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Sample records for rotator cuff tears

  1. Rotator Cuff Tear Shape Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, David Steven; Kaplan, Daniel James; Fralinger, David; Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Meislin, Robert J.; Jazrawi, Laith M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Proper surgical planning requires accurate and reliable pre-operative patient information. The more comprehensive the data, the more the surgeon can tailor a general surgical technique to an individual patient’s unique anatomy. A previous retrospective study demonstrated that three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging more accurately characterized rotator cuff tears compared to two-dimensional images when checked against intra-operative pictures. The purpose of this study was to determine if three-dimensional MRI imaging would continue to be more accurate than two-dimensional imaging in a prospective study. Methods: Patients were prospectively included if they had a full-thickness primary rotator cuff tear on pre-operative MRI. Intra-op videos were taken from the posterior and lateral portals, with a grasper fully mobilizing the torn tendon in each view. 7 surgeons then reviewed the videos and independently characterized the shape of the tears into crescent, U-shaped tears, L-shaped tears, or massive tears. This was considered the gold-standard. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed the corresponding MRI studies independently and blind to the arthroscopic findings and characterized the shape on the basis of the tear’s retraction and size 2D MRI. The 3D reconstructions of each cuff tear were reviewed by each radiologist to characterize the shape. Statistical analysis included 95% confidence intervals and fleiss’s kappa. Results: 37 patients were enrolled in the study. Among the 7 surgeons, agreement on cuff tear was 93% ( =.87). The accuracy for differentiating between crescent-shaped, longitudinal, and massive tears using measurements on 2D MRI was 73.4% for reader 1 and 71.2% for reader 2. The accuracy for tear shape characterization into crescent and longitudinal U- or L-shaped using 3D MRI was 92% for reader 1 and 94% for reader 2. When further characterizing the longitudinal tears as massive or not using 3D MRI, both readers had an

  2. Ultrasound determination of rotator cuff tear repairability

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Andrew K; Lam, Patrick H; Walton, Judie R; Hackett, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff repair aims to reattach the torn tendon to the greater tuberosity footprint with suture anchors. The present study aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability and to assess which sonographic and pre-operative features are strongest in predicting repairability. Methods The study was a retrospective analysis of measurements made prospectively in a cohort of 373 patients who had ultrasounds of their shoulder and underwent rotator cuff repair. Measurements of rotator cuff tear size and muscle atrophy were made pre-operatively by ultrasound to enable prediction of rotator cuff repairability. Tears were classified following ultrasound as repairable or irreparable, and were correlated with intra-operative repairability. Results Ultrasound assessment of rotator cuff tear repairability has a sensitivity of 86% (p < 0.0001) and a specificity of 67% (p < 0.0001). The strongest predictors of rotator cuff repairability were tear size (p < 0.001) and age (p = 0.004). Sonographic assessments of tear size ≥4 cm2 or anteroposterior tear length ≥25 mm indicated an irreparable rotator cuff tear. Conclusions Ultrasound assessment is accurate in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability. Tear size or anteroposterior tear length and age were the best predictors of repairability. PMID:27582996

  3. Rotator Cuff Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors because of a rotator cuff problem. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your shoulder. This means ... or more of the rotator cuff tendons is torn, the tendon no longer fully attaches to the ...

  4. Partial Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Matthewson, Graeme; Beach, Cara J.; Nelson, Atiba A.; Woodmass, Jarret M.; Ono, Yohei; Boorman, Richard S.; Lo, Ian K. Y.; Thornton, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Partial thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of pain in the adult shoulder. Despite their high prevalence, the diagnosis and treatment of partial thickness rotator cuff tears remains controversial. While recent studies have helped to elucidate the anatomy and natural history of disease progression, the optimal treatment, both nonoperative and operative, is unclear. Although the advent of arthroscopy has improved the accuracy of the diagnosis of partial thickness rotator cuff tears, the number of surgical techniques used to repair these tears has also increased. While multiple repair techniques have been described, there is currently no significant clinical evidence supporting more complex surgical techniques over standard rotator cuff repair. Further research is required to determine the clinical indications for surgical and nonsurgical management, when formal rotator cuff repair is specifically indicated and when biologic adjunctive therapy may be utilized. PMID:26171251

  5. Clinical and biological aspects of rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Giai Via, Alessio; De Cupis, Mauro; Spoliti, Marco; Oliva, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Summary Rotator cuff tears are common and are a frequent source of shoulder pain and disability. A wide variation in the prevalence of rotator cuff tears has been reported. The etiology of rotator cuff tear remains multifactorial and attempts to unify intrinsic and extrinsic theories tried to explain the etiopathogenesis of rotator cuff tears. Knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of rotator cuff tears is important to improve our therapies, surgical techniques and promote tendon repair. Several strategies have been proposed to enhance tendon healing and recently research has focused on regenerative therapies, such as Growth Factors (GFs) and Plasma Rich Platelet (PRP), with high expectations of success. PMID:23888289

  6. Arthroscopic Debridement for Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Hawi, N.; Schmiddem, U.; Omar, M.; Stuebig, T.; Krettek, C.; Petri, M.; Meller, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic debridement represents a salvage procedure for irreparable rotator cuff tears. It is important to accurately diagnose the patient for irreparable rotator cuff tears. The diagnosis and the therapeutic options must be explained to the patient. It is mandatory that the patient understands the primary goal of the arthroscopic debridement being reduction of pain, not improving strength or function. Methods: The procedure consists of 7 distinct steps to debride the soft tissues and alleviate pain. Results: Even though there is a lack of evidence that this procedure is superior to other therapeutic options, it has shown good results in patients with the main complaint of pain. Conclusion: The results reported in some studies should, however, be interpreted with caution, taking into consideration the substantial structural damage in irreparable defects.

  7. Rotator Cuff Tendinitis and Tear (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is usually treated with ice, antiinflammatory drugs, and physical therapy. (See 'Rotator cuff injury treatment' below.) Rotator cuff ... small- to medium-size tears usually improve with physical therapy exercises, stopping painful activities, and, in some cases, ...

  8. Rotator Cuff Tear Consequent to Glenohumeral Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Gilotra, Mohit N; Christian, Matthew W; Lovering, Richard M

    2016-08-01

    The patient was a 21-year-old collegiate running back who was tackled during a football game and sustained a posterior glenohumeral dislocation. He was referred to an orthopaedist and presented 3 weeks after the injury, and, following examination, further imaging was ordered by the orthopaedist due to rotator cuff weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a complete tear of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus, as well as a posterior Bankart lesion, a subscapularis tear, and a dislocation of the biceps long head tendon into the reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):708. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0413. PMID:27477475

  9. Assessment and treatment strategies for rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hakim, Wisam; Noorani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Tears of the rotator cuff are common and becoming an increasingly frequent problem. There is a vast amount of literature on the merits and limitations of the various methods of clinical and radiological assessment of rotator cuff tears. This is also the case with regard to treatment strategies. Certain popular beliefs and principles practiced widely and the basis upon which they are derived may be prone to inaccuracy. We provide an overview of the historical management of rotator cuff tears, as well as an explanation for how and why rotator cuff tears should be managed, and propose a structured methodology for their assessment and treatment. PMID:27582960

  10. Rotator cuff tears: An evidence based approach

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Khanna, Vishesh; Gul, Arif; Mounasamy, Varatharaj

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are a common occurrence affecting millions of people across all parts of the globe. RC tears are also rampantly prevalent with an age-dependent increase in numbers. Other associated factors include a history of trauma, limb dominance, contralateral shoulder, smoking-status, hypercholesterolemia, posture and occupational dispositions. The challenge lies in early diagnosis since a high proportion of patients are asymptomatic. Pain and decreasing shoulder power and function should alert the heedful practitioner in recognizing promptly the onset or aggravation of existing RC tears. Partial-thickness tears (PTT) can be bursal-sided or articular-sided tears. Over the course of time, PTT enlarge and propagate into full-thickness tears (FTT) and develop distinct chronic pathological changes due to muscle retraction, fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy. These lead to a reduction in tendon elasticity and viability. Eventually, the glenohumeral joint experiences a series of degenerative alterations - cuff tear arthropathy. To avert this, a vigilant clinician must utilize and corroborate clinical skill and radiological findings to identify tear progression. Modern radio-diagnostic means of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging provide excellent visualization of structural details and are crucial in determining further course of action for these patients. Physical therapy along with activity modifications, anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications form the pillars of nonoperative treatment. Elderly patients with minimal functional demands can be managed conservatively and reassessed at frequent intervals. Regular monitoring helps in isolating patients who require surgical interventions. Early surgery should be considered in younger, active and symptomatic, healthy patients. In addition to being cost-effective, this helps in providing a functional shoulder with a stable cuff. An easily reproducible technique of maximal strength and

  11. Arthroscopic Superior Capsule Reconstruction for Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Petri, Maximilian; Greenspoon, Joshua A; Millett, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Massive irreparable rotator cuff tears in young patients are a particular challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon. Surgical treatment options include debridement, partial rotator cuff repair, patch-augmented rotator cuff repair, bridging rotator cuff reconstruction with graft interposition, tendon transfer, and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Recently, reconstruction of the superior glenohumeral capsule using a fascia lata autograft has been suggested to reduce superior glenohumeral translation and restore superior stability. Promising clinical results have been reported in 1 case series of 23 patients, indicating that superior capsular reconstruction may be a promising tool to manage massive irreparable rotator cuff tears. This article describes our preferred technique for arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction. PMID:27284506

  12. Prevalence of rotator cuff tears in operative proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Choo, Andrew; Sobol, Garret; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Getz, Charles; Abboud, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Proximal humerus fractures and rotator cuff tears have been shown to have increasing rates with advancing age, theoretically leading to significant overlap in the 2 pathologies. The goal of this study was to examine the prevalence, associated factors, and effect on treatment of rotator cuff tears in surgically treated proximal humerus fractures. A retrospective review was performed of all patients who had surgery for a proximal humerus fracture from January 2007 to June 2012 in the shoulder department of a large academic institution. Patient demographics, the presence and management of rotator cuff tears, and surgical factors were recorded. Regression analysis was performed to determine which factors were associated with rotator cuff tears. This study reviewed 349 fractures in 345 patients. Of these, 30 (8.6%) had concomitant rotator cuff tears. Those with a rotator cuff tear were older (average age, 68.7 vs 63.1 years), were more likely to have had a dislocation (40% vs 12.5%), and were more likely to have undergone subsequent arthroscopic repair or reverse total shoulder arthroplasty than those without a rotator cuff tear. Most (22 of 30) were treated with suture repair at the time of surgery, but 5 patients underwent reverse total shoulder arthroplasty based primarily on the intraoperative finding of a significant rotator cuff tear. A concomitant rotator cuff tear in association with a proximal humerus fracture is relatively common. Rotator cuff tears are associated with older patients and those with a fracture-dislocation. In rare cases, these cases may require the availability of a reverse shoulder prosthesis. PMID:25361372

  13. Rotator cuff tear: physical examination and conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Itoi, Eiji

    2013-03-01

    Rotator cuff tear is one of the most common shoulder diseases. It is interesting that some rotator cuff tears are symptomatic, whereas others are asymptomatic. Pain is the most common symptom of patients with a tear. Even in patients with an asymptomatic tear, it may become symptomatic with an increase in tear size. Physical examination is extremely important to evaluate the presence, location, and extent of a tear. It also helps us to understand the mechanism of pain. Conservative treatment often works. Patients with well-preserved function of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus are the best candidates for conservative treatment. After a successful conservative treatment, the symptom once disappeared may come back again. This recurrence of symptoms is related to tear expansion. Those with high risk of tear expansion and those with less functional rotator cuff muscles are less likely to respond to conservative treatment. They may need a surgical treatment.

  14. Biological factors in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Berton, Alessandra; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2011-09-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common, and lead to shoulder pain and functional impairment. Despite their frequency and related disability, etiology and pathogenesis are still debated. Multiple factors contribute to tears of the rotator cuff. Extrinsic factors are anatomic variables, such as acromial morphologic characteristics, os acromiale, and acromial spurs that compress the rotator cuff by bony impingement or direct pressure from the surrounding soft tissue. Intrinsic factors arise from the tendon itself, because of tensile overload, aging, microvascular supply, traumatisms, or degeneration. Little information is available from a cellular and molecular point of view. We reviewed the biological factors involved in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff tears. Understanding the mechanism of rotator cuff pathology would facilitate the rationale for therapeutic interventions, by guiding the design, selection, and implementation of treatment strategies such as biologic modulation and preventive measures.

  15. Rotator Cuff Tears in the Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCT) are a common clinical problem in the geriatric population, and debate exists over how to best provide pain relief and restore shoulder function. Treatment options can be broadly divided into nonsurgical and surgical, with the majority of patients initially placed on a trial of conservative therapy. For those with irreparable RCT, low functional demand, or interest in nonoperative management, there are a number of nonsurgical treatments to consider, including rehabilitation and injections of corticosteroids, hyaluronate, and platelet-rich plasma. Surgical treatment is increasingly common, as geriatric patients remain active with high functional demands. Studies in elderly populations have demonstrated satisfactory healing and clinical results following surgical repair. Predictors of poor outcome after repair are large tear size as well as higher stages of fatty infiltration. Decompression is a less invasive surgical option that has been shown to provide short-term pain relief, though the lasting effects may deteriorate over time. A number of factors must be weighed when considering which patients are likely to benefit from surgical intervention. PMID:26328240

  16. No prosthetic management of massive and irreparable rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, Raffaele; Cesari, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    A massive rotator cuff tear is not necessarily irreparable. Number of tendons involved, muscle-tendon unit quality, and decreased acromionhumeral distance (AHD) are as important as tear size in determining reparability of lesion. Massive and irreparable rotator cuff tears cannot be anatomically repaired to the bone and are a common source of pain and disability even in middle-aged patients. In these patients when conservative management has failed, it is possible to perform different surgical techniques. A functional repair can help to restore the horizontal force couple of the cuff on the humeral head and to increase the AHD. Debridement of irreparable tears and biceps tenotomy or tenodesis can have a role in low functional demand patients but results deteriorate over time. Recently, several commercially available tissue-engineered biological and synthetic scaffolds have been developed to augment rotator cuff repairs. The aim is to provide a mechanical improvement in case of poor quality tissue at time zero and give a support to have a better cuff healing. In selected cases, the scaffold can be used also to bridge tendon defect. Patients who not have pseudoparalysis, cuff tear arthropathy and with intact deltoid function can benefit from tendon transfers with satisfactory outcomes. These different procedures should be chosen for each patient with selected criteria and after a satisfactory explanation about the really possible expectation after surgery. PMID:27582930

  17. Risk Factors, Pathobiomechanics and Physical Examination of Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, Samuel G.; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Millett, Peter J.; Petri, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is important to appreciate the risk factors for the development of rotator cuff tears and specific physical examination maneuvers. Methods: A selective literature search was performed. Results: Numerous well-designed studies have demonstrated that common risk factors include age, occupation, and anatomic considerations such as the critical shoulder angle. Recently, research has also reported a genetic component as well. The rotator cuff axially compresses the humeral head in the glenohumeral joint and provides rotational motion and abduction. Forces are grouped into coronal and axial force couples. Rotator cuff tears are thought to occur when the force couples become imbalanced. Conclusion: Physical examination is essential to determining whether a patient has an anterosuperior or posterosuperior tear. Diagnostic accuracy increases when combining a series of examination maneuvers. PMID:27708731

  18. Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: Restoring Joint Kinematics by Tendon Transfers

    PubMed Central

    Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Millett, Peter J.; Moulton, Samuel G.; Petri, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tendon transfers can be a surgical treatment option in managing younger, active patients with massive irreparable rotator cuff tears. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the use of tendon transfers to treat massive irreparable rotator cuff tears and to summarize clinical outcomes. Methods: A selective literature search was performed and personal surgical experiences are reported. Results: Latissimus dorsi transfers have been used for many years in the management of posterosuperior rotator cuff tears with good reported clinical outcomes. It can be transferred without or with the teres major (L’Episcopo technique). Many surgical techniques have been described for latissimus dorsi transfer including single incision, double incision, and arthroscopically assisted transfer. Transfer of the pectoralis major tendon is the most common tendon transfer procedure performed for anterosuperior rotator cuff deficiencies. Several surgical techniques have been described, however transfer of the pectoralis major beneath the coracoid process has been found to most closely replicate the force vector that is normally provided by the intact subscapularis. Conclusion: Tendon transfers can be used successfully in the management of younger patients with massive irreparable rotator cuff tears and minimal glenohumeral arthritis. Improvements in clinical outcomes scores and range of motion have been demonstrated. This can delay arthroplasty, which is of particular importance for younger patients with high functional demands.

  19. Non-Operative Management of Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Petri, M.; Ettinger, M.; Brand, S.; Stuebig, T.; Krettek, C.; Omar, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The role of nonoperative management for rotator cuff tears remains a matter of debate. Clinical results reported in the literature mainly consist of level IV studies, oftentimes combining a mixed bag of tear sizes and configurations, and are contradictory to some extent. Methods: A selective literature search was performed and personal surgical experiences are reported. Results: Most studies show an overall success rate of around 75% for nonoperative treatment. However, the majority of studies also present a progression of tear size and fatty muscle infiltration over time, with however debatable clinical relevance for the patient. Suggested factors associated with progression of a rotator cuff tear are an age of 60 years or older, full-thickness tears, and fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff muscles at the time of initial diagnosis. Conclusion: Non-operative management is indicated for patients with lower functional demands and moderate symptoms, and/or of course for those refusing to have surgery. Close routinely monitoring regarding development of tear size should be performed, especially in patients that remain symptomatic during nonoperative treatment. To ensure judicious patient counseling, it has to be taken into account that 1) tears that are initially graded as reparable may become irreparable over time, and 2) results after secondary surgical therapy after failed nonoperative treatment are usually reported to be inferior to those who underwent primary tendon repair.

  20. Glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps: a rare complication of traumatic rotator cuff tear*

    PubMed Central

    Agnollitto, Paulo Moraes; Chu, Marcio Wen King; Lorenzato, Mario Muller; Zatiti, Salomão Chade Assan; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-01-01

    The present report describes a case where typical findings of traumatic glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps were surgically confirmed. This condition is a rare complication of shoulder trauma. Generally, it occurs in high-energy trauma, frequently in association with glenohumeral joint dislocation. Radiography demonstrated increased joint space, internal rotation of the humerus and coracoid process fracture. In addition to the mentioned findings, magnetic resonance imaging showed massive rotator cuff tear with interposition of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and subscapularis stumps within the glenohumeral joint. Surgical treatment was performed confirming the injury and the rotator cuff stumps interposition. It is important that radiologists and orthopedic surgeons become familiar with this entity which, because of its rarity, might be neglected in cases of shoulder trauma. PMID:26929462

  1. Arthroscopic Superior Capsule Reconstruction for Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Mihata, Teruhisa; Lee, Thay Q.; Itami, Yasuo; HASEGAWA, Akihiko; Ohue, Mutsumi; Neo, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: An arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction, in which the fascia lata autograft attached medially to the superior glenoid and laterally to the greater tuberosity, restores shoulder stability and muscle balance in patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears; consequently, it improves shoulder function specifically deltoid muscle function and relieves pain. We assessed the clinical outcome of arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction (Figure 1) in 100 consecutive patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears. Specifically, we focused on the rates of return to sport and work. Methods: From 2007 to 2014, we performed arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction on 107 consecutive patients (mean 66.7 years; range, 43 to 82) with irreparable rotator cuff tears that had failed conservative treatment. Seven patients were lost to follow-up because of other medical problems or reasons. In the remaining 100 patients there were 56 supraspinatus and infraspinatus tears; 39 supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tears; 3 supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis tears; and 2 supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and teres minor tears. Physical examination, radiography, and MRI were performed before surgery; at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery; and yearly thereafter. Rates of return to sport and work were also investigated in those patients who had been employed (34 patients: 21 manual workers, 10 farmers, 1 butcher, 1 cook, and 1 athletic trainer) or played sport (26 patients: 6 golf, 4 table tennis, 4 swimming, 3 martial arts, 2 baseball, 2 yoga, 1 tennis, 1 badminton, 1 skiing, 1 mountain-climbing, and 1 ground golf) before injury. Results: The average preoperative American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score was 31.6 points (range, 3.3 to 63.3 points) and the average Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score was 51.6 points (26.5 to 68.5 points). Average postoperative clinical outcome scores all improved significantly at final

  2. Biceps Lesion Associated With Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ho Yeon; Kim, Jung Youn; Cho, Nam Su; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various tenodesis methods are being used for long head of the biceps tendon lesions. However, there is no consensus on the most appropriate surgical method. Hypothesis: There are significant differences in incidence of cosmetic deformity and persistent bicipital pain between open subpectoral and arthroscopic intracuff tenodesis groups. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This study included 72 patients who underwent biceps tenodesis and rotator cuff repair between January 2009 and May 2014 and who were followed for at least 1 year. Open subpectoral tenodesis was performed in 39 patients (group A), and arthroscopic intracuff tenodesis was performed in 33 patients (group B). Results: In group A, the mean visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain during motion and mean University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Constant scores significantly improved from 4.6, 18.6, and 64.5 preoperatively to 1.9, 30.5, and 86.5 at last follow-up, respectively (P < .001 for all). In group B, these scores significantly improved from 5.1, 17.6, and 62.9 preoperatively to 1.8, 31.5, and 85.9 at last follow-up, respectively (P < .001 for all). Popeye deformity was noted in 2 (5.2%) patients from group A and 5 (15.6%) patients from group B (P = .231). Additionally, persistent bicipital tenderness was noted in 1 (2.6%) patient from group A and 8 (24.2%) patients from group B (P = .012). Conclusion: Both open subpectoral tenodesis and arthroscopic intracuff tenodesis show good clinical outcomes for long head of the biceps tendon lesions. However, open subpectoral tenodesis may be more appropriate, considering the low incidence of Popeye deformity and tenderness. PMID:27231699

  3. I.S.Mu.L.T - Rotator Cuff Tears Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Francesco; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Bossa, Michela; Via, Alessio Giai; Colombo, Alessandra; Chillemi, Claudio; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Pellicciari, Leonardo; Franceschetti, Edoardo; Rugiero, Clelia; Scialdoni, Alessandro; Vittadini, Filippo; Brancaccio, Paola; Creta, Domenico; Buono, Angelo Del; Garofalo, Raffaele; Franceschi, Francesco; Frizziero, Antonio; Mahmoud, Asmaa; Merolla, Giovanni; Nicoletti, Simone; Spoliti, Marco; Osti, Leonardo; Padulo, Johnny; Portinaro, Nicola; Tajana, Gianfranco; Castagna, Alex; Foti, Calogero; Masiero, Stefano; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Tarantino, Umberto; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high level achieved in the field of shoulder surgery, a global consensus on rotator cuff tears management is lacking. This work is divided into two main sessions: in the first, we set questions about hot topics involved in the rotator cuff tears, from the etiopathogenesis to the surgical treatment. In the second, we answered these questions by mentioning Evidence Based Medicine. The aim of the present work is to provide easily accessible guidelines: they could be considered as recommendations for a good clinical practice developed through a process of systematic review of the literature and expert opinion, in order to improve the quality of care and rationalize the use of resources. PMID:26958532

  4. I.S.Mu.L.T - Rotator Cuff Tears Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Francesco; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Bossa, Michela; Via, Alessio Giai; Colombo, Alessandra; Chillemi, Claudio; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Pellicciari, Leonardo; Franceschetti, Edoardo; Rugiero, Clelia; Scialdoni, Alessandro; Vittadini, Filippo; Brancaccio, Paola; Creta, Domenico; Buono, Angelo Del; Garofalo, Raffaele; Franceschi, Francesco; Frizziero, Antonio; Mahmoud, Asmaa; Merolla, Giovanni; Nicoletti, Simone; Spoliti, Marco; Osti, Leonardo; Padulo, Johnny; Portinaro, Nicola; Tajana, Gianfranco; Castagna, Alex; Foti, Calogero; Masiero, Stefano; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Tarantino, Umberto; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high level achieved in the field of shoulder surgery, a global consensus on rotator cuff tears management is lacking. This work is divided into two main sessions: in the first, we set questions about hot topics involved in the rotator cuff tears, from the etiopathogenesis to the surgical treatment. In the second, we answered these questions by mentioning Evidence Based Medicine. The aim of the present work is to provide easily accessible guidelines: they could be considered as recommendations for a good clinical practice developed through a process of systematic review of the literature and expert opinion, in order to improve the quality of care and rationalize the use of resources. PMID:26958532

  5. Surgical treatment of tears of the rotator cuff in athletes.

    PubMed

    Tibone, J E; Elrod, B; Jobe, F W; Kerlan, R K; Carter, V S; Shields, C L; Lombardo, S J; Yocum, L

    1986-07-01

    Forty-five athletes with either a partial or a complete tear of the rotator cuff were treated with anterior acromioplasty and repair of the tear. The minimum duration of follow-up was twenty-four months (average, forty-two months). Thirty patients had an incomplete tear and fifteen had a complete tear. Postoperatively, thirty-nine (87 per cent) of the patients stated that they were improved compared with their preoperative status, although only thirty-four patients (76 per cent) felt that they had a significant reduction of pain postoperatively. Objectively, twenty-five (56 per cent) of the patients were rated as having a good result, which allowed them to return to their former competitive level without significant pain. Twelve (41 per cent) of the twenty-nine athletes who had been involved in pitching and throwing returned to their former competitive status. Seven (32 per cent) of the twenty-two pitchers and throwers who had been active at a professional or collegiate level returned to the same competitive level. In our experience, a repair of the rotator cuff combined with an acromioplasty in a young athletic population provides satisfactory relief of pain but does not guarantee that the patient will be able to return to his or her former competitive status in all sports.

  6. The influence of the acromial coverage index in rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Torrens, Carlos; López, Joan-Miquel; Puente, Isabel; Cáceres, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    Several intrinsic and extrinsic factors have been advocated in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff tears, but it is still unclear whether the origin of the tear is related to tendon degeneration itself or induced by several morphologic changes. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between the acromial coverage of the humeral head and the presence of a cuff tear. We evaluated 148 shoulders, including 45 that underwent surgical rotator cuff repair (group I), 26 with documented rotator cuff tears treated conservatively (group II), and 77 with no cuff pathology as a control group (group III). The mean acromial coverage index was 0.68 in group I, 0.72 in group II, and 0.59 in group III, giving a highly significant difference (P < .0001) between the control group and both cuff tear groups. Patients with a cuff tear have a significantly higher acromial coverage index than the control group.

  7. Rotator Cuff Tears: Surgical Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... topic.cfm?topic=A00064 Surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff most o en involves re-attaching ... Recommended Your doctor may recommend surgery for a torn rotator cuff if your pain does not improve ...

  8. Association between alcohol consumption and rotator cuff tear

    PubMed Central

    Passaretti, Daniele; Candela, Vittorio; Venditto, Teresa; Giannicola, Giuseppe; Gumina, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Long-term alcohol intake is associated with various negative effects on capillary microcirculation and tissue perfusion. We hypothesized that alcohol consumption might be a risk factor for both the occurrence and the severity of rotator cuff tears (RCTs). Patients and methods — A case-control study was performed. We studied 249 consecutive patients (139 men and 110 women; mean age 64 (54–78) years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Tear size was determined intraoperatively. The control group had 356 subjects (186 men and 170 women; mean age 66 (58–82) years) with no RCT. All participants were questioned about their alcohol intake. Participants were divided into: (1) non-drinkers if they consumed less than 0.01 g of ethanol per day, and (2) moderate drinkers and (3) excessive drinkers if women (men) consumed > 24 g (36 g) per day for at least 2 years. Results — Total alcohol consumption, wine consumption, and duration of alcohol intake were higher in both men and women with RCT than in both men and women in the control group. Excessive alcohol consumption was found to be a risk factor for the occurrence of RCT in both sexes (men: OR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.2–3.9; women: OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 0.94–4.1). Massive tears were associated with a higher intake of alcohol (especially wine) than smaller lesions. Interpretation — Long-term alcohol intake is a significant risk factor for the occurrence and severity of rotator cuff tear in both sexes. PMID:26610042

  9. Review article: Risk factors for poor outcome following surgical treatment for rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Sahni, V; Narang, A M

    2016-08-01

    The Medline database was searched using key words: 'rotator cuff', 'tear', and 'treatment'. 12 studies that involved (1) surgical treatment for rotator cuff tear, (2) measurement of pre- and post-operative pain score, functional score, and/or patient satisfaction, (3) patients that failed to improve functionally or had poor satisfaction, (4) preoperative examination of risk factors that could lead to poor outcome, and (5) a minimum follow-up of 6 months were reviewed to identify risk factors associated with poor outcome following surgical treatment for rotator cuff tear. The most common risk factor was tear size, followed by open compensation claim, age, and time from injury to surgery. PMID:27574276

  10. How do massive immobile rotator cuff tears behave after arthroscopic interval slides? Comparison with mobile tears

    PubMed Central

    FOSSATI, CHIARA; ARRIGONI, PAOLO; RAGONE, VINCENZA; SPENNACCHIO, PIETRO; BANFI, GIUSEPPE; RANDELLI, FILIPPO; RANDELLI, PIETRO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to compare clinical outcomes of contracted immobile massive rotator cuff tears mobilised through an arthroscopic interval slide technique versus massive mobile cuff tears directly repaired without any mobilisation. Methods twenty-five patients who underwent arthroscopic repair for massive rotator cuff tears with a minimum of 18 months follow-up were included. The patients were retrospectively divided into two groups. In group 1, a single or double interval slide was performed to achieve adequate tendon mobilisation. In group 2 (control group), massive rotator cuff tears were arthroscopically repaired without any additional release. Patients were evaluated with validated outcomes scores: subjective and objective Constant score, a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain, and single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE). Results the two groups were comparable in terms of age, gender and involvement of the dominant arm. The mean follow-up duration was 31 months in group 1 and 28 months in group 2 (p = 0.4). The two groups showed no significant differences in SANE and VAS results (group 1: SANE 77%, VAS 1.3; group 2: SANE 88%, VAS 1.6), or in total Constant score (group 1: 66.5 ± 11; group 2: 75 ± 14; p = 0.1) and subjective Constant score (Group 1: 31 ± 5; group 2: 30.8 ± 7; p = 0.9). A significant difference was found for the objective Constant score, which was higher in the control group (group 1: 35.5 ± 7; group 2: 44 ± 8; p = 0.009). Conclusions Subjective clinical outcomes of arthroscopic repair with or without interval slides did not differ and were satisfactory. Objectively, immobile cuff tears showed inferior results. The use of interval slides might be considered a first step or an alternative to more invasive procedures for low demanding patients. Level of evidence Level III, retrospective comparative study. PMID:25606545

  11. Occult Interpositional Rotator Cuff - an Extremely Rare Case of Traumatic Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Li; Su, Wei-Ren; Jou, I-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic interposition of a rotator cuff tendon in the glenohumeral joint without recognizable glenohumeral dislocation is an unusual complication after shoulder trauma. Here we report the clinical and imaging presentations of a 17-year-old man with trapped rotator cuff tendons in the glenohumeral joint after a bicycle accident. The possible trauma mechanism is also discussed. PMID:22247643

  12. Augmented Fixation With Biodegradable Subacromial Spacer After Repair of Massive Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Murat; Akkaya, Mustafa; Gursoy, Safa; Isik, Cetin

    2015-01-01

    Unsuccessful outcomes after repair of massive rotator cuff ruptures accompanied by muscle atrophy and fatty degeneration are frequently associated with inadequate management and secondary tears. We report the functional differences after rotator cuff rupture repair with a biodegradable spacer application. In these patients, rotator cuff rupture repair should provide coverage of the humeral head. Subsequently, acromioplasty should be performed to allow adequate space for the subacromial spacer. Thereafter measurement of the intra-articular space required for application of the biodegradable spacer is performed. Using this method can decrease the rate of tears by providing a safe subacromial space in cases of massive rotator cuff rupture. PMID:26697306

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination features for identifying large rotator cuff tears in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Cadogan, Angela; McNair, Peter; Laslett, Mark; Hing, Wayne; Taylor, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Rotator cuff tears are a common and disabling complaint. The early diagnosis of medium and large size rotator cuff tears can enhance the prognosis of the patient. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features with the strongest ability to accurately predict the presence of a medium, large or multitendon (MLM) rotator cuff tear in a primary care cohort. Methods: Participants were consecutively recruited from primary health care practices (n = 203). All participants underwent a standardized history and physical examination, followed by a standardized X-ray series and diagnostic ultrasound scan. Clinical features associated with the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear were identified (P<0.200), a logistic multiple regression model was derived for identifying a MLM rotator cuff tear and thereafter diagnostic accuracy was calculated. Results: A MLM rotator cuff tear was identified in 24 participants (11.8%). Constant pain and a painful arc in abduction were the strongest predictors of a MLM tear (adjusted odds ratio 3.04 and 13.97 respectively). Combinations of ten history and physical examination variables demonstrated highest levels of sensitivity when five or fewer were positive [100%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.86–1.00; negative likelihood ratio: 0.00, 95% CI: 0.00–0.28], and highest specificity when eight or more were positive (0.91, 95% CI: 0.86–0.95; positive likelihood ratio 4.66, 95% CI: 2.34–8.74). Discussion: Combinations of patient history and physical examination findings were able to accurately detect the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear. These findings may aid the primary care clinician in more efficient and accurate identification of rotator cuff tears that may require further investigation or orthopedic consultation. PMID:24421626

  14. Acromio-clavicular joint cyst associated with a complete rotator cuff tear - a case report.

    PubMed

    McCreesh, Karen M; Riley, Sara J; Crotty, James M

    2014-10-01

    This case report describes a patient with an acromio-clavicular joint (ACJ) cyst, associated with a complete tear of the supraspinatus tendon, and the related arthropathy. Ultrasound was a suitable imaging modality to make the diagnosis, and rule out other pathologies. Full assessment of the rotator cuff must be carried out in the presence of ACJ cysts due to their common co-existence with large cuff tears. Cyst aspiration is not a suitable treatment, due to the high likelihood of recurrence. Optimal treatment requires management of the underlying rotator cuff tear.

  15. Result from arthroscopic surgical treatment of renewed tearing of the rotator cuff of the shoulder☆

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; França, Flávio de Oliveira; Freitas, José Márcio Alves; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; Prandini, Alexandre; Godinho, André Couto; Costa, Rafael Patrocínio de Paula

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate function among patients with postoperative recurrence of rotator cuff injuries that was treated arthroscopically (case series) and compare this with function in patients without recurrence (control group); and to compare function among patients with recurrence of rotator cuff injuries that were greater than and smaller than 3 cm. Methods This was a retrospective evaluation of patients who underwent arthroscopic revision of rotator cuff injuries using the ASES, Constant & Murley and UCLA scores and a visual analog pain scale, in comparison with patients in a control group who underwent primary rotator cuff repair. Results The size of the rotator cuff injury recurrence had a statistically significant influence on the result from the arthroscopic surgical treatment. The functional scores showed worse results than those from the first procedure. Conclusion Arthroscopic surgical treatment of renewed tearing of rotator cuff injuries showed worse functional scores than those from primary repair of the injury. PMID:26229900

  16. Arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears and SLAP lesions in professional baseball players.

    PubMed

    Conway, J E

    2001-07-01

    Internal impingement is a primary cause of shoulder pain in throwers; however, instability, internal rotation deficit, scapula muscle dysfunction, and core muscle dysfunction are also important elements of the internal impingement process. Articular surface rotator cuff tears, posterior superior labrum tears, SLAP lesions, anterior capsular ligament attenuation, and posterior capsular ligament contracture are commonly seen in throwers. Each of these conditions must be recognized and appropriately treated to ensure the best possible outcome. There is little potential for spontaneous healing of rotator cuff tears and SLAP lesions after debridement.

  17. Predictors of Pain and Function in Patients With Symptomatic, Atraumatic Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Joshua D.; Pedroza, Angela; Jones, Grant L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of full-thickness rotator cuff tears increases with age, many patients are asymptomatic and may not require surgical repair. The factors associated with pain and loss of function in patients with rotator cuff tears are not well defined. Purpose To determine which factors correlate with pain and loss of function in patients with symptomatic, atraumatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears who are enrolled in a structured physical therapy program. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A multicenter group enrolled patients with symptomatic, atraumatic rotator cuff tears in a prospective, nonrandomized cohort study evaluating the effects of a structured physical therapy program. Time-zero patient data were reviewed to test which factors correlated with Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores. Results A total of 389 patients were enrolled. Mean ASES score was 53.9; mean WORC score was 46.9. The following variables were associated with higher WORC and ASES scores: female sex (P = .001), education level (higher education, higher score; P <.001), active abduction (degrees; P = .021), and strength in forward elevation (P = .002) and abduction (P = .007). The following variables were associated with lower WORC and ASES scores: male sex (P = .001), atrophy of the supraspinatus (P = .04) and infraspinatus (P = .003), and presence of scapulothoracic dyskinesia (P < .001). Tear size was not a significant predictor (WORC) unless comparing isolated supraspinatus tears to supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tears (P = .004). Age, tear retraction, duration of symptoms, and humeral head migration were not statistically significant. Conclusion Nonsurgically modifiable factors, such as scapulothoracic dyskinesia, active abduction, and strength in forward elevation and abduction, were identified that could be addressed nonoperatively with therapy. Therefore

  18. A Prospective Evaluation of Survivorship of Asymptomatic Degenerative Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Keener, Jay D.; Galatz, Leesa M.; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Middleton, William D.; Steger-May, Karen; Stobbs-Cucchi, Georgia; Patton, Rebecca; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this prospective study was to report the long-term risks of rotator cuff tear enlargement and symptom progression associated with degenerative asymptomatic tears. Methods: Subjects with an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear in one shoulder and pain due to rotator cuff disease in the contralateral shoulder enrolled as part of a prospective longitudinal study. Two hundred and twenty-four subjects (118 initial full-thickness tears, fifty-six initial partial-thickness tears, and fifty controls) were followed for a median of 5.1 years. Validated functional shoulder scores were calculated (visual analog pain scale, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES], and simple shoulder test [SST] scores). Subjects were followed annually with shoulder ultrasonography and clinical evaluations. Results: Tear enlargement was seen in 49% of the shoulders, and the median time to enlargement was 2.8 years. The occurrence of tear-enlargement events was influenced by the severity of the final tear type, with enlargement of 61% of the full-thickness tears, 44% of the partial-thickness tears, and 14% of the controls (p < 0.05). Subject age and sex were not related to tear enlargement. One hundred subjects (46%) developed new pain. The final tear type was associated with a greater risk of pain development, with the new pain developing in 28% of the controls, 46% of the shoulders with a partial-thickness tear, and 50% of those with a full-thickness tear (p < 0.05). The presence of tear enlargement was associated with the onset of new pain (p < 0.05). Progressive degenerative changes of the supraspinatus muscle were associated with tear enlargement, with supraspinatus muscle degeneration increasing in 4% of the shoulders with a stable tear compared with 30% of the shoulders with tear enlargement (p < 0.05). Nine percent of the shoulders with a stable tear showed increased infraspinatus muscle degeneration compared with 28% of those in which the tear had enlarged (p = 0

  19. Rotator cuff tears after total shoulder arthroplasty in primary osteoarthritis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David M.; Abrams, Geoffrey D.; Harris, Joshua D.; Bach, Bernard R.; Nicholson, Gregory P.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears have been reported to be uncommon following total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). Postoperative rotator cuff tears can lead to pain, proximal humeral migration, and glenoid component loosening. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the incidence of post-TSA rotator cuff tears or dysfunction in osteoarthritic patients. A systematic review of multiple databases was performed using preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines. Levels I-IV evidence clinical studies of patients with primary osteoarthritis with a minimum 2-year follow-up were included. Fifteen studies with 1259 patients (1338 shoulders) were selected. Student's t-tests were used with a significant alpha value of 0.05. All patients demonstrated significant improvements in motion and validated clinical outcome scores (P < 0.001). Radiographic humeral head migration was the most commonly reported data point for extrapolation of rotator cuff integrity. After 6.6 ± 3.1 years, 29.9 ± 20.7% of shoulders demonstrated superior humeral head migration and 17.9 ± 14.3% migrated a distance more than 25% of the head. This was associated with an 11.3 ± 7.9% incidence of postoperative superior cuff tears. The incidence of radiographic anterior humeral head migration was 11.9 ± 15.9%, corresponding to a 3.0 ± 13.6% rate of subscapularis tears. We found an overall 1.2 ± 4.5% rate of reoperation for cuff injury. Nearly all studies reported indirect markers of rotator cuff dysfunction, such as radiographic humeral head migration and clinical exam findings. This systematic review suggests that rotator cuff dysfunction following TSA may be more common than previously reported. IV, systematic review of Levels I-IV studies. PMID:27186060

  20. Influence of rotator cuff tears on glenohumeral stability during abduction tasks.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Thomas; Weber, Tim; Lazarev, Igor; Englert, Carsten; Dendorfer, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    One of the main goals in reconstructing rotator cuff tears is the restoration of glenohumeral joint stability, which is subsequently of utmost importance in order to prevent degenerative damage such as superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) lesion, arthrosis, and malfunction. The goal of the current study was to facilitate musculoskeletal models in order to estimate glenohumeral instability introduced by muscle weakness due to cuff lesions. Inverse dynamics simulations were used to compute joint reaction forces for several static abduction tasks with different muscle weakness. Results were compared with the existing literature in order to ensure the model validity. Further arm positions taken from activities of daily living, requiring the rotator cuff muscles were modeled and their contribution to joint kinetics computed. Weakness of the superior rotator cuff muscles (supraspinatus; infraspinatus) leads to a deviation of the joint reaction force to the cranial dorsal rim of the glenoid. Massive rotator cuff defects showed higher potential for glenohumeral instability in contrast to single muscle ruptures. The teres minor muscle seems to substitute lost joint torque during several simulated muscle tears to maintain joint stability. Joint instability increases with cuff tear size. Weakness of the upper part of the rotator cuff leads to a joint reaction force closer to the upper glenoid rim. This indicates the comorbidity of cuff tears with SLAP lesions. The teres minor is crucial for maintaining joint stability in case of massive cuff defects and should be uprated in clinical decision-making. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1628-1635, 2016. PMID:26756861

  1. Arthroscopic Implantation of a Bio-Inductive Collagen Scaffold for Treatment of an Articular-Sided Partial Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Richard K.N.; Ryu, Jessica H.J.; Abrams, Jeffrey S.; Savoie, Felix H.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of articular-sided partial rotator cuff tears remains a challenge to the treating orthopaedic surgeon. Treatment algorithms have included nonoperative management, debridement alone, and debridement and subacromial decompression, as well as articular-sided rotator cuff repair and completion of the tear on the bursal side followed by a traditional arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Implantation of a bio-inductive collagen scaffold on the bursal side of the rotator cuff to potentially heal an articular-sided tear represents a novel approach to this difficult clinical entity. PMID:26697308

  2. Clinical evidence in the treatment of rotator cuff tears with hyaluronic acid

    PubMed Central

    Osti, Leonardo; Buda, Matteo; Buono, Angelo Del; Osti, Raffaella; Massari, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Purpose the aim of this quantitative review is to document potential benefit and adverse effects of hyaluronic acid (HA) injection into the shoulder with rotator cuff tears. Methods a systematic literature search was performed in english PubMed, Medline, Ovid, Google Scholar and Embase databases using the combined key words “hyaluronic acid”, “rotator cuff tear”, “hyaluronate”, “shoulder”, “viscosupplementation”, with no limit regarding the year of publication. Articles were included if they reported data on clinical and functional outcomes, complications in series of patients who had undergone HA injection for management of rotator cuff tears. Two Authors screened the selected articles for title, abstract and full text in accordance with predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The papers were accurately analyzed focusing on objective rating scores reported. Results a total of 11 studies, prospective, 7 were randomized were included by full text. A total of 1102 patients were evaluated clinically after different HA injection compare with corticosteroid injection, physically therapies, saline solution injection and control groups. The use of HA in patients with rotator cuff tears improve VAS and functional score in all trials that we have analyzed. Conclusion intra-articular injection with HA is effective in reducing pain and improving function in shoulder with rotator cuff tears and without severe adverse reaction. Level of evidence Level I. PMID:26958534

  3. Clinical Outcomes of Conservative Treatment and Arthroscopic Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Hyung; Do, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Joong Hoon; Kim, Bo Ram; Noh, Jee Hyun; Choi, Soo Hyun; Chung, Sun Gun; Lee, Shi-Uk; Choi, Ji Eun; Kim, Seihee; Kim, Min Jee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical outcomes following conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair in patients with a rotator cuff tear. Methods In this retrospective study, patients aged >50 years with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear were reviewed. The rotator cuff tendons were evaluated using ultrasonography, shoulder magnetic resonance imaging or MR arthrography, and the patients with either a high-grade partial-thickness or small-to-medium-sized (≤3 cm) full-thickness tear were included in this study. The primary outcome measures were a pain assessment score and range of motion (ROM) at 1-year follow-up. The secondary outcomes were the rate of tear progression or retear along with the rate of symptom aggravation after the treatments. Results A total of 357 patients were enrolled, including 183 patients that received conservative treatment and 174 patients who received an arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score (p<0.001) and the ROM in forward flexion (p<0.001) were significantly improved in both groups. The ROM in internal rotation did not significantly change after conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score and ROM were not significantly different between the two groups. Retear was observed in 9.6% of patients who had an arthroscopic repair and tear progression was found in 6.7% of those who underwent conservative treatment. The proportion of aggravation for pain and ROM did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusion The effectiveness of conservative treatment is not inferior to arthroscopic repair for patients >50 years old with a less than medium-sized rotator cuff tear in a 1-year follow-up period. Further study is warranted to find the optimal combination of conservative treatment for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear. PMID:27152275

  4. T lymphocytes are not required for the development of fatty degeneration after rotator cuff tear

    PubMed Central

    Gumucio, J.; Flood, M.; Harning, J.; Phan, A.; Roche, S.; Lynch, E.; Bedi, A.; Mendias, C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Rotator cuff tears are among the most common and debilitating upper extremity injuries. Chronic cuff tears result in atrophy and an infiltration of fat into the muscle, a condition commonly referred to as ‘fatty degeneration’. While stem cell therapies hold promise for the treatment of cuff tears, a suitable immunodeficient animal model that could be used to study human or other xenograft-based therapies for the treatment of rotator cuff injuries had not previously been identified. Methods A full-thickness, massive supraspinatus and infraspinatus tear was induced in adult T-cell deficient rats. We hypothesised that, compared with controls, 28 days after inducing a tear we would observe a decrease in muscle force production, an accumulation of type IIB fibres, and an upregulation in the expression of genes involved with muscle atrophy, fibrosis and inflammation. Results Chronic cuff tears in nude rats resulted in a 30% to 40% decrease in muscle mass, a 23% reduction in production of muscle force, and an induction of genes that regulate atrophy, fibrosis, lipid accumulation, inflammation and macrophage recruitment. Marked large lipid droplet accumulation was also present. Conclusions The extent of degenerative changes in nude rats was similar to what was observed in T-cell competent rats. T cells may not play an important role in regulating muscle degeneration following chronic muscle unloading. The general similarities between nude and T-cell competent rats suggest the nude rat is likely an appropriate preclinical model for the study of xenografts that have the potential to enhance the treatment of chronically torn rotator cuff muscles. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:262–72. PMID:25185444

  5. Tendon transfer for irreparable rotator cuff tears: indications and surgical rationale

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, Giovanni; Chillemi, Claudio; Franceschini, Vincenzo; Cerciello, Simone; Ippolito, Giorgio; Paladini, Paolo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: treatment of symptomatic irreparable rotator cuff tears is extremely challenging because, at present, there are no ideal solutions to this problem. Many patients respond favorably to nonsurgical treatment. However, when conservative measures fail to improve the patient’s pain and disability, surgery should be considered. Methods: different surgical techniques are available and the choice of the most appropriate procedure depends on the presenting symptoms, age of the patient, functional demand, medical comorbidities, joint stability and presence of arthritic changes. The transposition of the surrounding muscles to replace the rotator cuff function represents a viable option in the treatment of younger patients without glenohumeral osteoarthritis and with severe functional limitation. Purpose: aim of this study is to give an overview of the currently available evidence regarding tendon transfer procedures for irreparable rotator cuff tears. PMID:25767779

  6. Arthroscopic Knotless, Double-Row, Extended Linked Repair for Massive Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Greenspoon, Joshua A; Petri, Maximilian; Millett, Peter J

    2016-02-01

    The management of massive rotator cuff tears remains a challenge for physicians, with failure rates being higher when compared with smaller tears. Many surgical treatment options exist including debridement with biceps tenodesis, complete repair, partial repair, repair with augmentation devices, superior capsule reconstruction, tendon transfer, and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The purpose of this article is to describe our preferred surgical technique for a complete arthroscopic repair using an extended linked, knotless, double-row construct. PMID:27330944

  7. Revision Rotator Cuff Reconstruction for Large Tears With Retraction: A Novel Technique Using Autogenous Tendon and Autologous Marrow.

    PubMed

    Skoff, Hillel D

    2015-07-01

    Revision rotator cuff reconstruction for large tears with retraction results in a high rate of recurrent cuff tearing. To try to obtain more consistent results, I conducted a study of a technique that addresses the potential factors involved. Ten patients (7 men, 3 women) were enrolled. Mean age was 58 years. Mean follow-up was 24 months. Mean time between primary and revision cuff surgery was 36 months. The cardinal inclusion criterion was a symptomatic, full-thickness rotator cuff tear with at least 3 cm of retraction in a shoulder that previously underwent rotator cuff repair. Ultrasound was used for postoperative radiographic assessment of cuff integrity. Validated Constant, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder scoring systems were used. Surgical technique included mini-open incision, adequate débridement and mobilization of remaining cuff, reconstitution of cuff defect with autogenous biceps tendon incubated in concentrated autologous bone marrow, and sewing under zero tissue tension. Constant, ASES, and UCLA scores improved significantly (standard error at .001). Ultrasound revealed 0% incidence of full-thickness rotator cuff retearing. In patients with large recurrent retracted rotator cuff tears the technique presented in the current study consistently yields satisfactory clinical results and promotes rotator cuff tissue healing without full-thickness retearing.

  8. Serious rotator cuff injuries.

    PubMed

    Jobe, F W

    1983-07-01

    Usually, serious rotator cuff injuries can be operated upon and a high level of performance can be achieved afer surgery. This is not so for the substantial tears seen in baseball pitchers. However, a damaged rotator cuff can be rehabilitated and can recover from the threatened tear without surgery if detected early enough and given the proper treatment.

  9. Arthroscopic treatment options for irreparable rotator cuff tears of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Anley, Cameron M; Chan, Samuel KL; Snow, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears remains a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons with the final treatment option in many algorithms being either a reverse shoulder arthroplasty or a tendon transfer. The long term results of these procedures are however still widely debated, especially in younger patients. A variety of arthroscopic treatment options have been proposed for patients with an irreparable rotator cuff tear without the presence of arthritis of the glenohumeral joint. These include a simple debridement with or without a biceps tenotomy, partial rotator cuff repair with or without an interval slide, tuberplasty, graft interposition of the rotator cuff, suprascapular nerve ablation, superior capsule reconstruction and insertion of a biodegradable spacer (Inspace) to depress the humeral head. These options should be considered as part of the treatment algorithm in patients with an irreparable rotator cuff and could be used as either as an interim procedure, delaying the need for more invasive surgery in the physiologically young and active, or as potential definitive procedures in the medically unfit. The aim of this review is to highlight and summarise arthroscopic procedures and the results thereof currently utilised in the management of these challenging patients. PMID:25405083

  10. Symptoms of Pain Do Not Correlate with Rotator Cuff Tear Severity

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Warren R.; Kuhn, John E.; Sanders, Rosemary; An, Qi; Baumgarten, Keith M.; Bishop, Julie Y.; Brophy, Robert H.; Carey, James L.; Holloway, G. Brian; Jones, Grant L.; Ma, C. Benjamin; Marx, Robert G.; McCarty, Eric C.; Poddar, Sourav K.; Smith, Matthew V.; Spencer, Edwin E.; Vidal, Armando F.; Wolf, Brian R.; Wright, Rick W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: For many orthopaedic disorders, symptoms correlate with disease severity. The objective of this study was to determine if pain level is related to the severity of rotator cuff disorders. Methods: A cohort of 393 subjects with an atraumatic symptomatic full-thickness rotator-cuff tear treated with physical therapy was studied. Baseline pretreatment data were used to examine the relationship between the severity of rotator cuff disease and pain. Disease severity was determined by evaluating tear size, retraction, superior humeral head migration, and rotator cuff muscle atrophy. Pain was measured on the 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) in the patient-reported American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score. A linear multiple regression model was constructed with use of the continuous VAS score as the dependent variable and measures of rotator cuff tear severity and other nonanatomic patient factors as the independent variables. Forty-eight percent of the patients were female, and the median age was sixty-one years. The dominant shoulder was involved in 69% of the patients. The duration of symptoms was less than one month for 8% of the patients, one to three months for 22%, four to six months for 20%, seven to twelve months for 15%, and more than a year for 36%. The tear involved only the supraspinatus in 72% of the patients; the supraspinatus and infraspinatus, with or without the teres minor, in 21%; and only the subscapularis in 7%. Humeral head migration was noted in 16%. Tendon retraction was minimal in 48%, midhumeral in 34%, glenohumeral in 13%, and to the glenoid in 5%. The median baseline VAS pain score was 4.4. Results: Multivariable modeling, controlling for other baseline factors, identified increased comorbidities (p = 0.002), lower education level (p = 0.004), and race (p = 0.041) as the only significant factors associated with pain on presentation. No measure of rotator cuff tear severity correlated with pain (p > 0.25). Conclusions

  11. A Probabilistic Model of Glenohumeral External Rotation Strength for Healthy Normals and Rotator Cuff Tear Cases

    PubMed Central

    Langenderfer, Joseph E.; Carpenter, James E.; Johnson, Marjorie E.; An, Kai-nan; Hughes, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    The reigning paradigm of musculoskeletal modeling is to construct deterministic models from parameters of an “average” subject and make predictions for muscle forces and joint torques with this model. This approach is limited because it does not perform well for outliers, and it does not model the effects of population parameter variability. The purpose of this study was to simulate variability in musculoskeletal parameters on glenohumeral external rotation strength in healthy normals, and in rotator cuff tear cases using a Monte Carlo model. The goal was to determine if variability in musculoskeletal parameters could quantifiably explain variability in glenohumeral external rotation strength. Multivariate Gamma distributions for musculoskeletal architecture and moment arm were constructed from empirical data. Gamma distributions of measured joint strength were constructed. Parameters were sampled from the distributions and input to the model to predict muscle forces and joint torques. The model predicted measured joint torques for healthy normals, subjects with supraspinatus tears, and subjects with infraspinatus–supraspinatus tears with small error. Muscle forces for the three conditions were predicted and compared. Variability in measured torques can be explained by differences in parameter variability. PMID:16474916

  12. Greater tuberosity notch: an important indicator of articular-side partial rotator cuff tears in the shoulders of throwing athletes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, S; Yoneda, M; Hayashida, K; Wakitani, S; Okamura, K

    2001-01-01

    We examined the location of rotator cuff tears, associated labral injuries, and notches on the greater tuberosity of the humeral head in shoulders of throwing athletes. Arthroscopic findings (rotator cuff tear, labral condition, and greater tuberosity notch) as well as other factors (duration of playing baseball, range of motion, and joint laxity) of 61 baseball players were retrospectively studied. The presence of a greater tuberosity notch was also evaluated for by plain radiographs. Forty patients had articular-side partial rotator cuff tears, most of which occurred in the interval between the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons. The existence of a rotator cuff tear was not related to the range of motion, joint laxity, the detachment of the superior glenoid labrum, or posterosuperior labral injury. Greater tuberosity notches were recognized in 38 shoulders by arthroscopy and most were detected on plain radiographs. The presence of a notch was significantly related to the existence of a rotator cuff tear, while the size of the notch was significantly related to the depth and width of the tear. The greater tuberosity notch seems to be one of the most important diagnostic indicators for a rotator cuff tear in throwing athletes.

  13. PROSPECTIVE AND COMPARATIVE STUDY ON FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER OPEN AND ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF ROTATOR CUFF TEARS

    PubMed Central

    de Castro Veado, Marco Antônio; Castilho, Rodrigo Simões; Maia, Philipe Eduardo Carvalho; Rodrigues, Alessandro Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively assess the surgical results from patients undergoing repairs to rotator cuff injuries via open and arthroscopic procedures, with regard to functional and clinical features, and by means of ultrasound examinations, and to compare occurrences of renewed tearing. Methods: Sixty patients underwent operations performed by the same surgeon (29 via open surgery and 31 via arthroscopy), to repair complete rotator cuff tears. The procedures were performed at Hospital Governor Israel Pinheiro (HGIP) and Mater Dei Hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, between August 2007 and February 2009. The patients were assessed functionally by means of the UCLA score before and after the operation, and magnetic resonance imaging was done before the operation. All the patients were reassessed at least 12 months after the operation, and an ultrasound examination was also performed at this time. Results: Out of the 29 patients who underwent open surgery, 27 (93.1%) presented good or excellent results, with a mean UCLA score of 32 after the operation. Their mean follow-up was 14 months. Three patients presented renewed tearing on ultrasound, of whom one remained asymptomatic. Out of the 31 patients who underwent arthroscopic procedures, 29 (93.5%) presented good or excellent results, with a mean UCLA score of 33 after the operation. Their mean follow-up was 19 months. Two patients presented renewed tearing, of whom one remained asymptomatic and one evolved with loosening of an anchor, with an unsatisfactory result. Conclusion: The repairs on rotator cuff injuries presented good results by means of both open surgery and arthroscopy, with similar functional results in the two groups and similar rates of renewed tearing. PMID:27027052

  14. EXERCISE REHABILITATION IN THE NON-OPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF ROTATOR CUFF TEARS: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Peter; Ebert, Jay; Joss, Brendan; Bhabra, Gev; Ackland, Tim; Wang, Allan

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of rotator cuff tears increases with age, with full-thickness rotator cuff tears present in approximately 25% of individuals in their sixties, and more than 50% of those in their eighties. While surgery is considered an effective treatment, recurrent tears at the insertion site are common, especially with degenerative tears, which are frequent in the older population. More recently, there has been increasing interest in exercise rehabilitation and physical therapy as a means to manage partial and full thickness tears of the rotator cuff by addressing weakness and functional deficits. Recent studies have suggested that patients opting for physical therapy have demonstrated high satisfaction, an improvement in function, and success in avoiding surgery. When considering the increasing rate of shoulder surgery and the associated economic and social burden rotator cuff surgery places on both the patient and the health care system, non-surgical management such as physical therapy and exercise may, in selected cases, be a treatment alternative to surgical repair. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide an overview of rotator cuff pathology and pathogenesis, and to present an evidence-based case for the role of conservative rehabilitation in the management of rotator cuff injuries. Level of Evidence Level 5 PMID:27104061

  15. Massive rotator cuff tears in patients younger than 65 years. What treatment options are available?

    PubMed

    Favard, L; Berhouet, J; Colmar, M; Boukobza, E; Richou, J; Sonnard, A; Huguet, D; Courage, O

    2009-06-01

    Management of massive rotator cuff tears is a therapeutic challenge in patients younger than 65 years, particularly if still working. According to our hypothesis, choice of the most appropriate treatment option mainly depends on the patient's functional status and on two predictive factors: height of the subacromial space and fatty muscle infiltration. This is a retrospective, multicenter study of a series of 296 patients younger than 65 years, including 176 males and 120 females with extensive or massive cuff tear. Patients had loss of elevation or external rotation or both in 162 cases. Four types of management of massive rotator cuff tear were performed in this study: anatomical watertight repairs, palliative treatments and partial repairs, watertight repairs using flaps or cuff prostheses and reverse shoulder prostheses. At follow-up, the Constant score (65.6+/-3.4) and active elevation (147.7 degrees +/-32 degrees) had significantly improved. Active external rotation with elbow at the side, and acromiohumeral interval (AHI) were unchanged. Work-related injuries, previous surgeries and complications were correlated with a poorer Constant score. At follow-up, the anatomical repair sub-group had a significantly better Constant score than the three other treatment groups but involved patients with unchanged AHI and a low degree of fatty infiltration of the infraspinatus muscle. The reverse shoulder prostheses sub-group showed better outcomes in terms of function benefits. The presence of a long biceps was correlated with the use of a palliative treatment. In the light of the results and literature, an approach to treatment is suggested related to the functional capacity of patients, the AHI and the degree of fatty infiltration of the infraspinatus and subscapularis muscles. PMID:19427282

  16. In Vivo Measurement of Rotator Cuff Tear Tension: Medial Versus Lateral Footprint Position.

    PubMed

    Dierckman, Brian D; Wang, David W; Bahk, Michael S; Burns, Joseph P; Getelman, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a study to evaluate in vivo tension applied to the rotator cuff tendon positioned at the medial versus lateral footprint during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We evaluated 20 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. During repair, a grasper was inserted through a lateral portal, and a digital weigh scale was attached. The tendon was grasped and translated to the medial footprint, and tension recorded. After a relaxation period, the tendon edge was translated to the lateral footprint, and tension recorded. Mean (SD) tension was 0.41 (0.33) pound when tendons were positioned at the medial footprint and 2.21 (1.20) pounds when they were positioned at the lateral footprint, representing a 5.4-fold difference (P < .0001). For smaller tears (≤ 20 mm anterior-posterior), 7.6 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. For larger tears, 4.1 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. This study demonstrated a significant, 5.4-fold increase in tension when the tendon edge was reduced to the lateral as opposed to the medial footprint in vivo. PMID:26991588

  17. In Vivo Measurement of Rotator Cuff Tear Tension: Medial Versus Lateral Footprint Position.

    PubMed

    Dierckman, Brian D; Wang, David W; Bahk, Michael S; Burns, Joseph P; Getelman, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a study to evaluate in vivo tension applied to the rotator cuff tendon positioned at the medial versus lateral footprint during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We evaluated 20 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. During repair, a grasper was inserted through a lateral portal, and a digital weigh scale was attached. The tendon was grasped and translated to the medial footprint, and tension recorded. After a relaxation period, the tendon edge was translated to the lateral footprint, and tension recorded. Mean (SD) tension was 0.41 (0.33) pound when tendons were positioned at the medial footprint and 2.21 (1.20) pounds when they were positioned at the lateral footprint, representing a 5.4-fold difference (P < .0001). For smaller tears (≤ 20 mm anterior-posterior), 7.6 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. For larger tears, 4.1 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. This study demonstrated a significant, 5.4-fold increase in tension when the tendon edge was reduced to the lateral as opposed to the medial footprint in vivo.

  18. Treatment of massive rotator-cuff tears with a polyester ligament (LARS) patch.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Michael J; Ismaiel, A Hany

    2013-12-01

    We describe and analyse the results of our technique for repairing chronic massive tears (Goutallier grade 3 or 4) of the rotator cuff using a ligament augmentation and reconstruction system. This prospective, single surgeon series included 29 symptomatic patients (21 male, 8 female) with a mean age of 67.1 years who underwent 31 ligament augmentation and reconstruction system procedures (two bilateral procedures) with a mean follow-up period of 3 years. All patients had clinical, radiographic, magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic evidence of a chronic massive rotator cuff tear. The primary outcome measure was assessed using the Oxford Shoulder Score and visual analogue score pre-operatively and at follow-up. Postoperative overall Oxford shoulder score and visual analogue score results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement at follow-up, compared with pre-operative values (p < 0.0001). Post-operative acromio-humeral interval showed a statistically significant increase when compared to pre-operative radiographs (p = 0.0004). Two patients required revision with good postoperative results. We believe that, in the appropriate age group, the ligament augmentation and reconstruction system repair offers a good option for chronic, primary, non-closable rotator cuff defects in terms of pain relief and function. PMID:24563965

  19. Interobserver Agreement in the Classification of Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears Using the Snyder Classification System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christopher S.; Davis, Shane M.; Doremus, Brittany; Kouk, Shalen; Stetson, William B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: At present, there is no widely accepted classification system for partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, and as a result, optimal treatment remains controversial. Purpose: To examine the interobserver reliability and accuracy of classifying partial rotator cuff tears using the Snyder classification system. We hypothesized that the Snyder classification would be reproducible with high reliability and accuracy. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Twenty-seven orthopaedic surgeons reviewed 10 video-recorded shoulder arthroscopies. Each surgeon was provided with a description of the Snyder classification system for partial-thickness rotator cuff tears and was then instructed to use this system to describe each tear. Interrater kappa statistics and percentage agreement between observers were calculated to measure the level of agreement. Surgeon experience as well as fellowship training was evaluated to determine possible correlations. Results: A kappa coefficient of 0.512 indicated moderate reliability between surgeons using the Snyder classification to describe partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. The mean correct score was 80%, which indicated “very good” agreement. There was no correlation between the number of shoulder arthroscopies performed per year and fellowship training and the number of correct scores. Conclusion: The Snyder classification system is reproducible and can be used in future research studies in analyzing the treatment options of partial rotator cuff tears. PMID:27738643

  20. Arthroscopic Superior Capsular Reconstruction for Treatment of Massive Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Hirahara, Alan M.; Adams, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Massive irreparable rotator cuff tears have been troublesome entities to treat, especially in younger patients. Few good options exist, leaving most patients in recent years receiving a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty carries serious risks, a limited lifespan, and no other viable options should it fail. Recent biomechanical studies have shown that the superior capsule is critical to containing the glenohumeral joint reduced, allowing the larger muscles like the deltoid and pectoralis major to function properly. The superior capsular reconstruction is an anatomic reconstruction of the superior capsule to restore the normal restraint to superior translation that occurs with a deficient rotator cuff. The technique described in this article is an arthroscopic reconstruction of the superior capsule with dermal allograft. PMID:26870638

  1. Smoking Status and a Pulmonary Function Test in Patients with Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Chiharu; Uchida, Soushi; Noguchi, Shingo; Torii, Ryo; Shimabukuro, Ikuko; Yatera, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Although chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects one in several smokers, only a few patients are correctly diagnosed compared to the estimated number of patients. Several recent reports indicate that the development of rotator cuff tears is related to smoking. In this study, we investigated smoking status in patients with rotator cuff tears and evaluated the possibility of undiagnosed COPD by a pulmonary function test. The subjects were 150 consecutive patients over 40 years old, who had been diagnosed with rotator cuff tears and had been examined by a pulmonary function test before surgery in our orthopedic department between April 2011 and June 2015. They consisted of 96 men and 54 women, which included 59 non-smokers (39.3%), 62 ex-smokers (41.3%), and 29 smokers (19.3%). The smoking rate of the subjects was the same as that of the general Japanese population. However, the ever-smokers who smoked more than 21 cigarettes per day were 31.9%, which was high compared to the Japanese ever-smokers population, i.e. 15.2% of men and 5.5% of women. Twenty-five subjects (16.7%) showed airflow limitation, and they consisted of 7 cases of COPD, 3 cases of bronchial asthma, one case of bronchiectasis, and 14 undiagnosed cases. The undiagnosed cases consisted of 7 non-smokers, 5 ex-smokers, and 2 smokers. Their stages of COPD were stage 1 in 11 cases and stage 2 in 3 cases. The prevalence of airflow limitation increased with increasing age: 0% for 40's, 8.3% for 50's, 20.7% for 60's, and 25.6% for over 70's. From these results, we recognized that paying attention to the numbers of cigarettes smoked per day are important in addition to the smoking history, for the patients with rotator cuff tears. Also, sharing the data of a pulmonary function test before surgery can contribute to the early diagnosis of COPD. PMID:27627973

  2. Effects of Rotator Cuff Pathology and Physical Therapy on In Vivo Shoulder Motion and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With a Symptomatic Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Baumer, Timothy G.; Chan, Derek; Mende, Veronica; Dischler, Jack; Zauel, Roger; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Siegal, Daniel S.; Divine, George; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Bey, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical therapy (PT) is often prescribed for patients with rotator cuff tears. The extent to which PT influences strength, range of motion (ROM), and patient-reported outcomes has been studied extensively, but the effect of PT on in vivo joint kinematics is not well understood. Purpose: To assess the influence of symptomatic rotator cuff pathology and the effects of PT on shoulder motion, strength, and patient-reported outcomes. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-five patients with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear and 25 age-matched asymptomatic control subjects were recruited. Shoulder motion was measured using a biplane radiography imaging system, strength was assessed with a Biodex dynamometer, and patient-reported outcomes were assessed using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores. Data were acquired from the patients before and after 8 weeks of physical therapy. Data were acquired at 1 time point for the control subjects. Results: Compared with the control subjects, patients with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear had significantly worse pain/function scores (P < .01); less ROM (P < .01); lower abduction (ABD), external rotation (ER), and internal rotation (IR) strength (P < .01); less scapulothoracic posterior tilt (P = .05); and lower glenohumeral joint elevation (P < .01). Physical therapy resulted in improved pain/function scores (P < .01), increased ROM (P < .02), increased scapulothoracic posterior tilt (P = .05), increased glenohumeral joint elevation (P = .01), and decreased acromiohumeral distance (AHD) (P = .02). Conclusion: Compared with age-matched controls, patients had worse pain/function scores, less ROM, and lower ABD, ER, and IR strength. Patients also had less scapulothoracic anteroposterior tilt, less glenohumeral joint elevation, and an altered glenohumeral joint contact path. PT resulted in improved pain/function scores, increased ROM, greater posterior

  3. RADIOGRAPHIC STUDY ON THE ACROMION INDEX AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH ROTATOR CUFF TEARS

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Da Silva, Luciana Andrade; Menegassi Martel, Éder; Debom, Leandro Gervazoni; Andrade, Manoel Loyola; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the lateral projection of the acromion and rotator cuff tears (RCTs) in the Brazilian population. Methods: The lateral projection of the acromion was measured using anteroposterior radiographs of the shoulders, carried out with the glenoid cavity in absolute profile and the humeral head in the neutral position or with internal rotation. The acromion index (AI) was defined as the ratio between the distance from the plane of the glenoid cavity to the lateral edge of the acromion and the distance from the plane of the glenoid cavity to the lateral edge of the humeral head. This index was measured in 83 patients (mean age of 54 years) with RCTs and compared with a group of 28 individuals (mean age of 48 years) without RCTs. The presence or absence of RCTs was determined by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Results: The mean AI was 0.7194 for the patients with RCTs and 0.6677 for the individuals without RCTs, in the Brazilian population. This difference was statistically significant, with P < 0.001. Conclusion: A relationship can be established between AI and rotator cuff tears in the Brazilian population. PMID:27022534

  4. Initial treatment of complete rotator cuff tear and transition to surgical treatment: systematic review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Wahab, Taiceer A.; Betancourt, Jean P.; Hassan, Fadi; Thani, Saeed Al.; Choueiri, Hened; Jain, Nitin B.; Malanga, Gerard A.; Murrell, William D.; Prasad, Anil; Verborgt, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background rotator cuff tear affects many people. Natural history, and evidence for non-operative treatment remains limited. Our objective is to assess evidence available for the efficacy and morbidity of commonly used systemic medications, physiotherapy, and injections alongside evaluating any negative long-term effects. Methods a systematic search was performed of PubMed, Cochrane, EMBASE and CINAHL dates (1 January 1960 – 1 December 2014), search terms: ‘rotator cuff tear’, ‘natural history’, ‘atraumatic’, ‘injection’, ‘physiotherapy’ or ‘physical therapy’, ‘injection’, ‘corticosteroid’, ‘PRP‘, ‘MSC’, risk of conservative treatment’, and ‘surgical indication’. Results eleven studies were included. The mean Coleman Methodology Score modified for conservative therapy is 69.21 (range 88–44) (SD 12.31). This included 2 RCTs, 7 prospective, and 2 retrospective studies. Evidence suggests it is safe to monitor symptomatic rotator cuff tears, as tear size and symptoms are not correlated with pain, function, and/or ultimate outcome. Conclusions complete rotator cuff tears may be effectively treated with injections, exercise in the short and intermediate terms respectively. Negative effect of corticosteroids on rotator cuff tissue has not been demonstrated. Timing to end conservative treatment is unknown, but likely indicated when a patient demonstrates increased weakness and loss of function not recoverable by physiotherapy. PMID:27331030

  5. Deltoid muscle shape analysis with magnetic resonance imaging in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It seems appropriate to assume, that for a full and strong global shoulder function a normally innervated and active deltoid muscle is indispensable. We set out to analyse the size and shape of the deltoid muscle on MR-arthrographies, and analyse its influence on shoulder function and its adaption (i.e. atrophy) for reduced shoulder function. Methods The fatty infiltration (Goutallier stages), atrophy (tangent sign) and selective myotendinous retraction of the rotator cuff, as well as the thickness and the area of seven anatomically defined segments of the deltoid muscle were measured on MR-arthrographies and correlated with shoulder function (i.e. active abduction). Included were 116 patients, suffering of a rotator cuff tear with shoulder mobility ranging from pseudoparalysis to free mobility. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to determine the distribution of the data before either Spearman or Pearson correlation and a multiple regression was applied to reveal the correlations. Results Our developed method for measuring deltoid area and thickness showed to be reproducible with excellent interobserver correlations (r = 0.814–0.982). The analysis of influencing factors on active abduction revealed a weak influence of the amount of SSP tendon (r = −0.25; p < 0.01) and muscle retraction (r = −0.27; p < 0.01) as well as the stage of fatty muscle infiltration (GFDI: r = −0.36; p < 0.01). Unexpectedly however, we were unable to detect a relation of the deltoid muscle shape with the degree of active glenohumeral abduction. Furthermore, long-standing rotator cuff tears did not appear to influence the deltoid shape, i.e. did not lead to muscle atrophy. Conclusions Our data support that in chronic rotator cuff tears, there seems to be no disadvantage to exhausting conservative treatment and to delay implantation of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, as the shape of deltoid muscle seems only to be influenced by natural aging

  6. Massive rotator cuff tear associated with acute traumatic posterior shoulder dislocation: report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Luenam, Suriya; Kosiyatrakul, Arkaphat

    2013-12-01

    A massive rotator cuff tear in association with acute traumatic posterior glenohumeral dislocation is rare. To our knowledge, only four documented cases have been reported in the literature. We present two additional cases of such injury secondary to the traffic accident. The first patient had an unsuccessful closed reduction due to the posterior instability while the second developed the profound shoulder weakness following the reduction. From the findings of our cases together with the previous reports, every patient had a unique injury mechanism of high-energy directed axial loading on an outstretched, adducted, and internally rotated arm. The glenohumeral capsule and rotator cuff were uniformly avulsed from the humeral attachment, and the supraspinatus and infraspinatus were always involved. However, the clinical presentations were variable based on the severity of the associated rotator cuff tear. The outcomes of operative treatment in this type of injury with the open repair were favorable. PMID:22782426

  7. PLATELET-RICH PLASMA IN ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIRS OF COMPLETE TEARS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Sunada, Edwin Eiji; Benegas, Eduardo; de Santis Prada, Flavia; Neto, Raul Bolliger; Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate shoulder functional results and the retear rate of arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff augmented with platelet-rich plasma (PRP).Methods: Prospective case series with single-row arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff augmented with PRP. Only cases of isolated supraspinatus tears with retraction of less than 3 cm were included in this series. The PRP used was obtained by apheresis. It was applied on liquid consistency in its activated form, with the addition of autologous thrombin. Patients were evaluated after 12 months of the surgical procedure. The Constant-Murley, UCLA and VAS scales were used, and the retear rate was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: Fourteen patients were evaluated (14 shoulders). The mean Constant-Murley score was 45.64 ± 12.29 before the operation and evolved to 80.78 ± 13.22 after the operation (p < 0.001). The UCLA score increased from 13.78 ± 5.66 to 31.43 ± 3.9 (p < 0.001). The patients’ pain level decreased from a median of 7.5 (p25% = 6, p75% = 8) to 0.5 (p25% = 0, p75% = 3) (p = 0.0013) according to the VAS score. None of the patients presented complete retear. Three patients (21.4%) showed partial retear, without transfixation. Only one patient developed complications (adhesive capsulitis). Conclusion: Patients submitted to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair augmented with PRP showed significant functional improvement and none of them had complete retearing. PMID:27047894

  8. The posterior impingement sign: diagnosis of rotator cuff and posterior labral tears secondary to internal impingement in overhand athletes.

    PubMed

    Meister, Keith; Buckley, Bernadette; Batts, Joel

    2004-08-01

    We conducted this study to determine whether a test, the posterior impingement maneuver, could be used to prospectively identify articular side tears of the rotator cuff and/or posterior labrum. Sixty-nine athletes presented with posterior shoulder pain that developed during overhand athletics. Injured shoulders were placed into 90 degrees to 110 degrees of abduction, slight extension, and maximum external rotation, and an effort was made to elicit pain deep within the posterior aspect. Overall sensitivity of the test was 75.5%, and specificity was 85%. When only athletes with noncontact injuries (gradual onset of pain) were considered, sensitivity was 95% and specificity was 100%. A positive posterior impingement sign correlated highly with undersurface tearing of the rotator cuff and/or tearing of the posterior labrum in athletes with gradual onset of posterior shoulder pain during overhand athletics. PMID:15379239

  9. All-Suture Transosseous Repair for Rotator Cuff Tear Fixation Using Medial Calcar Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Aramberri-Gutiérrez, Mikel; Martínez-Menduiña, Amaia; Valencia-Mora, María; Boyle, Simon

    2015-01-01

    We describe an all-suture transosseous repair technique used in the management of rotator cuff tears by means of an all-suture anchor secured on the intra-articular side of the humeral calcar. The technique uses an anterior cruciate ligament guide to ensure accurate positioning of the tunnels, avoiding the articular cartilage and minimizing risk to the neurovascular structures. The distal end of the guide is inserted through a rotator interval portal and passed down to the axillary pouch. The proximal end of the guide is approximated to the greater tuberosity at the cuff footprint, and a complete transosseous tunnel is created with a 2.4-mm drill. An all-suture implant is inserted through this tunnel down to the calcar, and its deployment is visualized under arthroscopy. Gentle traction is applied to the anchor, resulting in a 4-mm concertina of the suture anchor that rests opposed to the medial cortex. The major advantage of this technique is the fixation strength gained from the biomechanically superior cortical bone of the calcar. Furthermore, this method permits greater preservation of bone surface area at the level of the footprint for a larger tendon-to-bone healing surface. This technique also provides an excellent alternative in revision situations. PMID:26052495

  10. Deltoid detachment consequent to open surgical repair of massive rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Gumina, S; Di Giorgio, G; Perugia, D; Postacchini, F

    2008-02-01

    Deltoid detachment is one of the complications in open rotator cuff repair. Although it is often described, the actual prevalence, time at which it occurs and the predisposing causes are still unknown. We prospectively studied 112 patients with massive rotator cuff tears with a mean age of 67. The surgical approach was performed with a lateral para-acromial incision. Clinical assessment was performed with Constant's method. Of the 112 patients, 9 (8%) had deltoid detachment. It occurred about 3 months after surgery. Of the nine patients, two underwent revision surgery for the deltoid trans-bone reattachment. At the follow-up, the patients with deltoid detachment had a mean increase of only 5.5 points in the Constant score compared to that of 16.9 obtained by the control group. Deltoid reattachment, performed on the two patients, provided a mean increase of 7 points only with respect to the post-operative control at the 4th month. Considering the unsatisfactory functional result consequent to deltoid detachment and the slight improvement obtained with the reattachment, we recommend the following: use suture thread thicker than #2, do not use a simple stitch and avoid extending acromioplasty to the lateral margin of the acromion. PMID:17410365

  11. Deltoid detachment consequent to open surgical repair of massive rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Di Giorgio, G.; Perugia, D.; Postacchini, F.

    2007-01-01

    Deltoid detachment is one of the complications in open rotator cuff repair. Although it is often described, the actual prevalence, time at which it occurs and the predisposing causes are still unknown. We prospectively studied 112 patients with massive rotator cuff tears with a mean age of 67. The surgical approach was performed with a lateral para-acromial incision. Clinical assessment was performed with Constant’s method. Of the 112 patients, 9 (8%) had deltoid detachment. It occurred about 3 months after surgery. Of the nine patients, two underwent revision surgery for the deltoid trans-bone reattachment. At the follow-up, the patients with deltoid detachment had a mean increase of only 5.5 points in the Constant score compared to that of 16.9 obtained by the control group. Deltoid reattachment, performed on the two patients, provided a mean increase of 7 points only with respect to the post-operative control at the 4th month. Considering the unsatisfactory functional result consequent to deltoid detachment and the slight improvement obtained with the reattachment, we recommend the following: use suture thread thicker than #2, do not use a simple stitch and avoid extending acromioplasty to the lateral margin of the acromion. PMID:17410365

  12. Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer for Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: A Modified Technique Using Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Villacis, Diego; Merriman, Jarrad; Wong, Karlton; Rick Hatch, George F.

    2013-01-01

    Latissimus dorsi transfer is a well-established method for the treatment of posterosuperior massive irreparable rotator cuff tears. We propose using an arthroscopically assisted technique that avoids insult to the deltoid. With the patient in the lateral decubitus position, an L-shaped incision is made along the anterior belly of the latissimus muscle and then along the posterior axillary line. The latissimus and teres major are identified and separated. The tendon insertion of the latissimus is isolated, and a FiberWire traction suture (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is placed, facilitating dissection of the muscle to the thoracodorsal neurovascular pedicle and subsequent mobilization. The interval deep to the deltoid and superficial to the teres minor is developed into a subdeltoid tunnel for arthroscopic tendon transfer. The latissimus tendon is then transferred and stabilized arthroscopically to the lateral aspect of the infraspinatus and supraspinatus footprints by multiple suture anchors. PMID:23767006

  13. Arthroscopy of the shoulder in the management of partial tears of the rotator cuff: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J R; Broussard, T S; Carson, W G

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-six patients with partial tears of the supraspinatus portion of the rotator cuff underwent arthroscopic examination and debridement of the lesion. All patients, whose average age was 22 years, were involved in competitive athletics; 64% were baseball pitchers. The average duration of symptoms prior to arthroscopy was 12 months. The most common presenting complaint was pain felt in the shoulder during overhead activities. Associated pathology included tears of the glenoid labrum and partial tearing or tendinitis of the long head of the biceps tendon. Of the 34 patients available for follow-up, 26 (76%) had excellent results, three (9%) had good results, and five (15%) had poor results. Eighty-five percent of the patients returned satisfactorily to their preoperative athletic activity. Our preliminary experience with arthroscopy of the shoulder in the management of patients with partial rotator cuff tears is encouraging. Not only can a partial rotator cuff tear be debrided to initiate a healing response, but a definitive diagnosis can also be made and associated pathology identified, permitting the establishment of an appropriate rehabilitation program.

  14. Summary of Meta-Analyses Dealing with Single-Row versus Double-Row Repair Techniques for Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Spiegl, U.J.; Euler, S.A.; Millett, P.J.; Hepp, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials have been performed to analyze whether double-row (DR) rotator cuff repair (RCR) provides superior clinical outcomes and structural healing compared to single-row (SR) repair. The purpose of this study was to sum up the results of meta-analysis comparing SR and DR repair with respect on clinical outcomes and re-tear rates. Methods: A literature search was undertaken to identify all meta-analyses dealing with randomized controlled trials comparing clinical und structural outcomes after SR versus DR RCR. Results: Eight meta-analyses met the eligibility criteria: two including Level I studies only, five including both Level I and Level II studies, and one including additional Level III studies. Four meta-analyses found no differences between SR and DR RCR for patient outcomes, whereas four favored DR RCR for tears greater than 3 cm. Two meta-analyses found no structural healing differences between SR and DR RCR, whereas six found DR repair to be superior for tears greater than 3 cm tears. Conclusion: No clinical differences are seen between single-row and double-row repair for small and medium rotator cuff tears after a short-term follow-up period with a higher re-tear rate following single-row repairs. There seems to be a trend to superior results with double-row repair in large to massive tear sizes. PMID:27708735

  15. Fascia lata allograft bridging of a rotator cuff tear in a rabbit animal model

    PubMed Central

    Varvitsiotis, Dimitrios; Papaspiliopoulos, Athanasios; Vlachou, Vasiliki; Feroussis, John; Papalois, Apostolos; Papacharalampous, Xenofon; Soucacos, Panayotis N.; Zoubos, Aristides

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Despite advances in surgical treatment options, large rotator cuff (r-c) tears still represent a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temporary and spatial histological incorporation of fascia lata allografts, used for bridging artificially created defects of the r-c. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two rabbits were divided into two groups and a supraspinatus tendinous defect was created. Half of the rabbit population underwent repair only, while in the other half, the defect was bridged utilizing fascia lata allograft. The animals were euthanized at 2, 4, and 6 weeks postoperative. Half of the specimens were evaluated histologically and the other half underwent mechanical testing. Results: There was an increased remodeling activity, fibroblastic in growth and strong presence of collagen fibers observed at 6 weeks on both groups. A gradually increasing mechanical strength was noticed by week 6 and increased toughness was also found at the same time period. There was no significant difference observed between the two groups regarding their histological and mechanical properties. Conclusions: In the difficult scenario of a large irreparable tear where the simple suture of the remaining r-c is impossible, allograft bridging, could be used with satisfactory results. Clinical Relevance: Treatment Study, Level 1. PMID:25114414

  16. Systematic Review of All-Arthroscopic Versus Mini-Open Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongzhong; Wang, Sanrong; Wang, Yule; Qin, Xiaoxia; Sun, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare outcomes in patients with rotator cuff tears undergoing all-arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair. A systematic review and meta-analysis of outcomes of all-arthroscopic repair versus mini-open repair in patients with rotator cuff repair was conducted. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria were screened and included from systematic literature search for electronic databases including Medline, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, and CINAHL library was conducted from 1969 and 2015. A total of 18 comparative studies including 4 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included. Pooled results indicate that there was no difference in the functional outcomes, range of motion, visual analog scale (VAS) score, and short-form 36 (SF-36) subscales. However, Constant-Murley functional score was found to be significantly better in patients with mini-open repair. However, the results of the review should be interpreted with caution due to small size and small number of studies contributing to analysis in some of the outcomes. All-arthroscopic and mini-open repair surgical techniques for the management of rotator cuff repair are associated with similar outcomes and can be used interchangeably based on the patient and rotator tear characteristics. PMID:26947557

  17. Evaluation of functional results from shoulders after arthroscopic repair of complete rotator cuff tears associated with traumatic anterior dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; Freitas, José Márcio Alves; de Oliveira França, Flávio; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; de Simoni, Leandro Furtado; Godinho, Pedro Couto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical outcome of arthroscopic rotator cuff fixation and, when present, simultaneous repair of the Bankart lesion caused by traumatic dislocation; and to assess whether the size of the rotator cuff injury caused by traumatic dislocation has any influence on the postoperative clinical outcomes. Methods Thirty-three patients with traumatic shoulder dislocation and complete rotator cuff injury, with at least two years of follow up, were retrospectively evaluated. For analysis purposes, the patients were divided into groups: presence of fixed Bankart lesion or absence of this lesion, and rotator cuff lesions smaller than 3.0 cm (group A) or greater than or equal to 3.0 cm (group B). All the patients underwent arthroscopic repair of the lesions and were evaluated postoperatively by means of the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) score and strength measurements. Results The group with Bankart lesion repair had a postoperative UCLA score of 33.96, while the score of the group without Bankart lesion was 33.7, without statistical significance (p = 0.743). Group A had a postoperative UCLA score of 34.35 and group B, 33.15, without statistical significance (p = 0.416). Conclusion The functional outcomes of the patients who only presented complete rotator cuff tearing after traumatic shoulder dislocation, which underwent arthroscopic repair, were similar to the outcomes of those who presented an associated with a Bankart lesion that was corrected simultaneously with the rotator cuff injury. The extent of the original rotator cuff injury did not alter the functional results in the postoperative evaluation. PMID:27069884

  18. FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION OF PATIENTS WHO HAVE UNDERGONE ARTHROSCOPIC DEBRIDEMENT TO TREAT MASSIVE AND IRREPARABLE TEARS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Veado, Marco Antônio de Castro; Rodrigues, Alessandro Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the results from patients who underwent arthroscopic debridement of extensive irreparable rotator cuff injuries. Methods: 27 patients were operated between 2003 and 2007, and 22 of them were evaluated. The surgical procedure consisted of arthroscopic debridement of the stumps of the tendons involved, bursectomy, removal of acromial osteophytes and, possibly, biceps tenotomy and tuberoplasty. Results: All the patients showed involvement of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons at the preoperative stage. In the postoperative evaluation, 14 patients had a complete teres minor muscle, and three had partial tears of the subscapularis tendon. There was an improvement in the UCLA criteria, from 15 preoperatively to 31 postoperatively. There was no improvement in muscle strength, but there was a reduction in the pain. Conclusion: Arthroscopic debridement is a recommended procedure for elderly patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears, good range of motion and low functional demand, when the main objective is to diminish pain. PMID:27022590

  19. Impact of Platelet-Rich Plasma on Arthroscopic Repair of Small- to Medium-Sized Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Holtby, Richard; Christakis, Monique; Maman, Eran; MacDermid, Joy C.; Dwyer, Tim; Athwal, George S.; Faber, Kenneth; Theodoropoulos, John; Woodhouse, Linda J.; Razmjou, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased interest in using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as an augment to rotator cuff repair warrants further investigation, particularly in smaller rotator cuff tears. Purpose: To examine the effectiveness of PRP application in improving perioperative pain and function and promoting healing at 6 months after arthroscopic repair of small- or medium-sized rotator cuff tears. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Methods: This was a double-blinded randomized controlled trial of patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of partial- or full-thickness rotator cuff tears of up to 3 cm who were observed for 6 months. Patients were randomized to either repair and PRP application (study group) or repair only (control group) groups. The patient-oriented outcome measures utilized were the visual analog scale (VAS), the Short Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (ShortWORC), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) form, and the Constant-Murley Score (CMS). Range of motion (ROM) and inflammatory and coagulation markers were measured before and after surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging was used at 6 months to assess retear and fatty infiltration rate. Results: Eighty-two patients (41 males) with a mean age of 59 ± 8 years were enrolled; 41 patients were included in each group. Both the PRP and control groups showed a significant improvement in their pain level based on the VAS within the first 30 days (P < .0001), with the PRP group reporting less pain than the control group (P = .012), which was clinically significantly different from days 8 through 11. The PRP group reported taking less painkillers (P = .026) than the control group within the first 30 days. All outcome measure scores and ROM improved significantly after surgery (P < .0001), with no between-group differences. No differences were observed between groups in inflammatory or coagulation marker test results (P > .05), retear (14% vs 18% full retear; P = .44), or fatty

  20. Impact of Platelet-Rich Plasma on Arthroscopic Repair of Small- to Medium-Sized Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Holtby, Richard; Christakis, Monique; Maman, Eran; MacDermid, Joy C.; Dwyer, Tim; Athwal, George S.; Faber, Kenneth; Theodoropoulos, John; Woodhouse, Linda J.; Razmjou, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased interest in using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as an augment to rotator cuff repair warrants further investigation, particularly in smaller rotator cuff tears. Purpose: To examine the effectiveness of PRP application in improving perioperative pain and function and promoting healing at 6 months after arthroscopic repair of small- or medium-sized rotator cuff tears. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Methods: This was a double-blinded randomized controlled trial of patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of partial- or full-thickness rotator cuff tears of up to 3 cm who were observed for 6 months. Patients were randomized to either repair and PRP application (study group) or repair only (control group) groups. The patient-oriented outcome measures utilized were the visual analog scale (VAS), the Short Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (ShortWORC), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) form, and the Constant-Murley Score (CMS). Range of motion (ROM) and inflammatory and coagulation markers were measured before and after surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging was used at 6 months to assess retear and fatty infiltration rate. Results: Eighty-two patients (41 males) with a mean age of 59 ± 8 years were enrolled; 41 patients were included in each group. Both the PRP and control groups showed a significant improvement in their pain level based on the VAS within the first 30 days (P < .0001), with the PRP group reporting less pain than the control group (P = .012), which was clinically significantly different from days 8 through 11. The PRP group reported taking less painkillers (P = .026) than the control group within the first 30 days. All outcome measure scores and ROM improved significantly after surgery (P < .0001), with no between-group differences. No differences were observed between groups in inflammatory or coagulation marker test results (P > .05), retear (14% vs 18% full retear; P = .44), or fatty

  1. Perivascular Stem Cells Diminish Muscle Atrophy and Retain Viability in a Rotator Cuff Tear Model

    PubMed Central

    Eliasberg, Claire; Jensen, Andrew; Dar, Ayelet; Kowalski, Tomasz J.; Murray, Iain; Khan, Adam Z.; Natsuhara, Kyle; Garagozlo, Cameron; McAllister, David R.; Petrigliano, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are a common cause of shoulder pain and often necessitate surgical repair. Muscle changes including atrophy, fibrosis, and fatty degeneration can develop after RCTs, which may compromise surgical repair and clinical outcomes. Lipoaspirate-derived human perivascular stem cells (PSCs) have demonstrated myogenic and angiogenic potential in other small animal models of muscle injury. We hypothesized that the administration of PSCs following massive RCTs may help to diminish these muscle changes in a small animal model. Methods: A total of 90 immunodeficient mice were used (15 groups, N=6). Each was assigned to one of three surgical groups: i) sham, ii) supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon transection (TT), or iii) TT and suprascapular nerve denervation (TT+DN). PSCs were harvested from human lipoaspirate and sorted using fluorescence-activated cell sorting into small blood vessel residing pericytes (CD146+ CD34- CD45- CD31-) and large blood perivascular adventitial cells (CD146- CD34+ CD45- CD31-). Mice received either a) no injection, b) saline injection, c) pericyte injection, or d) adventitial cell injection at the time of the index procedure or at two weeks following index surgery. The supraspinatus muscles were harvested six weeks after the index procedure. Muscle atrophy was assessed by measuring percent wet muscle weight change for each sample. Muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), fibrosis, and fatty degeneration were analyzed using Image J™. Additionally, pericytes and adventitial cells were transduced with a luciferase-containing construct. Animals were given injections of luciferin and imaged using IVIS to track in vivo bioluminescence following injections to assess cell viability. Results: Treatment with PSC injection after TT resulted in less wet weight loss and greater muscle fiber CSA than control groups (P<0.05). The TT+DN groups treated with PSC injections two weeks post-op also had less muscle weight loss

  2. Evidence for an Environmental and Inherited Predisposition Contributing to the Risk for Global Tendinopathies or Compression Neuropathies in Patients With Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Tashjian, Robert Z.; Farnham, James M.; Granger, Erin K.; Teerlink, Craig C.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tearing has been found to be clinically associated with other tendinopathies and compression neuropathies; a significant excess of these phenotypes has been seen in patients with rotator cuff tears. It is unclear if the association is secondary to environmental or genetic influences. Purpose: To examine population-based data for comorbid association of rotator cuff tearing and tendinopathies and compression neuropathies and to determine whether the association extends to relatives of patients with rotator cuff tears, which could suggest a genetic contribution. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The Utah Population Database (UPDB) contains health and genealogical data on over 2 million Utah residents. Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Revision, codes (CPT 4) and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes (ICD-9) entered in patient records were used to identify patients with rotator cuff tearing and with comorbid tendinopathies and compression neuropathies. We tested the hypothesis of excess familial clustering of these other phenotypes with rotator cuff tearing using a well-established method (estimation of relative risks) in the overall study group of rotator cuff patients (N = 1889). Results: Significantly elevated risk for elbow, hand/wrist, foot/ankle, knee, and hip tendinopathies, as well as for all tendinopathies and compression neuropathies, was observed in rotator cuff tear cases themselves (P < 2.8e–13), in their spouses (P < .02), and in their first-degree relatives (P < 5.5e–4). A significant excess of elbow (P = .01), foot/ankle (P = .04), and all tendinopathies (P = 3.1e–3) was also observed in second-degree relatives, and a significant excess of compression neuropathies (P = .03) was observed in third-degree relatives. Conclusion: The current study shows strong evidence of familial clustering of rotator cuff tearing with other tendinopathies and with compression

  3. Identification of Suitable Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies in Tendons from Patients with Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Cohen, Carina; Loyola, Leonor Casilla; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Smith, Marília Cardoso; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tear is one of the most common causes of shoulder dysfunction. Gene expression analysis may be a useful tool for understanding tendon tears and the failure of cuff healing, and reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) has become an effective method for such studies. However, this technique requires the use of suitable reference genes for data normalization. Here, we evaluate the suitability of six reference genes (18S, ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, HPRT1 and TBP) using samples from the rotator cuff tendons of 28 individuals with tendon tears (3 tendons regions) and 8 controls (2 tendon regions); for the tear patients, we evaluated ruptured and non-ruptured tendon samples. The stability of the candidate reference genes was determined using the NormFinder, geNorm, BestKeeper and DataAssist software packages. Overall, HPRT1 was the best single reference gene, and HPRT1+TBP composed the best pair and HPRT1+TBP+ACTB composed the best trio of reference genes from the analysis of different groups, including the simultaneous analysis of all tissue samples. To identify the optimal combination of reference genes, we evaluated the expression of COL1A1 and COL3A1, and no obvious differences were observed when using 2, 3 or 4 reference genes for most of the analyses. However, COL3A1 expression differed between ruptured and non-ruptured (posterior superior region) tendons of patients only when normalized by HPRT1+TBP+B2M and HPRT1+TBP. On the other hand, the comparison between these two groups using the best trio of reference genes (HPRT1+TBP+ACTB) and 4 reference genes did not revealed a significant difference in COL3A1 expression. Consequently, the use of suitable reference genes for a reliable gene expression evaluation by RT-qPCR should consider the type of tendon samples investigated. HPRT1+TBP+ACTB seems to be the best combination of reference genes for the analysis of involving different tendon samples of individuals with rotator cuff tears

  4. Identification of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies in tendons from patients with rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Cohen, Carina; Loyola, Leonor Casilla; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Smith, Marília Cardoso; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tear is one of the most common causes of shoulder dysfunction. Gene expression analysis may be a useful tool for understanding tendon tears and the failure of cuff healing, and reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) has become an effective method for such studies. However, this technique requires the use of suitable reference genes for data normalization. Here, we evaluate the suitability of six reference genes (18S, ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, HPRT1 and TBP) using samples from the rotator cuff tendons of 28 individuals with tendon tears (3 tendons regions) and 8 controls (2 tendon regions); for the tear patients, we evaluated ruptured and non-ruptured tendon samples. The stability of the candidate reference genes was determined using the NormFinder, geNorm, BestKeeper and DataAssist software packages. Overall, HPRT1 was the best single reference gene, and HPRT1+TBP composed the best pair and HPRT1+TBP+ACTB composed the best trio of reference genes from the analysis of different groups, including the simultaneous analysis of all tissue samples. To identify the optimal combination of reference genes, we evaluated the expression of COL1A1 and COL3A1, and no obvious differences were observed when using 2, 3 or 4 reference genes for most of the analyses. However, COL3A1 expression differed between ruptured and non-ruptured (posterior superior region) tendons of patients only when normalized by HPRT1+TBP+B2M and HPRT1+TBP. On the other hand, the comparison between these two groups using the best trio of reference genes (HPRT1+TBP+ACTB) and 4 reference genes did not revealed a significant difference in COL3A1 expression. Consequently, the use of suitable reference genes for a reliable gene expression evaluation by RT-qPCR should consider the type of tendon samples investigated. HPRT1+TBP+ACTB seems to be the best combination of reference genes for the analysis of involving different tendon samples of individuals with rotator cuff tears

  5. Arthroscopic Percutaneous Repair of Anterosuperior Rotator Cuff Tear Including Biceps Long Head: A 2-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Young; Lee, Sang-Soo; Seo, Eun-Min; Hwang, Jung-Taek; Kwon, Sun-Chang; Lee, Jae-Won

    2012-01-01

    Background To report the results of an arthroscopic percutaneous repair technique for partial-thickness tears of the anterosuperior cuff combined with a biceps lesion. Methods The inclusion criteria were evidence of the upper subscapularis tendon tear and an articular side partial-thickness tear of the supraspinatus tendon, degeneration of the biceps long head or degenerative superior labrum anterior-posterior, above lesions treated by arthroscopic percutaneous repair, and follow-up duration > 24 months after the operation. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, constant score, the pain level on a visual analogue scale, ranges of motion and strength were assessed. Results The mean (± standard deviation) age of the 20 enrolled patients was 56.0 ± 7.7 years. The forward flexion strength increased from 26.3 ± 6.7 Nm preoperatively to 38.9 ± 5.1 Nm at final follow-up. External and internal rotation strength was also significantly increased (14.2 ± 1.7 to 19.1 ± 3.03 Nm, 12.3 ± 3.2 to 18.1 ± 2.8 Nm, respectively). Significant improvement was observed in ASES and constant scores at 3 months, 1 year and the time of final follow-up when compared with preoperative scores (p < 0.001). The mean subjective shoulder value was 86% (range, 78% to 97%). Conclusions The implementation of complete rotator cuff repair with concomitant tenodesis of the biceps long head using arthroscopic percutaneous repair achieved full recovery of normal rotator cuff function, maximum therapeutic efficacy, and patient satisfaction. PMID:23205238

  6. Factors affecting rotator cuff healing.

    PubMed

    Mall, Nathan A; Tanaka, Miho J; Choi, Luke S; Paletta, George A

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have noted that increasing age is a significant factor for diminished rotator cuff healing, while biomechanical studies have suggested the reason for this may be an inferior healing environment in older patients. Larger tears and fatty infiltration or atrophy negatively affect rotator cuff healing. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, double-row repairs, performing a concomitant acromioplasty, and the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) do not demonstrate an improvement in structural healing over mini-open rotator cuff repairs, single-row repairs, not performing an acromioplasty, or not using PRP. There is conflicting evidence to support postoperative rehabilitation protocols using early motion over immobilization following rotator cuff repair. PMID:24806015

  7. The MRI geyser sign: acromioclavicular joint cysts in the setting of a chronic rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H John; Milillo, Ralph; Klein, Devon A; DiFelice, Gregory S

    2011-06-01

    We present the case of a 71-year-old man with a large acromioclavicular (AC) joint cyst successfully managed with surgical excision. AC joint cysts are soft tissue masses generally signifying underlying rotator cuff pathology. Traditionally, these cysts were identified with shoulder arthrography as a "geyser" of fluid escaping through the AC joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is today's preferred imaging modality; we describe the MRI equivalent of the "geyser sign," signifying synovial fluid escaping through the cuff defect, across the subacromial bursa, and decompressing superiorly through a degenerated AC joint. Surgical management is preferred for symptomatic cysts. Based on a review of limited retrospective case series, recommendations for management of these lesions are as follows. Repair of the rotator cuff is preferable whenever possible. In the case of an irreparable defect, good results can be achieved through excisional AC joint arthroplasty and resection of the cyst base. Aspiration of these cysts should not be attempted, due to the high recurrence rate and potential for a draining sinus. Hemiarthroplasty also may be effective in indirectly decompressing these cysts; but given the invasive nature of this procedure, it should be reserved for patients who are also symptomatic from cuff arthropathy.

  8. The MRI geyser sign: acromioclavicular joint cysts in the setting of a chronic rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H John; Milillo, Ralph; Klein, Devon A; DiFelice, Gregory S

    2011-06-01

    We present the case of a 71-year-old man with a large acromioclavicular (AC) joint cyst successfully managed with surgical excision. AC joint cysts are soft tissue masses generally signifying underlying rotator cuff pathology. Traditionally, these cysts were identified with shoulder arthrography as a "geyser" of fluid escaping through the AC joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is today's preferred imaging modality; we describe the MRI equivalent of the "geyser sign," signifying synovial fluid escaping through the cuff defect, across the subacromial bursa, and decompressing superiorly through a degenerated AC joint. Surgical management is preferred for symptomatic cysts. Based on a review of limited retrospective case series, recommendations for management of these lesions are as follows. Repair of the rotator cuff is preferable whenever possible. In the case of an irreparable defect, good results can be achieved through excisional AC joint arthroplasty and resection of the cyst base. Aspiration of these cysts should not be attempted, due to the high recurrence rate and potential for a draining sinus. Hemiarthroplasty also may be effective in indirectly decompressing these cysts; but given the invasive nature of this procedure, it should be reserved for patients who are also symptomatic from cuff arthropathy. PMID:21869946

  9. Arthroscopic Management of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears in Major League Baseball Pitchers: The Lateralized Footprint Repair Technique.

    PubMed

    Dines, Joshua S; Jones, Kristofer; Maher, Patrick; Altchek, David

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcomes of surgical management of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in professional baseball players have been uniformly poor. We conducted a study to investigate return-to-play data and functional performance using a novel arthroscopic repair technique. We hypothesized that arthroscopic rotator cuff repair would result in a high rate of return to professional pitching and favorable functional outcomes. We identified 6 consecutive Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers who underwent surgical repair of full-thickness rotator cuff injuries using the lateralized footprint repair technique. At most recent follow-up, patients were evaluated to determine their ability to return to athletic activity. Functional outcomes were also assessed using player performance statistics. By mean follow-up of 66.7 months (range, 23.2-94.6 months), 5 (83%) of the 6 pitchers had returned to their preinjury level of competition for at least 1 full season. Despite the high rate of return to MLB play, few pitchers resumed pitching productivity at their preoperative level; mean number of innings pitched decreased from 1806.5 to 183.7. A slight performance reduction was also found in a comparison of preoperative and postoperative pitching statistics. Of note, the return rate was higher for players over age 30 years than for those under 30 years. Overhead athletes require a delicate balance of shoulder mobility and stability to meet functional demands. Anatomical adaptations at the glenohumeral joint should be considered when performing rotator cuff repair in these patients in order to preserve peak functional performance. This novel repair technique affords a high rate of return to MLB play, though elite overhead throwers should be counseled that pitching productivity might decrease after surgery.

  10. Arthroscopic Management of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears in Major League Baseball Pitchers: The Lateralized Footprint Repair Technique.

    PubMed

    Dines, Joshua S; Jones, Kristofer; Maher, Patrick; Altchek, David

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcomes of surgical management of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in professional baseball players have been uniformly poor. We conducted a study to investigate return-to-play data and functional performance using a novel arthroscopic repair technique. We hypothesized that arthroscopic rotator cuff repair would result in a high rate of return to professional pitching and favorable functional outcomes. We identified 6 consecutive Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers who underwent surgical repair of full-thickness rotator cuff injuries using the lateralized footprint repair technique. At most recent follow-up, patients were evaluated to determine their ability to return to athletic activity. Functional outcomes were also assessed using player performance statistics. By mean follow-up of 66.7 months (range, 23.2-94.6 months), 5 (83%) of the 6 pitchers had returned to their preinjury level of competition for at least 1 full season. Despite the high rate of return to MLB play, few pitchers resumed pitching productivity at their preoperative level; mean number of innings pitched decreased from 1806.5 to 183.7. A slight performance reduction was also found in a comparison of preoperative and postoperative pitching statistics. Of note, the return rate was higher for players over age 30 years than for those under 30 years. Overhead athletes require a delicate balance of shoulder mobility and stability to meet functional demands. Anatomical adaptations at the glenohumeral joint should be considered when performing rotator cuff repair in these patients in order to preserve peak functional performance. This novel repair technique affords a high rate of return to MLB play, though elite overhead throwers should be counseled that pitching productivity might decrease after surgery. PMID:26991564

  11. A Prospective Follow-up of Patients Treated Surgically or Non-Surgically for Full-thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Gagnier, Joel Joseph; Oltean, Hanna N.; Bedi, Asheesh; Carpenter, James E.; Miller, Bruce S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this project are: (1) to compare the efficacy of surgical versus non-surgical management of full-thickness rotator cuff tears, and (2) to detect variables that predict success within each treatment group. Methods: Patients who presented to our care for management of symptomatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears were enrolled in our Shoulder Registry and clinical data were collected prospectively. In addition to baseline demographic information, the following outcome measures were collected at baseline, 6 months, 1 year and annually up to 3 years: Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) Index, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Modified Marx Shoulder Activity Level Scale, VR-12, 100-point Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) rating, 100-point visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and a patient satisfaction scale. All patients were allocated treatment as recommended by the attending surgeon. We described all patient demographic characteristics, and performed linear and logistic regression for variables associated with treatment allocation and with treatment effects. We also used Student’ t-tests and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests where appropriate, to explore differences in treatment effects between the groups for all outcome measures at all time points. Results: A total of 292 patients were included with 155 allocated to surgery and 137 to non-surgical treatment. Those allocated to surgery were younger (58.6 years vs 65.2 years; P<.0001), less likely to have diabetes (12% vs 21%; P=0.05), more likely to have a known traumatic injury (71% vs 55%; P=0.002), and tended to be worse off on all outcome measures at baseline then the non-surgical group. Both the surgical group and non-surgical group improved on all outcome measures across the follow up period with several variables predicting changes at each time point. Table 1 contains the list of specific variables that predicted improved outcomes separately for both treatment

  12. Rotator Cerclage Technique for Partial Rotator Cuff Ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Murat; Firat, Ahmet; Gursoy, Safa; Akkaya, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of partial rotator cuff tears is gradually increasing because of the advancements in imaging methods and arthroscopy techniques. One of the repair techniques is repair of the partial rotator cuff tear by conversion to a full-thickness tear. Another technique, the transtendon technique, has some practical challenges and risks. We attempted to develop a practical and easy technique with low morbidity to repair partial tears called the rotator cerclage technique. PMID:26900559

  13. A Prospective Comparative Study of High Resolution Ultrasound and MRI in the Diagnosis of Rotator Cuff Tears in a Tertiary Hospital of North India

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Narvir Singh; Ahluwalia, Ajay; Sharma, Yash Paul; Thakur, Lokesh

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background To evaluate the accuracy of high resolution ultrasound (USG) and MRI in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears (RCT) and to determine if high resolution USG compares favorably in sensitivity and specificity to MRI in the diagnosis of rotator cuff injury. Material/Methods In this prospective comparative study, 40 patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff tears underwent both ultrasound and MRI of the shoulder. Out of these 40 patients, 31 patients who had positive findings for rotator cuff tears on ultrasound and/or MRI were finally included in the study while the remaining 9 patients with negative or unrelated findings were excluded. The USG and MRI were interpreted by two radiologists experienced in musculoskeletal radiology and blinded to findings of each other. Comparison was done using MRI as a standard reference. Results The agreement between USG and MRI for diagnosis of RCTs was statistically excellent; USG showed a sensitivity of 86.7% and a specificity of 100% for full-thickness tears, and a sensitivity of 89.7% and a specificity of 98.8% for partial-thickness tears; observed accuracy for full thickness tears was 98.4% and 95.9% for partial thickness tears. The Kappa coefficient of association was 0.91 for full thickness tears and 0.90 for partial thickness tears. Conclusions Considering the comparable diagnostic accuracy of USG and MRI, the former modality can be used as a first-line investigation for diagnosis of RCT. MRI should be used secondarily as a problem-solving tool either following an equivocal shoulder USG or for delineation of anatomy in cases where surgical correction is needed. PMID:27800039

  14. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that attach to the bones of the shoulder ... Rotator cuff tendinitis refers to irritation of these tendons and inflammation of the bursa (a normally smooth ...

  15. Management of In-Season Concurrent Rotator Cuff Tear With Shoulder Instability in Professional Contact Football Athletes; Respect the Career Goals!

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Maike; Hoy, Gregory; Branson, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Professional sports injuries are usually all dealt with at one single operation to return the player to the sport after appropriate rehabilitation. We questioned the assumption that rotator cuff tears must be repaired concurrently with instability syndromes, and aimed to allow a professional rugby league player to achieve career goals by NOT correcting all pathology at one surgery. Case Presentation A professional rugby league player presented with acute shoulder instability on a setting of a chronic full thickness rotator cuff tear. We performed an “in season” arthroscopic stabilization on an elite rugby league player, leaving a previously diagnosed large full thickness rotator cuff tear untreated. This allowed aggressive rehabilitation and return to contact competition at 12 weeks post-surgery. The player achieved a long held career goal of winning a premiership ring before undertaking rotator cuff repair at the end of the season. Latest follow up at seven years (still at elite level) demonstrated an asymptomatic shoulder. Conclusions The assumption that all pathology found at surgical exploration requires correction to play at elite level is not universally correct. We postulate that whilst rotator cuff deficiency has severe long-term sequelae, it is shoulder instability alone that prevents high level contact sports participation. Career goal management is an important part of managing elite level athletes. We have demonstrated that by careful management of the specific pathology preventing participation can allow elite athletes to achieve career goals without compromising long-term health. PMID:27217928

  16. Patch-Augmented Latissimus Dorsi Transfer and Open Reduction–Internal Fixation of Unstable Os Acromiale for Irreparable Massive Posterosuperior Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Maximilian; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Millett, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Latissimus dorsi transfer is a reasonable treatment option for massive posterosuperior rotator cuff tears that can substantially improve chronically painful and dysfunctional shoulders. This report and accompanying video describe the treatment of an active 43-year-old man with severe pain and weakness in the right shoulder after 3 failed rotator cuff repairs. Preoperative imaging showed a massive posterosuperior rotator cuff tear retracted to the glenoid as well as a hypermobile os acromiale likely causing dynamic impingement and recurrent rotator cuff tears. After diagnostic arthroscopy, the latissimus tendon is harvested and augmented with a 3-mm human acellular dermal patch (ArthroFlex; Arthrex, Naples, FL). The native rotator cuff tissue is repaired as much as possible, and the latissimus tendon is passed underneath the deltoid and posterior to the teres minor. The patch-augmented tendon is then integrated into a double-row SpeedBridge repair of eight 4.75-mm BioComposite SwiveLock anchors (Arthrex). The bony surface of the os acromiale is prepared and then fixed to the acromion with 2 cannulated partially threaded screws and additional tension-band wiring. Postoperative rehabilitation initially focuses on early passive range of motion, followed by active and active-assisted motion and a biofeedback program starting at 6 weeks postoperatively. PMID:26697309

  17. Proposal and Evaluation of a Telerehabilitation Platform Designed for Patients With Partial Rotator Cuff Tears: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To propose and evaluate the effectiveness of a telerehabilitation platform designed for patients with rotator cuff (RC) tears. Methods During the first study phase, a virtual service platform that included information on RC tear pathology, joint care, and a series of instructions regarding therapeutic exercise was designed and created. Subsequently, in the clinical phase, a quasi-experimental study was performed. The platform was tested on patients and evaluated at baseline and at 1, 2, 3, and 6 months with respect to their pain levels and functionality on the Constant-Murley (CM) scale. Results Eleven patients were included, 5 women and 6 men, with a median age of 55 years (range, 42–68 years). Pain diminished from a baseline value of 64 mm (range, 40–80 mm) to 16 mm (range, 0–30 mm) at 6 months (p<0.001). Points on the CM scale rose from a baseline value of 54 points (range, 51–66 points) to 85 points (range, 70–100 points) at 6 months (p=0.001). Functionality in daily living and work activities, movement, and strength exhibited significant changes at 6 months (p<0.05). Conclusion Significant changes were observed in pain and functionality in this group of participants who used a telerehabilitation platform. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that included a specific program for RC tears. PMID:27606278

  18. Proposal and Evaluation of a Telerehabilitation Platform Designed for Patients With Partial Rotator Cuff Tears: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To propose and evaluate the effectiveness of a telerehabilitation platform designed for patients with rotator cuff (RC) tears. Methods During the first study phase, a virtual service platform that included information on RC tear pathology, joint care, and a series of instructions regarding therapeutic exercise was designed and created. Subsequently, in the clinical phase, a quasi-experimental study was performed. The platform was tested on patients and evaluated at baseline and at 1, 2, 3, and 6 months with respect to their pain levels and functionality on the Constant-Murley (CM) scale. Results Eleven patients were included, 5 women and 6 men, with a median age of 55 years (range, 42–68 years). Pain diminished from a baseline value of 64 mm (range, 40–80 mm) to 16 mm (range, 0–30 mm) at 6 months (p<0.001). Points on the CM scale rose from a baseline value of 54 points (range, 51–66 points) to 85 points (range, 70–100 points) at 6 months (p=0.001). Functionality in daily living and work activities, movement, and strength exhibited significant changes at 6 months (p<0.05). Conclusion Significant changes were observed in pain and functionality in this group of participants who used a telerehabilitation platform. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that included a specific program for RC tears.

  19. Effect of Bone Mineral Density on Rotator Cuff Tear: An Osteoporotic Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaobin; Giambini, Hugo; Ben-Abraham, Ephraim; An, Kai-Nan; Nassr, Ahmad; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Introduction An increased bone mineral density (BMD) in the proximity to tendon insertion can improve rotator cuff repair and healing. However, how a decrease of BMD in the humeral head affects the biomechanical properties of the rotator cuff tendon is still unclear. Previous studies have demonstrated ovariectomy in animals to lead to osteoporosis and decreased BMD, and Teriparatide (PTH) administration to improve BMD and strength of bone. This study aimed to explore the correlation between humeral head BMD and infraspinatus (ISP) tendon insertion strength, and if an increase in bone quantity of the humeral head can improve the strength of the rotator cuff. Materials and Methods Eighteen New England white rabbits were divided into the 3 groups: Control, Ovariectomy-Saline (OVX-Saline), and Ovariectomy-PTH (OVX-PTH). The OVX-Saline group and the OVX-PTH were administered daily saline and Teriparatide injections for 8 weeks starting at 17 weeks of OVX. BMD of the humeral head was measured, the ISP tendon failure load was tested and the failure stress was calculated. One specimen from each group was used for histological analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to derive equations for the BMD and failure stress. Results Significant differences were observed in the measured humeral head BMD of the Control and OVX-PTH groups compared to the OVX-Saline group (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.0024, respectively). No significant difference was found in failure stress among the three groups, but an expected trend with the control group and OVX-PTH group presenting higher failure strength compared to the OVX-Saline group. BMD at the humeral head showed a positive linear correlation with stress (r2 = 0.54). Histology results showed the superiority in OVX-PTH group ISP enthesis compared to the OVX-Saline group. Conclusion Bone loss of the humeral head leads to decreased tendon/bone insertion strength of the infraspinatus tendon enthesis. Teriparatide administration can increase bone

  20. Influence of psychomotor skills and innervation patterns on results of latissimus dorsi tendon transfer for irreparable rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Werner, Clément M L; Ruckstuhl, Thomas; Müller, Roland; Zanetti, Marco; Gerber, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This investigation was performed to analyze the influence of innervation and psychomotor skills on the outcome of latissimus dorsi transfer. Patients with the 10 best and 10 worst results after latissimus dorsi transfer for irreparable rotator cuff tears were selected. All patients meeting the inclusion criteria (n = 12) were subject to a psychomotor test battery (Motorische Leistungsserie) and electromyographic innervation assessment. There was no statistical difference between the 2 groups preoperatively in terms of the commonly tested factors known to influence the results of this procedure adversely. There was a significant difference in both the pattern and selectivity of innervation in the group that had better clinical results. The psychomotor findings were negatively correlated with the range of motion and the strength of the operative shoulder. Function of the operative shoulder could also be predicted by psychomotor function of the uninjured contralateral side. Psychomotor skills testing appears to be a new, potential method by which to predict the outcome of latissimus dorsi transfer.

  1. The effects of a rotator cuff tear on activities of daily living in older adults: A kinematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Vidt, Meghan E; Santago, Anthony C; Marsh, Anthony P; Hegedus, Eric J; Tuohy, Christopher J; Poehling, Gary G; Freehill, Michael T; Miller, Michael E; Saul, Katherine R

    2016-02-29

    Rotator cuff tears (RCT) in older individuals may compound age-associated physiological changes and impact their ability to perform daily functional tasks. Our objective was to quantify thoracohumeral kinematics for functional tasks in 18 older adults (mean age=63.3±2.2), and compare findings from nine with a RCT to nine matched controls. Motion capture was used to record kinematics for 7 tasks (axilla wash, forward reach, functional pull, hair comb, perineal care, upward reach to 90°, upward reach to 105°) spanning the upper limb workspace. Maximum and minimum joint angles and motion excursion for the three thoracohumeral degrees of freedom (elevation plane, elevation, axial rotation) were identified for each task and compared between groups. The RCT group used greater minimum elevation angles for axilla wash and functional pull (p≤0.0124) and a smaller motion excursion for functional pull (p=0.0032) compared to the control group. The RCT group also used a more internally rotated maximum axial rotation angle than controls for functional reach, functional pull, hair comb, and upward reach to 105° (p≤0.0494). The most differences between groups were observed for axial rotation, with the RCT group using greater internal rotation to complete functional tasks, and significant differences between groups were identified for all three thoracohumeral degrees of freedom for functional pull. We conclude that older adults with RCT used more internal rotation to perform functional tasks than controls. The kinematic differences identified in this study may have consequences for progression of shoulder damage and further functional impairment in older adults with RCT. PMID:26879327

  2. Implementation of a Shoulder Soft Tissue Injury Triage Service in a UK NHS Teaching Hospital Improves Time to Surgery for Acute Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Marcus; Davies-Jones, Gareth; Tambe, Amol; Clark, David I

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder problems account for 2.4% of GP consultations in the United Kingdom and of those 70% are related to the rotator cuff. Many rotator cuff tears are of a degenerate nature but they can occur as a result of trauma in 8% of cases. Evidence suggests that patients with traumatic rotator cuff tears gain a better outcome in terms of pain and function if the tear is repaired early after injury. A specialist shoulder soft tissue injury clinic was set up in a large UK NHS teaching hospital with the primary purpose in the first year to halve the length of time patients with traumatic rotator cuff tears had to wait to consult a specialist and double the number of patients undergoing surgical repair within three months. The secondary purpose was to ensure that the new clinic was utilised to capacity by the end of the first year. The clinic was later expanded to manage patients with acute glenohumeral joint (GHJ) or acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocations and identify those patients requiring surgical stabilisation. The new service involved referral of all patients presenting to the Accident & Emergency department with recent shoulder trauma and either an inability to raise the arm over shoulder height with a normal set of radiographs, or a confirmed GHJ or ACJ dislocation; to a specialist clinic run by an experienced upper limb physiotherapist. Patients were reassessed and referred for further imaging if required. Those patients found to have traumatic rotator cuff tears or structural instability lesions were listed for expedited surgery. The clinic ran alongside a consultant-led fracture clinic giving fast access to surgical decision-making. The service was reviewed after 3, 6, and 12 months and findings compared to a sample of 30 consecutive patients having undergone rotator cuff repair surgery via the previous pathway. 144 patients were referred to the clinic in the first year: 62 with rotator cuff symptoms, 38 with GHJ instability, 13 with ACJ instability, and 33

  3. Treatment of non-traumatic rotator cuff tears: A randomised controlled trial with one-year clinical results.

    PubMed

    Kukkonen, J; Joukainen, A; Lehtinen, J; Mattila, K T; Tuominen, E K J; Kauko, T; Aärimaa, V

    2014-01-01

    We have compared three different methods of treating symptomatic non-traumatic tears of the supraspinatus tendon in patients above 55 years of age. A total of 180 shoulders (173 patients) with supraspinatus tendon tears were randomly allocated into one of three groups (each of 60 shoulders); physiotherapy (group 1), acromioplasty and physiotherapy (group 2) and rotator cuff repair, acromioplasty and physiotherapy (group 3). The Constant score was assessed and followed up by an independent observer pre-operatively and at three, six and twelve months after the intervention. Of these, 167 shoulders were available for assessment at one year (follow-up rate of 92.8%). There were 55 shoulders in group 1 (24 in males and 31 in females, mean age 65 years (55 to 79)), 57 in group 2 (29 male and 28 female, mean age 65 years (55 to 79)) and 55 shoulders in group 3 (26 male and 29 female, mean age 65 years (55 to 81)). There were no between-group differences in the Constant score at final follow-up: 74.1 (sd 14.2), 77.2 (sd 13.0) and 77.9 (sd 12.1) in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively (p = 0.34). The mean change in the Constant score was 17.0, 17.5, and 19.8, respectively (p = 0.34). These results suggest that at one-year follow-up, operative treatment is no better than conservative treatment with regard to non-traumatic supraspinatus tears, and that conservative treatment should be considered as the primary method of treatment for this condition. PMID:24395315

  4. Evidence of healing of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears following arthroscopic augmentation with a collagen implant: a 2-year MRI follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Bokor, Desmond John; Sonnabend, David; Deady, Luke; Cass, Ben; Young, Allan; Van Kampen, Craig; Arnoczky, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background partial-thickness rotator cuff tears frequently enlarge due to increased local strain and often progress to full-thickness tears. Studies suggest the addition of new tendinous tissue to injured cuff tendons would significantly decrease peak strain, possibly protecting against tear progression. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of a highly-porous collagen implant to induce new tissue formation and limit tear progression when placed on the bursal surface of partial-thickness cuff tears. Methods following arthroscopic subacromial decompression, the implant was attached to the bursal surface of the supraspinatus tendon in a prospective series of 13 consecutive patients with intermediate – (3–6 mm) to high-grade (>6 mm) partial – thickness cuff tears (5 articular, 3 bursal, 5 intra-substance). Tendon thickness, defect size, and tendon quality were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Constant and American Shoulder and Elbow Society scores at the same preoperative and follow-up times. All 13 patients completed all follow-up exams (mean length of follow-up 27.0 months, range 23.3–32.0); no patients were lost to follow-up. Results the implant induced significant new tissue formation in all patients by 3 months (mean increase in tendon thickness 2.2 ± 0.26 mm). This tissue matured over time and became radiologically indistinguishable from the underlying tendon. The partial-thickness cuff tears showed consistent filling of the defects, with complete healing in 7 patients at 12 months, and a progressive improvement in tendon quality in the remaining patients. No tear progression was observed by MRI in any of the patients at 24 months. All clinical scores improved significantly over time. At 24 months, 12 of 13 patients (92%) had satisfactory or better results. Conclusions the results of this clinical study demonstrated

  5. Are Platelet-Rich Products Necessary during the Arthroscopic Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Ge, Heng’an; Zhou, Jiaojiao; Cheng, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Background Platelet-rich products (PRP) are widely used for rotator cuff tears. However, whether platelet-rich products produce superior clinical or radiological outcomes is controversial. This study aims to use meta-analysis to compare clinical and radiological outcomes between groups with or without platelet-rich products. Methods The Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane library databases were searched for relevant studies published before April 20, 2013. Studies were selected that clearly reported a comparison between the use or not of platelet-rich products. The Constant, ASES, UCLA, and SST scale systems and the rotator cuff retear rate were evaluated. The weighted mean differences and relative risks were calculated using a fixed-effects model. Results Seven studies were enrolled in this meta-analysis. No significant differences were found for the Constant scale (0.73, 95% CI, −1.82 to 3.27, P = 0.58), ASES scale (−2.89, 95% CI, −6.31 to 0.53, P = 0.1), UCLA scale (−0.79, 95% CI, −2.20 to 0.63, P = 0.28), SST scale (0.34, 95% CI, −0.01 to 0.69, P = 0.05), and the overall rotator cuff retear rate (0.71, 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.05, P = 0.08). Subgroup analysis according to the initial tear size showed a lower retear rate in small- and medium-sized tears (0.33, 95% CI, 0.12 to 0.91, P = 0.03) after platelet-rich product application but no difference for large- and massive-sized tears (0.86, 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.23, P = 0.42). Conclusion In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests that the platelet-rich products have no benefits on the overall clinical outcomes and retear rate for the arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. However, a decrease occurred in the rate of retears among patients treated with PRP for small- and medium-sized rotator cuff tears but not for large- and massive-sized tears. Level of Evidence Level II PMID:23874991

  6. Rotator cuff injuries in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jennifer M; Arkader, Alexandre; Wells, Lawrence M; Ganley, Theodore J

    2013-03-01

    The cause of rotator cuff injuries in the young athlete has been described as an overuse injury related to internal impingement. Abduction coupled with external rotation is believed to impinge on the rotator cuff, specifically the supraspinatus, and lead to undersurface tears that can progress to full-thickness tears. This impingement is believed to be worsened with increased range of motion and instability in overhead athletes. A retrospective review of seven patients diagnosed with rotator cuff injuries was performed to better understand this shoulder injury pattern. The type of sport played, a history of trauma, diagnosis, treatment method, and outcome were noted. Six patients were male and one was a female. Baseball was the primary sport for four patients, basketball for one, gymnastics for one, and wrestling for one. The following injury patterns were observed: two patients tore their subscapularis tendon, two sustained avulsion fractures of their lesser tuberosity, one tore his rotator interval, one tore his supraspinatus, and one avulsed his greater tuberosity. Only four patients recalled a specific traumatic event. Three patients were treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, three with miniopen repair, and one was treated with rehabilitation. Six of the seven patients returned to their preinjury level of sport after treatment. Rotator cuff tears are rare in the adolescent age group. The injury patterns suggest that acute trauma likely accounts for many rotator cuff tears and their equivalents in the young patient. Adolescents with rotator cuff tears reliably return to sports after treatment. The possibility of rotator cuff tears in skeletally immature athletes should be considered. The prognosis is very good once this injury is identified and treated. PMID:22668571

  7. Rotator cuff injuries in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jennifer M; Arkader, Alexandre; Wells, Lawrence M; Ganley, Theodore J

    2013-03-01

    The cause of rotator cuff injuries in the young athlete has been described as an overuse injury related to internal impingement. Abduction coupled with external rotation is believed to impinge on the rotator cuff, specifically the supraspinatus, and lead to undersurface tears that can progress to full-thickness tears. This impingement is believed to be worsened with increased range of motion and instability in overhead athletes. A retrospective review of seven patients diagnosed with rotator cuff injuries was performed to better understand this shoulder injury pattern. The type of sport played, a history of trauma, diagnosis, treatment method, and outcome were noted. Six patients were male and one was a female. Baseball was the primary sport for four patients, basketball for one, gymnastics for one, and wrestling for one. The following injury patterns were observed: two patients tore their subscapularis tendon, two sustained avulsion fractures of their lesser tuberosity, one tore his rotator interval, one tore his supraspinatus, and one avulsed his greater tuberosity. Only four patients recalled a specific traumatic event. Three patients were treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, three with miniopen repair, and one was treated with rehabilitation. Six of the seven patients returned to their preinjury level of sport after treatment. Rotator cuff tears are rare in the adolescent age group. The injury patterns suggest that acute trauma likely accounts for many rotator cuff tears and their equivalents in the young patient. Adolescents with rotator cuff tears reliably return to sports after treatment. The possibility of rotator cuff tears in skeletally immature athletes should be considered. The prognosis is very good once this injury is identified and treated.

  8. Obesity Has Minimal Impact on Short-Term Functional Scores After Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for Rotator Cuff Tear Arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Morris, Brent J; Haigler, Richard E; Cochran, John M; Laughlin, Mitzi S; Elkousy, Hussein A; Gartsman, Gary M; Edwards, T Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The potential adverse effect of body mass index (BMI) on shoulder function scores after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) has not been investigated. We conducted a study to examine outcomes of RSA performed for rotator cuff tear arthropathy (RCTA) across BMI categories (normal weight, overweight, obese). We hypothesized that, compared with normal-weight patients, obese patients would have worse shoulder function scores, worse mobility, and more complications. Using a prospective shoulder arthroplasty registry, we identified 77 primary RSAs performed for RCTA with minimum 2-year follow-up. Thirty-four patients had normal weight (BMI <25 kg/m2), 21 were overweight (BMI 25-30 kg/m2), and 22 were obese (BMI >30 kg/m2). Shoulder function scores, mobility, and satisfaction were evaluated before surgery and at final follow-up. The 3 BMI groups were not significantly different on demographic factors, preoperative shoulder function scores, or preoperative mobility (P > .05). For each group, shoulder function scores and mobility significantly improved between the preoperative and final follow-up assessments (P < .001). Patient satisfaction was similar between groups (P = .967). Improved shoulder function scores, mobility, and patient satisfaction can be expected after RSA for RCTA in patients regardless of BMI. PMID:27327923

  9. Medium- to long-term results of a randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of arthoscopic-subacromial decompression versus mini-open repair for the treatment of medium-sized rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Ann; Temperley, David; Odak, Saurabh; Walton, Michael J; Haines, John F; Trail, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Background We report on the medium- to long-term results of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) aiming to determine whether rotator cuff repair confers any advantage over arthroscopic sub-acromial decompression (ASAD) alone in the management of medium-sized rotator cuff tears. Methods Ethical approval was sought to follow-up patients previously enrolled in a completed and previously published RCT comparing the outcome of ASAD with mini-open cuff repair for the treatment of rotator cuff tear. Forty-two patients were enrolled in the original study, with a mean of 64 years (range 54 years to 77 years). Results Fifteen of the original 17 patients randomized to ASAD alone and 18 of the original 25 patients randomized to cuff repair were available for follow-up. Each patient underwent American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and Constant scoring, and clinical and ultrasound examination. Mean duration of follow-up was 7 years (range 5 years to 11 years). There was no statistically significant difference in terms of ASES, DASH and Constant scores at follow-up between the two groups. Some 33% of patients in the cuff-repair group had a proven re-rupture on ultrasound. This patient subgroup had significantly worse Constant scores compared to patients where the repair remained intact. None of the patients from either group developed cuff-tear arthropathy requiring arthroplasty surgery. Conclusions In this medium- to longer-term study, there is no demonstrable significant benefit of cuff repair over decompression alone for the treatment of medium-sized rotator cuff tears, in terms of ASES, DASH and Constant scores for pain, function and strength modules. The presence of cuff tear does not necessitate surgical repair. This conclusion should drive surgical strategies and shared decision-making between patients and surgeons. PMID:27583006

  10. Minimally Important Differences and Change Across Time in Patients Treated Surgically and Non-Surgically for Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Bruce S.; Robbins, Christopher; Gagnier, Joel Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The minimally important difference (MID) is the smallest change in an outcome measure that is perceived by patients as beneficial. The MIDs for the ASES and WORC scores have not been established in a homogenous population of patients with rotator cuff tears. The objective of the present study was to establish the MIDs for patients with known cuff tears who were treated both surgically and non-surgically, and to compare the MIDs over time. Methods: We included 209 subjects with known full-thickness rotator cuff tears who were followed prospectively for two years. The WORC and ASES scores were collected at baseline, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 48 weeks, 1 year and 2 years. At the final follow-up point patients filled out an end-of-study form which included questions regarding change in their condition after treatment. Results: For those that indicated being minimally better, the change from baseline for the ASES score was -20.57 (-2.94 to -38.20) and for the WORC was 418.60 (70.39 to 766.81); both indicated improvement in outcomes. When converted to the percentage change score the WORC change represented 19.93%. The plots of these new MID values for the ASES and WORC indicate that not only does the operative group improve more than the non-operative group but it does so to an extent that is greater than the MID. The non-operative group also improved across time, but the magnitude did not exceed the MID for either the WORC or the ASES. Conclusion: We found that the ASES and the WORC MIDs in patients with rotator cuff tears is different from that previously reported, and that the operative group change was greater than the non-operative group change. This information will directly improve our ability to: (1) Determine when patients with RCTs are changing in a meaningful manner; (2) Accurately power clinical studies using these outcome measures; (3) Make more informed choices of treatments in these patients. This is the first study to report MIDs for the ASES and WORC

  11. High-Grade Articular, Bursal, and Intratendinous Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: A Retrospective Study Comparing Functional Outcomes After Completion and Repair.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Nicholas K; Nickel, Brian T; Grindel, Steven I

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a study to assess the impact of tear location on functional outcomes in high-grade partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) after arthroscopic completion and repair. Retrospectively, we evaluated the preoperative and postoperative findings of 60 patients who underwent arthroscopic completion and repair of Ellman grade 3 partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus. The 60 patients were grouped by tear subtype (20 articular, 20 bursal, 20 intratendinous) as identified by preoperative imaging and confirmed at time of surgery. After surgery, the 3 subtypes showed similar significant (P < .001) improvements in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores (articular, 46.9, 85.1; bursal, 44.3, 80.3; intratendinous, 43.6, 86.1), Constant scores (articular, 54.3, 79.4; bursal, 49.9, 75.0; intratendinous, 56.8, 80.9), and visual analog scale scores (articular, 5.1, 1.2; bursal, 5.8, 1.6; intratendinous, 6.0, 1.2). Our study findings validate use of the current algorithm for Ellman grade 3 PTRCTs of the supraspinatus and advocate their completion and repair, regardless of tear location. PMID:27552462

  12. A comparison of functional outcomes in patients undergoing revision arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears with and without arthroscopic suprascapular nerve release

    PubMed Central

    Savoie, Felix H; Zunkiewicz, Mark; Field, Larry D; Replogle, William H; O’Brien, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to compare functional outcomes in patients undergoing revision repair of massive rotator cuff tears (retracted medial to the glenoid) with Goutallier Grade 4 atrophy and concomitant release of the suprascapular nerve to a similar group of patients with Grade 3 atrophy undergoing revision rotator cuff repair (RTCR) without nerve release. We hypothesized that patients undergoing nerve release would have more favorable functional outcomes as measured by the Modified University of California at Los Angeles shoulder rating scale (UCLA). Patients and methods Twenty-two patients underwent revision repair of massive rotator cuff tears with release of the suprascapular nerve at the suprascapular notch. We compared total preoperative, postoperative, and change in UCLA score in these patients to a similar group of 22 patients undergoing revision RTCR without suprascapular nerve release. Additionally, UCLA subscores between the two groups were compared preoperatively and at final follow-up. Results The average preoperative UCLA score in the nerve-release group was 7.91, and final follow-up average was 27.86; average 3.05 grades of strength were recovered. In the comparison group, average preoperative UCLA score was 11.77, and final follow-up average was 29.09; average 1.32 grades of strength were recovered. The average preoperative UCLA score was significantly worse in the nerve-release group (P=0.007). The average postoperative UCLA score was not significantly different (P=0.590) between the groups, indicating a better improvement in the nerve-release group with significantly greater improvement in active forward flexion, strength, and pain relief. Conclusion Patients who underwent concomitant release of the suprascapular nerve during revision RTCR had greater overall improvement as noted in pain relief, active forward flexion, and strength, than a comparable group without nerve release. PMID:27799834

  13. Rotator cuff repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... torn rotator cuff is usually successful in relieving pain in the shoulder. The procedure may not always return strength to ... may not fully heal. Stiffness, weakness, and chronic pain may still be ... are not followed. Older patients (over age 65). Smoking.

  14. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  15. Treatment options for irreparable postero-superior cuff tears in young patients

    PubMed Central

    Galasso, Olimpio; Familiari, Filippo; Gasparini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) occur more commonly with advanced age, with most rotator cuff abnormalities in patients less than 30 years old being painful tendinoses or partial-thickness RCTs. Irreparable postero-superior cuff tears has been reported as frequent as 7% to 10% in the general population, and the incidence of irreparable RCTs in young patients is still unknown. Several surgical procedures have been proposed for young patients with irreparable postero-superior RCTs, such as rotator cuff debridement, partial rotator cuff repair, biceps tenotomy/tenodesis, rotator cuff grafting, latissimus dorsi tendon transfer, and reverse shoulder arthroplasty. After being thoroughly investigated in open surgery, arthroscopic techniques for latissimus dorsi tendon transfer have been recently described. They have been shown to be an adequate option to open surgery for managing irreparable postero-superior RCTs refractory to conservative management. PMID:26601058

  16. Scaffold devices for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Ricchetti, Eric T; Aurora, Amit; Iannotti, Joseph P; Derwin, Kathleen A

    2012-02-01

    Rotator cuff tears affect 40% or more of those aged older than 60 years, and repair failure rates of 20% to 70% remain a significant clinical challenge. Hence, there is a need for repair strategies that can augment the repair by mechanically reinforcing it, while at the same time biologically enhancing the intrinsic healing potential of the tendon. Tissue engineering strategies to improve rotator cuff repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, and cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Currently, scaffolds derived from mammalian extracellular matrix, synthetic polymers, and a combination thereof, have been cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and are marketed as medical devices for rotator cuff repair in humans. Despite the growing clinical use of scaffold devices for rotator cuff repair, there are numerous questions related to their indication, surgical application, safety, mechanism of action, and efficacy that remain to be clarified or addressed. This article reviews the current basic science and clinical understanding of commercially available synthetic and extracellular matrix scaffolds for rotator cuff repair. Our review will emphasize the host response and scaffold remodeling, mechanical and suture-retention properties, and preclinical and clinical studies on the use of these scaffolds for rotator cuff repair. We will discuss the implications of these data on the future directions for use of these scaffolds in tendon repair procedures.

  17. Arthroscopic Repair of Articular Surface Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Transtendon Technique versus Repair after Completion of the Tear—A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Woodmass, Jarret M.; Bois, Aaron J.; Boorman, Richard S.; Thornton, Gail M.

    2016-01-01

    Articular surface partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are commonly repaired using two different surgical techniques: transtendon repair or repair after completion of the tear. Although a number of studies have demonstrated excellent clinical outcomes, it is unclear which technique may provide superior clinical outcomes and tendon healing. The purpose was to evaluate and compare the clinical outcomes following arthroscopic repair of articular surface PTRCT using a transtendon technique or completion of the tear. A systematic review of the literature was performed following PRISMA guidelines and checklist. The objective outcome measures evaluated in this study were the Constant Score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Visual Analogue Scale, physical examination, and complications. Three studies met our criteria. All were prospective randomized comparative studies with level II evidence and published from 2012 to 2013. A total of 182 shoulders (mean age 53.7 years; mean follow-up 40.5 months) were analyzed as part of this study. Both procedures provided excellent clinical outcomes with no significant difference in Constant Score and other measures between the procedures. Both procedures demonstrated improved clinical outcomes. However, there were no significant differences between each technique. Further studies are required to determine the long-term outcome of each technique. PMID:27462471

  18. Biologics in rotator cuff surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schär, Michael O; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    Pathologies of the rotator cuff are by far the most common cause of shoulder dysfunction and pain. Even though reconstruction of the rotator cuff results in improved clinical outcome scores, including decreased pain, several studies report high failure rates. Orthopaedic research has therefore focused on biologically augmenting the rotator cuff reconstruction and improving tendon–bone healing of the rotator cuff. This biological augmentation has included the application of different platelet concentrates containing growth factors, mesenchymal stem cells, scaffolds and a combination of the above. The present review provides an overview over the biological augmentation options based upon current evidence. PMID:27582941

  19. Patch-Augmented Rotator Cuff Repair and Superior Capsule Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Petri, M.; Greenspoon, J.A.; Moulton, S.G.; Millett, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Massive rotator cuff tears in active patients with minimal glenohumeral arthritis remain a particular challenge for the treating surgeon. Methods: A selective literature search was performed and personal surgical experiences are reported. Results: For patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears, a reverse shoulder arthroplasty or a tendon transfer are often performed. However, both procedures have rather high complication rates and debatable long-term results, particularly in younger patients. Therefore, patch-augmented rotator cuff repair or superior capsule reconstruction (SCR) have been recently developed as arthroscopically applicable treatment options, with promising biomechanical and early clinical results. Conclusion: For younger patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears wishing to avoid tendon transfers or reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, both patch-augmentation and SCR represent treatment options that may delay the need for more invasive surgery.

  20. Improved apparatus for predictive diagnosis of rotator cuff disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Anup; Hall, Brittany N.; Thigpen, Charles A.; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2014-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease impacts over 50% of the population over 60, with reports of incidence being as high as 90% within this population, causing pain and possible loss of function. The rotator cuff is composed of muscles and tendons that work in tandem to support the shoulder. Heavy use of these muscles can lead to rotator cuff tear, with the most common causes is age-related degeneration or sport injuries, both being a function of overuse. Tears ranges in severity from partial thickness tear to total rupture. Diagnostic techniques are based on physical assessment, detailed patient history, and medical imaging; primarily X-ray, MRI and ultrasonography are the chosen modalities for assessment. The final treatment technique and imaging modality; however, is chosen by the clinician is at their discretion. Ultrasound has been shown to have good accuracy for identification and measurement of full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. In this study, we report on the progress and improvement of our method of transduction and analysis of in situ measurement of rotator cuff biomechanics. We have improved the ability of the clinician to apply a uniform force to the underlying musculotendentious tissues while simultaneously obtaining the ultrasound image. This measurement protocol combined with region of interest (ROI) based image processing will help in developing a predictive diagnostic model for treatment of rotator cuff disease and help the clinicians choose the best treatment technique.

  1. Rotator cuff repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... shoulder and arm bones. The tendons can be torn from overuse or injury. ... Surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff is usually very successful at relieving pain in the shoulder. The procedure is less predictable at returning strength ...

  2. Rotator cuff - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that attach to the bones of the shoulder ... problems include: Tendinitis , which is irritation of the tendons and inflammation of the bursa (a normally smooth ...

  3. Regenerative Medicine in Rotator Cuff Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Randelli, Pietro; Ragone, Vincenza; Menon, Alessandra; Cabitza, Paolo; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff injuries are a common source of shoulder pathology and result in an important decrease in quality of patient life. Given the frequency of these injuries, as well as the relatively poor result of surgical intervention, it is not surprising that new and innovative strategies like tissue engineering have become more appealing. Tissue-engineering strategies involve the use of cells and/or bioactive factors to promote tendon regeneration via natural processes. The ability of numerous growth factors to affect tendon healing has been extensively analyzed in vitro and in animal models, showing promising results. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a whole blood fraction which contains several growth factors. Controlled clinical studies using different autologous PRP formulations have provided controversial results. However, favourable structural healing rates have been observed for surgical repair of small and medium rotator cuff tears. Cell-based approaches have also been suggested to enhance tendon healing. Bone marrow is a well known source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Recently, ex vivo human studies have isolated and cultured distinct populations of MSCs from rotator cuff tendons, long head of the biceps tendon, subacromial bursa, and glenohumeral synovia. Stem cells therapies represent a novel frontier in the management of rotator cuff disease that required further basic and clinical research. PMID:25184132

  4. Natural History of Rotator Cuff Disease and Implications on Management

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative rotator cuff disease is commonly associated with ageing and is often asymptomatic. The factors related to tear progression and pain development are just now being defined through longitudinal natural history studies. The majority of studies that follow conservatively treated painful cuff tears or asymptomatic tears that are monitored at regular intervals show slow progression of tear enlargement and muscle degeneration over time. These studies have highlighted greater risks for disease progression for certain variables, such as the presence of a full-thickness tear and involvement of the anterior aspect supraspinatus tendon. Coupling the knowledge of the natural history of degenerative cuff tear progression with variables associated with greater likelihood of successful tendon healing following surgery will allow better refinement of surgical indications for rotator cuff disease. In addition, natural history studies may better define the risks of nonoperative treatment over time. This article will review pertinent literature regarding degenerative rotator cuff disease with emphasis on variables important to defining appropriate initial treatments and refining surgical indications. PMID:26726288

  5. Impingement is not impingement: the case for calling it "Rotator Cuff Disease".

    PubMed

    McFarland, Edward G; Maffulli, Nicola; Del Buono, Angelo; Murrell, George A C; Garzon-Muvdi, Juan; Petersen, Steve A

    2013-07-01

    Historically, many causes have been proposed for rotator cuff conditions. The most prevalent theory is that the rotator cuff tendons, especially the supraspinatus, make contact with the acromion and coracoacromial ligament, resulting in pain and eventual tearing of the tendon. However, more recent evidence suggests that this concept does not explain the changes in rotator cuff tendons with age. The role of acromioplasty and coracoacromial ligament release in the treatment of rotator cuff disease has become questioned. Evidence now suggests that tendinopathy associated with aging may be a predominant factor in the development of rotator cuff degeneration. We propose that the overwhelming evidence favors factors other than "impingement" as the major cause of rotator cuff disease and that a paradigm shift in the way the development of rotator cuff pathology is conceptualized allows for a more comprehensive approach to the care of the patient with rotator cuff disease. PMID:24367779

  6. Impingement is not impingement: the case for calling it “Rotator Cuff Disease”

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Edward G.; Maffulli, Nicola; Del Buono, Angelo; Murrell, George A. C.; Garzon-Muvdi, Juan; Petersen, Steve A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Historically, many causes have been proposed for rotator cuff conditions. The most prevalent theory is that the rotator cuff tendons, especially the supraspinatus, make contact with the acromion and coracoacromial ligament, resulting in pain and eventual tearing of the tendon. However, more recent evidence suggests that this concept does not explain the changes in rotator cuff tendons with age. The role of acromioplasty and coracoacromial ligament release in the treatment of rotator cuff disease has become questioned. Evidence now suggests that tendinopathy associated with aging may be a predominant factor in the development of rotator cuff degeneration. We propose that the overwhelming evidence favors factors other than “impingement” as the major cause of rotator cuff disease and that a paradigm shift in the way the development of rotator cuff pathology is conceptualized allows for a more comprehensive approach to the care of the patient with rotator cuff disease. PMID:24367779

  7. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tempelaere, Christine; Pierrart, Jérome; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Vuillemin, Valérie; Cuénod, Charles-André; Hansen, Ulrich; Mir, Olivier; Skalli, Wafa; Gregory, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases. Methods Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI. Results The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear) and without tears (tendinopathy) (p = 0.012). The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm) than in normals (3.4mm) (p = 0.02). The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm) and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm) shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm) and tendinopathy (4.8mm) shoulders (p = 0.05). Conclusion The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; ‘Looseness’, i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position. PMID:27434235

  8. Rotator cuff and subacromial pathology.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Corrie M; Jacobson, Jon A

    2015-07-01

    Both MRI and ultrasound (US) demonstrate equivalent accuracy in the evaluation of the rotator cuff. Both modalities have their advantages, disadvantages, and pitfalls. Radiography is an important complementary modality in that it can demonstrate occult sources of shoulder pain. MRI is recommended for the evaluation of shoulder pain in patients < 40 years of age because labral pathology is frequently identified. However, in patients > 40 years, US should be the first-line modality because the incidence of rotator cuff pathology increases with age. US is useful to guide procedures such as subacromial injection and calcific tendinosis lavage. Radiologists should be knowledgeable of both MRI and US of the shoulder to tailor these examinations to the specific needs of their patients.

  9. Infraspinatus/Teres Minor Transfer Biceps In Situ Tenodesis Procedure: Initial Results of a Technique for Massive Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Matt D. A.

    2013-01-01

    Massive rotator cuff tears may not be primarily repairable with salvage options not necessarily providing acceptable results. Extrinsic tendon transfer is a significant undertaking with prolonged rehabilitation and variable outcome. A novel technique for the reconstruction of massive tears, not amenable to primary repair, by performing a transfer of the intrinsic posterior rotator cuff onto an intact, tenodesed long head of biceps tendon acting as a scaffold for the intrinsic transfer is described. The clinical results at short to medium term in 17 initial patients are presented. Encouraging results from this study suggest that this is a viable option for the management of massive rotator cuff tears with an intact posterior cuff with results equal or superior to other reconstructive techniques. PMID:24967113

  10. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Rotator Cuff Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Joseph; Mirzayan, Raffy

    2016-01-01

    The success of rotator cuff repair (RCR) surgery can be measured clinically (validated outcome scores, range of motion) as well as structurally (re-tear rates using imaging studies). Regardless of repair type or technique, most studies have shown that patients do well clinically. However, multiple studies have also shown that structurally, the failure rate can be very high. A variety of factors, including poor tendon quality, age over 63 years, smoking, advanced fatty infiltration into the muscle, and the inability of the tendon to heal to bone, have been implicated as the cause of the high re-tear rate in RCRs. The suture-tendon interface is felt to be the weakest link in the RCR construct, and suture pullout through the tendon is believed to be the most common method of failure. This review of the published literature seeks to determine if there is support for augmentation of RCR with acellular dermal matrices to strengthen the suture-tendon interface and reduce the re-tear rate. PMID:27552454

  11. Latissimus dorsi tendon transfer for irreparable postero-superior cuff tears: current concepts, indications, and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Jean; Kany, Jean

    2014-03-01

    Latissimus dorsi tendon transfer is a method for surgical treatment of massive irreparable posterosuperior cuff tears. It partially restores active anteflexion, external rotation, and function of the shoulder but does not significantly increase strength of the shoulder. It is contraindicated in case of pseudoparalytic shoulder; associated irreparable subscapularis tear, deltoid palsy, and in case of associated osteoarthritis, as an isolated procedure. Results are inferior when performed as a secondary procedure compared with a primary procedure. However, latissimus dorsi tendon transfer is an attractive solution to improve shoulder mobility and function of young and non osteoarthritic patients whose previous surgical treatment of massive postero-superior irreparable rotator cuff tear failed. As a primary procedure, latissimus dorsi tendon transfer competes with debridement, biceps tenotomy, and partial cuff repair. In association with reverse shoulder arthroplasty, it restores active external rotation in osteoarthritic patients with active external rotation deficit. New arthroscopic assisted techniques might improve results in the future.

  12. The Role of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) and Other Biologics for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Moulton, Samuel G.; Millett, Peter J.; Petri, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatment of rotator cuff tears has consistently demonstrated good clinical and functional outcomes. However, in some cases, the rotator cuff fails to heal. While improvements in rotator cuff constructs and biomechanics have been made, the role of biologics to aid healing is currently being investigated. Methods: A selective literature search was performed and personal surgical experiences are reported. Results: Biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repairs can for example be performed wtableith platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Clinical results on PRP application have been controversial. Application of MSCs has shown promise in animal studies, but clinical data on its effectiveness is presently lacking. The role of Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors is another interesting field for potential targeted drug therapy after rotator cuff repair. Conclusions: Large randomized clinical studies need to confirm the benefit of these approaches, in order to eventually lower retear rates and improve clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair.

  13. Investigation of 3D glenohumeral displacements from 3D reconstruction using biplane X-ray images: Accuracy and reproducibility of the technique and preliminary analysis in rotator cuff tear patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Skalli, Wafa; Lagacé, Pierre-Yves; Billuart, Fabien; Ohl, Xavier; Cresson, Thierry; Bureau, Nathalie J; Rouleau, Dominique M; Roy, André; Tétreault, Patrice; Sauret, Christophe; de Guise, Jacques A; Hagemeister, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) tears may be associated with increased glenohumeral instability; however, this instability is difficult to quantify using currently available diagnostic tools. Recently, the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and registration method of the scapula and humeral head, based on sequences of low-dose biplane X-ray images, has been proposed for glenohumeral displacement assessment. This research aimed to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of this technique and to investigate its potential with a preliminary application comparing RC tear patients and asymptomatic volunteers. Accuracy was assessed using CT scan model registration on biplane X-ray images for five cadaveric shoulder specimens and showed differences ranging from 0.6 to 1.4mm depending on the direction of interest. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility was assessed through two operators who repeated the reconstruction of five subjects three times, allowing defining 95% confidence interval ranging from ±1.8 to ±3.6mm. Intraclass correlation coefficient varied between 0.84 and 0.98. Comparison between RC tear patients and asymptomatic volunteers showed differences of glenohumeral displacements, especially in the superoinferior direction when shoulder was abducted at 20° and 45°. This study thus assessed the accuracy of the low-dose 3D biplane X-ray reconstruction technique for glenohumeral displacement assessment and showed potential in biomechanical and clinical research.

  14. Analysis of Direct Costs of Outpatient Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Narvy, Steven J; Ahluwalia, Avtar; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery is one of the most commonly performed orthopedic surgical procedures. We conducted a study to calculate the direct cost of arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-eight shoulders in 26 patients (mean age, 54.5 years) underwent primary rotator cuff repair by a single fellowship-trained arthroscopic surgeon in the outpatient surgery center of a major academic medical center. All patients had interscalene blocks placed while in the preoperative holding area. Direct costs of this cycle of care were calculated using the time-driven activity-based costing algorithm. Mean time in operating room was 148 minutes; mean time in recovery was 105 minutes. Calculated surgical cost for this process cycle was $5904.21. Among material costs, suture anchor costs were the main cost driver. Preoperative bloodwork was obtained in 23 cases, adding a mean cost of $111.04. Our findings provide important preliminary information regarding the direct economic costs of rotator cuff surgery and may be useful to hospitals and surgery centers negotiating procedural reimbursement for the increased cost of repairing complex tears. PMID:26761928

  15. Analysis of Direct Costs of Outpatient Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Narvy, Steven J; Ahluwalia, Avtar; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery is one of the most commonly performed orthopedic surgical procedures. We conducted a study to calculate the direct cost of arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-eight shoulders in 26 patients (mean age, 54.5 years) underwent primary rotator cuff repair by a single fellowship-trained arthroscopic surgeon in the outpatient surgery center of a major academic medical center. All patients had interscalene blocks placed while in the preoperative holding area. Direct costs of this cycle of care were calculated using the time-driven activity-based costing algorithm. Mean time in operating room was 148 minutes; mean time in recovery was 105 minutes. Calculated surgical cost for this process cycle was $5904.21. Among material costs, suture anchor costs were the main cost driver. Preoperative bloodwork was obtained in 23 cases, adding a mean cost of $111.04. Our findings provide important preliminary information regarding the direct economic costs of rotator cuff surgery and may be useful to hospitals and surgery centers negotiating procedural reimbursement for the increased cost of repairing complex tears.

  16. Arthroscopic Transosseous Rotator Cuff Repair: Technical Note, Outcomes, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Black, Eric M.; Lin, Albert; Srikumaran, Uma; Jain, Nitin; Freehill, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to review the authors’ initial experience with arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair. Thirty-one patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair over a 15-month period. Preoperatively, demographics and subjective scores were recorded. Postoperatively, pain levels, subjective shoulder values, satisfaction scores, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores, complications, and reoperations were noted with a minimum 2-year follow-up. The relationships between pre- and intraoperative variables and outcome scores were determined with univariate analysis. Average patient age was 56 years, and 23 patients (74%) were men. Twenty patients (65%) underwent primary rotator cuff repair, and 11 patients (35%) underwent revision repair. Average time to follow-up was 26 months. Average preoperative pain level and subjective shoulder value were 5.1 of 10 and 35%, respectively. Average postoperative scores included pain level of 0.9 of 10, subjective shoulder value of 84%, satisfaction score of 90.6 of 100, and ASES score of 86.3 of 100. There were 3 (9.7%) major and 2 (6%) minor complications. Patients undergoing revision rotator cuff repair had significantly worse outcomes (pain level, subjective shoulder value, ASES score; P<.05) compared with those undergoing primary repair, and cortical augmentation did not significantly affect outcome. Overall, outcomes after arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair are good, although patients undergoing revision repair do not have the same outcomes as those undergoing primary cuff repair. The procedure is not without complications (9.7% major, 6% minor complications). Cortical augmentation may be used to supplement fixation, although it does not necessarily affect outcomes. Patients without such augmentation may be at increased risk for suture cutout through the bone. PMID:25970360

  17. Midterm clinical outcomes following arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Flanagin, Brody A.; Garofalo, Raffaele; Lo, Eddie Y.; Feher, LeeAnne; Castagna, Alessandro; Qin, Huanying; Krishnan, Sumant G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Arthroscopic transosseous (TO) rotator cuff repair has recently emerged as a new option for surgical treatment of symptomatic rotator cuff tears. Limited data is available regarding outcomes using this technique. This study evaluated midterm clinical outcomes following a novel arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair technique. Materials and Methods: A consecutive series of 107 patients and 109 shoulders underwent arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair for a symptomatic full-thickness tear. Pre and postoperative range of motion (ROM) was compared at an average of 11.8 months. Postoperative outcome scores were obtained at an average of 38.0 months. Statistical analysis was performed to compare pre and postoperative ROM data. Univariate analysis was performed using Student's t-test to compare the effect of other clinical characteristics on final outcome. Results: Statistically significant improvements were noted in forward flexion, external rotation and internal rotation (P < 0.0001). Average postoperative subjective shoulder value was 93.7, simple shoulder test 11.6, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score 94.6. According to ASES scores, results for the 109 shoulders available for final follow-up were excellent in 95 (87.1%), good in 8 (7.3%), fair in 3 (2.8%), and poor in 3 (2.8%). There was no difference in ROM or outcome scores in patients who underwent a concomitant biceps procedure (tenodesis or tenotomy) compared with those who did not. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in outcome between patients who underwent either biceps tenodesis or tenotomy. Age, history of injury preceding the onset of pain, tear size, number of TO tunnels required to perform the repair, and presence of fatty infiltration did not correlate with postoperative ROM or subjective outcome measures at final follow-up. Two complications and four failures were noted. Conclusions: Arthroscopic TO rotator cuff repair technique leads to

  18. Teres Minor Hypertrophy is a Common and Negative Predictor of Outcomes after Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Tokish, John M.; Thigpen, Charles A.; Kissenberth, Michael J.; Hunt, Quinn; Tolan, Stefan John; Swinehart, S. Dane; Shelley, Christina; Hawkins, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The teres minor has received increased attention in its role as a rotator cuff muscle, particularly in the setting of large infraspinatus tears. Studies have shown that it plays an important beneficial role after total (TSA) and reverse (RSA) shoulder arthroplasty, as well as in maintenance of function in the setting of infraspinatus wasting in patients with large rotator cuff tears. No study, however, has investigated how often teres minor hypertrophy occurs in a population of rotator cuff tears, whether it occurs in the absence of infraspinatus tearing, or whether it is a positive or negative prognostic indicator on outcomes after rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of teres minor hypertrophy in a cohort of patients undergoing rotator cuff repair, and to determine its prognostic effect, if any, on outcomes after surgical repair. Methods: Over a 3 year period, all rotator cuff repairs performed in a single practice by 3 American Shoulder and Elbow Society (ASES) member surgeons were collected. One hundered forty-four patients who had preoperative and postoperative (ASES) outcomes (minimum 2 year), and preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) were included in the study. All MRIs were evaluated for rotator cuff tear tendon involvement, tear size, and Goutallier changes of each muscle. In addition, occupational ratios were determined for the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and teres minor muscles. Patients were divided into 2 groups, based upon whether they had teres minor hypertrophy or not, based on a previously established definition. A 2 way univariate ANOVA was used to determine the effect of teres minor hypertrophy(tear size by hypertrophy) and Goutallier changes(tear size by fatty infiltration) on ASES change scores(α=0.05) Results: Teres minor hypertrophy was a relatively common finding in this cohort of rotator cuff patients, with 51% of all shoulders demonstrating hypertrophy. Interestingly, in

  19. Management of failed rotator cuff repair: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Importance Recurrent tear after rotator cuff repair (RCR) is common. Conservative, and open and arthroscopic revisions, have been advocated to treat these failures. Aim or objective The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the different options for managing recurrent rotator cuff tears. Evidence review A search was conducted of level I through 4 studies from January 2000 to October 2015, to identify studies reporting on failed RCR. 10 articles were identified. The overall quality of evidence was very low. Findings Mid-term to long-term follow-up of patients treated conservatively revealed acceptable results; a persistent defect is a well-tolerated condition that only occasionally requires subsequent surgery. Conservative treatment might be indicated in most patients, particularly in case of posterosuperior involvement and poor preoperative range of motion. Revision surgery might be indicated in a young patient with a repairable lesion, a 3 tendon tear, and in those with involvement of the subscapularis. Conclusions and relevance The current review indicates that arthroscopic revision RCR can lead to improvement in functional outcome despite a high retear rate. Further studies are needed to develop specific rehabilitation in the case of primary rotator cuff failure, to better understand the place of each treatment option, and, in case of repair, to optimise tendon healing. PMID:27134759

  20. REHABILITATION AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR: CURRENT CONCEPTS REVIEW AND EVIDENCE-BASED GUIDELINES

    PubMed Central

    Westgard, Paul; Chandler, Zachary; Gaskill, Trevor R.; Kokmeyer, Dirk; Millett, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the characteristics and timing of rotator cuff healing and provide an update on treatments used in rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs. The authors' protocol of choice, used within a large sports medicine rehabilitation center, is presented and the rationale behind its implementation is discussed. Background: If initial nonsurgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear fails, surgical repair is often the next line of treatment. It is evident that a successful outcome after surgical rotator cuff repair is as much dependent on surgical technique as it is on rehabilitation. To this end, rehabilitation protocols have proven challenging to both the orthopaedic surgeon and the involved physical therapist. Instead of being based on scientific rationale, traditionally most rehabilitation protocols are solely based on clinical experience and expert opinion. Methods: A review of currently available literature on rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair on PUBMED / MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed to illustrate the available evidence behind various postoperative treatment modalities. Results: There is little high-level scientific evidence available to support or contest current postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation protocols. Most existing protocols are based on clinical experience with modest incorporation of scientific data. Conclusion: Little scientific evidence is available to guide the timing of postsurgical rotator cuff rehabilitation. To this end, expert opinion and clinical experience remains a large facet of rehabilitation protocols. This review describes a rotator cuff rehabilitation protocol that incorporates currently available scientific literature guiding rehabilitation. PMID:22530194

  1. Clinical and Radiological Evaluation after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Using Suture Bridge Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Won; Bae, Kyoung Wan; Choy, Won Sik

    2013-01-01

    Background We retrospectively assessed the clinical outcomes and investigated risk factors influencing retear after arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique for rotator cuff tear through clinical assessment and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA). Methods Between January 2008 and April 2011, sixty-two cases of full-thickness rotator cuff tear were treated with arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique and follow-up MRA were performed. The mean age was 56.1 years, and mean follow-up period was 27.4 months. Clinical and functional outcomes were assessed using range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score. Radiological outcome was evaluated with preoperative and follow-up MRA. Potential predictive factors that influenced cuff retear, such as age, gender, geometric patterns of tear, size of cuff tear, acromioplasty, fatty degeneration, atrophy of cuff muscle, retraction of supraspinatus, involved muscles of cuff and osteolysis around the suture anchor were evaluated. Results Thirty cases (48.4%) revealed retear on MRA. In univariable analysis, retear was significantly more frequent in over 60 years age group (62.5%) than under 60 years age group (39.5%; p = 0.043), and also in medium to large-sized tear than small-sized tear (p = 0.003). There was significant difference in geometric pattern of tear (p = 0.015). In multivariable analysis, only age (p = 0.036) and size of tear (p = 0.030) revealed a significant difference. The mean active range of motion for forward flexion, abduction, external rotation at the side and internal rotation at the side were significantly improved at follow-up (p < 0.05). The mean Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score increased significantly at follow-up (p < 0.01). The range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score did not differ significantly between the groups with retear and intact repairs (p > 0.05). The locations of retear were insertion site in 10 cases (33.3%) and

  2. Measurement of migration of soft tissue by modified Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA): validation of a new technique to monitor rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Cashman, P M M; Baring, T; Reilly, P; Emery, R J H; Amis, A A

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a technique to use Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) to measure migration of soft-tissue structures after rotator cuff repair. RSA stereo films were obtained; images were analysed using a semi-automatic software program allowing 3D viewing of results. RSA imaging experiments were performed to validate the technique, using a glass phantom with implanted RSA beads and an animal model with steel sutures as RSA markers which were moved known distances. Repeated measurements allowed assessment of inter- and intra-observer variability at a maximum of 1.06 mm. RSA analysis of the phantom showed a variation up to 0.22 mm for static and 0.28 mm for dynamic studies. The ovine tissue specimen demonstrated that using steel sutures as RSA markers in soft tissue is feasible, although less accurate than when measuring bone motion. This novel application of RSA to measure soft tissue migration is practicable and can be extended to in vivo studies.

  3. Arthroscopic Double-Row Transosseous Equivalent Rotator Cuff Repair with a Knotless Self-Reinforcing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Mook, William R.; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Millett, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tears are a significant cause of shoulder morbidity. Surgical techniques for repair have evolved to optimize the biologic and mechanical variables critical to tendon healing. Double-row repairs have demonstrated superior biomechanical advantages to a single-row. Methods: The preferred technique for rotator cuff repair of the senior author was reviewed and described in a step by step fashion. The final construct is a knotless double row transosseous equivalent construct. Results: The described technique includes the advantages of a double-row construct while also offering self reinforcement, decreased risk of suture cut through, decreased risk of medial row overtensioning and tissue strangulation, improved vascularity, the efficiency of a knotless system, and no increased risk for subacromial impingement from the burden of suture knots. Conclusion: Arthroscopic knotless double row rotator cuff repair is a safe and effective method to repair rotator cuff tears. PMID:27733881

  4. The clinical utility of ultrasonography for rotator cuff disease, shoulder impingement syndrome and subacromial bursitis.

    PubMed

    Awerbuch, Mark S

    2008-01-01

    Periarticular shoulder disorders are common in clinical practice, and diagnosis is often difficult. Medicare statistics indicate that between 2001 and 2006 the use of diagnostic shoulder ultrasonography increased significantly. Rotator cuff disease, shoulder impingement syndrome and subacromial bursitis are among the most common diagnoses reported on shoulder ultrasonography. Shoulder ultrasonography is useful in the diagnosis of full thickness tears, but its utility for other rotator cuff disorders, shoulder impingement syndrome and subacromial bursitis is less well established. PMID:18205566

  5. Editorial Commentary: Reflections From a Mature Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgeon on the History and Current Benefits of Augmentation for the Revision of a Massive Rotator Cuff Tear Using Acellular Human Dermal Matrix Allograft.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    Acellular human dermal matrix allografts are now being used to augment and sometimes replace severely damaged rotator cuff tissue. I have been interested in this important aspect of orthopaedics for 15 years and am pleased to have the opportunity to share my personal reflections of some of the highlights in science and the literature that helped get to the point now where we can expect greater than 80% healing even in these difficult cases of revision after massive failed cuff repair. The field of tissue engineering will certainly be a critical part of our rotator cuff surgical future.

  6. Editorial Commentary: Reflections From a Mature Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgeon on the History and Current Benefits of Augmentation for the Revision of a Massive Rotator Cuff Tear Using Acellular Human Dermal Matrix Allograft.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    Acellular human dermal matrix allografts are now being used to augment and sometimes replace severely damaged rotator cuff tissue. I have been interested in this important aspect of orthopaedics for 15 years and am pleased to have the opportunity to share my personal reflections of some of the highlights in science and the literature that helped get to the point now where we can expect greater than 80% healing even in these difficult cases of revision after massive failed cuff repair. The field of tissue engineering will certainly be a critical part of our rotator cuff surgical future. PMID:27594327

  7. Imaging of the Rotator Cuff With Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Hartshorn, Timothy; Ren, Jian; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated the utility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in imaging porcine and human rotator cuff (RTC) tissue, analyzed its effectiveness in identifying clinical pathology, and correlated these findings with histologic examination. Twelve human cadaveric and 6 porcine shoulders were evaluated. Six-millimeter-wide bone sections were harvested from the proximal humerus of each specimen, with each containing the entire enthesis of the respective RTC tendon, as well as 2 cm of tendon medial to the enthesis. Only the supraspinatus tendon was evaluated in the human specimens, whereas the enthesis of multiple RTC tendons were evaluated in the porcine model. All specimens were imaged using OCT and correlated with histologic evaluation. Optical coherence tomography evaluation of macroscopically healthy tissue consistently showed an easily identifiable banding pattern (birefringence) in contrast to a disorganized, homogeneous appearance in grossly diseased tissue. Optical coherence tomography was more effective for qualitative evaluation of RTC tissue, identification of bursal-sided RTC tears, and localization of calcific deposits, whereas intrasubstance tendon delaminations and partial articular-sided tendon avulsion lesions were relatively more difficult to identify. Optical coherence tomography correlated well with histologic evaluation in all specimens. Optical coherence tomography provides high-resolution, subsurface imaging of rotator cuff tissue in real-time to a depth of up to 4 mm with excellent correlation to histology in a cadaveric model. Optical coherence tomography could be an effective adjunctive tool for the identification and localization of rotator cuff pathology. The use of OCT in arthroscopic shoulder surgery potentially provides a minimally invasive modality for qualitative assessment of rotator cuff pathology. This may allow for a decrease in soft tissue dissection, improved qualitative assessment of cuff tissue, and improved patient

  8. The role of acromioplasty for management of rotator cuff problems: where is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Shi, Lewis L; Edwards, T Bradley

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of acromioplasty has increased dramatically in recent decades, but its role in rotator cuff surgery has been debated. Neer popularized the extrinsic theory of rotator cuff pathology, where mechanical compression of the coracoacromial arch leads to tearing of the rotator cuff. Under this theory, acromioplasty is advocated to modify acromial morphology as an essential part of rotator cuff surgery. Proponents of the intrinsic theory suggest rotator cuff tendons undergo degeneration through aging and overuse, and that bursectomy alone without acromioplasty is sufficient. There exist cadaveric studies, expert opinions, and numerous case series espousing both sides of the argument. Recently, however, numerous high-quality prospective randomized controlled trials have been published examining the role of acromioplasty. They have similar study design and randomization protocols, including groups of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with bursectomy and acromioplasty versus isolated bursectomy. The results have been consistent across all studies, with no difference in the outcomes of the acromioplasty and isolated bursectomy groups. Current evidence does not support the routine use of acromioplasty in the treatment of rotator cuff disease. PMID:23316375

  9. FATTY MUSCLE INFILTRATION IN CUFF TEAR: PRE AND POST OPERATIVE EVALUATION BY MRI

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; Sella, Guilherme do Val; Miranda, Eduardo Régis de Alencar Bona; Zampieri, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the fatty infiltration and atrophy of the supraespinatus in the pre- and postoperative of a rotator cuff lesion (RCL), by MRI. Methods: Ten patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears who had undergone surgical arthroscopic rotator cuff repair between September and December 2011 were included. This is a prospective study, with analysis and comparison of fatty infiltration and atrophy of the supraespinatus. The occupation ratio was measured using the magic selection tool in Adobe Photoshop CS3(r) on T1 oblique sagittal Y-view MRI. Through Photoshop, the proportion occupied by the muscle belly regarding its fossae was calculated. Results: There was a statistically significant increase in the muscle ratio (p=0.013) comparing images pre and postoperative, analyzed by the Wilcoxon T test. Conclusion: The proportion of the supraspinal muscle above the pit increases in the immediate postoperative period, probably due to the traction exerted on the tendon at the time of repair. Level of Evidence II, Cohort Study. PMID:26981032

  10. Composition of Muscle Fiber Types in Rat Rotator Cuff Muscles.

    PubMed

    Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Feng; Mi, Jingyi

    2016-10-01

    The rat is a suitable model to study human rotator cuff pathology owing to the similarities in morphological anatomy structure. However, few studies have reported the composition muscle fiber types of rotator cuff muscles in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and distribution in rotator cuff muscles of the rat. It was found that rotator cuff muscles in the rat were of mixed fiber type composition. The majority of rotator cuff fibers labeled positively for MyHCII. Moreover, the rat rotator cuff muscles contained hybrid fibers. So, compared with human rotator cuff muscles composed partly of slow-twitch fibers, the majority of fast-twitch fibers in rat rotator cuff muscles should be considered when the rat model study focus on the pathological process of rotator cuff muscles after injury. Gaining greater insight into muscle fiber types in rotator cuff muscles of the rat may contribute to elucidate the mechanism of pathological change in rotator cuff muscles-related diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1397-1401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Tissue Engineering for Rotator Cuff Repair: An Evidence-Based Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Berton, Alessandra; Spiezia, Filippo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to address the treatment of rotator cuff tears by applying tissue engineering approaches to improve tendon healing, specifically platelet rich plasma (PRP) augmentation, stem cells, and scaffolds. Our systematic search was performed using the combination of the following terms: “rotator cuff”, “shoulder”, “PRP”, “platelet rich plasma”, “stemcells”, “scaffold”, “growth factors”, and “tissue engineering”. No level I or II studies were found on the use of scaffolds and stem cells for rotator cuff repair. Three studies compared rotator cuff repair with or without PRP augmentation. All authors performed arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with different techniques of suture anchor fixation and different PRP augmentation. The three studies found no difference in clinical rating scales and functional outcomes between PRP and control groups. Only one study showed clinical statistically significant difference between the two groups at the 3-month follow up. Any statistically significant difference in the rates of tendon rerupture between the control group and the PRP group was found using the magnetic resonance imaging. The current literature on tissue engineering application for rotator cuff repair is scanty. Comparative studies included in this review suggest that PRP augmented repair of a rotator cuff does not yield improved functional and clinical outcome compared with non-augmented repair at a medium and long-term followup. PMID:25098365

  12. Vitamin D and the immunomodulation of rotator cuff injury.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Kaitlin A; Dilisio, Matthew F; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-01-01

    Tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair surgery has a failure rate of 20%-94%. There has been a recent interest to determine the factors that act as determinants between successful and unsuccessful rotator cuff repair. Vitamin D level in patients is one of the factors that have been linked to bone and muscle proliferation and healing, and it may have an effect on tendon-to-bone healing. The purpose of this article is to critically review relevant published research that relates to the effect of vitamin D on rotator cuff tears and subsequent healing. A review of the literature was conducted to identify all studies that investigate the relationship between vitamin D and tendon healing, in addition to its mechanism of action. The data were then analyzed in order to summarize what is currently known about vitamin D, rotator cuff pathology, and tendon-to-bone healing. The activated metabolite of vitamin D, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, affects osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Likewise, vitamin D plays a significant role in the tendon-to-bone healing process by increasing the bone mineral density and strengthening the skeletal muscles. The 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 binds to vitamin D receptors on myocytes to stimulate growth and proliferation. The form of vitamin D produced by the liver, calcifediol, is a key initiator of the myocyte healing process by moving phosphate into myocytes, which improves function and metabolism. Investigation into the effect of vitamin D on tendons has been sparse, but limited studies have been promising. Matrix metalloproteinases play an active role in remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tendons, particularly deleterious remodeling of the collagen fibers. Also, the levels of transforming growth factor-β3 positively influence the success of the surgery for rotator cuff repair. In the tendon-to-bone healing process, vitamin D has been shown to successfully influence bone and muscle healing, but more research is

  13. Vitamin D and the immunomodulation of rotator cuff injury

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Kaitlin A; Dilisio, Matthew F; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-01-01

    Tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair surgery has a failure rate of 20%–94%. There has been a recent interest to determine the factors that act as determinants between successful and unsuccessful rotator cuff repair. Vitamin D level in patients is one of the factors that have been linked to bone and muscle proliferation and healing, and it may have an effect on tendon-to-bone healing. The purpose of this article is to critically review relevant published research that relates to the effect of vitamin D on rotator cuff tears and subsequent healing. A review of the literature was conducted to identify all studies that investigate the relationship between vitamin D and tendon healing, in addition to its mechanism of action. The data were then analyzed in order to summarize what is currently known about vitamin D, rotator cuff pathology, and tendon-to-bone healing. The activated metabolite of vitamin D, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, affects osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Likewise, vitamin D plays a significant role in the tendon-to-bone healing process by increasing the bone mineral density and strengthening the skeletal muscles. The 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 binds to vitamin D receptors on myocytes to stimulate growth and proliferation. The form of vitamin D produced by the liver, calcifediol, is a key initiator of the myocyte healing process by moving phosphate into myocytes, which improves function and metabolism. Investigation into the effect of vitamin D on tendons has been sparse, but limited studies have been promising. Matrix metalloproteinases play an active role in remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tendons, particularly deleterious remodeling of the collagen fibers. Also, the levels of transforming growth factor-β3 positively influence the success of the surgery for rotator cuff repair. In the tendon-to-bone healing process, vitamin D has been shown to successfully influence bone and muscle healing, but more research is

  14. Biological Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kovacevic, David

    2008-01-01

    A histologically normal insertion site does not regenerate following rotator cuff tendon-to-bone repair, which is likely due to abnormal or insufficient gene expression and/or cell differentiation at the repair site. Techniques to manipulate the biologic events following tendon repair may improve healing. We used a sheep infraspinatus repair model to evaluate the effect of osteoinductive growth factors and BMP-12 on tendon-to-bone healing. Magnetic resonance imaging and histology showed increased formation of new bone and fibrocartilage at the healing tendon attachment site in the treated animals, and biomechanical testing showed improved load-to-failure. Other techniques with potential to augment repair site biology include use of platelets isolated from autologous blood to deliver growth factors to a tendon repair site. Modalities that improve local vascularity, such as pulsed ultrasound, have the potential to augment rotator cuff healing. Important information about the biology of tendon healing can also be gained from studies of substances that inhibit healing, such as nicotine and antiinflammatory medications. Future approaches may include the use of stem cells and transcription factors to induce formation of the native tendon-bone insertion site after rotator cuff repair surgery. PMID:18264850

  15. Rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair: a survey of current UK practice

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff disorders, including rotator cuff tears, are common and can be treated conservatively or surgically. Data suggest that the incidence of surgery to repair the rotator cuff is rising. Despite this rise, the most effective approach to postoperative rehabilitation, a critical component of the recovery process, is not well developed. The present study aimed to describe current practice in the UK in relation to rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair. Methods An electronic survey was developed and disseminated to UK based physiotherapists and surgeons involved with rotator cuff repair. Results One hundred valid responses were received. Although there is a degree of variation, current practice for the majority of respondents consists of sling immobilization for 4 weeks to 6 weeks. During this time, passive movement would be commenced before active movement is introduced towards the end of this phase. Resisted exercise begins 7 weeks to 12 weeks postoperatively, alongside return to light work. A progressive resumption of function, including manual work and sport, is advised from approximately 13 weeks. Conclusions In the context of the current literature, it might be suggested that the current approach to rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair for the majority of respondents is somewhat cautious and has not progressed for over a decade. PMID:27582979

  16. Pseudomonas osteomyelitis of the proximal humerus after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Nuri; Şirin, Evrim; Aydemir, Ahmet Nadir; Zengin, Gökhan

    2014-01-01

    A 59-year-old male patient was operated arthroscopically due to a rotator cuff tear. An early postoperative Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection was treated with early arthroscopic debridement and antibiotic therapy. The patient was lost to follow-up and presented to our clinic with Pseudomonas aeruginosa osteomyelitis after two years. Debridement was again performed and antibiotic-impregnated cement beads were filled into the cavity and taken out 6 weeks postoperatively. No findings of infection were observed at the patient's 2nd year follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first case of Pseudomonas aeruginosa osteomyelitis of the shoulder after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. PMID:25637735

  17. The influence of rotator cuff pathology on functional outcome in total shoulder replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ahearn, Nathanael; McCann, Philip A; Tasker, Andrew; Sarangi, Partha P

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Total shoulder replacement (TSR) is a reliable treatment for glenohumeral osteoarthritis. In addition to proper component orientation, successful arthroplasty requires accurate restoration of soft tissues forces around the joint to maximize function. We hypothesized that pathological changes within the rotator cuff on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) adversely affect the functional outcome following TSR. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of case notes and MRI of patients undergoing TSR for primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis over a 4-year period was performed. Patients were divided into three groups based upon their preoperative MRI findings: (1) normal rotator cuff, (2) the presence of tendonopathy within the rotator cuff, or (3) the presence of a partial thickness rotator cuff tear. Intra-operatively tendonopathy was addressed with debridement and partial thickness tears with repair. Functional outcome was assessed with the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS), and quick disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand score (quick-DASH). Results: We had a full dataset of complete case-notes, PACS images, and patient reported outcome measures available for 43 patients, 15 in group 1, 14 in group 2, and 14 in group 3. Quick-DASH and OSS were calculated at a minimum of 24 months following surgery. There was no statistically significant difference between the results obtained between the three groups of either the OSS (P = 0.45), or quick-DASH (P = 0.46). Conclusions: TSR is an efficacious treatment option for patients with primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis in the medium term, even in the presence of rotator cuff tendonopathy or partial tearing. Minor changes within the cuff do not significantly affect functional outcome following TSR. PMID:24403759

  18. Synthetic Patch Rotator Cuff Repair: A 10-year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Henry M.; Lam, Patrick H.; Murrell, George A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to determine the long-term outcome as a result of the use of synthetic patches as tendon substitutes to bridge massive irreparable rotator cuff defects. Methods All patients who previously had a rotator cuff repair with a synthetic patch (2-mm Gore DUALMESH ePTFE patch; Gore, Flagstaff, AZ, USA; or a 2.87-mm Bard PTFE Felt pledgets; CR Bard, Warwick, RI, USA) were followed-up at a minimum of 8.5 years postoperatively. Assessment of shoulder pain, function, range of motion, strength and imaging was performed. Results Six patients had an interpositional repair with a synthetic patch. One patient had died. In the remaining five patients, the mean tear size at repair was 27 cm2. At 9.7 years postoperatively, all the patches remained in situ and no patient required further surgery. The repair was intact in four out of five patients. Patients had improved external rotation and abduction compared to before surgery (p < 0.02). Conclusions We describe the long-term outcomes of patients who had undergone synthetic patch rotator cuff repair for an irreparable rotator cuff tear. At 9.7 years postoperatively, patients reported less severe and more infrequent pain, as well as greater overall shoulder function, compared to before surgery. Patients also had increased passive external rotation and abduction. All the patches remain in situ and there have been no further operations on these shoulders. PMID:27582907

  19. Prognostic factors for clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Pécora, José Otávio Reggi; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Assunção, Jorge Henrique; Gracitelli, Mauro Emílio Conforto; Martins, João Paulo Sobreiro; Ferreira, Arnaldo Amado

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify prognostic factors of postoperative functional outcomes. METHODS: Retrospective case series evaluating patients undergoing rotator cuff repair, analyzed by the UCLA score (pre and 12-month postoperative) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (preoperative). Patients' intrinsic variables related to the injury and intervention were evaluated. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to determine variables impact on postoperative functional assessment. RESULTS: 131 patients were included. The mean UCLA score increased from 13.17 ± 3.77 to 28.73 ± 6.09 (p<0,001). We obtained 65.7% of good and excellent results. Age (r= 0.232, p= 0.004) and reparability of posterosuperior injuries (r= 0.151, p= 0.043) correlated with the functional assessment at 12 months. After multivariate linear regression analysis, only age was associated (p = 0.008). CONCLUSIONS: The surgical treatment of rotator cuff tears lead to good and excellent results in 65.6% of patients. Age was an independent predictor factor with better clinical outcomes by UCLA score in older patients. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:26207092

  20. Rotator cuff injuries in baseball. Prevention and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Jobe, F W; Bradley, J P

    1988-12-01

    Rotator cuff and ligamentous capsule injuries are common in the young baseball player. In order to understand these injuries, it is important to first appreciate the delicate balance between shoulder mobility and stability as well as the biomechanics of throwing. This background information makes it easy to see how shoulder injuries are really part of a progressive continuum beginning with instability leading to subluxation, and later impingement which can result in a rotator cuff tear. A detailed and precise history and physical is crucial in determining where a patient might be on the continuum. An accurate evaluation will also help appropriately place a patient in one of the following 4 groups: pure impingement, anterior instability due to trauma with secondary impingement, anterior stability due to a hyperelasticity with secondary impingement, and pure anterior instability. A kinesiological repair is the initial treatment of choice. It is the best preventative or early treatment available, and consists of a specific strengthening programme. If this fails (as in only 5 to 10% of the cases), an anatomical repair is instituted. There are 4 basic guidelines when doing this surgery: (a) maintain muscle attachments and proprioceptive fibres; (b) do not shorten the capsule significantly; (c) build up the anterior labrum; and (d) regain full range of motion quickly through abduction splinting and rehabilitation. A postoperative rehabilitation programme is then diligently adhered to, as it is at least as important as the surgery itself.

  1. TGF-β Small Molecule Inhibitor SB431542 Reduces Rotator Cuff Muscle Fibrosis and Fatty Infiltration By Promoting Fibro/Adipogenic Progenitor Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lawrence; Laron, Dominique; Ning, Anne Y.; Kim, Hubert T.; Feeley, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears represent a large burden of muscle-tendon injuries in our aging population. While small tears can be repaired surgically with good outcomes, critical size tears are marked by muscle atrophy, fibrosis, and fatty infiltration, which can lead to failed repair, frequent re-injury, and chronic disability. Previous animal studies have indicated that Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) signaling may play an important role in the development of these muscle pathologies after injury. Here, we demonstrated that inhibition of TGF-β1 signaling with the small molecule inhibitor SB431542 in a mouse model of massive rotator cuff tear results in decreased fibrosis, fatty infiltration, and muscle weight loss. These observed phenotypic changes were accompanied by decreased fibrotic, adipogenic, and atrophy-related gene expression in the injured muscle of mice treated with SB431542. We further demonstrated that treatment with SB431542 reduces the number of fibro/adipogenic progenitor (FAP) cells—an important cellular origin of rotator cuff muscle fibrosis and fatty infiltration, in injured muscle by promoting apoptosis of FAPs. Together, these data indicate that the TGF-β pathway is a critical regulator of the degenerative muscle changes seen after massive rotator cuff tears. TGF-β promotes rotator cuff muscle fibrosis and fatty infiltration by preventing FAP apoptosis. TGF-β regulated FAP apoptosis may serve as an important target pathway in the future development of novel therapeutics to improve muscle outcomes following rotator cuff tear. PMID:27186977

  2. Rotator cuff disorders: How to write a surgically relevant magnetic resonance imaging report?

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Ahmed M; El-Morsy, Ahmad; Badran, Mohamed Aboelnour

    2014-06-28

    Evaluation of rotator cuff is a common indication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning of the shoulder. Conventional MRI is the most commonly used technique, while magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is reserved for certain cases. Rotator cuff disorders are thought to be caused by a combination of internal and external mechanisms. A well-structured MRI report should comment on the relevant anatomic structures including the acromial type and orientation, the presence of os acromiale, acromio-clavicular degenerative spurs and fluid in the subacromial subdeltoid bursa. In addition, specific injuries of the rotator cuff tendons and the condition of the long head of biceps should be accurately reported. The size and extent of tendon tears, tendon retraction and fatty degeneration or atrophy of the muscles are all essential components of a surgically relevant MRI report.

  3. Rotator Cuff Disease and Injury--Evaluation and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Randy

    This presentation considers the incidence, evaluation, and management of rotator cuff disease and injury. Pathogenesis, symptoms, physical findings, treatment (therapeutic and surgical), and prevention are discussed. It is noted that rotator cuff problems, common in athletes, are usually related to an error in training or lack of training. They…

  4. Rotator cuff rehabilitation: current theories and practice.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Jeffrey D; Gowda, Ashok L; Wiater, Brett; Wiater, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    A fully functioning, painless shoulder joint is essential to maintain a healthy, normal quality of life. Disease of the rotator cuff tendons (RCTs) is a common issue that affects the population, increasing with age, and can lead to significant disability and social and health costs. RCT injuries can affect younger, healthy patients and the elderly alike, and may be the result of trauma or occur as a result of chronic degeneration. They can be acutely painful, limited to certain activities or completely asymptomatic and incidental findings. A wide variety of treatment options exists ranging from conservative local and systemic pain modalities, to surgical fixation. Regardless of management ultimately chosen, physiotherapy of the RCT, rotator cuff muscles and surrounding shoulder girdle plays an essential role in proper treatment. Length of treatment, types of therapy and timing may vary if therapy is definitive care or part of a postoperative protocol. Allowing time for adequate RCT healing must always be considered when implementing ROM and strengthening after surgery. With current rehabilitation methods, patients with all spectrums of RCT pathology can improve their function, pain and quality of life. This manuscript reviews current theories and practice involving rehabilitation for RCT injuries.

  5. Preclinical Models for Translating Regenerative Medicine Therapies for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Andrew Ryan; Iannotti, Joseph P.; McCarron, Jesse A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite improvements in the understanding of rotator cuff pathology and advances in surgical treatment options, repairs of chronic rotator cuff tears often re-tear or fail to heal after surgery. Hence, there is a critical need for new regenerative repair strategies that provide effective mechanical reinforcement of rotator cuff repair as well as stimulate and enhance the patient's intrinsic healing potential. This article will discuss and identify appropriate models for translating regenerative medicine therapies for rotator cuff repair. Animal models are an essential part of the research and development pathway; however, no one animal model reproduces all of the features of the human injury condition. The rat shoulder is considered the most appropriate model to investigate the initial safety, mechanism, and efficacy of biologic treatments aimed to enhance tendon-to-bone repair. Whereas large animal models are considered more appropriate to investigate the surgical methods, safety and efficacy of the mechanical—or combination biologic/mechanical—strategies are ultimately needed for treating human patients. The human cadaver shoulder model, performed using standard-of-care repair techniques, is considered the best for establishing the surgical techniques and mechanical efficacy of various repair strategies at time zero. While preclinical models provide a critical aspect of the translational pathway for engineered tissues, controlled clinical trials and postmarketing surveillance are also needed to define the efficacy, proper indications, and the method of application for each new regenerative medicine strategy. PMID:19663651

  6. Repair Integrity and Clinical Outcomes Following Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ariel A.; Mark, P.; DiVenere, Jessica Megan; Klinge, Stephen Austin; Arciero, Robert A.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To prospectively evaluate the effect of early versus delayed motion on repair integrity on 6-month postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans following rotator cuff repair, and to correlate repair integrity with clinical and functional outcomes. We hypothesized that repair integrity would differ between the early and delayed groups and that patients with repair failures would have worse clinical and functional outcomes. Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, single blinded clinical trial comparing an early motion (post-op day 2-3) to a delayed motion (post-op day 28) rehabilitation protocol following arthroscopic repair of isolated supraspinatus tears. All patients underwent MRI at 6 months post-operatively as part of the study protocol. A blinded board-certified and fellowship-trained orthopaedic surgeon (not part of the surgical team) reviewed operative photos and video to confirm the presence of a full thickness supraspinatus tear and to ensure an adequate and consistent repair. The same surgeon along with a blinded sports medicine fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist independently reviewed all MRIs to determine whether the repair was intact at 6 months. Outcome measures were collected by independent evaluators who were also blinded to group assignment. These included the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index, Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) ratings, pain scores, sling use, and physical exam data. Enrolled patients were followed at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year. Results: From October 2008 to April 2012, 73 patients met all inclusion criteria and were willing to participate. 36 patients were randomized to delayed motion and 37 were randomized to early motion. The final study group at 6 months consisted of 58 study participants. Postoperative MRIs were obtained on all of these patients at 6 months regardless of whether or not they were progressing as expected. These MRIs demonstrated an overall failure rate of

  7. Interposition Porcine Acellular Dermal Matrix Xenograft Successful Alternative in Treatment for Massive Rotator Cuff

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Julie; Zgonis, Miltiadis H.; Reay, Kathleen Dolores; Mayer, Stephanie W.; Boggess, Blake; Toth, Alison P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Despite advances in the surgical techniques of rotator cuff repair (RCR), the management of massive rotator cuff tears in shoulders without glenohumeral arthritis poses a difficult problem for surgeons. Failure of massive rotator cuff repairs range from 20-90% at one to two years postoperatively using arthrography, ultrasound, or magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, there are inconsistent outcomes reported with debridement alone of massive rotator cuff tears as well as limitations seen with other current methods of operative intervention including arthroplasty and tendon transfers. The purpose of this prospective, comparative study was to determine if the repair of massive rotator cuff tears using an interposition porcine acellular dermal matrix xenograft improves subjective function, pain, range of motion, and strength at greater than two years follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the largest prospective series reporting outcomes of using porcine acellular dermal matrix xenograft as an interposition graft. Methods: Thirty-seven patients (37 shoulders) with an average age of 66 years (range 51-80 years) were prospectively followed for 33 months (range 23-48) following massive RCR using porcine acellular dermal matrix interposition xenograft. Subjective outcomes were measured using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain score (0-10, 0 = no pain), Modified American Shoulder and Elbow Score (M-ASES), and Short-Form12 (SF-12) scores. Preoperative and postoperative objective outcome measures included active range of motion and supraspinatus and infraspinatus manual muscle strength. Postoperative outcome measures included quantitative muscle strength using a dynamometer and static and dynamic ultrasonography to assess the integrity of the repair. Results: Average VAS pain score decreased from 4.5 to 1.1 (P<0.001). Average postoperative M-ASES was 89.23. Average postoperative SF-12 was 52.6. Mean forward flexion, external and internal rotation significantly

  8. Comparing normal and torn rotator cuff tendons using dynamic shear analysis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, S; Holland, C; Vollrath, F; Carr, A J

    2011-07-01

    This study reports the application of a novel method for quantitatively determining differences in the mechanical properties of healthy and torn rotator cuff tissues. In order to overcome problems of stress risers at the grip-tendon interface that can obscure mechanical measurements of small tendons, we conducted our investigation using dynamic shear analysis. Rotator cuff tendon specimens were obtained from 100 patients during shoulder surgery. They included 82 differently sized tears and 18 matched controls. We subjected biopsy samples of 3 mm in diameter to oscillatory deformation under compression using dynamic shear analysis. The storage modulus (G') was calculated as an indicator of mechanical integrity. Normal tendons had a significantly higher storage modulus than torn tendons, indicating that torn tendons are mechanically weaker than normal tendons (p = 0.003). Normal tendons had a significantly higher mean shear modulus than tendons with massive tears (p < 0.01). Dynamic shear analysis allows the determination of shear mechanical properties of small tissue specimens obtained intra-operatively that could not be studied by conventional methods of tensile testing. These methods could be employed to investigate other musculoskeletal tissues. This pilot study provides some insight into mechanisms that might contribute to the failure of repair surgery, and with future application could help direct the most appropriate treatment for specific rotator cuff tears.

  9. Management of Rotator Cuff and Impingement Injuries in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gerald R.; Kelley, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To review current concepts of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of rotator cuff and impingement injuries in the athlete. Data Sources: The information we present was compiled from a review of classic and recently published material regarding rotator cuff and impingement injuries. These materials were identified through a search of a personal literature database compiled by the authors, as well as by selective searching of the MEDLINE. In addition, much of the information presented represents observations and opinions of the authors developed over 8 to 10 years of treating shoulder injuries in athletes. Data Synthesis: Biomechanics of the normal shoulder and pathophysiology of rotator cuff injuries in the athletic population are discussed, followed by a summary of the important diagnostic features of rotator cuff and impingement injuries. The principles of rehabilitation are extensively presented, along with indications and important technical aspects of selected surgical procedures. General principles and specific protocols of postoperative rehabilitation are also summarized. Conclusions/Recommendations: Rotator cuff and impingement injuries in the athletic population are multifactorial in etiology, exhibiting significant overlap with glenohumeral instability. Nonoperative treatment is successful in most athletic patients with rotator cuff and impingement injuries. When nonoperative treatment fails, arthroscopic surgical techniques such as rotator cuff repair and subacromial decompression may be successful in returning the athlete to competition. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12.Figure 13. PMID:16558644

  10. Rotator Cuff Damage: Reexamining the Causes and Treatments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Heyward L.

    1988-01-01

    Sports medicine specialists are beginning to reexamine the causes and treatments of rotator cuff problems, questioning the role of primary impingement in a deficient or torn cuff and trying new surgical procedures as alternatives to the traditional open acromioplasty. (Author/CB)

  11. Are the good functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff injuries maintained over the long term?☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz; Yonamine, Alexandre Maris

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the good and excellent functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears are maintained over the long term. Methods From the sample of the study conducted by our group in 2006, in which we evaluated the functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears, 35 patients were reassessed, 8 years after the first evaluation. The inclusion criteria were that these patients with massive rotator cuff tears operated by means of an arthroscopic technique, who participated in the previous study and achieved good or excellent outcomes according to the UCLA criteria. Patients whose results were not good or excellent in the first evaluation according to the UCLA criteria were excluded. Results Among the 35 patients reassessed, 91% of them continued to present good and excellent results (40% excellent and 51% good), while 3% presented fair results and 6% poor results. The time interval between the first and second evaluations was 8 years and the minimum length of follow-up since the immediate postoperative period was 9 years (range: 9–17 years), with an average of 11.4 years. Conclusion The good and excellent results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears were mostly maintained (91%), with the same level of function and satisfaction, even though 8 years had passed since the first assessment, with a follow-up period averaging 11.4 years. PMID:26962491

  12. Arthroscopic technique for patch augmentation of rotator cuff repairs.

    PubMed

    Labbé, Marc R

    2006-10-01

    The patient is placed in the lateral position, and an arthroscopic cuff repair is performed according to standard techniques. The line of repair is usually in the shape of a "T" or an "L." The repair is viewed through the lateral portal, with fluid inflow through the scope. Mattress sutures are placed in the anterior and posterior portions of the cuff, with respect to the line of repair, just medial to the most medial point of the tear. The sutures are placed in accordance with margin convergence suture passing methods. Next, 2 double-stranded suture anchors are placed into the lateral aspect of the greater tuberosity, which can be used to secure the anterior and posterior portions of the rotator cuff as well as the patch. The cuff sutures are tied first; then, the patch is addressed. The graft is sized by placement of a ruled probe or similar device into the subacromial space. The length of each side of the "rectangle" is measured to obtain the dimensions of the patch. The patch is then cut to fit the measurements. If the patch material is elastic, a slightly smaller than measured graft is cut to provide tension on the repair. The arthroscope is then moved to the posterior portal, and a large (8 mm) cannula, with a dam, is placed into the lateral portal. All sutures are brought out of the lateral cannula, and corresponding ends of each suture are held together in a clamp. The sutures are placed in their respective orientations once outside the cannula (e.g., anterior-medial, anterior-lateral), covering all 4 quadrants. Care is taken to ensure that the sutures have no twists and are not wrapped around one another. The sutures are passed through the graft, in mattress fashion, with a free needle, in their respective corners and clamped again. The graft is then grasped with a small locking grasper on its medial edge and is passed through the cannula into the subacromial space. The clamps holding the sutures are then gently pulled to remove the slack. A smaller (5 mm

  13. Quantitative assessment of rotator cuff muscle elasticity: Reliability and feasibility of shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Giambini, Hugo; Uehara, Kosuke; Okamoto, Seiji; Chen, Shigao; Sperling, John W; Itoi, Eiji; An, Kai-Nan

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been used to evaluate various shoulder pathologies, whereas, quantification of the rotator cuff muscle stiffness using shear wave elastography (SWE) has not been verified. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and feasibility of SWE measurements for the quantification of supraspinatus (SSP) muscle elasticity. Thirty cadaveric shoulders (18 intact and 12 with torn rotator cuff) were used. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was evaluated on an established SWE technique for measuring the SSP muscle elasticity. To assess the effect of overlying soft tissues above the SSP muscle, SWE values were measured with the transducer placed on the skin, on the subcutaneous fat after removing the skin, on the trapezius muscle after removing the subcutaneous fat, and directly on the SSP muscle. In addition, SWE measurements on 4 shoulder positions (0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° abduction) were compared in those with/without rotator cuff tears. Intra- and inter-observer reliability of SWE measurements were excellent for all regions in SSP muscle. Also, removing the overlying soft tissue showed no significant difference on SWE values measured in the SSP muscle. The SSP muscle with 0° abduction showed large SWE values, whereas, shoulders with large-massive tear showed smaller variation throughout the adduction-abduction positions. SWE is a reliable and feasible tool for quantitatively assessing the SSP muscle elasticity. This study also presented SWE measurements on the SSP muscle under various shoulder abduction positions which might help characterize patterns in accordance to the size of rotator cuff tears. PMID:26472309

  14. Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy: Navigating the Diagnosis-Management Conundrum.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jeremy; McCreesh, Karen; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Ginn, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Synopsis The hallmark characteristics of rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy are pain and weakness, experienced most commonly during shoulder external rotation and elevation. Assessment is complicated by nonspecific clinical tests and the poor correlation between structural failure and symptoms. As such, diagnosis is best reached by exclusion of other potential sources of symptoms. Symptomatic incidence and prevalence data currently cannot be determined with confidence, primarily as a consequence of a lack of diagnostic accuracy, as well as the uncertainty as to the location of symptoms. People with symptoms of RC tendinopathy should derive considerable comfort from research that consistently demonstrates improvement in symptoms with a well-structured and graduated exercise program. This improvement is equivalent to outcomes reported in surgical trials, with the additional generalized benefits of exercise, less sick leave, a faster return to work, and reduced costs to the health care system. This evidence covers the spectrum of conditions that include symptomatic RC tendinopathy and atraumatic partial- and full-thickness RC tears. The principles guiding exercise treatment for RC tendinopathy include relative rest, modification of painful activities, an exercise strategy that initially does not exacerbate pain, controlled reloading, and gradual progression from simple to complex shoulder movements. Evidence also exists for a specific exercise program being beneficial for people with massive inoperable tears of the RC. Education is an essential component of rehabilitation, and attention to lifestyle factors (smoking cessation, nutrition, stress, and sleep management) may enhance outcomes. Outcomes may also be enhanced by subgrouping RC tendinopathy presentations and directing treatment strategies according to the clinical presentation and the patient's response to shoulder symptom modification procedures outlined herein. There are substantial deficits in our knowledge

  15. Massive cuff tears treated with arthroscopically assisted latissimus dorsi transfer. Surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    De Cupis, Vincenzo; De Cupis, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Summary Latissimus dorsi transfer is our preferred treatment for active disabled patients with a posterosuperior massive cuff tear. We present an arthroscopically assisted technique which avoids an incision through the deltoid obtaining a better and faster clinical outcome. The patient is placed in lateral decubitus. After the arthroscopic evaluation of the lesion through a posterior and a posterolateral portal, with the limb in traction we perform the preparation of the greater tuberosity of the humerus. We place the arm in abduction and internal rotation and we proceed to the harvest of the latissimus dorsi and the tendon preparation by stitching the two sides using very resistant sutures. After restoring limb traction, under arthroscopic visualization, we pass a curved grasper through the posterolateral portal by going to the armpit in the space between the teres minor and the posterior deltoid. Once the grasper has exited the access at the level of the axilla we fix two drainage transparent tubes, each with a wire inside, and, withdrawing it back, we shuttle the two tubes in the subacromial space. After tensioning the suture wires from the anterior portals these are assembled in a knotless anchor of 5.5 mm that we place in the prepared site on the greater tuberosity of the humerus. A shoulder brace at 15° of abduction and neutral rotation protect the patient for the first month post-surgery but physical therapy can immediately start. PMID:23738290

  16. Assessment and characterization of in situ rotator cuff biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trent, Erika A.; Bailey, Lane; Mefleh, Fuad N.; Raikar, Vipul P.; Shanley, Ellen; Thigpen, Charles A.; Dean, Delphine; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2013-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a degenerative disorder that is a common, costly, and often debilitating, ranging in severity from partial thickness tear, which may cause pain, to total rupture, leading to loss in function. Currently, clinical diagnosis and determination of disease extent relies primarily on subjective assessment of pain, range of motion, and possibly X-ray or ultrasound images. The final treatment plan however is at the discretion of the clinician, who often bases their decision on personal experiences, and not quantitative standards. The use of ultrasound for the assessment of tissue biomechanics is established, such as in ultrasound elastography, where soft tissue biomechanics are measured. Few studies have investigated the use of ultrasound elastography in the characterization of musculoskeletal biomechanics. To assess tissue biomechanics we have developed a device, which measures the force applied to the underlying musculotendentious tissue while simultaneously obtaining the related ultrasound images. In this work, the musculotendinous region of the infraspinatus of twenty asymptomatic male organized baseball players was examined to access the variability in tissue properties within a single patient and across a normal population. Elastic moduli at percent strains less than 15 were significantly different than those above 15 percent strain within the normal population. No significant difference in tissue properties was demonstrated within a single patient. This analysis demonstrated elastic moduli are variable across individuals and incidence. Therefore threshold elastic moduli will likely be a function of variation in local-tissue moduli as opposed to a specific global value.

  17. Predictors of Outcomes after Arthroscopic Double-row Rotator Cuff Repair in 155 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Katthagen, Jan Christoph; Millett, Peter J.; Espinoza-Ervin, Christopher; Horan, Marilee P.; Ho, Charles P.; Warth, Ryan J.; Dornan, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze predictors of clinical outcomes of knotted versus knotless double-row self-reinforcing rotator cuff repairs of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with propensity score matching. Methods: Patients with arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears involving the supraspinatus tendon using either a knotted or knotless linked, self-reinforcing double-row technique were included in the study. Preoperative subjective evaluation was performed using the ASES and SF-12 PCS scores. After a minimum two-year follow-up period, ASES and SF-12 PCS scores were collected again along with the SANE score, the QuickDASH score, and patient satisfaction. All data were collected prospectively and retrospectively reviewed. Postoperative ASES and SF-12 PCS scores were then modeled using inverse propensity score weighting in a multiple linear regression model (MLR) with multiple imputations. Age, sex, baseline ASES score, length of follow-up, number of anchors, worker’s compensation, previous cuff repair, and double-row repair technique (knotted or knotless) were the covariates used in this model. Results: 155 shoulders in 151 patients (109 men, 42 women; mean age at time of surgery 59±10 years) were eligible for inclusion. Outcomes data were available for 130 of 148 shoulders (87.8%) after exclusion of seven shoulders (4.5%) that underwent revision rotator cuff repair before final follow up (n=33/39 in the knotted group [84.6%]; n=97/109 [88.9%] in the knotless group).The mean follow-up was 2.9 years (range, 2.0-5.4 years). Overall, postoperative outcomes scores were significantly improved when compared to preoperative baselines (p<0.05), with a median postoperative ASES score of 97 for the entire cohort. Our model showed that previous rotator cuff repair had a significant negative effect on postoperative ASES (β = -12.7, p<0.001) and SF-12 PCS scores (β = -5.0, p = 0.036). A workers’ compensation claim (β = -10.6, p

  18. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff

    PubMed Central

    ElShewy, Mohamed Taha

    2016-01-01

    Calcific tendinitis within the rotator cuff tendon is a common shoulder disorder that should be differentiated from dystrophic calcification as the pathogenesis and natural history of both is totally different. Calcific tendinitis usually occurs in the fifth and sixth decades of life among sedentary workers. It is classified into formative and resorptive phases. The chronic formative phase results from transient hypoxia that is commonly associated with repeated microtrauma causing calcium deposition into the matrix vesicles within the chondrocytes forming bone foci that later coalesce. This phase may extend from 1 to 6 years, and is usually asymptomatic. The resorptive phase extends from 3 wk up to 6 mo with vascularization at the periphery of the calcium deposits causing macrophage and mononuclear giant cell infiltration, together with fibroblast formation leading to an aggressive inflammatory reaction with inflammatory cell accumulation, excessive edema and rise of the intra-tendineous pressure. This results in a severely painful shoulder. Radiological investigations confirm the diagnosis and suggest the phase of the condition and are used to follow its progression. Although routine conventional X-ray allows detection of the deposits, magnetic resonance imaging studies allow better evaluation of any coexisting pathology. Various methods of treatment have been suggested. The appropriate method should be individualized for each patient. Conservative treatment includes pain killers and physiotherapy, or “minimally invasive” techniques as needling or puncture and aspiration. It is almost always successful since the natural history of the condition ends with resorption of the deposits and complete relief of pain. Due to the intolerable pain of the acute and severely painful resorptive stage, the patient often demands any sort of operative intervention. In such case arthroscopic removal is the best option as complete removal of the deposits is unnecessary. PMID

  19. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Different Rotator Cuff Lesions Using Shoulder Musculoskeletal Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ruey-Feng; Lee, Chung-Chien; Lo, Chung-Ming

    2016-09-01

    The lifetime prevalence of shoulder pain approaches 70%, which is mostly attributable to rotator cuff lesions such as inflammation, calcific tendinitis and tears. On clinical examination, shoulder ultrasound is recommended for the detection of lesions. However, there exists inter-operator variability in diagnostic accuracy because of differences in the experience and expertise of operators. In this study, a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system was developed to assist ultrasound operators in diagnosing rotator cuff lesions and to improve the practicality of ultrasound examination. The collected cases included 43 cases of inflammation, 30 cases of calcific tendinitis and 26 tears. For each case, the lesion area and texture features were extracted from the entire lesions and combined in a multinomial logistic regression classifier for lesion classification. The proposed CAD achieved an accuracy of 87.9%. The individual accuracy of this CAD system was 88.4% for inflammation, 83.3% for calcific tendinitis and 92.3% for tears. Cohen's k was 0.798. On the basis of its diagnostic performance, clinical use of this CAD technique has promise.

  20. [Bony avulsions of the rotator cuff : Arthroscopic concepts].

    PubMed

    Greiner, S; Scheibel, M

    2011-01-01

    Bony avulsions of the rotator cuff and isolated greater or lesser tuberosity fractures are rare injuries and a clear consensus regarding classification and therapy does not yet exist. Conservative therapy is limited, especially in injuries with displaced fragments and in these cases surgical treatment is frequently indicated. The ongoing development of arthroscopic techniques has led to quite a number of reports about arthroscopically assisted or total arthroscopic techniques in the treatment of these injuries. The advantages and disadvantages of arthroscopic concepts for the treatment of bony avulsions of the rotator cuff are presented with reference to the current literature. PMID:21153534

  1. Evaluation and nonsurgical management of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Greis, Ari C; Derrington, Stephen M; McAuliffe, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy is a common finding that accounts for about 7% of patients with shoulder pain. There are numerous theories on the pathogenesis of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy. The diagnosis is confirmed with radiography, MRI or ultrasound. There are numerous conservative treatment options available and most patients can be managed successfully without surgical intervention. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and multiple modalities are often used to manage pain and inflammation; physical therapy can help improve scapular mechanics and decrease dynamic impingement; ultrasound-guided needle aspiration and lavage techniques can provide long-term improvement in pain and function in these patients.

  2. Reliability of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Rotator Cuff: The ROW Study

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nitin B.; Collins, Jamie; Newman, Joel S.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Losina, Elena; Higgins, Laurence D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Physiatrists encounter patients with rotator cuff disorders and imaging is frequently an important component of their diagnostic assessment. However, there is paucity of literature on reliability of MRI assessment between shoulder specialists and musculoskeletal radiologists. Objective We assessed inter- and intra-rater reliability of MRI characteristics of the rotator cuff. Design Cross-sectional secondary analyses in a prospective cohort study Setting Academic tertiary care centers Patients Subjects with shoulder pain recruited from orthopedic and physiatry clinics Methods Two shoulder fellowship trained physicians (a physiatrist and a shoulder surgeon) jointly performed a blinded composite MRI review by consensus on 31 subjects with shoulder pain. Subsequently, MRI was reviewed by one fellowship trained musculoskeletal radiologist. Main Outcome Measures We calculated Cohen’s kappa coefficients and percent agreement among the two reviews (composite review of two shoulder specialists versus that of the musculoskeletal radiologist). Intra-rater reliability was assessed among the shoulder specialists by performing a repeat blinded composite MRI review. In addition to this repeat composite review, only one of the physiatry shoulder specialists performed an additional review. Results Inter-rater reliability (shoulder specialists versus musculoskeletal radiologist) was substantial for the presence or absence of tear (kappa=0.90; 95% CI=0.72, 1.00), tear-thickness (kappa=0.84;95% CI=0.70, 0.99), longitudinal size of tear (kappa=0.75;95% CI=0.44, 1.00), fatty infiltration (kappa=0.62; 95% CI=0.45, 0.79), and muscle atrophy (kappa=0.68; 95% CI=0.50, 0.86). There was only fair inter-rater reliability of transverse size of tear (kappa=0.20; 95% CI=0.00, 0.51). The kappa for intra-rater reliability was high for tear thickness (0.88; 95% CI=0.72, 1.00), longitudinal tear size (0.61; 95% CI=0.22, 0.99), fatty infiltration (0.89; 95% CI=0.80, 0.98), and muscle

  3. Towards predictive diagnosis and management of rotator cuff disease: using curvelet transform for edge detection and segmentation of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai Raikar, Vipul; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2016-04-01

    Degradation and injury of the rotator cuff is one of the most common diseases of the shoulder among the general population. In orthopedic injuries, rotator cuff disease is only second to back pain in terms of overall reduced quality of life for patients. Clinically, this disease is managed via pain and activity assessment and diagnostic imaging using ultrasound and MRI. Ultrasound has been shown to have good accuracy for identification and measurement of rotator cuff tears. In our previous work, we have developed novel, real-time techniques to biomechanically assess the condition of the rotator cuff based on Musculoskeletal Ultrasound. Of the rotator cuff tissues, supraspinatus is the first that sees degradation and is the most commonly affected. In our work, one of the challenges lies in effectively segmenting and characterizing the supraspinatus. We are exploring the possibility of using curvelet transform for improving techniques to segment tissue in ultrasound. Curvelets have been shown to give optimal multi-scale representation of edges in images. They are designed to represent edges and singularities along curves in images which makes them an attractive proposition for use in ultrasound segmentation. In this work, we present a novel approach to the possibility of using curvelet transforms for automatic edge and feature extraction for the supraspinatus.

  4. Matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors are altered in torn rotator cuff tendons, but also in the macroscopically and histologically intact portion of those tendons.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Alessandro; Cesari, Eugenio; Garofalo, Raffaele; Gigante, Antonio; Conti, Marco; Markopoulos, Nikolaos; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated whether matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors are involved in extracellular matrix remodelling and degradation of chronic rotator cuff tears. Tendon samples were harvested from 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear. Supraspinatus specimens were harvested en bloc from the arthroscopically intact middle portion of the tendon, more than 1 cm lateral to the torn edge, from the lateral edge of the tear, and from the superior margin of the macroscopically intact subscapularis tendon, used as control. The collagenases, the stromelysins, and the tissue inhibitors of metalloprotease arrays were analyzed blindly by multiplex sandwich ELISA in each specimen. Histological evidence of tendinopathy was present in all patients with a rotator cuff tear, but not in the macroscopically intact subscapularis tendon. There were significantly increased levels of MMP 1, MMP 2, MMP 3, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in all specimens examined, including the macroscopically intact portion of the supraspinatus tendon and the subscapularis (control specimens). The levels of specific matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors are altered in torn rotator cuff tendons, but also in the macroscopically and histologically intact tendons. These changes extended medially to the site of tendon tear, and to other tendons. PMID:24367772

  5. Superior labrum anterior to posterior tears in throwing athletes.

    PubMed

    Lintner, David M

    2013-01-01

    Superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears and partial undersurface tears of the rotator cuff are common in experienced throwers, may be adaptive, and are only occasionally symptomatic. Pain in the shoulder of a throwing athlete with an MRI-documented SLAP tear or partial undersurface tear of the rotator cuff can be managed nonsurgically, with attention to posterior capsular contracture, scapular dyskinesia, and rotator cuff strength. The results of the surgical repair of SLAP lesions in the throwing athlete, with or without rotator cuff repair, are inferior to those of nonsurgical treatment. The cause of pain in the throwing athlete must be accurately diagnosed without reliance on MRI findings. PMID:23395053

  6. Superior labrum anterior to posterior tears in throwing athletes.

    PubMed

    Lintner, David M

    2013-01-01

    Superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears and partial undersurface tears of the rotator cuff are common in experienced throwers, may be adaptive, and are only occasionally symptomatic. Pain in the shoulder of a throwing athlete with an MRI-documented SLAP tear or partial undersurface tear of the rotator cuff can be managed nonsurgically, with attention to posterior capsular contracture, scapular dyskinesia, and rotator cuff strength. The results of the surgical repair of SLAP lesions in the throwing athlete, with or without rotator cuff repair, are inferior to those of nonsurgical treatment. The cause of pain in the throwing athlete must be accurately diagnosed without reliance on MRI findings.

  7. A larger critical shoulder angle requires more rotator cuff activity to preserve joint stability.

    PubMed

    Viehöfer, Arnd F; Gerber, Christian; Favre, Philippe; Bachmann, Elias; Snedeker, Jess G

    2016-06-01

    Shoulders with rotator cuff tears (RCT) tears are associated with significantly larger critical shoulder angles (CSA) (RCT CSA = 38.2°) than shoulders without RCT (CSA = 32.9°). We hypothesized that larger CSAs increase the ratio of glenohumeral joint shear to joint compression forces, requiring substantially increased compensatory supraspinatus loads to stabilize the arm in abduction. A previously established three dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model was used. Two acromion shapes mimicked the mean CSA of 38.2° found in patients with RCT and that of a normal CSA (32.9°). In a first step, the moment arms for each muscle segment were obtained for 21 different thoracohumeral abduction angles to simulate a quasi-static abduction in the scapular plane. In a second step, the muscle forces were calculated by minimizing the range of muscle stresses able to compensate an external joint moment caused by the arm weight. If the joint became unstable, additional force was applied by the rotator cuff muscles to restore joint stability. The model showed a higher joint shear to joint compressive force for the RCT CSA (38.2°) for thoracohumeral abduction angles between 40° and 90° with a peak difference of 23% at 50° of abduction. To achieve stability in this case additional rotator cuff forces exceeding physiological values were required. Our results document that a higher CSA tends to destabilize the glenohumeral joint such that higher than normal supraspinatus forces are required to maintain modeled stability during active abduction. This lends strong support to the concept that a high CSA can induce supraspinatus (SSP) overload. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:961-968, 2016. PMID:26572231

  8. EXTENSIVE ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES: AN EVALUATION OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Silva, Luciana Andrade; Eduardo, Cesar Moreira Mariz Pinto Rodrigo Tormin Ortiz; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of the surgical treatment of extensive rotator cuff injuries through arthroscopy. Methods: Between June 1998 and October 2006, 61 patients with extensive rotator cuff injuries and submitted to surgical arthroscopy technique by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Santa Casa de Misericórdia Medical School were reassessed. The study included all patients with at least two tendons affected or with retraction at least on two tendons up to the glenoidal cavity edge and with at least 12 months of follow-up. Results: According to UCLA's evaluation criteria, 54 (89%) patients showed excellent or good outcomes; no fair outcome in none of the patients; and seven (11%) poor outcomes. A satisfaction rate of 92% was reported. Postoperative joint motion went from a mean lifting value of 93° to 141°, the mean lateral rotation went from 32° to 48° and the mean medial rotation went from L1 to T10. These differences were regarded as statistically significant. Conclusion: The arthroscopic repair of extensive rotator cuff injuries leads to satisfactory outcomes for most of the patients, with a high satisfaction degree. PMID:26998466

  9. Early rehabilitation affects functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shimo, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuta; Tokiyoshi, Akinari; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effect of early rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is currently unknown. We examined short-term effects of early rehabilitation on functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. [Subject and Methods] An 82-year-old male fell during a walk, resulting in a supraspinatus tear. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed using a single-row technique. He wore an abduction brace for 6 weeks after surgery. [Results] From day 1 after surgery, passive range of motion exercises, including forward flexion and internal and external rotation were performed twice per day. Starting at 6 weeks after surgery, active range of motion exercises and muscle strengthening exercises were introduced gradually. At 6 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 150°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 36 points. At 20 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 120°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 0 points. [Conclusion] These protocols are recommended to physical therapists during rehabilitation for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair to support rapid reintegration into activities of daily living. PMID:27064886

  10. Early rehabilitation affects functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuta; Tokiyoshi, Akinari; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effect of early rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is currently unknown. We examined short-term effects of early rehabilitation on functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. [Subject and Methods] An 82-year-old male fell during a walk, resulting in a supraspinatus tear. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed using a single-row technique. He wore an abduction brace for 6 weeks after surgery. [Results] From day 1 after surgery, passive range of motion exercises, including forward flexion and internal and external rotation were performed twice per day. Starting at 6 weeks after surgery, active range of motion exercises and muscle strengthening exercises were introduced gradually. At 6 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 150°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 36 points. At 20 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 120°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 0 points. [Conclusion] These protocols are recommended to physical therapists during rehabilitation for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair to support rapid reintegration into activities of daily living. PMID:27064886

  11. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Using the Undersurface Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rubenis, Imants; Lam, Patrick H.; Murrell, George A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has traditionally been performed in the subacromial space from the bursal side of the tendon. The undersurface rotator cuff repair technique involves the arthroscope remaining in the glenohumeral joint, thus viewing the tendon from its undersurface during repair without a bursectomy or acromioplasty. Purpose: To compare the clinical and structural outcomes of undersurface rotator cuff repair with bursal-side repair. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was conducted on 2 cohorts of patients who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with knotless suture anchors configured in a single-row formation using inverted mattress–style sutures from either the bursal side (n = 100) or undersurface (n = 165) of the supraspinatus tendon. Data were collected preoperatively, intraoperatively, and at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 2 years postoperatively. At each time point, patients completed a modified L’Insalata questionnaire to assess patient-ranked pain scores and were clinically examined using standardized tests. Ultrasound examination was performed at 6 months and 2 years to assess the integrity of the repair. Results: At 2 years postoperatively, patients in both cohorts had significantly less pain and less difficulty with overhead activities compared with preoperative levels (P < .001). The type of repair performed (bursal or undersurface) did not affect the ability to perform overhead activities at 2 years. At 2 years, both groups also had similar retear rates (21% for bursal side, 23% for undersurface). The mean operative time for the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was 32 minutes when performed from the bursal side and 20 minutes when performed from the undersurface (P < .001). Conclusion: Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, whether performed from the subacromial space or glenohumeral joint, resulted in decreased levels of

  12. Diagnostic Performance and Reliability of Ultrasonography for Fatty Degeneration of the Rotator Cuff Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Lindley B.; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Middleton, William D.; Dahiya, Nirvikar; Steger-May, Karen; Kim, H. Mike; Wessell, Daniel; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diagnostic evaluation of rotator cuff muscle quality is important to determine indications for potential operative repair. Ultrasonography has developed into an accepted and useful tool for evaluating rotator cuff tendon tears; however, its use for evaluating rotator muscle quality has not been well established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance and observer reliability of ultrasonography in grading fatty degeneration of the posterior and superior rotator cuff muscles. Methods: The supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and teres minor muscles were prospectively evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography in eighty patients with shoulder pain. The degree of fatty degeneration on MRI was graded by four independent raters on the basis of the modified Goutallier grading system. Ultrasonographic evaluation of fatty degeneration was performed by one of three radiologists with use of a three-point scale. The two scoring systems were compared to determine the diagnostic performance of ultrasonography. The interobserver and intraobserver reliability of MRI grading by the four raters were determined. The interobserver reliability of ultrasonography among the three radiologists was determined in a separate group of thirty study subjects. The weighted Cohen kappa, percentage agreement, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated. Results: The accuracy of ultrasonography for the detection of fatty degeneration, as assessed on the basis of the percentage agreement with MRI, was 92.5% for the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles and 87.5% for the teres minor. The sensitivity was 84.6% for the supraspinatus, 95.6% for the infraspinatus, and 87.5% for the teres minor. The specificity was 96.3% for the supraspinatus, 91.2% for the infraspinatus, and 87.5% for the teres minor. The agreement between MRI and ultrasonography was substantial for the supraspinatus and infraspinatus (kappa = 0.78 and 0.71, respectively

  13. Gender Affects Early Postoperative Outcomes of Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hee-Uk; Jung, Jae-Won; Lee, Young-Kuk

    2015-01-01

    Background The literature does not provide consistent information on the impact of patients' gender on recovery after rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to determine whether gender affects pain and functional recovery in the early postoperative period after rotator cuff repair. Methods Eighty patients (40 men and 40 women) were prospectively enrolled. Pain intensity and functional recovery were evaluated, using visual analog scale (VAS) pain score and range of motion on each of the first 5 postoperative days, at 2 and 6 weeks and at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Perioperative medication-related adverse effects and postoperative complications were also assessed. Results The mean VAS pain score was significantly higher for women than men at 2 weeks after surgery (p = 0.035). For all other periods, there was no significant difference between men and women in VAS pain scores, although women had higher scores than men. Mean forward flexion in women was significantly lower than men at 6 weeks after surgery (p = 0.033) and the mean degree of external rotation in women was significantly lower than men at 6 weeks (p = 0.007) and at 3 months (p = 0.017) after surgery. There was no significant difference in medication-related adverse effects or postoperative complications. Conclusions Women had more pain and slower recovery of shoulder motion than men during the first 3 months after rotator cuff repair. These findings can serve as guidelines for pain management and rehabilitation after surgery and can help explain postoperative recovery patterns to patients with scheduled rotator cuff repair. PMID:26217471

  14. Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis

    MedlinePlus

    .org Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis Page ( 1 ) One of the most common physical complaints is shoulder pain. Your shoulder is made up of several ... is vulnerable to many different problems. The rotator cuff is a frequent source of pain in the ...

  15. Prognosis Driven Rehabilitation After Rotator Cuff Repair Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kokmeyer, Dirk; Dube, Eric; Millett,, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rehabilitation after rotator cuff repair surgery has been the focus of several clinical trials in the past decade. Many illuminate new evidence with regard to the prognosis of structural and functional success after surgery. Methods: A selective literature search was performed and personal physiotherapeutic and surgical experiences are reported. Results: Post-operative rehabilitation parameters, namely the decision to delay or allow early range of motion after surgery, play a large role in the overall success after surgery. Using a prognosis driven rehabilitation program offers clinicians a means of prescribing optimal rehabilitation parameters while ensuring structural and functional success. This commentary aims to synthesize the evidence in a spectrum of prognostic factors to guide post-operative rehabilitation. Conclusion: The optimal rehabilitation program after rotator cuff repair surgery is debatable; therefore, we suggest using a spectrum of prognostic factors to determine a rehabilitation program suited to ensure structural and functional success, quickly and safely. PMID:27708736

  16. Is There an Association Between the “Critical Shoulder Angle” and Clinical Outcome after Rotator Cuff Repair?

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Jacob Matthew; Nathani, Amit; Robbins, Christopher; Gagnier, Joel Joseph; Bedi, Asheesh; Miller, Bruce S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Variations in scapular morphology have been associated with the development of atraumatic rotator cuff tears (RCT). Current theories suggest a morphologic predisposition for altered shoulder biomechanics favoring the development of RCTs. The critical shoulder angle (CSA) is a radiographic measure that accounts for both glenoid inclination and lateral extension of the acromion, and angles >35 degrees are reported to be correlated with the development of degenerative RCTs. The impact of the CSA on outcomes following rotator cuff repair (RCR) has not previously been investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the CSA and clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair. Methods: As part of a prospective observational cohort study we obtained CSA measurements for 144 patients with documented full-thickness RCTs who were followed up for a minimum of 48 weeks. Patients were then stratified based on RCT etiology and treatment. Demographic data as well as The Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain were collected at baseline, four, eight, 16, 32 and 48 weeks. The CSA for all of the patients was measured retrospectively, with all assessors being blinded to the data and we calculated interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) to measure agreement. The statistical analysis included longitudinal multilevel regression modeling to investigate the association of the CSA and the WORC, ASES and VAS for pain. Results: Controlling for demographic and clinical characteristics, patients with CSAs less than 38 degrees reported better outcome scores over time compared to those with CSAs greater than 38 degrees (WORC: B=-106.6, p=0.025, ASES: B=4.83, p=0.0001, VAS: B=-12.99, p=0.0001). Interobserver and intraobserver reliability for CSA measurements resulted in an ICC of 0.969 and 0.982 respectively, indicating excellent agreement. Conclusion: We found

  17. Evaluation of Internet Information About Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Kevin A; Codella, Stephen; Ciccotti, Michael G; Kane, Patrick W; Duncan, Ian C; Cohen, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    The content and quality of Internet websites are not governed or regulated. Therefore, patients who consult the Internet may receive outdated or incorrect medical information. Researchers have analyzed the quality of web information about various orthopedic surgeries, but no such analysis has been performed on websites covering rotator cuff repair. We conducted a study to evaluate and analyze rotator cuff repair information available to the general public through the Internet; to assess changes in the quality of information over time; to determine if sites sponsored by academic institutions offered higher-quality information; and to assess whether the readability of the material varied according to DISCERN scores. Two Internet searches were conducted, in 2011 and 2014. The 3 most commonly used search engines were used to search for rotator cuff repair. The first 50 websites from each search engine were evaluated for authorship and content. The DISCERN instrument was used to analyze the quality of each website's health information. The 2011 search revealed 21% of websites were associated with an academic institution, 38% were authored by a hospital or physician group, and 11.5% were industry-sponsored. The 2014 search revealed a similar distribution of contributors. The highest DISCERN scores were given to academic institution websites (51.6) and public education websites (49). There was no correlation between readability and DISCERN scores. Websites associated with academic institutions produced the highest-quality medical information. Over the past few years, authorship and content have changed little with respect to Internet information about rotator cuff repair.

  18. Chronic rotator cuff impingement in the throwing athlete.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D W

    1976-01-01

    Compromise of the space between the humeral head and the coracoacromial arch may be a source of chronic shoulder pain associated with rotator cuff impingement in the athlete participating in throwing sports. In certain carefully selected individuals, surgical decompression may alleviate these symptoms. The surgical procedure can be done under local anesthesia and may enable the athlete to return to his previous level of performance without disability.

  19. Neer Award 2005: The Grammont reverse shoulder prosthesis: results in cuff tear arthritis, fracture sequelae, and revision arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Pascal; Watkinson, Duncan; Hatzidakis, Armodios M; Hovorka, Istvan

    2006-01-01

    This clinical study was performed to analyze the midterm results and potential complications of the reverse prosthesis in different diagnosis. Forty-five consecutive patients with Grammont prosthesis were evaluated clinically and radiographically with a mean follow-up of 40 months (range, 24-72 months). The indication was a massive and irreparable cuff tear associated with arthrosis (CTA) in 21 cases, fracture sequelae (FS) with arthritis in 5 cases, and failure of a revision arthroplasty (revision) in 19 cases. Fourteen complications occurred in 11 patients. 3 dislocations, 3 deep infections (all 3 in the revision group), 1 case of aseptic humeral loosening, 2 periprosthetic humeral fractures, 1 intraoperative glenoid fracture, 1 wound hematoma, 2 late acromial fractures, and 1 axillary nerve palsy. Of the patients, 10 (22%) required further surgery: 4 reoperations, 4 prosthesis revisions, and 2 prosthesis removals. Complications were higher in revision than in CTA (47% vs. 5%). All 3 groups showed a significant increase in active elevation (from 55 degrees preoperatively to 121 degrees postoperatively) and Constant score (from 17 to 58 points) but no significant change in active external rotation (from 7 degrees to 11 degrees ) or internal rotation (S1 preoperatively and postoperatively). Of the patients, 78% were satisfied or very satisfied with the result and 67% had no or slight pain. However, the postoperative Constant score, adjusted Constant score, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder score were all significantly higher in the CTA group with as compared with the revision group (P = .01, .004, and .002, respectively). Scapular notching was seen in 24 cases (68%). No glenoid loosening was observed at current follow-up, even when the notch extended beyond the inferior screw (28% of cases). Atrophy of severe fatty infiltration of the teres minor was associated with lower external rotation (15 degrees vs 0 degrees , P = .02) and lower functional

  20. Functional Outcomes After Double-Row Versus Single-Row Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Stephen J.; Lee, Steven J.; Mullaney, Michael J.; Tyler, Timothy F.; Fukunaga, Takumi; Johnson, Christopher D.; McHugh, Malachy P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The functional benefits of double-row (DR) versus single-row (SR) rotator cuff repair are not clearly established. Purpose: To examine the effect of DR versus SR rotator cuff repair on functional outcomes and strength recovery in patients with full-thickness tears. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Forty-nine patients were randomized to DR or SR repairs; 36 patients (13 women, 23 men; mean age, 62 ± 7 years; 20 SR, 16 DR) were assessed at a mean 2.2 ± 1.6 years after surgery (range, 1-7 years; tear size: 17 medium, 13 large, 9 massive). The following data were recorded prior to surgery and at follow-up: Penn shoulder score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) results; range of motion (ROM) for shoulder flexion, external rotation (ER) at 0° and 90° of abduction, and internal rotation (IR) at 90° of abduction; and shoulder strength (Lafayette manual muscle tester) in empty- and full-can tests, abduction, and ER at 0° of abduction. Treatment (SR vs DR) × time (pre- vs postoperative) mixed-model analysis of variance was used to assess the effect of rotator cuff repair. Results: Rotator cuff repair markedly improved Penn, ASES, and SST scores (P < .001), with similar improvement between SR and DR repairs (treatment × time, P = .38-.10) and excellent scores at follow-up (DR vs SR: Penn, 91 ± 11 vs 92 ± 11 [P = .73]; ASES, 87 ± 12 vs 92 ± 12 [P = .21]; SST, 11.4 ± 1.0 vs 11.3 ± 1.0 [P = .76]). Patients with DR repairs lost ER ROM at 0° of abduction (preoperative to final follow-up, 7° ± 10° loss [P = .013]). ER ROM did not significantly change with SR repair (5° ± 14° gain, P = .16; treatment by time, P = .008). This effect was not apparent for ER ROM at 90° of abduction (treatment × time, P = .26). IR ROM improved from preoperative to final follow-up (P < .01; SR, 17° ± 27°; DR, 7° ± 21°; treatment × time, P = .23). Rotator cuff repair markedly

  1. Arthroscopic fixation with a minimally invasive axillary approach for latissimus dorsi transfer using an endobutton in massive and irreparable postero-superior cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Yariv; Grimberg, Jean; Valenti, Philippe; Chechik, Ofir; Drexler, Michael; Kany, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Arthroscopically assisted latissimus dorsi transfer is a viable option for treatment of patients in their 50s to 70s, without arthritis of the glenohumeral joint, who suffer from massive rotator cuff tears that are not amendable to primary repair due to fatty changes in the muscle tissue, or that have failed previous repair attempts. This procedure offers immediate and dramatic pain relief and is not as technically demanding as one might think. Understanding and respecting the principles of tendon transfer is a key to the success of this procedure.

  2. Arthroscopic fixation with a minimally invasive axillary approach for latissimus dorsi transfer using an endobutton in massive and irreparable postero-superior cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Yariv; Grimberg, Jean; Valenti, Philippe; Chechik, Ofir; Drexler, Michael; Kany, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopically assisted latissimus dorsi transfer is a viable option for treatment of patients in their 50s to 70s, without arthritis of the glenohumeral joint, who suffer from massive rotator cuff tears that are not amendable to primary repair due to fatty changes in the muscle tissue, or that have failed previous repair attempts. This procedure offers immediate and dramatic pain relief and is not as technically demanding as one might think. Understanding and respecting the principles of tendon transfer is a key to the success of this procedure. PMID:23960367

  3. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS ON THE RESULT FOR ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF SUTURE BETWEEN SMOKING AND NON-SMOKING PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Valin, Márcio Rangel; Zampieri, Rodrigo; Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto de; Roveda, Gilberto; Agostini, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To comparatively analyze the results from arthroscopic rotator cuff suture between smoking and non-smoking patients. Methods: A group of 286 patients who underwent arthroscopic suturing of primary rotator cuff injuries between June 12, 2002, and May 14, 2008, was analyzed. The patients included in the study were evaluated using the UCLA scale, with a minimum follow-up of 12 months and average of 56.52 months. The variables studied were age, sex, side operated, dominance, profile of cigarette use and UCLA index. Results: This study evaluated a total of 205 patients. Mean age (p = 0.289) and sex (p = 0.124) were analyzed statistically between the smoking and non-smoking patients and the two groups were considered to be similar. The average UCLA score for the non-smoking patients (143) was 34 (32 to 35). The average UCLA score for the smoking patients (51) was 33 (29 to 35). There was no statistically significant difference in UCLA score (p = 0.123) between the smoking and non-smoking patients. For the purposes of statistical analysis, we grouped the small and medium tears (107) and compared these with the large and extensive tears (80), between smokers and non-smokers. There was no statistically significant difference using the Mann-Whitney test regarding the small and medium tears (p = 818). There was a statistically significant difference using the Mann-Whitney test regarding the large and extended tears, between the smoking and non-smoking patients, such that the non-smokers showed better UCLA scores (p = 0.038). Conclusion: The results from arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries are inferior among smoking patients. PMID:27027006

  4. Histomorphometric and ultrastructural analysis of the tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Gotoh, Masafumi; Ohta, Keisuke; Honda, Hirokazu; Ohzono, Hiroki; Shimokobe, Hisao; Shiba, Naoto; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Successful rotator cuff repair requires biological anchoring of the repaired tendon to the bone. However, the histological structure of the repaired tendon-bone interface differs from that of a normal tendon insertion. We analysed differences between the normal tendon insertion and the repaired tendon-bone interface after surgery in the mechanical properties, histomorphometric analysis, and 3-dimensional ultrastructure of the cells using a rat rotator cuff repair model. Twenty-four adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats underwent complete cuff tear and subsequent repair of the supraspinatus tendon. The repaired tendon-bone interface was evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. At each time point, shoulders underwent micro-computed tomography scanning and biomechanical testing (N = 6), conventional histology and histomorphometric analysis (N = 6), and ultrastructural analysis with focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope (FIB/SEM) tomography (N = 4). We demonstrated that the cellular distribution between the repaired tendon and bone at 12 weeks after surgery bore similarities to the normal tendon insertion. However, the ultrastructure of the cells at any time point had a different morphology than those of the normal tendon insertion. These morphological differences affect the healing process, partly contributing to re-tearing at the repair site. These results may facilitate future studies of the regeneration of a normal tendon insertion. PMID:27647121

  5. Histomorphometric and ultrastructural analysis of the tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Gotoh, Masafumi; Ohta, Keisuke; Honda, Hirokazu; Ohzono, Hiroki; Shimokobe, Hisao; Shiba, Naoto; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Successful rotator cuff repair requires biological anchoring of the repaired tendon to the bone. However, the histological structure of the repaired tendon-bone interface differs from that of a normal tendon insertion. We analysed differences between the normal tendon insertion and the repaired tendon-bone interface after surgery in the mechanical properties, histomorphometric analysis, and 3-dimensional ultrastructure of the cells using a rat rotator cuff repair model. Twenty-four adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats underwent complete cuff tear and subsequent repair of the supraspinatus tendon. The repaired tendon-bone interface was evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. At each time point, shoulders underwent micro-computed tomography scanning and biomechanical testing (N = 6), conventional histology and histomorphometric analysis (N = 6), and ultrastructural analysis with focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope (FIB/SEM) tomography (N = 4). We demonstrated that the cellular distribution between the repaired tendon and bone at 12 weeks after surgery bore similarities to the normal tendon insertion. However, the ultrastructure of the cells at any time point had a different morphology than those of the normal tendon insertion. These morphological differences affect the healing process, partly contributing to re-tearing at the repair site. These results may facilitate future studies of the regeneration of a normal tendon insertion. PMID:27647121

  6. Stem cell therapy in the management of shoulder rotator cuff disorders.

    PubMed

    Valencia Mora, Maria; Ruiz Ibán, Miguel A; Díaz Heredia, Jorge; Barco Laakso, Raul; Cuéllar, Ricardo; García Arranz, Mariano

    2015-05-26

    Rotator cuff tears are frequent shoulder problems that are usually dealt with surgical repair. Despite improved surgical techniques, the tendon-to-bone healing rate is unsatisfactory due to difficulties in restoring the delicate transitional tissue between bone and tendon. It is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms that determine this failure. The study of the molecular environment during embryogenesis and during normal healing after injury is key in devising strategies to get a successful repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can differentiate into different mesodermal tissues and have a strong paracrine, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory and angiogenic potential. Stem cell therapy is thus a potentially effective therapy to enhance rotator cuff healing. Promising results have been reported with the use of autologous MSC of different origins in animal studies: they have shown to have better healing properties, increasing the amount of fibrocartilage formation and improving the orientation of fibrocartilage fibers with less immunologic response and reduced lymphocyte infiltration. All these changes lead to an increase in biomechanical strength. However, animal research is still inconclusive and more experimental studies are needed before human application. Future directions include expanded stem cell therapy in combination with growth factors or different scaffolds as well as new stem cell types and gene therapy.

  7. Stem cell therapy in the management of shoulder rotator cuff disorders.

    PubMed

    Valencia Mora, Maria; Ruiz Ibán, Miguel A; Díaz Heredia, Jorge; Barco Laakso, Raul; Cuéllar, Ricardo; García Arranz, Mariano

    2015-05-26

    Rotator cuff tears are frequent shoulder problems that are usually dealt with surgical repair. Despite improved surgical techniques, the tendon-to-bone healing rate is unsatisfactory due to difficulties in restoring the delicate transitional tissue between bone and tendon. It is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms that determine this failure. The study of the molecular environment during embryogenesis and during normal healing after injury is key in devising strategies to get a successful repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can differentiate into different mesodermal tissues and have a strong paracrine, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory and angiogenic potential. Stem cell therapy is thus a potentially effective therapy to enhance rotator cuff healing. Promising results have been reported with the use of autologous MSC of different origins in animal studies: they have shown to have better healing properties, increasing the amount of fibrocartilage formation and improving the orientation of fibrocartilage fibers with less immunologic response and reduced lymphocyte infiltration. All these changes lead to an increase in biomechanical strength. However, animal research is still inconclusive and more experimental studies are needed before human application. Future directions include expanded stem cell therapy in combination with growth factors or different scaffolds as well as new stem cell types and gene therapy. PMID:26029341

  8. Assessment of the canine model of rotator cuff injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Derwin, Kathleen A; Baker, Andrew R; Codsi, Michael J; Iannotti, Joseph P

    2007-01-01

    Animal shoulder models are used to systematically investigate the factors influencing rotator cuff injury and repair. Each model has advantages and disadvantages that must be considered in the context of the specific research questions being asked. Herein we evaluate the utility of the canine model for studies of acute, full-thickness rotator cuff tendon injury and repair. We found that time zero failure load is dependent on the suture type and configuration used for repair. Acute, full-width tendon repairs fail anatomically within the first days after surgery in the canine model, regardless of suture type, suture configuration or post-operative protocol. Robust scar tissue forms in the gap between the failed tendon end and the humerus, which can be visually, mechanically and histologically misconstrued as tendon if an objective test of repair connectivity is not performed. We conclude that a full-width injury and repair model in the canine will provide a rigorous test of whether a new repair strategy or post-operative protocol (such as casting or temporary muscle paralysis) can maintain repair integrity in a high load environment. Alternatively, a partial-width tendon injury model allows loads to be shared between the tendon repair and the remaining intact portion of the infraspinatus tendon and prohibits complete tendon retraction. Thus a partial-width injury in the canine may model the mechanical environment of many single tendon tears in the human injury condition and warrants further investigation. PMID:17560802

  9. MRI-Arthroscopic Correlation in Rotator Cuff Tendon Pathologies; A Comparison between Various Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sefidbakht, Sepideh; Momenzadeh, Omid Reza; Dehghani, Sakineh; Gerami, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been considered a perfect imaging study for evaluation of shoulder pathologies despite occasional discrepancies between MR reports and arthroscopic findings. In this study we aim to evaluate impact of imaging center as an indicator of image quality on accuracy of MRI reports in diagnosis of rotator cuff tendon pathologies. Methods: We reviewed MR reports of 64 patients who underwent arthroscopy in university center hospital. MRIs were done in various centers including both university-affiliated and out-centers. All studies were reported by two radiologists in consensus unaware of the arthroscopic results or previous reports. An inter-observer agreement analysis using the kappa statistics was performed to determine consistency among imaging and surgical reports. Results: Kappa values for out-centers were as follows: 0.785 for biceps, 0.469 for suscapularis, 0.846 for supraspinatus and 0.785 for infraspinatus tendons. In university centers values were 0.799 for biceps, 0.802 for suscapularis, 0.789 for supraspinatus and 0.770 for infraspinatus tendons. Conclusion: Image reporting in university centers with proficient sequences increased accuracy of diagnosis in 3/4 of evaluated features and showed subtle decreased inter-observer agreement in 1/4 of features. Uniformity of the scanners and protocols as well as evaluation on a workstation rather than hard copies cumulatively resulted in a meaningful increase in the accuracy of the same radiologists in diagnosis of rotator cuff tendon tear. PMID:27200392

  10. Stem cell therapy in the management of shoulder rotator cuff disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Maria Valencia; Ibán, Miguel A Ruiz; Heredia, Jorge Díaz; Laakso, Raul Barco; Cuéllar, Ricardo; Arranz, Mariano García

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are frequent shoulder problems that are usually dealt with surgical repair. Despite improved surgical techniques, the tendon-to-bone healing rate is unsatisfactory due to difficulties in restoring the delicate transitional tissue between bone and tendon. It is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms that determine this failure. The study of the molecular environment during embryogenesis and during normal healing after injury is key in devising strategies to get a successful repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can differentiate into different mesodermal tissues and have a strong paracrine, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory and angiogenic potential. Stem cell therapy is thus a potentially effective therapy to enhance rotator cuff healing. Promising results have been reported with the use of autologous MSC of different origins in animal studies: they have shown to have better healing properties, increasing the amount of fibrocartilage formation and improving the orientation of fibrocartilage fibers with less immunologic response and reduced lymphocyte infiltration. All these changes lead to an increase in biomechanical strength. However, animal research is still inconclusive and more experimental studies are needed before human application. Future directions include expanded stem cell therapy in combination with growth factors or different scaffolds as well as new stem cell types and gene therapy. PMID:26029341

  11. Extracting Information about the Rotator Cuff from Magnetic Resonance Images Using Deterministic and Random Techniques

    PubMed Central

    De Los Ríos, F. A.; Paluszny, M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider some methods to extract information about the rotator cuff based on magnetic resonance images; the study aims to define an alternative method of display that might facilitate the detection of partial tears in the supraspinatus tendon. Specifically, we are going to use families of ellipsoidal triangular patches to cover the humerus head near the affected area. These patches are going to be textured and displayed with the information of the magnetic resonance images using the trilinear interpolation technique. For the generation of points to texture each patch, we propose a new method that guarantees the uniform distribution of its points using a random statistical method. Its computational cost, defined as the average computing time to generate a fixed number of points, is significantly lower as compared with deterministic and other standard statistical techniques. PMID:25650281

  12. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) gel: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Jo, Chris Hyunchul

    2011-10-01

    Evidence suggesting that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may have a potential for augmenting tissue healing has been growing recently. However, its local application technique has not been well established. Because of saline irrigation for keeping clear vision during arthroscopic procedures, it appears unreasonable to apply PRP in liquid form. We describe a technique of PRP gel application in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. It does not require any special instruments nor a long additional time. It can be easily performed with routine arthroscopic instruments such as a regular knot pusher, a 5.5 mm metal cannula, and a regular 8.0 mm cannula. With this technique, the PRP gels could be accurately and reproducibly placed in the repair site without concerns of loss or tearing off during delivery under a direct vision without closing the inflow. We suggest that this technique could be useful for arthroscopic application of PRP gels.

  13. Interrater reproducibility of clinical tests for rotator cuff lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ostor, A; Richards, C; Prevost, A; Hazleman, B; Speed, C

    2004-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff lesions are common in the community but reproducibility of tests for shoulder assessment has not been adequately appraised and there is no uniform approach to their use. Objective: To study interrater reproducibility of standard tests for shoulder evaluation among a rheumatology specialist, rheumatology trainee, and research nurse. Methods: 136 patients were reviewed over 12 months at a major teaching hospital. The three assessors examined each patient in random order and were unaware of each other's evaluation. Each shoulder was examined in a standard manner by recognised tests for specific lesions and a diagnostic algorithm was used. Between-observer agreement was determined by calculating Cohen's κ coefficients (measuring agreement beyond that expected by chance). Results: Fair to substantial agreement was obtained for the observations of tenderness, painful arc, and external rotation. Tests for supraspinatus and subscapularis also showed at least fair agreement between observers. 40/55 (73%) κ coefficient assessments were rated at >0.2, indicating at least fair concordance between observers; 21/55 (38%) were rated at >0.4, indicating at least moderate concordance between observers. Conclusion: The reproducibility of certain tests, employed by observers of varying experience, in the assessment of the rotator cuff and general shoulder disease was determined. This has implications for delegation of shoulder assessment to nurse specialists, the development of a simplified evaluation schedule for general practitioners, and uniformity in epidemiological research studies. PMID:15361389

  14. Evaluation of rotator cuff muscle strength in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Paulo José Oliveira; Tomazini, José Elias

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the strength generated by the rotator muscles of the shoulder joint between the right upper limb and left upper limb among healthy individuals. METHODS: To evaluate the muscle strength of upper limbs from isometric contractions in the horizontal direction (rotation) an isometric dynamometer was used, equipped with transducers, signal conditioning, a data acquisition board, and finally, a computer. Study participants were 22 male military subjects, aged between 18 and 19 years old, body mass between 57.7 and 93.0 kg (71.8 ± 9.45 kg) and height between 1.67 and 1.90 m (1.75 ± 0.06 m), healthy and without clinical diseases or any type of orthopedic injury in the muscle skeletal system. RESULTS: The internal rotation in the right upper limb (RUL) was higher than the average strength of internal rotation in the left upper limb (LUL) (p = 0.723). The external rotation strength in RUL was lower than the average strength of external rotation in the LUL (p=0.788). No statistical difference was observed by comparing the strength values of all isometric strength tests. CONCLUSION: For the sample and methodology used to assess muscle strength, there was no statistical difference between the strength generated by the muscles of the rotator cuff of the right and left upper limbs. Experimental Study. PMID:26207091

  15. Editorial Commentary: Save the Subchondral Bone in Rotator Cuff Repair Greater Tuberosity Preparation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-04-01

    Results from a recent investigation into the practice of greater tuberosity decortication before rotator cuff repair showed that decortication significantly reduced the ultimate failure load. Although the potential of greater tuberosity treatment for solving the rotator cuff healing quandary still exists, the biomechanics are clear, one should not decorticate the greater tuberosity to cancellous bone. PMID:27039677

  16. Editorial Commentary: Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair--Infection Rate After Rotator Cuff Repair With Arthroscopic, Open, and Mini-open Techniques.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-03-01

    In "Risk Factors for Infection After Rotator Cuff Repair," B. G. Vopat et al. report a lower rate of postoperative infection with an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair than with an open or mini-open approach. Although there were only 14 infections (infection rate of 0.77%), the reason for the preponderance of male patients, 13 of the 14 infections, needs further research to determine effective preventive strategies.

  17. Tissue discrimination in magnetic resonance imaging of the rotator cuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschino, G. J.; Comas, D. S.; González, M. A.; Capiel, C.; Ballarin, V. L.

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation and diagnosis of diseases of the muscles within the rotator cuff can be done using different modalities, being the Magnetic Resonance the method more widely used. There are criteria to evaluate the degree of fat infiltration and muscle atrophy, but these have low accuracy and show great variability inter and intra observer. In this paper, an analysis of the texture features of the rotator cuff muscles is performed to classify them and other tissues. A general supervised classification approach was used, combining forward-search as feature selection method with kNN as classification rule. Sections of Magnetic Resonance Images of the tissues of interest were selected by specialist doctors and they were considered as Gold Standard. Accuracies obtained were of 93% for T1-weighted images and 92% for T2-weighted images. As an immediate future work, the combination of both sequences of images will be considered, expecting to improve the results, as well as the use of other sequences of Magnetic Resonance Images. This work represents an initial point for the classification and quantification of fat infiltration and muscle atrophy degree. From this initial point, it is expected to make an accurate and objective system which will result in benefits for future research and for patients’ health.

  18. Fibrin Scaffold as a Carrier for Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Growth Factors in Shoulder Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Voss, Andreas; McCarthy, Mary Beth; Allen, Donald; Cote, Mark P; Beitzel, Knut; Imhoff, Andreas B; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2016-06-01

    With an increase in the aging population, rotator cuff tears are becoming more common. High failure rates with shoulder rotator cuff repair surgery have been persistent, prompting the introduction of biologic methods to promote healing. The aim of the present technique is to deliver stem cells and growth factors to the footprint of the repair site. A platelet-rich plasma (PRP) fibrin clot is used as a scaffold for the delivery of stem cells, by using PRP, to provide a source of growth factors, and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) as a source for fibrinogen for the matrix for the scaffold. In the second step, bone marrow is harvested from the proximal humerus, concentrated, and combined with the PRP and PPP. Using a customized device, we then activate the clotting process and transfer the scaffold containing the stem cells using a suture anchor onto the shoulder rotator cuff footprint. In an effort to promote healing, this technique reimplants autologous stem cells and growth factors into the operative site. This technique may serve as an alternative for typically used scaffolds such as collagen matrices or decellularized human dermis patches. PMID:27656360

  19. Effect of rotator cuff exercise on humeral rotation torque in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Moncrief, Scott A; Lau, Jeffery D; Gale, Judith R; Scott, Samuel A

    2002-05-01

    Conservative management of rotator cuff pathology often involves certain therapeutic exercises. Although a major goal of these exercises is to increase strength of the rotator cuff, little empirical evidence supports this assertion. In this study, 34 nonpathologic young adults were pretested using a LIDO Multijoint II isokinetic device for average and peak torque generated during internal and external rotation. Subjects were arbitrarily assigned to a right-arm- or left-arm-trained group, exercised for 4 weeks, and then posttested for changes in humeral rotation torque. Moderate but significant increases in torque (8-10%) as well as in total work done were observed in both groups, only in the trained arm. Subjects who trained the nondominant (left) arm experienced gains similar to those who trained the right arm. Gains were significant in the case of both internal and external rotation (also average as well as peak torque), with men and women experiencing the same relative increases. These data, in addition to supporting the use of selected exercises to increase humeral rotation torque in a healthy population, offer a potential model for the rehabilitation of patients with rotator cuff injury. PMID:11991780

  20. The Role of the Peripheral and Central Nervous Systems in Rotator Cuff Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bachasson, Damien; Singh, Anshuman; Shah, Sameer; Lane, John G.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) disease is an extremely common condition associated with shoulder pain, reduced functional capacities and impaired quality of life. It primarily involves alterations in tendon health and mechanical properties that can ultimately lead to tendon failure. RC tendon tears induce progressive muscular changes that negatively impact surgical reparability of the RC tendons and clinical outcomes. At the same time, a significant base of clinical data suggests a relatively weak relationship between RC integrity and clinical presentation, emphasizing the multifactorial aspects of RC disease. This review aims to summarize the potential contribution of peripheral, spinal and supraspinal neural factors that may: (i) exacerbate structural and functional muscle changes induced by tendon tear, (ii) compromise the reversal of these changes during surgery and rehabilitation, (iii) contribute to pain generation and persistence of pain, iv) impair shoulder function through reduced proprioception, kinematics and muscle recruitment, and iv) help to explain interindividual differences and response to treatment. Given the current clinical and scientific interest in peripheral nerve injury in the context of RC disease and surgery, we carefully reviewed this body of literature with a particular emphasis for suprascapular neuropathy that has generated a large number of studies in the past decade. Within this process, we highlight the gaps in current knowledge and suggest research avenues for scientists and clinicians. PMID:26189809

  1. Study of the porcine dermal collagen repair patch in morpho-functional recovery of the rotator cuff after minimum follow-up of 2.5 years.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Stefano; Ghilardi, Marco; Dell'osso, Giacomo; Magistrelli, Luca; Bugelli, Giulia; Di Rollo, Frederica; Ricci, Giulia; Calabrese, Rosanna; Siciliano, Gabriele; Guido, Giulio

    2014-03-01

    Tendon augmentation grafts have the potential to facilitate the repair of massive or otherwise unrepairable rotator cuff tears. In our clinic, between 2009 and 2013, 25 patients underwent surgery to treat massive symptomatic rotator cuff tears with porcine dermal collagen patch. This study is a clinical and instrumental assessment of 9 patients with the longest follow-up. These patients were evaluated with Constant score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Evaluation Form, ultrasound imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and electromyography. The clinical evaluations have shown good outcomes. The magnetic resonance imaging results were comparable with those of the ultrasound scan. In all cases, we found covering of humeral head, centering of the humeral head, maintenance of the tropism of the supraspinatus, no appearance of fatty degeneration, no worse in cases with fatty degeneration. With the electromyographic examination a complete functional recovery was observed with the possibility of performing maximal contraction against resistance in all cases. We believe that porcine dermal collagen is effective as an augmentation graft in the treatment of chronic extensive rotator cuff tears, providing excellent pain relief with an improvement in active ranges of motion and strength. PMID:24526420

  2. Labrum and rotator cuff injuries in the throwing athlete.

    PubMed

    Menge, Travis J; Byram, Ian R; Boykin, Robert E; Bushnell, Brandon D

    2015-02-01

    The large amount of force imparted across the shoulder during the act of throwing makes the glenohumeral joint highly susceptible to injury in the athlete performing overhead throwing motions. The bony incongruity of the shoulder enables greater range of motion than any other joint in the body, but it also results in significant strain on the surrounding soft tissues during the throwing motion. Throwers can present with acute injuries, but more commonly they suffer from chronic overuse conditions resulting from repetitive overload. Proper management requires early recognition with treatment directed toward the athlete's safe return to sports. Failure to institute an appropriate management strategy may result in significant complications, including prolonged disability, progression of symptoms, and further injury. We discuss the functional anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, evaluation, and treatment of common injuries of the glenoid labrum and rotator cuff in the overhead throwing athlete. PMID:25599876

  3. The geyser sign and torn rotator cuff: clinical significance and pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Craig, E V

    1984-12-01

    The geyser radiographic sign on shoulder arthrogram is characterized by leakage of dye from the glenohumeral joint into the subdeltoid bursa. The dye outlines the acromioclavicular joint. It is usually an indication of a full-thickness cuff tear of long duration. The clinical occurrence and pathomechanics of this finding indicate that repair is generally difficult.

  4. The geyser sign and torn rotator cuff: clinical significance and pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Craig, E V

    1984-12-01

    The geyser radiographic sign on shoulder arthrogram is characterized by leakage of dye from the glenohumeral joint into the subdeltoid bursa. The dye outlines the acromioclavicular joint. It is usually an indication of a full-thickness cuff tear of long duration. The clinical occurrence and pathomechanics of this finding indicate that repair is generally difficult. PMID:6499313

  5. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-15

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≫ 1, where τ{sub R} and τ{sub V} represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  6. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-01

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τR/τV ≫ 1, where τR and τV represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τR/τV ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  7. Classification and treatment of rotator cuff injuries in the overhand athlete.

    PubMed

    Meister, K; Andrews, J R

    1993-08-01

    Rotator cuff injury in athletes results from accumulation of microtrauma to both the static and dynamic stabilizers of the shoulder. Our classification of these injuries and treatment protocol is based on knowledge of the pathophysiology of events leading to rotator cuff failure. Rotator cuff disease is attributed to one of five different modes of failure: primary compressive disease, secondary compressive disease, primary tensile overload, secondary tensile overload, and macrotraumatic injuries. Although disease is categorized based on a single failure mode, there is often significant overlap between the mechanisms of injury leading to the disease. Categorization and, consequently, treatment of the injury rely upon proper identification of the primary pathology and an understanding of the causative factors leading to rotator cuff failure. In most cases conservative management is successful, but, in the refractory cases, minimally invasive surgical techniques have also been successful in returning most athletes to a premorbid level of function.

  8. Preliminary investigation of a biological augmentation of rotator cuff repairs using a collagen implant: a 2-year MRI follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Bokor, Desmond John; Sonnabend, David; Deady, Luke; Cass, Ben; Young, Allan; Van Kampen, Craig; Arnoczky, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background the inability to restore the normal tendon footprint and limit strains on the repair site are thought to contribute to re-tearing following rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to use a collagen implant to augment rotator cuff repairs through the restoration of the native tendon footprint and the induction of new tissue to decrease overall tendon strain. Methods repairs of full-thickness rotator cuff lesions in 9 adult patients were augmented with a novel collagen implant placed over the bursal surface of the repair. Tendon thickness and footprint anatomy were evaluated using MRI at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Clinical results were assessed using standard outcome metrics. Mean follow-up for all patients was 25.8 months. Results the implant induced significant new tissue formation in all patients by 3 months. This tissue matured over time and became indistinguishable from the underlying tendon. At 24 months all repairs remained intact and normal footprint anatomy of the tendon was restored in all patients. All clinical scores improved significantly over time. Conclusion the ability of a collagen implant to induce new host tissue formation and restore the normal footprint anatomy may represent a significant advancement in the biological augmentation and ultimate durability of rotator cuff repairs. PMID:26605186

  9. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF CALCIFYING TENDINITIS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; Trevizani, Cassio Silva; Benegas, Eduardo; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emílio Conforto; Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; Neto, Francisco José dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of the rotator cuff in patients with calcifying tendinitis. Method: A retrospective study was conducted on twenty patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment for calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder between March 1999 and November 2005. Six patients were excluded due to loss of follow-up. The average follow-up period was 41.4 months. Eight patients (57%) were female and six (43%) were male. The right side was affected in 10 cases (71%) and the left in four cases (29%). Nine cases (64%) had calcification in the supraspinatus tendon, two (14%) in the infraspinatus tendon, and three (21%) in both tendons. Results: In all cases, resection of the calcium deposits was performed by means of a needle (Jelco® No. 14) in combination with curettage (mini-curette). Two shoulders (14%) underwent subacromial decompression, and one (7%) underwent excision of the distal clavicle. A tendon-tendon suture was performed in three shoulders (21%). None of the patients underwent tendon-bone reinsertion. The mean score obtained on the UCLA scale was 33 points (26-35), thus indicating that a majority of patients had good results. In the final radiographic evaluation, none of the patients showed signs of calcification. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder safely allows excision of the calcification, leading to good results in relation to shoulder pain and function. PMID:27022591

  10. Do changes in hand grip strength correlate with shoulder rotator cuff function?

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, Lee; Hoyle, Rebecca; Prescott, Evie; Bellamy, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain as a result of rotator cuff pathology is one of the most common musculoskeletal complaints presenting within primary care. Assessment of hand grip strength has been proposed as an indicator of rotator cuff function. This experimental study assessed the relationship between grip strength and shoulder lateral rotator muscle strength in a number of different shoulder positions, aiming to investigate whether such a relationship existed and whether grip strength could be used as a functional assessment tool for the posterior cuff. Methods Twenty-seven healthy, physically active, volunteers (19 males, eight females) with no history of shoulder, upper limb or neck injury comprised the study group. The mean (SD) age was 19.8 (5.7) years (range 18 years to 23 years). Grip strength (measured with hand grip dynamometer) and lateral rotator strength (measured with a hand held dynamometer) was measured at neutral, 90° abduction, and 90° abduction with 90° external rotation. Results The correlation between grip strength and shoulder lateral rotation strength ranged between r = 0.91 (r2 = 0.84) and r = 0.72 (r2 = 0.52) across all positions. Conclusions A strong correlation between grip strength and lateral rotator strength was shown at all positions for both left and right hands, suggesting that assessment of grip strength could be used as a rotator cuff monitor of recruitment function. PMID:27583010

  11. Imaging Algorithms for Evaluating Suspected Rotator Cuff Disease: Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound Consensus Conference Statement

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Jon A.; Benson, Carol B.; Bancroft, Laura W.; Bedi, Asheesh; McShane, John M.; Miller, Theodore T.; Parker, Laurence; Smith, Jay; Steinbach, Lynne S.; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Thiele, Ralf G.; Tuite, Michael J.; Wise, James N.; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound convened a panel of specialists from a variety of medical disciplines to reach a consensus about the recommended imaging evaluation of painful shoulders with clinically suspected rotator cuff disease. The panel met in Chicago, Ill, on October 18 and 19, 2011, and created this consensus statement regarding the roles of radiography, ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography. The consensus panel consisted of two co-moderators, a facilitator, a statistician and health care economist, and 10 physicians who have specialty expertise in shoulder pain evaluation and/or treatment. Of the 13 physicians on the panel, nine were radiologists who were chosen to represent a broad range of skill sets in diagnostic imaging, different practice types (private and academic), and different geographical regions of the United States. Five of the radiologists routinely performed musculoskeletal US as part of their practice and four did not. There was also one representative from each of the following clinical specialties: rheumatology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, orthopedic surgery, and nonoperative sports medicine. The goal of this conference was to construct several algorithms with which to guide the imaging evaluation of suspected rotator cuff disease in patients with a native rotator cuff, patients with a repaired rotator cuff, and patients who have undergone shoulder replacement. The panel hopes that these recommendations will lead to greater uniformity in rotator cuff imaging and more cost-effective care for patients suspected of having rotator cuff abnormality. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23401583

  12. Increased Upper Trapezius Muscle Stiffness in Overhead Athletes with Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Leong, Hio Teng; Hug, François; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2016-01-01

    Although excessive tension of the upper trapezius (UT) is thought to contribute to rotator cuff tendinopathy, no study examined UT tension in athletes with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Here we used UT shear modulus measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography as an index of muscle stiffness/tension. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to determine whether the UT muscle shear modulus is altered in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy compared to asymptomatic athletes, and 2) to detect optimal cut-off points of UT shear modulus in identifying athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Forty-three male volleyball players (17 asymptomatic and 26 with rotator cuff tendinopathy, mean age = 22.9±3.5 years) participated in the study. UT shear modulus was quantified during active arm holding at 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction and passive arm positioning at 0°, 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction. During the active tasks, the UT shear modulus was higher in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy than the asymptomatic athletes (p = 0.002), regardless the arm position. During the passive tasks, athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy exhibited a higher UT shear modulus than asymptomatic athletes only at 0° of shoulder abduction (13.0±2.5 kPa vs 10.2±1.8 kPa, p = 0.001). When considering the active task, an optimal cut-off shear modulus of 12.0 kPa at 30° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.84, specificity = 0.57, AUC = 0.757, p = 0.008) and 9.5 kPa at 60° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.67, AUC = 0.816, p = 0.002) was detected. When considering the passive task at 0° of shoulder abduction, a cut-off of 12.2 kPa was found (sensitivity = 0.73, AUC = 0.817, p = 0.001). Findings from the present study show that monitoring passive and active UT muscle shear modulus may provide important information for the prevention/rehabilitation of rotator cuff tendinopathy. PMID:27159276

  13. Increased Upper Trapezius Muscle Stiffness in Overhead Athletes with Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Hio Teng; Hug, François; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2016-01-01

    Although excessive tension of the upper trapezius (UT) is thought to contribute to rotator cuff tendinopathy, no study examined UT tension in athletes with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Here we used UT shear modulus measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography as an index of muscle stiffness/tension. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to determine whether the UT muscle shear modulus is altered in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy compared to asymptomatic athletes, and 2) to detect optimal cut-off points of UT shear modulus in identifying athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Forty-three male volleyball players (17 asymptomatic and 26 with rotator cuff tendinopathy, mean age = 22.9±3.5 years) participated in the study. UT shear modulus was quantified during active arm holding at 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction and passive arm positioning at 0°, 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction. During the active tasks, the UT shear modulus was higher in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy than the asymptomatic athletes (p = 0.002), regardless the arm position. During the passive tasks, athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy exhibited a higher UT shear modulus than asymptomatic athletes only at 0° of shoulder abduction (13.0±2.5 kPa vs 10.2±1.8 kPa, p = 0.001). When considering the active task, an optimal cut-off shear modulus of 12.0 kPa at 30° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.84, specificity = 0.57, AUC = 0.757, p = 0.008) and 9.5 kPa at 60° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.67, AUC = 0.816, p = 0.002) was detected. When considering the passive task at 0° of shoulder abduction, a cut-off of 12.2 kPa was found (sensitivity = 0.73, AUC = 0.817, p = 0.001). Findings from the present study show that monitoring passive and active UT muscle shear modulus may provide important information for the prevention/rehabilitation of rotator cuff tendinopathy. PMID:27159276

  14. Isokinetic torque imbalances in the rotator cuff of the elite water polo player.

    PubMed

    McMaster, W C; Long, S C; Caiozzo, V J

    1991-01-01

    The specific repetitive activity of water polo, like baseball pitching, emphasizes adduction and internal rotation. This study used the Cybex II to evaluate the isokinetic strength of the rotator cuff in elite water polo players and in a group of control subjects. The water polo players were significantly stronger than the controls. Of greater importance was the confirmation of imbalances in the rotator cuff force couples of adduction/abduction and external/internal rotation. These changes are similar to those reported for pitchers. The adductors in the water polo group had gained in relative strength resulting in an increase in the adduction/abduction ratio to about 2:1. The internal rotators had gained in relative strength resulting in a decrease in the external/internal ratio to about 0.6:1. For both force couples the differences are more apparent at a slow speed. Side-to-side differences were not significant.

  15. Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... as those salty drops that fall from your eyes when you cry. Actually, your tears clean your eyes every time you blink. Tears also keep your eyes moist, which is important for your vision. Tear ...

  16. Revision reverse shoulder arthroplasty in failed shoulder arthroplasties for rotator cuff deficiency

    PubMed Central

    RANDELLI, PIETRO; RANDELLI, FILIPPO; COMPAGNONI, RICCARDO; CABITZA, PAOLO; RAGONE, VINCENZA; PULICI, LUCA; BANFI, GIUSEPPE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this systematic literature review is to report clinical outcomes of reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) used as a revision surgery following failure of the primary implant due to rotator cuff insufficiency. Methods a systematic review was performed using the following key words: revision, shoulder, rotator cuff deficiency, outcome assessment, treatment outcome, complications. Studies eligible for inclusion in the review were clinical trials investigating patients in whom a primary shoulder arthroplasty implant with an incompetent rotator cuff was replaced with a reverse shoulder prosthesis. Results nine articles were identified and further reviewed. The results refer to a total of 226 shoulders that were treated with RSA as revision surgery. The patients in the studies had a mean age ranging from 64 to 72 years and the longest follow-up was 3.8 years. Improvements in function and reduction of pain were shown by many studies, but the mean Constant score ranged from 44.2 to 56. High complication rates (of up to 62%) were recorded, and a mean reoperation rate of 27.5%. Conclusions RSA as revision surgery for patients with rotator cuff deficiency is a valid option, and often the only solution available, but it should be limited to elderly patients with poor function and severe pain. Level of evidence level IV, systematic review of level I–IV studies. PMID:26151037

  17. Eccentric training as a new approach for rotator cuff tendinopathy: Review and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Paula R; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Salvini, Tania F

    2014-11-18

    Excessive mechanical loading is considered the major cause of rotator cuff tendinopathy. Although tendon problems are very common, they are not always easy to treat. Eccentric training has been proposed as an effective conservative treatment for the Achilles and patellar tendinopathies, but less evidence exists about its effectiveness for the rotator cuff tendinopathy. The mechanotransduction process associated with an adequate dose of mechanical load might explain the beneficial results of applying the eccentric training to the tendons. An adequate load increases healing and an inadequate (over or underuse) load can deteriorate the tendon structure. Different eccentric training protocols have been used in the few studies conducted for people with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Further, the effects of the eccentric training for rotator cuff tendinopathy were only evaluated on pain, function and strength. Future studies should assess the effects of the eccentric training also on shoulder kinematics and muscle activity. Individualization of the exercise prescription, comprehension and motivation of the patients, and the establishment of specific goals, practice and efforts should all be considered when prescribing the eccentric training. In conclusion, eccentric training should be used aiming improvement of the tendon degeneration, but more evidence is necessary to establish the adequate dose-response and to determine long-term follow-up effects. PMID:25405092

  18. Eccentric training as a new approach for rotator cuff tendinopathy: Review and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Paula R; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Salvini, Tania F

    2014-01-01

    Excessive mechanical loading is considered the major cause of rotator cuff tendinopathy. Although tendon problems are very common, they are not always easy to treat. Eccentric training has been proposed as an effective conservative treatment for the Achilles and patellar tendinopathies, but less evidence exists about its effectiveness for the rotator cuff tendinopathy. The mechanotransduction process associated with an adequate dose of mechanical load might explain the beneficial results of applying the eccentric training to the tendons. An adequate load increases healing and an inadequate (over or underuse) load can deteriorate the tendon structure. Different eccentric training protocols have been used in the few studies conducted for people with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Further, the effects of the eccentric training for rotator cuff tendinopathy were only evaluated on pain, function and strength. Future studies should assess the effects of the eccentric training also on shoulder kinematics and muscle activity. Individualization of the exercise prescription, comprehension and motivation of the patients, and the establishment of specific goals, practice and efforts should all be considered when prescribing the eccentric training. In conclusion, eccentric training should be used aiming improvement of the tendon degeneration, but more evidence is necessary to establish the adequate dose-response and to determine long-term follow-up effects. PMID:25405092

  19. Do Matrix Metalloproteases and Tissue Inhibitors of Metalloproteases in Tenocytes of the Rotator Cuff Differ with Varying Donor Characteristics?

    PubMed Central

    Klatte-Schulz, Franka; Aleyt, Thomas; Pauly, Stephan; Geißler, Sven; Gerhardt, Christian; Scheibel, Markus; Wildemann, Britt

    2015-01-01

    An imbalance between matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases (TIMPs) may have a negative impact on the healing of rotator cuff tears. The aim of the project was to assess a possible relationship between clinical and radiographic characteristics of patients such as the age, sex, as well as the degenerative status of the tendon and the MMPs and TIMPs in their tenocyte-like cells (TLCs). TLCs were isolated from ruptured supraspinatus tendons and quantitative Real-Time PCR and ELISA was performed to analyze the expression and secretion of MMPs and TIMPs. In the present study, MMPs, mostly gelatinases and collagenases such as MMP-2, -9 and -13 showed an increased expression and protein secretion in TLCs of donors with higher age or degenerative status of the tendon. Furthermore, the expression and secretion of TIMP-1, -2 and -3 was enhanced with age, muscle fatty infiltration and tear size. The interaction between MMPs and TIMPs is a complex process, since TIMPs are not only inhibitors, but also activators of MMPs. This study shows that MMPs and TIMPs might play an important role in degenerative tendon pathologies. PMID:26068238

  20. Ultrasound Dimensions of the Rotator Cuff and Other Associated Structures in Korean Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeongwon; Kim, Hong Geum; Song, Daeheon; Yoon, Jung Yoon; Chung, Myung Eun

    2016-09-01

    In evaluating patients complaining of shoulder pain, ultrasonography is an emerging imaging tool due to convenience, low cost, high sensitivity and specificity. However, normative values of ultrasound dimensions of the shoulder to be compared with pathologic findings in Korean adults are not provided yet. We evaluated the ultrasound dimensions of the rotator cuff, long head of biceps tendon, deltoid muscle and acromioclavicular joint in Korean healthy adults. Shoulder ultrasonography was performed on 200 shoulders from 100 healthy adults. The dimensions of the thickness of rotator cuff (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis tendon), deltoid muscle, long head of biceps tendon, subacromial subdeltoid bursa, and acromioclavicular joint interval were measured in a standardized manner. Differences in measurements among sex, age, and dominant arms were compared. The thickness of rotator cuff tendons (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis) and deltoid muscle were significantly different between men and women. The thickness of subacromial subdeltoid bursa was significantly different between men and women for non-dominant side. In rotator cuff tendon measurements, the differences between dominant and non-dominant shoulders were not significant, which means the asymptomatic contralateral shoulder can be used to estimate the normal reference values. When stratified by age divided by 10 years, the measurements of supraspinatus, subscapularis and deltoid thickness showed tendency of increase with the age. The acromioclavicular joint interval, on the other hand, revealed decreasing tendency. This report suggests normative values of ultrasound dimensions of healthy Korean population with varying age, and can be useful as reference values in evaluating shoulder pathology, especially in rotator cuff tendon pathology. PMID:27510393

  1. Ultrasound Dimensions of the Rotator Cuff and Other Associated Structures in Korean Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In evaluating patients complaining of shoulder pain, ultrasonography is an emerging imaging tool due to convenience, low cost, high sensitivity and specificity. However, normative values of ultrasound dimensions of the shoulder to be compared with pathologic findings in Korean adults are not provided yet. We evaluated the ultrasound dimensions of the rotator cuff, long head of biceps tendon, deltoid muscle and acromioclavicular joint in Korean healthy adults. Shoulder ultrasonography was performed on 200 shoulders from 100 healthy adults. The dimensions of the thickness of rotator cuff (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis tendon), deltoid muscle, long head of biceps tendon, subacromial subdeltoid bursa, and acromioclavicular joint interval were measured in a standardized manner. Differences in measurements among sex, age, and dominant arms were compared. The thickness of rotator cuff tendons (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis) and deltoid muscle were significantly different between men and women. The thickness of subacromial subdeltoid bursa was significantly different between men and women for non-dominant side. In rotator cuff tendon measurements, the differences between dominant and non-dominant shoulders were not significant, which means the asymptomatic contralateral shoulder can be used to estimate the normal reference values. When stratified by age divided by 10 years, the measurements of supraspinatus, subscapularis and deltoid thickness showed tendency of increase with the age. The acromioclavicular joint interval, on the other hand, revealed decreasing tendency. This report suggests normative values of ultrasound dimensions of healthy Korean population with varying age, and can be useful as reference values in evaluating shoulder pathology, especially in rotator cuff tendon pathology. PMID:27510393

  2. Difference in isokinetic torque acceleration energy of the rotator cuff: competitive male pitchers versus male nonathletes.

    PubMed

    Manske, Robert C; Tajchman, Casey S; Stranghoner, Todd A; Ellenbecker, Todd S

    2004-08-01

    Rotator cuff function is critical to the overhead athlete. Rotator cuff power is felt to be important in the overhead athlete during the throwing motion. Little research exists regarding torque acceleration energy (TAE) in overhead athletes. Twenty-five males were divided into 2 groups consisting of overhead athletes (pitchers) (n = 12) and nonoverhead athletes (controls) (n = 13). All participants were given a concentric velocity spectrum isokinetic test at speeds of 60 degrees (1.05 r), 180 degrees (3.16 r), and 300 degrees.s(-1) (5.26 r) to both the dominant and nondominant shoulder internal and external rotators. Significant differences were found for all internal rotator TAE scores (p = 0.000-0.016), at each of the 3 velocities, when comparing dominant to nondominant arms of both overhead athletes and nonoverhead athletes. Only 60 degrees.s(-1) (1.05 r) was found to be different during external rotation TAE testing of the overhead athletes (p = 0.027) but was not found in the control subjects. Post hoc analysis revealed no differences between dominant or nondominant TAE scores when comparisons were made between overhead athletes and controls. Results may reveal that power of the rotator cuff muscles may not be a critical component of the overhead throwing motion.

  3. Partial rotator cuff injury in athletes: bursal or articular?☆

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Cassiano Diniz; Cohen, Carina; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Monteiro, Gustavo Cará; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    A painful shoulder is a very common complaint among athletes, especially in the case of those in sports involving throwing. Partial lesions of the rotator cuff may be very painful and cause significant functional limitation to athletes’ sports practice. The incidence of partial lesions of the cuff is variable (13–37%). It is difficult to make the clinical and radiological diagnosis, and this condition should be borne in mind in the cases of all athletes who present symptoms of rotator cuff syndrome, including in patients who are diagnosed only with tendinopathy. Objective To evaluate the epidemiological behavior of partial lesions of the rotator cuff in both amateur and professional athletes in different types of sports. Methods We evaluated 720 medical files on athletes attended at the shoulder service of the Discipline of Sports Medicine at the Sports Traumatology Center, Federal University of São Paulo. The majority of them were men (65%). Among all the patients, 83 of them were diagnosed with partial lesions of the rotator cuff, by means of ultrasonography or magnetic resonance, or in some cases using both. We applied the binomial test to compare the proportions found. Result It was observed that intra-articular lesions predominated (67.6%) and that these occurred more frequently in athletes in sports involving throwing (66%). Bursal lesions occurred in 32.4% of the athletes, predominantly in those who did muscle building (75%). Conclusion Intra-articular lesions are more frequent than bursal lesions and they occur predominantly in athletes in sports involving throwing, while bursal lesions were more prevalent in athletes who did muscle building. PMID:26417568

  4. Unstable domains of tearing and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in a rotating cylindrical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, D. M.; Wei, L.; Wang, Z. X. Zheng, S.; Duan, P.

    2014-09-15

    Effects of poloidal rotation profile on tearing and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities in a cylindrical plasma are investigated by using a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model. Since the poloidal rotation has different effects on the tearing and KH modes in different rotation regimes, four unstable domains are numerically identified, i.e., the destabilized tearing mode domain, stabilized tearing mode domain, stable-window domain, and unstable KH mode domain. It is also found that when the rotation layer is in the outer region of the rational surface, the stabilizing role of the rotation can be enhanced so significantly that the stable window domain is enlarged. Moreover, Alfvén resonances can be induced by the tearing and KH modes in such rotating plasmas. Radially wide profiles of current and vorticity perturbations can be formed when multiple current sheets on different resonance positions are coupled together.

  5. The Effect of Size and Location of Tears in the Supraspinatus Tendon on Potential Tear Propagation.

    PubMed

    Thunes, James; Matthew Miller, R; Pal, Siladitya; Damle, Sameer; Debski, Richard E; Maiti, Spandan

    2015-08-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common problem in patients over the age of 50 yr. Tear propagation is a potential contributing factor to the failure of physical therapy for treating rotator cuff tears, thus requiring surgical intervention. However, the evolution of tears within the rotator cuff is not well understood yet. The objective of this study is to establish a computational model to quantify initiation of tear propagation in the supraspinatus tendon and examine the effect of tear size and location. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the supraspinatus tendon was constructed from images of a healthy cadaveric tendon. A tear of varying length was placed at six different locations within the tendon. A fiber-reinforced Mooney-Rivlin material model with spatial variation in material properties along the anterior-posterior (AP) axis was utilized to obtain the stress state of the computational model under uniaxial stretch. Material parameters were calibrated by comparing computational and experimental stress-strain response and used to validate the computational model. The stress state of the computational model was contrasted against the spatially varying material strength to predict the critical applied stretch at which a tear starts propagating further. It was found that maximum principal stress (as well as the strain) was localized at the tips of the tear. The computed critical stretch was significantly lower for the posterior tip of the tear than for the anterior tip suggesting a propensity to propagate posteriorly. Onset of tear propagation was strongly correlated with local material strength and stiffness in the vicinity of the tear tip. Further, presence of a stress-shielded zone along the edges of the tear was observed. This study illustrates the complex interplay between geometry and material properties of tendon up to the initiation of tear propagation. Future work will examine the evolution of tears during the propagation process as well as under more complex

  6. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for Management of Postinfectious Arthropathy With Rotator Cuff Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Morris, Brent J; Waggenspack, Wame N; Laughlin, Mitzi S; Elkousy, Hussein A; Gartsman, Gary M; Edwards, T Bradley

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of patients with rotator cuff deficiency and arthritis in the setting of a prior glenohumeral infection (postinfectious arthropathy) is complex, with little evidence to guide treatment. The current authors present their approach to management of these patients and clinical outcomes after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). All primary RSAs performed for postinfectious arthropathy and rotator cuff deficiency with native glenohumeral joints were identified in a prospective shoulder arthroplasty registry. Eight patients with a minimum of 2-year follow-up were included in the analysis. Clinical outcomes, including the Constant score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, the Western Ontario Osteoarthritis Shoulder (WOOS) index, the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) score, and range of motion measurements, were assessed preoperatively and at final follow-up. At an average follow-up of 4.4 years, no patient had a clinically detectable recurrence of infection. Significant improvements were noted in all outcome scores from preoperative evaluation to final follow-up after RSA, including Constant score (P=.003), ASES score (P<.001), WOOS index (P=.002), SANE score (P=.025), forward flexion (P<.001), abduction (P<.001), and external rotation (P=.020). Seven of 8 patients reported they were satisfied or very satisfied at final follow-up. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty can be performed in patients without significant medical comorbidities in the setting of postinfectious arthropathy and rotator cuff deficiency with a low risk of recurrence of infection. Significant clinical improvements were noted at short-term follow-up. PMID:26270757

  7. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for Management of Postinfectious Arthropathy With Rotator Cuff Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Morris, Brent J; Waggenspack, Wame N; Laughlin, Mitzi S; Elkousy, Hussein A; Gartsman, Gary M; Edwards, T Bradley

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of patients with rotator cuff deficiency and arthritis in the setting of a prior glenohumeral infection (postinfectious arthropathy) is complex, with little evidence to guide treatment. The current authors present their approach to management of these patients and clinical outcomes after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). All primary RSAs performed for postinfectious arthropathy and rotator cuff deficiency with native glenohumeral joints were identified in a prospective shoulder arthroplasty registry. Eight patients with a minimum of 2-year follow-up were included in the analysis. Clinical outcomes, including the Constant score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, the Western Ontario Osteoarthritis Shoulder (WOOS) index, the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) score, and range of motion measurements, were assessed preoperatively and at final follow-up. At an average follow-up of 4.4 years, no patient had a clinically detectable recurrence of infection. Significant improvements were noted in all outcome scores from preoperative evaluation to final follow-up after RSA, including Constant score (P=.003), ASES score (P<.001), WOOS index (P=.002), SANE score (P=.025), forward flexion (P<.001), abduction (P<.001), and external rotation (P=.020). Seven of 8 patients reported they were satisfied or very satisfied at final follow-up. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty can be performed in patients without significant medical comorbidities in the setting of postinfectious arthropathy and rotator cuff deficiency with a low risk of recurrence of infection. Significant clinical improvements were noted at short-term follow-up.

  8. Effects of therapeutic ultrasound and exercise on pain, function, and isokinetic shoulder rotator strength of patients with rotator cuff disease

    PubMed Central

    Analan, Pınar Doruk; Leblebici, Berrin; Adam, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was to evaluate the effects of therapeutic continuous ultrasound (US) on patients with rotator cuff disease. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two patients were treated with a standard physiotherapy program consisting of a hot-pack, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), exercises, and US that was supervised by the same physiotherapist. The patients were randomly assigned to either a group that received true US (n=11) or one that received sham US (n=11). [Results] There were significant differences between the pre- and post-intervention UCLA Shoulder Rating Scale and Constant-Murley Shoulder Outcome scores, VAS, and external rotation (ER) peak torque 60°/second values for both the true and sham US groups. However, the between-group differences were not statistically significant. [Conclusion] In patients with rotator cuff disease, physiotherapy interventions effectively treat the pain, improve the clinical status, and increase the muscle strength of the shoulder ER at a low constant angular velocity, with functional improvement being seen immediately after treatment. However, at the end of the intervention, the US had yielded no additional efficacy to the physiotherapy treatment regimen of the patients with rotator cuff disease. PMID:26644656

  9. Effects of therapeutic ultrasound and exercise on pain, function, and isokinetic shoulder rotator strength of patients with rotator cuff disease.

    PubMed

    Analan, Pınar Doruk; Leblebici, Berrin; Adam, Mehmet

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was to evaluate the effects of therapeutic continuous ultrasound (US) on patients with rotator cuff disease. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two patients were treated with a standard physiotherapy program consisting of a hot-pack, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), exercises, and US that was supervised by the same physiotherapist. The patients were randomly assigned to either a group that received true US (n=11) or one that received sham US (n=11). [Results] There were significant differences between the pre- and post-intervention UCLA Shoulder Rating Scale and Constant-Murley Shoulder Outcome scores, VAS, and external rotation (ER) peak torque 60°/second values for both the true and sham US groups. However, the between-group differences were not statistically significant. [Conclusion] In patients with rotator cuff disease, physiotherapy interventions effectively treat the pain, improve the clinical status, and increase the muscle strength of the shoulder ER at a low constant angular velocity, with functional improvement being seen immediately after treatment. However, at the end of the intervention, the US had yielded no additional efficacy to the physiotherapy treatment regimen of the patients with rotator cuff disease. PMID:26644656

  10. Ultrasound vs. MRI in the assessment of rotator cuff structure prior to shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Christian Alexander; Weber, Marc-André; Neubecker, Clément; Bruckner, Thomas; Tanner, Michael; Zeifang, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims We compared the accuracy of US to 3 T Tesla MRI for the detection of rotator cuff and long biceps tendon pathologies before joint replacement. Methods 45 patients were prospectively included. Results For the supraspinatus tendon, the accuracy of US when using MRI as reference was 91.1%. For the infraspinatus tendon, the accuracy with MRI as reference was 84.4%. The subscapularis tendon was consistently assessed by US and MRI in 35/45 patients (accuracy 77.8%). For the long biceps tendon the accuracy was 86.7%. Conclusion US detection of rotator cuff and biceps tendon integrity is comparable to MRI and should be preferred in revision cases. PMID:25829757

  11. Platelets and plasma stimulate sheep rotator cuff tendon tenocytes when cultured in an extracellular matrix scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brian A; Proffen, Benedikt L; Haslauer, Carla M; Murray, Martha M

    2016-04-01

    The addition of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to rotator cuff repair has not translated into improved outcomes after surgery. However, recent work stimulating ligament healing has demonstrated improved outcomes when PRP or whole blood is combined with an extracellular matrix carrier. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three components of blood (plasma, platelets, and macrophages) on the in vitro activity of ovine rotator cuff cells cultured in an extracellular matrix environment. Tenocytes were obtained from six ovine infraspinatus tendons and cultured over 14 days in an extracellular matrix scaffold with the following additives: (1) plasma (PPP), (2) plasma and platelets (PAP), (3) plasma and macrophages (PPPM), (4) plasma, platelets and macrophages (PAPM), (5) phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and (6) PBS with macrophages (PBSM). Assays measuring cellular metabolism (AlamarBlue), proliferation (Quantitative DNA assay), synthesis of collagen and cytokines (SIRCOL, TNF-α and IL-10 ELISA, and MMP assay), and collagen gene expression (qPCR) were performed over the duration of the experiment, as well as histology at the conclusion. Plasma was found to stimulate cell attachment and spreading on the scaffold, as well as cellular proliferation. Platelets also stimulated cell proliferation, cellular metabolism, transition of cells to a myofibroblast phenotype, and contraction of the scaffolds. The addition of macrophages did not have any significant effect on the sheep rotator cuff cells in vitro. In vivo studies are needed to determine whether these changes in cellular function will translate into improved tendon healing.

  12. RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF DENERATIVE ARTHROPATHY OF THE ROTATOR CUFF USING HEMIARTHROPLASTY- CTA®

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Rômulo Brasil; Ribeiro, Fabiano Rebouças; Tenor, Antonio Carlos; Filho, Cantidio Salvador Filardi; da Costa, Guilherme Barbieri Leme; Storti, Thiago Medeiros; da Costa Garcia, André; Lutfi, Hilton Vargas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess results of CTA® partial shoulder arthroplasty for treatment of degenerative arthropathy of the rotator cuff. Methods: Between December 2006 and June 2009, 23 shoulders of 23 patients were submitted to CTA® type partial shoulder arthroplasty for treatment of arthropathy secondary to rotator cuff injury. Post-operative follow up time ranged from 6 to 35 months. Mean age was 74.1 years. Patients were predominantly female, representing 78.3% of cases. The right limb was affected in 18 patients. All patients had undergone at least 6 months of physiotherapy without improvement of the algetic picture, and being submitted to surgery by the same surgical team. None of the patients had history of surgery on the affected shoulder. The method elected for assessing patients during post-operative follow up was based on UCLA scoring criteria. Results: Improvement in pain was observed in all patients after arthroplasty. Mean UCLA pain score was 9.22 (ranging from 10 to 8). Mean function was 6 (10 to 2). Active frontal flexion was 2.39 (highest score 4 and lowest 0). Mean frontal flexion force was 4.09, maximum was 5 and minimum 3. Mean score on the UCLA was 26.52. 95% were satisfied with the surgery. Conclusion: CTA® type partial shoulder arthroplasty produced satisfactory results in the treatment of degenerative arthropathy of the rotator cuff and had a low rate of complications. PMID:27028431

  13. COMPARISON OF COMPLEMENTARY EXAMS IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES

    PubMed Central

    El-Kouba, Gabriel; Andreas Huber, Thomas; Freitas, José Renato Wilke; Steglich, Valdir; Ayzemberg, Henrique; Santos, Adriano M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of simple radiography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing rotator cuff injuries, comparing their findings with open or arthroscopic surgery findings. Methods: Protocols of the Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Service for patients undergoing surgical treatment for rotator cuff injuries diagnosed by means of radiography, ultrasound and/or MRI between 2002 and 2007 were evaluated. Based on the data gathered, we analyzed the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of these complementary examinations, compared with the findings during the surgical procedures. Results: This study included 147 patients with a mean age of 46.09 years. All the patients had undergone a radiography examination, 101 had undergone ultrasound examination and 72 had undergone MRI. We found sensitivity of 13.8%, specificity of 2.6% and accuracy of 30% with radiography; sensitivity of 57.6%, specificity of 29.6% and accuracy of 51.4% with ultrasound; and sensitivity of 86.6%, specificity of 22.2% and accuracy of 63.3% with MRI. Conclusion: Radiography was found to be a specific examination when the mirror sign was present. MRI and ultrasound were shown to be reliable methods with high accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff injuries. PMID:27022589

  14. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS FROM REOPERATIONS ON PATIENTS WITH ROTATOR CUFF LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Santos, Ruy Mesquita Maranhão; de Souza, Adriano; Estelles, José Renato Depari; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the results from open or arthroscopic surgical treatment on patients with symptomatic recurrence of rotator cuff injuries. Methods: Between December 1990 and July 2007, 30 patients were assessed and underwent reoperation performed by the Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Group of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Fernandinho Simonsen Wing, Santa Casa de São Paulo, because of dehiscence of the rotator cuff suture. The study included patients with symptomatic recurrence of the injury and with at least 24 months of postoperative follow-up. Results: According to the UCLA evaluation criteria, 21 patients (70%) showed excellent or good outcomes; and nine patients (30%) showed fair or poor outcomes. Conclusion: Open or arthroscopic surgical treatment of recurrent rotator cuff injuries tended to present worse results than from the primary repair. In this study, we found that 70% of the results were excellent and good. The presence of extensive injuries in the reoperation tended to evolve with larger numbers of unsatisfactory results. In our study, we obtained better results from arthroscopic surgery than from open surgery. PMID:27026985

  15. A Canine Non-Weight-Bearing Model with Radial Neurectomy for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiaoxi; Bao, Nirong; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.; Steinmann, Scott P.; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Background The major concern of using a large animal model to study rotator cuff repair is the high rate of repair retears. The purpose of this study was to test a non-weight-bearing (NWB) canine model for rotator cuff repair research. Methods First, in the in vitro study, 18 shoulders were randomized to 3 groups. 1) Full-width transections repaired with modified Mason-Allen sutures using 3-0 polyglactin suture, 2) Group 1 repaired using number 2 (#2) polyester braid and long-chain polyethylene suture, and 3) Partial-width transections leaving the superior 2 mm infraspinatus tendon intact without repair. In the in vivo study of 6 dogs, the infraspinatus tendon was partially transected as the same as the in vitro group 3. A radial neurectomy was performed to prevent weight bearing. The operated limb was slung in a custom-made jacket for 6 weeks. Results In the in vitro study, mean ultimate tensile load and stiffness in Group 2 were significantly higher than Group 1 and 3 (p<0.05). In the in vivo study, gross inspection and histology showed that the preserved superior 2-mm portion of the infraspinatus tendon remained intact with normal structure. Conclusions Based on the biomechanical and histological findings, this canine NWB model may be an appropriate and useful model for studies of rotator cuff repair. PMID:26107616

  16. COMPREHENSIVE STRENGTH TRAINING PROGRAM FOR A RECREATIONAL SENIOR GOLFER 11-MONTHS AFTER A ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Erik P.; En Gilpin, Hui; Brunette, Meredith

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Golf is a popular sport played by hundreds of thousands of individuals of all ages and of varying skill levels. An orthopedic or sports-related injury and/or surgery may limit an individual's sport participation, require him/her to complete a course of rehabilitation, and initiate (or resume) a sport-specific training program. Unlike the availability of evidence to guide postsurgical rehabilitation and sport-specific training of athletes from sports other than golf, there have only been two reports describing outcomes after surgery and for golfers. The purpose of this case report is to present a post-rehabilitation return to sport-training program for a recreational golfer 11-months after a rotator cuff repair. Case Description: The subject, a 67-year old female, injured her right shoulder requiring a rotator cuff repair 11-months prior to her participation in a golf fitness training program. The subject participated in six training sessions over seven week period consisting of general strengthening exercises (including exercises for the rotator cuff), exercises for the core, plyometrics, and power exercises. Outcomes: The subject made improvements in power and muscular endurance of the core. She was able to resume golf at the completion of the training program. Discussion: The subject was able to make functional improvements and return to golf after participation in a comprehensive strength program. Additional studies are necessary to improve program design for golfers who wish to return to sport after shoulder surgery. PMID:22163096

  17. The development and validation of a questionnaire for rotator cuff disorders: The Functional Shoulder Score

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Edward F; Petrou, Charalambos; Galanos, Antonis

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to validate the Functional Shoulder Score (FSS), a new patient-reported outcome score specifically designed to evaluate patients with rotator cuff disorders. Methods One hundred and nineteen patients were assessed using two shoulder scoring systems [the FSS and the Constant–Murley Score (CMS)] at 3 weeks pre- and 6 months post-arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery. The reliability, validity, responsiveness and interpretability of the FSS were evaluated. Results Reliability analysis (test–retest) showed an intraclass correlation coefficient value of 0.96 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.92 to 0.98]. Internal consistency analysis revealed a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.93. The Pearson correlation coefficient FSS-CMS was 0.782 pre-operatively and 0.737 postoperatively (p < 0.0005). There was a statistically significant increase in FSS scores postoperatively, an effect size of 3.06 and standardized response mean of 2.80. The value for minimal detectable change was ±8.38 scale points (based on a 90% CI) and the minimal clinically important difference for improvement was 24.7 ± 5.4 points. Conclusions The FSS is a patient-reported outcome measure that can easily be incorporated into clinical practice, providing a quick, reliable, valid and practical measure for rotator cuff problems. The questionnaire is highly sensitive to clinical change. PMID:27582986

  18. Cross-Sectional Area of the Rotator Cuff Muscles in MRI – Is there Evidence for a Biomechanical Balanced Shoulder?

    PubMed Central

    Bouaicha, Samy; Slankamenac, Ksenija; Moor, Beat K.; Tok, Sina; Andreisek, Gustav; Finkenstaedt, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide in-vivo evidence for the common biomechanical concept of transverse and craniocaudal force couples in the shoulder that are yielded by both the rotator cuff muscles (RCM) and the deltoid and to quantitatively evaluate and correlate the cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the corresponding RCM as a surrogate marker for muscle strength using MRI. Materials and Methods Fifty patients (mean age, 36 years; age range, 18–57 years; 41 male, 9 female) without rotator cuff tears were included in this retrospective study. Data were assessed by two readers. The CSA (mm2) of all rotator cuff muscles was measured on parasagittal T1-weighted FSE sequence at two different positions (at the established “y-position” and at a more medial slice in the presumably maximal CSA for each muscle, i.e., the “set position”). The CSA of the deltoid was measured on axial intermediate-weighted FSE sequences at three positions. CSA measurements were obtained using 1.5 Tesla MR-arthrographic shoulder. Pearson’s correlation for the corresponding CSA of the force couple as well as was the intraclass correlation coefficient for the inter- and intra-reader agreement was calculated. Results The mean CSA was 770 mm2 (±167) and 841 mm2 (±191) for the supraspinatus (in the y- and set-positions, respectively) and 984 mm2 (±241) and 1568 mm2 (±338) for the infraspinatus. The mean CSA was 446 mm2 (±129) and 438 mm2 (±128) for the teres minor (in the y- and set-positions, respectively) and 1953 mm2 (±553) and 2343 mm2 (±587) for the subscapularis. The three measurements of the deltoid revealed a CSA of 3063 mm2 (±839) for the upper edge, 3829 mm2 (±836) for the lower edge and 4069 mm2 (±937) for the middle of the glenoid. At the set position Pearson’s correlation of the transverse force couple (subscapularis/infraspinatus) showed a moderate positive correlation of r = 0.583 (p<0.0001) and a strong correlation when the CSA of the teres minor was added to the

  19. Effects of humeral head compression taping on the isokinetic strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon-Hwan; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of humeral head compression taping (HHCT) on the strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with rotator cuff tendinitis were recruited. The shoulder external rotator strength was measured using a Biodex isokinetic dynamometer system. A paired t-test was performed to evaluate within-group differences in the strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle. [Results] Significantly higher shoulder external rotator peak torque and peak torque per body weight were found in the HHCT condition than in the no-taping condition. [Conclusion] HHCT may effectively increase the shoulder external rotator muscle strength in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis. PMID:25642053

  20. Low-term results from non-conventional partial arthroplasty for treating rotator cuff arthroplasthy☆

    PubMed Central

    Tenor Júnior, Antônio Carlos; de Lima, José Alano Benevides; de Vasconcelos, Iúri Tomaz; da Costa, Miguel Pereira; Filho, Rômulo Brasil; Ribeiro, Fabiano Rebouças

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the evolution of the functional results from CTA® hemiarthroplasty for surgically treating degenerative arthroplathy of the rotator cuff, with a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. Methods Eighteen patients who underwent CTA® partial arthroplasty to treat degenerative arthroplathy of the rotator cuff between April 2007 and June 2009 were reevaluated, with minimum and mean follow-ups of 4.6 years and 5.4 years, respectively. Pre and postoperative parameters for functionality and patient satisfaction were used (functional scale of the University of California in Los Angeles, UCLA). All the patients underwent prior conservative treatment for 6 months and underwent surgical treatment because of the absence of satisfactory results. Patients were excluded if they presented any of the following: previous shoulder surgery; pseudoparalysis; insufficiency of the coracoacromial arch (type 2 B in Seebauer's classification); neurological lesions; or insufficiency of the deltoid muscle and the subscapularis muscle. Results With a mean follow-up of 5.4 years, 14 patients considered that they were satisfied with the surgery (78%); the mean range of joint motion for active elevation improved from 55.8° before the operation to 82.0° after the operation; the mean external rotation improved from 18.9° before the operation to 27.3° after the operation; and the mean medial rotation remained at the level of the third lumbar vertebra. The mean UCLA score after the mean follow-up of 5.4 years was 23.94 and this was an improvement in comparison with the preoperative mean and the mean 1 year after the operation. Conclusion The functional results from CTA® hemiarthroplasty for treating rotator cuff arthroplasty in selected patients remained satisfactory after a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. PMID:26229938

  1. Influence of sports discipline on shoulder rotator cuff balance.

    PubMed

    Codine, P; Bernard, P L; Pocholle, M; Benaim, C; Brun, V

    1997-11-01

    Isokinetic shoulder rotational strength was evaluated in four groups of subjects as follows: 12 nonathletes, 12 runners, 15 tennis players, and 12 baseball players for a total of 51 subjects. The tests were performed in the seated 45 degrees abducted test position in the scapular plane at 60, 180, and 300 degrees.s-1 for both shoulders. Peak torque and mean power values were gathered, and from these values the internal/external rotation ratios were calculated. Intergroup comparison showed a progression of the ratio related to the sports discipline. The nonathletes and runners had ratios close to those reported for nonathletes (1.3 to 1.5). The tennis players had ratios close to 1.5, whereas the baseball players had ratios from 1.6 to 2.2. The comparison between dominant and nondominant side showed no significant differences in the tennis players and higher values for the dominant side in the nonathletes and runners under certain conditions (180 degrees.s-1 for the nonathletes and 300 degrees.s-1 for the runners). Regarding the baseball players, the ratio was systematically higher for the dominant side. These results raise questions about the influence of sports discipline on the internal/external rotator muscle ratio and indicate the need to establish normative values based on the characteristics of the population under study.

  2. Effects of Preoperative Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs on Pain Mitigation and Patients' Shoulder Performance Following Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Alireza; Tabrizi, Ali; Elmi, Asghar; Abedini, Naghi; Mirza Tolouei, Fardin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Pain is one of the most important factors adversely affecting clinical outcomes of operated patients. The present study aims at evaluating effects of preoperative COX2 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory inhibitors on pain mitigation and performance of patients with shoulder rotator cuff tear. Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 60 patients suffering from rotator cuff injury candidate for arthroscopic repair. The patients were classified in two parallel and matched groups. One group (case group) was treated using Celecoxib (200mg/12h) started 48 hours before surgery and continued for 10 days after operation. In the control group, the placebo was prescribed in the same way. Postoperative pain, side effects, sleep disturbance, and short-term outcomes were compared between two groups using DASH questionnaire. Results: Postoperative pain in the Celecoxib group significantly decreased in comparison with the control one. The difference was statistically meaningful (P<0.001). Well motion ability was seen in 80% of patients of the Celecoxib group. It was 26.6% in the placebo group since pain inhibited them from exercising more motions. In this regard, there was a statistically meaningful difference between these two groups (P=0.02). Sleep disturbance was meaningfully at higher levels in the placebo group (P=0.001). Following up the patients for three months, it was made clear that performance of the Celecoxib group was better than that of the placebo one. Conclusion: COX2 inhibitors are well efficient in patients' pain management after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery. It results in less life complications, less sleep disturbances, improvement of patients' short-term clinical outcome, and more quick recovery. PMID:25436192

  3. Outcomes following arthroscopic transosseous equivalent suture bridge double row rotator cuff repair: a prospective study and short-term results

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Mohamed Abdelnabi; Abdelkafy, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Background: The transosseous-equivalent cross bridge double row (TESBDR) rotator cuff (RC) repair technique has been developed to optimize healing biology at a repaired RC tendon insertion. It has been shown in the laboratory to improve pressurized contact area and mean foot print pressure when compared with a double row anchor technique. Pressure has been shown to influence healing between tendon and bone, and the tendon compression vector provided by the transosseous-equivalent suture bridges may enhance healing. The purpose was to prospectively evaluate the outcomes of arthroscopic TESBDR RC repair. Methods: Single center prospective case series study. Sixty-nine patients were selected to undergo arthroscopic TESBDR RC repair and were included in the current study. Primary outcome measures included the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS), the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score, the Constant-Murley (CM) Score and Range of motion (ROM). Secondary outcome measures included a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain, another VAS for patient satisfaction from the operative procedure, EuroQoL 5-Dimensions Questionnaire (EQ-5D) for quality of life assessment. Results: At 24 months post-operative, average OSS score was 44, average UCLA score was 31, average CM score was 88, average forward flexion was 145°, average internal rotation was 35°, average external rotation was 79°, average abduction was 150°, average EQ-5D score was 0.73, average VAS for pain was 2.3, and average VAS for patient satisfaction was 9.2. Conclusion: Arthroscopic TESBDR RC repair is a procedure with good post-operative functional outcome and low re-tear rate based on a short term follow-up. PMID:27163096

  4. Functional evaluation of arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in patients with pseudoparalysis☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Neto, Douglas Lobato Lopes; Muchiuti Junior, Melvis; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the functional result from arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in patients with pseudoparalysis, defined as incapacity to actively raise the arm above 90°, while complete passive elevation was possible. Methods we reevaluated 38 patients with a mean follow-up of 51 months (minimum of 24). We analyzed the pseudoparalysis reversion rate and the functional result obtained. Results according to the assessment criteria of the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA), 31 (82%) patients had good and excellent results, two (5%) had fair results and five (13%) had poor results. The mean active elevation went from 39° before the operation to 139° after the operation (p < 0.05); the mean active lateral rotation went from 30° to 48° (p < 0.05) and the mean active medial rotation went from level L3 to T12 (p < 0.05). Conclusion arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries produced good and excellent results in 82% of the cases and a statistically significant improvement of active range of motion, with reversion of the pseudoparalysis in 97.4% of the cases. It is therefore a good treatment option. PMID:26229796

  5. Suprascapular nerve rotator cuff compression syndrome in volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Sandow, M J; Ilic, J

    1998-01-01

    Selective denervation of the infraspinatus muscle producing weakness and wasting has been reported in certain sports (eg, volleyball and baseball). Nerve kinking or friction caused by excessive infraspinatus motion and compression by superior or inferior transverse scapular ligament or ganglions have been proposed as possible causes. However, in extreme abduction with full external rotation of the shoulder, the medial tendinous margin between the infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles impinges strongly against the lateral edge of scapular spine, compressing the intervening infraspinatus branch of the suprascapular nerve. Spinaglenoid notchplasty has been performed in 5 elite volleyball players with infraspinatus neuropathy, allowing recovery of shoulder function in all patients and correction of infraspinatus muscle wasting. All returned to the same or higher level of volleyball by 8 months after surgery. An alternative cause of infraspinatus compromise in volleyball players is proposed and has been treated surgically with satisfactory outcome.

  6. Posterior rotator cuff strengthening using theraband(r) in a functional diagonal pattern in collegiate baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Page, P A; Lamberth, J; Abadie, B; Boling, R; Collins, R; Linton, R

    1993-01-01

    The deceleration phase of the pitching mechanism requires forceful eccentric contraction of the posterior rotator cuff. Because traditional isotonic strengthening may not be specific to this eccentric pattern, a more effective and functional means of strengthening the posterior rotator cuff is needed. Twelve collegiate baseball pitchers performed a moderate intensity isotonic dumbbell strengthening routine for 6 weeks. Six of the 12 subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group and placed on a Theraband(R) Elastic Band strengthening routine in a functional-diagonal pattern to emphasize the eccentric contraction of the posterior rotator cuff, in addition to the isotonic routine. The control group (n = 6) performed only the isotonic exercises. Both groups were evaluated on a KIN-COM(R) isokinetic dynamometer in a functional diagonal pattern. Pretest and posttest average eccentric force production of the posterior rotator cuff was compared at two speeds, 60 and 180 degrees /s. Data were analyzed with an analysis of covariance at the .05 level with significance at 60 degrees /s. Values at 180 degrees /s, however, were not significant. Eccentric force production at 60 degrees /s increased more during training in the experimental group (+19.8%) than in the control group (-1.6%). There was no difference in the two groups at 180 degrees /s; both decreased (8 to 15%). Theraband was effective at 60 degrees /s in functional eccentric strengthening of the posterior rotator cuff in the pitching shoulder.

  7. The prevalence of neovascularity in patients clinically diagnosed with rotator cuff tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Shoulder dysfunction is common and pathology of the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa are considered to be a major cause of pain and morbidity. Although many hypotheses exist there is no definitive understanding as to the origin of the pain arising from these structures. Research investigations from other tendons have placed intra-tendinous neovascularity as a potential mechanism of pain production. The prevalence of neovascularity in patients with a clinical diagnosis of rotator cuff tendinopathy is unknown. As such the primary aim of this pilot study was to investigate if neovascularity could be identified and to determine the prevalence of neovascularity in the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa in subjects with unilateral shoulder pain clinically assessed to be rotator cuff tendinopathy. The secondary aims were to investigate the association between the presence of neovascularity and pain, duration of symptoms, and, neovascularity and shoulder function. Methods Patients with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral rotator cuff tendinopathy referred for a routine diagnostic ultrasound (US) scan in a major London teaching hospital formed the study population. At referral patients were provided with an information document. On the day of the scan (on average, at least one week later) the patients agreeing to participate were taken through the consent process and underwent an additional clinical examination prior to undergoing a bilateral grey scale and colour Doppler US examination (symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulder) using a Philips HDI 5000 Sono CT US machine. The ultrasound scans were performed by one of two radiologists who recorded their findings and the final assessment was made by a third radiologist blinded both to the clinical examination and the ultrasound examination. The findings of the radiologists who performed the scans and the blinded radiologist were compared and any disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results

  8. Imaging of the rotator cuff following repair: human and animal models.

    PubMed

    Potter, Hollis G; Jawetz, Shari T; Foo, Li Foong

    2007-01-01

    Imaging of the rotator cuff following repair may be challenging due to the type of fixation, surgical manipulation of the tissue and the presence of residual defects that may exist in the presence of good functional outcome. Both ultrasound and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging present unique advantages in evaluation of the postoperative tissue. MR imaging has superior soft tissue contrast and provides a more global shoulder assessment, including the degree of arthrosis, while ultrasound enables a more dynamic testing of the repaired tissue. Power Doppler ultrasound and new contrast agents provide insight into the degree of vascular recruitment following repair.

  9. Double-needle ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinitis: tips & tricks.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Viganò, Sara; Martini, Chiara; Aliprandi, Alberto; Randelli, Pietro; Serafini, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinitis is a very common disease and may result in a very painful shoulder. Aetiology of this disease is still poorly understood. When symptoms are mild, this disease may be treated conservatively. Several treatment options have been proposed. Among them, ultrasound-guided procedures have been recently described. All procedures use one or two needles to inject a fluid, to dissolve calcium and to aspirate it. In the present article, we review some tips and tricks that may be useful to improve performance of an ultrasound-guided double-needle procedure.

  10. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR ON ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES AMONG PATIENTS UNDER 50 YEARS OF AGE

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Santos, Ruy Mesquita Maranhão; de Souza, Adriano; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries among patients under 50 years of age. Methods: Sixty-three patients with rotator cuff injuries who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment performed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, in the Fernandinho Simonsen wing of Santa Casa Medical School, São Paulo, between August 1998 and December 2007, were reassessed. The study included all patients with rotator cuff injuries who were under 50 years of age and had been followed up postoperatively for at least 24 months. Results: According to the UCLA evaluation criteria, 59 patients (92%) showed excellent and good results; five (8%) showed fair results; and none showed poor results. The postoperative evaluation showed that the mean range of motion was 145° for elevation, 47° for lateral rotation and T10 for medial rotation. Unsatisfactory results were associated with prolonged duration of the injury, with a statistically significant relationship. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in young patients produces excellent or good results for most patients. PMID:27047819

  11. Antioxidant's cytoprotective effects on rotator cuff tenofibroblasts exposed to aminoamide local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ra Jeong; Hah, Young-Sool; Kang, Jae-Ran; Park, Hyung Bin

    2015-07-01

    Local anesthetics (LA) are among the drugs most frequently used for musculoskeletal problems, in procedures ranging from diagnosis to postoperative pain control. The cytotoxicity of LA is an emerging area of concern. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cyanidin, an antioxidant, exerts cytoprotective effects against tenofibroblast death induced by LA. Primary cultured human rotator cuff tenofibroblasts were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of these LA: Ropivacaine (0.075%), Bupivacaine (0.05%), and Lidocaine (0.2%). The effects of cyanidin (100 μg/ml) on the cytotoxicity induced by these LA were investigated. Cell viability, ROS production, caspase-3/7 activity, and expressions of phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), phospho-p38, phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and cleaved PARP-1 were evaluated. Exposure to LA significantly induced cell death (p < 0.001), ROS production (p ≤ 0.04), the activation of caspase-3/7 (p < 0.001), and the increased expressions of phospho-ERK, phospho-p38, phospho-JNK, and cleaved PARP-1. These LA-induced cytotoxic effects were reduced by cyanidin. These data indicate that cyanidin, an antioxidant, has cytoprotective effects against LA-induced cytotoxicity to rotator cuff tenofibroblasts. PMID:25639557

  12. The Effect of Platelet-rich Fibrin Matrix on Rotator Cuff Healing in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S; Weinberg, M; Khatib, O; Jazrawi, L; Strauss, E J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine if the application of platelet-rich fibrin matrix could improve regeneration of the tendon-bone insertion site in a rat rotator cuff repair model. 25 Lewis syngeneic rats underwent bilateral tenotomy and repair of the supraspinatus tendon. 10 separate rats were used for PRFM harvest. All left (control) shoulders underwent transosseous rotator cuff repair, while all right (treatment) shoulders were repaired similarly with PRFM augmentation. 9 rats were sacrificed at 2-weeks and ten at 4-weeks for biomechanical testing. 3 separate rats were sacrificed at 2-weeks and 4-weeks each for histologic analysis of the insertion site. At 2 weeks, the experimental group repairs were significantly stronger in ultimate load to failure (P=0.01), stress (P=0.03), and stiffness (P=0.03). Differences in biomechanical testing were not found between the groups at 4 weeks. Histological analysis revealed less collagen organization and cartilage formation at the insertion site in the experimental group. Semiquantitative histologic analysis confirmed our qualitative assessment of the specimens. PRFM does not recapitulate the native enthesis, but rather induces an exuberant and disordered healing response that is characterized by fibrovascular scar tissue. PMID:26509369

  13. The Effect of Platelet-rich Fibrin Matrix on Rotator Cuff Healing in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S; Weinberg, M; Khatib, O; Jazrawi, L; Strauss, E J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine if the application of platelet-rich fibrin matrix could improve regeneration of the tendon-bone insertion site in a rat rotator cuff repair model. 25 Lewis syngeneic rats underwent bilateral tenotomy and repair of the supraspinatus tendon. 10 separate rats were used for PRFM harvest. All left (control) shoulders underwent transosseous rotator cuff repair, while all right (treatment) shoulders were repaired similarly with PRFM augmentation. 9 rats were sacrificed at 2-weeks and ten at 4-weeks for biomechanical testing. 3 separate rats were sacrificed at 2-weeks and 4-weeks each for histologic analysis of the insertion site. At 2 weeks, the experimental group repairs were significantly stronger in ultimate load to failure (P=0.01), stress (P=0.03), and stiffness (P=0.03). Differences in biomechanical testing were not found between the groups at 4 weeks. Histological analysis revealed less collagen organization and cartilage formation at the insertion site in the experimental group. Semiquantitative histologic analysis confirmed our qualitative assessment of the specimens. PRFM does not recapitulate the native enthesis, but rather induces an exuberant and disordered healing response that is characterized by fibrovascular scar tissue.

  14. Rotator cuff muscle size and the interpretation of scapular shape in primates.

    PubMed

    Larson, Susan G

    2015-03-01

    Scapular shape variation among primates is widely viewed as being strongly related to locomotor differences. The relative importance of overhead forelimb elevation in the locomotor repertoire of a species, as reflected in muscular leverage for scapular rotation or in the sizes of attachment areas for muscles involved in glenohumeral elevation, has proven to be a useful organizing principle for understanding this variation. While generally successful in sorting primate scapulae into functional groups, the scapulae of some species do not entirely match predictions based on the perceived importance of forelimb elevation. A recent study has shown that scapular fossa sizes in apes are not as accurate predictors of the sizes of the muscles arising from them as has been assumed. To further explore the degree of correspondence between actual and predicted muscle size based on the perceived importance of forelimb elevation, the current study examines the relative sizes of the rotator cuff muscles in a wider sample of primate taxa using published data on muscle mass and cross-sectional area. The results do not support some of the accepted generalizations about the relative sizes of members of the rotator cuff based on measurements of the sizes of scapular fossae. For example, orthograde apes do not display enlarged supraspinatus muscles compared to pronograde monkeys. Differences in assessments of relative muscle size based on mass compared to those based on cross-sectional area suggest that poor correspondence between muscle size predicted from scapular fossa size and actual muscle size may be related to constraints on scapular form associated with muscular leverage for scapular rotation and with scapular position on the thorax.

  15. Quantitative Assessment of Fat Infiltration in the Rotator Cuff Muscles using water-fat MRI

    PubMed Central

    Nardo, Lorenzo; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.; Lansdown, Drew A.; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Lee, Sonia; Maroldi, Roberto; Ma, C. Benjamin; Link, Thomas M.; Krug, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate a chemical shift-based fat quantification technique in the rotator cuff muscles in comparison with the semi-quantitative Goutallier fat infiltration classification (GC) and to assess their relationship with clinical parameters. Materials and Methods The shoulders of 57 patients were imaged using a 3T MR scanner. The rotator cuff muscles were assessed for fat infiltration using GC by two radiologists and an orthopedic surgeon. Sequences included oblique-sagittal T1-, T2- and proton density-weighted fast spin echo, and six-echo gradient echo. The iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation (IDEAL) was used to measure fat fraction. Pain and range of motion of the shoulder were recorded. Results Fat fraction values were significantly correlated with GC grades (p< 0.0001, kappa>0.9) showing consistent increase with GC grades (grade=0, 0%–5.59%; grade=1, 1.1%–9.70%; grade=2, 6.44%–14.86%; grade=3, 15.25%–17.77%; grade=4, 19.85%–29.63%). A significant correlation between fat infiltration of the subscapularis muscle quantified with IDEAL versus a) deficit in internal rotation (Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient=0.39, 95% CI 0.13–0.60, p<0.01) and b) pain (Spearman Rank Correlation coefficient=0.313, 95% CI 0.049–0.536, p=0.02) was found but was not seen between the clinical parameters and GC grades. Additionally, only quantitative fat infiltration measures of the supraspinatus muscle were significantly correlated with a deficit in abduction (Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient=0.45, 95% CI 0.20–0.60, p<0.01). Conclusion We concluded that an accurate and highly reproducible fat quantification in the rotator cuff muscles using water-fat MRI techniques is possible and significantly correlates with shoulder pain and range of motion. PMID:24115490

  16. Intramuscular migration of calcific tendinopathy in the rotator cuff: ultrasound appearance and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Becciolini, Marco; Bonacchi, Giovanni; Galletti, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder is a common condition caused by calcium hydroxyapatite crystals, affecting the tendons of the rotator cuff. Among uncommon complication, one is the migration of the calcium in the subacromion-subdeltoid bursa. More rare is the intraosseous migration. We present four cases of an even more rare condition, not well described in literature yet, the intramuscular migration of calcium.

  17. Evaluation and management of adult shoulder pain: a focus on rotator cuff disorders, acromioclavicular joint arthritis, and glenohumeral arthritis.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, April

    2014-07-01

    Shoulder pain is a common reason for a patient to see their primary care physician. This article focuses on the evaluation and management of 3 common shoulder disorders; rotator cuff disorders, acromioclavicular joint arthritis, and glenohumeral joint arthritis. The typical history and physical examination findings for each of these entities are highlighted, in addition to treatment options.

  18. Shoulder impairments and their association with symptomatic rotator cuff disease in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Ebaugh, David; Spinelli, Bryan; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2011-10-01

    Over 2.6 million breast cancer survivors currently reside in the United States. While improvements in the medical management of women diagnosed with breast cancer have resulted in a 5-year survival rate of 89%, curative treatments are associated with a high prevalence of shoulder and arm morbidity, which, in turn, can negatively impact a woman's quality of life. Breast cancer survivors frequently experience shoulder and arm pain, decreased range of motion, muscle weakness, and lymphedema. These symptoms can lead to difficulties with daily activities ranging from overhead reaching and carrying objects to caring for family and returning to work. Despite health care professionals awareness of these problems, a significant number of breast cancer survivors are confronted with long-term, restricted use of their affected shoulder and upper extremity. This problem may partially be explained by: (1) an incomplete understanding of relevant impairments and diagnoses associated with shoulder/arm pain and limited upper extremity use, and (2) the limited effectiveness of current rehabilitation interventions for managing shoulder pain and decreased upper extremity function in breast cancer survivors. Because breast cancer treatment directly involves the neuromusculoskeletal tissues of the shoulder girdle, it is understandable why breast cancer survivors are likely to develop shoulder girdle muscle weakness and fatigue, decreased shoulder motion, altered shoulder girdle alignment, and lymphedema. These impairments can be associated with diagnoses such as post-mastectomy syndrome, adhesive capsulitis, myofascial dysfunction, and brachial plexopathy, all of which have been reported among breast cancer survivors. It is our belief that these impairments also put women at risk for developing symptomatic rotator cuff disease. In this paper we set forth the rationale for our belief that breast cancer treatments and subsequent impairments of shoulder girdle neuromusculoskeletal tissues

  19. EVALUATION OF ANATOMICAL INTEGRITY USING ULTRASOUND EXAMINATION, AND FUNCTIONAL INTEGRITY USING THE CONSTANT & MURLEY SCORE, OF THE ROTATOR CUFF FOLLOWING ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; França, Flavio de Oliveira; Alves, Freitas José Marcio; Watanabe, Fábio Nagato; Nobre, Leonardo Oliveira; De Almeida Neto, Manoel Augusto; Mendes Da Silva, Marcos André

    2015-01-01

    repair to treat full tear lesions of the rotator cuff. The clinical results from the complete rotator cuff repairs via arthroscopy presented a high level of functional recovery (Constant 83.96), compared with the contralateral shoulder. The postoperative ultrasound reports presented a high percentage of re-rupture (35%). Postoperative strength was greater among the patients aged under 60 years (p = 0.002) and in cases of lesions less than or equal to 3 cm (p = 0.003). PMID:27022538

  20. Reverse arthroplasty of the shoulder for treating rotator cuff arthropathy☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Marcus Vinicius Galvão; de Faria, José Leonardo Rocha; Siqueira, Gláucio; Cohen, Marcio; Brandão, Bruno; Moraes, Rickson; Monteiro, Martim; Motta, Geraldo

    2014-01-01

    Objective to present a retrospective analysis on the clinical-functional results and complications among patients with rotator cuff arthropathy (RCA) who underwent reverse arthroplasty of the shoulder. Methods patients with a diagnosis of RCA associated with pseudoparalysis of anterior elevation who underwent reverse arthroplasty of the shoulder with a minimum follow-up of one year were selected. Results preoperative information was gathered from our shoulder and elbow arthroplasty register, comprising age, sex, laterality, history of previous procedures, Constant's functional scores and the preoperative range of motion as described in the protocol of the American Academy of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (ASES). After a mean follow-up of 44 months, 17 patients (94%) were satisfied with the result from the procedure. Conclusion reverse arthroplasty for treating RCA in patients with pseudoparalysis of the shoulder was shown to be effective in achieving a statistically significant improvement in range of motion regarding anterior flexion and abduction. However, in this series, there was no improvement in range of motion regarding external and internal rotation. Reverse arthroplasty is a procedure that reestablishes shoulder joint function in patients who previously did not present any therapeutic possibilities. PMID:26229813

  1. Shoulder rotator cuff balance, strength, and endurance in young swimmers during a competitive season.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Nuno M; Raimundo, Armando M; Tomas-Carus, Pablo; Barbosa, Tiago M; Silva, António J

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of a competitive swim season on the strength, balance, and endurance of shoulder rotator cuff muscles in young swimmers. A repeated measures design was used with 3 measurements performed during the swim season. A swimmers group (n = 20) of young men with no dry land training and a sedentary group (n = 16) of male students with the same characteristics (age, body mass, height, and maturational state) were evaluated. In both groups, the peak torque of shoulder internal rotator (IRt) and external rotator (ERt) was assessed during preseason, midseason (16 weeks), and postseason (32 weeks). Concentric action at 60 and 180°·s(-1) was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. The ER/IR strength ratios and endurance ratios were also obtained. At 60°·s(-1), there were significant training effects in the IRt strength and ER/IR ratio on both shoulders. This trend was the same throughout the competitive season. The same trend was present at 180°·s(-1) because the training effects are seen primarily in IRt and ER/IR ratios. With respect to endurance ratios, within-group data were similar in ERt and IRt for both shoulders, with no significant differences between moments. However, between-group differences occurred mostly in the IRt. Results suggest that a competitive swim season favors the increase of muscular imbalances in the shoulder rotators of young competitive swimmers, mainly because of increased levels of IRt strength and endurance that are proportionally larger than those of their antagonists. A compensatory strength training program should be considered.

  2. Rotator cuff injury in patients over the age of 65 years: evaluation of function, integrity and strength☆

    PubMed Central

    de Castro Veado, Marco Antonio; Prata, Eric Fontes; Gomes, David Correia

    2015-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively evaluate the results from patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment for rotator cuff injuries, among those aged over 65 years, observing integrity, function and strength. Methods Thirty-five shoulders were operated between July 2005 and July 2010, and 28 shoulders were re-evaluated regarding elevation strength and external rotation, using a digital dynamometer. Integrity was evaluated by means of ultrasound examinations. The patients, whose mean age was 70.54 years (ranging from 65 to 82 years), were followed up for a minimum of 26 months and mean of 51.18 months (ranging from 26 to 82 months). To evaluate function, the UCLA score, the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain were used. Results In analyzing the ultrasound scans, it was observed that the integrity of the rotator cuff was maintained in 75% of the cases at the end of the follow-up, along with the improvement in the UCLA score, which evolved from 17.46 to 32.39, i.e. excellent and good results in 89.28%. The mean SST and VAS indices were 9.86 and 1.5 respectively. Conclusion Arthroscopic surgery to repair rotator cuff injuries in patients over the age of 65 years leads to improved function and pain relief, with maintenance of the integrity of the repair. The data on muscle strength were inconclusive. PMID:26229937

  3. Effects of 8 Weeks’ Specific Physical Training on the Rotator Cuff Muscle Strength and Technique of Javelin Throwers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeyoung; Lee, Youngsun; Shin, Insik; Kim, Kitae; Moon, Jeheon

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] For maximum efficiency and to prevent injury during javelin throwing, it is critical to maintain muscle balance and coordination of the rotator cuff and the glenohumeral joint. In this study, we investigated the change in the rotator cuff muscle strength, throw distance and technique of javelin throwers after they had performed a specific physical training that combined elements of weight training, function movement screen training, and core training. [Subjects] Ten javelin throwers participated in this study: six university athletes in the experimental group and four national-level athletes in the control group. [Methods] The experimental group performed 8 weeks of the specific physical training. To evaluate the effects of the training, measurements were performed before and after the training for the experimental group. Measurements comprised anthropometry, isokinetic muscle strength measurements, the function movement screen test, and movement analysis. [Results] After the specific physical training, the function movement screen score and external and internal rotator muscle strength showed statistically significant increases. Among kinematic factors, only pull distance showed improvement after training. [Conclusion] Eight weeks of specific physical training for dynamic stabilizer muscles enhanced the rotator cuff muscle strength, core stability, throw distance, and flexibility of javelin throwers. These results suggest that specific physical training can be useful for preventing shoulder injuries and improving the performance for javelin throwers. PMID:25364111

  4. Intramuscular migration of calcific tendinopathy in the rotator cuff: ultrasound appearance and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Becciolini, Marco; Bonacchi, Giovanni; Galletti, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder is a common condition caused by calcium hydroxyapatite crystals, affecting the tendons of the rotator cuff. Among uncommon complication, one is the migration of the calcium in the subacromion-subdeltoid bursa. More rare is the intraosseous migration. We present four cases of an even more rare condition, not well described in literature yet, the intramuscular migration of calcium. PMID:27635162

  5. Retrospective study of sonographic findings in bone involvement associated with rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy: preliminary results of a case series*

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Lorenzato, Mario Muller

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at investigating bone involvement secondary to rotator cuff calcific tendonitis at ultrasonography. Materials and Methods Retrospective study of a case series. The authors reviewed shoulder ultrasonography reports of 141 patients diagnosed with rotator cuff calcific tendonitis, collected from the computer-based data records of their institution over a four-year period. Imaging findings were retrospectively and consensually analyzed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists looking for bone involvement associated with calcific tendonitis. Only the cases confirmed by computed tomography were considered for descriptive analysis. Results Sonographic findings of calcific tendinopathy with bone involvement were observed in 7/141 (~ 5%) patients (mean age, 50.9 years; age range, 42-58 years; 42% female). Cortical bone erosion adjacent to tendon calcification was the most common finding, observed in 7/7 cases. Signs of intraosseous migration were found in 3/7 cases, and subcortical cysts in 2/7 cases. The findings were confirmed by computed tomography. Calcifications associated with bone abnormalities showed no acoustic shadowing at ultrasonography, favoring the hypothesis of resorption phase of the disease. Conclusion Preliminary results of the present study suggest that ultrasonography can identify bone abnormalities secondary to rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, particularly the presence of cortical bone erosion. PMID:26811551

  6. Exercises focusing on rotator cuff and scapular muscles do not improve shoulder joint position sense in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yin-Liang; Karduna, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Proprioception is essential for shoulder neuromuscular control and shoulder stability. Exercise of the rotator cuff and scapulothoracic muscles is an important part of shoulder rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of rotator cuff and scapulothoracic muscle exercises on shoulder joint position sense. Thirty-six healthy subjects were recruited and randomly assigned into either a control or training group. The subjects in the training group received closed-chain and open-chain exercises focusing on rotator cuff and scapulothoracic muscles for four weeks. Shoulder joint position sense errors in elevation, including the humerothoracic, glenohumeral and scapulothoracic joints, was measured. After four weeks of exercise training, strength increased overall in the training group, which demonstrated the effect of exercise on the muscular system. However, the changes in shoulder joint position sense errors in any individual joint of the subjects in the training group were not different from those of the control subjects. Therefore, exercises specifically targeting individual muscles with low intensity may not be sufficient to improve shoulder joint position sense in healthy subjects. Future work is needed to further investigate which types of exercise are more effective in improving joint position sense, and the mechanisms associated with those changes. PMID:27475714

  7. OUTCOME OF ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR IN SNYDER TYPE Cl AND C2 LESIONS, CONSIDERING SMOKERS AND NONSMOKERS

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Sérgio Correa Pinto; Luciano, Lessandro Gesser; Zotto, Crischiman Dal; Vieira, Felipe Fantozzi; Klassen, Ralf; Rodrigues, Airton; Neto, Francisco José dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of smoking on the results from surgical repair of Snyder type C1 and C2 complete lesions of the rotator cuff. Methods: We evaluated 166 patients who had undergone surgical treatment for Snyder type C1 and C2 complete lesions of the rotator cuff, between June 2002 and December 2006. The inclusion criteria were a minimum follow-up period of 24 months and the absence of previous surgery on the affected shoulder. Patients with other associated injuries were excluded. We evaluated smoking and nonsmoking patients in accordance with the criteria of the World Health Organization (WHO). Female patients (119) predominated over male patients (47), and the mean age was 57 years (38 to 78). Out of the 166 patients evaluated, 21 were classified as smokers and 145 as nonsmokers. The final results were evaluated using the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) criteria and statistical analysis was performed using the Epi Info® software. Results: According to the UCLA criteria, smokers had a final average of 32.6 points, while non-smokers had 33.8. Postoperative statistical analysis revealed a difference between the two groups, such that non-smoking patients had a better outcome. Conclusion: Smoking interferes with the final results from repairs of small and medium-sized lesions of the rotator cuff. PMID:27026963

  8. Comparative analysis on arthroscopic sutures of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries in relation to the degree of osteopenia☆

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Atti, Vinícius; Agostini, Daniel Cecconi; Valin, Márcio Rangel; de Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto; Agostini, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the results from arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries, according to the patient's degree of osteopenia. Method 138 patients who underwent arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries between 2003 and 2011 were analyzed. Those operated from October 2008 onwards formed a prospective cohort, while the remainder formed a retrospective cohort. Also from October 2008 onwards, bone densitometry evaluation was requested at the time of the surgical treatment. For the patients operated before this date, densitometry examinations performed up to two years before or after the surgical treatment were investigated. The patients were divided into three groups. Those with osteoporosis formed group 1 (n = 16); those with osteopenia, group 2 (n = 33); and normal individuals, group 3 (n = 55). Results In analyzing the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) scores of group 3 and comparing them with group 2, no statistically significant difference was seen (p = 0.070). Analysis on group 3 in comparison with group 1 showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.027). Conclusion The results from arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries seem to be influenced by the patient's bone mineral density, as assessed using bone densitometry. PMID:26229899

  9. Comparison of ultrasonic suture welding and traditional knot tying in a rabbit rotator cuff repair model.

    PubMed

    Nho, Shane J; Cole, Brian J; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Williams, James M; Romeo, Anthony A; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Bach, Bernard R; Hallab, Nadim J

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate ultrasonic suture welding of monofilament suture in an animal model of rotator cuff repair with biomechanical and histologic analyses. We randomly assigned 46 shoulders in 23 rabbits to 1 of 3 treatment groups: sham-operated (n = 15), knotted (n = 15), and welded (n = 16). Supraspinatus defects were surgically created and acutely repaired with suture anchors loaded with either No. 2-0 Ethibond for knotted group or No. 2-0 nylon for welded shoulders. Eighteen weeks postoperatively, all animals were killed, and the shoulders underwent either biomechanical testing or histologic analysis. The maximum stress of the sham-operated group (20.6 N/mm2) was significantly greater than that of both the knotted (10.2 N/mm2) and welded (8.3 N/mm2) groups (P < .05), but no differences were observed between the knotted and welded groups. Although some histologic changes were noted, none was considered to be significant to distinguish either group.

  10. A systematic review of the histological and molecular changes in rotator cuff disease

    PubMed Central

    Dean, B. J. F.; Franklin, S. L.; Carr, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The pathogenesis of rotator cuff disease (RCD) is complex and not fully understood. This systematic review set out to summarise the histological and molecular changes that occur throughout the spectrum of RCD. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature with specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results A total of 101 studies met the inclusion criteria: 92 studies used human subjects exclusively, seven used animal overuse models, and the remaining two studies involved both humans and an animal overuse model. A total of 58 studies analysed supraspinatus tendon exclusively, 16 analysed subacromial bursal tissue exclusively, while the other studies analysed other tissue or varying combinations of tissue types including joint fluid and muscle. The molecular biomarkers that were altered in RCD included matrix substances, growth factors, enzymes and other proteins including certain neuropeptides. Conclusions The pathogenesis of RCD is being slowly unravelled as a result of the significant recent advances in molecular medicine. Future research aimed at further unlocking these key molecular processes will be pivotal in developing new surgical interventions both in terms of the diagnosis and treatment of RCD. PMID:23610686

  11. Effect of rotation and velocity shear on tearing layer stability in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ryan L.; Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2015-10-01

    Using a resistive generalization of the Frieman-Rotenberg formalism, the leading-order effects of velocity shear and rotation on linear tearing layer stability are studied for tokamak equilibria. The layer equations for resistive interchange modes are derived for arbitrary equilibrium rotation and velocity shear. The resulting layer equations do not conserve parity and are not simplified by Fourier transform. Thus, many standard numerical techniques cannot be implemented in a straightforward manner. Layer equations are also derived in the constant- Ψ limit. The constant- Ψ dispersion relation is obtained and is used to study the leading-order effects of rotation and velocity shear on the critical value of Δ' required for tearing instability. It is found that rotation and velocity shear can couple with the parallel current and the current gradient in the layer to reduce Δ'crit . If parallel currents are sufficiently weak to compete with second-order effects, velocity shear can be stabilizing, while rotation is found to have a destabilizing effect. Second-order coupling of velocity shear and rotation can have either sign, and thus can affect stability in either direction.

  12. Braking of tearing mode rotation by ferromagnetic conducting walls in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2015-09-15

    An in-depth investigation of the braking of tearing mode rotation in tokamak plasmas via eddy currents induced in external ferromagnetic conducting structures is performed. In general, there is a “forbidden band” of tearing mode rotation frequencies that separates a branch of high-frequency solutions from a branch of low-frequency solutions. When a high-frequency solution crosses the upper boundary of the forbidden band, there is a bifurcation to a low-frequency solution, and vice versa. The bifurcation thresholds predicted by simple torque-balance theory (which takes into account the electromagnetic braking torque acting on the plasma, as well as the plasma viscous restoring torque, but neglects plasma inertia) are found to be essentially the same as those predicted by more complicated time-dependent mode braking theory (which takes inertia into account). Significant ferromagnetism causes otherwise electromagnetically thin conducting structures to become electromagnetically thick and also markedly decreases the critical tearing mode amplitude above which the mode “locks” to the conducting structures (i.e., the high-frequency to low-frequency bifurcation is triggered). On the other hand, if the ferromagnetism becomes too large, then the forbidden band of mode rotation frequencies is suppressed, and the mode frequency consequently varies smoothly and reversibly with the mode amplitude.

  13. Rotator cuff arthropathy: what functional results can be expected from reverse arthroplasty?☆

    PubMed Central

    Fávaro, Rodrigo Caldonazzo; Abdulahad, Michel; Filho, Salim Mussi; Valério, Rafael; Superti, Mauro José

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the functional results from reverse arthroplasty and its complications and relationships with types of injury. Methods Twenty-seven shoulders (26 women and one man) were treated. The patients were assessed using the UCLA functional scale. The implant used was the Delta Xtend Depuy® model. The injuries were classified using the Seebauer method for the degree of arthroplasty and the Nerot method for notching. Result The mean age was 77.4 years (range: 67–89) and the follow-up was 25.8 months (range: 6–51). The preoperative UCLA score was 10.1 (range: 6–15) and the postoperative UCLA score was 29.8 (range: 22–35), which was a statistically significant improvement (p < 0.001). According to the Seebauer classification, five patients were 1B, 19 were 2A and three were 2B. Fifteen cases presented complications (55.5%) and notching was the commonest of these, occurring in 14 patients (nine with grade 1 and five with grade 2), but this did not cause instability in any of them. Only one patient (3.7%) had a major complication, consisting of dislocation in the immediate postoperative period. Two patients (7.4%) said that they would undergo the procedure again. One patient (3.7%) underwent a revision procedure. Conclusion Reverse arthroplasty was shown to be an excellent option for treating patients with rotator cuff arthropathy, with a low rate of major complications. Notching was a frequent complication, but in the majority of the cases, it did not present clinical repercussions. PMID:26535197

  14. Altered Satellite Cell Responsiveness and Denervation Implicated in Progression of Rotator-Cuff Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gigliotti, Deanna; Leiter, Jeff R. S.; MacDonald, Peter B.; Peeler, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Background Rotator-cuff injury (RCI) is common and painful; even after surgery, joint stability and function may not recover. Relative contributions to atrophy from disuse, fibrosis, denervation, and satellite-cell responsiveness to activating stimuli are not known. Methods and Findings Potential contributions of denervation and disrupted satellite cell responses to growth signals were examined in supraspinatus (SS) and control (ipsilateral deltoid) muscles biopsied from participants with RCI (N = 27). Biopsies were prepared for explant culture (to study satellite cell activity), immunostained to localize Pax7, BrdU, and Semaphorin 3A in satellite cells, sectioning to study blood vessel density, and western blotting to measure the fetal (γ) subunit of acetylcholine receptor (γ-AchR). Principal component analysis (PCA) for 35 parameters extracted components identified variables that contributed most to variability in the dataset. γ-AchR was higher in SS than control, indicating denervation. Satellite cells in SS had a low baseline level of activity (Pax7+ cells labelled in S-phase) versus control; only satellite cells in SS showed increased proliferative activity after nitric oxide-donor treatment. Interestingly, satellite cell localization of Semaphorin 3A, a neuro-chemorepellent, was greater in SS (consistent with fiber denervation) than control muscle at baseline. PCAs extracted components including fiber atrophy, satellite cell activity, fibrosis, atrogin-1, smoking status, vascular density, γAchR, and the time between symptoms and surgery. Use of deltoid as a control for SS was supported by PCA findings since “muscle” was not extracted as a variable in the first two principal components. SS muscle in RCI is therefore atrophic, denervated, and fibrotic, and has satellite cells that respond to activating stimuli. Conclusions Since SS satellite cells can be activated in culture, a NO-donor drug combined with stretching could promote muscle growth and

  15. The effect of radial pressure force on rotating double tearing mode in compressible plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Qu; Xiong, Guo-Zhen; Li, Xiao-Qing

    2016-05-01

    The role of radial pressure force in the interlocking dynamics of double tearing modes (DTMs) is investigated by force balance analysis based on the compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model. It is found that the stability of symmetric DTMs is dominated by the radial pressure force rather than the field line bending force. Owing to the compressibility of rotating plasmas, unbalanced radial forces can just result in the rotating islands drift toward each other in the radial direction but do not trigger the explosive growth of the mode in the interlocking process, which is different from that of antisymmetric DTM without flow.

  16. Supraspinatus Intramuscular Calcified Hematoma or Necrosis Associated with Tendon Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Genevay, Muriel; Abrassart, Sophie; Schwitzguébel, Adrien Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Rotator cuff intramuscular calcification is a rare condition usually caused by heterotopic ossification and myositis ossificans. Case Presentation. We describe a patient with voluminous calcified mass entrapped in supraspinatus muscle associated with corresponding tendon tear. Histological examination corresponded to a calcified hematoma or necrosis. Patient was surgically managed with open excision of the calcified hematoma and rotator cuff arthroscopic repair. At 6 months, supraspinatus muscle was healed, and functional outcome was good. Discussion and Conclusion. We hypothesized that supraspinatus intramuscular calcified hematoma was responsible for mechanical stress on the tendon. This association has never been described. PMID:26380138

  17. Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 4: Hydrotherapy following rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Hay, Laura; Wylie, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    A short cut review was carried out to establish whether hydrotherapy is beneficial in rehabilitation after rotator cuff repair. 27 papers were found using the reported searches, of which one presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of that best paper are tabulated. It is concluded that while there may be some short term benefit to passive range of movement, further research is needed.

  18. Acute Calcific Bursitis After Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Barbotage of Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bo-Sung; Lee, Seung Hak; Cho, Yung; Chung, Sun Gun

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous barbotage is an effective treatment for rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, providing rapid and substantial pain relief. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with aggravated pain early after ultrasound-guided barbotage of a large calcific deposit in the supraspinatus tendon. Subsequent examination revealed a thick calcification spreading along the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa space, suggesting acute calcific bursitis complicated by barbotage. Additional barbotage alleviated her pain completely. Therefore, a high index of suspicion for acute calcific bursitis is required in patients with unresolved or aggravated pain after barbotage. Repeated barbotage could be effective for this condition. PMID:26902864

  19. Self-suppression of double tearing modes via Alfven resonance in rotating tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhengxiong; Wei Lai; Liu Yue; Wang Xiaogang

    2011-05-15

    Reversed magnetic shear configuration, a key method for improving plasma confinement in advanced tokamaks, is prone to exciting double tearing modes (DTMs) that can severely degrade the plasma confinement. In this letter, we reveal a new mechanism of suppressing the DTM instability due to the self-induced Alfven resonance in rotating tokamak plasmas. The linear growth rate is reduced from {approx}S{sub Hp}{sup -1/3} of the fast DTM regime to {approx}S{sub Hp}{sup -3/5} of the slow single tearing mode regime, where S{sub Hp} is magnetic Reynolds number. Instead of generating magnetic islands at the inner rational surface that can greatly enhance plasma transport in the core region, the formation of current sheets at resonance layers not only prevents the fast nonlinear DTM reconnection phase but also contributes to plasma heating.

  20. Effect of pain scrambler therapy on shoulder joint pain and range of motion in patients who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for the first time

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effect of pain scrambler therapy on shoulder joint pain and range of motion in patients who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for the first time. [Subjects and Methods] Pain scrambler therapy was administered once a day every 40 minutes for 10 days to patients that had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for the first time. The visual analog scale was used to measure pain, and a goniometer was used to measure shoulder range of motion. [Results] After 10 sessions of pain scrambler therapy, pain was significantly reduced from that before the treatment. In addition, shoulder range of motion was increased after 10 treatment sessions. [Conclusion] Thus, pain scrambler therapy greatly reduced pain and increased should range of motion in the patients who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for the first time. PMID:27512291

  1. Ground reaction forces are more sensitive gait measures than temporal parameters in rodents following rotator cuff injury.

    PubMed

    Pardes, A M; Freedman, B R; Soslowsky, L J

    2016-02-01

    Gait analysis is a quantitative, non-invasive technique that can be used to investigate functional changes in animal models of musculoskeletal disease. Changes in ground reaction forces following injury have been observed that coincide with differences in tissue mechanical and histological properties during healing. However, measurement of these kinetic gait parameters can be laborious compared to the simpler and less time-consuming analysis of temporal gait parameters alone. We compared the sensitivity of temporal and kinetic gait parameters in detecting functional changes following rotator cuff injury in rats. Although these parameters were strongly correlated, temporal measures were unable to detect greater than 50% of the functional gait differences between injured and uninjured animals identified simultaneously by ground reaction forces. Regression analysis was used to predict ground reaction forces from temporal parameters. This model improved the ability of temporal parameters to identify known functional changes, but only when these differences were large in magnitude (i.e., between injured vs. uninjured animals, but not between different post-operative treatments). The results of this study suggest that ground reaction forces are more sensitive measures of limb/joint function than temporal parameters following rotator cuff injury in rats. Therefore, although gait analysis systems without force plates are typically efficient and easy to use, they may be most appropriate for use when major functional changes are expected. PMID:26768230

  2. Effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage and rotator cuff tendon healing: An in vivo rabbit study.

    PubMed

    Friel, Nicole A; McNickle, Allison G; DeFranco, Michael J; Wang, FanChia; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R; Chubinskaya, Susan; Kramer, Susan M; Wang, Vincent M

    2015-12-01

    Highly purified capsaicin has emerged as a promising injectable compound capable of providing sustained pain relief following a single localized treatment during orthopedic surgical procedures. To further assess its reliability for clinical use, the potential effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage metabolism as well as tendon structure and function warrants clarification. In the current study, rabbits received unilateral supraspinatus transection and repair with a single 1 ml injection of capsaicin (R+C), PEG-only placebo (R+P), or saline (R+S) into the glenohumeral joint (GHJ). An additional group received 1 ml capsaicin onto an intact rotator cuff (I+C). At 18 weeks post-op, cartilage proteoglycan (PG) synthesis and content as well as cell viability were similar (p>0.05) across treatment groups. Biomechanical testing revealed no differences (p>0.05) among tendon repair treatment groups. Similarly, histologic features of both cartilage and repaired tendons showed minimal differences across groups. Hence, in this rabbit model, a single injection of highly purified capsaicin into the GHJ does not induce a deleterious response with regard to cartilage matrix metabolism and cell viability, or rotator cuff healing. These data provide further evidence supporting the use of injectable, highly purified capsaicin as a safe alternative for management of postoperative pain following GHJ surgery. PMID:26135547

  3. [Muscle efficiency in total shoulder prosthesis implantation: dependence on position of the humeral head and rotator cuff function].

    PubMed

    Klages, A; Hurschler, C; Wülker, N; Windhagen, H

    2001-09-01

    Modern shoulder prostheses permit an anatomic reconstruction of the joint, although the biomechanical advantages are not proven. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between position of the humeral head and function of the shoulder prosthesis (muscle efficiency). Shoulder elevation-motion and rotator cuff defects were simulated in vitro in a robot-assisted shoulder simulator. The EPOCA Custom Offset shoulder prosthesis (Argomedical AG, Cham, CH) was implanted in seven normal shoulders (77 +/- 20 kg, 55 +/- 14 years). Active elevation was simulated by hydraulic cylinders, and scapulothoratic motion by a specially programmed industrial robot. Muscle efficiency (elevation-angle/muscle-force of the deltoid muscle) was measured in anatomic (ANA), medialised (MED) and lateralised (LAT) positions of the humeral head, with or without rotator cuff muscle deficiency. Medialisation increased efficiency by 0.03 +/- 0.04 deg/N (p = 0.022), lateralisation decreased it by 0.04 +/- 0.06 deg/N (p = 0.009). Supraspinatus muscle deficiency increased the deltoid force required to elevate the arm, and thus decreased efficiency (ANA p = 0.091, MED p = 0.018, LAT p = 0.028). The data confirm that the position of the humeral head affects the mechanics of total shoulder arthroplasty. Medialisation increases efficiency of the deltoid muscle and may prove useful in compensating isolated supraspinatus muscle deficiency. Lateralisation, in contrast, leads to an unfavorable situation.

  4. Effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage and rotator cuff tendon healing: An in vivo rabbit study.

    PubMed

    Friel, Nicole A; McNickle, Allison G; DeFranco, Michael J; Wang, FanChia; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R; Chubinskaya, Susan; Kramer, Susan M; Wang, Vincent M

    2015-12-01

    Highly purified capsaicin has emerged as a promising injectable compound capable of providing sustained pain relief following a single localized treatment during orthopedic surgical procedures. To further assess its reliability for clinical use, the potential effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage metabolism as well as tendon structure and function warrants clarification. In the current study, rabbits received unilateral supraspinatus transection and repair with a single 1 ml injection of capsaicin (R+C), PEG-only placebo (R+P), or saline (R+S) into the glenohumeral joint (GHJ). An additional group received 1 ml capsaicin onto an intact rotator cuff (I+C). At 18 weeks post-op, cartilage proteoglycan (PG) synthesis and content as well as cell viability were similar (p>0.05) across treatment groups. Biomechanical testing revealed no differences (p>0.05) among tendon repair treatment groups. Similarly, histologic features of both cartilage and repaired tendons showed minimal differences across groups. Hence, in this rabbit model, a single injection of highly purified capsaicin into the GHJ does not induce a deleterious response with regard to cartilage matrix metabolism and cell viability, or rotator cuff healing. These data provide further evidence supporting the use of injectable, highly purified capsaicin as a safe alternative for management of postoperative pain following GHJ surgery.

  5. The concentration of stress at the rotator cuff tendon-to-bone attachment site is conserved across species.

    PubMed

    Saadat, Fatemeh; Deymier, Alix C; Birman, Victor; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Genin, Guy M

    2016-09-01

    The tendon-to-bone attachment site integrates two distinct tissues via a gradual transition in composition, mechanical properties, and structure. Outcomes of surgical repair are poor, in part because surgical repair does not recreate the natural attachment, and in part because the mechanical features that are most critical to mechanical and physiological functions have not been identified. We employed allometric analysis to resolve a paradox about how the architecture of the rotator cuff contributes to load transfer: whereas published data suggest that the mean muscle stresses expected at the tendon-to-bone attachment are conserved across species, data also show that the relative dimensions of key anatomical features vary dramatically, suggesting that the amplification of stresses at the interface between tendon and bone should also vary widely. However, a mechanical model that enabled a sensitivity analysis revealed that the degree of stress concentration was in fact highly conserved across species: the factors that most affected stress amplification were most highly conserved across species, while those that had a lower effect showed broad variation across a range of relative insensitivity. Results highlight how micromechanical factors can influence structure-function relationships and cross-species scaling over several orders of magnitude in animal size, and provide guidance on physiological features to emphasize in surgical and tissue engineered repair of the rotator cuff. PMID:27161959

  6. The interaction between plasma rotation, stochastic fields and tearing mode excitation by external perturbation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBock, M. F. M.; Classen, I. G. J.; Busch, C.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Koslowski, H. R.; Unterberg, B.; TEXTOR Team

    2008-01-01

    For fusion reactors, based on the principle of magnetic confinement, it is important to avoid so-called magnetic islands or tearing modes. They reduce confinement and can be the cause of major disruptions. One class of magnetic islands is that of the perturbation field driven modes. This perturbation field can, for example, be the intrinsic error field. Theoretical work predicts a strong relationship between plasma rotation and the excitation of perturbation field modes. Experimentally, the theory on mode excitation and plasma rotation has been confirmed on several tokamaks. In those experiments, however, the control over the plasma rotation velocity and direction, and over the externally applied perturbation field was limited. In this paper experiments are presented that were carried out at the TEXTOR tokamak. Two tangential neutral beam injectors and a set of helical perturbation coils, called the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED), provide control over both the plasma rotation and the external perturbation field in TEXTOR. This made it possible to set up a series of experiments to test the theory on mode excitation and plasma rotation in detail. The perturbation field induced by the DED not only excites magnetic islands, it also sets up a layer near the plasma boundary where the magnetic field is stochastic. It will be shown that this stochastic field alters both the rotational response of the plasma on the perturbation field and the threshold for mode excitation. It therefore has to be included in an extended theory on mode excitation.

  7. Low-dose CT imaging of radio-opaque markers for assessing human rotator cuff repair: accuracy, repeatability and the effect of arm position.

    PubMed

    Derwin, K A; Milks, R A; Davidson, I; Iannotti, J P; McCarron, J A; Bey, M J

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies have used radiostereometric analysis (RSA) to assess the integrity and mechanical properties of repaired tendons and ligament grafts. A conceptually similar approach is to use CT imaging to measure the 3D position and distance between implanted markers. The purpose of this study was to quantify the accuracy and repeatability of measuring the position and distance between metallic markers placed in the rotator cuff using low-dose CT imaging. We also investigated the effect of repeated or variable positions of the arm on position and distance measures. Six human patients had undergone rotator cuff repair and placement of tantalum beads in the rotator cuff at least one year prior to participating in this study. On a single day each patient underwent nine low-dose CT scans in seven unique arm positions. CT scans were analyzed to assess bias, precision and RMS error of the measurement technique. The effect of repeated or variable positions of the arm on the 3D position of the beads and the distance between these beads and suture anchors in the humeral head were also assessed. Results showed the CT imaging method is accurate and repeatable to within 0.7 mm. Further, measures of bead position and anchor-to-bead distance are influenced by arm position and location of the bead within the rotator cuff. Beads located in the posterior rotator cuff moved medially as much as 20 mm in abduction or external rotation. When clinically relevant CT arm positions such as the hand on umbilicus or at side were repeated, bead position varied less than 4 mm in any anatomic direction and anchor-to-bead distance varied +2.8 to -1.6 mm (RMS 1.3 mm). We conclude that a range of ± 3 mm is a conservative estimate of the uncertainty in anchor-to-bead distance for patients repeatedly scanned in clinically-relevant arm positions.

  8. Tendon of the long head of the biceps originating from the rotator cuff - An uncommon anatomical variation: case report.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Esteves, Leonardo Roure; Figueiredo, Eduardo; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations at the origin of the biceps tendon have been described by several authors, but occurrences of an origin in the supraspinatus are rare. It is unclear whether this variation might contribute toward pathological conditions of the shoulder. Our objective here was to describe a case of an anatomical variation in the origin of the tendon of the long head of the biceps. The clinical information, preoperative images and arthroscopic images relating to a patient with an aberrant origin of the long head of the biceps, which was observed during shoulder arthroscopy, were reviewed. In this case study, the origin of the biceps was found in the rotator cuff, without any origin from the supraglenoid tubercle or upper labrum. This variant did not seem to contribute toward the pathological condition of the shoulder, and standard treatment for the concomitant condition was sufficient for treating it.

  9. Tendon of the long head of the biceps originating from the rotator cuff – An uncommon anatomical variation: case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Esteves, Leonardo Roure; Figueiredo, Eduardo; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    Anatomical variations at the origin of the biceps tendon have been described by several authors, but occurrences of an origin in the supraspinatus are rare. It is unclear whether this variation might contribute toward pathological conditions of the shoulder. Our objective here was to describe a case of an anatomical variation in the origin of the tendon of the long head of the biceps. The clinical information, preoperative images and arthroscopic images relating to a patient with an aberrant origin of the long head of the biceps, which was observed during shoulder arthroscopy, were reviewed. In this case study, the origin of the biceps was found in the rotator cuff, without any origin from the supraglenoid tubercle or upper labrum. This variant did not seem to contribute toward the pathological condition of the shoulder, and standard treatment for the concomitant condition was sufficient for treating it. PMID:26962493

  10. A simple technique to restore needle patency during percutaneous lavage and aspiration of calcific rotator cuff tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Jelsing, Elena J; Maida, Eugene; Smith, Jay

    2013-03-01

    Calcific rotator cuff tendinopathy caused by symptomatic calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition is a well-established cause of shoulder pain. In refractory or acutely symptomatic cases, sonographically guided percutaneous lavage and aspiration can significantly reduce pain in approximately 60%-92% of cases. Although the complication rate of sonographically guided percutaneous lavage and aspiration is apparently low, needle clogging attributable to impacted calcific debris has been described by several authors and in our experience can occur in daily practice. Traditionally, an inability to relieve the obstruction via needle repositioning or increased syringe plunger pressure has required needle removal and replacement. In this article, we outline a simple technique that can be used to restore patency of the obstructed lavage needle without necessitating needle removal and replacement. PMID:23399296

  11. Evaluation of the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries in patients aged 65 years and over☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; Santos, Pedro Doenux; Checchia, Sergio Luiz; Cohen, Carina; Giora, Taís Stedile Busin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries in patients aged 65 years and over. Methods Between 1998 and 2009, 168 patients underwent operations. Five cases were excluded. The remaining 163 patients were stratified according to their age group: 65–69 years (49.1%), 70–74 (26.4%) and 75 years and over (24.5%). Their mean age was 71 years (range: 65–83). There were 63 male patients (38.7%). The mean length of time with pain, from the onset of symptoms to the surgery, was 23 months (range: 2 days to 240 months). Sixty-two patients (38%) reported histories of trauma and 26 (16%) reported that their pain worsened through exertion. Results From the UCLA criteria, 80.4% of the results were excellent, 16% good, 1.8% fair and 1.8% poor. Complications occurred in 11%. The final clinical result did not show any correlation with age progression, injury size or tendons affected. However, there was a significant association (p < 0.001) between the presence of trauma and larger injuries. The length of time between the onset of symptoms and the surgical procedure had a significant relationship (p < 0.027) with the postoperative results: the longer this time was, the worse the results were. Conclusion Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff injuries in patients aged 65 years and over presented excellent and good results in 96.4% of the cases, according to the UCLA assessment, with a low complication rate. Advanced age did not show any influence on the postoperative clinical evolution, but the earlier the surgical treatment was instituted, the better the results were. PMID:26229935

  12. Effect of Angiogenesis-Related Cytokines on Rotator Cuff Disease: The Search for Sensitive Biomarkers of Early Tendon Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Savitskaya, Yulia A.; Izaguirre, Aldo; Sierra, Luis; Perez, Francisco; Cruz, Francisco; Villalobos, Enrique; Almazan, Arturo; Ibarra, Clemente

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hallmarks of the pathogenesis of rotator cuff disease (RCD) include an abnormal immune response, angiogenesis, and altered variables of vascularity. Degenerative changes enhance production of pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory, and vascular angiogenesis-related cytokines (ARC) that play a pivotal role in the immune response to arthroscopic surgery and participate in the pathogenesis of RCD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ARC profile, ie, interleukin (IL): IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and angiogenin (ANG), in human peripheral blood serum and correlate this with early degenerative changes in patients with RCD. Methods: Blood specimens were obtained from 200 patients with RCD and 200 patients seen in the orthopedic clinic for nonrotator cuff disorders. Angiogenesis imaging assays was performed using power Doppler ultrasound to evaluate variables of vascularity in the rotator cuff tendons. Expression of ARC was measured by commercial Bio-Plex Precision Pro Human Cytokine Assays. Results: Baseline concentrations of IL-1β, IL-8, and VEGF was significantly higher in RCD patients than in controls. Significantly higher serum VEGF levels were found in 85% of patients with RCD, and correlated with advanced stage of disease (r = 0.75; P < 0.0005), average microvascular density (r = 0.68, P < 0.005), and visual analog score (r = 0.75, P < 0.0002) in RCD patients. ANG and IL-10 levels were significantly lower in RCD patients versus controls. IL-1β and ANG levels were significantly correlated with degenerative tendon grade in RCD patients. No difference in IL-6 and bFGF levels was observed between RCD patients and controls. Patients with degenerative changes had markedly lower ANG levels compared with controls. Power Doppler ultrasound showed high blood vessel density in patients with tendon rupture. Conclusion: The pathogenesis of RCD is associated with an imbalance

  13. Nonlinear evolution of multi-helicity neo-classical tearing modes in rotating tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lai; Wang, Zheng-Xiong; Wang, Jialei; Yang, Xuefeng

    2016-10-01

    Plasma perturbations from the core and/or boundary regions of tokamaks can provide seed islands for the excitation of neo-classical tearing modes (NTMs) with negative {{ Δ }\\prime} , where {{ Δ }\\prime} is the linear instability parameter of the classical tearing mode. In this work, by means of reduced magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we numerically investigate the nonlinear evolution of multi-helicity NTMs in rotating tokamak plasmas with these two types of plasma perturbations with different boundary conditions. In the first case of initial plasma perturbations from the core region with a zero boundary condition, the meta-stable property of seed-island triggered NTM with negative {{ Δ }\\prime} is verified in the single helicity simulation. Nevertheless in the multiple helicity simulation, this seed-island triggered NTM with negative {{ Δ }\\prime} can be suppressed by a spontaneous NTM with positive {{ Δ }\\prime} through the competitive interaction between NTMs with different helicities. If a fixed poloidal rotation is taken into account in the first case, two different helicity NTMs could coexist in the saturation stage, which is different qualitatively from the process without plasma rotation. In the second case of initial plasma perturbations from the boundary region with a nonzero boundary condition, as the amplitude of plasma perturbations on the boundary increases, the mode with negative {{ Δ }\\prime} gradually changes from the driven-reconnection state to the NTM state, accompanied by an enhancement of magnetic island width in the single helicity simulation. Nevertheless in the multi-helicity simulation, the spontaneous NTM with positive {{ Δ }\\prime} can make the driven-reconnection triggered NTM with negative {{ Δ }\\prime} transfer from the NTM state back to the driven-reconnection state again. The underlying mechanism behind these transitions is analyzed step by step. Effects of fixed and unfixed poloidal rotations on the nonlinear

  14. Towards the development of a novel experimental shoulder simulator with rotating scapula and individually controlled muscle forces simulating the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Daniel; Tomas, Daniel; Gossweiler, Lukas; Siegl, Walter; Osterhoff, Georg; Heinlein, Bernd

    2014-03-01

    A preclinical analysis of novel implants used in shoulder surgery requires biomechanical testing conditions close to physiology. Existing shoulder experiments may only partially apply multiple cycles to simulate postoperative, repetitive loading tasks. The aim of the present study was therefore the development of an experimental shoulder simulator with rotating scapula able to perform multiple humeral movement cycles by simulating individual muscles attached to the rotator cuff. A free-hanging, metallic humerus pivoted in a polyethylene glenoid is activated by tension forces of linear electroactuators to simulate muscles of the deltoideus (DELT), supraspinatus (SSP), infraspinatus/teres minor and subscapularis. The abductors DELT and SSP apply forces with a ratio of 3:1 up to an abduction angle of 85°. The rotating scapular part driven by a rotative electro actuator provides one-third to the overall arm abduction. Resulting joint forces and moments are measured by a 6-axis load cell. A linear increase in the DELT and SSP motors is shown up to a maximum of 150 and 50 N for the DELT and SSP, respectively. The force vector in the glenoid resulted in 253 N at the maximum abduction. The present investigation shows the contribution of individual muscle forces attached to the moving humerus to perform active abduction in order to reproducibly test shoulder implants.

  15. Human dermal matrix scaffold augmentation for large and massive rotator cuff repairs: preliminary clinical and MRI results at 1-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Rotini, Roberto; Marinelli, Alessandro; Guerra, Enrico; Bettelli, Graziano; Castagna, Alessandro; Fini, Milena; Bondioli, Elena; Busacca, Maurizio

    2011-07-01

    The high incidence of recurrent tendon tears after repair of massive cuff lesions is prompting the research of materials aimed at mechanically or biologically reinforcing the tendon. Among the materials studied upto now, the extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds of human origin have proved to be the safest and most efficient, but the current laws about grafts and transplants preclude their use in Europe. In order to overcome this condition in 2006, we started a project regarding the production of an ECM scaffold of human origin which could be implanted in Europe too. In 2009, the clinical study began with the implantation of dermal matrix scaffolds in 7 middle-aged patients affected with large/massive cuff lesions and tendon degeneration. Out of 5 cases, followed for at least 1 year in which the scaffold was employed as an augmentation device, there were 3 patients with complete healing, 1 partial re-tear, and 1 total recurrence. The absence of adverse inflammatory or septic complications allows to continue this line of research with a prospective controlled study in order to define the real advantages and correct indications offered by scaffold application. PMID:21691735

  16. Abnormal origins of the long head of the biceps tendon can lead to rotator cuff pathology: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Alan L; Gates, Cameron H; Link, Thomas M; Ma, C Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Previous case reports have highlighted various anomalous origins of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) that do not originate from the superior glenoid labrum or supraglenoid tubercle. Yet, these cases were all reported as incidental findings and were not thought to cause any significant shoulder pathology. We present the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinical treatment of two cases where aberrant intra-articular origins of the long head of the biceps tendon from the anterior edge of the supraspinatus tendon may have contributed to symptomatic rotator cuff pathology. Arthroscopy confirmed MR findings of partial articular-sided supraspinatus lesions in close proximity to the anomalous origins and treatment with tenodesis of the LHBT successfully relieved symptoms. Although rare occurrences with subtle and potentially misleading imaging findings, it is important to be aware of aberrant origins of the LHBT that may contribute to concomitant rotator cuff pathology.

  17. Stimulation of Rotator Cuff Repair by Sustained Release of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-7 Using a Gelatin Hydrogel Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Kabuto, Yukichi; Morihara, Toru; Sukenari, Tsuyoshi; Kida, Yoshikazu; Oda, Ryo; Arai, Yuji; Sawada, Koshiro; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) promotes not only osteogenesis but also matrix production in chondrocytes and tenocytes. However, because of its short half-life, maintaining local concentrations of BMP-7 is difficult. We examined the use of a gelatin hydrogel sheet (GHS) for the sustained release of BMP-7 in stimulating rotator cuff repair at the tendon-to-bone insertion. Twelve-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Radiolabeled BMP-7 (125I-BMP-7) was injected into the subacromial bursa in the 125I-BMP-7 group, whereas a GHS impregnated with 125I-BMP-7 was implanted on the tendon attached to the tendon-to-bone insertion in the 125I-BMP-7+GHS group. Levels of 125I-BMP-7 in the tendon-to-bone insertion were assessed at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 postoperative days. The BMP-7 concentrations were significantly higher in the 125I-BMP-7+GHS group than in the 125I-BMP-7 group. Next, the bilateral supraspinatus tendons were resected and sutured to the greater tuberosity of the humerus using the Mason-Allen technique. Treatment groups were created as follows: either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or BMP-7 was injected into the subacromial bursa in the PBS and BMP-7 groups, whereas a GHS impregnated with either PBS or BMP-7 was implanted on the repaired tendon attached to the tendon-to-bone insertion in the PBS+GHS and BMP-7+GHS groups. The resected specimens were stained at 2, 4, and 8 postoperative weeks with hematoxylin and eosin as well as Safranin O, and tissue repair was evaluated histologically by using the tendon-to-bone maturing score. Tissue repair was assessed biomechanically at 4 and 8 postoperative weeks. The BMP-7+GHS group at 8 postoperative weeks demonstrated a favorable cartilage matrix production and tendon orientation; moreover, the tendon-to-bone maturing score and the ultimate force-to-failure were the highest in this group. The ability of GHS to provide controlled release of various growth factors has been previously reported. We confirmed that

  18. Knotless single-row rotator cuff repair: a comparative biomechanical study of 2 knotless suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Efird, Chad; Traub, Shaun; Baldini, Todd; Rioux-Forker, Dana; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Davisson, Twana; Hawkins, Monica; McCarty, Eric

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the gap formation during cyclic loading, maximum repair strength, and failure mode of single-row full-thickness supraspinatus repairs performed using 2 knotless suture anchors with differing internal suture-retention mechanisms in a human cadaver model. Nine matched pairs of cadaver shoulders were used. Full-thickness tears were induced by detaching the supraspinatus tendon from the greater tuberosity. Single-row repairs were performed with either type I (Opus Magnum PI; ArthroCare, Austin, Texas) or type II (ReelX STT; Stryker, Mahwah, New Jersey) knotless suture anchors. The repaired tendon was cycled from 10 to 90 N for 500 cycles, followed by load to failure. Gap formation was measured at 5, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 cycles with a video digitizing system. Anchor type or location (anterior or posterior) had no effect on gap formation during cyclic loading regardless of position (anterior, P=.385; posterior, P=.389). Maximum load to failure was significantly greater (P=.018) for repairs performed with type II anchors (288±62 N) compared with type I anchors (179±39 N). Primary failure modes were anchor pullout and tendon tearing for type II anchors and suture slippage through the anchor for type I anchors. The internal ratcheting suture-retention mechanism of type II anchors may have helped this anchor outperform the suture-cinching mechanism of type I anchors by supporting significantly higher loads before failure and minimizing suture slippage, potentially leading to stronger repairs clinically. PMID:23937749

  19. Ultrasound-Guided Myofascial Trigger Point Injection Into Brachialis Muscle for Rotator Cuff Disease Patients With Upper Arm Pain: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Mi Ri; Chang, Won Hyuk; Choi, Hyo Seon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of trigger point injection into brachialis muscle for rotator cuff disease patients with upper arm pain. Methods A prospective, randomized, and single-blinded clinical pilot trial was performed at university rehabilitation hospital. Twenty-one patients clinically diagnosed with rotator cuff disease suspected of having brachialis myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) were randomly allocated into two groups. Effect of ultrasound (US)-guided trigger point injection (n=11) and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (n=10) was compared by visual analog scale (VAS). Results US-guided trigger point injection of brachialis muscle resulted in excellent outcome compared to the oral NSAID group. Mean VAS scores decreased significantly after 2 weeks of treatment compared to the baseline in both groups (7.3 vs. 4.5 in the injection group and 7.4 vs. 5.9 in the oral group). The decrease of the VAS score caused by injection (ДVAS=-2.8) was significantly larger than caused by oral NSAID (ДVAS=-1.5) (p<0.05). Conclusion In patients with rotator cuff disease, US-guided trigger point injection of the brachialis muscle is safe and effective for both diagnosis and treatment when the cause of pain is suspected to be originated from the muscle. PMID:25379497

  20. SLAP tear associated with a minimally displaced proximal humerus fracture.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Corey B; Tanner, Stephanie L; Tolan, Stefan J

    2007-12-01

    Nondisplaced proximal humerus fracture may be associated with soft tissue injury. This case report examines 2 cases of superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) tears in association with nondisplaced fractures of the proximal humerus. In the first case, the patient fell from a jet ski, causing a traction injury to his arm. A greater tuberosity fracture was identified. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not reveal a definitive labral tear. After conservative management had failed, a type IV SLAP tear and a small rotator cuff tear were arthroscopically identified and repaired. In the second case, a power company lineman fell from a lift and attempted to hold on with his dominant arm. A nondisplaced greater tuberosity and a surgical neck fracture were discovered. MR arthrography revealed no evidence of SLAP tear. Four months after injury, a type II SLAP tear was arthroscopically identified and repaired. In these 2 cases, the presence of the fracture likely slowed operative intervention because pain was attributed to the fracture itself, and not to the SLAP tear. If patients do not follow the usual course of improvement after a proximal humerus fracture from a superior traction mechanism, consideration should be given to associated superior labral tears that may require surgical intervention.

  1. [Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in tendinosis calcarea of the rotator cuff. Long-term results and efficacy].

    PubMed

    Daecke, W; Kusnierczak, D; Loew, M

    2002-07-01

    Calcifying tendinitis (TC) of the rotator cuff is a transient shoulder disease with a high rate of spontaneous resorption of the deposit. Therefore, primary treatment should be conservative. In cases of persistent pain despite conservative treatment, extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) can be performed as an alternative minimally invasive method. Various short-term studies have demonstrated the efficiency of ESWT for TC. To evaluate the short- and long-term results, complications, and the number of operations avoided by ESWT, a prospective study with 115 patients was performed over a period of 4 years. The patients had received high-energy ESWT once (group A: n = 56) or twice (group B: n = 59). Six months after therapy, 47% in group A and 77% in group B showed evidence of disappearance or disintegration of the calcium deposits. Pain relief was achieved in 45% of group A and 53% of group B. Four years after treatment, 20% of the patients had undergone surgery on the involved shoulder. Of the remaining patients, 59% (68 patients) were seen for follow-up. Subjectively, 78% of group A and 87% of group B judged the treatment to be successful. X-ray examination revealed complete or partial resorption of the calcium deposit in 93% in both groups. The Constant score increased from 45 before treatment to 88 in group A and 85 in group B after treatment. ESWT was successful for about 70% of the treated patients with no long-term complications seen.

  2. Calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder: arthroscopic needling versus complete calcium removal and rotator cuff repair. A prospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    CASTAGNA, ALESSANDRO; DE GIORGI, SILVANA; GAROFALO, RAFFAELE; CONTI, MARCO; TAFURI, SILVIO; MORETTI, BIAGIO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of the present study was to verify the differences in the clinical outcomes of two arthroscopic techniques used to treat calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder: needling versus complete removal of the calcium deposit and tendon repair. Methods from September 2010 to September 2012, 40 patients with calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff were arthroscopically treated by the same surgeon using one of the two following techniques: needling (Group 1) and complete removal of the calcium deposit and tendon repair with suture anchors (Group 2). Both groups followed the same rehabilitation program. The two groups were compared at 6 and 12 months of follow-up for the presence of residual calcifications and for the following clinical outcomes: Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Evaluation Form (ASES) shoulder score, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale, Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Results all the clinical scores (Constant, ASES, UCLA, SST and VAS scores) improved significantly between baseline and postoperative follow-up, both at 6 and at 12 months. No differences at final follow-up were found between the two groups. Conclusions both the techniques were effective in solving the symptoms of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder. Clinical scores improved in both groups. Residual calcifications were found in only a few cases and were always less than 10 mm. Level of evidence Level II, prospective comparative study. PMID:26904521

  3. Intrauterine rectovaginal tear during a manual attempt to rotate a neonate.

    PubMed

    Al-Benna, Sammy; Tzakas, Elias

    2010-09-01

    Intrauterine rectovaginal tears in neonates are a rare and life-threatening complication of abnormal presentation during labor. Two previous cases have been presented in the literature, of which one had a fatal outcome. The authors present a third case of a severe rectovaginal intrauterine tear that had a favorable outcome.

  4. Concentric versus eccentric isokinetic strengthening of the rotator cuff. Objective data versus functional test.

    PubMed

    Ellenbecker, T S; Davies, G J; Rowinski, M J

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-two male and female college varsity tennis players trained for 6 weeks, one group using eccentric isokinetic internal and external shoulder rotation, and the second group using concentric isokinetic internal and external shoulder rotation. Subjects pretested and posttested both concentrically and eccentrically, so that training overflow and specificity could be examined. Three maximally hit tennis serves made before and after training, which were analyzed by high speed cinematography to obtain ball velocity, served as a functional performance measurement. Statistical analysis of peak torque (newton meters) and peak torque to body weight ratio have revealed significant concentric strength gains (P less than 0.005) in the concentric as well as the eccentric training groups. Eccentric strength gains were demonstrated by the concentric training group at selected speeds (P less than 0.05 and P less than 0.005) but were not generated in the eccentric group at the P less than 0.05 significance level. Functional test analysis shows an increase in maximal serve velocity at a significance level of P less than 0.005 in the concentric training group, with no significant (P greater than 0.01) increases in the eccentric group. PMID:3344883

  5. TENOTOMY WITH OR WITHOUT TENODESIS OF THE LONG HEAD OF THE BICEPS USING REPAIR OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Pileggi, Paulo Eduardo; Murachovsky, Joel; Nascimento, Luís Gustavo Prata; Serpone, Rogerio Bueno; Strose, Eric; Oliveira, Luiz Henrique Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the functional results among patients undergoing tenotomy with or without tenodesis of the long head of the biceps associated with arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries, with a minimum two-year follow-up. Method: This was a retrospective non-randomized trial with evidence level III, in which the medical files of 77 patients with lesions of the long head of the biceps were reviewed and clinically reassessed. Among these, 55 patients underwent tenotomy without tenodesis and 22 underwent tenotomy with tenodesis, with outpatient follow-up for at least two years. The age, dominant side, operated side, lesion size using the Gartsman classification, pre and postoperative range of motion, presence or absence of the Popeye sign, pain in the bicipital groove and assessments using the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score and the elbow strength index. Results: The mean UCLA score of the sample went from 16.92 (range: 8 to 25) to 31.45 (range: 13 to 35) (p < 0.001). Comparison of the pre and postoperative UCLA scores in the two groups showed that the difference in the group with tenotomy and tenodesis was 15.95 and in the group with tenotomy alone, 14.62 (p = 0.023). However, there was no statistical significance in comparing the groups regarding pain in the bicipital groove, Popeye sign or elbow strength index. Conclusion: This study showed that the difference in UCLA scores was statistically significant. The group with tenotomy and tenodesis of the long head of the biceps presented better functional results. PMID:27047893

  6. High-resolution ultrasound of rotator cuff and biceps reflection pulley in non-elite junior tennis players: anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tennis is believed to be potentially harmful for the shoulder, therefore the purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomy of the rotator cuff and the coraco-humeral ligament (CHL) in a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players with high-resolution ultrasound (US). Methods From August 2009 to September 2010 n = 90 a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players (mean age ± standard deviation: 15 ± 3) and a control group of age- and sex- matched subjects were included. Shoulder assessment with a customized standardized protocol was performed. Body mass index, dominant arm, years of practice, weekly hours of training, racket weight, grip (Eastern, Western and semi-Western), kind of strings were recorded. Results Abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 14/90 (15%) players. Two players had supraspinatus tendinosis, two had subacromial impingement and ten had subacromial bursitis. CHL thickness resulted comparable in the dominant and non-dominant arms (11.3 ± 4.4 mm vs. 13 ± 4.2, p > 0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that no association was present among CHL thickness and the variables evaluated. In the control group, abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 6/60 (10%) subjects (sub-acromial bursitis). No statistically significant differences between players and control group were found (p = 0.71). Conclusion In a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players only minor shoulder abnormalities were found. PMID:25034864

  7. Characteristics and stimulation potential with BMP-2 and BMP-7 of tenocyte-like cells isolated from the rotator cuff of female donors.

    PubMed

    Klatte-Schulz, Franka; Pauly, Stephan; Scheibel, Markus; Greiner, Stefan; Gerhardt, Christian; Hartwig, Jelka; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Wildemann, Britt

    2013-01-01

    Tendon bone healing of the rotator cuff is often associated with non-healing or recurrent defects, which seems to be influenced by the patient's age and sex. The present study aims to examine cellular biological characteristics of tenocyte-like cells that may contribute to this impaired rotator cuff healing. Moreover, a therapeutic approach using growth factors could possibly stimulate tendon bone healing. Therefore, our second aim was to identify patient groups who would particularly benefit from growth factor stimulation. Tenocyte-like cells isolated from supraspinatus tendons of female donors younger and older than 65 years of age were characterized with respect to different cellular biological parameters, such as cell density, cell count, marker expression, collagen-I protein synthesis, and stem cell potential. Furthermore, cells of the donor groups were stimulated with BMP-2 and BMP-7 (200 and 1000 ng/ml) in 3D-culture and analyzed for cell count, marker expression and collagen-I protein synthesis. Female donors older than 65 years of age showed significantly decreased cell count and collagen-I protein synthesis compared to cells from donors younger than 65 years. Cellular biological parameters including cell count, collagen-I and -III expression, and collagen-I protein synthesis of cells from both donor groups were stimulated with BMP-2 and BMP-7. The cells from donors older than 65 years revealed a decreased stimulation potential for cell count compared to the younger group. Cells from female donors older than 65 years of age showed inferior cellular biological characteristics. This may be one reason for a weaker healing potential observed in older female patients and should be taken into consideration for tendon bone healing of the rotator cuff. PMID:23825642

  8. Characteristics and Stimulation Potential with BMP-2 and BMP-7 of Tenocyte-Like Cells Isolated from the Rotator Cuff of Female Donors

    PubMed Central

    Klatte-Schulz, Franka; Pauly, Stephan; Scheibel, Markus; Greiner, Stefan; Gerhardt, Christian; Hartwig, Jelka; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Wildemann, Britt

    2013-01-01

    Tendon bone healing of the rotator cuff is often associated with non-healing or recurrent defects, which seems to be influenced by the patient’s age and sex. The present study aims to examine cellular biological characteristics of tenocyte-like cells that may contribute to this impaired rotator cuff healing. Moreover, a therapeutic approach using growth factors could possibly stimulate tendon bone healing. Therefore, our second aim was to identify patient groups who would particularly benefit from growth factor stimulation. Tenocyte-like cells isolated from supraspinatus tendons of female donors younger and older than 65 years of age were characterized with respect to different cellular biological parameters, such as cell density, cell count, marker expression, collagen-I protein synthesis, and stem cell potential. Furthermore, cells of the donor groups were stimulated with BMP-2 and BMP-7 (200 and 1000 ng/ml) in 3D-culture and analyzed for cell count, marker expression and collagen-I protein synthesis. Female donors older than 65 years of age showed significantly decreased cell count and collagen-I protein synthesis compared to cells from donors younger than 65 years. Cellular biological parameters including cell count, collagen-I and –III expression, and collagen-I protein synthesis of cells from both donor groups were stimulated with BMP-2 and BMP-7. The cells from donors older than 65 years revealed a decreased stimulation potential for cell count compared to the younger group. Cells from female donors older than 65 years of age showed inferior cellular biological characteristics. This may be one reason for a weaker healing potential observed in older female patients and should be taken into consideration for tendon bone healing of the rotator cuff. PMID:23825642

  9. All-Endoscopic Single-Row Repair of Full-Thickness Gluteus Medius Tears

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David M.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Grzybowski, Jeffrey S.; Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2016-01-01

    Abductor tendon tears typically develop insidiously in middle-aged women and can lead to debilitating lateral hip pain and a Trendelenburg limp. The gluteus medius tendon is most commonly torn and may show fatty degeneration over time, similar to the rotator cuff muscles of the shoulder. Endoscopic repair offers a therapeutic alternative to traditional open techniques. This article describes the workup, examination, and endoscopic repair of a full-thickness gluteus medius tear presenting as lateral hip pain and weakness. The surgical repair for this case used a single-row suture anchor technique. In addition, the indications and technique for a double-row repair will be discussed. PMID:27073767

  10. Rotator Cuff Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... you finish doing all 4 exercises, put an ice pack on your shoulder for 20 minutes. It's best to use a plastic bag with ice cubes in it or a bag of frozen peas, not gel packs. If you do all 4 exercises 3 to ...

  11. Rotator cuff exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Shoulder exercises ... A key part in your recovery is doing exercises to make the muscles and tendons in your ... for everyday tasks or sports activities Before doing exercises at home, ask your doctor or physical therapist ...

  12. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... cold to the sore area Medicines that reduce pain and swelling Electrical stimulation of muscles and nerves Ultrasound Cortisone injection Surgery NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease

  13. Tear System

    MedlinePlus

    ... with tear production or tear drainage. Increased Tear Production and Dry Eyes The eye has two sets ... as aging and menopause lead to decreased tear production. As tear production diminishes, the surface of the ...

  14. [Stress fracture of the scapular spine associated with rotator cuff dysfunction: Report of 3 cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    García-Coiradas, J; Lópiz, Y; Marco, F

    2014-01-01

    Scapular spine stress fractures have been scarcely reported in the literature. Their pathomechanics, clinical course and treatment are not well established. We review 3 cases in 2 patients that were associated with cuff dysfunction. On follow-up, none of these fractures progressed to healing. Two of them needed osteosynthesis and bone grafting, and the third one became a painless non-union. The authors propose the combination of 3 factors as a reason for this lesion: a functionally impaired cuff, a greater activation of the muscles with origin and insertion in the spine-acromion and a fragile bone. As we believe that these fractures are unstable, and non-union would be expected, their surgical management is recommended.

  15. [Stress fracture of the scapular spine associated with rotator cuff dysfunction: Report of 3 cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    García-Coiradas, J; Lópiz, Y; Marco, F

    2014-01-01

    Scapular spine stress fractures have been scarcely reported in the literature. Their pathomechanics, clinical course and treatment are not well established. We review 3 cases in 2 patients that were associated with cuff dysfunction. On follow-up, none of these fractures progressed to healing. Two of them needed osteosynthesis and bone grafting, and the third one became a painless non-union. The authors propose the combination of 3 factors as a reason for this lesion: a functionally impaired cuff, a greater activation of the muscles with origin and insertion in the spine-acromion and a fragile bone. As we believe that these fractures are unstable, and non-union would be expected, their surgical management is recommended. PMID:24821480

  16. Detection of partial-thickness tears in ligaments and tendons by Stokes-polarimetry imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; John, Raheel; Walsh, Joseph T.

    2008-02-01

    A Stokes polarimetry imaging (SPI) system utilizes an algorithm developed to construct degree of polarization (DoP) image maps from linearly polarized light illumination. Partial-thickness tears of turkey tendons were imaged by the SPI system in order to examine the feasibility of the system to detect partial-thickness rotator cuff tear or general tendon pathology. The rotating incident polarization angle (IPA) for the linearly polarized light provides a way to analyze different tissue types which may be sensitive to IPA variations. Degree of linear polarization (DoLP) images revealed collagen fiber structure, related to partial-thickness tears, better than standard intensity images. DoLP images also revealed structural changes in tears that are related to the tendon load. DoLP images with red-wavelength-filtered incident light may show tears and related organization of collagen fiber structure at a greater depth from the tendon surface. Degree of circular polarization (DoCP) images exhibited well the horizontal fiber orientation that is not parallel to the vertically aligned collagen fibers of the tendon. The SPI system's DOLP images reveal alterations in tendons and ligaments, which have a tissue matrix consisting largely of collagen, better than intensity images. All polarized images showed modulated intensity as the IPA was varied. The optimal detection of the partial-thickness tendon tears at a certain IPA was observed. The SPI system with varying IPA and spectral information can improve the detection of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears by higher visibility of fiber orientations and thereby improve diagnosis and treatment of tendon related injuries.

  17. Leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) for long-term delivery of growth factor in rotator cuff repair: review, preliminary results and future directions.

    PubMed

    Zumstein, Matthias A; Berger, Simon; Schober, Martin; Boileau, Pascal; Nyffeler, Richard W; Horn, Michael; Dahinden, Clemens A

    2012-06-01

    Surgical repair of the rotator cuff repair is one of the most common procedures in orthopedic surgery. Despite it being the focus of much research, the physiological tendon-bone insertion is not recreated following repair and there is an anatomic non-healing rate of up to 94%. During the healing phase, several growth factors are upregulated that induce cellular proliferation and matrix deposition. Subsequently, this provisional matrix is replaced by the definitive matrix. Leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) contain growth factors and has a stable dense fibrin matrix. Therefore, use of LPRF in rotator cuff repair is theoretically attractive. The aim of the present study was to determine 1) the optimal protocol to achieve the highest leukocyte content; 2) whether L-PRF releases growth factors in a sustained manner over 28 days; 3) whether standard/gelatinous or dry/compressed matrix preparation methods result in higher growth factor concentrations. 1) The standard L-PRF centrifugation protocol with 400 x g showed the highest concentration of platelets and leukocytes. 2) The L-PRF clots cultured in medium showed a continuous slow release with an increase in the absolute release of growth factors TGF-β1, VEGF and MPO in the first 7 days, and for IGF1, PDGF-AB and platelet activity (PF4=CXCL4) in the first 8 hours, followed by a decrease to close to zero at 28 days. Significantly higher levels of growth factor were expressed relative to the control values of normal blood at each culture time point. 3) Except for MPO and the TGFβ-1, there was always a tendency towards higher release of growth factors (i.e., CXCL4, IGF-1, PDGF-AB, and VEGF) in the standard/gelatinous- compared to the dry/compressed group. L-PRF in its optimal standard/gelatinous-type matrix can store and deliver locally specific healing growth factors for up to 28 days and may be a useful adjunct in rotator cuff repair.

  18. Refractive power of a multilayer rotationally symmetric model of the human cornea and tear film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Sergio

    2006-07-01

    Optical models of the human cornea and tear film typically employ a single homogeneous cornea with an average refractive index. I propose to use a more realistic multilayer model based on morphological data from the literature. The mathematical methodology to derive the refractive power equation of this model is presented. Special attention is given to the axial gradient index of the refraction structure of the stroma layer because of its optical implications. The importance of considering this multilayer model is quantified in a specific example (orthokeratology) with the help of the derived power equation.

  19. Efficacy of arthroscopically placed pain catheter adjacent to the suprascapular nerve (continuous arthroscopically assisted suprascapular nerve block) following arthroscopic rotator-cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotator-cuff surgery is well recognized to be a painful procedure. Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an arthroscopically placed perineural catheter at the scapular notch to provide a continuous block of the suprascapular nerve (continuous arthroscopically assisted suprascapular nerve block [ca-SSNB]) following arthroscopic rotator-cuff repair (ARCR). Materials and methods This level II, prospective, randomized, controlled trial without postoperative blinding included 40 patients, who had a 48-hour pain pump, with 0.2% ropivacaine infusion and a continuous rate of 3 mL/hour, placed via an arthroscopically placed catheter following ARCR with arthroscopic release of the superior transverse ligament: 21 patients had a ca-SSNB, and 19 patients had a continuous subacromial bursal block (SAB). The visual analog scale (at 6 hours and on the first, second, and third postoperative days) and the total number of additional pain-reduction attempts during the 3 postoperative days were calculated. Results The respective visual analog scale scores (mm) obtained from the ca-SSNB and SAB groups were 62.4 and 67.6 (P=0.73) before surgery, 9.1 and 19.4 (P=0.12) at 6 hours after surgery, 24.4 and 44.6 (P=0.019) on the first postoperative day, 19.4 and 40.4 (P=0.0060) on the second postoperative day, and 18.5 and 27.8 (P=0.21) on the third postoperative day. Total additional pain-reduction attempts recorded for the ca-SSNB and SAB groups during the 3 postoperative days were 0.3 times and 1.2 times (P=0.0020), respectively. Conclusion ca-SSNB was highly effective in controlling postoperative pain after ARCR. PMID:24982592

  20. The use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the treatment of trigger points that are associated with rotator cuff tendonitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shenqiti, A.; Oldham, J.

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of LLLT in the treatment of trigger points (TrPs) that are associated with rotator cuff tendonitis. A double-blind randomized controlled trail was conducted. Sixty patients were randomly allocated to one of two groups: sham or laser therapy. The laser (Excel, Omega Universal Technologies Ltd, London, UK) parameters used were a wavelength of 820 nm, a power output of 100 mW, a frequency of 5000 Hz (modulated) and energy density of 32 J/cm2. The two groups received a course of 12 treatment sessions for four weeks (3 sessions per week). Pain, functional activities (as measured using the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, SPADI), pressure pain threshold (PPT) and range of motion (ROM) were assessed pre and post treatment, with a three month follow-up assessment. Significant improvements in pain (p < 0.001) were observed for the laser group (6 cm median improvement on a 10 cm VAS) compared to the sham group (2 cm median improvement) immediately post treatment. The improvements in the laser group continued post treatment with a 7 cm median improvement observed at three month follow-up. Similar between group differences were observed for ROM (p < 0.01), functional activities (p <= 0.001) and PPT (p <= 0.05). The findings of the current study suggested that LLLT is effective in treating patients with TrPs associated with rotator cuff tendonitis, when using the parameters described. However, the mechanism of its action is not yet clear, and will require further investigation.

  1. Endoscopic Treatment of Gluteus Medius Tears: A Review.

    PubMed

    Lerebours, Frantz R; Cohn, Randy; Youm, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is a term used to describe disorders of the peritrochanteric region. This constellation of conditions includes greater trochanteric bursitis, gluteus medius (GM) tears, and external coxa saltans or snapping hip syndrome. Tears of the abductor mechanism, more specifically gluteus medius tears, have recently gained a considerable amount of interest in the orthopaedic literature. Abductor tears were first described by Bunker and Kagan in the late 1990s. They used the rotator cuff as an analogous structure to describe the pathological process associated with gluteus medius tears. Tears of the gluteus medius tendon can often be difficult to recognize. The clinical presentation is often attributed to trochanteric bursal inflammation, without any further workup. Provocative hip physical examination findings are an important key to proper diagnosis of abductor injuries. Depending on the size of the tear, patients with abductor tendon pathology may present with a Trendelenburg gait and reduced resisted abduction strength accompanied by pain. Initial noninvasive management of greater trochanteric pain syndrome includes oral or topical anti-inflammatory medication and activity modification. Physical therapy or other treatment modalities can be considered, with a focus on core strengthening, truncal alignment, and iliotibial band stretching. Gluteus medius tears have historically been repaired in an open fashion; however, the advent of new endoscopic surgery techniques has allowed for a less invasive approach. Access to the peritrochanteric space affords the surgeon with access to pathology associated with the greater trochanter, iliotibial band, trochanteric bursa, sciatic nerve, short external-rota tors, iliopsoas tendon, and the gluteus medius and minimus tendon attachments. Over the last decade, we have seen rapid technological advances in hip arthroscopy, improved diagnostic imaging and interpretation, and an improved

  2. Biceps instability and Slap type II tear in overhead athletes.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Soldati, Francesco; Cheli, Andrea; Pari, Carlotta; Massari, Leo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-10-01

    Type II lesions are common lesions encountered in overhead athletes with controversies arising in term of timing for treatment, surgical approach, rehabilitation and functional results. The aim of our study was to evaluate the outcomes of arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP tears in overhead athletes, focusing on the time elapsed from diagnosis and treatment, time needed to return to sport, rate of return to sport and to previous level of performance, providing an overview concerning evidence for the effectiveness of different surgical approaches to type II SLAP tears in overhead athletes. A internet search on peer reviewed Journal from 1990, first descriprion of this pathology, to 2012, have been conducted evaluating the outcomes for both isolated Slap II tear overhead athletes and those who presented associated lesions treated. The results have been analyzed according to the scale reported focusing on return to sport and level of activity. Apart from a single study, non prospective level I and II studies were detected. Return to play at the same level ranged form 22% to 94% with different range of technique utilized with the majority of the authors recommending the fixation of these lesions but biceps tenodesis can lead to higher satisfaction racte when directly compated to the anchor fixation. Associated pathologies such as partial or full tickness rotator cuff tear did not clearly affect the outcomes and complications rate. There is no consensus regarding timing and treatment for type II SLAP, especially in overhead athletes who need to regain a high level of performance.

  3. Does a land-based compensatory strength-training programme influences the rotator cuff balance of young competitive swimmers?

    PubMed

    Batalha, Nuno; Raimundo, Armando; Tomas-Carus, Pablo; Paulo, João; Simão, Roberto; Silva, António J

    2015-01-01

    During the repeated execution of the swimming strokes, the shoulder adductor and internal rotator muscles have a tendency to become proportionally stronger when compared to their antagonist group. This can lead to muscle imbalances. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a compensatory training programme on the strength and balance of shoulder rotator muscles in young swimmers. A randomized controlled trial design was used. Forty male swimmers took part in the study and were randomly divided into two groups: an experimental group (n = 20) and a training group (n = 20). A control group (n = 16) of young sedentary male students was also evaluated. The experimental group subjects participated in a 16-week shoulder-strength programme with Thera-Band® elastic bands; the training group was restricted to aquatic training. Peak torque of shoulder internal rotator and external rotator (ER) was measured at baseline and after 16 weeks. Concentric action at 1.04 rad s(-1) (3 reps) and 3.14 rad s(-1) (20 reps) was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. The strength-training programme led to an improvement of the ER strength and shoulder rotator balance in the experimental group (data from both shoulders at 1.04 rad s(-1)). Moreover, concentric action at 3.14 rad s(-1) presented significant differences only for the dominant shoulder. Findings suggest that the prescribed shoulder-strengthening exercises could be a useful training option for young competitive swimmers. They can produce an increase in absolute strength values and greater muscle balance in shoulder rotators. PMID:26332051

  4. Specificity and sensitivity of the anterior slide test in throwing athletes with superior glenoid labral tears.

    PubMed

    Kibler, W B

    1995-06-01

    This study documents the sensitivity and specificity of a clinical test to aid in the diagnosis of superior glenoid labral lesions. The anterior slide test, a method of applying an anteriorly and superiorly directed force to the glenohumeral joint, was performed on several groups of athletes. These included symptomatic athletes with isolated superior labral tears, rotator cuff tears, and instabilities, and asymptomatic athletes with rotational deficits. In addition, non-throwing athletes were tested. The sensitivity of the test was 78.4%, and the specificity was 91.5%. This study shows that the anterior slide test can be used in the clinical examination, in that it has high specificity for superior labral lesions, but not enough sensitivity to be the sole diagnostic criterion for these lesions.

  5. Biomechanical evaluation of a novel suturing scheme for grafting load-bearing collagen scaffolds for rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Anowarul; Bohl, Michael S.; Tsai, Andrew G; Younesi, Mousa; Gillespie, Robert; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, there are no well-established suture protocols to attach fully load-bearing scaffolds which span tendon defects between bone and muscle for repair of critical sized tendon tears. Methods to attach load-bearing tissue repair scaffolds could enable functional repair of tendon injuries. Methods Sixteen rabbit shoulders were dissected (New Zealand white rabbits, 1 yr. old, female) to isolate the humeral-infraspinatus muscle complex. A unique suture technique was developed to allow for a 5 mm segmental defect in infraspinatus tendon to be replaced with a mechanically strong bioscaffold woven from pure collagen threads. The suturing pattern resulted in a fully load-bearing scaffold. The tensile stiffness and strength of scaffold repair was compared with intact infraspinatus and regular direct repair. Findings The failure load and displacement at failure of the scaffold repair group were 59.9 N (Standard Deviation, SD = 10.7) and 10.3 mm (SD = 2.9), respectively and matched those obtained by direct repair group which were 57.5 N (SD = 15.3) and 8.6 mm (SD = 1.5), (p > 0.05). Failure load, displacement at failure and stiffness of both of the repair groups were half of the intact infraspinatus shoulder group. Interpretation With the developed suture technique, scaffolds repair showed similar failure load, displacement at failure and stiffness to the direct repair. This novel suturing pattern and the mechanical robustness of the scaffold at time zero indicates that the proposed model is mechanically viable for future in vivo studies which has a higher potential to translate into clinical uses. PMID:26009492

  6. Repair versus shaving of partial-thickness articular-sided tears of the upper subscapularis tendon. A prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    RANDELLI, PIETRO; ARRIGONI, PAOLO; ALIPRANDI, ALBERTO; SDAO, SILVANA; RAGONE, VINCENZA; D’AMBROSI, RICCARDO; RANDELLI, FILIPPO; CABITZA, PAOLO; BANFI, GIUSEPPE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether treating partial-thickness articular-sided tears of the upper subscapularis (SSC) tendon with a dedicated suture anchor would result in an internal rotation strength improvement compared with simple shaving of the SSC tendon and footprint. Methods twenty-six patients with a limited SSC tendon tear (equal or inferior to the most superior centimeter) in association with a posterosuperior cuff lesion were prospectively randomized to two treatments: repair with a dedicated suture anchor versus shaving of the tendon and footprint. The patients also underwent long head of the biceps (LHB) treatment and posterosuperior cuff tear repair. In each patient the following parameters were measured both preoperatively and at a minimum follow-up of 2.5 years: strength in internal rotation in the bear-hug testing position (using a digital tensiometer), DASH score and Constant scores. MRI assessment of tendon healing was performed at the final follow-up. Results twenty of the 26 patients (76%) were reviewed after a mean follow-up time of 42 months: 11 patients had undergone SSC tendon repair and nine simple shaving. At final follow-up no significant differences were found between the repaired and shaving group in strength in internal rotation (9.5 ± 3.8 kg versus 10.3±5.4 kg; p=0.7). The DASH score and Constant score also failed to show significant differences between the two groups. Furthermore, no significant difference in SSC tendon healing rate was observed on MRI evaluation. Conclusions partial-thickness articular-sided tear of the upper SSC tendon in association with a posterosuperior rotator cuff repair and LHB treatment, when limited to the superior centimeter of the SSC tendon, shows a comparable performance in terms of strength in internal rotation either after simple shaving or a tendon-to-bone repair. Level of evidence Level II, prospective comparative study. PMID:26889466

  7. The Subscapularis Interlocking Stitch for the Arthroscopic Treatment of Subscapularis Tendon Tears at the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Jörn; Schwalba, Knut; Hedtmann, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of subscapularis function is essential for long-term maintenance of good clinical results for both traumatic and nontraumatic rotator cuff tears. The anatomic repair of partially and completely torn tendons from the footprint at the lesser tuberosity is the goal of surgical repair. The described technique, with a combination of an interlocking stitch and additional mattress sutures using a double-loaded suture anchor, provides reduction of the retracted tendon, sufficient pullout strength, and compression of the tendon to the footprint to facilitate healing. PMID:26900550

  8. Association between meniscal tears and the peak external knee adduction moment and foot rotation during level walking in postmenopausal women without knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Davies-Tuck, Miranda L; Wluka, Anita E; Teichtahl, Andrew J; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Jones, Graeme; Ding, Changhai; Davis, Susan R; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Meniscal injury is a risk factor for the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis, yet little is known about risk factors for meniscal pathology. Joint loading mediated via gait parameters may be associated with meniscal tears, and determining whether such an association exists was the aim of this study. Methods Three-dimensional Vicon gait analyses were performed on the dominant knee of 20 non-osteoarthritic women, and the peak external knee adduction moment during early and late stance was determined. The degree of foot rotation was also examined when the knee adductor moment peaked during early and late stance. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to determine the presence and severity of meniscal lesions in the dominant knee. Results The presence (P = 0.04) and severity (P = 0.01) of medial meniscal tears were positively associated with the peak external knee adduction moment during early stance while a trend for late stance was observed (P = 0.07). They were also associated with increasing degrees of internal foot rotation during late stance, independent of the magnitude of the peak external knee adduction moment occurring at that time (P = 0.03). During level walking among healthy women, the presence and severity of medial meniscal tears were positively associated with the peak external knee adduction moment. Moreover, the magnitude of internal foot rotation was associated with the presence and severity of medial meniscal lesions, independent of the peak knee adductor moment during late stance. Conclusion These data may suggest that gait parameters may be associated with meniscal damage, although longitudinal studies will be required to clarify whether gait abnormalities predate meniscal lesions, or vice versa, and therefore whether modification of gait patterns may be helpful. PMID:18492234

  9. Skin tears.

    PubMed

    Baranoski, S

    2001-08-01

    Skin tears are a serious, painful problem for older patients. Find out how your staff can recognize patients at risk, what they can do to prevent skin tears, and how to manage them effectively if they occur.

  10. STRENGTH EXERCISES COMBINED WITH DRY NEEDLING WITH ELECTRICAL STIMULATION IMPROVE PAIN AND FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY: A RETROSPECTIVE CASE SERIES

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and Purpose Rotator cuff tendinopathy (RTCT) is regularly treated by the physical therapist. Multiple etiologies for RTCT exist, leading an individual to seek treatment from their provider of choice. Strengthening exercises (SE) have been reported to be effective in the treatment of RTCT, but there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of dry needing (DN) for this condition. The purpose of this retrospective case series was to investigate DN to various non-trigger point-based anatomical locations coupled with strengthening exercises (SE) as a treatment strategy to decrease pain and increase function in healthy patients with chronic RTC pathology. Case Descriptions Eight patients with RTCT were treated 1-2 times per week for up to eight weeks, and no more than sixteen total treatment sessions of SE and DN. Outcomes were tested at baseline and upon completion of therapy. A long-term outcome measure follow up averaging 8.75 months (range 3 to 20 months) was also performed. The outcome measures included the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Quick Dash (QD). Outcomes Clinically meaningful improvements in disability and pain in the short term and upon long-term follow up were demonstrated for each patient. The mean VAS was broken down into best (VASB), current (VASC), and worst (VASW) rated pain levels and the mean was calculated for the eight patients. The mean VASB improved from 22.5 mm at the initial assessment to 2.36 mm upon completion of the intervention duration. The mean VASC improved from 28.36 mm to 5.0 mm, and the mean VASW improved from 68.88 mm to 13.25 mm. At the long-term follow up (average 8.75 months), The mean VASB, VASC, and VASW scores were 0.36 mm, 4.88 mm, and 17.88 mm respectively. The QDmean for the eight patients improved from 43.09 at baseline to 16.04 at the completion of treatment. At long-term follow-up, the QDmean was 6.59. Conclusion Clinically meaningful improvements in pain and disability were

  11. Rotation in the Plasma Flow Frame of Marginal Neoclassical Tearing Mode Islands in DIII-D and NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Haye, R. J.; Buttery, R. J.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2011-10-01

    Small island effects inhibit the pervasive occurrence of neoclassical tearing modes. m / n = 2 / 1 or 3/1 islands are reduced (by decreasing beta and thus the destabilizing bootstrap current density) to the self-stabilization size (``marginal point'') in DIII-D and NSTX. Non-zero island propagation in the plasma flow frame can produce a stabilizing polarization current provided it occurs in the direction of (but does not exceed) the ion diamagnetic drift. This ``polarization threshold'' naturally scales as a characteristic island size of several times the ion banana width, which is consistent with experiment. Comparison of measurements in DIII-D and NSTX discharges of similar cross-section (but different aspect ratio) with polarization current theory will be presented. Work supported in part by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC02-09CH11466, and DE-FG02-04ER54761.

  12. SLAP Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by acute trauma or by repetitive shoulder motion. An acute SLAP injury may result from: • A ... labrum tears as a result of repeated shoulder motion. This cross-section view of the shoulder socket ...

  13. The Hug-up Test: A New, Sensitive Diagnostic Test for Supraspinatus Tears

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Lei; Ao, Ying-Fang; Yan, Hui; Cui, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background: The supraspinatus tendon is the most commonly affected tendon in rotator cuff tears. Early detection of a supraspinatus tear using an accurate physical examination is, therefore, important. However, the currently used physical tests for detecting supraspinatus tears are poor diagnostic indicators and involve a wide range of sensitivity and specificity values. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish a new physical test for the diagnosis of supraspinatus tears and evaluate its accuracy in comparison with conventional tests. Methods: Between November 2012 and January 2014, 200 consecutive patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy were prospectively evaluated preoperatively. The hug-up test, empty can (EC) test, full can (FC) test, Neer impingement sign, and Hawkins-Kennedy impingement sign were used and compared statistically for their accuracy in terms of supraspinatus tears, with arthroscopic findings as the gold standard. Muscle strength was precisely quantified using an electronic digital tensiometer. Results: The prevalence of supraspinatus tears was 76.5%. The hug-up test demonstrated the highest sensitivity (94.1%), with a low negative likelihood ratio (NLR, 0.08) and comparable specificity (76.6%) compared with the other four tests. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the hug-up test was 0.854, with no statistical difference compared with the EC test (z = 1.438, P = 0.075) or the FC test (z = 1.498, P = 0.067). The hug-up test showed no statistical difference in terms of detecting different tear patterns according to the position (χ2 = 0.578, P = 0.898) and size (Fisher's exact test, P > 0.999) compared with the arthroscopic examination. The interobserver reproducibility of the hug-up test was high, with a kappa coefficient of 0.823. Conclusions: The hug-up test can accurately detect supraspinatus tears with a high sensitivity, comparable specificity, and low NLR compared with the conventional clinical tests and

  14. A mixed methods study to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a self-managed exercise programme versus usual physiotherapy for chronic rotator cuff disorders: protocol for the SELF study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain is the third most common reason for consultation with a physiotherapist and up to 26% of the general population might be expected to experience an episode at any one time. Disorders of the shoulder muscles and tendons (rotator cuff) are thought to be the commonest cause of this pain. The long-term outcome is frequently poor despite treatment. This means that many patients are exposed to more invasive treatment, e.g. surgery, and/or long-term pain and disability. Patients with this disorder typically receive a course of physiotherapy which might include a range of treatments. Specifically the value of exercise against gravity or resistance (loaded exercise) in the treatment of tendon disorders is promising but appears to be under-used. Loaded exercise in other areas of the body has been favourably evaluated but further investigation is needed to evaluate the impact of these exercises in the shoulder and particularly the role of home based or supervised exercise versus usual treatment requiring clinic attendance. Methods/Design A single-centre pragmatic unblinded parallel group randomised controlled trial will evaluate the effectiveness of a self-managed loaded exercise programme versus usual clinic based physiotherapy. A total of 210 study participants with a primary complaint of shoulder pain suggestive of a rotator cuff disorder will be recruited from NHS physiotherapy waiting lists and allocated to receive a programme of self-managed exercise or usual physiotherapy using a process of block randomisation with sealed opaque envelopes. Baseline assessment for shoulder pain, function and quality of life will be undertaken with the Shoulder Pain & Disability Index, the Patient Specific Functional Scale and the SF-36. Follow-up evaluations will be completed at 3, 6 and 12 months by postal questionnaire. Both interventions will be delivered by NHS Physiotherapist’s. An economic analysis will be conducted from an NHS and Personal Social

  15. Single-row, double-row, and transosseous equivalent techniques for isolated supraspinatus tendon tears with minimal atrophy: A retrospective comparative outcome and radiographic analysis at minimum 2-year followup

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Frank; Gupta, Anil; Bruce, Ben; Harris, Josh; Abrams, Geoff; Wilson, Hillary; Hussey, Kristen; Cole, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the subjective, objective, and radiographic healing outcomes of single-row (SR), double-row (DR), and transosseous equivalent (TOE) suture techniques for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Materials and Methods: A retrospective comparative analysis of arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs by one surgeon from 2004 to 2010 at minimum 2-year followup was performed. Cohorts were matched for age, sex, and tear size. Subjective outcome variables included ASES, Constant, SST, UCLA, and SF-12 scores. Objective outcome variables included strength, active range of motion (ROM). Radiographic healing was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), Mann — Whitney and Kruskal — Wallis tests with significance, and the Fisher exact probability test <0.05. Results: Sixty-three patients completed the study requirements (20 SR, 21 DR, 22 TOE). There was a clinically and statistically significant improvement in outcomes with all repair techniques (ASES mean improvement P = <0.0001). The mean final ASES scores were: SR 83; (SD 21.4); DR 87 (SD 18.2); TOE 87 (SD 13.2); (P = 0.73). There was a statistically significant improvement in strength for each repair technique (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between techniques across all secondary outcome assessments: ASES improvement, Constant, SST, UCLA, SF-12, ROM, Strength, and MRI re-tear rates. There was a decrease in re-tear rates from single row (22%) to double-row (18%) to transosseous equivalent (11%); however, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.6). Conclusions: Compared to preoperatively, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, using SR, DR, or TOE techniques, yielded a clinically and statistically significant improvement in subjective and objective outcomes at a minimum 2-year follow-up. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic level 3. PMID:24926159

  16. CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS OF SUBSCAPULARIS TENDON TEAR USING THE BEAR HUG SEMIOLOGICAL MANEUVER

    PubMed Central

    Schiefer, Márcio; Júnior, Yonder Archanjo Ching-San; Silva, Sérgio Maurício; Fontenelle, César; Dias Carvalho, Marcos Genúncio; de Faria, Fabio Garcia; Franco, José Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the Bear Hug maneuver for clinically diagnosing subscapularis tendon tears, and compare this with other maneuvers described previously (Lift-off, Napoleon and Belly Press). Methods: Forty-nine patients with rotator cuff injuries who had undergone arthroscopy to repair the injury and had previously been assessed using the semiological maneuvers mentioned above were evaluated. Results: The diagnostic values obtained for the Bear Hug test were as follows: sensitivity 75%, specificity 56%, positive predictive value 62%, negative predictive value 70% and accuracy 65%. Conclusion: The highest sensitivity and negative predictive value values were obtained with the Bear Hug test. The highest specificity value was seen with the Lift-off test. The Belly press test gave the greatest specificity, positive predictive and accuracy values. PMID:27047870

  17. Clinico-Radiological Correlation of Subcoracoid Impingement with Reduced Coracohumeral Interval and its Relation to Subscapularis Tears in Indian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Srivatsa Nagaraja; Kumaran, Chandrababu Kadassery; Kochukunju, Bhaskaran Vadakkekottu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinically, subcoracoid impingement is characterized by pain at the anterior aspect of the shoulder that is induced by adduction, internal rotation and forward flexion. This position leads to narrowing of the Coraco-Humeral Interval (CHI)-that is, the space between the coracoid process and the lesser tuberosity of the humerus. Structures in the rotator interval are at greatest risk for impingement which includes the Subscorapularis tendon, tendon of the long head of the biceps, and the middle gleno-humeral ligament. This may result in Rotator interval pathologies such as subscapularis tear and long head of biceps tendon subluxation or fraying. Aim To study the prevalence of radiological evidence of reduced Coraco-Humeral Interval (CHI) in patients with clinically evident Subcoracoid impingement and to examine the presence of Subscapularis tears in these patients. Materials and Methods Twenty four patients (6 males, 18 females, average age 52.83 years) were included in this prospective study who were diagnosed to have rotator cuff tears clinically. Nine of these patients were clinically found to have concomitant subcracoid impingement. All patients were subjected to MRI of shoulder. Measurement of the CHI was done in images with humerus in maximal internal rotation. Presence of subscapularis tear was examined intraoperatively. Statistical evaluation of the data was performed using Student’s t-test and Fisher’s exact test and the results were applied to two cohorts of patients. One cohort consisted of patients who had a CHI value of less than 5.5mm and the other cohort had a CHI value greater than 5.5mm. Average CHI values in patients with and without a subscapularis tear were determined. Results Nine patients who had clinical subcoracoid impingement were found to have an average CHI of 5.33mm. All nine of them had an associated tear of subscapularis with long head of Biceps tendon subluxation and/or fraying. Remaining 15 patients had an average CHI

  18. Suture anchor fixation strength with or without augmentation in osteopenic and severely osteoporotic bones in rotator cuff repair: a biomechanical study on polyurethane foam model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to compare the results of various types of anchor applications with or without augmentation in both osteopenic and severely osteoporotic bone models. Methods Two different types of suture anchors were tested in severely osteoporotic (SOP) and osteopenic polyurethane (PU) foam blocks using an established protocol. An Instron machine applied static loading parallel to the axis of insertion until failure, and the mean anchor failure strengths were calculated. The mode of failure (anchor pullout, suture tear) was recorded. The anchors tested included the Corkscrew® (CS) (Arthrex Inc., Naples, FL, USA) (without augmentation, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-augmented, and bioabsorbable tricalcium phosphate (TCP) cement-augmented) and Corkscrew® FT II (CS FT II) 5.5 mm (without augmentation as used routinely). Results The mean failure loads for both SOP and osteopenic PU foam blocks, respectively, were as follows: CS, 16.2 and 212.4 N; CS with TCP, 75.2 and 396 N; CS with PMMA, 101.2 and 528.8 N; CS FT II, 13.8 and 339.8 N. Conclusions Augmentation of CS with TCP or PMMA would be essential to SOP bones. In the osteopenic bone model, although anchor fixation augmented with PMMA is the best fixation method, CS augmented with TCP cement or CS FT II without any need for augmentation may also be used as an alternative. PMID:25148925

  19. Comparison of Pressure Changes by Head and Neck Position between High-Volume Low-Pressure and Taper-Shaped Cuffs: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Mihara, Ryosuke; Imagawa, Kentaro; Hattori, Kazuo; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    The present study compared changes in cuff pressure by head and neck position between high-volume low-pressure (HVLP) and taper-shaped (taper) cuffs in a prospective randomized clinical trial. Methods. Forty patients were intubated using tracheal tubes with either HVLP (n = 20; HVLP group) or taper-shaped (n = 20; Taper group) cuffs. Initial cuff pressure was adjusted to 15, 20, or 25 cmH2O in the neutral position. Cuff pressure was evaluated after changing the head and neck positions to flexion, extension, and rotation. Results. Cuff pressure significantly increased with flexion in both HVLP and Taper groups at all initial cuff pressures. It significantly increased with extension in the HVLP group, but not in the Taper group. Cuff pressure did not significantly differ with rotation in either group and was significantly smaller in the Taper group during flexion and extension than in the HVLP group, regardless of initial cuff pressure. Conclusion. Cuff pressure changes with head and neck flexion and extension were smaller in the Taper group than in the HVLP group. Our results highlight the potential for taper cuffs to prevent excessive cuff pressure increases with positional changes in the head and neck. This trial is registered with UMIN000016119. PMID:26509152

  20. Comparison of Pressure Changes by Head and Neck Position between High-Volume Low-Pressure and Taper-Shaped Cuffs: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Mihara, Ryosuke; Imagawa, Kentaro; Hattori, Kazuo; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    The present study compared changes in cuff pressure by head and neck position between high-volume low-pressure (HVLP) and taper-shaped (taper) cuffs in a prospective randomized clinical trial. Methods. Forty patients were intubated using tracheal tubes with either HVLP (n = 20; HVLP group) or taper-shaped (n = 20; Taper group) cuffs. Initial cuff pressure was adjusted to 15, 20, or 25 cmH2O in the neutral position. Cuff pressure was evaluated after changing the head and neck positions to flexion, extension, and rotation. Results. Cuff pressure significantly increased with flexion in both HVLP and Taper groups at all initial cuff pressures. It significantly increased with extension in the HVLP group, but not in the Taper group. Cuff pressure did not significantly differ with rotation in either group and was significantly smaller in the Taper group during flexion and extension than in the HVLP group, regardless of initial cuff pressure. Conclusion. Cuff pressure changes with head and neck flexion and extension were smaller in the Taper group than in the HVLP group. Our results highlight the potential for taper cuffs to prevent excessive cuff pressure increases with positional changes in the head and neck. This trial is registered with UMIN000016119.

  1. Special report: Occlusive cuff controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    A mechanical occlusive cuff controller suitable for blood flow experiments in space shuttle flights is described. The device requires 115 volt ac power and a pressurized gas source. Two occluding cuff pressures (30 and 50 mmHg) are selectable by a switch on the front panel. A screw driver adjustment allows accurate cuff pressurization levels for under or oversized limbs. Two pressurization cycles (20 second and 2 minutes) can be selected by a front panel switch. Adjustment of the timing cycles is also available through the front panel. A pushbutton hand switch allows remote start of the cuff inflation cycle. A stop/reset switch permits early termination of the cycle and disabling of the controller to prevent inadvertent reactivation. Pressure in the cuff is monitored by a differential aneroid barometer. In addition, an electrocardiogram trigger circuit permits the initiation of the pressurization cycle by an externally supplied ECG cycle.

  2. Rolling cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, Donald R.

    1985-01-01

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  3. Rotator Cuff and Shoulder Conditioning Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor’s supervision. Talk to your doctor or physical therapist about which exercises will best help you meet ... weeks, unless otherwise specified by your doctor or physical therapist. After your recovery, these exercises can be continued ...

  4. Management of the throwing shoulder: cuff, labrum and internal impingement.

    PubMed

    Greiwe, R Michael; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2010-07-01

    Repetitive throwing or other overhead activity places great stress on the shoulder. As a result, the shoulder is a common site of injury in athletes. Addressing throwing-related injuries requires an understanding of throwing biomechanics and pathology. Nonoperative treatment is directed at restoring strength, flexibility, and neuromuscular control to the entire kinetic chain. Surgery is indicated when nonoperative treatment fails, and is directed at correcting labral, capsular, and rotator cuff pathology.

  5. High Prevalence of Superior Labral Tears Diagnosed by MRI in Middle-Aged Patients With Asymptomatic Shoulders

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzberg, Randy; Reuss, Bryan L.; Burkhart, Bradd G.; Butterfield, Matt; Wu, James Y.; McLean, Kevin W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of superior labral surgery has increased in the past decade in the United States, and a contributing factor could be an increased rate of superior labral tears diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Prior MRI studies of the asymptomatic shoulder have focused on rotator cuff pathology or pathology in a narrow and specific group of athletes. Labral abnormalities have not previously been thoroughly evaluated in asymptomatic middle-aged individuals. Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence of superior labral tears diagnosed by MRI in the asymptomatic shoulders of middle-aged people (age range, 45-60 years). Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 53 asymptomatic adults (age range, 45-60 years) with no history of surgery or injury to either shoulder were included in the study. Physical examinations of all shoulders were performed. Noncontrast MRI (1.5 T) was performed in 1 randomly determined shoulder of each subject. Two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists who were blinded to the purpose of the study and ages of the subjects evaluated each MRI. Results: Radiologists interpreted the MRIs as consistent with superior labral tears in 55% and 72% of the cohort. Comparison of the radiological evaluations of the superior labra were moderate (κ = 0.410, P = .033). There were no differences in readings for superior labral tear regarding age (P = .87), sex (P = .41), whether the dominant shoulder underwent MRI (P = .99), whether the subject worked a physical job (P = .08), or whether the subject participated in overhead sports for a period of 1 year (P = .62). Conclusion: Superior labral tears are diagnosed with high frequency using MRI in 45- to 60-year-old individuals with asymptomatic shoulders. These shoulder MRI findings in middle-aged populations emphasize the need for supporting clinical judgment when making treatment decisions for this patient population. Clinical Relevance: To avoid

  6. 21 CFR 868.5760 - Cuff spreader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5760 Cuff spreader. (a) Identification. A cuff spreader is a device used to install tracheal tube cuffs on tracheal or tracheostomy tubes. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of...

  7. Avoidance of Tearing Mode Locking and Disruption with Electro-Magnetic Torque Introduced by Feedback-based Mode Rotation Control in DIII-D and RFX-mod

    SciTech Connect

    Okabayashi, M.; Zanca, P.; Strait, E. J.

    2014-09-01

    Disruptions caused by tearing modes (TMs) are considered to be one of the most critical roadblocks to achieving reliable, steady-state operation of tokamak fusion reactors. Here we have demonstrated a very promising scheme to avoid such disruptions by utilizing the electro-magnetic (EM) torque produced with 3D coils that are available in many tokamaks. In this scheme, the EM torque to the modes is created by a toroidal phase shift between the externally-applied field and the excited TM fields, compensating for the mode momentum loss due to the interaction with the resistive wall and uncorrected error fields. Fine control of torque balance is provided by a feedback scheme. We have explored this approach in two vastly different devices and plasma conditions: DIII-D and RFX-mod operated in tokamak mode. In DIII-D, the plasma target was high βN plasmas in a non-circular divertor tokamak. In RFX-mod, the plasma was ohmically-heated plasma with ultralow safety factor in a circular limiter discharge of active feedback coils outside the thick resistive shell. The DIII-D and RFX-mod experiments showed remarkable consistency with theoretical predictions of torque balance. The application to ignition-oriented devices such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) would expand the horizon of its operational regime. The internal 3D coil set currently under consideration for edge localized mode suppression in ITER would be well suited to this purpose.

  8. Tear biomarkers for keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Nishtala, Krishnatej; Pahuja, Natasha; Shetty, Rohit; Nuijts, Rudy M M A; Ghosh, Arkasubhra

    2016-01-01

    Keratoconus is a progressive corneal thinning, ectatic condition, which affects vision. Recent advances in corneal topography measurements has helped advance proper diagnosis of this condition and increased research and clinical interests in the disease etiopathogenesis. Considerable progress has been achieved in understanding the progression of the disease and tear fluid has played a major role in the progress. This review discusses the importance of tear fluid as a source of biomarker for keratoconus and how advances in technology have helped map the complexity of tears and thereby molecular readouts of the disease. Expanding knowledge of the tear proteome, lipidome and metabolome opened up new avenues to study keratoconus and to identify probable prognostic or diagnostic biomarkers for the disease. A multidimensional approach of analyzing tear fluid of patients layering on proteomics, lipidomics and metabolomics is necessary in effectively decoding keratoconus and thereby identifying targets for its treatment. PMID:27493978

  9. Antimicrobial compounds in tears.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Alison M

    2013-12-01

    The tear film coats the cornea and conjunctiva and serves several important functions. It provides lubrication, prevents drying of the ocular surface epithelia, helps provide a smooth surface for refracting light, supplies oxygen and is an important component of the innate defense system of the eye providing protection against a range of potential pathogens. This review describes both classic antimicrobial compounds found in tears such as lysozyme and some more recently identified such as members of the cationic antimicrobial peptide family and surfactant protein-D as well as potential new candidate molecules that may contribute to antimicrobial protection. As is readily evident from the literature review herein, tears, like all mucosal fluids, contain a plethora of molecules with known antimicrobial effects. That all of these are active in vivo is debatable as many are present in low concentrations, may be influenced by other tear components such as the ionic environment, and antimicrobial action may be only one of several activities ascribed to the molecule. However, there are many studies showing synergistic/additive interactions between several of the tear antimicrobials and it is highly likely that cooperativity between molecules is the primary way tears are able to afford significant antimicrobial protection to the ocular surface in vivo. In addition to effects on pathogen growth and survival some tear components prevent epithelial cell invasion and promote the epithelial expression of innate defense molecules. Given the protective role of tears a number of scenarios can be envisaged that may affect the amount and/or activity of tear antimicrobials and hence compromise tear immunity. Two such situations, dry eye disease and contact lens wear, are discussed here.

  10. Antimicrobial Compounds in Tears

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    The tear film coats the cornea and conjunctiva and serves several important functions. It provides lubrication, prevents drying of the ocular surface epithelia, helps provide a smooth surface for refracting light, supplies oxygen and is an important component of the innate defense system of the eye providing protection against a range of potential pathogens. This review describes both classic antimicrobial compounds found in tears such as lysozyme and some more recently identified such as members of the cationic antimicrobial peptide family and surfactant protein-D as well as potential new candidate molecules that may contribute to antimicrobial protection. As is readily evident from the literature review herein, tears, like all mucosal fluids, contain a plethora of molecules with known antimicrobial effects. That all of these are active in vivo is debatable as many are present in low concentrations, may be influenced by other tear components such as the ionic environment, and antimicrobial action may be only one of several activities ascribed to the molecule. However, there are many studies showing synergistic/additive interactions between several of the tear antimicrobials and it is highly likely that cooperativity between molecules is the primary way tears are able to afford significant antimicrobial protection to the ocular surface in vivo. In addition to effects on pathogen growth and survival some tear components prevent epithelial cell invasion and promote the epithelial expression of innate defense molecules. Given the protective role of tears a number of scenarios can be envisaged that may affect the amount and/or activity of tear antimicrobials and hence compromise tear immunity. Two such situations, dry eye disease and contact lens wear, are discussed here. PMID:23880529

  11. Reinterpretation of O'Brien test in posterior labral tears of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Owen, J. Matthew; Boulter, Thomas; Walton, Mike; Funk, Lennard; Mackenzie, Tanya Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Injuries to the posterior labrum are less common and more difficult to diagnose compared to anterior labral pathology. This may be in part due to difficulties in preoperative diagnosis. Posterior labral injuries cause abnormal loading of the rotator cuff with subsequent weakness. Examination using the O'Briens test tightens the posterior capsule and posteriorly translates the humeral head, stressing the labrum resulting in pain and weakness. Method: A retrospective study. Results: Of 74 patients diagnosed with a posterior labral tear at arthroscopy 55 had subjective weakness on performing a O'Briens test, a sensitivity of 83% and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 90%. Conclusion: Multiple tests have been described for posterior labral pathology and none of these, on their own, have a high sensitivity rate. Posterior labral injuries can often be missed on magnetic resonance imaging scanning and also at surgery if not specifically looked for. Using a sign of clinically demonstrated weakness when performing the O'Briens test, and hence reinterpretation of the test, is sensitive, with a high PPV for posterior labral pathology and can help guide further treatment. PMID:25709238

  12. Effect of Return to Overuse Activity Following an Isolated Supraspinatus Tendon Tear on Adjacent Intact Tendons and Glenoid Cartilage in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Reuther, Katherine E.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Sarver, Joseph J.; Tucker, Jennica J.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Gray, Chancellor F.; Glaser, David L.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common conditions that can alter shoulder mechanics and may lead to damage of intact joint tissues. These injuries are of particular concern in populations who perform tasks requiring repetitive overhead activity (e.g., athletes and laborers) and who are likely to return to aggressive pre-injury activity levels despite limited understanding of the potentially damaging effects on the remaining tissues. Therefore, we investigated the effect of returning to overuse activity following a supraspinatus tear on shoulder function and the mechanical properties of the remaining intact tendons and glenoid cartilage. Forty rats underwent 4 weeks of overuse activity to create a tendinopathic condition followed by detachment of the supraspinatus tendon and were then randomized into two groups: continued overuse or cage activity. Ambulatory measurements were performed throughout the 8 weeks prior to euthaniasia, and properties of the adjacent tendons and cartilage were evaluated. Results demonstrated that shoulder function was not compromised in the return to overuse group. However, alterations of the glenoid cartilage and biceps tendon properties occurred. Our results help define the contributory roles of common mechanical injury mechanisms and provide a framework by which physicians could better prescribe long-term treatment strategies for patients. PMID:23280495

  13. Effect of return to overuse activity following an isolated supraspinatus tendon tear on adjacent intact tendons and glenoid cartilage in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Reuther, Katherine E; Thomas, Stephen J; Sarver, Joseph J; Tucker, Jennica J; Lee, Chang-Soo; Gray, Chancellor F; Glaser, David L; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2013-05-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common conditions that can alter shoulder mechanics and may lead to damage of intact joint tissues. These injuries are of particular concern in populations who perform tasks requiring repetitive overhead activity (e.g., athletes and laborers) and who are likely to return to aggressive pre-injury activity levels despite limited understanding of the potentially damaging effects on the remaining tissues. Therefore, we investigated the effect of returning to overuse activity following a supraspinatus tear on shoulder function and the mechanical properties of the remaining intact tendons and glenoid cartilage. Forty rats underwent 4 weeks of overuse activity to create a tendinopathic condition followed by detachment of the supraspinatus tendon and were then randomized into two groups: continued overuse or cage activity. Ambulatory measurements were performed throughout the 8 weeks prior to euthaniasia, and properties of the adjacent tendons and cartilage were evaluated. Results demonstrated that shoulder function was not compromised in the return to overuse group. However, alterations of the glenoid cartilage and biceps tendon properties occurred. Our results help define the contributory roles of common mechanical injury mechanisms and provide a framework by which physicians could better prescribe long-term treatment strategies for patients.

  14. Cuff width alters the amplitude envelope of wrist cuff pressure pulse waveforms.

    PubMed

    Jilek, Jiri; Stork, Milan

    2010-07-01

    The accuracy of noninvasive blood pressure (BP) measurement with any method is affected by cuff width. Measurement with a too narrow cuff overestimates BP and measurement with a too wide cuff underestimates BP. Automatic wrist cuff BP monitors use permanently attached narrow cuffs with bladders about 6 cm wide. Such narrow cuffs should result in under-cuffing for wrist circumferences larger than 15 cm. The objective of this qualitative study was to show that a narrow wrist cuff results in increased BP values when a cuff pulse amplitude ratio algorithm is used. According to the algorithm used in this study, systolic pressure (SBP) corresponds to the point of 50% of maximal amplitude; for diastolic pressure (DBP) the ratio is 70%. Data were acquired from 12 volunteers in the sitting position. The mean wrist circumference was 18 cm. The acquired cuff pulse data were used to compute SBP, mean pressure (MAP) and DBP. The mean values for a 6 cm cuff were SBP = 144 mmHg, MAP = 104 mmHg and DBP = 88 mmHg. The values for a 10 cm cuff were SBP = 128 mmHg, MAP = 93 mmHg and DBP = 78 mmHg. The reference BP values were SBP = 132 mmHg, MAP = 96 mmHg and DBP = 80 mmHg. All narrow (6 cm) cuff BP values were higher than wide (10 cm) cuff or reference BP values. The results indicate that wider wrist cuffs may be desirable for more accurate and reliable BP measurement with wrist monitors. PMID:20505218

  15. Cardiorespiratory arrest secondary to tracheostomy cuff herniation

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Ian R; Stotz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This report details the case of a 67-year-old man who required intubation following a fall and multiple rib fractures and underwent surgical tracheostomy. Postoperatively, he deteriorated on the intensive care unit with airway obstruction. Bronchoscopy demonstrated tracheostomy cuff herniation obstructing airflow necessitating conventional orotracheal reintubation. On inspection of the tracheostomy an unusual cuff deformation was noted. PMID:23988825

  16. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nerve cuff. 882.5275 Section 882.5275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve...

  17. Rolling-cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, D.R.

    1982-09-27

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping, is described. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  18. Tear dynamics and dry eye.

    PubMed

    Tsubota, K

    1998-10-01

    Tears undergo four processes: production by the lacrimal gland, distribution by blinking, evaporation from the ocular surface and drainage through the nasolacrimal duct. Abnormalities in any of these steps can cause dry eye. There are two kinds of tear production, basic and reflex, which can be distinguished from each other by the Schirmer test with nasal stimulation. Reflex tearing is important because it supplies such essential components as EGF and vitamin A, whose deficiency may cause squamous metaplasia. There is no reflex tearing in Sjogren's syndrome because of destruction of the lacrimal gland. In cases of diminished or absent reflex tearing, topical autologous serum is the treatment of choice. Even when there is adequate tear production, insufficient distribution, such as occurs with the decreased blinking associated with the use of video display terminals (VDT), may cause dry eye. Any process or activity that suppresses blinking interferes with tear distribution. Tear evaporation increases under certain conditions and in some diseases. When the exposed ocular surface area is increased, such as in VDT work, tear evaporation increases. Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) also causes increased tear evaporation by altering the quality of the oily layer in tears. Tear evaporation can be suppressed by using a warm compresser or a humidifier, narrowing the palpebral fissure, or wearing protective eyeglasses. The tear clearance rate is measured by fluorescein dye dilution in the conjunctiva. When the tear clearance is low, inflammatory cytokines or preservatives accumulate in the conjunctival sac, resulting in ocular surface diseases. Frequent use of artificial tears without preservative is the key treatment. A differential diagnosis of the abnormalities of tear dynamics can give us a proper understanding of the pathogenesis of dry eye. With this knowledge, we can formulate an efficient therapeutic approach.

  19. Tearing Modes in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.

    2008-05-14

    This lecture gives a basic introduction to magnetic pound elds, magnetic surface destruction, toroidal equilibrium and tearing modes in a tokamak, including the linear and nonlinear development of these modes and their modi pound cation by current drive and bootstrap current, and sawtooth oscillations and disruptions.

  20. Tears of Wine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gugliotti, Marcos

    2004-01-01

    The unique occurrence of the upward motion of a thin film of wine, and its formation into drops inside the wall of a wine glass is explained. Evaporation of alcohol generates a surface tension gradient, moving the film of wine upwards on the internal sides of a wine glass, where it collects and forms into drops or tears.

  1. Rotationally actuated prosthetic helping hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G., Jr. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); West, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A prosthetic device has been developed for below-the-elbow amputees. The device consists of a cuff, a stem, a housing, two hook-like fingers, an elastic band for holding the fingers together, and a brace. The fingers are pivotally mounted on a housing that is secured to the amputee's upper arm with the brace. The stem, which also contains a cam, is rotationally mounted within the housing and is secured to the cuff, which fits over the amputee's stump. By rotating the cammed stem between the fingers with the lower arm, the amputee can open and close the fingers.

  2. Electrosurgical Settings and Vaginal Cuff Complications

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Megan L.; Rao, Rama; Manahan, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: After being encouraged to change the technique for opening the vaginal cuff during robotic surgery, this study was performed to determine the correlation between vaginal cuff complications and electrosurgical techniques. Methods: The study group consisted of patients who had their vaginal cuffs opened with a cutting current compared to the group of patients having their vaginal cuff opened with a coagulation current. Data were collected on 150 women who underwent robotic surgery for endometrial cancer. All patients received preoperative antibiotics. Data, including operative time, type of electrosurgery used, estimated blood loss, transfusion rate, and complications, were collected from the patients' records. Results: Surgeries in 150 women and the associated complications were studied. The mean age of the patients was not significantly different between the groups (P = .63). The mean body mass index was 38 kg/m2 in the coagulation arm and 36 kg/m2 in the cutting arm (P = .03). Transfusion was not required. Estimated blood loss and operative time were not significantly different in the coagulation versus the cutting arms (P = .29 and .5; respectively). No patients in the cutting arm and 4 patients (with 5 complications) in the coagulation arm had cuff complications (P = .02). Conclusions: Complications involving the vaginal cuff appear to occur more frequently when the vagina is entered by using electrosurgery with coagulation versus cutting in this cohort of patients undergoing robot-assisted surgery for endometrial cancer.. PMID:26681912

  3. Change in endotracheal tube cuff pressure during nitrous oxide anaesthesia: a comparison between air and distilled water cuff inflation.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, N L; Norsidah, A M

    2001-10-01

    In this prospective, randomized controlled trial, changes in endotracheal tube cuff pressure were studied in 60 patients undergoing elective surgery under general anaesthesia with nitrous oxide and oxygen. The cuffs were inflated with either air or distilled water. The mean pressure in the air-filled cuffs increased steadily throughout the procedure, reaching 47.5 +/- 7.3 cmH2O at one hour compared with 31.6 +/- 2.4 cmH2O mean pressure in the water-filled cuffs. The pressure and the rate of rise in cuff pressure were significantly lower (P<0.05) in the water-filled cuffs throughout the hour of study. When an endotracheal tube cuff is distended with water, the rise in cuff pressure during nitrous oxide anaesthesia is lower than that of an air-filled cuff.

  4. Preliminary ultrasound evaluation of the rotator cable in asymptomatic volunteers☆

    PubMed Central

    Orlandi, D.; Sconfienza, L.M.; Fabbro, E.; Ferrero, G.; Martini, C.; Lacelli, F.; Serafini, G.; Silvestri, E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the rotator cable high-resolution ultrasound appearance in asymptomatic shoulders of volunteers of different age. Materials and methods IRB approval and volunteers’ written consent was obtained. Excluding subjects with known shoulder affections, we screened 24 asymptomatic volunteers. Supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons high-resolution ultrasound evaluation was performed according to standard scan protocols, further excluding shoulders with partial/full-thickness cuff tears. Thus, we studied 24 shoulders in 12 young volunteers (age range 21–39 years, mean age 33 ± 8 years) and 21 shoulders in 11 elderly volunteers (age range 62–83 years, mean age 75 ± 45 years). For each shoulder, we noted rotator cable visibility and its thickness and width. Fisher’s and U Mann–Whitney statistics were used. Results Rotator cable was less frequently detected in young than in elderly volunteers (5/24 vs. 11/21 shoulders; P = 0.034). When detected, rotator cable was significantly thicker in young (range 1.2–1.5 mm, mean thickness 1.3 ± 0.1 mm) than in elderly (range 0.9–1.4 mm, mean thickness 1.2 ± 0.1 mm) volunteers (P = 0.025), while its width was not significantly different in young (range 4.5–7.1 mm, mean 5.6 ± 1.1 mm) compared to elderly (range 2.5–7.1 mm, mean 4.2 ± 1.4 mm) volunteers (P = 0.074) although a tendency can be highlighted. Conclusions Ultrasound demonstrated the different consistency of rotator cable in young and elderly asymptomatic patients, with high interobserver reproducibility. PMID:23396940

  5. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  6. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  7. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  8. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  20. Tear Film Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Butovich, Igor A.

    2013-01-01

    Human meibomian gland secretions (MGS, or meibum) are formed from a complex mixture of lipids of different classes such as wax esters, cholesteryl esters, (O-acyl)-ω-hydroxy fatty acids (OAHFA) and their esters, acylglycerols, diacylated diols, free fatty acids, cholesterol, and a smaller amount of other polar and nonpolar lipids, whose chemical nature and the very presence in MGS have been a matter of intense debates. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent results that were obtained using different experimental techniques, estimate limitations of their usability, and discuss their biochemical, biophysical, and physiological implications. To create a lipid map of MGS and tears, the results obtained in the author’s laboratory were integrated with available information on chemical composition of MGS and tears. The most informative approaches that are available today to researchers, such as HPLC-MS, GC-MS, and proton NMR, are discussed in details. A map of the meibomian lipidome (as it is seen in reverse phase liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry experiments) is presented. Directions of future efforts in the area are outlined. PMID:23769846

  1. Linear stability of tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, S.C.; Kulsrud, R.M.; Hahm, T.S.

    1986-05-01

    This paper examines the stability of tearing modes in a sheared slab when the width of the tearing layer is much smaller than the ion Larmor radius. The ion response is nonlocal, and the quasineutrality retains its full integal form. An expansion procedure is introduced to solve the quasineutrality equation in powers of the width of the tearing layer over the ion Larmor radius. The expansion procedure is applied to the collisionless and semi-collisional tearing modes. The first order terms in the expansion we find to be strongly stabilizing. The physics of the mode and of the stabilization is discussed. Tearing modes are observed in experiments even though the slab theory predicts stability. It is proposed that these modes grow from an equilibrium with islands at the rational surfaces. If the equilibrium islands are wider than the ion Larmor radius, the mode is unstable when ..delta..' is positive.

  2. Tear-ducts in wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John W. M.

    1999-11-01

    We examine the radial spoke pattern evident in the meniscus region in glasses of strong alcoholic beverages exhibiting the `tears-in-wine' phenomenon. We demonstrate that the pattern results from ridge-like elevations of the free surface which are supported by evaporatively-driven Marangoni convection in the meniscus region. Vortices associated with the convective motions are aligned in the radial direction by the surface tension gradient responsible for the generation of tears. The radial flow is focussed into the ridges, which thus serve as the principal conduits of fluid for the tears; consequently, we refer to the ridges as `tear-ducts'. The phenomenon is examined experimentally, and a numerical model of evaporatively-driven Marangoni convection is developed which reproduces the salient features of the tear-duct phenomenon.

  3. Skin tears: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Wick, Jeannette Y; Zanni, Guido R

    2008-07-01

    While skin tears are common among the elderly in general, and residents of long-term care facilities in particular, there has been limited research into their treatment. Many facilities voluntarily track skin tears, and some states require facilities to report these events. Risk factors include age, xerosis (abnormal eye, skin, or mouth dryness), need for help in activities of daily living, presence of senile purpura, visual impairment, and poor nutrition. Plans to prevent skin tears that employ skin sleeves, padded side rails, gentle skin cleansers, moisturizing lotions, as well as staff education, can decrease by half the number of skin tears incurred in a long-term care facility. Although the treatment process seems simple, it is time consuming and can be painful for the patient. Residents with dementia or agitation often try to remove bulky dressings used to cover skin tears. Dressing changes may injure the fragile wound via skin stripping.

  4. Identification of a Very High Cuff Pressure by Manual Palpation of the External Cuff Balloon on an Endotracheal Tube.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Pia; Eklund, Carolina; Högqvist, Sandra

    2015-06-01

    The most common complication due to intubation is a high cuff pressure. A high cuff pressure can cause postanesthetic tracheal mucosal injuries in patients undergoing surgery. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to describe whether anesthetic nurses and anesthesiologists identified a very high cuff pressure by manual palpation of the external cuff balloon on an endotracheal tube. An airway device was intubated with an endotracheal tube cuffed to 95 cm H2O. Each participant palpated the external cuff balloon and then filled out a questionnaire, including estimation of the cuff pressure and user frequency of the cuff pressure manometer. The results showed that 89.1% estimated that the cuff pressure was high. Among the participants who rated the cuff pressure as high, 44.8% rated the pressure as quite high and 60.6% rated the pressure as very high. There was no significant relationship between profession and skill in identifying a very high cuff pressure (P = .843) or between work experience and skill in terms of identifying a very high cuff pressure (P = .816). These findings indicate that 10% of patients are at risk of tracheal erosion because of a high cuff pressure.

  5. Tear Lipocalin: Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Dartt, Darlene A.

    2014-01-01

    Lipocalins are a family of diverse low molecular weight proteins that act extracellularly. They use multiple recognition properties that include: 1) ligand binding to small hydrophobic molecules, 2) macromolecular complexation with other soluble macromolecules, and 3) binding to specific cell surface receptors to deliver cargo. Tear lipocalin (TLC) is a major protein in tears and has a large ligand binding cavity that allows the lipocalin to bind an extensive and diverse set of lipophilic molecules. TLC can also bind to macromolecules including the tear proteins lactoferin and lysozyme. The receptor to which TLC binds is termed tear lipocalin interacting membrane receptor (LIMR). LIMR appears to work by endocytosis. TLC has a variety of suggested functions in tears including regulation of tear viscosity, binding and release of lipids, endonuclease inactivation of viral DNA, binding of microbial siderophores (iron chelators used to deliver essential iron to bacteria), use as a biomarker for dry eye, and possession of anti-inflammatory activity. Additional research is warranted to determine the actual functions of TLC in tears and the presence of its receptor on the ocular surface. PMID:21791187

  6. Electronic enhancement of tear secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinton, Mark; Lim Chung, Jae; Kossler, Andrea; Kook, Koung Hoon; Loudin, Jim; Franke, Manfred; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Objective. To study electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves for enhanced tear secretion, as a potential treatment for dry eye disease. We investigate the response pathways and electrical parameters to safely maximize tear secretion. Approach. We evaluated the tear response to electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves in isofluorane-anesthetized rabbits. In acute studies, electrical stimulation was performed using bipolar platinum foil electrodes, implanted beneath the inferior lacrimal gland, and a monopolar electrode placed near the afferent ethmoid nerve. Wireless microstimulators with bipolar electrodes were implanted beneath the lacrimal gland for chronic studies. To identify the response pathways, we applied various pharmacological inhibitors. To optimize the stimulus, we measured tear secretion rate (Schirmer test) as a function of pulse amplitude (1.5-12 mA), duration (0.1-1 ms) and repetition rate (10-100 Hz). Main results. Stimulation of the lacrimal gland increased tear secretion by engaging efferent parasympathetic nerves. Tearing increased with stimulation amplitude, pulse duration and repetition rate, up to 70 Hz. Stimulation with 3 mA, 500 μs pulses at 70 Hz provided a 4.5 mm (125%) increase in Schirmer score. Modulating duty cycle further increased tearing up to 57%, compared to continuous stimulation in chronically implanted animals (36%). Ethmoid (afferent) nerve stimulation increased tearing similar to gland stimulation (3.6 mm) via a reflex pathway. In animals with chronically implanted stimulators, a nearly 6 mm increase (57%) was achieved with 12-fold less charge density per pulse (0.06-0.3 μC mm-2 with 170-680 μs pulses) than the damage threshold (3.5 μC mm-2 with 1 ms pulses). Significance. Electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland or afferent nerves may be used as a treatment for dry eye disease. Clinical trials should validate this approach in patients with aqueous tear deficiency, and

  7. The minimal leak test technique for endotracheal cuff maintenance.

    PubMed

    DA, Harvie; Jn, Darvall; M, Dodd; A, De La Cruz; M, Tacey; Rl, D'Costa; D, Ward

    2016-09-01

    Endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff pressure management is an essential part of airway management in intubated and mechanically ventilated patients. Both under- and over-inflation of the ETT cuff can lead to patient complications, with an ideal pressure range of 20-30 cmH2O defined. A range of techniques are employed to ensure adequate ETT cuff inflation, with little comparative data. We performed an observational cross-sectional study in a tertiary metropolitan ICU, assessing the relationship between the minimal leak test and cuff manometry. Forty-five mechanically ventilated patients, over a three-month period, had ETT cuff manometry performed at the same time as their routine cuff maintenance (minimal leak test). Bedside nurse measurements were compared with investigator measurements. At the endpoint of cuff inflation, 20 of 45 patients (44%) had cuff pressures between 20 and 30 cmH2O; 11 of 45 patients (24%) had cuff pressures <20 cmH2O; 14 of 45 patients (31%) had cuff pressures ≥30 cmH2O. Univariate analysis demonstrated an association between both patient obesity and female gender requiring less ETT cuff volume (P=0.008 and P <0.001 respectively), though this association was lost on multivariate analysis. No association was demonstrated between any measured variables and cuff pressures. Inter-operator reliability in performing the minimal leak test showed no evidence of bias between nurse and investigators (Pearson coefficient = 0.897). We conclude the minimal leak test for maintenance of ETT cuffs leads to both over- and under-inflation, and alternative techniques, such as cuff manometry, should be employed. PMID:27608343

  8. Control device for prosthetic urinary sphincter cuff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinicke, Robert H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A device for controlling flow of fluid to and from a resilient inflatable cuff implanted about the urethra to control flow of urine therethrough. The device comprises a flexible bulb reservoir and a control unit that includes a manually operated valve that opens automatically when the bulb is squeezed to force fluid into the cuff for closing the urethra. The control unit also includes a movable valve seat member having a relatively large area exposed to pressure of fluid in a chamber that is connected to the cuff and which moves to a position in which the valve member is unseated by an abutment when fluid pressure in the chamber exceeds a predetermined value to thereby relieve excess fluid pressure in the cuff. The arrangement is such that the valve element is held closed against the seat member by the full differential in fluid pressures acting on both sides of the valve element until the seat member is moved away from the valve element to thus insure positive closing of the valve element until the seat member is moved out of engagement with the valve element by excess pressure differential.

  9. Dural tears in spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, Michael T; Rhyne, Alfred; Darden, Bruce V

    2010-09-01

    Dural tears are among the most commonly seen complications in spine surgery. Most studies in the literature indicate that long-term outcomes are not negatively affected, provided that the tears are diagnosed early and managed appropriately. Direct suture repair remains the preferred method for the management of durotomy caused by or found during surgery. However, recent literature reports encouraging results with sutureless repair. Understanding dural anatomy, dural healing, and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics is helpful in choosing among the available management options for dural tear.

  10. 49 CFR 178.1070 - Tear test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tear test. 178.1070 Section 178.1070... Containers § 178.1070 Tear test. (a) General. The tear test must be conducted for the qualification of all of Flexible Bulk Containers design types. (b) Special preparation for the tear test. Flexible Bulk...

  11. 49 CFR 178.818 - Tear test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tear test. 178.818 Section 178.818 Transportation... Tear test. (a) General. The tear test must be conducted for the qualification of all flexible IBC design types. (b) Special preparation for the tear test. The flexible IBC must be filled to not less...

  12. 49 CFR 178.818 - Tear test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tear test. 178.818 Section 178.818 Transportation... Tear test. (a) General. The tear test must be conducted for the qualification of all flexible IBC design types. (b) Special preparation for the tear test. The flexible IBC must be filled to not less...

  13. The management of skin tears.

    PubMed

    Meuleneire, Frans

    During the ageing process the layers of the skin start to atrophy; the epidermis becomes thin and fragile, and dermal thickness decreases by 20 per cent (White et al, 1994). This makes skin tears a common problem among older people.

  14. Partial rotator cuff injury in athletes: bursal or articular?

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cassiano Diniz; Cohen, Carina; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Monteiro, Gustavo Cará; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    O ombro doloroso é uma queixa muito comum entre os atletas, especialmente no caso dos arremessadores. As lesões parciais do manguito rotador podem ser muito dolorosas e causar limitação funcional importante na pratica esportiva do atleta. A incidência das lesões parciais do manguito é variável (13% a 37%). O diagnóstico clínico e radiológico é difícil e deve ser considerado em todo atleta que apresente sintomatologia da síndrome do manguito rotador, inclusive nos pacientes diagnosticados apenas com tendinopatia.

  15. Endotracheal cuff pressure and tracheal mucosal blood flow: endoscopic study of effects of four large volume cuffs.

    PubMed Central

    Seegobin, R D; van Hasselt, G L

    1984-01-01

    Large volume, low pressure endotracheal tube cuffs are claimed to have less deleterious effect on tracheal mucosa than high pressure, low volume cuffs. Low pressure cuffs, however, may easily be overinflated to yield pressures that will exceed capillary perfusion pressure. Various large volume cuffed endotracheal tubes were studied, including Portex Profile, Searle Sensiv, Mallinkrodt Hi-Lo, and Lanz. Tracheal mucosal blood flow in 40 patients undergoing surgery was assessed using an endoscopic photographic technique while varying the cuff inflation pressure. It was found that these cuffs when overpressurised impaired mucosal blood flow. This impairment of tracheal mucosal blood flow is an important factor in tracheal morbidity associated with intubation. Hence it is recommended that a cuff inflation pressure of 30 cm H2O (22 mm Hg) should not be exceeded. Images FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:6423162

  16. Wear and Tear - Mechanical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this chapter is on the long term wear and tear, or aging, of the mechanical subsystem of a spacecraft. The mechanical subsystem is herein considered to be the primary support structure (as in a skeleton or exoskeleton) upon which all other spacecraft systems rest, and the associated mechanisms. Mechanisms are devices which have some component that moves at least once, in response to some type of passive or active control system. For the structure, aging may proceed as a gradual degradation of mechanical properties and/or function, possibly leading to complete structural failure over an extended period of time. However, over the 50 years of the Space Age such failures appear to be unusual. In contrast, failures for mechanisms are much more frequent and may have a very serious effect on mission performance. Just as on Earth, all moving devices are subject to normal (and possibly accelerated) degradation from mechanical wear due to loss or breakdown of lubricant, misalignment, temperature cycling effects, improper design/selection of materials, fatigue, and a variety of other effects. In space, such environmental factors as severe temperature swings (possibly 100's of degrees C while going in and out of direct solar exposure), hard vacuum, micrometeoroids, wear from operation in a dusty or contaminated environment, and materials degradation from radiation can be much worse. In addition, there are some ground handling issues such as humidity, long term storage, and ground transport which may be of concern. This chapter addresses the elements of the mechanical subsystem subject to wear, and identifies possible causes. The potential impact of such degradation is addressed, albeit with the recognition that the impact of such wear often depends on when it occurs and on what specific components. Most structural elements of the mechanical system typically are conservatively designed (often to a safety factor of greater than approximately 1.25 on yield for

  17. Tear exchange and contact lenses: a review.

    PubMed

    Muntz, Alex; Subbaraman, Lakshman N; Sorbara, Luigina; Jones, Lyndon

    2015-01-01

    Tear exchange beneath a contact lens facilitates ongoing fluid replenishment between the ocular surface and the lens. This exchange is considerably lower during the wear of soft lenses compared with rigid lenses. As a result, the accumulation of tear film debris and metabolic by-products between the cornea and a soft contact lens increases, potentially leading to complications. Lens design innovations have been proposed, but no substantial improvement in soft lens tear exchange has been reported. Researchers have determined post-lens tear exchange using several methods, notably fluorophotometry. However, due to technological limitations, little remains known about tear hydrodynamics around the lens and, to-date, true tear exchange with contact lenses has not been shown. Further knowledge regarding tear exchange could be vital in aiding better contact lens design, with the prospect of alleviating certain adverse ocular responses. This article reviews the literature to-date on the significance, implications and measurement of tear exchange with contact lenses.

  18. The current management of skin tears.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoti; Lau, Kwan; Taira, Breena R; Singer, Adam J

    2009-07-01

    Each year, there are more than 1 million skin tears among the elderly and disabled. Because of their fragile nature, management of skin tears can be very challenging. Methods of wound closure should minimize additional trauma to the skin and promote an optimal wound healing environment while minimizing the risk of infection. The current article reviews the etiology, risk factors, classification, and therapeutic options for treating skin tears. We also review preventive measures to help reduce the incidence of skin tears.

  19. Oblique electron-cyclotron-emission radial and phase detector of rotating magnetic islands applied to alignment and modulation of electron-cyclotron-current-drive for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, F.; Austin, M. E.; Campbell, G.; Deterly, T.

    2012-10-15

    A two channel oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer was installed on the DIII-D tokamak and interfaced to four gyrotrons. Oblique ECE was used to toroidally and radially localize rotating magnetic islands and so assist their electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization. In particular, after manipulations operated by the interfacing analogue circuit, the oblique ECE signals directly modulated the current drive in synch with the island rotation and in phase with the island O-point, for a more efficient stabilization. Apart from the different toroidal location, the diagnostic view is identical to the ECCD launch direction, which greatly simplified the real-time use of the signals. In fact, a simple toroidal extrapolation was sufficient to lock the modulation to the O-point phase. This was accomplished by a specially designed phase shifter of nearly flat response over the 1-7 kHz range. Moreover, correlation analysis of two channels slightly above and below the ECCD frequency allowed checking the radial alignment to the island, based on the fact that for satisfactory alignment the two signals are out of phase.

  20. Oblique electron-cyclotron-emission radial and phase detector of rotating magnetic islands applied to alignment and modulation of electron-cyclotron-current-drive for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization.

    PubMed

    Volpe, F; Austin, M E; Campbell, G; Deterly, T

    2012-10-01

    A two channel oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer was installed on the DIII-D tokamak and interfaced to four gyrotrons. Oblique ECE was used to toroidally and radially localize rotating magnetic islands and so assist their electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization. In particular, after manipulations operated by the interfacing analogue circuit, the oblique ECE signals directly modulated the current drive in synch with the island rotation and in phase with the island O-point, for a more efficient stabilization. Apart from the different toroidal location, the diagnostic view is identical to the ECCD launch direction, which greatly simplified the real-time use of the signals. In fact, a simple toroidal extrapolation was sufficient to lock the modulation to the O-point phase. This was accomplished by a specially designed phase shifter of nearly flat response over the 1-7 kHz range. Moreover, correlation analysis of two channels slightly above and below the ECCD frequency allowed checking the radial alignment to the island, based on the fact that for satisfactory alignment the two signals are out of phase.

  1. Physical properties of stimulated and unstimulated tears.

    PubMed

    Pandit, J C; Nagyová, B; Bron, A J; Tiffany, J M

    1999-02-01

    It has long been assumed that unstimulated tears are more thoroughly equilibrated with epithelial secretions than stimulated tears, since they are in contact with tarsal, bulbar and corneal surfaces for longer. It was also believed from results with model solutions that soluble mucin is responsible for the observed surface tension and viscosity of tears. If longer contact means more mucin is dissolved in the aqueous tears, then the surface activity (surface tension lowered by mucin) and viscosity (raised by mucin) of tears should therefore be enhanced in unstimulated over stimulated tears. Pools of stimulated and minimally-stimulated tears were collected from a group of healthy adult volunteers by glass capillary. Viscosities were measured in the Contraves Low Shear 30 rheometer over the range of shear rates 0-130 sec-1. Surface tension was measured in the collection capillaries by a micro-technique, before and after refrigerated storage. Both surface tension and viscosity were determined for a variety of tear proteins and mucins. No significant difference was found between the viscosity/shear rate plots of stimulated and unstimulated tear samples. The viscosities of solutions of individual tear proteins were low, except for the combination of lysozyme and secretory IgA. Surface tensions were also similar in both cases, and unchanged by storage at room temperature or refrigeration, indicating no significant loss of surface-active material by adsorption on the capillary walls. Results with model mucin solutions gave a variety of results indicating either little surface activity or losses due to wall adsorption. Tear proteins, individually or in combination, did not lower surface tension to the level of tears. Tear viscosity seems not to depend on the level of dissolved mucins. This suggests either that a constant level of these is picked up even by short-term contact with ocular surfaces, or that viscosity arises from currently unknown materials which vary little

  2. RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF ISOLATED TEARS OF THE SUBSCAPULARIS TENDON

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; de Oliveira França, Flávio; Freita, José Márcio Alves; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; dos Santos, Ricardo Barreto Monteiro; Taglietti, Thiago Martins; Guevara, Carlos Leonidas Escobar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the functional and clinical outcomes and identify prognostic factors in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of isolated tears of the subscapularis tendon. Methods: Between January 2003 and May 2009, we identified 18 shoulders with isolated tears or deinsertions that were complete or affected at least one third of the subscapularis tendon and underwent arthroscopic repair. Results: Three shoulders (17%) showed lesions in the upper third of the subscapularis; nine shoulders (50%) showed lesions in the upper two thirds; and six shoulders (33%) presented complete tears. In comparing the range of lateral rotation of the injured shoulder between before surgery and the time of the reevaluation, there was no statistical difference (p = 0.091). The LHBT was damaged in 11 shoulders (61%). According to the Constant score validation, we had excellent and good results in 83% of the cases and 17% were reasonable. The reevaluations on three patients showed re-tearing on MRI. Acromioplasty was performed on ten patients and this procedure did not represent statistical differences in the final results (p = 0.57). Conclusions: There was no statistically significant difference in relation to preoperative lateral rotation between the injured shoulder and the contralateral side. There was no significant loss of lateral rotation after surgery. The LHBT may be normal in deinsertions of the subscapularis tendon. Acromioplasty did not influence the results. The re-tearing rate for arthroscopic repair of the subscapularis tendon was 16.6%. PMID:27042642

  3. Laryngeal Cuff Force Application Modeling During Air Medical Evacuation Simulation.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, David; Eisenbrey, Arthur B; Pettengill, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Endotracheal tubes are intended to protect the airway and assist with mechanical ventilation in sedated patients. The blood vessels of the tracheal mucosa can be compressed by high tracheal tube cuff pressures (> 30 cm H2O), leading to reduced mucosal blood flow with resulting ischemia and morbidity. Previous research showed a direct correlation between aircraft pressure altitude and the pressure reading from the tracheal cuff, with resulting pressures > 80 cm H2O at 10,000 ft. Standard practice is to periodically remove air from the cuff during ascent based on assumed increased pressure on the adjacent tracheal mucosa. Using a vacuum chamber and a direct reading micropressure sensor in a 22-mm-diameter semirigid tube, we assessed the direct force applied by the tracheal cuff against the laryngeal tube analog. Standard tracheal cuffs showed direct force/pressure relationships when properly inflated to 20 cm H2O but much less than reported in the literature. Current literature reports values of 55 to 150 cm H2O at 5,000 ft, whereas we report 23 to 25 cm H2O. Our data indicate that a properly inflated cuff does not exceed the critical pressure of 30 cm H2O until the altitude exceeds 8,000 ft. Thus, the standard practice of deflating the laryngeal cuff on ascent should be reconsidered because it may be counterproductive to patient safety. PMID:27637439

  4. Magnitude of Interfractional Vaginal Cuff Movement: Implications for External Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Daniel J.; Michaletz-Lorenz, Martha; Goddu, S. Murty; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the extent of interfractional vaginal cuff movement in patients receiving postoperative irradiation for cervical or endometrial cancer in the absence of bowel/bladder instruction. Methods and Materials: Eleven consecutive patients with cervical or endometrial cancer underwent placement of three gold seed fiducial markers in the vaginal cuff apex as part of standard of care before simulation. Patients subsequently underwent external irradiation and brachytherapy treatment based on institutional guidelines. Daily megavoltage CT imaging was performed during each external radiation treatment fraction. The daily positions of the vaginal apex fiducial markers were subsequently compared with the original position of the fiducial markers on the simulation CT. Composite dose-volume histograms were also created by summing daily target positions. Results: The average ({+-} standard deviation) vaginal cuff movement throughout daily pelvic external radiotherapy when referenced to the simulation position was 16.2 {+-} 8.3 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff movement for any patient during treatment was 34.5 mm. In the axial plane the mean vaginal cuff movement was 12.9 {+-} 6.7 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff axial movement was 30.7 mm. In the craniocaudal axis the mean movement was 10.3 {+-} 7.6 mm, with a maximum movement of 27.0 mm. Probability of cuff excursion outside of the clinical target volume steadily dropped as margin size increased (53%, 26%, 4.2%, and 1.4% for 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 cm, respectively.) However, rectal and bladder doses steadily increased with larger margin sizes. Conclusions: The magnitude of vaginal cuff movement is highly patient specific and can impact target coverage in patients without bowel/bladder instructions at simulation. The use of vaginal cuff fiducials can help identify patients at risk for target volume excursion.

  5. Vitamin D in Tear Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaowen; Elizondo, Rodolfo A.; Nielsen, Rikke; Christensen, Erik I.; Yang, Jun; Hammock, Bruce D.; Watsky, Mitchell A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the source(s) of vitamin D in tear fluid and examine the expression of the endocytic proteins and putative vitamin D transporters megalin and cubilin in lacrimal and Harderian glands. Methods Wild-type, heterozygous, and vitamin D receptor (VDR) knockout C57BL/6 mice were used, with a subset of knockout mice fed a replenishment diet for some studies. Mouse lacrimal and Harderian glands from each group were used to measure megalin and cubilin by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. New Zealand white rabbits were used to collect lacrimal and accessory gland fluid for vitamin D mass spectroscopy measurements. Results Ten-week-old knockout mice were significantly (P < 0.05) smaller than wild-type mice. Real-time PCR and Western blot showed decreased expression of megalin and cubilin in select VDR knockout mouse groups. Immunohistochemistry showed apical duct cell megalin staining and weaker megalin staining in VDR knockout mice compared with controls. Vitamin D2 was more prevalent in rabbit lacrimal and accessory gland fluid than vitamin D3, and greater amounts of Vitamin D2 were found in in tear fluid obtained directly from lacrimal and accessory glands as compared with plasma concentrations. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the presence of megalin and cubilin in lacrimal and accessory glands responsible for producing tear fluid. The results strengthen the hypothesis that megalin and cubilin are likely involved in the secretory pathway of vitamin D into tear fluid by the duct cells. PMID:26348637

  6. Model for ocular tear film function.

    PubMed

    Mathers, W D; Lane, J A; Sutphin, J E; Zimmerman, M B

    1996-03-01

    Blepharitis patients have a number of disturbances in their tear film associated with meibomian gland dysfunction that affect evaporation and tear osmolarity. We tested a series of 156 consecutive patients, with a presumed diagnosis of blepharitis, dry eye, or allergic disease, and a series of 72 normals. We compared their tear film characteristics using tear osmolarity, tear volume, tear production (fluorophotometric and Schirmer test), tear turnover (decay constant), tear evaporation, and meibomian gland function evaluated by gland drop-out, expressed lipid viscosity, and volume. Of the 156 patients tested, we found 37 had dry eye, 10 had only allergic disease, 73 had meibomian gland dysfunction and dry eye, and 36 had only meibomian gland dysfunction. We created a model of the relative influence some of these factors had on each other using their correlation coefficients. The highest correlations for osmolarity were Schirmer test (-0.44), lipid volume low (-0.44), lipid viscosity high (0.39), gland drop-out (0.39), and tear evaporation (0.36). With regression analysis we accounted for 47% of the total variation in osmolarity, but only 17% of the variation in tear evaporation. We also present our classification system for blepharitis and dry eye patients based on our measurable physiologic parameters.

  7. Tear analysis in contact lens wearers.

    PubMed Central

    Farris, R L

    1985-01-01

    Tear analysis in contact lens wearers was compared with tear analysis in aphakics without contact lens wear and normal phakic patients. Subjects were divided into five groups: group 1, aphakic without contact lens; group 2, phakic with daily-wear hard contact lens; group 3, phakic with daily-wear soft contact lens; group 4, phakic with extended-wear soft contact lens; and group 5, aphakic with extended-wear soft contact lens. The experimental groups were compared with age- and sex-matched control groups for statistical analysis of tear variables by means of the Student's t-test. The variables measured were tear osmolarity, tear albumin, and lysozyme and lactoferrin concentrations in basal and reflex tears. Highly significant elevations of tear osmolarity were found in aphakic subjects without contact lenses. Less significant differences in tear osmolarity were found in phakic subjects with hard daily-wear lenses or with extended-wear soft lenses. Tear albumin, lysozyme, and lactoferrin in basal and reflex tears were not significantly different in the different groups of contact lens wearers or in the group of aphakic subjects without contact lenses compared with their control groups. Individual variations in tear albumin, lysozyme, and lactoferrin appeared to be responsible for the inability to demonstrate significant differences in tear composition in association with the wearing of different types of contact lenses. Older and aphakic patients demonstrated a tendency to have increased concentrations of proteins in the tears compared with younger, phakic contact lens wearers and normal controls without contact lenses. PMID:3914131

  8. Tear and decohesion of bovine pericardial tissue.

    PubMed

    Tobaruela, Almudena; Elices, Manuel; Bourges, Jean Yves; Rojo, Francisco Javier; Atienza, José Miguel; Guinea, Gustavo

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the fracture-by tear and delamination-of bovine pericardium tissues which are usually employed for the manufacture of bioprosthetic valves. A large number of samples (77) were tested in root-to-apex and circumferential directions, according to a standardised tear test (ASTM D 1938). Before performing the tear test, some samples were subjected to 1000 cycles of fatigue to a maximum stress of 3MPa. Fracture toughness of tearing and delamination were computed by following a simple fracture model. The study showed significantly lower values of delamination toughness compared with tear delamination. Moreover, tear forces were different in each test direction, revealing a clear orthotropic behaviour. All these results, as well as the testing procedure, could be of value for future research in the physiological function of pericardium tissues and clinical applications. PMID:27337412

  9. Hot tearing evaluation for aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brůna, Marek

    2016-06-01

    Hot tearing during solidification of aluminium alloys castings can be a serious problem. This phenomenon is well known but still insufficiently investigated. Hot tearing occurs in form of irregular cracks in metal castings that develop during solidification and cooling. The cause of hot tearing is generally attributed to the development of thermally induced tensile stresses and strains in a casting as the molten metal contracts during solidification and solid state shrinkage. Submited paper consists of two parts. The first part introduces the reader to the phenomenon of hot tearing. The second part describes newly developed method for assessing hot tearing susceptibility of aluminium alloys, and also gives the results on hot tearing for various aluminium alloys.

  10. Tear and decohesion of bovine pericardial tissue.

    PubMed

    Tobaruela, Almudena; Elices, Manuel; Bourges, Jean Yves; Rojo, Francisco Javier; Atienza, José Miguel; Guinea, Gustavo

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the fracture-by tear and delamination-of bovine pericardium tissues which are usually employed for the manufacture of bioprosthetic valves. A large number of samples (77) were tested in root-to-apex and circumferential directions, according to a standardised tear test (ASTM D 1938). Before performing the tear test, some samples were subjected to 1000 cycles of fatigue to a maximum stress of 3MPa. Fracture toughness of tearing and delamination were computed by following a simple fracture model. The study showed significantly lower values of delamination toughness compared with tear delamination. Moreover, tear forces were different in each test direction, revealing a clear orthotropic behaviour. All these results, as well as the testing procedure, could be of value for future research in the physiological function of pericardium tissues and clinical applications.

  11. Preventing and managing skin tears: a review.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Mary J

    2007-01-01

    Skin tears are an increasingly common problem in frail elders, and the wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC) nurse must be knowledgeable regarding both prevention and management of these lesions. A literature review was conducted to identify current concepts regarding management of skin tears. Articles reviewed provided numerous suggested interventions and protocols. Recurring themes were prevention of skin tears whenever possible and management of existing lesions with products that manage the exudate, maintain a moist surface, and prevent additional trauma.

  12. Artificial tears potpourri: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Moshirfar, Majid; Pierson, Kasey; Hanamaikai, Kamalani; Santiago-Caban, Luis; Muthappan, Valliammai; Passi, Samuel F

    2014-01-01

    Numerous brands and types of artificial tears are available on the market for the treatment of dysfunctional tear syndrome. Past literature has focused on comparing the components of these products on patient’s clinical improvement. The wide array of products on the market presents challenges to both clinicians and patients when trying to choose between available tear replacement therapies. Different formulations affect patients based on etiology and severity of disease. In order to provide an unbiased comparison between available tear replacement therapies, we conducted a literature review of existing studies and National Institutes of Health clinical trials on commercially available, brand name artificial tears. Outcomes evaluated in each study, as well as the percent of patients showing clinical and symptomatic improvement, were analyzed. Fifty-one studies evaluating different brands of artificial tears, and their efficacy were identified. Out of the 51 studies, 18 were comparison studies testing brand name artificial tears directly against each other. Nearly all formulations of artificial tears provided significant benefit to patients with dysfunctional tear syndrome, but some proved superior to others. From the study data, a recommended treatment flowchart was derived. PMID:25114502

  13. Artificial tears potpourri: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Moshirfar, Majid; Pierson, Kasey; Hanamaikai, Kamalani; Santiago-Caban, Luis; Muthappan, Valliammai; Passi, Samuel F

    2014-01-01

    Numerous brands and types of artificial tears are available on the market for the treatment of dysfunctional tear syndrome. Past literature has focused on comparing the components of these products on patient's clinical improvement. The wide array of products on the market presents challenges to both clinicians and patients when trying to choose between available tear replacement therapies. Different formulations affect patients based on etiology and severity of disease. In order to provide an unbiased comparison between available tear replacement therapies, we conducted a literature review of existing studies and National Institutes of Health clinical trials on commercially available, brand name artificial tears. Outcomes evaluated in each study, as well as the percent of patients showing clinical and symptomatic improvement, were analyzed. Fifty-one studies evaluating different brands of artificial tears, and their efficacy were identified. Out of the 51 studies, 18 were comparison studies testing brand name artificial tears directly against each other. Nearly all formulations of artificial tears provided significant benefit to patients with dysfunctional tear syndrome, but some proved superior to others. From the study data, a recommended treatment flowchart was derived.

  14. Resistive wall tearing mode generated finite net electromagnetic torque in a static plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, G. Z. Wang, A. K.; Xu, M.; Qu, H. P.; Peng, X. D.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, J. Q.; Qiu, X. M.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2014-01-15

    The MARS-F code [Y. Q. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 3681 (2000)] is applied to numerically investigate the effect of the plasma pressure on the tearing mode stability as well as the tearing mode-induced electromagnetic torque, in the presence of a resistive wall. The tearing mode with a complex eigenvalue, resulted from the favorable averaged curvature effect [A. H. Glasser et al., Phys. Fluids 18, 875 (1975)], leads to a re-distribution of the electromagnetic torque with multiple peaking in the immediate vicinity of the resistive layer. The multiple peaking is often caused by the sound wave resonances. In the presence of a resistive wall surrounding the plasma, a rotating tearing mode can generate a finite net electromagnetic torque acting on the static plasma column. Meanwhile, an equal but opposite torque is generated in the resistive wall, thus conserving the total momentum of the whole plasma-wall system. The direction of the net torque on the plasma is always opposite to the real frequency of the mode, agreeing with the analytic result by Pustovitov [Nucl. Fusion 47, 1583 (2007)]. When the wall time is close to the oscillating time of the tearing mode, the finite net torque reaches its maximum. Without wall or with an ideal wall, no net torque on the static plasma is generated by the tearing mode. However, re-distribution of the torque density in the resistive layer still occurs.

  15. Resistive wall tearing mode generated finite net electromagnetic torque in a static plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, G. Z.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, A. K.; Xu, M.; Qu, H. P.; Peng, X. D.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, J. Q.; Qiu, X. M.

    2014-01-01

    The MARS-F code [Y. Q. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 3681 (2000)] is applied to numerically investigate the effect of the plasma pressure on the tearing mode stability as well as the tearing mode-induced electromagnetic torque, in the presence of a resistive wall. The tearing mode with a complex eigenvalue, resulted from the favorable averaged curvature effect [A. H. Glasser et al., Phys. Fluids 18, 875 (1975)], leads to a re-distribution of the electromagnetic torque with multiple peaking in the immediate vicinity of the resistive layer. The multiple peaking is often caused by the sound wave resonances. In the presence of a resistive wall surrounding the plasma, a rotating tearing mode can generate a finite net electromagnetic torque acting on the static plasma column. Meanwhile, an equal but opposite torque is generated in the resistive wall, thus conserving the total momentum of the whole plasma-wall system. The direction of the net torque on the plasma is always opposite to the real frequency of the mode, agreeing with the analytic result by Pustovitov [Nucl. Fusion 47, 1583 (2007)]. When the wall time is close to the oscillating time of the tearing mode, the finite net torque reaches its maximum. Without wall or with an ideal wall, no net torque on the static plasma is generated by the tearing mode. However, re-distribution of the torque density in the resistive layer still occurs.

  16. Stability of coupled tearing and twisting modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    1994-03-01

    A dispersion relation is derived for resistive modes of arbitrary parity in a tokamak plasma. At low mode amplitude, tearing and twisting modes which have nonideal MHD behavior at only one rational surface at a time in the plasma are decoupled via sheared rotation and diamagnetic flows. At higher amplitude, more unstable {open_quote}compound{close_quote} modes develop which have nonideal behavior simultaneously at many surfaces. Such modes possess tearing parity layers at some of the nonideal surfaces, and twisting parity layers at others, but mixed parity layers are generally disallowed. At low mode number, {open_quote}compound{close_quote} modes are likely to have tearing parity layers at all of the nonideal surfaces in a very low-{beta} plasma, but twisting parity layers become more probable as the plasma {beta} is increased. At high mode number, unstable twisting modes which exceed a critical amplitude drive conventional magnetic island chains on alternate rational surfaces, to form an interlocking structure in which the O-points and X-points of neighboring chains line up.

  17. Mechanics of the occlusive arm cuff and its application as a volume sensor.

    PubMed

    Drzewiecki, G; Bansal, V; Karam, E; Hood, R; Apple, H

    1993-07-01

    Although a common medical instrument, the mechanical function of an occlusive arm cuff has not been fully described in an engineering sense. The occlusive arm cuff is examined here using a mathematical mechanics model and experimental measurements. Cuff stretch was modeled by a nonlinear pressure-volume function. Air compression was represented by Boyle's law. An apparatus was developed to measure pressure due to the air volume pumped into the cuff for fixed arm volume. Data were obtained for two different cuff designs, and reveal a nonlinear cuff pressure-volume relationship that could be represented accurately by the mathematical model. Calibration constants are provided for the two types of occlusive cuff. Thus, the cuff pressure was found to consist of a balance between that produced by stretch of the elastic cuff bladder and that of the compression of the air contained within the bladder. The use of the gas law alone was found to be inadequate to represent the cuff mechanics. When applying the cuff to measure change in arm volume, such as during plethysmography or oscillometry, it cannot be assumed that the cuff sensitivity is constant. More precisely, it was found that the occlusive cuff is a transducer with a volume sensitivity that increases with cuff pressure and volume until it becomes nearly constant at high levels of cuff pressure (150 mmHg). A hypothetical case of a linear elastic artery with constant pulse pressure was used as input to the cuff model to illustrate the change in cuff pressure oscillations that occurs while cuff pressure is released.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8244431

  18. Dural tear of unusual cause

    PubMed Central

    Kechna, Hicham; Loutid, Jaouad; Ouzzad, Omar; Hanafi, Sidi Mohamed; Hachimi, Moulay Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is highly recommended in cancer anorectal surgery. In addition to the fight against pain it provides some benefit in allowing early rehabilitation of patients. One of the risks of this practice is the dural tear creating a cerebrospinal fluid leak (CSF) in the epidural space (EPD). Clinical features the typical positional headache, a procession of various more or less severe symptoms: nausea, vomiting, dizziness, visual or hearing impairment or radicular pain. We report a dural of unusual cause secondary of the obstruction of tuohy catheter by vertebral cartilage. PMID:26113920

  19. Congenital Aberrant Tearing: A Re-Look

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marilyn T.; Strömland, Kerstin; Ventura, Liana

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Congenital aberrant tearing is characterized by tearing when eating (“crocodile tears”), lack of emotional tearing, or both. Most reported cases are associated with Duane syndrome. In our previous studies we observed aberrant tearing in individuals with thalidomide embryopathy and Möbius sequence. This report summarizes the literature on the subject and adds 3 new studies that give information on this unusual condition. Methods Twenty-eight individuals with Möbius sequence were interviewed about tearing symptoms at a support group meeting in Italy. In Sweden 30 adults primarily from the original thalidomide series were reexamined. In this latter study, a Schirmer test was done at baseline and repeated 5 minutes after eating. Twenty families in Brazil who have children with Möbius sequence were questioned about tearing symptoms and exposure to misoprostol during pregnancy. Results In the 28 Italian individuals, either “crocodile tears” or lack of emotional tearing was noted in 7 cases. In the thalidomide study, 10 of 30 patients had tearing when eating and 7 had no emotional tearing. Low Schirmer scores or increased tearing after eating was noted in a few asymptomatic individuals. Among the 20 Brazilian children with Möbius sequence, 10 had some tearing abnormality. Conclusion Congenital anomalous lacrimation is rare but usually associated with Duane syndrome or abduction deficits, as in Möbius sequence and, less frequently, facial nerve palsy. Studies implicate an early insult in development at 4 to 6 weeks. At that time the facial nerve, sixth nerve, and lacrimal nucleus are in close proximity in the embryo. PMID:19277226

  20. Interferometric characterization of tear film dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primeau, Brian Christopher

    The anterior refracting surface of the eye is the thin tear film that forms on the surface of the cornea. When a contact lens is on worn, the tear film covers the contact lens as it would a bare cornea, and is affected by the contact lens material properties. Tear film irregularity can cause both discomfort and vision quality degradation. Under normal conditions, the tear film is less than 10 microns thick and the thickness and topography change in the time between blinks. In order to both better understand the tear film, and to characterize how contact lenses affect tear film behavior, two interferometers were designed and built to separately measure tear film behavior in vitro and in vivo. An in vitro method of characterizing dynamic fluid layers applied to contact lenses mounted on mechanical substrates has been developed using a phase-shifting Twyman-Green interferometer. This interferometer continuously measures light reflected from the surface of the fluid layer, allowing precision analysis of the dynamic fluid layer. Movies showing this fluid layer behavior can be generated. The fluid behavior on the contact lens surface is measured, allowing quantitative analysis beyond what typical contact angle or visual inspection methods provide. The in vivo interferometer is a similar system, with additional modules included to provide capability for human testing. This tear film measurement allows analysis beyond capabilities of typical fluorescein visual inspection or videokeratometry and provides better sensitivity and resolution than shearing interferometry methods.

  1. The Effects of Hemodialysis on Tear Osmolarity.

    PubMed

    Taskapili, Muhittin; Serefoglu Cabuk, Kubra; Aydin, Rukiye; Atalay, Kursat; Kirgiz, Ahmet; Sit, Dede; Kayabasi, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To determine the effects of hemodialysis (HD) on tear osmolarity and to define the blood biochemical tests correlating with tear osmolarity among patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Material-Method. Tear osmolarity of ESRD patients before and after the hemodialysis program was determined as well as the blood biochemical data including glucose, sodium, potassium, calcium, urea, and creatinine levels. Results. Totally 43 eyes of 43 patients (20 females and 23 males) with a mean age of 53.98 ± 18.06 years were included in the study. Tear osmolarity of patients was statistically significantly decreased after hemodialysis (314.06 ± 17.77 versus 301.88 ± 15.22 mOsm/L, p = 0.0001). In correlation analysis, pre-HD tear osmolarity was negatively correlated with pre-HD blood creatinine level (r = -0.366,  p = 0.016). Post-HD tear osmolarity was statistically significantly correlated with the post-HD glucose levels (r = 0.305  p = 0.047). Tear osmolarity alteration by HD was negatively correlated with creatinine alteration, body weight alteration, and ultrafiltration (r = -0.426,  p = 0.004; r = -0.365,  p = 0.016; and r = -0.320, p = 0.036, resp.). There was no correlation between tear osmolarity and Kt/V and URR values. Conclusion. HD effectively decreases tear osmolarity to normal values and corrects the volume and composition of the ocular fluid transiently. Tear osmolarity alteration induced by HD is correlated with body weight changes, creatinine alterations, and ultrafiltration. PMID:26640702

  2. Linear and nonlinear effect of sheared plasma flow on resistive tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qiming Hu, Xiwei; Yu, Q.

    2014-12-15

    The effect of sheared plasma flow on the m/n = 2/1 tearing mode is studied numerically (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers). It is found that in the linear phase the plasma flow with a weak or moderate shear plays a stabilizing effect on tearing mode. However, the mode is driven to be more unstable by sufficiently strong sheared flow when approaching the shear Alfvén resonance (AR). In the nonlinear phase, a moderate (strong) sheared flow leads to a smaller (larger) saturated island width. The stabilization of tearing modes by moderate shear plasma flow is enhanced for a larger plasma viscosity and a lower Alfvén velocity. It is also found that in the nonlinear phase AR accelerates the plasma rotation around the 2/1 rational surface but decelerates it at the AR location, and the radial location satisfying AR spreads inwards towards the magnetic axis.

  3. Analysis of meibum and tear lipids.

    PubMed

    Pucker, Andrew D; Nichols, Jason J

    2012-10-01

    The meibum is a lipid-rich secretion that is the primary component of the external layer of the tear film. The meibomian glands produce the meibum, and meibomian gland dysfunction can lead to degradation of the tear film. Such dysfunction can result in ocular irritation, inflammation, and clinical disease. Understanding this relationship is critical to preventing ocular disease; therefore, a search of peer-reviewed literature focusing on the collection, quantification, and analysis of normal and abnormal meibum and tear lipids was conducted. Numerous collection and quantification techniques are described, including their advantages and disadvantages. Studies indicate that the meibum and tear lipids consist of a large array of polar and nonpolar lipids; individual lipids or their classes can be correlated to pathology. Significant amounts of lipids are deposited on contact lenses, depending on the nature of their polymer chemistry. These findings taken together indicate that normal meibum and tear lipids are essential for normal ocular health. Additional studies are required to provide a better understanding of the meibum and tear film biomolecules so that more effective treatments for blepharitis, dry eye disease, and tear film-related contact lens complications can be devised.

  4. Comparison of prophylactic effects of polyurethane cylindrical or tapered cuff and polyvinyl chloride cuff endotracheal tubes on ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Peyrovi-far, Ali; Hamishehkar, Hadi; Bakhtyiari, Zhaleh; Mirinezhad, Mir Mousa; Hamidi, Masoud; Golzari, Samad Eslam Jamal

    2013-08-07

    Because microaspiration of contaminated supraglottic secretions past the endotracheal tube cuff is considered to be central in the pathogenesis of pneumonia, improved design of tracheal tubes with new cuff material and shape have reduced the size and number of folds, which together with the addition of suction ports above the cuff to drain pooled subglottic secretions leads to reduced aspiration of oropharyngeal secretions. So we conducted a study to compare the prophylactic effects of polyurethane-cylindrical or tapered cuff and polyvinyl chloride cuff endotracheal tubes (ETT) on ventilator-associated pneumonia. This randomized clinical trial was carried out in a 12 bed surgical intensive care unit. 96 patients expected to require mechanical ventilation more than 96 hours were randomly allocated to one of three following groups: Polyvinyl chloride cuff (PCV) ETT, Polyurethane (PU) cylindrical Sealguard ETT and PU Taperguard ETT. Cuff pressure monitored every three hours 3 days in all patients. Mean cuff pressure didn't have significant difference between three groups during 72 hours. Pneumonia was seen in 11 patients (34%) in group PVC, 8 (25%) in Sealguard and 7 (21%) in Taperguard group. Changes in mean cuff pressure between Sealguard and PVC tubes and also between Taperguard and PVC tubes did not show any significant difference. There was no significant difference in overinflation between three groups. The use of ETT with PU material results in reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia compared to ETT with PVC cuff. In PU tubes Taperguard has less incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia compared to Sealguard tubes.

  5. Effects of Wing-Cuff on NACA 23015 Aerodynamic Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, S. M. A.; Belhenniche, M.; Madani Fouatih, O.; Imine, B.

    2014-03-01

    The main subject of this work is the numerical study control of flow separation on a NACA 23015 airfoil by using wing cuff. This last is a leading edge modification done to the wing. The modification consists of a slight extension of the chord on the outboard section of the wings. Different numerical cases are considered for the baseline and modified airfoil NACA 23015 according at different angle of incidence. The turbulence is modeled by two equations k-epsilon model. The results of this numerical investigation showed several benefits of the wing cuff compared with a conventional airfoil and an agreement is observed between the experimental data and the present study. The most intriguing result of this research is the capability for wing cuff to perform short take-offs and landings.

  6. On the tear resistance of skin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen; Sherman, Vincent R.; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schaible, Eric; Stewart, Polite; Ritchie, Robert O.; Meyers, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Tear resistance is of vital importance in the various functions of skin, especially protection from predatorial attack. Here, we mechanistically quantify the extreme tear resistance of skin and identify the underlying structural features, which lead to its sophisticated failure mechanisms. We explain why it is virtually impossible to propagate a tear in rabbit skin, chosen as a model material for the dermis of vertebrates. We express the deformation in terms of four mechanisms of collagen fibril activity in skin under tensile loading that virtually eliminate the possibility of tearing in pre-notched samples: fibril straightening, fibril reorientation towards the tensile direction, elastic stretching and interfibrillar sliding, all of which contribute to the redistribution of the stresses at the notch tip. PMID:25812485

  7. On the tear resistance of skin

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wen; Sherman, Vincent R.; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schaible, Eric; Stewart, Polite; Ritchie, Robert O.; Meyers, Marc A.

    2015-03-27

    Tear resistance is vitally important for the various functions of skin, especially protection from predatorial attack. Here, we mechanistically quantify the extreme tear resistance of skin and identify the underlying structural features, which lead to its sophisticated failure mechanisms. Here we explain why it is virtually impossible to propagate a tear in rabbit skin, chosen as a model material for the dermis of vertebrates. Finally, we express the deformation in terms of four mechanisms of collagen fibril activity in skin under tensile loading that virtually eliminate the possibility of tearing in pre-notched samples: fibril straightening, fibril reorientation towards the tensile direction, elastic stretching and interfibrillar sliding, all of which contribute to the redistribution of the stresses at the notch tip.

  8. On the tear resistance of skin

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Wen; Sherman, Vincent R.; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schaible, Eric; Stewart, Polite; Ritchie, Robert O.; Meyers, Marc A.

    2015-03-27

    Tear resistance is vitally important for the various functions of skin, especially protection from predatorial attack. Here, we mechanistically quantify the extreme tear resistance of skin and identify the underlying structural features, which lead to its sophisticated failure mechanisms. Here we explain why it is virtually impossible to propagate a tear in rabbit skin, chosen as a model material for the dermis of vertebrates. Finally, we express the deformation in terms of four mechanisms of collagen fibril activity in skin under tensile loading that virtually eliminate the possibility of tearing in pre-notched samples: fibril straightening, fibril reorientation towards the tensilemore » direction, elastic stretching and interfibrillar sliding, all of which contribute to the redistribution of the stresses at the notch tip.« less

  9. A novel way to treat skin tears.

    PubMed

    Moradian, Scott; Klapper, Andrew M

    2016-04-01

    Skin tears are one of the most commonly treated wounds in the elderly population. In their most basic form, they are essentially traumatic random pattern flaps. We postulate that the injured blood flow to these skin flaps should be ignored and the tissue should be treated as a skin graft. A case report is presented of an 86-year-old female with an 8 × 3·5 cm skin tear to her right upper extremity after a hip fracture. In addition to conventional wound closure strips re-approximating the tissues, a disposable negative pressure wound therapy device was placed to act as bolster. Upon its removal on day 5, the opposed skin tear tissue was found to be 100% viable. We therefore propose that this update may be an improvement over classical skin tear treatments and should be followed up with a case series.

  10. On the tear resistance of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wen; Sherman, Vincent R.; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schaible, Eric; Stewart, Polite; Ritchie, Robert O.; Meyers, Marc A.

    2015-03-01

    Tear resistance is of vital importance in the various functions of skin, especially protection from predatorial attack. Here, we mechanistically quantify the extreme tear resistance of skin and identify the underlying structural features, which lead to its sophisticated failure mechanisms. We explain why it is virtually impossible to propagate a tear in rabbit skin, chosen as a model material for the dermis of vertebrates. We express the deformation in terms of four mechanisms of collagen fibril activity in skin under tensile loading that virtually eliminate the possibility of tearing in pre-notched samples: fibril straightening, fibril reorientation towards the tensile direction, elastic stretching and interfibrillar sliding, all of which contribute to the redistribution of the stresses at the notch tip.

  11. 49 CFR 178.818 - Tear test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... superimposed load, be lifted clear of the floor and maintained in that position for a period of five minutes. (d) Criterion for passing the test. The IBC passes the tear test if the cut does not propagate...

  12. Neoclassical tearing modes in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.

    1988-12-01

    Linear tearing instability is studied in the banana collisionality regime in tokamak geometry. Neoclassical effects produce significant modifications of Ohm's law and the vorticity equation, so that the growth rate of tearing modes driven by ..delta..' is dramatically reduced compared to the usual resistive magnetohydrodynamic values. Consequences of this result, regarding the presence of pressure-gradient-driven neoclassical resistive interchange instabilities and the evolution of magnetic islands in the Rutherford regime, are discussed.

  13. Neoclassical tearing modes in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.

    1988-08-01

    Linear tearing instability is studied in the banana collisionality regime in tokamak geometry. Neoclassical effects produce significant modifications of Ohm's law and the vorticity equation so that the growth rate of tearing modes driven by ..delta..' is dramatically reduced compared to the usual resistive MHD value. Consequences of this result, regarding the presence of pressure-gradient-driven neoclassical resistive interchange instabilities and the evolution of magnetic islands in the Rutherford regime, are discussed. 10 refs.

  14. Tear film MMP accumulation and corneal disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, V; Rishmawi, H; Hussein, H; Easty, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) accumulate in the tears of patients with active peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) but it is unknown whether these enzymes have a central role in disease progression. The aims of the present investigation were to determine the source of these enzymes and to ascertain whether their accumulation in tears is a phenomenon specific to PUK or a general feature of other anterior segment diseases.
METHODS—The experimental samples were obtained from the culture media of conjunctival and corneal epithelial cells, from fractionated blood plasma and leucocytes of healthy subjects and patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and from the tears of healthy subjects and patients with a variety of anterior segment diseases. The MMPs of all samples were visualised by zymography and tear samples were assayed using nitrophenol acetate and an MMP-9 susceptible quenched fluorescent peptide as substrate.
RESULTS—The major MMPs that accumulate in the tears of patients with rheumatoid arthritis with active ocular disease are MMP-9 and a species of Mr 116 000. By comparing the zymographic activity profiles of the gelatinases present in the samples obtained, it was deduced that the main source of these MMPs was granulocytes. Their accumulation in tears was not unique to patients with PUK; detectable amounts of the enzymes also occurred in the tears of patients with keratoconus with associated atopic disease, patients undergoing treatment for herpetic eye disease, and patients with systemic and non-systemic dry eye disease.
CONCLUSION—The MMPs that accumulate in tears are mainly derived from granulocytes. This may be effected by autoimmune diseases that involve ocular tissue or by ocular diseases that induce an inflammatory response.

 PMID:11159476

  15. Popliteomeniscal Fascicle Tear: Diagnosis and Operative Technique

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong-Kwan; Lee, Hee-Sung; Lee, Young-Kuk; Bae, Ki-Cheor; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Jae

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence and the consistency of the popliteomeniscal fascicle between the popliteus tendon and the lateral meniscus have been the subject of debate. It is difficult to diagnose and treat popliteomeniscal fascicle tears. Furthermore, popliteomeniscal fascicle tears are difficult to identify with arthroscopy. This article describes the diagnostic factors for popliteomeniscal fascicle tears and the safe, effective operative techniques that can be used for their treatment. We suggest that popliteomeniscal fascicle tears are diagnosed when the following 3 conditions are confirmed: (1) existence of mechanical symptoms such as pain, locking, and giving way in the lateral compartment of the knee; (2) identification of hypermobility of the lateral meniscus through arthroscopic probing; and (3) occurrence of an osteochondral lesion in the posterior area of the lateral femoral condyle. In the case of popliteomeniscal fascicle tears, the tear area can be repaired with a suture hook and polydioxanone with an all-inside technique. If the joint space is narrowing because of soft-tissue tightness, it can be repaired with a zone-specific cannula through an inside-out technique. PMID:23766962

  16. Laboratory findings in tear fluid analysis.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Yoshiki; Dogru, Murat; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2006-07-15

    The tear film, composed of the lipid, aqueous and mucin layers, has many functions including defending the ocular surface. The tear film covering the ocular surface presents a mechanical and antimicrobial barrier and ensures an optical refractive surface. The lipid component originates from the meibomian glands of the tarsus and forms the superficial layer of the tear film. The aqueous component contains electrolytes, water, and a large variety of proteins, peptides and glycoproteins, and is primarily secreted by the lacrimal gland. Mucins are glycoproteins expressed by epithelial tissues of mucous surfaces. They protect tissues by functioning as antioxidants, providing lubrication, and inhibiting bacterial adherence. Quantitatively and qualitatively, its composition must be maintained within the fairly narrow limits to maintain a healthy and functional visual system. Abnormalities of the tear film, affecting the constituents or the volume, can rapidly result in serious dysfunction of the eyelids and conjunctiva and ultimately affect the transparency of the cornea. Many ocular surface tests have been developed for the clinical diagnosis of dry eye syndromes. This paper provides an overview on laboratory methods for the analysis of the tear film. Understanding the components of the tear film will aid in the treatment of dry eye syndromes and the ocular surface diseases.

  17. Tear film measurement by optical reflectometry technique.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Wang, Michael R; Wang, Jianhua; Shen, Meixiao

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation of tear film is performed by an optical reflectometer system with alignment guided by a galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer system utilizes optical fibers to deliver illumination light to the tear film and collect the film reflectance as a function of wavelength. Film thickness is determined by best fitting the reflectance-wavelength curve. The spectral reflectance acquisition time is 15 ms, fast enough for detecting film thickness changes. Fast beam alignment of 1 s is achieved by the galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer was first used to evaluate artificial tear film on a model eye with and without a contact lens. The film thickness and thinning rate have been successfully quantified with the minimum measured thickness of about 0.3 μm. Tear films in human eyes, with and without a contact lens, have also been evaluated. A high-contrast spectral reflectance signal from the precontact lens tear film is clearly observed, and the thinning dynamics have been easily recorded from 3.69 to 1.31 μm with lipid layer thickness variation in the range of 41 to 67 nm. The accuracy of the measurement is better than ±0.58% of the film thickness at an estimated tear film refractive index error of ±0.001. The fiber-based reflectometer system is compact and easy to handle.

  18. Diet, nutraceuticals and the tear film.

    PubMed

    Jalbert, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    Nutrition disorders and their correlates such as obesity are increasingly prevalent worldwide. A number of studies to date have suggested numerous potential associations between diet and tear film health; this paper will provide a summary of the available literature. The tear film is characterized through its protein and lipid content and through clinical measurements of characteristics such as osmolarity, volume and stability. Malnutrition, protein and vitamin-A deficiencies are extremely deleterious to tear film health and supplementation with oral vitamin A in this setting is of clear benefit. The relative impact of diet on tear film within what would be considered normal ranges of consumption is less clear. A number of population studies have suggested that hyperlipidemia and a diet low in omega-3 fatty acids are risks factor for dry eye disease. Numerous studies have investigated the effectiveness of oral supplementation with antioxidants, omega-3 (e.g. fish oil and linseed oil) and omega-6 (e.g. evening primrose oil) fatty acids in the last 10 years. Taken together, these suggest a small benefit of oral supplementation on tear film volume, stability and decreased ocular symptoms in patients previously diagnosed with diseases involving the ocular surface (e.g. Sjögren's syndrome, meibomian gland dysfunction, dry eye disease) and contact lens wearers suffering from dry eye. More research is required to determine the exact composition, dosage and indications for their use and to fully characterize how these nutraceuticals modulate the tear film.

  19. Tear film measurement by optical reflectometry technique.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Wang, Michael R; Wang, Jianhua; Shen, Meixiao

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation of tear film is performed by an optical reflectometer system with alignment guided by a galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer system utilizes optical fibers to deliver illumination light to the tear film and collect the film reflectance as a function of wavelength. Film thickness is determined by best fitting the reflectance-wavelength curve. The spectral reflectance acquisition time is 15 ms, fast enough for detecting film thickness changes. Fast beam alignment of 1 s is achieved by the galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer was first used to evaluate artificial tear film on a model eye with and without a contact lens. The film thickness and thinning rate have been successfully quantified with the minimum measured thickness of about 0.3 μm. Tear films in human eyes, with and without a contact lens, have also been evaluated. A high-contrast spectral reflectance signal from the precontact lens tear film is clearly observed, and the thinning dynamics have been easily recorded from 3.69 to 1.31 μm with lipid layer thickness variation in the range of 41 to 67 nm. The accuracy of the measurement is better than ±0.58% of the film thickness at an estimated tear film refractive index error of ±0.001. The fiber-based reflectometer system is compact and easy to handle. PMID:24500519

  20. Comparison of the effects of room air and N2O + O2 used for ProSeal LMA cuff inflation on cuff pressure and oropharyngeal structure.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Murat; Kati, Ismail; Tomak, Yakup; Yuca, Koksal

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of different inflating gases used for ProSeal LMA (PLMA) cuff inflation on cuff pressure, oropharyngeal structure, and the incidence of sore throat. Eighty patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists; ASA I-II) were randomly divided into two groups. PLMA cuff inflation was achieved with appropriate volumes of 50% N2O + 50% O2 in group I and room air in group II, respectively. When the PLMA was removed, oropharyngeal examination was carried out immediately, using a rigid optical telescope. Patients were asked about sore throat symptoms postoperatively. Cuff pressures were significantly lower in group I, except at the initial pressure measurement. Cuff pressure was positively correlated with the length of the operation in group II, and negatively correlated in group I. PLMA cuff inflation with room air led to increased cuff pressure during the operation, possibly due to the diffusion of N2O into the cuff. We consider that a PLMA cuff inflated with an N2O-O2 mixture is convenient, especially in operations in which N2O has been used.

  1. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure before, during, and after fixed-wing air medical retrieval.

    PubMed

    Brendt, Peter; Schnekenburger, Marc; Paxton, Karen; Brown, Anthony; Mendis, Kumara

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background. Increased endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff pressure is associated with compromised tracheal mucosal perfusion and injuries. No published data are available for Australia on pressures in the fixed-wing air medical retrieval setting. Objective. After introduction of a cuff pressure manometer (Mallinckrodt, Hennef, Germany) at the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) Base in Dubbo, New South Wales (NSW), Australia, we assessed the prevalence of increased cuff pressures before, during, and after air medical retrieval. Methods. This was a retrospective audit in 35 ventilated patients during fixed-wing retrievals by the RFDS in NSW, Australia. Explicit chart review of ventilated patients was performed for cuff pressures and changes during medical retrievals with pressurized aircrafts. Pearson correlation was calculated to determine the relation of ascent and ETT cuff pressure change from ground to flight level. Results. The mean (± standard deviation) of the first ETT cuff pressure measurement on the ground was 44 ± 20 cmH2O. Prior to retrieval in 11 patients, the ETT cuff pressure was >30 cmH2O and in 11 patients >50 cmH2O. After ascent to cruising altitude, the cuff pressure was >30 cmH2O in 22 patients and >50 cmH2O in eight patients. The cuff pressure was reduced 1) in 72% of cases prior to take off and 2) in 85% of cases during flight, and 3) after landing, the cuff pressure increased in 85% of cases. The correlation between ascent in cabin altitude and ETT cuff pressure was r = 0.3901, p = 0.0205. Conclusions. The high prevalence of excessive cuff pressures during air medical retrieval can be avoided by the use of cuff pressure manometers. Key words: cuff pressure; air medical retrieval; prehospital. PMID:23252881

  2. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure before, during, and after fixed-wing air medical retrieval.

    PubMed

    Brendt, Peter; Schnekenburger, Marc; Paxton, Karen; Brown, Anthony; Mendis, Kumara

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background. Increased endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff pressure is associated with compromised tracheal mucosal perfusion and injuries. No published data are available for Australia on pressures in the fixed-wing air medical retrieval setting. Objective. After introduction of a cuff pressure manometer (Mallinckrodt, Hennef, Germany) at the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) Base in Dubbo, New South Wales (NSW), Australia, we assessed the prevalence of increased cuff pressures before, during, and after air medical retrieval. Methods. This was a retrospective audit in 35 ventilated patients during fixed-wing retrievals by the RFDS in NSW, Australia. Explicit chart review of ventilated patients was performed for cuff pressures and changes during medical retrievals with pressurized aircrafts. Pearson correlation was calculated to determine the relation of ascent and ETT cuff pressure change from ground to flight level. Results. The mean (± standard deviation) of the first ETT cuff pressure measurement on the ground was 44 ± 20 cmH2O. Prior to retrieval in 11 patients, the ETT cuff pressure was >30 cmH2O and in 11 patients >50 cmH2O. After ascent to cruising altitude, the cuff pressure was >30 cmH2O in 22 patients and >50 cmH2O in eight patients. The cuff pressure was reduced 1) in 72% of cases prior to take off and 2) in 85% of cases during flight, and 3) after landing, the cuff pressure increased in 85% of cases. The correlation between ascent in cabin altitude and ETT cuff pressure was r = 0.3901, p = 0.0205. Conclusions. The high prevalence of excessive cuff pressures during air medical retrieval can be avoided by the use of cuff pressure manometers. Key words: cuff pressure; air medical retrieval; prehospital.

  3. Dose-Response Evaluation of Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebert, Douglas; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Ham, David; Hamilton, Douglas; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Braslet-M is a set of special elasticized thigh cuffs used by the Russian space agency to reduce the effects of the head-ward fluid shift during early adaptation to microgravity by sequestering fluid in the lower extremities. Currently, no imaging modalities are used in the calibration of the device, and the pressure required to produce a predictable physiological response is unknown. This investigation intends to relate the pressure exerted by the cuffs to the extent of fluid redistribution and commensurate physiological effects. Materials and Methods: Ten healthy subjects with standardized fluid intake participated in the study. Data collection included femoral and internal jugular vein imaging in two orthogonal planes, pulsed Doppler of cervical and femoral vessels and middle cerebral artery, optic nerve imaging, and echocardiography. Braslet-M cuff pressure was monitored at the skin interface using pre-calibrated pressure sensors. Using 6 and 30 head-down tilt in two separate sessions, the effect of Braslet-M was assessed while incrementally tightening the cuffs. Cuffs were then simultaneously released to document the resulting hemodynamic change. Results: Preliminary analysis shows correlation between physical pressure exerted by the Braslet-M device and several parameters such as jugular and femoral vein cross-sections, resistivity of the lower extremity vascular bed, and others. A number of parameters reflect blood redistribution and will be used to determine the therapeutic range of the device and to prevent unsafe application. Conclusion: Braslet-M exerts a physical effect that can be measured and correlated with many changes in central and peripheral hemodynamics. Analysis of the full data set will be required to make definitive recommendations regarding the range of safe therapeutic application. Objective data and subjective responses suggest that a safer and equally effective use of Braslet can be achieved when compared with the current

  4. Tear metabolite changes in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Karamichos, D; Zieske, JD; Sejersen, H; Sarker-Nag, A; Asara, John M; Hjortdal, J

    2015-01-01

    While efforts have been made over the years, the exact cause of keratoconus (KC) remains unknown. The aim of this study was to identify alterations in endogenous metabolites in the tears of KC patients compared with age-matched healthy subjects. Three groups were tested: 1) Age-matched controls with no eye disease (N=15), 2) KC – patients wearing Rigid Gas permeable lenses (N=16), and 3) KC – No Correction (N=14). All samples were processed for metabolomics analysis using LC-MS/MS. We identified a total of 296 different metabolites of which >40 were significantly regulated between groups. Glycolysis and gluconeogenesis had significant changes, such as 3-phosphoglycerate and 1,3 diphopshateglycerate. As a result the citric acid cycle (TCA) was also affected with notable changes in Isocitrate, aconitate, malate, and acetylphosphate, up regulated in Group 2 and/or 3. Urea cycle was also affected, especially in Group 3 where ornithine and aspartate were up-regulated by at least 3 fold. The oxidation state was also severely affected. Groups 2 and 3 were under severe oxidative stress causing multiple metabolites to be regulated when compared to Group 1. Group 2 and 3, both showed significant down regulation in GSH-to-GSSG ratio when compared to Group 1. Another indicator of oxidative stress, the ratio of lactate – pyruvate was also affected with Groups 2 and 3 showing at least a 2-fold up regulation. Overall, our data indicate that levels of metabolites related to urea cycle, TCA cycle and oxidative stress are highly altered in KC patients. PMID:25579606

  5. A Profile of Glenohumeral Internal and External Rotation Motion in the Uninjured High School Baseball Pitcher, Part II: Strength

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Wendy J.; Kaplan, Kevin M.; ElAttrache, Neal S.; Jobe, Frank W.; Morrey, Bernard F.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: A database describing the range of normal rotator cuff strength values in uninjured high school pitchers has not been established. Chronologic factors that contribute to adaptations in strength also have not been established. Objectives: To establish a normative profile of rotator cuff strength in uninjured high school baseball pitchers and to determine whether bilateral differences in rotator cuff strength are normal findings in this age group. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Baseball playing field. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 165 uninjured male high school baseball pitchers (age = 16 ± 1 years, height = 1.8 ± 0.1 m, mass = 76.8 ± 10.1 kg, pitching experience = 7 ± 2 years). Main Outcome Measure(s): Isometric rotator cuff strength was measured bilaterally with a handheld dynamometer. We calculated side-to-side differences in strength (external rotation [ER], internal rotation [IR], and the ratio of ER:IR at 90° of abduction), differences in strength by age, and the influence of chronologic factors (participant age, years of pitching experience) on limb strength. Results: Side-to-side differences in strength were found for ER, IR, and ER:IR ratio at 90° of abduction. Age at the time of testing was a significant but weak predictor of both ER strength (R2 = 0.032, P = .02) and the ER:IR ratio (R2 = 0.051, P = .004) at 90° of abduction. Conclusions: We established a normative profile of rotator cuff strength for the uninjured high school baseball pitcher that might be used to assist clinicians and researchers in the interpretation of muscle strength performance in this population. These data further suggested that dominant-limb adaptations in rotator cuff strength are a normal finding in this age group and did not demonstrate that these adaptations were a consequence of the age at the time of testing or the number of years of pitching experience. PMID:21669099

  6. Gyrokinetic simulation of the tearing mode instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startsev, Edward; Wang, Weixing; Lee, Wei-Li

    2014-10-01

    A recently developed split-weight perturbative particle simulation scheme for finite- β plasmas in the presence of background inhomogeneities which analytically separates the additional adiabatic response of the particles associated with the quasi-static bending of the magnetic field lines has been generalized to the sheared magnetic field geometry. The new scheme has been implemented in a 2D particle-in-cell code in slab geometry with drift-kinetic electrons and gyrokinetic ions. The electrons pitch-scattering collision operator has also been implemented to study collisionless as well as collisional tearing, and drift-tearing instabilities. In this paper the results of linear simulations of tearing and drift-tearing modes for realistic mass ratio mi /me = 1837 and different values of plasma β, electron-ion collision frequency, density and temperature gradients are presented and compared to the solution of the eigenvalue equation. We will also present preliminary results of collisionless tearing mode simulations in cylindrical geometry using tokamak turbulence code GTS. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  7. Effect of plasma motion on tearing modes in cylindrical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J. Q.; Peng, X. D.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of equilibrium plasma motion on the resistive m/n = 2/1 tearing mode (TM) in low β plasmas is investigated in cylindrical geometry (with m and n being poloidal and toroidal mode numbers). Without equilibrium plasma motion but with viscosity, the TM stability is mainly determined by the Reynolds number S and reaches maximum near S = 104, which is consistent with previous findings. The poloidal plasma rotation has stabilizing effect on TM; however, the rotation shear has destabilization effect in the low viscosity regime. The axial plasma motion has strong stabilizing effect on TM in the low viscosity regime for Prandtl number Pr < 1, while its shear has slight stabilizing effect with the decrease of growth rate less than 15%. When the axial velocity becomes large enough, the mode frequency tends to be independent of the Prandtl number. In the presence of parallel plasma motion, the growth rate is determined by the axial component at low parallel velocity, while determined by poloidal component at large parallel velocity. The parallel plasma motion drives the TM rotating in the opposite direction. It is shown that the equilibrium motion reduces the growth rate of TM by changing the phase difference and coupling coefficient between potential perturbation and magnetic flux perturbation (deviating from π/2 ), which results in a lower mode frequency. Compared to the role of velocity shear, the magnitude of plasma velocity itself at the m/n = 2/1 rational surface is dominant in determining the TM characteristics.

  8. Slab tears and intermediate-depth seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meighan, Hallie E.; Ten Brink, Uri; Pulliam, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Active tectonic regions where plate boundaries transition from subduction to strike slip can take several forms, such as triple junctions, acute, and obtuse corners. Well-documented slab tears that are associated with high rates of intermediate-depth seismicity are considered here: Gibraltar arc, the southern and northern ends of the Lesser Antilles arc, and the northern end of Tonga trench. Seismicity at each of these locations occurs, at times, in the form of swarms or clusters, and various authors have proposed that each marks an active locus of tear propagation. The swarms and clusters start at the top of the slab below the asthenospheric wedge and extend 30–60 km vertically downward within the slab. We propose that these swarms and clusters are generated by fluid-related embrittlement of mantle rocks. Focal mechanisms of these swarms generally fit the shear motion that is thought to be associated with the tearing process.

  9. Presumed hyposecretory/hyperevaporative KCS: tear characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    McCulley, James P; Shine, Ward E; Aronowicz, Joel; Oral, Deniz; Vargas, Jose

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To characterize patients with ocular surface drying and a diagnosis of keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). METHODS: Patients with a prior diagnosis of KCS and symptoms of dryness or foreign-body sensation who also had vital staining of the interpalpebral fissure ocular surface in the absence of lid and ocular surface inflammation were entered into the study along with normal controls. Patients were segregated into those with "classic" KCS, who did not have concomitant meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD), and those with KCS and MGD. The latter had slit-lamp evidence of difficult-to-express or turbid meibomian secretions upon expression. Patients and normal controls were evaluated for tear volume, flow, and turnover using fluorophotometry; meibomian gland dropout by meibography; evaporation by evaporometry; and tear production by the Schirmer 1 test. RESULTS: All patients with KCS had decreased tear volume, flow, and Schirmer 1 values as well as increased meibomian gland dropout. None of the patient groups were found to have increased tear evaporation compared with normals or other disease subgroups. No correlation between degree of meibomian gland dropout and evaporation was found. The degree of total vital staining or presence of corneal staining correlated with a more severe aqueous deficiency. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with ocular surface drying in the absence of inflammation have decreased tear volume, flow, and Schirmer 1 values as well as increased meibomian gland dropout. The role of meibomian gland dropout or slit-lamp MGD in disease is unclear and in our study specifically did not correlate with increased tear evaporation. PMID:14971572

  10. Analysis of tear glucose concentration with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Christopher R; Baca, Justin T; Asher, Sanford A; Grabowski, Joseph J; Finegold, David N

    2007-02-01

    We have developed a mass spectrometry-based method that allows one to accurately determine the glucose concentration of tear fluid. We used a 1 microL micro-capillary to collect tear fluid from the tear meniscus with minimal irritation of the eye. We analyzed the 1 muL volume of collected tear fluid with liquid-chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with the use of D-glucose-6,6-d2 as an internal standard. Repeated measurements and a recovery experiment on pooled, onion-induced tears showed that the analysis of the glucose in tears was precise (4% relative standard deviation) and provided 100% recovery. We found the tear glucose concentration of one fasting nondiabetic subject to be 13 to 51 microM while the onion-induced tear glucose concentration of a different nondiabetic subject to be 211 to 256 microM. PMID:17084090

  11. Analysis of Tear Glucose Concentration with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Taormina, Christopher R.; Baca, Justin T.; Finegold, David N.; Asher, Sanford A.; Grabowski, Joseph J.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a mass spectrometry-based method which allows one to accurately determine the glucose concentration of tear fluid. We used a 1 μL micro-capillary to collect tear fluid from the tear meniscus with minimal irritation of the eye. We analyzed the 1 μL volume of collected tear fluid with liquid-chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with the use of D-glucose-6,6-d2 as an internal standard. Repeated measurements and a recovery experiment on pooled, onion-induced tears showed that the analysis of the glucose in tears was precise (4% relative standard deviation) and provided 100% recovery. We found the tear glucose concentration of one fasting non-diabetic subject to be 13 to 51 μM while the onion-induced tear glucose concentration of a different non-diabetic subject to be 211 to 256 μM. PMID:17084090

  12. Langmuir films study on lipid-containing artificial tears.

    PubMed

    Torrent-Burgués, J

    2016-04-01

    Lipid-containing artificial tears are a type of artificial tears that use lipid components in order to restore the lipid layer of the tear film. One of these components is lecithin which can be applied in spray solutions containing lecithin liposomes. In this work the behavior of three of these commercial tears based on lecithin, Innoxa, Opticalm and Optrex, are studied using the Langmuir technique. The obtained isotherms are presented, discussed and compared. This technique seems useful in order to see the film behavior of the lipid components of these tears and determine some important parameters such as fluidity and extension at the air-water interface, and allows us to discern differences between these commercial tears. Innoxa and Optrex tears are more similar to each other than to Opticalm tears. Opticalm presents more fluidity, probably due to the presence of more insaturations in the fatty acid chains of the phospholipids of the lecithin used in fabrication.

  13. Horizontal intra-articular patellar dislocation resulting in quadriceps avulsion and medial patellofemoral ligament tear: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Dennis E; Simoni, Michael K

    2013-07-01

    Intra-articular patellar dislocations are rare. We present a 13-year-old boy who sustained a complete horizontal intra-articular patellar dislocation following blunt trauma to the flexed knee. Closed reduction was unsuccessful and open reduction indicated a repairable quadriceps avulsion and medial patellofemoral ligament tear. He is the youngest patient to sustain a quadriceps rupture and the only patient to sustain a medial patellofemoral ligament tear to date. His flexed knee and the horizontally positioned patella (seen on lateral radiograph) were indicative of a complete rotational injury with extensor mechanism involvement. Open reduction allowed for the repair of both injuries and a favorable outcome.

  14. Tearing mode stabilization by electron cyclotron resonance heating demonstrated in the TEXTOR tokamak and the implication for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhof, E.; Lazaros, A.; Farshi, E.; de Baar, M. R.; de Bock, M. F. M.; Classen, I. G. J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Koslowski, H. R.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Liang, Y.; Lopes Cardozo, N. J.; Zimmermann, O.

    2007-02-01

    Controlled experiments on the suppression of the m/n = 2/1 tearing mode with electron cyclotron heating and current drive in TEXTOR are reported. The mode was produced reproducibly by an externally applied rotating perturbation field, allowing a systematic study of its suppression. Heating inside the island of the mode is shown to be the dominant suppression mechanism in these experiments. An extrapolation of these findings to ITER indicates that the projected system for suppression of the tearing mode could be significantly more effective than present estimates indicate, which only consider the effect of the current drive but not of the heating inside the island.

  15. Wearable PWV technologies to measure Blood Pressure: eliminating brachial cuffs.

    PubMed

    Solá, J; Proença, M; Chételat, O

    2013-01-01

    The clinical demand for technologies to monitor Blood Pressure (BP) in ambulatory scenarios with minimal use of inflation cuffs is strong: new generation of BP monitors are expected to be not only accurate, but also non-occlusive. In this paper we review recent advances on the use of the so-called Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) technologies to estimate BP in a beat-by-beat basis. After introducing the working principle and underlying methodological limitations, two implementation examples are provided. Pilot studies have demonstrated that novel PWV-based BP monitors depict accuracy scores falling within the limits of the British Hypertensive Society (BHS) Grade A standard. The reported techniques pave the way towards ambulatory-compliant, continuous and non-occlusive BP monitoring devices, where the use of inflation cuffs is drastically reduced. PMID:24110633

  16. 49 CFR 173.340 - Tear gas devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tear gas devices. 173.340 Section 173.340... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.340 Tear gas devices. (a) Packagings for tear gas devices must be approved prior to initial transportation by the Associate Administrator....

  17. 49 CFR 173.340 - Tear gas devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tear gas devices. 173.340 Section 173.340... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.340 Tear gas devices. (a) Packagings for tear gas devices must be approved prior to initial transportation by the Associate Administrator....

  18. 49 CFR 173.340 - Tear gas devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tear gas devices. 173.340 Section 173.340... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.340 Tear gas devices. (a) Packagings for tear gas devices must be approved prior to initial transportation by the Associate Administrator....

  19. 49 CFR 173.340 - Tear gas devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tear gas devices. 173.340 Section 173.340... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.340 Tear gas devices. (a) Packagings for tear gas devices must be approved prior to initial transportation by the Associate Administrator....

  20. Endoscopic Management of Gluteus Medius Tendon Tears.

    PubMed

    Thaunat, Mathieu; Noël, Eric; Nové-Josserand, Laurent; Murphy, Colin G; Sbiyaa, Mouhcine; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2016-03-01

    Tears in the gluteus medius and minimus tendons have been recognized as an important cause of recalcitrant greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Because of the frequency of partial-thickness undersurface tears, this relatively unknown pathology is often misdiagnosed and left untreated. Surgery is indicated in case of 4 associated conditions: (i) Failure of conservative treatment with duration of symptoms >6 months; (ii) magnetic resonance imaging showing a tendon tear; (iii) positive ultrasound-guided infiltration test; and (iv) the absence of an evolved fatty degeneration or atrophy of the gluteus medius and minimus muscle. Endoscopic repair of partial or full-thickness tears, with systematic resection of the bony structures implicated in the impingement, and a complete bursectomy appear to give satisfactory results, although these results remain to be confirmed by clinical studies with longer follow-up. The degree of tendon degeneration may compromise the tissue left for reattachment, raising concerns over its healing capacity, durability, and ultimate strength of the repair. PMID:26752773

  1. Labral tears in throwing and racquet sports.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J R; Kupferman, S P; Dillman, C J

    1991-10-01

    Throwing and overhead racquet motion is stressful activity that places great physical demands on the athlete's shoulder. This article focuses on glenoid labral tears as a consequence of this dynamic activity. These labral lesions may be present as an isolated entity or may be in association with glenohumeral instability.

  2. Tearing mode analysis in tokamaks, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Y.; Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    1997-12-01

    A new {Delta}{prime} shooting code has been developed to investigate tokamak plasma tearing mode stability in a cylinder and large aspect ratio ({epsilon} {le} 0.25) toroidal geometries, neglecting toroidal mode coupling. A different computational algorithm is used (shooting out from the singular surface instead of into it) to resolve the strong singularities at the mode rational surface, particularly in the presence of finite pressure term. Numerical results compare favorably with Furth et al. results. The effects of finite pressure, which are shown to decrease {Delta}{prime}, are discussed. It is shown that the distortion of the flux surfaces by the Shafranov shift, which modifies the geometry metric element stabilizes the tearing mode significantly, even in a low {beta} regime before the toroidal magnetic curvature effects come into play. Double tearing modes in toroidal geometries are examined as well. Furthermore, m {ge} 2 tearing mode stability criteria are compared with three dimensional initial value MHD simulation by the FAR code.

  3. Two cases of peroneus brevis tendon tear.

    PubMed

    Minoyama, O; Uchiyama, E; Iwaso, H; Hiranuma, K; Takeda, Y

    2002-02-01

    A longitudinal tear of the peroneal tendon is thought to be the result of repetitive peroneal subluxation. However, this report documents two cases of longitudinal split of the peroneus brevis tendon that had no peroneal tendon subluxation. Primary suture was performed. Subluxation of the peroneal tendons was not identified surgically in either case.

  4. A Controlled Study on the Correlation between Tear Film Volume and Tear Film Stability in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Iman M; Khalil, Noha M; El-Gendy, Heba A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the tear film quantity and correlate it with the quality and stability of the tear film in diabetics and compare them to age matched controls. Introduction. Diabetes affects tear film parameters in multiple ways. Poor metabolic control and neuropathy are postulated factors. To further understand how diabetes affects tear film parameters this study was conducted. Subjects and Methods. Tear meniscus height was measured by anterior segment OCT, along with tear thinning time, a subtype of noninvasive tear break-up time, and blinking rate per minute which were all recorded for 22 diabetic patients. Correlations between these tear film parameters were studied and then compared to 16 age matched controls. Results. A statistically significant difference was found in blinking rate between the diabetic and the control group (P = 0.002), with higher blinking rate among diabetics. All tear film parameters were negatively correlated with duration of diabetes. A positive