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Sample records for rotavirus vaccine live

  1. Reassortant rotaviruses as potential live rotavirus vaccine candidates.

    PubMed Central

    Midthun, K; Greenberg, H B; Hoshino, Y; Kapikian, A Z; Wyatt, R G; Chanock, R M

    1985-01-01

    A series of reassortants was isolated from coinfection of cell cultures with a wild-type animal rotavirus and a "noncultivatable" human rotavirus. Wild-type bovine rotavirus (UK strain) was reassorted with human rotavirus strains D, DS-1, and P; wild-type rhesus rotavirus was reassorted with human rotavirus strains D and DS-1. The D, DS-1, and P strains represent human rotavirus serotypes 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Monospecific antiserum (to bovine rotavirus, NCDV strain) or a set of monoclonal antibodies to the major outer capsid neutralization glycoprotein, VP7 (of the rhesus rotavirus), was used to select for reassortants with human rotavirus neutralization specificity. This selection technique yielded many reassortants which received only the gene segment coding for the major neutralization protein from the human rotavirus parent, whereas the remaining genes were derived from the animal rotavirus parent. Single human rotavirus gene substitution reassortants of this sort represent potential live vaccine strains. Images PMID:2983101

  2. Rotavirus Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Why get vaccinated?Rotavirus is a virus that causes diarrhea, mostly in babies and young children. The diarrhea can be severe, and lead ... and fever are also common in babies with rotavirus.Before rotavirus vaccine, rotavirus disease was a common ...

  3. Clinical efficacy of the RIT 4237 live attenuated bovine rotavirus vaccine in infants vaccinated before a rotavirus epidemic.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, T; Isolauri, E; Delem, A; d'Hondt, E; André, F E; Beards, G M; Flewett, T H

    1985-08-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 331 infants aged 6 to 12 months received orally, at an interval of 1 month, either two doses of live attenuated bovine rotavirus vaccine strain RIT 4237 or equivalent placebo. The vaccinations were carried out during September to November, a non-rotavirus season; only three cases of rotavirus diarrhea occurred in the study group before the vaccinations were completed. During the epidemic season from December to May, 31 patients with clinically significant rotavirus diarrhea required therapy. Five of these were among the 168 vaccine recipients, and 26 among the 160 placebo recipients (P less than 0.001), giving a vaccine protection rate of 82%. The incidence of clinically significant diarrhea from all causes was reduced by 76% in the vaccinees. As determined by an enzyme immunoassay antibody test with homologous virus antigen, seroconversion after vaccination was obtained in 53% of the initially seronegative infants. Clinical protection correlated well with seroconversion, but the vaccinees who failed to seroconvert also had less rotavirus diarrhea than the placebo recipients, suggesting that immunity may be mediated by factors other than serum EIA antibody. Seventeen of the 23 rotavirus isolates in the epidemic season that were typed were of serotype 1, two were of serotype 2, and four were of serotype 3. The protection rates against clinically significant diarrhea were 72%, 100%, and 100% for serotypes 1, 2, and 3, respectively. We conclude that epidemic infantile winter diarrhea associated with human rotaviruses can be significantly reduced by vaccination with the live attenuated RIT 4237 bovine rotavirus vaccine before the epidemic season.

  4. Rotavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G

    1998-01-01

    Encouraging results have been reported from several large trials of tetravalent rhesus rotavirus vaccine, with efficacy of 70-80% against severe disease. A recent Venezuelan study showed similar results to trials in USA and Europe. The vaccine may soon be licensed in USA. It provides the exciting prospect of a strategy to prevent one of the world's major child killers. Other candidate vaccines are under development including human-bovine reassortants, neonatal strains, non-replicating rotaviruses, vector vaccines and other genetically engineered products. Second and third generation rotavirus vaccines are on the horizon. The need for a rotavirus vaccine is well accepted by paediatricians, but public health authorities need to be lobbied. Other issues which need to be addressed include relative importance of non-group A rotaviruses, possible administration with OPV, the influence of breast feeding, and most importantly, cost. It is essential that rotavirus vaccine is somehow made available to all of the world's children, not just those in developed countries. PMID:9553287

  5. Rotavirus vaccines: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Midthun, K; Kapikian, A Z

    1996-01-01

    Rotavirus vaccine development has focused on the delivery of live attenuated rotavirus strains by the oral route. The initial "Jennerian" approach involving bovine (RIT4237, WC3) or rhesus (RRV) rotavirus vaccine candidates showed that these vaccines were safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic but induced highly variable rates of protection against rotavirus diarrhea. The goal of a rotavirus vaccine is to prevent severe illness that can lead to dehydration in infants and young children in both developed and developing countries. These studies led to the concept that a multivalent vaccine that represented each of the four epidemiologically important VP7 serotypes might be necessary to induce protection in young infants, the target population for vaccination. Human-animal rotavirus reassortants whose gene encoding VP7 was derived from their human rotavirus parent but whose remaining genes were derived from the animal rotavirus parent were developed as vaccine candidates. The greatest experience with a multivalent vaccine to date has been gained with the quadrivalent preparation containing RRV (VP7 serotype 3) and human-RRV reassortants of VP7 serotype 1, 2, and 4 specificity. Preliminary efficacy trial results in the United States have been promising, whereas a study in Peru has shown only limited protection. Human-bovine reassortant vaccines, including a candidate that contains the VP4 gene of a human rotavirus (VP4 serotype 1A), are also being studied. PMID:8809469

  6. Transplacental rotavirus IgG interferes with immune response to live oral rotavirus vaccine ORV-116E in Indian infants.

    PubMed

    Appaiahgari, Mohan Babu; Glass, Roger; Singh, Shakti; Taneja, Sunita; Rongsen-Chandola, Temsunaro; Bhandari, Nita; Mishra, Sukhdev; Vrati, Sudhanshu

    2014-02-01

    The lower immune response and efficacy of live oral rotavirus (RV) vaccines tested in developing countries may be due in part to high levels of pre-existing RV antibodies transferred to the infant from mother via the placenta. The candidate RV vaccine strain 116E was isolated from a newborn indicating that it might grow well even in the presence of this transplacental rotavirus antibody. Since the immune response to this vaccine among infants in the Indian subcontinent has been greater than that of the commercially licensed vaccines, we questioned whether this might be due to the ability of RV 116E to grow well in infants despite the presence of maternal RV antibody. To this end, we tested pre-immunization sera from Indian infants enrolled in a phase Ia/IIb trial of candidate RV vaccine ORV-116E for transplacental RV IgG to see whether it affected the immune responses and seroconversion to the vaccine. We found that the high titers of transplacental RV IgG diminished the immune responses of infants to ORV-116E vaccine. However, the vaccine was able to overcome the inhibitory effect of this RV IgG in a dose-dependent manner. This report clearly demonstrates the interference of maternal antibody on RV vaccine immunogenicity in infants in a field study as well as the ability of ORV-116E to overcome this interference when used at a higher dose.

  7. Stability of live attenuated rotavirus vaccine with selected preservatives and primary containers.

    PubMed

    Lal, Manjari; Jarrahian, Courtney; Zhu, Changcheng; Hosken, Nancy A; McClurkan, Chris L; Koelle, David M; Saxon, Eugene; Roehrig, Andrew; Zehrung, Darin; Chen, Dexiang

    2016-05-11

    Rotavirus infection, which can be prevented by vaccination, is responsible for a high burden of acute gastroenteritis disease in children, especially in low-income countries. An appropriate formulation, packaging, and delivery device for oral rotavirus vaccine has the potential to reduce the manufacturing cost of the vaccine and the logistical impact associated with introduction of a new vaccine, simplify the vaccination procedure, and ensure that the vaccine is safely and accurately delivered to children. Single-dose prefilled presentations can be easy to use; however, they are typically more expensive, can be a bottleneck during production, and occupy a greater volume per dose vis-à-vis supply chain storage and medical waste disposal, which is a challenge in low-resource settings. Multi-dose presentations used thus far have other issues, including increased wastage of vaccine and the need for separate delivery devices. In this study, the goals were to evaluate both the technical feasibility of using preservatives to develop a liquid multi-dose formulation and the primary packaging alternatives for orally delivered, liquid rotavirus vaccines. The feasibility evaluation included evaluation of commonly used preservatives for compatibility with rotavirus vaccines and stability testing of rotavirus vaccine in various primary containers, including Lameplast's plastic tubes, BD's oral dispenser version of Uniject™ (Uniject DP), rommelag's blow-fill-seal containers, and MEDInstill's multi-dose vial and pouch. These presentations were compared to a standard glass vial. The results showed that none of the preservatives tested were compatible with a live attenuated rotavirus vaccine because they had a detrimental effect on the viability of the virus. In the presence of preservatives, vaccine virus titers declined to undetectable levels within 1 month. The vaccine formulation without preservatives maintained a stability profile over 12 months in all primary containers

  8. Rotavirus vaccination: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, T

    2012-10-01

    Live attenuated oral rotavirus vaccines were tested for proof-of-concept in the early 1980s, the first vaccine (RotaShield, Wyeth) was introduced in 1998 but was subsequently withdrawn because of association with intussusception, and the two currently licensed vaccine (Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline, and RotaTeq, Merck) were introduced in 2006. Before licensure both vaccines were extensively tested for safety (for intussusception) and efficacy in trials comprising in over 60,000 infants each. Rotarix is a single-strain human rotavirus vaccine (RV1) and RotaTeq is a combination of five bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses (RV5). Although the composition of the two vaccines is different, their field effectiveness and, largely, mechanism of action are similar. Both prevent effectively severe rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) but are less efficacious against mild RVGE or rotavirus infection. Field effectiveness of these vaccines in Europe and the USA against severe RVGE has been above 90% and in Latin America around 80%. Trials in Africa have yielded efficacy rates between 50 and 80%. Rotavirus vaccination has been introduced into the national immunization programmes of about 20 countries in Latin America, with Brazil and Mexico as leading countries, as well as in the USA, Australia and South Africa. Introduction into other African countries will start in 2012. In Europe, Belgium, Luxembourg, Austria and Finland and five federal states of Germany have introduced universal rotavirus vaccination. The reasons for the slow progress in Europe include low mortality from RVGE, unfavourable cost-benefit calculations in some countries, and concerns that still exist over intussusception.

  9. Effect of withholding breastfeeding on the immune response to a live oral rotavirus vaccine in North Indian infants.

    PubMed

    Rongsen-Chandola, Temsunaro; Strand, Tor A; Goyal, Nidhi; Flem, Elmira; Rathore, Sudeep Singh; Arya, Alok; Winje, Brita Askeland; Lazarus, Robin; Shanmugasundaram, Elango; Babji, Sudhir; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Vainio, Kirsti; Kang, Gagandeep; Bhandari, Nita

    2014-08-11

    Interference from transplacental and breast milk antibodies may impede the performance of oral live vaccines. The effect of breastfeeding on the immunogenicity of Rotarix, a two-dose oral monovalent rotavirus vaccine, was examined in a community-based trial in New Delhi, India. Four hundred mother-infant pairs were randomized into two equal groups. Infants were aged 6-7 weeks at enrollment. Mothers were encouraged to either breastfeed or to withhold breastfeeding during the 30 min prior to and after each vaccine dose was administered. We collected blood specimens from infants at enrollment and 4 weeks after the second vaccine dose. Blood and breast milk specimens were obtained from mothers at baseline and breast milk specimens were collected at the time of the second vaccine dose. Seroconversion was defined as infant serum anti-VP6 IgA antibody level of ≥20 IU/mL 4 weeks after the second vaccine dose and a ≥4-fold rise from baseline. There was no difference in the proportion who seroconverted between the two groups (26% vs 27%; p=0.92). The levels of infant serum IgA, maternal serum and breast milk IgA and IgG anti-rotavirus antibodies predicted the anti-rotavirus IgA level in infants at end-study and explained approximately 10% of the variability of the immune response (r(2)=0.10, p<0.001). In this population, the immune response to Rotarix was not enhanced by withholding breastfeeding around the time of vaccination. Maternal anti-rotavirus antibodies explained little of the variability in the immune response to the vaccine. Factors other than maternal anti-rotavirus antibodies probably explain why infants in low-and middle-income settings respond poorly to live oral rotavirus vaccines.

  10. Rotavirus Vaccine -- Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... to these vaccines. The infant's immune response to influenza vaccine administered at the same time as rotavirus vaccine ... previously that an inactivated vaccine (e.g., inactivated influenza vaccine) may be administered either simultaneously or at any ...

  11. Rotavirus vaccines in routine use.

    PubMed

    Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D

    2014-11-01

    Vaccines are now available to combat rotavirus, the most common cause of severe diarrhea among children worldwide. We review clinical trial data for available rotavirus vaccines and summarize postlicensure data on effectiveness, impact, and safety from countries routinely using these vaccines in national programs. In these countries, rotavirus vaccines have reduced all-cause diarrhea and rotavirus hospitalizations by 17%-55% and 49%-92%, respectively, and all-cause diarrhea deaths by 22%-50% in some settings. Indirect protection of children who are age-ineligible for rotavirus vaccine has also been observed in some high and upper middle income countries. Experience with routine use of rotavirus vaccines in lower middle income countries has been limited to date, but vaccine introductions in such countries have been increasing in recent years. The risk-benefit analysis of rotavirus vaccines is extremely favorable but other strategies to improve the effectiveness of the vaccine, particularly in lower middle income settings, should be considered.

  12. Prospects for development of a rotavirus vaccine against rotavirus diarrhea in infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Kapikian, A Z; Flores, J; Hoshino, Y; Midthun, K; Gorziglia, M; Green, K Y; Chanock, R M; Potash, L; Sears, S D; Clements, M L

    1989-01-01

    Major advances have been made in elucidating the etiologic agents of severe infantile diarrhea, and it is clear that rotaviruses are the single most important etiologic agents. Progress in the development of rotavirus vaccine candidates has also moved swiftly with the "Jennerian" approach, in which a related live, attenuated rotavirus strain from a nonhuman host is used as the immunizing antigen. If this strategy is not effective against all rotavirus serotypes, reassortant rotaviruses hold great promise for the development of a multivalent vaccine. Field trials with the "Jennerian" approach vaccines are under way, and phase 1 trials with the reassortants have been initiated.

  13. New approaches in oral rotavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kuate Defo, Zenas; Lee, Byong

    2016-05-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe dehydrating diarrhea worldwide, and affects primarily developing nations, in large part because of the inaccessibility of vaccines and high rates of mortality present therein. At present, there exist two oral rotaviral vaccines, Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™. These vaccines are generally effective in their actions: however, associated costs often stymie their effectiveness, and they continue to be associated with a slight risk of intussusception. While different programs are being implemented worldwide to enhance vaccine distribution and monitor vaccine administration for possible intussusception in light of recent WHO recommendation, another major problem persists: that of the reduced efficacy of the existing rotaviral vaccines in developing countries over time. The development of new oral rotavirus vaccine classes - live-attenuated vaccines, virus-like particles, lactic acid bacteria-containing vaccines, combination therapy with immunoglobulins, and biodegradable polymer-encapsulated vaccines - could potentially circumvent these problems.

  14. Rotavirus vaccines: targeting the developing world.

    PubMed

    Glass, Roger I; Bresee, Joseph S; Turcios, Reina; Fischer, Thea K; Parashar, Umesh D; Steele, A Duncan

    2005-09-01

    For the past 2 decades, rotavirus infection, the most common cause of severe diarrhea in children, has been a priority target for vaccine development. This decision to develop rotavirus vaccines is predicated on the great burden associated with fatal rotavirus disease (i.e., 440,000 deaths/year), the firm scientific basis for developing live oral vaccines, the belief that increased investment in development at this time could speed the introduction of vaccines in developing countries, and the appreciation that implementation of a vaccine program should result in a measurable decrease in the number of hospitalizations and deaths associated with rotavirus disease within 2-3 years. RotaShield (Wyeth-Ayerst), the first rotavirus vaccine licensed in the United States, was withdrawn after 9 months because of a rare association of the vaccine with the development of intussusception. In the developing world, this vaccine could still have had a measurable effect, because the benefits of preventing deaths due to rotavirus disease would have been substantially greater than the rare risk of intussusception. Two live oral vaccines being prepared by GlaxoSmithKline and Merck have completed large-scale clinical trials. The GlaxoSmithKline vaccine has been licensed in Mexico and the Dominican Republic, and the Merck vaccine could be licensed in the United States within 1 year; several other candidate vaccines are in earlier stages of testing. However, many challenges remain before any of these vaccines can be incorporated into childhood immunization programs in the developing world. First, vaccine efficacy, which has already been demonstrated in children in industrialized and middle-income countries, needs to be proven in poor developing countries in Africa and Asia. The safety of vaccines with regard to the associated risk of intussusception must be demonstrated as well. Novel financing strategies will be needed to ensure that new vaccines are affordable and available in the

  15. Rotavirus vaccines: viral shedding and risk of transmission.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Evan J

    2008-10-01

    Rotavirus causes gastroenteritis in almost all children by 5 years of age. Immunity to rotavirus is incomplete, with potential for recurrent infections occurring throughout life. Live rotavirus vaccines have been developed for the protection of children from severe wildtype rotavirus infections. Transmission of vaccine virus strains from vaccinated children to unvaccinated contacts harbours the potential for herd immunity, but also the risk of vaccine-derived disease in immunocompromised contacts. A review of rotavirus vaccine prelicensure studies shows that viral shedding and transmission were higher with the old tetravalent rhesus rotavirus vaccine than with the current human attenuated monovalent rotavirus vaccine and the pentavalent bovine-human reassortant vaccine. Immunocompromised contacts should be advised to avoid contact with stool from the immunised child if possible, particularly after the first vaccine dose for at least 14 days. Since the risk of vaccine transmission and subsequent vaccine-derived disease with the current vaccines is much less than the risk of wildtype rotavirus disease in immunocompromised contacts, vaccination should be encouraged.

  16. WHO informal consultation on quality, safety and efficacy specifications for live attenuated rotavirus vaccines Mexico City, Mexico, 8-9 February 2005.

    PubMed

    Wood, David

    2005-12-01

    Rotavirus vaccines are at an advanced stage of development but there are as yet no WHO recommendations on production and quality control to provide regulatory guidance. A meeting of experts was convened by WHO and PAHO/AMRO to review the scientific basis for production and quality control of rotavirus vaccines, and to discuss specific measures to assure the safety and efficacy of rotavirus vaccines. The meeting was attended by 25 experts from 14 countries, drawn from academia, public health, national regulatory authorities and vaccine producers. It was agreed that existing guidance for other live virus vaccines provides a very good basis for product characterization, especially for source materials and control of production. The basis for attenuation of current vaccines or vaccine candidates is not known but, at least for the vaccines based on the Jennerian approach of using animal (bovine) rotaviruses, is likely to be multigenic. The risk of intussusception in humans is influenced by genetic background and age. Recent analyzes of large vaccine safety trials found that certain strains of vaccine virus were not associated with intussusception, although in these trials the first dose of vaccine was not administered to children over 3 months of age. Since age is a risk factor for intussusception, this may suggest that early delivery of the first dose of vaccine is desirable. However, maternal antibodies may mitigate against early delivery of the first vaccine dose. Factors which could affect vaccine efficacy or safety include strain diversity, malnutrition, other enteric infections, parasitic infection or immune suppression. It was concluded that data from clinical trials conducted in one part of the world would not necessarily be predictive of vaccine efficacy in other places. It was agreed that in nonclinical evaluations there was a need to use oral dosing for toxicity studies and, because rotavirus is non-neurovirulent, that there was no need for an animal

  17. Influence of oral polio vaccines on performance of the monovalent and pentavalent rotavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manish; Steele, A Duncan; Parashar, Umesh D

    2012-04-27

    In recent years, two live, oral rotavirus vaccines have been successfully tested in developing and industrialized countries, and both vaccines are now recommended by the World Health Organization for all children worldwide. Both immunogenicity and efficacy of these rotavirus vaccines has been lower in developing compared to industrialized settings. We reviewed the data on the effect of trivalent OPV on the immunogenicity and efficacy of two rotavirus vaccines currently recommended by the WHO. While rotavirus vaccines have not affected immune responses to OPV, in general, the immune responses (i.e., antibody levels) to rotavirus vaccination were lower when rotavirus vaccines were co-administered with OPV. Limited data suggests that the interference is greater after the first dose of OPV, presumably because the first dose is associated with greatest intestinal replication of vaccine polio virus strains, and this interference is largely overcome with subsequent rotavirus vaccine doses. Despite the lower immunogenicity, one large efficacy study in middle income Latin American countries showed no decrease in protective efficacy of rotavirus vaccine in infants receiving concurrent OPV. While these data are encouraging and support simultaneous administration of rotavirus vaccines and OPV, additional evidence should be gathered as rotavirus vaccines are used more widely in developing country settings, where OPV is routinely used, rather than inactivated polio vaccine.

  18. Withdrawal of rotavirus vaccine recommendation.

    PubMed

    1999-11-01

    In July 1999, CDC recommended that health-care providers and parents postpone use of the rhesus rotavirus vaccine-tetravalent (RRV-TV) (RotaShield, Wyeth Laboratories, Inc., Marietta, Pennsylvania), for infants, at least until November 1999. This action was based on reports to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System of intussusception (a type of bowel obstruction that occurs when the bowel folds in on itself) among 15 infants who received rotavirus vaccine. Also at that time, the manufacturer, in consultation with the Food and Drug Administration, voluntarily ceased further distribution of the vaccine.

  19. Mice develop effective but delayed protective immune responses when immunized as neonates either intranasally with nonliving VP6/LT(R192G) or orally with live rhesus rotavirus vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    VanCott, John L; Prada, Anne E; McNeal, Monica M; Stone, Susan C; Basu, Mitali; Huffer, Bert; Smiley, Kristi L; Shao, Mingyuan; Bean, Judy A; Clements, John D; Choi, Anthony H-C; Ward, Richard L

    2006-05-01

    Rotavirus vaccines are delivered early in life, when the immune system is immature. To determine the effects of immaturity on responses to candidate vaccines, neonatal (7 days old) and adult mice were immunized with single doses of either Escherichia coli-expressed rotavirus VP6 protein and the adjuvant LT(R192G) or live rhesus rotavirus (RRV), and protection against fecal rotavirus shedding following challenge with the murine rotavirus strain EDIM was determined. Neonatal mice immunized intranasally with VP6/LT(R192G) were unprotected at 10 days postimmunization (dpi) and had no detectable rotavirus B-cell (antibody) or CD4(+) CD8(+) T-cell (rotavirus-inducible, Th1 [gamma interferon and interleukin-2 {IL-2}]-, Th2 [IL-5 and IL-4]-, or ThIL-17 [IL-17]-producing spleen cells) responses. However, by 28 and 42 dpi, these mice were significantly (P >or= 0.003) protected and contained memory rotavirus-specific T cells but produced no rotavirus antibody. In contrast, adult mice were nearly fully protected by 10 dpi and contained both rotavirus immunoglobulin G and memory T cells. Neonates immunized orally with RRV were also less protected (P=0.01) than adult mice by 10 dpi and produced correspondingly less rotavirus antibody. Both groups contained few rotavirus-specific memory T cells. Protection levels by 28 dpi for neonates or adults were equal, as were rotavirus antibody levels. This report introduces a neonatal mouse model for active protection studies with rotavirus vaccines. It indicates that, with time, neonatal mice develop full protection after intranasal immunization with VP6/LT(R192G) or oral immunization with a live heterologous rotavirus and supports reports that protection depends on CD4(+) T cells or antibody, respectively. PMID:16641286

  20. Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Esona, Mathew D; Gautam, Rashi

    2015-06-01

    Group A rotavirus (RVA) is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. Introduction of two live, attenuated rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix® and RotaTeq®, has dramatically reduced RVA-associated AGE and mortality. High-throughput, sensitive and specific techniques are required to rapidly diagnose and characterize rotavirus strains in stool samples for proper patient treatment and to monitor circulating vaccine and wild-type rotavirus strains. New molecular assays are rapidly developed that are more sensitive and specific than the conventional assays for detection, genotyping and full genome characterization of circulating rotavirus wild-type and vaccine (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) strains causing AGE.

  1. A reverse evidence of rotavirus vaccines impact

    PubMed Central

    Martinón-Torres, Federico; Aramburo, Angela; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Cebey, Miriam; Seoane-Pillado, María Teresa; Redondo-Collazo, Lorenzo; Martinón-Sánchez, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, and due to a quality problem identified in the vaccine manufacture, the rotavirus (RV) vaccination was withheld in Spain during 5 months. Our study aimed to evaluate the impact that this sudden cease had on rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (RAGE) hospitalizations. An increase in RAGE hospitalization was observed in parallel to the drop in vaccine coverage. Here, we report the first reverse evidence of rotavirus vaccine impact. PMID:23836258

  2. Rhesus Rotavirus candidate vaccine. Clinical trial in children vaccinated between 2 and 5 months of age.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, T; Rautanen, T; Varis, T; Beards, G M; Kapikian, A Z

    1990-03-01

    Live attenuated oral rhesus Rotavirus candidate vaccine (strain MMU 18006 [lot RRV-1]) was evaluated for immunogenicity, safety, and clinical protection in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 200 infants aged 2 to 5 months when vaccinated. Vaccine-induced fourfold or greater rise of Rotavirus antibodies was seen in 62% of the infants. Febrile reactions of short duration on days 3 and/or 4 after vaccination occurred in 26% of the vaccine recipients. The clinical follow-up covered two Rotavirus seasons, in which serotypes 1 and 4 were prevalent. There were 16 cases of confirmed Rotavirus diarrhea in the placebo-treated group and 10 in the vaccine-treated group; from this a vaccine protection rate of 38% was derived. Clinical severity of Rotavirus diarrhea was assessed by a score; 13 cases in the placebo-treated group and 5 in the vaccine-treated group were regarded as severe or moderately severe, giving a vaccine protection rate of 67%. The rhesus Rotavirus vaccine induces partial protection against heterotypic Rotavirus disease, but the level of protection achieved with the present vaccine dose in this age group appears to be insufficient for a general Rotavirus vaccination.

  3. Rotavirus infections and vaccines: burden of illness and potential impact of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Grimwood, Keith; Lambert, Stephen B; Milne, Richard J

    2010-08-01

    Rotaviruses are the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in children. By 5 years of age virtually every child worldwide will have experienced at least one rotavirus infection. This leads to an enormous disease burden, where every minute a child dies because of rotavirus infection and another four are hospitalized, at an annual societal cost in 2007 of $US2 billion. Most of the annual 527 000 deaths are in malnourished infants living in rural regions of low and middle income countries. In contrast, most measurable costs arise from medical expenses and lost parental wages in high income countries. Vaccines are the only public health prevention strategy likely to control rotavirus disease. They were developed to mimic the immunity following natural rotavirus infection that confers protection against severe gastroenteritis and consequently reduces the risk of primary healthcare utilization, hospitalization and death. The two currently licensed vaccines--one a single human strain rotavirus vaccine, the other a multiple strain human-bovine pentavalent reassortant rotavirus vaccine--are administered to infants in a two- or three-dose course, respectively, with the first dose given at 6-14 weeks of age. In various settings they are safe, immunogenic and efficacious against many different rotavirus genotypes. In high and middle income countries, rotavirus vaccines confer 85-100% protection against severe disease, while in low income regions of Africa and Asia, protection is less, at 46-77%. Despite this reduced efficacy in low income countries, the high burden of diarrheal disease in these regions means that proportionately more severe cases are prevented by vaccination than elsewhere. Post-licensure effectiveness studies show that rotavirus vaccines not only reduce rotavirus activity in infancy but they also decrease rates of rotavirus diarrhea in older and unimmunized children. A successful rotavirus vaccination program will rely upon sustained vaccine efficacy

  4. Economic Impact of a Rotavirus Vaccine in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Constenla, Dagna O.; Linhares, Alexandre C.; Rheingans, Richard D.; Antil, Lynn R.; Waldman, Eliseu A.; da Silva, Luiz J.

    2008-01-01

    The study was done to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a national rotavirus vaccination programme in Brazilian children from the healthcare system perspective. A hypothetical annual birth-cohort was followed for a five-year period. Published and national administrative data were incorporated into a model to quantify the consequences of vaccination versus no vaccination. Main outcome measures included the reduction in disease burden, lives saved, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted. A rotavirus vaccination programme in Brazil would prevent an estimated 1,804 deaths associated with gastroenteritis due to rotavirus, 91,127 hospitalizations, and 550,198 outpatient visits. Vaccination is likely to reduce 76% of the overall healthcare burden of rotavirus-associated gastroenteritis in Brazil. At a vaccine price of US$ 7-8 per dose, the cost-effectiveness ratio would be US$ 643 per DALY averted. Rotavirus vaccination can reduce the burden of gastroenteritis due to rotavirus at a reasonable cost-effectiveness ratio. PMID:19069617

  5. Rotavirus vaccination in central Europe.

    PubMed

    Mészner, Zsófia; Anca, Ioana; André, Francis; Chlibek, Roman; Čižman, Milan; Grzesiowski, Paweł; Mangarov, Atanas; Pokorn, Marko; Prymula, Roman; Richter, Darko; Salman, Nuran; Šimurka, Pavol; Tamm, Eda; Tešović, Goran; Urbancikova, Ingrid; Usonis, Vytautas; Zavadska, Dace

    2013-06-01

    Each year, rotavirus (RV) infection is the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis requiring hospitalisation and of nosocomially transmitted diseases in children younger than 5 years across Central European Vaccination Awareness Group (CEVAG) countries; however, inadequate surveillance systems and lack of routine RV testing still exist in most CEVAG countries, making it difficult to accurately assess the present burden of acute RV gastroenteritis in the younger population. Furthermore, routine immunisation of infants with RV vaccines has not been implemented, and no official and uniform recommendations exist in most of the countries in these territories. The present study provides CEVAG country-specific estimates of the disease burden of RV gastroenteritis among the youngest population and presents evidence-based advice on the use of RV vaccines in the region, while providing a framework for vaccination at the national level.

  6. Impact of rotavirus vaccination on hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea: the IVANHOE study.

    PubMed

    Gagneur, Arnaud; Nowak, Emmanuel; Lemaitre, Thomas; Segura, Jean-Francois; Delaperrière, Nadège; Abalea, Lydie; Poulhazan, Elise; Jossens, Anne; Auzanneau, Lucie; Tran, Adissa; Payan, Christopher; Jay, Nadine; de Parscau, Loic; Oger, Emmanuel

    2011-05-12

    The aim of the IVANHOE study was to determine the real-world impact of the rotavirus vaccine, controlling for epidemic-to-epidemic variation in disease burden. A population-based prospective cohort study was conducted in Brest City and 7 suburban districts (CUB area), North-western Brittany, France (210,000 inhabitants; 5500 births per year). The vaccination program started in May 2007 for a 2-year period for all infants born in the Brest birth zone through pediatricians, public outpatient clinics and general practitioners. To determine vaccine impact we monitored trends in hospitalizations for rotavirus-specific diarrhea using an active hospital-based surveillance system initiated 5 years before vaccine introduction. The number of hospitalizations for rotavirus-specific diarrhea during the 2008/2009 epidemic in infants less than 2 years of age whose parents lived within the CUB area was modelled as a function of (1) the number of hospitalizations in infants 2-5 years of age to control for epidemic-to-epidemic variation and (2) vaccine introduction. A total of 4684 infants received at least one dose. Of these, 2635 lived within the CUB area. Vaccine coverage for a complete schedule in the CUB area was 47.1%. Poisson modelling revealed a reduction by a factor of 2.04 (1.56-2.66) in the number of hospitalizations during the last epidemic season (2008/2009), the number of observed cases being equal to 30, against an expected number of 61. Relative risk reduction for hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea was 98% (95% CI: 83-100%). We observed a noticeable impact of vaccination on rotavirus diarrhea hospitalizations within 2 years of vaccine introduction integrating for the first time rotavirus epidemics variation. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number, NCT00740935. PMID:21443962

  7. Impact of rotavirus vaccination on hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea: the IVANHOE study.

    PubMed

    Gagneur, Arnaud; Nowak, Emmanuel; Lemaitre, Thomas; Segura, Jean-Francois; Delaperrière, Nadège; Abalea, Lydie; Poulhazan, Elise; Jossens, Anne; Auzanneau, Lucie; Tran, Adissa; Payan, Christopher; Jay, Nadine; de Parscau, Loic; Oger, Emmanuel

    2011-05-12

    The aim of the IVANHOE study was to determine the real-world impact of the rotavirus vaccine, controlling for epidemic-to-epidemic variation in disease burden. A population-based prospective cohort study was conducted in Brest City and 7 suburban districts (CUB area), North-western Brittany, France (210,000 inhabitants; 5500 births per year). The vaccination program started in May 2007 for a 2-year period for all infants born in the Brest birth zone through pediatricians, public outpatient clinics and general practitioners. To determine vaccine impact we monitored trends in hospitalizations for rotavirus-specific diarrhea using an active hospital-based surveillance system initiated 5 years before vaccine introduction. The number of hospitalizations for rotavirus-specific diarrhea during the 2008/2009 epidemic in infants less than 2 years of age whose parents lived within the CUB area was modelled as a function of (1) the number of hospitalizations in infants 2-5 years of age to control for epidemic-to-epidemic variation and (2) vaccine introduction. A total of 4684 infants received at least one dose. Of these, 2635 lived within the CUB area. Vaccine coverage for a complete schedule in the CUB area was 47.1%. Poisson modelling revealed a reduction by a factor of 2.04 (1.56-2.66) in the number of hospitalizations during the last epidemic season (2008/2009), the number of observed cases being equal to 30, against an expected number of 61. Relative risk reduction for hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea was 98% (95% CI: 83-100%). We observed a noticeable impact of vaccination on rotavirus diarrhea hospitalizations within 2 years of vaccine introduction integrating for the first time rotavirus epidemics variation. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number, NCT00740935.

  8. Rotavirus vaccination in Central American children.

    PubMed

    Ulloa-Gutierrez, Rolando; Avila-Aguero, María L

    2014-06-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of acute diarrhea in children younger than five years of age around the world. Severe dehydration and mortality rates are higher in developing countries, especially those from Latin America, Africa, and Asia. The vaccine has been introduced in the national immunization programs of more than half of Latin American countries, and impact data from some of these nations has been already published. The two rotavirus vaccines, the 2-dose monovalent (RV-1) and the 3-dose pentavalent (RV-5) vaccine, have been available in the market to all Central American countries. Rotavirus vaccine has been universally introduced in the expanded immunization national programs of Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Panama, but not in Belize and Costa Rica. This review summarizes what has been published about the epidemiology and impact of universal rotavirus vaccination in Central America.

  9. Patterns of Rotavirus Vaccine Uptake and Use in Privately-Insured US Infants, 2006–2010

    PubMed Central

    Panozzo, Catherine A.; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Pate, Virginia; Jonsson Funk, Michele; Stürmer, Til; Weber, David J.; Brookhart, M. Alan

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus vaccines are highly effective at preventing gastroenteritis in young children and are now universally recommended for infants in the US. We studied patterns of use of rotavirus vaccines among US infants with commercial insurance. We identified a large cohort of infants in the MarketScan Research Databases, 2006–2010. The analysis was restricted to infants residing in states without state-funded rotavirus vaccination programs. We computed summary statistics and used multivariable regression to assess the association between patient-, provider-, and ecologic-level variables of rotavirus vaccine receipt and series completion. Approximately 69% of 594,117 eligible infants received at least one dose of rotavirus vaccine from 2006–2010. Most infants received the rotavirus vaccines at the recommended ages, but more infants completed the series for monovalent rotavirus vaccine than pentavalent rotavirus vaccine or a mix of the vaccines (87% versus 79% versus 73%, P<0.001). In multivariable analyses, the strongest predictors of rotavirus vaccine series initiation and completion were receipt of the diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis vaccine (Initiation: RR = 7.91, 95% CI = 7.69–8.13; Completion: RR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.23–1.29), visiting a pediatrician versus family physician (Initiation: RR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.49–1.52; Completion: RR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.11–1.14), and living in a large metropolitan versus smaller metropolitan, urban, or rural area. We observed rapid diffusion of the rotavirus vaccine in routine practice; however, approximately one-fifth of infants did not receive at least one dose of vaccine as recently as 2010. Interventions to increase rotavirus vaccine coverage should consider targeting family physicians and encouraging completion of the vaccine series. PMID:24066076

  10. Rotavirus vaccine - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by other germs. Another virus called porcine circovirus (or parts of it) can be found in ... get rotavirus vaccine. Babies who have had a type of bowel blockage called "intussusception" should not get ...

  11. Bovine rotavirus pentavalent vaccine development in India.

    PubMed

    Zade, Jagdish K; Kulkarni, Prasad S; Desai, Sajjad A; Sabale, Rajendra N; Naik, Sameer P; Dhere, Rajeev M

    2014-08-11

    A bovine rotavirus pentavalent vaccine (BRV-PV) containing rotavirus human-bovine (UK) reassortant strains of serotype G1, G2, G3, G4 and G9 has been developed by the Serum Institute of India Ltd, in collaboration with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), USA. The vaccine underwent animal toxicity studies and Phase I and II studies in adults, toddlers and infants. It has been found safe and immunogenic and will undergo a large Phase III study to assess efficacy against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis.

  12. Measuring indirect effects of rotavirus vaccine in low income countries.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Aisleen; Bar-Zeev, Naor; Cunliffe, Nigel A

    2016-08-17

    Widespread introduction of rotavirus vaccines has led to major reductions in the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis worldwide. Vaccine effectiveness is diminished, however, in low income countries, that harbour the greatest burden of rotavirus attributed morbidity and mortality. Indirect effects of rotavirus vaccine (herd immunity and herd protection) could increase population level impact and improve vaccine cost effectiveness in such settings. While rotavirus vaccine indirect effects have been demonstrated in high and middle income countries, there are very little data from low income countries where force of infection, population structures and vaccine schedules differ. Targeted efforts to evaluate indirect effects of rotavirus vaccine in low income countries are required to understand the total impact of rotavirus vaccine on the global burden of rotavirus disease. PMID:27443593

  13. Effectiveness of Monovalent and Pentavalent Rotavirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Immergluck, Lilly Cheng; Held, Melissa; Jain, Shabnam; Chan, Trisha; Grizas, Alexandra P.; Khizer, Saadia; Barrett, Carol; Quaye, Osbourne; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Gautam, Rashi; Bowen, Michael D.; Moore, Jessica; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Vázquez, Marietta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Previous US evaluations have not assessed monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1, a G1P[8] human rotavirus strain) effectiveness, because of its later introduction (2008). Using case-control methodology, we measured the vaccine effectiveness (VE) of the 2-dose RV1 and 3-dose pentavalent vaccine (RV5) series against rotavirus disease resulting in hospital emergency department or inpatient care. METHODS: Children were eligible for enrollment if they presented to 1 of 5 hospitals (3 in Georgia, 2 in Connecticut) with diarrhea of ≤10 days’ duration during January through June 2010 or 2011, and were born after RV1 introduction. Stools were collected; immunization records were obtained from providers and state electronic immunization information system (IIS). Case-subjects (children testing rotavirus antigen-positive) were compared with 2 control groups: children testing rotavirus negative and children selected from IIS. RESULTS: Overall, 165 rotavirus-case subjects and 428 rotavirus-negative controls were enrolled. Using the rotavirus-negative controls, RV1 VE was 91% (95% confidence interval [CI] 80 to 95) and RV5 VE was 92% (CI 75 to 97) among children aged ≥8 months. The RV1 VE against G2P[4] disease was high (94%, CI 78 to 98), as was that against G1P[8] disease (89%, CI 70 to 96). RV1 effectiveness was sustained among children aged 12 through 23 months (VE 91%; CI 75 to 96). VE point estimates using IIS controls were similar to those using rotavirus-negative controls. CONCLUSIONS: RV1 and RV5 were both highly effective against severe rotavirus disease. RV1 conferred sustained protection during the first 2 years of life and demonstrated high effectiveness against G2P[4] (heterotypic) disease. PMID:23776114

  14. Rotavirus and the indigenous children of the Australian outback: monovalent vaccine effective in a high-burden setting.

    PubMed

    Snelling, Thomas L; Schultz, Rosalie; Graham, Julie; Roseby, Robert; Barnes, Graeme L; Andrews, Ross M; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2009-08-01

    Indigenous children living in arid Central Australia experience frequent outbreaks of rotavirus gastroenteritis. A widespread outbreak of G9 rotavirus infection occurred several months after introduction of the RIX4414 rotavirus vaccine. We performed a retrospective case-control study to determine vaccine efficacy during the outbreak. Two doses provided an estimated vaccine efficacy of 77.7% (95% confidence interval, 40.2%-91.7%) against hospitalization for gastroenteritis. Vaccine efficacy was 84.5% (95% confidence interval, 23.4%-96.9%) against confirmed cases of rotavirus infection. Vaccination was effective in this high-burden setting.

  15. Rotavirus vaccine: early introduction in Latin America-risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Isa, Pavel; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2006-01-01

    Rotavirus infection is the cause of severe gastroenteritis of young children worldwide, leading to an estimate of 600,000 deaths a year. Efforts to develop an effective and safe vaccine resulted in licensing in 1998 of a live oral vaccine (RotaShield) that was withdrawn less than 1 year later when reports of cases of intussusception were linked to its application. This led to development of new rotavirus vaccine candidates that are currently in late phase III clinical trials. One of these vaccines, GlaxoSmithKline's Rotarix, was licensed in July 2004 to be used in Mexico. This review describes the general background for rotavirus vaccine development, the different vaccine candidates that have been tested or are currently being evaluated, the association of rotavirus vaccination with the bowel blockage known as intussuception, and discusses the benefits and risks of the fast-track introduction of Rotarix in Latin America, and particularly in Mexico.

  16. Rotavirus vaccination within the South African Expanded Programme on Immunisation.

    PubMed

    Seheri, L Mapaseka; Page, Nicola A; Mawela, Mothahadini P B; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Steele, A Duncan

    2012-09-01

    Diarrhoeal diseases are ranked the third major cause of childhood mortality in South African children less than 5 years, where the majority of deaths are among black children. Acute severe dehydrating rotavirus diarrhoea remains an important contributor towards childhood mortality and morbidity and has been well documented in South Africa. As the preventive strategy to control rotavirus diarrhoea, South Africa became the first country in the WHO African Region to adopt the rotavirus vaccine in the national childhood immunisation programme in August 2009. The rotavirus vaccine in use, Rotarix, GSK Biologicals, is given at 6 and 14 weeks of age, along with other vaccines as part of Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI). Studies which facilitated the introduction of rotavirus vaccine in South Africa included the burden of rotavirus disease and strain surveillance, economic burden of rotavirus infection and clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of vaccine candidates. This paper reviews the epidemiology of rotavirus in South Africa, outlines some of the steps followed to introduce rotavirus vaccine in the EPI, and highlights the early positive impact of vaccination in reducing the rotavirus burden of disease based on the post-marketing surveillance studies at Dr George Mukhari hospital, a sentinel site at University of Limpopo teaching hospital in Pretoria, South Africa, which has conducted rotavirus surveillance for >20 years.

  17. Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index SMALLPOX FACT SHEET The Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine The vaccinia virus is the "live virus" used ... cannot cause smallpox. What is a "live virus" vaccine? A "live virus" vaccine is a vaccine that ...

  18. Estimating rotavirus vaccine effectiveness in Japan using a screening method

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Kaoru; Hara, Megumi; Sakanishi, Yuta; Shimanoe, Chisato; Nishida, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Muneaki; Tanaka, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    abstract Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a highly contagious, acute viral disease that imposes a significant health burden worldwide. In Japan, rotavirus vaccines have been commercially available since 2011 for voluntary vaccination, but vaccine coverage and effectiveness have not been evaluated. In the absence of a vaccination registry in Japan, vaccination coverage in the general population was estimated according to the number of vaccines supplied by the manufacturer, the number of children who received financial support for vaccination, and the size of the target population. Patients with rotavirus gastroenteritis were identified by reviewing the medical records of all children who consulted 6 major hospitals in Saga Prefecture with gastroenteritis symptoms. Vaccination status among these patients was investigated by reviewing their medical records or interviewing their guardians by telephone. Vaccine effectiveness was determined using a screening method. Vaccination coverage increased with time, and it was 2-times higher in municipalities where the vaccination fee was supported. In the 2012/13 season, vaccination coverage in Saga Prefecture was 14.9% whereas the proportion of patients vaccinated was 5.1% among those with clinically diagnosed rotavirus gastroenteritis and 1.9% among those hospitalized for rotavirus gastroenteritis. Thus, vaccine effectiveness was estimated as 69.5% and 88.8%, respectively. This is the first study to evaluate rotavirus vaccination coverage and effectiveness in Japan since vaccination began. PMID:26680277

  19. Catching-up with pentavalent vaccine: Exploring reasons behind lower rotavirus vaccine coverage in El Salvador.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Castaneda, Eduardo; Burnett, Eleanor; Elas, Miguel; Baltrons, Rafael; Pezzoli, Lorenzo; Flannery, Brendan; Kleinbaum, David; de Oliveira, Lucia Helena; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina

    2015-11-27

    Rotavirus vaccine was introduced in El Salvador in 2006 and is recommended to be given concomitantly with DTP-HepB-Haemophilus influenzae type b (pentavalent) vaccine at ages 2 months (upper age limit 15 weeks) and 4 months (upper age limit 8 months) of age. However, rotavirus vaccination coverage continues to lag behind that of pentavalent vaccine, even in years when national rotavirus vaccine stock-outs have not occurred. We analyzed factors associated with receipt of oral rotavirus vaccine among children who received at least 2 doses of pentavalent vaccine in a stratified cluster survey of children aged 24-59 months conducted in El Salvador in 2011. Vaccine doses included were documented on vaccination cards (94.4%) or in health facility records (5.6%). Logistic regression and survival analysis were used to assess factors associated with vaccination status and age at vaccination. Receipt of pentavalent vaccine by age 15 weeks was associated with rotavirus vaccination (OR: 5.1; 95% CI 2.7, 9.4), and receipt of the second pentavalent dose by age 32 weeks was associated with receipt of two rotavirus vaccine doses (OR: 5.0; 95% CI 2.1-12.3). Timely coverage with the first pentavalent vaccine dose was 88.2% in the 2007 cohort and 91.1% in the 2008 cohort (p=0.04). Children born in 2009, when a four-month national rotavirus vaccine stock-out occurred, had an older median age of receipt of rotavirus vaccine and were less likely to receive rotavirus on the same date as the same dose of pentavalent vaccine than children born in 2007 and 2008. Upper age limit recommendations for rotavirus vaccine administration contributed to suboptimal vaccination coverage. Survey data suggest that late rotavirus vaccination and co-administration with later doses of pentavalent vaccine among children born in 2009 helped increase rotavirus vaccine coverage following shortages.

  20. Efficacy of two doses of RIT 4237 bovine rotavirus vaccine for prevention of rotavirus diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, T; Ruuska, T; Delem, A; André, F E; Beards, G M; Flewett, T H

    1991-02-01

    Candidate oral bovine rotavirus vaccine RIT 4237 or placebo was given to 252 Finnish infants at birth and at 7 months of age. No vaccine-associated reactions were observed. Primary rotavirus ELISA IgM responses were detected in 36% of the infants after the first vaccination; after the second dose 68% of the vaccinees were seropositive for rotavirus ELISA IgG antibody. The infants remained in clinical follow-up over two rotavirus epidemic seasons (total 28 months). Counted from child years in follow-up the overall vaccine protection rate was 43%. The clinical severity of rotavirus episodes was assessed using a numerical score 0-20. Vaccine protection rate for cases with a score greater than or equal to 7 was 57% and for cases with a score greater than or equal to 11 it was 89%. It is concluded that vaccination with a bovine rotavirus vaccine at birth and at 7 months of age, with the second dose given shortly before rotavirus epidemic season, protects infants against moderately severe and severe rotavirus diarrhoea in the first 2 years of life.

  1. Impact of non-routine rotavirus vaccination on hospitalizations for diarrhoea and rotavirus infections in Spain.

    PubMed

    Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Gonzalez-Escalada, Alba; Alvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Garcia-Garcia, Laura; San-Martin, Maria; González-López, Antonio; Gil-de-Miguel, Angel

    2013-10-01

    This study shows hospital discharges related to all-cause diarrhoea and rotavirus infection in children up to five years of age from 2005 to 2009 in Spain. Rotavirus vaccines have been available in Spain since late 2006 and early 2007. They are neither funded nor reimbursed by the National Health Care System. However, they are recommended by the Spanish Association of Pediatricians and prescribed by paediatricians. The vaccination coverage was 17% in 2007, 35% in 2008 and 38% in 2009. Among a total of 111,738 hospitalizations recorded, 24% (N=26,500) were coded as rotavirus and 14% (N=16,217) as diarrhoea of undetermined aetiology. The overall annual incidence of hospitalization was 991,235 and 144 per 100,000 children up to five years of age for all-causes diarrhoea, rotavirus infection and diarrhoea of undetermined aetiology respectively. The annual rate significantly decreased during the study period. Hospitalization rates for all-cause diarrhoea, rotavirus infection and diarrhoea of undetermined aetiology in children under five years of age in 2009 were 35, 37 and 36% lower than in the period 2005-2006, before rotavirus vaccine introduction. This decrease was greater in children <12 months of age: 42% for all-cause diarrhoea and 43% for rotavirus and diarrhoea of undetermined aetiology. The use of rotavirus vaccines, with relatively low vaccination coverage, in Spain has been shown to decrease hospitalizations for rotavirus gastroenteritis and all-cause diarrhoea during the study period.

  2. Diarrheal Diseases Hospitalization in Yemen before and after Rotavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Al-Areqi, Lina; Mujally, Abulatif; Alkarshy, Fawzya; Nasser, Arwa; Jumaan, Aisha O.

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on diarrheal diseases hospitalization and to identify the rotavirus genotypes most prevalent before and after vaccine introduction among children ≤ 5 years of age. Rotarix™ ® rotavirus vaccine is currently licensed for infants in Yemen and was introduced in 2012. The vaccination course consists of two doses. The first dose is administrated at 6 weeks of age and the second dose is completed by 10 weeks. Based on a longitudinal observational study, we assessed the impact of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalization before and after vaccination among children ≤ 5 years of age at the Yemeni-Swedish Hospital (YSH) in Taiz, Yemen. Prevaccination covered January 2009–July 2012 during which 2335 fecal samples were collected from children ≤ 5 years old. Postvaccination covered January 2013–December 2014 during which 1114 fecal samples were collected. Rotavirus was detected by Enzyme Linkage Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The incidence of rotavirus hospitalization decreased from 43.79% in 2009 to 10.54% in 2014. Hospitalization due to rotavirus diarrhea was reduced by 75.93%. Vaccine coverage increased from 23% in 2012 to 72% in 2014. Also, the results showed that the most predominant genotypes in prevaccination period were G2P[4] (55.0%), followed by G1P[8] (15.0%), while in postvaccination period G1P[8] (31%) was the predominant genotype, followed by G9P[8] (27.5%). In conclusion, rotavirus vaccination in Yemen resulted in sharp reduction in diarrheal hospitalization. A successful rotavirus vaccination program in Yemen will rely upon efficient vaccine delivery systems and sustained vaccine efficacy against diverse and evolving rotavirus strains. PMID:27437161

  3. Diarrheal Diseases Hospitalization in Yemen before and after Rotavirus Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Amood Al-Kamarany, Mohammed; Al-Areqi, Lina; Mujally, Abulatif; Alkarshy, Fawzya; Nasser, Arwa; Jumaan, Aisha O

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on diarrheal diseases hospitalization and to identify the rotavirus genotypes most prevalent before and after vaccine introduction among children ≤ 5 years of age. Rotarix™ ® rotavirus vaccine is currently licensed for infants in Yemen and was introduced in 2012. The vaccination course consists of two doses. The first dose is administrated at 6 weeks of age and the second dose is completed by 10 weeks. Based on a longitudinal observational study, we assessed the impact of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalization before and after vaccination among children ≤ 5 years of age at the Yemeni-Swedish Hospital (YSH) in Taiz, Yemen. Prevaccination covered January 2009-July 2012 during which 2335 fecal samples were collected from children ≤ 5 years old. Postvaccination covered January 2013-December 2014 during which 1114 fecal samples were collected. Rotavirus was detected by Enzyme Linkage Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The incidence of rotavirus hospitalization decreased from 43.79% in 2009 to 10.54% in 2014. Hospitalization due to rotavirus diarrhea was reduced by 75.93%. Vaccine coverage increased from 23% in 2012 to 72% in 2014. Also, the results showed that the most predominant genotypes in prevaccination period were G2P[4] (55.0%), followed by G1P[8] (15.0%), while in postvaccination period G1P[8] (31%) was the predominant genotype, followed by G9P[8] (27.5%). In conclusion, rotavirus vaccination in Yemen resulted in sharp reduction in diarrheal hospitalization. A successful rotavirus vaccination program in Yemen will rely upon efficient vaccine delivery systems and sustained vaccine efficacy against diverse and evolving rotavirus strains. PMID:27437161

  4. Burden of Norovirus and Rotavirus in Children After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction, Cochabamba, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    McAtee, Casey L; Webman, Rachel; Gilman, Robert H; Mejia, Carolina; Bern, Caryn; Apaza, Sonia; Espetia, Susan; Pajuelo, Mónica; Saito, Mayuko; Challappa, Roxanna; Soria, Richard; Ribera, Jose P; Lozano, Daniel; Torrico, Faustino

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in the field may set the stage for a changing landscape of diarrheal illness affecting children worldwide. Norovirus and rotavirus are the two major viral enteropathogens of childhood. This study describes the prevalence of norovirus and rotavirus 2 years after widespread rotavirus vaccination in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Stool samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and outpatients aged 5-24 months without AGE were recruited from an urban hospital serving Bolivia's third largest city. Both viruses were genotyped, and norovirus GII.4 was further sequenced. Norovirus was found much more frequently than rotavirus. Norovirus was detected in 69/201 (34.3%) of specimens from children with AGE and 13/71 (18.3%) of those without diarrhea. Rotavirus was detected in 38/201 (18.9%) of diarrheal specimens and 3/71 (4.2%) of non-diarrheal specimens. Norovirus GII was identified in 97.8% of norovirus-positive samples; GII.4 was the most common genotype (71.4% of typed specimens). Rotavirus G3P[8] was the most prevalent rotavirus genotype (44.0% of typed specimens) and G2P[4] was second most prevalent (16.0% of typed specimens). This community is likely part of a trend toward norovirus predominance over rotavirus in children after widespread vaccination against rotavirus.

  5. Rotavirus vaccines for infants in developing countries in Africa and Asia: considerations from a world health organization-sponsored consultation.

    PubMed

    Steele, A Duncan; Patel, Manish; Parashar, Umesh D; Victor, John C; Aguado, Teresa; Neuzil, Kathleen M

    2009-11-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) and its international partners have prioritized the development of rotavirus vaccines for the past 3 decades. In November 2005, the WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts first reviewed the clinical efficacy data from 2 new live attenuated oral rotavirus vaccines, which demonstrated excellent protective efficacy against severe rotavirus disease in regions where they were evaluated. Despite these successes, the WHO has urged the clinical evaluation of these vaccines in populations of Africa and Asia, where most of the deaths due to rotavirus occur, and has emphasized the need for ongoing postlicensure safety monitoring in countries introducing vaccines. Clinical studies in Africa and Asia will soon provide data on the efficacy of both new vaccines in these populations. A WHO international consultative meeting convened to evaluate how to use these imminent data for the future use of rotavirus vaccines in developing countries. In brief, it was agreed that (1) even vaccines with lesser efficacy in developing countries, compared with industrialized countries, would still lead to substantial public health benefits and would be cost-effective in saving lives in Africa and Asia; (2) criteria, such as the WHO mortality strata and local epidemiology of rotavirus infection, would be appropriate measures for extrapolating the clinical data to other regions and countries; and (3) research toward understanding the programmatic limitations of rotavirus vaccine use may help develop strategies to improve vaccine uptake and overall impact.

  6. Conquering rotavirus: from discovery to global vaccine implementation.

    PubMed

    Bines, Julie E; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus, the commonest cause of severe dehydrating gastroenteritis world-wide, was discovered less than 50 years ago. It causes about 450,000 deaths per year in children <5 years of age and hospitalises millions more. Rotavirus vaccines have been shown to have a major impact on hospital admissions due to rotavirus gastroenteritis and all-cause gastroenteritis and reduce mortality in developing countries. In Australia, there has been a 71% decrease in rotavirus hospitalisations in children 0-5 years of age. From the discovery of rotavirus as the major causative agent for severe gastroenteritis, through vaccine development and vaccine post-marketing surveillance activities, Australian scientists and clinicians have played a significant role in the global effort to reduce the burden of rotavirus infection. PMID:25586843

  7. Estimated impact and cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in India: effects of geographic and economic disparities.

    PubMed

    Rheingans, Richard; Anderson, John D; Anderson, Benjamin; Chakraborty, Poulomy; Atherly, Deborah; Pindolia, Deepa

    2014-08-11

    India accounts for 23% of global rotavirus mortality in under-five children, with more than 100,000 deaths from rotavirus annually. Introduction of a vaccine in India is considered to be the most effective intervention for preventing rotavirus mortality. Recent research suggests that there is considerable variation in rotavirus mortality burden across regional, gender and socio-economic subpopulations within India. In addition, there is potential variability in who would likely receive rotavirus vaccine if introduced. We use available household data to estimate heterogeneity in rotavirus mortality risk, vaccination benefits, and cost-effectiveness across geographic and socio-economic groups within India. We account for heterogeneity by modeling estimated three-dose routine vaccinations as a proxy for a generalized rotavirus vaccine, and mortality for subpopulations of children aggregated by region and state, socio-economic status and sex, separately. Results are presented for six geographic regions and for Bihar, Uttar Pradesh, and Madhya Pradesh, three high mortality states accounting for 56% of national mortality estimates. Impact estimates accounting for disparities predict rotavirus vaccine introduction will prevent 35,000 deaths at an average cost of $118/DALY averted (7292 INR/DALY averted). Rotavirus vaccines are most cost-effective for the poor living in high mortality regions and states. Reductions in geographic and socio-economic disparities based on regional estimates could prevent an additional 9400 deaths annually, while reductions in socio-economic disparities in the three highest morality states alone could prevent an additional 10,600 deaths annually. Understanding the impact of heterogeneity can help improve strategies to maximize the benefits of rotavirus vaccination introduction, leading to fewer lives lost as a result of rotavirus disease. PMID:25091669

  8. Laboratory-Confirmed Rotavirus Disease in Utah Children: Clinical and Economic Impact of Rotavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Angel Herrera; Stockmann, Chris; Pavia, Andrew T.; Hersh, Adam L.; Thorell, Emily A.; Weng, Hsin Yi; Korgenski, Kent; Byington, Carrie L.; Ampofo, Krow

    2012-01-01

    Background. Rotavirus is the most common cause of infectious diarrhea in children worldwide. Recent studies have described changes in the burden of all-cause gastroenteritis; however, there are limited data on the clinical and economic impact of rotavirus vaccine on cases of laboratory-confirmed rotavirus disease. Methods. We performed a retrospective study of laboratory-confirmed rotavirus disease from July 2003 through June 2010 at a children's hospital and a community hospital in Utah. Demographics and hospital costs for children <5 years with rotavirus symptoms and a positive rotavirus enzyme immunoassay test on a stool specimen were abstracted from electronic medical records. We compared the prevaccine period (2003–2007) with the postvaccine period (2008–2010). Results. The overall incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis declined in the postvaccine period, from 26.6 to 5.2 cases per 10 000 person-years for Salt Lake County residents. The largest decrease in the incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis was among children <12 months (−87%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 79–93). Older children (12–23 months) also experienced significant decreases (−81%; 95% CI, 72–88), as did those 24–59 months (−61%; 95% CI, 51–71). In 2009, 3 years after rotavirus vaccine introduction, there was a 79% decrease in emergency department visits and a 78% decrease in hospitalizations across both hospitals. The cost of emergency department visits and hospitalizations for rotavirus gastroenteritis decreased by 79% and 72%, respectively, resulting in annual savings of $790 000 at a children's hospital and $140 000 at a community hospital. Conclusion. Rotavirus vaccination in infants has dramatically decreased the clinical burden and direct medical costs of rotavirus gastroenteritis in both infants and young children. PMID:23687580

  9. Effect of monovalent rotavirus vaccine on rotavirus disease burden and circulating rotavirus strains among children in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Benhafid, Mohammed; Elomari, Nezha; Azzouzi Idrissi, Meryem; Rguig, Ahmed; Gentsch, Jon R; Parashar, Umesh; Elaouad, Rajae

    2015-06-01

    Rotarix(TM) vaccine was introduced into the National Program of Immunization of Morocco in October 2010, reaching quickly 87% of the target population of children nationally. The incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis and the prevalence of circulating rotavirus strains has been monitored in three sentinel hospitals since June 2006. The average percentage of rotavirus positive cases among all children under 5 years old hospitalized for gastroenteritis during the pre-vaccine period (2006-2010) was 44%. This percentage dropped to 29%, 15% and 24% in the 3 years post vaccine introduction (2011, 2012 and 2013), which is a decline of 34%, 66%, and 45%, respectively. Declines in prevalence were greatest among children 0-1 years of age (53%) and were most prominent during the winter and autumn rotavirus season. The prevalence of the G2P[4] and G9P[8] genotype sharply increased in the post vaccine period (2011-2013) compared to the previous seasons (2006-2010). Rotavirus vaccines have reduced greatly the number of children hospitalized due to rotavirus infection at the three sentinel hospitals; it is however unclear if the predominance of G2P[4] and G9P[8] genotypes is related to the vaccine introduction, or if this is attributable to normal genotype fluctuations. Continued surveillance will be pivotal to answer this question in the future.

  10. Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Y A; Yolken, R H

    1990-09-01

    Since their discovery in the 1970s, the human rotaviruses have been recognized as the most important cause of acute infectious gastroenteritis among infants and children worldwide. Rotavirus has been found to infect almost all mammalian and avian species tested, and is primarily a disease of the young. In humans, rotavirus is the most frequent gastrointestinal pathogen in infants and children less than 2 years of age. In developing countries, the attack rate peaks at 6 months of age, whereas in developed areas of the world the virus is most commonly found among children 6-12 months of age. Rotavirus displays a marked seasonality in temperate climates, with the number of cases peaking in the colder winter months. In tropical climates, this seasonality is not as apparent, and infection may occur year round. Symptoms of rotavirus infection are non-specific and include vomiting and diarrhoea, occasionally accompanied by a low grade fever. Dehydration is more common with rotavirus infection than with most bacterial pathogens, and is the most common cause of death related to rotavirus infection. Treatment is non-specific and includes the use of oral rehydration therapy, especially in developing countries where malnutrition is common. Strategies for the prevention of rotavirus infection are dependent on advances in the understanding of the molecular biology of the rotavirus. The genetic structure of the virus has been extensively studied, and a number of the structural proteins have been identified. The neutralization antigens, located on VP4 and VP7, may be important in conferring immunity to rotavirus in vivo. Two animal-derived and several reassortant rotavirus vaccines are currently being evaluated in field studies, and a number of other candidate vaccines are being tested in vitro and in animal studies. PMID:1962726

  11. Rotavirus-associated hospitalization and emergency department costs and rotavirus vaccine program impact☆

    PubMed Central

    Kilgore, April; Donauer, Stephanie; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Payne, Daniel C.; Szilagyi, Peter G.; Rice, Marilyn; Cassedy, Amy; Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael R.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Staat, Mary Allen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the medical costs of laboratory-confirmed rotavirus hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits and estimate the economic impact of the rotavirus vaccine program. Patients and methods During 4 rotavirus seasons (2006–2009), children <3 years of age hospitalized or seen in the ED with laboratory-confirmed rotavirus were identified through active population-based rotavirus surveillance in three US counties. Medical costs were obtained from hospital and physician billing data, and factors associated with increased costs were examined. Annual national costs were estimated using rotavirus hospitalization and ED visit rates and medical costs for rotavirus hospitalizations and ED visits from our surveillance program for pre- (2006–2007) and post-vaccine (2008–2009) time periods. Results Pre-vaccine, for hospitalizations, the median medical cost per child was $3581, the rotavirus hospitalization rate was 22.1/10,000, with an estimated annual national cost of $91 million. Post-vaccine, the median medical cost was $4304, the hospitalization rate was 6.3/10,000 and the estimated annual national cost was $31 million. Increased costs were associated with study site, age <3 months, underlying medical conditions and an atypical acute gastroenteritis presentation. For ED visits, the pre-vaccine median medical cost per child was $574, the ED visit rate was 291/10,000 resulting in an estimated annual national cost of $192 million. Post-vaccine, the median medical cost was $794, the ED visit rate was 71/10,000 with an estimated annual national cost of $65 million. Conclusions After implementation of rotavirus immunization, the total annual medical costs decreased from $283 million to $96 million, an annual reduction of $187 million PMID:23845802

  12. Influenza Vaccine, Live Intranasal

    MedlinePlus

    ... the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should NOT ... to your doctor or pharmacist about the best flu vaccine option for you or your family.

  13. The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in preventing acute gastroenteritis during rotavirus seasons among Polish children

    PubMed Central

    Kieltyka, Agnieszka; Majewska, Renata; Augustyniak, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rotavirus is the main etiological cause of intestinal infections in children. Voluntary rotavirus vaccines were included in the Polish vaccination schedule in 2007. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a completed rotavirus vaccination course in preventing acute gastroenteritis in Polish infants during their first five years of life. Material and methods This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in Lesser Poland (Malopolska Province). The sample population included a group of 303 children who received the completed rotavirus vaccination course and 303 children not vaccinated against rotavirus. The date of the child's acute gastroenteritis diagnosis and his or her vaccination history were extracted from the physicians’ records. Each kind of diagnosed acute gastroenteritis during winter-spring rotavirus seasons was treated as the endpoint. The relative risk of having gastrointestinal infection was assessed using the hazard ratio from the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results In the examined group, 96 (15.8%) children had winter-spring gastrointestinal infections. In the non-vaccinated children, the cumulative incidence of these infections in the first 5 years of life was 20.8%, whereas in the children vaccinated with Rotarix it was only 10.9%. Those who were vaccinated with Rotarix had a 44% reduction in the risk of a winter-spring acute gastroenteritis infection compared to those not vaccinated with Rotarix (p = 0.005). Birth weight less than 2500 g increased the risk of the infection twofold and also reached statistical significance (p = 0.044). Conclusions The results showed that Rotarix is effective in preventing acute gastroenteritis in Polish children during rotavirus seasons. PMID:27279856

  14. Effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine against hospitalized rotavirus diarrhea: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Maria Y T; Rodrigues, Laura C; Teles Santos, Carlos A S; Teixeira, Maria da Gloria L C; De Jesus, Sandra R; Alvim De Matos, Sheila M; Gagliardi Leite, Jose P; Barreto, Mauricio L

    2014-05-13

    Rotavirus is one of the leading cause of hospitalization and outpatients visits among children under five years. This study evaluated overall and genotype-specific vaccine effectiveness of oral monovalent rotavirus vaccine (G1P[8] strain) in preventing hospital admission of Brazilian children with rotavirus acute diarrhea. A hospital based case-control study was conducted in five Regions of Brazil using the National Rotavirus Acute Diarrhea Surveillance System from July 2008 to August 2011. A total of 215 cases (aged 4-24 months) admitted with confirmed rotavirus diarrhea were recruited and 1961 controls hospitalized without diarrhea were frequency matched by sex and age group to cases. Two-dose adjusted vaccine effectiveness (adjusted by year of birth and the frequency matching variables) was 76% (95%CI: 58-86) lasting for two years. Effectiveness controlled by the available potential confounders was 72% (95%CI: 44-85), suggesting no appreciable confounding by those factors for which adjustment was made. In a half of the cases the rotavirus genotype was G2P[4] and in 15% G1P[8]. Genotype-specific VE (two doses) was 89% (95%CI: 78-95), for G1P[8] and 76% (95%CI: 64-84) for G2P[4]. For all G1, it was 74% (95%CI: 35-90), for all G2, 76% (95%CI: 63-84), and for all non G1/G2 genotypes, 63% (95%CI: -27-99). Effectiveness for one dose was 62% (95%CI: 39-97). Effectiveness of two-dose monovalent rotavirus vaccine in preventing hospital admission with rotavirus diarrhea was high, lasted for two years and it was similar against both G1P[8] and G2P[4]. Based on the findings of the study we recommend the continued use of rotavirus in the Brazilian National Immunization Program and the monitoring of the early emergence of unusual and novel rotavirus genotypes.

  15. Effectiveness of the live attenuated rotavirus vaccine produced by a domestic manufacturer in China studied using a population-based case-control design.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Shan-Shan; Li, Yue; Wang, Song-Mei; Zhang, Xin-Jiang; Hao, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Ma, Jing-Chen; Zhou, Peng; Zhang, Zhen; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2015-10-01

    A universal rotavirus (RV) immunization program is a potentially cost-effective measure for preventing RV infection in China. However, the efficacy of the only licensed RV vaccine (Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine, LLR), which is made by a domestic manufacturer, has not been proven by a properly designed clinical trial. In October 2011 to March 2012, to measure the potential protection provided by LLR, a case-control study nested in a population-based active diarrhea surveillance study of children <5 years of age was conducted in rural Zhengding county. During the study period, 308 episodes of diarrhea were identified as being caused by RV infection, resulting in an incidence rate of 48.0/1000 people/year. The predominant RV serotype was G3 (61.5%), followed by G1 (15.2%), and G9 (6.5%). Overall, a protection of 35.0% (95% confidence interval (CI), 13.0%-52.0%) was identified, and higher protection was found among moderate RV gastroenteritis cases caused by the serotype G3 (52.0% 95% CI: 2.0%-76.1%). A concurrently conducted case-control study comparing non-RV viral diarrheal cases with non-diarrheal controls in the same population found that the RV vaccine offered no protection against non-RV diarrhea. Even under a less ideal immunization schedule, the oral LLR conferred a certain level of protection against RV gastroenteritis. However, further studies are needed to understand the full characteristics of the LLR, including its efficacy when administered following the optimal regimen, the potential risk of inducing intussusception, and the direct and indirect protective effects of LLR.

  16. Effectiveness of the live attenuated rotavirus vaccine produced by a domestic manufacturer in China studied using a population-based case-control design.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Shan-Shan; Li, Yue; Wang, Song-Mei; Zhang, Xin-Jiang; Hao, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Ma, Jing-Chen; Zhou, Peng; Zhang, Zhen; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2015-10-01

    A universal rotavirus (RV) immunization program is a potentially cost-effective measure for preventing RV infection in China. However, the efficacy of the only licensed RV vaccine (Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine, LLR), which is made by a domestic manufacturer, has not been proven by a properly designed clinical trial. In October 2011 to March 2012, to measure the potential protection provided by LLR, a case-control study nested in a population-based active diarrhea surveillance study of children <5 years of age was conducted in rural Zhengding county. During the study period, 308 episodes of diarrhea were identified as being caused by RV infection, resulting in an incidence rate of 48.0/1000 people/year. The predominant RV serotype was G3 (61.5%), followed by G1 (15.2%), and G9 (6.5%). Overall, a protection of 35.0% (95% confidence interval (CI), 13.0%-52.0%) was identified, and higher protection was found among moderate RV gastroenteritis cases caused by the serotype G3 (52.0% 95% CI: 2.0%-76.1%). A concurrently conducted case-control study comparing non-RV viral diarrheal cases with non-diarrheal controls in the same population found that the RV vaccine offered no protection against non-RV diarrhea. Even under a less ideal immunization schedule, the oral LLR conferred a certain level of protection against RV gastroenteritis. However, further studies are needed to understand the full characteristics of the LLR, including its efficacy when administered following the optimal regimen, the potential risk of inducing intussusception, and the direct and indirect protective effects of LLR. PMID:26576341

  17. Effectiveness of the live attenuated rotavirus vaccine produced by a domestic manufacturer in China studied using a population-based case–control design

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Shan-Shan; Li, Yue; Wang, Song-Mei; Zhang, Xin-Jiang; Hao, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Ma, Jing-Chen; Zhou, Peng; Zhang, Zhen; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2015-01-01

    A universal rotavirus (RV) immunization program is a potentially cost-effective measure for preventing RV infection in China. However, the efficacy of the only licensed RV vaccine (Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine, LLR), which is made by a domestic manufacturer, has not been proven by a properly designed clinical trial. In October 2011 to March 2012, to measure the potential protection provided by LLR, a case–control study nested in a population-based active diarrhea surveillance study of children <5 years of age was conducted in rural Zhengding county. During the study period, 308 episodes of diarrhea were identified as being caused by RV infection, resulting in an incidence rate of 48.0/1000 people/year. The predominant RV serotype was G3 (61.5%), followed by G1 (15.2%), and G9 (6.5%). Overall, a protection of 35.0% (95% confidence interval (CI), 13.0%–52.0%) was identified, and higher protection was found among moderate RV gastroenteritis cases caused by the serotype G3 (52.0% 95% CI: 2.0%–76.1%). A concurrently conducted case–control study comparing non-RV viral diarrheal cases with non-diarrheal controls in the same population found that the RV vaccine offered no protection against non-RV diarrhea. Even under a less ideal immunization schedule, the oral LLR conferred a certain level of protection against RV gastroenteritis. However, further studies are needed to understand the full characteristics of the LLR, including its efficacy when administered following the optimal regimen, the potential risk of inducing intussusception, and the direct and indirect protective effects of LLR. PMID:26576341

  18. Evidence of Vaccine-related Reassortment of Rotavirus, Brazil, 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Marques da Silva, Marcelle Figueira; Goméz, Mariela Martinéz; Resque, Hugo Reis; Ichihara, Maria Yury Travassos; Volotão, Eduardo de Mello; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of 27 rotavirus strains from vaccinated and unvaccinated children revealed reassortment events in 3 strains: a gene derived from a vaccine; a gene acquired from a circulating strain; and reassortment between circulating strains. Data suggest that the widespread use of this monovalent rotavirus vaccine may introduce vaccine genes into circulating human rotaviruses or vice versa. PMID:24188273

  19. Scope for rotavirus vaccination in India: revisiting the scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    Neogi, Sutapa Bandyopadhyay; Hasan, Habib; Sheikh, Kabir; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2011-10-01

    Rotavirus vaccines have been developed to prevent deaths resulting from severe diarrhea of rotavirus origin. The use of vaccines as an intervention at scale to prevent and control the burden of rotavirus diarrhea is supported by the argument that prevailing public health measures such as hygiene and sanitation, breast feeding and use of ORS have failed to prevent severe dehydration resulting from diarrhea. The article reviews the existing evidence on the rationale of using rotavirus vaccine as against the feasibility of scaling it up in developing countries like India. The vaccines currently available may not cover the strains circulating in Indian population. The diversity of Rotavirus infection in the country is tremendous and since the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy data has not been collected for India, there is first a need to conduct studies to measure the extent of protection and cross-protection provided by the available vaccines for local strains, before venturing into Rotavirus vaccination program. The potential benefits of immunization have to be first vetted against the risks involved by the policymakers and other stakeholders.

  20. Comparative analysis of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine strains and G8 rotaviruses identified during vaccine trial in Africa.

    PubMed

    Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Ciarlet, Max; Lawrence, Jody; Steele, Duncan; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-10-06

    RotaTeqTM is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine based on a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone in vitro reassorted with human outer capsid genes. During clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, the vaccine efficacy over a 2-year follow-up was lower against the genotypes contained in the vaccine than against the heterotypic G8P[6] and G8P[1] rotavirus strains of which the former is highly prevalent in Africa. Complete genome analyses of 43 complete rotavirus genomes collected during phase III clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, were conducted to gain insight into the high level of cross-protection afforded by RotaTeqTM against these G8 strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a high number of bovine rotavirus gene segments in these human G8 strains. In addition, we performed an in depth analysis on the individual amino acid level which showed that G8 rotaviruses were more similar to the RotaTeqTM vaccine than non-G8 strains. Because RotaTeqTM possesses a bovine genetic backbone, the high vaccine efficacy against G8 strains might be partially explained by the fact that all these strains contain a complete or partial bovine-like backbone. Altogether, this study supports the hypothesis that gene segments other than VP7 and VP4 play a role in vaccine-induced immunity.

  1. Comparative analysis of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine strains and G8 rotaviruses identified during vaccine trial in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Ciarlet, Max; Lawrence, Jody; Steele, Duncan; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    RotaTeqTM is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine based on a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone in vitro reassorted with human outer capsid genes. During clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, the vaccine efficacy over a 2-year follow-up was lower against the genotypes contained in the vaccine than against the heterotypic G8P[6] and G8P[1] rotavirus strains of which the former is highly prevalent in Africa. Complete genome analyses of 43 complete rotavirus genomes collected during phase III clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, were conducted to gain insight into the high level of cross-protection afforded by RotaTeqTM against these G8 strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a high number of bovine rotavirus gene segments in these human G8 strains. In addition, we performed an in depth analysis on the individual amino acid level which showed that G8 rotaviruses were more similar to the RotaTeqTM vaccine than non-G8 strains. Because RotaTeqTM possesses a bovine genetic backbone, the high vaccine efficacy against G8 strains might be partially explained by the fact that all these strains contain a complete or partial bovine-like backbone. Altogether, this study supports the hypothesis that gene segments other than VP7 and VP4 play a role in vaccine-induced immunity. PMID:26440913

  2. Comparative analysis of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine strains and G8 rotaviruses identified during vaccine trial in Africa.

    PubMed

    Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Ciarlet, Max; Lawrence, Jody; Steele, Duncan; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    RotaTeqTM is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine based on a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone in vitro reassorted with human outer capsid genes. During clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, the vaccine efficacy over a 2-year follow-up was lower against the genotypes contained in the vaccine than against the heterotypic G8P[6] and G8P[1] rotavirus strains of which the former is highly prevalent in Africa. Complete genome analyses of 43 complete rotavirus genomes collected during phase III clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, were conducted to gain insight into the high level of cross-protection afforded by RotaTeqTM against these G8 strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a high number of bovine rotavirus gene segments in these human G8 strains. In addition, we performed an in depth analysis on the individual amino acid level which showed that G8 rotaviruses were more similar to the RotaTeqTM vaccine than non-G8 strains. Because RotaTeqTM possesses a bovine genetic backbone, the high vaccine efficacy against G8 strains might be partially explained by the fact that all these strains contain a complete or partial bovine-like backbone. Altogether, this study supports the hypothesis that gene segments other than VP7 and VP4 play a role in vaccine-induced immunity. PMID:26440913

  3. Reduction in Rotavirus Disease and Sustained Predominance of G2P[4] Rotavirus Strain following Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccine in Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Fernanda Maria Ulisses; Falbo, Ana Rodrigues; Germano, Eliane Mendes; Correia, Nancy Barros; Souza, Edvaldo da Silva; Nakagomi, Osamu; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Cuevas, Luis E; Cunliffe, Nigel A; Correia, Jailson B

    2015-06-01

    Rotavirus vaccination was introduced in Brazil in March 2006. We describe the distribution of rotavirus genotypes in children with acute gastroenteritis in a hospital in Recife, Brazil, during pre- and post-vaccination periods. There was a 43.8% reduction in the proportion of diarrhea episodes due to rotavirus. Nevertheless, we observed a sustained predominance of G2P[4] as the main genotype identified in the post-vaccination period.

  4. Effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in preventing severe gastroenteritis in young children according to socioeconomic status

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin, Virginie; Généreux, Mélissa; Gagneur, Arnaud; Petit, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In 2011, the monovalent rotavirus vaccine was introduced into a universal immunization program in Quebec (Canada). This retrospective cohort study assessed vaccine effectiveness (VE) in preventing acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) hospitalizations among children <3 y living in the Quebec Eastern Townships region according to socioeconomic status (SES). Data were gathered from a tertiary hospital database paired with a regional immunization registry. Three cohorts of children were followed: (1) vaccinated children born in post-universal vaccination period (2011–2013, n = 5,033), (2) unvaccinated children born in post-universal vaccination period (n = 1,239), and (3) unvaccinated children born in pre-universal vaccination period (2008–2010, n = 6,436). In each cohort, AGE and RVGE hospitalizations were identified during equivalent follow-up periods to calculate VE globally and according to neighborhood-level SES. Using multivariable logistic regression, adjusted odds ratios (OR) were computed to obtain VE (1-OR). Adjusted VE of 2 doses was 62% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 37%–77%) and 94% (95%CI: 52%–99%) in preventing AGE and RVGE hospitalization, respectively. Stratified analyses according to SES showed that children living in neighborhoods with higher rates of low-income families had significantly lower VE against AGE hospitalizations compared to neighborhoods with lower rates of low-income families (30% vs. 78%, p = 0.027). Our results suggest that the rotavirus vaccine is highly effective in preventing severe gastroenteritis in young children, particularly among the most well-off. SES seems to influence rotavirus VE, even in a high-income country like Canada. Further studies are needed to determine factors related to lower rotavirus VE among socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. PMID:27367155

  5. [Vaccination against chickenpox, shingles and rotavirus-infection].

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Nico G; Rümke, Hans C; Visser, Henk K A

    2009-01-01

    The Dutch National Immunisation Programme (NIP) has been very successful over the past 50 years. In future, this programme shall not include all new vaccines. Such vaccines can, however, be individually administered. At present there are 3 vaccines available in the Netherlands that have not been included in the NIP to date: against varicella (chickenpox), herpes zoster (shingles) and rotavirus infections. These vaccines are safe and effective. Chickenpox is not always a harmless childhood disease. A chickenpox vaccine is now available as well as a combined vaccine against mumps, measles, rubella and chickenpox. Shingles (herpes zoster) is a common disease in the elderly people. For many patients it is a considerable burden with significant complications, mainly postherpetic neuralgia and herpes zoster ophthalmicus. Vaccination may be considered for people 60 years and older. Rotavirus is much more associated with severe symptoms of diarrhoea than other pathogens. More than 95% of children experience one or more episodes of rotavirus gastroenteritis before their 5th birthday. In the Netherlands about 3400 children are hospitalised each year for rehydration following rotavirus infection. The vaccine is given orally.

  6. Rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 (Rotarix™): a pharmacoeconomic review of its use in the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in developed countries.

    PubMed

    Plosker, Greg L

    2011-05-01

    The most common cause of severe diarrhoea in infants and young children is rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE), which is associated with significant morbidity, healthcare resource use and direct and indirect costs in industrialized nations. The monovalent rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 (Rotarix™) is administered as a two-dose oral series in infants and has demonstrated protective efficacy against RVGE in clinical trials conducted in developed countries. In addition, various naturalistic studies have demonstrated 'real-world' effectiveness after the introduction of widespread rotavirus vaccination programmes in the community setting. Numerous cost-effectiveness analyses have been conducted in developed countries in which a universal rotavirus vaccination programme using RIX4414 was compared with no universal rotavirus vaccination programme. There was a high degree of variability in base-case results across studies even when conducted in the same country, often reflecting differences in the selection of data sources or assumptions used to populate the models. In addition, results were sensitive to plausible changes in a number of key input parameters. As such, it is not possible to definitively state whether a universal rotavirus vaccination programme with RIX4414 is cost effective in developed countries, although results of some analyses in some countries suggest this is the case. In addition, international guidelines advocate universal vaccination of infants and children against rotavirus. It is also difficult to draw conclusions regarding the cost effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 relative to that of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, which is administered as a three-dose oral series. Although indirect comparisons in cost-effectiveness analyses indicate that RIX4414 provided more favourable incremental cost-effectiveness ratios when each vaccine was compared with no universal rotavirus vaccination programme, results were generally sensitive to vaccine costs

  7. Fulfilling the promise of rotavirus vaccines: how far have we come since licensure?

    PubMed

    Patel, Manish M; Glass, Roger; Desai, Rishi; Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D

    2012-07-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of fatal and severe childhood diarrhoea worldwide. Two new rotavirus vaccines have shown efficacy against severe rotavirus disease in large clinical trials. Between 2006 and 2010, 27 countries introduced rotavirus vaccination into national immunisation programmes and, subsequently, the burden of severe rotavirus disease in these countries has decreased substantially in both vaccinated and unvaccinated children. Rotavirus vaccination has led to large, sustained declines in childhood deaths from diarrhoea in Brazil and Mexico, which supports estimates that rotavirus was the leading cause of diarrhoeal deaths in these countries. Studies after licensing have provided new insights into these vaccines, such as the duration of protection, relative effectiveness in poor populations, and strain evolution after vaccine introduction. The challenge for policy makers worldwide is to analyse the effect of vaccination in early adopter countries and to assess whether the benefits outweigh the costs and encourage wider dissemination of these vaccines.

  8. Dynamic modeling of cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination, Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Freiesleben de Blasio, Birgitte; Flem, Elmira; Latipov, Renat; Kuatbaeva, Ajnagul; Kristiansen, Ivar Sønbø

    2014-01-01

    The government of Kazakhstan, a middle-income country in Central Asia, is considering the introduction of rotavirus vaccination into its national immunization program. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination spanning 20 years by using a synthesis of dynamic transmission models accounting for herd protection. We found that a vaccination program with 90% coverage would prevent ≈880 rotavirus deaths and save an average of 54,784 life-years for children <5 years of age. Indirect protection accounted for 40% and 60% reduction in severe and mild rotavirus gastroenteritis, respectively. Cost per life year gained was US $18,044 from a societal perspective and US $23,892 from a health care perspective. Comparing the 2 key parameters of cost-effectiveness, mortality rates and vaccine cost at vaccination program costs would be entirely offset. To further evaluate efficacy of a vaccine program, benefits of indirect protection conferred by vaccination warrant further study.

  9. Dynamic modeling of cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination, Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Freiesleben de Blasio, Birgitte; Flem, Elmira; Latipov, Renat; Kuatbaeva, Ajnagul; Kristiansen, Ivar Sønbø

    2014-01-01

    The government of Kazakhstan, a middle-income country in Central Asia, is considering the introduction of rotavirus vaccination into its national immunization program. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination spanning 20 years by using a synthesis of dynamic transmission models accounting for herd protection. We found that a vaccination program with 90% coverage would prevent ≈880 rotavirus deaths and save an average of 54,784 life-years for children <5 years of age. Indirect protection accounted for 40% and 60% reduction in severe and mild rotavirus gastroenteritis, respectively. Cost per life year gained was US $18,044 from a societal perspective and US $23,892 from a health care perspective. Comparing the 2 key parameters of cost-effectiveness, mortality rates and vaccine cost at vaccination program costs would be entirely offset. To further evaluate efficacy of a vaccine program, benefits of indirect protection conferred by vaccination warrant further study. PMID:24378188

  10. The first case of Kawasaki disease in a 20-month old baby following immunization with rotavirus vaccine and hepatitis A vaccine in China: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shi; Liubao, Peng; Chongqing, Tan; Xiaomin, Wan

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) after rotavirus and hepatitis A vaccination has not previously been reported in a baby in China. Herein, we describe a 20-month-old child who developed Kawasaki disease after receiving her second dose of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine (LLR) and her first dose of freeze-dried live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine. The case report was conducted by collecting and analyzing the hospital in-patient medical records and reviewing both the domestic and foreign pertinent literature. These findings will be important to note this possible side effect and to further investigate the association between the above 2 vaccines and Kawasaki disease.

  11. Evaluation of RIT 4237 bovine rotavirus vaccine in newborn infants: correlation of vaccine efficacy to season of birth in relation to rotavirus epidemic period.

    PubMed

    Ruuska, T; Vesikari, T; Delem, A; André, F E; Beards, G M; Flewett, T H

    1990-01-01

    A single oral dose of bovine rotavirus vaccine RIT 4237 or placebo was given to 2 groups of 5-day-old infants, born in October 1984 (n = 244) and June 1985 (n = 245), who remained in follow-up for 2.8 and 2.0 years, respectively. The vaccine had no effect on the total number of detectable episodes of rotavirus diarrhoea: there were 22 cases in the vaccinees and 24 in the placebo recipients in the October group and 18 and 16 respectively in the June group. However, vaccination decreased significantly the clinical severity of rotavirus diarrhoea, as assessed by a numerical score 0-20; this vaccine effect was much greater in the infants born in October. The mean severity scores for vaccine and placebo recipients were 4.55 and 10.75 respectively in the October group (p less than 0.0001, t-test) and 8.2 and 11.6 respectively in the June group (p = 0.010, t-test). Vaccine-induced clinical protection against rotavirus diarrhoea did not correlate well with serological response after vaccination, but showed good correlation to the presence of rotavirus antibodies before the rotavirus epidemic season. It is concluded that bovine rotavirus vaccine is more efficacious when given immediately before the rotavirus epidemic season: the vaccine effect may be amplified by exposure to wild rotaviruses during the season.

  12. The cost effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi Jarrahi, Yasaman; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Sadigh, Nader; Esmaeelpoor Langeroudy, Keyhan; Khodadost, Mahmoud; Ranjbaran, Mehdi; Sanjari Moghaddam, Ali; Besharat, Mehdi; Mosavi Jarrahi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea leading to hospitalization or disease-specific death among young children. Effective vaccines have recently been approved and successful vaccination program implemented. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost effectiveness of mass rotavirus vaccination program in Iran. We developed a Markov model that reflects key features of rotavirus natural history. Parameters of the model were assessed by field study or developed through literature search and published data. We applied the model to the 2009 Iranian birth cohort and evaluated the cost-effectiveness of including the rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix®) into Iranian expanded immunization program (EPI). With an estimated hospitalization rate of 0.05 and outpatient rate of 0.23 cases per person-year, vaccinating cohort of 1231735 infants in Iran with 2 doses of (Rotarix®), would prevent 32092 hospitalizations, 158750 outpatient visits, and 1591 deaths during 5 y of follow-up. Under base-case assumption of $10 cost per course of vaccine, the vaccination would incur an extra cost of $1,019,192 from health care perspective and would avert 54680 DALYs. From societal perspective, there would be $15,192,568 saving for the society with the same averted DALYs. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio showed a cost of $19 US dollars per averted DALY from health care perspective and a saving of $278 US dollars for each averted DALY from societal perspective. Introducing rotavirus vaccine into EPI program would be highly cost-effective public health intervention in Iran. PMID:26360331

  13. Rotavirus, vaccine and unanswered questions: a perspective from a least developed country.

    PubMed

    Pun, Sher Bahadur

    2013-01-01

    Two rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq (Merck) and Rotarix (GlaxoSmithKline) have been developed to neutralize the most common rotavirus serotypes, and are now available in the global market. These vaccines are primarily aimed at reducing rotavirus gastroenteritis in children in the least developed countries, where rotavirus mortality rate is believed to be greatest. Thus, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended rotavirus vaccination be included in all national immunization programs, while the least developed countries have so far not come up with clear vision and long term strategy on vaccine implementation, and several questions, in addition to this, remain unanswered.

  14. Rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 (Rotarix™): a pharmacoeconomic review of its use in the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Plosker, Greg L

    2011-11-01

    This article provides an overview of the clinical profile of rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 (Rotarix™) in the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) in developing countries, followed by a comprehensive review of pharmacoeconomic analyses with the vaccine in low- and middle-income countries. RVGE is associated with significant morbidity and mortality among children <5 years of age in developing countries. The protective efficacy of a two-dose oral series of rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 has been demonstrated in several well designed clinical trials conducted in developing countries, and the 'real-world' effectiveness of the vaccine has also been shown in naturalistic and case-control trials after the introduction of universal vaccination programmes with RIX4414 in Latin American countries. The WHO recommends universal rotavirus vaccination programmes for all countries. Numerous modelled cost-effectiveness analyses have been conducted with rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 across a wide range of low- and middle-income countries. Although data sources and assumptions varied across studies, results of the analyses consistently showed that the introduction of the vaccine as part of a national vaccination programme would be very (or highly) cost effective compared with no rotavirus vaccination programme, according to widely used cost-effectiveness thresholds for developing countries. Vaccine price was not known at the time the analyses were conducted and had to be estimated. In sensitivity analyses, rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 generally remained cost effective at the highest of a range of possible vaccine prices considered. Despite these favourable results, decisions regarding the implementation of universal vaccination programmes with RIX4414 may also be contingent on budgetary and other factors, underscoring the importance of subsidized vaccination programmes for poor countries through the GAVI Alliance (formerly the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization).

  15. Pharmacoeconomic spotlight on rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 (Rotarix™) in the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Plosker, Greg L

    2012-12-01

    This article provides an overview of the clinical profile of rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 (Rotarix™) in the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) in developing countries, followed by a review of pharmacoeconomic analyses with the vaccine in low- and middle-income countries. RVGE is associated with significant morbidity and mortality among children <5 years of age in developing countries. The protective efficacy of a two-dose oral series of rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 has been demonstrated in several well designed clinical trials conducted in developing countries, and the 'real-world' effectiveness of the vaccine has also been shown in naturalistic and case-control trials after the introduction of universal vaccination programs with RIX4414 in Latin American countries. The WHO recommends universal rotavirus vaccination programs for all countries. Numerous modelled cost-effectiveness analyses have been conducted with rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 across a wide range of low- and middle-income countries. Although data sources and assumptions varied across studies, results of the analyses consistently showed that the introduction of the vaccine as part of a national vaccination program would be very cost effective compared with no rotavirus vaccination program, according to widely used cost-effectiveness thresholds for developing countries. Vaccine price was not known at the time the analyses were conducted and had to be estimated. In sensitivity analyses, rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 generally remained cost effective at the highest of a range of possible vaccine prices considered. Despite these favorable results, decisions regarding the implementation of universal vaccination programs with RIX4414 may also be contingent on budgetary and other factors, underscoring the importance of subsidized vaccination programs for poor countries through the GAVI Alliance (formerly the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization).

  16. Impact of rotavirus vaccination on coverage and timing of pentavalent vaccination - Experience from 2 Latin American countries.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, A; Pessler, F; Akmatov, M K

    2016-05-01

    We examined the coverage and timing of rotavirus vaccination and the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on coverage and timing of the pentavalent vaccine. We used data from the Demographic and Health Surveys in Honduras (2011/2012) and Peru (2012). The samples were divided into 2 subcohorts: children born before and after the introduction of rotavirus vaccine. We compared coverage and timing of the pentavalent vaccine in the aforementioned subcohorts. Coverage with the first and second doses of rotavirus vaccination was 95% (95% confidence intervals: 93-97%) and 91% (89-95%) in Honduras and 79% (77-82%) and 72% (69-75%) in Peru, respectively. Coverage increased in both countries over the years. The proportion of children vaccinated according to age-appropriate vaccination schedules varied between 67% (second dose of rotavirus vaccinations in Peru) and 89% (first dose of rotavirus vaccination in Honduras). Coverage with the first and second doses of pentavalent vaccination remained constant over the years in Honduras, while in Peru there was a significant increase in coverage over the years (p for trend, <0.0001). In both countries, timing of pentavalent vaccination was better in post-rota-cohorts than in pre-rota-cohorts. Since its introduction, coverage of rotavirus vaccination has improved over time in both countries. An introduction of rotavirus vaccination in both countries appears to have improved the coverage and timing of other similarly scheduled vaccinations. PMID:26833132

  17. Rotavirus Seasonal Distribution and Prevalence Before and After the Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccine in a Peri-Urban Community of Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Millie R.; Velapatiño, Grace; Campos, Miguel; Chea-Woo, Elsa; Baiocchi, Nelly; Cleary, Thomas G.; Ochoa, Theresa J.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the monthly distribution of rotavirus diarrhea in a cohort of children 12–24 months of age followed as part of a diarrhea clinical trial in a peri-urban community of Lima. We observed a peak of rotavirus diarrhea in the winter months and a decrease in rotavirus prevalence after the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in Peru. PMID:25778507

  18. Effectiveness and impact of rotavirus vaccines in Europe, 2006-2014.

    PubMed

    Karafillakis, Emilie; Hassounah, Sondus; Atchison, Christina

    2015-04-27

    Prior to the introduction of rotavirus vaccines in 2006, rotavirus was the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis among European children <5 years of age. We conducted a systematic review of the published literature to examine the effectiveness and impact of rotavirus vaccines in Europe following the first eight years of routine use. Four publication databases were searched, yielding 276 unique citations from February 1st, 2006 to July 31st, 2014. Twenty four studies on effectiveness (n=9) and impact (n=15) met the inclusion criteria. Across Europe, vaccine effectiveness against rotavirus-related healthcare utilisation ranged from 68% to 98%, consistent with efficacy data from clinical trials. Reductions in rotavirus hospitalisations ranged from 65% to 84%, consistent with findings from post-marketing studies from the US and Latin America. We confirm the significant public health benefit of rotavirus vaccination in Europe and provide further evidence to support implementation of universal rotavirus vaccination in all European countries.

  19. Cost effectiveness of a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in Oman

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotavirus gastroenteritis (RGE) is the leading cause of diarrhea in young children in Oman, incurring substantial healthcare and economic burden. We propose to formally assess the potential cost effectiveness of implementing universal vaccination with a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) on reducing the health care burden and costs associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis (RGE) in Oman Methods A Markov model was used to compare two birth cohorts, including children who were administered the RV5 vaccination versus those who were not, in a hypothetical group of 65,500 children followed for their first 5 years of life in Oman. The efficacy of the vaccine in reducing RGE-related hospitalizations, emergency department (ED) and office visits, and days of parental work loss for children receiving the vaccine was based on the results of the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST). The outcome of interest was cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained from health care system and societal perspectives. Results A universal RV5 vaccination program is projected to reduce, hospitalizations, ED visits, outpatient visits and parental work days lost due to rotavirus infections by 89%, 80%, 67% and 74%, respectively. In the absence of RV5 vaccination, RGE-related societal costs are projected to be 2,023,038 Omani Rial (OMR) (5,259,899 United States dollars [USD]), including 1,338,977 OMR (3,481,340 USD) in direct medical costs. However, with the introduction of RV5, direct medical costs are projected to be 216,646 OMR (563,280 USD). Costs per QALY saved would be 1,140 OMR (2,964 USD) from the health care payer perspective. An RV5 vaccination program would be considered cost saving, from the societal perspective. Conclusions Universal RV5 vaccination in Oman is likely to significantly reduce the health care burden and costs associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis and may be cost-effective from the payer perspective and cost saving from the societal

  20. Value of post-licensure data on benefits and risks of vaccination to inform vaccine policy: The example of rotavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Umesh D; Cortese, Margaret M; Payne, Daniel C; Lopman, Benjamin; Yen, Catherine; Tate, Jacqueline E

    2015-11-27

    In 1999, the first rhesus-human reassortant rotavirus vaccine licensed in the United States was withdrawn within a year of its introduction after it was linked with intussusception at a rate of ∼1 excess case per 10,000 vaccinated infants. While clinical trials of 60,000-70,000 infants of each of the two current live oral rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq (RV5) and Rotarix (RV1), did not find an association with intussusception, post-licensure studies have documented a risk in several high and middle income countries, at a rate of ∼1-6 excess cases per 100,000 vaccinated infants. However, considering this low risk against the large health benefits of vaccination that have been observed in many countries, including in countries with a documented vaccine-associated intussusception risk, policy makers and health organizations around the world continue to support the routine use of RV1 and RV5 in national infant immunization programs. Because the risk and benefit data from affluent settings may not be directly applicable to developing countries, further characterization of any associated intussusception risk following rotavirus vaccination as well as the health benefits of vaccination is desirable for low income settings.

  1. [The rotavirus disease and the oral human rotavirus vaccination in the Brazilian scenario: an integrative literature review].

    PubMed

    Salvador, Pétala Tuani Candido de Oliveira; de Almeida, Taciana Jacinto de; Alves, Kisna Yasmin Andrade; Dantas, Cilene Nunes

    2011-02-01

    Due to the epidemiological relevance of rotavirus disease on the worldwide panorama as an important cause of morbid-mortality in the infantile public and to the still incipient production of studies concerning the problematic in the nationwide scenario, not to mention the unique necessity of encouraging the promotion of care and education as inseparable factors in the health spaces, it was delimited as study object of the present article the rotavirus disease in the Brazilian scenario, emphasizing the vaccination as preventive measure against this ill. Thus it is aimed to analyze the publications about rotavirus disease in our country's contexture, stressing the vaccination against the Rotavirus (VORH) as the strategy mentioned. It is a bibliographic research performed on the BDENF, Lilacs, SciELO and Medline databases, in February 2010. During the study the following thematic pillars were discussed: rotavirus characteristics; the rotavirus disease as a public health issue; and the vaccination against rotavirus as primordial action of health care. The study evidenced the epidemiological importance of rotavirus disease in the worldwide scenario and the relevance of vaccination as preventive measure against such problematics.

  2. The cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in Armenia.

    PubMed

    Jit, Mark; Yuzbashyan, Ruzanna; Sahakyan, Gayane; Avagyan, Tigran; Mosina, Liudmila

    2011-11-01

    The cost-effectiveness of introducing infant rotavirus vaccination in Armenia in 2012 using Rotarix(R) was evaluated using a multiple birth cohort model. The model considered the cost and health implications of hospitalisations, primary health care consultations and episodes not leading to medical care in children under five years old. Rotavirus vaccination is expected to cost the Ministry of Health $220,000 in 2012, rising to $830,000 in 2016 following termination of GAVI co-financing, then declining to $260,000 in 2025 due to vaccine price maturity. It may reduce health care costs by $34,000 in the first year, rising to $180,000 by 2019. By 2025, vaccination may be close to cost saving to the Ministry of Health if the vaccine purchase price declines as expected. Once coverage has reached high levels, vaccination may prevent 25,000 cases, 3000 primary care consultations, 1000 hospitalisations and 8 deaths per birth cohort vaccinated. The cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) saved is estimated to be about $650 from the perspective of the Ministry of Health, $850 including costs accrued to both the Ministry and to GAVI, $820 from a societal perspective excluding indirect costs and $44 from a societal perspective including indirect costs. Since the gross domestic product per capita of Armenia in 2008 was $3800, rotavirus vaccination is likely to be regarded as "very cost-effective" from a WHO standpoint. Vaccination may still be "very cost-effective" if less favourable assumptions are used regarding vaccine price and disease incidence, as long as DALYs are not age-weighted.

  3. The cost-effectiveness of pentavalent rotavirus vaccination in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Katherine E; Shim, Eunha; Carroll, Stuart; Quilici, Sibilia; Galvani, Alison P

    2012-11-01

    Rotavirus vaccines have shown great potential for reducing the disease burden of the major cause of severe childhood gastroenteritis. The decision regarding whether rotavirus vaccination will be introduced into the national immunization program is currently being reviewed. The conclusions of previous evaluations of rotavirus vaccination cost-effectiveness contradict each other. This is the first analysis to incorporate a dynamic transmission model to assess the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in England and Wales. Most previously reported models do not include herd protection, and thus may underestimate the cost-effectiveness of vaccination against rotavirus. We incorporate a dynamic model of rotavirus transmission in England and Wales into a cost-effectiveness analysis to determine the probability that the pentavalent rotavirus vaccination will be cost-effective over a range of full-course vaccine prices. This novel approach allows the cost-effectiveness analysis to include a feasible level of herd protection provided by a vaccination program. Our base case model predicts that pentavalent rotavirus vaccination is likely to be cost-effective in England and Wales at £ 60 per course. In some scenarios the vaccination is predicted to be not only cost-effective but also cost-saving. These savings could be generated within ten years after vaccine introduction. Our budget impact analysis demonstrates that for the realistic base case scenarios, 58-96% of the cost outlay for vaccination will be recouped within the first four years of a program. Our results indicate that rotavirus vaccination would be beneficial to public health and could be economically sound. Since rotavirus vaccination is not presently on the immunization schedule for England and Wales but is currently under review, this study can inform policymakers of the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of implementing a mass rotavirus vaccine strategy.

  4. Monovalent rotavirus vaccine provides protection against an emerging fully heterotypic G9P[4] rotavirus strain in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Yen, Catherine; Figueroa, Jesùs Reyna; Uribe, Edgar Sánchez; Carmen-Hernández, Luz Del; Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D; Patel, Manish M; Richardson López-Collado, Vesta

    2011-09-01

    After the introduction of monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1) in Mexico in 2006-2007, diarrhea mortality and morbidity declined substantially among Mexican children under 5 years of age. In January 2010, surveillance identified the emergence of a novel G9P[4] rotavirus strain nationwide. We conducted a case-control study to assess the field effectiveness of RV1 against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis caused by this unusual strain and to determine whether the G9P[4] emergence was related to vaccine failure or failure to vaccinate. RV1 was 94% effective (95% confidence interval, 16%-100%) against G9P[4] rotavirus-related hospitalization, indicating that its emergence was likely unrelated to vaccine pressure.

  5. Characterization of RotaTeq® vaccine-derived rotaviruses in South Korean infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Than, Van Thai; Jeong, Sunyoung; Kim, Wonyong

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping of human rotaviruses was performed in 191 rotavirus-positive fecal samples collected from infants with acute gastroenteritis, 3 years after the introduction of two rotavirus vaccines in South Korea. Among these samples, the most prevalent rotavirus genotype was G3P[8] (30.9%), followed by G1P[8] (27.7%), G4P[6] (15.2%), and G9P[8] (5.8%). Sequence analysis identified RotaTeq® vaccine-derived strains in 12 samples (6.3%), comprising 11 G1P[8] human-bovine double reassortant rotaviruses and 1 G1P[5] human-bovine single reassortant rotavirus. It is of note that cross-reactivity between the current G4-specific typing primer and RotaTeq®-specific G1 genotypes was found. A trace of the clinical and environmental routes of the rotavirus vaccine strains revealed unexpected complexity, and the diagnostic protocol for rotaviruses may require modification by using either another typing primer set or nucleotide sequence analysis.

  6. Health Impact of Rotavirus Vaccination in Developing Countries: Progress and Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Umesh D; Johnson, Hope; Steele, A Duncan; Tate, Jacqueline E

    2016-05-01

    Two rotavirus vaccines have been licensed in >100 countries worldwide since 2006. As of October 2105, these vaccines have been implemented in the national immunization programs of 79 countries, including 36 low-income countries that are eligible for support for vaccine purchase from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. Rotavirus vaccines were initially introduced in Australia and countries of the Americas and Europe after completion of successful clinical trials in these regions, and the impact of routine vaccination in reducing the health burden of severe childhood gastroenteritis in these regions has been well documented. Because of concerns around the performance of orally administered rotavirus vaccines in developing countries, vaccine implementation in these settings only began after additional clinical trials were completed and the World Health Organization issued a global recommendation for use of rotavirus vaccines in 2009. This supplementary issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases includes a collection of articles describing the impact and effectiveness of routine rotavirus vaccination in developing countries that were among the early adopters of rotavirus vaccine. The data highlight the benefits of vaccination and should provide valuable evidence to sustain vaccine use in these countries and encourage other countries to adopt routine rotavirus vaccination to reduce the health burden of severe childhood gastroenteritis. PMID:27059361

  7. Health Impact of Rotavirus Vaccination in Developing Countries: Progress and Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Umesh D; Johnson, Hope; Steele, A Duncan; Tate, Jacqueline E

    2016-05-01

    Two rotavirus vaccines have been licensed in >100 countries worldwide since 2006. As of October 2105, these vaccines have been implemented in the national immunization programs of 79 countries, including 36 low-income countries that are eligible for support for vaccine purchase from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. Rotavirus vaccines were initially introduced in Australia and countries of the Americas and Europe after completion of successful clinical trials in these regions, and the impact of routine vaccination in reducing the health burden of severe childhood gastroenteritis in these regions has been well documented. Because of concerns around the performance of orally administered rotavirus vaccines in developing countries, vaccine implementation in these settings only began after additional clinical trials were completed and the World Health Organization issued a global recommendation for use of rotavirus vaccines in 2009. This supplementary issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases includes a collection of articles describing the impact and effectiveness of routine rotavirus vaccination in developing countries that were among the early adopters of rotavirus vaccine. The data highlight the benefits of vaccination and should provide valuable evidence to sustain vaccine use in these countries and encourage other countries to adopt routine rotavirus vaccination to reduce the health burden of severe childhood gastroenteritis.

  8. Intussusception following rotavirus vaccination in the Valencia Region, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Vilar, Silvia; Díez-Domingo, Javier; Puig-Barberà, Joan; Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Romio, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown high intussusception rates in Spain. We performed a hospital-based retrospective observational study of the intussusception risk following rotavirus vaccinations among infants in Valencia, a region of Spain with an annual birth cohort of approximately 48,000 children, during 2007–2011, using a self-controlled case series design. We performed medical record review of all cases using Brighton Collaboration´s case definition and assessed the positive predictive value (PPV) of the intussusception diagnosis code. Among 151 hospitalized cases discharged as intussusception, we confirmed 136 as Brighton Collaboration's Levels 1 or 2, resulting in a PPV of 93% (95% CI: 87%–96%). Three confirmed cases occurred within days 1–7 following the first rotavirus vaccination. The incidence rate ratio was 9.0 (95% CI: 0.9–86.5) (crude) and 4.7 (95% CI:0.3–74.1)(age adjusted). In this first study in Europe, the intussusception risk point estimate was comparable to other studies, although results were not statistically significant, maybe due to limited power. The high PPV found will facilitate implementation of a larger study without requiring medical record review. Our finding of very few vaccinated cases despite a thorough 5-year investigation in a country that, according to previous studies, may have a large background rate of intussusception is reassuring and should contribute to deliberations about the need to include rotavirus vaccines in the official Spanish calendars. PMID:26083707

  9. Rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Desselberger, Ulrich

    2014-09-22

    Recent advances of rotavirus (RV) basic and applied research are reviewed. They consist of determination of the RV particle structure and functions of structural proteins, classification into genotypes based on whole genome analyses, description of the RV genome and gene protein assignments, description of the viral replication cycle and of functions of RV-encoded non-structural proteins as well as cellular proteins and cellular organelles involved, the present status of RV genetics and reverse genetics, molecular determinants of pathogenesis and pathophysiology, the RV-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, innate immune responses and correlates of protection, laboratory diagnosis, differential diagnosis and present status of treatment, the molecular epidemiology and mechanisms of evolution of RVs, the development and universal application of RV vaccines as well as issues arising from present universal RV vaccination programs and work on alternative vaccines. The review concludes by presenting problems requiring further exploration and perspectives of future basic and translational research. PMID:25016036

  10. Oral immunization with live Lactococcus lactis expressing rotavirus VP8 subunit induces specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Belkis; Perez, Ana Rosa; Banchio, Claudia; de Mendoza, Diego; Magni, Christian

    2011-07-01

    Rotaviruses are the major cause of worldwide infectious diarrhea in children and vaccination is considered to be the most effective way to control these infections. The development of a mucosal live vaccine using the food-grade lactic acid bacteria Lactococcus lactis as antigen vehicle is an attractive and safe vaccination strategy against rotavirus. In this study, the construction of recombinant L. lactis strains able to produce the rotavirus spike-protein subunit VP8 in cytoplasmic, secreted and cell wall-anchored forms is reported. Evaluation of the immune response generated after immunization was conducted in a mouse model. The present study shows that animals inoculated orally with the L. lactis strain producing the cytoplasmic form of VP8 (LL1) developed significant levels of intestinal IgA antibodies while animals receiving L. lactis producing the cell wall-anchored VP8 form (LL3) exhibited anti-VP8 antibodies at both intestinal and systemic levels. Furthermore, it was observed that intestinal antibodies of the LL1-treated group and serum antibodies of the LL3-treated group were able to block rotavirus infection by 50% and 100%, respectively. These encouraging results represent a step towards the development of a new and safe mucosal vaccine against rotavirus.

  11. Impact of vaccination uptake on hospitalizations due to rotavirus acute gastroenteritis in 2 different socioeconomic areas of Spain.

    PubMed

    Giménez Sánchez, Francisco; Nogueira, Esperanza Jiménez; Sánchez Forte, Miguel; Ibáñez Alcalde, Mercedes; Cobo, Elvira; Angulo, Raquel; Garrido Fernández, Pablo

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of hospitalization due to acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in infants and toddlers. However, rotavirus vaccination has been associated with a decline in hospitalization rates due to rotavirus AGE. A descriptive retrospective study was conducted to analyze the impact of rotavirus vaccination on the rate of hospitalizations due to AGE among children ≤2 years old in 2 areas of the province of Almería, Spain. After eight years of rotavirus vaccination, rates of hospitalizations due to rotavirus AGE are diminished. This decline is closely related to vaccine coverage in the studied areas.

  12. Progress in the introduction of rotavirus vaccine--Latin America and the Caribbean, 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    2011-12-01

    Rotavirus disease is the leading cause of childhood morbidity and mortality related to diarrhea in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), where an estimated 8,000 deaths related to rotavirus diarrhea occur annually among children aged <5 years. After two safe and effective rotavirus vaccines became available, the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2007 recommended inclusion of rotavirus vaccine in the immunization programs of Europe and the Americas, and in 2009 expanded the recommendation to all infants aged <32 weeks worldwide. This report describes progress in the introduction of rotavirus vaccine in LAC, where it was first introduced in 2006 in Brazil, El Salvador, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, and Venezuela; by January 2011, it was included in the national immunization schedules of 14 countries in LAC. Estimated national rotavirus vaccine coverage (2 doses of the monovalent vaccine or 3 doses of the pentavalent vaccine) among children aged <1 year in 2010 ranged from 49% to 98% (median: 89%) in the 11 LAC countries with vaccine introduction before 2010. Of the 14 countries that had introduced rotavirus vaccine into their national immunization programs, 13 participate in a hospital-based rotavirus surveillance network. Data from some countries in this network and from other monitoring efforts in LAC countries have shown declines in hospitalizations and deaths related to severe diarrhea after rotavirus vaccine introduction. The rapid introduction of rotavirus vaccine in LAC demonstrates the benefits of the early commitment of national decision makers to introduce these vaccines in low-income and middle-income countries at the same time as in high-income countries.

  13. Dual functions of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™ at the intermediate dose in protection against rotavirus diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs vaccinated with a human rotavirus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fangning; Wen, Ke; Li, Guohua; Yang, Xingdong; Kocher, Jacob; Bui, Tammy; Jones, Dorothy; Pelzer, Kevin; Clark-Deener, Sherrie; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine dose effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (LA) ™ strain on rotavirus-specific antibody and B cell responses in gnotobiotic pigs vaccinated with an oral attenuated human rotavirus (AttHRV). Methods Pigs were inoculated with AttHRV vaccine in conjunction with high dose LA (14 doses, total 2.2×109 colony forming units [CFU]), intermediate dose LA (9 doses, total 3.2×106 CFU), low dose LA (5 doses, total 2.1×106 CFU) or without LA feeding. Protection against rotavirus shedding and diarrhea was assessed upon challenge with a virulent HRV. Rotavirus-specific IgA and IgG antibodies in serum and rotavirus-specific IgA and IgG antibody-secreting cells (ASC) and memory B cells in ileum, spleen and blood of the pigs were measured and compared among treatment groups. Results The intermediate dose LA (MidLA), but not high or low dose LA, significantly reduced rotavirus diarrhea (MidLA only group) and significantly improved the protection conferred by AttHRV vaccine (MidLA+AttHRV group). Associated with the increased protection, MidLA significantly enhanced rotavirus-specific antibody, ASC and memory B cell responses to AttHRV vaccine. High or low dose LA did not enhance virus-specific antibody and ASC responses, hence did not improve the vaccine efficacy. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of dose selection and indicate that certain specific lactobacilli strains at the appropriate dose have the dual function of reducing rotavirus diarrhea and enhancing the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of rotavirus vaccines. PMID:24126832

  14. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of yeast extracts containing rotavirus-like particles: a potential veterinary vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Limas, William A; Pastor, Ana Ruth; Esquivel-Soto, Ernesto; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2014-05-19

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea in many animal species of economic interest. A simple, safe and cost-effective vaccine is required for the control and prevention of rotavirus in animals. In this study, we evaluated the use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts containing rotavirus-like particles (RLP) as a vaccine candidate in an adult mice model. Two doses of 1mg of yeast extract containing rotavirus proteins (between 0.3 and 3 μg) resulted in an immunological response capable of reducing the replication of rotavirus after infection. Viral shedding in all mice groups diminished in comparison with the control group when challenged with 100 50% diarrhea doses (DD50) of murine rotavirus strain EDIM. Interestingly, when immunizing intranasally protection against rotavirus infection was observed even when no increase in rotavirus-specific antibody titers was evident, suggesting that cellular responses were responsible of protection. Our results indicate that raw yeast extracts containing rotavirus proteins and RLP are a simple, cost-effective alternative for veterinary vaccines against rotavirus.

  15. Strain diversity plays no major role in the varying efficacy of rotavirus vaccines: an overview.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Daniel E; Parashar, Umesh D; Jiang, Baoming

    2014-12-01

    While a monovalent Rotarix® [RV1] and a pentavalent RotaTeq® [RV5] have been extensively tested and found generally safe and equally efficacious in clinical trials, the question still lingers about the evolving diversity of circulating rotavirus strains over time and their relationship with protective immunity induced by rotavirus vaccines. We reviewed data from clinical trials and observational studies that assessed the efficacy or field effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines against different rotavirus strains worldwide. RV1 provided broad clinical efficacy and field effectiveness against severe diarrhea due to all major circulating strains, including the homotypic G1P[8] and the fully heterotypic G2P[4] strains. Similarly, RV5 provided broad efficacy and effectiveness against RV5 and non-RV5 strains throughout different locations. Rotavirus vaccination provides broad heterotypic protection; however continuing surveillance is needed to track the change of circulating strains and monitor the effectiveness and safety of vaccines.

  16. Evaluation of the Intussusception Risk after Pentavalent Rotavirus Vaccination in Finnish Infants

    PubMed Central

    Leino, Tuija; Ollgren, Jukka; Strömberg, Nina; Elonsalo, Ulpu

    2016-01-01

    Background An association between rotavirus immunisation and intussusception (IS) has been suggested with present rotavirus vaccines in post-licensure studies. In Finland, rotavirus vaccination programme was implemented in September 2009 using a 2, 3, and 5 months schedule with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine. By the end of 2013, it is estimated that 719 000 rotavirus vaccine doses have been given in the national programme of which 240 000 were first doses. Nationwide register allows us to evaluate the association between rotavirus vaccination and IS. Methods and Materials Cases of IS diagnosed during 1999–2013 were identified from National Hospital Discharge Register. All cases under 250 days of age diagnosed during 2009–2013 were confirmed by reviewing medical charts. Self-controlled case-series method was used to assess the risk of IS during 1–21 days compared to 22–42 days post vaccination. Findings In register data the relative incidence of IS at 2 months of age between the post and pre vaccination era was 9.1 (95%CI 2.0–84.3). We identified 22 verified cases with date of admission less than 43 days after any of the three rotavirus vaccine doses. The incidence of IS in the risk period after the 1st dose relative to the control period was 2.0 (95% CI 0.5–8.4; p = 0.34.) Number of excess IS cases per 100 000 first vaccine doses was therefore estimated to be 1.04 (95% CI 0.0–2.5), i.e. one additional IS case per 96 000 first doses of rotavirus vaccine (95% CI 54 600 to ∞). There was no risk detected after 2nd and 3rd doses. Conclusion The finding is in line with the recent published estimates. The benefits of rotavirus immunisation programme outweigh possible small risks of intussusception. PMID:26950702

  17. Determining the effectiveness of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine against rotavirus hospitalizations and emergency department visits using two study designs

    PubMed Central

    Donauer, Stephanie; Payne, Daniel C.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Szilagyi, Peter G.; Hornung, Richard W.; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Chappell, James; Hall, Caroline B.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Staat, Mary Allen

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the vaccine effectiveness (VE) of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) for preventing rotavirus-related hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits during the 2006–07 and 2007–08 rotavirus seasons using two study designs. Active, prospective population-based surveillance was conducted to identify cases of laboratory-confirmed rotavirus-related hospitalizations and ED visits to be used in case-cohort and case-control designs. VE was calculated using one comparison group for the case-cohort method and two comparison groups for the case-control method. The VE estimates produced by the three analyses were similar. Three doses of RV5 were effective for preventing rotavirus-related hospitalizations and ED visits in each analysis, with VE estimated as 92% in all three analyses. Two doses of RV5 were also effective, with VE ranging from 79% to 83%. A single dose was effective in the case-cohort analysis, but was not significant in either of the case-control analyses. The case-cohort and the case-control study designs produced the same VE point estimates for completion of the three dose series. Two and three doses of RV5 were effective in preventing rotavirus-related hospitalizations and ED visits. PMID:23583814

  18. Cost-Effectiveness of Rotavirus Vaccination in Bolivia from the State Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily R.; Rowlinson, Emily E.; Iniguez, Volga; Etienne, Kizee A.; Rivera, Rosario; Mamani, Nataniel; Rheingans, Rick; Patzi, Maritza; Halkyer, Percy; Leon, Juan S.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND In Bolivia, in 2008, the under-five mortality rate is 54 per 1000 live births. Diarrhea causes 15% of these deaths, and 40% of pediatric diarrhea-related hospitalizations are caused by rotavirus illness (RI). Rotavirus vaccination (RV), subsidized by international donors, is expected to reduce morbidity, mortality, and economic burden to the Bolivian state. Estimates of illness and economic burden of RI and their reduction by RV are essential to the Bolivian state’s policies on RV program financing. The goal of this report is to estimate the economic burden of RI and the cost-effectiveness of the RV program. METHODS To assess treatment costs incurred by the healthcare system, we abstracted medical records from 287 inpatients and 6,751 outpatients with acute diarrhea between 2005 and 2006 at 5 sentinel hospitals in 4 geographic regions. RI prevalence rates were estimated from 4 years of national hospital surveillance. We used a decision-analytic model to assess the potential cost-effectiveness of universal RV in Bolivia. RESULTS Our model estimates that, in a 5-year birth cohort, Bolivia will incur over US$3 million in direct medical costs due to RI. RV reduces, by at least 60%, outpatient visits, hospitalizations, deaths, and total direct medical costs associated with rotavirus diarrhea. Further, RV was cost-savings below a price of US$3.81 per dose and cost-effective below a price of US$194.10 per dose. Diarrheal mortality and hospitalization inputs were the most important drivers of rotavirus vaccine cost-effectiveness. DISCUSSION Our data will guide Bolivia’s funding allocation for RV as international subsidies change. PMID:21624421

  19. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events. PMID:27462899

  20. Protection against gastroenteritis in US households with children who received rotavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Margaret M; Dahl, Rebecca Moritz; Curns, Aaron T; Parashar, Umesh D

    2015-02-15

    We used Truven Health Marketscan claims database (2008-2011) to compare gastroenteritis rates during January-June among households whose child had received rotavirus vaccine with those whose child did not receive vaccine. Statistically significantly lower rates of hospitalization with a rotavirus gastroenteritis or unspecified-gastroenteritis discharge code occurred in vaccinated households among persons 20-29 years and females 20-29 years (2008/2009), and males 30-39 years (2009/2010). Lower emergency department gastroenteritis rates occurred in vaccinated households among females 20-29 years (2009/2010) and individuals 5-19 years (2010/2011). These data suggest rotavirus vaccination of infants provides indirect protection against moderate-to-severe rotavirus disease in young parents and older siblings.

  1. Preparing for the scale-up of rotavirus vaccine introduction in Africa: establishing surveillance platforms to monitor disease burden and vaccine impact.

    PubMed

    Mwenda, Jason M; Tate, Jacqueline E; Steele, A Duncan; Parashar, Umesh D

    2014-01-01

    Countries in Africa have begun introducing rotavirus vaccines in their national immunization programs, and wide-scale rollout across the continent is expected during the next few years. In preparation for vaccine introduction, many countries initiated surveillance for rotavirus and other studies to document disease burden, to describe the epidemiology and to monitor circulating rotavirus strains in Africa. In addition, 2 countries sought to systematically investigate cases of intussusception, a rare adverse event that has been associated with rotavirus vaccines in some settings. The ongoing surveillance provided data that will serve as a baseline against which the impact of rotavirus vaccines in Africa can be assessed.

  2. Sustained low rotavirus activity and hospitalisation rates in the post-vaccination era in Belgium, 2007 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Sabbe, Martine; Berger, Nicolas; Blommaert, Adriaan; Ogunjimi, Benson; Grammens, Tine; Callens, Michiel; Van Herck, Koen; Beutels, Philippe; Van Damme, Pierre; Bilcke, Joke

    2016-07-01

    In 2006, Belgium was the first country in the European Union to recommend rotavirus vaccination in the routine infant vaccination schedule and rapidly achieved high vaccine uptake (86-89% in 2007). We used regional and national data sources up to 7 years post-vaccination to study the impact of vaccination on laboratory-confirmed rotavirus cases and rotavirus-related hospitalisations and deaths. We showed that (i) from 2007 until 2013, vaccination coverage remained at 79-88% for a complete course, (ii) in children 0-2 years, rotavirus cases decreased by 79% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 68--89%) in 2008-2014 compared to the pre-vaccination period (1999--2006) and by 50% (95% CI: 14-82%) in the age group ≥ 10 years, (iii) hospitalisations for rotavirus gastroenteritis decreased by 87% (95% CI: 84-90%) in 2008--2012 compared to the pre-vaccination period (2002--2006), (iv) median age of rotavirus cases increased from 12 months to 17 months and (v) the rotavirus seasonal peak was reduced and delayed in all post-vaccination years. The substantial decline in rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalisations and in rotavirus activity following introduction of rotavirus vaccination is sustained over time and more pronounced in the target age group, but with evidence of herd immunity. PMID:27418466

  3. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands; the results of a consensus model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Each year rotavirus gastroenteritis results in thousands of paediatric hospitalisations and primary care visits in the Netherlands. While two vaccines against rotavirus are registered, routine immunisation of infants has not yet been implemented. Existing cost-effectiveness studies showed inconsistent results for these vaccines because of lack of consensus on the impact. We aimed to investigate which factors had a major impact on cost-effectiveness and were primarily responsible for the large differences in previously estimated cost-effectiveness ratios. Methods Based on updated data on health outcomes and cost estimates, we re-assessed the cost-effectiveness of routine paediatric rotavirus vaccination within the National Immunization Program for the Netherlands. Two consensus meetings were organised with national and international experts in the field to achieve consensus and resolve potential controversies. Results It was estimated that rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands could avert 34,214 cases of rotavirus gastroenteritis in children aged less than 5 years. Notably, 2,779 hospitalisations were averted of which 315 were extensions of existing hospital stays due to nosocomial rotavirus infection. With a threshold varying from 20K€ - 50K€ per QALY and according to the base-case scenario, the full vaccination costs per child leading to cost-effectiveness was €57.76 -€77.71. Results were sensitive to the inclusion of potential vaccine induced herd protection, QALY losses and number of deaths associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis. Conclusions Our economic analysis indicates that inclusion of rotavirus vaccination in the Dutch National Immunization Program might be cost-effective depending on the cost of the vaccine and the impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis on children's quality of life. PMID:21663620

  4. Detection of Rotavirus Genotypes in Korea 5 Years after the Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ju-Young; Kim, Min-Sung; Jung, Tae Woong; Kim, Seong Joon; Kang, Jin-Han; Han, Seung Beom; Kim, Sang Yong; Rhim, Jung Woo; Kim, Hwang-Min; Park, Jae Hong; Jo, Dae Sun; Ma, Sang Hyuk; Jeong, Hye-Sook; Cheon, Doo-Sung; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is one of the most important viral etiologic agents of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children. Although effective RV vaccines (RVVs) are now used worldwide, novel genotypes and outbreaks resulting from rare genotype combinations have emerged. This study documented RV genotypes in a Korean population of children with AGE 5 yr after the introduction of RVV and assessed potential genotype differences based on vaccination status or vaccine type. Children less than 5-yr-old diagnosed with AGE between October 2012 and September 2013 admitted to 9 medical institutions from 8 provinces in Korea were prospectively enrolled. Stool samples were tested for RV by enzyme immunoassay and genotyped by multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. In 346 patients, 114 (32.9%) were RV-positive. Among them, 87 (76.3%) patients were infected with RV alone. Eighty-six of 114 RV-positive stool samples were successfully genotyped, and their combinations of genotypes were G1P[8] (36, 41.9%), G2P[4] (12, 14.0%), and G3P[8] (6, 7.0%). RV was detected in 27.8% of patients in the vaccinated group and 39.8% in the unvaccinated group (P=0.035). Vaccination history was available for 67 of 86 cases with successfully genotyped RV-positive stool samples; RotaTeq (20, 29.9%), Rotarix (7, 10.4%), unvaccinated (40, 59.7%). The incidence of RV AGE is lower in the RV-vaccinated group compared to the unvaccinated group with no evidence of substitution with unusual genotype combinations.

  5. Did Large-Scale Vaccination Drive Changes in the Circulating Rotavirus Population in Belgium?

    PubMed Central

    Pitzer, Virginia E.; Bilcke, Joke; Heylen, Elisabeth; Crawford, Forrest W.; Callens, Michael; De Smet, Frank; Van Ranst, Marc; Zeller, Mark; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination can place selective pressures on viral populations, leading to changes in the distribution of strains as viruses evolve to escape immunity from the vaccine. Vaccine-driven strain replacement is a major concern after nationwide rotavirus vaccine introductions. However, the distribution of the predominant rotavirus genotypes varies from year to year in the absence of vaccination, making it difficult to determine what changes can be attributed to the vaccines. To gain insight in the underlying dynamics driving changes in the rotavirus population, we fitted a hierarchy of mathematical models to national and local genotype-specific hospitalization data from Belgium, where large-scale vaccination was introduced in 2006. We estimated that natural- and vaccine-derived immunity was strongest against completely homotypic strains and weakest against fully heterotypic strains, with an intermediate immunity amongst partially heterotypic strains. The predominance of G2P[4] infections in Belgium after vaccine introduction can be explained by a combination of natural genotype fluctuations and weaker natural and vaccine-induced immunity against infection with strains heterotypic to the vaccine, in the absence of significant variation in strain-specific vaccine effectiveness against disease. However, the incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis is predicted to remain low despite vaccine-driven changes in the distribution of genotypes. PMID:26687288

  6. Change in incidence of clinic visits for all-cause and rotavirus gastroenteritis in young children following the introduction of universal rotavirus vaccination in Israel.

    PubMed

    Muhsen, Khitam; Chodick, Gabriel; Goren, Sophy; Anis, Emilia; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Shalev, Varda; Cohen, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Both rotavirus vaccines RotaTeq and Rotarix were efficacious against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in clinical trials; yet real-world data on the effect of rotavirus vaccines on mild to moderate disease are limited. We used a large computerised database of Maccabi Health Services Health Maintenance Organisation (HMO), the second largest HMO in Israel covering 25% of the Israeli population, to compare the incidence of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) clinic visits in community settings (n=302,445) before (2005-10) and after (2011-13) the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation in Israel. We retrieved laboratory results of rotavirus antigen tests (n=18,133) and using a weighted analysis, we estimated the impact of rotavirus immunisation on the disease burden of rotavirus AGE clinic visits. Following the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation, the typical winter peaks of rotavirus AGE were substantially lower and significant reductions of 14.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 13.5-16.1) in all-cause AGE clinic visits and of 59.7% (95% CI: 59.8-62.6) in rotavirus AGE clinic visits were observed. The decrease was observed in all age groups, but it was greater in children aged 0 to 23 months than those aged 24 to 59 months. Continued rotavirus laboratory surveillance is warranted to monitor the sustainability of these changes.

  7. Change in incidence of clinic visits for all-cause and rotavirus gastroenteritis in young children following the introduction of universal rotavirus vaccination in Israel.

    PubMed

    Muhsen, Khitam; Chodick, Gabriel; Goren, Sophy; Anis, Emilia; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Shalev, Varda; Cohen, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Both rotavirus vaccines RotaTeq and Rotarix were efficacious against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in clinical trials; yet real-world data on the effect of rotavirus vaccines on mild to moderate disease are limited. We used a large computerised database of Maccabi Health Services Health Maintenance Organisation (HMO), the second largest HMO in Israel covering 25% of the Israeli population, to compare the incidence of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) clinic visits in community settings (n=302,445) before (2005-10) and after (2011-13) the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation in Israel. We retrieved laboratory results of rotavirus antigen tests (n=18,133) and using a weighted analysis, we estimated the impact of rotavirus immunisation on the disease burden of rotavirus AGE clinic visits. Following the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation, the typical winter peaks of rotavirus AGE were substantially lower and significant reductions of 14.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 13.5-16.1) in all-cause AGE clinic visits and of 59.7% (95% CI: 59.8-62.6) in rotavirus AGE clinic visits were observed. The decrease was observed in all age groups, but it was greater in children aged 0 to 23 months than those aged 24 to 59 months. Continued rotavirus laboratory surveillance is warranted to monitor the sustainability of these changes. PMID:26538450

  8. Burden of paediatric Rotavirus Gastroenteritis (RVGE) and potential benefits of a universal Rotavirus vaccination programme with a pentavalent vaccine in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. The aim of the study was to assess the health outcomes and the economic impact of a universal rotavirus vaccination programme with RotaTeq, the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, versus no vaccination programme in Spain. Methods A birth cohort was followed up to the age of 5 using a cohort model. Epidemiological parameters were taken from the REVEAL study (a prospective epidemiological study conducted in Spain, 2004-2005) and from the literature. Direct and indirect costs were assessed from the national healthcare payer and societal perspectives by combining health care resource utilisation collected in REVEAL study and unit costs from official sources. RotaTeq per protocol efficacy data was taken from a large worldwide rotavirus clinical trial (70,000 children). Health outcomes included home care cases, General Practioner (GP)/Paediatrician, emergency department visits, hospitalisations and nosocomial infections. Results The model estimates that the introduction of a universal rotavirus vaccination programme with RotaTeq (90% coverage rate) would reduce the rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) burden by 75% in Spain; 53,692 home care cases, 35,187 GP/Paediatrician visits, 34,287 emergency department visits, 10,987 hospitalisations and 2,053 nosocomial infections would be avoided. The introduction of RotaTeq would avoid about 76% of RVGE-related costs from both perspectives: €22 million from the national health system perspective and €38 million from the societal perspective. Conclusions A rotavirus vaccination programme with RotaTeq would reduce significantly the important medical and economic burden of RVGE in Spain. PMID:20698958

  9. Prevalence of Rotavirus Genotypes in Children Younger than 5 Years of Age before the Introduction of a Universal Rotavirus Vaccination Program: Report of Rotavirus Surveillance in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Durmaz, Riza; Kalaycioglu, Atila Taner; Acar, Sumeyra; Bakkaloglu, Zekiye; Karagoz, Alper; Korukluoglu, Gulay; Ertek, Mustafa; Torunoglu, Mehmet Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background Group A rotaviruses are the most common causative agent of acute gastroenteritis among children less than 5 years of age throughout the world. This sentinel surveillance study was aimed to obtain baseline data on the rotavirus G and P genotypes across Turkey before the introduction of a universal rotavirus vaccination program. Methods Rotavirus antigen-positive samples were collected from 2102 children less than 5 years of age who attended hospitals participating in the Turkish Rotavirus Surveillance Network. Rotavirus antigen was detected in the laboratories of participating hospitals by commercial serological tests such as latex agglutination, immunochromatographic test or enzyme immunoassay. Rotavirus G and P genotypes were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using consensus primers detecting the VP7 and VP4 genes, followed by semi-nested type-specific multiplex PCR. Results RT-PCR found rotavirus RNA in 1644 (78.2%) of the samples tested. The highest rate of rotavirus positivity (38.7%) was observed among children in the 13 to 24 month age group, followed by children in the age group of 25 to 36 months (28.3%). A total of eight different G types, six different P types, and 42 different G–P combinations were obtained. Four common G types (G1, G2, G3, and G9) and two common P types (P[8] and P[4]) accounted for 95.1% and 98.8% of the strains, respectively. G9P[8] was the most common G/P combination found in 40.5% of the strains followed by G1P[8] (21.6%), G2P[8] (9.3%), G2P[4] (6.5%), G3P[8] (3.5%), and finally, G4P[8] (3.4%). These six common genotypes included 83.7% of the strains tested in this study. The rate of uncommon genotypes was 14%. Conclusion The majority of the strains analyzed belonged to the G1–G4 and G9 genotypes, suggesting high coverage of current rotavirus vaccines. This study also demonstrates a dramatic increase in G9 genotype across the country. PMID:25437502

  10. The composition of demand for newly launched vaccines: results from the pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccine introductions in Ethiopia and Malawi.

    PubMed

    Williams, B Adam; Kidane, Teklay; Chirwa, Geoffrey; Tesfaye, Neghist; Prescott, Marta R; Scotney, Soleine T; Valle, Moussa; Abebe, Sintayehu; Tambuli, Adija; Malewezi, Bridget; Mohammed, Tahir; Kobayashi, Emily; Wootton, Emily; Wong, Renee; Dosani, Rahima; Subramaniam, Hamsa; Joseph, Jessica; Yavuz, Elif; Apple, Aliza; Le Tallec, Yann; Kang'ethe, Alice

    2016-06-01

    Understanding post-launch demand for new vaccines can help countries maximize the benefits of immunization programmes. In particular, low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) should ensure adequate resource planning with regards to stock consumption and service delivery for new vaccines, whereas global suppliers must produce enough vaccines to meet demand. If a country underestimates the number of children seeking vaccination, a stock-out of commodities will create missed opportunities for saving lives. We describe the post-launch demand for the first dose of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV1) in Ethiopia and Malawi and the first dose of rotavirus vaccine (Rota1) in Malawi, with focus on the new birth cohort and the 'backlog cohort', comprised of older children who are still eligible for vaccination at the time of launch. PCV1 and Rota1 uptake were compared with the demand for the first dose of pentavalent vaccine (Penta1), a routine immunization that targets the same age group and immunization schedule. In the first year, the total demand for PCV1 was 37% greater than that of Penta1 in Ethiopia and 59% greater in Malawi. In the first 6 months, the demand of Rota1 was only 5.9% greater than Penta1 demand in Malawi. Over the first three post-introduction months, 70.7% of PCV1 demand in Ethiopia and 71.5% of demand in Malawi came from children in the backlog cohort, whereas only 28.0% of Rota1 demand in Malawi was from the backlog cohort. The composition of demand was impacted by time elapsed since vaccine introduction and age restrictions. Evidence suggests that countries' plans should account for the impact of backlog demand, especially in the first 3 months post-introduction. LMICs should request for higher stock volumes when compared with routine needs, plan social mobilization activities to reach the backlog cohort and allocate human resources and cold chain capacity to accommodate high demand following vaccine introduction.

  11. An update to "The cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination: comparative analyses for five European countries and transferability in Europe".

    PubMed

    Jit, Mark; Mangen, Marie-Josée J; Melliez, Hugues; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Bilcke, Joke; Salo, Heini; Edmunds, W John; Beutels, Philippe

    2010-11-01

    A cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination in Belgium, England and Wales, Finland, France and the Netherlands published in 2009 was updated based on recent studies on rotavirus burden of disease and vaccine efficacy. All the qualitative conclusions in the previous study were found to remain valid. Vaccination remains cost-effective in Finland only when using plausible tender prices.

  12. Rotavirus vaccination compliance and completion in a Medicaid infant population.

    PubMed

    Krishnarajah, Girishanthy; Landsman-Blumberg, Pamela; Eynullayeva, Elnara

    2015-01-01

    We examined completion and compliance rates of rotavirus (RV) vaccination according to the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and the Food and Drug Administration approved Prescribing Information (PI) for Rotarix® (RV1, GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines) and RotaTeq® (RV5, Merck and Co.) among infants under one year of age covered by Medicaid programs. Healthcare claims data from state Medicaid programs that constituted the Truven Health MarketScan® Multi-State Medicaid Database were retrieved from May 2008-June 2012. Infants were grouped under PI and ACIP cohorts based on the dosing regimens followed. The overall compliance per PI (n=673,956) and ACIP (n=695,612) recommendations were 24.5% and 28.2%, respectively; completion rates were 30.3% and 32.6%, respectively. In the PI cohort, infants who received RV1 had significantly higher compliance as compared with infants who received RV5 (65.2% vs. 31.3%; p<0.0001); completion rates among infants receiving RV1 and RV5 were 65.3% and 46.4%, respectively (p<0.0001). In the ACIP cohort, compliance with RV1 was significantly higher than RV5 (68.8% vs. 45.9%; p<0.0001) as was the overall completion rate (73.5% vs. 48.8%; p<0.0001). While compliance is increasing year over year, overall compliance of RV vaccines is suboptimal, with over 40% of eligible infants unvaccinated in both populations. The 2-dose RV vaccine showed better completion rates and higher compliance than the 3-dose RV vaccine in the United States. Public health initiatives focusing on suboptimal compliance and completion rates of RV vaccination in the Medicaid population could improve these metrics, thereby offering protection against RV infection.

  13. Synthesizing evidences for policy translation: a public health discourse on rotavirus vaccine in India.

    PubMed

    Panda, Samiran; Das, Aritra; Samanta, Saheli

    2014-08-11

    The debate on the relevance of rotavirus vaccine to immunization program in India, where 27 million children are born every year, rages on. We synthesized the issues raised during these debates and reviewed the current literature to identify themes that could inform public health policy decision. The paradigm we used integrated disease burden data, host and environmental factors, vaccine efficacy, immunization program issues, and economic considerations. Our synthesis reveals that substantive country specific information on disease burden and economic impact of rotavirus illness in India is constrained by lack of public discussion and qualitative studies on mothers' perceptions of the vaccine in concern. The need to improve the performance of current immunization program against six major vaccine preventable diseases (tuberculosis, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, and measles) is often cited as a priority over introduction of rotavirus vaccine. Health in India being a state subject, we emphasize that the states which are in a position to reap the benefit of rotavirus vaccine, due to their good immunization program performance, should not be restrained from doing so. Meanwhile, the poorly performing states should step up their vaccination program and increase immunization coverage. Scientific, ethical and societal concerns captured through multiple sources indicate that the introduction of rotavirus vaccine would be a good investment for India. PMID:25091671

  14. Development and characterization of candidate rotavirus vaccine strains derived from children with diarrhoea in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Luan, Le T; Trang, Nguyen V; Phuong, Nguyen M; Nguyen, Huong T; Ngo, Huong T; Nguyen, Huong T M; Tran, Hanh B; Dang, Ha N; Dang, Anh D; Gentsch, Jon R; Wang, Yuhuan; Esona, Mathew D; Glass, Roger I; Steele, A Duncan; Kilgore, Paul E; Nguyen, Man V; Jiang, Baoming; Nguyen, Hien D

    2009-11-20

    In Vietnam, rotavirus infection accounts for more than one-half of all hospitalizations for diarrhoea among children less than 5 years of age. While new vaccines to prevent rotavirus diarrhoea have been developed and introduced into some countries by multinational manufacturers, the ability for developing countries such as Vietnam to introduce several new and important vaccines into the routine infant immunization schedule may be challenging. In order to be partially self-sufficient in vaccine production, Vietnam has pursued the development of several rotavirus strains as candidate vaccines using isolates obtained from Vietnamese children with diarrhoea. This paper describes the origin, isolation and characterization of 3 human rotavirus strains being considered for further vaccine development in Vietnam. The goal is to prepare a monovalent G1P [8] rotavirus vaccine using one of these strains obtained in Vietnam and naturally attenuated by multiple passages in cell culture. While this is an ambitious project that will require several years' work, we are using the lessons learned to improve the overall quality of vaccine production including the use of Vero cell techniques for the manufacture of other vaccines in Vietnam.

  15. Association of Maternal Immunity with Rotavirus Vaccine Immunogenicity in Zambian Infants

    PubMed Central

    Chilengi, Roma; Simuyandi, Michelo; Beach, Lauren; Mwila, Katayi; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Emperador, Devy M.; Velasquez, Daniel E.; Bosomprah, Samuel; Jiang, Baoming

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Live attenuated oral vaccines against rotavirus (RV) have been shown to be less efficacious in children from developing countries. Reasons for this disparity are not fully understood. We assessed the role of maternal factors including breast milk RV-specific IgA, transplacentally acquired infant serum RV-specific IgG and maternal HIV status in seroconversion among Zambian infants routinely immunized with Rotarix™ (RV1). Methods 420 mother-child pairs were recruited at infant age 6–12 weeks in Lusaka. Clinical information and samples were collected at baseline and at one month following the second dose of RV1. Determination of breast milk RV-specific IgA and serum RV-specific IgA and IgG was done using standardized ELISA. Seroconversion was defined as a ≥ 4 fold rise in serum IgA titre from baseline to one-month post RV1 dose 2, while seropositivity of IgA was defined as serum titre ≥ 40 and antibody variables were modelled on log-base 2. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of the odds of seroconversion. Results Baseline infant seropositivity was 25.5% (91/357). The seroconversion frequency was 60.2% (130/216). Infants who were IgA seropositive at baseline were less likely to seroconvert compared to their seronegative counterparts (P = 0.04). There was no evidence of an association between maternal HIV status and seroconversion (P = 0.25). Higher titres of breast milk rotavirus-specific IgA were associated with a lower frequency of seroconverson (Nonparametric test for trend Z = -2.84; P<0.01): a two-fold increase in breast milk RV-specific IgA titres was associated with a 22% lower odds of seroconversion (OR = 0.80; 95% CI = 0.68–0.94; P = 0.01). There was seasonal variation in baseline breast milk rotavirus-specific IgA titres, with significantly higher GMTs during the cold dry months (P = 0.01). Conclusion Low immunogenicity of RV1 vaccine could be explained in part by exposure to high antibody titres in breast milk and

  16. Overcoming perceptions of financial barriers to rotavirus vaccine introduction in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, E Anthony S; de Quadros, Ciro A; Santosham, Mathuram; Parashar, Umesh D; Steele, A Duncan

    2013-01-01

    Despite a WHO recommendation in 2009, reaffirmed in 2013, that all countries should consider introducing rotavirus vaccines into their National Immunization Programs, as of June 2013 only 45 have done so. One major consideration appears to have been the costs of the vaccine to countries. Of concern, is that Asian countries have been slow to introduce rotavirus vaccines despite having robust data that could inform the decision-making process. Although decisions on new vaccine introduction are very complex and vary by country and region, economic evaluations are often pivotal once vaccine efficacy and safety has been established, and disease burden documented and communicated. Unfortunately, with private sector list prices of vaccines often used in economic evaluations, rather than a potential public health sector pricing structure, policy-makers may defer decisions on rotavirus vaccine introduction based on the belief that “the vaccine price is too high,” even though this might be based on erroneous data. The Pan American Health Organization’s Revolving Fund provides one example of how vaccine price can be made more competitive and transparent through a regional tendering process. Other mechanisms, such as tiered pricing and UNICEF procurement, also exist that could help Asian and other countries move forward more quickly with rotavirus vaccine introduction. PMID:23955246

  17. European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases consensus recommendations for rotavirus vaccination in Europe: update 2014.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, Timo; Van Damme, Pierre; Giaquinto, Carlo; Dagan, Ron; Guarino, Alfredo; Szajewska, Hania; Usonis, Vytautas

    2015-06-01

    The first evidence-based recommendations for rotavirus (RV) vaccination in Europe were prepared at the time of licensure of 2 live oral RV vaccines (Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, and RotaTeq, Sanofi Pasteur MSD) in 2006 and published in 2008. Since then several countries in Europe and more globally have adopted universal RV vaccination of all healthy infants as part of their national immunization programs (NIPs). The experience from these NIPs has produced a wealth of post-introduction effectiveness data that, together with the evidence from prelicensure efficacy trials presented in the 2008 Recommendations, support the case of RV vaccination in Europe. The prelicensure safety trials of Rotarix and RotaTeq, each in populations of more than 60,000 infants, did not reveal risk of intussusception (IS), but postvaccination surveillance in several countries, particularly Australia and Mexico, has established that the risk of IS for both vaccines after the first dose might be between 1:50,000 and 1:80,000. Although it may be argued that the risk is acceptable vis-à-vis the great benefits of RV vaccination, this argument alone may not suffice, and every effort should be made to reduce the risk of IS. Considerable evidence, including postvaccination surveillance data from Germany, suggests that the risk of IS can be reduced by early administration of the first dose of oral RV vaccine. The previous European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases/European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition recommendations held that the first dose of oral RV vaccine should be given between 6 and 12 weeks of age; this recommendation is sustained but with an emphasis toward the lower range of the recommended age, that is, preferably between 6 and 8 weeks of age. At the time of the earlier recommendations, experience of RV vaccination in premature infants and other special target groups was limited. It is now recommended with greater confidence than

  18. European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases consensus recommendations for rotavirus vaccination in Europe: update 2014.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, Timo; Van Damme, Pierre; Giaquinto, Carlo; Dagan, Ron; Guarino, Alfredo; Szajewska, Hania; Usonis, Vytautas

    2015-06-01

    The first evidence-based recommendations for rotavirus (RV) vaccination in Europe were prepared at the time of licensure of 2 live oral RV vaccines (Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, and RotaTeq, Sanofi Pasteur MSD) in 2006 and published in 2008. Since then several countries in Europe and more globally have adopted universal RV vaccination of all healthy infants as part of their national immunization programs (NIPs). The experience from these NIPs has produced a wealth of post-introduction effectiveness data that, together with the evidence from prelicensure efficacy trials presented in the 2008 Recommendations, support the case of RV vaccination in Europe. The prelicensure safety trials of Rotarix and RotaTeq, each in populations of more than 60,000 infants, did not reveal risk of intussusception (IS), but postvaccination surveillance in several countries, particularly Australia and Mexico, has established that the risk of IS for both vaccines after the first dose might be between 1:50,000 and 1:80,000. Although it may be argued that the risk is acceptable vis-à-vis the great benefits of RV vaccination, this argument alone may not suffice, and every effort should be made to reduce the risk of IS. Considerable evidence, including postvaccination surveillance data from Germany, suggests that the risk of IS can be reduced by early administration of the first dose of oral RV vaccine. The previous European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases/European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition recommendations held that the first dose of oral RV vaccine should be given between 6 and 12 weeks of age; this recommendation is sustained but with an emphasis toward the lower range of the recommended age, that is, preferably between 6 and 8 weeks of age. At the time of the earlier recommendations, experience of RV vaccination in premature infants and other special target groups was limited. It is now recommended with greater confidence than

  19. Evaluating the potential risks and benefits of infant rotavirus vaccination in England.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andy; Jit, Mark; Andrews, Nick; Atchison, Christina; Edmunds, W John; Sanderson, Colin

    2014-06-17

    Rotarix(®), a vaccine for the prevention of gastroenteritis in young children, was introduced in England in July 2013. At around this time, an elevated risk of intussusception (a cause of bowel obstruction) was reported among infants vaccinated in Australia and the USA. A risk-benefit analysis compared potential vaccine-related risks (additional intussusception admissions and deaths) with estimated vaccine benefits (prevented rotavirus general practitioner visits, emergency visits, admissions and deaths) in the 2012 birth cohort. Detailed data from England included the incidence of intussusception events aged <2 years by week of age, the coverage of vaccination aged <2 years by week of age, and the incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) events aged <5 years by week of age. Recent estimates of vaccine-related risk from Australia were applied during the 1-21 day period after the first and second dose of vaccination. Rotarix(®) is estimated to cause one additional intussusception admission in every 18,551 vaccinated English infants (5th and 95th percentiles, 6728-93,952), equivalent to 35 (7-98) additional intussusception admissions each year. The vaccine is estimated to prevent three rotavirus deaths, 13,000 rotavirus admissions, 27,000 rotavirus emergency visits and 74,000 rotavirus GP consultations in children aged <5 years, and lead to annual savings of over £11 million, each year. We estimate 375 (136-1900) fewer RVGE admissions for every additional intussusception admission, and 88 (18-852) fewer RVGE deaths for every additional intussusception death. The estimated benefits of Rotarix(®) vaccination would greatly exceed the potential risk in England.

  20. Maintaining vaccine delivery following the introduction of the rotavirus and pneumococcal vaccines in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bruce Y; Assi, Tina-Marie; Rookkapan, Korngamon; Wateska, Angela R; Rajgopal, Jayant; Sornsrivichai, Vorasith; Chen, Sheng-I; Brown, Shawn T; Welling, Joel; Norman, Bryan A; Connor, Diana L; Bailey, Rachel R; Jana, Anirban; Van Panhuis, Willem G; Burke, Donald S

    2011-01-01

    Although the substantial burdens of rotavirus and pneumococcal disease have motivated many countries to consider introducing the rotavirus vaccine (RV) and heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) to their National Immunization Programs (EPIs), these new vaccines could affect the countries' vaccine supply chains (i.e., the series of steps required to get a vaccine from their manufacturers to patients). We developed detailed computational models of the Trang Province, Thailand, vaccine supply chain to simulate introducing various RV and PCV-7 vaccine presentations and their combinations. Our results showed that the volumes of these new vaccines in addition to current routine vaccines could meet and even exceed (1) the refrigerator space at the provincial district and sub-district levels and (2) the transport cold space at district and sub-district levels preventing other vaccines from being available to patients who arrive to be immunized. Besides the smallest RV presentation (17.1 cm³/dose), all other vaccine introduction scenarios required added storage capacity at the provincial level (range: 20 L-1151 L per month) for the three largest formulations, and district level (range: 1 L-124 L per month) across all introduction scenarios. Similarly, with the exception of the two smallest RV presentation (17.1 cm³/dose), added transport capacity was required at both district and sub-district levels. Added transport capacity required across introduction scenarios from the provincial to district levels ranged from 1 L-187 L, and district to sub-district levels ranged from 1 L-13 L per shipment. Finally, only the smallest RV vaccine presentation (17.1 cm³/dose) had no appreciable effect on vaccine availability at sub-districts. All other RV and PCV-7 vaccines were too large for the current supply chain to handle without modifications such as increasing storage or transport capacity. Introducing these new vaccines to Thailand could have dynamic effects on the

  1. A field trial to evaluate the efficacy of a combined rotavirus-coronavirus/Escherichia coli vaccine in dairy cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Waltner-Toews, D; Martin, S W; Meek, A H; McMillan, I; Crouch, C F

    1985-01-01

    A field trial was designed to determine the efficacy of a combination rotavirus-coronavirus/Escherichia coli vaccine on dairy farms in southwestern Ontario. In Part A of the trial, 321 cows on 15 farms were randomly assigned to either vaccination or placebo groups. On eight farms, 50% of the dams were vaccinated, while on the other seven farms, 80% of the dams were vaccinated. In Part B of the trial, 26 farms were randomly assigned to either a total vaccination program or to no vaccination program. Mortality, disease occurrence and weight gains were recorded on all calves for the first two weeks of life. In Part A, 23.5% of all calves were treated in the first two weeks of life, 20.9% were treated specifically for scours and 3.6% of live-born calves died. Enteropathogenic E. coli was identified on 13 of the 15 farms, rotavirus on 11 and coronavirus on ten. At least one of the three potential pathogens was found on every farm. There were no significant differences between calves from placebo-treated and vaccine-treated dams with regard to the proportion treated for all diseases, or for scours, or the proportion which died. Neither were there differences in days to first treatment for all diseases (seven days on average), days to first scour (6.7 days), duration of treatments (3.9 days for all diseases, 3.7 days for scours), or estimated weight gains (0.5 kg/day to 14 days). These results were not altered when the presence or absence of enteropathogenic E. coli, rotavirus or coronavirus on the premises was accounted for.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2985213

  2. Assessing the impacts of the first year of rotavirus vaccination in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Marlow, Robin; Muir, Peter; Vipond, Barry; Lyttle, Mark; Trotter, Caroline; Finn, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The United Kingdom (UK) added rotavirus (RV) vaccine (Rotarix GlaxoSmithKline) to the national vaccine schedule in July 2013. During the 2012-2014 rotavirus seasons, children presenting to the Bristol Royal Hospital for Children Emergency Department with gastroenteritis symptoms had stool virology analysis (real-time PCR) and clinical outcome recorded. Nosocomial cases were identified as patients with non-gastroenteritis diagnosis testing positive for rotavirus > 48h after admission. In comparison to average pre-vaccine seasons, in the first year after vaccine introduction there were 48% fewer attendances diagnosed with gastroenteritis, 53% reduction in gastroenteritis admissions and a total saving of 330 bed-days occupancy. There was an overall reduction in number of rotavirus-positive stool samples with 94% reduction in children aged under one year and a 65% reduction in those too old to have been vaccinated. In the first year after the introduction of universal vaccination against rotavirus we observed a profound reduction in gastroenteritis presentations and admissions with a substantial possible herd effect seen in older children. Extrapolating these findings to the UK population we estimate secondary healthcare savings in the first year of ca £7.5 (€10.5) million. Ongoing surveillance will be required to determine the long-term impact of the RV immunisation programme.

  3. [Rotavirus Vaccine. Statement of the Consultive Committee of Immunizations on behalf of The Chilean Infectious Diseases Society. March 2006].

    PubMed

    Muñoz M, Alma; Abarca V, Katia; Luchsinger F, Vivian; Valenzuela B, M Teresa; Jiménez de la J, Jorge

    2006-06-01

    The article briefly reviews the epidemiology of rotavirus infection and the scientific information of the rotavirus vaccines: Rotashield, withdrawn from the market due to its association with intussusception, Rotateq currently in an advanced phase of development, and Rotarix, recently licensed in Chile. Considering the available information, the Consultive Committee of Immunizations of the Chilean Society of Infectious Diseases, summarizes its conclusions and makes recommendations for infants vaccination against rotavirus in our country.

  4. Burden of rotavirus infections in Liguria, Northern Italy: hospitalisations and potential savings by vaccination.

    PubMed

    Panatto, D; Amicizia, D; Giacchino, R; Tacchella, A; Natalizia, A R; Melioli, G; Bandettini, R; Di Pietro, P; Diana, M C; Gasparini, R

    2011-08-01

    We evaluated the rates of gastroenteritis admissions to the emergency department and of rotavirus-related hospitalisations in children ≤5 years of age in 2006 at an Italian paediatric hospital. We calculated the number of rotavirus cases avoidable through the universal vaccination of children. Epidemiological data were extracted from the Data Elaboration Centre. To calculate the hospitalisation rate due to rotavirus, the virus was sought in the faeces of children hospitalised for acute gastroenteritis by means of rapid immunochromatographic assay. Emergency department admissions due to gastroenteritis numbered 2,396 (11.58% of the total admissions). Of these, 276 children (11.52%) were examined and then sent home, 1,286 (53.67%) were kept in short observation and 776 (32.38%) were hospitalised. In 27.83% of hospitalised cases, the rotavirus test proved positive. The rotavirus hospitalisation rate was 55 per 10,000 children ≤5 years of age in Genoa in 2006. In 85.6% of hospitalised patients with community-acquired rotavirus infection, the disease was severe. The number of avoidable cases confirmed that the vaccination of children ≤1 year of age could reduce the burden of rotavirus infection, especially with regard to hospitalisation (45 per 10,000 children ≤5 years of age) and admissions to short observation (85 per 10,000), generating benefits for the Italian healthcare system.

  5. A qualitative assessment of factors influencing acceptance of a new rotavirus vaccine among health care providers and consumers

    SciTech Connect

    Manish M Patel, Alan P Janssen, Richard Tardif, Mark Herring, Umesh Parashar

    2007-10-18

    In 2006, a new rotavirus vaccine (RotaTeq) was licensed in the US and recommended for routine immunization of all US infants. Because a previously licensed vaccine (Rotashield) was withdrawn from the US for safety concerns, identifying barriers to uptake of RotaTeq will help develop strategies to broaden vaccine coverage. Our qualitative assessment provides complementary data to recent quantitative surveys and suggests that physicians and parents are likely to adopt the newly licensed rotavirus vaccine. Increasing parental awareness of the rotavirus disease burden and providing physicians with timely post-marketing surveillance data will be integral to a successful vaccination program.

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of Rotavirus Vaccination for Under-Five Children in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shakerian, Sareh; Moradi Lakeh, Maziar; Esteghamati, Abdoulreza; Zahraei, Mohsen; Yaghoubi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rotavirus diarrhea is one of the most important causes of death among under-five children. Anti-rotavirus vaccination of these children may have a reducing effect on the disease. Objectives: this study is intended to contribute to health policy-makers of the country about the optimal decision and policy development in this area, by performing cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis on anti-rotavirus vaccination for under-5 children. Patients and Methods: A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using a decision tree model to analyze rotavirus vaccination, which was compared with no vaccination with Iran’s ministry of health perspective in a 5-year time horizon. Epidemiological data were collected from published and unpublished sources. Four different assumptions were considered to the extent of the disease episode. To analyze costs, the costs of implementing the vaccination program were calculated with 98% coverage and the cost of USD 7 per dose. Medical and social costs of the disease were evaluated by sampling patients with rotavirus diarrhea, and sensitivity analysis was also performed for different episode rates and vaccine price per dose. Results: For the most optimistic assumption for the episode of illness (10.2 per year), the cost per DALY averted is 12,760 and 7,404 for RotaTeq and Rotarix vaccines, respectively, while assuming the episode of illness is 300%, they will be equal to 2,395 and 354, respectively, which will be highly cost-effective. Number of life-years gained is equal to 3,533 years. Conclusions: Assuming that the illness episodes are 100% and 300% for Rotarix and 300% for Rota Teq, the ratio of cost per DALY averted is highly cost-effective, based on the threshold of the world health organization (< 1 GDP per capita = 4526 USD). The implementation of a national rotavirus vaccination program is suggested. PMID:26396704

  7. Genetic Diversity of Circulating Rotavirus Strains in Tanzania Prior to the Introduction of Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Moyo, Sabrina J.; Blomberg, Bjørn; Hanevik, Kurt; Kommedal, Oyvind; Vainio, Kirsti; Maselle, Samuel Y.; Langeland, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Background Tanzania currently rolls out vaccination against rotavirus-diarrhea, a major cause of child illness and death. As the vaccine covers a limited number of rotavirus variants, this study describes the molecular epidemiology of rotavirus among children under two years in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, prior to implementation of vaccination. Methods Stool specimens, demographic and clinical information, were collected from 690 children admitted to hospital due to diarrhea (cases) and 545 children without diarrhea (controls) during one year. Controls were inpatient or children attending child health clinics. Rotavirus antigen was detected using ELISA and positive samples were typed by multiplex semi-nested PCR and sequencing. Results The prevalence of rotavirus was higher in cases (32.5%) than in controls (7.7%, P<0.001). The most common G genotypes were G1 followed by G8, G12, and G4 in cases and G1, G12 and G8 in controls. The Tanzanian G1 variants displayed 94% similarity with the Rotarix vaccine G1 variant. The commonest P genotypes were P[8], P[4] and P[6], and the commonest G/P combination G1 P[8] (n = 123), G8 P[4] and G12 P[6]. Overall, rotavirus prevalence was higher in cool (23.9%) than hot months (17.1%) of the year (P = 0.012). We also observed significant seasonal variation of G genotypes. Rotavirus was most frequently found in the age group of four to six months. The prevalence of rotavirus in cases was lower in stunted children (28.9%) than in non-stunted children (40.1%, P = 0.003) and lower in HIV-infected (15.4%, 4/26) than in HIV-uninfected children (55.3%, 42/76, P<0.001). Conclusion This pre-vaccination study shows predominance of genotype G1 in Tanzania, which is phylogenetically distantly related to the vaccine strains. We confirm the emergence of genotype G8 and G12. Rotavirus infection and circulating genotypes showed seasonal variation. This study also suggests that rotavirus may not be an opportunistic pathogen in children

  8. Rotavirus genotype distribution during the pre-vaccine period in Bolivia: 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Rosario; Forney, Kristen; Castro, Maria René; Rebolledo, Paulina A.; Mamani, Nataniel; Patzi, Maritza; Halkyer, Percy; Leon, Juan S.; Iñiguez, Volga

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objectives Rotavirus is the most important etiology of severe diarrhea in Bolivia. The monovalent attenuated human oral rotavirus vaccine Rotarix® was introduced in Bolivia in 2008. We describe the molecular epidemiology of circulating rotavirus strains before vaccine introduction. Methods Two thousand one hundred thirty-five diarrheal samples were collected from hospitals in four Bolivian cities during 2007–2008. Forty-three percent (445 of 1030 rotavirus-positive samples) were analyzed for G and P genotypes. Among those, 331 were electropherotyped by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Disease severity was quantified using a modified Vesikari scale. Results Among the 445 samples, five genotypes were found to be prevalent: G9P[8] (33%), G1P[6] (17%), G2P[4] (13%), G9P[6] (12%), and G1P[8] (4%). Co-infections with two or more strains accounted for 14% of samples. The most prevalent strain, G9, showed greater electropherotype diversity compared to other serogroups. Strain G1P[6] generally infected younger children and peaked later in the year than other strains. No particular genotype was associated with a higher severity score, though there was a significant difference in the duration of diarrhea between genotypes. Conclusions During the 2-year pre-vaccine period, substantial diversity of rotavirus co-circulating strains was observed. These data constitute a baseline against which changes in circulating strains post-vaccine introduction can be monitored. PMID:23688547

  9. Potential epidemiological and economical impact of two rotavirus vaccines in Colombia.

    PubMed

    De la Hoz, Fernando; Alvis, Nelson; Narváez, Javier; Cediel, Natalia; Gamboa, Oscar; Velandia, Martha

    2010-05-14

    A complete economic study was carried out to assess the economical impact of two rotavirus vaccine in Colombia. A Markov decision model was built to assess the health outcomes from birth to 24 months of age for three hypothetical cohorts: one unvaccinated, one vaccinated with 2 doses of Rotarix and the third, with 3 doses of Rotateq. Without vaccination, the annual number of medical visits by diarrhea in children under 2 years would be 1,293,159 cases, with 105,378 medical visits and 470 deaths (IC95% 295-560) related to rotavirus. Without vaccination, rotavirus disease would cost around USD$8 millions including direct and indirect costs. Assuming a cost per dose of USD$7.5, average cost-effectiveness ratio would be USD$663/DALY with Rotarix and USD$1391 with Rotateq. When price per dose falls below USD$7 both vaccines yield a similar average cost-effectiveness ratio (USD$1063/DALY). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of Rotateq versus Rotarix was USD$7787/DALY. Cost-effectiveness ratio was influenced mainly by vaccine cost and cost per case hospitalized. Other programmatic aspects such as number of doses to be applied, likelihood of completing vaccination schedule with shorter versus longer schedules, and storage space within the chain cold should be considered to make decisions on which vaccine should be introduced. In conclusion, vaccinating against rotavirus in Colombia with either vaccine would be very cost effective. If cost per vaccinated children falls below USD$3 per dose vaccination would be cost saving. PMID:20347057

  10. Potential epidemiological and economical impact of two rotavirus vaccines in Colombia.

    PubMed

    De la Hoz, Fernando; Alvis, Nelson; Narváez, Javier; Cediel, Natalia; Gamboa, Oscar; Velandia, Martha

    2010-05-14

    A complete economic study was carried out to assess the economical impact of two rotavirus vaccine in Colombia. A Markov decision model was built to assess the health outcomes from birth to 24 months of age for three hypothetical cohorts: one unvaccinated, one vaccinated with 2 doses of Rotarix and the third, with 3 doses of Rotateq. Without vaccination, the annual number of medical visits by diarrhea in children under 2 years would be 1,293,159 cases, with 105,378 medical visits and 470 deaths (IC95% 295-560) related to rotavirus. Without vaccination, rotavirus disease would cost around USD$8 millions including direct and indirect costs. Assuming a cost per dose of USD$7.5, average cost-effectiveness ratio would be USD$663/DALY with Rotarix and USD$1391 with Rotateq. When price per dose falls below USD$7 both vaccines yield a similar average cost-effectiveness ratio (USD$1063/DALY). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of Rotateq versus Rotarix was USD$7787/DALY. Cost-effectiveness ratio was influenced mainly by vaccine cost and cost per case hospitalized. Other programmatic aspects such as number of doses to be applied, likelihood of completing vaccination schedule with shorter versus longer schedules, and storage space within the chain cold should be considered to make decisions on which vaccine should be introduced. In conclusion, vaccinating against rotavirus in Colombia with either vaccine would be very cost effective. If cost per vaccinated children falls below USD$3 per dose vaccination would be cost saving.

  11. Predictors of Uptake and Timeliness of Newly Introduced Pneumococcal and Rotavirus Vaccines, and of Measles Vaccine in Rural Malawi: A Population Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chihana, Menard; Crampin, Amelia C.; Kabuluzi, Storn; Chirwa, Geoffrey; Mwansambo, Charles; Costello, Anthony; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; Heyderman, Robert S.; French, Neil; Bar-Zeev, Naor

    2016-01-01

    Background Malawi introduced pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) and monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1) in 2011 and 2012 respectively, and is planning the introduction of a second-dose measles vaccine (MV). We assessed predictors of availability, uptake and timeliness of these vaccines in a rural Malawian setting. Methods Commencing on the first date of PCV13 eligibility we conducted a prospective population-based birth cohort study of 2,616 children under demographic surveillance in Karonga District, northern Malawi who were eligible for PCV13, or from the date of RV1 introduction both PCV13 and RV1. Potential predictors of vaccine uptake and timeliness for PCV13, RV1 and MV were analysed respectively using robust Poisson and Cox regression. Results Vaccine coverage was high for all vaccines, ranging from 86.9% for RV1 dose 2 to 95.4% for PCV13 dose 1. Median time delay for PCV13 dose 1 was 17 days (IQR 7–36), 19 days (IQR 8–36) for RV1 dose 1 and 20 days (IQR 3–46) for MV. Infants born to lower educated or farming mothers and those living further away from the road or clinic were at greater risk of being not fully vaccinated and being vaccinated late. Delays in vaccination were also associated with non-facility birth. Vaccine stock-outs resulted in both a delay in vaccine timeliness and in a decrease in completion of schedule. Conclusion Despite high vaccination coverage in this setting, delays in vaccination were common. We identified programmatic and socio-demographic risk factors for uptake and timeliness of vaccination. Understanding who remains most vulnerable to be unvaccinated allows for focussed delivery thereby increasing population coverage and maximising the equitable benefits of universal vaccination programmes. PMID:27152612

  12. Effectiveness of monovalent rotavirus vaccine in Bolivia: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Patzi, Maritza; Pastor, Desiree; Nina, Aleida; Roca, Yelin; Alvarez, Leovigildo; Iniguez, Volga; Rivera, Rosario; Tam, Ka Ian; Quaye, Osbourne; Bowen, Michael; Parashar, Umesh; De Oliveira, Lucia Helena

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of two doses of a monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1) against hospital admission for rotavirus in Bolivia. Design Case-control study. Setting Six hospitals in Bolivia, between March 2010 and June 2011. Participants 400 hospital admissions for rotavirus, 1200 non-diarrhea hospital controls, and 718 rotavirus negative hospital controls. Main outcome measures Odds of antecedent vaccination between case patients and controls; effectiveness of vaccination ((1–adjusted odds ratio)×100), adjusted for age and other confounders; and stratified effectiveness by dose, disease severity, age group, and serotype. Results In comparison with non-diarrhea controls, case patients were more likely to be male and attend day care but less likely to have chronic underlying illness, higher level maternal education, and telephones and computers in their home. Rotavirus negative controls were somewhat more similar to case patients but also were more likely to be male and attend day care and less likely to have higher level maternal education and computers in their homes. The adjusted effectiveness of RV1 against hospital admission for rotavirus was 69% (95% confidence interval 54% to 79%) with rotavirus negative controls and 77% (65% to 84%) with non-diarrhea controls. The effectiveness of one dose of RV1 was 36% and 56%, respectively. With both control groups, protection was sustained through two years of life, with similar efficacy against hospital admission among children under 1 year (64% and 77%) and over 1 year of age (72% and 76%). RV1 provided significant protection against diverse serotypes, partially and fully heterotypic to the G1P[8] vaccine. Effectiveness using the two control groups was 80% and 85% against G9P[8], 74% and 93%% against G3P[8], 59% and 69% against G2P[4], and 80% and 87% against G9P[6] strains. Conclusion The monovalent rotavirus vaccine conferred high protection against hospital admission for diarrhea due to rotavirus

  13. Incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis by age in African, Asian and European children: Relevance for timing of rotavirus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Steele, A. Duncan; Madhi, Shabir A.; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; Vesikari, Timo; Phua, Kong Boo; Lim, Fong Seng; Nelson, E. Anthony S.; Lau, Yu-Lung; Huang, Li-Min; Karkada, Naveen; Debrus, Serge; Han, Htay Htay; Benninghoff, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Variability in rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) epidemiology can influence the optimal vaccination schedule. We evaluated regional trends in the age of RVGE episodes in low- to middle- versus high-income countries in three continents. We undertook a post-hoc analysis based on efficacy trials of a human rotavirus vaccine (HRV; Rotarix™, GSK Vaccines), in which 1348, 1641, and 5250 healthy infants received a placebo in Europe (NCT00140686), Africa (NCT00241644), and Asia (NCT00197210, NCT00329745). Incidence of any/severe RVGE by age at onset was evaluated by active surveillance over the first two years of life. Severity of RVGE episodes was assessed using the Vesikari-scale. The incidence of any RVGE in Africa was higher than in Europe during the first year of life (≤2.78% vs. ≤2.03% per month), but much lower during the second one (≤0.86% versus ≤2.00% per month). The incidence of severe RVGE in Africa was slightly lower than in Europe during the first year of life. Nevertheless, temporal profiles for the incidence of severe RVGE in Africa and Europe during the first (≤1.00% and ≤1.23% per month) and second (≤0.53% and ≤1.13% per month) years of life were similar to those of any RVGE. Any/severe RVGE incidences peaked at younger ages in Africa vs. Europe. In high-income Asian regions, severe RVGE incidence (≤0.31% per month) remained low during the study. The burden of any RVGE was higher earlier in life in children from low- to middle- compared with high-income countries. Differing rotavirus vaccine schedules are likely warranted to maximize protection in different settings. PMID:27260009

  14. The composition of demand for newly launched vaccines: results from the pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccine introductions in Ethiopia and Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Kidane, Teklay; Chirwa, Geoffrey; Tesfaye, Neghist; Prescott, Marta R; Scotney, Soleine T; Valle, Moussa; Abebe, Sintayehu; Tambuli, Adija; Malewezi, Bridget; Mohammed, Tahir; Kobayashi, Emily; Wootton, Emily; Wong, Renee; Dosani, Rahima; Subramaniam, Hamsa; Joseph, Jessica; Yavuz, Elif; Apple, Aliza; Le Tallec, Yann; Kang’ethe, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Understanding post-launch demand for new vaccines can help countries maximize the benefits of immunization programmes. In particular, low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) should ensure adequate resource planning with regards to stock consumption and service delivery for new vaccines, whereas global suppliers must produce enough vaccines to meet demand. If a country underestimates the number of children seeking vaccination, a stock-out of commodities will create missed opportunities for saving lives. We describe the post-launch demand for the first dose of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV1) in Ethiopia and Malawi and the first dose of rotavirus vaccine (Rota1) in Malawi, with focus on the new birth cohort and the ‘backlog cohort’, comprised of older children who are still eligible for vaccination at the time of launch. PCV1 and Rota1 uptake were compared with the demand for the first dose of pentavalent vaccine (Penta1), a routine immunization that targets the same age group and immunization schedule. In the first year, the total demand for PCV1 was 37% greater than that of Penta1 in Ethiopia and 59% greater in Malawi. In the first 6 months, the demand of Rota1 was only 5.9% greater than Penta1 demand in Malawi. Over the first three post-introduction months, 70.7% of PCV1 demand in Ethiopia and 71.5% of demand in Malawi came from children in the backlog cohort, whereas only 28.0% of Rota1 demand in Malawi was from the backlog cohort. The composition of demand was impacted by time elapsed since vaccine introduction and age restrictions. Evidence suggests that countries’ plans should account for the impact of backlog demand, especially in the first 3 months post-introduction. LMICs should request for higher stock volumes when compared with routine needs, plan social mobilization activities to reach the backlog cohort and allocate human resources and cold chain capacity to accommodate high demand following vaccine introduction. PMID:26856361

  15. Budget impact and cost-utility analysis of universal infant rotavirus vaccination in Spain.

    PubMed

    Imaz, Iñaki; Rubio, Beltrán; Cornejo, Ana M; González-Enríquez, Jesús

    2014-04-01

    Rotavirus is not included in the Spanish mass infant vaccination schedule but has also not been economically evaluated for its inclusion. We analysed cost-utility of the universal infant rotavirus vaccination using RotaTeq® versus no vaccination in Spain. We also carried out a budget impact analysis and determined the effect on results of different variables introduced in the model. A deterministic Markov model was built considering loss of quality of life for children and their parents, and introducing direct and indirect costs updated to 2011. The introduction of the vaccination using RotaTeq® as a universal infant vaccination would increase the annual health care budget in 10.43 million euro and would result in a gain of an additional Quality Adjusted Life Year at a cost of 280,338€ from the healthcare system perspective and 210,167€ from the societal perspective. The model was stable to variable modifications. To sum up, according to our model and estimates, the introduction of a universal infant rotavirus vaccination with RotaTeq® in Spain would cause a large impact on the health care budget and would not be efficient unless significant variations in vaccine price, vaccine efficacy and/or utilities took place. PMID:24360847

  16. Comparative characteristics of the VP7 and VP4 antigenic epitopes of the rotaviruses circulating in Russia (Nizhny Novgorod) and the Rotarix and RotaTeq vaccines.

    PubMed

    Morozova, O V; Sashina, T A; Fomina, S G; Novikova, N A

    2015-07-01

    Two live, attenuated rotavirus A (RVA) vaccines, Rotarix and RotaTeq, have been successfully introduced into national immunization programs worldwide. The parent strains of both vaccines were obtained more than 30 years ago. Nonetheless, only very limited data are available on the molecular similarity of the vaccine strains and their genetic relationships to the wild-type strains circulating within the territory of Russian Federation. In this study, we have determined the nucleotide sequences of the genes encoding the viral proteins VP7 and VP4 (the globular domain VP8*) of vaccine strains and natural isolates of rotaviruses in Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. The VP7 and VP4 proteins contain antigenic sites that are the main targets of neutralizing antibodies. Phylogenetic analysis based on VP4 and VP7 showed that the majority of the natural RVA isolates from Nizhny Novgorod and the vaccine strains belong to different clusters. Four amino acids within the VP7 antigenic sites were common in both the wild-type and vaccine strains. The largest number of amino acid differences was found between the vaccine strain Rotarix and the Nizhny Novgorod G2 strains (19 residues out of 29). From 3 to 5 amino acid differences per strain were identified in the antigenic sites of VP4 (domain VP8*) between wild-type strains and the vaccine RotaTeq, and 6-8 substitutions were found when they were compared with the vaccine strain Rotarix. For the first time, immunodominant T-cell epitopes of VP7 were analyzed, and differences in the sequences between the vaccine and the wild-type strains were found. The accumulation of amino acid substitutions in the VP7 and VP4 antigenic sites may potentially reduce the immune protection of vaccinated children from wild-type strains of rotavirus.

  17. Human rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix): focus on effectiveness and impact 6 years after first introduction in Africa.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Giaquinto, Carlo; Benninghoff, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    A decade after licensure of the human rotavirus vaccine (HRV), a wealth of evidence supports a reduction of rotavirus (RV) gastroenteritis-associated mortality and hospitalizations following HRV inclusion in national immunization programs. Nevertheless, the majority of real-world data has been generated in high- or middle-income settings. Clinical efficacy trials previously indicated RV vaccine performance may be lower in less-developed countries compared with wealthier counterparts. Using recently published data from Africa, we examine the effectiveness and impact of HRV in resource-deprived areas, exploring whether vaccine performance differs by socioeconomic setting and the potential underlying factors. HRV vaccine effectiveness in early adopting African countries has proven to be similar or even superior to the efficacy results observed in pre-licensure studies. PMID:26098566

  18. The cost-utility of rotavirus vaccination with Rotarix (RIX4414) in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Lucas M A; Standaert, Baudouin; Hartwig, Nico; Hövels, Anke M; Al, Maiwenn J

    2008-02-20

    The objective of this study was to estimate the cost-utility of mass vaccination of 0-4-year-old children with Rotarix in the Netherlands. We used a Markov process with Dutch data on incidence, resource use and costs (GP, hospitalisation, productivity loss and household costs) to compare vaccination to conventional treatment from a societal perspective. Utility loss due to rotavirus-induced diarrhoea was measured using EQ5D, with GPs and paediatricians serving as proxies to fill out the questions. As the costs of a vaccination course ranged from 90 euro to 100 euro per child, the cost-utility ratio varied from 21,900 euro to 35,076 euro per QALY gained. Based on the current study, it is clear that mass vaccination with Rotarix against rotavirus gastroenteritis can be attractive, from an economic and a health care perspective.

  19. Human rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix): focus on effectiveness and impact 6 years after first introduction in Africa.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Giaquinto, Carlo; Benninghoff, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    A decade after licensure of the human rotavirus vaccine (HRV), a wealth of evidence supports a reduction of rotavirus (RV) gastroenteritis-associated mortality and hospitalizations following HRV inclusion in national immunization programs. Nevertheless, the majority of real-world data has been generated in high- or middle-income settings. Clinical efficacy trials previously indicated RV vaccine performance may be lower in less-developed countries compared with wealthier counterparts. Using recently published data from Africa, we examine the effectiveness and impact of HRV in resource-deprived areas, exploring whether vaccine performance differs by socioeconomic setting and the potential underlying factors. HRV vaccine effectiveness in early adopting African countries has proven to be similar or even superior to the efficacy results observed in pre-licensure studies.

  20. National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Addition of Intussusception as Injury for Rotavirus Vaccines to the Vaccine Injury Table. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-06-23

    On July 24, 2013, the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary) published in the Federal Register a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) proposing changes to the regulations governing the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). Specifically, the Secretary proposed revisions to the Vaccine Injury Table (Table). The basis for this change is consistent with the Secretary's findings that intussusceptions can reasonably be determined in some circumstances to be caused by rotavirus vaccines. The Secretary is now making this amendment to the Table and to the Qualifications and Aids to Interpretation (QAI), described below under Background Information, as proposed in the NPRM. These regulations will apply only to petitions for compensation under the VICP filed after this final rule becomes effective.

  1. Rotavirus Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... PATH's Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  2. Rotavirus Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Treatment Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... PATH's Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  3. Cost-effectiveness of introducing a rotavirus vaccine in developing countries: The case of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Mendoza, Atanacio; Bertozzi, Stefano M; Gutierrez, Juan-Pablo; Itzler, Robbin

    2008-01-01

    Background In developing countries rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhoea and diarrhoeal deaths in children under 5. Vaccination could greatly alleviate that burden, but in Mexico as in most low- and middle-income countries the decision to add rotavirus vaccine to the national immunisation program will depend heavily on its cost-effectiveness and affordability. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of including the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in Mexico's national immunisation program. Methods A cost-effectiveness model was developed from the perspective of the health system, modelling the vaccination of a hypothetical birth cohort of 2 million children monitored from birth through 60 months of age. It compares the cost and disease burden of rotavirus in an unvaccinated cohort of children with one vaccinated as recommended at 2, 4, and 6 months. Results Including the pentavalent vaccine in the national immunisation program could prevent 71,464 medical visits (59%), 5,040 hospital admissions (66%), and 612 deaths from rotavirus gastroenteritis (70%). At US$10 per dose and a cost of administration of US$13.70 per 3-dose regimen, vaccination would cost US$122,058 per death prevented, US$4,383 per discounted life-year saved, at a total net cost of US$74.7 million dollars to the health care system. Key variables influencing the results were, in order of importance, case fatality, vaccine price, vaccine efficacy, serotype prevalence, and annual loss of efficacy. The results are also very sensitive to the discount rate assumed when calculated per life-year saved. Conclusion At prices below US $15 per dose, the cost per life-year saved is estimated to be lower than one GNP per capita and hence highly cost effective by the WHO Commission on Macroeconomics and Health criteria. The cost-effectiveness estimates are highly dependent upon the mortality in the absence of the vaccine, which suggests that the vaccine is likely to be

  4. Economic analysis for evidence-based policy-making on a national immunization program: a case of rotavirus vaccine in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Muangchana, Charung; Riewpaiboon, Arthorn; Jiamsiri, Suchada; Thamapornpilas, Piyanit; Warinsatian, Porpit

    2012-04-16

    Severe diarrhea caused by rotavirus is a health problem worldwide, including Thailand. The World Health Organization has recommended incorporating rotavirus vaccination into national immunization programs. This policy has been implemented in several countries, but not in Thailand where the mortality rate is not high. This leads to the question of whether it would be cost-effective to implement such a policy. The Thai National Vaccine Committee, through the Immunization Practice Subcommittee, has conducted an economic analysis. Their study aimed to estimate the costs of rotavirus diarrhea and of a rotavirus vaccination program, and the cost-effectiveness of such a program including budget impact analysis. The study was designed as an economic evaluation, employing modeling technique in both provider and societal perspectives. A birth cohort of Thai children in 2009 was used in the analysis, with a 5-year time horizon. Costs were composed of cost of the illness and the vaccination program. Outcomes were measured in the form of lives saved and DALYs averted. Both costs and outcomes were discounted at 3%. The study found the discounted number of deaths to be 7.02 and 20.52 for vaccinated and unvaccinated cohorts, respectively (13.5 deaths averted). Discounted DALYs were 263.33 and 826.57 for vaccinated and unvaccinated cohorts, respectively (563.24 DALYs averted). Costs of rotavirus diarrhea in a societal perspective were US$6.6 million and US$21.0 million for vaccinated and unvaccinated cohorts, respectively. At base case, the costs per additional death averted were US$5.1 million and US$5.7 for 2-dose and 3-dose vaccines, respectively, in a societal perspective. Costs per additional DALYs averted were US$128,063 and US$142,144, respectively. In a societal perspective, with a cost-effectiveness threshold at 1 GDP per capita per DALYs averted, vaccine prices per dose were US$4.98 and US$3.32 for 2-dose and 3-dose vaccines, respectively; in a provider perspective, they

  5. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C; McAllen, John K; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2015-08-08

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide.

  6. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C; McAllen, John K; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2015-09-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide. PMID:26254487

  7. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C.; McAllen, John K.; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide. PMID:26254487

  8. Vaccine-derived NSP2 segment in rotaviruses from vaccinated children with gastroenteritis in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Bucardo, Filemón; Rippinger, Christine M; Svensson, Lennart; Patton, John T

    2012-08-01

    Rotavirus (RV) vaccination programs have been established in several countries using the human-attenuated G1P[8] monovalent vaccine Rotarix (GlaxoSmithKline) and/or the human-bovine reassortant G1, G2, G3, G4, P[8] pentavalent vaccine RotaTeq (Merck). The efficacy of both vaccines is high (∼90%) in developed countries, but can be remarkably lower in developing countries. For example, a vaccine efficacy against severe diarrhea of only 58% was observed in a 2007-2009 Nicaraguan study using RotaTeq. To gain insight into the significant level of vaccine failure in this country, we sequenced the genomes of RVs recovered from vaccinated Nicaraguan children with gastroenteritis. The results revealed that all had genotype specificities typical for human RVs (11 G1P[8], 1 G3P[8]) and that the sequences and antigenic epitopes of the outer capsid proteins (VP4 and VP7) of these viruses were similar to those reported for RVs isolated elsewhere in the world. As expected, nine of the G1P[8] viruses and the single G3P[8] virus had genome constellations typical of human G1P[8] and G3P[8] RVs: G1/3-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. However, two of the G1P[8] viruses had atypical constellations, G1-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N2-T1-E1-H1, due to the presence of a genotype-2 NSP2 (N2) gene. The sequence of the N2 NSP2 gene was identical to the bovine N2 NSP2 gene of RotaTeq, indicating that the two atypical viruses originated via reassortment of human G1P[8] RVs with RotaTeq viruses. Together, our data suggest that the high level of vaccine failure in Nicaraguan is probably not due to antigenic drift of commonly circulating virus strains nor the emergence of new antigenetically distinct virus strains. Furthermore, our data suggest that the widespread use of the RotaTeq vaccine has led to the introduction of vaccine genes into circulating human RVs.

  9. Vaccine-Derived NSP2 Segment in Rotaviruses from Vaccinated Children with Gastroenteritis in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Bucardo, Filemón; Rippinger, Christine M.; Svensson, Lennart; Patton, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) vaccination programs have been established in several countries using the human-attenuated G1P[8] monovalent vaccine Rotarix™ (GlaxoSmithKline) and/or the human-bovine reassortant G1, G2, G3, G4, P[8] pentavalent vaccine RotaTeq™ (Merck). The efficacy of both vaccines is high (~90%) in developed countries, but can be remarkably lower in developing countries. For example, a vaccine efficacy against severe diarrhea of only 58% was observed in a 2007–2009 Nicaraguan study using RotaTeq. To gain insight into the significant level of vaccine failure in this country, we sequenced the genomes of RVs recovered from vaccinated Nicaraguan children with gastroenteritis. The results revealed that all had genotype specificities typical for human RVs (11 G1P[8], 1 G3P[8]) and that the sequences and antigenic epitopes of the outer capsid proteins (VP4 and VP7) of these viruses were similar to those reported for RVs isolated elsewhere in the world. As expected, nine of the G1P[8] viruses and the single G3P[8] virus had genome constellations typical of human G1P[8] and G3P[8] RVs: G1/3-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. However, two of the G1P[8] viruses had atypical constellations, G1-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N2-T1-E1-H1, due to the presence of a genotype-2 NSP2 (N2) gene. The sequence of the N2 NSP2 gene was identical to the bovine N2 NSP2 gene of RotaTeq, indicating that the two atypical viruses originated via reassortment of human G1P[8] RVs with RotaTeq viruses. Together, our data suggest that the high level of vaccine failure in Nicaraguan is probably not due to antigenic drift of commonly circulating virus strains nor the emergence of new antigenetically distinct virus strains. Furthermore, our data suggests that the widespread use of the RotaTeq vaccine has led to the introduction of vaccine genes into circulating human RVs. PMID:22487061

  10. The Impact of Socio-Economic Determinants on the Vaccination Rates with Rotavirus and Human Papiloma Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    GRDADOLNIK, Urška; SOČAN, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Background Socio-economic inequalities may have an impact on the uptake of selfpaid vaccines. The aim of the study was to identify the effect of some socio economic determinants on vaccination rates with self-paid human papilloma virus (HPV) and rotavirus (RV) vaccines. Methods Vaccination coverage data, available in electronic database cepljenje.net (administered by the National Institute of Public Health), were collected at administrative unit level. The socio-economic determinants (the average gross pay in euros, the unemployment rate, the educational and households structure, the population density, the number of inhabitants, the number of children aged from 0 to 4, the number of women aged from 15 to 30) were extracted from Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia web page. The strength of the correlation between socioeconomic variables and self-paid HPV and RV vaccination rates was determined. Results Rotavirus vaccination rates show a slight negative correlation with the number of residents per administrative unit (ρ=−0.29, p=0.04), and no correlation with other socio-economic variables. Likewise, no correlation has been found between HPV vaccination rates and the selected socio-economic variables. Conclusion Ecological study did not reveal any correlations between socio economic variables and vaccination rates with RV and HPV self-paid vaccines on administrative unit level. PMID:27647088

  11. The Impact of Socio-Economic Determinants on the Vaccination Rates with Rotavirus and Human Papiloma Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    GRDADOLNIK, Urška; SOČAN, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Background Socio-economic inequalities may have an impact on the uptake of selfpaid vaccines. The aim of the study was to identify the effect of some socio economic determinants on vaccination rates with self-paid human papilloma virus (HPV) and rotavirus (RV) vaccines. Methods Vaccination coverage data, available in electronic database cepljenje.net (administered by the National Institute of Public Health), were collected at administrative unit level. The socio-economic determinants (the average gross pay in euros, the unemployment rate, the educational and households structure, the population density, the number of inhabitants, the number of children aged from 0 to 4, the number of women aged from 15 to 30) were extracted from Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia web page. The strength of the correlation between socioeconomic variables and self-paid HPV and RV vaccination rates was determined. Results Rotavirus vaccination rates show a slight negative correlation with the number of residents per administrative unit (ρ=−0.29, p=0.04), and no correlation with other socio-economic variables. Likewise, no correlation has been found between HPV vaccination rates and the selected socio-economic variables. Conclusion Ecological study did not reveal any correlations between socio economic variables and vaccination rates with RV and HPV self-paid vaccines on administrative unit level.

  12. Perspective on live varicella vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Anne A; Katz, Samuel L

    2008-03-01

    The attenuation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) by Takahashi in 1974 was a remarkable achievement. It swiftly led to development of a live vaccine against chickenpox, which was initially tested in Japan. With its successful employment in immunocompromised children to prevent morbidity and mortality due to varicella, the vaccine began to be tested in healthy children in Japan and elsewhere. In the United States, vaccine use progressed from extensive clinical trials that demonstrated safety and efficacy to universal immunization of healthy infants and children. In the past 10 years, >30 million healthy American individuals, mostly children, have been vaccinated. With increasing use of vaccine, there has been a concomitant decrease in the incidence of disease, along with decreases in hospitalizations and deaths due to VZV. To improve protection, however, a 2-dose schedule of immunization was recommended for routine use in all children by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in June 2006. At roughly the same time, licensure of the combined measles-mumps-rubella-varicella vaccine was completed, which allowed harmonization of immunization against these 4 viruses with 1 injection given twice in childhood. Concomitantly, a version of the varicella vaccine with 10 times the titer was developed for immunization of healthy individuals >60 years of age against herpes zoster (HZ). Although elimination of VZV from human populations may not yet be possible, the combined approach of immunization against both varicella in childhood and HZ in adulthood in the developed world are predicted to dramatically increase our control of this troublesome virus.

  13. The establishment of the infant intestinal microbiome is not affected by rotavirus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Li; Arboleya, Silvia; Lihua, Guo; Chuihui, Yuan; Nan, Qin; Suarez, Marta; Solís, Gonzalo; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The microbial colonization of the intestine during the first months of life constitutes the most important process for the microbiota-induced host-homeostasis. Alterations in this process may entail a high-risk for disease in later life. However, the potential factors affecting this process in the infant are not well known. Moreover, the potential impact of orally administered vaccines upon the establishing microbiome remains unknown. Here we assessed the intestinal microbiome establishment process and evaluated the impact of rotavirus vaccination upon this process. Metagenomic, PCR-DGGE and faecal short chain fatty acids analyses were performed on faecal samples obtained from three infants before and after the administration of each dose of vaccine. We found a high inter-individual variability in the early life gut microbiota at microbial composition level, but a large similarity between the infants' microbiomes at functional level. Rotavirus vaccination did not show any major effects upon the infant gut microbiota. Thus, the individual microbiome establishment and development process seems to occur in a defined manner during the first stages of life and rotavirus vaccination appears to be inconsequential for this process. PMID:25491920

  14. Rotavirus vaccination and intussusception – Science, surveillance, and safety: A review of evidence and recommendations for future research priorities in low and middle income countries

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Catherine; Healy, Kelly; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Bines, Julie; Neuzil, Kathleen; Santosham, Mathuram; Steele, A. Duncan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT As of January 2016, 80 countries have introduced rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs. Many have documented significant declines in rotavirus-specific and all-cause diarrheal illnesses following vaccine introduction. Two globally licensed rotavirus vaccines have been associated with a low risk of intussusception in several studies. In July 2014, the Rotavirus Organization of Technical Allies Council convened a meeting of research and advocacy organizations, public health experts, funders, and vaccine manufacturers to discuss post-marketing intussusception surveillance and rotavirus vaccine impact data. Meeting objectives were to evaluate updated data, identify and prioritize research gaps, discuss best practices for intussusception monitoring in lower-income settings and risk communication, and provide insight to country-level stakeholders on best practices for intussusception monitoring and communication. Meeting participants agreed with statements from expert bodies that the benefits of vaccination with currently available rotavirus vaccines outweigh the low risk of vaccination-associated intussusception. However, further research is needed to better understand the relationship of intussusception to wild-type rotavirus and rotavirus vaccines and delineate potential etiologies and mechanisms of intussusception. Additionally, evidence from research and post-licensure evaluations should be presented with evidence of the benefits of vaccination to best inform policymakers deciding on vaccine introduction or vaccination program sustainability. PMID:27322835

  15. Inclusion of a universal tetanus toxoid CD4(+) T cell epitope P2 significantly enhanced the immunogenicity of recombinant rotavirus ΔVP8* subunit parenteral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaobo; Wen, Ke; Cao, Dianjun; Li, Guohua; Jones, Ronald W; Li, Jianping; Szu, Shousun; Hoshino, Yasutaka; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-07-31

    Currently available live oral rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®), are highly efficacious in developed countries. However, the immunogenicity and efficacy of such vaccines in some developing countries are low. We reported previously that bacterially-expressed rotavirus ΔVP8* subunit vaccine candidates with P[8], P[4] or P[6] specificity elicited high-titer virus neutralizing antibodies in animals immunized intramuscularly. Of note was the finding that antibodies induced with the P[8]ΔVP8* vaccine neutralized both homotypic P[8] and heterotypic P[4] rotavirus strains to high titer. To further improve its vaccine potential, a tetanus toxoid universal CD4(+) T cell epitope P2 was introduced into P[8] or P[6]ΔVP8* construct. The resulting recombinant fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli were of high solubility and were produced with high yield. Two doses (10 or 20 μg/dose) of the P2-P[8]ΔVP8* vaccine or P2-P[6]ΔVP8* vaccine with aluminum phosphate adjuvant elicited significantly higher geometric mean homologous neutralizing antibody titers than the vaccines without P2 in intramuscularly immunized guinea pigs. Interestingly, high levels of neutralizing antibody responses induced in guinea pigs with 3 doses of the P2-P[8]ΔVP8* vaccine persisted for at least 6 months. Furthermore, in the gnotobiotic piglet challenge study, three intramuscular doses (50 μg/dose) of the P2-P[8]ΔVP8* vaccine with aluminum phosphate adjuvant significantly delayed the onset of diarrhea and significantly reduced the duration of diarrhea and the cumulative diarrhea score after oral challenge with virulent human rotavirus Wa (G1P[8]) strain. The P2-P[8]ΔVP8* vaccine induced serum virus neutralizing antibody and VP4-specific IgG antibody production prechallenge, and primed the pigs for higher antibody and intestinal and systemic virus-specific IFN-γ producing CD4(+) T cell responses postchallenge. These two subunit vaccines could be used at a minimum singly or

  16. Understanding internalization of rotavirus VP6 nanotubes by cells: towards a recombinant vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mabel; Wood, Christopher; Sanchez-López, Rosana; Castro-Acosta, Ricardo M; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2014-05-01

    Rotavirus VP6 nanotubes are an attractive option for a recombinant vaccine against rotavirus disease. Protection against rotavirus infection and an adjuvant effect have been observed upon immunization with VP6 nanotubes. However, little information exists on how VP6 nanotubes interact with cells and trigger an immune response. In this work, the interaction between VP6 nanotubes and different cell lines was characterized. VP6 nanotubes were not cytotoxic to any of the animal or human cell lines tested. Uptake of nanotubes into cells was cell-line-dependent, as only THP1 and J774 macrophage cells internalized them. Moreover, the size and spatial arrangement of VP6 assembled into nanotubes allowed their uptake by macrophages, as double-layered rotavirus-like particles also displaying VP6 in their surface were not taken up. The internalization of VP6 nanotubes was inhibited by methyl-β-cyclodextrin, but not by genistein, indicating that nanotube entry is specific, depends on the presence of cholesterol in the plasma membrane, and does not require the activity of tyrosine kinases. The information generated here expands our understanding of the interaction of protein nanotubes with cells, which is useful for the application of VP6 nanotubes as a vaccine.

  17. Molecular characterization of rotavirus strains from pre- and post-vaccination periods in a country with low vaccination coverage: the case of Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Steyer, Andrej; Sagadin, Martin; Kolenc, Marko; Poljšak-Prijatelj, Mateja

    2014-12-01

    Rotavirus vaccination started in Slovenia in 2007 on a voluntarily basis. The vaccination rate is relatively low (up to 27%) and no increasing trend is observed. We present rotavirus genotype distribution among children hospitalized for rotavirus gastroenteritis in Slovenia. Eight consecutive rotavirus seasons were followed, from 2005/06 to 2012/13, and 113 strains of the most common rotavirus genotypes were randomly selected for molecular characterization of rotavirus VP7 and VP4 (VP8(∗)) genome segments. During the vaccine introduction period, from 2007 to 2013, rotavirus genotype prevalences changed, with G1P[8] decreasing from 74.1% to 8.7% between 2007/08 and 2010/11 seasons, replaced by G4P[8] and G2P[4], with up to 52.0% prevalence. Comparable analysis of VP7 and VP8(∗) genome fragments within G1P[8] genotype lineages revealed considerable differences for rotavirus strains circulating before and during the vaccination period. The G1P[8] rotavirus strains from the pre-vaccination period clustered in a phylogenetic tree within Rotarix®-like VP7 and VP8(∗) lineages. However, since 2007, the majority of G1P[8] strains have shifted to distant genetic lineages with lower nucleotide (88.1-94.0% for VP7 and 86.6-91.1% for VP8(∗)) and amino acid (93.8-95.2% for VP7 and 85.3-94.6% for VP8(∗)) identities to the vaccine Rotarix® strain. This change also resulted in a different deduced amino acid profile at the major VP7 and VP8(∗) antigenic epitopes.

  18. Burden of rotavirus disease and cost-effectiveness of universal vaccination in the Province of Genoa (Northern Italy).

    PubMed

    Panatto, D; Amicizia, D; Ansaldi, F; Marocco, A; Marchetti, F; Bamfi, F; Giacchino, R; Tacchella, A; Del Buono, S; Gasparini, R

    2009-05-26

    Rotavirus is acknowledged to be a major cause of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children. As gastroenteritis due to rotavirus is a public health problem and two new vaccines are currently available, we investigated the rotavirus burden and developed a cost-effectiveness analysis, using data collected in the Province of Genoa (Italy), to evaluate the benefits of new borns vaccination. The cost-effectiveness of a rotavirus vaccination programme in the Province of Genoa was performed, in comparison with no vaccination, for both the regional healthcare system (RHS) and society (S). In 2006, admissions to the paediatric emergency department for gastroenteritis numbered 2338 (about 11% of total admissions); of these 33% were hospitalised. In 28% of cases, the children tested positive for rotavirus. During epidemics, paediatricians receive from 3 to 5 calls per day for gastroenteritis, carry out 1 or 2 ambulatory examinations and for children with a severe case history, make house visits. A rotavirus immunisation programme would have a great impact on disease burden, in that 90% coverage would reduce the number of severe cases by more than 85%. From the perspective of both the RHS and S, vaccination proved to be highly cost-effective.

  19. Background paper to the recommendation for routine rotavirus vaccination of infants in Germany.

    PubMed

    Koch, J; Wiese-Posselt, M; Remschmidt, C; Wichmann, O; Bertelsmann, H; Garbe, E; Hengel, H; Meerpohl, J J; Mas Marques, A; Oppermann, H; Hummers-Pradier, E; von Kries, R; Mertens, T

    2013-07-01

    Two rotavirus (RV) vaccines were introduced to the European market in 2006. To support the decision-making process of the German Standing Committee on Vaccination ("Ständige Impfkommission", STIKO) regarding adoption of routine RV vaccination into the national vaccination schedule in Germany relevant scientific background was reviewed. According to STIKO’s Standard Operating Procedures for the development of evidence-based vaccination recommendations, a set of key questions was addressed and systematic reviews were performed with a focus on the efficacy, effectiveness, impact and safety of RV vaccines. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was applied to assess the quality of available evidence. Data from 5 randomized controlled trials demonstrated a high efficacy of RV vaccines in preventing severe RV-associated gastroenteritis (91%) and hospitalization (92%) in settings comparable to Germany. Post-marketing observational studies confirmed these findings. In several countries, impact studies suggest that age groups not eligible for vaccination might also benefit from herd effects and demonstrated a decrease in the number of nosocomial RV infections after RV vaccine introduction. The vaccines were considered safe, except for a slightly increased risk of intussusception shortly after the first dose, corresponding to 1-2 additional cases per 100,000 infants vaccinated (relative risk =1.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.68-2.14). RV case-fatality is extremely low in Germany. However, RV incidence among children aged <5 years is high (reported 8-14 cases per 1000 children annually), and of these almost half require hositalization. In view of the available evidence and expected benefits, STIKO recommends routine rotavirus vaccination of children under the age of 6 months with the main goal of preventing RV-associated hospitalizations in Germany, especially among infants and young children. PMID:23807405

  20. Correlates of protection for rotavirus vaccines: Possible alternative trial endpoints, opportunities, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Juana; Steele, A Duncan; Franco, Manuel A

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is a major vaccine-preventable killer of young children worldwide. Two RV vaccines are globally commercially available and other vaccines are in different stages of development. Due to the absence of a suitable correlate of protection (CoP), all RV vaccine efficacy trials have had clinical endpoints. These trials represent an important challenge since RV vaccines have to be introduced in many different settings, placebo-controlled studies are unethical due to the availability of licensed vaccines, and comparator assessments for new vaccines with clinical endpoints are very large, complex, and expensive to conduct. A CoP as a surrogate endpoint would allow predictions of vaccine efficacy for new RV vaccines and enable a regulatory pathway, contributing to the more rapid development of new RV vaccines. The goal of this review is to summarize experiences from RV natural infection and vaccine studies to evaluate potential CoP for use as surrogate endpoints for assessment of new RV vaccines, and to explore challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25483685

  1. Rotavirus vaccines in developing countries: the potential impact, implementation challenges, and remaining questions.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Thomas; Wang, Susan; Mantel, Carsten

    2012-04-27

    Diarrhoeal disease is one of the commonest causes of death in children, especially in developing countries in Africa and Asia. Rotavirus has been consistently identified as the commonest pathogen associated with severe diarrhoea. Hence, the availability of vaccines against this organism provides the opportunity to reduce child mortality. Data from efficacy trials in developing countries in Africa and Asia showed that the vaccine efficacy was lower than that observed in other countries. Nevertheless, the vaccines are expected to be of significant benefit in high mortality countries in these regions. While the reports published in this supplement add to our understanding about the performance of these vaccines in developing countries in these regions, questions remain over the overall impact of these vaccines when used in national programmes of developing countries in Africa and Asia, the optimal vaccination schedules and the impact of age restrictions for vaccine use on immunization coverage. Additional research is required to improve understanding on the performance of these vaccines in developing countries in Africa and Asia and measures that may improve performance. Data that will assist in the definition of the optimal immunization schedule and possibly allow relaxation of the age restrictions for vaccine use may help in enhancing the impact of the vaccines in these countries. Finally, disease surveillance and studies are required to document the impact of vaccination and monitor changes in disease epidemiology.

  2. Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC-INFO or visit www. cdc. gov/ vaccines/ parents. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Academy of Family Physicians, and the American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommend all children receive their vaccines according to the recommended schedule.

  3. Live attenuated intranasal influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Montinaro, Valentina; Groppali, Elena; Tenconi, Rossana; Semino, Margherita; Principi, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Annual vaccination is the most effective means of preventing and controlling influenza epidemics, and the traditional trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) is by far the most widely used. Unfortunately, it has a number of limitations, the most important of which is its poor immunogenicity in younger children and the elderly, the populations at greatest risk of severe influenza. Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) has characteristics that can overcome some of these limitations. It does not have to be injected because it is administered intranasally. It is very effective in children and adolescents, among whom it prevents significantly more cases of influenza than the traditional TIV. However, its efficacy in adults has not been adequately documented, which is why it has not been licensed for use by adults by the European health authorities. LAIV is safe and well tolerated by children aged > 2 y and adults, but some concerns arisen regarding its safety in younger children and subjects with previous asthma or with recurrent wheezing. Further studies are needed to solve these problems and to evaluate the possible role of LAIV in the annual vaccination of the general population.

  4. Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It

    MedlinePlus

    ... 800-CDC-INFO or visit CDC Vaccines for Parents site . The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Academy of Family Physicians, and the American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommend all children receive their vaccines according ... Diseases and the Vaccines that Prevent Them Chickenpox ...

  5. Do vaccines save lives? Yes they do!

    PubMed

    Lernout, Tinne; Theeten, Heidi; Leuridan, Elke; Van Damme, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Since their introduction and widespread use, vaccines have been very successful in reducing morbidity and mortality of the diseases they target, at an individual level and through herd immunity. The impact on the mortality has been rapid and easy to measure for some diseases, such as diphtheria, pertussis and measles. For other diseases, including hepatitis B and human papillomavirus infections, deaths averted occur many years after vaccination, and it takes years until the full potential of the vaccine can be established. Finally, in middle and high income countries, the impact of vaccination against some diseases, like invasive pneumococcal disease and rotavirus gastro-enteritis, is measured by decrease in incidence of the disease and reduction in hospitalization rather than impact on mortality. But in the countries with the highest incidence of these diseases, mortality remains high due to low availability of these vaccines, and millions of deaths could be averted by optimal use of vaccines in these regions. Major challenges for vaccination programmes are to maintain and strengthen trust in the benefits of vaccination and adapt immunization schedules according to the changing epidemiological landscape.

  6. Direct, indirect, total, and overall effectiveness of the rotavirus vaccines for the prevention of gastroenteritis hospitalizations in privately insured US children, 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Catherine A; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Pate, Virginia; Weber, David J; Jonsson Funk, Michele; Stürmer, Til; Brookhart, M Alan

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate how direct, indirect, total, and overall effectiveness estimates and absolute benefits of rotavirus vaccines vary through the years following vaccine introduction. Privately insured US children in a large claims database were followed from age 8 months until they 1) experienced a hospitalization for rotavirus or acute gastroenteritis; 2) lost continuous health plan enrollment; 3) turned 20 months of age; or 4) reached the end of the study period. Vaccine effectiveness estimates in preventing rotavirus and acute gastroenteritis hospitalizations were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression, stratified by calendar year and adjusted for birth month. Incidence rate differences were estimated to determine the absolute number of gastroenteritis hospitalizations prevented in the cohort. Among 905,718 children, 51%, 66%, 80%, and 86% received 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in each year from 2007 to 2010. The direct vaccine effectiveness of 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalizations ranged from 87% to 92% each year. Accounting for indirect protection increased estimates of vaccine effectiveness by an additional 3%-8% among those vaccinated. Failing to account for population-level vaccine benefits in 2010, when circulation of rotavirus was low, could underestimate the sustained impact of the vaccine program.

  7. Direct, indirect, total, and overall effectiveness of the rotavirus vaccines for the prevention of gastroenteritis hospitalizations in privately insured US children, 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Catherine A; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Pate, Virginia; Weber, David J; Jonsson Funk, Michele; Stürmer, Til; Brookhart, M Alan

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate how direct, indirect, total, and overall effectiveness estimates and absolute benefits of rotavirus vaccines vary through the years following vaccine introduction. Privately insured US children in a large claims database were followed from age 8 months until they 1) experienced a hospitalization for rotavirus or acute gastroenteritis; 2) lost continuous health plan enrollment; 3) turned 20 months of age; or 4) reached the end of the study period. Vaccine effectiveness estimates in preventing rotavirus and acute gastroenteritis hospitalizations were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression, stratified by calendar year and adjusted for birth month. Incidence rate differences were estimated to determine the absolute number of gastroenteritis hospitalizations prevented in the cohort. Among 905,718 children, 51%, 66%, 80%, and 86% received 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in each year from 2007 to 2010. The direct vaccine effectiveness of 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalizations ranged from 87% to 92% each year. Accounting for indirect protection increased estimates of vaccine effectiveness by an additional 3%-8% among those vaccinated. Failing to account for population-level vaccine benefits in 2010, when circulation of rotavirus was low, could underestimate the sustained impact of the vaccine program. PMID:24578359

  8. Direct, Indirect, Total, and Overall Effectiveness of the Rotavirus Vaccines for the Prevention of Gastroenteritis Hospitalizations in Privately Insured US Children, 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    Panozzo, Catherine A.; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Pate, Virginia; Weber, David J.; Jonsson Funk, Michele; Stürmer, Til; Brookhart, M. Alan

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate how direct, indirect, total, and overall effectiveness estimates and absolute benefits of rotavirus vaccines vary through the years following vaccine introduction. Privately insured US children in a large claims database were followed from age 8 months until they 1) experienced a hospitalization for rotavirus or acute gastroenteritis; 2) lost continuous health plan enrollment; 3) turned 20 months of age; or 4) reached the end of the study period. Vaccine effectiveness estimates in preventing rotavirus and acute gastroenteritis hospitalizations were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression, stratified by calendar year and adjusted for birth month. Incidence rate differences were estimated to determine the absolute number of gastroenteritis hospitalizations prevented in the cohort. Among 905,718 children, 51%, 66%, 80%, and 86% received 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in each year from 2007 to 2010. The direct vaccine effectiveness of 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalizations ranged from 87% to 92% each year. Accounting for indirect protection increased estimates of vaccine effectiveness by an additional 3%–8% among those vaccinated. Failing to account for population-level vaccine benefits in 2010, when circulation of rotavirus was low, could underestimate the sustained impact of the vaccine program. PMID:24578359

  9. Suspension of rotavirus vaccine after reports of intussusception--United States, 1999.

    PubMed

    2004-09-01

    On July 16, 1999, CDC recommended that health-care providers suspend use of the licensed rhesus-human rotavirus reassortant-tetravalent vaccine (RRV-TV) (RotaShield, Wyeth Laboratories, Inc., Marietta, Pennsylvania) in response to 15 cases of intussusception (i.e., a bowel obstruction in which one segment of bowel becomes enfolded within another segment) among infants who received RRV-TV. The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) monitored for adverse events following licensure of RRV-TV on August 31, 1999. After the recommendation to suspend use of the vaccine, no additional cases were reported. This report describes the surveillance activities used to identify this vaccine adverse event, the emergency response, and follow-up investigations. Suspension of RRV-TV after the initial cases of intussusception parallels the removal of the Broad Street pump handle in response to John Snow's epidemiologic studies; both were decisive, life-saving public health actions.

  10. Serum IgA levels induced by rotavirus natural infection, but not following immunization with the RRV-TV vaccine (Rotashield), correlate with protection.

    PubMed

    González, Rosabel; Franco, Manuel; Sarmiento, Luis; Romero, Milagros; Schael, Irene Pérez

    2005-08-01

    To directly compare serum rotavirus specific IgA as a marker of protection in children vaccinated with the RRV-TV (Rotashield) vaccine and in naturally infected children, we studied pre-existing rotavirus IgA antibodies by ELISA assays in these groups of children within the first 5 days after the onset of a diarrhea episode, due or not to rotavirus. In immunized children, rotavirus IgA titers were similar between infected and non-RV infected children. In non-immunized children, the proportion with rotavirus IgA titers was significantly greater in non-RV infected children (58%) than in infected children (31%). Additionally, a titer >/=1:800 was associated with 68% protection. Thus, in this study serum rotavirus IgA showed a good correlation with protection in children pre-exposed to natural infection but not in those immunized with the RRV-TV vaccine.

  11. Rotavirus Genotypes and Vaccine Effectiveness from a Sentinel, Hospital-Based, Surveillance Study for Three Consecutive Rotavirus Seasons in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Zainab; Harastani, Houda; Hammadi, Moza; Reslan, Lina; Ghanem, Soha; Hajar, Farah; Sabra, Ahmad; Haidar, Amjad; Inati, Adlette; Rajab, Mariam; Fakhouri, Hassan; Ghanem, Bassam; Baasiri, Ghassan; Gerbaka, Bernard; Zaraket, Hassan; Matar, Ghassan M.; Dbaibo, Ghassan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Globally, rotavirus (RV) is the leading cause of gastroenteritis (GE) in children. Longitudinal data about changes in RV genotype distribution and vaccine effectiveness (VE) are scarce. This study was conducted in Lebanon over 3 consecutive RV seasons to estimate the rate of RVGE hospitalization, identify RV genotypes, determine the seasonal and geographical variations, and calculate RV VE. Materials and Methods This prospective, multicenter, hospital-based surveillance study was conducted between 2011 and 2013 and enrolled children (<5 years) admitted for GE. Socio-demographic and clinical data about the current episode of GE at admission were collected. Genotypes were determined from stool samples testing positive for RV by PCR. Results Of 1,414 cases included in the final analysis, 83% were <2 years old and 55.6% were boys. Median duration of hospitalization was 4 days and 91.6% of GE cases were severe (Vesikari score ≥11). PCR testing showed that 30.3% of subjects were RV-positive of which 62.1% had fever versus 71.1% of RV-negative subjects (P = 0.001). RV was predominantly detected in the cold season from November till March (69.9%). G and P genotype pairs for all RV-positive stool specimens showed a predominance of G1P[8] in 36% (n = 154) of specimens, G9P[8] in 26.4% (n = 113), and G2P[4] in 17.8% (n = 76). RV-negative subjects were more likely to be RV-vaccinated (21%) compared to the RV-positive subjects (11.3%) (P<0.001), with a vaccine breakthrough rate of 18.8%. The ratio of RV1-vaccinated for each RV5-vaccinated subject was 7.8 and VE against RV disease was 68.4% (95%CI, 49.6%-80.2%). Conclusion RV is a major cause of GE requiring hospitalization of children under 5 years of age in Lebanon. A few genotypes predominated over the three RV seasons studied. Mass RV vaccination will likely decrease the burden of hospitalization due to RV. VE is similar to what has been observed for other middle-income countries. PMID:27571515

  12. Rotavirus strain surveillance for three years following the introduction of rotavirus vaccine into Belém, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Sylvia F S; Linhares, Alexandre C; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc P; Oliveira, Alessilva; Justino, Maria Cleonice A; Soares, Luana S; Müller, Elza Caroline; Brasil, Patrícia; Tuboi, Suely; Ortega-Barria, Eduardo; Colindres, Rómulo

    2015-08-01

    The monovalent human rotavirus (RV) vaccine, RIX4414 (Rotarix™, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) was introduced into Brazil's Expanded Program on Immunization in March 2006. One year after vaccine introduction, the G2P[4] strain was found to be predominant, with an apparent extinction of many non-G2 strains. This study investigated the diversity of circulating strains in the three years following RIX4414 introduction. Between May 2008 and May 2011, stool samples were collected from children aged ≥12 weeks who were hospitalized for severe lab confirmed RV-gastroenteritis (≥3 liquid or semi-liquid motions over a 24-h period for <14 days, requiring ≥1 overnight hospital stay and intravenous rehydration therapy) in Belém, Brazil. RV-gastroenteritis was detected by ELISA and the G- and P-types were determined by RT-PCR assays. During the first year of surveillance nucleotide sequencing was used for typing those samples not previously typed by RT-PCR. A total of 1,726 of 10,030 severe gastroentertis hospitalizations (17.2%) were due to severe RVGE. G2P[4] was detected in 57.2% of circulating strains over the whole study period, however it predominated during the first 20 months from May 2008 to January 2009. G1P[8] increased in the last part of the study period from May 2010 to May 2011 and represented 36.6% (112/306) of the circulating strains. G2P[4] was the predominant RV strain circulating during the first 20 months of the study, followed by G1P[8]. These findings probably reflect a natural fluctuation in RV strains over time, rather than a vaccine-induced selective pressure.

  13. Population Impact and Effectiveness of Monovalent Rotavirus Vaccination in Urban Malawian Children 3 Years After Vaccine Introduction: Ecological and Case-Control Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Zeev, Naor; Jere, Khuzwayo C.; Bennett, Aisleen; Pollock, Louisa; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Nakagomi, Osamu; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren; Costello, Anthony; Mwansambo, Charles; Parashar, Umesh D.; Heyderman, Robert S.; French, Neil; Cunliffe, Nigel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rotavirus vaccines have been introduced in many low-income African countries including Malawi in 2012. Despite early evidence of vaccine impact, determining persistence of protection beyond infancy, the utility of the vaccine against specific rotavirus genotypes, and effectiveness in vulnerable subgroups is important. Methods. We compared rotavirus prevalence in diarrheal stool and hospitalization incidence before and following rotavirus vaccine introduction in Malawi. Using case-control analysis, we derived vaccine effectiveness (VE) in the second year of life and for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–exposed and stunted children. Results. Rotavirus prevalence declined concurrent with increasing vaccine coverage, and in 2015 was 24% compared with prevaccine mean baseline in 1997–2011 of 32%. Since vaccine introduction, population rotavirus hospitalization incidence declined in infants by 54.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 32.8–68.8), but did not fall in older children. Comparing 241 rotavirus cases with 692 test-negative controls, VE was 70.6% (95% CI, 33.6%–87.0%) and 31.7% (95% CI, −140.6% to 80.6%) in the first and second year of life, respectively, whereas mean age of rotavirus cases increased from 9.3 to 11.8 months. Despite higher VE against G1P[8] than against other genotypes, no resurgence of nonvaccine genotypes has occurred. VE did not differ significantly by nutritional status (78.1% [95% CI, 5.6%–94.9%] in 257 well-nourished and 27.8% [95% CI, −99.5% to 73.9%] in 205 stunted children; P = .12), or by HIV exposure (60.5% [95% CI, 13.3%–82.0%] in 745 HIV-unexposed and 42.2% [95% CI, −106.9% to 83.8%] in 174 exposed children; P = .91). Conclusions. Rotavirus vaccination in Malawi has resulted in reductions in disease burden in infants <12 months, but not in older children. Despite differences in genotype-specific VE, no genotype has emerged to suggest vaccine escape. VE was not demonstrably affected by HIV exposure

  14. Probiotics and colostrum/milk differentially affect neonatal humoral immune responses to oral rotavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Esseili, Malak A; Siegismund, Christine; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2013-04-01

    Breast milk (colostrum [col]/milk) components and gut commensals play important roles in neonatal immune maturation, establishment of gut homeostasis and immune responses to enteric pathogens and oral vaccines. We investigated the impact of colonization by probiotics, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Bb12) with/without col/milk (mimicking breast/formula fed infants) on B lymphocyte responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig model. Col/milk did not affect probiotic colonization in AttHRV vaccinated pigs. However, unvaccinated pigs fed col/milk shed higher numbers of probiotic bacteria in feces than non-col/milk fed colonized controls. In AttHRV vaccinated pigs, col/milk feeding with probiotic treatment resulted in higher mean serum IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers compared to col/milk fed, non-colonized vaccinated pigs. In vaccinated pigs without col/milk, probiotic colonization did not affect IgA HRV antibody titers, but serum IgG HRV antibody titers and gut IgG ASC numbers were lower, suggesting that certain probiotics differentially impact HRV vaccine responses. Our findings suggest that col/milk components (soluble mediators) affect initial probiotic colonization, and together, they modulate neonatal antibody responses to oral AttHRV vaccine in complex ways. PMID:23453730

  15. The First Rotavirus Vaccine and the Politics of Acceptable Risk

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jason L

    2012-01-01

    Context Vaccination in the United States is a frequent source of controversy, with critics alleging failures by public health officials to adequately identify, monitor, and respond to risks associated with vaccines. In response to these charges, the case of RotaShield, a vaccine withdrawn in 1999 following confirmation of a serious adverse event associated with its use, is regularly invoked as evidence of the effectiveness of current vaccine safety activities. Methods This article examines the history of RotaShield, with particular attention paid to decision making regarding its use in the United States and internationally. I reviewed and analyzed federal advisory committee meeting transcripts, international conference reports, government and scientific publications, media coverage, and other primary and secondary source materials. I also conducted six semistructured interviews with former senior officials and advisory committee members at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention who participated in decisions regarding the vaccine. Findings Decision making regarding RotaShield, including the ultimate withdrawal of its recommendation for use, was shaped significantly by government health officials’ concern for preserving public confidence in overall U.S. vaccination efforts amid several unrelated vaccine risk controversies ongoing at that time. This attention to public perception and external pressures occurred in tandem with the evaluation of the quantitative evidence regarding the magnitude and severity of the risk associated with the vaccine. The decisions made in the United States resulted in foreseen but unintended consequences for international use of the vaccine, including in nations where the profile of risks and potential benefits was dramatically different. Conclusions As enthusiasm for evidence-based decision making grows throughout medicine and public health, greater explicit attention should be directed to the processes by which decision

  16. Improvement in hospital Quality of Care (QoC) after the introduction of rotavirus vaccination: An evaluation study in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Standaert, B; Alwan, A; Strens, D; Raes, M; Postma, MJ

    2015-01-01

    During each winter period hospital emergency rooms and pediatric wards are often overwhelmed by high patient influx with infectious diseases leading to chaotic conditions with poor quality of care (QoC) delivery as a consequence. The conditions could be improved if we were able to better control the influx by introducing for instance better prevention strategies against some of the most frequent infectious diseases. New prevention strategies using vaccination against rotavirus infection were introduced in Belgium in November 2006. We developed a measure of hospital QoC suitable for assessing the impact of pediatric rotavirus vaccination. The study is retrospective collecting routine data on bed and staff management in one pediatric hospital in Belgium. The data were divided in pre- and post-vaccination periods during rotavirus-epidemic and non-epidemic periods. The scores were constructed using Explanatory Factor Analysis (EFA). All patients enrolled were admitted to the pediatric ward over the period from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2009. The results of the epidemic period indicated that bed-day occupancy, bed-day turnover and unplanned readmissions for acute gastroenteritis were lower in the post-vaccination compared with the pre-vaccination periods. The QoC scores were therefore significantly lower (indicating improved QoC) after the introduction of rotavirus vaccination, compared with pre-vaccination. The data suggests that the reduction in the winter peak of rotavirus-related hospitalizations after the introduction of the vaccine reduces pressure on hospital resources and improves the quality of hospital care. The findings should be further tested in similar settings. PMID:25902371

  17. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Levine, Myron M

    2015-06-19

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed Salmonella Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Paratyphi A, Salmonella Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines.

  18. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed S. Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: S. Typhi, S. Paratyphi A, S. Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis and S. Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines. PMID:25902362

  19. Herd immunity after two years of the universal mass vaccination program against rotavirus gastroenteritis in Austria.

    PubMed

    Paulke-Korinek, Maria; Kundi, Michael; Rendi-Wagner, Pamela; de Martin, Alfred; Eder, Gerald; Schmidle-Loss, Birgit; Vecsei, Andreas; Kollaritsch, Herwig

    2011-03-24

    Austria was the first country in Europe implementing a universal mass vaccination program against rotavirus gastroenteritis (RV-GE) for all infants nationwide. Epidemiological data from a hospital based surveillance system show that incidence rates of children hospitalized with RV-GE decreased in 2009 compared to 2008 and compared to the prevaccination period 2001-2005. Decreasing hospitalization-rates from RV-GE were observed in children of all age groups, even in those not eligible for vaccination according to their age, suggesting herd immunity induced by universal mass vaccination against RV-GE. In 2009 the disease burden was highest in children below three months of age stressing the importance of the early start of the immunization course.

  20. Rotavirus VP6 preparations as a non-replicating vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Jalilvand, Somayeh; Marashi, Sayed Mahdi; Shoja, Zabihollah

    2015-06-26

    Rotavirus (RV) structural proteins VP4 and VP7, located on the surface of viral particles, elicit neutralizing antibodies (Abs) and are therefore considered to be important components of RV vaccines. However, despite inducing neutralizing Abs, limits of cross-neutralizing activity and lack of full correlation with protection limit the usefulness of these proteins as protective agents against RV disease. VP6 protein, which forms the middle layer of RV particles, is discussed as an alternative vaccine candidate since it can induce cross-protective immune responses against different RV strains although the Ab raised is not neutralizing. This report reviews different functions of VP6 that can lead to considering it as an alternative vaccine against RV disease.

  1. Compliance of mothers following recommendations to breastfeed or withhold breast milk during rotavirus vaccination in North India: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neutralizing antibodies in breast milk may adversely influence the immune response to live oral vaccines. Withholding breastfeeding around the time of vaccine administration has been suggested for improving vaccine performance. However, we do not know whether mothers find withholding breastfeeding around the time of vaccination acceptable and how they perceive this recommendation. Methods In a clinical study designed to examine predictors of poor immune response to rotavirus vaccine in infants in India, Rotarix® was administered to infants at 6 and 10 weeks with other childhood vaccines. For the study, 400 mother–infant pairs were randomized into two groups in a 1:1 ratio. Mothers were either recommended to withhold breastfeeding or were encouraged to breastfeed half an hour before and after administration of Rotarix®. The mother–infant pairs were observed and the breastfeeding intervals were recorded during this period. Mothers were administered a questionnaire about their perception of the intervention after the infants received the second dose of Rotarix®. Results Almost 98% (391/400) of the infants received both doses of Rotarix®. Adherence to the recommendations was high in both groups. All mothers in the group who were asked to withhold breastfeeding did so, except one who breastfed her infant before the recommended time after the first dose of Rotarix®. Of the mothers, 4% (7/195) reported that the recommendation to withhold breastfeeding was difficult to follow. All mothers in this group reported that they would withhold breastfeeding at the time of vaccination if they were asked to by a health-care provider. Only one mother responded that withholding breastfeeding would be a reason for not giving rotavirus vaccine to her infant. Conclusions Withholding breastfeeding half an hour before and after vaccination appears to be acceptable to mothers in this setting. If withholding breastfeeding produces an improvement in the performance of the

  2. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission.

    PubMed

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACTThis article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events.RESUMOEste artigo fornece uma revisão sobre imunidade, diagnóstico e aspectos clínicos da doença causada por rotavírus. Também aponta as principais mudanças no perfil epidemiológico da doença diarreica e na diversidade genética das cepas circulantes de rotavírus do grupo A, após a introdução vacinal. O rotavírus do grupo A é o principal patógeno associado à gastroenterite em animais. Seu genoma RNA segmentado pode levar ao surgimento de cepas novas ou incomuns na população humana, por meio de transmissão entre espécies e eventos de rearranjo.

  3. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission.

    PubMed

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACTThis article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events.RESUMOEste artigo fornece uma revisão sobre imunidade, diagnóstico e aspectos clínicos da doença causada por rotavírus. Também aponta as principais mudanças no perfil epidemiológico da doença diarreica e na diversidade genética das cepas circulantes de rotavírus do grupo A, após a introdução vacinal. O rotavírus do grupo A é o principal patógeno associado à gastroenterite em animais. Seu genoma RNA segmentado pode levar ao surgimento de cepas novas ou incomuns na população humana, por meio de transmissão entre espécies e eventos de rearranjo. PMID:27462899

  4. Impact of Withholding Breastfeeding at the Time of Vaccination on the Immunogenicity of Oral Rotavirus Vaccine—A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asad; Kazi, Abdul Momin; Cortese, Margaret M.; Fleming, Jessica A.; Moon, SungSil; Parashar, Umesh D.; Jiang, Baoming; McNeal, Monica M.; Steele, Duncan; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Zaidi, Anita K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast milk contains anti-rotavirus IgA antibodies and other innate immune factors that inhibit rotavirus replication in vitro. These factors could diminish the immunogenicity of oral rotavirus vaccines, particularly if breastfeeding occurs close to the time of vaccine administration. Methods Between April 2011 and November 2012, we conducted an open label, randomized trial to compare the immunogenicity of Rotarix (RV1) in infants whose breastfeeding was withheld one hour before through one hour after vaccination with that in infants breastfed at the time of vaccination. The trial was conducted in the peri-urban area of Ibrahim Hyderi in Karachi, Pakistan. Both groups received three doses of RV1 at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of age. Seroconversion (anti-rotavirus IgA antibodies ≥20 U/mL in subjects seronegative at 6 weeks of age) following three vaccine doses (6, 10 and 14 weeks) was determined at 18 weeks of age (primary objective) and seroconversion following two doses (6 and 10 weeks) was determined at 14 weeks of age (secondary objective). Results Four hundred eligible infants were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio between the withholding breastfeeding and immediate breastfeeding arms. Overall, 353 (88.3%) infants completed the study according to protocol; 181 in the withholding breastfeeding group and 172 in the immediate breastfeeding group. After three RV1 doses, anti-rotavirus IgA antibody seroconversion was 28.2% (95% CI: 22.1; 35.1) in the withholding arm and 37.8% (95% CI: 30.9; 45.2) in the immediate breastfeeding arm (difference: -9.6% [95% CI: -19.2; 0.2] p=0.07). After two doses of RV1, seroconversion was 16.6% (95% CI: 11.9; 22.7) in the withholding arm and 29.1% (95% CI: 22.8, 36.3) in the immediate breastfeeding arm (difference: -12.5% [95% CI: -21.2,-3.8] p=0.005). Conclusions Withholding breastfeeding around the time of RV1 vaccine administration did not lead to increased anti-rotavirus IgA seroconversion compared with that seen with a

  5. Whole genome analyses of G1P[8] rotavirus strains from vaccinated and non-vaccinated South African children presenting with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Magagula, Nonkululeko B; Esona, Mathew D; Nyaga, Martin M; Stucker, Karla M; Halpin, Rebecca A; Stockwell, Timothy B; Seheri, Mapaseka L; Steele, A Duncan; Wentworth, David E; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis and eventually death among infants and young children worldwide, and disease prevention and management through vaccination is a public health priority. In August 2009, Rotarix™ was introduced in the South African Expanded Programme on Immunisation. As a result, substantial reductions in RVA disease burden have been reported among children younger than 5 years old. Rotavirus strain surveillance post-vaccination is crucial to, inter alia, monitor and study the evolution of vaccine escape strains. Here, full-genome sequence data for the 11 gene segments from 11 South African G1P[8] rotavirus strains were generated, including 5 strains collected from non-vaccinated children during the 2004-2009 rotavirus seasons and 6 strains collected from vaccinated children during the 2010 rotavirus season. These data were analyzed to gain insights into the overall genetic makeup and evolution of South African G1P[8] rotavirus strains and to compare their genetic backbones with those of common human Wa-like RVAs from other countries, as well as with the Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™ G1P[8] vaccine components. All 11 South African G1P[8] strains revealed a complete Wa-like genotype constellation of G1-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. On the basis of sequence similarities, the South African G1P[8] strains (with the exception of strain RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/1262/2004/G1P[8]) were closely related to each other (96-100% identity in all gene segments). Comparison to the Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™ G1P[8] vaccine components revealed a moderate nucleotide identity of 89-96% and 93-95%, respectively. The results indicated that none of the gene segments of these 11 South African G1P[8] strains were vaccine-derived. This study illustrates that large-scale next generation sequencing will provide crucial information on the influence of the vaccination program on evolution of rotavirus strains. This is the first report to describe

  6. Whole genome analyses of G1P[8] rotavirus strains from vaccinated and non-vaccinated South African children presenting with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Magagula, Nonkululeko B; Esona, Mathew D; Nyaga, Martin M; Stucker, Karla M; Halpin, Rebecca A; Stockwell, Timothy B; Seheri, Mapaseka L; Steele, A Duncan; Wentworth, David E; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis and eventually death among infants and young children worldwide, and disease prevention and management through vaccination is a public health priority. In August 2009, Rotarix™ was introduced in the South African Expanded Programme on Immunisation. As a result, substantial reductions in RVA disease burden have been reported among children younger than 5 years old. Rotavirus strain surveillance post-vaccination is crucial to, inter alia, monitor and study the evolution of vaccine escape strains. Here, full-genome sequence data for the 11 gene segments from 11 South African G1P[8] rotavirus strains were generated, including 5 strains collected from non-vaccinated children during the 2004-2009 rotavirus seasons and 6 strains collected from vaccinated children during the 2010 rotavirus season. These data were analyzed to gain insights into the overall genetic makeup and evolution of South African G1P[8] rotavirus strains and to compare their genetic backbones with those of common human Wa-like RVAs from other countries, as well as with the Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™ G1P[8] vaccine components. All 11 South African G1P[8] strains revealed a complete Wa-like genotype constellation of G1-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. On the basis of sequence similarities, the South African G1P[8] strains (with the exception of strain RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/1262/2004/G1P[8]) were closely related to each other (96-100% identity in all gene segments). Comparison to the Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™ G1P[8] vaccine components revealed a moderate nucleotide identity of 89-96% and 93-95%, respectively. The results indicated that none of the gene segments of these 11 South African G1P[8] strains were vaccine-derived. This study illustrates that large-scale next generation sequencing will provide crucial information on the influence of the vaccination program on evolution of rotavirus strains. This is the first report to describe

  7. Etiology of Childhood Diarrhea Following Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction: A Prospective, Population-Based Study in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Bucardo, Filemon; Vilchez, Samuel; Zambrana, Luis Enrique; Liu, Lan; Weber, David J.; Peña, Rodolfo; Barclay, Leslie; Vinjé, Jan; Hudgens, Michael G.; Nordgren, Johan; Svensson, Lennart; Morgan, Douglas R.; Espinoza, Félix; Paniagua, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Background Nicaragua was the first developing nation to implement routine immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5). In this RV5-immunized population, understanding infectious etiologies of childhood diarrhea is necessary to direct diarrhea treatment and prevention efforts. Methods We followed a population-based sample of children less than 5 years in León, Nicaragua for diarrhea episodes through household visits. Information was obtained on RV5 history and sociodemographics. Stool samples collected during diarrhea episodes and among healthy children underwent laboratory analysis for viral, bacterial, and parasitic enteropathogens. Detection frequency and incidence of each enteropathogen was calculated. Results The 826 children in the cohort experienced 677 diarrhea episodes during 607.5 child-years of exposure time (1.1 episodes per child-year). At least one enteropathogen was detected among 61.1% of the 337 diarrheal stools collected. The most common enteropathogens among diarrheal stools were: norovirus (20.4%), sapovirus (16.6%), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, 11.3%), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (8.3%), Giardia lamblia (8.0%), and enterotoxigenic E.coli (ETEC, 7.7%), with rotavirus detected among 5.3% of diarrheal stools. EPEC and ETEC were frequently detected among stools from healthy children. Among children with diarrhea, norovirus was more commonly detected among younger children (< 2 years) and G. lamblia was more commonly detected among older children (2-4 years). The mean age of rotavirus detection was 34.6 months. Conclusions In this Central American community following RV5 introduction, rotavirus was not commonly detected among children with diarrhea. Prevention and appropriate management of norovirus and sapovirus should be considered to further reduce the burden of diarrheal disease. PMID:24879131

  8. Review of global rotavirus strain prevalence data from six years post vaccine licensure surveillance: is there evidence of strain selection from vaccine pressure?

    PubMed

    Dóró, Renáta; László, Brigitta; Martella, Vito; Leshem, Eyal; Gentsch, Jon; Parashar, Umesh; Bányai, Krisztián

    2014-12-01

    Comprehensive reviews of pre licensure rotavirus strain prevalence data indicated the global importance of six rotavirus genotypes, G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G4P[8], G9P[8] and G12P[8]. Since 2006, two vaccines, the monovalent Rotarix (RV1) and the pentavalent RotaTeq (RV5) have been available in over 100 countries worldwide. Of these, 60 countries have already introduced either RV1 or RV5 in their national immunization programs. Post licensure vaccine effectiveness is closely monitored worldwide. This review aimed at describing the global changes in rotavirus strain prevalence over time. The genotype distribution of the nearly 47,000 strains that were characterized during 2007-2012 showed similar picture to that seen in the preceding period. An intriguing finding was the transient predominance of heterotypic strains, mainly in countries using RV1. Unusual and novel antigen combinations continue to emerge, including some causing local outbreaks, even in vaccinated populations. In addition, vaccine strains have been found in both vaccinated infants and their contacts and there is evidence for genetic interaction between vaccine and wild-type strains. In conclusion, the post-vaccine introduction strain prevalence data do not show any consistent pattern indicative of selection pressure resulting from vaccine use, although the increased detection rate of heterotypic G2P[4] strains in some countries following RV1 vaccination is unusual and this issue requires further monitoring.

  9. Ecological assessment of the direct and indirect effects of routine rotavirus vaccination in Merseyside, UK using data from multiple health systems: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Hungerford, Daniel; Vivancos, Roberto; French, Neil; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren; Cunliffe, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children worldwide. Currently 67 countries include rotavirus vaccine in childhood immunisation programmes, but uptake in Western Europe has been slow. In July 2013, rotavirus vaccine was introduced into the UK's routine childhood immunisation programme. Prior to vaccine introduction in the UK, rotavirus was estimated to result in 750 000 diarrhoea episodes and 80 000 general practice (GP) consultations each year, together with 45% and 20% of hospital admissions and emergency department attendances for acute gastroenteritis, in children under 5 years of age. This paper describes a protocol for an ecological study that will assess rotavirus vaccine impact in the UK, to inform rotavirus immunisation policy in the UK and in other Western European countries. Methods and analysis In Merseyside, UK, we will conduct an ecological study using a ‘before and after’ approach to examine changes in gastroenteritis and rotavirus incidence following the introduction of rotavirus vaccination. Data will be collected on mortality, hospital admissions, nosocomial infection, emergency department attendances, GP consultations and community health consultations to capture all healthcare providers in the region. We will assess both the direct and indirect effects of the vaccine on the study population. Comparisons of outcome indicator rates will be made in relation to vaccine uptake and socioeconomic status. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by NHS Research Ethics Committee, South Central-Berkshire REC Reference: 14/SC/1140. Study outputs will be disseminated through scientific conferences and peer-reviewed publications. The study will demonstrate the impact of rotavirus vaccination on the burden of disease from a complete health system perspective. It will identify key areas that require improved data collection tools to maximise the usefulness of this surveillance

  10. Assessment of Live Plague Vaccine Candidates.

    PubMed

    Feodorova, Valentina A; Sayapina, Lidiya V; Motin, Vladimir L

    2016-01-01

    Since its creation in the early twentieth century, live plague vaccine EV has been successfully applied to millions of people without severe complications. This vaccine has been proven to elicit protection against both bubonic and pneumonic plague, and it is still in use in populations at risk mainly in the countries of the former Soviet Union. Despite extensive efforts in developing subunit vaccines, there is a reviving interest in creation of a precisely attenuated strain of Yersinia pestis superior to the EV that can serve as a live plague vaccine with improved characteristics. Here we summarize decades of experience of the Russian anti-plague research in developing a standard protocol for early-stage evaluation of safety and immunogenicity of live plague vaccines. This protocol allows step-by-step comparison of the novel test candidates with the EV vaccine by using subcutaneous immunization and bubonic plague infection models in two animal species, e.g., guinea pigs and mice. PMID:27076149

  11. Assessment of Live Plague Vaccine Candidates.

    PubMed

    Feodorova, Valentina A; Sayapina, Lidiya V; Motin, Vladimir L

    2016-01-01

    Since its creation in the early twentieth century, live plague vaccine EV has been successfully applied to millions of people without severe complications. This vaccine has been proven to elicit protection against both bubonic and pneumonic plague, and it is still in use in populations at risk mainly in the countries of the former Soviet Union. Despite extensive efforts in developing subunit vaccines, there is a reviving interest in creation of a precisely attenuated strain of Yersinia pestis superior to the EV that can serve as a live plague vaccine with improved characteristics. Here we summarize decades of experience of the Russian anti-plague research in developing a standard protocol for early-stage evaluation of safety and immunogenicity of live plague vaccines. This protocol allows step-by-step comparison of the novel test candidates with the EV vaccine by using subcutaneous immunization and bubonic plague infection models in two animal species, e.g., guinea pigs and mice.

  12. Noninterference of Rotavirus Vaccine With Measles-Rubella Vaccine at 9 Months of Age and Improvements in Antirotavirus Immunity: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, K.; Fleming, Jessica A.; Victor, John C.; Yunus, Mohammad; Bari, Tajul Islam A.; Azim, Tasnim; Rahman, Mustafizur; Mowla, Syed Mohammad Niaz; Bellini, William J.; McNeal, Monica; Icenogle, Joseph P.; Lopman, Ben; Parashar, Umesh; Cortese, Margaret M.; Steele, A. Duncan; Neuzil, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The burden of rotavirus morbidity and mortality is high in children aged <5 years in developing countries, and evaluations indicate waning protection from rotavirus immunization in the second year. An additional dose of rotavirus vaccine may enhance the immune response and lengthen the period of protection against disease, but coadministration of this dose should not interfere with immune responses to concurrently given vaccines. Methods. A total of 480 9-month-old participants from Matlab, Bangladesh, were enrolled in a study with a primary objective to establish noninferiority of concomitant administration of measles-rubella vaccine (MR) and a third dose of human rotavirus vaccine (HRV; MR + HRV), compared with MR given alone. Secondary objectives included noninferiority of rubella antibody seroconversion and evaluating rotavirus IgA/IgG seroresponses in MR + HRV recipients. Results. Two months after vaccination, 75.3% and 74.3% of MR + HRV and MR recipients, respectively, had seroprotective levels of measles virus antibodies; 100.0% and 99.6%, respectively, showed anti–rubella virus immunoglobulin G (IgG) seroprotection. In the MR + HRV group, antirotavirus immunoglobulin A and IgG seropositivity frequencies before vaccination (52.7% and 66.3%, respectively) increased to 69.6% and 88.3% after vaccination. Conclusions. Vaccine-induced measles and rubella antibody responses are not negatively affected by concomitant administration of HRV. The HRV dose increases antirotavirus serum antibody titers and the proportion of infants with detectable antirotavirus antibody. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01700621. PMID:26823338

  13. Rotavirus vaccination in a Medicaid infant population from four US states: compliance, vaccination completion rate, and predictors of compliance

    PubMed Central

    Calnan, Michaela; Krishnarajah, Girishanthy; Duh, Mei Sheng; Haider, Batool A.; Yermakov, Sander; Davis, Matthew; Yan, Songkai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A retrospective observational cohort study was conducted using Medicaid administrative claims data from four states in the United States (US) to analyze overall and state-specific compliance and completion rates for rotavirus (RV) vaccines. Compliance was based on an infant receiving the recommended number of doses each within the appropriate time frame, and completion was based on an infant receiving the recommended number of doses over a recommended time period. Compliance and completion were defined separately for RV vaccines by package insert (PI) and Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) guidelines. Infants born between 1 May 2008 and 31 October 2011 in Florida, 31 July 2012 in Iowa and Kansas, and 30 April 2013 in Mississippi, and continuously enrolled in Medicaid with medical and pharmacy benefits for ≥8 months from birth were included. Study participants were assigned to cohorts based on type of RV vaccinations received within recommended vaccination windows. Using the PI guidelines, there were 658,219 eligible infants; 40% received no RV vaccines. The RV1 cohort had a significantly higher proportion of compliant infants compared to the RV5 cohort (54% vs. 25%; p <0.001). For infants initiating RV1, 55% completed both doses; for infants initiating RV5, 44% completed all three doses (p<0.001). Analysis by state and by ACIP guidelines yielded similar trends. Major predictors of compliance to RV vaccination were use of RV1 vaccine and DTaP vaccination completion. Increased awareness to the importance and timeliness of vaccination is needed. PMID:26900728

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of Monovalent Rotavirus Vaccination of Infants in Malawi: A Postintroduction Analysis Using Individual Patient–Level Costing Data

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Zeev, Naor; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Pecenka, Clint; Chikafa, Jean; Mvula, Hazzie; Wachepa, Richard; Mwansambo, Charles; Mhango, Themba; Chirwa, Geoffrey; Crampin, Amelia C.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Costello, Anthony; Heyderman, Robert S.; French, Neil; Atherly, Deborah; Cunliffe, Nigel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rotavirus vaccination reduces childhood hospitalization in Africa, but cost-effectiveness has not been determined using real-world effectiveness and costing data. We sought to determine monovalent rotavirus vaccine cost-effectiveness in Malawi, one of Africa's poorest countries and the first Gavi-eligible country to report disease reduction following introduction in 2012. Methods. This was a prospective cohort study of children with acute gastroenteritis at a rural primary health center, a rural first referral–level hospital and an urban regional referral hospital in Malawi. For each participant we itemized household costs of illness and direct medical expenditures incurred. We also collected Ministry of Health vaccine implementation costs. Using a standard tool (TRIVAC), we derived cost-effectiveness. Results. Between 1 January 2013 and 21 November 2014, we recruited 530 children aged <5 years with gastroenteritis. Costs did not differ by rotavirus test result, but were significantly higher for admitted children and those with increased severity on Vesikari scale. Adding rotavirus vaccine to the national schedule costs Malawi $0.42 per dose in system costs. Vaccine copayment is an additional $0.20. Over 20 years, the vaccine program will avert 1 026 000 cases of rotavirus gastroenteritis, 78 000 inpatient admissions, 4300 deaths, and 136 000 disability-adjusted-life-years (DALYs). For this year's birth cohort, it will avert 54 000 cases of rotavirus and 281 deaths in children aged <5 years. The program will cost $10.5 million and save $8.0 million in averted healthcare costs. Societal cost per DALY averted was $10, and the cost per rotavirus case averted was $1. Conclusions. Gastroenteritis causes substantial economic burden to Malawi. The rotavirus vaccine program is highly cost-effective. Together with the demonstrated impact of rotavirus vaccine in reducing population hospitalization burden, its cost-effectiveness makes a strong argument

  15. Protect Your Child from Rotavirus Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... within the first week after the first or second dose of rotavirus vaccine.​ CDC continues to recommend that infants receive rotavirus vaccine. The benefits of the vaccine far outweigh the small risk ...

  16. Live attenuated influenza vaccine--a review.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, R; Amicizia, D; Lai, P L; Panatto, D

    2011-09-01

    Owing to the variability of influenza viruses, vaccine composition needs to be up-dated annually. As many variables can influence their efficacy, vaccines are still considered "sub-optimal". Many studies have been carried out in recent years to improve vaccines. In particular, researchers and vaccine-producing corporations have focused on developing a live vaccine. Among the candidate vaccines, the strain developed by Maassab has recently been licensed in the USA and Europe, after extensive investigation. This vaccine is safe and well tolerated, and has shown very good genetic stability. Although vaccine recipients are able to spread the virus, transmission to close contacts is practically non-existent. Studies on cold-adapted attenuated influenza vaccines have demonstrated that such vaccines are effective, and sometimes more effective than inactivated influenza vaccines. Cold-adapted attenuated influenza vaccines therefore appear to be an important weapon against influenza. However, a more widespread use of these vaccines is to be recommended, especially in children, as the more acceptable way of administration can favour parental compliance.

  17. High prevalence of G12P[8] rotavirus strains in Rio Branco, Acre, Western Amazon, in the post-rotavirus vaccine introduction period.

    PubMed

    Neves, Mayara A O; Pinheiro, Helder H C; Silva, Rita S U; Linhares, Alexandre C; Silva, Luciana D; Gabbay, Yvone B; Silva, Mônica C M; Loureiro, Edvaldo C B; Soares, Luana S; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc P

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to provide a molecular characterization of circulating rotavirus (RVA) strains in Rio Branco, Acre, in the post-rotavirus vaccination period, particularly with regard to the emerging, increasingly prevalent G12P[8] genotype. A total of 488 fecal specimens from diarrheic and non-diarrheic children were obtained between January and December 2012. RVA detection was initially performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method, followed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using specific primers. RVA was detected in 18.3% (44/241) of the children with acute diarrhea and in 1.2% (3/247) of the non-diarrheic children (P < 0.001), with overall RVA-positivity of 9.6% (47/488). The most common genotype was G2P[4] with 43.2% (19/44) of the diarrheic cases, followed by G12P[8] (27.3%, 12/44), G3P[6] (18.2%, 8/44), G3P[8] (4.5%, 2/44), and G12P[6] (2.3%, 1/44). G12 samples belonged to lineage III and were from children aged 4-52 months. All of these children had acute diarrhea associated with fever (83.3%, 10/12) and vomiting (66.7%, 8/12). Most of the cases occurred in August (58.3%, 7/12), 75% (9/12) of which having received the full vaccination scheme with Rotarix™. For the first time G12 was reported at relative high prevalence in Brazil. Our findings warrant further monitoring studies on the molecular characterization of circulating RVA strains after rotavirus vaccine introduction in Brazil and elsewhere, since the occurrence of either unusual our emerging genotypes may pose a challenge to vaccination strategies. PMID:26466923

  18. Influenza (Flu) vaccine (Live, Intranasal): What you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC Influenza Live, Intranasal Flu Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ ... flulive.html . CDC review information for Live, Intranasal Influenza VIS: Vaccine Information Statement Influenza Page last reviewed: ...

  19. Rotavirus infections in Detroit, USA, a region of low vaccine prevalence.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Haq, Nahed; Amjad, Muhammad; McGrath, Eric; Salimnia, Hossein; Fairfax, Marilynn; Asmar, Basim I

    2016-06-01

    After a sharp drop of rotavirus (RV) infections at Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, USA in 2010 season, we noted an increase in the number of cases during the 2011 season including some RV vaccine (RVV) recipients. This study was conducted to determine the circulating genotypes during 2011 season and whether the increase in RV diarrhea was caused by replacement genotypes. G and P genotypes were determined by RT PCR and nucleotide sequencing of selected strains was performed. The vaccination rate among study patients was 24 %. RV strains from 68 stool samples were genotyped including 18 from vaccinated children and 50 from unvaccinated children. The predominant G genotype was G1 (58.8 %) followed by G9 (17.7 %) and G4 (15.5 %). P[8] was the predominant P genotype (68 %) followed by P[6] (17.6 %) and P[4] (3 %). All G9 strains were associated with P[6]. The most prevalent G-P combination was G1P[8] (56 %), followed by G9P[6] (17.6 %). Similar proportions of RV genotypes were found among vaccinated and unvaccinated children. Our local data suggest that 5 years after the introduction of RVV there has been no genotype replacement. Although a small increase in G9P[6] frequency was noted, G1P[8] remained the predominant strain of RV in our inner city community in the Midwestern USA.

  20. Impact of vaccination on the molecular epidemiology and evolution of group A rotaviruses in Latin America and factors affecting vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Bucardo, Filemón; Nordgren, Johan

    2015-08-01

    Despite high rotavirus (RV) vaccine coverage (∼83%) and good effectiveness (∼77%) against RV-diarrhea hospitalization, RV is still contributing to the burden of diarrhea that persists in hospital settings in several Latin American countries, where RV vaccination is being implemented. Due to the extensive genomic and antigenic diversity, among co-circulating human RV, a major concern has been that the introduction of RV vaccination could exert selection pressure leading to higher prevalence of strains not included in the vaccines and/or emergence of new strains, thus, reducing the efficacy of vaccination. Here we review the molecular epidemiology of RV in Latin America and explore issues of RV evolution and selection in light of vaccination. We further explore etiologies behind the large burden of diarrhea remaining after vaccination in some countries and discuss plausible reasons for vaccine failures.

  1. Impact of vaccination on the molecular epidemiology and evolution of group A rotaviruses in Latin America and factors affecting vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Bucardo, Filemón; Nordgren, Johan

    2015-08-01

    Despite high rotavirus (RV) vaccine coverage (∼83%) and good effectiveness (∼77%) against RV-diarrhea hospitalization, RV is still contributing to the burden of diarrhea that persists in hospital settings in several Latin American countries, where RV vaccination is being implemented. Due to the extensive genomic and antigenic diversity, among co-circulating human RV, a major concern has been that the introduction of RV vaccination could exert selection pressure leading to higher prevalence of strains not included in the vaccines and/or emergence of new strains, thus, reducing the efficacy of vaccination. Here we review the molecular epidemiology of RV in Latin America and explore issues of RV evolution and selection in light of vaccination. We further explore etiologies behind the large burden of diarrhea remaining after vaccination in some countries and discuss plausible reasons for vaccine failures. PMID:26079278

  2. Immunogenicity of porcine P[6], P[7]-specific △VP8* rotavirus subunit vaccines with a tetanus toxoid universal T cell epitope.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaobo; Wei, Xiaoman; Ran, Xuhua; Ni, Hongbo; Cao, Si; Zhang, Yao

    2015-08-26

    Currently, commercial porcine rotavirus vaccines remain varied limitations. The objective of this study is to develop an alternative porcine rotavirus subunit vaccine candidate by parenteral administration, which enables to elicit robust immune responses against most prevalence porcine rotavirus strains. The bacterially-expressed porcine rotavirus P[6]- or P[7]-specific truncated VP8* (aa 64-223) recombinant protein with or without a universal tetanus toxoid CD4(+) T cell epitope P2 was generated. All the recombinant subunit proteins △VP8*s or P2-△VP8*s were of high solubility and high yields. The immunogenicity of each purified △VP8* and P2-△VP8* was evaluated in mice (10 μg/dose) or guinea pigs (20 μg/dose) immunized IM with 600 μg aluminum hydroxide three times at 2-week interval. The introduction of P2T cell epitope to P[7]-△VP8* elicited significantly higher IgG titer in mice than its absence. Comparatively, P2 epitope slightly enhanced the immunogenicity of P[6]-△VP8*. P2-P[7]△VP8* elicited high titer of neutralizing antibody against heterotypic P[7]-specific rotaviruses with varied G type combination. Our data indicated that two subunit vaccines could be plausible bivalent rotavirus vaccine candidate to provide antigenic coverage of porcine rotavirus strains of global or regional importance.

  3. Maternal knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding gastroenteritis and rotavirus vaccine before implementing vaccination program: which key messages in light of a new immunization program?

    PubMed

    Morin, Alyssa; Lemaître, Thomas; Farrands, Anne; Carrier, Nathalie; Gagneur, Arnaud

    2012-09-01

    In July 2010, the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recommended the systematic administration of rotavirus vaccines for all infants in Canada. According to the Erickson and De Wals framework, multiple factors need to be evaluated before implementing such a decision, including the study of the acceptability of this vaccine by the general population. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from February 10 to February 18, 2011, at the Sherbrooke University Hospital Center in the province of Quebec. A questionnaire, based upon the Health Belief Model (HBM) and theoretical planned action, was self-administered to pregnant or early post-partum women. The variables collected included socio-demographic data, past experience with gastroenteritis, cues to vaccination and HBM dimensions. The associations between questionnaire variables and vaccination intention were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Of the 343 respondents, only 29% had already heard about rotavirus vaccination and among these, the intention of vaccination was 74%. In multivariate analysis, having a perception of infant vulnerability to gastroenteritis (OR=2.3, 95% CI 1.3-4.0) and having no other child at home (OR=2.3, 95% CI 1.3-4.2) were factors positively associated with a higher intention of vaccination, contrary to having already heard about the rotavirus vaccine in the media (OR=0.5, 95% CI 0.2-0.9). The three cues independently associated with intention of vaccination were the reimbursement of the vaccine (OR=3.0, 95% CI 1.6-5.7), its recommendation by a doctor (OR=21.2, 95% CI 5.8-75.9) and its protection against the most severe forms of gastroenteritis (OR=4.4, 95% CI 1.4-13.6). To improve the success of this new vaccination program, several key messages should be integrated in the information made available to the general population: (1) rotavirus gastroenteritis is a mandatory infection for every child <5 years; (2) the vaccine is reimbursed and included in the

  4. One-step multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for detecting and genotyping wild-type group A rotavirus strains and vaccine strains (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Rashi; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Esona, Mathew D; Tam, Ka Ian; Quaye, Osbourne; Bowen, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Background. Group A rotavirus (RVA) infection is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. Introduction of two live-attenuated rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq® and Rotarix®, has dramatically reduced RVA associated AGE and mortality in developed as well as in many developing countries. High-throughput methods are needed to genotype rotavirus wild-type strains and to identify vaccine strains in stool samples. Quantitative RT-PCR assays (qRT-PCR) offer several advantages including increased sensitivity, higher throughput, and faster turnaround time. Methods. In this study, a one-step multiplex qRT-PCR assay was developed to detect and genotype wild-type strains and vaccine (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) rotavirus strains along with an internal processing control (Xeno or MS2 RNA). Real-time RT-PCR assays were designed for VP7 (G1, G2, G3, G4, G9, G12) and VP4 (P[4], P[6] and P[8]) genotypes. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay also included previously published NSP3 qRT-PCR for rotavirus detection and Rotarix® NSP2 and RotaTeq® VP6 qRT-PCRs for detection of Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine strains respectively. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay was validated using 853 sequence confirmed stool samples and 24 lab cultured strains of different rotavirus genotypes. By using thermostable rTth polymerase enzyme, dsRNA denaturation, reverse transcription (RT) and amplification (PCR) steps were performed in single tube by uninterrupted thermocycling profile to reduce chances of sample cross contamination and for rapid generation of results. For quantification, standard curves were generated using dsRNA transcripts derived from RVA gene segments. Results. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98.8-100% sensitivity, 99.7-100% specificity, 85-95% efficiency and a limit of detection of 4-60 copies per singleplex reaction. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 81-92% efficiency and limit of detection of 150-600 copies in multiplex reactions. The VP4 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98

  5. One-step multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for detecting and genotyping wild-type group A rotavirus strains and vaccine strains (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) in stool samples

    PubMed Central

    Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Esona, Mathew D.; Tam, Ka Ian; Quaye, Osbourne; Bowen, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Group A rotavirus (RVA) infection is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. Introduction of two live-attenuated rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq® and Rotarix®, has dramatically reduced RVA associated AGE and mortality in developed as well as in many developing countries. High-throughput methods are needed to genotype rotavirus wild-type strains and to identify vaccine strains in stool samples. Quantitative RT-PCR assays (qRT-PCR) offer several advantages including increased sensitivity, higher throughput, and faster turnaround time. Methods. In this study, a one-step multiplex qRT-PCR assay was developed to detect and genotype wild-type strains and vaccine (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) rotavirus strains along with an internal processing control (Xeno or MS2 RNA). Real-time RT-PCR assays were designed for VP7 (G1, G2, G3, G4, G9, G12) and VP4 (P[4], P[6] and P[8]) genotypes. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay also included previously published NSP3 qRT-PCR for rotavirus detection and Rotarix® NSP2 and RotaTeq® VP6 qRT-PCRs for detection of Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine strains respectively. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay was validated using 853 sequence confirmed stool samples and 24 lab cultured strains of different rotavirus genotypes. By using thermostable rTth polymerase enzyme, dsRNA denaturation, reverse transcription (RT) and amplification (PCR) steps were performed in single tube by uninterrupted thermocycling profile to reduce chances of sample cross contamination and for rapid generation of results. For quantification, standard curves were generated using dsRNA transcripts derived from RVA gene segments. Results. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98.8–100% sensitivity, 99.7–100% specificity, 85–95% efficiency and a limit of detection of 4–60 copies per singleplex reaction. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 81–92% efficiency and limit of detection of 150–600 copies in multiplex reactions. The VP4 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98.8

  6. Influenza virus vaccine live intranasal--MedImmune vaccines: CAIV-T, influenza vaccine live intranasal.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    MedImmune Vaccines (formerly Aviron) has developed a cold-adapted live influenza virus vaccine [FluMist] that can be administered by nasal spray. FluMist is the first live virus influenza vaccine and also the first nasally administered vaccine to be marketed in the US. The vaccine will be formulated to contain live attenuated (att) influenza virus reassortants of the strains recommended by the US Public Health Service for each 'flu season. The vaccine is termed cold-adapted (ca) because the virus has been adapted to replicate efficiently at 25 degrees C in the nasal passages, which are below normal body temperature. The strains used in the seasonal vaccine will also be made temperature sensitive (ts) so that their replication is restricted at 37 degrees C (Type B strains) and 39 degrees C (Type A strains). The combined effect of the antigenic properties and the att, ca and ts phenotypes of the influenza strains contained in the vaccine enables the viruses to replicate in the nasopharynx to produce protective immunity. The original formulation of FluMist requires freezer storage throughout distribution. Because many international markets do not have distribution channels well suited to the sale of frozen vaccines, Wyeth and MedImmune are collaborating to develop a second generation, refrigerator-stable, liquid trivalent cold-adapted influenza vaccine (CAIV-T), which is in phase III trials. Initially, the frozen formulation will only be available in the US. For the 2003-2004 season, FluMist will contain A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1), A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2) (A/Moscow/10/99-like) and B/Hong Kong/330/2001. Aviron was acquired by MedImmune on 15 January 2002. Aviron is now a wholly-owned subsidiary of MedImmune and is called MedImmune Vaccines. Aviron acquired FluMist in March 1995 through a Co-operative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the US NIAID, and a licensing agreement with the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. In June 2000, the CRADA was

  7. Influenza virus vaccine live intranasal--MedImmune vaccines: CAIV-T, influenza vaccine live intranasal.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    MedImmune Vaccines (formerly Aviron) has developed a cold-adapted live influenza virus vaccine [FluMist] that can be administered by nasal spray. FluMist is the first live virus influenza vaccine and also the first nasally administered vaccine to be marketed in the US. The vaccine will be formulated to contain live attenuated (att) influenza virus reassortants of the strains recommended by the US Public Health Service for each 'flu season. The vaccine is termed cold-adapted (ca) because the virus has been adapted to replicate efficiently at 25 degrees C in the nasal passages, which are below normal body temperature. The strains used in the seasonal vaccine will also be made temperature sensitive (ts) so that their replication is restricted at 37 degrees C (Type B strains) and 39 degrees C (Type A strains). The combined effect of the antigenic properties and the att, ca and ts phenotypes of the influenza strains contained in the vaccine enables the viruses to replicate in the nasopharynx to produce protective immunity. The original formulation of FluMist requires freezer storage throughout distribution. Because many international markets do not have distribution channels well suited to the sale of frozen vaccines, Wyeth and MedImmune are collaborating to develop a second generation, refrigerator-stable, liquid trivalent cold-adapted influenza vaccine (CAIV-T), which is in phase III trials. Initially, the frozen formulation will only be available in the US. For the 2003-2004 season, FluMist will contain A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1), A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2) (A/Moscow/10/99-like) and B/Hong Kong/330/2001. Aviron was acquired by MedImmune on 15 January 2002. Aviron is now a wholly-owned subsidiary of MedImmune and is called MedImmune Vaccines. Aviron acquired FluMist in March 1995 through a Co-operative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the US NIAID, and a licensing agreement with the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. In June 2000, the CRADA was

  8. Rotavirus Strain Trends During the Postlicensure Vaccine Era: United States, 2008–2013

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Michael D.; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Esona, Mathew D.; Teel, Elizabeth N.; Gautam, Rashi; Sturgeon, Michele; Azimi, Parvin H.; Baker, Carol J.; Bernstein, David I.; Boom, Julie A.; Chappell, James; Donauer, Stephanie; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Englund, Janet A.; Halasa, Natasha B.; Harrison, Christopher J.; Johnston, Samantha H.; Klein, Eileen J.; McNeal, Monica M.; Moffatt, Mary E.; Rench, Marcia A.; Sahni, Leila C.; Selvarangan, Rangaraj; Staat, Mary A.; Szilagyi, Peter G.; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Wikswo, Mary E.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Payne, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are a significant cause of pediatric gastroenteritis worldwide. The New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN) has conducted active surveillance for RVA at pediatric hospitals and emergency departments at 3–7 geographically diverse sites in the United States since 2006. Methods Over 6 consecutive years, from 2008 to 2013, 1523 samples from NVSN sites that were tested positive by a Rotaclone enzyme immunoassay were submitted to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for genotyping. Results In the 2009, 2010, and 2011 seasons, genotype G3P[8] was the predominant genotype throughout the network, with a 46%–84% prevalence. In the 2012 season, G12P[8] replaced G3P[8] as the most common genotype, with a 70% prevalence, and this trend persisted in 2013 (68.0% prevalence). Vaccine (RotaTeq; Rotarix) strains were detected in 0.6%–3.4% of genotyped samples each season. Uncommon and unusual strains (eg, G8P[4], G3P[24], G2P[8], G3P[4], G3P[6], G24P[14], G4P[6], and G9P[4]) were detected sporadically over the study period. Year, study site, and race were found to be significant predictors of genotype. Conclusions Continued active surveillance is needed to monitor RVA genotypes in the United States and to detect potential changes since vaccine licensure. PMID:27302190

  9. Diarrhoea-related hospitalizations in children before and after implementation of monovalent rotavirus vaccination in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Esparza-Aguilar, Marcelino; Sánchez-Uribe, Edgar; Desai, Rishi; Parashar, Umesh D; Richardson, Vesta; Patel, Manish

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess, by socioeconomic setting, the effect of nationwide vaccination against species A rotavirus (RVA) on childhood diarrhoea-related hospitalizations in Mexico. Methods Data on children younger than 5 years who were hospitalized for diarrhoea in health ministry hospitals between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2011 were collected from monthly discharge reports. Human development indexes were used to categorize the states where hospitals were located as having generally high, intermediate or low socioeconomic status. Annual rates of hospitalization for diarrhoea – per 10 000 hospitalizations for any cause – were calculated. Administrative data were used to estimate vaccine coverage. Findings In the states with high, intermediate and low socioeconomic status, coverage with a two-dose monovalent RVA vaccine – among children younger than 5 years – had reached 93%, 86% and 71%, respectively, by 2010. The corresponding median annual rates of hospitalization for diarrhoea – per 10 000 admissions – fell from 1001, 834 and 1033 in the “prevaccine” period of 2003–2006, to 597, 497 and 705 in the “postvaccine” period from 2008 to 2011, respectively. These decreases correspond to rate reductions of 40% (95% confidence interval, CI: 38–43), 41% (95% CI: 38–43) and 32% (95% CI: 29–34), respectively. Nationwide, RVA vaccination appeared to have averted approximately 16 500 hospitalizations for childhood diarrhoea in each year of the postvaccine period. Conclusion Monovalent RVA vaccination has substantially reduced childhood diarrhoea-related hospitalizations for four continuous years in discretely different socioeconomic populations across Mexico. PMID:24623905

  10. Determinants of Parents' Decision to Vaccinate Their Children against Rotavirus: Results of a Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, E.; Bettinger, J. A.; Halperin, B.; Bradet, R.; Lavoie, F.; Sauvageau, C.; Gilca, V.; Boulianne, N.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus disease is a common cause of health care utilization and almost all children are affected by the age of 5 years. In Canada, at the time of this survey (2008-09), immunization rates for rotavirus were less than 20%. We assessed the determinants of a parent's acceptance to have their child immunized against rotavirus. The survey…

  11. Molecular and biological characterization of the 5 human-bovine rotavirus (WC3)-based reassortant strains of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq (registered)

    SciTech Connect

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Joelsson, Daniel B.; Warakomski, Donald J.; Zhou, Tingyi; Mathis, Pamela K.; Maanen, Marc-Henri van; Ranheim, Todd S.; Ciarlet, Max

    2010-08-01

    RotaTeq (registered) is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine that contains five human-bovine reassortant strains (designated G1, G2, G3, G4, and P1) on the backbone of the naturally attenuated tissue culture-adapted parental bovine rotavirus (BRV) strain WC3. The viral genomes of each of the reassortant strains were completely sequenced and compared pairwise and phylogenetically among each other and to human rotavirus (HRV) and BRV reference strains. Reassortants G1, G2, G3, and G4 contained the VP7 gene from their corresponding HRV parent strains, while reassortants G1 and G2 also contained the VP3 gene (genotype M1) from the HRV parent strain. The P1 reassortant contained the VP4 gene from the HRV parent strain and all the other gene segments from the BRV WC3 strain. The human VP7s had a high level of overall amino acid identity (G1: 95-99%, G2: 94-99% G3: 96-100%, G4: 93-99%) when compared to those of representative rotavirus strains of their corresponding G serotypes. The VP4 of the P1 reassortant had a high identity (92-97%) with those of serotype P1A[8] HRV reference strains, while the BRV VP7 showed identities ranging from 91% to 94% to those of serotype G6 HRV strains. Sequence analyses of the BRV or HRV genes confirmed that the fundamental structure of the proteins in the vaccine was similar to those of the HRV and BRV references strains. Sequences analyses showed that RotaTeq (registered) exhibited a high degree of genetic stability as no mutations were identified in the material of each reassortant, which undergoes two rounds of replication cycles in cell culture during the manufacturing process, when compared to the final material used to fill the dosing tubes. The infectivity of each of the reassortant strains of RotaTeq (registered) , like HRV strains, did not require the presence of sialic acid residues on the cell surface. The molecular and biologic characterization of RotaTeq (registered) adds to the significant body of clinical data supporting the

  12. [Viral vaccines in the national vaccination program--views of the near future].

    PubMed

    Vesikari, Timo

    2013-01-01

    Both conventional virus vaccines and those being introduced in the near future are either live attenuated viruses or nonliving inactivated viruses, mere virus-like particles (VLP) or purified proteins. Live vaccines yield a "more natural" immunity, but in many cases also a nonliving vaccine is sufficient to protect from viral infections. Influenza vaccines are of both types. The commencing HPV vaccination program will be conducted with a VLP vaccine comprising two serotypes. A live chickenpox vaccine will be introduced in the national vaccination program in the next few years. In addition, a shingles vaccine is needed. The live oral rotavirus vaccine works well.

  13. [Development of microencapsulating measles live vaccine].

    PubMed

    Nechaeva, E A; Riabicheva, T G; Varaksin, N A; Sen'kina, T Iu; Zhilina, N V; Smolina, M P; Zaĭtsev, B N

    2004-01-01

    Designing of non-injection methods of immunization against measles has recently turned into a topical issue. Development of mucosal vaccines ensuring the "entry gate" immunity, which is highly effective in airborne infection, is in the focus of attention. The authors developed a method of microencapsulating the viral particles into the matrix of pH-dependent polymers. Microencapsulated live measles vaccine shaped as 0.6-2.0 microm particles was obtained. The specific activity of measles virus in the drug was 3.36-4.31 log TCD50/0.5 ml. In subcutaneous immunization of guinea pigs with capsules, the best results were obtained in a single administration of vaccine based on ethylcrylate, sodium alginate/ chitosan and sodium slaginate/HMDA. In the intranasal administration of vaccine based on sodium alginate/spermin and sodium alginate/HMDA, there was a need in 2 and 3 stages of immunization. PMID:15651665

  14. Decline in rotavirus hospitalizations following the first three years of vaccination in Castile-La Mancha, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, Olga; Cano, Rosa; Simón, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus is a major burden on the Spanish Healthcare System. Rotarix® and RotaTeq® were simultaneously commercialized in Spain by February, 2007. The objective is to analyze the incidence and seasonality of rotavirus hospitalizations (RH) in Castile-La Mancha (CLM), following the first 3 y of commercialization. A cross-sectional study of the hospital discharge registry's Minimum Basic Data Set (MBDS) in CLM between 2003 and 2009 was performed. We used the Poisson regression model to quantify the percentage of change in the rotavirus incidence rate (IR) for 2007–09 vs. 2003–05, adjusting for age, sex, and province. To analyze changes between epidemic seasons the chi-square test was used. The median IR in 2003–09 was 224.71 per 105 [interquartile range (IQR): 185.24–274.70], which represents 60% of hospital admissions due to infectious acute gastroenteritis. The median rate in 2007–09 decreased [incidence rate ratio (IRR): 0.86, 95% CI: 0.78–0.96], significantly in Toledo (IRR: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.39–0.75). An incipient decline at the beginning of the last cold season was observed, preceded by a significant decrease of 68% in the autumn season of 2009. Despite its limited coverage, the rotavirus vaccine may have contributed to decrease RH in CLM. PMID:25644531

  15. Low prevalence of rotavirus and high prevalence of norovirus in hospital and community wastewater after introduction of rotavirus vaccine in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Bucardo, Filemón; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Svensson, Lennart; Nordgren, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) and norovirus (NoV) are major causes of pediatric diarrhea and are altogether associated with approximately 800,000 deaths in young children every year. In Nicaragua, national RV vaccination program using the pentavalent RV5 vaccine from Merck was implemented in October 2006. To determine whether RV vaccination decreased the overall number of RV infections, we investigated the occurrence of RV and NoV in wastewater in the city of León from July 2007 to July 2008 and compared these data with pre-vaccination data. The major finding was the low prevalence of RV compared to NoV in all sampling points (11% vs 44%, p<0.05), and that RV concentration was lower as compared to NoV. RV was observed mainly during the rainy season (July-September), and the majority of all RV detected (6/9) belonged to subgroup (SG) I. The partial VP7-gene obtained from one RV positive sample was similar (99% nt identity) to a G6 VP7-gene of bovine origin and similar to the corresponding gene of the vaccine strain (98%). Furthermore RV G-types 2 and 4 were found in the incoming wastewater. NoV strains were detected throughout the year, of which a majority (20/21) were of genotype GII.4. We conclude that the introduction of RV vaccination reduced the transmission of RV in the community in Nicaragua. However, the burden of diarrhea in the country remains high, and the high prevalence of NoVs in hospital and municipal wastewater is noteworthy. This study highlights the need for further assessment of NoV following RV vaccine introduction.

  16. Low Prevalence of Rotavirus and High Prevalence of Norovirus in Hospital and Community Wastewater after Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccine in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Bucardo, Filemón; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Svensson, Lennart; Nordgren, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) and norovirus (NoV) are major causes of pediatric diarrhea and are altogether associated with approximately 800,000 deaths in young children every year. In Nicaragua, national RV vaccination program using the pentavalent RV5 vaccine from Merck was implemented in October 2006. To determine whether RV vaccination decreased the overall number of RV infections, we investigated the occurrence of RV and NoV in wastewater in the city of León from July 2007 to July 2008 and compared these data with pre-vaccination data. The major finding was the low prevalence of RV compared to NoV in all sampling points (11% vs 44%, p<0.05), and that RV concentration was lower as compared to NoV. RV was observed mainly during the rainy season (July–September), and the majority of all RV detected (6/9) belonged to subgroup (SG) I. The partial VP7-gene obtained from one RV positive sample was similar (99% nt identity) to a G6 VP7-gene of bovine origin and similar to the corresponding gene of the vaccine strain (98%). Furthermore RV G-types 2 and 4 were found in the incoming wastewater. NoV strains were detected throughout the year, of which a majority (20/21) were of genotype GII.4. We conclude that the introduction of RV vaccination reduced the transmission of RV in the community in Nicaragua. However, the burden of diarrhea in the country remains high, and the high prevalence of NoVs in hospital and municipal wastewater is noteworthy. This study highlights the need for further assessment of NoV following RV vaccine introduction. PMID:22016794

  17. Divergent immunomodulating effects of probiotics on T cell responses to oral attenuated human rotavirus vaccine and virulent human rotavirus infection in a neonatal gnotobiotic piglet disease model.

    PubMed

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2013-09-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a leading cause of childhood diarrhea. Current oral vaccines are not effective in impoverished countries where the vaccine is needed most. Therefore, alternative affordable strategies are urgently needed. Probiotics can alleviate diarrhea in children and enhance specific systemic and mucosal Ab responses, but the T cell responses are undefined. In this study, we elucidated the T cell and cytokine responses to attenuated human RV (AttHRV) and virulent human RV (HRV) in gnotobiotic pigs colonized with probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG [LGG] and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 [Bb12]), mimicking gut commensals in breastfed infants. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs are the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea. Probiotic colonized and nonvaccinated (Probiotic) pigs had lower diarrhea and reduced virus shedding postchallenge compared with noncolonized and nonvaccinated pigs (Control). Higher protection in the Probiotic group coincided with higher ileal T regulatory cells (Tregs) before and after challenge, and higher serum TGF-β and lower serum and biliary proinflammatory cytokines postchallenge. Probiotic colonization in vaccinated pigs enhanced innate serum IFN-α, splenic and circulatory IFN-γ-producing T cells, and serum Th1 cytokines, but reduced serum Th2 cytokines compared with noncolonized vaccinated pigs (Vac). Thus, LGG+Bb12 induced systemic Th1 immunostimulatory effects on oral AttHRV vaccine that coincided with lower diarrhea severity and reduced virus shedding postchallenge in Vac+Pro compared with Vac pigs. Previously unreported intestinal CD8 Tregs were induced in vaccinated groups postchallenge. Thus, probiotics LGG+Bb12 exert divergent immunomodulating effects, with enhanced Th1 responses to oral AttHRV vaccine, whereas inducing Treg responses to virulent HRV. PMID:23918983

  18. Recommendation of rotavirus vaccination and herd effect: a budget impact analysis based on German health insurance data.

    PubMed

    Karmann, Alexander; Jurack, Andrea; Lukas, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the budget impact and health effects of introducing rotavirus (RV) vaccination in Saxony, Germany, from a health insurance perspective. Special emphasis is given to the herd effect. We analyzed direct medical and non-medical costs of RV infection for Social Health Insurance between 2007 and 2010 based on 360,000 routine data observations from the AOK PLUS for children below 5 years of age. We compared the actual annual number of RV cases (vaccination scenario) with the number derived from 2005 (no vaccination, base case scenario). The vaccination coverage rate has increased from 5% to 61% between 2007 and 2010. The number of RV cases decreased by 21% from 32,274 in 2007 to 25,614 in 2010. Based on vaccination coverage, the total cost savings per 1,000 children due to RV vaccination was estimated to be 39,686 Euros. The overall share of outpatient costs was 60%. Mean gross cost savings were expected to be 304 Euros per avoided case. The net cost savings were expected to be 19 Euros per avoided case. About 59% of total savings was due to herd protection resulting from increasing vaccine rates. The herd effect per avoided case increased with increasing vaccine coverage. Incidence of RV cases, vaccination costs and days absent from work were sensitive parameters. This retrospective analysis showed that the increase in RV vaccination coverage in Saxony has been budget neutral if not cost saving for sick funds.

  19. Development and evaluation of two subunit vaccine candidates containing antigens of hepatitis E virus, rotavirus, and astrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ming; Wei, Chao; Wang, Leyi; Cao, Dianjun; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Jiang, Xi; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), rotavirus (RV), and astrovirus (AstV) are important pathogens that transmit through a common fecal-oral route, causing hepatitis (HEV) and gastroenteritis (RV and AstV) respectively in humans. In this study, we developed and evaluated two subunit vaccine candidates that consisted of the same protruding or spike protein antigens of the three viruses in two formats, a fusion of the three antigens into one molecule (fused vaccine) vs. a mixture of the three free antigens together (mixed vaccine). Both vaccines were easily made via E. coli expression system. Mouse immunization experiments showed that the fused vaccine elicited significantly higher antibody responses against the three viral antigens than those induced by the mixed vaccine. In addition, the mouse post-immune antisera of the fused vaccine revealed significantly higher neutralizing titers against HEV infection in cell culture, as well as significantly higher 50% blocking titers (BT50) against RV VP8-HBGA receptor interactions than those of the post-immune antisera after immunization of the mixed vaccine. Thus, the fused vaccine is a promising trivalent vaccine candidate against HEV, RV, and AstV, which is worth for further development. PMID:27194006

  20. Malaria Vaccine Protection Short-Lived in Young Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159656.html Malaria Vaccine Protection Short-Lived in Young Children Kids ... 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The world's most promising malaria vaccine appears to offer short-lived protection, fading ...

  1. Methodology and lessons-learned from the efficacy clinical trial of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Zaman, K; Yunus, M; El Arifeen, Shams; Azim, Tasnim; Faruque, A S G; Huq, Ehsanul; Hossain, Ilias; Luby, Stephen P; Victor, John C; Dallas, Michael J; Lewis, Kristen D C; Rivers, Stephen B; Steele, A Duncan; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Ciarlet, Max; Sack, David A

    2012-04-27

    An efficacy clinical trial with pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (PRV), RotaTeq(®), was conducted at Matlab field site of ICDDR,B, Bangladesh from March 2007 to March 2009. The methodology, including operation logistics, and lessons-learned are described in this report. Vaccination was organized at 41 fixed-site clinics twice/month. A total of 1136 infants were randomized 1:1 to receive 3 doses of PRV/placebo at approximately 6-, 10-, and 14-weeks of age with routine vaccines of the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) schedule. Twelve field-workers routinely visited study participants for safety and efficacy follow-up. The study was conducted following good clinical practices and maintaining cold-chain requirements. There were no temperature deviations of clinical vaccine supplies. Data entry was done using the source documents to a central database developed by the sponsor which was linked to web. Among enrolled infants, 1128 (99.3%) received 3 doses of PRV/placebo and efficacy follow-up was conducted for a median of 554 days. For the evaluation of immunogenicity, blood samples were collected from 150 participants predose 1 and from 147 (98%) of the same participants post dose 3. Stool samples were collected from 778 (99.9%) acute gastroenteritis episodes among children who reported to diarrhoea treatment centres. Thirty-nine serious adverse events, including 6 deaths, occurred among study participants. The efficacy of PRV against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis was 42.7% through the entire follow-up period; serum anti-rotavirus IgA response was 78.1%. Inclement weather, difficult transportation, and movement of study participants were some of the challenges identified. This is the first vaccine trial in rural Bangladesh with online data entry. The study was well accepted in the community and was completed successfully. PMID:22520143

  2. The assembly conformation of rotavirus VP6 determines its protective efficacy against rotavirus challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Ana Ruth; Rodríguez-Limas, William A; Contreras, Martha A; Esquivel, Ernesto; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2014-05-19

    Viral protein assemblies have shown to be superior immunogens used in commercial vaccines. However, little is known about the effect of protein assembly structure in immunogenicity and the protection conferred by a vaccine. In this work, rotavirus VP6, a polymorphic protein that assembles into nanotubes, icosahedra (dlRLP) or trimers was used to compare the immune response elicited by three different assemblies. VP6 is the most antigenic and abundant rotavirus structural protein. It has been demonstrated that antibodies against VP6 interfere with the replication cycle of rotavirus, making it a vaccine candidate. Groups of mice were immunized with either nanotubes, dlRLP or trimers and the humoral response (IgG and IgA titers) was measured. Immunized mice were challenged with EDIM rotavirus and protection against rotavirus infection, measured as viral shedding, was evaluated. Immunization with nanotubes resulted in the highest IgG titers, followed by immunization with dlRLP. While immunization with one dose of nanotubes was sufficient to reduce viral shedding by 70%, two doses of dlRLP or trimers were required to obtain a similar protection. The results show that the type of assembly of VP6 results in different humoral responses and protection efficacies against challenge with live virus. This information is important for the design of recombinant vaccines in general.

  3. Methods and challenges in measuring the impact of national pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccine introduction on morbidity and mortality in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Zeev, Naor; Kapanda, Lester; King, Carina; Beard, James; Phiri, Tambosi; Mvula, Hazzie; Crampin, Amelia C.; Mwansambo, Charles; Costello, Anthony; Parashar, Umesh; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Verani, Jennifer R.; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; French, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Background Pneumonia and gastroenteritis are leading causes of vaccine-preventable childhood morbidity and mortality. Malawi introduced pneumococcal conjugate and rotavirus vaccines to the immunisation programme in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Evaluating their effectiveness is vital to ensure optimal implementation and justify sustained investment. Methods/Design A national evaluation platform was established to determine vaccine effectiveness and impact in Malawi. Impact and effectiveness against vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease, radiological pneumonia and rotavirus gastroenteritis are investigated using before-after incidence comparisons and case-control designs, respectively. Mortality is assessed using a prospective population cohort. Cost-effectiveness evaluation is nested within the case-control studies. We describe platform characteristics including strengths and weaknesses for conducting vaccine evaluations. Discussion Integrating data from individual level and ecological methods across multiple sites provides comprehensive information for policymakers on programme impact and vaccine effectiveness including changes in serotype/genotype distribution over time. Challenges to robust vaccine evaluation in real-world conditions include: vaccination ascertainment; pre-existing rapid decline in mortality and pneumococcal disease in the context of non-vaccine interventions; and the maintenance of completeness and quality of reporting at scale and over time. In observational non-randomised designs ascertainment of vaccine status may be biased particularly in infants with fatal outcomes. In the context of multiple population level interventions targeting study endpoints attribution of reduced incidence to vaccine impact may be flawed. Providing evidence from several independent but complementary studies will provide the greatest confidence in assigning impact. Welcome declines in disease incidence and in child mortality make accrual of required sample sizes

  4. Intellectual property rights and challenges for development of affordable human papillomavirus, rotavirus and pneumococcal vaccines: Patent landscaping and perspectives of developing country vaccine manufacturers.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Amin, Tahir; Kim, Joyce; Furrer, Eliane; Matterson, Anna-Carin; Schwalbe, Nina; Nguyen, Aurélia

    2015-11-17

    The success of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance depends on the vaccine markets providing appropriate, affordable vaccines at sufficient and reliable quantities. Gavi's current supplier base for new and underutilized vaccines, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV), rotavirus, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is very small. There is growing concern that following globalization of laws on intellectual property rights (IPRs) through trade agreements, IPRs are impeding new manufacturers from entering the market with competing vaccines. This article examines the extent to which IPRs, specifically patents, can create such obstacles, in particular for developing country vaccine manufacturers (DCVMs). Through building patent landscapes in Brazil, China, and India and interviews with manufacturers and experts in the field, we found intense patenting activity for the HPV and pneumococcal vaccines that could potentially delay the entry of new manufacturers. Increased transparency around patenting of vaccine technologies, stricter patentability criteria suited for local development needs and strengthening of IPRs management capabilities where relevant, may help reduce impediments to market entry for new manufacturers and ensure a competitive supplier base for quality vaccines at sustainably low prices.

  5. Intellectual property rights and challenges for development of affordable human papillomavirus, rotavirus and pneumococcal vaccines: Patent landscaping and perspectives of developing country vaccine manufacturers.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Amin, Tahir; Kim, Joyce; Furrer, Eliane; Matterson, Anna-Carin; Schwalbe, Nina; Nguyen, Aurélia

    2015-11-17

    The success of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance depends on the vaccine markets providing appropriate, affordable vaccines at sufficient and reliable quantities. Gavi's current supplier base for new and underutilized vaccines, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV), rotavirus, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is very small. There is growing concern that following globalization of laws on intellectual property rights (IPRs) through trade agreements, IPRs are impeding new manufacturers from entering the market with competing vaccines. This article examines the extent to which IPRs, specifically patents, can create such obstacles, in particular for developing country vaccine manufacturers (DCVMs). Through building patent landscapes in Brazil, China, and India and interviews with manufacturers and experts in the field, we found intense patenting activity for the HPV and pneumococcal vaccines that could potentially delay the entry of new manufacturers. Increased transparency around patenting of vaccine technologies, stricter patentability criteria suited for local development needs and strengthening of IPRs management capabilities where relevant, may help reduce impediments to market entry for new manufacturers and ensure a competitive supplier base for quality vaccines at sustainably low prices. PMID:26368398

  6. Immunogens of rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Paul, P S; Lyoo, Y S

    1993-11-01

    Rotaviruses cause gastroenteritis in neonates of many animal species including cattle, swine, horses, dogs, cats, chickens and turkeys. Rotavirions are nonenveloped, are about 75 nm in diameter, have a double capsid, and contain 11 double-stranded RNA segments as their genome. Several antigenically distinct groups of rotaviruses have been identified and have been alphabetically designated as A through G. Group A rotaviruses were the first group of rotaviruses isolated and are the most commonly detected rotaviruses in diarrheic animals. Group A rotaviruses have two surface proteins, VP4 and VP7, both of which are important in serotype determination and in inducing neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity. Multiple serotypes of group A rotavirus based on glycoprotein VP7 (designated as G types) and based on VP4 (P types) have been identified. The immune response to rotaviruses is essentially serotype specific, however, cross-reactive or heterotypic epitopes have also been identified. Currently acceptable methods for immunogen quantitation include the induction of neutralizing antibody in host or laboratory animals. The in vivo efficacy of vaccines against rotavirus-associated gastroenteritis remains the standard method against which in vitro methods must be compared. Several animal models have been developed which could potentially be used in evaluating the efficacy of candidate vaccines. Monoclonal antibodies to rotavirus immunogens are also currently available and serve as valuable reagents for in vitro quantitation of rotaviral immunogens. PMID:8116188

  7. Predominance of Norovirus and Sapovirus in Nicaragua after Implementation of Universal Rotavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bucardo, Filemón; Reyes, Yaoska; Svensson, Lennart; Nordgren, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite significant reduction of rotavirus (RV) infections following implementation of RotaTeq vaccination in Nicaragua, a large burden of patients with diarrhea persists. Methods We conducted a community- and hospital-based study of the burden of RV, norovirus (NV) and sapovirus (SV) infections as cause of sporadic acute gastroenteritis (GE) among 330 children ≤ 5 years of age between September 2009 and October 2010 in two major cities of Nicaragua with a RotaTeq coverage rate of 95%. Results We found that NV, SV and RV infections altogether accounted for 45% of cases of GE. Notably, NV was found in 24% (79/330) of the children, followed by SV (17%, 57/330) and RV (8%, 25/330). The detection rate in the hospital setting was 27%, 15% and 14% for NV, SV and RV respectively, whereas in the community setting the detection rate of RV was < 1%. Among each of the investigated viruses one particular genogroup or genotype was dominant; GII.4 (82%) for NV, GI (46%) for SV and G1P[8] (64%) in RV. These variants were also found in higher proportions in the hospital setting compared to the community setting. The GII.4.2006 Minerva strain circulating globally since 2006 was the most common among genotyped NV in this study, with the GII.4-2010 New Orleans emerging in 2010. Conclusions This study shows that NV has become the leading viral cause of gastroenteritis at hospital and community settings in Nicaragua after implementation of RV vaccination. PMID:24849288

  8. Immunologic interference from sequential administration of live attenuated alphavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    McClain, D J; Pittman, P R; Ramsburg, H H; Nelson, G O; Rossi, C A; Mangiafico, J A; Schmaljohn, A L; Malinoski, F J

    1998-03-01

    Two different human vaccine trials examined interference arising from sequential administration of vaccines against heterologous alphaviruses. The first trial indicated that persons previously vaccinated against Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) exhibited poor neutralizing antibody responses to a live attenuated chikungunya virus (CHIKV) vaccine (46% response rate). The second trial prospectively examined neutralizing antibody responses to live attenuated VEEV vaccine in persons previously inoculated with either CHIKV vaccine or placebo. Following seroconversion to CHIKV, CHIKV vaccine recipients' geometric mean titers (GMTs) to VEEV by 80% plaque-reduction neutralization titration never exceeded 10, compared with a peak GMT of 95 after VEEV vaccination for alphavirus-naive volunteers who initially received placebo (P < .003). ELISA antibody responses demonstrated cross-reactive IgG to VEEV after primary CHIKV immunization and then an anamnestic response upon subsequent VEEV vaccination. These data indicate that preexisting alphavirus immunity in humans interferes with subsequent neutralizing antibody response to a live attenuated, heterologous vaccine.

  9. Development of Streptococcus pneumoniae Vaccines Using Live Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shifeng; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae still causes severe morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in young children and the elderly. Much effort has been dedicated to developing protein-based universal vaccines to conquer the current shortcomings of capsular vaccines and capsular conjugate vaccines, such as serotype replacement, limited coverage and high costs. A recombinant live vector vaccine delivering protective antigens is a promising way to achieve this goal. In this review, we discuss the researches using live recombinant vaccines, mainly live attenuated Salmonella and lactic acid bacteria, to deliver pneumococcal antigens. We also discuss both the limitations and the future of these vaccines. PMID:25309747

  10. The cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination: Comparative analyses for five European countries and transferability in Europe.

    PubMed

    Jit, Mark; Bilcke, Joke; Mangen, Marie-Josée J; Salo, Heini; Melliez, Hugues; Edmunds, W John; Yazdan, Yazdanpanah; Beutels, Philippe

    2009-10-19

    Cost-effectiveness analyses are usually not directly comparable between countries because of differences in analytical and modelling assumptions. We investigated the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in five European Union countries (Belgium, England and Wales, Finland, France and the Netherlands) using a single model, burden of disease estimates supplied by national public health agencies and a subset of common assumptions. Under base case assumptions (vaccination with Rotarix, 3% discount rate, health care provider perspective, no herd immunity and quality of life of one caregiver affected by a rotavirus episode) and a cost-effectiveness threshold of euro30,000, vaccination is likely to be cost effective in Finland only. However, single changes to assumptions may make it cost effective in Belgium and the Netherlands. The estimated threshold price per dose for Rotarix (excluding administration costs) to be cost effective was euro41 in Belgium, euro28 in England and Wales, euro51 in Finland, euro36 in France and euro46 in the Netherlands.

  11. Proceedings of the Consensus Day Meeting: Implications for Rotavirus Vaccination in the 2014 Apulian Lifetime Immunization Schedule. Foggia, 17 April 2015.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, D; Fortunato, F; Cappelli, M G; Gallone, M S; Tafuri, S; Prato, R

    2015-01-01

    Recommendations for vaccination against rotavirus (RV) were issued in Apulia in 2006; the vaccine was free of charge to children who entered day care or nursery school by 1 year of age or those affected by chronic diseases for which diarrhea caused by rotavirus can increase the risk of complications and hospitalization. In 2014, vaccination became available to all healthy children with only a copayment. However, there has not been a significant increase in vaccination coverage. On April 17, 2015, Apulian public health physicians and paediatricians met to share strategies to promote the RV vaccine indications provided in the regional immunization schedule. During the meeting, presentation of data reports were interspersed with discussions that were led with a "bottom-up" approach. The discussants responded to pre-planned questions raised by the participants and encouraged by the discussion.

  12. Live bacterial vaccine vectors: An overview

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Adilson José; Zangirolami, Teresa Cristina; Novo-Mansur, Maria Teresa Marques; Giordano, Roberto de Campos; Martins, Elizabeth Angélica Leme

    2014-01-01

    Genetically attenuated microorganisms, pathogens, and some commensal bacteria can be engineered to deliver recombinant heterologous antigens to stimulate the host immune system, while still offering good levels of safety. A key feature of these live vectors is their capacity to stimulate mucosal as well as humoral and/or cellular systemic immunity. This enables the use of different forms of vaccination to prevent pathogen colonization of mucosal tissues, the front door for many infectious agents. Furthermore, delivery of DNA vaccines and immune system stimulatory molecules, such as cytokines, can be achieved using these special carriers, whose adjuvant properties and, sometimes, invasive capacities enhance the immune response. More recently, the unique features and versatility of these vectors have also been exploited to develop anti-cancer vaccines, where tumor-associated antigens, cytokines, and DNA or RNA molecules are delivered. Different strategies and genetic tools are constantly being developed, increasing the antigenic potential of agents delivered by these systems, opening fresh perspectives for the deployment of vehicles for new purposes. Here we summarize the main characteristics of the different types of live bacterial vectors and discuss new applications of these delivery systems in the field of vaccinology. PMID:25763014

  13. Rotavirus Prevalence in the Primary Care Setting in Nicaragua after Universal Infant Rotavirus Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Paniagua, Margarita; Zambrana, Luis Enrique; Bucardo, Filemon; Hudgens, Michael G.; Weber, David J.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Espinoza, Félix

    2011-01-01

    Nicaragua was the first developing nation to implement universal infant rotavirus immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5). Initial studies of vaccine effectiveness in Nicaragua and other developing nations have focused on the prevention of hospitalizations and severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, rotavirus diarrhea is more commonly treated in the primary care setting, with only 1–3% of rotavirus cases receiving hospital care. We measured the prevalence of rotavirus infection in primary care clinics in León, Nicaragua, after introduction of the immunization program. In the post-vaccine period, 3.5% (95% confidence interval = 1.9–5.8) of children seeking care for diarrhea tested positive for rotavirus. A high diversity of rotavirus genotypes was encountered among the few positive samples. In conclusion, rotavirus was an uncommon cause of childhood diarrhea in this primary care setting after implementation of a rotavirus immunization program. PMID:22049057

  14. Rotavirus prevalence in the primary care setting in Nicaragua after universal infant rotavirus immunization.

    PubMed

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Paniagua, Margarita; Zambrana, Luis Enrique; Bucardo, Filemon; Hudgens, Michael G; Weber, David J; Morgan, Douglas R; Espinoza, Félix

    2011-11-01

    Nicaragua was the first developing nation to implement universal infant rotavirus immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5). Initial studies of vaccine effectiveness in Nicaragua and other developing nations have focused on the prevention of hospitalizations and severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, rotavirus diarrhea is more commonly treated in the primary care setting, with only 1-3% of rotavirus cases receiving hospital care. We measured the prevalence of rotavirus infection in primary care clinics in León, Nicaragua, after introduction of the immunization program. In the post-vaccine period, 3.5% (95% confidence interval = 1.9-5.8) of children seeking care for diarrhea tested positive for rotavirus. A high diversity of rotavirus genotypes was encountered among the few positive samples. In conclusion, rotavirus was an uncommon cause of childhood diarrhea in this primary care setting after implementation of a rotavirus immunization program.

  15. Molecular characterization of equine rotaviruses isolated in Europe in 2013: implications for vaccination.

    PubMed

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Ons, Ellen; De Coster, Sarah; Conceição-Neto, Nádia; Gryspeerdt, Annick; Van Ranst, Marc; Raue, Rudiger

    2015-03-23

    Equine group A rotavirus (RVAs) mainly cause disease in foals under the age of 3 months. Only sporadic data are available on the circulation of RVAs in equine populations in Europe. In this study, 65 diarrheic samples from foals under 4 months of age were collected in Belgium (n=32), Germany (n=17), Slovenia (n=5), Sweden (n=4), Hungary (n=3), Italy (n=2), France (n=1) and The Netherlands (n=1). Forty percent of these samples (n=26) were found to be RVA positive by a quantitative RT-PCR assay. The viral load in 11 of these samples was sufficiently high to be (partially) genotyped. G3, G14 and P[12] were the main genotypes detected, and phylogenetic analyses revealed that they were closely related to contemporary equine RVA strains detected in Europe as well as in Brazil and South Africa. Regional variation was observed with only G14 and P[12] being detected in Germany, whereas mainly G3P[12] was encountered in Belgium. Surprisingly the only G14P[12] RVA strain detected in Belgium was also found to possess the very rare P[18] genotype, which has been described only once from equine RVA strain L338 detected in the UK in 1991. Despite the identification of this uncommon P[18] genotype, G3P[12] and G14P[12] RVA strains remained the most important genotypes in Europe during the study period. Based on this finding and the knowledge that G3P[12] and G14P[12] serotypes are partially cross-reactive it can be assumed that a vaccine based on an inactivated virus of the G3P[12] genotype is still relevant in the current European epidemiological situation, although the addition of a G14 strain would most likely be beneficial. PMID:25637313

  16. Epidemiology and evolution of rotaviruses and noroviruses from an archival WHO Global Study in Children (1976-79) with implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Rackoff, Lauren A; Bok, Karin; Green, Kim Y; Kapikian, Albert Z

    2013-01-01

    Prompted by the discovery of new gastrointestinal viruses, the NIH, NIAID and WHO investigated the etiology of acute diarrhea that occurred from 1976-1979 in a global cohort of infants and young children. Rotaviruses were found to be major pathogens worldwide, whereas the Norwalk virus could not be detected using a radioimmunoassay. The aim of this study is to re-evaluate the role and diversity of rotaviruses and noroviruses in the original cohort using more sensitive current technologies. Stools collected from Asia, Africa, and South America (n = 485) were evaluated for viral genotypes by RT-PCR and sequencing. Rotaviruses were detected in 28.9% and noroviruses in 9.7% of the specimens, with G1 rotaviruses and GII noroviruses accounting for the majority of each respective virus. Various strains in this study predated the currently assigned dates of discovery for their particular genotype, and in addition, two noroviruses (KL45 and T091) could not be assigned to current genotypes. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated a relative constancy in circulating rotavirus genotypes over time, with several genotypes from this study becoming established in the current repertoire of viral species. Similarly, GII noroviruses have maintained dominance, with GII.4 noroviruses continuing as a predominant genotype over time. Taken together, the complex molecular epidemiology of rotaviruses and noroviruses circulating in the 1970's is consistent with current patterns, an important consideration in the design of multivalent vaccines to control these viruses.

  17. Use of a current varicella vaccine as a live polyvalent vaccine vector.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kouki; Mori, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the causative agent of varicella and zoster. The varicella vaccine was developed to control VZV infection in children. The currently available Oka vaccine strain is the only live varicella vaccine approved by the World Health Organization. We previously cloned the complete genome of the Oka vaccine strain into a bacterial artificial chromosome vector and then successfully reconstituted the virus. We then used this system to generate a recombinant Oka vaccine virus expressing mumps virus gene(s). The new recombinant vaccine may be an effective polyvalent live vaccine that provides protection against both varicella and mumps viruses. In this review, we discussed about possibility of polyvalent live vaccine(s) using varicella vaccine based on our recent studies.

  18. Characterization of a G1P[8] rotavirus causing an outbreak of gastroenteritis in the Northern Territory, Australia, in the vaccine era

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Celeste M; Cowley, Daniel; Snelling, Thomas L; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, a large outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis occurred in the Alice Springs region of the Northern Territory, Australia. The outbreak occurred 43 months after the introduction of the G1P[8] rotavirus vaccine Rotarix®. Forty-three infants were hospitalized during the outbreak and analysis of fecal samples from each infant revealed a G1P[8] rotavirus strain. The outbreak strain was adapted to cell culture and neutralization assays were performed using VP7 and VP4 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The outbreak strain exhibited a distinct neutralization resistance pattern compared to the Rotarix® vaccine strain. Whole genome sequencing of the 2010 outbreak virus strain demonstrated numerous amino acid differences compared to the Rotarix® vaccine strain in the characterized neutralization epitopes of the VP7 and VP4 proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of the outbreak strain revealed a close genetic relationship to global strains, in particular RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE0098/2009/G1P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE00038/2008/G1P[8] for numerous genes. The 2010 outbreak strain was likely introduced from a globally circulating population of strains rather than evolving from an endemic Australian strain. The outbreak strain possessed antigenic differences in the VP7 and VP4 proteins compared to the Rotarix® vaccine strain. The outbreak was associated with moderate vaccine coverage and possibly low vaccine take in the population. PMID:26038746

  19. Characterization of a G1P[8] rotavirus causing an outbreak of gastroenteritis in the Northern Territory, Australia, in the vaccine era.

    PubMed

    Donato, Celeste M; Cowley, Daniel; Snelling, Thomas L; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2014-07-01

    In 2010, a large outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis occurred in the Alice Springs region of the Northern Territory, Australia. The outbreak occurred 43 months after the introduction of the G1P[8] rotavirus vaccine Rotarix(®). Forty-three infants were hospitalized during the outbreak and analysis of fecal samples from each infant revealed a G1P[8] rotavirus strain. The outbreak strain was adapted to cell culture and neutralization assays were performed using VP7 and VP4 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The outbreak strain exhibited a distinct neutralization resistance pattern compared to the Rotarix(®) vaccine strain. Whole genome sequencing of the 2010 outbreak virus strain demonstrated numerous amino acid differences compared to the Rotarix(®) vaccine strain in the characterized neutralization epitopes of the VP7 and VP4 proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of the outbreak strain revealed a close genetic relationship to global strains, in particular RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE0098/2009/G1P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE00038/2008/G1P[8] for numerous genes. The 2010 outbreak strain was likely introduced from a globally circulating population of strains rather than evolving from an endemic Australian strain. The outbreak strain possessed antigenic differences in the VP7 and VP4 proteins compared to the Rotarix(®) vaccine strain. The outbreak was associated with moderate vaccine coverage and possibly low vaccine take in the population. PMID:26038746

  20. Characterization of a G1P[8] rotavirus causing an outbreak of gastroenteritis in the Northern Territory, Australia, in the vaccine era.

    PubMed

    Donato, Celeste M; Cowley, Daniel; Snelling, Thomas L; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2014-07-01

    In 2010, a large outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis occurred in the Alice Springs region of the Northern Territory, Australia. The outbreak occurred 43 months after the introduction of the G1P[8] rotavirus vaccine Rotarix(®). Forty-three infants were hospitalized during the outbreak and analysis of fecal samples from each infant revealed a G1P[8] rotavirus strain. The outbreak strain was adapted to cell culture and neutralization assays were performed using VP7 and VP4 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The outbreak strain exhibited a distinct neutralization resistance pattern compared to the Rotarix(®) vaccine strain. Whole genome sequencing of the 2010 outbreak virus strain demonstrated numerous amino acid differences compared to the Rotarix(®) vaccine strain in the characterized neutralization epitopes of the VP7 and VP4 proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of the outbreak strain revealed a close genetic relationship to global strains, in particular RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE0098/2009/G1P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE00038/2008/G1P[8] for numerous genes. The 2010 outbreak strain was likely introduced from a globally circulating population of strains rather than evolving from an endemic Australian strain. The outbreak strain possessed antigenic differences in the VP7 and VP4 proteins compared to the Rotarix(®) vaccine strain. The outbreak was associated with moderate vaccine coverage and possibly low vaccine take in the population.

  1. Investigations on live vaccines against infectious bursal disease of chicks.

    PubMed

    Yadin, H; Hoekstra, J; Oei, H L; van Roozelaar, D J

    1980-01-01

    Summary Four live virus vaccines against Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) were studied with regard to their safety, immune response and applicability. None of the vaccines caused clinical symptoms or had an adverse impact on bodyweight. Differences between these vaccins were observed in their effect on the Bursa/ Bodyweight Ratio and the severity of the microscopical lesions of the bursa Fabricii. The immunosuppressive effect of IBD vaccination at one day of age on the response to Newcastle disease vaccine applied was rather low. Three of the four vaccines induced antibodies associated with protection against challenge. Vaccination of SPF rearing chickens by drinking water at an age of 15 weeks produced an antibody response (Agar Gel Precipitin Test) whereas at an age of 23, 32 and 60 weeks it did not. Chickens of all age groups responded serologically to an intramusculair vaccination. A correlation was found between the immunological response and the effect of the vaccines on the bursa Fabricii.

  2. Longitudinal analysis of VP7 gene of group A human rotavirus G2P[4] strains circulating in the pre-vaccine era in Sapporo, Japan from 1991 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Masatoshi; Nagaoka, Yoshinobu; Tsugawa, Takeshi; Yoto, Yuko; Hori, Tsukasa; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    Sequence analysis of the VP7 gene in 23 group A human rotavirus G2P[4] strains obtained during 1991-2011, that is, the pre-vaccine era, in Sapporo, Japan showed considerable genetic diversity, mainly in variable regions. Recent G2P[4] epidemic strains were located in sublineage IVa with a distinctive substitution of D96N. This study provides background data on the genetic variability of G2P[4] rotavirus-VP7 gene prior to the widespread use of rotavirus vaccines in Japan.

  3. Rotavirus capsid VP6 protein acts as an adjuvant in vivo for norovirus virus-like particles in a combination vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Blazevic, Vesna; Malm, Maria; Arinobu, Daisuke; Lappalainen, Suvi; Vesikari, Timo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rotavirus (RV) and norovirus (NoV) are the 2 leading causes of acute viral gastroenteritis worldwide. We have developed a non-live NoV and RV vaccine candidate consisting of NoV virus-like particles (VLPs) and recombinant polymeric RV VP6 protein produced in baculovirus-insect cell expression system. Both components have been shown to induce strong potentially protective immune responses. As VP6 nanotubes are highly immunogenic, we investigated here a possible adjuvant effect of these structures on NoV-specific immune responses in vivo. BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with a suboptimal dose (0.3 μg) of GII.4 or GI.3 VLPs either alone or in a combination with 10 μg dose of VP6 and induction of NoV-specific antibodies in sera of experimental animals were measured. Blocking assay using human saliva or synthetic histo-blood group antigens was employed to test NoV blocking antibodies. Suboptimal doses of the VLPs alone did not induce substantial anti-NoV antibodies. When co-administered with the VP6, considerable titers of not only type-specific but also cross-reactive IgG antibodies against NoV VLP genotypes not included in the vaccine composition were induced. Most importantly, NoV-specific blocking antibodies, a surrogate for neutralizing antibodies, were generated. Our results show that RV VP6 protein has an in vivo adjuvant effect on NoV-specific antibody responses and support the use of VP6 protein as a part of the NoV-RV combination vaccine, especially when addition of external adjuvants is not desirable. PMID:26467630

  4. A significant and consistent reduction in rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalization of children under 5 years of age, following the introduction of universal rotavirus immunization in Israel.

    PubMed

    Muhsen, Khitam; Rubenstein, Uri; Kassem, Eias; Goren, Sophy; Schachter, Yaakov; Kremer, Adi; Shulman, Lester M; Ephros, Moshe; Cohen, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Universal rotavirus vaccination with RotaTeq was introduced in Israel in December 2010. We examined hospitalization rates of children under 5 years of age due to all-cause and rotavirus gastroenteritis, both before and 3 years after universal introduction of the vaccination. An ongoing hospital-based surveillance network that was established in November 2007, accessed information regarding hospitalization of children due to gastroenteritis (n = 6205) in 3 hospitals in northern Israel, with an annual average of about 60,000 children under 5 years of age living in the catchment area of these hospitals. Stool samples were tested for rotavirus by immunochromatography. Compared to the period preceding implementation of the universal rotavirus vaccination (2008-2010), hospitalizations due to rotavirus gastroenteritis in children <5 years of age decreased significantly, by 55% (95% CI 43%-67%) during the period of universal vaccination (2011-2013), a decrease that was sustained throughout the 3 year period. This reduction was greater in children aged 0-23 months (60-61%) than in toddlers aged 24-59 months (36%). A 32% (95% CI 21%-45%) decrease in the incidence of all-cause gastroenteritis was also observed. During the period preceding universal vaccination, rotavirus diarrhea showed typical winter seasonality, with highest incidence in December. However, the winter peak was substantially blunted during the period of universal immunization. Surveillance of rotavirus gastroenteritis should continue to assess the long-term impact of such a program. Our findings are of relevance to high and middle-income countries considering the introduction of a universal rotavirus immunization program.

  5. Acceptability of live attenuated influenza vaccine by vaccine providers in Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Eve; Gagnon, Dominique; Kiely, Marilou; Boulianne, Nicole; Landry, Monique

    2015-01-01

    A live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) was offered during the 2012-13 influenza season in Quebec, Canada, to children aged between 2 and 17 years with chronic medical conditions. Despite the offer, uptake of the vaccine was low. We assessed the perceptions and opinions about seasonal influenza vaccination and LAIV use among vaccine providers who participated in the 2012-13 campaign. More than 70% of them thought that LAIV was safe and effective and more than 90% considered that the vaccine was well-received by parents and healthcare professionals. According to respondents, the most frequent concerns of parents about LAIV were linked to vaccine efficacy. LAIV is well-accepted by vaccine providers involved in influenza vaccination clinics, but more information about the vaccine and the recommendations for its use are needed to increase vaccine uptake.

  6. International reference Preparation of Newcastle Diseaase Vaccine (Live).

    PubMed

    Stewart, D L; Davidson, I; Hebert, C N

    1968-01-01

    The Central Veterinary Laboratory, Weybridge, England, was requested by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization to arrange a collaborative assay to test a freeze-dried preparation of live Newcastle disease vaccine (Hitchner B1 strain) for its suitability to serve as an international reference preparation. Nine laboratories in 8 countries assayed the vaccine against a number of test preparations of different vaccine strains. On the basis of the results obtained, the material has been established as the International Reference Preparation of Newcastle Disease Vaccine (Live) and is considered suitable for standardizing the titration of the Hitchner B1 strain and related strains of virus.

  7. Public Health Impact of Complete and Incomplete Rotavirus Vaccination among Commercially and Medicaid Insured Children in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Krishnarajah, Girishanthy; Duh, Mei Sheng; Korves, Caroline; Demissie, Kitaw

    2016-01-01

    Background This study (NCT01682005) aims to assess clinical and cost impacts of complete and incomplete rotavirus (RV) vaccination. Methods Beneficiaries who continuously received medical and pharmacy benefits since birth were identified separately in Truven Commercial Claims and Encounters (2000–2011) and Truven Medicaid Claims (2002–2010) and observed until the first of end of insurance eligibility or five years. Infants with ≥1 RV vaccine within the vaccination window (6 weeks-8 months) were divided into completely and incompletely vaccinated cohorts. Historically unvaccinated (before 2007) and contemporarily unvaccinated (2007 and after) cohorts included children without RV vaccine. Claims with International Classification of Disease 9th edition (ICD-9) codes for diarrhea and RV were identified. First RV episode incidence, RV-related and diarrhea-related healthcare resource utilization after 8 months old were calculated and compared across groups. Poisson regressions were used to generate incidence rates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Mean total, inpatient, outpatient and emergency room costs for first RV and diarrhea episodes were calculated; bootstrapping was used to construct 95% CIs to evaluate cost differences. Results 1,069,485 Commercial and 515,557 Medicaid patients met inclusion criteria. Among commercially insured, RV incidence per 10,000 person-years was 3.3 (95% CI 2.8–3.9) for completely, 4.0 (95% CI 3.3–5.0) for incompletely vaccinated, and 20.9 (95% CI 19.5–22.4) for contemporarily and 40.3 (95% CI 38.6–42.1) for historically unvaccinated. Rates in Medicaid were 7.5 (95% CI 4.8–11.8) for completely, 9.0 (95% CI 6.5–12.3) for incompletely vaccinated, and 14.6 (95% CI 12.8–16.7) for contemporarily and 52.0 (95% CI 50.2–53.8) for historically unvaccinated. Mean cost for first RV episode per cohort member was $15.33 (95% CI $12.99-$18.03) and $4.26 ($95% CI $2.34-$6.35) lower for completely vaccinated versus contemporarily

  8. The "Performance of Rotavirus and Oral Polio Vaccines in Developing Countries" (PROVIDE) study: description of methods of an interventional study designed to explore complex biologic problems.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Colgate, E Ross; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Haque, Rashidul; Dickson, Dorothy M; Carmolli, Marya P; Nayak, Uma; Taniuchi, Mami; Naylor, Caitlin; Qadri, Firdausi; Ma, Jennie Z; Alam, Masud; Walsh, Mary Claire; Diehl, Sean A; Petri, William A

    2015-04-01

    Oral vaccines appear less effective in children in the developing world. Proposed biologic reasons include concurrent enteric infections, malnutrition, breast milk interference, and environmental enteropathy (EE). Rigorous study design and careful data management are essential to begin to understand this complex problem while assuring research subject safety. Herein, we describe the methodology and lessons learned in the PROVIDE study (Dhaka, Bangladesh). A randomized clinical trial platform evaluated the efficacy of delayed-dose oral rotavirus vaccine as well as the benefit of an injectable polio vaccine replacing one dose of oral polio vaccine. This rigorous infrastructure supported the additional examination of hypotheses of vaccine underperformance. Primary and secondary efficacy and immunogenicity measures for rotavirus and polio vaccines were measured, as well as the impact of EE and additional exploratory variables. Methods for the enrollment and 2-year follow-up of a 700 child birth cohort are described, including core laboratory, safety, regulatory, and data management practices. Intense efforts to standardize clinical, laboratory, and data management procedures in a developing world setting provide clinical trials rigor to all outcomes. Although this study infrastructure requires extensive time and effort, it allows optimized safety and confidence in the validity of data gathered in complex, developing country settings.

  9. Live attenuated hepatitis A vaccines developed in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Two live, attenuated hepatitis A vaccines, H 2 and LA-1 virus strains, were developed through serial passages of the viruses in cell cultures at 32 °C and 35 °C respectively. Both vaccines were safe and immunogenic, providing protection against clinical hepatitis A in 95% of the vaccinees, with a single dose by subcutaneous injection. The vaccine recipients were not protected from asymptomatic, subclinical hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, which induced a similar antibody response as for unvaccinated subjects. A second dose caused anamnestic response and can be used for boosting. Oral immunization of human with H 2 vaccine or of marmoset with LA-1 vaccine failed, and no evidence was found for person-to-person transmission of the H 2 strain or for marmoset-to-marmoset transmission of LA-1 strain, by close contact. H 2 strain was genetically stable when passaged in marmosets, humans or cell cultures at 37 °C; 3 consecutive passages of the virus in marmosets did not cause virulence mutation. The live vaccines offer the benefits of low cost, single dose injection, long- term protection, and increased duration of immunity through subclinical infection. Improved sanitation and administration of 150 million doses of the live vaccines to children had led to a 90% reduction in the annual national incidence rate of hepatitis A in China during the 16-year period, from 1991 to 2006. Hepatitis A immunization with both live and inactivated HA vaccines was implemented in the national routine childhood immunization program in 2008 and around 92% of the 16 million annual births received the affordable live, attenuated vaccines at 18 months of age. Near elimination of the disease was achieved in China for 14 years following introduction of the H 2 live vaccine into the Expanded Immunization Program (EPI) in 1992.

  10. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria enhance mucosal B cell responses and differentially modulate systemic antibody responses to an oral human rotavirus vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig disease model

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sukumar; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    B cells play a key role in generation of protective immunity against rotavirus infection, a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Current RV vaccines are less effective in developing countries compared to developed countries. Commensals/probiotics influence mucosal immunity, but the role of early gut colonizing bacteria in modulating intestinal B cell responses to RV vaccines is largely unknown. We co-colonized neonatal gnotobiotic pigs, the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea, with 2 dominant bacterial species present in the gut of breastfed infants, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and Bifidobacterium animalis lactis Bb12 to evaluate their impact on B cell responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine. Following HRV challenge, probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated piglets had significantly lower fecal scores and reduced HRV shedding titers compared to uncolonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs. The reduction in HRV diarrhea was significantly correlated with higher intestinal IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal HRV-specific IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs. The significantly higher small intestinal HRV IgA antibody responses coincided with higher IL-6, IL-10 and APRIL responses of ileal mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the immunomodulatory effects of probiotics genomic DNA on TGF-β and IL-10 responses. However, serum RV IgG antibody titers and total IgG titers were significantly lower in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs, both pre- and post-challenge. In summary, LGG and Bb12 beneficially modulated intestinal B cell responses to HRV vaccine. PMID:25483333

  11. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria enhance mucosal B cell responses and differentially modulate systemic antibody responses to an oral human rotavirus vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig disease model.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sukumar; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    B cells play a key role in generation of protective immunity against rotavirus infection, a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Current RV vaccines are less effective in developing countries compared to developed countries. Commensals/probiotics influence mucosal immunity, but the role of early gut colonizing bacteria in modulating intestinal B cell responses to RV vaccines is largely unknown. We co-colonized neonatal gnotobiotic pigs, the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea, with 2 dominant bacterial species present in the gut of breastfed infants, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and Bifidobacterium animalis lactis Bb12 to evaluate their impact on B cell responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine. Following HRV challenge, probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated piglets had significantly lower fecal scores and reduced HRV shedding titers compared to uncolonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs. The reduction in HRV diarrhea was significantly correlated with higher intestinal IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal HRV-specific IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs. The significantly higher small intestinal HRV IgA antibody responses coincided with higher IL-6, IL-10 and APRIL responses of ileal mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the immunomodulatory effects of probiotics genomic DNA on TGF-β and IL-10 responses. However, serum RV IgG antibody titers and total IgG titers were significantly lower in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs, both pre- and post-challenge. In summary, LGG and Bb12 beneficially modulated intestinal B cell responses to HRV vaccine. PMID:25483333

  12. Live attenuated varicella vaccine in children with leukemia in remission.

    PubMed

    Gershon, A A; Steinberg, S; Galasso, G; Borkowsky, W; Larussa, P; Ferrara, A; Gelb, L

    1984-09-01

    One-hundred-ninety-one children with acute leukemia in remission for at least one year were immunized with 1 or more doses of live attenuated varicella vaccine. All were susceptible to varicella prior to vaccination. The only significant side effect was mild to moderate rash, seen especially in children with maintenance chemotherapy temporarily suspended for one week before and one week after vaccination. Children with rash were at some risk (10%) to transmit vaccine virus to varicella susceptibles with whom they had close contact.

  13. Passive immunity to bovine rotavirus in newborn calves fed colostrum supplements from immunized or nonimmunized cows.

    PubMed Central

    Saif, L J; Redman, D R; Smith, K L; Theil, K W

    1983-01-01

    Colostrum was collected and pooled from each of five cows in three experimental groups: group I cows received intramuscular and intramammary inoculations of adjuvanted modified live Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center rotavirus vaccine; group II cows were injected intramuscularly with a commercial modified-live rota-coronavirus vaccine; and group III cows were uninoculated controls. Pooled colostrum from group I cows had higher (P less than 0.05) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) immunoglobulin G (IgG1) and virus neutralization (VN) rotavirus antibody titers (ELISA IgG1 = 2,413,682; VN = 360,205) than did colostrum from group II (ELISA IgG1 = 8,192; VN = 4,395) or group III cows (ELISA IgG1 = 5,916; VN = 2,865). The antibody titers of these last two colostrum pools did not differ (P greater than 0.05). Samples of these colostrum pools were fed as daily supplements (percent [vol/vol] in cow's milk infant formula) to 28 newborn, unsuckled, antibody-seronegative, male Holstein calves. Eight calves received no supplemental colostrum. The calves were orally challenged with virulent bovine rotavirus and monitored daily for diarrhea and fecal rotavirus shedding. Diarrhea and rotavirus shedding occurred in the eight calves fed no supplemental colostrum and persisted longest in this group. The pooled colostrum from group I cows protected eight of eight calves from both rotavirus diarrhea and shedding when fed as a 1% supplement. The pooled colostrum from neither group II nor group III cows protected 12 other calves against rotavirus diarrhea or shedding when fed at the same concentration (1%). Six rotavirus-challenged calves fed 0.1% supplemental colostrum from group I cows and two calves fed 10 and 50% supplemental colostrum from control cows displayed partial passive immunity, exemplified by delayed onset and shortened duration of rotavirus-associated diarrhea and virus shedding. PMID:6309660

  14. Live attenuated varicella vaccine use in immunocompromised children and adults.

    PubMed

    Gershon, A A; Steinberg, S P; Gelb, L

    1986-10-01

    Live attenuated varicella vaccine has been administered to 307 children with leukemia in remission and to 86 healthy adults. The vaccine was well tolerated and immunogenic. The major side effect in leukemic children receiving maintenance chemotherapy was development of a vaccine-associated rash. Vaccinees in whom a rash developed were potentially somewhat infectious to others about 1 month after immunization. Vaccination was not associated with an increase in the incidence of herpes zoster or in relapse of leukemia. Vaccination provided excellent protection against severe varicella. It was associated with a significant decrease in the attack rate of chickenpox following an intimate exposure to varicella-zoster virus, conferring about 80% protection in leukemic children. The cases of breakthrough varicella that occurred were mild. Thus, the vaccine may either prevent or modify varicella in high-risk individuals. It may also have use for prevention of nosocomial varicella.

  15. Group a rotavirus and norovirus genotypes circulating in the northeastern Brazil in the post-monovalent vaccination era.

    PubMed

    Sá, Ana Caroline C; Gómez, Mariela M; Lima, Ila Fernanda N; Quetz, Josiane S; Havt, Alexandre; Oriá, Reinaldo B; Lima, Aldo A; Leite, José Paulo G

    2015-09-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) and noroviruses (NoV) are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) worldwide. Childhood diarrhea deaths and hospital admissions have declined since the introduction of the monovalent (G1P[8]) vaccine (Rotarix(®) [RV1]) in the National Immunization Program in Brazil in 2006. This study aims to investigate the epidemiological profile of NoV and RVA infections from children with AGE in the Northeastern region of Brazil in the post vaccine season. Two-hundred fecal samples collected from children up to 10 years old in Fortaleza, Ceará between 2008-2009 were screened for the presence of RVA and NoV. Positive samples were genotyped and sequenced. The RVA screening revealed 12% prevalence and all RVA strains belonged to G2P[4] genotype. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 11 RVA genome segments sequenced from eight samples revealed a DS-1-like genotype constellation: I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2. For NoV screening, the prevalence observed was 17% and the following genotypes were detected: GII.4 (59%), GII.12 (17%), GII.6 (9%), GII.3 (6%), and GII.? (9%). At least four different NoVs genotypes and two RVA G2P[4] variants were identified circulating in the Northeastern region of Brazil. RVA phylogenetic analysis suggests that the RVA G2P[4] strains might have originated from intragenogroup reassortment events. Whether the genetic modifications observed in these contemporary G2P[4] RVA strains may impact the long-term effectiveness of the current vaccination programs remains to be explored. These data reinforce the importance of surveillance for monitoring the emergence of new strains of RVA and NoV and their impact on cases of acute gastroenteritis.

  16. Comparative study of the immunobiological properties of live brucellosis vaccines.

    PubMed

    Salmakov, K M; Fomin, A M; Plotnikova, E M; Safina, G M; Galimova, G M; Salmakova, A V; Ivanov, A V; Panin, A N; Sklyarov, O D; Shumilov, K V; Klimanov, A I

    2010-10-01

    Findings from the comparative study of the immunobiological properties of live brucellosis vaccines in guinea pigs are presented in the article. Vaccines from strains Brucella abortus 19 (U.S.) and 82 (Russia), in the S and SR forms, respectively, exhibited the highest and most pronounced immunological efficacy, while vaccines from strains B. abortus 82-PS (in the RS form) and B. abortus RB-51 and 75/79-AB (in the R forms) exhibited the lowest. The live vaccine from strain B. abortus 82, together with a high immunological activity, possesses inagglutinogenic properties. The great advantage of this vaccine over the vaccine from strain B. abortus 19 is that after its use in animals the problem of the differential diagnosis of brucellosis becomes much simpler. The live vaccine from strain B. abortus 82 was adopted in veterinary practice in the Russian Federation; it is widely used for the targeted prevention of bovine brucellosis, but can also be used successfully for wild animals such as bison, deer, elk, and others.

  17. Investigations towards an efficacious and safe strangles vaccine: submucosal vaccination with a live attenuated Streptococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, A A; Goovaerts, D; Nuijten, P J; Theelen, R P; Hartford, O M; Foster, T J

    2000-11-11

    As part of a search for a safe and efficacious strangles vaccine, several different vaccines and different vaccination routes were tested in foals. The degree of protection was evaluated after an intranasal challenge with virulent Streptococcus equi by clinical, postmortem and bacteriological examinations. Inactivated vaccines containing either native purified M-protein (500 microg per dose) or whole S equi cells (10(10) cells per dose) administered at least twice intramuscularly at intervals of four weeks, did not protect against challenge. Different live attenuated S equi mutants administered at least twice at intervals of four weeks by the intranasal route were either safe but not protective or caused strangles. In contrast, a live attenuated deletion mutant administered intramuscularly, induced complete protection but also induced unacceptable local reactions at the site of vaccination. Submucosal vaccination in the inner side of the upper lip with the live attenuated mutant at > or =10(8) colony-forming units per dose, appeared to be safe and efficacious in foals as young as four months of age. The submucosal vaccinations caused small transient swellings that resolved completely within two weeks, and postmortem no vaccine remnants or other abnormalities were found at the site of vaccination.

  18. Immunization of newborn children with living oral trivalent poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    CAMPILLO-SAINZ, C; ORNELAS HERNANDEZ, A; DE MUCHA MACIAS, J; NAVA, S E

    1962-09-01

    Campillo-Sainz, C. (Instituto Nacional de Virología de la S.S.A., México, D.F.), A. Ornelas Hernandez, J. de Mucha Macías, and S. E. Nava. Immunization of newborn children with living oral trivalent poliovirus vaccine. J. Bacteriol. 84:446-450. 1962.-The serological response to one dose of living oral trivalent polio-virus vaccine was compared in two groups of children, 49 vaccinated at birth and 44 vaccinated at the age of 4 months. Of those vaccinated at birth, 44 (90%) responded to the vaccine strains of type 1 and type 3 and 30 (61%) to the type 2 strain. Of those vaccinated at 4 months of age; 64% responded to type 1, 52% to type 2, and 82% to type 3. The difference between the responses of the two groups, which for type 1 is significant, may result from the interference of other enteric viruses in the 4-month-old children. A second dose of vaccine, administered to the children vaccinated at birth when they reached the age of 4 months, increased the over-all immunological response to 100% for types 1 and 3 and 96% for type 2, and showed that no immunological tolerance had been developed. The vaccine produced no undesirable effects in any of the children, and no paralytic poliomyelitis occurred among them. The observation of other investigators, that a high titer of maternal antibody inhibits immunological response to vaccination, was confirmed, but breast feeding apparently had no unfavorable effect on response.

  19. Molecular characterisation of wild-type G1P[8] and G3P[8] rotaviruses isolated in Vietnam 2008 during a vaccine trial.

    PubMed

    Do, L P; Doan, Y H; Nakagomi, T; Kaneko, M; Gauchan, P; Ngo, C T; Nguyen, M B; Yamashiro, T; Dang, A D; Nakagomi, O

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus vaccines work better in developed countries than in developing countries, leading to the question of whether the circulating strains are different in these two settings. In 2008, a clinical trial of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine was performed in Nha Trang, Vietnam, in which the efficacy was reported to be 64 %. Although samples were collected independently from the clinical trial, we examined faecal specimens from children hospitalised for rotavirus diarrhoea and found that G3P[8] and G1P[8] were co-dominant at the time of the clinical trial. The aim of this study was to explore whether they were divergent from the strains circulating in the developed countries where the vaccine efficacy is high. Two G3P[8] and two G1P[8] strains that were regarded as representatives based on their electropherotypes were selected for full-genome sequencing. The genotype constellation was G1/G3-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. All but the VP4 genes, one of which belonged to the emerging P[8]b genotype (OP354-like VP4), clustered into one or more lineages/alleles with the strains circulating in developed countries, with ≥97.5 % nucleotide sequence identity. Additionally, 10 G1 and 12 G3 VP7 sequences as well as 31 VP4 sequences were determined. No amino acid differences were observed between the Vietnamese strains and strains in the developed countries that were likely to have affected the neutralisation specificity of their VP7 and VP4. In conclusion, apart from prevalent P[8]b VP4, virtually no differences were observed between the predominant strains circulating in Vietnam at the time of the clinical trial and the strains in the developed countries; hence, the lower vaccine efficacy was more likely to be due to factors other than strain divergence.

  20. Zoonotic transmission of rotavirus: surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Dóró, Renáta; Farkas, Szilvia L; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotavirus (Rotavirus A, RVA) is the main cause of acute dehydrating diarrhea in humans and numerous animal species. RVA shows vast diversity and a variety of human strains share genetic and antigenic features with animal origin RVA strains. This finding suggests that interspecies transmission is an important mechanism of rotavirus evolution and contributes to the diversity of human RVA strains. RVA is responsible for half a million deaths and several million hospitalizations worldwide. Globally, two rotavirus vaccines are available for routine use in infants. These vaccines show a great efficacy profile and induce protective immunity against various rotavirus strains. However, little is known about the long-term evolution and epidemiology of RVA strains under selective pressure related to vaccine use. Continuous strain surveillance in the post-vaccine licensure era is needed to help better understand mechanisms that may affect vaccine effectiveness.

  1. Zoonotic transmission of rotavirus: surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Dóró, Renáta; Farkas, Szilvia L; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotavirus (Rotavirus A, RVA) is the main cause of acute dehydrating diarrhea in humans and numerous animal species. RVA shows vast diversity and a variety of human strains share genetic and antigenic features with animal origin RVA strains. This finding suggests that interspecies transmission is an important mechanism of rotavirus evolution and contributes to the diversity of human RVA strains. RVA is responsible for half a million deaths and several million hospitalizations worldwide. Globally, two rotavirus vaccines are available for routine use in infants. These vaccines show a great efficacy profile and induce protective immunity against various rotavirus strains. However, little is known about the long-term evolution and epidemiology of RVA strains under selective pressure related to vaccine use. Continuous strain surveillance in the post-vaccine licensure era is needed to help better understand mechanisms that may affect vaccine effectiveness. PMID:26428261

  2. 9 CFR 113.300 - General requirements for live virus vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... vaccines. 113.300 Section 113.300 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.300 General requirements for live virus vaccines. When prescribed in an applicable Standard Requirement or in the filed Outline of Production, a live virus vaccine shall meet...

  3. 9 CFR 113.300 - General requirements for live virus vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... vaccines. 113.300 Section 113.300 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.300 General requirements for live virus vaccines. When prescribed in an applicable Standard Requirement or in the filed Outline of Production, a live virus vaccine shall meet...

  4. 9 CFR 113.300 - General requirements for live virus vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... vaccines. 113.300 Section 113.300 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.300 General requirements for live virus vaccines. When prescribed in an applicable Standard Requirement or in the filed Outline of Production, a live virus vaccine shall meet...

  5. 9 CFR 113.300 - General requirements for live virus vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... vaccines. 113.300 Section 113.300 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.300 General requirements for live virus vaccines. When prescribed in an applicable Standard Requirement or in the filed Outline of Production, a live virus vaccine shall meet...

  6. Pneumococcal vaccination in people living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, John; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Orkin, Chloe

    2015-06-22

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading bacterial opportunistic infection (OI) in HIV positive individuals. Anti-retroviral treatment (ART) reduces their risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD), however, it remains 20- to 40-fold greater than that of the general population. In HIV-infected adults, pneumococcal vaccination (PCV) induces more durable and functional antibody responses in individuals on ART at the time of vaccination than in ART-naive adults, independently of the baseline CD4+ cell count. National guidelines in the UK recommend vaccination in HIV-infected adults with CD4 count >200cells/mL and advise that it be considered for those with CD4 count <200cells/mL(3). We report data on IPD from a London HIV cohort of 3500 north-east London patients from 2009 to 2012. IPD was defined as a positive pneumococcal culture from blood, CSF, joint aspirate or pericardial fluid. HIV positive cases were identified by cross-referencing hospital identifiers with a positive HIV Ab/Ag test result or HIV viral load test result on the virology database. There were a total 189 cases of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease identified over the three years. 4.8% (n=9) were known to be HIV positive at the time of their Invasive Pneumococcal infection. The serotypes of S. pneumoniae in the HIV positive cases included 3, 7F, 10F, 19A (n=2), 19F and 31. The estimated incidence of IPD in our HIV cohort was 85.7 per 100,000, (based on an overall HIV cohort size of 3500) which is significantly higher when compared to the general population in London (local epidemiological data reported the incidence rate for IPD at 7.5 per 100,000 in London). Given the higher burden of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in this cohort, low levels of vaccination, and the predominance of vaccine sensitive strains in our cases, vaccination and strategies to improve vaccine uptake is a priority in this at risk group.

  7. Epidemiology of rotavirus diarrhoea in Albania.

    PubMed

    Kota, M; Bino, S; Delogu, R; Simaku, A; Neza, B; Ruggeri, F M; Fiore, L

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of rotavirus disease in children<5 years old in Tirana, Albania, and to monitor and characterize the rotavirus genotypes. Rotavirus was detected in 21% of samples, more frequently in children under 2 years of age, which accounted for 80.8% of all positive cases. Among all rotavirus-positive samples collected, G4P[8] was the most prevalent genotype (38%), followed by G1P[8] (36.6%). The use of safe and effective rotavirus vaccines for the prevention of severe diarrhoea and the reduction of treatment costs will be of great importance for Albania.

  8. Herpes Simplex Vaccines: Prospects of Live-attenuated HSV Vaccines to Combat Genital and Ocular infections

    PubMed Central

    Stanfield, Brent; Kousoulas, Konstantin Gus

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) and its closely related type-2 (HSV-2) viruses cause important clinical manifestations in humans including acute ocular disease and genital infections. These viruses establish latency in the trigeminal ganglionic and dorsal root neurons, respectively. Both viruses are widespread among humans and can frequently reactivate from latency causing disease. Currently, there are no vaccines available against herpes simplex viral infections. However, a number of promising vaccine approaches are being explored in pre-clinical investigations with few progressing to early phase clinical trials. Consensus research findings suggest that robust humoral and cellular immune responses may partially control the frequency of reactivation episodes and reduce clinical symptoms. Live-attenuated viral vaccines have long been considered as a viable option for generating robust and protective immune responses against viral pathogens. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the same alphaherpesvirus subfamily with herpes simplex viruses. A live-attenuated VZV vaccine has been extensively used in a prophylactic and therapeutic approach to combat primary and recurrent VZV infection indicating that a similar vaccine approach may be feasible for HSVs. In this review, we summarize pre-clinical approaches to HSV vaccine development and current efforts to test certain vaccine approaches in human clinical trials. Also, we discuss the potential advantages of using a safe, live-attenuated HSV-1 vaccine strain to protect against both HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections. PMID:27114893

  9. Biological safety concepts of genetically modified live bacterial vaccines.

    PubMed

    Frey, Joachim

    2007-07-26

    Live vaccines possess the advantage of having access to induce cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immunity; thus in certain cases they are able to prevent infection, and not only disease. Furthermore, live vaccines, particularly bacterial live vaccines, are relatively cheap to produce and easy to apply. Hence they are suitable to immunize large communities or herds. The induction of both cell-mediated immunity as well as antibody-mediated immunity, which is particularly beneficial in inducing mucosal immune responses, is obtained by the vaccine-strain's ability to colonize and multiply in the host without causing disease. For this reason, live vaccines require attenuation of virulence of the bacterium to which immunity must be induced. Traditionally attenuation was achieved simply by multiple passages of the microorganism on growth medium, in animals, eggs or cell cultures or by chemical or physical mutagenesis, which resulted in random mutations that lead to attenuation. In contrast, novel molecular methods enable the development of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) targeted to specific genes that are particularly suited to induce attenuation or to reduce undesirable effects in the tissue in which the vaccine strains can multiply and survive. Since live vaccine strains (attenuated by natural selection or genetic engineering) are potentially released into the environment by the vaccinees, safety issues concerning the medical as well as environmental aspects must be considered. These involve (i) changes in cell, tissue and host tropism, (ii) virulence of the carrier through the incorporation of foreign genes, (iii) reversion to virulence by acquisition of complementation genes, (iv) exchange of genetic information with other vaccine or wild-type strains of the carrier organism and (v) spread of undesired genes such as antibiotic resistance genes. Before live vaccines are applied, the safety issues must be thoroughly evaluated case-by-case. Safety assessment

  10. Host defense mechanism-based rational design of live vaccine.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yo Han; Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Park, Eun-Sook; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Yoon-Jae; Lee, Jinhee; Kim, Kyun-Hwan; Seong, Baik Lin

    2013-01-01

    Live attenuated vaccine (LAV), mimicking natural infection, provides an excellent protection against microbial infection. The development of LAV, however, still remains highly empirical and the rational design of clinically useful LAV is scarcely available. Apoptosis and caspase activation are general host antiviral responses in virus-infected cells. Utilizing these tightly regulated host defense mechanisms, we present a novel apoptosis-triggered attenuation of viral virulence as a rational design of live attenuated vaccine with desired levels of safety, efficacy, and productivity. Mutant influenza viruses carrying caspase recognition motifs in viral NP and the interferon-antagonist NS1 proteins were highly attenuated both in vitro and in vivo by caspase-mediated cleavage of those proteins in infected cells. Both viral replication and interferon-resistance were substantially reduced, resulting in a marked attenuation of virulence of the virus. Despite pronounced attenuation, the viruses demonstrated high growth phenotype in embryonated eggs at lower temperature, ensuring its productivity. A single dose vaccination with the mutant virus elicited high levels of systemic and mucosal antibody responses and provided complete protection against both homologous and heterologous lethal challenges in mouse model. While providing a practical means to generate seasonal or pandemic influenza live vaccines, the sensitization of viral proteins to pathogen-triggered apoptotic signals presents a potentially universal, mechanism-based rational design of live vaccines against many viral infections.

  11. Factors influencing the stability of live oral attenuated bacterial vaccines.

    PubMed

    Cryz, S J; Pasteris, O; Varallyay, S J; Fürer, E

    1996-01-01

    Live oral attenuated vaccines against typhoid fever (Salmonella typhi Ty21a) and cholera (Vibrio cholerae CVD 103-HgR) have been licensed for human use. Vaccine potency is dependent upon each dose containing a minimum number of viable organisms and galenic parameters. To ensure long-term stability, such vaccines must be stored at 5 degrees C +/- 3 degrees C. However, exposure to ambient temperatures (25 degrees C) for short periods of time (< 7 days) does not compromise vaccine potency. Brief exposures (< or = 24 hours) to temperatures as high as 37 degrees C will also not render the vaccine unsuitable for use. The Ty21a vaccine is available either as enteric-coated capsules or as a "liquid formulation", while CVD 103-HgR is presented only in the latter form. Each galenic formulation presents unique challenges with regard to the production of stable vaccines. Residual moisture, excipients, and processing temperatures during manufacturing were all found to markedly affect vaccine stability.

  12. The role of human adenoviruses type 41 in acute diarrheal disease in Minas Gerais after rotavirus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Thaís Aparecida Vieira; Assis, Andrêssa Silvino Ferreira; do Valle, Daniel Almeida; Barletta, Vívian Honorato; de Carvalho, Iná Pires; Rose, Tatiana Lundgren; Portes, Silvana Augusta Rodrigues; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; da Rosa e Silva, Maria Luzia

    2016-01-01

    distribution. These data indicate the significant involvement of HAdV-F type 41 in the etiology of ADD in Minas Gerais, which demonstrates the importance of other viral agents in the development of the disease after the introduction of rotavirus vaccine immunization. PMID:26887251

  13. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of the human rotavirus vaccine, RIX4414 oral suspension, when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong-Cheng; Huang, Teng; Li, Yanping; Wang, Lao-Hong; Tao, Junhui; Fu, Botao; Si, Guoai; Nong, Yi; Mo, Zhaojun; Liao, XueYan; Luan, Ivy; Tang, Haiwen; Rathi, Niraj; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the immunogenicity of the human rotavirus (RV) vaccine (RIX4414) when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants (NCT01171963). Healthy infants aged 6-16 weeks received 2 doses of either RIX4414 or placebo according to a 0, 1-month schedule. Infants received routine diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa) and oral poliovirus (OPV) vaccines either separately from or concomitantly with RIX4414/placebo (separate and co-administration cohorts, respectively). Anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates (one month post-dose-2) and seropositivity rates (at one year of age) were measured using ELISA. Immune responses against the DTPa and OPV antigens were measured one month post-DTPa dose-3 in the co-administration cohort. Solicited local and general symptoms were recorded for 8-days post-vaccination (total cohort). The according-to-protocol immunogenicity population included 511 infants in the separate cohort and 275 in the co-administration cohort. One month post-RIX4414 dose-2, anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates were 74.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68.9-79.9) and 64.2% (95% CI: 55.4-72.3) in the separate and co-administration cohorts; seropositivity rates at one year of age were 71.5% (95% CI: 65.5-77.1) and 50.0% (95% CI: 40.9-59.1), respectively. One month post-DTPa dose-3, all infants in the co-administration cohort were seroprotected against diphtheria and tetanus, and seropositive for pertussis toxoid, pertactin and filamentous haemaglutinin. Two months post-OPV dose-3, seroprotection rates against anti-poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 were >99% in the co-administration cohort. Reactogenicity profiles were similar in both cohorts. RIX4414 was immunogenic and well-tolerated in Chinese infants and did not appear to interfere with the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of co-administered routine childhood vaccines. PMID:27149266

  14. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of the human rotavirus vaccine, RIX4414 oral suspension, when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rong-cheng; Huang, Teng; Li, Yanping; Wang, Lao-Hong; Tao, Junhui; Fu, Botao; Si, Guoai; Nong, Yi; Mo, Zhaojun; Liao, XueYan; Luan, Ivy; Tang, Haiwen; Rathi, Niraj; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the immunogenicity of the human rotavirus (RV) vaccine (RIX4414) when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants (NCT01171963). Healthy infants aged 6–16 weeks received 2 doses of either RIX4414 or placebo according to a 0, 1-month schedule. Infants received routine diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa) and oral poliovirus (OPV) vaccines either separately from or concomitantly with RIX4414/placebo (separate and co-administration cohorts, respectively). Anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates (one month post-dose-2) and seropositivity rates (at one year of age) were measured using ELISA. Immune responses against the DTPa and OPV antigens were measured one month post-DTPa dose-3 in the co-administration cohort. Solicited local and general symptoms were recorded for 8-days post-vaccination (total cohort). The according-to-protocol immunogenicity population included 511 infants in the separate cohort and 275 in the co-administration cohort. One month post-RIX4414 dose-2, anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates were 74.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68.9–79.9) and 64.2% (95% CI: 55.4–72.3) in the separate and co-administration cohorts; seropositivity rates at one year of age were 71.5% (95% CI: 65.5–77.1) and 50.0% (95% CI: 40.9–59.1), respectively. One month post-DTPa dose-3, all infants in the co-administration cohort were seroprotected against diphtheria and tetanus, and seropositive for pertussis toxoid, pertactin and filamentous haemaglutinin. Two months post-OPV dose-3, seroprotection rates against anti-poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 were >99% in the co-administration cohort. Reactogenicity profiles were similar in both cohorts. RIX4414 was immunogenic and well-tolerated in Chinese infants and did not appear to interfere with the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of co-administered routine childhood vaccines. PMID:27149266

  15. Rotavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration. Almost all children in the U.S. are likely to be infected with rotavirus before ...

  16. Establishment of indirect immunofluorescence assay for rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Tao, J; Zhang, J; Liu, X; Jin, H; Jiang, C; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most frequent cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide and a significant cause of death in infants and young children, following severe diarrhea and dehydration. Rotavirus vaccines are considered the most effective way to prevent rotavirus infections. In the process of developing rotavirus vaccines, it is crucial to establish a reliable and standardized method to determine vaccine titer. In this study, we developed an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) to determine the infectious titer of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus (LLR) vaccine grown in MA104 cells. The activating concentration of trypsin was 1 µg/ml for healthy monolayers of MA104 cells at 100% confluence. After incubation for 18 hr, a rabbit anti-SA11 polyclonal antibody, diluted at 1:800 in PBS, was added to all wells, followed by an Alexa-488-conjugated secondary antibody diluted at 1:500 in PBS. Cells were examined with a fluorescence microscope. Our results show that IFA was more reproducible, more sensitive, simpler, and more rapid than the log 50% cell culture infectious dose-ELISA (lgCCID50-ELISA) in measuring the rotavirus vaccines. IFA provided a reliable basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of rotavirus, and the certification of rotavirus vaccine production.

  17. Establishment of indirect immunofluorescence assay for rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Tao, J; Zhang, J; Liu, X; Jin, H; Jiang, C; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most frequent cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide and a significant cause of death in infants and young children, following severe diarrhea and dehydration. Rotavirus vaccines are considered the most effective way to prevent rotavirus infections. In the process of developing rotavirus vaccines, it is crucial to establish a reliable and standardized method to determine vaccine titer. In this study, we developed an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) to determine the infectious titer of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus (LLR) vaccine grown in MA104 cells. The activating concentration of trypsin was 1 µg/ml for healthy monolayers of MA104 cells at 100% confluence. After incubation for 18 hr, a rabbit anti-SA11 polyclonal antibody, diluted at 1:800 in PBS, was added to all wells, followed by an Alexa-488-conjugated secondary antibody diluted at 1:500 in PBS. Cells were examined with a fluorescence microscope. Our results show that IFA was more reproducible, more sensitive, simpler, and more rapid than the log 50% cell culture infectious dose-ELISA (lgCCID50-ELISA) in measuring the rotavirus vaccines. IFA provided a reliable basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of rotavirus, and the certification of rotavirus vaccine production. PMID:26982471

  18. Live vaccines for human metapneumovirus designed by reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Ursula J; Nagashima, Kunio; Murphy, Brian R; Collins, Peter L

    2006-10-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) was first described in 2001 and has quickly become recognized as an important cause of respiratory tract disease worldwide, especially in the pediatric population. A vaccine against HMPV is required to prevent severe disease associated with infection in infancy. The primary strategy is to develop a live-attenuated virus for intranasal immunization, which is particularly well suited against a respiratory virus. Reverse genetics provides a means of developing highly characterized 'designer' attenuated vaccine candidates. To date, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed, each using a different mode of attenuation. One candidate involves deletion of the G glycoprotein, providing attenuation that is probably based on reduced efficiency of attachment. A second candidate involves deletion of the M2-2 protein, which participates in regulating RNA synthesis and whose deletion has the advantageous property of upregulating transcription and increasing antigen synthesis. A third candidate involves replacing the P protein gene of HMPV with its counterpart from the related avian metapneumovirus, thereby introducing attenuation owing to its chimeric nature and host range restriction. Another live vaccine strategy involves using an attenuated parainfluenza virus as a vector to express HMPV protective antigens, providing a bivalent pediatric vaccine. Additional modifications to provide improved vaccines will also be discussed.

  19. Live vaccines for human metapneumovirus designed by reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Ursula J; Nagashima, Kunio; Murphy, Brian R; Collins, Peter L

    2006-10-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) was first described in 2001 and has quickly become recognized as an important cause of respiratory tract disease worldwide, especially in the pediatric population. A vaccine against HMPV is required to prevent severe disease associated with infection in infancy. The primary strategy is to develop a live-attenuated virus for intranasal immunization, which is particularly well suited against a respiratory virus. Reverse genetics provides a means of developing highly characterized 'designer' attenuated vaccine candidates. To date, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed, each using a different mode of attenuation. One candidate involves deletion of the G glycoprotein, providing attenuation that is probably based on reduced efficiency of attachment. A second candidate involves deletion of the M2-2 protein, which participates in regulating RNA synthesis and whose deletion has the advantageous property of upregulating transcription and increasing antigen synthesis. A third candidate involves replacing the P protein gene of HMPV with its counterpart from the related avian metapneumovirus, thereby introducing attenuation owing to its chimeric nature and host range restriction. Another live vaccine strategy involves using an attenuated parainfluenza virus as a vector to express HMPV protective antigens, providing a bivalent pediatric vaccine. Additional modifications to provide improved vaccines will also be discussed. PMID:17181442

  20. Formulation and Stabilization of Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain

    PubMed Central

    OHTAKE, SATOSHI; MARTIN, RUSSELL A.; SAXENA, ATUL; LECHUGA-BALLESTEROS, DAVID; SANTIAGO, ARACELI E; BARRY, EILEEN M.; TRUONG-LE, VU

    2012-01-01

    Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (F. tularensis LVS), a promising vaccine candidate for protection against F. tularensis exposure, is a particularly thermolabile vaccine and difficult to stabilize sufficiently for storage under refrigerated conditions. Our preliminary data show that F. tularensis LVS can be stabilized in the dried state using foam drying, a modified freeze drying method, with sugar-based formulations. The process was conducted under mild drying conditions, which resulted in a good titer retention following processing. The inclusion of osmolytes in the growth media resulted in an acceleration of growth kinetics, although no change in osmotolerance was observed. The optimized F. tularensis formulation, which contained trehalose, gelatin, and Pluronic F68 demonstrated stability for approximately 1.5 weeks at 37°C (i.e., time required for the vaccine to decrease in potency by 1 log10 colony forming unit) and for 12 weeks at 25°C. At refrigerator storage condition (4°C), stabilized F. tularensis LVS vaccine exhibited no activity loss for at least 12 weeks. This stabilization method utilizes conventional freeze dryers and pharmaceutically approved stabilizers, and thus can be readily implemented at many manufacturing sites for large-scale production of stabilized vaccines. The improved heat stability of the F. tularensis LVS could mitigate risks of vaccine potency loss during long-term storage, shipping, and distribution. PMID:21491457

  1. Global antibody response to Staphylococcus aureus live-cell vaccination.

    PubMed

    Selle, Martina; Hertlein, Tobias; Oesterreich, Babett; Klemm, Theresa; Kloppot, Peggy; Müller, Elke; Ehricht, Ralf; Stentzel, Sebastian; Bröker, Barbara M; Engelmann, Susanne; Ohlsen, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The pathogen Staphylococcus aureus causes a broad range of severe diseases and is feared for its ability to rapidly develop resistance to antibiotic substances. The increasing number of highly resistant S. aureus infections has accelerated the search for alternative treatment options to close the widening gap in anti-S. aureus therapy. This study analyses the humoral immune response to vaccination of Balb/c mice with sublethal doses of live S. aureus. The elicited antibody pattern in the sera of intravenously and intramuscularly vaccinated mice was determined using of a recently developed protein array. We observed a specific antibody response against a broad set of S. aureus antigens which was stronger following i.v. than i.m. vaccination. Intravenous but not intramuscular vaccination protected mice against an intramuscular challenge infection with a high bacterial dose. Vaccine protection was correlated with the strength of the anti-S. aureus antibody response. This study identified novel vaccine candidates by using protein microarrays as an effective tool and showed that successful vaccination against S. aureus relies on the optimal route of administration. PMID:27103319

  2. Global antibody response to Staphylococcus aureus live-cell vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Selle, Martina; Hertlein, Tobias; Oesterreich, Babett; Klemm, Theresa; Kloppot, Peggy; Müller, Elke; Ehricht, Ralf; Stentzel, Sebastian; Bröker, Barbara M.; Engelmann, Susanne; Ohlsen, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The pathogen Staphylococcus aureus causes a broad range of severe diseases and is feared for its ability to rapidly develop resistance to antibiotic substances. The increasing number of highly resistant S. aureus infections has accelerated the search for alternative treatment options to close the widening gap in anti-S. aureus therapy. This study analyses the humoral immune response to vaccination of Balb/c mice with sublethal doses of live S. aureus. The elicited antibody pattern in the sera of intravenously and intramuscularly vaccinated mice was determined using of a recently developed protein array. We observed a specific antibody response against a broad set of S. aureus antigens which was stronger following i.v. than i.m. vaccination. Intravenous but not intramuscular vaccination protected mice against an intramuscular challenge infection with a high bacterial dose. Vaccine protection was correlated with the strength of the anti-S. aureus antibody response. This study identified novel vaccine candidates by using protein microarrays as an effective tool and showed that successful vaccination against S. aureus relies on the optimal route of administration. PMID:27103319

  3. Spread and predominance in Japan of novel G1P[8] double-reassortant rotavirus strains possessing a DS-1-like genotype constellation typical of G2P[4] strains.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoshiki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nishimura, Naoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Miura, Sinobu; Ito, Hisato; Doan, Yen Hai; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Ozaki, Takao; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in children <5 years of age worldwide, and two, live attenuated rotavirus vaccines are globally available. As rotavirus vaccines are introduced into national immunization programs, there is an increasing need to monitor circulating wild-type strains. However, few studies have systematically examined their full genotype constellation. This study was therefore undertaken to characterize the whole genotype constellation of circulating rotavirus strains in three widely-separated locations in Japan during the 2012 rotavirus season when rotavirus vaccines became available in the country for the first time. Of 107 rotavirus-positive specimens, 50 (46.7%) strains collected from all three locations possessed an unusual G1-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 constellation in which a typical G2P[4] strain appeared to have acquired its two surface protein genes from the most common G1P[8] strain. These G1P[8] double-reassortant strains were shown to possess the 11 genome segments virtually indistinguishable from each other in their nucleotide sequences and phylogenetic lineages except for two strains that underwent further intra-genotype reassortment. Successful spread to and predominance in broad locations across Japan of novel rotavirus strains possessing a genotype constellation that was previously thought not to be preferred suggests unexpected genomic flexibility of the genotype constellation.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of a G6P[5] bovine rotavirus strain isolated in a neonatal diarrhea outbreak in a beef cattle herd vaccinated with G6P[1] and G10P[11] genotypes.

    PubMed

    da Silva Medeiros, Thais Neris; Lorenzetti, Elis; Alfieri, Alice Fernandes; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to perform the molecular characterization of the eleven genes of a G6P[5] bovine group A rotavirus (RVA) strain detected in a diarrhea outbreak from a vaccinated beef cattle herd. The outbreak affected 80 % of calves between 15-30 days old. RVA was identified by RT-PCR in 12 (70.6 %) out of 17 diarrheic fecal samples evaluated. The rotavirus wild-type strain had the genotype constellation G6(IV)-P[5](IX)-I2c-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2e-H3a. This study confirms the importance of homotypic immunity against the bovine RVA P[5] genotype in neonatal diarrhea in cattle herds that are regularly vaccinated against rotaviruses. PMID:25377636

  5. Quantitation of cytokine gene expression by real time PCR in bovine milk and colostrum cells from cows immunized with a bovine rotavirus VP6 experimental vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, D D; Rimondi, A; Perez Aguirreburualde, M S; Mozgovoj, M; Bellido, D; Wigdorovitz, A; Dus Santos, M J

    2013-10-01

    In a previous work, VP6 recombinant protein was produced using baculovirus system and it was evaluated in a colostrum-deprived calf model. This vaccine was able to protect calves against viral challenge without inducing neutralizing antibodies (NAb), suggesting that another immunological effectors were involved in the protection observed. In this work, groups of cows (n=4) were immunized in the last third of gestation with a bovine rotavirus (BRV) experimental vaccine and with a VP6 subunit vaccine. At birth, colostrums from vaccinated and non-vaccinated cows were processed and viable colostral mononuclear cells were obtained. With the purpose of determining the cytokine patterns generated by cells from immune secretions (colostrums and milk), a relative quantification by real time PCR was standardized. Quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) was used to determine transcript levels of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IFN-γ and IFN-α from these cells. Colostral and milk mononuclear cells expressed a different cytokine transcript expression pattern regarding the vaccine used. These results demonstrated that the colostral cellular population was active and could exert its action influencing the final immune response. PMID:23602433

  6. Rotavirus genotypes and the indigenous children of Brazilian midwest in the vaccine era, 2008-2012: Footprints of animal genome.

    PubMed

    Luchs, Adriana; Cilli, Audrey; Morillo, Simone Guadagnucci; Ribeiro, Cibele Daniel; Carmona, Rita de Cassia Compagnoli; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2015-11-01

    World group A rotavirus (RVA) surveillance data provides useful estimates of the disease burden, however, indigenous population might require special consideration. The aim of this study was to describe the results of G- and P-types from Brazilian native children ≤ 3 years. Furthermore, selected strains have been analyzed for the VP7, VP6, VP4, and NSP4 encoding genes in order to gain insight into genetic variability of Brazilian strains. A total of 149 samples, collected during 2008-2012, were tested for RVA using ELISA and PAGE, following by RT-PCR and sequencing. RVA infection was detected in 8.7% of samples (13/149). Genotype G2P[4] was detected in 2008 and 2010, G8P[6] in 2009, and G3P[8] in 2011. The phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 and VP4 genes grouped the Brazilian G2P[4] and G3P[8] strains within the lineages currently circulating in humans worldwide. However, the phylogenetic analysis of the VP6 and NSP4 from the Brazilian G2P[4] strains, and the VP7 and NSP4 from the Brazilian G3P[8] strains suggest a distant common ancestor with different animal strains (bovine, caprine, and porcine). The epidemiological and genetic information obtained in the present study is expected to provide an updated understanding of RVA genotypes circulating in the native infant population, and to formulate policies for the use of RVA vaccines in indigenous Brazilian people. Moreover, these results highlight the great diversity of human RVA strains circulating in Brazil, and an in-depth surveillance of human and animal RVA will lead to a better understanding of the complex dynamics of RVA evolution.

  7. Rotavirus genotypes and the indigenous children of Brazilian midwest in the vaccine era, 2008-2012: Footprints of animal genome.

    PubMed

    Luchs, Adriana; Cilli, Audrey; Morillo, Simone Guadagnucci; Ribeiro, Cibele Daniel; Carmona, Rita de Cassia Compagnoli; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2015-11-01

    World group A rotavirus (RVA) surveillance data provides useful estimates of the disease burden, however, indigenous population might require special consideration. The aim of this study was to describe the results of G- and P-types from Brazilian native children ≤ 3 years. Furthermore, selected strains have been analyzed for the VP7, VP6, VP4, and NSP4 encoding genes in order to gain insight into genetic variability of Brazilian strains. A total of 149 samples, collected during 2008-2012, were tested for RVA using ELISA and PAGE, following by RT-PCR and sequencing. RVA infection was detected in 8.7% of samples (13/149). Genotype G2P[4] was detected in 2008 and 2010, G8P[6] in 2009, and G3P[8] in 2011. The phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 and VP4 genes grouped the Brazilian G2P[4] and G3P[8] strains within the lineages currently circulating in humans worldwide. However, the phylogenetic analysis of the VP6 and NSP4 from the Brazilian G2P[4] strains, and the VP7 and NSP4 from the Brazilian G3P[8] strains suggest a distant common ancestor with different animal strains (bovine, caprine, and porcine). The epidemiological and genetic information obtained in the present study is expected to provide an updated understanding of RVA genotypes circulating in the native infant population, and to formulate policies for the use of RVA vaccines in indigenous Brazilian people. Moreover, these results highlight the great diversity of human RVA strains circulating in Brazil, and an in-depth surveillance of human and animal RVA will lead to a better understanding of the complex dynamics of RVA evolution. PMID:25963945

  8. In-Depth Characterization of Live Vaccines Used in Europe for Oral Rabies Vaccination of Wildlife.

    PubMed

    Cliquet, Florence; Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Mojzis, Miroslav; Dirbakova, Zuzana; Muizniece, Zita; Jaceviciene, Ingrida; Mutinelli, Franco; Matulova, Marta; Frolichova, Jitka; Rychlik, Ivan; Celer, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Although rabies incidence has fallen sharply over the past decades in Europe, the disease is still present in Eastern Europe. Oral rabies immunization of wild animal rabies has been shown to be the most effective method for the control and elimination of rabies. All rabies vaccines used in Europe are modified live virus vaccines based on the Street Alabama Dufferin (SAD) strain isolated from a naturally-infected dog in 1935. Because of the potential safety risk of a live virus which could revert to virulence, the genetic composition of three commercial attenuated live rabies vaccines was investigated in two independent laboratories using next genome sequencing. This study is the first one reporting on the diversity of variants in oral rabies vaccines as well as the presence of a mix of at least two different variants in all tested batches. The results demonstrate the need for vaccine producers to use new robust methodologies in the context of their routine vaccine quality controls prior to market release.

  9. In-Depth Characterization of Live Vaccines Used in Europe for Oral Rabies Vaccination of Wildlife.

    PubMed

    Cliquet, Florence; Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Mojzis, Miroslav; Dirbakova, Zuzana; Muizniece, Zita; Jaceviciene, Ingrida; Mutinelli, Franco; Matulova, Marta; Frolichova, Jitka; Rychlik, Ivan; Celer, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Although rabies incidence has fallen sharply over the past decades in Europe, the disease is still present in Eastern Europe. Oral rabies immunization of wild animal rabies has been shown to be the most effective method for the control and elimination of rabies. All rabies vaccines used in Europe are modified live virus vaccines based on the Street Alabama Dufferin (SAD) strain isolated from a naturally-infected dog in 1935. Because of the potential safety risk of a live virus which could revert to virulence, the genetic composition of three commercial attenuated live rabies vaccines was investigated in two independent laboratories using next genome sequencing. This study is the first one reporting on the diversity of variants in oral rabies vaccines as well as the presence of a mix of at least two different variants in all tested batches. The results demonstrate the need for vaccine producers to use new robust methodologies in the context of their routine vaccine quality controls prior to market release. PMID:26509266

  10. Safety of a live attenuated Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae vaccine for swine.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Eric J; Grinberg, Alex; Bonistalli, Kathryn N; Mack, Hamish J; Lehrbach, Philip R; Gibson, Nicole

    2009-03-30

    Infection with Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae has a significant economic impact on pig production systems worldwide. Both inactivated and attenuated vaccines are available to prevent development of clinical signs of swine erysipelas. The ability of a live attenuated E. rhusiopathiae strain to become persistently established in pigs after intranasal exposure and its potential to cause clinical signs consistent with swine erysipelas after being administered directly into the nasopharynx of healthy pigs was evaluated. Five, E. rhusiopathiae-negative pigs were vaccinated by deep intranasal inoculation then followed for 14 days. Nasal swabs were collected daily for 5 days and clinical observations were made daily for 14 days post-vaccination. Nasal swabs were cultured for E. rhusiopathiae with the intent of back-passaging any recovered organisms into subsequent replicates. No organism was recovered from nasal swabs in the first vaccination replicate. A second replicate including 10 pigs was initiated and followed in an identical manner to that described above. Again, no E. rhusiopathiae was recovered from any pigs. No pigs in either replicate showed any signs of clinical swine erysipelas. The live attenuated E. rhusiopathiae strain evaluated in this study did not appear to become persistently established in pigs post-vaccination, did not cause any local or systemic signs consistent with swine erysipelas, and was therefore unlikely to revert to a virulent state when used in a field setting.

  11. 9 CFR 113.64 - General requirements for live bacterial vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Ingredients used for the growth and preparation of Master Seed Bacteria and of live bacterial vaccine shall... bacterial vaccines. 113.64 Section 113.64 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.64 General requirements for live bacterial...

  12. 9 CFR 113.64 - General requirements for live bacterial vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Ingredients used for the growth and preparation of Master Seed Bacteria and of live bacterial vaccine shall... bacterial vaccines. 113.64 Section 113.64 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.64 General requirements for live bacterial...

  13. 9 CFR 113.64 - General requirements for live bacterial vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Ingredients used for the growth and preparation of Master Seed Bacteria and of live bacterial vaccine shall... bacterial vaccines. 113.64 Section 113.64 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.64 General requirements for live bacterial...

  14. 9 CFR 113.64 - General requirements for live bacterial vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... Ingredients used for the growth and preparation of Master Seed Bacteria and of live bacterial vaccine shall... bacterial vaccines. 113.64 Section 113.64 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.64 General requirements for live bacterial...

  15. 9 CFR 113.64 - General requirements for live bacterial vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... Ingredients used for the growth and preparation of Master Seed Bacteria and of live bacterial vaccine shall... bacterial vaccines. 113.64 Section 113.64 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.64 General requirements for live bacterial...

  16. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be...

  17. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be...

  18. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be...

  19. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be...

  20. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be...

  1. Improved characteristics and protective efficacy in an animal model of E. coli-derived recombinant double-layered rotavirus virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingdong; Lin, Haijun; Zhang, Yue; Li, Min; Wang, Daning; Che, Yaojian; Zhu, Yinbin; Li, Shaowei; Zhang, Jun; Ge, Shengxiang; Zhao, Qinjian; Xia, Ningshao

    2014-04-01

    Live rotavirus vaccines that are effective in middle- and high-income countries have been found to be less immunogenic and effective in infants in resource-limited settings. The virus-like particle (VLP) approach is promising for rotavirus vaccine development, but challenges remain for VLP production at large scale. In this study, rotavirus capsid VP2 and VP6 proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and were assembled with high efficiency into homogeneous single-layered VP6-VLPs or double-layered VP2/6-VLPs (dl2/6-VLPs) through a post-purification assembly process. The dl2/6-VLPs were observed to have better thermal stability and antigenicity. Although the immunogenicity of VP6 trimers, VP6-VLPs and dl2/6-VLPs was comparable, the efficacy of the dl2/6-VLPs to protect against rotavirus-induced diarrhea in pups was significantly higher than that of the trimeric VP6 or the VP6-VLPs when assessed using a mouse maternal antibody model. Taken together, the recombinant dl2/6-VLP antigen, which is highly analogous to rotavirus virion-derived double-layered particles, is a viable candidate for vaccine development and has the potential to be a parenterally administered safe and efficacious rotavirus vaccine.

  2. Passive immunity to bovine rotavirus in newborn calves fed colostrum supplements from cows immunized with recombinant SA11 rotavirus core-like particle (CLP) or virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, F M; Conner, M E; Hodgins, D C; Parwani, A V; Nielsen, P R; Crawford, S E; Estes, M K; Saif, L J

    1998-03-01

    Heterotypic passive immunity to IND (P/5/G6) bovine rotavirus (BRV) was evaluated. Three groups of calves (n = 5 per group) were fed 1% pooled colostrum supplements (birth to 7 days of age) from BRV seropositive cows vaccinated with recombinant SA11(P/2/G3) rotavirus-like particles (VLPs), recombinant SA11 rotavirus core-like particles (CLPs), or inactivated SA11 rotavirus (SA11). Control calves (n = 5 per group) received either pooled colostrum from unvaccinated (BRV field exposure seropositive) control cows, or no colostrum. IgG1 antibody titers to IND BRV for the pooled colostrum were: 1,048,576 (VLP); 1,048,576 (CLP); 262,144 (SA11); and 16,384 (control colostrum). Elevated titers of BRV neutralizing (VN) antibodies were present in VLP colostrum (98,000), and SA11 colostrum (25,000), but not in CLP colostrum (1400), compared to colostrum from nonvaccinates (2081). Calves were orally inoculated with virulent IND BRV at 2 days of age and challenged at post-inoculation day (PID) 21. Calves were monitored daily for diarrhea and faecal BRV shedding through PID 10 and post-challenge day (PCD) 10. After colostrum feeding, the IgG1 antibody titers were highest in serum and faeces of calves fed VLP and CLP colostrum, but VN and IgA antibodies were highest in calves fed VLP colostrum. After BRV inoculation, calves fed colostrum from vaccinated cows had significantly fewer days of BRV-associated diarrhea and BRV shedding than control calves. All calves fed VLP colostrum were protected from diarrhea after BRV inoculation; two calves shed BRV. In the CLP colostrum group, one calf developed BRV-associated diarrhea and all calves shed virus. In the SA11 colostrum group, three calves developed BRV-associated diarrhea and four calves shed virus. BRV-associated diarrhea and shedding occurred in 9 of 10 control calves. Active IgM antibody responses occurred in faeces and/or serum of most calves after BRV inoculation. However, the highest active antibody responses (IgM and IgG1 in

  3. Skin vaccination with live virus vectored microneedle arrays induce long lived CD8(+) T cell memory.

    PubMed

    Becker, Pablo D; Hervouet, Catherine; Mason, Gavin M; Kwon, Sung-Yun; Klavinskis, Linda S

    2015-09-01

    A simple dissolvable microneedle array (MA) platform has emerged as a promising technology for vaccine delivery, due to needle-free injection with a formulation that preserves the immunogenicity of live viral vectored vaccines dried in the MA matrix. While recent studies have focused largely on design parameters optimized to induce primary CD8(+) T cell responses, the hallmark of a vaccine is synonymous with engendering long-lasting memory. Here, we address the capacity of dried MA vaccination to programme phenotypic markers indicative of effector/memory CD8(+) T cell subsets and also responsiveness to recall antigen benchmarked against conventional intradermal (ID) injection. We show that despite a slightly lower frequency of dividing T cell receptor transgenic CD8(+) T cells in secondary lymphoid tissue at an early time point, the absolute number of CD8(+) T cells expressing an effector memory (CD62L(-)CD127(+)) and central memory (CD62L(+)CD127(+)) phenotype during peak expansion were comparable after MA and ID vaccination with a recombinant human adenovirus type 5 vector (AdHu5) encoding HIV-1 gag. Similarly, both vaccination routes generated CD8(+) memory T cell subsets detected in draining LNs for at least two years post-vaccination capable of responding to secondary antigen. These data suggest that CD8(+) T cell effector/memory generation and long-term memory is largely unaffected by physical differences in vaccine delivery to the skin via dried MA or ID suspension.

  4. Quadrivalent Ann Arbor strain live-attenuated influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Toback, Seth L; Levin, Myron J; Block, Stan L; Belshe, Robert B; Ambrose, Christopher S; Falloon, Judith

    2012-11-01

    Influenza B is responsible for significant morbidity in children and adults worldwide. For more than 25 years, two antigenically distinct lineages of influenza B viruses, B/Yamagata and B/Victoria, have cocirculated globally. Current influenza vaccine formulations are trivalent and contain two influenza subtype A strains (A/H1N1 and A/H3N2) but only one B strain. In a half of recent influenza seasons, the predominant circulating influenza B lineage was different from that contained in trivalent influenza vaccines. A quadrivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccine (Q/LAIV) that contains two B strains, one from each lineage, has been developed to help provide broad protection against influenza B. Q/LAIV was recently approved for use in the USA in eligible individuals 2-49 years of age. This review summarizes clinical trial data in support of Q/LAIV.

  5. In-season and out-of-season variation of rotavirus genotype distribution and age of infection across 12 European countries before the introduction of routine vaccination, 2007/08 to 2012/13.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, Daniel; Vivancos, Roberto; Read, Jonathan M; Pitzer, Virginia E; Cunliffe, Nigel; French, Neil; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren

    2016-01-01

    The EuroRotaNet surveillance network has conducted rotavirus genotype surveillance since 2007 in 16 European countries. Using epidemiological and microbiological data from 39,786 genotyped rotavirus-positive specimens collected between September 2007 and August 2013, we assessed genotype distribution and age distribution of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) cases in and out of peak season in 12 countries which were yet to implement routine rotavirus vaccination. In multinomial multivariate logistic regression, adjusting for year, country and age, the odds of infection caused by genotype-constellation 2 DS-1-like stains (adjusted multinomial odds ratio (aM-OR) = 1.25; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13-1.37; p < 0.001), mixed or untypable genotypes (aM-OR = 1.55; 95% CI: 1.40-1.72; p < 0.001) and less common genotypes (aM-OR = 2.11; 95% CI:1.78-2.51; p < 0.001) increased out of season relative to G1P[8]. Age varied significantly between seasons; the proportion of RVGE cases younger than 12 months in the United Kingdom increased from 34% in season to 39% out of season (aM-OR = 1.66; 95% CI: 1.20-2.30), and the proportion five years and older increased from 9% in season to 17% out of season (aM-OR = 2.53; 95% CI: 1.67-3.82). This study provides further understanding of the rotavirus ecology before vaccine introduction, which will help interpret epidemiological changes in countries introducing or expanding rotavirus vaccination programmes.

  6. Live attenuated vaccines: Historical successes and current challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, Philip D.

    2015-05-15

    Live attenuated vaccines against human viral diseases have been amongst the most successful cost effective interventions in medical history. Smallpox was declared eradicated in 1980; poliomyelitis is nearing global eradication and measles has been controlled in most parts of the world. Vaccines function well for acute diseases such as these but chronic infections such as HIV are more challenging for reasons of both likely safety and probable efficacy. The derivation of the vaccines used has in general not been purely rational except in the sense that it has involved careful clinical trials of candidates and subsequent careful follow up in clinical use; the identification of the candidates is reviewed. - Highlights: • Live vaccines against human diseases caused by viruses have been very successful. • They have been developed by empirical clinical studies and problems identified in later use. • It can be difficult to balance ability to cause disease and ability to immunise for a strain. • There is currently no reliable basis for predicting success from pure virological studies. • Vaccinia, which eradicated smallpox, is the paradigm for all successes and issues.

  7. Cellular immunity against Salmonella typhi after live oral vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Tagliabue, A; Nencioni, L; Caffarena, A; Villa, L; Boraschi, D; Cazzola, G; Cavalieri, S

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen adult volunteers were vaccinated orally with the live attenuated Salmonella typhi mutant strain Ty21a. Their peripheral blood mononuclear cells were tested at different times after vaccination for direct cell-mediated activity against bacteria, employing a simple short-term in vitro assay. It was observed that 16/17 of the vaccinated subjects acquired the capacity to express specific cellular immunity against S. typhi which lasted from 15 days to at least 3 years. The effector cell of the in vitro antibacterial activity was preliminarily characterized as a non-adherent T3+, T8-, T4+ lymphocyte. In parallel, mice immunized orally with S. typhimurium and proving resistant to reinfection were tested employing the same in vitro assay. Also in this case peripheral and, most important, intestinal lymphocytes were able to express cellular immunity against the agent of murine typhoid. It is concluded that administration of live oral vaccine against S. typhi results in the induction of specific cellular immunity which is expressed at the peripheral and, probably, also at the intestinal level. PMID:3878744

  8. Clinical evaluation strategies for a live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Precioso, Alexander Roberto; Palacios, Ricardo; Thomé, Beatriz; Mondini, Gabriella; Braga, Patrícia; Kalil, Jorge

    2015-12-10

    Butantan Institute is a public Brazilian biomedical research-manufacturer center affiliated to the São Paulo State Secretary of Health. Currently, Butantan is one of the main public producers of vaccines, antivenoms, and antitoxins in Latin America. The partnership between Butantan and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the United Sates has been one of the longest and most successful partnerships in the development and manufacturing of new vaccines. Recently, Butantan Institute has developed and manufactured a lyophilized tetravalent live attenuated dengue vaccine with the four dengue viruses attenuated and licensed from the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases at The National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (LID/NIAID/NIH). The objective of this paper is to describe the clinical evaluation strategies of a live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (Butantan-DV) developed and manufactured by Butantan Institute. These clinical strategies will be used to evaluate the Butantan-DV Phase III trial to support the Butantan-DV licensure for protection against any symptomatic dengue caused by any serotype in people aged 2 to 59 years.

  9. Principles underlying rational design of live attenuated influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yo Han

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent innovative advances in molecular virology and the developments of vaccines, influenza virus remains a serious burden for human health. Vaccination has been considered a primary countermeasure for prevention of influenza infection. Live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs) are particularly attracting attention as an effective strategy due to several advantages over inactivated vaccines. Cold-adaptation, as a classical means for attenuating viral virulence, has been successfully used for generating safe and effective donor strains of LAIVs against seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. Recently, the advent of reverse genetics technique expedited a variety of rational strategies to broaden the pool of LAIVs. Considering the breadth of antigenic diversity of influenza virus, the pool of LAIVs is likely to equip us with better options for controlling influenza pandemics. With a brief reflection on classical attenuating strategies used at the initial stage of development of LAIVs, especially on the principles underlying the development of cold-adapted LAIVs, we further discuss and outline other attenuation strategies especially with respect to the rationales for attenuation, and their practicality for mass production. Finally, we propose important considerations for a rational vaccine design, which will provide us with practical guidelines for improving the safety and effectiveness of LAIVs. PMID:23596576

  10. Neurovirulence of varicella and the live attenuated varicella vaccine virus.

    PubMed

    Horien, Corey; Grose, Charles

    2012-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic herpesvirus, which can cause a variety of complications during varicella infections. These range from meningoencephalitis to polyneuritis to retinitis. After primary VZV infection, VZV enters the dorsal root ganglia in a latent state. Reactivation from latency leads to zoster. The velocity of VZV is 13 cm per day, as the virus travels from ganglion to skin. The live attenuated varicella vaccine virus is markedly less neurovirulent than the wild-type virus. Nevertheless, a few cases of herpes zoster due to the vaccine virus have been documented. Usually, herpes zoster occurs in the same arm as the vaccination, often 3 or more years after vaccination. Thus, herpes zoster in a vaccinee often represents a reactivation of vaccine virus that was carried to the cervical dorsal root ganglia from a site of local replication in the arm. Finally, the role of autophagy during VZV infection is discussed. Autophagosome formation is a prominent feature in the skin vesicles during both varicella and herpes zoster. Therefore, autophagy is one of the innate immune mechanisms associated with VZV infection in humans.

  11. Report of the 7th African Rotavirus Symposium, Cape Town, South Africa, 8th November 2012.

    PubMed

    Seheri, L M; Mwenda, J M; Page, N

    2014-11-12

    The 7th African Rotavirus Symposium was held in Cape Town, South Africa, on the 8th November 2012 as a Satellite Symposium at the First International African Vaccinology Conference. Over 150 delegates participated in this symposium including scientists, clinicians, health officials, policymakers and vaccine manufacturers from across Africa. Key topics discussed included rotavirus surveillance, rotavirus vaccine introduction, post rotavirus vaccine impact analysis and intussusception data and surveillance in Africa. The symposium provided early rotavirus vaccine adopter countries in Africa (South Africa, Ghana and Botswana) an opportunity to share up-to-date information on vaccine introduction, and allowed colleagues to share experiences in establishing routine rotavirus surveillance (Tanzania, Niger and Rwanda). Overall, the symposium highlighted the high burden of rotavirus in Africa, and the need to continue to strengthen efforts in preventing rotavirus diarrhoea in Africa.

  12. Demystifying FluMist, a new intranasal, live influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Sherif B

    2003-09-01

    FluMist--a cold-adapted, live-attenuated, trivalent, intranasal influenza virus vaccine approved by the US Food and Drug Administration on June 17, 2003--has been shown to be safe and effective, but its role in the general prevention of influenza is yet to be defined. Intranasal administration is expected to be more acceptable than parenteral, particularly in children, but the potential for the shedding of live virus may pose a risk to anyone with a compromised immune system. PMID:14518575

  13. Correlates of protection induced by live Aro- Salmonella typhimurium vaccines in the murine typhoid model.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, J A; Villarreal-Ramos, B; Mastroeni, P; Demarco de Hormaeche, R; Hormaeche, C E

    1997-01-01

    Live attenuated salmonella vaccines generally confer better protection than killed vaccines. The immune responses in BALB/c mice elicited by immunization with a live attenuated Aro Salmonella typhimurium vaccine given orally, intravenously or subcutaneously were compared with those elicited by killed whole-cell vaccines (acetone or heat-treated) given subcutaneously. Live vaccines given by all routes elicited higher interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) responses in spleen cells against an alkali-treated whole-cell salmonella lysate than did killed vaccines. Live and killed vaccines elicited high total antibody levels to smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), but all live vaccine regimes elicited higher IgG2a, suggesting a Th1 response. Oral and intravenous vaccination with live organisms elicited IgA against smooth LPS which subcutaneous vaccination with live or killed salmonellae failed to evoke. Western blots using rough whole-cell lysates showed that all vaccines elicited a varied anti-protein response; however, all groups immunized with live organisms recognized three unidentified bands of MW 52,000, 46,000 and 18,000 which were consistently absent in groups immunized with killed organisms. The results indicate that immunization with live aroA salmonellae elicited a Th1 type of response, including bystander T-cell help to LPS, and a response to proteins not seen in mice that received killed vaccines. Images Figure 6 PMID:9176117

  14. Live bacterial vaccines – a review and identification of potential hazards

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Ann; Glenting, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    The use of live bacteria to induce an immune response to itself or to a carried vaccine component is an attractive vaccine strategy. Advantages of live bacterial vaccines include their mimicry of a natural infection, intrinsic adjuvant properties and their possibility to be administered orally. Derivatives of pathogenic and non-pathogenic food related bacteria are currently being evaluated as live vaccines. However, pathogenic bacteria demands for attenuation to weaken its virulence. The use of bacteria as vaccine delivery vehicles implies construction of recombinant strains that contain the gene cassette encoding the antigen. With the increased knowledge of mucosal immunity and the availability of genetic tools for heterologous gene expression the concept of live vaccine vehicles gains renewed interest. However, administration of live bacterial vaccines poses some risks. In addition, vaccination using recombinant bacteria results in the release of live recombinant organisms into nature. This places these vaccines in the debate on application of genetically modified organisms. In this review we give an overview of live bacterial vaccines on the market and describe the development of new live vaccines with a focus on attenuated bacteria and food-related lactic acid bacteria. Furthermore, we outline the safety concerns and identify the hazards associated with live bacterial vaccines and try to give some suggestions of what to consider during their development. PMID:16796731

  15. Live bacterial vaccines--a review and identification of potential hazards.

    PubMed

    Detmer, Ann; Glenting, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    The use of live bacteria to induce an immune response to itself or to a carried vaccine component is an attractive vaccine strategy. Advantages of live bacterial vaccines include their mimicry of a natural infection, intrinsic adjuvant properties and their possibility to be administered orally. Derivatives of pathogenic and non-pathogenic food related bacteria are currently being evaluated as live vaccines. However, pathogenic bacteria demands for attenuation to weaken its virulence. The use of bacteria as vaccine delivery vehicles implies construction of recombinant strains that contain the gene cassette encoding the antigen. With the increased knowledge of mucosal immunity and the availability of genetic tools for heterologous gene expression the concept of live vaccine vehicles gains renewed interest. However, administration of live bacterial vaccines poses some risks. In addition, vaccination using recombinant bacteria results in the release of live recombinant organisms into nature. This places these vaccines in the debate on application of genetically modified organisms. In this review we give an overview of live bacterial vaccines on the market and describe the development of new live vaccines with a focus on attenuated bacteria and food-related lactic acid bacteria. Furthermore, we outline the safety concerns and identify the hazards associated with live bacterial vaccines and try to give some suggestions of what to consider during their development.

  16. The impact of rotavirus disease in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Schael, I

    1996-09-01

    Information concerning the disease burden of rotavirus, particularly in developing countries, has important implications for the use and for monitoring the impact of rotavirus vaccines. Although rotavirus has been recognized as the most frequent cause of hospitalization in the world, national estimates and specific information about the incidence of hospitalization for rotavirus gastroenteritis are very limited. Consequently, estimates of the incidence of hospitalization among children during the first 2 years of life in Venezuela were determined by extrapolation of data from a community-based study carried out in Caracas.

  17. 76 FR 3075 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA... testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector. The... field testing of this vaccine, examines the potential effects that field testing this veterinary...

  18. Detection of G3P[3] and G3P[9] rotavirus strains in American Indian children with evidence of gene reassortment between human and animal rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Grant, Lindsay; Esona, Mathew; Gentsch, Jon; Watt, James; Reid, Raymond; Weatherholtz, Robert; Santosham, Mathuram; Parashar, Umesh; O'Brien, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    The distribution and evolution of human rotavirus strains is important for vaccine development and effectiveness. In settings where rotavirus vaccine coverage is high, vaccine pressure could select for replacement of common strains (similar to those included in rotavirus vaccines) with uncommon strains, some of which could be generated by reassortment between human and animal rotaviruses. Between 2002 and 2004, a phase-III rotavirus vaccine clinical trial was conducted among American Indian children of the Navajo and White Mountain Apache tribes, which are known to be at high risk for rotavirus diarrhea. We evaluated the rotavirus strains collected from study participants who received placebo during the trial to determine the distribution of rotavirus genotypes and to detect emerging strains that contribute to disease and could influence rotavirus vaccine effectiveness. Three uncommon strains of human rotavirus, two G3P[3] and one G3P[9] strains were detected in stools of children aged 3 to 6 months of age. Segments of all 11 rotavirus genes were sequenced and genotyped by comparison of cognate gene fragments with reference strains. The G3P[3] strains had similar genotypes to each other and to reference dog and cat strains. The G3P[9] strain had similar genotypes to cow, cat and dog reference strains. Genetic analyses of these three strains support the known diversity generating mechanisms of rotavirus. PMID:21567432

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Capripoxvirus Strain KSGP 0240 from a Commercial Live Attenuated Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbussche, Frank; Mathijs, Elisabeth; Haegeman, Andy; Al-Majali, Ahmad; De Clercq, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Capripoxviruses cause economically important diseases in domestic ruminants in regions endemic for these viruses. We report here the complete genome sequence of the KSGP 0240 vaccine strain from the live attenuated vaccine Kenyavac (JOVAC). PMID:27795268

  20. The effect of rotavirus immunization on rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalization rates in military dependents.

    PubMed

    Eberly, Matthew D; Gorman, Greg H; Eide, Matilda B; Olsen, Cara H; Rajnik, Michael

    2011-01-17

    We conducted a retrospective review of all U.S. military dependents less than 5 years old hospitalized with rotavirus-associated gastroenteritis from July 2003 to June 2009. The two post-vaccine seasons showed a significant reduction of 62.4% (95% CI, 58.6-65.8, P<0.001) in rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalization rate compared to the three pre-vaccine seasons. Infants less than 12 months old showed the greatest reduction in incidence at 75.3%. A substantial decrease was also seen in unvaccinated children as well. Vaccine efficacy against hospitalization was 86.0% (95% CI, 77.7-91.3) after just a single dose. The overwhelming majority of children hospitalized for rotavirus since the introduction of the vaccine (ranging from 91.8 to 100% per season) had not received any of the rotavirus vaccine series.

  1. The control of rotavirus gastroenteritis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Glass, Roger I; Parashar, Umesh; Patel, Manish; Tate, Jacqueline; Jiang, Baoming; Gentsch, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Since 2006, two new vaccines have been licensed to prevent rotavirus, the cause of 20% to 50% of severe acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. These vaccines have been implemented in national immunization programs in about 30 high- and middle-income countries, including the United States, and vaccine use has led to substantial decreases in diarrhea-related health care visits. In addition to reductions in diarrhea burden in vaccinated children, decreases have been observed in older, unvaccinated age groups in many settings, suggesting indirect benefits (i.e., herd immunity) from vaccination. Although the efficacy of these oral rotavirus vaccines is expectedly lower in developing countries in Asia and Africa, the public health benefits of vaccination in these settings, where more than 90% of the estimated 453,000 annual deaths from rotavirus occur, are likely to be substantial. Efforts continue to develop alternative rotavirus vaccines that could have a better efficacy and safety profile and may be less expensive.

  2. Antibody response of cattle to vaccination with commercial modified live rabies vaccines in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Amy; Greenberg, Lauren; Moran, David; Alvarez, Danilo; Alvarado, Marlon; Garcia, Daniel L; Peruski, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Vampire bat rabies is a public and animal health concern throughout Latin America. As part of an ecological study of vampire bat depredation on cattle in southern Guatemala, we conducted a vaccine seroconversion study among three dairy farms. The main objectives of this cross sectional and cohort study were to understand factors associated with bat bites among cattle, to determine whether unvaccinated cattle had evidence of rabies virus exposure and evaluate whether exposure was related to bat bite prevalence, and to assess whether cattle demonstrate adequate seroconversion to two commercial vaccines used in Guatemala. In 2012, baseline blood samples were collected immediately prior to intramuscular inoculation of cattle with one of two modified live rabies vaccines. Post vaccination blood samples were collected 13 and 393 days later. Sera were tested for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (rVNA) by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Across two years of study, 36% (254/702) of inspected cattle presented gross evidence of vampire bat bites. Individual cattle with a bat bite in 2012 were more likely have a bat bite in 2013. Prior to vaccination, 12% (42/350) of cattle sera demonstrated rVNA, but bite status in 2012 was not associated with presence of rVNA. Vaccine brand was the only factor associated with adequate rVNA response of cattle by day 13. However, vaccine brand and rVNA status at day 13 were associated with an adequate rVNA titer on day 393, with animals demonstrating an adequate titer at day 13 more likely to have an adequate titer at day 393. Our findings support stable levels of vampire bat depredation and evidence of rVNA in unvaccinated cattle. Brand of vaccine may be an important consideration impacting adequate rVNA response and long-term maintenance of rVNA in cattle. Further, the results demonstrate that initial response to vaccination is associated with rVNA status over one year following vaccination. PMID:25466762

  3. Intranasal live attenuated seasonal influenza vaccine: does not challenge current practice.

    PubMed

    2013-09-01

    Influenza vaccination of children is only justified when there is a risk of serious influenza complications. In 2012, a live attenuated vaccine for intranasal administration was authorised in the European Union for influenza prevention in individuals aged from 2 to less than 18 years. This type of vaccine has been available in the United States since 2003. Clinical evaluation of this live vaccine is based on three non-inferiority trials versus an injected inactivated vaccine. There are no specific trials in children at risk of serious influenza complications. Only one of these trials was double-blinded. Two trials involved children with a history of respiratory problems. Symptomatic influenza confirmed by viral culture was less frequent in these three trials after intranasal vaccination than after injection of the conventional vaccine (about 3 to 5% and 6 to 10%, respectively). There was no difference between the vaccines in terms of clinical complications of influenza, especially asthma exacerbations. Adverse effects attributed to the intranasal vaccine mainly consisted of local reactions such as rhinorrhoea and nasal congestion, as well as flu-like syndromes. Wheezing, respiratory tract infections and hospitalisation were more frequent with the intranasal vaccine than with the injected vaccine in children aged less than 1 year and in children with a history of severe respiratory illness. The intranasal vaccine is contraindicated in these children. The intranasal vaccine contains live attenuated virus strains and is therefore contraindicated in immunocompromised patients. US pharmacovigilance data suggest that severe allergic reactions to the intranasal vaccine, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and transmission of vaccine viruses to contacts are very rare. Intranasal administration seems to be more practical, especially for children. In practice, there is no firm evidence that this live attenuated influenza vaccine has any clinical advantages over injected vaccines

  4. Efficacy of HVT-IBD vector vaccine compared to attenuated live vaccine using in-ovo vaccination against a Korean very virulent IBDV in commercial broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Roh, J-H; Kang, M; Wei, B; Yoon, R-H; Seo, H-S; Bahng, J-Y; Kwon, J-T; Cha, S-Y; Jang, H-K

    2016-05-01

    The production performance, efficacy, and safety of two types of vaccines for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) were compared with in-ovo vaccination of Cobb 500 broiler chickens for gross and microscopic examination of the bursa of Fabricius, bursa/body weight (b/B) ratio, flow cytometry, and serologic response to Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccination. One vaccine was a recombinant HVT-IBD vector vaccine (HVT as for herpesvirus of turkeys) and the other was an intermediate plus live IBDV vaccine. A significant difference was detected at 21 d. Eight of 10 chickens that received the IBDV live vaccine had severe bursal lesions and a relatively low b/B ratio of 0.95, and an inhibited NDV vaccine response. On the other hand, the HVT-IBD vector vaccine resulted in mild bursal lesions and a b/B ratio of 1.89. Therefore, the live vaccine had lower safety than that of the HVT-IBD vector vaccine. To determine the protective efficacy, chickens were intraocularly challenged at 24 d. Eight of 10 chickens in the IBDV live vaccination group showed gross and histological lesions characterized by hemorrhage, cyst formation, lymphocytic depletion, and a decreased b/B ratio. In contrast, the HVT-IBD vector vaccinated chickens showed mild gross and histological lesions in three of 10 chickens with a b/B ratio of 1.36, which was similar to that of the unchallenged controls. Vaccinated chickens showed a significant increase in IBDV antibody titers, regardless of the type of vaccine used. In addition, significantly better broiler flock performance was observed with the HVT-IBD vector vaccine compared to that of the live vaccine. Our results revealed that the HVT-IBD vector vaccine could be used as an alternative vaccine to increase efficacy, and to have an improved safety profile compared with the IBDV live vaccine using in-ovo vaccination against the Korean very virulent IBDV in commercial broiler chickens. PMID:26944964

  5. Efficacy of combined killed-in-oil emulsion and live Newcastle disease vaccines in chickens.

    PubMed

    Folitse, R; Halvorson, D A; Sivanandan, V

    1998-01-01

    Following the introduction of routine vaccination regimes with different types of Newcastle disease (ND) vaccines, the incidence of velogenic viscerotropic Newcastle disease (VVND) in commercial poultry worldwide has declined dramatically. Unfortunately, these vaccination regimes are not feasible in free-range and backyard systems of poultry production practiced in many developing countries. In this study, we sought to develop a single vaccination regime in chickens with ND vaccines to elicit a long-lasting high level of ND virus (NDV) antibodies adequate to protect chickens against ND. The level of antibody response, as measured by the hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) test, and the degree of protection against the virulent strain of NDV were studied in chickens immunized with different vaccines. The vaccines used were: killed-in-oil emulsion (subcutaneous; s.c.) plus live virus (oculanasal; o.n.), given concurrently; experimental vaccine (s.c.) plus live virus (o.n.), given concurrently; killed-in-oil (s.c.); experimental vaccine prepared by homogenizing commercial live vaccine and oil emulsion (s.c.); and live virus (o.n.). The results obtained in this study indicate that concurrent administration of oil emulsion and live NDV vaccines induced the best antibody response, but there was no significant difference in protection among the vaccinated groups.

  6. Inflammatory and oxidative stress in rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the single leading cause of life-threatening diarrhea affecting children under 5 years of age. Rotavirus entry into the host cell seems to occur by sequential interactions between virion proteins and various cell surface molecules. The entry mechanisms seem to involve the contribution of cellular molecules having binding, chaperoning and oxido-reducing activities. It appears to be that the receptor usage and tropism of rotaviruses is determined by the species, cell line and rotavirus strain. Rotaviruses have evolved functions which can antagonize the host innate immune response, whereas are able to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling. A networking between ER stress, inflammation and oxidative stress is suggested, in which release of calcium from the ER increases the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria. Sustained ER stress potentially stimulates inflammatory response through unfolded protein response pathways. However, the detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these rotavirus-induced stressful conditions is still lacking. The signaling events triggered by host recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns offers an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with rotavirus infection. The use of N-acetylcysteine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PPARγ agonists to inhibit rotavirus infection opens a new way for treating the rotavirus-induced diarrhea and complementing vaccines. PMID:27175349

  7. Large increase of rotavirus diarrhoea in the hospital setting associated with emergence of G12 genotype in a highly vaccinated population in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Bucardo, F; Mercado, J; Reyes, Y; González, F; Balmaseda, A; Nordgren, J

    2015-06-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a major cause of severe diarrhoea in young children. Nicaragua introduced routine immunization with the pentavalent RV vaccine (RV5) in 2006, which greatly reduced the incidence of diarrhoea. A remaining concern has been the possible emergence of new RV strains to which the vaccination has less effect. In this study, 837 children with diarrhoea in hospital settings were investigated for RV between May 2011 and July 2013. RVs were subsequently typed by multiplex PCR and/or sequencing. Fecal anti-RV IgA titres for a subset of RV-infected (n = 137) and noninfected children (n = 52) were determined with an in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The RV detection rate was 8% in 2011, followed by a sharp increase to 29% in 2012 and 19% in 2013. This was associated with emergence and predominance of genotype G12 RV, from 0% in 2011 to 66% in 2012 and 82% in 2013, infecting children from 1 month to 10 years of age. Two sequenced G12 strains showed a Wa-like genome with genotype G12-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1, similar to the globally emerging G12 strains. Fecal anti-RV IgA analysis showed that most G12-infected and noninfected children had been in contact with either vaccine or wild RV strains, but such antibodies did not prevent symptomatic G12 infection. A marked increase of RV was evident in the hospital setting associated with a nationwide emergence and predominance of RV G12 genotype in a population with high RV5 vaccine coverage.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Live Vaccine Strain Brucella abortus 82

    PubMed Central

    Shevtsov, Alexander; Zholdybayeva, Elena; Shevtsova, Elena; Momynkulov, Dauren; Sytnik, Igor; Karibaev, Talgat; Chsherbakov, Andrey; Momynaliev, Kuvat

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination is a crucial part of the brucellosis eradication programs worldwide. A live vaccine strain of Brucella abortus 82 has been successfully used for the vaccination of cattle against brucellosis in the former Soviet republics for the last 39 years. Here, we report the genome sequence of Brucella abortus 82. PMID:24371203

  9. Improving live attenuated bacterial carriers for vaccination and therapy.

    PubMed

    Loessner, Holger; Endmann, Anne; Leschner, Sara; Bauer, Heike; Zelmer, Andrea; zur Lage, Susanne; Westphal, Kathrin; Weiss, Siegfried

    2008-01-01

    Live attenuated bacteria are well established as vaccines. Thus, their use as carriers for prophylactic and therapeutic macromolecules is a logical consequence. Here we describe several experimental applications of bacteria to carry heterologous macromolecules into the murine host. First, Listeria monocytogenes are described that are able to transfer eukaryotic expression plasmids into host cells for gene therapy. High multiplicities of infection are still required for efficient gene transfer and we point out some of the bottlenecks that counteract a more efficient transfer and application in vivo. Then, we describe Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) as an expression plasmid transfer vehicle for oral DNA vaccination of mice. We demonstrate that the stabilization of the plasmid transformants results in an improved immune response. Stabilization was achieved by replacing the origin of replication of the original high-copy-number plasmid by a low-copy-number origin. Finally, we describe Salmonella carriers for the improved expression of heterologous proteins. We introduce a system in which the plasmid is carried as a single copy during cultivation but is amplified several fold upon infection of the host. Using the same in vivo inducible promoter for both protein expression and plasmid amplification, a substantial increase in antigen expression in vivo can be achieved. A modification of this approach is the introduction of inducible gene expression in vivo with a low-molecular-weight compound. Using P(BAD) promoter and L-arabinose as inducer we were able to deliberately activate genes in the bacterial carrier. No background activity could be observed with P(BAD) such that an inducible suicide gene could be introduced. This is adding an important safety feature to such live attenuated carrier bacteria.

  10. The efficacy of Mycoplasma gallisepticum K-strain live vaccine in broiler and layer chickens.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Noel, N M; Williams, S M

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of a live Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) vaccine candidate (K-strain) was compared to commercially available vaccines in broiler-type chickens (Trial 1) and layer-type chickens (Trial 2). In Trial 1, three-week-old broiler-type chickens were vaccinated via aerosol with K-strain or an F-strain vaccine. The vaccinated chickens and 10 non-vaccinated controls were subsequently challenged with virulent R-strain via aerosol at six weeks post vaccination; both K-strain and F-strain vaccination resulted in significant protection from air sac and tracheal lesions, as well as R-strain colonization (P ≤ 0.05). In Trial 2, commercial layer-type chickens were vaccinated with ts-11 (via eye drop) or K-strain (via aerosol) at 12 weeks of age. At 25 weeks of age these birds were challenged with R-strain via aerosol. The ts-11 and K-strain vaccinated groups both had significantly lower air sac lesion scores and a lower prevalence of ovarian regression after challenge as compared to non-vaccinated chickens (P ≤ 0.05). K-strain vaccination also prevented significant tracheal lesions and R-strain colonization (P ≤ 0.05). K-strain shows great potential as a highly efficacious live MG vaccine in broiler and layer-type chickens for protection of the respiratory and reproductive systems as well as prevention of infection with field strains. PMID:25571953

  11. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of the Impact of Alternative Dosing Schedules on the Immune Response to Human Rotavirus Vaccine in Rural Ghanaian Infants

    PubMed Central

    Armah, George; Lewis, Kristen D. C.; Cortese, Margaret M.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Ansah, Akosua; Gazley, Lauren; Victor, John C.; McNeal, Monica M.; Binka, Fred; Steele, A. Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Background. The recommended schedule for receipt of 2-dose human rotavirus vaccine (HRV) coincides with receipt of the first and second doses of diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus vaccine (ie, 6 and 10 weeks of age, respectively). Alternative schedules and additional doses of HRV have been proposed and may improve vaccine performance in low-income countries. Methods. In this randomized trial in rural Ghana, HRV was administered at ages 6 and 10 weeks (group 1), 10 and 14 weeks (group 2), or 6, 10, and 14 weeks (group 3). We compared serum antirotavirus immunoglobulin A (IgA) seroconversion (≥20 U/mL) and geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) between group 1 and groups 2 and 3. Results. Ninety-three percent of participants (424 of 456) completed the study per protocol. In groups 1, 2, and 3, the IgA seroconversion frequencies among participants with IgA levels of <20 U/mL at baseline were 28.9%, 37.4%, and 43.4%, respectively (group 1 vs group 3, P = .014; group 1 vs group 2, P = .163). Postvaccination IgA GMCs were 22.1 U/mL, 26.5 U/mL, and 32.6 U/mL in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (group 1 vs group 3, P = .038; group 1 vs group 2, P = .304). Conclusions. A third dose of HRV resulted in increased seroconversion frequencies and GMCs, compared with 2 doses administered at 6 and 10 weeks of age. Since there is no correlate of protection, a postmarketing effectiveness study is required to determine whether the improvement in immune response translates into a public health benefit in low-income countries. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT015751. PMID:26823335

  12. Genotypification of bovine group A rotavirus in México.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Limas, William A; Flores-Samaniego, Beatriz; de la Mora, Germán; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2009-10-30

    Bovine scours, frequently provoked by rotavirus infection, causes significant economic losses. Nevertheless, no information exists about the bovine rotavirus genotypes present in Mexico. This information is necessary for designing efficient vaccines. In this work, 128 samples from diarrheic calves were collected between 2005 and 2006 in 26 dairy and/or beef cattle herds located in 10 regions of Mexico, and analyzed for the presence of group A rotavirus. G and P genotypes were determined by PCR in rotavirus-positive samples (12/128). Three different genotype combinations were found, G10, P[11]; G6, P[5]; and G10, P[5]; in 67, 25 and 8% of the positive samples, respectively. Some rotavirus-positive animals had been vaccinated with an inactivated rotavirus strain of a different genotype.

  13. Vaccination of pigs against Aujeszky's disease by the intradermal route using live attenuated and inactivated virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vannier, P; Cariolet, R

    1989-09-01

    A study was undertaken of the protection induced by inactivated and live Aujeszky's disease virus vaccines. The vaccines were administered using a special device which, without the use of a needle, delivered the preparation intradermally. The trials were performed on 88 pigs which were vaccinated at the beginning of the fattening period both in experimental conditions and in pig herds. All the pigs were challenged at the end of the fattening period in isolation units. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using the same vaccines injected intramuscularly. It was shown that vaccination via the intradermal route induced good protection in the vaccinated animals and was similar to that conferred by live virus vaccine injected intramuscularly. The results, with the inactivated virus vaccine, were not so good when it was injected via the intradermal route. Studies with intradermal vaccination showed no local lesion or very small nodules strictly localized to the dermis. The results also confirmed that the effects of challenge exposure depended on the health status of animals prior to infection and show the necessity to use a synthetic value (delta G) to interpret the data and mainly to compare the results objectively. In fattening pigs this vaccination procedure is attractive because (i) less animal constraint is needed than would be for intramuscular injections, (ii) injection can be checked by the presence of a visible papula at the site of inoculation and, (iii) pigs can be vaccinated in the ham while they are feeding. Injection without a needle also contributes to avoiding bacterial contamination under practical farm conditions of vaccination.

  14. Respiratory and oral vaccination improves protection conferred by the live vaccine strain against pneumonic tularemia in the rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Elizabeth; Smith, Le'Kneitah P; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Barry, Eileen M; Reed, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    Tularemia is a severe, zoonotic disease caused by a gram-negative bacterium, Francisella tularensis We have previously shown that rabbits are a good model of human pneumonic tularemia when exposed to aerosols containing a virulent, type A strain, SCHU S4. We further demonstrated that the live vaccine strain (LVS), an attenuated type B strain, extended time to death when given by scarification. Oral or aerosol vaccination has been previously shown in humans to offer superior protection to parenteral vaccination against respiratory tularemia challenge. Both oral and aerosol vaccination with LVS were well tolerated in the rabbit with only minimal fever and no weight loss after inoculation. Plasma antibody titers against F. tularensis were higher in rabbits that were vaccinated by either oral or aerosol routes compared to scarification. Thirty days after vaccination, all rabbits were challenged with aerosolized SCHU S4. LVS given by scarification extended time to death compared to mock-vaccinated controls. One orally vaccinated rabbit did survive aerosol challenge, however, only aerosol vaccination extended time to death significantly compared to scarification. These results further demonstrate the utility of the rabbit model of pneumonic tularemia in replicating what has been reported in humans and macaques as well as demonstrating the utility of vaccination by oral and respiratory routes against an aerosol tularemia challenge. PMID:27511964

  15. Respiratory and oral vaccination improves protection conferred by the live vaccine strain against pneumonic tularemia in the rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Elizabeth; Smith, Le'Kneitah P; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Barry, Eileen M; Reed, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    Tularemia is a severe, zoonotic disease caused by a gram-negative bacterium, Francisella tularensis We have previously shown that rabbits are a good model of human pneumonic tularemia when exposed to aerosols containing a virulent, type A strain, SCHU S4. We further demonstrated that the live vaccine strain (LVS), an attenuated type B strain, extended time to death when given by scarification. Oral or aerosol vaccination has been previously shown in humans to offer superior protection to parenteral vaccination against respiratory tularemia challenge. Both oral and aerosol vaccination with LVS were well tolerated in the rabbit with only minimal fever and no weight loss after inoculation. Plasma antibody titers against F. tularensis were higher in rabbits that were vaccinated by either oral or aerosol routes compared to scarification. Thirty days after vaccination, all rabbits were challenged with aerosolized SCHU S4. LVS given by scarification extended time to death compared to mock-vaccinated controls. One orally vaccinated rabbit did survive aerosol challenge, however, only aerosol vaccination extended time to death significantly compared to scarification. These results further demonstrate the utility of the rabbit model of pneumonic tularemia in replicating what has been reported in humans and macaques as well as demonstrating the utility of vaccination by oral and respiratory routes against an aerosol tularemia challenge.

  16. Rotavirus infection in hospitalized children and estimates of disease burden in Kyrgyzstan, 2005-2007.

    PubMed

    Flem, Elmira T; Kasymbekova, Kaliya T; Vainio, Kirsti; Gentsch, Jon; Abdikarimov, Sabirjan T; Glass, Roger I; Bresee, Joseph S

    2009-11-20

    To estimate the rotavirus-associated burden in Kyrgyzstan, we conducted hospital surveillance among children <5 years old with diarrhoea during 2005-2007. Of 3756 children hospitalized with diarrhoea, 26% had rotavirus detected in stool samples by an enzyme immunoassay. The virus genotype G1P[8] was identified in 60% of 190 characterized samples from 2005 to 2006. The estimated risk for rotavirus hospitalization by age 5 years was 1 in 28 children. One quarter of all gastroenteritis hospitalizations in children <5 years old in Kyrgyzstan may be attributable to rotavirus. Rotavirus vaccination could be an important health intervention to reduce the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis.

  17. Protective effects of natural rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, F Raúl

    2009-03-01

    Rotavirus is a ubiquitous infection that is the leading cause of severe diarrhea worldwide. Severe infections are most commonly observed in the first 2 years of life. Rotavirus-induced diarrhea is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality rates and socioeconomic costs with adverse outcomes particularly prevalent in developing countries. The natural history of rotavirus infection can provide guidance for the development and optimization of an effective vaccine. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that children who acquire natural rotavirus infections develop immunity to subsequent infections, with the protective effect increasing with each natural infection. Natural infections also decrease the severity of any subsequent rotavirus infections. Notably, asymptomatic infections provide protection similar to that induced by symptomatic infections. Data also suggest that the antibody response to natural infection is heterotypic, and therefore may provide protection against multiple serotypes. These data suggest that the development of a vaccine that produces asymptomatic infection at an optimal time point may provide effective immunity. An effective vaccine should mimic protection provided by natural infection and provide protection against the most common rotavirus serotypes (ie, G1, G2, G3, G4, G9) and be able to decrease disease severity, reduce hospitalizations, and decrease disease-related costs.

  18. Virulence-Associated Genome Mutations of Murine Rotavirus Identified by Alternating Serial Passages in Mice and Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Masatoshi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although significant clinical efficacy and safety of rotavirus vaccines were recently revealed in many countries, the mechanism of their attenuation is not well understood. We passaged serially a cell culture-adapted murine rotavirus EB strain in mouse pups or in cell cultures alternately and repeatedly and fully sequenced all 11 genes of 21 virus samples passaged in mice or in cell cultures. Sequence analysis revealed that mouse-passaged viruses that regained virulence almost consistently acquired four kinds of amino acid (aa) substitutions in VP4 and substitution in aa 37 (Val to Ala) in NSP4. In addition, they gained and invariably conserved the 3′ consensus sequence in NSP1. The molecular changes occurred along with the acquisition of virulence during passages in mice and then disappeared following passages in cell cultures. Intraperitoneal injection of recombinant NSP4 proteins confirmed the aa 37 site as important for its diarrheagenic activity in mice. These genome changes are likely to be correlated with rotavirus virulence. IMPORTANCE Serial passage of a virulent wild-type virus in vitro often results in loss of virulence of the virus in an original animal host, while serial passage of a cell culture-adapted avirulent virus in vivo often gains virulence in an animal host. Actually, live attenuated virus vaccines were originally produced by serial passage in cell cultures. Although clinical efficacy and safety of rotavirus vaccines were recently revealed, the mechanism of their attenuation is not well understood. We passaged serially a murine rotavirus by alternating switch of host (mice or cell cultures) repeatedly and sequenced the eleven genes of the passaged viruses to identify mutations associated with the emergence or disappearance of virulence. Sequence analysis revealed that changes in three genes (VP4, NSP1, and NSP4) were associated with virulence in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of recombinant NSP4 proteins confirmed its

  19. Biosafety aspects of the recombinant live oral Vibrio cholerae vaccine strain CVD 103-HgR.

    PubMed

    Viret, Jean-François; Dietrich, Guido; Favre, Didier

    2004-06-23

    The development of live attenuated vaccines, allowing for the safe and effective immunisation at mucosal surfaces, is a strategy of great interest for vaccinologists. The main advantage of this approach over conventional parenteral vaccines is the induction of strong mucosal immune responses, allowing targeting of the pathogen at the initial point of contact with the host. Further advantages include the ease of administration, high acceptance by vaccines, and relatively low production costs. Finally, well-characterised, safe and immunogenic vaccine strains are well suited as vectors for the mucosal delivery of foreign vaccine antigens and of DNA vaccines. However, such vaccines, when based on or containing genetically modified organisms (GMOs), are facing new and specific regulatory hurdles, particularly regarding the potential risks for humans and the environment. In this contribution we address selected aspects of the risk assessment of live attenuated bacterial vaccines covered in the course of the registration of vaccine strain CVD 103-HgR as a recombinant live oral vaccine against cholera.

  20. Rotavirus Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The avian rotaviruses are members of the Reoviridae family, which is characterized by virions that contain 10-12 linear double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) segments. The Reoviridae consists of 15 genera which can be placed into two recognized subfamilies based upon the presence or absence of structural “tur...

  1. [Rotavirus infection in Brazil: epidemiology and challenges for its control].

    PubMed

    Linhares, A C

    2000-01-01

    Worldwide, rotaviruses account for 600,000 to 870,000 deaths per year among infants and young children. In Brazil, rotaviruses were first seen in 1976 by scanning electron microscopy of stool samples from diarrheic infants in Belém, Pará. Hospital-based studies have shown that rotaviruses are associated with 12-42% of cases of acute diarrhea. In addition, community-based studies yielded an average of 0.25 rotavirus-related diarrheal episodes per child per year. G types 1 to 4 account for about two-thirds of circulating strains, but the (unusual) P[8],G5 genotype has been claimed to cause over 10% of rotavirus diarrheal episodes. It has been shown that over 70% of children develop rotavirus antibodies by the age of 4-5 years. The tetravalent rhesus-human rotavirus vaccine (RRV-TV) conferred 35% protection according to a two-year follow-up study in Belém, Pará, Brazil, but reached an efficacy of 60% during the first year of life. RRV-TV was also shown to be 75% protective against very severe gastroenteritis in northern Brazil. Vaccination with RRV-TV has been suspended recently in the United States because of the detection of intussusception as a side effect. Therefore, further vaccine trials in Brazil will probably involve rotavirus candidate vaccines other than RRV-TV.

  2. Efficacy and effectiveness of live attenuated influenza vaccine in school-age children.

    PubMed

    Coelingh, Kathleen; Olajide, Ifedapo Rosemary; MacDonald, Peter; Yogev, Ram

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of high efficacy of live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) from randomized controlled trials is strong for children 2-6 years of age, but fewer data exist for older school-age children. We reviewed the published data on efficacy and effectiveness of LAIV in children ≥5 years. QUOSA (Elsevier database) was searched for articles published from January 1990 to June 2014 that included 'FluMist', 'LAIV', 'CAIV', 'cold adapted influenza vaccine', 'live attenuated influenza vaccine', 'live attenuated cold adapted' or 'flu mist'. Studies evaluated included randomized controlled trials, effectiveness and indirect protection studies. This review demonstrates that LAIV has considerable efficacy and effectiveness in school-age children.

  3. Determinants of tetanus and seasonal influenza vaccine uptake in adults living in Germany.

    PubMed

    Böhmer, Merle M; Walter, Dietmar; Krause, Gérard; Müters, Stephan; Gösswald, Antje; Wichmann, Ole

    2011-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess determinants of vaccine uptake in adults living in Germany exemplified by one standard vaccination (tetanus) and one vaccination targeting specific risk-groups (seasonal influenza). Data from 21,262 telephone household-interviews representative of the adult population in Germany were collected in 2009 and analysed. A total 73.1% of the adult population had a sufficient tetanus vaccination status according to national recommendations (i.e. last tetanus shot ≤10 years ago). Influenza vaccination coverage in the target population (i.e. persons ≥60 years, chronically ill, healthcare workers) was 44.1%. Persons who received professional vaccination advice within the past five years were more frequently vaccinated against tetanus and influenza than persons without (p< 0.001). Private physicians were identified as the most important source for vaccination advice. Having a statutory health insurance, last physician contact < 1 year ago, and living in the eastern part of Germany were independently associated with higher tetanus and influenza vaccine uptake. Low socio-economic status, two-sided migration background, and the feeling of being insufficiently informed on the benefits of vaccination were independently associated with low uptake of tetanus but not influenza vaccines. Our results show that tetanus vaccination coverage in the general adult population and influenza vaccination coverage in the target population are unsatisfactorily low in Germany. Since physicians' advice has a major impact on the vaccination decision, physician reminder systems could provide a method to increase vaccination coverage in adults. For tetanus, information activities should target population groups with an increased risk of being undervaccinated.

  4. Gene-deleted live-attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi parasites as vaccines to protect against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Valdéz, Fernando J; Pérez Brandán, Cecilia; Ferreira, Arturo; Basombrío, Miguel Ángel

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. This illness is now becoming global, mainly due to congenital transmission, and so far, there are no prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines available to either prevent or treat Chagas disease. Therefore, different approaches aimed at identifying new protective immunogens are urgently needed. Live vaccines are likely to be more efficient in inducing protection, but safety issues linked with their use have been raised. The development of improved protozoan genetic manipulation tools and genomic and biological information has helped to increase the safety of live vaccines. These advances have generated a renewed interest in the use of genetically attenuated parasites as vaccines against Chagas disease. This review discusses the protective capacity of genetically attenuated parasite vaccines and the challenges and perspectives for the development of an effective whole-parasite Chagas disease vaccine.

  5. Evolutionary reversion of live viral vaccines: Can genetic engineering subdue it?

    PubMed Central

    Bull, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Attenuated, live viral vaccines have been extraordinarily successful in protecting against many diseases. The main drawbacks in their development and use have been reliance on an unpredictable method of attenuation and the potential for evolutionary reversion to high virulence. Methods of genetic engineering now provide many safer alternatives to live vaccines, so if live vaccines are to compete with these alternatives in the future, they must either have superior immunogenicity or they must be able to overcome these former disadvantages. Several live vaccine designs that were historically inaccessible are now feasible because of advances in genome synthesis. Some of those methods are addressed here, with an emphasis on whether they enable predictable levels of attenuation and whether they are stable against evolutionary reversion. These new designs overcome many of the former drawbacks and position live vaccines to be competitive with alternatives. Not only do new methods appear to retard evolutionary reversion enough to prevent vaccine-derived epidemics, but it may even be possible to permanently attenuate live vaccines that are transmissible but cannot evolve to higher virulence under prolonged adaptation. PMID:27034780

  6. Rotavirus in India: Forty Years of Research.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gagandeep

    2016-07-01

    Rotavirus was first identified as a human pathogen just over 40 years ago, and work on this pathogen in India started shortly thereafter. Subsequent studies have confirmed its pre-eminent role in gastroenteritis in children in India. Standardized surveillance has enabled the documentation of the high burden of disease, and has demonstrated that there is considerable geographic and temporal variation in strain circulation. Internationally licensed vaccines, vaccine candidates based on indigenous strains and out-licensed strains have been tested for safety, immunogenicity and efficacy; three vaccines are now licensed in India and are used in the private sector. Public sector vaccination has begun, and it will be path-breaking for Indian vaccinologists to measure impact of vaccine introduction in terms of safety and effectiveness. So far, India has kept pace with international epidemiologic and vaccine research on rotavirus, and these efforts should continue. PMID:27508532

  7. Substantial Receptor-induced Structural Rearrangement of Rotavirus VP8*: Potential Implications for Cross-Species Infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing; Mishra, Rahul; Holloway, Gavan; von Itzstein, Mark; Coulson, Barbara S; Blanchard, Helen

    2015-10-12

    Rotavirus-cell binding is the essential first step in rotavirus infection. This binding is a major determinant of rotavirus tropism, as host cell invasion is necessary to initiate infection. Initial rotavirus-cell interactions are mediated by carbohydrate-recognizing domain VP8* of the rotavirus capsid spike protein VP4. Here, we report the first observation of significant structural rearrangement of VP8* from human and animal rotavirus strains upon glycan receptor binding. The structural adaptability of rotavirus VP8* delivers important insights into how human and animal rotaviruses utilize the wider range of cellular glycans identified as VP8* binding partners. Furthermore, our studies on rotaviruses with atypical genetic makeup provide information expected to be critical for understanding the mechanisms of animal rotavirus gene emergence in humans and support implementation of epidemiologic surveillance of animal reservoirs as well as future vaccination schemes.

  8. Substantial Receptor-induced Structural Rearrangement of Rotavirus VP8*: Potential Implications for Cross-Species Infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing; Mishra, Rahul; Holloway, Gavan; von Itzstein, Mark; Coulson, Barbara S; Blanchard, Helen

    2015-10-12

    Rotavirus-cell binding is the essential first step in rotavirus infection. This binding is a major determinant of rotavirus tropism, as host cell invasion is necessary to initiate infection. Initial rotavirus-cell interactions are mediated by carbohydrate-recognizing domain VP8* of the rotavirus capsid spike protein VP4. Here, we report the first observation of significant structural rearrangement of VP8* from human and animal rotavirus strains upon glycan receptor binding. The structural adaptability of rotavirus VP8* delivers important insights into how human and animal rotaviruses utilize the wider range of cellular glycans identified as VP8* binding partners. Furthermore, our studies on rotaviruses with atypical genetic makeup provide information expected to be critical for understanding the mechanisms of animal rotavirus gene emergence in humans and support implementation of epidemiologic surveillance of animal reservoirs as well as future vaccination schemes. PMID:26250751

  9. Influence of maternally-derived antibodies on live attenuated influenza vaccine efficacy in pigs.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Hyun Mi; Hlasny, Magda; Zhou, Yan

    2015-07-17

    Vaccination during pregnancy is practiced in swine farms as one measure to control swine influenza virus (SIV) infection in piglets at an early age. Vaccine-induced maternal antibodies transfer to piglets through colostrum and stabilize the herd: however, maternally derived antibodies (MDA) interfere with immune response following influenza vaccination in piglets at the later stage of life. In addition, MDA is related to enhanced respiratory disease in SIV infection. Previously, we have developed a bivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) which harbors both H1 and H3 HAs. We demonstrated vaccination of this LAIV provided protection to homologous and heterologous SIV infection in pigs. In this study we aimed to investigate the influence of MDA on LAIV efficacy. To this end, SIV sero-negative sows were vaccinated with a commercial vaccine. After parturition, nursery piglets were vaccinated with LAIV intranasally or intramuscularly, and were then challenged with SIV. We report that MDA hampered serum antibody response induced by intramuscular vaccination but not by intranasal vaccination of the LAIV. Viral challenge in the presence of MDA caused exacerbated respiratory disease in unvaccinated piglets. In contrast, all LAIV vaccinated piglets were protected from homologous viral infection regardless of the route of vaccination and the presence of MDA. Our results demonstrated that LAIV conferred protection in the presence of MDA without inciting exacerbated respiratory disease.

  10. Long-term viremia and fecal shedding in pups after modified-live canine parvovirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Decaro, Nicola; Crescenzo, Giuseppe; Desario, Costantina; Cavalli, Alessandra; Losurdo, Michele; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Ventrella, Gianpiero; Rizzi, Stefania; Aulicino, Stefano; Lucente, Maria Stella; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2014-06-24

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) modified live virus vaccines are able to infect vaccinated dogs replicating in the bloodstream and enteric mucosa. However, the exact duration and extent of CPV vaccine-induced viremia and fecal shedding are not known. With the aim to fill this gap, 26 dogs were administered two commercial vaccines containing a CPV-2 or CPV-2b strain and monitored for 28 days after vaccination. By using real-time PCR, vaccine-induced viremia and shedding were found to be long lasting for both vaccinal strains. Vaccinal CPV-2b shedding was detected for a shorter period than CPV-2 (12 against 19 mean days) but with greater viral loads, whereas viremia occurred for a longer period (22 against 19 mean days) and with higher titers for CPV-2b. Seroconversion appeared as early as 7 and 14 days post-vaccination for CPV-2b and CPV-2 vaccines, respectively. With no vaccine there was any diagnostic interference using in-clinic or hemagglutination test, since positive results were obtained only by fecal real-time PCR testing. The present study adds new insights into the CPV vaccine persistence in the organism and possible interference with diagnostic tests.

  11. Vaccine supply chains need to be better funded and strengthened, or lives will be at risk.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Judith R; Miller, Roger; Cheyne, James

    2011-06-01

    In the next decade, at least twelve additional vaccines that target such diseases as typhoid, malaria, and dengue will become available to lower- and middle-income countries. These vaccines must travel along what are called supply chains, which include all personnel, systems, equipment, and activities involved in ensuring that vaccines are effectively delivered from the point of production to the people who need them. But for various reasons, supply chains are already strained in many developing countries, and the potential inability to distribute new vaccines will place lives at risk. Among the many steps needed to strengthen the global vaccine supply chain, we suggest that the international community pursue improved coordination between organizations that donate and ship vaccines and the host-country officials who receive and distribute the vaccines, as well as better training for supply-chain managers. PMID:21653965

  12. Vaccine supply chains need to be better funded and strengthened, or lives will be at risk.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Judith R; Miller, Roger; Cheyne, James

    2011-06-01

    In the next decade, at least twelve additional vaccines that target such diseases as typhoid, malaria, and dengue will become available to lower- and middle-income countries. These vaccines must travel along what are called supply chains, which include all personnel, systems, equipment, and activities involved in ensuring that vaccines are effectively delivered from the point of production to the people who need them. But for various reasons, supply chains are already strained in many developing countries, and the potential inability to distribute new vaccines will place lives at risk. Among the many steps needed to strengthen the global vaccine supply chain, we suggest that the international community pursue improved coordination between organizations that donate and ship vaccines and the host-country officials who receive and distribute the vaccines, as well as better training for supply-chain managers.

  13. Current status of live attenuated influenza virus vaccine in the US.

    PubMed

    Belshe, Robert B

    2004-07-01

    The efficacy and effectiveness of cold adapted live attenuated (CAIV-T, FluMist intranasal influenza vaccine is reviewed. CAIV-T consists of approximately 10(7) TCID50 per dose of each influenza A/H1N1, influenza A/H3N2, and influenza B vaccine strain. The exact strains are updated each year to antigenically match the antigens recommended by national health authorities for inclusion in the vaccine. In one year in which the vaccine strain did not well match the epidemic strain, the live attenuated vaccine induced a broad immune response that cross-reacted significantly with the drifted strain. The efficacy of CAIV-T in adults was demonstrated with challenge studies and the effectiveness of the vaccine for reducing febrile upper respiratory illness, days of missed work, and days of antibiotic use was demonstrated in a large field trial. In young children, protective efficacy against culture confirmed influenza was demonstrated in a field trial with overall protective efficacy of 92% during a two year study. Vaccine was also highly protective against a strain not contained in the vaccine, with 86% protective efficacy demonstrated against this significantly drifted virus. Effectiveness measures, including protection against febrile otitis media and visits to the doctor were demonstrated. Live attenuated vaccine provides a significant new tool to help prevent influenza.

  14. Potential drug interaction between Rho(D) immune globulin and live virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Amy; Wright, Debra

    2014-12-01

    Women often receive Rho(D) immune globulin as well as a live virus vaccine in the immediate postpartum period. The immune globulin product has the potential to interfere with appropriate immune response to the vaccine. Here we describe our approach to identifying and following up on this often overlooked potential drug interaction. PMID:25495973

  15. Potential drug interaction between Rho(D) immune globulin and live virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Amy; Wright, Debra

    2014-12-01

    Women often receive Rho(D) immune globulin as well as a live virus vaccine in the immediate postpartum period. The immune globulin product has the potential to interfere with appropriate immune response to the vaccine. Here we describe our approach to identifying and following up on this often overlooked potential drug interaction.

  16. G1P[8] species A rotavirus over 27 years--pre- and post-vaccination eras--in Brazil: full genomic constellation analysis and no evidence for selection pressure by Rotarix® vaccine.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marcelle Figueira Marques da; Rose, Tatiana Lundgren; Gómez, Mariela Martínez; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe Anibal; Fialho, Alexandre Madi; Assis, Rosane Maria Santos de; Andrade, Juliana da Silva Ribeiro de; Volotão, Eduardo de Mello; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological data on species A rotavirus (RVA) infections have demonstrated the genetic diversity of strains circulating worldwide. Many G and P genotype combinations have been described over the years, varying regionally and temporally, especially in developing countries. However, the most common G and P genotype combinations identified in RVA human strains worldwide are G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G4P[8] and G9P[8]. RVA genotype G1P[8] strains are responsible for more than 50% of child infections worldwide and component of the two vaccines (Rotarix® [RV1] and RotaTeq® [RV5]) licensed globally. For a better understanding of the evolutionary mechanisms of this genotype in Brazil, phylogenetic analyses based on the 11 RVA genome segments (genomic constellation) from 90 G1P[8] RVA strains collected in two eras - (i) pre-vaccination with RV1 (1996-February 2006); (ii) post-vaccination (March 2006-2013) - in different Brazilian states were performed. The results showed the Wa-like genomic constellation of the Brazilian G1P[8] strains with a I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 specificity, except for two strains (rj14055-07 and ba19030-10) that belong to a I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T3-E1-H1 genomic constellation, evidencing the occurrence of reassortment (Wa-like×AU-1-like) of the NSP3 gene. Reassortment events were also demonstrated between Brazilian G1P[8] strains and the RV1 vaccine strain in some genes in vaccinated and unvaccinated children. VP7 and VP8* antigenic site analysis showed that the amino acid substitutions observed in samples collected after the introduction of RV1 in Brazil were already detected in samples collected in the 1980s and 1990s, suggesting that mass Brazilian RV1 vaccination had no impact on the diversity observed inside antigenic sites for these two proteins.

  17. Comparison of probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria effects, immune responses and rotavirus vaccines and infection in different host species.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2016-04-01

    Different probiotic strains of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium genera possess significant and widely acknowledged health-promoting and immunomodulatory properties. They also provide an affordable means for prevention and treatment of various infectious, allergic and inflammatory conditions as demonstrated in numerous human and animal studies. Despite the ample evidence of protective effects of these probiotics against rotavirus (RV) infection and disease, the precise immune mechanisms of this protection remain largely undefined, because of limited mechanistic research possible in humans and investigated in the majority of animal models. Additionally, while most human clinical probiotic trials are well-standardized using the same strains, uniform dosages, regimens of the probiotic treatments and similar host age, animal studies often lack standardization, have variable experimental designs, and non-uniform and sometime limited selection of experimental variables or observational parameters. This review presents selected data on different probiotic strains of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria and summarizes the knowledge of their immunomodulatory properties and the associated protection against RV disease in diverse host species including neonates.

  18. Detection of the emerging rotavirus G12P[8] genotype at high frequency in brazil in 2014: Successive replacement of predominant strains after vaccine introduction.

    PubMed

    Luchs, Adriana; Cilli, Audrey; Morillo, Simone Guadagnucci; Gregório, Debora de Souza; de Souza, Karen Aparecida Farias; Vieira, Heloísa Rosa; Fernandes, Adeline de Mira; Carmona, Rita de Cássia Compagnoli; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-04-01

    The continuum characterization of rotavirus (RVA) genotypes is essential to understand how vaccine introduction could impact virus epidemiology. In the present study, an unexpected rapid changing pattern of RVA genotypes distribution in Brazilian population during three followed seasons is described. From January/2012 to December/2014, a total of 3441 fecal specimens were collected from collaborating centers across Southern, Southeastern and Midwest of Brazil. All specimens were screened for RVA using ELISA, and genotyped by RT-PCR. Differences in proportions were tested using Chi-Squares. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RVA was detected in 19.7% (677/3441). Among RVA positive cases (n=677), a total of 652 (96.3%) samples were successfully amplified by RT-PCR. G3P[8] remained prevalent in 2012 (37.6%, 69/185) and 2013 (40.1%, 74/186) (χ(2)=0.107, p=0.743), but declined markedly in 2014 (3.5%, 10/281) (χ(2)=71.770, p=0.000). G12P[8] was second highest strain in 2012 (22.7%, 42/185), decrease rapidly in 2013 (2.7%, 5/186) (χ(2)=26.224, p=0.000) and re-emerged as the predominant genotype in 2014 (86.6%, 243/281) (χ(2)=118.299, p=0.000). From July/2014, G12P[8] was the single genotype detected in all regions studied. The sudden emergence, spread and predominance of G12P[8] strain in Brazil, raised the hypothesis of a possible G12 outbreak being in progress. Nationally, the long term decline in gastroenteritis hospitalization observed in the country after RVA vaccine introduction was confirmed. Nevertheless, the sharp increase in diarrhea hospitalization prevalence from 2013 to 2014 observed in Southern and Southeastern regions is consistent with what appears to be an outbreak of G12P[8]. Continued surveillance is needed to verify the effectiveness of the RotarixTM vaccine in Brazil together with potential emergence of unusual genotypes.

  19. Safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of a recombinant, genetically engineered, live-attenuated vaccine against canine blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Krajaejun, Theerapong; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie; Bass, Chris; Filutowicz, Hanna I; Legendre, Alfred M; Klein, Bruce S

    2011-05-01

    Blastomycosis is a severe, commonly fatal infection caused by the dimorphic fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis in dogs that live in the United States, Canada, and parts of Africa. The cost of treating an infection can be expensive, and no vaccine against this infection is commercially available. A genetically engineered live-attenuated strain of B. dermatitidis lacking the major virulence factor BAD-1 successfully vaccinates against lethal experimental infection in mice. Here we studied the safety, toxicity, and immunogenicity of this strain as a vaccine in dogs, using 25 beagles at a teaching laboratory and 78 foxhounds in a field trial. In the beagles, escalating doses of live vaccine ranging from 2 × 10⁴ to 2 × 10⁷ yeast cells given subcutaneously were safe and did not disseminate to the lung or induce systemic illness, but a dose of < 2 × 10⁶ yeast cells induced less fever and local inflammation. A vaccine dose of 10⁵ yeast cells was also well tolerated in vaccinated foxhounds who had never had blastomycosis; however, vaccinated dogs with prior infection had more local reactions at the vaccine site. The draining lymph node cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes from vaccinated dogs demonstrated gamma interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) specifically in response to stimulation with Blastomyces antigens. Thus, the live-attenuated vaccine against blastomycosis studied here proved safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic in dogs and merits further studies of vaccine efficacy.

  20. The rotavirus experience in Mexico: discovery to control.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manish M; Parashar, Umesh D; Santosham, Mathuram; Richardson, Vesta

    2013-02-01

    The recent introduction of a rotavirus vaccine program in Mexico to control rotavirus disease, a common killer of children worldwide, has dramatically reduced the number of Mexican children dying and being hospitalized because of diarrhea. The successful introduction of a rotavirus vaccine program was preceded by several decades of focused research efforts to document the burden of disease and to generate the knowledge base to develop and deploy a vaccine. The postlicensure experience from Mexico demonstrates that evaluating the impact and safety of the vaccination program is vitally necessary for sustaining it. All in all, the immensely successful Mexico experience with control of rotavirus disease, if copied, could yield tremendously favorable results for children and parents worldwide.

  1. 9 CFR 113.312 - Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... calculations, five replicate virus titrations shall be conducted on a sample of the vaccine virus dilution used... rehydrated vaccine which, on the basis of previous titrations, has been diluted to the proposed minimum... disrupted and undiluted cell fluids from each lot shall be tested. (2) Virus titrations. Final...

  2. 9 CFR 113.312 - Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... calculations, five replicate virus titrations shall be conducted on a sample of the vaccine virus dilution used... rehydrated vaccine which, on the basis of previous titrations, has been diluted to the proposed minimum... disrupted and undiluted cell fluids from each lot shall be tested. (2) Virus titrations. Final...

  3. 9 CFR 113.312 - Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... calculations, five replicate virus titrations shall be conducted on a sample of the vaccine virus dilution used... rehydrated vaccine which, on the basis of previous titrations, has been diluted to the proposed minimum... disrupted and undiluted cell fluids from each lot shall be tested. (2) Virus titrations. Final...

  4. 9 CFR 113.312 - Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... calculations, five replicate virus titrations shall be conducted on a sample of the vaccine virus dilution used... rehydrated vaccine which, on the basis of previous titrations, has been diluted to the proposed minimum... disrupted and undiluted cell fluids from each lot shall be tested. (2) Virus titrations. Final...

  5. 9 CFR 113.312 - Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... calculations, five replicate virus titrations shall be conducted on a sample of the vaccine virus dilution used... rehydrated vaccine which, on the basis of previous titrations, has been diluted to the proposed minimum... disrupted and undiluted cell fluids from each lot shall be tested. (2) Virus titrations. Final...

  6. Comparative genomics of the Mycobacterium signaling architecture and implications for a novel live attenuated Tuberculosis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peifu; Xie, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), remains a major threat to global public health. A new TB vaccine affording superior immune protection to M. bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is imperative. The advantage of a live attenuated vaccine is that it can mimic the bona fide pathogen, elicit immune responses similar to natural infection, and potentially provide more protection than other vaccines. BCG, the only vaccine and a live attenuated vaccine that is the result of cumulative mutations by serial passage of M. bovis, has provided clues for the construction of novel improved vaccines. A strategy is put forward for identifying a new live attenuated TB vaccine generated by cumulative mutation based on M.tb. Given the important role of the M.tb signaling network consisting of a two-component system, eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr protein kinase system and sigma factor system based on comparisons among M.tb H37Rv, M. bovis, and BCG, we have put a premium on this signaling circuit as the starting point for the generation of an attenuated TB vaccine.

  7. The Case for Live Attenuated Vaccines against the Neglected Zoonotic Diseases Brucellosis and Bovine Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Aseem; Cabello, Ana; Akoolo, Lavoisier; Rice-Ficht, Allison; Arenas-Gamboa, Angela; McMurray, David; Ficht, Thomas A.; de Figueiredo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination of humans and animals with live attenuated organisms has proven to be an effective means of combatting some important infectious diseases. In fact, the 20th century witnessed tremendous improvements in human and animal health worldwide as a consequence of large-scale vaccination programs with live attenuated vaccines (LAVs). Here, we use the neglected zoonotic diseases brucellosis and bovine tuberculosis (BTb) caused by Brucella spp. and Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), respectively, as comparative models to outline the merits of LAV platforms with emphasis on molecular strategies that have been pursued to generate LAVs with enhanced vaccine safety and efficacy profiles. Finally, we discuss the prospects of LAV platforms in the fight against brucellosis and BTb and outline new avenues for future research towards developing effective vaccines using LAV platforms. PMID:27537413

  8. The Case for Live Attenuated Vaccines against the Neglected Zoonotic Diseases Brucellosis and Bovine Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Aseem; Cabello, Ana; Akoolo, Lavoisier; Rice-Ficht, Allison; Arenas-Gamboa, Angela; McMurray, David; Ficht, Thomas A; de Figueiredo, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Vaccination of humans and animals with live attenuated organisms has proven to be an effective means of combatting some important infectious diseases. In fact, the 20th century witnessed tremendous improvements in human and animal health worldwide as a consequence of large-scale vaccination programs with live attenuated vaccines (LAVs). Here, we use the neglected zoonotic diseases brucellosis and bovine tuberculosis (BTb) caused by Brucella spp. and Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), respectively, as comparative models to outline the merits of LAV platforms with emphasis on molecular strategies that have been pursued to generate LAVs with enhanced vaccine safety and efficacy profiles. Finally, we discuss the prospects of LAV platforms in the fight against brucellosis and BTb and outline new avenues for future research towards developing effective vaccines using LAV platforms. PMID:27537413

  9. Live RB51 vaccine lyophilized hydrogel formulations with increased shelf life for practical ballistic delivery.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Jonathan L; Christie, R James; Pollard, Emily J; Olsen, Steven C; Grainger, David W

    2016-02-10

    Ballistic delivery capability is essential to delivering vaccines and other therapeutics effectively to both livestock and wildlife in many global scenarios. Here, lyophilized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-glycolide dimethacrylate crosslinked but degradable hydrogels were assessed as payload vehicles to protect and deliver a viable bacterial vaccine, Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51), ballistically using commercial thermoplastic cellulosic degradable biobullets. Degradable PEG hydrogel rods loaded with ∼10(10) live RB51 bacteria (CFUs) were fabricated using three different polymerization methods, cut into fixed-sized payload segments, and lyophilized. Resulting dense, glassy RB51 vaccine-loaded monoliths were inserted into thermoplastic biobullet 100-μL payload chambers. Viability studies of lyophilized formulations assessed as a function of time and storage temperature supported the abilities of several conditions to produce acceptable vaccine shelf-lives. Fired from specifically designed air rifles, gel-loaded biobullets exhibit down-range ballistic properties (i.e., kinetic energy, trajectory, accuracy) similar to unloaded biobullets. Delivered to bovine tissue, these hydrogels rehydrate rapidly by swelling in tissue fluids, with complete hydration observed after 5h in serum. Live RB51 vaccine exhibited excellent viability following carrier polymerization, lyophilization, and storage, at levels sufficient for vaccine dosing to wild range bison, the intended target. These data validate lyophilized degradable PEG hydrogel rods as useful drug carriers for remote delivery of both live vaccines and other therapeutics to livestock, wildlife, or other free-range targets using ballistic technologies. PMID:26705151

  10. Standardization of large scale production of homologous live attenuated PPR vaccine in India.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Raveendra; Gomes, Amitha R; Byregowda, S M; Hugar, Paramananda; Giridhar, P; Renukaprasad, C

    2008-01-01

    Live attenuated homologous vaccine against peste des petits ruminants of sheep and goats was produced on a large scale basis in roller culture bottles using seed virus developed at the Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Muktheswar, India. Vero cells between 130-150 passages with six percent foetal calf serum were used for the production of vaccine. The cells were infected with 0.01 multiplicity of infection and harvested when the cytopathic effect was 80%. The vaccine was freezedried in order to maintain the stability of the vaccine. Identity test and titration was performed and the vaccine titre was monitored to be minimum of 10(5)/100 doses. In-house sterility tests and quality control tests using experimental animals and small ruminants were performed. The vacuum and moisture content of the vaccine were also regulated to be within the normal limits.

  11. Increasing uptake of live attenuated influenza vaccine among children in the United States, 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Loren; Pabst, Laura J; Chaves, Sandra S

    2015-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends annual influenza vaccination for all persons in the United States aged ≥6 months. On June 25, 2014, ACIP preferentially recommended live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) for healthy children aged 2-8 years. Little is known about national LAIV uptake. To determine uptake of LAIV relative to inactivated influenza vaccine, we analyzed vaccination records from six immunization information system sentinel sites (approximately 10% of US population). LAIV usage increased over time in all sites. Among children 2-8 years of age vaccinated for influenza, exclusive LAIV usage in the collective sentinel site area increased from 20.1% (2008-09 season) to 38.0% (2013-14). During 2013-14, at least half of vaccinated children received LAIV in Minnesota (50.0%) and North Dakota (55.5%). Increasing LAIV usage suggests formulation acceptability, and this preexisting trend offers a favorable context for implementation of ACIP's preferential recommendation.

  12. Modified live virus vaccine induces a distinct immune response profile compared to inactivated influenza A virus vaccines in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and antigenic diversity within H1 influenza A virus (IAV) subtypes circulating in swine is increasing. The need for cross-protective influenza vaccines in swine is necessary as the virus becomes more diverse. This study compared the humoral and cell-mediated immune response of modified live ...

  13. Live attenuated HIV vaccines: predicting the tradeoff between efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Blower, S M; Koelle, K; Kirschner, D E; Mills, J

    2001-03-13

    The utility of live attenuated vaccines for controlling HIV epidemics is being debated. Live attenuated HIV vaccines (LAHVs) could be extremely effective in protecting against infection with wild-type strains, but may not be completely safe as the attenuated strain could cause AIDS in some vaccinated individuals. We present a theoretical framework for evaluating the consequences of the tradeoff between vaccine efficacy (in terms of preventing new infections with wild-type strains) and safety (in terms of vaccine-induced AIDS deaths). We use our framework to predict, for Zimbabwe and Thailand, the epidemiological impact of 1,000 different (specified by efficacy and safety characteristics) LAHVs. We predict that paradoxically: (i) in Zimbabwe (where transmission is high) LAHVs would significantly decrease the AIDS death rate, but (ii) in Thailand (where transmission is low) exactly the same vaccines (in terms of efficacy and safety characteristics) would increase the AIDS death rate. Our results imply that a threshold transmission rate exists that determines whether any given LAHV has a beneficial or a detrimental impact. We also determine the vaccine perversity point, which is defined in terms of the fraction of vaccinated individuals who progress to AIDS as a result of the vaccine strain. Vaccination with any LAHV that causes more than 5% of vaccinated individuals to progress to AIDS in 25 years would, even 50 years later, lead to perversity (i.e., increase the annual AIDS death rate) in Thailand; these same vaccines would lead to decreases in the annual AIDS death rate in Zimbabwe.

  14. Application of a live varicella vaccine in children with acute leukemia or other malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Izawa, T; Ihara, T; Hattori, A; Iwasa, T; Kamiya, H; Sakurai, M; Takahashi, M

    1977-12-01

    A live varicella vaccine was used in 11 susceptible children in remission from acute leukemia, ten of whom had been in remission for six months or less, and in 6 children with neuroblastoma and retinoblastoma. In the immunological checkup before vaccination, most of them showed a positive reaction in the skin tests with dinitrochlorobenzene, phytohemagglutinin, purified protein derivative, and viral antigens. Leukopenia (three cases, less than 3,000/cu mm) and decreased IgG level (two cases, 380 mg/dl and 445 mg/dl) were observed in the children with leukemia. Anticancer medication was suspended from one week before vaccination to one week after vaccination. The only clinical reaction was a minute rash that appeared three weeks after vaccination in two children with leukemia and that disappeared within three days. Serological responses by complement fixing and neutralizing (NT) tests were detected in all the vaccinated children four weeks after vaccination, and NT antibody was still detected 28 months after vaccination in the two patients tested. Three of the vaccines were exposed to natural varicella at home and in the classroom 2 to 18 months after vaccination, but they were free from any varicella symptoms.

  15. Efficacy of a live attenuated vaccine in classical swine fever virus postnatally persistently infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-González, Sara; Perez-Simó, Marta; Muñoz, Marta; Bohorquez, José Alejandro; Rosell, Rosa; Summerfield, Artur; Domingo, Mariano; Ruggli, Nicolas; Ganges, Llilianne

    2015-07-09

    Classical swine fever (CSF) causes major losses in pig farming, with various degrees of disease severity. Efficient live attenuated vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV) are used routinely in endemic countries. However, despite intensive vaccination programs in these areas for more than 20 years, CSF has not been eradicated. Molecular epidemiology studies in these regions suggests that the virus circulating in the field has evolved under the positive selection pressure exerted by the immune response to the vaccine, leading to new attenuated viral variants. Recent work by our group demonstrated that a high proportion of persistently infected piglets can be generated by early postnatal infection with low and moderately virulent CSFV strains. Here, we studied the immune response to a hog cholera lapinised virus vaccine (HCLV), C-strain, in six-week-old persistently infected pigs following post-natal infection. CSFV-negative pigs were vaccinated as controls. The humoral and interferon gamma responses as well as the CSFV RNA loads were monitored for 21 days post-vaccination. No vaccine viral RNA was detected in the serum samples and tonsils from CSFV postnatally persistently infected pigs for 21 days post-vaccination. Furthermore, no E2-specific antibody response or neutralising antibody titres were shown in CSFV persistently infected vaccinated animals. Likewise, no of IFN-gamma producing cell response against CSFV or PHA was observed. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the absence of a response to vaccination in CSFV persistently infected pigs.

  16. Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program annual report, 2014.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Carl D; Roczo-Farkas, Suzie

    2015-09-30

    The Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program, together with collaborating laboratories Australia-wide, reports the rotavirus genotypes responsible for the hospitalisation of children with acute gastroenteritis. During the survey period of 1 January to 31 December 2014, 1,022 faecal samples were referred for rotavirus G and P genotype analysis, and of these 733 were confirmed as rotavirus positive. A total of 480 specimens were collected from children under 5 years of age, while 253 were from older children and adults. Genotype analysis of the 733 rotavirus samples collected from both children and adults revealed that G12P[8] was the dominant genotype in this reporting period, identified in 29.6% of strains nationally. Genotype G1P[8] was the 2nd most common strain nationally, representing 22.9% of samples, followed by genotype G3P[8] (14.9%). This report highlights the continued significance of G12P[8] strains as the major cause of disease in this population. The genotype distribution was slightly altered when the analysis was restricted to samples collected from children under 5 years of age, with G1P[8] being the dominant genotype (29%) followed by G12P[8] as the 2nd most common genotype (26%). Fluctuations in genotype distribution were also observed based on the vaccine type in use. Genotype G12P[8] was more common in states and territories using RotaTeq, while G1P[8] was more common in the locations using Rotarix. This survey highlights the yearly fluctuations in rotavirus genotypes observed since vaccine introduction. The continuation of G12P[8] as the dominant genotype further illustrates the dynamic and diversity present in the wild-type rotavirus population evident in the Australian population since vaccine introduction.

  17. Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program annual report, 2013.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Carl D; Roczo-Farkas, Susie

    2014-12-31

    This report from the Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program, together with collaborating laboratories Australia-wide, describes the rotavirus genotypes responsible for the hospitalisation of children with acute gastroenteritis during the period 1 January to 31 December 2013. During the survey period, 1,035 faecal samples were referred for rotavirus G and P genotype analysis. Of these 828 were confirmed as rotavirus positive. A total of 503 specimens were collected from children under 5 years of age, while 325 were from older children and adults. Genotype analysis of the 828 rotavirus samples collected from both children and adults revealed that G12P[8] was the dominant genotype in this reporting period, identified in 33% of strains nationally. Genotype G3P[8] was the second most common strain nationally, representing 31% of samples, followed by genotype G2P[4] (14%). This represents the first report where G12P[8] strains are the major cause of disease in this population. The genotype distribution was slightly altered when the analysis was restricted to samples collected from children under 5 years of age, with G3P[8] being the dominant genotype (39.2%) followed by G12P[8] as the second most common genotype (31%). Fluctuations in genotype distribution were also observed based on the vaccine type in use. Genotype G12P[8] was more common in states and territories using RotaTeq, while G3P[8] was more common in the locations using Rotarix. This survey highlights the yearly fluctuations in rotavirus genotypes observed since vaccine introduction, with changes in dominant genotypes an annual event. The emergence of G12P[8] as the dominant genotype further illustrates the ongoing changes in the wild type rotavirus population evident in the Australian population since vaccine introduction.

  18. Methods to Evaluate the Preclinical Safety and Immunogenicity of Genetically Modified Live-Attenuated Leishmania Parasite Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Dey, Ranadhir; Ismail, Nevien; Avishek, Kumar; Salotra, Poonam; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Satoskar, Abhay; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2016-01-01

    Live-attenuated parasite vaccines are being explored as potential vaccine candidates since other approaches of vaccination have not produced an effective vaccine so far. In order for live-attenuated parasite vaccines to be tested in preclinical studies and possibly in clinical studies, the safety and immunogenicity of these organisms must be rigorously evaluated. Here we describe methods to test persistence in the immunized host and immunogenicity, and to identify biomarkers of vaccine safety and efficacy with particular reference to genetically attenuated Leishmania parasites.

  19. Methods to Evaluate the Preclinical Safety and Immunogenicity of Genetically Modified Live-Attenuated Leishmania Parasite Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Dey, Ranadhir; Ismail, Nevien; Avishek, Kumar; Salotra, Poonam; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Satoskar, Abhay; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2016-01-01

    Live-attenuated parasite vaccines are being explored as potential vaccine candidates since other approaches of vaccination have not produced an effective vaccine so far. In order for live-attenuated parasite vaccines to be tested in preclinical studies and possibly in clinical studies, the safety and immunogenicity of these organisms must be rigorously evaluated. Here we describe methods to test persistence in the immunized host and immunogenicity, and to identify biomarkers of vaccine safety and efficacy with particular reference to genetically attenuated Leishmania parasites. PMID:27076157

  20. Experimental evaluation of inactivated and live attenuated vaccines against Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides.

    PubMed

    Mwirigi, Martin; Nkando, Isabel; Aye, Racheal; Soi, Reuben; Ochanda, Horace; Berberov, Emil; Potter, Andrew; Gerdts, Volker; Perez-Casal, Jose; Naessens, Jan; Wesonga, Hezron

    2016-01-01

    The current control method for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in Africa is vaccination with a live, attenuated strain of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm). However, this method is not very efficient and often causes serious adverse reactions. Several studies have attempted to induce protection using inactivated mycoplasma, but with widely contradictory results. Therefore, we compared the protective capacity of the live T1/44 vaccine with two inactivated preparations of Mmm strain Afadé, inoculated with an adjuvant. Protection was measured after a challenge with Afadé. The protection levels were 31%, 80.8% and 74.1% for the formalin-inactivated, heat-inactivated and live attenuated preparations, respectively. These findings indicate that low doses of heat-inactivated Mmm can offer protection to a level similar to the current live attenuated (T1/44) vaccine formulation.

  1. Experimental evaluation of inactivated and live attenuated vaccines against Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides.

    PubMed

    Mwirigi, Martin; Nkando, Isabel; Aye, Racheal; Soi, Reuben; Ochanda, Horace; Berberov, Emil; Potter, Andrew; Gerdts, Volker; Perez-Casal, Jose; Naessens, Jan; Wesonga, Hezron

    2016-01-01

    The current control method for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in Africa is vaccination with a live, attenuated strain of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm). However, this method is not very efficient and often causes serious adverse reactions. Several studies have attempted to induce protection using inactivated mycoplasma, but with widely contradictory results. Therefore, we compared the protective capacity of the live T1/44 vaccine with two inactivated preparations of Mmm strain Afadé, inoculated with an adjuvant. Protection was measured after a challenge with Afadé. The protection levels were 31%, 80.8% and 74.1% for the formalin-inactivated, heat-inactivated and live attenuated preparations, respectively. These findings indicate that low doses of heat-inactivated Mmm can offer protection to a level similar to the current live attenuated (T1/44) vaccine formulation. PMID:26827840

  2. A potent Brucella abortus 2308 Δery live vaccine allows for the differentiation between natural and vaccinated infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junbo; Yin, Shuanghong; Guo, Fei; Meng, Ren; Chen, Chuangfu; Zhang, Hui; Li, Zhiqiang; Fu, Qiang; Shi, Huijun; Hu, Shengwei; Ni, Wei; Li, Tiansen; Zhang, Ke

    2014-08-01

    Brucellosis is a globally distributed zoonotic disease that causes animal and human diseases. However, the current Brucella abortus vaccines (S19 and RB51) are deficient; they can cause abortion in pregnant animals. Moreover, when the vaccine S19 is used, tests cannot differentiate natural from vaccinated infection. Therefore, a safer and more potent vaccine is needed. A Brucella abortus 2308 ery promoter mutant (Δery) was constructed to overcome these drawbacks. The growth of the Δery mutant was significantly attenuated in macrophages and mice and induced high protective immunity in mice. Moreover, Δery induced an anti-Brucella-specific IgG (immunoglobulin G) response and stimulated the expression of interferon-gamma (INF-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Furthermore, the expression of EryA antigen allowed for the serological differentiation between natural and vaccinated infection in mice. These results indicate that the Δery mutant is a potential attenuated live vaccine candidate against virulent Brucella abortus 2308 (S2308) infection.

  3. Influenza vaccination for the pediatric patient: a focus on the new intranasal, cold-adapted, live attenuated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jennifer M; Reilly, Joan C; Salazar, Juan C

    2004-04-01

    FluMist is the first live attenuated, cold-adapted intranasal influenza vaccine (LAIV) approved for the prevention of influenza A and B. Clinical trials have shown that annual vaccination with LAIV is effective for the prevention of influenza. LAIV appears well tolerated in healthy patients 5-49 years of age. The most common adverse events are abdominal pain, chills, cough, diarrhea, headache, irritability, lethargy, muscle aches, otitis media, rhinitis, sinusitis, sore throat, and vomiting. FluMist has a novel intranasal route of administration that allows for influenza prevention without a painful intramuscular injection. Barriers preventing acceptance of LAIV include defining the appropriate patient population, cost, and insurance coverage.

  4. Vaccination of pigs against swine influenza viruses by using an NS1-truncated modified live-virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Richt, Jürgen A; Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Lager, Kelly M; Vincent, Amy L; Loiacono, Christina M; Janke, Bruce H; Wu, Wai-Hong; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Webby, Richard J; Solórzano, Alicia; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2006-11-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIV) naturally infect pigs and can be transmitted to humans. In the pig, genetic reassortment to create novel influenza subtypes by mixing avian, human, and swine influenza viruses is possible. An SIV vaccine inducing cross-protective immunity between different subtypes and strains circulating in pigs is highly desirable. Previously, we have shown that an H3N2 SIV (A/swine/Texas/4199-2/98 [TX98]) containing a deleted NS1 gene expressing a truncated NS1 protein of 126 amino acids, NS1black triangle126, was attenuated in swine. In this study, 4-week-old pigs were vaccinated with the TX98 NS1black triangle126 modified live virus (MLV). Ten days after boosting, pigs were challenged with wild-type homologous H3N2 or heterosubtypic H1N1 SIV and sacrificed 5 days later. The MLV was highly attenuated and completely protected against challenge with the homologous virus. Vaccinated pigs challenged with the heterosubtypic H1N1 virus demonstrated macroscopic lung lesions similar to those of the unvaccinated H1N1 control pigs. Remarkably, vaccinated pigs challenged with the H1N1 SIV had significantly lower microscopic lung lesions and less virus shedding from the respiratory tract than did unvaccinated, H1N1-challenged pigs. All vaccinated pigs developed significant levels of hemagglutination inhibition and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titers in serum and mucosal immunoglobulin A antibodies against H3N2 SIV antigens. Vaccinated pigs were seronegative for NS1, indicating the potential use of the TX98 NS1black triangle126 MLV as a vaccine to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals.

  5. Oral vaccination reduces the incidence of tuberculosis in free-living brushtail possums

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, D. M.; Ramsey, D. S. L.; Cross, M. L.; Aldwell, F. E.; de Lisle, G. W.; Buddle, B. M.

    2009-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (Tb) caused by Mycobacterium bovis has proved refractory to eradication from domestic livestock in countries with wildlife disease reservoirs. Vaccination of wild hosts offers a way of controlling Tb in livestock without wildlife culling. This study was conducted in a Tb-endemic region of New Zealand, where the introduced Australian brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) is the main wildlife reservoir of Tb. Possums were trapped and vaccinated using a prototype oral-delivery system to deliver the Tb vaccine bacille Calmette–Guerin. Vaccinated and control possums were matched according to age, sex and location, re-trapped bimonthly and assessed for Tb status by palpation and lesion aspiration; the site was depopulated after 2 years and post-mortem examinations were conducted to further identify clinical Tb cases and subclinical infection. Significantly fewer culture-confirmed Tb cases were recorded in vaccinated possums (1/51) compared with control animals (12/71); the transition probability from susceptible to infected was significantly reduced in both males and females by vaccination. Vaccine efficacy was estimated at 95 per cent (87–100%) for females and 96 per cent (82–99%) for males. Hence, this trial demonstrates that orally delivered live bacterial vaccines can significantly protect wildlife against natural disease exposure, indicating that wildlife vaccination, along with existing control methods, could be used to eradicate Tb from domestic animals. PMID:19493904

  6. Sequence Diversity of VP4 and VP7 Genes of Human Rotavirus Strains in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Moneim, Ahmed S; Al-Malky, Mater I R; Alsulaimani, Adnan A A; Abuelsaad, Abdelaziz S A; Mohamed, Imad; Ismail, Ayman K

    2015-12-01

    Group A rotavirus is responsible for inducing severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. Rotavirus vaccines are used to control the disease in many countries. In the current study, the sequences of human rotavirus G and P types in Saudi Arabia are reported and compared to different relevant published sequences. In addition, the VP4 and VP7 genes of the G1P[8] strains are compared to different antigenic epitopes of the rotavirus vaccines. Stool samples were collected from children under 2 years suffering from severe diarrhea. Screening of the rotavirus-positive samples was performed with rapid antigen detection kit. RNA was amplified from rotavirus-positive samples by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay for both VP4 and VP7 genes. Direct sequencing of the VP4 and VP7 genes was conducted and the obtained sequences were compared to each other and to the rotavirus vaccines. Both G1P[8] G1P[4] genotypes were detected. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the detected strains belong to G1 lineage 1 and 2, P[8] lineage 3, and to P[4] lineage 5. Multiple amino acid substitutions were detected between the Saudi RVA strains and the commonly used vaccines. The current findings emphasize the importance of the continuous surveillance of the circulating rotavirus strains, which is crucial for monitoring virus evolution and helping in predicting the protection level afforded by rotavirus vaccines.

  7. CANINE DISTEMPER VIRUS ANTIBODY TITERS IN DOMESTIC CATS AFTER DELIVERY OF A LIVE ATTENUATED VIRUS VACCINE.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Edward; Sadler, Ryan; Rush, Robert; Seimon, Tracie; Tomaszewicz, Ania; Fleetwood, Ellen A; McAloose, Denise; Wilkes, Rebecca P

    2016-06-01

    Three methods for delivering a live attenuated canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine to domestic cats ( Felis catus ) were investigated, as models for developing vaccination protocols for tigers (Panthera tigris). Twenty domestic cats were randomly divided into four treatment groups: saline injection (negative controls); and oral, intranasal, and subcutaneous vaccinates. Cats were injected with saline or a CDV vaccine (Nobivac DP, Merck) at wk 0 and 4. Blood and nasal swabs were collected at wk 0 (prior to the initial vaccination) and weekly thereafter for 9 wk. Urine samples were collected on wk 1 to 9 after initial vaccination. Forty-nine weeks following the initial vaccination series, three cats from the subcutaneous group and three cats from the intranasal group were revaccinated. Blood was collected immediately prior, and 7 and 21 days subsequent to revaccination. Nasal swabs and urine samples were collected from each cat prior to wk 49 revaccination and daily for 7 days thereafter. Nasal swabs and urine were analyzed by quantitative PCR for vaccine virus presence. Sera were tested for CDV antibodies by virus neutralization. All cats were sero-negative for CDV antibodies at the beginning of the study, and saline-injected cats remained sero-negative throughout the study. A dramatic anamnestic response was seen following wk 4 subcutaneous vaccinations, with titers peaking at wk 6 (geometric mean = 2,435.5). Following wk 49 revaccination, subcutaneous vaccinates again mounted impressive titers (wk 52 geometric mean = 2,048). Revaccination of the intranasal group cats at wk 49 produced a small increase in titers (wk 52 geometric mean = 203). CDV viral RNA was detected in six nasal swabs but no urine samples, demonstrating low viral shedding postvaccination. The strong antibody response to subcutaneous vaccination and the lack of adverse effects suggest this vaccine is safe and potentially protective against CDV infection in domestic cats.

  8. Unique immunogenicity of hepatitis B virus DNA vaccine presented by live-attenuated Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Woo, P C; Wong, L P; Zheng, B J; Yuen, K Y

    2001-04-01

    A novel vaccine for hepatitis B virus (HBV) was designed by putting a naked DNA vaccine carrying hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) into live-attenuated Salmonella typhimurium. Mucosal immunization by the oral route in mice showed significantly stronger cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response than recombinant HBsAg vaccination (P < 0.01 at an effector:target ratio of 100:1), while comparable to intramuscular naked DNA immunization at all effector:target ratios. Contrary to previous reports on naked DNA vaccines given intramuscularly, the IgG antibody response induced by the mucosal DNA vaccine is relatively weak when compared to recombinant HBsAg vaccine (P < 0.001 at day 21). These findings are supported by a high interferon-gamma but a low interleukin-4 level detected in the supernatant of splenic cell cultures obtained from mucosally immunized mice. As distinct to recombinant HBsAg vaccine which is effective for protection, oral mucosal DNA vaccine should be considered as a candidate for therapeutic immunization in chronic HBV infection, donor immunization before adoptive transfer of HBV-specific CTL to HBsAg positive bone marrow transplant recipients, and immunization of non-responders to recombinant HBsAg vaccine. This strongly cellular and relatively absent humoral response may make this vaccine a better candidate as a therapeutic vaccine for chronic HBV carriers than naked DNA vaccines, as the humoral response is relatively less important for the clearance of HBV from hepatocytes, but its presence may lead to side effects such as serum sickness and immune complex deposition in chronic HBV carriers.

  9. CANINE DISTEMPER VIRUS ANTIBODY TITERS IN DOMESTIC CATS AFTER DELIVERY OF A LIVE ATTENUATED VIRUS VACCINE.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Edward; Sadler, Ryan; Rush, Robert; Seimon, Tracie; Tomaszewicz, Ania; Fleetwood, Ellen A; McAloose, Denise; Wilkes, Rebecca P

    2016-06-01

    Three methods for delivering a live attenuated canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine to domestic cats ( Felis catus ) were investigated, as models for developing vaccination protocols for tigers (Panthera tigris). Twenty domestic cats were randomly divided into four treatment groups: saline injection (negative controls); and oral, intranasal, and subcutaneous vaccinates. Cats were injected with saline or a CDV vaccine (Nobivac DP, Merck) at wk 0 and 4. Blood and nasal swabs were collected at wk 0 (prior to the initial vaccination) and weekly thereafter for 9 wk. Urine samples were collected on wk 1 to 9 after initial vaccination. Forty-nine weeks following the initial vaccination series, three cats from the subcutaneous group and three cats from the intranasal group were revaccinated. Blood was collected immediately prior, and 7 and 21 days subsequent to revaccination. Nasal swabs and urine samples were collected from each cat prior to wk 49 revaccination and daily for 7 days thereafter. Nasal swabs and urine were analyzed by quantitative PCR for vaccine virus presence. Sera were tested for CDV antibodies by virus neutralization. All cats were sero-negative for CDV antibodies at the beginning of the study, and saline-injected cats remained sero-negative throughout the study. A dramatic anamnestic response was seen following wk 4 subcutaneous vaccinations, with titers peaking at wk 6 (geometric mean = 2,435.5). Following wk 49 revaccination, subcutaneous vaccinates again mounted impressive titers (wk 52 geometric mean = 2,048). Revaccination of the intranasal group cats at wk 49 produced a small increase in titers (wk 52 geometric mean = 203). CDV viral RNA was detected in six nasal swabs but no urine samples, demonstrating low viral shedding postvaccination. The strong antibody response to subcutaneous vaccination and the lack of adverse effects suggest this vaccine is safe and potentially protective against CDV infection in domestic cats. PMID:27468028

  10. Development of TV003/TV005, a single dose, highly immunogenic live attenuated dengue vaccine; what makes this vaccine different from the Sanofi-Pasteur CYD™ vaccine?

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is caused by four serotype-distinct dengue viruses (DENVs), and developing a multivalent vaccine against dengue has not been straightforward since partial immunity to DENV may predispose to more severe disease upon subsequent DENV infection. The vaccine that is furthest along in development is CYD™, a live attenuated tetravalent vaccine (LATV) produced by Sanofi Pasteur. Although the multi-dose vaccine demonstrated protection against severe dengue, its overall efficacy was limited by DENV serotype, serostatus at vaccination, region and age. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has developed the LATV dengue vaccines TV003/TV005. A single dose of either TV003 or TV005 induced seroconversion to four DENV serotypes in 74-92% (TV003) and 90% (TV005) of flavivirus seronegative adults and elicited near-sterilizing immunity to a second dose of vaccine administered 6-12 months later. The important differences in the structure, infectivity and immune responses to TV003/TV005 are compared with CYD™. PMID:26559731

  11. Effects of vaccination against bluetongue on milk production and quality in cattle vaccinated with live-attenuated monovalent type 2 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, A; Conte, A; Panichi, G; Calistri, P; Dessì, M; Foddis, F; Schintu, A; Caporale, V

    2004-01-01

    The first epidemic of bluetongue (BT) to affect the three regions of Sardinia, Sicily and Calabria (Italy) in 2000 induced high economic losses caused by the disease itself and by the cessation of ruminant movements both within, and out of, the infected areas. In order to reduce virus circulation, and to create a resistant livestock population, the Italian Ministry of Health ruled, in May 2001, that all sheep, cattle, goats and water buffalo, in infected and in neighbouring regions, be vaccinated. The live-attenuated BTV-2 monovalent vaccine produced by Onderstepoort Biological Products in South Africa was to be used. Accordingly, in 2002, 98.6% of the sheep and goats, and 88.1% of the cattle, on Sardinia were vaccinated. Included was the vaccination of >70% of the cattle in the province of Oristano where >18,000 dairy cows in >220 herds are concentrated in the municipality of Arborea (Oristano) and which account for 65-70% of the milk produced in Sardinia. Using data collected at the centralised dairy co-operative since 1999 the quantity and quality of milk produced before vaccination against bluetongue was compared to that produced after vaccination. The following variables were analysed: average milk production/cow/month, monthly average fat content (%), monthly average protein content (%), average monthly somatic cell count and average monthly platelet count. The findings indicate that vaccination against BTV-2 in Sardinian dairy cattle did not impact negatively upon milk quantity nor milk quality.

  12. Rotavirus landscape in Africa-Towards prevention and control: A report of the 8th African rotavirus symposium, Livingstone, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Cheryl; Mwenda, Jason; Chilengi, Roma

    2015-06-26

    The 8th African Rotavirus Symposium was held in Livingstone, Zambia from the 12-13 June 2014. Over 130 delegates from 35 countries - 28 from African nations - participated in this symposium, which included scientists, clinicians, immunisation managers, public health officials, policymakers and vaccine manufacturers. The theme for the symposium was Rotavirus Landscape in Africa-Towards Prevention and Control. At the time of the symposium, a total of 21 African countries had introduced the rotavirus vaccine into their national immunisation schedules. This meeting was particularly timely and relevant to review early data on vaccine adoption and impact from these countries. The concluding panel discussion proposed several recommendations for areas of focus moving forward in rotavirus advocacy and research.

  13. Effect of vaccination with a multivalent modified-live viral vaccine on reproductive performance in synchronized beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Walz, Paul H; Edmondson, Misty A; Riddell, Kay P; Braden, Timothy D; Gard, Julie A; Bayne, Jenna; Joiner, Kellye S; Galik, Patricia K; Zuidhof, Sjoert; Givens, M Daniel

    2015-03-15

    Prebreeding vaccination should provide fetal and abortive protection against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) but not impede reproduction when administered to cattle before estrus synchronization and breeding. The objective was to assess reproductive performance when naive beef heifers were vaccinated with modified-live viral (MLV) vaccine 2 days after unsynchronized estrus, and then revaccinated with MLV vaccine at 10 or 31 days before synchronized natural breeding. Sixty beef heifers naive to BVDV and BoHV-1 were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups. Groups A and B (n = 20 per group) were vaccinated with MLV vaccine containing BVDV and BoHV-1 at 2 days after initial detected estrus, and then revaccinated 30 days later, which corresponded to 10 days (group A) or 31 days (group B) before synchronized natural breeding. Groups C and D (n = 10 per group) served as controls and were vaccinated with an inactivated vaccine that did not contain BVDV or BoHV-1 at the same time points as groups A and B, respectively. Estrous behavior was assessed using radio frequency technology. Estrus synchronization was performed, with initiation occurring at revaccination (groups A and C) or 21 days after revaccination (groups B and D). After synchronization, heifers were submitted to a bull breeding pasture for 45 days. At the end of the breeding period, heifers were assessed for pregnancy using ultrasonography. Progesterone concentrations were evaluated at estrus and 10 days after unsynchronized and synchronized estrus, at initial pregnancy check, and at the end of the study. All pregnant heifers in groups A and B and five pregnant heifers in group C were euthanized between 44 and 62 days of gestation and ovarian and conceptus tissues were assayed for BVDV and BoHV-1. Vaccination with MLV vaccine did not result in significant negative reproductive impact based on the duration of interestrus intervals, proportion of heifers

  14. Response of pheasants to live attenuated turkey rhinotracheitis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dalton, J R F; Niblett, J; Thrusfield, M V

    2002-09-21

    The entire crop of 18,120 pheasants for the 2000 rearing season (May 8 to August 7) of one estate in the south of England was vaccinated at one day and five weeks of age with a turkey rhinotracheitis (TRT) vaccine. Blood samples and oropharyngeal swabs were taken from the second week's hatching every three weeks throughout the growing season to assess the response of the birds. There was evidence of seroconversion in samples collected three weeks after vaccination, with positive titres being maintained in 33 per cent or more of the population up to at least 22 weeks of age. Positive titres were also recorded in samples taken on December 6 from shot birds between 22 and 30 weeks of age. Positive titres to infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) were identified in a high proportion of the poults as early as one day of age. Reverse-transcriptase PCR detected IBV-like virus and TRT of the same subtype as the TRT vaccine administered three weeks previously.

  15. TLR3 and TLR9 Agonists Improve Postexposure Vaccination Efficacy of Live Smallpox Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Israely, Tomer; Erez, Noam; Politi, Boaz; Waner, Trevor; Lustig, Shlomo; Paran, Nir

    2014-01-01

    Eradication of smallpox and discontinuation of the vaccination campaign resulted in an increase in the percentage of unvaccinated individuals, highlighting the need for postexposure efficient countermeasures in case of accidental or deliberate viral release. Intranasal infection of mice with ectromelia virus (ECTV), a model for human smallpox, is curable by vaccination with a high vaccine dose given up to 3 days postexposure. To further extend this protective window and to reduce morbidity, mice were vaccinated postexposure with Vaccinia-Lister, the conventional smallpox vaccine or Modified Vaccinia Ankara, a highly attenuated vaccine in conjunction with TLR3 or TLR9 agonists. We show that co-administration of the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) even 5 days postexposure conferred protection, avoiding the need to increase the vaccination dose. Efficacious treatments prevented death, ameliorated disease symptoms, reduced viral load and maintained tissue integrity of target organs. Protection was associated with significant elevation of serum IFNα and anti-vaccinia IgM antibodies, modulation of IFNγ response, and balanced activation of NK and T cells. TLR9 agonists (CpG ODNs) were less protective than the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C). We show that activation of type 1 IFN by poly(I:C) and protection is achievable even without co-vaccination, requiring sufficient amount of the viral antigens of the infective agent or the vaccine. This study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of postexposure immune modulation by TLR activation, allowing to alleviate the disease symptoms and to further extend the protective window of postexposure vaccination. PMID:25350003

  16. TLR3 and TLR9 agonists improve postexposure vaccination efficacy of live smallpox vaccines.

    PubMed

    Israely, Tomer; Melamed, Sharon; Achdout, Hagit; Erez, Noam; Politi, Boaz; Waner, Trevor; Lustig, Shlomo; Paran, Nir

    2014-01-01

    Eradication of smallpox and discontinuation of the vaccination campaign resulted in an increase in the percentage of unvaccinated individuals, highlighting the need for postexposure efficient countermeasures in case of accidental or deliberate viral release. Intranasal infection of mice with ectromelia virus (ECTV), a model for human smallpox, is curable by vaccination with a high vaccine dose given up to 3 days postexposure. To further extend this protective window and to reduce morbidity, mice were vaccinated postexposure with Vaccinia-Lister, the conventional smallpox vaccine or Modified Vaccinia Ankara, a highly attenuated vaccine in conjunction with TLR3 or TLR9 agonists. We show that co-administration of the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) even 5 days postexposure conferred protection, avoiding the need to increase the vaccination dose. Efficacious treatments prevented death, ameliorated disease symptoms, reduced viral load and maintained tissue integrity of target organs. Protection was associated with significant elevation of serum IFNα and anti-vaccinia IgM antibodies, modulation of IFNγ response, and balanced activation of NK and T cells. TLR9 agonists (CpG ODNs) were less protective than the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C). We show that activation of type 1 IFN by poly(I:C) and protection is achievable even without co-vaccination, requiring sufficient amount of the viral antigens of the infective agent or the vaccine. This study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of postexposure immune modulation by TLR activation, allowing to alleviate the disease symptoms and to further extend the protective window of postexposure vaccination.

  17. Successful comeback of the single-dose live oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Effective and easy to administer cholera vaccines are in need more than ever, for at risk populations and travellers alike. In many parts of the world cholera is still endemic, causing outbreaks and constituting repeatedly serious public health problems. The oral live cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR (Orochol, Mutachol), the first genetically modified organism (GMO) used as vaccine, was in its time (launched 1993, Switzerland) the ideal cholera vaccine: single-dose, protective efficacy of 80-100% against moderate to severe cholera, acting within 8 days and exhibiting excellent safety, indiscernible from placebo. However, there were strong headwinds: In the 1990s the indication for cholera vaccines was generally downplayed by experts and in 1997 the European Commission called for a moratorium of GMOs which blocked the registration in the European Union. Thus, demand for this vaccine remained low and in 2003 it was taken off the market for economic reasons. After a decade in obscurity it (Vaxchora) has resurfaced again, now produced in the U.S. and equipped with a U.S. FDA license (June 10, 2016). What had happened? This commentary gives a critical account of an almost unbelievable string of misadventures, emerging adverse circumstances and man-made failures which nearly killed this single-dose live oral cholera vaccine. The good news is that patience and persistence lead to success in the end, allowing good science to prevail for the benefit of those in need. PMID:27425792

  18. Successful comeback of the single-dose live oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Effective and easy to administer cholera vaccines are in need more than ever, for at risk populations and travellers alike. In many parts of the world cholera is still endemic, causing outbreaks and constituting repeatedly serious public health problems. The oral live cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR (Orochol, Mutachol), the first genetically modified organism (GMO) used as vaccine, was in its time (launched 1993, Switzerland) the ideal cholera vaccine: single-dose, protective efficacy of 80-100% against moderate to severe cholera, acting within 8 days and exhibiting excellent safety, indiscernible from placebo. However, there were strong headwinds: In the 1990s the indication for cholera vaccines was generally downplayed by experts and in 1997 the European Commission called for a moratorium of GMOs which blocked the registration in the European Union. Thus, demand for this vaccine remained low and in 2003 it was taken off the market for economic reasons. After a decade in obscurity it (Vaxchora) has resurfaced again, now produced in the U.S. and equipped with a U.S. FDA license (June 10, 2016). What had happened? This commentary gives a critical account of an almost unbelievable string of misadventures, emerging adverse circumstances and man-made failures which nearly killed this single-dose live oral cholera vaccine. The good news is that patience and persistence lead to success in the end, allowing good science to prevail for the benefit of those in need.

  19. Live Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Virus Host Range Vaccine Is Immunogenic in African Green Monkeys following a Single Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katherine M.; Piper, Amanda; Huitt, Emerson; Spears, Carla J.; Quiles, Michelle; Ribeiro, Mariana; Thomas, Malcolm E.; Brown, Dennis T.; Hernandez, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The causative agent of dengue fever, dengue virus (DENV), is transmitted by mosquitoes, and as distribution of these insects has expanded, so has dengue-related disease. DENV is a member of the Flaviviridae family and has 4 distinct serotypes (DENV-1, -2, -3, and -4). No lasting cross protection is afforded to heterologous serotypes following infection by any one of the individual serotypes. The presence of nonneutralizing antibodies to one serotype can facilitate the occurrence of more-severe dengue hemorrhagic fever through immune enhancement upon infection with a second serotype. For this reason, the development of a safe, tetravalent vaccine to produce a balanced immune response to all four serotypes is critical. We have developed a novel approach to produce safe and effective live-attenuated vaccines for DENV and other insect-borne viruses. Host range (HR) mutants of each DENV serotype were created by truncating transmembrane domain 1 of the E protein and selecting for strains of DENV that replicated well in insect cells but not mammalian cells. These vaccine strains were tested for immunogenicity in African green monkeys (AGMs). No vaccine-related adverse events occurred. The vaccine strains were confirmed to be attenuated in vivo by infectious center assay (ICA). Analysis by 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT50) established that by day 62 postvaccination, 100% of animals seroconverted to DENV-1, -2, -3, and -4. Additionally, the DENV HR tetravalent vaccine (HR-Tet) showed a tetravalent anamnestic immune response in 100% (16/16) of AGMs after challenge with wild-type (WT) DENV strains. IMPORTANCE We have generated a live attenuated viral (LAV) vaccine capable of eliciting a strong immune response in African green monkeys (AGMs) in a single dose. This vaccine is delivered by injecting one of four attenuated serotypes into each limb of the animal. 100% of animals given the vaccine generated antibodies against all 4 serotypes, and this

  20. Recommendations for live viral and bacterial vaccines in immunodeficient patients and their close contacts.

    PubMed

    Shearer, William T; Fleisher, Thomas A; Buckley, Rebecca H; Ballas, Zuhair; Ballow, Mark; Blaese, R Michael; Bonilla, Francisco A; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Fuleihan, Ramsay; Gelfand, Erwin W; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian; Holland, Steven M; Hong, Richard; Lederman, Howard M; Malech, Harry L; Miles, Stephen; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Ochs, Hans D; Orange, Jordan S; Puck, Jennifer M; Routes, John M; Stiehm, E Richard; Sullivan, Kathleen; Torgerson, Troy; Winkelstein, Jerry

    2014-04-01

    The present uncertainty of which live viral or bacterial vaccines can be given to immunodeficient patients and the growing neglect of societal adherence to routine immunizations has prompted the Medical Advisory Committee of the Immune Deficiency Foundation to issue recommendations based on published literature and the collective experience of the committee members. These recommendations address the concern for immunodeficient patients acquiring infections from healthy subjects who have not been immunized or who are shedding live vaccine-derived viral or bacterial organisms. Such transmission of infectious agents can occur within the hospital, clinic, or home or at any public gathering. Collectively, we define this type of transmission as close-contact spread of infectious disease that is particularly relevant in patients with impaired immunity who might have an infection when exposed to subjects carrying vaccine-preventable infectious diseases or who have recently received a live vaccine. Immunodeficient patients who have received therapeutic hematopoietic stem transplantation are also at risk during the time when immune reconstitution is incomplete or while they are receiving immunosuppressive agents to prevent or treat graft-versus-host disease. This review recommends the general education of what is known about vaccine-preventable or vaccine-derived diseases being spread to immunodeficient patients at risk for close-contact spread of infection and describes the relative risks for a child with severe immunodeficiency. The review also recommends a balance between the need to protect vulnerable subjects and their social needs to integrate into society, attend school, and benefit from peer education.

  1. [PERSPECTIVES OF DEVELOPMENT OF LIVE RECOMBINANT ANTHRAX VACCINES BASED ON OPPORTUNISTIC AND APATHOGENIC MICROORGANISMS].

    PubMed

    Popova, P Yu; Mikshis, N I

    2016-01-01

    Live genetic engineering anthrax vaccines on the platform of avirulent and probiotic micro-organisms are a safe and adequate alternative to preparations based on attenuated Bacillus anthracis strains. Mucosal application results in a direct contact of the vaccine preparations with mucous membranes in those organs arid tissues of the macro-organisms, that are exposed to the pathogen in the first place, resulting in a development of local and systemic immune response. Live recombinant anthrax vaccines could be used both separately as well as in a prime-boost immunization scheme. The review focuses on immunogenic and protective properties of experimental live genetic engineering prearations, created based on members of geni of Salmonella, Lactobacillus and adenoviruses.

  2. [PERSPECTIVES OF DEVELOPMENT OF LIVE RECOMBINANT ANTHRAX VACCINES BASED ON OPPORTUNISTIC AND APATHOGENIC MICROORGANISMS].

    PubMed

    Popova, P Yu; Mikshis, N I

    2016-01-01

    Live genetic engineering anthrax vaccines on the platform of avirulent and probiotic micro-organisms are a safe and adequate alternative to preparations based on attenuated Bacillus anthracis strains. Mucosal application results in a direct contact of the vaccine preparations with mucous membranes in those organs arid tissues of the macro-organisms, that are exposed to the pathogen in the first place, resulting in a development of local and systemic immune response. Live recombinant anthrax vaccines could be used both separately as well as in a prime-boost immunization scheme. The review focuses on immunogenic and protective properties of experimental live genetic engineering prearations, created based on members of geni of Salmonella, Lactobacillus and adenoviruses. PMID:27029122

  3. Room Temperature Stabilization of Oral, Live Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi-Vectored Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ohtake, Satoshi; Martin, Russell; Saxena, Atul; Pham, Binh; Chiueh, Gary; Osorio, Manuel; Kopecko, Dennis; Xu, DeQi; Lechuga-Ballesteros, David; Truong-Le, Vu

    2011-01-01

    Foam drying, a modified freeze drying process, was utilized to produce a heat-stable, live attenuated Salmonella Typhi ‘Ty21a’ bacterial vaccine. Ty21a vaccine was formulated with pharmaceutically approved stabilizers, including sugars, plasticizers, amino acids, and proteins. Growth media and harvesting conditions of the bacteria were also studied to enhance resistance to desiccation stress encountered during processing as well as subsequent storage at elevated temperatures. The optimized Ty21a vaccine, formulated with trehalose, methionine, and gelatin, demonstrated stability for approximately 12 weeks at 37°C (i.e., time required for the vaccine to decrease in potency by 1log10 CFU) and no loss in titer at 4 and 25°C following storage for the same duration. Furthermore, the foam dried Ty21a elicited a similar immunogenic response in mice as well as protection in challenge studies compared to Vivotif™, the commercial Ty21a vaccine. The enhanced heat stability of the Ty21a oral vaccine, or Ty21a derivatives expressing foreign antigens (e.g. anthrax), could mitigate risks of vaccine potency loss during long term storage, shipping, delivery to geographical areas with warmer climates or during emergency distribution following a bioterrorist attack. Because the foam drying process is conducted using conventional freeze dryers and can be readily implemented at any freeze drying manufacturing facility, this technology appears ready and appropriate for large scale processing of foam dried vaccines. PMID:21300096

  4. Safety evaluation of adenovirus type 4 and type 7 vaccine live, oral in military recruits.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Azhar; Mathena, Julie; Albano, Jessica D; Yacovone, Margaret; Collins, Limone

    2016-08-31

    Before the widespread adoption of vaccination, adenovirus type 4 and type 7 were long associated with respiratory illnesses among military recruits. When supplies were depleted and vaccination was suspended in 1999 for approximately a decade, respiratory illnesses due to adenovirus infections resurged. In March 2011, a new live, oral adenovirus vaccine was licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration and was first universally administered to military recruits in October 2011, leading to rapid, dramatic elimination of the disease within a few months. As part of licensure, a postmarketing study (Sentinel Surveillance Plan) was performed to detect potential safety signals within 42days after immunization of military recruits. This study retrospectively evaluated possible adverse events related to vaccination using data from the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS) database. Among 100,000 recruits who received the adenovirus vaccine, no statistically significant greater risk of prespecified medical events was observed within 42days after vaccination when compared with a historical cohort of 100,000 unvaccinated recruits. In an initial statistical analysis of International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes, a statistically significant higher risk for 19 other (not prespecified) medical events occurring in 5 or more recruits was observed among vaccinated compared with unvaccinated groups. After case record data abstraction for attribution and validation, two events (psoriasis [21 vs 7 cases] and serum reactions [12 vs 4 cases]) occurred more frequently in the vaccinated cohort. A causal relation of these rare events with adenovirus vaccination could not be established given confounding factors in the DMSS, such as coadministration of other vaccines and incomplete or inaccurate medical information, for some recruits. Prospective surveillance assessing these uncommon, but potentially

  5. Protective Live Oral Brucellosis Vaccines Stimulate Th1 and Th17 Cell Responses ▿

    PubMed Central

    Clapp, Beata; Skyberg, Jerod A.; Yang, Xinghong; Thornburg, Theresa; Walters, Nancy; Pascual, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Zoonotic transmission of brucellosis often results from exposure to Brucella-infected livestock, feral animals, or wildlife or frequently via consumption of unpasteurized milk products or raw meat. Since natural infection of humans often occurs by the oral route, mucosal vaccination may offer a means to confer protection for both mucosal and systemic tissues. Significant efforts have focused on developing a live brucellosis vaccine, and deletion of the znuA gene involved in zinc transport has been found to attenuate Brucella abortus. A similar mutation has been adapted for Brucella melitensis and tested to determine whether oral administration of ΔznuA B. melitensis can confer protection against nasal B. melitensis challenge. A single oral vaccination with ΔznuA B. melitensis rapidly cleared from mice within 2 weeks and effectively protected mice upon nasal challenge with wild-type B. melitensis 16M. In 83% of the vaccinated mice, no detectable brucellae were found in their spleens, unlike with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-dosed mice, and vaccination also enhanced the clearance of brucellae from the lungs. Moreover, vaccinated gamma interferon-deficient (IFN-γ−/−) mice also showed protection in both spleens and lungs, albeit protection that was not as effective as in immunocompetent mice. Although IFN-γ, interleukin 17 (IL-17), and IL-22 were stimulated by these live vaccines, only RB51-mediated protection was codependent upon IL-17 in BALB/c mice. These data suggest that oral immunization with the live, attenuated ΔznuA B. melitensis vaccine provides an attractive strategy to protect against inhalational infection with virulent B. melitensis. PMID:21768283

  6. Complete genome analysis of contemporary G12P[8] rotaviruses reveals heterogeneity within Wa-like genomic constellation.

    PubMed

    De Grazia, Simona; Dóró, Renáta; Bonura, Floriana; Marton, Szilvia; Cascio, Antonio; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián; M Giammanco, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    G12 rotaviruses are globally emergent rotaviruses causing severe childhood gastroenteritis. Little is known about the evolution and diversity of G12P[8] rotaviruses and the possible role that widespread vaccine use, globally, has had on their emergence. In Sicily, Italy, surveillance activity for rotaviruses has been conducted uninterruptedly since 1985, thus representing a unique observatory for the study of human rotaviruses in the pre- and post-vaccine era. G12 rotaviruses were first detected only in 2012 and between 2012 and 2014 they accounted for 8.7% of all rotavirus-associated infections among children, with peaks of 27.8% in 2012/2013 and 21% in 2014. We determined and analyzed the full-genome of 22 G12P[8] rotaviruses collected during the 2012-2014. Although all G12P[8] rotaviruses exhibited a typical Wa-like genotype constellation (G12P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1), phylogenetic analysis allowed distinguishing either two or three (sub)lineages in each genome segment. On the basis of the segregation patterns into lineages/sublineages, 20 G12P[8] rotaviruses could be grouped into three stable major genomic sub-constellations, whilst two strains displayed unique genome architectures, likely due to ressortment with co-circulating strains. Altogether, these findings indicate that the onset and prolonged circulation of G12 rotaviruses was due to repeated introductions of different G12 rotaviruses circulating globally. Importantly, as regional rotavirus vaccination was initiated in 2012 reaching a 45% coverage in newborns in 2014, a correlation between the appearance and spread of G12 rotaviruses and the enacted vaccination program could not be drawn. Constant epidemiologic surveillance remains important to monitor the epidemiological dynamics of human rotaviruses. PMID:27353490

  7. Complete genome analysis of contemporary G12P[8] rotaviruses reveals heterogeneity within Wa-like genomic constellation.

    PubMed

    De Grazia, Simona; Dóró, Renáta; Bonura, Floriana; Marton, Szilvia; Cascio, Antonio; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián; M Giammanco, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    G12 rotaviruses are globally emergent rotaviruses causing severe childhood gastroenteritis. Little is known about the evolution and diversity of G12P[8] rotaviruses and the possible role that widespread vaccine use, globally, has had on their emergence. In Sicily, Italy, surveillance activity for rotaviruses has been conducted uninterruptedly since 1985, thus representing a unique observatory for the study of human rotaviruses in the pre- and post-vaccine era. G12 rotaviruses were first detected only in 2012 and between 2012 and 2014 they accounted for 8.7% of all rotavirus-associated infections among children, with peaks of 27.8% in 2012/2013 and 21% in 2014. We determined and analyzed the full-genome of 22 G12P[8] rotaviruses collected during the 2012-2014. Although all G12P[8] rotaviruses exhibited a typical Wa-like genotype constellation (G12P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1), phylogenetic analysis allowed distinguishing either two or three (sub)lineages in each genome segment. On the basis of the segregation patterns into lineages/sublineages, 20 G12P[8] rotaviruses could be grouped into three stable major genomic sub-constellations, whilst two strains displayed unique genome architectures, likely due to ressortment with co-circulating strains. Altogether, these findings indicate that the onset and prolonged circulation of G12 rotaviruses was due to repeated introductions of different G12 rotaviruses circulating globally. Importantly, as regional rotavirus vaccination was initiated in 2012 reaching a 45% coverage in newborns in 2014, a correlation between the appearance and spread of G12 rotaviruses and the enacted vaccination program could not be drawn. Constant epidemiologic surveillance remains important to monitor the epidemiological dynamics of human rotaviruses.

  8. Development of a stable liquid formulation of live attenuated influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    White, Jessica A; Estrada, Marcus; Flood, E Alexander; Mahmood, Kutub; Dhere, Rajeev; Chen, Dexiang

    2016-07-12

    Vaccination is the most effective means of preventing influenza. However, the cost of producing annual seasonal influenza vaccines puts them out of reach for most developing countries. While live attenuated influenza vaccines are among the most efficacious and can be manufactured at low cost, they may require lyophilization to be stable enough for developing-country use, which adds a significant cost burden. The development of a liquid live attenuated seasonal influenza vaccine that is stable for around a year-the duration of an annual influenza season-would significantly improve not only the production output but also the use and accessibility of influenza vaccines in low-resource settings. In this study, potential stabilizing excipients were screened and optimized using the least stable influenza vaccine strain presently known, H1N1 (A/California/07/2009), as a model. The stability-conferring properties of the lead formulations were also tested with a Type B strain of influenza virus (B/Brisbane/60/2008). Stability was also evaluated with higher titers of influenza virus and exposure to agitation and freeze-thaw stresses to further confirm the stability of the lead formulations. Through this process, we identified a liquid formulation consisting of sucrose phosphate glutamate buffer with 1% arginine and 0.5% recombinant human serum albumin that provided storage stability of one year at 2-8°C for the influenza A and B strains tested. PMID:27155495

  9. Live-Attenuated Measles Virus Vaccine Targets Dendritic Cells and Macrophages in Muscle of Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Rennick, Linda J.; de Vries, Rory D.; Carsillo, Thomas J.; Lemon, Ken; van Amerongen, Geert; Ludlow, Martin; Nguyen, D. Tien; Yüksel, Selma; Verburgh, R. Joyce; Haddock, Paula; McQuaid, Stephen; de Swart, Rik L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although live-attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccines have been used successfully for over 50 years, the target cells that sustain virus replication in vivo are still unknown. We generated a reverse genetics system for the live-attenuated MV vaccine strain Edmonston-Zagreb (EZ), allowing recovery of recombinant (r)MVEZ. Three recombinant viruses were generated that contained the open reading frame encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) within an additional transcriptional unit (ATU) at various positions within the genome. rMVEZEGFP(1), rMVEZEGFP(3), and rMVEZEGFP(6) contained the ATU upstream of the N gene, following the P gene, and following the H gene, respectively. The viruses were compared in vitro by growth curves, which indicated that rMVEZEGFP(1) was overattenuated. Intratracheal infection of cynomolgus macaques with these recombinant viruses revealed differences in immunogenicity. rMVEZEGFP(1) and rMVEZEGFP(6) did not induce satisfactory serum antibody responses, whereas both in vitro and in vivo rMVEZEGFP(3) was functionally equivalent to the commercial MVEZ-containing vaccine. Intramuscular vaccination of macaques with rMVEZEGFP(3) resulted in the identification of EGFP+ cells in the muscle at days 3, 5, and 7 postvaccination. Phenotypic characterization of these cells demonstrated that muscle cells were not infected and that dendritic cells and macrophages were the predominant target cells of live-attenuated MV. IMPORTANCE Even though MV strain Edmonston-Zagreb has long been used as a live-attenuated vaccine (LAV) to protect against measles, nothing is known about the primary cells in which the virus replicates in vivo. This is vital information given the push to move toward needle-free routes of vaccination, since vaccine virus replication is essential for vaccination efficacy. We have generated a number of recombinant MV strains expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein. The virus that best mimicked the nonrecombinant vaccine

  10. [Condition of microflora of the nasopharynx in immunization with live influenza vaccine for oral administration].

    PubMed

    Kolotilova, L V; Shablovskaia, E A; Urin, A I; Lomnitskaia, V B; Vygovskaia, T V

    1975-07-01

    The authors present data concerning the state of the microflora of the nasopharynx in the immunization of adults and schoolchildren with the living influenza vaccine for oral administration. During the vaccinal process there occurred qualitative changes in the microbial pattern of the nasopharynx and a reduction in the level of the salivary lysozyme. The most pronounced changes were seen after the first vaccination, when the seeding efficiency of the pathogenic staphylococcus the E. coli and the Pr. mirabilis increased considerably. At the same time the incidence of isolation of the pathogenic staphylococcus, neisseria, and hemolytic streptococcus was decreased. The mentioned changes in the microbial flora directly depended on the dynamics of the survival of the vaccine influenza virus.

  11. Dose titration study of live attenuated varicella vaccine in healthy children. Pennridge Pediatric Associates.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, E P; Bernstein, H H; Ngai, A L; Cho, I; White, C J

    1997-02-01

    To approximate the effect of prolonged storage on safety and immunogenicity, healthy children were given a single dose of the currently marketed live attenuated varicella vaccine (3625 pfu) or of a partially heat-inactivated vaccine (1125 or 439 pfu). The 3 doses had similar antigen content (attenuated plus inactive virus particles). The vaccine was well tolerated. No significant differences in adverse reactions were observed. Although the seroconversion rates were excellent at each dose (> or = 98%), the higher doses resulted in significantly greater geometric mean antibody titers at 6 weeks (10.5 and 10.6 ELISA U/mL) compared with the 439 pfu dose (5.7 ELISA U/mL), P < or = .01. One year after immunization, differences in antibodies were similar to the 6-week postimmunization results. Results indicate that until the date of expiry, the vaccine's immunogenicity will be preserved and there will be no clinically important changes in type or frequency of adverse events.

  12. Live Oral Cholera Vaccine: Evaluation of the Clinical Effectiveness of Two Strains in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Richard A.; Music, Stanley I.; Libonati, Joseph P.; Schwartz, Andrew R.; Hornick, Richard B.

    1974-01-01

    El Tor Ogawa C14-S5 and EW-6, two live vaccine candidate strains, were given to volunteers in varying doses with and without bicarbonate. Vibrios were found in the stool of one of 32 men given the vaccine strain, and only three men developed a significant titer rise (fourfold or greater) at 2 weeks of vibriocidal or antitoxic antibody. Five men who had previously received 109 organisms of the C14-S5 strain were challenged subsequently with virulent Ogawa 395 Vibrio cholerae. The rate of clinical infection in these men was no different than in unvaccinated controls. It was demonstrated that the live oral cholera vaccines did not remain viable in the intestine long enough to act antigenically. PMID:4426706

  13. Superior protection elicited by live-attenuated vaccines in the murine model of paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pallab; Shippy, Daniel C; Talaat, Adel M

    2015-12-16

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) causes Johne's disease, a chronic enteric infection in ruminants with severe economic impact on the dairy industry in the USA and worldwide. Currently, available vaccines have limited protective efficacy against disease progression and does not prevent spread of the infection among animals. Because of their ability to elicit wide-spectrum immune responses, we adopted a live-attenuated vaccine approach based on a sigH knock-out strain of M. paratuberculosis (ΔsigH). Earlier analysis of the ΔsigH mutant in mice indicated their inadequate ability to colonize host tissues, unlike the isogenic wild-type strain, validating the role of this sigma factor in M. paratuberculosis virulence. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of the ΔsigH mutant compared to inactivated vaccine constructs in a vaccine/challenge model of murine paratuberculosis. The presented analysis indicated that ΔsigH mutant with or without QuilA adjuvant is capable of eliciting strong immune responses (such as interferon gamma-γ, IFN-γ) suggesting their immunogenicity and ability to potentially initiate effective vaccine-induced immunity. Following a challenge with virulent strains of M. paratuberculosis, ΔsigH conferred protective immunity as indicated by the reduced bacterial burden accompanied with reduced lesions in main body organs (liver, spleen and intestine) usually infected with M. paratuberculosis. More importantly, our data indicated better ability of the ΔsigH vaccine to confer protection compared to the inactivated vaccine constructs even with the presence of oil-adjuvant. Overall, our approach provides a rational basis for using live-attenuated mutant strains to develop improved vaccines that elicit robust immunity against this chronic infection.

  14. Vaccination of children with a live-attenuated, intranasal influenza vaccine – analysis and evaluation through a Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Andersohn, Frank; Bornemann, Reinhard; Damm, Oliver; Frank, Martin; Mittendorf, Thomas; Theidel, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Background: Influenza is a worldwide prevalent infectious disease of the respiratory tract annually causing high morbidity and mortality in Germany. Influenza is preventable by vaccination and this vaccination is so far recommended by the The German Standing Committee on Vaccination (STIKO) as a standard vaccination for people from the age of 60 onwards. Up to date a parenterally administered trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) has been in use almost exclusively. Since 2011 however a live-attenuated vaccine (LAIV) has been approved additionally. Consecutively, since 2013 the STIKO recommends LAIV (besides TIV) for children from 2 to 17 years of age, within the scope of vaccination by specified indications. LAIV should be preferred administered in children from 2 to 6 of age. The objective of this Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is to address various research issues regarding the vaccination of children with LAIV. The analysis was performed from a medical, epidemiological and health economic perspective, as well as from an ethical, social and legal point of view. Method: An extensive systematic database research was performed to obtain relevant information. In addition a supplementary research by hand was done. Identified literature was screened in two passes by two independent reviewers using predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Included literature was evaluated in full-text using acknowledged standards. Studies were graded with the highest level of evidence (1++), if they met the criteria of European Medicines Agency (EMA)-Guidance: Points to consider on applications with 1. meta-analyses; 2. one pivotal study. Results: For the medical section, the age of the study participants ranges from 6 months to 17 years. Regarding study efficacy, in children aged 6 months to ≤7 years, LAIV is superior to placebo as well as to a vac-cination with TIV (Relative Risk Reduction – RRR – of laboratory confirmed influenza infection approx. 80% and 50

  15. 9 CFR 113.300 - General requirements for live virus vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... applicable Standard Requirement or in the filed Outline of Production, a live virus vaccine shall meet the... Virus and bulk pooled material or final container samples from each serial shall also be tested for: (i.... Samples of each lot of Master Seed Virus and final container samples of completed product from each...

  16. Novel methods for expression of foreign antigens in live vector vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Yuan; Harley, Regina H.; Galen, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial live vector vaccines represent a vaccine development strategy that offers exceptional flexibility. In this approach, genes encoding protective antigens of unrelated bacterial, viral or parasitic pathogens are expressed in an attenuated bacterial vaccine strain that delivers these foreign antigens to the immune system, thereby eliciting relevant immune responses. Rather than expressing these antigens using low copy expression plasmids, here we pursue expression of foreign proteins from the live vector chromosome. Our strategy is designed to compensate for the inherent disadvantage of loss of gene dosage (vs. plasmid-based expression) by integrating antigen-encoding gene cassettes into multiple chromosomal sites already inactivated in an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi vaccine candidate. We tested expression of a cassette encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) integrated separately into native guaBA, htrA or clyA chromosomal loci. Using single integrations, we show that expression levels of GFPuv are significantly affected by the site of integration, regardless of the inclusion of additional strong promoters within the incoming cassette. Using cassettes integrated into both guaBA and htrA, we observe cumulative synthesis levels from two integration sites superior to single integrations. Most importantly, we observe that GFPuv expression increases in a growth phase-dependent manner, suggesting that foreign antigen synthesis may be “tuned” to the physiology of the live vaccine. We expect this novel platform expression technology to prove invaluable in the development of a wide variety of multivalent live vector vaccines, capable of expressing multiple antigens from both chromosomal and plasmid-based expression systems within a single strain. PMID:23406777

  17. Characterization of G2P[4] rotavirus strains associated with increased detection in Australian states using the RotaTeq® vaccine during the 2010-2011 surveillance period.

    PubMed

    Donato, Celeste M; Zhang, Zheng Andrew; Donker, Nicole C; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2014-12-01

    The introduction of rotavirus vaccines Rotarix® and RotaTeq® into the Australian National Immunisation Program in July 2007 has resulted in a dramatic decrease in the burden of rotavirus disease. G2P[4] strains became the dominant genotype Australia-wide during the 2010-2011 surveillance period and for the first time since vaccine introduction, a higher proportion were isolated in jurisdictions using RotaTeq® vaccine compared to locations using Rotarix®. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 gene of 32 G2P[4] strains identified six genetic clusters, these distinct clusters were also observed in the VP4 gene for a subset of 12 strains. The whole genome was determined for a representative strain of clusters; A (RVA/Human-wt/AUS/SA066/2010/G2P[4]), B (RVA/Human-wt/AUS/WAPC703/2010/G2P[4]), C (RVA/Human-wt/AUS/MON008/2010/G2P[4]) and E (RVA/Human-wt/AUS/RCH041/2010/G2P[4]). All of the strains possessed the archetypal DS-1 like genome constellation G2-P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2. Three of the strains, SA066, MON008 and WAPC703 clustered together and were distinct to RCH041 for all 11 genes. The VP7 genes of 31/32 of the strains characterized in this study possessed five conserved amino acid substitutions when compared to the G2 VP7 gene present in the RotaTeq® vaccine. Three of the substitutions were in the VP7 antigenic regions A and C, the substitutions A87T, D96N and S213D have been reported in the majority of G2P[4] strains circulating globally over the previous decade. These changes may have improved the ability of strains to circulate in settings of high vaccine use.

  18. Characterization of serum antibody responses to natural rotavirus infections in children by VP7-specific epitope-blocking assays.

    PubMed Central

    Matson, D O; O'Ryan, M L; Pickering, L K; Chiba, S; Nakata, S; Raj, P; Estes, M K

    1992-01-01

    Knowledge of the immune response to rotavirus is crucial for vaccine development. We compared an epitope-blocking assay (EBA) that uses VP7-specific monoclonal antibodies with neutralization assays (NAs) with polyclonal antisera for detecting serum antibody responses after natural rotavirus infection in children. Twenty-six serum pairs from children living in an orphanage with and without symptoms during two rotavirus outbreaks were evaluated for VP7 type 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-specific antibody responses. In the first outbreak, which was caused by a VP7 type 3 strain, homotypic antibody responses were detected in 11 of 11 symptomatic children by NA and in 10 of 11 symptomatic children by EBA. Heterotypic antibody responses were detected more frequently (12 of 15 children) by NA than by EBA, and the heterotypic epitope-blocking antibody responses occurred in children older than 14 months of age. Antibody responses in asymptomatic children were more commonly detected by EBA than by NA. EBA results from the sera of children in the second outbreak indicated that it was caused by VP7 type 4, whereas NA results suggested it was caused by VP7 type 3. Our results confirm that EBA is a sensitive and specific method for determining VP7 type-specific immune responses after natural rotavirus infections. PMID:1374761

  19. Genetic analysis of Group A rotaviruses: evidence for interspecies transmission of rotavirus genes.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Enzo A

    2002-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the major cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children and animals. The rotavirus genome is composed of eleven segments of double-stranded RNA and can undergo genetic reassortment during mixed infections, leading to progeny viruses with novel or atypical phenotypes. There are numerous descriptions of rotavirus strains isolated from human and animals that share genetic and antigenic features of viruses from heterologous species. In many cases, genetic analysis by hybridization has clearly demonstrated the genetic relatedness of gene segments to those from viruses isolated from different species. Together with the observation that some virus strains appear to have been transmitted to a different species as a whole genome constellation, these data suggest that interspecies transmission occurs naturally, albeit at low frequencies. Although interspecies transmission has not been documented directly, there is an increasing number of reports of atypical rotaviruses that are apparently derived from transmission between: humans, cats and dogs; humans and cattle; humans and pigs; pigs and cattle; and pigs and horses. Interspecies evolutionary relationships are supported by phylogenetic analysis of rotavirus genes from different species. The emergence of novel strains derived from interspecies transmission has implications for the design and implementation of successful human rotavirus vaccine strategies. PMID:11928984

  20. Identification of upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain and characterization of novel DNA vaccine candidates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (EST's) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC formerly RD-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and th...

  1. Transmission Dynamics of Rift Valley Fever Virus: Effects of Live and Killed Vaccines on Epizootic Outbreaks and Enzootic Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Chamchod, Farida; Cosner, Chris; Cantrell, R Stephen; Beier, John C; Ruan, Shigui

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arthropod-borne viral pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality in small ruminants throughout Africa and the Middle East. Due to the sporadic and explosive nature of RVF outbreaks, vaccination has proved challenging to reduce RVFV infection in the ruminant population. Currently, there are two available types of vaccines, live and killed, in endemic areas. In this study, two mathematical models have been developed to explore the impact of live and killed vaccines on the transmission dynamics of RVFV. We demonstrate in general that vaccination helps reduce the severity of RVF outbreaks and that less delay in implementation and more vaccination attempts and effective vaccines can reduce the outbreak magnitude and the endemic number of RVFV. However, an introduction of a number of ruminants vaccinated by live vaccines in RVFV-free areas may cause an outbreak and RVFV may become endemic if there is sustained use of live vaccines. Other factors that are the important determinants of RVF outbreaks include: unsustained vaccination programs, recruitment of susceptible ruminants, and the seasonal abundance of mosquitoes. PMID:26869999

  2. Transmission Dynamics of Rift Valley Fever Virus: Effects of Live and Killed Vaccines on Epizootic Outbreaks and Enzootic Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Chamchod, Farida; Cosner, Chris; Cantrell, R. Stephen; Beier, John C.; Ruan, Shigui

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arthropod-borne viral pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality in small ruminants throughout Africa and the Middle East. Due to the sporadic and explosive nature of RVF outbreaks, vaccination has proved challenging to reduce RVFV infection in the ruminant population. Currently, there are two available types of vaccines, live and killed, in endemic areas. In this study, two mathematical models have been developed to explore the impact of live and killed vaccines on the transmission dynamics of RVFV. We demonstrate in general that vaccination helps reduce the severity of RVF outbreaks and that less delay in implementation and more vaccination attempts and effective vaccines can reduce the outbreak magnitude and the endemic number of RVFV. However, an introduction of a number of ruminants vaccinated by live vaccines in RVFV-free areas may cause an outbreak and RVFV may become endemic if there is sustained use of live vaccines. Other factors that are the important determinants of RVF outbreaks include: unsustained vaccination programs, recruitment of susceptible ruminants, and the seasonal abundance of mosquitoes. PMID:26869999

  3. Deaths following vaccination: What does the evidence show?

    PubMed

    Miller, Elaine R; Moro, Pedro L; Cano, Maria; Shimabukuro, Tom T

    2015-06-26

    Vaccines are rigorously tested and monitored and are among the safest medical products we use. Millions of vaccinations are given to children and adults in the United States each year. Serious adverse reactions are rare. However, because of the high volume of use, coincidental adverse events including deaths, that are temporally associated with vaccination, do occur. When death occurs shortly following vaccination, loved ones and others might naturally question whether it was related to vaccination. A large body of evidence supports the safety of vaccines, and multiple studies and scientific reviews have found no association between vaccination and deaths except in rare cases. During the US multi-state measles outbreak of 2014-2015, unsubstantiated claims of deaths caused by measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine began circulating on the Internet, prompting responses by public health officials to address common misinterpretations and misuses of vaccine safety surveillance data, particularly around spontaneous reports submitted to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). We summarize epidemiologic data on deaths following vaccination, including examples where reasonable scientific evidence exists to support that vaccination caused or contributed to deaths. Rare cases where a known or plausible theoretical risk of death following vaccination exists include anaphylaxis, vaccine-strain systemic infection after administration of live vaccines to severely immunocompromised persons, intussusception after rotavirus vaccine, Guillain-Barré syndrome after inactivated influenza vaccine, fall-related injuries associated with syncope after vaccination, yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease or associated neurologic disease, serious complications from smallpox vaccine including eczema vaccinatum, progressive vaccinia, postvaccinal encephalitis, myocarditis, and dilated cardiomyopathy, and vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis from oral

  4. Deaths following vaccination: What does the evidence show?

    PubMed

    Miller, Elaine R; Moro, Pedro L; Cano, Maria; Shimabukuro, Tom T

    2015-06-26

    Vaccines are rigorously tested and monitored and are among the safest medical products we use. Millions of vaccinations are given to children and adults in the United States each year. Serious adverse reactions are rare. However, because of the high volume of use, coincidental adverse events including deaths, that are temporally associated with vaccination, do occur. When death occurs shortly following vaccination, loved ones and others might naturally question whether it was related to vaccination. A large body of evidence supports the safety of vaccines, and multiple studies and scientific reviews have found no association between vaccination and deaths except in rare cases. During the US multi-state measles outbreak of 2014-2015, unsubstantiated claims of deaths caused by measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine began circulating on the Internet, prompting responses by public health officials to address common misinterpretations and misuses of vaccine safety surveillance data, particularly around spontaneous reports submitted to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). We summarize epidemiologic data on deaths following vaccination, including examples where reasonable scientific evidence exists to support that vaccination caused or contributed to deaths. Rare cases where a known or plausible theoretical risk of death following vaccination exists include anaphylaxis, vaccine-strain systemic infection after administration of live vaccines to severely immunocompromised persons, intussusception after rotavirus vaccine, Guillain-Barré syndrome after inactivated influenza vaccine, fall-related injuries associated with syncope after vaccination, yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease or associated neurologic disease, serious complications from smallpox vaccine including eczema vaccinatum, progressive vaccinia, postvaccinal encephalitis, myocarditis, and dilated cardiomyopathy, and vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis from oral

  5. Detection of emerging rotavirus G12P[8] in Sonora, México.

    PubMed

    González-Ochoa, G; J, G de; Calleja-García, P M; Rosas-Rodríguez, J A; Virgen-Ortíz, A; Tamez-Guerra, P

    2016-06-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in children up to five years of age worldwide. The aim of the present study was to analyze the genotypes of rotavirus strains isolated from children with gastroenteritis, after the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in México. Rotavirus was detected in 14/100 (14%) fecal samples from children with gastroenteritis, using a commercial test kit. The viral genome was purified from these samples and used as a template in RT-PCR amplification of the VP4 and VP7 genes, followed by gene cloning and sequencing. Among the rotavirus strains, 4/14 (28.5%) were characterized as G12P[8], 2/14 (14.3%), as G12P (not typed), and 3/14 (21.42%) as G (not typed) P[8]. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 gene showed that G12 genotypes clustered in lineage III. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that VP4 genotype P[8] sequences clustered in lineage V, whereas other P[8] sequences previously reported in Mexico (2005-2008) clustered in different lineages. Rotavirus genotype G12 is currently recognized as a globally emerging rotavirus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this emerging rotavirus strain G12P[8] in México. Ongoing surveillance is recommended to monitor the distribution of rotavirus genotypes and to continually reassess the suitability of currently available rotavirus vaccines. PMID:27265462

  6. Detection of emerging rotavirus G12P[8] in Sonora, México.

    PubMed

    González-Ochoa, G; J, G de; Calleja-García, P M; Rosas-Rodríguez, J A; Virgen-Ortíz, A; Tamez-Guerra, P

    2016-06-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in children up to five years of age worldwide. The aim of the present study was to analyze the genotypes of rotavirus strains isolated from children with gastroenteritis, after the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in México. Rotavirus was detected in 14/100 (14%) fecal samples from children with gastroenteritis, using a commercial test kit. The viral genome was purified from these samples and used as a template in RT-PCR amplification of the VP4 and VP7 genes, followed by gene cloning and sequencing. Among the rotavirus strains, 4/14 (28.5%) were characterized as G12P[8], 2/14 (14.3%), as G12P (not typed), and 3/14 (21.42%) as G (not typed) P[8]. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 gene showed that G12 genotypes clustered in lineage III. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that VP4 genotype P[8] sequences clustered in lineage V, whereas other P[8] sequences previously reported in Mexico (2005-2008) clustered in different lineages. Rotavirus genotype G12 is currently recognized as a globally emerging rotavirus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this emerging rotavirus strain G12P[8] in México. Ongoing surveillance is recommended to monitor the distribution of rotavirus genotypes and to continually reassess the suitability of currently available rotavirus vaccines.

  7. Recombinant canine distemper virus serves as bivalent live vaccine against rabies and canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xijun; Feng, Na; Ge, Jinying; Shuai, Lei; Peng, Liyan; Gao, Yuwei; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu; Bu, Zhigao

    2012-07-20

    Effective, safe, and affordable rabies vaccines are still being sought. Attenuated live vaccine has been widely used to protect carnivores from canine distemper. In this study, we generated a recombinant canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine strain, rCDV-RVG, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) by using reverse genetics. The recombinant virus rCDV-RVG retained growth properties similar to those of vector CDV in Vero cell culture. Animal studies demonstrated that rCDV-RVG was safe in mice and dogs. Mice inoculated intracerebrally or intramuscularly with rCDV-RVG showed no apparent signs of disease and developed a strong rabies virus (RABV) neutralizing antibody response, which completely protected mice from challenge with a lethal dose of street virus. Canine studies showed that vaccination with rCDV-RVG induced strong and long-lasting virus neutralizing antibody responses to RABV and CDV. This is the first study demonstrating that recombinant CDV has the potential to serve as bivalent live vaccine against rabies and canine distemper in animals. PMID:22698451

  8. Salmonella typhimurium as a basis for a live oral Echinococcus granulosus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chabalgoity, J A; Moreno, M; Carol, H; Dougan, G; Hormaeche, C E

    2000-10-15

    A live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine candidate, LVR01, was constructed by introducing a null deletion into the aroC gene of the parental canine S. typhimurium isolate, P228067. LVR01 was used to orally deliver to the canine immune system a fatty acid binding protein (FABP) from Echinococcus granulosus (EgDf1), as a fusion protein with fragment C (TetC) of tetanus toxin. Immunization studies demonstrated that live LVR01 is well tolerated by orally vaccinated dogs. There was no detectable shedding of the vaccine strain in the faeces 2 days after immunization. Humoral antibody responses were observed against Salmonella, TetC and EgDf1. Cellular responses were consistently detected against Salmonella and TetC. A cellular response against EgDf1 was also seen in a proportion of the LVR01 vaccinated dogs. We propose S. typhimurium LVR01 as a carrier for recombinant antigens and a vector for the construction of multivalent oral vaccines for dogs.

  9. Impact of rotavirus disease in Spain: an estimate of hospital admissions due to rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Visser, L E; Cano Portero, R; Gay, N J; Martínez Navarro, J F

    1999-01-01

    The epidemiology of rotavirus infection in Spain was investigated using information from existing surveillance systems. Reports from laboratories and data on hospital admissions were used to estimate the number of hospital admissions due to rotavirus infection. Between January 1989 and December 1995 there were 8265 reports of rotavirus identification in the Sistema de Información Microbiológica, a voluntary national laboratory surveillance system. Where age was reported, 89.2% were in children under 5 y old. This represents 21.8% of all pathogens identified in faecal specimens in children of this age group. Between January and December 1994 there were 5639 admissions coded as "infectious intestinal disease" and 8225 as "non-infective gastroenteritis" in children under 5 y of age in the Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos, an obligatory hospital admissions surveillance system which covers 83% of public hospitals. Using regression analysis of admission data and laboratory reports it was estimated that rotavirus infection accounted for 3519 (25.3%) of the hospital admissions. We estimate that 4239 admissions attributable to rotavirus occurred in children under 5 y of age in Spain in 1994, a rate of 2.5/1000 population in this age group. These estimates are lower than those published for other countries, where the burden of disease is considered high enough to warrant a national vaccination programme. A cost-effectiveness study with Spanish information is essential before embarking on a national vaccination programme. PMID:10088916

  10. A systematic review of genetic diversity of human rotavirus circulating in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Than, Van Thai; Jeong, Sunyoung; Kim, Wonyong

    2014-12-01

    Rotavirus infections continue to be the leading cause of severe diarrhea in young Korean children. Rotavirus data acquired from uninterrupted surveillance studies between 1989 and 2009 in South Korea were analyzed to better understand the genetic diversity and evolution. The relationship between rotaviruses and the currently licensed rotavirus vaccine viruses was also examined. The most prevalent rotavirus strains, with genotype G1P[8], followed by G3P[8], G4P[6], and G2P[4], accounted for approximately 76.7% of the total identified strains, and more recently, rotavirus G9P[8] has significance increased to be the fifth most common genotype. Phylogenetic analyses underscored the heterogeneity between viral populations within each genotype, with different lineages and sub-lineages. Although the currently licensed rotavirus vaccines are effective, safe, and economical, additional data from rotavirus monitoring is necessary to evaluate the efficacy of these vaccines for their sustained use in South Korea. The present study provides comprehensive and up-to-date information regarding the epidemiology, genetic diversity, and evolution of the circulating rotaviruses in South Korea.

  11. Protective efficacy afforded by live Pasteurella multocida vaccines in chickens is independent of lipopolysaccharide outer core structure.

    PubMed

    Harper, Marina; John, Marietta; Edmunds, Mark; Wright, Amy; Ford, Mark; Turni, Conny; Blackall, P J; Cox, Andrew; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D

    2016-03-29

    Pasteurella multocida is a major animal pathogen that causes a range of diseases including fowl cholera. P. multocida infections result in considerable losses to layer and breeder flocks in poultry industries worldwide. Both killed whole-cell and live-attenuated vaccines are available; these vaccines vary in their protective efficacy, particularly against heterologous strains. Moreover, until recently there was no knowledge of P. multocida LPS genetics and structure to determine precisely how LPS structure affects the protective capacity of these vaccines. In this study we show that defined lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutants presented as killed whole-cell vaccines elicited solid protective immunity only against P. multocida challenge strains expressing highly similar or identical LPS structures. This finding indicates that vaccination of commercial flocks with P. multocida killed cell formulations will not protect against strains producing an LPS structure different to that produced by strains included in the vaccine formulation. Conversely, protective immunity conferred by vaccination with live P. multocida strains was found to be largely independent of LPS structure. Birds vaccinated with a range of live mutants belonging to the L1 and L3 LPS genotypes, each expressing a specific truncated LPS structure, were protected against challenge with the parent strain. Moreover, birds vaccinated with any of the five LPS mutants belonging to the L1 LPS genotype were also protected against challenge with an unrelated strain and two of the five groups vaccinated with live LPS mutants belonging to the L3 genotype were protected against challenge with an unrelated strain. In summary, vaccination with live P. multocida aroA mutants producing full-length L1 or L3 LPS or vaccination with live strains producing shortened L1 LPS elicited strong protective immunity against both homologous and heterologous challenge.

  12. Evaluation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum K-strain as a live vaccine in chickens.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Noel, N M; Laibinis, V A; Kleven, S H

    2012-03-01

    We evaluated the pathogenicity of three live Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) vaccine candidates by infection via aerosol of 3-wk-old chickens with log phase broth cultures (trial 1). Two of the candidates (K3020 and K4649A) colonized only 10% and 20% of the chickens, respectively, unlike K2101 (K-strain), which was reisolated from all of the vaccinated chickens tested. K-strain inoculation did not result in significant air sac or tracheal lesions in chickens at 10 and 39 days postinfection (P < or = 0.05). The efficacy of K-strain as a live vaccine was evaluated in trial 2, by challenge of vaccinated chickens with virulent R-strain via aerosol at 6 wk postvaccination. K-strain vaccination resulted in significant protection from air sac and tracheal lesions (P < or = 0.05). The K-strain was further investigated to evaluate transmissibility (trial 3), colonization and persistence of infection following aerosol administration (trial 4), genetic and phenotypic stability following back passage through chickens (trial 5), and vertical transmission (trial 6). The K-strain had a low rate of horizontal transmission; it remained primarily in the respiratory system of inoculated birds and persisted in the upper respiratory tract for the duration of the trial 4 (5 mo). There was no increase in virulence of K-strain when it was back passaged five times through chickens, and no vertical transmission of K-strain was detected. K-strain showed great potential as a safe and effective live MG vaccine. PMID:22545527

  13. Ontology-based combinatorial comparative analysis of adverse events associated with killed and live influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sarntivijai, Sirarat; Xiang, Zuoshuang; Shedden, Kerby A; Markel, Howard; Omenn, Gilbert S; Athey, Brian D; He, Yongqun

    2012-01-01

    Vaccine adverse events (VAEs) are adverse bodily changes occurring after vaccination. Understanding the adverse event (AE) profiles is a crucial step to identify serious AEs. Two different types of seasonal influenza vaccines have been used on the market: trivalent (killed) inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) and trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV). Different adverse event profiles induced by these two groups of seasonal influenza vaccines were studied based on the data drawn from the CDC Vaccine Adverse Event Report System (VAERS). Extracted from VAERS were 37,621 AE reports for four TIVs (Afluria, Fluarix, Fluvirin, and Fluzone) and 3,707 AE reports for the only LAIV (FluMist). The AE report data were analyzed by a novel combinatorial, ontology-based detection of AE method (CODAE). CODAE detects AEs using Proportional Reporting Ratio (PRR), Chi-square significance test, and base level filtration, and groups identified AEs by ontology-based hierarchical classification. In total, 48 TIV-enriched and 68 LAIV-enriched AEs were identified (PRR>2, Chi-square score >4, and the number of cases >0.2% of total reports). These AE terms were classified using the Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE), MedDRA, and SNOMED-CT. The OAE method provided better classification results than the two other methods. Thirteen out of 48 TIV-enriched AEs were related to neurological and muscular processing such as paralysis, movement disorders, and muscular weakness. In contrast, 15 out of 68 LAIV-enriched AEs were associated with inflammatory response and respiratory system disorders. There were evidences of two severe adverse events (Guillain-Barre Syndrome and paralysis) present in TIV. Although these severe adverse events were at low incidence rate, they were found to be more significantly enriched in TIV-vaccinated patients than LAIV-vaccinated patients. Therefore, our novel combinatorial bioinformatics analysis discovered that LAIV had lower chance of inducing these two

  14. A Low Gastric pH Mouse Model to Evaluate Live Attenuated Bacterial Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Brenneman, Karen E.; Willingham, Crystal; Kilbourne, Jacquelyn A.; 3rd, Roy Curtiss; Roland, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    The low pH of the stomach serves as a barrier to ingested microbes and must be overcome or bypassed when delivering live bacteria for vaccine or probiotic applications. Typically, the impact of stomach acidity on bacterial survival is evaluated in vitro, as there are no small animal models to evaluate these effects in vivo. To better understand the effect of this low pH barrier to live attenuated Salmonella vaccines, which are often very sensitive to low pH, we investigated the value of the histamine mouse model for this application. A low pH gastric compartment was transiently induced in mice by the injection of histamine. This resulted in a gastric compartment of approximately pH 1.5 that was capable of distinguishing between acid-sensitive and acid-resistant microbes. Survival of enteric microbes during gastric transit in this model directly correlated with their in vitro acid resistance. Because many Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi vaccine strains are sensitive to acid, we have been investigating systems to enhance the acid resistance of these bacteria. Using the histamine mouse model, we demonstrate that the in vivo survival of S. Typhi vaccine strains increased approximately 10-fold when they carried a sugar-inducible arginine decarboxylase system. We conclude that this model will be a useful for evaluating live bacterial preparations prior to clinical trials. PMID:24489912

  15. Increased Rotavirus Prevalence in Diarrheal Outbreak Precipitated by Localized Flooding, Solomon Islands, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Forrest K.; Ko, Albert I.; Becha, Chris; Joshua, Cynthia; Musto, Jennie; Thomas, Sarah; Ronsse, Axelle; Kirkwood, Carl D.; Sio, Alison; Aumua, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Flooding on 1 of the Solomon Islands precipitated a nationwide epidemic of diarrhea that spread to regions unaffected by flooding and caused >6,000 cases and 27 deaths. Rotavirus was identified in 38% of case-patients tested in the city with the most flooding. Outbreak potential related to weather reinforces the need for global rotavirus vaccination. PMID:27088272

  16. Increased Rotavirus Prevalence in Diarrheal Outbreak Precipitated by Localized Flooding, Solomon Islands, 2014.

    PubMed

    Jones, Forrest K; Ko, Albert I; Becha, Chris; Joshua, Cynthia; Musto, Jennie; Thomas, Sarah; Ronsse, Axelle; Kirkwood, Carl D; Sio, Alison; Aumua, Audrey; Nilles, Eric J

    2016-05-01

    Flooding on 1 of the Solomon Islands precipitated a nationwide epidemic of diarrhea that spread to regions unaffected by flooding and caused >6,000 cases and 27 deaths. Rotavirus was identified in 38% of case-patients tested in the city with the most flooding. Outbreak potential related to weather reinforces the need for global rotavirus vaccination. PMID:27088272

  17. Increased Rotavirus Prevalence in Diarrheal Outbreak Precipitated by Localized Flooding, Solomon Islands, 2014.

    PubMed

    Jones, Forrest K; Ko, Albert I; Becha, Chris; Joshua, Cynthia; Musto, Jennie; Thomas, Sarah; Ronsse, Axelle; Kirkwood, Carl D; Sio, Alison; Aumua, Audrey; Nilles, Eric J

    2016-05-01

    Flooding on 1 of the Solomon Islands precipitated a nationwide epidemic of diarrhea that spread to regions unaffected by flooding and caused >6,000 cases and 27 deaths. Rotavirus was identified in 38% of case-patients tested in the city with the most flooding. Outbreak potential related to weather reinforces the need for global rotavirus vaccination.

  18. Evaluation of Streptococcus iniae killed bacterin and live attenuated vaccines in hybrid striped bass through injection and bath immersion.

    PubMed

    Locke, Jeffrey B; Vicknair, Mike R; Ostland, Vaughn E; Nizet, Victor; Buchanan, John T

    2010-03-01

    Streptococcus iniae poses a serious threat to finfish aquaculture operations worldwide. Stringent regulatory standards limit the use of antibiotics to treat S. iniae infections; improved vaccination strategies are thus of great interest. We investigated the potential for efficient, non-injectable batch vaccination via the use of live attenuated vaccines. Three attenuated S. iniae strains with genetic mutations eliminating the production of virulence factors--capsular polysaccharide (delta cpsD), M-like protein (delta simA), and phosphoglucomutase (delta pgmA)--were evaluated in parallel with an adjuvanted, formalin-killed, whole-cell S. iniae bacterin. Juvenile hybrid striped bass (HSB; Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis) were vaccinated through intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection or bath immersion and held for 800 degree-days prior to challenge with a lethal dose of the virulent wild-type (WT) S. iniae parent strain. The delta cpsD, delta pgmA, and bacterin vaccines provided the highest level of vaccination safety (0% mortality), whereas the delta simA mutant, although it caused 12 to 16% vaccination-related mortality, was the only vaccine candidate to provide 100% protection in both i.p. and immersion delivery models. Our studies demonstrate the efficacy of live attenuated vaccines for prevention of S. iniae infection, and identify immersion delivery of live vaccines as an attractive option for use in commercial aquaculture settings.

  19. [Present status of vaccines in 1989].

    PubMed

    Roussey, M; Dabadie, A

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe 2 new vaccines now available in France: one is the GenHevac, an hepatitis B vaccine, the first virus recombinant vaccine; the other one is the Typhim Vi, a polysaccharide typhoid vaccine. Three other vaccines are currently used in foreign countries and will be soon available: the Hemophilus influenzae vaccine, the acellular pertussis vaccine and the varicella vaccine. Rotavirus and Cytomegalovirus vaccines are studied for their clinical efficacy.

  20. An avian live attenuated master backbone for potential use in epidemic and pandemic influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Danielle; Hossain, Md Jaber; Song, Haichen; Araya, Yonas; Solórzano, Alicia; Perez, Daniel R

    2008-11-01

    The unprecedented emergence in Asia of multiple avian influenza virus (AIV) subtypes with a broad host range poses a major challenge in the design of vaccination strategies that are both effective and available in a timely manner. The present study focused on the protective effects of a genetically modified AIV as a source for the preparation of vaccines for epidemic and pandemic influenza. It has previously been demonstrated that a live attenuated AIV based on the internal backbone of influenza A/Guinea fowl/Hong Kong/WF10/99 (H9N2), called WF10att, is effective at protecting poultry species against low- and high-pathogenicity influenza strains. More importantly, this live attenuated virus provided effective protection when administered in ovo. In order to characterize the WF10att backbone further for use in epidemic and pandemic influenza vaccines, this study evaluated its protective effects in mice. Intranasal inoculation of modified attenuated viruses in mice provided adequate protective immunity against homologous lethal challenges with both the wild-type influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) and A/Vietnam/1203/04 (H5N1) viruses. Adequate heterotypic immunity was also observed in mice vaccinated with modified attenuated viruses carrying H7N2 surface proteins. The results presented in this report suggest that the internal genes of a genetically modified AIV confer similar protection in a mouse model and thus could be used as a master donor strain for the generation of live attenuated vaccines for epidemic and pandemic influenza.

  1. The impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis on the family

    PubMed Central

    Mast, T Christopher; DeMuro-Mercon, Carla; Kelly, Claudia M; Floyd, Leigh Ellen; Walter, Emmanuel B

    2009-01-01

    difficulty of treating the illness with oral rehydration solutions, but had a largely positive outlook concerning the prospect of a rotavirus vaccine. Conclusion A better understanding of how rotavirus gastroenteritis impacts the family can help healthcare providers ease parental fears and advise them on the characteristics of this illness, practices to prevent infection, and the optimal care of an affected child. PMID:19200366

  2. Correlates of Immunity to Influenza as Determined by Challenge of Children with Live, Attenuated Influenza Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wright, Peter F; Hoen, Anne G; Ilyushina, Natalia A; Brown, Eric P; Ackerman, Margaret E; Wieland-Alter, Wendy; Connor, Ruth I; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Haynes, Brenda C; Luke, Catherine J; Subbarao, Kanta; Treanor, John J

    2016-04-01

    Background.  The efficacy of live, attenuated live attenuated influenza vaccine(LAIV) and inactivated influenza vaccine(IIV) is poorly explained by either single or composite immune responses to vaccination. Protective biomarkers were therefore studied in response to LAIV or IIV followed by LAIV challenge in children. Methods.  Serum and mucosal responses to LAIV or IIV were analyzed using immunologic assays to assess both quantitative and functional responses. Cytokines and chemokines were measured in nasal washes collected before vaccination, on days 2, 4, and 7 after initial LAIV, and again after LAIV challenge using a 63-multiplex Luminex panel. Results.  Patterns of immunity induced by LAIV and IIV were significantly different. Serum responses induced by IIV, including hemagglutination inhibition, did not correlate with detection or quantitation of LAIV on subsequent challenge. Modalities that induced sterilizing immunity seen after LAIV challenge could not be defined by any measurements of mucosal or serum antibodies induced by the initial LAIV immunization. No single cytokine or chemokine was predictive of protection. Conclusions.  The mechanism of protective immunity observed after LAIV could not be defined, and traditional measurements of immunity to IIV did not correlate with protection against an LAIV challenge. PMID:27419180

  3. An HIV-1 Mini Vaccine Induced Long-lived Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Mehdi; Ebtekar, Massoumeh; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Faezi, Sobhan; Khorram Khorshid, Hamidreza; Taghizadeh, Morteza; Azadmanesh, Keyhan

    2015-01-01

    Memory formation is the most important aspect of a vaccine which can guarantee long-lasting immunity and protection. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the memory immune responses after immunization with a mini vaccine. Mice were immunized with human immunodeficiency virus-1 P24-Nef fusion peptide and then cellular and humoral immune responses were evaluated. In order to determine long-lived memory, immune responses were monitored for 20 weeks after final immunization. The results showed that the candidate vaccine induced proliferation and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses and shifted cytokine patterns to T helper-1 profile. Evaluation of humoral immune responses also showed an increase in total peptide specific-IgG titer and a shift to IgG2a humoral response. Monitoring of immune responses at weeks 4, 12 and 20 after last immunization showed that immunologic parameters have been sustained for 20 weeks. Our findings support the notion that long-lived memory responses were achieved using a mini vaccine immunization. PMID:27014646

  4. Extended Preclinical Safety, Efficacy and Stability Testing of a Live-attenuated Chikungunya Vaccine Candidate.

    PubMed

    Plante, Kenneth S; Rossi, Shannan L; Bergren, Nicholas A; Seymour, Robert L; Weaver, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    We recently described a new, live-attenuated vaccine candidate for chikungunya (CHIK) fever, CHIKV/IRES. This vaccine was shown to be well attenuated, immunogenic and efficacious in protecting against CHIK virus (CHIKV) challenge of mice and nonhuman primates. To further evaluate its preclinical safety, we compared CHIKV/IRES distribution and viral loads in interferon-α/β receptor-incompetent A129 mice to another CHIK vaccine candidate, 181/clone25, which proved highly immunogenic but mildly reactive in human Phase I/II clinical trials. Compared to wild-type CHIK virus, (wt-CHIKV), both vaccines generated lower viral loads in a wide variety of tissues and organs, including the brain and leg muscle, but CHIKV/IRES exhibited marked restrictions in dissemination and viral loads compared to 181/clone25, and was never found outside the blood, spleen and muscle. Unlike wt-CHIKV, which caused disrupted splenic architecture and hepatic lesions, histopathological lesions were not observed in animals infected with either vaccine strain. To examine the stability of attenuation, both vaccines were passaged 5 times intracranially in infant A129 mice, then assessed for changes in virulence by comparing parental and passaged viruses for footpad swelling, weight stability and survival after subcutaneous infection. Whereas strain 181/clone25 p5 underwent a significant increase in virulence as measured by weight loss (from <10% to >30%) and mortality (from 0 to 100%), CHIKV/IRES underwent no detectible change in any measure of virulence (no significant weight loss and no mortality). These data indicate greater nonclinical safety of the CHIKV/IRES vaccine candidate compared to 181/clone25, further supporting its eligibility for human testing.

  5. Extended Preclinical Safety, Efficacy and Stability Testing of a Live-attenuated Chikungunya Vaccine Candidate.

    PubMed

    Plante, Kenneth S; Rossi, Shannan L; Bergren, Nicholas A; Seymour, Robert L; Weaver, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    We recently described a new, live-attenuated vaccine candidate for chikungunya (CHIK) fever, CHIKV/IRES. This vaccine was shown to be well attenuated, immunogenic and efficacious in protecting against CHIK virus (CHIKV) challenge of mice and nonhuman primates. To further evaluate its preclinical safety, we compared CHIKV/IRES distribution and viral loads in interferon-α/β receptor-incompetent A129 mice to another CHIK vaccine candidate, 181/clone25, which proved highly immunogenic but mildly reactive in human Phase I/II clinical trials. Compared to wild-type CHIK virus, (wt-CHIKV), both vaccines generated lower viral loads in a wide variety of tissues and organs, including the brain and leg muscle, but CHIKV/IRES exhibited marked restrictions in dissemination and viral loads compared to 181/clone25, and was never found outside the blood, spleen and muscle. Unlike wt-CHIKV, which caused disrupted splenic architecture and hepatic lesions, histopathological lesions were not observed in animals infected with either vaccine strain. To examine the stability of attenuation, both vaccines were passaged 5 times intracranially in infant A129 mice, then assessed for changes in virulence by comparing parental and passaged viruses for footpad swelling, weight stability and survival after subcutaneous infection. Whereas strain 181/clone25 p5 underwent a significant increase in virulence as measured by weight loss (from <10% to >30%) and mortality (from 0 to 100%), CHIKV/IRES underwent no detectible change in any measure of virulence (no significant weight loss and no mortality). These data indicate greater nonclinical safety of the CHIKV/IRES vaccine candidate compared to 181/clone25, further supporting its eligibility for human testing. PMID:26340754

  6. Extended Preclinical Safety, Efficacy and Stability Testing of a Live-attenuated Chikungunya Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Plante, Kenneth S; Rossi, Shannan L.; Bergren, Nicholas A.; Seymour, Robert L.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    We recently described a new, live-attenuated vaccine candidate for chikungunya (CHIK) fever, CHIKV/IRES. This vaccine was shown to be well attenuated, immunogenic and efficacious in protecting against CHIK virus (CHIKV) challenge of mice and nonhuman primates. To further evaluate its preclinical safety, we compared CHIKV/IRES distribution and viral loads in interferon-α/β receptor-incompetent A129 mice to another CHIK vaccine candidate, 181/clone25, which proved highly immunogenic but mildly reactive in human Phase I/II clinical trials. Compared to wild-type CHIK virus, (wt-CHIKV), both vaccines generated lower viral loads in a wide variety of tissues and organs, including the brain and leg muscle, but CHIKV/IRES exhibited marked restrictions in dissemination and viral loads compared to 181/clone25, and was never found outside the blood, spleen and muscle. Unlike wt-CHIKV, which caused disrupted splenic architecture and hepatic lesions, histopathological lesions were not observed in animals infected with either vaccine strain. To examine the stability of attenuation, both vaccines were passaged 5 times intracranially in infant A129 mice, then assessed for changes in virulence by comparing parental and passaged viruses for footpad swelling, weight stability and survival after subcutaneous infection. Whereas strain 181/clone25 p5 underwent a significant increase in virulence as measured by weight loss (from <10% to >30%) and mortality (from 0 to 100%), CHIKV/IRES underwent no detectible change in any measure of virulence (no significant weight loss and no mortality). These data indicate greater nonclinical safety of the CHIKV/IRES vaccine candidate compared to 181/clone25, further supporting its eligibility for human testing. PMID:26340754

  7. Tackling the issue of environmental survival of live Salmonella Typhimurium vaccines: deletion of the lon gene.

    PubMed

    Leyman, Bregje; Boyen, Filip; Van Parys, Alexander; Verbrugghe, Elin; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2012-12-01

    Vaccination is an important measure to control Salmonella contamination in the meat production chain. A previous study showed that both the ΔrfaJ and ΔrfaL strains are suitable markers and allow serological differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals. The aim of this study was to verify whether deletion of the lon gene in a Salmonella Typhimurium ΔrfaJ marker strain resulted in decreased environmental survival. Our results indicate that deletion of the lon gene in the ΔrfaJ strain did not affect invasiveness in IPEC-J2 cells and resulted in an increased susceptibility to UV, disinfectants (such as hydrogen peroxide and tosylchloramide sodium) and citric acid. Immunization of pigs with inactivated ΔrfaJ or ΔlonΔrfaJ vaccines allowed differentiation of infected and vaccinated pigs. Furthermore, deletion of the lon gene did not reduce the protection conferred by live wild type or ΔrfaJ vaccines against subsequent challenge with a virulent Salmonella Typhimurium strain in BALB/c mice. Based on our results in mice, we conclude that deletion of lon in ΔrfaJ contributes to environmental safety of the ΔrfaJ DIVA strain.

  8. Assessment of local reaction to vaccines in live piglets with magnetic resonance imaging compared to histopathology.

    PubMed

    Bernau, Maren; Kremer, Prisca V; Kreuzer, Lena S; Emrich, Daniela; Pappenberger, Elke; Cussler, Klaus; Hoffmann, Andreas; Leipig, Miriam; Hermanns, Walter; Scholz, Armin Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The safety of veterinary vaccines is assessed in clinical trials in Europe. The assessment of the local tissue reaction to vaccination by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could reduce the number of animals needed because repeated examinations can be performed in the same animal over time. The present study compared the evaluation of local tissue reactions to vaccination using MRI in live pigs with histopathology of porcine tissue, the current gold standard in regulatory safety testing. Eight piglets each were administered one of two commercial vaccines into marked injection sites. All animals were sedated and scanned repeatedly by MRI using a contrast agent up to day 29 after vaccination. On day 29, the animals were euthanized and underwent a pathological examination. The MRI results were compared with the pathomorphological findings at the injection site by regression analysis. The MR images and the pathological examinations yielded matching results concerning the sizes of the affected tissue volumes or areas. The use of MRI for regulatory safety testing can reduce the number of animals needed to 8 per examination group. The volume of a local reaction and its progression over time can be evaluated and documented. If persistent lesions develop a final pathomorphological examination is needed to identify the kind and local distribution of the reaction.

  9. Successful respiratory immunization with dry powder live-attenuated measles virus vaccine in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Hsuan; Griffin, Diane E; Rota, Paul A; Papania, Mark; Cape, Stephen P; Bennett, David; Quinn, Brian; Sievers, Robert E; Shermer, Charles; Powell, Kenneth; Adams, Robert J; Godin, Steven; Winston, Scott

    2011-02-15

    Measles remains an important cause of childhood mortality worldwide. Sustained high vaccination coverage is the key to preventing measles deaths. Because measles vaccine is delivered by injection, hurdles to high coverage include the need for trained medical personnel and a cold chain, waste of vaccine in multidose vials and risks associated with needle use and disposal. Respiratory vaccine delivery could lower these barriers and facilitate sustained high coverage. We developed a novel single unit dose, dry powder live-attenuated measles vaccine (MVDP) for respiratory delivery without reconstitution. We tested the immunogenicity and protective efficacy in rhesus macaques of one dose of MVDP delivered either with a mask or directly intranasal with two dry powder inhalers, PuffHaler and BD Solovent. MVDP induced robust measles virus (MeV)-specific humoral and T-cell responses, without adverse effects, which completely protected the macaques from infection with wild-type MeV more than one year later. Respiratory delivery of MVDP was safe and effective and could aid in measles control.

  10. Determination of rotavirus serotype-specific antibodies in sera by competitive enhanced enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Beards, G M; Desselberger, U

    1989-01-01

    A method is described for the specific detection of antibody to individual rotavirus serotypes in sera. A competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was developed in which rotavirus serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies against VP7 compete with antibodies in test sera for rotavirus serotype-specific antigen bound to a solid phase. There was an excellent correlation between serotype-specific EIA results and serotype-specific neutralization titres (r = 0.915, P = less than 0.001). The value of this method for rotavirus epidemiology and vaccine trials is discussed.

  11. Existing antiviral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ravanfar, Parisa; Satyaprakash, Anita; Creed, Rosella; Mendoza, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    The innovation of vaccines has allowed for one of the greatest advancements in the history of public health. The first of the vaccines have been the antiviral vaccines, in particular the smallpox vaccine that was first developed by Edward Jenner in 1796. This article will review vaccination for the following viral diseases: measles, mumps, rubella, polio, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, influenza, rotavirus, rabies, monkeypox, smallpox, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever. PMID:19335723

  12. Identification and expresion profile of multiple genes in channel catfish fry ten minutes after modified live Flavobacterium columnare vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 32 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from 96 clones of a channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fry subtractive library ten minutes post vaccination with a modified live Flavobacterum columnare vaccine. The transcription levels of ...

  13. Effect of size and temperature at vaccination on immunization and protection conferred by a live attenuated Francisella noatunensis immersion vaccine in red hybrid tilapia.

    PubMed

    Soto, Esteban; Brown, Nicholas; Gardenfors, Zackarias O; Yount, Shaun; Revan, Floyd; Francis, Stewart; Kearney, Michael T; Camus, Alvin

    2014-12-01

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is a pleomorphic, facultative intracellular, Gram-negative, emerging bacterial pathogen of marine and fresh water fish with worldwide distribution. In this study, the efficacy of an attenuated Fno intracellular growth locus C (iglC) mutant was evaluated for use as a live immersion vaccine, when administered to hybrid tilapia at two different stages of growth (5 g fry and 10 g fingerlings) and at two temperatures (25 °C and 30 °C). To determine vaccine efficacy, mortality, days to first death, and Fno genome equivalents (GE) in the spleens of survivors, as well as serum and mucus antibody levels, were evaluated after 30 d in fish challenged with a wild type virulent strain. Both size and temperature at vaccination played an important role in immunization and protection. Fry vaccinated at 25 °C were not protected when compared to non-vaccinated fry at 25 °C (p = 0.870). In contrast, 5 g fry vaccinated at 30 °C were significantly protected compared to non-vaccinated fry at 30 °C (p = 0.038). Although lower mortalities occurred, 10 g fingerlings vaccinated at 25 °C were not protected, compared to non-vaccinated fingerlings at 25 °C (p = 0.328), while, 10 g fingerlings vaccinated at 30 °C were significantly protected, compared to non-vaccinated fingerlings at 30 °C (p = 0.038). Additionally, overall mortality of 5 g fish was significantly higher than in 10 g fish. Mortality was also significantly higher in fish subjected to a 30 to 25 °C temperature change one week prior to challenge, than in fish maintained at the same temperature during vaccination and challenge. This information demonstrates that both temperature and size at vaccination are important factors when implementing immunization prophylaxis in cultured tilapia.

  14. Oral vaccination with lipid-formulated BCG induces a long-lived, multifunctional CD4(+) T cell memory immune response.

    PubMed

    Ancelet, Lindsay R; Aldwell, Frank E; Rich, Fenella J; Kirman, Joanna R

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery of BCG in a lipid formulation (Liporale™-BCG) targets delivery of viable bacilli to the mesenteric lymph nodes and confers protection against an aerosol Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. The magnitude, quality and duration of the effector and memory immune response induced by Liporale™-BCG vaccination is unkn