantity that is commonly used in differential geometry and surface thermodynamics, and can be easily calculated for different Laplacian drop shapes. The new definition of the shape parameter using the total Gaussian curvature is applied here to both pendant and constrained sessile drops as an illustration. The analysis showed that the new definition is superior and reflects experimental results better than previous definitions, especially at extreme values of the Bond number.

  14. Total Gaussian curvature, drop shapes and the range of applicability of drop shape techniques.

    PubMed

    Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2014-02-01

    Drop shape techniques are used extensively for surface tension measurement. It is well-documented that, as the drop/bubble shape becomes close to spherical, the performance of all drop shape techniques deteriorates. There have been efforts quantifying the range of applicability of drop techniques by studying the deviation of Laplacian drops from the spherical shape. A shape parameter was introduced in the literature and was modified several times to accommodate different drop constellations. However, new problems arise every time a new configuration is considered. Therefore, there is a need for a universal shape parameter applicable to pendant drops, sessile drops, liquid bridges as well as captive bubbles. In this work, the use of the total Gaussian curvature in a unified approach for the shape parameter is introduced for that purpose. The total Gaussian curvature is a dimensionless quantity that is commonly used in differential geometry and surface thermodynamics, and can be easily calculated for different Laplacian drop shapes. The new definition of the shape parameter using the total Gaussian curvature is applied here to both pendant and constrained sessile drops as an illustration. The analysis showed that the new definition is superior and reflects experimental results better than previous definitions, especially at extreme values of the Bond number. PMID:24373931

  15. An EPR line shape study of anisotropic rotational reorientation and slow tumbling in liquid and frozen jojoba oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. S.; Al-Rashid, W. A.

    Spin probe investigation of jojoba oil was carried out by electron paramagnetic rresonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The spin probe used was 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone- N-oxide. The EPR line shape studies were carried out in the lower temperature range of 192 to 275 K to test the applicability of the stochastic Liouville theory in the simulation of EPR line shapes where earlier relaxation theories do not apply. In an earlier study, this system was analysed by employing rotational diffusion at the fast-motional region. The results show that PD-Tempone exhibits asymmetric rotational diffusion with N = 3.3 at an axis z'= Y in the plane of the molecule and perpendicular to the NO bond direction. In this investigation we have extended the temperature range to lower temperatures and observed slow tumbling EPR spectra. It is shown that the stochastic Liouville method can be used to simulate all but two of the experimentally observed EPR spectra in the slow-motional region and details of the slow-motional line shape are sensitive to the anisotropy of rotation and showed good agreement for a moderate jump model. From the computer simulation of EPR line shapes it is found that the information obtained on τ R, and N in the motional-narrowing region can be extrapolated into the slow-tumbling region. It is also found that ln (τ R) is linear in 1/ T in the temperature range studied and the resulting activation energy for rotation is 51 kJ/mol. The two EPR spectra at 240 and 231 K were found to exhibit the effects of anisotropic viscosity observed by B IRELL for nitroxides oriented in tubular cavities in inclusion crystals in which the molecule is free to rotate about the long axis but with its rotation hindered about the other two axes because of the cavity geometry. These results proved that the slow-tumbling spectra were very sensitive to the effects of anisotropy in the viscosity.

  16. Change of translational-rotational coupling in liquids revealed by field-cycling {sup 1}H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, R.; Schneider, E.; Rössler, E. A.

    2015-01-21

    Applying the field-cycling nuclear magnetic resonance technique, the frequency dependence of the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate, R{sub 1}(ω)=T{sub 1}{sup −1}(ω), is measured for propylene glycol (PG) which is increasingly diluted with deuterated chloroform. A frequency range of 10 kHz–20 MHz and a broad temperature interval from 220 to about 100 K are covered. The results are compared to those of experiments, where glycerol and o-terphenyl are diluted with their deuterated counter-part. Reflecting intra- as well as intermolecular relaxation, the dispersion curves R{sub 1}(ω,x) (x denotes mole fraction PG) allow to extract the rotational time constant τ{sub rot}(T, x) and the self-diffusion coefficient D(T, x) in a single experiment. The Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) relation is tested in terms of the quantity D(T, x) τ{sub rot}(T, x) which provides a measure of an effective hydrodynamic radius or equivalently of the spectral separation of the translational and the rotational relaxation contribution. In contrast to o-terphenyl, glycerol and PG show a spectral separation much larger than suggested by the SED relation. In the case of PG/chloroform mixtures, not only an acceleration of the PG dynamics is observed with increasing dilution but also the spectral separation of rotational and translational relaxation contributions continuously decreases. Finally, following a behavior similar to that of o-terphenyl already at about x = 0.6; i.e., while D(T, x) τ{sub rot}(T, x) in the mixture is essentially temperature independent, it strongly increases with x signaling thus a change of translational-rotational coupling. This directly reflects the dissolution of the hydrogen-bond network and thus a change of solution structure.

  17. A dead-zone free ⁴He atomic magnetometer with intensity-modulated linearly polarized light and a liquid crystal polarization rotator.

    PubMed

    Wu, T; Peng, X; Lin, Z; Guo, H

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical (4)He atomic magnetometer experimental scheme based on an original Bell-Bloom configuration. A single intensity-modulated linearly polarized laser beam is used both for generating spin polarization within a single (4)He vapor and probing the spin precessing under a static magnetic field. The transmitted light signal from the vapor is then phase-sensitively detected at the modulation frequency and its harmonics, which lead to the atomic magnetic resonance signals. Based on this structure, a liquid crystal is added in our magnetometer system and constitutes a polarization rotator. By controlling the voltage applied on the liquid crystal, the light linear polarization vector can be kept perpendicular with the ambient magnetic field direction, which in turn provides the maximum resonance signal amplitude. Moreover, the system exhibits a magnetic-field noise floor of about 2pT/√Hz, which is not degraded due to the presence of the liquid crystal and varying magnetic field direction. The experiment results prove that our method can eliminate the dead-zone effect, improve the system spatial isotropy, and thus be suitable in mobile applications.

  18. Youth Crime Drop. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Jeffrey A.

    This report examines the recent drop in violent crime in the United States, discussing how much of the decrease seen between 1995-99 is attributable to juveniles (under age 18 years) and older youth (18-24 years). Analysis of current FBI arrest data indicates that not only did America's violent crime drop continue through 1999, but falling youth…

  19. Drop Tower Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in "The Physics Teacher" in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at…

  20. Thermocapillary motion of deformable drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Shi, Qingping; Borhan, Ali

    1994-01-01

    The thermocapillary motion of initially spherical drops/bubbles driven by a constant temperature gradient in an unbounded liquid medium is simulated numerically. Effects of convection of momentum and energy, as well as shape deformations, are addressed. The method used is based on interface tracking on a base cartesian grid, and uses a smeared color or indicator function for the determination of the surface topology. Quad-tree adaptive refinement of the cartesian grid is implemented to enhance the fidelity of the surface tracking. It is shown that convection of energy results in a slowing of the drop, as the isotherms get wrapped around the front of the drop. Shape deformation resulting from inertial effects affect the migration velocity. The physical results obtained are in agreement with the existing literature. Furthermore, remarks are made on the sensitivity of the calculated solutions to the smearing of the fluid properties. Analysis and simulations show that the migration velocity depends very strongly on the smearing of the interfacial force whereas it is rather insensitive to the smearing of other properties, hence the adaptive grid.

  1. Airflows generated by an impacting drop.

    PubMed

    Bischofberger, Irmgard; Ray, Bahni; Morris, Jeffrey F; Lee, Taehun; Nagel, Sidney R

    2016-03-28

    A drop impacting a solid surface with sufficient velocity will splash and emit many small droplets. However, lowering the ambient air pressure suppresses splashing completely. This effect, robustly found for different liquid and substrate properties, raises the fundamental question of how air affects a spreading drop. In a combined experimental and numerical study we characterize the flow of air induced by the drop after it hits the substrate, using a modified Schlieren optics technique combined with high-speed video imaging and Lattice-Boltzmann simulations. Our experiments reveal the emergence of air structures on different length scales. On large scales, the airflow induced in the drop's wake leads to vortex structures due to interaction with the substrate. On smaller scales, we visualize a ring structure above the outer edge of the spreading liquid generated by the spreading of the drop. Our simulations reveal the interaction between the wake vorticity and the flows originating from the rapidly escaping air from below the impacting drop. We show that the vorticity is governed by a balance between inertial and viscous forces in the air, and is unrelated to the splashing threshold. PMID:26809314

  2. Airflows generated by an impacting drop.

    PubMed

    Bischofberger, Irmgard; Ray, Bahni; Morris, Jeffrey F; Lee, Taehun; Nagel, Sidney R

    2016-03-28

    A drop impacting a solid surface with sufficient velocity will splash and emit many small droplets. However, lowering the ambient air pressure suppresses splashing completely. This effect, robustly found for different liquid and substrate properties, raises the fundamental question of how air affects a spreading drop. In a combined experimental and numerical study we characterize the flow of air induced by the drop after it hits the substrate, using a modified Schlieren optics technique combined with high-speed video imaging and Lattice-Boltzmann simulations. Our experiments reveal the emergence of air structures on different length scales. On large scales, the airflow induced in the drop's wake leads to vortex structures due to interaction with the substrate. On smaller scales, we visualize a ring structure above the outer edge of the spreading liquid generated by the spreading of the drop. Our simulations reveal the interaction between the wake vorticity and the flows originating from the rapidly escaping air from below the impacting drop. We show that the vorticity is governed by a balance between inertial and viscous forces in the air, and is unrelated to the splashing threshold.

  3. Modeling Evaporation of Drops of Different Kerosenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical model describes the evaporation of drops of a hydrocarbon liquid composed of as many as hundreds of chemical species. The model is intended especially for application to any of several types of kerosenes commonly used as fuels. The concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of the evaporating multicomponent liquid is described by use of a probability distribution function (PDF). However, the present model is more generally applicable than is its immediate predecessor.

  4. Jumps, somersaults, and symmetry breaking in Leidenfrost drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Simeng; Bertola, Volfango

    2016-08-01

    When a droplet of water impacts a heated surface, the drop may be observed to bounce. Recently is has been found that small quantities (˜100 ppm) of polymer additives such as polyethylene oxide can significantly increase the maximum bouncing height of drops. This effect has been explained in terms of the reduction of energy dissipation caused by polymer additives during the drop retraction and rebound, resulting in higher mechanical energy available for bouncing. Here we demonstrate, by comparing three types of fluids (Newtonian, shear-thinning, and viscoelastic), that the total kinetic energy carried by low-viscosity Newtonian drops during retraction is partly transformed into rotational kinetic energy rather than dissipated when compared with high-viscosity or non-Newtonian drops. We also show that non-Newtonian effects play little role in the energy distribution during drop impact, while the main effect is due to the symmetry break observed during the retraction of low-viscosity drops.

  5. Jumps, somersaults, and symmetry breaking in Leidenfrost drops.

    PubMed

    Chen, Simeng; Bertola, Volfango

    2016-08-01

    When a droplet of water impacts a heated surface, the drop may be observed to bounce. Recently is has been found that small quantities (∼100 ppm) of polymer additives such as polyethylene oxide can significantly increase the maximum bouncing height of drops. This effect has been explained in terms of the reduction of energy dissipation caused by polymer additives during the drop retraction and rebound, resulting in higher mechanical energy available for bouncing. Here we demonstrate, by comparing three types of fluids (Newtonian, shear-thinning, and viscoelastic), that the total kinetic energy carried by low-viscosity Newtonian drops during retraction is partly transformed into rotational kinetic energy rather than dissipated when compared with high-viscosity or non-Newtonian drops. We also show that non-Newtonian effects play little role in the energy distribution during drop impact, while the main effect is due to the symmetry break observed during the retraction of low-viscosity drops. PMID:27627234

  6. Settling of copper drops in molten slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warczok, A.; Utigard, T. A.

    1995-02-01

    The settling of suspended metal and sulfide droplets in liquid metallurgical, slags can be affected by electric fields. The migration of droplets due to electrocapillary motion phenomena may be used to enhance the recovery of suspended matte/metal droplets and thereby to increase the recovery of pay metals. An experimental technique was developed for the purpose of measuring the effect of electric fields on the settling rate of metallic drops in liquid slags. Copper drops suspended in CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-Cu2O slags were found to migrate toward the cathode. Electric fields can increase the settling rate of 5-mm-diameter copper drops 3 times or decrease the settling until levitation by reversal of the electric field. The enhanced settling due to electric fields decreases with increasing Cu2O contents in the slag.

  7. Electric field induced deformation of sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, Lindsey; Tsakonas, Costas; Duffy, Brian; Mottram, Nigel; Brown, Carl; Wilson, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    The ability to control the shape of a drop with the application of an electric field has been exploited for many technological applications including measuring surface tension, producing an optical display device, and optimising the optical properties of microlenses. In this work we consider, both theoretically and experimentally, the deformation of pinned sessile drops with contact angles close to either 0° or 90° resting on the lower substrate inside a parallel plate capacitor due to an A.C. electric field. Using both asymptotic and numerical approaches we obtain predictive equations for the static and dynamic drop shape deformations as functions of the key experimental parameters (drop size, capacitor plate separation, electric field magnitude and contact angle). The asymptotic results agree well with the experimental results for a range of liquids. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of EPSRC via research Grants EP/J009865 and EP/J009873.

  8. Charge and Size Distributions of Electrospray Drops

    PubMed

    de Juan L; de la Mora JF

    1997-02-15

    The distributions of charge q and diameter d of drops emitted from electrified liquid cones in the cone-jet mode are investigated with two aerosol instruments. A differential mobility analyzer (DMA, Vienna type) first samples the spray drops, selects those with electrical mobilities within a narrow band, and either measures the associated current or passes them to a second instrument. The drops may also be individually counted optically and sized by sampling them into an aerodynamic size spectrometer (API's Aerosizer). For a given cone-jet, the distribution of charge q for the main electrospray drops is some 2.5 times broader than their distribution of diameters d, with qmax/qmin approximately 4. But mobility-selected drops have relative standard deviations of only 5% for both d and q, showing that the support of the (q, d) distribution is a narrow band centered around a curve q(d). The approximate one-dimensionality of this support region is explained through the mechanism of jet breakup, which is a random process with only one degree of freedom: the wavelength of axial modulation of the jet. The observed near constancy of the charge over volume ratio (q approximately d3) shows that the charge is frozen in the liquid surface at the time scale of the breakup process. The charge over volume ratio of the primary drops varies between 98 and 55% of the ratio of spray current I over liquid flow rate Q, and decreases at increasing Q. I/Q is therefore an unreliable measure of the charge density of these drops.

  9. Liquid Oxygen Rotating Friction Ignition Testing of Aluminum and Titanium with Monel and Inconel for Rocket Engine Propulsion System Contamination Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta, S.; Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    Metallic contaminant was found in the liquid oxygen (LOX) pre-valve screen of the shuttle main engine propulsion system on two orbiter vehicles. To investigate the potential for an ignition, NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility performed (modified) rotating friction ignition testing in LOX. This testing simulated a contaminant particle in the low-pressure oxygen turbo pump (LPOTP) and the high-pressure oxygen turbo pump (HPOTP) of the shuttle main propulsion system. Monel(R) K-500 and Inconel(R) 718 samples represented the LPOTP and HPOTP materials. Aluminum foil tape and titanium foil represented the contaminant particles. In both the Monel(R) and Inconel(R) material configurations, the aluminum foil tape samples did not ignite after 30 s of rubbing. In contrast, all of the titanium foil samples ignited regardless of the rubbing duration or material configuration. However, the titanium foil ignitions did not propagate to the Monel and Inconel materials.

  10. Instabilities of volatile films and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murisic, Nebojsa

    2008-12-01

    We report on instabilities during spreading of volatile liquids, with emphasis on the novel instability observed when isopropyl alcohol (IPA) is deposited on a monocrystalline silicon (Si) wafer. This instability is characterized by emission of drops ahead of the expanding front, with each drop followed by smaller, satellite droplets, forming the structures which we nickname "octopi" due to their appearance. A less volatile liquid, or a substrate of larger heat conductivity, suppress this instability. In addition, we examine the spreading of drops of water (DIW)-IPA mixtures on both Si wafers and plain glass slides, and describe the variety of contact line instabilities which appear. We find that the decrease of IPA concentration in mixtures leads to transition from "octopi" to mushroom-like instabilities. Through manipulation of our experimental set up, we also find that the mechanism responsible for these instabilities appears to be mostly insensitive to both the external application of convection to the gas phase, and the doping of the gas phase with vapor in order to create the saturated environment. In order to better understand the "octopi" instability, we develop a theoretical model for evaporation of a pure liquid drop on a thermally conductive solid substrate. This model includes all relevant physical effects, including evaporation, thermal conductivity in both liquid and solid, (thermocapillary) Marangoni effect, vapor recoil, disjoining pressure, and gravity. The crucial ingredient in this problem is the evaporation model, since it influences both the motion of the drop contact line, and the temperature profiles along the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interfaces. We consider two evaporation models: the equilibrium "lens" model and the non-equilibrium one-sided (NEOS) model. Along with the assumption of equilibrium at the liquid-gas interface, the "lens" model also assumes that evaporation proceeds in a (vapor) diffusion-limited regime, therefore bringing

  11. Relaxation time of molecular rotation about its long axis in the smectic-A phase of ferroelectricand antiferroelectric liquid crystals as observed by picosecond optical Kerr effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyachi, Kouichi; Takanishi, Yoichi; Ishikawa, Ken; Takezoe, Hideo; Fukuda, Atsuo

    1997-02-01

    We have studied the molecular rotational motion about its long axis in ferroelectric chiral smectic-C (Sm-C) and antiferroelectric chiral smectic-Ca (Sm-C*>A) liquid crystals and observed a few tens of picosecond relaxation time. Previously reported results using degenerate four-wave mixing with 25-ps pump pulses [Lalanne et al., Phys. Rev. A 44, 6632 (1991)] claimed to show a critical slowing down in the temperature region more than 0.1 °C above the Sm-A-Sm-C phase transition. Our measurements of the optical Kerr effect with 130-fs pump pulses do not show any critical slowing down in the corresponding temperature region above the phase transition from Sm-A to Sm-C or Sm-C*>A. The result may indicate that the laser-induced molecular reorientation with τ~10-11 s scarcely couples with the tilt angle and the polarization. A possibility has been discussed that a slower rotational motion with τ>~10-10 s plays a primary role for the emergence of ferroelectricity and/or antiferroelectricity.

  12. On the effect of mantle conductivity on the super-rotating jets near the liquid core surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizerski, K. A.; Bajer, K.

    2007-03-01

    We consider hydromagnetic Couette flows in planar and spherical geometries with strong magnetic field (large Hartmann number, M≫1). The highly conducting bottom boundary is in steady motion that drives the flow. The top boundary is stationary and is either a highly conducting thin shell or a weakly conducting thick mantle. The magnetic field, B+b, is a combination of the strong, force-free background B and a perturbation b induced by the flow. This perturbation generates strong streamwise electromagnetic stress inside the fluid which, in some regions, forms a jet moving faster than the driving boundary. The super-velocity, in the spherical geometry called super-rotation, is particularly prominent in the region where the 'grazing' line of B has a point of tangent contact with the top boundary and where the Hartmann layer is singular. This is a consequence of topological discontinuity across that special field line. We explain why the magnitude of super-rotation already present when the top wall is insulating [Dormy, E., Jault, D., Soward, A.M., 2002. A super-rotating shear layer in magnetohydrodynamic spherical Couette flow. J. Fluid Mech. 452, 263-291], considerably increases when that wall is even slightly conducting. The asymptotic theory is valid when either the thickness of the top wall is small, δ˜M-1 and its conductivity is high, ɛ˜1 or when δ˜1 and ɛ˜M-1. The theory predicts the super-velocity enhancement of the order of δM in the first case and ɛM in the second case. We also numerically solve the planar problem outside the asymptotic regime, for ɛ=1 and δ=1, and find that with the particular B that we chose the peak super-velocity scales like M0.33. This scaling is different from M0.6 found in spherical geometry [Hollerbach, R., Skinner, S., 2001. Instabilities of magnetically induced shear layers and jets. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 457, 785-802].

  13. Bursting drops in solid dielectrics caused by high voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming; Suo, Zhigang; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2012-10-01

    Fluid drops tend to be spheres—a shape that minimizes surface energy. In thunderstorm clouds, drops can become unstable and emit thin jets when charged beyond certain limits. The instability of electrified drops in gases and liquids has been widely studied and used in applications including ink-jet printing, electrospinning nanofibers, microfluidics and electrospray ionization. Here we report a different scenario: drops in solids become unstable and burst under sufficiently high electric fields. We find the instability of drops in solids morphologically resembles that in liquids, but the critical electric field for the instability follows a different scaling due to elasticity of solids. Our observations and theoretical models not only advance the fundamental understanding of electrified drops, but also suggest a new failure mechanism of high energy density dielectric polymers, which have diverse applications ranging from capacitors for power grids and electric vehicles to muscle-like transducers for soft robots and energy harvesting.

  14. Bursting drops in solid dielectrics caused by high voltages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiming; Suo, Zhigang; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2012-01-01

    Fluid drops tend to be spheres--a shape that minimizes surface energy. In thunderstorm clouds, drops can become unstable and emit thin jets when charged beyond certain limits. The instability of electrified drops in gases and liquids has been widely studied and used in applications including ink-jet printing, electrospinning nanofibers, microfluidics and electrospray ionization. Here we report a different scenario: drops in solids become unstable and burst under sufficiently high electric fields. We find the instability of drops in solids morphologically resembles that in liquids, but the critical electric field for the instability follows a different scaling due to elasticity of solids. Our observations and theoretical models not only advance the fundamental understanding of electrified drops, but also suggest a new failure mechanism of high energy density dielectric polymers, which have diverse applications ranging from capacitors for power grids and electric vehicles to muscle-like transducers for soft robots and energy harvesting. PMID:23093194

  15. Bursting drops in solid dielectrics caused by high voltages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiming; Suo, Zhigang; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2012-01-01

    Fluid drops tend to be spheres--a shape that minimizes surface energy. In thunderstorm clouds, drops can become unstable and emit thin jets when charged beyond certain limits. The instability of electrified drops in gases and liquids has been widely studied and used in applications including ink-jet printing, electrospinning nanofibers, microfluidics and electrospray ionization. Here we report a different scenario: drops in solids become unstable and burst under sufficiently high electric fields. We find the instability of drops in solids morphologically resembles that in liquids, but the critical electric field for the instability follows a different scaling due to elasticity of solids. Our observations and theoretical models not only advance the fundamental understanding of electrified drops, but also suggest a new failure mechanism of high energy density dielectric polymers, which have diverse applications ranging from capacitors for power grids and electric vehicles to muscle-like transducers for soft robots and energy harvesting.

  16. Drop Tower Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David

    2013-01-01

    Ground based microgravity facilities are an important proving ground for space experiments, ground-based research and space hardware risk mitigation. An overview of existing platforms will be discussed with an emphasis on drop tower capabilities. The potential for extension to partial gravity conditions will be discussed. Input will be solicited from attendees for their potential to use drop towers in the future and the need for enhanced capabilities (e.g. partial gravity)

  17. Numerical heat transfer during partially-confined, confined, and free liquid jet impingement with rotation and chemical mechanical planarization process modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallave Cortes, Jorge C.

    This work presents the use of numerical modeling for the analysis of transient and steady state liquid jet impingement for cooling application of electronics, and energy dissipation during a CMP process under the influence of a series of parameters that controls the transport phenomena mechanism. Seven thorough studies were done to explore how the flow structure and conjugated heat transfer in both the solid and fluid regions was affected by adding a secondary rotational flow during the jet impingement process. Axis-symmetrical numerical models of round jets with a spinning or static nozzle were developed using the following configurations: confined, partially-confined, and free liquid jet impingement on a rotating or stationary uniformly heated disk of finite thickness and radius. Calculations were done for various materials, namely copper, silver, Constantan, and silicon with a solid to fluid thermal conductivity ratio covering a range of 36.91.2222, at different laminar Reynolds numbers ranging from 220 to 2,000, under a broad rotational rate range of 0 to 1,000 RPM (Ekman number=infinity--3.31x10--5), nozzle-to-plate spacing (beta=0.25.5.0), dimensionless disk thicknesses (b/dn=0.167.1.67), confinement ratio (rp/rd=0.2.0.75), and Prandtl number (1.29.124.44) using NH3, H2O, FC.77 and MIL.7808 as working fluids. An engineering correlation relating the average Nusselt number with the above parameters was developed for the prediction of system performance. The simulation results compared reasonably well with previous experimental studies. The second major contribution of this research was the development of a three dimensional CMP model that shows the temperature distributions profile as an index of energy dissipation at the wafer and pad surfaces, and slurry interface. A finite element analysis was done with FIDAP 8.7.4 package under the influence of physical parameters, such as slurry flow rates (0.5.1.42 cc/s), polishing pressures (17.24.41.37 kPa), pad

  18. Microjetting from wave focusing on oscillating drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoroddsen, S. T.; Etoh, T. G.; Takehara, K.

    2007-05-01

    We present experimental observations of microjetting from an oscillating drop. The jet is generated by the focusing of axisymmetric capillary waves that overturn and collide at an apex of the drop. These jets are up to two orders of magnitude smaller than the original drops. We present two widely different configurations that produce such microjets. The first occurs on a satellite drop, produced by the pinch-off of a water drop from a vertical nozzle. The large oscillations following the contraction of the satellite bridge focus waves at the bottom, sending out a 30μm jet at 9.9m/s. The second jet arises when a water drop, containing surfactants, falls onto and passes through a hemispherical soap film. The gentle deformation of the drop creates a surface wave that focuses at its top, shooting out a tiny jet and entrapping a small bubble inside the drop. This jet is 16±5μm in diameter and emerges at 6.3m/s. In this configuration, the soap film wraps around the drop and acts as a sensor of the air flow, revealing that the liquid jet is preceded by a localized faster-moving air jet. The jetting in both configurations is quite robust and occurs even for slightly asymmetric conditions. These microjets appear for much lower values of the Reynolds and Weber numbers than previously observed, suggesting that free-surface jetting is not limited to the inviscid capillary-inertial regime, which has been the focus of much of the theoretical work.

  19. Viscosity Measurement using Drop Coalescence in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.; Ethridge, Edwin; Maxwell, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    We present in here details of a new method, using drop coalescence, for application in microgravity environment for determining the viscosity of highly viscous undercooled liquids. The method has the advantage of eliminating heterogeneous nucleation at container walls caused by crystallization of undercooled liquids during processing. Also, due to the rapidity of the measurement, homogeneous nucleation would be avoided. The technique relies on both a highly accurate solution to the Navier-Stokes equations as well as on data gathered from experiments conducted in near zero gravity environment. The liquid viscosity is determined by allowing the computed free surface shape relaxation time to be adjusted in response to the measured free surface velocity of two coalescing drops. Results are presented from two validation experiments of the method which were conducted recently on board the NASA KC-135 aircraft. In these tests the viscosity of a highly viscous liquid, such as glycerine at different temperatures, was determined to reasonable accuracy using the liquid coalescence method. The experiments measured the free surface velocity of two glycerine drops coalescing under the action of surface tension alone in low gravity environment using high speed photography. The free surface velocity was then compared with the computed values obtained from different viscosity values. The results of these experiments were found to agree reasonably well with the calculated values.

  20. Viscosity Measurement via Drop Coalescence: A Space Station Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil; Ethridge, Edwin C.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of using low gravity experimental data together with CFD simulations for measuring the viscosity of highly viscous liquids was recently validated on onboard the International Space Station (ISS). A series of microgravity tests were conducted for this purpose on the ISS in July, 2004 and in May of 2005. In these experiments two liquid drops were brought manually together until they touched and were allowed to coalesce under the action of the capillary force alone. The coalescence process was recorded photographically from which the contact radius speed of the merging drops was measured. The liquid viscosity was determined by fitting the measured data with accurate numerical simulation of the coalescence process. Several liquids were tested and for each liquid several drop diameters were employed. Experimental and numerical results will be presented in which the viscosity of several highly viscous liquids were determined using this technique.

  1. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  2. [Solvent demulsification-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for simultaneous determination of organochlorine pesticides in aqueous samples].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Zhu, Chenghua; Zou, Xiaoli; Huang, Lizhi; Yan, Dong

    2013-11-01

    A novel method for simultaneous determination of eight organochlorine pesticides in solidification of floating organic drop coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was established. A mixture of extractant (n-hexadecane) and dispersive agent (acetone) at the ratio of 1/5 (v/v) was injected into aqueous sample to form an emulsion and an extraction process was accomplished. The demulsifier (750 microL acetone) was then injected to break up the emulsion. The two phases were separated quickly without centrifugation. After being solidified in an ice-bath, the upper layer (n-hexadecane) was transferred into an Eppendorf tube and analyzed by GC-MS after melted at room temperature. Factors affecting extraction efficiency such as the type and volume of extractant, dispersive agent and demulsifier, also ionic strength and pH value of extraction system were studied. Under the optimized conditions, the working curve of the proposed method provided a good linearity in the range of 0.025-2.00 microg/L (r = 0.999 5-0.999 9). The detection limits of the organochlorine pesticides calculated by Hubaux-Vos method were 0.012-0.024 microg/L and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 3.15% to 4.53%. The enrichment factors (EF) were 96-101. When the method was applied to the determination of farmland water, the average spiked recoveries were 96.77%-102.93% with the relative standard deviations of 2.68%-4.86%. The proposed method is sensitive and fast. It also has the advantage of little organic solvent consumption so that it is friendly to environment and suitable for batch analysis of organochlorine pesticides in aqueous samples. Meanwhile, it provides technical and methodological support for achieving the automation of sample pretreatment. PMID:24558843

  3. Large Eddy Simulation of jets laden with evaporating drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboissetier, A.; Okong'o, N.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    LES of a circular jet laden with evaporating liquid drops are conducted to assess computational-drop modeling and three different SGS-flux models: the Scale Similarity model (SSC), using a constant coefficient calibrated on a temporal mixing layer DNS database, and dynamic-coefficient Gradient and Smagorinsky models.

  4. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  5. Delayed Frost Growth on Jumping-Drop Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Boreyko, Jonathan B; Collier, Pat

    2013-01-01

    Self-propelled jumping drops are continuously removed from a condensing superhydrophobic surface to enable a micrometric steady-state drop size. Here, we report that subcooled condensate on a chilled superhydrophobic surface are able to repeatedly jump off the surface before heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs. Frost still forms on the superhydrophobic surface due to ice nucleation at neighboring edge defects, which eventually spreads over the entire surface via an inter-drop frost wave. The growth of this inter-drop frost front is shown to be up to three times slower on the superhydrophobic surface compared to a control hydrophobic surface, due to the jumping-drop effect dynamically minimizing the average drop size and surface coverage of the condensate. A simple scaling model is developed to relate the success and speed of inter-drop ice bridging to the drop size distribution. While other reports of condensation frosting on superhydrophobic surfaces have focused exclusively on liquid-solid ice nucleation for isolated drops, these findings reveal that the growth of frost is an inter-drop phenomenon that is strongly coupled to the wettability and drop size distribution of the surface. A jumping-drop superhydrophobic condenser was found to be superior to a conventional dropwise condenser in two respects: preventing heterogeneous ice nucleation by continuously removing subcooled condensate, and delaying frost growth by minimizing the success of interdrop ice bridge formation.

  6. Understanding the Early Regime of Drop Spreading.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Surjyasish; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2016-09-01

    We present experimental data to characterize the spreading of a liquid drop on a substrate kept submerged in another liquid medium. They reveal that drop spreading always begins in a regime dominated by drop viscosity where the spreading radius scales as r ∼ t with a nonuniversal prefactor. This initial viscous regime either lasts in its entirety or switches to an intermediate inertial regime where the spreading radius grows with time following the well-established inertial scaling of r ∼ t(1/2). This latter case depends on the characteristic viscous length scale of the problem. In either case, the final stage of spreading, close to equilibrium, follows Tanner's law. Further experiments performed on the same substrate kept in ambient air reveal a similar trend, albeit with limited spatiotemporal resolution, showing the universal nature of the spreading behavior. It is also found that, for early times of spreading, the process is similar to coalescence of two freely suspended liquid drops, making the presence of the substrate and consequently the three-phase contact line insignificant. PMID:27513708

  7. A growing-drop technique for measuring dynamic interfacial tension

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, C.A.; Radke, C.J.

    1993-10-01

    A novel, growing-drop technique is described for measuring dynamic interfacial tension due to sorption of surface-active solutes. The proposed method relates the instantaneous pressure and size of expanding liquid drops to interfacial tension and is useful for measuring both liquid/gas and liquid/liquid tensions over a wide range of time scales, currently from 10 ms to several hours. Growing-drop measurements on surfactant-free water/air and water/octanol interfaces yield constant tensions equal to their known literature values. For surfactant-laden, liquid drops, the growing-drop technique captures the actual transient tension evolution of a single interface, rather than interval times as with the classic maximum-drop-pressure and drop.-volume tension measurements. Dynamic tensions measured for 0.25 mM aqueous 1-decanol solution/air and 0.02 kg/m{sup 3} aqueous Triton X-100 solution/dodecane interfaces show nonmonotonic behavior, indicating slow surfactant transport relative to the imposed rates of interfacial dilatation. The dynamic tension of a purified and fresh 6 mM aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution/air interface shows only a monotonic decrease, indicating rapid surfactant transport relative to the imposed rates of dilatation. ConverselY, an aged SDS solution, naturally containing trace dodecanol impurities, exhibits dynamic tensions which reflect a superposition of the rapidly equilibrating SDS and the slowly adsorbing dodecanol.

  8. Blazed vector grating liquid crystal cells with photocrosslinkable polymeric alignment films fabricated by one-step polarizer rotation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Kotaro; Kuzuwata, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Noda, Kohei; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Blazed vector grating liquid crystal (LC) cells, in which the directors of low-molar-mass LCs are antisymmetrically distributed, were fabricated by one-step exposure of an empty glass cell inner-coated with a photocrosslinkable polymer LC (PCLC) to UV light. By adopting a LC cell structure, twisted nematic (TN) and homogeneous (HOMO) alignments were obtained in the blazed vector grating LC cells. Moreover, the diffraction efficiency of the blazed vector grating LC cells was greatly improved by increasing the thickness of the device in comparison with that of a blazed vector grating with a thin film structure obtained in our previous study. In addition, the diffraction efficiency and polarization states of ±1st-order diffracted beams from the resultant blazed vector grating LC cells were controlled by designing a blazed pattern in the alignment films, and these diffraction properties were well explained on the basis of Jones calculus and the elastic continuum theory of nematic LCs.

  9. Electrochemistry in an acoustically levitated drop.

    PubMed

    Chainani, Edward T; Ngo, Khanh T; Scheeline, Alexander

    2013-02-19

    Levitated drops show potential as microreactors, especially when radicals are present as reactants or products. Solid/liquid interfaces are absent or minimized, avoiding adsorption and interfacial reaction of conventional microfluidics. We report amperometric detection in an acoustically levitated drop with simultaneous ballistic addition of reactant. A gold microelectrode sensor was fabricated with a lithographic process; active electrode area was defined by a photosensitive polyimide mask. The microdisk gold working electrode of radius 19 μm was characterized using ferrocenemethanol in aqueous buffer. Using cyclic voltammetry, the electrochemically active surface area was estimated by combining a recessed microdisk electrode model with the Randles-Sevcik equation. Computer-controlled ballistic introduction of reactant droplets into the levitated drop was developed. Chronoamperometric measurements of ferrocyanide added ballistically demonstrate electrochemical monitoring using the microfabricated electrode in a levitated drop. Although concentration increases with time due to drop evaporation, the extent of concentration is predictable with a linear evaporation model. Comparison of diffusion-limited currents in pendant and levitated drops show that convection arising from acoustic levitation causes an enhancement of diffusion-limited current on the order of 16%. PMID:23351154

  10. Computational analysis of DOD drop formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi; Basaran, Osman

    2007-11-01

    A fundamental theoretical understanding of drop-on-demand (DOD) ink jet printing remains weak despite the widespread use of the method in practical applications for two decades. To overcome this deficiency, a computational analysis is carried out to simulate the formation of liquid drops of incompressible Newtonian fluids from a nozzle by imposing a transient flow rate upstream of the nozzle exit. The dynamics are studied as functions of the Ohnesorge number Oh (viscous/surface tension force) and the Weber number We (inertial/surface tension force). For a common ink forming from a nozzle of 10 micrometer radius, Oh=0.1. For this typical case, a phase or operability diagram is developed that shows that three regimes of operation are possible. In the first regime, where We is low, breakup does not occur, and drops remain pendant from the nozzle and undergo time periodic oscillations. Thus, the simulations show that sufficient fluid inertia, or a sufficiently large We, is required if a DOD drop is to form, in accord with intuition. At high We, two regimes exist. In the first of these two regimes, DOD drops do form but have negative velocities, i.e. they would move toward the nozzle upon breakup, which is undesirable. In the second breakup regime, not only are DOD drops formed but they do so with positive velocities.

  11. Dielectrophoresis of a surfactant-laden viscous drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-06-01

    The dielectrophoresis of a surfactant-laden viscous drop in the presence of non-uniform DC electric field is investigated analytically and numerically. Considering the presence of bulk-insoluble surfactants at the drop interface, we first perform asymptotic solution for both low and high surface Péclet numbers, where the surface Péclet number signifies the strength of surface convection of surfactants as compared to the diffusion at the drop interface. Neglecting fluid inertia and interfacial charge convection effects, we obtain explicit expression for dielectrophoretic drop velocity for low and high Péclet numbers by assuming small deviation of drop shape from sphericity and small deviation of surfactant concentration from the equilibrium uniform distribution. We then depict a numerical solution, assuming spherical drop, for arbitrary values of Péclet number. Our analyses demonstrate that the asymptotic solution shows excellent agreement with the numerical solution in the limiting conditions of low and high Péclet numbers. The present analysis shows that the flow-induced redistribution of the surfactants at the drop interface generates Marangoni stress, owing to the influence of the surfactant distribution on the local interfacial tension, at the drop interface and significantly alters the drop velocity at steady state. For a perfectly conducting/dielectric drop suspended in perfectly dielectric medium, Marangoni stress always retards the dielectrophoretic velocity of the drop as compared with a surfactant-free drop. For a leaky dielectric drop suspended in another leaky dielectric medium, in the low Péclet number limit, depending on the electrical conductivity and permittivity of both the liquids, the Marangoni stress may aid or retard the dielectrophoretic velocity of the drop. The Marangoni stress also has the ability to move the drop in the opposite direction as compared with a surfactant-free drop. This non-intuitive reverse motion of the drop is

  12. Drying drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin; Loquet, Boris; Sampol, José.

    2010-11-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood is fascinating by the complexity of the physical mechanisms that occur as well as the beauty of the phenomenon which has never been previously evidenced in the literature. The final stage of full blood evaporation reveals for a healthy person the same regular pattern with a good reproducibility. Other tests on anemia and hyperlipidemic persons were performed and presented different patterns. By means of digital camera, the influence of the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) which represent about 50% of the blood volume, is revealed as well as its consequences on the final stages of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid and solid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of hematology. Our group is the first to evidence that the specific regular patterns characteristic of a healthy individual do not appear in a dried drop of blood from a person with blood disease. Blood is a complex colloidal suspension for which the flow motion is clearly non-Newtonian. When drops of blood evaporate, all the colloids are carried by the flow motion inside the drop and interact.

  13. Nanofluid Drop Evaporation: Experiment, Theory, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, William James

    Nanofluids, stable colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in a base fluid, have potential applications in the heat transfer, combustion and propulsion, manufacturing, and medical fields. Experiments were conducted to determine the evaporation rate of room temperature, millimeter-sized pendant drops of ethanol laden with varying amounts (0-3% by weight) of 40-60 nm aluminum nanoparticles (nAl). Time-resolved high-resolution drop images were collected for the determination of early-time evaporation rate (D2/D 02 > 0.75), shown to exhibit D-square law behavior, and surface tension. Results show an asymptotic decrease in pendant drop evaporation rate with increasing nAl loading. The evaporation rate decreases by approximately 15% at around 1% to 3% nAl loading relative to the evaporation rate of pure ethanol. Surface tension was observed to be unaffected by nAl loading up to 3% by weight. A model was developed to describe the evaporation of the nanofluid pendant drops based on D-square law analysis for the gas domain and a description of the reduction in liquid fraction available for evaporation due to nanoparticle agglomerate packing near the evaporating drop surface. Model predictions are in relatively good agreement with experiment, within a few percent of measured nanofluid pendant drop evaporation rate. The evaporation of pinned nanofluid sessile drops was also considered via modeling. It was found that the same mechanism for nanofluid evaporation rate reduction used to explain pendant drops could be used for sessile drops. That mechanism is a reduction in evaporation rate due to a reduction in available ethanol for evaporation at the drop surface caused by the packing of nanoparticle agglomerates near the drop surface. Comparisons of the present modeling predictions with sessile drop evaporation rate measurements reported for nAl/ethanol nanofluids by Sefiane and Bennacer [11] are in fairly good agreement. Portions of this abstract previously appeared as: W. J

  14. Headspace-single drop microextraction (HS-SDME) in combination with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to evaluate the content of alkyl- and methoxy-phenolic compounds in biomass smoke.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Arturo A; Pino, Verónica; Ayala, Juan H; Afonso, Ana M

    2011-09-15

    The content of ten phenolic compounds present in four different biomass smoke materials: rock rose (Cistus monpelienisis), prickly pear (Opuntia ficus indica), pine needles (Pinus canariensis), and almonds skin (Prunus dulcis), have been evaluated. The sampling method mainly consisted of a trap alkaline solution to solubilize the phenols, and was optimized by an experimental design. Average sampling efficiencies of 78.1% and an average precision value of 10.6% (as relative standard deviation, RSD), were obtained for the selected group of phenols. The trapped phenolates were further analyzed by a headspace-single drop microextraction (HS-SDME) procedure, in combination with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection. The optimum variables for the HS-SDME method were: 1-decanol as extractant solvent, 3.5 μL of microdrop volume, 2 mL of sample volume, a pH value of 2, saturation of NaCl, an extraction temperature of 60°C, and an extraction time of 25 min. The optimized HS-SDME method presented detection limits ranging from 0.35 to 5.8 μg mL(-1), RSD values ranging from 0.7 to 7.4%, and an average relative recovery (RR) of 99.8% and an average standard deviation of 5.2. The average content of phenolic compounds in the biomass materials studied were 70, 161, 206 and 252 mg kg(-1) of biomass for prickly pear, almonds skin, rock rose, and pine needles, respectively. The main components of the smokes were vanillin, phenol and methoxyphenols, in all smoking materials studied.

  15. How do drops evaporate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murisic, Nebojsa; Kondic, Lou

    2007-11-01

    The problem of evaporating drops with non-pinned contact line, although seemingly trivial, so far lacks satisfactory theoretical description. In particular, there has been much discussion regarding appropriate evaporative mass flux model. We make an attempt to resolve this issue by comparing our experimental data with the results of several mathematical models for evaporating drops. After describing experimental procedure, we propose several models for mass flux and develop a governing equation for evolution of drop's thickness. Two-dimensional numerical results are then compared to the experimental results, and the most appropriate mass flux model is identified. Finally, we propose the governing equation for the full 3D system and present some new numerical results related to curious phenomena, where so-called ``octopus-shaped'' instabilities appear ahead of the contact line of volatile dropsootnotetextY. Gotkis, I. Ivanov, N. Murisic, L. Kondic, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 186101 (2006)..

  16. Small drops from large nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Said Mohamed, Ahmed; Castrejon-Pita, Jose Rafael; Herrada, Miguel Angel

    2015-11-01

    We report experimental and numerical results of the generation of drops which are significantly smaller than the nozzle from which they are generated. The system consists of a cylindrical reservoir and two endplates. One plate is a thin metal sheet with a small orifice in its centre which acts as the nozzle. The other end consists of a piston which moves by the action of an elecromechanical actuator which in turn is driven by sine-shape pull-mode pulses. The meniscus (formed at the nozzle) is thus first overturned, forming a cavity. This cavity collapses and a thin and fast jet emerges from its centre. Under appropriate conditions the tip of this jet breaks up and produces a single diminutive drop. A good agreement between the experimental and numerical results was found. Also, a series of experiments were performed in order to study the effects that the pulse amplitude and width, together with variations in the liquid properties, have over the final size of the droplet. Based on these experiments, a predictive law for the droplet size has been derived. This work was funded by the Royal Society (University Research Fellowship and Research Grant), the John Fell Fund (Oxford University Press), the Ministry of Science and Education (DPI2013-46485 Spain), and the Junta de Andalucia (P08-TEP-31704128 Spain).

  17. Dynamics of Aqueous Foam Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akhatov, Iskander; McDaniel, J. Gregory; Holt, R. Glynn

    2001-01-01

    We develop a model for the nonlinear oscillations of spherical drops composed of aqueous foam. Beginning with a simple mixture law, and utilizing a mass-conserving bubble-in-cell scheme, we obtain a Rayleigh-Plesset-like equation for the dynamics of bubbles in a foam mixture. The dispersion relation for sound waves in a bubbly liquid is then coupled with a normal modes expansion to derive expressions for the frequencies of eigenmodal oscillations. These eigenmodal (breathing plus higher-order shape modes) frequencies are elicited as a function of the void fraction of the foam. A Mathieu-like equation is obtained for the dynamics of the higher-order shape modes and their parametric coupling to the breathing mode. The proposed model is used to explain recently obtained experimental data.

  18. Drum drop test report

    SciTech Connect

    McBeath, R.S.

    1995-02-28

    Testing was performed to determine actual damage to drums when dropped from higher than currently stacked elevations. The drum configurations were the same as they are placed in storage; single drums and four drums banded to a pallet. Maximum drop weights were selected based on successful preliminary tests. Material was lost from each of the single drum tests while only a small amount of material was lost from one of the pelletized drums. The test results are presented in this report. This report also provides recommendations for further testing to determine the appropriate drum weight which can be stored on a fourth tier.

  19. Drop by Drop, Liter by Liter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Scope, 2004

    2004-01-01

    It can be found as a solid, liquid, or gas. It is cohesive, colorless, tasteless, odorless, and has a pH of 7. These are some of the properties of pure water. Life without water would be unimaginable. Water is one of the most important substances for organisms on Earth. It is so important as a means of sustaining life that its existence is one of…

  20. Theoretical Exploration of Barrel-Shaped Drops on Cactus Spines.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    To survive an arid environment, desert cacti are capable of harvesting water from fog by transporting condensed water drops using their spines. Cactus spines have a conical shape. In this work, on the basis of the difference of liquid pressure, a new theoretical model has been developed for a barrel-shaped liquid drop on a conical wire. This model is further simplified to interpret the effects of contact angles, conical angle, surface microgrooves, and gravity on the drop movement along a cactus spine.

  1. Theoretical Exploration of Barrel-Shaped Drops on Cactus Spines.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    To survive an arid environment, desert cacti are capable of harvesting water from fog by transporting condensed water drops using their spines. Cactus spines have a conical shape. In this work, on the basis of the difference of liquid pressure, a new theoretical model has been developed for a barrel-shaped liquid drop on a conical wire. This model is further simplified to interpret the effects of contact angles, conical angle, surface microgrooves, and gravity on the drop movement along a cactus spine. PMID:26473466

  2. Studies of the Stability and Dynamics of Levitated Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anikumar, A.; Lee, Chun Ping; Wang, T. G.

    1996-01-01

    This is a review of our experimental and theoretical studies relating to equilibrium and stability of liquid drops, typically of low viscosity, levitated in air by a sound field. The major emphasis here is on the physical principles and understanding behind the stability of levitated drops. A comparison with experimental data is also given, along with some fascinating pictures from high-speed photography. One of the aspects we shall deal with is how a drop can suddenly burst in an intense sound field; a phenomenon which can find applications in atomization technology. Also, we are currently investigating the phenomenon of suppression of coalescence between drops levitated in intense acoustic fields.

  3. Drop interaction with the ejecta sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoraval, M.-J.; Thoroddsen, S. T.; Takehara, K.; Etoh, T. G.; Ray, P.; Josserand, C.; Zaleski, S.

    2011-11-01

    We studied experimentally and numerically the dynamics of the ejecta sheet produced by a drop impacting on a deep pool of the same liquid at high Reynolds and Weber numbers. Ultra-high speed imaging revealed a diversity of evolutions by using different mixtures of water and glycerine, and different impact velocities. We observed a transition from a smooth ejecta sheet to a more irregular splashing for a Reynolds number of 3500. In this transition regime, the ejecta sheet interacts with the impacting drop. This interaction can pull the ejecta sheet towards the centre of the drop at lower splash parameters, or generate a bumping on the ejecta sheet moving outwards at higher splash parameters. The volume of fluid (VOF) code Gerris was used to reproduce numerically this peculiar dynamics in axisymmetric conditions. Very good agreement with the experiments was reached by using adaptive refinement and parallelization of the calculations.

  4. The origin of star-shaped oscillations of Leidenfrost drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Burton, Justin C.

    We experimentally investigate the oscillations of Leidenfrost drops of water, liquid nitrogen, ethanol, methanol, acetone and isopropyl alcohol. The drops levitate on a cushion of evaporated vapor over a hot, curved surface which keeps the drops stationary. We observe star-shaped modes along the periphery of the drop, with mode numbers n = 2 to 13. The number of observed modes is sensitive to the properties of the liquid. The pressure oscillation frequency in the vapor layer under the drop is approximately twice that of the drop frequency, which is consistent with a parametric forcing mechanism. However, the Rayleigh and thermal Marangoni numbers are of order 10,000, indicating that convection should play a dominating role as well. Surprisingly, we find that the wavelength and frequency of the oscillations only depend on the thickness of the liquid, which is twice the capillary length, and do not depend on the mode number, substrate temperature, or the substrate curvature. This robust behavior suggests that the wavelength for the oscillations is set by thermal convection inside the drop, and is less dependent on the flow in the vapor layer under the drop

  5. Drops in Space: Super Oscillations and Surfactant Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apfel, Robert E.; Tian, Yuren; Jankovsky, Joseph; Shi, Tao; Chen, X.; Holt, R. Glynn; Trinh, Eugene; Croonquist, Arvid; Thornton, Kathyrn C.; Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Coleman, Catherine; Leslie, Fred W.; Matthiesen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    An unprecedented microgravity observation of maximal shape oscillations of a surfactant-bearing water drop the size of a ping pong ball was observed during a mission of Space Shuttle Columbia as part of the second United States Microgravity Laboratory-USML-2 (STS-73, October 20-November 5, 1995). The observation was precipitated by the action of an intense sound field which produced a deforming force on the drop. When this deforming force was suddenly reduced, the drop executed nearly free and axisymmetric oscillations for several cycles, demonstrating a remarkable amplitude of nonlinear motion. Whether arising from the discussion of modes of oscillation of the atomic nucleus, or the explosion of stars, or how rain forms, the complex processes influencing the motion, fission, and coalescence of drops have fascinated scientists for centuries. Therefore, the axisymmetric oscillations of a maximally deformed liquid drop are noteworthy, not only for their scientific value but also for their aesthetic character. Scientists from Yale University, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Vanderbilt University conducted liquid drop experiments in microgravity using the acoustic positioning/manipulation environment of the Drop Physics Module (DPM). The Yale/JPL group's objectives were to study the rheological properties of liquid drop surfaces on which are adsorbed surfactant molecules, and to infer surface properties such as surface tension, Gibb's elasticity, and surface dilatational viscosity by using a theory which relies on spherical symmetry to solve the momentum and mass transport equations.

  6. Capillary-inertial colloidal catapults upon drop coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Roger L.; Liu, Fangjie; Feng, James J.; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Surface energy released upon drop coalescence is known to power the self-propelled jumping of liquid droplets on superhydrophobic solid surfaces, and the jumping droplets can additionally carry colloidal payloads toward self-cleaning. Here, we show that drop coalescence on a spherical particle leads to self-propelled launching of the particle from virtually any solid surface. The main prerequisite is an intermediate wettability of the particle, such that the momentum from the capillary-inertial drop coalescence process can be transferred to the particle. By momentum conservation, the launching velocity of the particle-drop complex is proportional to the capillary-inertial velocity based on the drop radius and to the fraction of the liquid mass in the total mass. The capillary-inertial catapult is not only an alternative mechanism for removing colloidal contaminants, but also a useful model system for studying ballistospore launching.

  7. Macroscopic biaxiality and electric-field-induced rotation of the minor director in the nematic phase of a bent-core liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Mamatha; Merkel, K.; Vij, J. K.; Kocot, A.

    2010-09-01

    Biaxiality in the nematic phase has been investigated for the bent-core liquid-crystal para-heptylbenzoate diester, using polarised IR spectroscopy. Anisotropic fluctuations of the nematic director are discussed in terms of the self-assembly of the chiral conformers. The ordering of the minor director for the homeotropicaly aligned sample is found to depend on the rubbing of the substrates of the cell and the amplitude of in-plane electric field. On increasing the in-plane electric field, the rotation of the minor director in the plane of the substrate is observed with an angle of approximately 45°, where initially the minor director is shown to lie along the rubbing direction. It is also shown that on the average the long axis of the molecules is normal to the substrate with surface treatment, with and without rubbing. The electric in-plane field combined with rubbing is shown to induce biaxial order in the nematic phase of a material with negative dielectic anisotropy for the first time.

  8. Microemulsions with surfactant TX100, cyclohexane, and an ionic liquid investigated by conductance, DLS, FTIR measurements, and study of solvent and rotational relaxation within this microemulsion.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Rajib; Sarkar, Souravi; Ghatak, Chiranjib; Rao, Vishal Govind; Setua, Palash; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2010-06-10

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), N,N,N-trimethyl-N-propyl ammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide ([N(3111)][Tf(2)N]), were substituted for polar water and formed nonaqueous microemulsions with cyclohexane by the aid of nonionic surfactant TX-100. The phase behavior of the ternary system was investigated, and microregions of [N(3111)][Tf(2)N]-in-cyclohexane (IL/O), bicontinuous, and cyclohexane-in-[N(3111)][Tf(2)N] (O/IL) were identified by traditional electrical conductivity measurements. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed the formation of the IL microemulsions. The FTIR study of O-H stretching band of TX100 also supports this finding. The dynamics of solvent and rotational relaxation have been investigated in [N(3111)][Tf(2)N]/TX100/cyclohexane microemulsions using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool and coumarin 480 (C-480) as a fluorescence probe. The size of the microemulsions increases with gradual addition of [N(3111)][Tf(2)N], which revealed from DLS measurement. This leads to the faster collective motions of cation and anions of [N(3111)][Tf(2)N], which contributes to faster solvent relaxation in microemulsions. PMID:20469906

  9. Sliding viscoelastic drops on slippery surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Clarke, A.; Rothstein, J. P.; Poole, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We study the sliding of drops of constant-viscosity dilute elastic liquids (Boger fluids) on various surfaces caused by sudden surface inclination. For smooth or roughened hydrophilic surfaces, such as glass or acrylic, there is essentially no difference between these elastic liquids and a Newtonian comparator fluid (with identical shear viscosity, surface tension, and static contact angle). In contrast for embossed polytetrafluoroethylene superhydrophobic surfaces, profound differences are observed: the elastic drops slide at a significantly reduced rate and complex branch-like patterns are left on the surface by the drop's wake including, on various scales, beads-on-a-string like phenomena. Microscopy images indicate that the strong viscoelastic effect is caused by stretching filaments of fluid from isolated islands, residing at pinning sites on the surface pillars, of the order ˜30 μm in size. On this scale, the local strain rates are sufficient to extend the polymer chains, locally increasing the extensional viscosity of the solution, retarding the drop and leaving behind striking branch-like structures on much larger scales.

  10. Initial drop size and velocity distributions for airblast coaxial atomizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eroglu, H.; Chigier, N.

    1991-01-01

    Phase Doppler measurements were used to determine initial drop size and velocity distributions after a complete disintegration of coaxial liquid jets. The Sauter mean diameter (SMD) distribution was found to be strongly affected by the structure and behavior of the preceding liquid intact jet. The axial measurement stations were determined from the photographs of the coaxial liquid jet at very short distances (1-2 mm) downstream of the observed break-up locations. Minimum droplet mean velocities were found at the center, and maximum velocities were near the spray boundary. Size-velocity correlations show that the velocity of larger drops did not change with drop size. Drop rms velocity distributions have double peaks whose radial positions coincide with the maximum mean velocity gradients.

  11. Sheathless hydrodynamic positioning of buoyant drops and bubbles inside microchannels.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Guglielmini, Laura; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Caviezel, Daniel; Stone, Howard A; Whitesides, George M

    2011-09-01

    Particles, bubbles, and drops carried by a fluid in a confined environment such as a pipe can be subjected to hydrodynamic lift forces, i.e., forces that are perpendicular to the direction of the flow. We investigated the positioning effect of lift forces acting on buoyant drops and bubbles suspended in a carrier fluid and flowing in a horizontal microchannel. We report experiments on drops of water in fluorocarbon liquid, and on bubbles of nitrogen in hydrocarbon liquid and silicone oil, inside microchannels with widths on the order of 0.1-1 mm. Despite their buoyancy, drops and bubbles could travel without contacting with the walls of channels; the most important parameters for reaching this flow regime in our experiments were the viscosity and the velocity of the carrier fluid, and the sizes of drops and bubbles. The dependencies of the transverse position of drops and bubbles on these parameters were investigated. At steady state, the trajectories of drops and bubbles approached the center of the channel for drops and bubbles almost as large as the channel, carried by rapidly flowing viscous liquids; among our experiments, these flow conditions were characterized by larger capillary numbers and smaller Reynolds numbers. Analytical models of lift forces developed for the flow of drops much smaller than the width of the channel failed to predict their transverse position, while computational fluid dynamic simulations of the experiments agreed better with the experimental measurements. The degrees of success of these predictions indicate the importance of confinement on generating strong hydrodynamic lift forces. We conclude that, inside microfluidic channels, it is possible to support and position buoyant drops and bubbles simply by flowing a single-stream (i.e., "sheathless") carrier liquid that has appropriate velocity and hydrodynamic properties.

  12. Control of Drop Motion by Mechanical Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestehorn, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Since the first experimental observations of Michael Faraday in 1831 it is known that a vibrating liquid may show an instability of its flat free surface with respect to oscillating regular surface patterns. We study thin liquid films on a horizontal substrate in the long wave approximation. The films are parametrically excited by mechanical horizontal or inclined oscillations. Inertia effects are taken into account and the standard thin film formulation is extended by a second equation for the vertically averaged mass flux. The films can be additionally unstable by Van der Waals forces on a partially wetting substrate, leading to the formation of drops. These drops can be manipulated by the vibrations to move in a desired direction. Linear results based on a damped complex valued Mathieu equation as well as fully nonlinear results using a reduced model will be presented, for more details see.

  13. Drops with non-circular footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravazzoli, Pablo D.; González, Alejandro G.; Diez, Javier A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study the morphology of drops formed on partially wetting substrates, whose footprint is not circular. These drops are consequence of the breakup processes occurring in thin films when anisotropic contact line motions take place. The anisotropy is basically due to the hysteresis of the contact angle since there is a wetting process in some parts of the contact line, while a dewetting occurs in other parts. Here, we obtain a characteristic drop shape from the rupture of a long liquid filament sitting on a solid substrate. We analyze its shape and contact angles by means of goniometric and refractive techniques. We also find a non-trivial steady state solution for the drop shape within the long wave approximation (lubrication theory), and we compare most of its features with experimental data. This solution is presented both in Cartesian and polar coordinates, whose constants must be determined by a certain group of measured parameters. Besides, we obtain the dynamics of the drop generation from numerical simulations of the full Navier-Stokes equation, where we emulate the hysteretic effects with an appropriate spatial distribution of the static contact angle over the substrate.

  14. Weight Drop Models in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Brian T; Whalen, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Weight drop models in rodents have been used for several decades to advance our understanding of the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury. Weight drop models have been used to replicate focal cerebral contusion as well as diffuse brain injury characterized by axonal damage. More recently, closed head injury models with free head rotation have been developed to model sports concussions, which feature functional disturbances in the absence of overt brain damage assessed by conventional imaging techniques. Here, we describe the history of development of closed head injury models in the first part of the chapter. In the second part, we describe the development of our own weight drop closed head injury model that features impact plus rapid downward head rotation, no structural brain injury, and long-term cognitive deficits in the case of multiple injuries. This rodent model was developed to reproduce key aspects of sports concussion so that a mechanistic understanding of how long-term cognitive deficits might develop will eventually follow. Such knowledge is hoped to impact athletes and war fighters and others who suffer concussive head injuries by leading to targeted therapies aimed at preventing cognitive and other neurological sequelae in these high-risk groups. PMID:27604720

  15. Numerical Simulations of Drop Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobari, M. R. H.; Tryggvason, G.

    1994-01-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of the off-axis collisions of two drops are presented. The full Navier-Stokes equations are solved by a Front-Tracking/Finite-Difference method that allows a fully deformable fluid interface and the inclusion of surface tension. The drops are accelerated towards each other by a body force that is turned off before the drops collide. Depending on whether the interface between the drops is ruptured or not, the drops either bounce or coalesce. For drops that coalesce, the impact parameter, which measures how far the drops are off the symmetry line, determines the eventual outcome of the collision. For low impact parameters, the drops coalesce permanently, but for higher impact parameters, a grazing collision, where the drops coalesce and then stretch apart again is observed. The results are in agreement with experimental observations.

  16. Drop tube technical tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Criteria, using fundamental thermochemical dynamics, were developed to assist a scientist using the Drop Tube Facility in designing a good experiment. The types of parameters involved in designing the experiments include the type of furnace, the type of atmosphere, and in general which materials are better behaved than others as determined by past experience in the facility. One of the major advantages of the facility lies in its ability to provide large undercoolings in the cooling curve during the drops. A beginning was to consider the effect of oxygen and other gases upon the amount of undercooling observed. The starting point of the thermochemistry was given by Ellingham and later transformed into what is known as the Richardson Chart. The effect of surface oxidations upon the nucleation phenomena can be observed in each specimen.

  17. Cusp formation in drops inside Taylor cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Alvaro G.; Loscertales, Ignacio G.; Barrero, Antonio

    2005-11-01

    Here, we report the formation of cusp in insulating drops inside compound Taylor cones. The action of the electrical shear stress acting on the outer interface, which is transmitted by viscous forces inside the Taylor cone, tends to deform the drop of insulating liquid placed inside. For appropriate values of the capillary number, the insulating drop develops a steady cusp angle which depends on both the capillary number and the conducting to insulating viscosity ratio. A self-similar analysis has been developed to qualitatively describe the flow inside these compounds Taylor cones. Any perturbation of the cusp gives rise to an intermittent emission of tiny droplets; this effect may recall the tip-streaming observed by G.I. Taylor in his four-roll mill device. This emission can be stabilized by an appropriate control of the injected flow rate of the insulating liquid. When the capillary number increases, the cusped interface turns into a spout which flows coated by the conducting liquid forming the electrified coaxial jet which has been successfully employed for the production of nanocapsules, coaxial nanofibers and nanotubes (Science 295, n. 5560, 1695, 2002; JACS 126, 5376, 2004).

  18. Encapsulating Ellipsoids in Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Michael; Brugarolas, Teresa; Chou, Jonathan; Bau, Haim; Lee, Daeyeon

    2012-11-01

    Large aspect ratio particles were produced by embedding spherical polystyrene particles within a polymer film and subsequently heating and stretching the film. Particles were released by dissolving the film. Using a flow-focusing device, the elongated particles were partially encapsulated within droplets of fluid A, such as water, surrounded by an immiscible fluid B, such as oil. Drop volumes were controlled by adjusting the flow rates of fluids A and B. The contact angle was adjusted indirectly by varying the amount of surfactant adsorbed to the particle surface. The encapsulation process was visualized with a high-speed video camera. We observed cases ranging from partial to complete encapsulation and examined experimentally and theoretically the shape of the interface between fluid A and fluid B as a function of the drop volume. The numerically predicted position of the pinning line and the shape of the drop were compared to experimentally produced conformations and agreed favorably. This work was supported by ITMAT (UL1RR024134 from the NCRR) and the Penn MRSEC (NSF DMR-1120901).

  19. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid-Driven Swirl Boiling Liquid/Gas Separator under Reduced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oinuma, Ryoji; Nguyen, Ngoc; Dickes, Neil; Kurwitz, Richard C.; Best, Frederick R.

    2009-03-01

    Under reduced gravity conditions, conventional gravity-assisted steam generators do not function properly and shear-driven or swirl type of devices must be used. Once-through boilers with special inserts such as twisted-tapes or swirl devices and rotating boilers have been previously studied. The once-through boiler requires a liquid-vapor phase separator due to the inability to vaporize all liquid completely to avoid burn-out. These devices also encounter instabilities due to the sudden formation or collapse of vapor. The rotating boiler requires a large power input to operate and has less reliability due to moving parts and dynamic seals at high temperature. A liquid-driven vortex boiling separator is categorized as a shear-driven boiler, but creates centripetal-driven buoyancy forces to form a gas-liquid vortex by injecting liquid tangentially along the inner wall of the cylinder rather than rotating the body itself. The vortex boiling separator eliminates the disadvantages of devices mentioned above, having a low pressure drop, no moving parts and generating dry vapor at its outlet. Texas A&M University carried out a reduced gravity flight experiment on the NASA C-9 aircraft to investigate the heat transfer characteristics and performance based on similar devices developed at Texas A&M.

  20. Acoustic rotation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Croonquist, A. P.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically controlled rotation of a levitated object, which avoids deformation of a levitated liquid object. Acoustic waves of the same wavelength are directed along perpendicular directions across the object, and with the relative phases of the acoustic waves repeatedly switched so that one wave alternately leads and lags the other by 90 deg. The amount of torque for rotating the object, and the direction of rotation, are controlled by controlling the proportion of time one wave leads the other and selecting which wave leads the other most of the time.

  1. Drop by drop scattering properties of a radar bin : a numerical experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the development and initial results of a numerical simulation of pseudo-radar observations computed as the sum of the electric field backscattered by each drop. Simulations are carried out for three successive radar bins with a gate length of 30 m and beam width of 1°. The first step is the simulation of a 100 m x 100 m x 100 m volume with all its drops. The 3D raindrop generator relies on the findings on the rainfall field very small scales (mm to few tens of m) spatio-temporal structure, of the HYDROP experiment and a recent analysis of 2D video disdrometer data in a Multifractal framework. More precisely: (i) The Liquid Water Content (LWC) distribution is represented with the help a multiplicative cascade down to 0.5 m, below which it is considered as homogeneous. (ii) Within each 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 m3 patch, liquid water is distributed into drops according to a pre-defined Drop Size Distribution (DSD) and located randomly uniformly. (iii) Such configuration is compared with the one consisting of the same drops uniformly distributed over the 50 x 50 x 50 m3 volume. Then the backscattered field by the drops located within a radar bin are computed as the sum a individual contribution. Antenna beam weighing is taken into account Due to the fact that the radar wave length is much smaller than the "patches" size for rainfall, it appears that as theoretically expected we retrieved an exponential distribution for potential measure horizontal reflectivity. A much lower dispersion is noticed for differential reflectivity. We show that a simple ballistic assumption for drop velocities does not enable to reproduce radar observations, and turbulence must be taken into account. Finally the sensitivity of these outputs to the various model parameters is quantified.

  2. Electrohydrodynamic deformation of drops and bubbles at large Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory

    2015-11-01

    In Taylor's theory of electrohydrodynamic drop deformation by a uniform electric field, inertia is neglected at the outset, resulting in fluid velocities that scale with E2, E being the applied-field magnitude. When considering strong fields and low viscosity fluids, the Reynolds number predicted by this scaling may actually become large, suggesting the need for a complementary large-Reynolds-number analysis. Balancing viscous and electrical stresses reveals that the velocity scales with E 4 / 3. Considering a gas bubble, the external flow is essentially confined to two boundary layers propagating from the poles to the equator, where they collide to form a radial jet. Remarkably, at leading order in the Capillary number the unique scaling allows through application of integral mass and momentum balances to obtain a closed-form expression for the O (E2) bubble deformation. Owing to a concentrated pressure load at the vicinity of the collision region, the deformed profile features an equatorial dimple which is non-smooth on the bubble scale. The dynamical importance of internal circulation in the case of a liquid drop leads to an essentially different deformation mechanism. This is because the external boundary layer velocity attenuates at a short distance from the interface, while the internal boundary-layer matches with a Prandtl-Batchelor (PB) rotational core. The dynamic pressure associated with the internal circulation dominates the interfacial stress profile, leading to an O (E 8 / 3) deformation. The leading-order deformation can be readily determined, up to the PB constant, without solving the circulating boundary-layer problem. To encourage attempts to verify this new scaling, we shall suggest a favourable experimental setup in which inertia is dominant, while finite-deformation, surface-charge advection, and gravity effects are negligible.

  3. Impact of water drops on small targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkov, A.; Prunet-Foch, B.; Vignes-Adler, M.

    2002-10-01

    The collision of water drops against small targets was studied experimentally by means of a high-speed photography technique. The drop impact velocity was about 3.5 m/s. Drop diameters were in the range of 2.8-4.0 mm. The target was a stainless steel disk of 3.9 mm diameter. The drop spread beyond the target like a central cap surrounded by a thin, slightly conical lamella bounded by a thicker rim. By mounting a small obstacle near the target, surface-tension driven Mach waves in the flowing lamella were generated, which are formally equivalent to the familiar compressibility driven Mach waves in gas dynamics. From the measurement of the Mach angle, the values of some flow parameters could be obtained as functions of time, which provided insight into the flow structure. The liquid flowed from the central cap to the liquid rim through the thin lamella at constant momentum flux. At a certain stage of the process, most of the liquid accumulated in the rim and the internal part of the lamella became metastable. In this situation, a rupture wave propagating through the metastable internal part of the lamella caused the rim to retract while forming outwardly directed secondary jets. The jets disintegrated into secondary droplets due to the Savart-Plateau-Rayleigh instability. Prior to the end of the retraction, an internal circular wave of rupture was formed. It originated at the target and then it propagated to meet the retracting rim. Their meeting resulted in a crown of tiny droplets. A theoretical analysis of the ejection process is proposed.

  4. Drop size distribution and air velocity measurements in air assist swirl atomizer sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, C.-P.; Oechsle, V.; Chigier, N.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed measurements of mean drop size (SMD) and size distribution parameters have been made using a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument in a series of sprays generated by an air assist swirl atomizer. Thirty-six different combinations of fuel and air mass flow rates were examined with liquid flow rates up to 14 lbm/hr and atomizing air flow rates up to 10 lbm/hr. Linear relationships were found between SMD and liquid to air mass flow rate ratios. SMD increased with distance downstream along the center line and also with radial distance from the axis. Increase in obscuration with distance downstream was due to an increase in number density of particles as the result of deceleration of drops and an increase in the exposed path length of the laser beam. Velocity components of the atomizing air flow field measured by a laser anemometer show swirling jet air flow fields with solid body rotation in the core and free vortex flow in the outer regions.

  5. Drop foot corrective device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deis, B. C. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A light weight, economical device to alleviate a plurality of difficulties encountered in walking by a victim suffering from a drop foot condition is discussed. A legband girdles the leg below the knee and above the calf providing an anchor point for the upper end of a ligament having its lower end attached to a toe of a shoe or a toe on the foot. The ligament is of such length that the foot is supported thereby and retained in a normal position during walking.

  6. Validation of an All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model: Heptane Fluid Drops in Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.; Bulzan, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Despite the fact that supercritical fluids occur both in nature and in industrial situations, the fundamentals of their behavior is poorly understood because supercritical fluids combine the characteristics of both liquids and gases, and therefore their behavior is not intuitive. There are several specific reasons for the lack of understanding: First, data from (mostly optical) measurements can be very misleading because regions of high density thus observed are frequently identified with liquids. A common misconception is that if in an experiment one can optically identify "drops" and "ligaments", the observed fluid must be in a liquid state. This inference is incorrect because in fact optical measurements detect any large change (i.e. gradients) in density. Thus, the density ratio may be well below Omicron(10(exp 3)) that characterizes its liquid/gas value, but the measurement will still identify a change in the index of refraction providing that the change is sudden (steep gradients). As shown by simulations of supercritical fluids, under certain conditions the density gradients may remain large during the supercritical binary fluids mixing, thus making them optically identifiable. Therefore, there is no inconsistency between the optical observation of high density regions and the fluids being in a supercritical state. A second misconception is that because a fluid has a liquid-like density, it is appropriate to model it as a liquid. However, such fluids may have liquid-like densities while their transport properties differ from those of a liquid. Considering that the critical pressure of most fuel hydrocarbons used in Diesel and gas turbine engines is in the range of 1.5 - 3 MPa, and the fact that the maximum pressure attained in these engines is about 6 Mps, it is clear that the fuel in the combustion chamber will experience both subcritical and supercritical conditions. Studies of drop behavior over a wide range of pressures were performed in the past

  7. Mechanically-Excited Sessile Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Bostwick, Joshua; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2010-11-01

    The volume and contact-line mobility of a sessile drop determine the frequency response of the drop to mechanical excitation. A useful signature of the drop is its response to a sweep of frequency. At particular frequencies the drop exhibits standing wave patterns of different mode numbers and/or azimuthal, spinning motion. We report observations of the spectrum of standing wave patterns and compare to predictions of a linear stability theory. On the side of application, the results suggest how to tune the pinning-unpinning of a sessile drop in order to maximize its translation.

  8. Static Drops on an Inclined Plane: Equilibrium Modeling and Numerical Analysis

    PubMed

    Iliev

    1997-10-15

    The continuum description of the equilibrium of small liquid drops located on a sloping plane is still discussed. The effect of drop holdup on the contact surface is modeled by describing the counteraction of a possible rolling liquid flow. This paper studies numerically the effect of the contact angle hysteresis, the critical slope angle at which the drop flows out. Copyright 1997 Academic Press. Copyright 1997Academic Press

  9. Substrate constraint modifies the Rayleigh spectrum of vibrating sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Bostwick, Joshua B.; Steen, Paul H.; Daniel, Susan

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we study the resonance behavior of mechanically oscillated, sessile water drops. By mechanically oscillating sessile drops vertically and within prescribed ranges of frequencies and amplitudes, a rich collection of resonance modes are observed and their dynamics subsequently investigated. We first present our method of identifying each mode uniquely, through association with spherical harmonics and according to their geometric patterns. Next, we compare our measured resonance frequencies of drops to theoretical predictions using both the classical theory of Lord Rayleigh and Lamb for free, oscillating drops, and a prediction by Bostwick and Steen that explicitly considers the effect of the solid substrate on drop dynamics. Finally, we report observations and analysis of drop mode mixing, or the simultaneous coexistence of multiple mode shapes within the resonating sessile drop driven by one sinusoidal signal of a single frequency. The dynamic response of a deformable liquid drop constrained by the substrate it is in contact with is of interest in a number of applications, such as drop atomization and ink jet printing, switchable electronically controlled capillary adhesion, optical microlens devices, as well as digital microfluidic applications where control of droplet motion is induced by means of a harmonically driven substrate.

  10. Substrate constraint modifies the Rayleigh spectrum of vibrating sessile drops.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Bostwick, Joshua B; Steen, Paul H; Daniel, Susan

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we study the resonance behavior of mechanically oscillated, sessile water drops. By mechanically oscillating sessile drops vertically and within prescribed ranges of frequencies and amplitudes, a rich collection of resonance modes are observed and their dynamics subsequently investigated. We first present our method of identifying each mode uniquely, through association with spherical harmonics and according to their geometric patterns. Next, we compare our measured resonance frequencies of drops to theoretical predictions using both the classical theory of Lord Rayleigh and Lamb for free, oscillating drops, and a prediction by Bostwick and Steen that explicitly considers the effect of the solid substrate on drop dynamics. Finally, we report observations and analysis of drop mode mixing, or the simultaneous coexistence of multiple mode shapes within the resonating sessile drop driven by one sinusoidal signal of a single frequency. The dynamic response of a deformable liquid drop constrained by the substrate it is in contact with is of interest in a number of applications, such as drop atomization and ink jet printing, switchable electronically controlled capillary adhesion, optical microlens devices, as well as digital microfluidic applications where control of droplet motion is induced by means of a harmonically driven substrate. PMID:24032932

  11. Sessile drop deformations under an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, James Q.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of steady axisymmetric deformations of a liquid sessile drop on a flat solid surface under an impinging gas jet is of interest for understanding the fundamental behavior of free surface flows as well as for establishing the theoretical basis in process design for the Aerosol direct-write technology. It is studied here numerically using a Galerkin finite-element method, by computing solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. For effective material deposition in Aerosol printing, the desired value of Reynolds number for the laminar gas jet is found to be greater than ~500. The sessile drop can be severely deformed by an impinging gas jet when the capillary number is approaching a critical value beyond which no steady axisymmetric free surface deformation can exist. Solution branches in a parameter space show turning points at the critical values of capillary number, which typically indicate the onset of free surface shape instability. By tracking solution branches around turning points with an arc-length continuation algorithm, critical values of capillary number can be accurately determined. Near turning points, all the free surface profiles in various parameter settings take a common shape with a dimple at the center and bulge near the contact line. An empirical formula for the critical capillary number for sessile drops with contact angle is derived for typical ranges of jet Reynolds number and relative drop sizes especially pertinent to Aerosol printing.

  12. Controlling charge on levitating drops.

    PubMed

    Hilger, Ryan T; Westphall, Michael S; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Levitation technologies are used in containerless processing of materials, as microscale manipulators and reactors, and in the study of single drops and particles. Presented here is a method for controlling the amount and polarity of charge on a levitating drop. The method uses single-axis acoustic levitation to trap and levitate a single, initially neutral drop with a diameter between 400 microm and 2 mm. This drop is then charged in a controllable manner using discrete packets of charge in the form of charged drops produced by a piezoelectric drop-on-demand dispenser equipped with a charging electrode. The magnitude of the charge on the dispensed drops can be adjusted by varying the voltage applied to the charging electrode. The polarity of the charge on the added drops can be changed allowing removal of charge from the trapped drop (by neutralization) and polarity reversal. The maximum amount of added charge is limited by repulsion of like charges between the drops in the trap. This charging scheme can aid in micromanipulation and the study of charged drops and particles using levitation. PMID:17580951

  13. Symmetry breaking in drop bouncing on curved surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yahua; Andrew, Matthew; Li, Jing; Yeomans, Julia M.; Wang, Zuankai

    2015-01-01

    The impact of liquid drops on solid surfaces is ubiquitous in nature, and of practical importance in many industrial processes. A drop hitting a flat surface retains a circular symmetry throughout the impact process. Here we show that a drop impinging on Echevaria leaves exhibits asymmetric bouncing dynamics with distinct spreading and retraction along two perpendicular directions. This is a direct consequence of the cylindrical leaves that have a convex/concave architecture of size comparable to the drop. Systematic experimental investigations on mimetic surfaces and lattice Boltzmann simulations reveal that this novel phenomenon results from an asymmetric momentum and mass distribution that allows for preferential fluid pumping around the drop rim. The asymmetry of the bouncing leads to ∼40% reduction in contact time. PMID:26602170

  14. Solidification Dynamics of Metal Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Brush, L. N.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of experimental observations were made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with the cooling of a molten drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Experimentally, silver drops (99.9%, 4-9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105m drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and argon atmospheres. By systematically varying the drops initial superheat the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approximately 4.6s of free fall time. Analysis reveals the relative importance of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  15. Solidification Dynamics of Silver Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Brush, Lucien N.

    1999-01-01

    Silver drops (99.9%, 4, 5, 7, and 9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105m drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and pure argon atmospheres. By systematically varying the initial superheat condition of the drop the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approximately 4.6s of free fall time. Comparison of the experimental observations is made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with cooling of the drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Analysis reveals the relative importance of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  16. Solidification Dynamics of Spherical Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Brush, Lucien N.

    2006-01-01

    Silver drops (99.9%, 4, 5, 7, and 9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105 meter drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and pure argon atmospheres. By varying a drop s initial superheat the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approx. 4.6s of free fall time. Comparison of the experimental observations is made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with cooling of the drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Analysis reveals the relative importance ,of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  17. Simulations of Coulombic Fission of Charged Inviscid Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, J. C.; Taborek, P.

    2011-04-01

    We present boundary-integral simulations of the evolution of critically charged droplets. For such droplets, small perturbations are unstable and eventually lead to the formation of a lemon-shaped drop with very sharp tips. For perfectly conducting drops, the tip forms a self-similar cone shape with a subtended angle identical to that of a Taylor cone, and quantities such as pressure and velocity diverge in time with power-law scaling. In contrast, when charge transport is described by a finite conductivity, we find that small progeny drops are formed at the tips, whose size decreases as the conductivity is increased. These small progeny drops are of nearly critical charge, and are precursors to the emission of a sustained flow of liquid from the tips as observed in experiments of isolated charged drops.

  18. Analysis of the reflection of a micro drop fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weimin; Liu, Qiang; Zhao, Lei; Li, Yingjuan; Yuan, Libo

    2005-01-01

    Micro drop fiber sensors are effective tools for measuring characters of liquids. These types of sensors are wildly used in biotechnology, beverage and food markets. For a fiber micro drop sensor, the signal of the output light is wavy with two peaks, normally. Carefully analyzing the wavy process can identify the liquid components. Understanding the reason of forming this wavy signal is important to design a suitable sensing head and to choose a suitable signal-processing method. The dripping process of a type of liquids is relative to the characters of the liquid and the shape of the sensing head. The quasi-Gauss model of the light field from the input-fiber end is used to analyse the distribution of the light field in the liquid drop. In addition, considering the characters of the liquid to be measured, the dripping process of the optical signal from the output-fiber end can be expected. The reflection surface of the micro drop varies as serials of spheres with different radiuses and global centers. The intensity of the reflection light changes with the shape of the surface. The varying process of the intensity relates to the tense, refractive index, transmission et al. To support the analyse above, an experimental system is established. In the system, LED is chosen as the light source and the PIN transform the light signal to the electrical signal, which is collected by a data acquisition card. An on-line testing system is made to check the theory discussed above.

  19. [The abdominal drop flap].

    PubMed

    Bodin, F; Liverneaux, P; Seigle-Murandi, F; Facca, S; Bruant-Rodier, C; Dissaux, C; Chaput, B

    2015-08-01

    The skin between the mastectomy scar and the future infra-mammary fold may be managed in different ways in delayed breast reconstruction using a DIEP (deep inferior epigastric perforator). Conserving this skin and positioning the flap skin paddle in the middle of the breast usually highlights skin color disparity because of two visible transition zones. Resection of the entire skin under the scar may be more aesthetic but limits direct closure possibility in case of flap failure. In order to benefit from both aesthetic result and safe surgical method, we propose the abdominal drop flap. The inferior thoracic skin flap is detached from the thoracic wall beyond the future infra-mammary fold, preserved and pushed under the breast.

  20. A boundary-integral model for drop deformation between two parallel plates with non-unit viscosity ratio drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, P. J. A.; Anderson, P. D.

    2008-10-01

    A boundary-integral method is presented for drop deformation between two parallel walls for non-unit viscosity ratio systems. To account for the effect of the walls the Green's functions are modified and all terms for the double-layer potential are derived. The full three-dimensional implementation is validated, and the model is shown to be accurate and consistent. The method is applied to study drop deformation in shear flow. An excellent match with small-deformation theory is found at low capillary numbers, and our results match with other BIM simulations for pressure-driven flows. For shear flow with moderate capillary numbers, we see that the behavior of a low-viscosity drop is similar to that of drop with a viscosity ratio of unity. High-viscosity drops, on the other hand, are prevented from rotating in shear flow, which results in a larger deformation, but less overshoot in the drop axes is observed. In contrast with unconfined flow, high-viscosity drops can be broken in shear flow between parallel plates; for low-viscosity drops the critical capillary number is higher in confined situations.