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Sample records for rotavirus vp1 protein

  1. Mechanism for Coordinated RNA Packaging and Genome Replication by Rotavirus Polymerase VP1

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaohui; McDonald, Sarah M.; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Tao, Yizhi Jane; Vasquez-Del Carpio, Rodrigo; Nibert, Max L.; Patton, John T.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2009-04-08

    Rotavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase VP1 catalyzes RNA synthesis within a subviral particle. This activity depends on core shell protein VP2. A conserved sequence at the 3' end of plus-strand RNA templates is important for polymerase association and genome replication. We have determined the structure of VP1 at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, as apoenzyme and in complex with RNA. The cage-like enzyme is similar to reovirus {lambda}3, with four tunnels leading to or from a central, catalytic cavity. A distinguishing characteristic of VP1 is specific recognition, by conserved features of the template-entry channel, of four bases, UGUG, in the conserved 3' sequence. Well-defined interactions with these bases position the RNA so that its 3' end overshoots the initiating register, producing a stable but catalytically inactive complex. We propose that specific 3' end recognition selects rotavirus RNA for packaging and that VP2 activates the autoinhibited VP1/RNA complex to coordinate packaging and genome replication.

  2. Human IgG Fc promotes expression, secretion and immunogenicity of enterovirus 71 VP1 protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Zhang, Chunhua

    2016-05-01

    Enterovirus (EV71) can cause severe neurological diseases, but the underlying pathogenesis remains unclear. The capsid protein, viral protein 1 (VP1), plays a critical role in the pathogenicity of EV71. High level expression and secretion of VP1 protein are necessary for structure, function and immunogenicity in its natural conformation. In our previous studies, 5 codon-optimized VP1 DNA vaccines, including wt-VP1, tPA-VP1, VP1-d, VP1-hFc and VP1-mFc, were constructed and analyzed. They expressed VP1 protein, but the levels of secretion and immunogenicity of these VP1 constructs were significantly different (P<0.05). In this study, we further investigated the protein levels of these constructs and determined that all of these constructs expressed VP1 protein. The secretion level was increased by including a tPA leader sequence, which was further increased by fusing human IgG Fc (hFc) to VP1. VP1-hFc demonstrated the most potent immunogenicity in mice. Furthermore, hFc domain could be used to purify VP1-hFc protein for additional studies. PMID:27533931

  3. A functional nuclear localization sequence in the VP1 capsid protein of coxsackievirus B3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tianying; Yu, Bohai; Lin, Lexun; Zhai, Xia; Han, Yelu; Qin, Ying; Guo, Zhiwei; Wu, Shuo; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yan; Tong, Lei; Zhang, Fengmin; Si, Xiaoning; Zhao, Wenran; Zhong, Zhaohua

    2012-11-25

    The capsid proteins of some RNA viruses can translocate to the nucleus and interfere with cellular phenotypes. In this study we found that the VP1 capsid protein of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) was dominantly localized in the nucleus of the cells transfected with VP1-expressing plasmid. The VP1 nuclear localization also occurred in the cells infected with CVB3. Truncation analysis indicated that the VP1 nuclear localization sequence located near the C-terminal. The substitution of His220 with threonine completely abolished its translocation. The VP1 proteins of other CVB types might have the nuclear localization potential because this region was highly conserved. Moreover, the VP1 nuclear localization induced cell cycle deregulation, including a prolonged S phase and shortened G2-M phase. Besides these findings, we also found a domain between Ala72 and Phe106 that caused the VP1 truncates dotted distributed in the cytoplasm. Our results suggest a new pathogenic mechanism of CVB. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The VP1 protein of coxsackievirus B3 can specifically localize in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear localization signal of coxsackievirus B3 VP1 protein locates near its C-terminal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The VP1 nuclear localization of coxsackievirus B3 can deregulate cell cycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is a domain in the VP1 that determines it dotted distributed in the cytoplasm.

  4. Effects of human parvovirus B19 VP1 unique region protein on macrophage responses

    PubMed Central

    Tzang, Bor-Show; Chiu, Chun-Ching; Tsai, Chun-Chou; Lee, Yi-Ju; Lu, I-Jung; Shi, Jing-Yu; Hsu, Tsai-Ching

    2009-01-01

    Background Activity of secreted phospholipase A (sPLA2) has been implicated in a wide range of cellular responses. However, little is known about the function of human parvovirus B19-VP1 unique region (VP1u) with sPLA2 activity on macrophage. Methods To investigate the roles of B19-VP1u in response to macrophage, phospholipase A2 activity, cell migration assay, phagocytosis activity, metalloproteinase assay, RT-PCR and immunoblotting were performed. Results In the present study, we report that migration, phagocytosis, IL-6, IL-1β mRNA, and MMP9 activity are significantly increased in RAW264.7 cells by B19-VP1u protein with sPLA2 activity, but not by B19-VP1uD175A protein that is mutated and lacks sPLA2 activity. Additionally, significant increases of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and JNK proteins were detected in macrophages that were treated with B19-VP1u protein, but not when they were treated with B19-VP1uD175A protein. Conclusion Taken together, our experimental results suggest that B19-VP1u with sPLA2 activity affects production of IL-6, IL-1β mRNA, and MMP9 activity, possibly through the involvement of ERK1/2 and JNK signaling pathways. These findings could provide clues in understanding the role of B19-VP1u and its sPLA2 enzymatic activity in B19 infection and B19-related diseases. PMID:19272185

  5. Phosphorylation of the budgerigar fledgling disease virus major capsid protein VP1.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, J I; Consigli, R A

    1992-01-01

    The structural proteins of the budgerigar fledgling disease virus, the first known nonmammalian polyomavirus, were analyzed by isoelectric focusing and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The major capsid protein VP1 was found to be composed of at least five distinct species having isoelectric points ranging from pH 6.45 to 5.85. By analogy with the murine polyomavirus, these species apparently result from different modifications of an initial translation product. Primary chicken embryo cells were infected in the presence of 32Pi to determine whether the virus structural proteins were modified by phosphorylation. SDS-PAGE of the purified virus structural proteins demonstrated that VP1 (along with both minor capsid proteins) was phosphorylated. Two-dimensional analysis of the radiolabeled virus showed phosphorylation of only the two most acidic isoelectric species of VP1, indicating that this posttranslational modification contributes to VP1 species heterogeneity. Phosphoamino acid analysis of 32P-labeled VP1 revealed that phosphoserine is the only phosphoamino acid present in the VP1 protein. Images PMID:1318417

  6. Phosphorylation of the budgerigar fledgling disease virus major capsid protein VP1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The structural proteins of the budgerigar fledgling disease virus, the first known nonmammalian polyomavirus, were analyzed by isoelectric focusing and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The major capsid protein VP1 was found to be composed of at least five distinct species having isoelectric points ranging from pH 6.45 to 5.85. By analogy with the murine polyomavirus, these species apparently result from different modifications of an initial translation product. Primary chicken embryo cells were infected in the presence of 32Pi to determine whether the virus structural proteins were modified by phosphorylation. SDS-PAGE of the purified virus structural proteins demonstrated that VP1 (along with both minor capsid proteins) was phosphorylated. Two-dimensional analysis of the radiolabeled virus showed phosphorylation of only the two most acidic isoelectric species of VP1, indicating that this posttranslational modification contributes to VP1 species heterogeneity. Phosphoamino acid analysis of 32P-labeled VP1 revealed that phosphoserine is the only phosphoamino acid present in the VP1 protein.

  7. Epitope mapping of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus virion protein VP1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Costello, F; Steenfos, N; Jensen, K T; Christensen, J; Gottschalck, E; Holm, A; Aasted, B

    1999-04-01

    Six overlapping fragments of the Aleutian Mink Disease parvoVirus (AMDV) virion protein VP1 and 2 (VP1/2) gene were inserted into the expression vector pMAL-c2. Four of the clones carried large overlapping fragments covering the entire VP1/2 gene. The remaining two clones covered specifically chosen regions within the VP1/2 gene. Using a Western blotting detection system, sera from AMDV-infected mink were tested against the recombinant polypeptides. These studies showed reactions primarily directed against the two AMDV polypeptides ranging from amino acids 297 to 518. Weaker reactions against other regions of the VP1/2 were also observed. The small fusion protein designed to cover the presumed AMDV VP1/2 loop 4 was purified by affinity chromatography and used to develop solid-phase immunoassays. Twelve small synthetic peptides were constructed and used as inhibitors. A peptide covering amino acids S428 to T448 was shown to block the reactivity of a pool of positive mink sera, indicating the presence of one dominant linear epitope. PMID:10219758

  8. Purification of recombinant budgerigar fledgling disease virus VP1 capsid protein and its ability for in vitro capsid assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, R E; Chang, D; Cai, X; Consigli, R A

    1994-01-01

    A recombinant system for the major capsid VP1 protein of budgerigar fledgling disease virus has been established. The VP1 gene was inserted into a truncated form of the pFlag-1 vector and expressed in Escherichia coli. The budgerigar fledgling disease virus VP1 protein was purified to near homogeneity by immunoaffinity chromatography. Fractions containing highly purified VP1 were pooled and found to constitute 3.3% of the original E. coli-expressed VP1 protein. Electron microscopy revealed that the VP1 protein was isolated as pentameric capsomeres. Electron microscopy also revealed that capsid-like particles were formed in vitro from purified VP1 capsomeres with the addition of Ca2+ ions and the removal of chelating and reducing agents. Images PMID:8151798

  9. Purification of recombinant budgerigar fledgling disease virus VP1 capsid protein and its ability for in vitro capsid assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. E.; Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A recombinant system for the major capsid VP1 protein of budgerigar fledgling disease virus has been established. The VP1 gene was inserted into a truncated form of the pFlag-1 vector and expressed in Escherichia coli. The budgerigar fledgling disease virus VP1 protein was purified to near homogeneity by immunoaffinity chromatography. Fractions containing highly purified VP1 were pooled and found to constitute 3.3% of the original E. coli-expressed VP1 protein. Electron microscopy revealed that the VP1 protein was isolated as pentameric capsomeres. Electron microscopy also revealed that capsid-like particles were formed in vitro from purified VP1 capsomeres with the addition of Ca2+ ions and the removal of chelating and reducing agents.

  10. Recombinant VP1 protein expressed in Pichia pastoris induces protective immune responses against EV71 in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Man; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Yefu

    2013-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease and is also associated with serious neurological diseases in children. Currently, there are no effective antiviral drugs or vaccines against EV71 infection. VP1, one of the major immunogenic capsid proteins of EV71, is widely considered to be the candidate antigen for an EV71 vaccine. In this study, VP1 of EV71 was expressed as a secretory protein with an N-terminal histidine tag in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, and purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Immunogenicity and vaccine efficacy of the recombinant VP1 were assessed in mouse models. The results showed that the recombinant VP1 could efficiently induce anti-VP1 antibodies in BALB/c mice, which were able to neutralize EV71 viruses in an in vitro neutralization assay. Passive protection of neonatal mice further confirmed the prophylactic efficacy of the antisera from VP1 vaccinated mice. Furthermore, VP1 vaccination induced strong lymphoproliferative and Th1 cytokine responses. Taken together, our study demonstrated that the yeast-expressed VP1 protein retained good immunogenicity and was a potent EV71 vaccine candidate.

  11. In vitro interaction between coxsackievirus B3 VP1 protein and human pleckstrin homology domain retinal protein (PHR1).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Zhiqin; Wang, Hongluan; Xia, Yanhua; Li, Xiuzhen; Yan, Yan; Zou, Weiwen; Zeng, Lingbing; Huang, Xiaotian

    2015-10-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection causes central nervous system diseases including aseptic meningitis and encephalitis. To understand the mechanism of this virus, a yeast two-hybrid system was used to screen cellular proteins from a human heart cDNA library. The results revealed that the human Pleckstrin Homology Domain Retinal protein (PHR1), a PH domain-containing protein with low expression in the heart and high expression in the brain, interacts with CVB3 VP1, a major structural protein of CVB3. Yeast mating assays and in vitro coimmunoprecipitation verified the interaction between CVB3 VP1 and PHR1. An α-galactosidase assay indicated that of α-galactosidase activity was higher in positive clones than in controls suggesting a strong interaction. Furthermore, assay of deletion mutants defined the minimal region of PHR1 required for its interaction with VP1 as amino acids 95-172 and two regions of VP1 required for its interaction with PHR1 as amino acids 729-767 and 811-859. The results revealed multiple binding sites between PHR1 and CVB3 VP1 and suggested that the strong interaction between these two proteins might play an important role in central nervous system disease in the human brain.

  12. Human parvovirus B19 VP1u Protein as inflammatory mediators induces liver injury in naïve mice.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsai-Ching; Chiu, Chun-Ching; Chang, Shun-Chih; Chan, Hsu-Chin; Shi, Ya-Fang; Chen, Tzy-Yen; Tzang, Bor-Show

    2016-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) is a human pathogen known to be associated with many non-erythroid diseases, including hepatitis. Although B19V VP1-unique region (B19-VP1u) has crucial roles in the pathogenesis of B19V infection, the influence of B19-VP1u proteins on hepatic injury is still obscure. This study investigated the effect and possible inflammatory signaling of B19-VP1u in livers from BALB/c mice that were subcutaneously inoculated with VP1u-expressing COS-7 cells. The in vivo effects of B19-VP1u were analyzed by using live animal imaging system (IVIS), Haematoxylin-Eosin staining, gel zymography, and immunoblotting after inoculation. Markedly hepatocyte disarray and lymphocyte infiltration, enhanced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activity and increased phosphorylation of p38, ERK, IKK-α, IκB and NF-κB (p-p65) proteins were observed in livers from BALB/c mice receiving COS-7 cells expressing B19-VP1u as well as the significantly increased CRP, IL-1β and IL-6. Notably, IFN-γ and phosphorylated STAT1, but not STAT3, were also significantly increased in the livers of BALB/c mice that were subcutaneously inoculated with VP1u-expressing COS-7 cells. These findings revealed the effects of B19-VP1u on liver injury and suggested that B19-VP1u may have a role as mediators of inflammation in B19V infection.

  13. Identification of Positively Charged Residues in Enterovirus 71 Capsid Protein VP1 Essential for Production of Infectious Particles

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shilin; Li, Guiming; Wang, Ying; Gao, Qianqian; Wang, Yizhuo; Cui, Rui

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a positive-stranded RNA virus, is the major cause of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in children, which can cause severe central nervous system disease and death. The capsids of EV71 consist of 60 copies of each of four viral structural proteins (VP1 to VP4), with VP1, VP2, and VP3 exposed on the surface and VP4 arranged internally. VP1 plays a central role in particle assembly and cell entry. To gain insight into the role of positively charged residues in VP1 function in these processes, a charged-to-alanine scanning analysis was performed using an infectious cDNA clone of EV71. Twenty-seven mutants containing single charged-to-alanine changes were tested. Sixteen of them were not viable, seven mutants were replication defective, and the remaining four mutants were replication competent. By selecting revertants, second-site mutations which could at least partially restore viral infectivity were identified within VP1 for four defective mutations and two lethal mutations. The resulting residue pairs represent a network of intra- and intermolecular interactions of the VP1 protein which could serve as a potential novel drug target. Interestingly, mutation K215A in the VP1 GH loop led to a significant increase in thermal stability, demonstrating that conditional thermostable mutants can be generated by altering the charge characteristics of VP1. Moreover, all mutants were sensitive to the EV71 entry inhibitor suramin, which binds to the virus particle via the negatively charged naphthalenetrisulfonic acid group, suggesting that single charged-to-alanine mutation is not sufficient for suramin resistance. Taken together, these data highlight the importance of positively charged residues in VP1 for production of infectious particles. IMPORTANCE Infection with EV71 is more often associated with neurological complications in children and is responsible for the majority of fatalities. No licensed vaccines or antiviral therapies are

  14. Recombinant VP1 protein of duck hepatitis virus 1 expressed in Pichia pastoris and its immunogenicity in ducks.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Li, X K; Wu, T C; Wang, Y; Zhang, C J; Cheng, X C; Chen, P Y

    2014-01-01

    The VP1 gene of duck hepatitis virus type 1 (DHV-1) strain VJ09 was amplified by reverse transcription PCR from the liver of a duckling with clinical symptoms of viral hepatitis. The resulting VP1 cDNA was 720 bp in length and encoded a 240-amino-acid protein. In VP1 gene-based phylogenetic analysis, the VJ09 strain grouped with DHV-1 genotype C. The VP1 gene was inserted into the expression vector pPICZαA and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The expressed VP1 protein was purified and identified by western blot analysis. To evaluate the recombinant VP1's immunogenic potential in ducklings, the antibodies raised in the immunized ducklings were titrated by ELISA, and lymphocyte proliferation and virus neutralization assays were performed. The results show that the recombinant VP1 protein induced a significant immune response in ducklings and this could be a candidate for the development of a subunit vaccine against DHV-1 genotype C.

  15. Generation of multifunctional murine monoclonal antibodies specifically directed to the VP1unique region protein of human parvovirus B19.

    PubMed

    Drechsler, Maik D; Obermeier, Ingrid; Döring, Yvonne; Lackner, Karl J; Modrow, Susanne; von Landenberg, Philipp

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the VP1unique region (VP1u), a part of one major capsid protein of human parvovirus B19 (B19), concerning its involvement in viral replication and infection cycle. Showing a phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-like activity, which is discussed to be necessary for viral release from host cell, its precise function remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to generate multifunctional monoclonal antibodies (mabs) for different applications that may be useful in investigating VP1u's relevance. To establish antiVP1u antibodies, spleen cells from Balb/c mice immunized with purified recombinant viral protein were used for generating antibody-producing hybridoma cell lines. Usability of the antibodies was tested in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western-blot analysis, immunofluorescence and an inhibition assay of enzymatic activity of PLA2. Three hybridoma cell lines secreting mab's specifically directed against the VP1u protein of B19 could be generated and functioned in every screening method used in this study. These antibodies are helpful tools for investigations in B19 research and diagnosis. Furthermore, the antibodies could help in gaining a deeper understanding of VP1u's role in viral replication and infection especially in the importance of its constitutive PLA2-like activity.

  16. Interaction between Simian Virus 40 Major Capsid Protein VP1 and Cell Surface Ganglioside GM1 Triggers Vacuole Formation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yong; Motamedi, Nasim; Magaldi, Thomas G.; Gee, Gretchen V.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Simian virus 40 (SV40), a polyomavirus that has served as an important model to understand many aspects of biology, induces dramatic cytoplasmic vacuolization late during productive infection of monkey host cells. Although this activity led to the discovery of the virus in 1960, the mechanism of vacuolization is still not known. Pentamers of the major SV40 capsid protein VP1 bind to the ganglioside GM1, which serves as the cellular receptor for the virus. In this report, we show that binding of VP1 to cell surface GM1 plays a key role in SV40 infection-induced vacuolization. We previously showed that SV40 VP1 mutants defective for GM1 binding fail to induce vacuolization, even though they replicate efficiently. Here, we show that interfering with GM1-VP1 binding by knockdown of GM1 after infection is established abrogates vacuolization by wild-type SV40. Vacuole formation during permissive infection requires efficient virus release, and conditioned medium harvested late during SV40 infection rapidly induces vacuoles in a VP1- and GM1-dependent fashion. Furthermore, vacuolization can also be induced by a nonreplicating SV40 pseudovirus in a GM1-dependent manner, and a mutation in BK pseudovirus VP1 that generates GM1 binding confers vacuole-inducing activity. Vacuolization can also be triggered by purified pentamers of wild-type SV40 VP1, but not by GM1 binding-defective pentamers or by intracellular expression of VP1. These results demonstrate that SV40 infection-induced vacuolization is caused by the binding of released progeny viruses to GM1, thereby identifying the molecular trigger for the activity that led to the discovery of SV40. PMID:27006465

  17. Transient inhibition of foot-and-mouth disease virus replication by siRNAs silencing VP1 protein coding region.

    PubMed

    Lv, Ke; Guo, Yingjun; Zhang, Yiliang; Wang, Kaiyu; Li, Ka; Zhu, Yan; Sun, Shuhan

    2009-06-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the causative agent of foot-and-mouth disease, a severe, clinically acute, vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals. RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism for silencing gene expression post-transcriptionally that is being exploited as a rapid antiviral strategy. To identify efficacious small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to inhibit the replication of FMDV, candidate siRNAs corresponding to FMDV VP1 gene were designed and synthesized in vitro using T7 RNA polymerase. In reporter assays, five siRNAs showed significant sequence-specific silencing effects on the expression of VP1-EGFP fusion protein from plasmid pVP1-EGFP-N1, which was cotransfected with siRNA into 293T cells. Furthermore, using RT-qPCR, viral titration and viability assay, we identified VP1-siRNA517, VP1-siRNA113 and VP1-siRNA519 that transiently acted as potent inhibitors of FMDV replication when BHK-21 cells were infected with FMDV. In addition, variations within multiple regions of the quasispecies of FMDV were retrospectively revealed by sequencing of FMDV genes, and a single nucleotide substitution was identified as the main factor in resistance to RNAi. Our data demonstrated that the three siRNA molecules synthesized with T7 RNA polymerase could have transient inhibitory effects on the replication of FMDV.

  18. Bioinformatic analysis of non-VP1 capsid protein of coxsackievirus A6.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Bo; Yang, Guang-Fei; Liang, Si-Jia; Lin, Jun

    2016-08-01

    This study bioinformatically analyzed the non-VP1 capsid proteins (VP2-VP4) of Coxasckievirus A6 (CVA6), with an attempt to predict their basic physicochemical properties, structural/functional features and linear B cell eiptopes. The online tools SubLoc, TargetP and the others from ExPASy Bioinformatics Resource Portal, and SWISS-MODEL (an online protein structure modeling server), were utilized to analyze the amino acid (AA) sequences of VP2-VP4 proteins of CVA6. Our results showed that the VP proteins of CVA6 were all of hydrophilic nature, contained phosphorylation and glycosylation sites and harbored no signal peptide sequences and acetylation sites. Except VP3, the other proteins did not have transmembrane helix structure and nuclear localization signal sequences. Random coils were the major conformation of the secondary structure of the capsid proteins. Analysis of the linear B cell epitopes by employing Bepipred showed that the average antigenic indices (AI) of individual VP proteins were all greater than 0 and the average AI of VP4 was substantially higher than that of VP2 and VP3. The VP proteins all contained a number of potential B cell epitopes and some eiptopes were located at the internal side of the viral capsid or were buried. We successfully predicted the fundamental physicochemical properties, structural/functional features and the linear B cell eiptopes and found that different VP proteins share some common features and each has its unique attributes. These findings will help us understand the pathogenicity of CVA6 and develop related vaccines and immunodiagnostic reagents. PMID:27465341

  19. Activation of synoviocytes by the secreted phospholipase A2 motif in the VP1-unique region of parvovirus B19 minor capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Zhi, Ning; Wong, Susan; Brown, Kevin E

    2006-02-15

    Parvovirus B19 infection in adults is often associated with acute symmetrical polyarthropathy, but the mechanism is unknown. Recently, a secreted phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)) motif was identified in the VP1-unique region (VP1u) of the B19 minor capsid protein. To investigate the role of this motif, we expressed VP1u with and without point mutations in the critical amino acids of sPLA(2). Although high concentrations of B19 did not infect human fibroblast-like synoviocytes (HFLSs), there was a >3-fold increase in synoviocyte migration that could be blocked by phospholipase inhibitors. Recombinant proteins with intact VP1u demonstrated sPLA(2) activity and induced cell migration, whereas proteins with mutated VP1u were nonfunctional in both assays. The incubation of HFLSs with proteins that had intact VP1u, but not with proteins with mutated VP1u, increased the production of prostaglandin E(2) >100-fold. Expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 mRNA transcripts, as determined by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and COX-2 protein expression were both significantly increased after incubation with protein that had intact VP1u. Proteins with VP1u in noninfectious B19 may participate in the inflammatory response in the synovial compartment.

  20. A novel finding for enterovirus virulence from the capsid protein VP1 of EV71 circulating in mainland China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongjuan; Fu, Chong; Wu, Suying; Chen, Xiong; Shi, Yingying; Zhou, Bingfei; Zhang, Lianglu; Zhang, Fengfeng; Wang, Zhihao; Zhang, Yingying; Fan, Chengpeng; Han, Song; Yin, Jun; Peng, Biwen; Liu, Wanhong; He, Xiaohua

    2014-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotropic virus that causes various clinical manifestations in young children, ranging from asymptomatic to fatal. Different pathotypes of EV71 notably differ in virulence. Several virulence determinants of EV71 have been predicted. However, these reported virulence determinants could not be used to identify the EV71 strains of subgenotype C4, which mainly circulate in China. In this study, VP1 sequences of 37 EV71 strains from severe cases (SC-EV71) and 192 EV71 strains from mild cases (MC-EV71) in mainland China were analyzed to determine the potential virulence determinants in the capsid protein VP1 of EV71. Although most SC-EV71 strains belonged to subgenotype C4a, no specific genetic lineages in C4a were correlated with EV71 virulence. Interestingly, amino acid substitutions at nine positions (H22Q, P27S, N31S/D, E98K, E145G/Q, D164E, T240A/S, V249I, and A289T) were detected by aligning the VP1 sequences of the SC-EV71 and MC-EV71 strains. Moreover, both the constituent ratios of the conservative or mutated residues in the MC-EV71 and SC-EV71 strains and the changes in the VP1 3D structure resulting from these mutations confirmed that the conservative residues (22H, 249V, and 289A) and the mutated residues (27S, 31S/D, 98K, 145G/Q, 164E, and 240A/S) might be potential virulence determinants in VP1 of EV71. Furthermore, these results led to the hypothesis that VP1 acts as a sandwich switch for viral particle stabilization and cellular receptors attachment, and specific mutations in this protein can convert mild cases into severe cases. These findings highlight new opportunities for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.

  1. Rotavirus RNA polymerase requires the core shell protein to synthesize the double-stranded RNA genome.

    PubMed

    Patton, J T; Jones, M T; Kalbach, A N; He, Y W; Xiaobo, J

    1997-12-01

    Rotavirus cores contain the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genome, RNA polymerase VP1, and guanylyltransferase VP3 and are enclosed within a lattice formed by the RNA-binding protein VP2. Analysis of baculovirus-expressed core-like particles (CLPs) has shown that VP1 and VP2 assemble into the simplest core-like structures with replicase activity and that VP1, but not VP3, is essential for replicase activity. To further define the role of VP1 and VP2 in the synthesis of dsRNA from viral mRNA, recombinant baculoviruses containing gene 1 (rBVg1) and gene 2 (rBVg2) of SA11 rotavirus were generated and used to express recombinant VP1 (rVP1) and rVP2, respectively. After purification, the proteins were assayed individually and together for the ability to catalyze the synthesis of dsRNA in a cell-free replication system. The results showed that dsRNA was synthesized only in assays containing rVP1 and rVP2, thus establishing that both proteins are essential for replicase activity. Even in assays containing a primer-linked mRNA template, neither rVP1 nor rVP2 alone directed RNA synthesis. Characterization of the cis-acting replication signals in mRNA recognized by the replicase of rVP1 and rVP2 showed that they were the same as those recognized by the replicase of virion-derived cores, thus excluding a role for VP3 in recognition of the mRNA template by the replicase. Analysis of RNA-protein interactions indicated that the mRNA template binds strongly to VP2 in replicase assays but that the majority of the dsRNA product neither is packaged nor stably associates with VP2. The results of replicase assays performed with mutant VP2 containing a deletion in its RNA-binding domain suggests that the essential role for VP2 in replication is linked to the protein's ability to bind the mRNA template for minus-strand synthesis.

  2. Chlamydiaphage φCPG1 Capsid Protein Vp1 Inhibits Chlamydia trachomatis Growth via the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanli; Guo, Rui; Zhou, Quan; Sun, Changgui; Zhang, Xinmei; Liu, Yuanjun; Liu, Quanzhong

    2016-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of curable bacterial sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Although the pathogen is well established, the pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear. Given the current challenges of antibiotic resistance and blocked processes of vaccine development, the use of a specific chlamydiaphage may be a new treatment solution. φCPG1 is a lytic phage specific for Chlamydia caviae, and shows over 90% nucleotide sequence identity with other chlamydiaphages. Vp1 is the major capsid protein of φCPG1. Purified Vp1 was previously confirmed to inhibit Chlamydia trachomatis growth. We here report the first attempt at exploring the relationship between Vp1-treated C. trachomatis and the protein and gene levels of the mitogen-activated/extracellular regulated protein kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway by Western blotting and real-time PCR, respectively. Moreover, we evaluated the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-1 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after Vp1 treatment. After 48 h of incubation, the p-ERK level of the Vp1-treated group decreased compared with that of the Chlamydia infection group. Accordingly, ERK1 and ERK2 mRNA expression levels of the Vp1-treated group also decreased compared with the Chlamydia infection group. IL-8 and IL-1 levels were also decreased after Vp1 treatment compared with the untreated group. Our results demonstrate that the inhibition effect of the chlamydiaphage φCPG1 capsid protein Vp1 on C. trachomatis is associated with the MAPK pathway, and inhibits production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and IL-1. The bacteriophages may provide insight into a new signaling transduction mechanism to influence their hosts, in addition to bacteriolysis. PMID:27089359

  3. Chlamydiaphage φCPG1 Capsid Protein Vp1 Inhibits Chlamydia trachomatis Growth via the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuanli; Guo, Rui; Zhou, Quan; Sun, Changgui; Zhang, Xinmei; Liu, Yuanjun; Liu, Quanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of curable bacterial sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Although the pathogen is well established, the pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear. Given the current challenges of antibiotic resistance and blocked processes of vaccine development, the use of a specific chlamydiaphage may be a new treatment solution. φCPG1 is a lytic phage specific for Chlamydia caviae, and shows over 90% nucleotide sequence identity with other chlamydiaphages. Vp1 is the major capsid protein of φCPG1. Purified Vp1 was previously confirmed to inhibit Chlamydia trachomatis growth. We here report the first attempt at exploring the relationship between Vp1-treated C. trachomatis and the protein and gene levels of the mitogen-activated/extracellular regulated protein kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway by Western blotting and real-time PCR, respectively. Moreover, we evaluated the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-1 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after Vp1 treatment. After 48 h of incubation, the p-ERK level of the Vp1-treated group decreased compared with that of the Chlamydia infection group. Accordingly, ERK1 and ERK2 mRNA expression levels of the Vp1-treated group also decreased compared with the Chlamydia infection group. IL-8 and IL-1 levels were also decreased after Vp1 treatment compared with the untreated group. Our results demonstrate that the inhibition effect of the chlamydiaphage φCPG1 capsid protein Vp1 on C. trachomatis is associated with the MAPK pathway, and inhibits production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and IL-1. The bacteriophages may provide insight into a new signaling transduction mechanism to influence their hosts, in addition to bacteriolysis. PMID:27089359

  4. Increased expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 in liver from NZB/W F1 mice received antibody against human parvovirus B19 VP1 unique region protein

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun-Chou; Tzang, Bor-Show; Chiang, Szu-Yi; Hsu, Gwo-Jong; Hsu, Tsai-Ching

    2009-01-01

    Background Human parvovirus B19 infection has been postulated to the anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) in autoimmunity. However, the influence of anti-B19-VP1u antibody in autoimmune diseases is still obscure. Methods To elucidate the effect of anti-B19-VP1u antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), passive transfer of rabbit anti-B19-VP1u IgG was injected intravenously into NZB/W F1 mice. Results Significant reduction of platelet count and prolonged thrombocytopenia time were detected in anti-B19-VP1u IgG group as compared to other groups, whereas significant increases of anti-B19-VP1u, anti-phospholipid (APhL), and anti-double strand DNA (dsDNA) antibody binding activity were detected in anti-B19-VP1u group. Additionally, significant increases of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) activity and protein expression were detected in B19-VP1u IgG group. Notably, phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate kinase (PI3K) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) proteins were involved in the induction of MMP9. Conclusion These experimental results firstly demonstrated the aggravated effects of anti-B19-VP1u antibody in disease activity of SLE. PMID:19272186

  5. The use of additive and subtractive approaches to examine the nuclear localization sequence of the polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been identified in the N-terminal (Ala1-Pro-Lys-Arg-Lys-Ser-Gly-Val-Ser-Lys-Cys11) amino acid sequence of the polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1. The importance of this amino acid sequence for nuclear transport of VP1 protein was demonstrated by a genetic "subtractive" study using the constructs pSG5VP1 (full-length VP1) and pSG5 delta 5'VP1 (truncated VP1, lacking amino acids Ala1-Cys11). These constructs were used to transfect COS-7 cells, and expression and intracellular localization of the VP1 protein was visualized by indirect immunofluorescence. These studies revealed that the full-length VP1 was expressed and localized in the nucleus, while the truncated VP1 protein was localized in the cytoplasm and not transported to the nucleus. These findings were substantiated by an "additive" approach using FITC-labeled conjugates of synthetic peptides homologous to the NLS of VP1 cross-linked to bovine serum albumin or immunoglobulin G. Both conjugates localized in the nucleus after microinjection into the cytoplasm of 3T6 cells. The importance of individual amino acids found in the basic sequence (Lys3-Arg-Lys5) of the NLS was also investigated. This was accomplished by synthesizing three additional peptides in which lysine-3 was substituted with threonine, arginine-4 was substituted with threonine, or lysine-5 was substituted with threonine. It was found that lysine-3 was crucial for nuclear transport, since substitution of this amino acid with threonine prevented nuclear localization of the microinjected, FITC-labeled conjugate.

  6. Alteration of amino acid 101 within capsid protein VP-1 changes the pathogenicity of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Chronic Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection of susceptible mice is an animal model for human demyelinating diseases. Previously we described an altered and diminished pattern of central nervous system disease in immunocompetent SJL/J mice infected with a variant virus. This variant virus H7A6-2 was selected with a neutralizing mAb recognizing the capsid protein VP-1 of Theiler's virus. Here we characterize the variant virus by ELISA and neutralization assays and by sequencing selected regions of the viral RNA genome and relate the alteration to disease. The variant virus contains one single point mutation within a neutralizing epitope of VP- 1. This nucleotide change lead to an amino acid replacement at amino acid 101 of VP-1, a threonine (wild type) to an isoleucine (variant). Model building based on sequence alignments and the known structure of the related Mengo virus indicates that the altered amino acid is located in an exposed loop on the surface of the virus at the periphery of a site that has been proposed to be the receptor binding site. The results of ELISA, neutralization assay, and direct RNA sequencing provide for the first time an opportunity to precisely map an important structural determinant of neurovirulence. PMID:2479706

  7. Alteration of amino acid 101 within capsid protein VP-1 changes the pathogenicity of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, A; Hogle, J M; Fujinami, R S

    1989-12-01

    Chronic Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection of susceptible mice is an animal model for human demyelinating diseases. Previously we described an altered and diminished pattern of central nervous system disease in immunocompetent SJL/J mice infected with a variant virus. This variant virus H7A6-2 was selected with a neutralizing mAb recognizing the capsid protein VP-1 of Theiler's virus. Here we characterize the variant virus by ELISA and neutralization assays and by sequencing selected regions of the viral RNA genome and relate the alteration to disease. The variant virus contains one single point mutation within a neutralizing epitope of VP-1. This nucleotide change lead to an amino acid replacement at amino acid 101 of VP-1, a threonine (wild type) to an isoleucine (variant). Model building based on sequence alignments and the known structure of the related Mengo virus indicates that the altered amino acid is located in an exposed loop on the surface of the virus at the periphery of a site that has been proposed to be the receptor binding site. The results of ELISA, neutralization assay, and direct RNA sequencing provide for the first time an opportunity to precisely map an important structural determinant of neurovirulence.

  8. Molecular characterization of the VP1, VP2, VP4, VP6, NSP1 and NSP2 genes of bovine group B rotaviruses: identification of a novel VP4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Souvik; Kobayashi, N; Nagashima, S; Chawla-Sarkar, M; Krishnan, T; Ganesh, B; Naik, T N

    2010-02-01

    Studies on bovine group B rotaviruses (GBRs) are limited. To date, only the VP6 gene of a single bovine GBR strain and the VP7 and NSP5 genes of a few bovine GBR strains have been sequenced and analyzed. In the present study, using a single-primer amplification method, we have determined the full-length nucleotide sequences of the VP1, VP2, VP4, VP6, NSP1 and NSP2 genes of three bovine GBR strains from eastern India. In all six of these genes, the bovine GBR strains shared high genetic relatedness among themselves but exhibited high genetic diversity with cognate genes of human, murine and ovine GBRs. Interestingly, as with group A rotaviruses, the bovine GBR VP1, VP2, VP6 and NSP2 genes appeared to be more conserved than the VP4 and NSP1 genes among strains of different species. The present study provides important insights into the genetic makeup and diversity of bovine GBRs, and also identifies a novel GBR VP4 genotype. PMID:19936611

  9. Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Y A; Yolken, R H

    1990-09-01

    Since their discovery in the 1970s, the human rotaviruses have been recognized as the most important cause of acute infectious gastroenteritis among infants and children worldwide. Rotavirus has been found to infect almost all mammalian and avian species tested, and is primarily a disease of the young. In humans, rotavirus is the most frequent gastrointestinal pathogen in infants and children less than 2 years of age. In developing countries, the attack rate peaks at 6 months of age, whereas in developed areas of the world the virus is most commonly found among children 6-12 months of age. Rotavirus displays a marked seasonality in temperate climates, with the number of cases peaking in the colder winter months. In tropical climates, this seasonality is not as apparent, and infection may occur year round. Symptoms of rotavirus infection are non-specific and include vomiting and diarrhoea, occasionally accompanied by a low grade fever. Dehydration is more common with rotavirus infection than with most bacterial pathogens, and is the most common cause of death related to rotavirus infection. Treatment is non-specific and includes the use of oral rehydration therapy, especially in developing countries where malnutrition is common. Strategies for the prevention of rotavirus infection are dependent on advances in the understanding of the molecular biology of the rotavirus. The genetic structure of the virus has been extensively studied, and a number of the structural proteins have been identified. The neutralization antigens, located on VP4 and VP7, may be important in conferring immunity to rotavirus in vivo. Two animal-derived and several reassortant rotavirus vaccines are currently being evaluated in field studies, and a number of other candidate vaccines are being tested in vitro and in animal studies. PMID:1962726

  10. The presence of Chlamydia phage PhiCPG1 capsid protein VP1 genes and antibodies in patients infected with Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingyue; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yuanjun; Li, Lingjie; Hou, Shuping; Gao, Xibo; Qi, Manli; Liu, Quanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia phage PhiCPG1 has been found in Chlamydia caviae in a guinea pig model for inclusion conjunctivitis, raising the possibility that Chlamydia phage is also present in patients infected with C. trachomatis (Ct). In the present study, we assayed for presence of Chlamydia phage capsid protein VP1 genes and antibodies in 84 non-Ct controls and 206 Ct patients using an enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), followed by verification with Western blot. None of the subjects were exposed to an antibiotic treatment or had a C. pneumoniae infection. The VP1 antibody test was positive in both, the ELISA and Western blot assay, in 4 Ct patients. PCR amplification experiments revealed presence of the VP1 gene in 5 Ct patients. The results suggest that Chlamydia phage capsid protein VP1 may exist in some Ct patients. PMID:27213552

  11. Increased cardiac injury in NZB/W F1 mice received antibody against human parvovirus B19 VP1 unique region protein.

    PubMed

    Tzang, Bor-Show; Lin, Tsung-Ming; Tsai, Chun-Chou; Hsu, Jeng-Dong; Yang, Lien-Chuan; Hsu, Tsai-Ching

    2011-07-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19) infection has been postulated to both myocardial injury and development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the influence of anti-B19-VP1u antibodies on cardiac disorders in SLE is still obscure. To elucidate the effects of anti-B19-VP1u IgG in SLE, passive transfer of PBS, normal rabbit IgG or rabbit anti-B19-VP1u IgG was injected intravenously into NZB/W F1 mice, respectively. Significant expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were detected in NZB/W F1 mice receiving rabbit anti-B19-VP1u IgG. Markedly cardiomyocyte disarray and lymphocyte infiltration were observed in left ventricle of hearts from NZB/W F1 mice receiving rabbit anti-B19-VP1u IgG. Additionally, significant increases of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) activity and protein expression were detected in left ventricle of hearts from NZB/W F1 mice receiving B19-VP1u IgG. Accordingly, significant increase of phosphorylated p-38 and NF-κB proteins were observed in left ventricle of hearts from NZB/W F1 mice receiving B19-VP1u IgG. However, no significant variation of cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABP) and creatine kinase MB (CK-MB) were detected among all experimental groups. These findings firstly demonstrated the aggravated effects of anti-B19 VP1u IgG on cardiac injury by induction of inflammatory but not myocardial infarction-associated proteins through activation of phosphorylated p-38 and NF-κB signaling.

  12. Recombinant viral capsid protein VP1 suppresses migration and invasion of human cervical cancer by modulating phosphorylated prohibitin in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ching-Feng; Peng, Jei-Ming; Hung, Shao-Wen; Liang, Chi-Ming; Liang, Shu-Mei

    2012-07-28

    Recombinant capsid protein VP1 (rVP1) of foot-and-mouth disease virus inhibits invasion/metastasis of cancer cells. Here we studied its mechanism of action on human cervical cancer cells. The inhibition of cell invasion by rVP1 was accompanied with reduction in phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate (PIP3), phospho-Akt S473, phosphorylated prohibitin (phospho-PHB) T258 in lipid rafts, dissociation of phospho-PHB T258 with Raf-1 and the inactivation of Raf-1/ERK. Addition of PIP3 or overexpression of constitutively active Akt and raft-anchored PHB T258 but not PHB T258I mutant protein reversed the inhibitory effects of rVP1. rVP1 inhibited cervical tumor growth and metastasis, and prolonged survival in xenograft mouse models. These results suggest that rVP1 inhibits cancer metastasis via de-phosphorylation of Akt and PHB T258 in lipid rafts to downregulate Raf/ERK signaling.

  13. Phospholipase A2 Activity-Dependent Stimulation of Ca2+ Entry by Human Parvovirus B19 Capsid Protein VP1

    PubMed Central

    Lupescu, Adrian; Bock, C.-Thomas; Lang, Philipp A.; Aberle, Susanne; Kaiser, Heike; Kandolf, Reinhard; Lang, Florian

    2006-01-01

    Recent reports demonstrated an association of human parvovirus B19 with inflammatory cardiomyopathy (iCMP), which is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. As intracellular Ca2+ activity is a key regulator of cell function and participates in mechanisms leading to endothelial dysfunction, the present experiments explored the effects of the B19 capsid proteins VP1 and VP2. A secreted phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-like activity has been located in the VP1 unique region of the B19 minor capsid protein. As PLA2 has recently been shown to activate the store-operated or capacitative Ca2+ channel ICRAC, we analyzed the impact of the viral PLA2 motif on Ca2+ entry. We cloned the VP1 and VP2 genes isolated from a patient suffering from fatal B19 iCMP into eukaryotic expression vectors. We also generated a B19 replication-competent plasmid to demonstrate PLA2 activity under the control of the complete B19 genome. After the transfection of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1), cytosolic Ca2+ activity was determined by utilizing Fura-2 fluorescence. VP1 and VP2 expression did not significantly modify basal cytosolic Ca2+ activity or the decline of cytosolic Ca2+ activity following the removal of extracellular Ca2+. However, expression of VP1 and of the full-length B19 clone, but not of VP2, significantly accelerated the increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity following the readdition of extracellular Ca2+ in the presence of thapsigargin, indicating an activation of ICRAC. The effect of VP1 was mimicked by the PLA2 product lysophosphatidylcholine and abolished by an inactivating mutation of the PLA2-encoding region of the VP1 gene. Our observations point to the activation of Ca2+ entry by VP1 PLA2 activity, an effect likely participating in the pathophysiology of B19 infection. PMID:16956939

  14. Identification of a conserved neutralizing linear B-cell epitope in the VP1 proteins of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 and 3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruihua; Zhou, Guomei; Xin, Yinghao; Chen, Junhao; Lin, Shaoli; Tian, Ye; Xie, Zhijing; Jiang, Shijin

    2015-11-18

    Duck virus hepatitis (DVH), mainly caused by duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), is a severe disease threaten to duck industry and has worldwide distribution. As the major structural protein, the VP1 protein of DHAV is able to induce neutralizing antibody in ducks. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4F8 against the intact DHAV-1 particles was used to identify the possible epitope in the three serotypes of DHAV. The mAb 4F8 had weak neutralizing activities to both DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, and reacted with the conserved linear B-cell epitopes of (75)GEIILT(80) in DHAV-1 VP1 and (75)GEVILT(80) in DHAV-3 VP1 protein, respectively, while not with DHAV-2 VP1. This was the first report about identification of the common conserved neutralizing linear B-cell epitope of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, which will facilitate understanding of the antigenic structure of VP1 and the serologic diagnosis of DHAV infection.

  15. Different Antibody Response against the Coxsackievirus A16 VP1 Capsid Protein: Specific or Non-Specific

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Teng, Zheng; Gao, Caixia; Qian, Baohua; Wang, Lili; Feng, Jiaojiao; Wang, Jinhong; Zhao, Chunyan; Guo, Cunjiu; Pan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease worldwide. The non-neutralizing antibody response that targets CA16 VP1 remains poorly elucidated. In the present study, antibody responses against CA16 VP1 in Shanghai blood donors and Shanxi individuals were analyzed by ELISA and inhibitory ELISA using five CA16 VP1 antigens: VP11-297, VP141-297, VP11-60, VP145-58 and VP161-297. The correlation coefficients for most of the reactions against each of the five antigens and the inhibition of the anti-CA16 VP1 antibody response produced by the various antigens were higher in Shanghai blood donors compared to those in Shanxi individuals. VP11-297 and VP141-297 strongly inhibited the anti-CA16 VP1 response in serum samples from both populations, while VP145-58 and VP161-297 intermediately and weakly inhibited the anti-CA16 VP1 response, respectively, in only Shanghai group. A specific type of inhibition (anti-CA16 VP1 was completely inhibited by both VP11-60 and VP141-297) characterized by high neutralizing antibody titers was identified and accounted for 71.4% of the strongly reactive samples from the Shanghai group. These results indicate that the Shanghai blood donors exhibited a consistent and specific antibody response, while the Shanxi individuals showed an inconsistent and non-specific antibody response. These findings may improve the understanding of host humoral immunity against CA16 and help to identify an effective approach for seroepidemiological surveillance and specific diagnosis of CA16 infection based on normal and competitive ELISA. PMID:27622652

  16. Different Antibody Response against the Coxsackievirus A16 VP1 Capsid Protein: Specific or Non-Specific.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yingying; Wang, Zhihong; Zhang, Xi; Teng, Zheng; Gao, Caixia; Qian, Baohua; Wang, Lili; Feng, Jiaojiao; Wang, Jinhong; Zhao, Chunyan; Guo, Cunjiu; Pan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease worldwide. The non-neutralizing antibody response that targets CA16 VP1 remains poorly elucidated. In the present study, antibody responses against CA16 VP1 in Shanghai blood donors and Shanxi individuals were analyzed by ELISA and inhibitory ELISA using five CA16 VP1 antigens: VP11-297, VP141-297, VP11-60, VP145-58 and VP161-297. The correlation coefficients for most of the reactions against each of the five antigens and the inhibition of the anti-CA16 VP1 antibody response produced by the various antigens were higher in Shanghai blood donors compared to those in Shanxi individuals. VP11-297 and VP141-297 strongly inhibited the anti-CA16 VP1 response in serum samples from both populations, while VP145-58 and VP161-297 intermediately and weakly inhibited the anti-CA16 VP1 response, respectively, in only Shanghai group. A specific type of inhibition (anti-CA16 VP1 was completely inhibited by both VP11-60 and VP141-297) characterized by high neutralizing antibody titers was identified and accounted for 71.4% of the strongly reactive samples from the Shanghai group. These results indicate that the Shanghai blood donors exhibited a consistent and specific antibody response, while the Shanxi individuals showed an inconsistent and non-specific antibody response. These findings may improve the understanding of host humoral immunity against CA16 and help to identify an effective approach for seroepidemiological surveillance and specific diagnosis of CA16 infection based on normal and competitive ELISA. PMID:27622652

  17. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) Development Is Associated With Mutations in JC Virus Capsid Protein VP1 That Change Its Receptor Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Carl; Testa, Manuela; Brickelmaier, Margot; Bossolasco, Simona; Pazzi, Annamaria; Bestetti, Arabella; Carmillo, Paul; Wilson, Ewa; McAuliffe, Michele; Tonkin, Christopher; Carulli, John P.; Lugovskoy, Alexey; Lazzarin, Adriano; Sunyaev, Shamil; Simon, Kenneth; Cinque, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a fatal demyelinating disease caused by JC virus (JCV) infection of oligodendrocytes, may develop in patients with immune disorders following reactivation of chronic benign infection. Mutations of JCV capsid viral protein 1 (VP1), the capsid protein involved in binding to sialic acid cell receptors, might favor PML onset. Cerebrospinal fluid sequences from 37/40 PML patients contained one of several JCV VP1 amino acid mutations, which were also present in paired plasma but not urine sequences despite the same viral genetic background. VP1-derived virus-like particles (VLPs) carrying these mutations lost hemagglutination ability, showed different ganglioside specificity, and abolished binding to different peripheral cell types compared with wild-type VLPs. However, mutants still bound brain-derived cells, and binding was not affected by sialic acid removal by neuraminidase. JCV VP1 substitutions are acquired intrapatient and might favor JCV brain invasion through abrogation of sialic acid binding with peripheral cells, while maintaining sialic acid–independent binding with brain cells. PMID:21628664

  18. Genetic linkage of capsid protein-encoding RNA segments in group A equine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Miño, Samuel; Barrandeguy, María; Parreño, Viviana; Parra, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus virions are formed by three concentric protein layers that enclose the 11 dsRNA genome segments and the viral proteins VP1 and VP3. Interactions amongst the capsid proteins (VP2, VP6, VP7 and VP4) have been described to play a major role in viral fitness, whilst restricting the reassortment of the genomic segments during co-infection with different rotavirus strains. In this work we describe and characterize the linkage between VP6 and VP7 proteins based on structural and genomic analyses of group A rotavirus strains circulating in Argentinean horses. Strains with the VP7 genotype G3 showed a strong association with the VP6 genotype I6, whilst strains with G14 were associated with the I2 genotype. Most of the differences on the VP6 and VP7 proteins were observed in interactive regions between the two proteins, suggesting that VP6 : VP7 interactions may drive the co-evolution and co-segregation of their respective gene segments.

  19. Genetic linkage of capsid protein-encoding RNA segments in group A equine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Miño, Samuel; Barrandeguy, María; Parreño, Viviana; Parra, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus virions are formed by three concentric protein layers that enclose the 11 dsRNA genome segments and the viral proteins VP1 and VP3. Interactions amongst the capsid proteins (VP2, VP6, VP7 and VP4) have been described to play a major role in viral fitness, whilst restricting the reassortment of the genomic segments during co-infection with different rotavirus strains. In this work we describe and characterize the linkage between VP6 and VP7 proteins based on structural and genomic analyses of group A rotavirus strains circulating in Argentinean horses. Strains with the VP7 genotype G3 showed a strong association with the VP6 genotype I6, whilst strains with G14 were associated with the I2 genotype. Most of the differences on the VP6 and VP7 proteins were observed in interactive regions between the two proteins, suggesting that VP6 : VP7 interactions may drive the co-evolution and co-segregation of their respective gene segments. PMID:26758293

  20. Enteroviruses and the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes revisited: cross-reactivity of enterovirus capsid protein (VP1) antibodies with human mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Sara F; Korsgren, Stella; Pontén, Fredrik; Korsgren, Olle

    2013-04-01

    Current or recent enteroviral infections show an association with type 1 diabetes. However, evidence for this has mainly been generated using a particular mouse monoclonal antibody (clone 5-D8/1) which binds the viral capsid protein VP1. Difficulty in confirming these findings using other independent methods has led to the concern that this might be artefactual. To address this, we examined the potential cross-reactivity of clone 5-D8/1 with normal islet proteins. Western blotting, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry were used to identify human islet proteins bound by the clone 5-D8/1. We found a distinct reactivity with two mitochondrial proteins, creatine kinase B-type and ATP synthase beta subunit. Immunohistochemistry using the clone 5-D8/1 revealed a granular cytoplasmic staining pattern in mitochondria-rich cells, ie hepatocytes, ductal epithelial cells, vascular endothelial cells, skeletal muscle cells, and the neoplastic salivary gland oncocytoma cells, whereas connective tissue and infiltrating immune cells were negative. Staining on islets of Langerhans from subjects with recent-onset type 1 diabetes, but not on isolated human islets infected in vitro with enteroviruses, could be blocked after mixing the clone 5-D8/1 with the mitochondrial proteins. Collectively, our data show that the clone 5-D8/1 detects two human mitochondrial enzymes in addition to enteroviral VP1. The notion that the previously reported VP1 positivity in islets of recent-onset type 1 diabetes patients could reflect cross-reactivity to native islet proteins and not the presence of EV is supported by difficulties in demonstrating EV infection by independent techniques such as PCR or in situ hybridization. These findings call for revisiting the presence of enteroviruses in pancreatic islets of patients with type 1 diabetes.

  1. Rotavirus Capsid Protein VP5* Permeabilizes Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Denisova, Evgeniya; Dowling, William; LaMonica, Rachel; Shaw, Robert; Scarlata, Suzanne; Ruggeri, Franco; Mackow, Erich R.

    1999-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the VP4 outer capsid spike protein into VP8* and VP5* proteins is required for rotavirus infectivity and for rotavirus-induced membrane permeability. In this study we addressed the function of the VP5* cleavage fragment in permeabilizing membranes. Expressed VP5* and truncated VP5* proteins were purified by nickel affinity chromatography and assayed for their ability to permeabilize large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) preloaded with carboxyfluorescein (CF). VP5* and VP5* truncations, but not VP4 or VP8*, permeabilized LUVs as measured by fluorescence dequenching of released CF. Similar to virus-induced CF release, VP5*-induced CF release was concentration and temperature dependent, with a pH optimum of 7.35 at 37°C, but independent of the presence of divalent cations or cholesterol. VP5*-induced permeability was completely inhibited by VP5*-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (2G4, M2, or M7) which recognize conformational epitopes on VP5* but was not inhibited by VP8*-specific neutralizing antibodies. In addition, N-terminal and C-terminal VP5* truncations including residues 265 to 474 are capable of permeabilizing LUVs. These findings demonstrate that VP5* permeabilizes membranes in the absence of other rotavirus proteins and that membrane-permeabilizing VP5* truncations contain the putative fusion region within predicted virion surface domains. The ability of recombinant expressed VP5* to permeabilize membranes should permit us to functionally define requirements for VP5*-membrane interactions. These findings indicate that VP5* is a specific membrane-permeabilizing capsid protein which is likely to play a role in the cellular entry of rotaviruses. PMID:10074166

  2. Characterization of virus-like particles produced by the expression of rotavirus capsid proteins in insect cells.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, S E; Labbé, M; Cohen, J; Burroughs, M H; Zhou, Y J; Estes, M K

    1994-01-01

    Rotaviruses are triple-layered particles that contain four major capsid proteins, VP2, VP4, VP6, and VP7, and two minor proteins, VP1 and VP3. We have cloned each of the rotavirus genes coding for a major capsid protein into the baculovirus expression system and expressed each protein in insect cells. Coexpression of different combinations of the rotavirus major structural proteins resulted in the formation of stable virus-like particles (VLPs). The coexpression of VP2 and VP6 alone or with VP4 resulted in the production of VP2/6 or VP2/4/6 VLPs, which were similar to double-layered rotavirus particles. Coexpression of VP2, VP6, and VP7, with or without VP4, produced triple-layered VP2/6/7 or VP2/4/6/7 VLPs, which were similar to native infectious rotavirus particles. The VLPs maintained the structural and functional characteristics of native particles, as determined by electron microscopic examination of the particles, the presence of nonneutralizing and neutralizing epitopes on VP4 and VP7, and hemagglutination activity of the VP2/4/6/7 VLPs. The production of VP2/4/6 particles indicated that VP4 interacts with VP6. Cell binding assays performed with each of the VLPs indicated that VP4 is the viral attachment protein. Chimeric particles containing VP7 from two different G serotypes also were obtained. The ability to express individual proteins or to coexpress different subsets of proteins provides a system with which to examine the interactions of the rotavirus structural proteins, the role of individual proteins in virus morphogenesis, and the feasibility of a subunit vaccine. Images PMID:8057471

  3. Re-emergence of circulatory foot-and-mouth disease virus serotypes Asia1 in Bangladesh and VP1 protein heterogeneity with vaccine strain IND 63/72.

    PubMed

    Ullah, H; Siddique, M A; Al Amin, Md; Das, B C; Sultana, M; Hossain, M A

    2015-02-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotypes O, A and Asia1 are responsible for significant number of disease outbreaks in Bangladesh; however serotype Asia1 has not been reported in circulation since 1996. The present investigation reports the detection of serotype FMDV Asia1 from local farms in 2012 and 2013 outbreaks. The farms were located in Jessore and Gazipur districts, and one of these farms was under vaccine control programme. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete VP1 gene revealed that FMDV Asia1 is under genetic lineage C having close similarity to the Asia1 sequences of Indian origin. The circulatory genotype Asia1 showed VP1 protein sequence heterogeneity of eight amino acid substitutions within the G-H loop with the vaccine strain [IND 63/72 (AY304994)] used in vaccination programme. ELISA assay revealed that, of seven, only one local field serum sample (cattle vaccinated 38 days earlier) was positive at a titre level of >2.4 (log10) but failed to protect the cattle from infection occurred by the virus. This investigation focused that the eight amino acid substitution in VP1 protein at G-H loop of the locally circulated FMDV serotype Asia1 strain may be a reason for current vaccination failure.

  4. A viable simian virus 40 variant with a deletion in the overlapping genes for virion proteins VP1, VP2 and VP3.

    PubMed

    Norkin, L C; Piatak, M

    1982-12-01

    Nucleotide sequence analysis was used to determine the exact location of a deletion in the late region of the SP2 mutant of simian virus 40 (SV40), a viable small-plaque variant isolated from a persistent infection of rhesus monkey kidney cells. The results indicate that six base pairs are deleted from that part of the SV40 genome in which the coding regions for the three virion proteins, VP1, VP2 and VP3, overlap. This implies that all three virion proteins are affected by the deletion. This finding is discussed with respect to the viability of SP2.

  5. Rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Desselberger, Ulrich

    2014-09-22

    Recent advances of rotavirus (RV) basic and applied research are reviewed. They consist of determination of the RV particle structure and functions of structural proteins, classification into genotypes based on whole genome analyses, description of the RV genome and gene protein assignments, description of the viral replication cycle and of functions of RV-encoded non-structural proteins as well as cellular proteins and cellular organelles involved, the present status of RV genetics and reverse genetics, molecular determinants of pathogenesis and pathophysiology, the RV-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, innate immune responses and correlates of protection, laboratory diagnosis, differential diagnosis and present status of treatment, the molecular epidemiology and mechanisms of evolution of RVs, the development and universal application of RV vaccines as well as issues arising from present universal RV vaccination programs and work on alternative vaccines. The review concludes by presenting problems requiring further exploration and perspectives of future basic and translational research. PMID:25016036

  6. Gene encoding capsid protein VP1 of foot-and-mouth disease virus: a quasispecies model of molecular evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Dopazo, J; Sobrino, F; Palma, E L; Domingo, E; Moya, A

    1988-01-01

    A phylogenetic tree relating the VP1 gene of 15 isolates of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) of serotypes A, C, and O has been constructed. The most parsimonious tree shows that FMDV subtypes and isolates within subtypes constitute sets of related, nonidentical genomes, in agreement with a quasispecies mode of evolution of this virus. The average number of nucleotide replacements per site for all possible pairs of VP1 coding segments is higher among representatives of serotype A than serotype C or O. In comparing amino acid sequences, the values of dispersion index (variance/mean value) are greater than 1, with the highest values scored when all sequences are considered. This indicates an accumulation of mutations at a limited number of residues, suggesting that distributions of sequences fluctuate around points of high stability. Evolution of FMDV follows a path very distant from that of a star phylogeny, and it has not been possible to derive conclusions on constancy of evolutionary rates with the test applied to the analysis. FMDVs, as other RNA viruses, are of limited genetic complexity and their population sizes are extremely large. Their evolution concerns complex, indeterminate mixtures of genomes rather than a single, determinate species. PMID:2842792

  7. Protective immune response to 16 kDa immunoreactive recombinant protein encoding the C-terminal VP1 portion of Foot and Mouth Disease Virus type Asia 1.

    PubMed

    Bayry, J; Prabhudas, K; Gopalakrishna, S; Patil, P K; Ramakrishna, C; Misra, L D; Suryanarayana, V V

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant protein of Foot and Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) type Asia 1 corresponding to the C-terminal half of VP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli. As an alternative to the synthetic peptide, this selected C-terminal region was used as a protein vaccine in guinea pigs in order to study the immune response with various adjuvant formulations: immune stimulatory complexes (ISCOMs), Montanide ISA 206, Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and cytokine mixture. A primary dose of 40 microg/animal followed by a booster of the same dose was injected after a 21-day interval. The sera were collected at intervals of 21, 42 and 63 days after the booster. The humoral response to vaccine was monitored by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a serum neutralization test (SNT). The guinea pig sera showed high titers both in ELISA and SNT, which could be protective. Further, irrespective of the adjuvant preparation used, the vaccine conferred protection against the challenge virus 105 days post-vaccination in 13 of 15 animals (86%). The results indicated that a combination of recombinant protein ISCOMs and Montanide ISA 206 would be a better choice for achieving early protective titers and longer lasting immunity and that the C-terminal half of the VP1 protein may be tried as a safe vaccine for secondary immunization. PMID:10524794

  8. Codon Optimization, Expression in Escherichia coli, and Immunogenicity of Recombinant Chinese Sacbrood Virus (CSBV) Structural Proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haochun; Jiang, Lili; Wang, Qiang; Zhong, Yi; Fan, Zhaobin; Ma, Mingxiao

    2015-01-01

    Chinese sacbrood virus (CSBV) is a small RNA virus family belonging to the genus Iflavirus that causes larval death, and even the collapse of entire bee colonies. The virus particle is spherical, non-enveloped, and its viral capsid is composed of four proteins, although the functions of the structural proteins are unclear. In this study, we used codon recoding to express the recombinant proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 in Escherichia coli. SDS-PAGE analysis and Western blotting revealed that the target genes were expressed at high levels. Mice were then immunized with the purified, recombinant proteins, and antibody levels and lymphocyte proliferation were analyzed by ELISA and the MTT assay, respectively. The results show that the recombinant proteins induced high antibody levels and promoted lymphocyte proliferation. Polyclonal antibodies directed against these proteins will aid future studies of the molecular pathogenesis of CSBV. PMID:26067659

  9. Phylogeography of circulating populations of human echovirus 30 over 50 years: nucleotide polymorphism and signature of purifying selection in the VP1 capsid protein gene.

    PubMed

    Bailly, J-L; Mirand, A; Henquell, C; Archimbaud, C; Chambon, M; Charbonné, F; Traoré, O; Peigue-Lafeuille, H

    2009-07-01

    A comprehensive set of 443 1D gene sequences (encoding the VP1 capsid protein) was analyzed to investigate the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary patterns among strains of human echovirus 30 (E30; genus Enterovirus, family Picornaviridae) characterized over 50 years. Maximum-likelihood (ML) phylogenetic trees of complete and nonredundant 1D gene sequences (total length=876 nucleotides) showed evidence of distinct lineages related to the isolation period of virus strains. Virus transportation was confirmed as a major epidemiological factor in the appearance of epidemics since recurrence of aseptic meningitis outbreaks in a given geographic area was associated with distinct E30 variants detected earlier in distant regions. Detection of the codon changes associated with E30 evolution was investigated with methods implemented in the Datamonkey web server. Evolution of the 1D gene was dominated by continual negative (purifying) selection against nonsynonymous substitutions at most codon sites, as determined by dN/dS ratio. Amino acid polymorphism was maintained at a limited number of sites (10/292) in the VP1 protein (within loops connecting beta strands and C-terminus). Amino acid changes are allowed at these sites because they are likely exposed on the virion particle and nonsynonymous substitutions are observed in the corresponding codons because negative selection is relaxed.

  10. Expression and immunogenic analysis of recombinant polypeptides derived from capsid protein VP1 for developing subunit vaccine material against hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyoung Ok; Park, Jong-Hwa; Lee, Hyun Ho; Chung, Dae Kyun; Kim, Wonyong; Chung, In Sik

    2014-08-01

    Three recombinant polypeptides, VP1-His, VP1-3N-His, and 3D2-His, were produced by Escherichia coli expression system. Recombinant VP1-His, VP1-3N-His, and 3D2-His were expressed as bands with molecular weights of 32, 38, and 30 kDa, respectively. These were purified by affinity chromatography using Ni-NTA Fast-flow resin and/or ion-exchange chromatography using DEAE-Sepharose Fast-flow resin. Intraperitoneal immunizations of recombinant polypeptides successfully elicited the productions of VP1-His, VP1-3N-His, and 3D2-His specific IgG antibodies (IgG subclass distribution of IgG1>IgG2a>IgG2b>IgG3) in sera and induced the secretions of cytokines IFN-γ and IL-6 in spleen cells. Sera from recombinant VP1-His-, VP1-3N-His-, and 3D2-His-immunized mice neutralized the propagation of HAV. The highest neutralizing activity was shown in sera from recombinant VP1-3N-His-immunized mice. These results suggest that recombinant VP1-3N-His can be a useful source for developing hepatitis A virus (HAV) subunit vaccine candidates.

  11. Molecular determinants of enterovirus 71 viral entry: cleft around GLN-172 on VP1 protein interacts with variable region on scavenge receptor B 2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pan; Song, Zilin; Qi, Yonghe; Feng, Xiaofeng; Xu, Naiqing; Sun, Yinyan; Wu, Xing; Yao, Xin; Mao, Qunyin; Li, Xiuling; Dong, Wenjuan; Wan, Xiaobo; Huang, Niu; Shen, Xinliang; Liang, Zhenglun; Li, Wenhui

    2012-02-24

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major pathogens that cause hand, foot, and mouth disease outbreaks in young children in the Asia-Pacific region in recent years. Human scavenger receptor class B 2 (SCARB2) is the main cellular receptor for EV71 on target cells. The requirements of the EV71-SCARB2 interaction have not been fully characterized, and it has not been determined whether SCARB2 serves as an uncoating receptor for EV71. Here we compared the efficiency of the receptor from different species including human, horseshoe bat, mouse, and hamster and demonstrated that the residues between 144 and 151 are critical for SCARB2 binding to viral capsid protein VP1 of EV71 and seven residues from the human receptor could convert murine SCARB2, an otherwise inefficient receptor, to an efficient receptor for EV71 viral infection. We also identified that EV71 binds to SCARB2 via a canyon of VP1 around residue Gln-172. Soluble SCARB2 could convert the EV71 virions from 160 S to 135 S particles, indicating that SCARB2 is an uncoating receptor of the virus. The uncoating efficiency of SCARB2 significantly increased in an acidic environment (pH 5.6). These studies elucidated the viral capsid and receptor determinants of enterovirus 71 infection and revealed a possible target for antiviral interventions.

  12. Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Esona, Mathew D; Gautam, Rashi

    2015-06-01

    Group A rotavirus (RVA) is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. Introduction of two live, attenuated rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix® and RotaTeq®, has dramatically reduced RVA-associated AGE and mortality. High-throughput, sensitive and specific techniques are required to rapidly diagnose and characterize rotavirus strains in stool samples for proper patient treatment and to monitor circulating vaccine and wild-type rotavirus strains. New molecular assays are rapidly developed that are more sensitive and specific than the conventional assays for detection, genotyping and full genome characterization of circulating rotavirus wild-type and vaccine (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) strains causing AGE.

  13. Rotavirus VP2 core shell regions critical for viral polymerase activation.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Sarah M; Patton, John T

    2011-04-01

    The innermost VP2 core shell of the triple-layered, icosahedral rotavirus particle surrounds the viral genome and RNA processing enzymes, including the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (VP1). In addition to anchoring VP1 within the core, VP2 is also an essential cofactor that triggers the polymerase to initiate double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) synthesis using packaged plus-strand RNA templates. The VP2 requirement effectively couples packaging with genome replication and ensures that VP1 makes dsRNA only within an assembling previrion particle. However, the mechanism by which the rotavirus core shell protein activates the viral polymerase remains very poorly understood. In the current study, we sought to elucidate VP2 regions critical for VP1-mediated in vitro dsRNA synthesis. By comparing the functions of proteins from several different rotaviruses, we found that polymerase activation by the core shell protein is specific. Through truncation and chimera mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the VP2 amino terminus, which forms a decameric, internal hub underneath each 5-fold axis, plays an important but nonspecific role in VP1 activation. Our results indicate that the VP2 residues correlating with polymerase activation specificity are located on the inner face of the core shell, distinct from the amino terminus. Based on these findings, we predict that several regions of VP2 engage the polymerase during the concerted processes of rotavirus core assembly and genome replication.

  14. [Synthesis and immunogenic properties of peptides--fragments of the immunodominant regions of the VP1 protein of the Asia-1 type of foot- and-mouth disease virus].

    PubMed

    Petrov, V N; Rybakov, S S; Petrova, O N; Chepurkin, A V; Gulenkin, V M

    1998-12-01

    Potential immunodominant epitopes were predicted on the basis of a theoretical analysis of the antigenic structure of the VP1 protein of the type Asia-1 foot-and-mouth disease virus. Peptides corresponding to the 140-153, 136-153, 132-153, 143-157, 137-157, and 193-208 fragments of the VP1 protein sequence were synthesized by the solid phase method, and the immunogenic properties of the peptides were studied on guinea pigs. The shortest peptide exhibiting the protective effect was found to correspond to the, 140-153 fragment of the VP1 sequence. The Plm-(Gly)3-(140-153)-(Gly)2-Lys(Plm)-Leu and [Ac-(140-153)-(Gly)3]8-(Lys)7-Gly synthetic constructions in combination with adjuvants provided up to 80% protection of immunized animals against infection with the foot-and-mouth disease virus.

  15. Rotavirus RNA Polymerases Resolve into Two Phylogenetically Distinct Classes that Differ in Their Mechanism of Template Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Kristen M.; Johne, Reimar; Patton, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are segmented double-stranded RNA viruses that cause gastroenteritis in mammals and birds. Within the RV genus, eight species (RVA-RVH) have been proposed. Here, we report the first RVF and RVG sequences for the viral RNA polymerase (VP1)-encoding segments and compare them to those of other RV species. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the VP1 RNA segments and proteins resolve into two major clades, with RVA, RVC, RVD and RVF in clade A, and RVB, RVG and RVH in clade B. Plus-strand RNA of clade A viruses, and not clade B viruses, contain a 3′-proximal UGUG cassette that serves as the VP1 recognition signal. VP1 structures for a representative of each RV species were predicted using homology modeling. Structural elements involved in interactions with the UGUG cassette were conserved among VP1 of clade A, suggesting a conserved mechanism of viral RNA recognition for these viruses. PMID:22687427

  16. Identification of specific antigenic epitope at N-terminal segment of enterovirus 71 (EV-71) VP1 protein and characterization of its use in recombinant form for early diagnosis of EV-71 infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianhua; Jiang, Bingfu; Xu, Mingjie; Dai, Xing; Purdy, Michael A.; Meng, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main etiologic agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). We sought to identify EV-71 specific antigens and develop serologic assays for acute-phase EV-71 infection. A series of truncated proteins within the N-terminal 100 amino acids (aa) of EV-71 VP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli. Western blot (WB) analysis showed that positions around 11–21 aa contain EV-71-specific antigenic sites, whereas positions 1–5 and 51–100 contain epitopes shared with human coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) and human echovirus 6 (E-6). The N-terminal truncated protein of VP1, VP16–43, exhibited good stability and was recognized by anti-EV-71 specific rabbit sera. Alignment analysis showed that VP16–43 is highly conserved among EV-71 strains from different genotypes but was heterologous among other enteroviruses. When the GST-VP16–43 fusion protein was incorporated as antibody-capture agent in a WB assay and an ELISA for detecting anti-EV-71 IgM in human sera, sensitivities of 91.7% and 77.8% were achieved, respectively, with 100% specificity for both. The characterized EV-71 VP1 protein truncated to positions 6–43 aa has potential as an antigen for detection of anti-EV-71 IgM for early diagnosis of EV-71 infection in a WB format. PMID:24952304

  17. Sequence analysis and structural implications of rotavirus capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Parbhoo, N; Dewar, J B; Gildenhuys, S

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the major cause of severe virus-associated gastroenteritis worldwide in children aged 5 and younger. Many children lose their lives annually due to this infection and the impact is particularly pronounced in developing countries. The mature rotavirus is a non-enveloped triple-layered nucleocapsid containing 11 double stranded RNA segments. Here a global view on the sequence and structure of the three main capsid proteins, VP2, VP6 and VP7 is shown by generating a consensus sequence for each of these rotavirus proteins, for each species obtained from published data of representative rotavirus genotypes from across the world and across species. Degree of conservation between species was represented on homology models for each of the proteins. VP7 shows the highest level of variation with 14-45 amino acids showing conservation of less than 60%. These changes are localised to the outer surface alluding to a possible mechanism in evading the immune system. The middle layer, VP6 shows lower variability with only 14-32 sites having lower than 70% conservation. The inner structural layer made up of VP2 showed the lowest variability with only 1-16 sites having less than 70% conservation across species. The results correlate with each protein's multiple structural roles in the infection cycle. Thus, although the nucleotide sequences vary due to the error-prone nature of replication and lack of proof reading, the corresponding amino acid sequence of VP2, 6 and 7 remain relatively conserved. Benefits of this knowledge about the conservation include the ability to target proteins at sites that cannot undergo mutational changes without influencing viral fitness; as well as possibility to study systems that are highly evolved for structure and function in order to determine how to generate and manipulate such systems for use in various biotechnological applications. PMID:27640436

  18. Mouse adaptation of a sub-genogroup B5 strain of human enterovirus 71 is associated with a novel lysine to glutamic acid substitution at position 244 in protein VP1.

    PubMed

    Zaini, Zainun; Phuektes, Patchara; McMinn, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Most human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) strains infect only primates and are unable to cause clinically apparent infection in mice. Here we describe a mouse-adapted HEV71 strain that belongs to sub-genogroup B5 with increased virulence in newborn BALB/c mice. The mouse-virulent strain was initially selected by serial passage of a HEV71 clinical isolate (HEV71-B5) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells (CHO-B5), followed by serial passage in newborn mice. Virus from the fifth mouse passage was cultured twice on Vero cells and designated as MP-B5. MP-B5 induces severe disease of high mortality in newborn mice in a dose-dependent manner. Skeletal muscle is the primary site of virus replication and results in severe myositis. CHO-B5 harbours a single amino acid substitution (K(149) → I) in the VP2 capsid protein. Five additional nucleotide sequence changes were identified in MP-B5, two of which are located in the 5' UTR and the three within the open reading frame (ORF). Two of the ORF mutations resulted in deduced amino acid changes in the capsid protein VP1: S(241) → L and K(244) → E; the third ORF mutation was a synonymous C → T change at nucleotide position 6072 within the 3D polymerase gene. Infectious cDNA clone-derived mutant virus populations of HEV71 belonging to sub-genogroup B3 (CHO-26 M) that contain the VP1 mutations identified in MP-B5 were generated in order to determine the mutation(s) responsible for mouse virulence. Only viruses expressing the VP1 (K(244) → E) mutation were virulent in 5-day-old BALB/c mice, indicating that the VP1 (K(244) → E) change is the critical genetic determinant of mouse adaptation and virulence in this model.

  19. VP1, the Putative RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus, Forms Complexes with the Capsid Protein VP3, Leading to Efficient Encapsidation into Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Eleuterio; Maraver, Antonio; Castón, José R.; Rivera, José; Fernández-Arias, Armando; Serrano, Antonio; Carrascosa, José L.; Rodriguez, José F.

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA corresponding to the coding region of VP1, the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) was cloned and inserted into the genome of a vaccinia virus inducible expression vector. The molecular mass and antigenic reactivity of VP1 expressed in mammalian cells are identical to those of its counterpart expressed in IBDV-infected cells. The results presented here demonstrate that VP1 is efficiently incorporated into IBDV virus-like particles (VLPs) produced in mammalian cells coexpressing the IBDV polyprotein and VP1. Incorporation of VP1 into VLPs requires neither the presence of IBDV RNAs nor that of the nonstructural polypeptide VP5. Immunofluorescence, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and immunoprecipitation analyses conclusively showed that VP1 forms complexes with the structural polypeptide VP3. Formation of VP1-VP3 complexes is likely to be a key step for the morphogenesis of IBDV particles. PMID:10400796

  20. A combination vaccine for allergy and rhinovirus infections based on rhinovirus-derived surface protein VP1 and a nonallergenic peptide of the major timothy grass pollen allergen Phl p 1.

    PubMed

    Edlmayr, Johanna; Niespodziana, Katarzyna; Linhart, Birgit; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Westritschnig, Kerstin; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Stoecklinger, Angelika; Kneidinger, Michael; Valent, Peter; Campana, Raffaela; Thalhamer, Josef; Popow-Kraupp, Theresia; Valenta, Rudolf

    2009-05-15

    Allergens and rhinovirus infections are among the most common elicitors of respiratory diseases. We report the construction of a recombinant combination vaccine for allergy and rhinovirus infections based on rhinovirus-derived VP1, the surface protein which is critically involved in infection of respiratory cells, and a nonallergenic peptide of the major grass pollen allergen Phl p 1. Recombinant hybrid molecules consisting of VP1 and a Phl p 1-derived peptide of 31 aa were expressed in Escherichia coli. The hybrid molecules did not react with IgE Abs from grass pollen allergic patients and lacked allergenic activity when exposed to basophils from allergic patients. Upon immunization of mice and rabbits, the hybrids did not sensitize against Phl p 1 but induced protective IgG Abs that cross-reacted with group 1 allergens from different grass species and blocked allergic patients' IgE reactivity to Phl p 1 as well as Phl p 1-induced basophil degranulation. Moreover, hybrid-induced IgG Abs inhibited rhinovirus infection of cultured human epithelial cells. The principle of fusing nonallergenic allergen-derived peptides onto viral carrier proteins may be used for the engineering of safe allergy vaccines which also protect against viral infections.

  1. Heat Shock Cognate Protein 70 Is Involved in Rotavirus Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A.; Bouyssounade, Daniela; Zárate, Selene; Iša, Pavel; López, Tomás; Espinosa, Rafaela; Romero, Pedro; Méndez, Ernesto; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2002-01-01

    In this work, we have identified the heat shock cognate protein (hsc70) as a receptor candidate for rotaviruses. hsc70 was shown to be present on the surface of MA104 cells, and antibodies to this protein blocked rotavirus infectivity, while not affecting the infectivity of reovirus and poliovirus. Preincubation of the hsc70 protein with the viruses also inhibited their infectivity. Triple-layered particles (mature virions), but not double-layered particles, bound hsc70 in a solid-phase assay, and this interaction was blocked by monoclonal antibodies to the virus surface proteins VP4 and VP7. Rotaviruses were shown to interact with hsc70 at a postattachment step, since antibodies to hsc70 and the protein itself did not inhibit the virus attachment to cells. We propose that the functional rotavirus receptor is a complex of several cell surface molecules that include, among others, hsc70. PMID:11907249

  2. The tight junction protein JAM-A functions as coreceptor for rotavirus entry into MA104 cells.

    PubMed

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M; Silva-Ayala, Daniela; Espinoza, Marco A; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2015-01-15

    Several molecules have been identified as receptors or coreceptors for rotavirus infection, including glycans, integrins, and hsc70. In this work we report that the tight junction proteins JAM-A, occludin, and ZO-1 play an important role during rotavirus entry into MA104 cells. JAM-A was found to function as coreceptor for rotavirus strains RRV, Wa, and UK, but not for rotavirus YM. Reassortant viruses derived from rotaviruses RRV and YM showed that the virus spike protein VP4 determines the use of JAM-A as coreceptor.

  3. Phospholipase A2-like activity of human bocavirus VP1 unique region.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiao-Wang; Liu, Wen-Pei; Qi, Zheng-Yu; Duan, Zhao-Jun; Zheng, Li-Shu; Kuang, Zi-Zhou; Zhang, Wan-Ju; Hou, Yun-De

    2008-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a new parvovirus first discovered in 2005, which is associated with acute respiratory infection. Analysis of sequence homology has revealed that a putative phospholipase A2 (PLA2) motif exists in the VP1 unique region of HBoV. However, little is known about whether the VP1 unique region of HBoV has PLA2 enzymatic activity and how these critical residues contribute to its PLA2 activity. To address these issues, the VP1 unique region protein and four of its mutants, were expressed in Eschericha coli. The purified VP1 unique protein (VP1U) showed a typical Ca2+-dependent secreted PLA2-like (sPLA2) activity, which was inhibited by sPLA2-specific inhibitors in a time-dependent manner. Mutation of one of the amino acids (21Pro, 41His, 42Asp or 63Asp) in VP1U almost eliminated the sPLA2 activity of HBoV VP1U. These data indicate that VP1U of HBoV has sPLA2-like enzymatic activity, and these residues are crucial for its sPLA2-like activity. Potentially, VP1U may be a target for the development of anti-viral drugs for HBoV.

  4. Amino acid sequence similarity of the VP7 protein of human rotavirus HCR3 to that of canine and feline rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Clark, H F; Gouvea, V

    1994-01-01

    The sequence of the VP7 gene of human rotavirus strain HCR3 was determined and its predicted amino acid sequence was compared with that of other rotavirus strains. The VP7 gene is 1062 nucleotides long and contains a single open reading frame of 981 nucleotides capable of encoding a protein of 326 amino acids. The VP7 amino acid sequence similarity of strain HCR3 to those of various human and animal G3 serotypes ranged from 88.7 to 99.4%, and from 60.4 to 88.3% to strains representing each of the other 13 G serotypes. Alignment of four variable regions [VR4, VR5(A), VR7(B) and VR8(C)] of HCR3 with those of G3 strains of different host species showed that HCR3 possesses a sequence almost identical to that of canine rotaviruses and feline rotavirus strain CAT97 in all four regions. A considerable divergence in regions VR4, VR7(B) and VR8(C) was found with strains of human, mouse, monkey, horse and rabbit rotaviruses. This observation together with results of our previous study on VP4 indicated that human rotavirus HCR3 is genetically more closely related to animal rotaviruses than to other human rotaviruses. PMID:8113730

  5. Molecular and Functional Analyses of a Human Parvovirus B19 Infectious Clone Demonstrates Essential Roles for NS1, VP1, and the 11-Kilodalton Protein in Virus Replication and Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Ning; Mills, Ian P.; Lu, Jun; Wong, Susan; Filippone, Claudia; Brown, Kevin E.

    2006-01-01

    In an attempt to experimentally define the roles of viral proteins encoded by the B19 genome in the viral life cycle, we utilized the B19 infectious clone constructed in our previous study to create two groups of B19 mutant genomes: (i) null mutants, in which either a translational initiation codon for each of these viral genes was substituted by a translational termination codon or a termination codon was inserted into the open reading frame by a frameshift; and (ii) a deletion mutant, in which half of the hairpin sequence was deleted at both the 5′ and the 3′ termini. The impact of these mutations on viral infectivity, DNA replication, capsid protein production, and distribution was systematically examined. Null mutants of the NS and VP1 proteins or deletion of the terminal hairpin sequence completely abolished the viral infectivity, whereas blocking expression of the 7.5-kDa protein or the putative protein X had no effect on infectivity in vitro. Blocking expression of the proline-rich 11-kDa protein significantly reduced B19 viral infectivity, and protein studies suggested that the expression of the 11-kDa protein was critical for VP2 capsid production and trafficking in infected cells. These findings suggest a previously unrecognized role for the 11-kDa protein, and together the results enhance our understanding of the key features of the B19 viral genome and proteins. PMID:16731932

  6. Gene protein products of SA11 simian rotavirus genome.

    PubMed Central

    Arias, C F; López, S; Espejo, R T

    1982-01-01

    When MA104 cells were infected with SA11 rotavirus, 12 protein classes, absent in mock-infected cells, could be distinguished by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. At least two of these proteins were glycosylated, and their synthesis could be blocked with tunicamycin. The oligosaccharides of both glycoproteins were cleaved by endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H, suggesting that they were residues of the "high-mannose" type. Of the 12 viral polypeptides observed in infected cells, 1 was probably the apoprotein of one of these glycoproteins; 5, including 1 glycoprotein, were structural components of the virions, whereas the other 6, including a second and possibly third glycoprotein, were nonstructural viral proteins. When the 11 double-stranded RNA genome segments of SA11 were translated, after denaturation, in an RNA-dependent cell-free translation system, at least 11 different polypeptides were synthesized. Ten of these polypeptides had electrophoretic migration patterns equal to those of viral proteins observed in tunicamycin-treated infected cells. Nine of the 11 double-stranded RNA genome segments were resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and were translated individually. Two were not resolved from each other and therefore were translated together. Correlation of each synthesized polypeptide with an individual RNA segment allowed us to make a probable gene-coding assignment for the different SA11 genome segments. Images PMID:6283128

  7. Serotypic characterization of outer capsid spike protein VP4 of vervet monkey rotavirus SA11 strain.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Y; Jones, R W; Kapikian, A Z

    1998-01-01

    The vervet monkey rotavirus SA11, a prototype strain of group A rotaviruses, has been shown to possess VP7 serotype 3 specificity but its neutralization specificity with regard to the other outer capsid protein VP4 has not been elucidated. We thus determined its VP4 specificity by two-way cross-neutralization with guinea pig antiserum prepared with a single gene substitution reassortant that had only the VP4-encoding gene from the simian rotavirus SA11 strain and remaining ten genes from human rotavirus DS-1 strain (G serotype 2). The SA11 VP4 was related antigenically in a one-way fashion to rhesus monkey rotavirus MMU18006 VP4 (a P5B strain) and marginally to human and canine rotavirus VP4s with P serotype 5A specificity. In addition, the SA11 VP4 was shown to be distinct antigenically from those of other known P serotypes (1-4, and 6-11) as well as those of uncharacterized equine, lapine, and avian rotavirus strains. The SA11 VP4 is thus proposed for classification as a P5B serotype. PMID:9687880

  8. Reassortant rotaviruses as potential live rotavirus vaccine candidates.

    PubMed Central

    Midthun, K; Greenberg, H B; Hoshino, Y; Kapikian, A Z; Wyatt, R G; Chanock, R M

    1985-01-01

    A series of reassortants was isolated from coinfection of cell cultures with a wild-type animal rotavirus and a "noncultivatable" human rotavirus. Wild-type bovine rotavirus (UK strain) was reassorted with human rotavirus strains D, DS-1, and P; wild-type rhesus rotavirus was reassorted with human rotavirus strains D and DS-1. The D, DS-1, and P strains represent human rotavirus serotypes 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Monospecific antiserum (to bovine rotavirus, NCDV strain) or a set of monoclonal antibodies to the major outer capsid neutralization glycoprotein, VP7 (of the rhesus rotavirus), was used to select for reassortants with human rotavirus neutralization specificity. This selection technique yielded many reassortants which received only the gene segment coding for the major neutralization protein from the human rotavirus parent, whereas the remaining genes were derived from the animal rotavirus parent. Single human rotavirus gene substitution reassortants of this sort represent potential live vaccine strains. Images PMID:2983101

  9. Expression and immunogenicity of novel subunit enterovirus 71 VP1 antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Juan; Wang, Shixia; Gan, Weihua; Zhang, Wenhong; Ju, Liwen; Huang, Zuhu; Lu, Shan

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EV71 is a major emerging infectious disease in many Asian countries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivated EV71 vaccines are in clinical studies but their safety and efficacy are unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developing subunit based EV71 vaccines is significant and novel antigen design is needed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA immunization is an efficient tool to test the immunogenicity of VP1 based EV71 vaccines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple VP1 antigens are developed showing immunogenic potential. -- Abstract: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common viral illness in young children. HFMD is caused by viruses belonging to the enterovirus genus of the picornavirus family. Recently, enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a virulent agent for HFMD with severe clinical outcomes. In the current report, we conducted a pilot antigen engineering study to optimize the expression and immunogenicity of subunit VP1 antigen for the design of EV71 vaccines. DNA immunization was adopted as a simple technical approach to test different designs of VP1 antigens without the need to express VP1 protein in vitro first. Our studies indicated that the expression and immunogenicity of VP1 protein can be improved with alternated VP1 antigen designs. Data presented in the current report revealed novel pathways to optimize the design of VP1 antigen-based EV71 vaccines.

  10. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, Crystal E.; Kelly, Deborah F.; McDonald, Sarah M.

    2015-03-15

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy.

  11. Recovery and characterization of a replicase complex in rotavirus-infected cells by using a monoclonal antibody against NSP2.

    PubMed Central

    Aponte, C; Poncet, D; Cohen, J

    1996-01-01

    Replication of the rotavirus genome involves two steps: (i) transcription and extrusion of transcripts and (ii) minus-strand RNA synthesis in viral complexes containing plus-strand RNA. In this study, we showed evidence for the importance of the viral nonstructural protein of rotavirus, NSP2, in the replication of viral RNAs. RNA-binding properties of NSP2 were tested by UV cross-linking in vivo (in rotavirus-infected MA104 cells and recombinant baculovirus-expressing NSP2-infected Sf9 cells). In rotavirus-infected cells, NSP2 is bound to the 11 double-stranded RNA genomic segments of rotavirus. Quantitative analysis (using hydrolysis by RNase A) is consistent with NSP2 being directly bound to partially replicated viral RNA. Using various monoclonal antibodies and specific antisera against the structural (VP1, VP2, and VP6) and nonstructural (NSP1, NSP2, NSP3, and NSP5) proteins, we developed a solid-phase assay for the viral replicase. In this test, we recovered a viral RNA-protein complex with replicase activity only with a monoclonal antibody directed against NSP2. Our results indicated that these viral complexes contain the structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP6 and the nonstructural protein NSP2. Our results show that NSP2 is closely associated in vivo with the viral replicase. PMID:8551639

  12. Purified recombinant bluetongue virus VP1 exhibits RNA replicase activity.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Mark; Wehrfritz, Josa; Noad, Rob; Roy, Polly

    2004-04-01

    The polymerase protein of all known double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses is located within a complex subviral core particle that is responsible for transcription of the viral genome. For members of the family Reoviridae, this particle allows messenger sense RNA synthesis while sequestering the viral genome away from cellular dsRNA surveillance systems during infection of eukaryotic cells. The core particle of bluetongue virus (BTV) consists of the major structural proteins VP3 and VP7 and the minor enzymatic proteins VP1 (polymerase), VP4 (capping enzyme), and VP6 (helicase). In this report we have characterized fully processive dsRNA synthesis by VP1 from a viral plus-strand RNA template in the absence of the other proteins of the BTV core. This replicase activity consists of de novo initiation of synthesis, followed by elongation of the minus strand. Purified VP1 exhibits little sequence specificity for BTV plus-strand template, suggesting that the choice of viral over nonviral RNA template comes from its association with other proteins within the viral core.

  13. Rotaviruses: Extraction and Isolation of RNA, Reassortant Strains, and NSP4 Protein.

    PubMed

    Yakshe, Krystle A; Franklin, Zachary D; Ball, Judith M

    2015-05-01

    Rotavirus (RV) contains 11 double-stranded RNA segments that encode for twelve structural and nonstructural proteins. The separation and isolation of viral RNA is a necessary precursor for many experimental techniques and can be useful for rapid RV RNA typing and sequencing of different rotavirus strains. The segmented genome enables RV to recombine easily. These recombinant viruses are essential for many purposes, including generation of potential vaccine strains. Rotavirus gene 10 expresses the viral enterotoxin, NSP4, which has been the focus of several studies due to the influence of NSP4 on rotavirus replication, morphogenesis, and pathogenesis. This unit will describe the isolation and separation of viral RNAs, the production characterization of recombinant RV in culture, and the expression and isolation of NSP4 in mammalian and insect cells.

  14. Hsp70 negatively controls rotavirus protein bioavailability in caco-2 cells infected by the rotavirus RF strain.

    PubMed

    Broquet, Alexis H; Lenoir, Christelle; Gardet, Agnès; Sapin, Catherine; Chwetzoff, Serge; Jouniaux, Anne-Marie; Lopez, Susana; Trugnan, Germain; Bachelet, Maria; Thomas, Ginette

    2007-02-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the induction of the heat shock protein Hsp70 in response to viral infection is highly specific and differs from one cell to another and for a given virus type. However, no clear consensus exists so far to explain the likely reasons for Hsp70 induction within host cells during viral infection. We show here that upon rotavirus infection of intestinal cells, Hsp70 is indeed rapidly, specifically, and transiently induced. Using small interfering RNA-Hsp70-transfected Caco-2 cells, we observed that Hsp70 silencing was associated with an increased virus protein level and enhanced progeny virus production. Upon Hsp70 silencing, we observed that the ubiquitination of the main rotavirus structural proteins was strongly reduced. In addition, the use of proteasome inhibitors in infected Caco-2 cells was shown to induce an accumulation of structural viral proteins. Together, these results are consistent with a role of Hsp70 in the control of the bioavailability of viral proteins within cells for virus morphogenesis.

  15. Production of a recombinant capsid protein VP1 from a newly described polyomavirus (RacPyV) for downstream use in virus characterization.

    PubMed

    Church, Molly E; Dela Cruz, Florante N; Kim, Kevin; Persiani, Michele; Woods, Leslie W; Pesavento, Patricia A; Woolard, Kevin D

    2016-06-01

    Here we describe the methods for production of a recombinant viral capsid protein and subsequent use in an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and for use in production of a rabbit polyclonal antibody. These reagents were utilized in development and optimization of an ELISA, which established the extent of exposure of free ranging raccoons to a newly described polyomavirus (RacPyV) [1]. Production of a polyclonal antibody has allowed for further characterization of RacPyV, including immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry techniques, in order to answer questions about pathogenesis of this virus. PMID:26955649

  16. The VP1-unique region of parvovirus B19 induces myocardial injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiaojing; Zhang, Guocheng; Xu, Dongliang; Sun, Xin; Li, Zhihong; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xuehong; He, Fei; Li, Yunming

    2010-01-01

    As a common human pathogen, parvovirus B19 (B19V) has been shown to be associated with many heart diseases, such as myocarditis, cardiomyopathy and cardiopericarditis. The virus protein 1-unique region (VP1u) is critical to B19V infectivity, but its role in the pathogenesis of B19V-induced myocardial injury has not been well studied. In this study to investigate the effects ofVP1u on the host myocardium, we first expressed a recombinant VP1u protein in Escherichia coli, produced it on a large scale by high-volume fermentation, and purified it using the AKTA explorer 100 system. Following treatment of mice with the recombinant protein, we then examined changes in the morphology of the cardiac muscles, the titre of anti-VP1u protein antibodies, and a panel of heart functional protein markers. Our results show that VP1u alone is sufficient to elicit pathological and ultrastructural changes in the host myocardium, and to increase the levels of the functional enzymes aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-MB) and alpha-hydroxybutyric acid dehydrogenase (alpha-HBDH). The changes in myocardial pathology and myocardial zymogram indicate that the VP1u protein of B19V causes myocardial injury, and may largely contribute to the pathogenesis of B19V-induced heart diseases.

  17. Identification and baculovirus expression of the VP4 protein of the human group B rotavirus ADRV.

    PubMed Central

    Mackow, E R; Werner-Eckert, R; Fay, M E; Tao, H; Chen, G

    1993-01-01

    A complete cDNA copy of the fourth RNA segment of the human group B rotavirus adult diarrheal rotavirus (ADRV) has been cloned into lambda phage and excised into plasmid pSK Bluescript. Gene segment 4 contains 2,303 bases and encodes one long open reading frame beginning at base 16 and terminating at base 2263. The encoded protein contains 749 amino acids, with a calculated molecular mass of 84.4 kDa and a pI of 6.1. Gene 4 cDNA was inserted into a recombinant baculovirus via homologous recombination. The gene 4 polypeptide migrates at 84 kDa when expressed either by a recombinant baculovirus or in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate. The gene 4 protein is immunoprecipitable by hyperimmune serum to ADRV, human ADRV convalescent-phase serum, a porcine group B rotavirus infection serum, and a monoclonal antibody made to ADRV virion. Guinea pig hyperimmune serum to the baculovirus-expressed ADRV VP4 protein recognizes virus and immunoprecipitates an 84-kDa protein from in vitro translations of total ADRV mRNA. In addition, the gene 4-encoded protein shares significant amino acid identity and similarity with the group A rotavirus VP4 protein. This information, together with our previous identification of an 84-kDa protein present on iodinated intact virion but not EDTA-treated ADRV, suggests that gene 4 encodes the VP4 protein equivalent present on the outer capsid of ADRV. The ADRV VP4 protein is also 58% identical to the IDIR rat group B rotavirus gene segment 3 protein. The substantial differences between these two group B VP4 proteins suggests that they are distantly related and likely to define two different group B rotavirus VP4 serotypes. The baculovirus-expressed VP4 protein should be useful for developing serotyping reagents and tests for human and animal group B rotaviruses as well as for addressing the role of VP4 in ADRV neutralization. Images PMID:8386274

  18. Parvovirus B19 Uptake Is a Highly Selective Process Controlled by VP1u, a Novel Determinant of Viral Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Leisi, Remo; Ruprecht, Nico; Kempf, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The VP1 unique region (VP1u) of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) is the immunodominant part of the viral capsid. Originally inaccessible, the VP1u becomes exposed upon primary attachment to the globoside receptor. To study the function of the exposed VP1u in B19V uptake, we expressed this region as a recombinant protein. Here, we report that purified recombinant VP1u binds and is internalized in UT7/Epo cells. By means of truncations and specific antibodies, we identified the most N-terminal amino acid residues of VP1u as the essential region for binding and internalization. Furthermore, the recombinant VP1u was able to block B19V uptake, suggesting that the protein and the virus undertake the same internalization pathway. Assays with different erythroid and nonerythroid cell lines showed that the N-terminal VP1u binding was restricted to a few cell lines of the erythroid lineage, which were also the only cells that allowed B19V internalization and infection. These results together indicate that the N-terminal region of VP1u is responsible for the internalization of the virus and that the interacting receptor is restricted to B19V-susceptible cells. The highly selective uptake mechanism represents a novel determinant of the tropism and pathogenesis of B19V. PMID:24067971

  19. Parvovirus B19 uptake is a highly selective process controlled by VP1u, a novel determinant of viral tropism.

    PubMed

    Leisi, Remo; Ruprecht, Nico; Kempf, Christoph; Ros, Carlos

    2013-12-01

    The VP1 unique region (VP1u) of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) is the immunodominant part of the viral capsid. Originally inaccessible, the VP1u becomes exposed upon primary attachment to the globoside receptor. To study the function of the exposed VP1u in B19V uptake, we expressed this region as a recombinant protein. Here, we report that purified recombinant VP1u binds and is internalized in UT7/Epo cells. By means of truncations and specific antibodies, we identified the most N-terminal amino acid residues of VP1u as the essential region for binding and internalization. Furthermore, the recombinant VP1u was able to block B19V uptake, suggesting that the protein and the virus undertake the same internalization pathway. Assays with different erythroid and nonerythroid cell lines showed that the N-terminal VP1u binding was restricted to a few cell lines of the erythroid lineage, which were also the only cells that allowed B19V internalization and infection. These results together indicate that the N-terminal region of VP1u is responsible for the internalization of the virus and that the interacting receptor is restricted to B19V-susceptible cells. The highly selective uptake mechanism represents a novel determinant of the tropism and pathogenesis of B19V.

  20. Facilitation of Rice Stripe Virus Accumulation in the Insect Vector by Himetobi P Virus VP1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuo; Ge, Shangshu; Wang, Xi; Sun, Lijuan; Liu, Zewen; Zhou, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    The small brown planthopper (SBPH) is the main vector for rice stripe virus (RSV), which causes serious rice stripe disease in East Asia. To characterize the virus-vector interactions, the SBPH cDNA library was screened with RSV ribonucleoprotein (RNP) as bait using a GAL4-based yeast two-hybrid system. The interaction between RSV-RNP and the Himetobi P virus (HiPV, an insect picorna-like virus) VP1 protein was identified. The relationships between HiPV and RSV in SBPH were further investigated, and the results showed that the titer of RSV was commonly higher in single insect that exhibited more VP1 expression. After the VP1 gene was repressed by RNA silencing, the accumulation of RSV decreased significantly in the insect, whereas the virus acquisition ability of SBPH was unaffected, which suggests that HiPV VP1 potentially facilitates the accumulation of RSV in SBPH. PMID:25807055

  1. A new serotype of the outer capsid protein VP4 shared by an unusual human rotavirus strain Ro1845 and canine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Nakagomi, O; Isegawa, Y; Hoshino, Y; Aboudy, Y; Shif, I; Silberstein, I; Nakagomi, T; Ueda, S; Sears, J; Flores, J

    1993-12-01

    The VP4 protein of human rotavirus (HRV) strain Ro1845 and canine rotavirus strains K9 and CU-1 exhibited greater than 98% amino acid identity within their group, but showed less identity with VP4 proteins of other HRV and animal rotavirus strains, the simian rotavirus strain RRV VP4 being most similar to them (90% amino acid identity). To exclude the possibility that these three strains were members of the RRV VP4 serotype P3, neutralization studies were performed using antisera to reassortant viruses containing the VP4 gene from each of Ro1845, CU-1 and RRV. The result established close antigenic similarity among the VP4 proteins of Ro1845, K9 and CU-1 and revealed only a marginal degree of similarity between the VP4 proteins of these three strains and that of strain RRV. These sequence and serological data suggest that the VP4 proteins of Ro1845, K9 and CU-1 represent a new P serotype which we propose to assign P13. PMID:8277285

  2. Detailed computational analysis of a comprehensive set of group A rotavirus NSP4 proteins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuo Liang; Tian, Peng

    2003-05-01

    Rotavirus infection causes diarrhea to humans, animals and birds. The NSP4 protein of Group A rotavirus has been recognized as a viral enterotoxin. This single protein plays important roles in viral pathogenesis and morphogenesis. Domains involved in structure and biologic functions have been proposed mainly based on the SA11 strain, a prototype of group A rotavirus. NSP4 has been classified into different genotypes based on sequence homology. These analyses are based on representative strains selected but not comprehensive. In this paper, we collected all NSP4 sequences in the GenBank and performed a detailed computational analysis. Our analysis of 176 NSP4 proteins in Groups A, B and C rotaviruses confirms that the recently published avian NSP4 sequences belong to a new genotype (Mori Y., Borgan M.A., Ito N., Sugiyama M. and Minamoto N., Virus Res 89, 145-151, 2002), besides the four known NSP4 genotypes of Group A mammalian rotaviruses. Significant differences were discovered in the physicochemical properties between the avian and mammalian NSP4 proteins. In particular, lack of a highly probable coiled-coil region in the avian sequences implies a diversion of the NSP4 quaternary structure from the latter, although the secondary and tertiary structures may be similar. Fourteen amino acids are found absolutely conserved in the Group A NSP4 sequences, regardless of genotype. Of the conserved residues, two are glycosylation sites, one is in the middle of the transmembrane segment, seven span the VP4 binding domain, and five are clustered in the middle of the toxic peptide region, indicating the functional importance of the conservation. PMID:12876455

  3. Post-translational regulation of rotavirus protein NSP1 expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Piña-Vázquez, C; De Nova-Ocampo, M; Guzmán-León, S; Padilla-Noriega, L

    2007-02-01

    The nonstructural rotavirus protein NSP1 binds specifically to viral mRNAs and to interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), inducing IRF3 degradation through a proteasome-dependent pathway. By using a vaccinia virus expression system in mammalian cells, we found that the yield of NSP1 was 8- and 13-fold lower than the viral proteins VP2 or NSP3, respectively; while in the presence of proteasome inhibitors such difference could be reduced to 2- to 2.5-fold, respectively. The susceptibility of NSP1 to proteasome degradation was fully reversed in a dose-dependent manner by transfection with the full complement of 11 molecules of translation-competent rotavirus mRNAs, but this effect was abrogated by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. These results demonstrate that NSP1 is degraded through a proteasome-dependent pathway, and viral proteins, alone or in combination with viral mRNAs, interfere with such degradation.

  4. Replication of the rotavirus genome requires an active ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    López, Tomás; Silva-Ayala, Daniela; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2011-11-01

    Here we show that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is required for the efficient replication of rotavirus RRV in MA104 cells. The proteasome inhibitor MG132 decreased the yield of infectious virus under conditions where it severely reduces the synthesis of not only viral but also cellular proteins. Addition of nonessential amino acids to the cell medium restored both viral protein synthesis and cellular protein synthesis, but the production of progeny viruses was still inhibited. In medium supplemented with nonessential amino acids, we showed that MG132 does not affect rotavirus entry but inhibits the replication of the viral genome. It was also shown that it prevents the efficient incorporation into viroplasms of viral polymerase VP1 and the capsid proteins VP2 and VP6, which could explain the inhibitory effect of MG132 on genome replication and infectious virus yield. We also showed that ubiquitination is relevant for rotavirus replication since the yield of rotavirus progeny in cells carrying a temperature-sensitive mutation in the E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme was reduced at the restrictive temperature. In addition, overexpression of ubiquitin in MG132-treated MA104 cells partially reversed the effect of the inhibitor on virus yield. Altogether, these data suggest that the ubiquitin-proteasome (UP) system has a very complex interaction with the rotavirus life cycle, with both the ubiquitination and proteolytic activities of the system being relevant for virus replication.

  5. Induction of protective immune response against both PPRV and FMDV by a novel recombinant PPRV expressing FMDV VP1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) and foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) are both highly contagious diseases of small domestic and wild ruminants caused by the PPR virus (PPRV) and the FMD virus (FMDV). In this study, a recombinant PPRV expressing the FMDV VP1 gene (rPPRV/VP1) was generated and FMDV VP1 expression did not impair replication of the recombinant virus in vitro and immunogenicity in inducing neutralizing antibody against PPR in goats. Vaccination with one dose of rPPRV/VP1 induced FMDV neutralizing antibody in goats and protected them from challenge with virulent FMDV. Our results suggest that the recombinant PPRV expressing the FMDV VP1 protein is a potential dual live vectored vaccine against PPRV and FMDV. PMID:24898430

  6. Mutations in the putative calcium-binding domain of polyomavirus VP1 affect capsid assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Chang, D.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Calcium ions appear to play a major role in maintaining the structural integrity of the polyomavirus and are likely involved in the processes of viral uncoating and assembly. Previous studies demonstrated that a VP1 fragment extending from Pro-232 to Asp-364 has calcium-binding capabilities. This fragment contains an amino acid stretch from Asp-266 to Glu-277 which is quite similar in sequence to the amino acids that make up the calcium-binding EF hand structures found in many proteins. To assess the contribution of this domain to polyomavirus structural integrity, the effects of mutations in this region were examined by transfecting mutated viral DNA into susceptible cells. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that although viral protein synthesis occurred normally, infective viral progeny were not produced in cells transfected with polyomavirus genomes encoding either a VP1 molecule lacking amino acids Thr-262 through Gly-276 or a VP1 molecule containing a mutation of Asp-266 to Ala. VP1 molecules containing the deletion mutation were unable to bind 45Ca in an in vitro assay. Upon expression in Escherichia coli and purification by immunoaffinity chromatography, wild-type VP1 was isolated as pentameric, capsomere-like structures which could be induced to form capsid-like structures upon addition of CaCl2, consistent with previous studies. However, although VP1 containing the point mutation was isolated as pentamers which were indistinguishable from wild-type VP1 pentamers, addition of CaCl2 did not result in their assembly into capsid-like structures. Immunogold labeling and electron microscopy studies of transfected mammalian cells provided in vivo evidence that a mutation in this region affects the process of viral assembly.

  7. T helper cell-mediated interferon-gamma expression after human parvovirus B19 infection: persisting VP2-specific and transient VP1u-specific activity.

    PubMed

    Franssila, R; Auramo, J; Modrow, S; Möbs, M; Oker-Blom, C; Käpylä, P; Söderlund-Venermo, M; Hedman, K

    2005-10-01

    Human parvovirus B19 is a small non-enveloped DNA virus with an icosahedral capsid consisting of proteins of only two species, the major protein VP2 and the minor protein VP1. VP2 is contained within VP1, which has an additional unique portion (VP1u) of 227 amino acids. We determined the ability of eukaryotically expressed parvovirus B19 virus-like particles consisting of VP1 and VP2 in the ratio recommended for vaccine use, or of VP2 alone, to stimulate, in an HLA class II restricted manner, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to proliferate and to secrete interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin (IL)-10 cytokines among recently and remotely B19 infected subjects. PBMC reactivity with VP1u was determined specifically with a prokaryotically expressed VP1u antigen. In general, B19-specific IFN-gamma responses were stronger than IL-10 responses in both recent and remote infection; however, IL-10 responses were readily detectable among both groups, with the exception of patients with relapsed or persisting symptoms who showed strikingly low IL-10 responses. Whereas VP1u-specific IFN-gamma responses were very strong among the recently infected subjects, the VP1u-specific IFN-gamma and IL-10 responses were virtually absent among the remotely infected subjects. The disappearance of VP1u-specific IFN-gamma expression is surprising, as B-cell immunity against VP1u is well maintained.

  8. T helper cell-mediated interferon-gamma expression after human parvovirus B19 infection: persisting VP2-specific and transient VP1u-specific activity

    PubMed Central

    Franssila, R; Auramo, J; Modrow, S; Möbs, M; Oker-Blom, C; Käpylä, P; Söderlund-Venermo, M; Hedman, K

    2005-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 is a small non-enveloped DNA virus with an icosahedral capsid consisting of proteins of only two species, the major protein VP2 and the minor protein VP1. VP2 is contained within VP1, which has an additional unique portion (VP1u) of 227 amino acids. We determined the ability of eukaryotically expressed parvovirus B19 virus-like particles consisting of VP1 and VP2 in the ratio recommended for vaccine use, or of VP2 alone, to stimulate, in an HLA class II restricted manner, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to proliferate and to secrete interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-10 cytokines among recently and remotely B19 infected subjects. PBMC reactivity with VP1u was determined specifically with a prokaryotically expressed VP1u antigen. In general, B19-specific IFN-γ responses were stronger than IL-10 responses in both recent and remote infection; however, IL-10 responses were readily detectable among both groups, with the exception of patients with relapsed or persisting symptoms who showed strikingly low IL-10 responses. Whereas VP1u-specific IFN-γ responses were very strong among the recently infected subjects, the VP1u-specific IFN-γ and IL-10 responses were virtually absent among the remotely infected subjects. The disappearance of VP1u-specific IFN-γ expression is surprising, as B-cell immunity against VP1u is well maintained. PMID:16178856

  9. Antibody-secreting cell responses to rotavirus proteins in gnotobiotic pigs inoculated with attenuated or virulent human rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Chang, K O; Vandal, O H; Yuan, L; Hodgins, D C; Saif, L J

    2001-08-01

    Because of their similarities to infants in mucosal immune responses and their susceptibility to human rotavirus (HRV) diarrhea, gnotobiotic pigs provide a useful model for rotaviral disease. In this study, we performed quantitative enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays to measure local and systemic isotype-specific antibody-secreting cell (ASC) responses to individual structural (VP4, VP6, and VP7) and nonstructural (NSP3 and NSP4) proteins of Wa HRV. The Spodoptera frugiperda cells expressing each recombinant baculovirus HRV protein were formalin fixed and used as antigen for ELISPOT assays. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs were orally inoculated once with virulent Wa (WaV) or three times with attenuated Wa (WaA) HRV or mock inoculated (Mock) and then were challenged with virulent Wa (WaV/PC) 28 days after the first inoculation. The ASCs from intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues of pigs from each group were quantitated by ELISPOT assay at the day of challenge, at postinoculation day 28 (WaV, WaA, and Mock) or at postchallenge day (PCD) 7 (WaV+WaV/PC, WaA+WaV/PC, and Mock+WaV/PC). In all virus-inoculated pigs, regardless of the inoculum, lymphoid tissue, or isotype, VP6 induced the highest numbers of ASCs, followed by VP4; ASCs specific for VP7, NSP3, and NSP4 were less numerous. At challenge, total HRV- and HRV protein-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG ASCs in intestinal lymphoid tissues were significantly greater in WaV- than in WaA-inoculated pigs, and WaV pigs were fully protected against diarrhea postchallenge, whereas the WaA pigs were partially protected. At PCD 7, there were no significant differences in ASC numbers for any HRV proteins between the WaV+WaV/PC and WaA+WaV/PC groups.

  10. The VP1u Receptor Restricts Parvovirus B19 Uptake to Permissive Erythroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leisi, Remo; Von Nordheim, Marcus; Ros, Carlos; Kempf, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) is a small non-enveloped virus and known as the causative agent for the mild childhood disease erythema infectiosum. B19V has an extraordinary narrow tissue tropism, showing only productive infection in erythroid precursor cells in the bone marrow. We recently found that the viral protein 1 unique region (VP1u) contains an N-terminal receptor-binding domain (RBD), which mediates the uptake of the virus into cells of the erythroid lineage. To further investigate the role of the RBD in connection with a B19V-unrelated capsid, we chemically coupled the VP1u of B19V to the bacteriophage MS2 capsid and tested the internalization capacity of the bioconjugate on permissive cells. In comparison, we studied the cellular uptake and infection of B19V along the erythroid differentiation. The results showed that the MS2-VP1u bioconjugate mimicked the specific internalization of the native B19V into erythroid precursor cells, which further coincides with the restricted infection profile. The successful mimicry of B19V uptake demonstrates that the RBD in the VP1u is sufficient for the endocytosis of the viral capsid. Furthermore, the recombinant VP1u competed with B19V uptake into permissive cells, thus excluding a significant alternative uptake mechanism by other receptors. Strikingly, the VP1u receptor appeared to be expressed only on erythropoietin-dependent erythroid differentiation stages that also provide the necessary intracellular factors for a productive infection. Taken together, these findings suggest that the VP1u binds to a yet-unknown erythroid-specific cellular receptor and thus restricts the virus entry to permissive cells. PMID:27690083

  11. Mutational analysis of residues involved in nucleotide and divalent cation stabilization in the rotavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase catalytic pocket.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Kristen M; Ramanathan, Harish N; Patton, John T

    The rotavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), VP1, contains canonical RdRp motifs and a priming loop that is hypothesized to undergo conformational rearrangements during RNA synthesis. In the absence of viral core shell protein VP2, VP1 fails to interact stably with divalent cations or nucleotides and has a retracted priming loop. To identify residues of potential import to nucleotide and divalent cation stabilization, we aligned VP1 of divergent rotaviruses and the structural homolog reovirus λ3. VP1 mutants were engineered and characterized for RNA synthetic capacity in vitro. Conserved aspartic acids in RdRp motifs A and C and arginines in motif F that likely stabilize divalent cations and nucleotides were required for efficient RNA synthesis. Mutation of individual priming loop residues diminished or enhanced RNA synthesis efficiency without obviating the need for VP2, which suggests that this structure serves as a dynamic regulatory element that links RdRp activity to particle assembly.

  12. Oral immunization of mice with Lactococcus lactis expressing the rotavirus VP8* protein.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Montava, Rebeca; Viana, Rosa; Buesa, Javier; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Monedero, Vicente

    2011-06-01

    The efficacy of recombinant Lactococcus lactis as a delivery vehicle for a rotavirus antigen was evaluated in a mouse model. The rotavirus VP8* protein was expressed intracellularly and extracellularly in L. lactis wild type and in an alr mutant deficient in alanine racemase activity, necessary for the synthesis of the cell-wall component D: -alanine. When the mucosal immune response was evaluated by measuring VP8*-specific IgA antibody in faeces, wild-type L. lactis triggered a low IgA synthesis only when the secreting strain was used. In contrast, VP8*-specific IgA was detected in faeces of both groups of mice orally given the alr mutant expressing extracellular VP8* and intracellular VP8*, which reached levels similar to that obtained with the wild type secreting strain. However, oral administration of the recombinant strains did not induce serum IgG or IgA responses. L. lactis cell-wall mutants may therefore provide certain advantages when low-antigenic proteins are expressed intracellularly. However, the low immune response obtained by using this antigen-bacterial host combination prompts to the use of new strains and vaccination protocols in order to develop acceptable rotavirus immunization levels.

  13. Phylogenetic and structural analysis of merkel cell polyomavirus VP1 in Brazilian samples.

    PubMed

    Baez, Camila F; Diaz, Nuria C; Venceslau, Marianna T; Luz, Flávio B; Guimarães, Maria Angelica A M; Zalis, Mariano G; Varella, Rafael B

    2016-08-01

    Our understanding of the phylogenetic and structural characteristics of the Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) is increasing but still scarce, especially in samples originating from South America. In order to investigate the properties of MCPyV circulating in the continent in more detail, MCPyV Viral Protein 1 (VP1) sequences from five basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and four saliva samples from Brazilian individuals were evaluated from the phylogenetic and structural standpoint, along with all complete MCPyV VP1 sequences available at Genbank database so far. The VP1 phylogenetic analysis confirmed the previously reported pattern of geographic distribution of MCPyV genotypes and the complexity of the South-American clade. The nine Brazilian samples were equally distributed in the South-American (3 saliva samples); North American/European (2 BCC and 1 saliva sample); and in the African clades (3 BCC). The classification of mutations according to the functional regions of VP1 protein revealed a differentiated pattern for South-American sequences, with higher number of mutations on the neutralizing epitope loops and lower on the region of C-terminus, responsible for capsid formation, when compared to other continents. In conclusion, the phylogenetic analysis showed that the distribution of Brazilian VP1 sequences agrees with the ethnic composition of the country, indicating that VP1 can be successfully used for MCPyV phylogenetic studies. Finally, the structural analysis suggests that some mutations could have impact on the protein folding, membrane binding or antibody escape, and therefore they should be further studied. PMID:27173789

  14. Immunogens of rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Paul, P S; Lyoo, Y S

    1993-11-01

    Rotaviruses cause gastroenteritis in neonates of many animal species including cattle, swine, horses, dogs, cats, chickens and turkeys. Rotavirions are nonenveloped, are about 75 nm in diameter, have a double capsid, and contain 11 double-stranded RNA segments as their genome. Several antigenically distinct groups of rotaviruses have been identified and have been alphabetically designated as A through G. Group A rotaviruses were the first group of rotaviruses isolated and are the most commonly detected rotaviruses in diarrheic animals. Group A rotaviruses have two surface proteins, VP4 and VP7, both of which are important in serotype determination and in inducing neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity. Multiple serotypes of group A rotavirus based on glycoprotein VP7 (designated as G types) and based on VP4 (P types) have been identified. The immune response to rotaviruses is essentially serotype specific, however, cross-reactive or heterotypic epitopes have also been identified. Currently acceptable methods for immunogen quantitation include the induction of neutralizing antibody in host or laboratory animals. The in vivo efficacy of vaccines against rotavirus-associated gastroenteritis remains the standard method against which in vitro methods must be compared. Several animal models have been developed which could potentially be used in evaluating the efficacy of candidate vaccines. Monoclonal antibodies to rotavirus immunogens are also currently available and serve as valuable reagents for in vitro quantitation of rotaviral immunogens. PMID:8116188

  15. The spike protein VP4 defines the endocytic pathway used by rotavirus to enter MA104 cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Salinas, Marco A; Romero, Pedro; Espinosa, Rafaela; Hoshino, Yasutaka; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2013-02-01

    Rotaviruses are internalized into MA104 cells by endocytosis, with different endocytic pathways used depending on the virus strain. The bovine rotavirus UK strain enters cells through a clathrin-mediated endocytic process, while the simian rhesus rotavirus (RRV) strain uses a poorly defined endocytic pathway that is clathrin and caveolin independent. The viral surface protein VP7 and the spike protein VP4 interact with cellular receptors during cell binding and penetration. To determine the viral protein that defines the mechanism of internalization, we used a panel of UK × RRV reassortant viruses having different combinations of the viral structural proteins. Characterization of the infectivities of these reassortants in MA104 cells either transfected with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against the heavy chain of clathrin or incubated with hypertonic medium that destabilizes the clathrin coat clearly showed that VP4 determines the pathway of virus entry. Of interest, the characterization of Nar3, a sialic acid-independent variant of RRV, showed that a single amino acid change in VP4 shifts the route of entry from being clathrin dependent to clathrin independent. Furthermore, characterizations of several additional rotavirus strains that differ in their use of cellular receptors showed that all entered cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, suggesting that diverse VP4-cell surface interactions can lead to rotavirus cell entry through this endocytic pathway.

  16. Rotavirus VP7 epitope chimeric proteins elicit cross-immunoreactivity in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingxin; Pan, Xiaoxia; Teng, Yumei; Xia, Wenyue; Wang, Jing; Wen, Yuling; Chen, Yuanding

    2015-10-01

    VP7 of group A rotavirus (RVA) contains major neutralizing epitopes. Using the antigenic protein VP6 as the vector, chimeric proteins carrying foreign epitopes have been shown to possess good immunoreactivity and immunogenicity. In the present study, using modified VP6 as the vector, three chimeric proteins carrying epitopes derived from VP7 of RVA were constructed. The results showed that the chimeric proteins reacted with anti-VP6 and with SA11 and Wa virus strains. Antibodies from guinea pigs inoculated with the chimeric proteins recognized VP6 and VP7 of RVA and protected mammalian cells from SA11 and Wa infection in vitro. The neutralizing activities of the antibodies against the chimeric proteins were significantly higher than those against the vector protein VP6F. Thus, development of chimeric vaccines carrying VP7 epitopes using VP6 as a vector could be a promising alternative to enhance immunization against RVAs.

  17. Interactions between the two surface proteins of rotavirus may alter the receptor-binding specificity of the virus.

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, E; Arias, C F; López, S

    1996-01-01

    The infection of target cells by most animal rotavirus strains requires the presence of sialic acids (SAs) on the cell surface. We recently isolated variants from simian rotavirus RRV whose infectivity is no longer dependent on SAs and showed that the mutant phenotype segregates with the gene coding for VP4, one of the two surface proteins of rotaviruses (the other one being VP7). The nucleotide sequence of the VP4 gene of four independently isolated variants showed three amino acid changes, at positions 37 (Leu to Pro), 187 (Lys to Arg), and 267 (Tyr to Cys), in all mutant VP4 proteins compared with RRV VP4. The characterization of revertant viruses from two independent mutants showed that the arginine residue at position 187 changed back to lysine, indicating that this amino acid is involved in the determination of the mutant phenotype. Surprisingly, sequence analysis of reassortant virus DS1XRRV, which depends on SAs to infect the cell, showed that its VP4 gene is identical to the VP4 gene of the variants. Since the only difference between DS1XRRV and the RRV variants is the parental origin of the VP7 gene (human rotavirus DS1 in the reassortant), these findings suggest that the receptor-binding specificity of rotaviruses, via VP4, may be influenced by the associated VP7 protein. PMID:8551583

  18. Antibodies induced with recombinant VP1 from human rhinovirus exhibit cross-neutralisation.

    PubMed

    Edlmayr, J; Niespodziana, K; Popow-Kraupp, T; Krzyzanek, V; Focke-Tejkl, M; Blaas, D; Grote, M; Valenta, R

    2011-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are the major cause of the common cold and account for 30-50% of all acute respiratory illnesses. Although HRV infections are usually harmless and invade only the upper respiratory tract, several studies demonstrate that HRV is involved in the exacerbation of asthma. VP1 is one of the surface-exposed proteins of the viral capsid that is important for the binding of rhinoviruses to the corresponding receptors on human cells. Here we investigated its potential usefulness for vaccination against the common cold. We expressed VP1 proteins from two distantly related HRV strains, HRV89 and HRV14, in Escherichia coli. Mice and rabbits were immunised with the purified recombinant proteins. The induced antibodies reacted with natural VP1 and with whole virus particles as shown by immunoblotting and immunogold electron microscopy. They exhibited strong cross-neutralising activity for different HRV strains. Therefore, recombinant VP1 may be considered a candidate HRV vaccine to prevent HRV-induced asthma exacerbations.

  19. Mutation distribution in the NSP4 protein in rotaviruses isolated from Mexican children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    González-Ochoa, Guadalupe; Menchaca, Griselda E; Hernández, Carlos E; Rodríguez, Cristina; Tamez, Reyes S; Contreras, Juan F

    2013-03-11

    The NSP4 protein is a multifunctional protein that plays a role in the morphogenesis and pathogenesis of the rotavirus. Although NSP4 is considered an enterotoxin, the relationship between gastroenteritis severity and amino acid variations in NSP4 of the human rotavirus remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the sequence diversity of NSP4 and the severity of gastroenteritis of children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis. The rotavirus-infected children were hospitalized before the rotavirus vaccine program in Mexico. All children had diarrhea within 1-4 days, 44 (88%) were vomiting and 35 (70%) had fevers. The severity analysis showed that 13 (26%) cases had mild gastroenteritis, 23 (46%) moderate gastroenteritis and 14 (28%) severe. NSP4 phylogenetic analysis showed three clusters within the genotype E1. Sequence analysis revealed similar mutations inside each cluster, and an uncommon variation in residue 144 was found in five of the Mexican NSP4 sequences. Most of the amino acid variations were located in the VP4 and VP6 binding site domains, with no relationship to different grades of gastroenteritis. This finding indicates that severe gastroenteritis caused by the rotavirus appears to be related to diverse viral or cellular factors instead of NSP4 activity as a unique pathogenic factor.

  20. Interspecies sharing of two distinct nonstructural protein 1 alleles among human and animal rotaviruses as revealed by dot blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Y; Nakagomi, O

    1997-10-01

    The distribution of the nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1) alleles from human strain AU-1 and canine strain K9 among rotaviruses of human, feline, canine, bovine, and simian origin was studied by a dot blot hybridization assay. Human and feline strains belonging to the AU-1 genogroup had the same NSP1 allele, while canine and feline strains belonging to the canine-feline genogroup shared another NSP1 allele. This canine-feline NSP1 allele had a significant level of homology with the NSP1 of rhesus rotavirus strain MMU18006. PMID:9316942

  1. Rotavirus Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Why get vaccinated?Rotavirus is a virus that causes diarrhea, mostly in babies and young children. The diarrhea can be severe, and lead ... and fever are also common in babies with rotavirus.Before rotavirus vaccine, rotavirus disease was a common ...

  2. The TATA-less promoter of VP1, a plant gene controlling seed germination.

    PubMed

    Carrari, F; Frankel, N; Lijavetzky, D; Benech-Arnold, R; Sánchez, R; Iusem, N D

    2001-01-01

    Vp1 is a seed-specific gene involved in the control of dormancy and germination. We here present the complete sequence of the sorghum vp1 promoter/enhancer region highlighting its main features, especially the lack of canonical TATA and CAAT boxes and the presence of elements responsive to abscisic acid and light. The region closest to the start of transcription is highly homologous to the partial proximal sequence reported for the maize vp1 promoter. This region is interrupted by a 57-nt stretch containing 14 CT microsatellite repeats. We observed a poor overall homology to the promoter from abi3 gene, the Arabidopsis counterpart bearing a similar coding sequence. However, there exists a high degree of homology (89%) between a TATA-rich 103-bp stretch of the sorghum vp1 promoter located about 700 nt upstream of the startpoint and miniature inverted transposable elements (MITEs) interspersed within the sorghum seed-specific kafirin cluster. This sorghum MITE-like element displays considerable homology (68%) to the TATA-less promoter from the sorghum NADP-malate dehydrogenase gene and lesser similarity to the Tourist, Pilgrim and Batuta MITEs previously identified within the promoter from the maize Abp1 (auxin-binding protein) gene.

  3. The TATA-less promoter of VP1, a plant gene controlling seed germination.

    PubMed

    Carrari, F; Frankel, N; Lijavetzky, D; Benech-Arnold, R; Sánchez, R; Iusem, N D

    2001-01-01

    Vp1 is a seed-specific gene involved in the control of dormancy and germination. We here present the complete sequence of the sorghum vp1 promoter/enhancer region highlighting its main features, especially the lack of canonical TATA and CAAT boxes and the presence of elements responsive to abscisic acid and light. The region closest to the start of transcription is highly homologous to the partial proximal sequence reported for the maize vp1 promoter. This region is interrupted by a 57-nt stretch containing 14 CT microsatellite repeats. We observed a poor overall homology to the promoter from abi3 gene, the Arabidopsis counterpart bearing a similar coding sequence. However, there exists a high degree of homology (89%) between a TATA-rich 103-bp stretch of the sorghum vp1 promoter located about 700 nt upstream of the startpoint and miniature inverted transposable elements (MITEs) interspersed within the sorghum seed-specific kafirin cluster. This sorghum MITE-like element displays considerable homology (68%) to the TATA-less promoter from the sorghum NADP-malate dehydrogenase gene and lesser similarity to the Tourist, Pilgrim and Batuta MITEs previously identified within the promoter from the maize Abp1 (auxin-binding protein) gene. PMID:11761708

  4. The Receptor-Binding Domain in the VP1u Region of Parvovirus B19.

    PubMed

    Leisi, Remo; Di Tommaso, Chiarina; Kempf, Christoph; Ros, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) is known as the human pathogen causing the mild childhood disease erythema infectiosum. B19V shows an extraordinary narrow tissue tropism for erythroid progenitor cells in the bone marrow, which is determined by a highly restricted uptake. We have previously shown that the specific internalization is mediated by the interaction of the viral protein 1 unique region (VP1u) with a yet unknown cellular receptor. To locate the receptor-binding domain (RBD) within the VP1u, we analyzed the effect of truncations and mutations on the internalization capacity of the recombinant protein into UT7/Epo cells. Here we report that the N-terminal amino acids 5-80 of the VP1u are necessary and sufficient for cellular binding and internalization; thus, this N-terminal region represents the RBD required for B19V uptake. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we further identified a cluster of important amino acids playing a critical role in VP1u internalization. In silico predictions and experimental results suggest that the RBD is structured as a rigid fold of three α-helices. Finally, we found that dimerization of the VP1u leads to a considerably enhanced cellular binding and internalization. Taken together, we identified the RBD that mediates B19V uptake and mapped functional and structural motifs within this sequence. The findings reveal insights into the uptake process of B19V, which contribute to understand the pathogenesis of the infection and the neutralization of the virus by the immune system.

  5. The Receptor-Binding Domain in the VP1u Region of Parvovirus B19

    PubMed Central

    Leisi, Remo; Di Tommaso, Chiarina; Kempf, Christoph; Ros, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) is known as the human pathogen causing the mild childhood disease erythema infectiosum. B19V shows an extraordinary narrow tissue tropism for erythroid progenitor cells in the bone marrow, which is determined by a highly restricted uptake. We have previously shown that the specific internalization is mediated by the interaction of the viral protein 1 unique region (VP1u) with a yet unknown cellular receptor. To locate the receptor-binding domain (RBD) within the VP1u, we analyzed the effect of truncations and mutations on the internalization capacity of the recombinant protein into UT7/Epo cells. Here we report that the N-terminal amino acids 5–80 of the VP1u are necessary and sufficient for cellular binding and internalization; thus, this N-terminal region represents the RBD required for B19V uptake. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we further identified a cluster of important amino acids playing a critical role in VP1u internalization. In silico predictions and experimental results suggest that the RBD is structured as a rigid fold of three α-helices. Finally, we found that dimerization of the VP1u leads to a considerably enhanced cellular binding and internalization. Taken together, we identified the RBD that mediates B19V uptake and mapped functional and structural motifs within this sequence. The findings reveal insights into the uptake process of B19V, which contribute to understand the pathogenesis of the infection and the neutralization of the virus by the immune system. PMID:26927158

  6. Protein kinase R is responsible for the phosphorylation of eIF2alpha in rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Margarito; Arias, Carlos F; López, Susana

    2010-10-01

    The eukaryotic initiation translation factor 2 (eIF2) represents a key point in the regulation of protein synthesis. This factor delivers the initiator Met-tRNA to the ribosome, a process that is conserved in all eukaryotic cells. Many types of stress reduce global translation by triggering the phosphorylation of the α subunit of eIF2, which reduces the formation of the preinitiation translation complexes. Early during rotavirus infection, eIF2α becomes phosphorylated, and even under these conditions viral protein synthesis is not affected, while most of the cell protein synthesis is blocked. Here, we found that the kinase responsible for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in rotavirus-infected cells is PKR, since in mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in the kinase domain of PKR, or in MA104 cells where the expression of PKR was knocked down by RNA interference, eIF2α was not phosphorylated upon rotavirus infection. The viral component responsible for the activation of PKR seems to be viral double-stranded RNA, which is found in the cytoplasm of infected cells, outside viroplasms. Taken together, these results suggest that rotaviruses induce the PKR branch of the interferon system and have evolved a mechanism to translate its proteins, surpassing the block imposed by eIF2α phosphorylation.

  7. The VP1 S154D mutation of type Asia1 foot-and-mouth disease virus enhances viral replication and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Lian, Kaiqi; Yang, Fan; Zhu, Zixiang; Cao, Weijun; Jin, Ye; Liu, Huanan; Li, Dan; Zhang, Keshan; Guo, Jianhong; Liu, Xiangtao; Zheng, Haixue

    2016-04-01

    One of the proteins encoded by the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), the VP1 protein, a capsid protein, plays an important role in integrin receptor attachment and humoral immunity-mediated host responses. The integrin receptor recognition motif and an important antigenic epitope exist within the G-H loop, which is comprised of amino acids 134-160 of the VP1 protein. FMDV strain, Asia1/HN/CHA/06, isolated from a pig, was passaged four times in suckling mice and sequenced. Sequencing analyses showed that there was a mutation of the integrin receptor recognition motif Arg-Gly-Asp/Arg-Asp-Asp (RGD/RDD, VP1 143-145) and a VP1 154 serine/Asp (VP1 S154D) mutation in the G-H loop of the VP1 protein. The influence of the RGD/RDD mutation on Asia1 FMDV disease phenotype has been previously studied. In this study, to determine the influence of the VP1 S154D mutation on FMDV Asia1 replication and pathogenicity, two recombinant FMDVs with different residues only at the VP1 154 site were rescued by reverse genetics techniques and their infectious potential in host cells and pathogenicity in pigs were compared. Our data indicates that the VP1 S154D mutation increases the replication level of FMDV Asia1/HN/CHA/06 in BHK-21, IB-RS-2, and PK-15 cells and enhances pathogenicity in pigs. Through the transient transfection-infection assay to compare integrin receptor usage of two recombinant viruses, the result shows that the VP1 S154D mutation markedly increases the ability of type Asia1 FMDV to use the integrin receptors αυβ6 and αυβ8 from pig. This study identifies a key research target for illuminating the role of residues located at G-H loop in FMDV pathogenicity. PMID:26792712

  8. Structure of Rotavirus Outer-Layer Protein VP7 Bound with a Neutralizing Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Scott T.; Settembre, Ethan C.; Trask, Shane D.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Harrison, Stephen C.; Dormitzer, Philip R.

    2009-06-17

    Rotavirus outer-layer protein VP7 is a principal target of protective antibodies. Removal of free calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) dissociates VP7 trimers into monomers, releasing VP7 from the virion, and initiates penetration-inducing conformational changes in the other outer-layer protein, VP4. We report the crystal structure at 3.4 angstrom resolution of VP7 bound with the Fab fragment of a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. The Fab binds across the outer surface of the intersubunit contact, which contains two Ca{sup 2+} sites. Mutations that escape neutralization by other antibodies suggest that the same region bears the epitopes of most neutralizing antibodies. The monovalent Fab is sufficient to neutralize infectivity. We propose that neutralizing antibodies against VP7 act by stabilizing the trimer, thereby inhibiting the uncoating trigger for VP4 rearrangement. A disulfide-linked trimer is a potential subunit immunogen.

  9. Production of rotavirus-like particles in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) fruit by expression of capsid proteins VP2 and VP6 and immunological studies.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, Sergio; Esquivel Guadarrama, Fernando; Olivera Flores, Teresa De Jesús; Arias, Nancy; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto; Mason, Hugh; Mor, Tsafrir; Richter, Liz; Arntzen, Charles J; Gómez Lim, Miguel A

    2006-01-01

    A number of different antigens have been successfully expressed in transgenic plants, and some are currently being evaluated as orally delivered vaccines. Here we report the successful expression of rotavirus capsid proteins VP2 and VP6 in fruits of transgenic tomato plants. By western blot analysis, using specific antibodies, we determined that the VP2 and VP6 produced in plants have molecular weights similar to those found in native rotavirus. The plant-synthesized VP6 protein retained the capacity to form trimers. We were able to recover rotavirus virus-like particles from tomato fruit (i.e., tomatoes) by centrifugation on a sucrose cushion and to visualize them by electron microscopy. This result indicated that VP2/VP6 can self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) in plant cells, even though only a small proportion of VP2/VP6 assembled into VLPs. To investigate immunogenicity, adult mice were immunized intraperitoneally (i.p.) three times with a protein extract from a transgenic tomatoes in adjuvant. We found that the transgenic tomato extract induced detectable levels of anti-rotavirus antibodies in serum; however, we did not determine the contribution of either the free rotavirus proteins or the VLPs to the induction of the antibody response. These results suggest the potential of plant-based rotavirus VLPs for the development of a vaccine against rotavirus infection.

  10. Liposome encapsulated subunit (VP1) and virion vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Vasantha, S; Antony, A; Lal, S M

    1987-03-01

    Subunit vaccine prepared from VP1 protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) types 0 and Asia 1 protected guinea pigs against FMD and also induced high levels of antibody. Liposomes have been used as a safe and potent immunological adjuvant for FMD vaccines. Vaccines prepared from inactivated virus types 0 and Asia 1 encapsulated in liposomes protected guinea pigs against challenge with homologous virus and showed good antibody response in pigs on a small scale field trial. PMID:2886019

  11. The shift from low to high non-structural protein 1 expression in rotavirus-infected MA-104 cells.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Álvarez, Laura; Piña-Vázquez, Carolina; Zarco, Wilbert; Padilla-Noriega, Luis

    2013-06-01

    A hallmark of group/species A rotavirus (RVA) replication in MA-104 cells is the logarithmic increase in viral mRNAs that occurs four-12 h post-infection. Viral protein synthesis typically lags closely behind mRNA synthesis but continues after mRNA levels plateau. However, RVA non-structural protein 1 (NSP1) is present at very low levels throughout viral replication despite showing robust protein synthesis. NSP1 has the contrasting properties of being susceptible to proteasomal degradation, but being stabilised against proteasomal degradation by viral proteins and/or viral mRNAs. We aimed to determine the kinetics of the accumulation and intracellular distribution of NSP1 in MA-104 cells infected with rhesus rotavirus (RRV). NSP1 preferentially localises to the perinuclear region of the cytoplasm of infected cells, forming abundant granules that are heterogeneous in size. Late in infection, large NSP1 granules predominate, coincident with a shift from low to high NSP1 expression levels. Our results indicate that rotavirus NSP1 is a late viral protein in MA-104 cells infected with RRV, presumably as a result of altered protein turnover.

  12. Rotavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration. Almost all children in the U.S. are likely to be infected with rotavirus before ...

  13. Rotavirus infection induces the unfolded protein response of the cell and controls it through the nonstructural protein NSP3.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Alonso, Vicenta; Maruri-Avidal, Liliana; Arias, Carlos F; López, Susana

    2011-12-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a cellular mechanism that is triggered in order to cope with the stress caused by the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This response is initiated by the endoribonuclease inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), and PKR-like ER kinase, which increase the expression of the genes involved in the folding and degradation processes and decrease the protein input into the ER by inhibiting translation. It has been shown that viruses both induce and manipulate the UPR in order to protect the host cells from an ER stress-mediated death, thus permitting the translation of viral proteins and the efficient replication of the virus. To understand the cellular events that occur during the rotavirus replication cycle, we examined the activation of the three UPR arms following infection, using luciferase reporters driven by promoters of the ER stress-responsive genes and real-time reverse transcription-PCR to determine the levels of the stress-induced mRNAs. Our findings indicated that during rotavirus infection two of the three arms of the UPR (IRE1 and ATF6) become activated; however, these pathways are interrupted at the translational level by the general inhibition of protein synthesis caused by NSP3. This response seems to be triggered by more than one viral protein synthesized during the replication of the virus, but not by the viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), since cells transfected with psoralen-inactivated virions, or with naked viral dsRNA, did not induce UPR.

  14. The rotavirus surface protein VP8 modulates the gate and fence function of tight junctions in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nava, Porfirio; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F; Islas, Socorro; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2004-11-01

    Rotaviruses constitute a major cause of diarrhea in young mammals. Rotaviruses utilize different integrins as cell receptors, therefore upon their arrival to the intestinal lumen their integrin receptors will be hidden below the tight junction (TJ), on the basolateral membrane. Here we have studied whether the rotavirus outer capsid proteins are capable of opening the paracellular space sealed by the TJ. From the outermost layer of proteins of the rotavirus, 60 spikes formed of protein VP4 are projected. VP4 is essential for virus-cell interactions and is cleaved by trypsin into peptides VP5 and VP8. Here we found that when these peptides are added to confluent epithelial monolayers (Madin-Darby canine kidney cells), VP8 is capable of diminishing in a dose dependent and reversible manner the transepithelial electrical resistance. VP5 exerted no effect. VP8 can also inhibit the development of newly formed TJs in a Ca-switch assay. Treatment with VP8 augments the paracellular passage of non-ionic tracers, allows the diffusion of a fluorescent lipid probe and the apical surface protein GP135, from the luminal to the lateral membrane, and triggers the movement of the basolateral proteins Na+-K+-ATPase, alphanubeta3 integrin and beta1 integrin subunit, to the apical surface. VP8 generates a freeze-fracture pattern of TJs characterized by the appearance of loose end filaments, that correlates with an altered distribution of several TJ proteins. VP8 given orally to diabetic rats allows the enteral administration of insulin, thus indicating that it can be employed to modulate epithelial permeability. PMID:15494377

  15. Cell attachment protein VP8* of a human rotavirus specifically interacts with A-type histo-blood group antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liya; Crawford, Sue E.; Czako, Rita; Cortes-Penfield, Nicolas W; Smith, David F.; Le Pendu, Jacques; Estes, Mary K.; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.

    2012-01-01

    As with many other viruses, the initial cell attachment of rotaviruses, major causative agent of infantile gastroenteritis, is mediated by interactions with specific cellular glycans1–4. The distally located VP8* domain of the rotavirus spike protein VP45 mediates such interactions. The existing paradigm is that ‘sialidase-sensitive’ animal rotavirus strains bind to glycans with terminal sialic acid (Sia), whereas ‘sialidase-insensitive’ human rotavirus (HR) strains bind to glycans with internal Sia such as GM13. Although the involvement of Sia in the animal strains is firmly supported by crystallographic studies1,3,6,7, it is not yet known how VP8* of HRs interacts with Sia and whether their cell attachment necessarily involves sialoglycans. We found that VP8* of a HR strain specifically recognizes A-type histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) using a glycan array screen comprised of 511 glycans, and that virus infectivity in HT-29 cells is abrogated by anti-Atype antibodies as well as significantly enhanced in CHO cells genetically modified to express the A-type HBGA, providing a novel paradigm for initial cell attachment of HR. HBGAs are genetically determined glycoconjugates present in mucosal secretions, epithelial and on red blood cells8, and are recognized as susceptibility and cell attachment factors for gastric pathogens like H. pylori9 and noroviruses10. Our crystallographic studies show that the A-type HBGA binds to the HR VP8* at the same location as the Sia in the VP8* of animal rotavirus, and suggest how subtle changes within the same structural framework allow for such receptor switching. These results raise the possibility that host susceptibility to specific HR strains and pathogenesis are influenced by genetically controlled expression of different HBGAs among the world’s population. PMID:22504179

  16. VP1 of infectious bursal disease virus is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    von Einem, Ursula I; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Schirrmeier, Horst; Behrens, Sven-Erik; Letzel, Tobias; Mundt, Egbert

    2004-08-01

    Segment B of the bisegmented, double-stranded RNA genome of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) encodes the viral protein VP1. This has been presumed to represent the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) as it contains motifs that are typical for the RdRp of plus-strand RNA viruses. Here it is demonstrated that baculovirus-expressed wild-type but not motif A mutated VP1 acts as an RdRp on IBDV-specific RNA templates. Thus, on a plus-strand IBDV segment A cRNA template, minus-strand synthesis occurred in such a way that a covalently linked double-stranded RNA product was generated (by a 'copy-back' mechanism). Importantly, enzyme activity was observed only with templates that comprised the 3' non-coding region of plus-strand RNAs transcribed from IBDV segments A and B, indicating template specificity. RdRp activity was shown to have a temperature optimum of 37 degrees C and required magnesium ions for enzyme activity. Thus, it has been demonstrated unequivocally that VP1 represents the RdRp of IBDV.

  17. B cell epitopes within VP1 of type O foot-and-mouth disease virus for detection of viral antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan-dian; Du, Jun-zheng; Chang, Hui-yun; Cong, Guo-zheng; Shao, Jun-Jun; Lin, Tong; Song, Shuai; Xie, Qing-ge

    2010-02-01

    In this study, the coding region of type O FMDV capsid protein VP1 and a series of codon optimized DNA sequences coding for VP1 amino acid residues 141-160 (epitope1), tandem repeat 200-213 (epitope2 (+2)) and the combination of two epitopes (epitope1-2) was genetically cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pP(RO)ExHTb and pGEX4T-1, respectively. VP1 and the fused epitopes GST-E1, GST-E2 (+2) and GST-E1-2 were successfully solubly expressed in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli and Western blot analysis demonstrated they retained antigenicity. Indirect VP1-ELISA and epitope ELISAs were subsequently developed to screen a panel of 80 field pig sera using LPB-ELISA as a standard test. For VP1-ELISA and all the epitope ELISAs, there were clear distinctions between the FMDV-positive and the FMDV-negative samples. Cross-reactions with pig sera positive to the viruses of swine vesicular disease virus that produce clinically indistinguishable syndromes in pigs or guinea pig antisera to FMDV strains of type A, C and Asia1 did not occur. The relative sensitivity and specificity for the GST-E1 ELISA, GST-E2 (+2), GST-E1-2 ELISA and VP1-ELISA in comparison with LPB-ELISA were 93.3% and 85.0%, 95.0% and 90%, 100% and 81.8%, 96.6% and 80.9% respectively. This study shows the potential use of the aforementioned epitopes as alternatives to the complex antigens used in current detection for antibody to FMDV structural proteins. PMID:20960280

  18. Uncatalyzed assembly of spherical particles from SV40 VP1 pentamers and linear dsDNA incorporates both low and high cooperativity elements

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Santanu; Kler, Stanislav; Oppenheim, Ariella; Zlotnick, Adam

    2010-02-05

    The capsid of SV40 virion is comprised of 72 pentamers of the major capsid protein, VP1. We examined the synergism between pentamer-pentamer interaction and pentamer-DNA interaction using a minimal system of purified VP1 and a linear dsDNA 600-mer, comparing electrophoresis with electron microscopy and size exclusion chromatography. At low VP1/DNA ratios, large tubes were observed that apparently did not survive native agarose gel electrophoresis. As the VP1 concentration increased, electrophoretic migration was slower and tubes were replaced by 200 A diameter particles and excess free pentamer. At high VP1/DNA ratios, a progressively larger fraction of particles was similar to 450 A diameter virions. VP1 association with DNA is very strong compared to the concentrations in these experiments yet, paradoxically, stable complexes appear only at high ratios of VP1 to DNA. These data suggest a DNA saturation-dependent nucleation event based on non-specific pentamer-DNA interaction that controls assembly and the ultimate capsid geometry.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of different immunogenic viral nanoconstructs from rotavirus VP6 inner capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Bugli, Francesca; Caprettini, Valeria; Cacaci, Margherita; Martini, Cecilia; Paroni Sterbini, Francesco; Torelli, Riccardo; Della Longa, Stefano; Papi, Massimiliano; Palmieri, Valentina; Giardina, Bruno; Posteraro, Brunella; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Arcovito, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    In order to deliver low-cost viral capsomeres from a large amount of soluble viral VP6 protein from human rotavirus, we developed and optimized a biotechnological platform in Escherichia coli. Specifically, three different expression protocols were compared, differing in their genetic constructs, ie, a simple native histidine-tagged VP6 sequence, VP6 fused to thioredoxin, and VP6 obtained with the newly described small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) fusion system. Our results demonstrate that the histidine-tagged protein does not escape the accumulation in the inclusion bodies, and that SUMO is largely superior to the thioredoxin-fusion tag in enhancing the expression and solubility of VP6 protein. Moreover, the VP6 protein produced according to the SUMO fusion tag displays well-known assembly properties, as observed in both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images, giving rise to either VP6 trimers, 60 nm spherical virus-like particles, or nanotubes a few microns long. This different quaternary organization of VP6 shows a higher level of immunogenicity for the elongated structures with respect to the spheres or the protein trimers. Therefore, the expression and purification strategy presented here – providing a large amount of the viral capsid protein in the native form with relatively simple, rapid, and economical procedures – opens a new route toward large-scale production of a more efficient antigenic compound to be used as a vaccination tool or as an adjuvant, and also represents a top-quality biomaterial to be further modified for biotechnological purposes. PMID:24936129

  20. Expression of rotavirus VP6 protein: a comparison amongst Escherichia coli, Pichia pastoris and Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Bredell, Helba; Smith, Jacques J; Prins, Willem A; Görgens, Johann F; van Zyl, Willem H

    2016-03-01

    During this study. we successfully expressed a codon-optimized gene for rotavirus VP6 protein intracellularly in two methylotrophic yeasts, Pichia pastoris and Hansenula polymorpha, during methanol induction. Expressions were performed in shake flasks and subsequently scaled-up to 1.3 L bioreactors. The yields obtained in the yeasts were compared with that observed in Escherichia coli. Despite producing the lowest biomass levels of all the expression systems in shake flasks, the highest VP6 concentration was obtained with E. coli. In shake flasks, P. pastoris yielded higher volumetric levels of VP6 than H. polymorpha, but specific production of VP6 was approximately similar in both yeasts. In the controlled environment of bioreactors, yeast strains attained typical high cell densities, but also increased VP6 production compared to all shake flask cultures. Unlike in shake flask expressions, H. polymorpha outperformed both P. pastoris as well as E. coli during bioreactor cultivation. VP6 production was in all three expression systems growth-associated. In contrast to yeast expressions, bacterial expressed VP6 protein was found to be insoluble upon analysis. This is the first report of VP6 expressed in methylotrophic yeast and holds the promise for the inexpensive production of VP6 as a possible vaccine candidate or drug delivery mechanism.

  1. Immune responses of recombinant adenovirus co-expressing VP1 of foot-and-mouth disease virus and porcine interferon alpha in mice and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Du, Yijun; Dai, Jianjun; Li, Yufeng; Li, Congzhi; Qi, Jing; Duan, Shuyi; Jiang, Ping

    2008-08-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically devastating vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals. In this study, we constructed and characterized the immune responses and vaccine efficacy conferred by the recombinant adenovirus co-expressing VP1 of FMDV and porcine interferon alpha as fusion protein (rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1). Six groups of female BALB/c mice each with 18 were inoculated subcutaneously twice 2-week intervals with the recombinant adenoviruses. The results showed that the levels of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in the group inoculated with rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1 were significantly higher than those in the group inoculated with rAd-VP1+rAd-pIFNalpha (P<0.05). Then four groups of guinea pigs each with six were inoculated two times at 2-week intervals intramuscularly with rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1, commercial inactivated FMD vaccine, wild-type adenovirus (wtAd) or PBS, and the protective efficacy of rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1 was determined. The results indicated that all the guinea pigs vaccinated with rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1 as well as inactivated FMD vaccine were protected from FMDV challenge, even though the levels of neutralizing antibodies (1:32-1:40) of the animals vaccinated with rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1 was lower than that in the group inoculated with inactivated FMD vaccine (1:64-1:128). It demonstrated that the newly recombinant adenovirus rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1 might further be an attractive candidate vaccine for preventing FMDV infection in swine. PMID:18511133

  2. [Reverse genetics system of rotaviruses: development and application for analysis of VP4 spike protein].

    PubMed

    Komoto, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    The rotavirus genome is composed of 11 gene segments of double-stranded (ds)RNA. Reverse genetics is the powerful and ideal methodology for the molecular analysis of virus biology, which enables the virus genome to be artificially manipulated. Although reverse genetics systems exist for nearly all major groups of RNA viruses, development of such a system for rotaviruses is more challenging owing in part to the technical complexity of manipulation of their multi-segmented genome. A breakthrough in the field of rotavirus reverse genetics came in 2006, when we established the first reverse genetics system for rotaviruses, which is a partially plasmid-based system that permits replacement of a viral gene segment with the aid of a helper virus. Although this helper virus-driven system is technically limited and gives low levels of recombinant viruses, it allows alteration of the rotavirus genome, thus contributing to our understanding of these medically important viruses. In this review, I describe the development and application of our rotavirus reverse genetics system, and its future perspectives.

  3. Intracellular distribution of rotavirus structural proteins and virus-like particles expressed in the insect cell-baculovirus system.

    PubMed

    Mena, Jimmy A; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2006-04-20

    The production of virus-like particles (VLP) is of interest to several fields. However, little is known about their assembly when they are expressed in insect cells, as it occurs in conditions different to those of native virus. Knowledge of the localization of recombinant proteins and of the site of accumulation of VLP can increase the understanding of VLP assembly and be useful for proposing production strategies. In this work, the rotavirus proteins VP6 and the fusion protein GFPVP2 were expressed in High Five insect cells. Recombinant proteins and rotavirus-like particles (RLP) were located and visualized by confocal, epifluorescence and electron microscopy. Single-layered (sl) RLP (conformed by GFPVP2) accumulated in the cytoplasm as highly ordered aggregates. In contrast, VP6 formed fibrillar structures composed of various tubes of VP6 that were not associated to microtubules. Coexpression of GFPVP2 and VP6 altered the distribution of both proteins. VP6 formed aggregates, even when all other conditions of individual protein expression remained unchanged. Double-layered (dl) RLP were observed in dense zones of the cytoplasm, but were not in ordered aggregates. It was determined that the assembly of both slRLP and dlRLP occurs intracellularly. Accordingly, strategies for the optimum assembly of dlRLP should guarantee that each cell produces both recombinant proteins.

  4. Fine mapping of sequential neutralization epitopes on the subunit protein VP8 of human rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs-Nolan, Jennifer; Yoo, Dongwan; Mine, Yoshinori

    2003-01-01

    The epitopes of the HRV (human rotavirus), especially those involved in virus neutralization, have not been determined in their entirety, and would have significant implications for HRV vaccine development. In the present study, we report on the epitope mapping and identification of sequential neutralization epitopes, on the Wa strain HRV subunit protein VP8, using synthetic overlapping peptides. Polyclonal antibodies against recombinant Wa VP8 were produced previously in chicken, and purified from egg yolk, which showed neutralizing activity against HRV in vitro. Overlapping VP8 peptide fragments were synthesized and probed with the anti-VP8 antibodies, revealing five sequential epitopes on VP8. Further analysis suggested that three of the five epitopes detected, M1-L10, I55-D66 and L223-P234, were involved in virus neutralization, indicating that sequential epitopes may also be important for the HRV neutralization. The interactions of the antibodies with the five epitopes were characterized by an examination of the critical amino acids involved in antibody binding. Epitopes comprised primarily of hydrophobic amino acid residues, followed by polar and charged residues. The more critical amino acids appeared to be located near the centre of the epitopes, with proline, isoleucine, serine, glutamine and arginine playing an important role in the binding of antibody to the VP8 epitopes. PMID:12901721

  5. Molecular evolution of the VP1, VP2, and VP3 genes in human rhinovirus species C.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Makoto; Niwa, Shoichi; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Masaru; Ryo, Akihide; Sato, Hironori; Kiyota, Naoko; Noda, Masahiro; Kozawa, Kunihisa; Shirabe, Komei; Kusaka, Takashi; Shimojo, Naoki; Hasegawa, Shunji; Sugai, Kazuko; Obuchi, Masatsugu; Tashiro, Masato; Oishi, Kazunori; Ishii, Haruyuki; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinovirus species C (HRV-C) was recently discovered, and this virus has been associated with various acute respiratory illnesses (ARI). However, the molecular evolution of the major antigens of this virus, including VP1, VP2, and VP3, is unknown. Thus, we performed complete VP1, VP2, and VP3 gene analyses of 139 clinical HRV-C strains using RT-PCR with newly designed primer sets and next-generation sequencing. We assessed the time-scale evolution and evolutionary rate of these genes using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In addition, we calculated the pairwise distance and confirmed the positive/negative selection sites in these genes. The phylogenetic trees showed that the HRV-C strains analyzed using these genes could be dated back approximately 400 to 900 years, and these strains exhibited high evolutionary rates (1.35 to 3.74 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year). Many genotypes (>40) were confirmed in the phylogenetic trees. Furthermore, no positively selected site was found in the VP1, VP2, and VP3 protein. Molecular modeling analysis combined with variation analysis suggested that the exterior surfaces of the VP1, VP2 and VP3 proteins are rich in loops and are highly variable. These results suggested that HRV-C may have an old history and unique antigenicity as an agent of various ARI. PMID:25640899

  6. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* carbohydrate-binding protein of the human rotavirus strain Wa

    SciTech Connect

    Kraschnefski, Mark J.; Scott, Stacy A.; Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S.; Itzstein, Mark von; Blanchard, Helen

    2005-11-01

    The carbohydrate-binding component (VP8*{sub 64–223}) of the human Wa rotavirus spike protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized in two different crystal forms. X-ray diffraction data have been collected that have enabled determination of the Wa VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement. Rotaviruses exhibit host-specificity and the first crystallographic information on a rotavirus strain that infects humans is reported here. Recognition and attachment to host cells, leading to invasion and infection, is critically linked to the function of the outer capsid spike protein of the rotavirus particle. In some strains the VP8* component of the spike protein is implicated in recognition and binding of sialic-acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates, thereby enabling infection by the virus. The cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* core from human Wa rotavirus is reported. Two crystal forms (trigonal P3{sub 2}21 and monoclinic P2{sub 1}) have been obtained and X-ray diffraction data have been collected, enabling determination of the VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement.

  7. Co-Expression of Anti-Rotavirus Proteins (Llama VHH Antibody Fragments) in Lactobacillus: Development and Functionality of Vectors Containing Two Expression Cassettes in Tandem

    PubMed Central

    Günaydın, Gökçe; Álvarez, Beatriz; Lin, Yin; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus is an important pediatric pathogen, causing severe diarrhea and being associated with a high mortality rate causing approximately 500 000 deaths annually worldwide. Even though some vaccines are currently available, their efficacy is lower in the developing world, as compared to developed countries. Therefore, alternative or complementary treatment options are needed in the developing countries where the disease burden is the largest. The effect of Lactobacillus in promoting health and its use as a vehicle for delivery of protein and antibody fragments was previously shown. In this study, we have developed co-expression vectors enabling Lactobacillus paracasei BL23 to produce two VHH fragments against rotavirus (referred to as anti-rotavirus proteins 1 and 3, ARP1 and ARP3) as secreted and/or surface displayed products. ARP1 and ARP3 fragments were successfully co-expressed as shown by Western blot and flow cytometry. In addition, engineered Lactobacillus produced VHH antibody fragments were shown to bind to a broad range of rotavirus serotypes (including the human rotavirus strains 69M, Va70, F45, DS1, Wa and ST3 and simian rotavirus strains including RRV and SA11), by flow cytometry and ELISA. Hereby, we have demonstrated for the first time that when RRV was captured by one VHH displayed on the surface of co-expressor Lactobacillus, targeting other epitope was possible with another VHH secreted from the same bacterium. Therefore, Lactobacillus producing two VHH antibody fragments may potentially serve as treatment against rotavirus with a reduced risk of development of escape mutants. This co-expression and delivery platform can also be used for delivery of VHH fragments against a variety of mucosal pathogens or production of other therapeutic molecules. PMID:24781086

  8. Rotavirus Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... PATH's Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  9. Rotavirus Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Treatment Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... PATH's Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  10. Effects on sialic acid recognition of amino acid mutations in the carbohydrate-binding cleft of the rotavirus spike protein.

    PubMed

    Kraschnefski, Mark J; Bugarcic, Andrea; Fleming, Fiona E; Yu, Xing; von Itzstein, Mark; Coulson, Barbara S; Blanchard, Helen

    2009-03-01

    The rotavirus spike protein VP4 mediates attachment to host cells and subsequent membrane penetration. The VP8(*) domain of VP4 forms the spike tips and is proposed to recognize host-cell surface glycans. For sialidase-sensitive rotaviruses such as rhesus (RRV), this recognition involves terminal sialic acids. We show here that the RRV VP8(*)(64-224) protein competes with RRV infection of host cells, demonstrating its relevance to infection. In addition, we observe that the amino acids revealed by X-ray crystallography to be in direct contact with the bound sialic acid derivative methyl alpha-D-N-acetylneuraminide, and that are highly conserved amongst sialidase-sensitive rotaviruses, are residues that are also important in interactions with host-cell carbohydrates. Residues Arg101 and Ser190 of the RRV VP8(*) carbohydrate-binding site were mutated to assess their importance for binding to the sialic acid derivative and their competition with RRV infection of host cells. The crystallographic structure of the Arg(101)Ala mutant crystallized in the presence of the sialic acid derivative was determined at 295 K to a resolution of 1.9 A. Our multidisciplinary study using X-ray crystallography, saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and competitive virus infectivity assays to investigate RRV wild-type and mutant VP8(*) proteins has provided the first evidence that the carbohydrate-binding cavity in RRV VP8(*) is used for host-cell recognition, and this interaction is not only with the sialic acid portion but also with other parts of the glycan structure.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a Genotype G23P[37] Pheasant Rotavirus Strain Identified in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Gál, János; Marton, Szilvia; Ihász, Katalin; Papp, Hajnalka; Jakab, Ferenc; Malik, Yashpal S.; Bányai, Krisztián

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the genomic properties of a rotavirus A strain isolated from diarrheic pheasant poults in Hungary in 2015. Sequence analyses revealed a shared genomic constellation (G23-P[37]-I4-R4-C4-M4-A16-N10-T4-E4-H4) and close relationship (range of nucleotide sequence similarity: VP2, 88%; VP1 and NSP4, 98%) with another pheasant rotavirus strain isolated previously in Germany. PMID:27034484

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of a Genotype G23P[37] Pheasant Rotavirus Strain Identified in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Gál, János; Marton, Szilvia; Ihász, Katalin; Papp, Hajnalka; Jakab, Ferenc; Malik, Yashpal S; Bányai, Krisztián; Farkas, Szilvia L

    2016-03-31

    We investigated the genomic properties of a rotavirus A strain isolated from diarrheic pheasant poults in Hungary in 2015. Sequence analyses revealed a shared genomic constellation (G23-P[37]-I4-R4-C4-M4-A16-N10-T4-E4-H4) and close relationship (range of nucleotide sequence similarity: VP2, 88%; VP1 and NSP4, 98%) with another pheasant rotavirus strain isolated previously in Germany.

  13. Broadly neutralizing human monoclonal JC polyomavirus VP1-specific antibodies as candidate therapeutics for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Jelcic, Ivan; Combaluzier, Benoit; Jelcic, Ilijas; Faigle, Wolfgang; Senn, Luzia; Reinhart, Brenda J; Ströh, Luisa; Nitsch, Roger M; Stehle, Thilo; Sospedra, Mireia; Grimm, Jan; Martin, Roland

    2015-09-23

    In immunocompromised individuals, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) may mutate and gain access to the central nervous system resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), an often fatal opportunistic infection for which no treatments are currently available. Despite recent progress, the contribution of JCPyV-specific humoral immunity to controlling asymptomatic infection throughout life and to eliminating JCPyV from the brain is poorly understood. We examined antibody responses against JCPyV major capsid protein VP1 (viral protein 1) variants in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy donors (HDs), JCPyV-positive multiple sclerosis patients treated with the anti-VLA-4 monoclonal antibody natalizumab (NAT), and patients with NAT-associated PML. Before and during PML, CSF antibody responses against JCPyV VP1 variants show "recognition holes"; however, upon immune reconstitution, CSF antibody titers rise, then recognize PML-associated JCPyV VP1 variants, and may be involved in elimination of the virus. We therefore reasoned that the memory B cell repertoire of individuals who recovered from PML could be a source for the molecular cloning of broadly neutralizing antibodies for passive immunization. We generated a series of memory B cell-derived JCPyV VP1-specific human monoclonal antibodies from HDs and a patient with NAT-associated PML-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). These antibodies exhibited diverse binding affinity, cross-reactivity with the closely related BK polyomavirus, recognition of PML-causing VP1 variants, and JCPyV neutralization. Almost all antibodies with exquisite specificity for JCPyV, neutralizing activity, recognition of all tested JCPyV PML variants, and high affinity were derived from one patient who had recovered from PML. These antibodies are promising drug candidates for the development of a treatment of PML. PMID:26400911

  14. Immune responses of two recombinant adenoviruses expressing VP1 antigens of FMDV fused with porcine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Du, Yijun; Jiang, Ping; Li, Yufeng; He, Hairong; Jiang, Wenming; Wang, Xinglong; Hong, Weibin

    2007-11-28

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically devastating vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals. In the present report, we constructed and characterized the immune responses conferred by two recombinant adenoviruses expressing VP1 epitopes (three amino acid residues 21-60, 141-160 and 200-213 in VP1, designated VPe) or VP1 protein of FMDV fused with porcine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (named rAd-GMCSF-VPe and rAd-GMCSF-VP1). Seven groups of female BALB/c mice each containing 18 mice were inoculated subcutaneously twice at 2-week intervals with the recombinant adenoviruses. Then the protective efficacy of the two adenoviruses was detected in guinea pigs and swine. The results showed that the highest levels of FMDV-specific T cell proliferation, IFN-gamma and IL-4 could be induced by rAd-GMCSF-VPe expressing fusion GMCSF-VPe, and the highest level of FMDV-specific humoral immune responses could be induced by rAd-GMCSF-VP1 expressing fusion GMCSF-VP1 in mice. All guinea pigs and swine co-administrated with rAd-GMCSF-VPe and rAd-GMCSF-VP1 were protected from viral challenge, even though the neutralizing antibody titers were significantly lower than those in the group inoculated with inactivated FMD vaccine. It demonstrated that co-administration of rAd-GMCSF-VPe and rAd-GMCSF-VP1 might be attractive candidate vaccines for preventing FMDV infection. PMID:17980939

  15. [Fusion expression of O type foot-and-mouth diseases virus VP1 gene and HSP70 gene and induction of immune responses in mice].

    PubMed

    Su, Chun-Xia; Duan, Xiang-Guo; Wang, Xiu-Qing; Ren, Xue-Feng; Cao, Rui-Bing; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2006-09-01

    Vp1 gene of O type foot-and-mouth diseases virus and M. tuberculosis HSP70 were expressed in methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris expression system. The results of cellular immune responses and humoral immune response were examined after BALB/c mice were immunized with fusion protein expressed in methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The genes was cloned into the vector pPICZalpha-A by routine molecular technique. The plasmid fusion (pPICZalphaA-vp1-HSP70) was created that HSP70 located downstream of VP1 gene of O type foot-and-mouth disease virus. Vp1 was expressed by fusing to the amino terminus of M. tuberculosis hsp70 in yeast Pichia pastoris. The recombined fusion plasmid was transformed into methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris X-33 by electrophoration. The recombinant transformants were selected by Zeocin and induced by the addition of methanol every 24h. The expressived product analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The result indicated that the fusion protein(vp1-HSP70) has specific antigenicity. Mice were inoculated transcutaneous three times at a two-weeks interval with fusion protein, PBS and conventional inactivated vaccines. To evaluate the prophylaxtic efficacy of fusion protein, Titers of antibodies was detected by ELISA and proliferation of lymphocytes were determined by MTT. The results indicated that fusion protein could elicit specific humoral immune and cellular immune responses. Compared with conventional inactivated vaccines, fusion protein elicited slightly lower FMDV antibody level but stronger T cell proliferation.

  16. Molecular characterization of two rare human G8P[14] rotavirus strains, detected in Italy in 2012.

    PubMed

    Delogu, Roberto; Ianiro, Giovanni; Morea, Anna; Chironna, Maria; Fiore, Lucia; Ruggeri, Franco M

    2016-10-01

    Since 2007, the Italian Rotavirus Surveillance Program (RotaNet-Italy) has monitored the diversity and distribution of genotypes identified in children hospitalized with rotavirus acute gastroenteritis. We report the genomic characterization of two rare human G8P[14] rotavirus strains, identified in two children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in the southern Italian region of Apulia during rotavirus strain surveillance in 2012. Both strains showed a G8-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A11-N2-T6-E2-H3 genomic constellation (DS-1-like genomic background). Phylogenetic analysis of each genome segment revealed a mixed configuration of genes of animal and zoonotic human origin, indicating that genetic reassortment events generated these unusual human strains. Eight out of 11 genes (VP1, VP2, VP3, VP6, VP7, NSP3, NSP4 and NSP5) of the Italian G8P[14] strains exhibited close identity with a Spanish sheep strain, whereas the remaining genes (VP4, NSP1 and NSP2) were more closely related to human strains. The amino acid sequences of the antigenic regions of outer capsid proteins VP4 and VP7 were compared with vaccine and field strains, showing high conservation between the amino acid sequences of Apulia G8P[14] strains and human and animal strains bearing G8 and/or P[14] proteins, and revealing many substitutions with respect to the RotaTeq™ and Rotarix™ vaccine strains. Conversely, the amino acid analysis of the four antigenic sites of VP6 revealed a high degree of conservation between the two Apulia strains and the human and animal strains analyzed. These results reinforce the potential role of interspecies transmission and reassortment in generating novel rotavirus strains that might not be fully contrasted by current vaccines. PMID:27449953

  17. A Novel Murine Model of Parvovirus Associated Dilated Cardiomyopathy Induced by Immunization with VP1-Unique Region of Parvovirus B19

    PubMed Central

    Šimoliūnas, Egidijus; Rinkūnaitė, Ieva; Smalinskaitė, Luka; Podkopajev, Andrej; Bironaitė, Daiva; Weis, Cleo-Aron; Marx, Alexander; Bukelskienė, Virginija; Gretz, Norbert; Grabauskienė, Virginija; Labeit, Dittmar; Labeit, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Background. Parvovirus B19 (B19V) is a common finding in endomyocardial biopsy specimens from myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy patients. However, current understanding of how B19V is contributing to cardiac damage is rather limited due to the lack of appropriate mice models. In this work we demonstrate that immunization of BALB/c mice with the major immunogenic determinant of B19V located in the unique sequence of capsid protein VP1 (VP1u) is an adequate model to study B19V associated heart damage. Methods and Results. We immunized mice in the experimental group with recombinant VP1u; immunization with cardiac myosin derived peptide served as a positive reference and phosphate buffered saline served as negative control. Cardiac function and dimensions were followed echocardiographically 69 days after immunization. Progressive dilatation of left ventricle and decline of ejection fraction were observed in VP1u- and myosin-immunized mice. Histologically, severe cardiac fibrosis and accumulation of heart failure cells in lungs were observed 69 days after immunization. Transcriptomic profiling revealed ongoing cardiac remodeling and immune process in VP1u- and myosin-immunized mice. Conclusions. Immunization of BALB/c mice with VP1u induces dilated cardiomyopathy in BALB/c mice and it could be used as a model to study clinically relevant B19V associated cardiac damage. PMID:27812527

  18. Structure and Dynamics of Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 1 VP1-Unique N-Terminal Domain and Its Role in Capsid Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Yarbrough, Joseph; Domsic, John; Bennett, Antonette; Bothner, Brian; Kozyreva, Olga G.; Samulski, R. Jude; Muzyczka, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the phospholipase A2 domain located within the unique N terminus of the capsid viral protein VP1 (VP1u) in parvovirus infection has been reported. This study used computational methods to characterize the VP1 sequence for adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes 1 to 12 and circular dichroism and electron microscopy to monitor conformational changes in the AAV1 capsid induced by temperature and the pHs encountered during trafficking through the endocytic pathway. Circular dichroism was also used to monitor conformational changes in AAV6 capsids assembled from VP2 and VP3 or VP1, VP2, and VP3 at pH 7.5. VP1u was predicted (computationally) and confirmed (in solution) to be structurally ordered. This VP domain was observed to undergo a reversible pH-induced unfolding/refolding process, a loss/gain of α-helical structure, which did not disrupt the capsid integrity and is likely facilitated by its difference in isoelectric point compared to the other VP sequences assembling the capsid. This study is the first to physically document conformational changes in the VP1u region that likely facilitate its externalization from the capsid interior during infection and establishes the order of events in the escape of the AAV capsid from the endosome en route to the nucleus. PMID:23427155

  19. Structure and dynamics of adeno-associated virus serotype 1 VP1-unique N-terminal domain and its role in capsid trafficking.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Yarbrough, Joseph; Domsic, John; Bennett, Antonette; Bothner, Brian; Kozyreva, Olga G; Samulski, R Jude; Muzyczka, Nicholas; McKenna, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2013-05-01

    The importance of the phospholipase A2 domain located within the unique N terminus of the capsid viral protein VP1 (VP1u) in parvovirus infection has been reported. This study used computational methods to characterize the VP1 sequence for adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes 1 to 12 and circular dichroism and electron microscopy to monitor conformational changes in the AAV1 capsid induced by temperature and the pHs encountered during trafficking through the endocytic pathway. Circular dichroism was also used to monitor conformational changes in AAV6 capsids assembled from VP2 and VP3 or VP1, VP2, and VP3 at pH 7.5. VP1u was predicted (computationally) and confirmed (in solution) to be structurally ordered. This VP domain was observed to undergo a reversible pH-induced unfolding/refolding process, a loss/gain of α-helical structure, which did not disrupt the capsid integrity and is likely facilitated by its difference in isoelectric point compared to the other VP sequences assembling the capsid. This study is the first to physically document conformational changes in the VP1u region that likely facilitate its externalization from the capsid interior during infection and establishes the order of events in the escape of the AAV capsid from the endosome en route to the nucleus. PMID:23427155

  20. Serum antibody response to recombinant major inner capsid protein following human infection with group B rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Eiden, J J; Mouzinho, A; Lindsay, D A; Glass, R I; Fang, Z Y; Taylor, J L

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant major inner capsid protein (VP6) of the IDIR strain of group B rotavirus (GBR) was incorporated in a solid-phase immunoassay to access antibody response to infection in humans. Expression of VP6 in insect cells permitted design of a highly sensitive assay that avoided the contaminants present in GBR antigens obtained from fecal specimens. Among patients infected with the ADRV strain of GBR in China, increased reactivity with recombinant VP6 was observed in convalescent-phase sera in comparison with sera obtained shortly after infection (P = 0.0084). Anti-VP6 antibodies were detectable as soon as 7 days after onset of gastrointestinal symptoms, and serum reactivity persisted in specimens drawn more than 1 year after infection. Solid-phase immunoassay with recombinant VP6 was next employed in order to assess anti-GBR antibody in 513 serum specimens obtained from 423 Maryland residents (ages, 7 months to 96 years; median age, 42 years). Four individuals (< 1%) exhibited serum antibodies directed against the recombinant VP6 (ages, 54 to 95 years; mean age, 77 years). Examination of 129 additional serum specimens including some from other geographic regions of the United States failed to reveal the presence of anti-GBR antibody. Anti-GBR antibody was also not detected in any of 131 serum specimens from 60 staff and residents of a nursing home in Switzerland. While infection of humans with GBR has been uncommon in these locations outside of China, the detection of serum antibodies in older individuals in the United States either indicated an unknown, age-related risk factor or may have indicated infection in the more distant past. The availability of these reagents should allow surveys for GBR infection among additional populations that have not previously been investigated. PMID:8077413

  1. Regulation of the Osem gene by abscisic acid and the transcriptional activator VP1: analysis of cis-acting promoter elements required for regulation by abscisic acid and VP1.

    PubMed

    Hattori, T; Terada, T; Hamasuna, S

    1995-06-01

    Osem, a rice gene homologous to the wheat Em gene, which encodes one of the late-embryogenesis abundant proteins was isolated. The gene was characterized with respect to control of transcription by abscisic acid (ABA) and the transcriptional activator VP1, which is involved in the ABA-regulated gene expression during late embryo-genesis. A fusion gene (Osem-GUS) consisting of the Osem promoter and the bacterial beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene was constructed and tested in a transient expression system, using protoplasts derived from a suspension-cultured line of rice cells, for activation by ABA and by co-transfection with an expression vector (35S-Osvp1) for the rice VP1 (OSVP1) cDNA. The expression of Osem-GUS was strongly (40- to 150-fold) activated by externally applied ABA and by over-expression of (OS)VP1. The Osem promoter has three ACGTG-containing sequences, motif A, motif B and motif A', which resemble the abscisic acid-responsive element (ABRE) that was previously identified in the wheat Em and the rice Rab16. There is also a CATGCATG sequence, which is known as the Sph box and is shown to be essential for the regulation by VP1 of the maize anthocyanin regulatory gene C1. Focusing on these sequence elements, various mutant derivatives of the Osem promoter in the transient expression system were assayed. The analysis revealed that motif A functions not only as an ABRE but also as a sequence element required for the regulation by (OS)VP1.

  2. Genotyping of enteroviruses isolated in Kenya from pediatric patients using partial VP1 region.

    PubMed

    Opanda, Silvanos M; Wamunyokoli, Fred; Khamadi, Samoel; Coldren, Rodney; Bulimo, Wallace D

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EV) are responsible for a wide range of clinical diseases in humans. Though studied broadly in several regions of the world, the genetic diversity of human enteroviruses (HEV) circulating in the sub-Saharan Africa remains under-documented. In the current study, we molecularly typed 61 HEV strains isolated in Kenya between 2008 and 2011 targeting the 3'-end of the VP1 gene. Viral RNA was extracted from the archived isolates and part of the VP1 gene amplified by RT-PCR, followed by sequence analysis. Twenty-two different EV types were detected. Majority (72.0 %) of these belonged to Enterovirus B species followed by Enterovirus D (21.3 %) and Enterovirus A (6.5 %). The most frequently detected types were Enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68), followed by Coxsackievirus B2 (CV-B2), CV-B1, CV-B4 and CV-B3. Phylogenetic analyses of these viruses revealed that Kenyan CV-B1 isolates were segregated among sequences of global CV-B1 strains. Conversely, the Kenyan CV-B2, CV-B3, CV-B4 and EV-D68 strains generally grouped together with those detected from other countries. Notably, the Kenyan EV-D68 strains largely clustered with sequences of global strains obtained between 2008 and 2010 than those circulating in recent years. Overall, our results indicate that HEV strains belonging to Enterovirus D and Enterovirus B species pre-dominantly circulated and played a significant role in pediatric respiratory infection in Kenya, during the study period. The Kenyan CV-B1 strains were genetically divergent from those circulating in other countries. Phylogenetic clustering of Kenyan EV-D68 strains with sequences of global strains circulating between 2008 and 2010 than those obtained in recent years suggests a high genomic variability associated with the surface protein encoding VP1 gene in these enteroviruses.

  3. The Abundant R2 mRNA Generated by Aleutian Mink Disease Parvovirus Is Tricistronic, Encoding NS2, VP1, and VP2▿

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jianming; Cheng, Fang; Pintel, David

    2007-01-01

    The abundant R2 mRNA encoded by the single left-end promoter of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus is tricistronic; it not only expresses the capsid proteins VP1 and VP2 but is also the major source for the nonstructural protein NS2. A cis-acting sequence within the NS2 gene was shown to be required for efficient capsid protein production, and its effect displayed a distinct location dependence. Ribosome transit through the upstream NS2 gene region was necessary for efficient VP1 and VP2 expression; however, neither ablation nor improvement of the NS2 initiating AUG had an effect on capsid protein production, suggesting that the translation of the NS2 protein per se had little influence on VP1 and VP2 expression. Thus, proper control of the alternative translation of the tricistronic R2 mRNA, a process critical for viral replication, is governed in a complex manner. PMID:17428872

  4. Full genome characterization of the first G3P[24] rotavirus strain detected in humans provides evidence of interspecies reassortment and mutational saturation in the VP7 gene.

    PubMed

    Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Roy, Sunando; Teel, Elizabeth N; Weinberg, Geoffrey A; Payne, Daniel C; Parashar, Umesh D; Bowen, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    During the 2008-2009 rotavirus season of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention New Vaccine Surveillance Network, one case of paediatric acute gastroenteritis associated with a rotavirus G14P[24] strain was identified. This was the first detection of the genotype G14 and P[24] in humans, and the first detection of the G14P[24] combination. To gain an insight into the origins and the evolution of this strain, we determined the complete ORF sequences of all 11 genes. A majority of the genes identified were similar to the simian strain TUCH, except for the VP1 and VP7 genes that clustered only distantly with the bovine and equine strains, respectively. In addition, this strain carried AU-1-like NSP2 and NSP4 genes. Using codon-partitioning and protein-based phylogenetic approaches, we determined that the VP7 genotype of strain 2009727118 was actually G3; therefore, the proposed full genomic classification of the 2009727118 strain is G3-P[24]-I9-R2-C3-M3-A9-N3-T3-E3-H6. These findings indicate the possibility that the 2009727118 strain originated by interspecies transmission and multiple reassortment events involving human, bovine and equine rotaviruses, resulting in the introduction of some genes into the genome of simian rotaviruses. Additionally, we found evidence of mutational saturation in the third codon position of the VP7 ORF which presented an issue with homoplasy in phylogenetic analyses. PMID:26590163

  5. Full genome characterization of the first G3P[24] rotavirus strain detected in humans provides evidence of interspecies reassortment and mutational saturation in the VP7 gene

    PubMed Central

    Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Roy, Sunando; Teel, Elizabeth N.; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Payne, Daniel C.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Bowen, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    During the 2008–2009 rotavirus season of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention New Vaccine Surveillance Network, one case of paediatric acute gastroenteritis associated with a rotavirus G14P[24] strain was identified. This was the first detection of the genotype G14 and P[24] in humans, and the first detection of the G14P[24] combination. To gain an insight into the origins and the evolution of this strain, we determined the complete ORF sequences of all 11 genes. A majority of the genes identified were similar to the simian strain TUCH, except for the VP1 and VP7 genes that clustered only distantly with the bovine and equine strains, respectively. In addition, this strain carried AU-1-like NSP2 and NSP4 genes. Using codon-partitioning and protein-based phylogenetic approaches, we determined that the VP7 genotype of strain 2009727118 was actually G3; therefore, the proposed full genomic classification of the 2009727118 strain is G3-P[24]-I9-R2-C3-M3-A9-N3-T3-E3-H6. These findings indicate the possibility that the 2009727118 strain originated by interspecies transmission and multiple reassortment events involving human, bovine and equine rotaviruses, resulting in the introduction of some genes into the genome of simian rotaviruses. Additionally, we found evidence of mutational saturation in the third codon position of the VP7 ORF which presented an issue with homoplasy in phylogenetic analyses. PMID:26590163

  6. Rotavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G

    1998-01-01

    Encouraging results have been reported from several large trials of tetravalent rhesus rotavirus vaccine, with efficacy of 70-80% against severe disease. A recent Venezuelan study showed similar results to trials in USA and Europe. The vaccine may soon be licensed in USA. It provides the exciting prospect of a strategy to prevent one of the world's major child killers. Other candidate vaccines are under development including human-bovine reassortants, neonatal strains, non-replicating rotaviruses, vector vaccines and other genetically engineered products. Second and third generation rotavirus vaccines are on the horizon. The need for a rotavirus vaccine is well accepted by paediatricians, but public health authorities need to be lobbied. Other issues which need to be addressed include relative importance of non-group A rotaviruses, possible administration with OPV, the influence of breast feeding, and most importantly, cost. It is essential that rotavirus vaccine is somehow made available to all of the world's children, not just those in developed countries. PMID:9553287

  7. Selective Membrane Permeabilization by the Rotavirus VP5* Protein Is Abrogated by Mutations in an Internal Hydrophobic Domain

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, William; Denisova, Evgeniya; LaMonica, Rachel; Mackow, Erich R.

    2000-01-01

    Rotavirus infectivity is dependent on the proteolytic cleavage of the VP4 spike protein into VP8* and VP5* proteins. Proteolytically activated virus, as well as expressed VP5*, permeabilizes membranes, suggesting that cleavage exposes a membrane-interactive domain of VP5* which effects rapid viral entry. The VP5* protein contains a single long hydrophobic domain (VP5*-HD, residues 385 to 404) at an internal site. In order to address the role of the VP5*-HD in permeabilizing cellular membranes, we analyzed the entry of o-nitrophenyl-β-d-galactopyranoside (ONPG) into cells induced to express VP5* or mutated VP5* polypeptides. Following IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) induction, VP5* and VP5* truncations containing the VP5*-HD permeabilized cells to the entry and cleavage of ONPG, while VP8* and control proteins had no effect on cellular permeability. Expression of VP5* deletions containing residues 265 to 474 or 265 to 404 permeabilized cells; however, C-terminal truncations which remove the conserved GGA (residues 399 to 401) within the HD abolished membrane permeability. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP5-HD further demonstrated a requirement for residues within the HD for VP5*-induced membrane permeability. Functional analysis of mutant VP5*s indicate that conserved glycines within the HD are required and suggest that a random coiled structure rather than the strictly hydrophobic character of the domain is required for permeability. Expressed VP5* did not alter bacterial growth kinetics or lyse bacteria following induction. Instead, VP5*-mediated size-selective membrane permeability, releasing 376-Da carboxyfluorescein but not 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran from preloaded liposomes. These findings suggest that the fundamental role for VP5* in the rotavirus entry process may be to expose triple-layered particles to low [Ca]i, which uncoats the virus, rather than to effect the detergent-like lysis of early endosomal membranes. PMID:10864647

  8. Mutations in the GM1 Binding Site of Simian Virus 40 VP1 Alter Receptor Usage and Cell Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Magaldi, Thomas G.; Buch, Michael H. C.; Murata, Haruhiko; Erickson, Kimberly D.; Neu, Ursula; Garcea, Robert L.; Peden, Keith; Stehle, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are nonenveloped viruses with capsids composed primarily of 72 pentamers of the viral VP1 protein, which forms the outer shell of the capsid and binds to cell surface oligosaccharide receptors. Highly conserved VP1 proteins from closely related polyomaviruses recognize different oligosaccharides. To determine whether amino acid changes restricted to the oligosaccharide binding site are sufficient to determine receptor specificity and how changes in receptor usage affect tropism, we studied the primate polyomavirus simian virus 40 (SV40), which uses the ganglioside GM1 as a receptor that mediates cell binding and entry. Here, we used two sequential genetic screens to isolate and characterize viable SV40 mutants with mutations in the VP1 GM1 binding site. Two of these mutants were completely resistant to GM1 neutralization, were no longer stimulated by incorporation of GM1 into cell membranes, and were unable to bind to GM1 on the cell surface. In addition, these mutant viruses displayed an infection defect in monkey cells with high levels of cell surface GM1. Interestingly, one mutant infected cells with low cell surface GM1 more efficiently than wild-type virus, apparently by utilizing a different ganglioside receptor. Our results indicate that a small number of mutations in the GM1 binding site are sufficient to alter ganglioside usage and change tropism, and they suggest that VP1 divergence is driven primarily by a requirement to accommodate specific receptors. In addition, our results suggest that GM1 binding is required for vacuole formation in permissive monkey CV-1 cells. Further study of these mutants will provide new insight into polyomavirus entry, pathogenesis, and evolution. PMID:22514351

  9. A Medicago truncatula H+-pyrophosphatase gene, MtVP1, improves sucrose accumulation and anthocyanin biosynthesis in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, J W; Wang, H Q; Xiang, W W; Chai, T Y

    2014-05-09

    We recently cloned MtVP1, a type I vacuolar-type H(+)-translocating inorganic pyrophosphatase from Medicago truncatula. In the present study, we investigated the cellular location and the function of this H(+)-PPase in Arabidopsis and potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). An MtVP1::enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion was constructed, which localized to the plasma membrane of onion epidermal cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana overexpressing MtVP1 had more robust root systems and redder shoots than wild-type (WT) plants under conditions of cold stress. Furthermore, overexpression of MtVP1 in potato accelerated the formation and growth of vegetative organs. The tuber buds and stem base of transgenic potatoes became redder than those of WT plants, but flowering was delayed by approximately half a month. Interestingly, anthocyanin biosynthesis was promoted in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings and potato tuber buds. The sucrose concentration of transgenic potato tubers and tuber buds was enhanced compared with that of WT plants. Furthermore, sucrose concentration in tubers was higher than that in tuber buds. Although there was no direct evidence to support Fuglsang's hypothetical model regarding the effects of H(+)-PPase on sucrose phloem loading, we speculated that sucrose concentration was increased in tuber buds owing to the increased concentration in tubers. Therefore, overexpressed MtVP1 enhanced sucrose accumulation of source organs, which might enhance sucrose transport to sink organs, thus affecting anthocyanin biosynthesis.

  10. A Medicago truncatula H+-pyrophosphatase gene, MtVP1, improves sucrose accumulation and anthocyanin biosynthesis in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, J W; Wang, H Q; Xiang, W W; Chai, T Y

    2014-01-01

    We recently cloned MtVP1, a type I vacuolar-type H(+)-translocating inorganic pyrophosphatase from Medicago truncatula. In the present study, we investigated the cellular location and the function of this H(+)-PPase in Arabidopsis and potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). An MtVP1::enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion was constructed, which localized to the plasma membrane of onion epidermal cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana overexpressing MtVP1 had more robust root systems and redder shoots than wild-type (WT) plants under conditions of cold stress. Furthermore, overexpression of MtVP1 in potato accelerated the formation and growth of vegetative organs. The tuber buds and stem base of transgenic potatoes became redder than those of WT plants, but flowering was delayed by approximately half a month. Interestingly, anthocyanin biosynthesis was promoted in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings and potato tuber buds. The sucrose concentration of transgenic potato tubers and tuber buds was enhanced compared with that of WT plants. Furthermore, sucrose concentration in tubers was higher than that in tuber buds. Although there was no direct evidence to support Fuglsang's hypothetical model regarding the effects of H(+)-PPase on sucrose phloem loading, we speculated that sucrose concentration was increased in tuber buds owing to the increased concentration in tubers. Therefore, overexpressed MtVP1 enhanced sucrose accumulation of source organs, which might enhance sucrose transport to sink organs, thus affecting anthocyanin biosynthesis. PMID:24854441

  11. Species H rotavirus detected in piglets with diarrhea, Brazil, 2012.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Bruna L D; Lorenzetti, Elis; Otonel, Rodrigo A A; Alfieri, Alice F; Alfieri, Amauri A

    2014-06-01

    We determined nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the rotavirus gene encoding viral protein 6 from 3 fecal samples collected from piglets with diarrhea in Brazil, 2012. The analyses showed that the porcine rotavirus strains in Brazil are closely related to the novel species H rotavirus. PMID:24855935

  12. The Role of VP1 Amino Acid Residue 145 of Enterovirus 71 in Viral Fitness and Pathogenesis in a Cynomolgus Monkey Model

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Chikako; Suzuki, Tadaki; Kotani, Osamu; Iwata-Yoshikawa, Naoko; Nagata, Noriyo; Ami, Yasushi; Wakita, Takaji; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a major causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease, occasionally causes severe neurological symptoms. We identified P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) as an EV71 receptor and found that an amino acid residue 145 in the capsid protein VP1 (VP1-145) defined PSGL-1-binding (PB) and PSGL-1-nonbinding (non-PB) phenotypes of EV71. However, the role of PSGL-1-dependent EV71 replication in neuropathogenesis remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated viral replication, genetic stability, and the pathogenicity of PB and non-PB strains of EV71 in a cynomolgus monkey model. Monkeys were intravenously inoculated with cDNA-derived PB and non-PB strains of EV71, EV71-02363-EG and EV71-02363-KE strains, respectively, with two amino acid differences at VP1-98 and VP1-145. Mild neurological symptoms, transient lymphocytopenia, and inflammatory cytokine responses, were found predominantly in the 02363-KE-inoculated monkeys. During the early stage of infection, viruses were frequently detected in clinical samples from 02363-KE-inoculated monkeys but rarely in samples from 02363-EG-inoculated monkeys. Histopathological analysis of central nervous system (CNS) tissues at 10 days postinfection revealed that 02363-KE induced neuropathogenesis more efficiently than that induced by 02363-EG. After inoculation with 02363-EG, almost all EV71 variants detected in clinical samples, CNS, and non-CNS tissues, possessed a G to E amino acid substitution at VP1-145, suggesting a strong in vivo selection of VP1-145E variants and CNS spread presumably in a PSGL-1-independent manner. EV71 variants with VP1-145G were identified only in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in two out of four 02363-EG-inoculated monkeys. Thus, VP1-145E variants are mainly responsible for the development of viremia and neuropathogenesis in a non-human primate model, further suggesting the in vivo involvement of amino acid polymorphism at VP1-145 in cell-specific viral

  13. Inflammatory and oxidative stress in rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the single leading cause of life-threatening diarrhea affecting children under 5 years of age. Rotavirus entry into the host cell seems to occur by sequential interactions between virion proteins and various cell surface molecules. The entry mechanisms seem to involve the contribution of cellular molecules having binding, chaperoning and oxido-reducing activities. It appears to be that the receptor usage and tropism of rotaviruses is determined by the species, cell line and rotavirus strain. Rotaviruses have evolved functions which can antagonize the host innate immune response, whereas are able to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling. A networking between ER stress, inflammation and oxidative stress is suggested, in which release of calcium from the ER increases the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria. Sustained ER stress potentially stimulates inflammatory response through unfolded protein response pathways. However, the detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these rotavirus-induced stressful conditions is still lacking. The signaling events triggered by host recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns offers an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with rotavirus infection. The use of N-acetylcysteine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PPARγ agonists to inhibit rotavirus infection opens a new way for treating the rotavirus-induced diarrhea and complementing vaccines. PMID:27175349

  14. VP1u phospholipase activity is critical for infectivity of full-length parvovirus B19 genomic clones.

    PubMed

    Filippone, Claudia; Zhi, Ning; Wong, Susan; Lu, Jun; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Gallinella, Giorgio; Kakkola, Laura; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Young, Neal S; Brown, Kevin E

    2008-05-10

    Three full-length genomic clones (pB19-M20, pB19-FL and pB19-HG1) of parvovirus B19 were produced in different laboratories. pB19-M20 was shown to produce infectious virus. To determine the differences in infectivity, all three plasmids were tested by transfection and infection assays. All three clones were similar in viral DNA replication, RNA transcription, and viral capsid protein production. However, only pB19-M20 and pB19-HG1 produced infectious virus. Comparison of viral sequences showed no significant differences in ITR or NS regions. In the capsid region, there was a nucleotide sequence difference conferring an amino acid substitution (E176K) in the phospholipase A2-like motif of the VP1-unique (VP1u) region. The recombinant VP1u with the E176K mutation had no catalytic activity as compared with the wild-type. When this mutation was introduced into pB19-M20, infectivity was significantly attenuated, confirming the critical role of this motif. Investigation of the original serum from which pB19-FL was cloned confirmed that the phospholipase mutation was present in the native B19 virus.

  15. VP1u phospholipase activity is critical for infectivity of full-length parvovirus B19 genomic clones✰

    PubMed Central

    Filippone, Claudia; Zhi, Ning; Wong, Susan; Lu, Jun; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Gallinella, Giorgio; Kakkola, Laura; Venermo, Maria S Söderlund; Young, Neal S.; Brown, Kevin E.

    2008-01-01

    Three full-length genomic clones (pB19-M20, pB19-FL and pB19-HG1) of parvovirus B19 were produced in different laboratories. pB19-M20 was shown to produce infectious virus. To determine the differences in infectivity, all three plasmids were tested by transfection and infection assays. All three clones were similar in viral DNA replication, RNA transcription, and viral capsid protein production. However, only pB19-M20 and pB19-HG1 produced infectious virus. Comparison of viral sequences showed no significant differences in ITR or NS regions. In the capsid region, there was a nucleotide sequence difference conferring an amino acid substitution (E176K) in the phospholipase A2-like motif of the VP1-unique (VP1u) region. The recombinant VP1u with the E176K mutation had no catalytic activity as compared with the wild-type. When this mutation was introduced into pB19-M20, infectivity was significantly attenuated, confirming the critical role of this motif. Investigation of the original serum from which pB19-FL was cloned confirmed that the phospholipase mutation was present in the native B19 virus. PMID:18252260

  16. Processing of the VP1/2A Junction Is Not Necessary for Production of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Empty Capsids and Infectious Viruses: Characterization of “Self-Tagged” Particles

    PubMed Central

    Gullberg, Maria; Polacek, Charlotta; Bøtner, Anette

    2013-01-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid protein precursor, P1-2A, is cleaved by 3Cpro to generate VP0, VP3, VP1, and the peptide 2A. The capsid proteins self-assemble into empty capsid particles or viruses which do not contain 2A. In a cell culture-adapted strain of FMDV (O1 Manisa [Lindholm]), three different amino acid substitutions (E83K, S134C, and K210E) were identified within the VP1 region of the P1-2A precursor compared to the field strain (wild type [wt]). Expression of the O1 Manisa P1-2A (wt or with the S134C substitution in VP1) plus 3Cpro, using a transient expression system, resulted in efficient capsid protein production and self-assembly of empty capsid particles. Removal of the 2A peptide from the capsid protein precursor had no effect on capsid protein processing or particle assembly. However, modification of E83K alone abrogated particle assembly with no apparent effect on protein processing. Interestingly, the K210E substitution, close to the VP1/2A junction, completely blocked processing by 3Cpro at this cleavage site, but efficient assembly of “self-tagged” empty capsid particles, containing the uncleaved VP1-2A, was observed. These self-tagged particles behaved like the unmodified empty capsids in antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and integrin receptor binding assays. Furthermore, mutant viruses with uncleaved VP1-2A could be rescued in cells from full-length FMDV RNA transcripts encoding the K210E substitution in VP1. Thus, cleavage of the VP1/2A junction is not essential for virus viability. The production of such engineered self-tagged empty capsid particles may facilitate their purification for use as diagnostic reagents and vaccines. PMID:23966400

  17. Processing of the VP1/2A junction is not necessary for production of foot-and-mouth disease virus empty capsids and infectious viruses: characterization of "self-tagged" particles.

    PubMed

    Gullberg, Maria; Polacek, Charlotta; Bøtner, Anette; Belsham, Graham J

    2013-11-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid protein precursor, P1-2A, is cleaved by 3C(pro) to generate VP0, VP3, VP1, and the peptide 2A. The capsid proteins self-assemble into empty capsid particles or viruses which do not contain 2A. In a cell culture-adapted strain of FMDV (O1 Manisa [Lindholm]), three different amino acid substitutions (E83K, S134C, and K210E) were identified within the VP1 region of the P1-2A precursor compared to the field strain (wild type [wt]). Expression of the O1 Manisa P1-2A (wt or with the S134C substitution in VP1) plus 3C(pro), using a transient expression system, resulted in efficient capsid protein production and self-assembly of empty capsid particles. Removal of the 2A peptide from the capsid protein precursor had no effect on capsid protein processing or particle assembly. However, modification of E83K alone abrogated particle assembly with no apparent effect on protein processing. Interestingly, the K210E substitution, close to the VP1/2A junction, completely blocked processing by 3C(pro) at this cleavage site, but efficient assembly of "self-tagged" empty capsid particles, containing the uncleaved VP1-2A, was observed. These self-tagged particles behaved like the unmodified empty capsids in antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and integrin receptor binding assays. Furthermore, mutant viruses with uncleaved VP1-2A could be rescued in cells from full-length FMDV RNA transcripts encoding the K210E substitution in VP1. Thus, cleavage of the VP1/2A junction is not essential for virus viability. The production of such engineered self-tagged empty capsid particles may facilitate their purification for use as diagnostic reagents and vaccines.

  18. Rotavirus Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The avian rotaviruses are members of the Reoviridae family, which is characterized by virions that contain 10-12 linear double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) segments. The Reoviridae consists of 15 genera which can be placed into two recognized subfamilies based upon the presence or absence of structural “tur...

  19. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) with a stable FLAG epitope in the VP1 G-H loop as a new tool for studying FMDV pathogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we generated a recombinant foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) particle derived from A24 Cruzeiro with a FLAG tag (DYKDDDDK) substitution in the hypervariable antigenic site of the G-H loop of the VP1 capsid protein in an effort to expand the immunogenicity of the virus particle and t...

  20. Conformational Changes in the VP1-Unique Region of Native Human Parvovirus B19 Lead to Exposure of Internal Sequences That Play a Role in Virus Neutralization and Infectivity▿

    PubMed Central

    Ros, Carlos; Gerber, Marco; Kempf, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    The unique region of the capsid protein VP1 (VP1u) of human parvovirus B19 (B19) elicits a dominant immune response and has a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity, which is necessary for the infection. In contrast to the rest of the parvoviruses, the VP1u of B19 is thought to occupy an external position in the virion, making this region a promising candidate for vaccine development. By using a monoclonal antibody against the most-N-terminal portion of VP1u, we revealed that this region rich in neutralizing epitopes is not accessible in native capsids. However, exposure of capsids to increasing temperatures or low pH led to its progressive accessibility without particle disassembly. Although unable to bind free virus or to block virus attachment to the cell, the anti-VP1u antibody was neutralizing, suggesting that the exposure of the epitope and the subsequent virus neutralization occur only after receptor attachment. The measurement of the VP1u-associated PLA2 activity of B19 capsids revealed that this region is also internal but becomes exposed in heat- and in low-pH-treated particles. In sharp contrast to native virions, the VP1u of baculovirus-derived B19 capsids was readily accessible in the absence of any treatment. These results indicate that stretches of VP1u of native B19 capsids harboring neutralizing epitopes and essential functional motifs are not external to the capsid. However, a conformational change renders these regions accessible and triggers the PLA2 potential of the virus. The results also emphasize major differences in the VP1u conformation between natural and recombinant particles. PMID:17020940

  1. Conformational changes in the VP1-unique region of native human parvovirus B19 lead to exposure of internal sequences that play a role in virus neutralization and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Ros, Carlos; Gerber, Marco; Kempf, Christoph

    2006-12-01

    The unique region of the capsid protein VP1 (VP1u) of human parvovirus B19 (B19) elicits a dominant immune response and has a phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) activity, which is necessary for the infection. In contrast to the rest of the parvoviruses, the VP1u of B19 is thought to occupy an external position in the virion, making this region a promising candidate for vaccine development. By using a monoclonal antibody against the most-N-terminal portion of VP1u, we revealed that this region rich in neutralizing epitopes is not accessible in native capsids. However, exposure of capsids to increasing temperatures or low pH led to its progressive accessibility without particle disassembly. Although unable to bind free virus or to block virus attachment to the cell, the anti-VP1u antibody was neutralizing, suggesting that the exposure of the epitope and the subsequent virus neutralization occur only after receptor attachment. The measurement of the VP1u-associated PLA(2) activity of B19 capsids revealed that this region is also internal but becomes exposed in heat- and in low-pH-treated particles. In sharp contrast to native virions, the VP1u of baculovirus-derived B19 capsids was readily accessible in the absence of any treatment. These results indicate that stretches of VP1u of native B19 capsids harboring neutralizing epitopes and essential functional motifs are not external to the capsid. However, a conformational change renders these regions accessible and triggers the PLA(2) potential of the virus. The results also emphasize major differences in the VP1u conformation between natural and recombinant particles.

  2. A Developmental Switch of Gene Expression in the Barley Seed Mediated by HvVP1 (Viviparous-1) and HvGAMYB Interactions.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Zamira; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Martínez, Manuel; Rubio-Somoza, Ignacio; Díaz, Isabel; Carbonero, Pilar; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús

    2016-04-01

    The accumulation of storage compounds in the starchy endosperm of developing cereal seeds is highly regulated at the transcriptional level. These compounds, mainly starch and proteins, are hydrolyzed upon germination to allow seedling growth. The transcription factor HvGAMYB is a master activator both in the maturation phase of seed development and upon germination, acting in combination with other transcription factors. However, the precise mechanism controlling the switch from maturation to germination programs remains unclear. We report here the identification and molecular characterization of Hordeum vulgare VIVIPAROUS1 (HvVP1), orthologous to ABA-INSENSITIVE3 from Arabidopsis thaliana HvVP1 transcripts accumulate in the endosperm and the embryo of developing seeds at early stages and in the embryo and aleurone of germinating seeds up to 24 h of imbibition. In transient expression assays, HvVP1 controls the activation of Hor2 and Amy6.4 promoters exerted by HvGAMYB. HvVP1 interacts with HvGAMYB in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the plant nuclei, hindering its interaction with other transcription factors involved in seed gene expression programs, like BPBF. Similarly, this interaction leads to a decrease in the DNA binding of HvGAMYB and the Barley Prolamine-Box binding Factor (BPBF) to their target sequences. Our results indicate that the HvVP1 expression pattern controls the full Hor2 expression activated by GAMYB and BPBF in the developing endosperm and the Amy6.4 activation in postgerminative reserve mobilization mediated by GAMYB. All these data demonstrate the participation of HvVP1 in antagonistic gene expression programs and support its central role as a gene expression switch during seed maturation and germination. PMID:26858366

  3. A Developmental Switch of Gene Expression in the Barley Seed Mediated by HvVP1 (Viviparous-1) and HvGAMYB Interactions.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Zamira; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Martínez, Manuel; Rubio-Somoza, Ignacio; Díaz, Isabel; Carbonero, Pilar; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús

    2016-04-01

    The accumulation of storage compounds in the starchy endosperm of developing cereal seeds is highly regulated at the transcriptional level. These compounds, mainly starch and proteins, are hydrolyzed upon germination to allow seedling growth. The transcription factor HvGAMYB is a master activator both in the maturation phase of seed development and upon germination, acting in combination with other transcription factors. However, the precise mechanism controlling the switch from maturation to germination programs remains unclear. We report here the identification and molecular characterization of Hordeum vulgare VIVIPAROUS1 (HvVP1), orthologous to ABA-INSENSITIVE3 from Arabidopsis thaliana HvVP1 transcripts accumulate in the endosperm and the embryo of developing seeds at early stages and in the embryo and aleurone of germinating seeds up to 24 h of imbibition. In transient expression assays, HvVP1 controls the activation of Hor2 and Amy6.4 promoters exerted by HvGAMYB. HvVP1 interacts with HvGAMYB in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the plant nuclei, hindering its interaction with other transcription factors involved in seed gene expression programs, like BPBF. Similarly, this interaction leads to a decrease in the DNA binding of HvGAMYB and the Barley Prolamine-Box binding Factor (BPBF) to their target sequences. Our results indicate that the HvVP1 expression pattern controls the full Hor2 expression activated by GAMYB and BPBF in the developing endosperm and the Amy6.4 activation in postgerminative reserve mobilization mediated by GAMYB. All these data demonstrate the participation of HvVP1 in antagonistic gene expression programs and support its central role as a gene expression switch during seed maturation and germination.

  4. The concentration of Ca2+ that solubilizes outer capsid proteins from rotavirus particles is dependent on the strain.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, M C; Charpilienne, A; Liprandi, F; Gajardo, R; Michelangeli, F; Cohen, J

    1996-08-01

    It has been previously shown that rotavirus maturation and stability of the outer capsid are calcium-dependent processes. More recently, it has been hypothesized that penetration of the cell membrane is also affected by conformational changes of the capsid induced by Ca2+. In this study, we determined quantitatively the critical concentration of calcium ion that leads to solubilization of the outer capsid proteins VP4 and VP7. Since this critical concentration is below or close to trace levels of Ca2+, we have used buffered solutions based on ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and Ca-EGTA. This method allowed us to show a very high variability of the free [Ca2+] needed to stabilize, at room temperature, the outer capsid of several rotavirus strains. This concentration is about 600 nM for the two bovine strains tested (RF and UK), 100 nM for the porcine strain OSU, and only 10 to 20 nM for the simian strain SA11. Titration of viral infectivity after incubation in buffer of defined [Ca2+] confirmed that the loss of infectivity occurs at different [Ca2+] for these three strains. For the bovine strain, the cleavage of VP4 by trypsin has no significant effect on the [Ca2+] that solubilizes outer shell proteins. The outer layer (VP7) of virus-like particles (VLP) made of recombinant proteins VP2, VP6, and VP7 (VLP2/6/7) was also solubilized by lowering the [Ca2+]. The critical concentration of Ca2+ needed to solubilize VP7 from VLP2/6/7 made of protein from the bovine strain is close to the concentration needed for the corresponding virus. Genetic analysis of this phenotype in a set of reassortant viruses from two parental strains having the phenotypes of strains OSU (porcine) and UK (bovine) confirmed that this property of viral particles is probably associated with the gene coding for VP7. The analysis of VLP by reverse genetics might allow the identification of the region(s) essential for calcium binding.

  5. The concentration of Ca2+ that solubilizes outer capsid proteins from rotavirus particles is dependent on the strain.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, M C; Charpilienne, A; Liprandi, F; Gajardo, R; Michelangeli, F; Cohen, J

    1996-01-01

    It has been previously shown that rotavirus maturation and stability of the outer capsid are calcium-dependent processes. More recently, it has been hypothesized that penetration of the cell membrane is also affected by conformational changes of the capsid induced by Ca2+. In this study, we determined quantitatively the critical concentration of calcium ion that leads to solubilization of the outer capsid proteins VP4 and VP7. Since this critical concentration is below or close to trace levels of Ca2+, we have used buffered solutions based on ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and Ca-EGTA. This method allowed us to show a very high variability of the free [Ca2+] needed to stabilize, at room temperature, the outer capsid of several rotavirus strains. This concentration is about 600 nM for the two bovine strains tested (RF and UK), 100 nM for the porcine strain OSU, and only 10 to 20 nM for the simian strain SA11. Titration of viral infectivity after incubation in buffer of defined [Ca2+] confirmed that the loss of infectivity occurs at different [Ca2+] for these three strains. For the bovine strain, the cleavage of VP4 by trypsin has no significant effect on the [Ca2+] that solubilizes outer shell proteins. The outer layer (VP7) of virus-like particles (VLP) made of recombinant proteins VP2, VP6, and VP7 (VLP2/6/7) was also solubilized by lowering the [Ca2+]. The critical concentration of Ca2+ needed to solubilize VP7 from VLP2/6/7 made of protein from the bovine strain is close to the concentration needed for the corresponding virus. Genetic analysis of this phenotype in a set of reassortant viruses from two parental strains having the phenotypes of strains OSU (porcine) and UK (bovine) confirmed that this property of viral particles is probably associated with the gene coding for VP7. The analysis of VLP by reverse genetics might allow the identification of the region(s) essential for calcium binding. PMID:8763990

  6. The Critical Role Of VP1 In Forming The Necessary Cavities For Receptor-mediated Entry Of FMDV To The Host Cell.

    PubMed

    Ashkani, Jahanshah; Rees, D J G

    2016-01-01

    The antigenic inconsistency of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is very broad, such that a vaccine made from one isolate will not offer protection against infection with other isolates from the same serotype. Viral particles (VPs) or surface exposed capsid proteins, VP1-VP3, of FMDV determine both the antigenicity of the virus and its receptor-mediated entry into the host cell. Therefore, modifications of these structural proteins may alter the properties of the virus. Here we show putative cavities on the FMDV-SAT1 (FMDV Southern African Territories1) capsid as possible binding sites for the receptor-mediated viral entry into the host cell. We identified three possible cavities on the FMDV capsid surface, from which the largest one (C2) is shaped in the contact regions of VP1-VP3. Our results demonstrate the significance of VP1, in the formation of FMDV-SAT1 surface cavities, which is the main component in all the identified cavities. Our findings can have profound implications in the protein engineering of FMDV in the contact region of VP1-VP3 found to be embedded in several cavities. Such information is of great significance in the context of vaccine design, as it provides the ground for future improvement of synthetic vaccines to control FMD caused by FMDV-SAT1 serotypes. PMID:27249937

  7. The Critical Role Of VP1 In Forming The Necessary Cavities For Receptor-mediated Entry Of FMDV To The Host Cell

    PubMed Central

    Ashkani, Jahanshah; Rees, D. J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The antigenic inconsistency of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is very broad, such that a vaccine made from one isolate will not offer protection against infection with other isolates from the same serotype. Viral particles (VPs) or surface exposed capsid proteins, VP1–VP3, of FMDV determine both the antigenicity of the virus and its receptor-mediated entry into the host cell. Therefore, modifications of these structural proteins may alter the properties of the virus. Here we show putative cavities on the FMDV-SAT1 (FMDV Southern African Territories1) capsid as possible binding sites for the receptor-mediated viral entry into the host cell. We identified three possible cavities on the FMDV capsid surface, from which the largest one (C2) is shaped in the contact regions of VP1–VP3. Our results demonstrate the significance of VP1, in the formation of FMDV-SAT1 surface cavities, which is the main component in all the identified cavities. Our findings can have profound implications in the protein engineering of FMDV in the contact region of VP1–VP3 found to be embedded in several cavities. Such information is of great significance in the context of vaccine design, as it provides the ground for future improvement of synthetic vaccines to control FMD caused by FMDV-SAT1 serotypes. PMID:27249937

  8. Identification of the two rotavirus genes determining neutralization specificities

    SciTech Connect

    Offit, P.A.; Blavat, G.

    1986-01-01

    Bovine rotavirus NCDV and simian rotavirus SA-11 represent two distinct rotavirus serotypes. A genetic approach was used to determine which viral gene segments segregated with serotype-specific viral neutralization. There were 16 reassortant rotarviruses derived by coinfection of MA-104 cells in vitro with the SA-11 and NCDV strains. The parental origin of reassortant rotavirus double-stranded RNA segments was determined by gene segment mobility in polyacrylamide gels and by hybridization with radioactively labeled parental viral transcripts. The authors found that two rotavirus gene segments found previously to code for outer capsid proteins vp3 and vp7 cosegreated with virus neutralization specificities.

  9. Crystal structure of the C-terminal 2’,5’-phosphodiesterase domain of group A rotavirus protein VP3

    PubMed Central

    Brandmann, Tobias; Jinek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In response to viral infections, the mammalian innate immune system induces the production of the second messenger 2’-5’ oligoadenylate (2–5A) to activate latent ribonuclease L (RNase L) that restricts viral replication and promotes apoptosis. A subset of rotaviruses and coronaviruses encode 2’,5’-phosphodiesterase enzymes that hydrolyze 2–5A, thereby inhibiting RNase L activation. We report the crystal structure of the 2’,5’-phosphodiesterase domain of group A rotavirus protein VP3 at 1.39 Å resolution. The structure exhibits a 2H phosphoesterase fold and reveals conserved active site residues, providing insights into the mechanism of 2–5A degradation in viral evasion of host innate immunity. PMID:25758703

  10. Combined 5' UTR RFLP analysis and VP1 sequencing for epidemic investigation of enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Kyriakopoulou, Zaharoula; Tsolis, Kostas; Pliaka, Vaia; Tsakogiannis, Dimitris; Ruether, Irina Georgia Anna; Gartzonika, Constantina; Levidiotou-Stefanou, Stamatina; Markoulatos, Panayotis

    2013-01-01

    Enteroviruses, the main cause of aseptic meningitis, consist of 100 serotypes, and many of them have been associated with large outbreaks. In the present study, a comparison of RFLP analysis of the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) and sequencing of both the 5'UTR and VP1 regions was conducted for epidemiological linkage of 27 clinical enterovirus strains. The clinical enterovirus strains were clustered into five restriction profile groups. Even though the restriction profile clusters of clinical isolates were not related to those of the respective prototype strains, epidemiological relationships between the members of each cluster were observed. The restriction profile clusters in the 5'UTR corresponded to the phylogenetic clusters in the VP1 genomic region. The incongruence between the topology of Gior strain in 5'UTR and VP1 phylogenetic trees indicates a recombination event. The proposed RFLP assay in combination with VP1 sequencing can offer crucial epidemiological information about the circulating enteroviruses.

  11. Rotavirus disrupts cytoplasmic P bodies during infection.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Rahul; Mukherjee, Arpita; Patra, Upayan; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta

    2015-12-01

    Cytoplasmic Processing bodies (P bodies), the RNA-protein aggregation foci of translationally stalled and potentially decaying mRNA, have been reported to be differentially modulated by viruses. Rotavirus, the causative agent of acute infantile gastroenteritis is a double stranded RNA virus which completes its entire life-cycle exclusively in host cell cytoplasm. In this study, the fate of P bodies was investigated upon rotavirus infection. It was found that P bodies get disrupted during rotavirus infection. The disruption occurred by more than one different mechanism where deadenylating P body component Pan3 was degraded by rotavirus NSP1 and exonuclease XRN1 along with the decapping enzyme hDCP1a were relocalized from cytoplasm to nucleus. Overall the study highlights decay and subcellular relocalization of P body components as novel mechanisms by which rotavirus subverts cellular antiviral responses.

  12. Analysis of Human Rotaviruses from a Single Location Over an 18-Year Time Span Suggests that Protein Coadaption Influences Gene Constellations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; McDonald, Paul W.; Thompson, Travis A.; Dennis, Allison F.; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Patton, John T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rotaviruses (RVs) are 11-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses that cause severe gastroenteritis in children. In addition to an error-prone genome replication mechanism, RVs can increase their genetic diversity by reassorting genes during host coinfection. Such exchanges allow RVs to acquire advantageous genes and adapt in the face of selective pressures. However, reassortment may also impose fitness costs if it unlinks genes/proteins that have accumulated compensatory, coadaptive mutations and that operate best when kept together. To better understand human RV evolutionary dynamics, we analyzed the genome sequences of 135 strains (genotype G1/G3/G4-P[8]-I1-C1-R1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1) that were collected at a single location in Washington, DC, during the years 1974 to 1991. Intragenotypic phylogenetic trees were constructed for each viral gene using the nucleotide sequences, thereby defining novel allele level gene constellations (GCs) and illuminating putative reassortment events. The results showed that RVs with distinct GCs cocirculated during the vast majority of the collection years and that some of these GCs persisted in the community unchanged by reassortment. To investigate the influence of protein coadaptation on GC maintenance, we performed a mutual information-based analysis of the concatenated amino acid sequences and identified an extensive covariance network. Unexpectedly, amino acid covariation was highest between VP4 and VP2, which are structural components of the RV virion that are not thought to directly interact. These results suggest that GCs may be influenced by the selective constraints placed on functionally coadapted, albeit noninteracting, viral proteins. This work raises important questions about mutation-reassortment interplay and its impact on human RV evolution. IMPORTANCE Rotaviruses are devastating human pathogens that cause severe diarrhea and kill >450,000 children each year. The virus can evolve by accumulating mutations and by

  13. Evidence for genetic linkage between the gene segments encoding NSP4 and VP6 proteins in common and reassortant human rotavirus strains.

    PubMed

    Iturriza-Gòmara, Miren; Anderton, Emma; Kang, Gagandeep; Gallimore, Chris; Phillips, Wendy; Desselberger, Ulrich; Gray, Jim

    2003-08-01

    NSP4-encoding genes of 78 human rotavirus strains of common or reassortant genotypes were characterized by reverse transcription-PCR followed by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. It was found that all the human strains characterized clustered into only two of the five known NSP4 genotypes. Linkage between NSP4 genotypes and VP6 subgroups was 100%, NSP4 genotype A being linked to VP6 of subgroup I (SGI) and NSP4 of genotype B being linked to VP6 of SGII. The diversity among the NSP4- and VP6-encoding genes was significantly less than that among the VP7 and VP4 genes in cocirculating human rotavirus strains. Whereas G and P types appear to be shared among different animal species and humans, the NSP4- and VP6-encoding genes appear to segregate according to their host of origin, suggesting that these two proteins may be host restriction determinants. The NSP4-VP6 association may be structurally determined during rotavirus replication (morphogenesis).

  14. Mimicking filtration and transport of rotavirus and adenovirus in sand media using DNA-labeled, protein-coated silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pang, Liping; Farkas, Kata; Bennett, Grant; Varsani, Arvind; Easingwood, Richard; Tilley, Richard; Nowostawska, Urszula; Lin, Susan

    2014-10-01

    Rotavirus (RoV) and adenovirus (AdV) are important viral pathogens for the risk analysis of drinking water. Despite this, little is known about their retention and transport behaviors in porous media due to a lack of representative surrogates. We developed RoV and AdV surrogates by covalently coupling 70-nm sized silica nanoparticles with specific proteins and a DNA marker for sensitive detection. Filtration experiments using beach sand columns demonstrated the similarity of the surrogates' concentrations, filtration efficiencies and attachment kinetics to those of the target viruses. The surrogates showed the same magnitude of concentration reduction as the viruses. Conversely, MS2 phage (a traditional virus model) over-predicted concentrations of AdV and RoV by 1- and 2-orders of magnitude respectively. The surrogates remained stable in size, surface charge and DNA concentration for at least one year. They can be easily and rapidly detected down to a single particle. Preliminary tests suggest that they were readily detectable in a number of environmental waters and treated effluent. With up-scaling validation in pilot trials, the surrogates developed here could be a cost-effective new tool for studying virus retention and transport in porous media. Examples include assessing filter efficacy in water and wastewater treatment, tracking virus migration in groundwater after effluent land disposal, and establishing safe setback distances for groundwater protection. PMID:24954130

  15. Mimicking Retention and Transport of Rotavirus and Adenovirus in Sand Media Using DNA-labeled, Protein-coated Silica Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Liping; Farkas, Kata; Bennett, Grant; Varsani, Arvind; Easingwood, Richard; Tilley, Richard; Nowostawska, Urszula; Lin, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Rotavirus (RoV) and adenovirus (AdV) are important viral pathogens for the risk analysis of drinking water. Despite this, little is known about their retention and transport behaviors in porous media (e.g. sand filtered used for water treatment and groundwater aquifers due to a lack of representative surrogates. In this study, we developed RoV and AdV surrogates by covalently coating 70-nm sized silica nanoparticles with specific proteins and a DNA marker for sensitive detection. Filtration experiments using beach sand columns demonstrated the similarity of the surrogates' concentrations, attachment, and filtration efficiencies to the target viruses. The surrogates showed the same magnitude of concentration reduction as the viruses. Conversely, MS2 phage (a traditional virus model) over predicted concentrations of AdV and RoV by 1- and 2-orders of magnitude, respectively. The surrogates remained stable in size, surface charge and DNA concentration for at least one year. They can be easily and rapidly detected at concentrations down to one particle per PCR reaction and are readily detectable in natural waters and even in effluent. With up-scaling validation in pilot trials, the surrogates can be a useful cost-effective new tool for studying virus retention and transport in porous media, e.g. for assessing filter efficiency in water and wastewater treatment, tracking virus migration in groundwater after effluent land disposal, and establishing safe setback distances for groundwater protection.

  16. Immune responses elicited against rotavirus middle layer protein VP6 inhibit viral replication in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Suvi; Pastor, Ana Ruth; Tamminen, Kirsi; López-Guerrero, Vanessa; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Palomares, Laura A; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is a common cause of severe gastroenteritis (GE) in children worldwide. Live oral RV vaccines protect against severe RVGE, but the immune correlates of protection are not yet clearly defined. Inner capsid VP6 protein is a highly conserved, abundant, and immunogenic RV protein, and VP6-specific mucosal antibodies, especially IgA, have been implicated to protect against viral challenge in mice. In the present study systemic and mucosal IgG and IgA responses were induced by immunizing BALB/c mice intranasally with a combination of recombinant RV VP6 protein (subgroup II [SGII]) and norovirus (NoV) virus-like particles (VLPs) used in a candidate vaccine. Following immunization mice were challenged orally with murine RV strain EDIMwt (SG non-I-non-II, G3P10[16]). In order to determine neutralizing activity of fecal samples, sera, and vaginal washes (VW) against human Wa RV (SGII, G1P1A[8]) and rhesus RV (SGI, G3P5B[3]), the RV antigen production was measured with an ELISA-based antigen reduction neutralization assay. Only VWs of immunized mice inhibited replication of both RVs, indicating heterotypic protection of induced antibodies. IgA antibody depletion and blocking experiments using recombinant VP6 confirmed that neutralization was mediated by anti-VP6 IgA antibodies. Most importantly, after the RV challenge significant reduction in viral shedding was observed in feces of immunized mice. These results suggest a significant role for mucosal RV VP6-specific IgA for the inhibition of RV replication in vitro and in vivo. In addition, these results underline the importance of non-serotype-specific immunity induced by the conserved subgroup-specific RV antigen VP6 in clearance of RV infection. PMID:25424814

  17. Peptide-Recombinant VP6 Protein Based Enzyme Immunoassay for the Detection of Group A Rotaviruses in Multiple Host Species

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Subhankar; Saurabh, Sharad; Gulati, Baldev R.; Singh, Neeraj; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Joshi, Vinay G.; Banyai, Krisztian; Dhama, Kuldeep

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel enzyme immunoassay for the detection of group A rotavirus (RVA) antigen in fecal samples of multiple host species. The assay is based on the detection of conserved VP6 protein using anti-recombinant VP6 antibodies as capture antibodies and anti-multiple antigenic peptide (identified and constructed from highly immunodominant epitopes within VP6 protein) antibodies as detector antibodies. The clinical utility of the assay was evaluated using a panel of 914 diarrhoeic fecal samples from four different host species (bovine, porcine, poultry and human) collected from diverse geographical locations in India. Using VP6- based reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) as the gold standard, we found that the diagnostic sensitivity (DSn) and specificity (DSp) of the new assay was high [bovine (DSn = 94.2% & DSp = 100%); porcine (DSn = 94.6% & DSp = 93.3%); poultry (DSn = 74.2% & DSp = 97.7%) and human (DSn = 82.1% & DSp = 98.7%)]. The concordance with RT-PCR was also high [weighted kappa (k) = 0.831–0.956 at 95% CI = 0.711–1.0] as compared to RNA-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (RNA-PAGE). The performance characteristics of the new immunoassay were comparable to those of the two commercially available ELISA kits. Our results suggest that this peptide-recombinant protein based assay may serve as a preliminary assay for epidemiological surveillance of RVA antigen and for evaluation of vaccine effectiveness especially in low and middle income settings. PMID:27391106

  18. Immune responses elicited against rotavirus middle layer protein VP6 inhibit viral replication in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lappalainen, Suvi; Pastor, Ana Ruth; Tamminen, Kirsi; López-Guerrero, Vanessa; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Palomares, Laura A; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is a common cause of severe gastroenteritis (GE) in children worldwide. Live oral RV vaccines protect against severe RVGE, but the immune correlates of protection are not yet clearly defined. Inner capsid VP6 protein is a highly conserved, abundant, and immunogenic RV protein, and VP6-specific mucosal antibodies, especially IgA, have been implicated to protect against viral challenge in mice. In the present study systemic and mucosal IgG and IgA responses were induced by immunizing BALB/c mice intranasally with a combination of recombinant RV VP6 protein (subgroup II [SGII]) and norovirus (NoV) virus-like particles (VLPs) used in a candidate vaccine. Following immunization mice were challenged orally with murine RV strain EDIMwt (SG non-I-non-II, G3P10[16]). In order to determine neutralizing activity of fecal samples, sera, and vaginal washes (VW) against human Wa RV (SGII, G1P1A[8]) and rhesus RV (SGI, G3P5B[3]), the RV antigen production was measured with an ELISA-based antigen reduction neutralization assay. Only VWs of immunized mice inhibited replication of both RVs, indicating heterotypic protection of induced antibodies. IgA antibody depletion and blocking experiments using recombinant VP6 confirmed that neutralization was mediated by anti-VP6 IgA antibodies. Most importantly, after the RV challenge significant reduction in viral shedding was observed in feces of immunized mice. These results suggest a significant role for mucosal RV VP6-specific IgA for the inhibition of RV replication in vitro and in vivo. In addition, these results underline the importance of non-serotype-specific immunity induced by the conserved subgroup-specific RV antigen VP6 in clearance of RV infection. PMID:25424814

  19. Sequence analysis of the foot and mouth disease virus type O/IRN/2007 VP1 gene from Iranian isolate.

    PubMed

    Soleimanjahi, H; Motamedi Sedeh, F; Jalilian, A R; Mahravani, H

    2013-01-01

    The foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a vesicular and contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. In this study, the virus was isolated from vesicles of the infected cattle using cell culture and serotyped by ELISA test. The extracted RNA from the infected cells was reverse transcribed and amplified using VP1 gene-specific primer pairs by means of one-step RT-PCR. The purified VP1 gene was sub-cloned into the uniqe KpnI and BamHI cloning sites of the pcDNA3.1+ vector. The DH5α strain of E. coli was transformed by the vector. The sequences of sub-cloned FMDV type O/IRN/2007 VP1 were aligned with FMDV type O/UKG/2001 VP1 using MegAlign software. Nucleotide sequence comparisons were made using the BLAST software available from the NCBI website. The amino acid sequences of three sub-cloned FMDV type O/IRN/2007 VP1 were also aligned with three other similar sequences using MegAlign software. Nineteen of the most similar VP1 nucleotide sequences (by BLASTN program), FMDV O/IRN/2007 VP1 sequence, twenty isolates of FMDV-O VP1 in Iran and eight topotypes of FMDV type O were aligned by Mega5 to create a FMDV-O VP1-based sequence similarity tree. The nucleotide sequence comparison indicated that FMDV O/ IRN/2007 VP1 had the greatest nucleotide sequence similarity to the VP1 gene of FMDV O1/Manisa/Turkey/69 (99%), FMDV O1/Manisa/Netherlands (98%) and FMDV O1/Manisa/iso87/Turkey (98%). It was also observed that the highest identity between FMDV O/IRN/2007 VP1 sequence and other nucleotide sequences of FMDV type O VP1 genes isolated in Iran during 1997-2004 was about 91%.

  20. Cooperative effect of the VP1 amino acids 98E, 145A and 169F in the productive infection of mouse cell lines by enterovirus 71 (BS strain).

    PubMed

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Meng, Tao; Chow, Vincent Tk; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotrophic virus that causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and occasional neurological infection among children. It infects primate cells but not rodent cells, primarily due to the incompatibility between the virus and the expressed form of its receptor, scavenger receptor class B member 2 (SCARB2) protein, on rodent cells (mSCARB2). We previously generated adapted strains (EV71:TLLm and EV71:TLLmv) that were shown to productively infect primate and rodent cell lines and whose genomes exhibited a multitude of non-synonymous mutations compared with the EV71:BS parental virus. In this study, we aimed to identify mutations that are necessary for productive infection of murine cells by EV71:BS. Using reverse genetics and site-directed mutagenesis, we constructed EV71 infectious clones with specific mutations that generated amino acid substitutions in the capsid VP1 and VP2 proteins. We subsequently assessed the infection induced by clone-derived viruses (CDVs) in mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH/3T3 and murine neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cell lines. We found that the CDV:BS-VP1(K98E,E145A,L169F) with three substitutions in the VP1 protein-K98E, E145A and L169F-productively infected both mouse cell lines for at least three passages of the virus in murine cells. Moreover, the virus gained the ability to utilize the mSCARB2 protein to infect murine cell lines. These results demonstrate that the three VP1 residues cooperate to effectively interact with the mSCARB2 protein on murine cells and permit the virus to infect murine cells. Gain-of-function studies similar to the present work provide valuable insight into the mutational trajectory required for EV71 to infect new host cells previously non-susceptible to infection. PMID:27329847

  1. Cooperative effect of the VP1 amino acids 98E, 145A and 169F in the productive infection of mouse cell lines by enterovirus 71 (BS strain)

    PubMed Central

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Meng, Tao; Chow, Vincent TK; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotrophic virus that causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and occasional neurological infection among children. It infects primate cells but not rodent cells, primarily due to the incompatibility between the virus and the expressed form of its receptor, scavenger receptor class B member 2 (SCARB2) protein, on rodent cells (mSCARB2). We previously generated adapted strains (EV71:TLLm and EV71:TLLmv) that were shown to productively infect primate and rodent cell lines and whose genomes exhibited a multitude of non-synonymous mutations compared with the EV71:BS parental virus. In this study, we aimed to identify mutations that are necessary for productive infection of murine cells by EV71:BS. Using reverse genetics and site-directed mutagenesis, we constructed EV71 infectious clones with specific mutations that generated amino acid substitutions in the capsid VP1 and VP2 proteins. We subsequently assessed the infection induced by clone-derived viruses (CDVs) in mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH/3T3 and murine neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cell lines. We found that the CDV:BS-VP1K98E,E145A,L169F with three substitutions in the VP1 protein—K98E, E145A and L169F—productively infected both mouse cell lines for at least three passages of the virus in murine cells. Moreover, the virus gained the ability to utilize the mSCARB2 protein to infect murine cell lines. These results demonstrate that the three VP1 residues cooperate to effectively interact with the mSCARB2 protein on murine cells and permit the virus to infect murine cells. Gain-of-function studies similar to the present work provide valuable insight into the mutational trajectory required for EV71 to infect new host cells previously non-susceptible to infection. PMID:27329847

  2. The N-Terminal of Aquareovirus NS80 Is Required for Interacting with Viral Proteins and Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Hong; Chen, Qingxiu; Zhang, Fuxian; Fang, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Reovirus replication and assembly occurs within viral inclusion bodies that formed in specific intracellular compartments of cytoplasm in infected cells. Previous study indicated that aquareovirus NS80 is able to form inclusion bodies, and also can retain viral proteins within its inclusions. To better understand how NS80 performed in viral replication and assembly, the functional regions of NS80 associated with other viral proteins in aquareovirus replication were investigated in this study. Deletion mutational analysis and rotavirus NSP5-based protein association platform were used to detect association regions. Immunofluorescence images indicated that different N-terminal regions of NS80 could associate with viral proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 and NS38. Further co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the interaction between VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 with different regions covering the N-terminal amino acid (aa, 1–471) of NS80, respectively. Moreover, removal of NS80 N-terminal sequences required for interaction with proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 not only prevented the capacity of NS80 to support viral replication in NS80 shRNA-based replication complementation assays, but also inhibited the expression of aquareovirus proteins, suggesting that N-terminal regions of NS80 are necessary for viral replication. These results provided a foundational basis for further understanding the role of NS80 in viral replication and assembly during aquareovirus infection. PMID:26871941

  3. Substantial Receptor-induced Structural Rearrangement of Rotavirus VP8*: Potential Implications for Cross-Species Infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing; Mishra, Rahul; Holloway, Gavan; von Itzstein, Mark; Coulson, Barbara S; Blanchard, Helen

    2015-10-12

    Rotavirus-cell binding is the essential first step in rotavirus infection. This binding is a major determinant of rotavirus tropism, as host cell invasion is necessary to initiate infection. Initial rotavirus-cell interactions are mediated by carbohydrate-recognizing domain VP8* of the rotavirus capsid spike protein VP4. Here, we report the first observation of significant structural rearrangement of VP8* from human and animal rotavirus strains upon glycan receptor binding. The structural adaptability of rotavirus VP8* delivers important insights into how human and animal rotaviruses utilize the wider range of cellular glycans identified as VP8* binding partners. Furthermore, our studies on rotaviruses with atypical genetic makeup provide information expected to be critical for understanding the mechanisms of animal rotavirus gene emergence in humans and support implementation of epidemiologic surveillance of animal reservoirs as well as future vaccination schemes.

  4. Substantial Receptor-induced Structural Rearrangement of Rotavirus VP8*: Potential Implications for Cross-Species Infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing; Mishra, Rahul; Holloway, Gavan; von Itzstein, Mark; Coulson, Barbara S; Blanchard, Helen

    2015-10-12

    Rotavirus-cell binding is the essential first step in rotavirus infection. This binding is a major determinant of rotavirus tropism, as host cell invasion is necessary to initiate infection. Initial rotavirus-cell interactions are mediated by carbohydrate-recognizing domain VP8* of the rotavirus capsid spike protein VP4. Here, we report the first observation of significant structural rearrangement of VP8* from human and animal rotavirus strains upon glycan receptor binding. The structural adaptability of rotavirus VP8* delivers important insights into how human and animal rotaviruses utilize the wider range of cellular glycans identified as VP8* binding partners. Furthermore, our studies on rotaviruses with atypical genetic makeup provide information expected to be critical for understanding the mechanisms of animal rotavirus gene emergence in humans and support implementation of epidemiologic surveillance of animal reservoirs as well as future vaccination schemes. PMID:26250751

  5. Identification of an exposed region of the immunogenic capsid polypeptide VP1 on foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, B H; Moore, D M; Grubman, M J; Kleid, D G

    1983-01-01

    Iodination of intact foot-and-mouth disease virus results in the selective labeling of VP1, substantiating its exposed location on the virion. A comparison of tryptic peptides revealed that a single tyrosine-containing peptide was labeled with iodine on intact or protease-cleaved virus. The labeled peptide from intact and protease-cleaved virus was characterized by molecular weight sizing and sequence analysis. Carboxypeptidase digestion of intact VP1, limited trypsin-cleaved VP1, and VP1 purified from bacterially contaminated tissue cultures yielded carboxyterminal residues of leucine, valine-arginine, and serine-alanine, respectively. The correlation of these findings with previous data on the amino acid sequence derived from nucleotide sequencing of serotypes A12 and O1 of foot-and-mouth disease virus VP1 places the probable exposed antigenic region of VP1 in a serotype-variable region including residues 136 through 144. Images PMID:6186823

  6. Development of a subunit vaccine containing recombinant chicken anemia virus VP1 and pigeon IFN-γ.

    PubMed

    Shen, Sin Ying; Chang, Wei Chun; Yi, Hsiang Heng; Tsai, Shinn-Shong; Liu, Hung Jen; Liao, Pei-Chun; Chuang, Kuo Pin

    2015-10-15

    Chicken anemia virus (CAV) is a severe threat to the chicken industry and causes heavy economic losses worldwide. In this study, we evaluated the immune response and protective efficacy provided by a subunit vaccine containing recombinant VP1 (rVP1) and pigeon interferon-γ (rPiIFN-γ). Results indicated that rPiIFN-γ enhanced humoral immunity elicited by rVP1 as early as 10 day after primary immunization and reach the high titer after secondary immunization. When compared to chickens immunized with rVP1, inactivated vaccine, chickens immunized with rVP1+rPiIFN-γ showed faster and higher levels (p<0.05) of antibody titer. The CAV challenge result showed that the rVP1+rPiIFN-γ vaccine prevent the reducing of hematocrit values in comparison with the rVP1 or inactivated groups. The relative fold inductions of mRNA expression of Th1-type (IFN-γ), but not Th2-type (IL-4) cytokines in splenocytes isolated from chickens immunized with rVP1+rPiIFN-γ were significantly higher than those of the rVP1 or inactivated vaccine groups. In conclusion, our study found that rPiIFN-γ can enhance both humoral and cellular immunity elicited by an rVP1 vaccine. The rVP1+rPiIFN-γ vaccine may provide a new strategy vaccine against CAV in chicken.

  7. Synthetic peptides against foot-and-mouth disease--immunization with VP1-peptides of type O1-Kaufbeuren.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, H; Holl, U; Reimann, I; Nöckler, A; Schäfer, D; Thalmann, G; Dölling, R

    1990-01-01

    Coupled synthetic peptides, representing the sequences of amino acids 130-160, 141-160 and 145-160 of foot-and-mouth disease virus O1K protein VP1, induced virus-binding and virus-neutralizing antibody response in guinea pigs, rabbits, and pigs. We also detected antibody response in guinea pigs after immunization with uncoupled peptides and in cattle with 21 aa-peptide-Keyhole-limpet hemocyanin (-KLH). The best results were obtained from 21 aa-peptide-KLH and 31 aa-peptide with or without KLH or thyroglobulin as carrier. Our preliminary results show the induction of virus-neutralizing antibodies to be obviously influenced by length of the peptide as well as by the kind of carrier and coupling. PMID:1966360

  8. Engineered Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG expressing IgG-binding domains of protein G: Capture of hyperimmune bovine colostrum antibodies and protection against diarrhea in a mouse pup rotavirus infection model.

    PubMed

    Günaydın, Gökçe; Zhang, Ran; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold

    2014-01-16

    Rotavirus-induced diarrhea causes more than 500,000 deaths annually in the world, and although vaccines are being made available, new effective treatment strategies should still be considered. Purified antibodies derived from hyperimmune bovine colostrum (HBC), from cows immunized with rotavirus, were previously used for treatment of rotavirus diarrhea in children. A combination of HBC antibodies and a probiotic strain of Lactobacillus (L. rhamnosus GG) was also found to be more effective than HBC alone in reducing diarrhea in a mouse model of rotavirus infection. In order to further improve this form of treatment, L. rhamnosus GG was engineered to display surface expressed IgG-binding domains of protein G (GB1, GB2, and GB3) which capture HBC-derived IgG antibodies (HBC-IgG) and thus target rotavirus. The expression of IgG-binding domains on the surface of the bacteria as well as their binding to HBC-IgG and to rotavirus (simian strain RRV) was demonstrated by Western blot, flow cytometry, and electron microscopy. The prophylactic effect of engineered L. rhamnosus GG and anti-rotaviral activity of HBC antibodies was evaluated in a mouse pup model of RRV infection. The combination therapy with engineered L. rhamnosus GG (PG3) and HBC was significantly more effective in reducing the prevalence, severity, and duration of diarrhea in comparison to HBC alone or a combination of wild-type L. rhamnosus GG and HBC. The new therapy reduces the effective dose of HBC between 10 to 100-fold and may thus decrease treatment costs. This antibody capturing platform, tested here for the first time in vivo, could potentially be used to target additional gastrointestinal pathogens. PMID:24291196

  9. Engineered Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG expressing IgG-binding domains of protein G: Capture of hyperimmune bovine colostrum antibodies and protection against diarrhea in a mouse pup rotavirus infection model.

    PubMed

    Günaydın, Gökçe; Zhang, Ran; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold

    2014-01-16

    Rotavirus-induced diarrhea causes more than 500,000 deaths annually in the world, and although vaccines are being made available, new effective treatment strategies should still be considered. Purified antibodies derived from hyperimmune bovine colostrum (HBC), from cows immunized with rotavirus, were previously used for treatment of rotavirus diarrhea in children. A combination of HBC antibodies and a probiotic strain of Lactobacillus (L. rhamnosus GG) was also found to be more effective than HBC alone in reducing diarrhea in a mouse model of rotavirus infection. In order to further improve this form of treatment, L. rhamnosus GG was engineered to display surface expressed IgG-binding domains of protein G (GB1, GB2, and GB3) which capture HBC-derived IgG antibodies (HBC-IgG) and thus target rotavirus. The expression of IgG-binding domains on the surface of the bacteria as well as their binding to HBC-IgG and to rotavirus (simian strain RRV) was demonstrated by Western blot, flow cytometry, and electron microscopy. The prophylactic effect of engineered L. rhamnosus GG and anti-rotaviral activity of HBC antibodies was evaluated in a mouse pup model of RRV infection. The combination therapy with engineered L. rhamnosus GG (PG3) and HBC was significantly more effective in reducing the prevalence, severity, and duration of diarrhea in comparison to HBC alone or a combination of wild-type L. rhamnosus GG and HBC. The new therapy reduces the effective dose of HBC between 10 to 100-fold and may thus decrease treatment costs. This antibody capturing platform, tested here for the first time in vivo, could potentially be used to target additional gastrointestinal pathogens.

  10. Role of sialic acids in rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Isa, Pavel; Arias, Carlos F; López, Susana

    2006-02-01

    Rotaviruses are the leading cause of childhood diarrhea. The entry of rotaviruses into the host cell is a complex process that includes several interactions of the outer layer proteins of the virus with different cell surface molecules. The fact that neuraminidase treatment of the cells, or preincubation of the virus with sialic acid-containing compounds decrease the infectivity of some rotavirus strains, suggested that these viruses interact with sialic acid on the cell surface. The infectivity of some other rotavirus strains is not affected by neuraminidase treatment of the cells, and therefore they are considered neuraminidase-resistant. However, the current evidence suggests that even these neuraminidase-resistant strains might interact with sialic acids located in context different from that of the sialic acids used by the neuraminidase-sensitive strains. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the rotavirus-sialic acid interaction, its structural basis, the specificity with which distinct rotavirus isolates interact with sialic acid-containing compounds, and also the potential use of these compounds as therapeutic agents.

  11. Crystallographic and Glycan Microarray Analysis of Human Polyomavirus 9 VP1 Identifies N-Glycolyl Neuraminic Acid as a Receptor Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zaigham Mahmood; Liu, Yan; Neu, Ursula; Gilbert, Michel; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human polyomavirus 9 (HPyV9) is a closely related homologue of simian B-lymphotropic polyomavirus (LPyV). In order to define the architecture and receptor binding properties of HPyV9, we solved high-resolution crystal structures of its major capsid protein, VP1, in complex with three putative oligosaccharide receptors identified by glycan microarray screening. Comparison of the properties of HPyV9 VP1 with the known structure and glycan-binding properties of LPyV VP1 revealed that both viruses engage short sialylated oligosaccharides, but small yet important differences in specificity were detected. Surprisingly, HPyV9 VP1 preferentially binds sialyllactosamine compounds terminating in 5-N-glycolyl neuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) over those terminating in 5-N-acetyl neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), whereas LPyV does not exhibit such a preference. The structural analysis demonstrated that HPyV9 makes specific contacts, via hydrogen bonds, with the extra hydroxyl group present in Neu5Gc. An equivalent hydrogen bond cannot be formed by LPyV VP1. IMPORTANCE The most common sialic acid in humans is 5-N-acetyl neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), but various modifications give rise to more than 50 different sialic acid variants that decorate the cell surface. Unlike most mammals, humans cannot synthesize the sialic acid variant 5-N-glycolyl neuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) due to a gene defect. Humans can, however, still acquire this compound from dietary sources. The role of Neu5Gc in receptor engagement and in defining viral tropism is only beginning to emerge, and structural analyses defining the differences in specificity for Neu5Ac and Neu5Gc are still rare. Using glycan microarray screening and high-resolution protein crystallography, we have examined the receptor specificity of a recently discovered human polyomavirus, HPyV9, and compared it to that of the closely related simian polyomavirus LPyV. Our study highlights critical differences in the specificities of both viruses

  12. Rotavirus vaccines: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Midthun, K; Kapikian, A Z

    1996-01-01

    Rotavirus vaccine development has focused on the delivery of live attenuated rotavirus strains by the oral route. The initial "Jennerian" approach involving bovine (RIT4237, WC3) or rhesus (RRV) rotavirus vaccine candidates showed that these vaccines were safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic but induced highly variable rates of protection against rotavirus diarrhea. The goal of a rotavirus vaccine is to prevent severe illness that can lead to dehydration in infants and young children in both developed and developing countries. These studies led to the concept that a multivalent vaccine that represented each of the four epidemiologically important VP7 serotypes might be necessary to induce protection in young infants, the target population for vaccination. Human-animal rotavirus reassortants whose gene encoding VP7 was derived from their human rotavirus parent but whose remaining genes were derived from the animal rotavirus parent were developed as vaccine candidates. The greatest experience with a multivalent vaccine to date has been gained with the quadrivalent preparation containing RRV (VP7 serotype 3) and human-RRV reassortants of VP7 serotype 1, 2, and 4 specificity. Preliminary efficacy trial results in the United States have been promising, whereas a study in Peru has shown only limited protection. Human-bovine reassortant vaccines, including a candidate that contains the VP4 gene of a human rotavirus (VP4 serotype 1A), are also being studied. PMID:8809469

  13. PCR-based approach to distinguish group A human rotavirus genotype 1 vs. genotype 2 genes.

    PubMed

    McKell, Allison O; Nichols, Joshua C; McDonald, Sarah M

    2013-12-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVs) are eleven-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses and important causes of severe diarrhea in children. A full-genome classification system is readily used to describe the genetic makeup of individual RV strains. In this system, each viral gene is assigned a specific genotype based upon its nucleotide sequence and established percent identity cut-off values. However, a faster and more cost-effective approach to determine RV gene genotypes is to utilize specific oligonucleotide primer sets in RT-PCR/PCR. Such primer sets and PCR-based genotyping methods have already been developed for the VP7-, VP6-, VP4- and NSP4-coding gene segments. In this study, primers were developed for the remaining seven RV gene segments, which encode proteins VP1, VP2, VP3, NSP1, NSP2, NSP3, and NSP5/6. Specifically, primers were designed to distinguish the two most common human RV genotypes (1 vs. 2) for these genes and were validated on several cell culture-adapted human and animal RV strains, as well as on human RVs from clinical fecal specimens. As such, primer sets now exist for all eleven genes of common human RVs, allowing for the identification of reassortant strains with mixed constellations of both genotype 1 and 2 genes using a rapid and economical RT-PCR/PCR method. PMID:24012969

  14. Identification of human rotavirus serotype by hybridization to polymerase chain reaction-generated probes derived from a hyperdivergent region of the gene encoding outer capsid protein VP7

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J.; Sears, J.; Schael, I.P.; White, L.; Garcia, D.; Lanata, C.; Kapikian, A.Z. )

    1990-08-01

    We have synthesized {sup 32}P-labeled hybridization probes from a hyperdivergent region (nucleotides 51 to 392) of the rotavirus gene encoding the VP7 glycoprotein by using the polymerase chain reaction method. Both RNA (after an initial reverse transcription step) and cloned cDNA from human rotavirus serotypes 1 through 4 could be used as templates to amplify this region. High-stringency hybridization of each of the four probes to rotavirus RNAs dotted on nylon membranes allowed the specific detection of corresponding sequences and thus permitted identification of the serotype of the strains dotted. The procedure was useful when applied to rotaviruses isolated from field studies.

  15. Early steps in rotavirus cell entry.

    PubMed

    Lopez, S; Arias, C F

    2006-01-01

    Rotaviruses, the leading cause of severe dehydrating diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide, are non-enveloped viruses formed by three concentric layers of protein that enclose a genome of double-stranded RNA. These viruses have a specific cell tropism in vivo, infecting primarily the mature enterocytes of the villi of the small intestine. It has been found that rotavirus cell entry is a complex multistep process, in which different domains of the rotavirus surface proteins interact sequentially with different cell surface molecules, which act as attachment and entry receptors. These recently described molecules include integrins (alpha2beta1, alphavbeta3, and alphaxbeta2) and a heat shock protein (hsc70), and have been found to be associated with cell membrane lipid microdomains. The requirement for several cell molecules, which might need to be present and organized in a precise fashion, could explain the cell and tissue tropism of these viruses. This review focuses on recent data describing the interactions between the virus and its receptors, the role of lipid microdomains in rotavirus infection, and the possible mechanism of rotavirus cell entry.

  16. Distinct function of COAR and B3 domains of maize VP1 in induction of ectopic gene expression and plant developmental phenotypes in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize VP1 enhancement of ABA sensitivity in roots is B3 independent. ABA and VP1 mediated suppression of auxin induced lateral root development is B3 independent. Arabidopsis transgenic system to delineate B3 dependent and COAR domain dependent regulatory functions of VP1. Analyses of ectopic ABA re...

  17. The assembly conformation of rotavirus VP6 determines its protective efficacy against rotavirus challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Ana Ruth; Rodríguez-Limas, William A; Contreras, Martha A; Esquivel, Ernesto; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2014-05-19

    Viral protein assemblies have shown to be superior immunogens used in commercial vaccines. However, little is known about the effect of protein assembly structure in immunogenicity and the protection conferred by a vaccine. In this work, rotavirus VP6, a polymorphic protein that assembles into nanotubes, icosahedra (dlRLP) or trimers was used to compare the immune response elicited by three different assemblies. VP6 is the most antigenic and abundant rotavirus structural protein. It has been demonstrated that antibodies against VP6 interfere with the replication cycle of rotavirus, making it a vaccine candidate. Groups of mice were immunized with either nanotubes, dlRLP or trimers and the humoral response (IgG and IgA titers) was measured. Immunized mice were challenged with EDIM rotavirus and protection against rotavirus infection, measured as viral shedding, was evaluated. Immunization with nanotubes resulted in the highest IgG titers, followed by immunization with dlRLP. While immunization with one dose of nanotubes was sufficient to reduce viral shedding by 70%, two doses of dlRLP or trimers were required to obtain a similar protection. The results show that the type of assembly of VP6 results in different humoral responses and protection efficacies against challenge with live virus. This information is important for the design of recombinant vaccines in general.

  18. Interaction of rotavirus particles with liposomes.

    PubMed

    Nandi, P; Charpilienne, A; Cohen, J

    1992-06-01

    We have studied the interactions of purified viral particles with liposomes as a model to understand the mechanism of entry of rotavirus into the cell. Liposomes, made from pure as well as mixed lipids, that contained encapsulated self-quenching concentrations of the fluorophore carboxyfluorescein (CF) were used. Rotavirus-liposome interactions were studied from the fluorescence dequenching of CF resulting from its release to the bulk solution. Purified infectious double-shelled virus particles induced a concentration- and temperature-dependent release of CF. The rate and extent of CF release was maximum between pH 7.3 and 7.6. The removal of outer structural proteins VP4 and VP7 from virus, which results in the formation of single-shelled particles, prevented virus interaction with liposomes. Rotavirus particles with uncleaved VP4 did not interact with liposomes, but treatment in situ of these particles with trypsin restored the interaction with the liposomes and resulted in CF dequenching. Our data support the view that rotavirus enters the cell through direct penetration of the plasma membrane. In contrast, adenovirus, the only other nonenveloped virus studied by this method, shows the optimum rate of marker release from liposomes at around pH 6 (R. Blumenthal, P. S. Seth, M. C. Willingham, and I. Pastan, Biochemistry 25:2231-2237, 1986). The interaction between rotavirus and liposomes is sensitive to specific divalent metal ions, unlike the adenovirus-liposome interaction, which is independent of them. PMID:1316453

  19. A computational study of the interaction of the foot and mouth disease virus VP1 with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Ruben; Limardo, Ramiro Rodríguez; Carrillo, Elisa; König, Guido A; Turjanski, Adrián G

    2015-10-01

    Foot and mouth disease is caused by a non-enveloped virus (FMDV), which disposes several antigenic sites at the surface of their capsid proteins. The most relevant and immunodominant antigenic site of FMDV (site A or AnSA) includes a key virus-cell interaction element (RGD motif) located in the Viral Protein 1 (VP1), more precisely at the GH loop. AnSA includes a set of overlapped and mainly linear epitopes, which are the main targets of the humoral immune response. Taking advantage over specific structural features of the GH loop, we have evaluated the influence of every amino acid residue at AnSA in the interaction with 2 neutralizing antibodies by molecular modeling techniques. Additionally, we constructed diverse interaction complexes with multiple site A mutants and discussed about the structural influence of amino acidic insertions in such relevant antigenic site of FMDV. Our approach is in agreement with previous ELISA experiments and allows the understanding of how FMDV mutations may alter the interaction with different antibodies, as we can estimate the contribution of each amino acid to the interaction. Overall, our work contributes to the development of specific vaccination strategies for FMD control.

  20. P[8] and P[4] Rotavirus Infection Associated with Secretor Phenotypes Among Children in South China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu-Fu; Long, Yan; Tan, Ming; Zhang, Ting; Huang, Qiong; Jiang, Xi; Tan, Wen-Fang; Li, Jian-Dong; Hu, Gui-Fang; Tang, Shixing; Dai, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Rotaviruses are known to recognize human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as a host ligand that is believed to play an important role in rotavirus host susceptibility and host range. In this study, paired fecal and saliva samples collected from children with viral gastroenteritis, as well as paired serum and saliva samples collected from the general population in south China were studied to evaluate potential association between rotavirus infections and human HBGA phenotypes. Rotavirus was detected in 75 (28%) of 266 fecal samples and P[8] rotaviruses were found to be the predominant genotype. The HBGA phenotypes of the rotavirus-infected children were determined through their saliva samples. Secretor statuses were found to correlate with the risk of rotavirus infection and all P[8]/P[4] rotavirus infected children were secretors. Accordingly, recombinant VP8* proteins of the P[8]/P[4] rotaviruses bound saliva samples from secretor individuals. Furthermore, correlation between serum P[8]/P[4]-specific IgG and host Lewis and secretor phenotypes has been found among 206 studied serum samples. Our study supported the association between rotavirus infection and the host HBGA phenotypes, which would help further understanding of rotavirus host range and epidemiology. PMID:27708367

  1. Whole genomic characterization of Korean porcine G8P[7] reassortant rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Gyu; Park, Sang-Ik; Woo, Nam-Il; Kim, Deok-Song; Seo, Ja-Young; Alfajaro, Mia Madel; Kim, Ji-Yun; Soliman, Mahmoud; Baek, Yeong-Bin; Cho, Eun-Hyo; Kwon, Joseph; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kang, Mun-Il; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2016-10-01

    This study analyzed eleven genomic segments of three Korean porcine G8P[7] group A rotavirus (RVA) strains. Phylogenetically, these strains contained two bovine-like and nine porcine-like genomic segments. Eight genes (VP1, VP2, VP6 and NSP1-NSP5) of strains 156-1 and 42-1 and seven genes (VP1, VP2, VP6 and NSP2-NSP5) of strain C-1 clustered closely with porcine and porcine-like animal strains and distantly from typical human Wa-like strains. The VP3-M2 genotype of these strains clustered closely with bovine-like strains, but distantly with typical human DS-1-like strains. These data indicate that multiple reassortments involving porcine and bovine RVA strains in Korea must have occurred. PMID:27393603

  2. Delineation of a neutralizing subregion within the immunodominant epitope (GH loop) of foot-and-mouth disease virus VP1 which does not contain the RGD motif.

    PubMed

    Brown, F; Benkirane, N; Limal, D; Halimi, H; Newman, J F; Van Regenmortel, M H; Briand, J P; Muller, S

    1999-08-20

    The major immunogenic site of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is contained in a disordered loop comprising residues 134-158 of capsid protein VP1, located on the surface of the viral particle. Peptides corresponding to this sequence generally elicit protective levels of neutralizing antibodies in guinea pigs. In some instances, however, the level of neutralizing antibodies is low although the level of antibodies against the peptide, determined by ELISA, is as high as that in the sera with high neutralizing antibody titres. In an attempt to ascertain the reason for this difference, we have synthesized on a cellulose membrane 10 overlapping decapeptides, offset by one residue, covering the segment 141-159 of VP1 of two viruses belonging to serotypes A12 and O1, and tested them with guinea pig antisera raised against peptide 141-159, VP1 and FMDV particles (SPOTscan method). With type A, some peptides which were strongly positive with highly neutralizing antisera did not include the RGD triplet located at residues 145-147. In contrast, antisera with low neutralization titres reacted only with decapeptides which included the RGD motif. Moreover, peptide 147-156 coupled to keyhole limpet haemocyanin, but not peptide 141-149 coupled to the same carrier, elicited high levels of neutralizing antibodies in guinea pigs. In the case of serotype O, highly neutralizing antisera to virus reacted in ELISA with peptides 141-150 (containing the RGD motif) and 135-144 (located upstream from the RGD motif). The results suggest that the RGD triplet is not an indispensable constituent of peptides able to elicit a neutralizing antibody response against the virus. PMID:10501234

  3. Rotavirus (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... spring months. It is particularly a problem in childcare centers and children's hospitals because rotavirus infection is ... who care for kids, including health care and childcare workers, also can spread the virus, especially if ...

  4. Description of rotavirus F in broilers from Brazilian poultry farms.

    PubMed

    Beserra, L A R; Gregori, F

    2014-09-01

    Rotaviruses are segmented double-stranded RNA viruses that cause gastroenteritis in mammals and birds. Here we describe the first partial nucleotide sequences of the structural protein VP6 from the genomes of group F rotaviruses that were detected in 5 out of 53 fecal samples (9.43%) from healthy broilers from Brazilian poultry farms based on reverse-transcriptase-PCR with primers designed for this study. The findings support the development of molecular detection systems, which can be used for the assessment of the distribution of rotavirus F in birds, their potential involvement in diseases, and their impact on poultry health.

  5. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of yeast extracts containing rotavirus-like particles: a potential veterinary vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Limas, William A; Pastor, Ana Ruth; Esquivel-Soto, Ernesto; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2014-05-19

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea in many animal species of economic interest. A simple, safe and cost-effective vaccine is required for the control and prevention of rotavirus in animals. In this study, we evaluated the use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts containing rotavirus-like particles (RLP) as a vaccine candidate in an adult mice model. Two doses of 1mg of yeast extract containing rotavirus proteins (between 0.3 and 3 μg) resulted in an immunological response capable of reducing the replication of rotavirus after infection. Viral shedding in all mice groups diminished in comparison with the control group when challenged with 100 50% diarrhea doses (DD50) of murine rotavirus strain EDIM. Interestingly, when immunizing intranasally protection against rotavirus infection was observed even when no increase in rotavirus-specific antibody titers was evident, suggesting that cellular responses were responsible of protection. Our results indicate that raw yeast extracts containing rotavirus proteins and RLP are a simple, cost-effective alternative for veterinary vaccines against rotavirus.

  6. Frequently Asked Questions about Rotavirus

    MedlinePlus

    ... from being exposed to rotavirus. Better hygiene and sanitation have not been very good at reducing rotavirus disease. Because the virus is so widespread, even the cleanest environments can be infected. Children who have previously had ...

  7. Fabrication of gold nanoparticles in Therminol VP-1 by laser ablation and fragmentation with fs pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Mendieta, R.; Mondragón, R.; Juliá, E.; Mendoza-Yero, O.; Cordoncillo, E.; Lancis, J.; Mínguez-Vega, G.

    2014-12-01

    This letter reports on a physical method to produce highly pure, size-controlled and well-dispersed spherical gold nanoparticles (NPs) in Therminol VP-1 by pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) using a 30 fs Ti:Sapphire laser at a fluence of 1 J cm-2. A second photo-fragmentation of the ablated colloid solution by subsequent treatment with the same laser light yields a mean size and size dispersion of the NPs of 58 ± 31 nm. A study of the nanofluid properties reveals a low agglomeration over time and an enhancement of thermal conductivity of the base fluid by up to 4%. These results improve the characteristics of current nanofluids in thermal oils that may have a potential impact on the improvement of the efficiency of harvesting of solar light.

  8. Rotavirus capsid VP6 protein acts as an adjuvant in vivo for norovirus virus-like particles in a combination vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Blazevic, Vesna; Malm, Maria; Arinobu, Daisuke; Lappalainen, Suvi; Vesikari, Timo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rotavirus (RV) and norovirus (NoV) are the 2 leading causes of acute viral gastroenteritis worldwide. We have developed a non-live NoV and RV vaccine candidate consisting of NoV virus-like particles (VLPs) and recombinant polymeric RV VP6 protein produced in baculovirus-insect cell expression system. Both components have been shown to induce strong potentially protective immune responses. As VP6 nanotubes are highly immunogenic, we investigated here a possible adjuvant effect of these structures on NoV-specific immune responses in vivo. BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with a suboptimal dose (0.3 μg) of GII.4 or GI.3 VLPs either alone or in a combination with 10 μg dose of VP6 and induction of NoV-specific antibodies in sera of experimental animals were measured. Blocking assay using human saliva or synthetic histo-blood group antigens was employed to test NoV blocking antibodies. Suboptimal doses of the VLPs alone did not induce substantial anti-NoV antibodies. When co-administered with the VP6, considerable titers of not only type-specific but also cross-reactive IgG antibodies against NoV VLP genotypes not included in the vaccine composition were induced. Most importantly, NoV-specific blocking antibodies, a surrogate for neutralizing antibodies, were generated. Our results show that RV VP6 protein has an in vivo adjuvant effect on NoV-specific antibody responses and support the use of VP6 protein as a part of the NoV-RV combination vaccine, especially when addition of external adjuvants is not desirable. PMID:26467630

  9. Rotavirus vaccines in routine use.

    PubMed

    Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D

    2014-11-01

    Vaccines are now available to combat rotavirus, the most common cause of severe diarrhea among children worldwide. We review clinical trial data for available rotavirus vaccines and summarize postlicensure data on effectiveness, impact, and safety from countries routinely using these vaccines in national programs. In these countries, rotavirus vaccines have reduced all-cause diarrhea and rotavirus hospitalizations by 17%-55% and 49%-92%, respectively, and all-cause diarrhea deaths by 22%-50% in some settings. Indirect protection of children who are age-ineligible for rotavirus vaccine has also been observed in some high and upper middle income countries. Experience with routine use of rotavirus vaccines in lower middle income countries has been limited to date, but vaccine introductions in such countries have been increasing in recent years. The risk-benefit analysis of rotavirus vaccines is extremely favorable but other strategies to improve the effectiveness of the vaccine, particularly in lower middle income settings, should be considered.

  10. Effects of Human Parvovirus B19 and Bocavirus VP1 Unique Region on Tight Junction of Human Airway Epithelial A549 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chun-Ching; Shi, Ya-Fang; Yang, Jiann-Jou; Hsiao, Yuan-Chao; Tzang, Bor-Show; Hsu, Tsai-Ching

    2014-01-01

    As is widely recognized, human parvovirus B19 (B19) and human bocavirus (HBoV) are important human pathogens. Obviously, both VP1 unique region (VP1u) of B19 and HBoV exhibit the secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-like enzymatic activity and are recognized to participate in the pathogenesis of lower respiratory tract illnesses. However, exactly how, both VP1u from B19 and HBoV affect tight junction has seldom been addressed. Therefore, this study investigates how B19-VP1u and HBoV-VP1u may affect the tight junction of the airway epithelial A549 cells by examining phospholipase A2 activity and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) as well as performing immunoblotting analyses. Experimental results indicate that TEER is more significantly decreased in A549 cells by treatment with TNF-α (10 ng), two dosages of B19-VP1u and BoV-VP1u (400 ng and 4000 ng) or bee venom PLA2 (10 ng) than that of the control. Accordingly, more significantly increased claudin-1 and decreased occludin are detected in A549 cells by treatment with TNF-α or both dosages of HBoV-VP1u than that of the control. Additionally, more significantly decreased Na+/K+ ATPase is observed in A549 cells by treatment with TNF-α, high dosage of B19-VP1u or both dosages of BoV-VP1u than that of the control. Above findings suggest that HBoV-VP1u rather than B19 VP1u likely plays more important roles in the disruption of tight junction in the airway tract. Meanwhile, this discrepancy appears not to be associated with the secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-like enzymatic activity. PMID:25268969

  11. Effects of human Parvovirus B19 and Bocavirus VP1 unique region on tight junction of human airway epithelial A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chun-Ching; Shi, Ya-Fang; Yang, Jiann-Jou; Hsiao, Yuan-Chao; Tzang, Bor-Show; Hsu, Tsai-Ching

    2014-01-01

    As is widely recognized, human parvovirus B19 (B19) and human bocavirus (HBoV) are important human pathogens. Obviously, both VP1 unique region (VP1u) of B19 and HBoV exhibit the secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-like enzymatic activity and are recognized to participate in the pathogenesis of lower respiratory tract illnesses. However, exactly how, both VP1u from B19 and HBoV affect tight junction has seldom been addressed. Therefore, this study investigates how B19-VP1u and HBoV-VP1u may affect the tight junction of the airway epithelial A549 cells by examining phospholipase A2 activity and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) as well as performing immunoblotting analyses. Experimental results indicate that TEER is more significantly decreased in A549 cells by treatment with TNF-α (10 ng), two dosages of B19-VP1u and BoV-VP1u (400 ng and 4000 ng) or bee venom PLA2 (10 ng) than that of the control. Accordingly, more significantly increased claudin-1 and decreased occludin are detected in A549 cells by treatment with TNF-α or both dosages of HBoV-VP1u than that of the control. Additionally, more significantly decreased Na+/K+ ATPase is observed in A549 cells by treatment with TNF-α, high dosage of B19-VP1u or both dosages of BoV-VP1u than that of the control. Above findings suggest that HBoV-VP1u rather than B19 VP1u likely plays more important roles in the disruption of tight junction in the airway tract. Meanwhile, this discrepancy appears not to be associated with the secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-like enzymatic activity.

  12. Signaling from the embryo conditions Vp1-mediated repression of alpha-amylase genes in the aleurone of developing maize seeds.

    PubMed

    Hoecker, U; Vasil, I K; McCarty, D R

    1999-08-01

    The VP1 transcription factor functions as both a repressor and an activator of gene expression in the developing aleurone. Vp1 activation of the anthocyanin pathway exhibits strict cell autonomy in aleurone. In contrast, Vp1-mediated repression of hydrolase genes in aleurone cells during seed development is determined by a combination of cell autonomous and cell non-autonomous signals. To analyze signaling between the embryo and aleurone during seed development, a T-B3La chromosome translocation was used to create seed that has non-concordant embryo and endosperm genotypes. We show that de-repression of an Amy-GUS reporter gene in developing vp1 mutant aleurone cells strongly depends on the presence of a viviparous embryo. Genetic ablation of the developing embryo in vp1 mutant and Vp1 seeds through the introduction of an early embryo mutation caused a similar enhancement of Amy-GUS expression in the aleurone, suggesting that the quiescent embryo present in normal seed is a critical source of inhibitory signals. Analysis of an ABA deficient vp1 vp5 double mutant indicates that ABA synthesized in the embyro interacts additively with Vp1 to prevent precocious induction of alpha-amylase genes in the aleurone of the developing seed. A lack of ABA synthesis, however, does not account for the strongly synergistic interaction between a viviparous vp1 embryo and mutant aleurone suggesting that a quiescent embyro is a source of other inhibitory signals.

  13. Silencing the Morphogenesis of Rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    López, Tomas; Camacho, Minerva; Zayas, Margarita; Nájera, Rebeca; Sánchez, Rosana; Arias, Carlos F.; López, Susana

    2005-01-01

    The morphogenesis of rotaviruses follows a unique pathway in which immature double-layered particles (DLPs) assembled in the cytoplasm bud across the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), acquiring during this process a transient lipid membrane which is modified with the ER resident viral glycoproteins NSP4 and VP7; these enveloped particles also contain VP4. As the particles move towards the interior of the ER cisternae, the transient lipid membrane and the nonstructural protein NSP4 are lost, while the virus surface proteins VP4 and VP7 rearrange to form the outermost virus protein layer, yielding mature infectious triple-layered particles (TLPs). In this work, we have characterized the role of NSP4 and VP7 in rotavirus morphogenesis by silencing the expression of both glycoproteins through RNA interference. Silencing the expression of either NSP4 or VP7 reduced the yield of viral progeny by 75 to 80%, although the underlying mechanism of this reduction was different in each case. Blocking the synthesis of NSP4 affected the intracellular accumulation and the cellular distribution of several viral proteins, and little or no virus particles (neither DLPs nor TLPs) were assembled. VP7 silencing, in contrast, did not affect the expression or distribution of other viral proteins, but in its absence, enveloped particles accumulated within the lumen of the ER, and no mature infectious virus was produced. Altogether, these results indicate that during a viral infection, NSP4 serves as a receptor for DLPs on the ER membrane and drives the budding of these particles into the ER lumen, while VP7 is required for removing the lipid envelope during the final step of virus morphogenesis. PMID:15596814

  14. Isolation and characterization of TgVP1, a type I vacuolar H+-translocating pyrophosphatase from Toxoplasma gondii. The dynamics of its subcellular localization and the cellular effects of a diphosphonate inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Drozdowicz, Yolanda M; Shaw, Michael; Nishi, Manami; Striepen, Boris; Liwinski, Helene A; Roos, David S; Rea, Philip A

    2003-01-10

    Here we report the isolation and characterization of a type I vacuolar-type H(+)-pyrophosphatase (V-PPase), TgVP1, from an apicomplexan, Toxoplasma gondii, a parasitic protist that is particularly amenable to molecular and genetic manipulation. The 816-amino acid TgVP1 polypeptide is 50% sequence-identical (65% similar) to the prototypical type I V-PPase from Arabidopsis thaliana, AVP1, and contains all the sequence motifs characteristic of this pump category. Unlike AVP1 and other known type I enzymes, however, TgVP1 contains a 74-residue N-terminal extension encompassing a 42-residue N-terminal signal peptide sequence, sufficient for targeting proteins to the secretory pathway of T. gondii. Providing that the coding sequence for the entire N-terminal extension is omitted from the plasmid, transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with plasmid-borne TgVP1 yields a stable and functional translation product that is competent in aminomethylenediphosphonate (AMDP)-inhibitable K(+)-activated pyrophosphate (PP(i)) hydrolysis and PP(i)-energized H(+) translocation. Immunofluorescence microscopy of both free and intracellular T. gondii tachyzoites using purified universal V-PPase polyclonal antibodies reveals a punctate apical distribution for the enzyme. Equivalent studies of the tachyzoites during host cell invasion, by contrast, disclose a transverse radial distribution in which the V-PPase is associated with a collar-like structure that migrates along the length of the parasite in synchrony with and in close apposition to the penetration furrow. Although treatment of T. gondii with AMDP concentrations as high as 100 microm had no discernible effect on the efficiency of host cell invasion and integration, concentrations commensurate with the I(50) for the inhibition of TgVP1 activity in vitro (0.9 microm) do inhibit cell division and elicit nuclear enlargement concomitant with the inflation and eventual disintegration of acidocalcisome-like vesicular structures. A

  15. Expression and purification of recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein and its interactions with polyomavirus proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, X.; Chang, D.; Rottinghaus, S.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448), using the recombinant expression system pFPYV2. Recombinant VP2 was purified to near homogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, electroelution, and Extracti-Gel chromatography. Polyclonal serum to this protein which reacted specifically with recombinant VP2 as well as polyomavirus virion VP2 and VP3 on Western blots (immunoblots) was produced. Purified VP2 was used to establish an in vitro protein-protein interaction assay with polyomavirus structural proteins and purified recombinant VP1. Recombinant VP2 interacted with recombinant VP1, virion VP1, and the four virion histones. Recombinant VP1 coimmunoprecipitated with recombinant VP2 or truncated VP2 (delta C12VP2), which lacked the carboxy-terminal 12 amino acids. These experiments confirmed the interaction between VP1 and VP2 and revealed that the carboxyterminal 12 amino acids of VP2 and VP3 were not necessary for formation of this interaction. In vivo VP1-VP2 interaction study accomplished by cotransfection of COS-7 cells with VP2 and truncated VP1 (delta N11VP1) lacking the nuclear localization signal demonstrated that VP2 was capable of translocating delta N11VP1 into the nucleus. These studies suggest that complexes of VP1 and VP2 may be formed in the cytoplasm and cotransported to the nucleus for virion assembly to occur.

  16. Rotaviruses from Canadian farm samples.

    PubMed

    Lamhoujeb, Safaa; Cook, Angela; Pollari, Frank; Bidawid, Sabah; Farber, Jeff; Mattison, Kirsten

    2010-07-01

    Animal rotavirus (RoV) strains detected in Canadian swine and dairy cattle farms were characterized by sequence analysis of viral protein 4 (VP4), VP6, VP7 and non-structural protein 4 segments from 15 RoV strains. Some porcine strains were found to contain a mixture of segments typical of human and animal viruses. One strain represented a novel VP6 genotype "I14", G2-P[27]-I14. Other strains detected in porcine samples represented multiple different segment types. These results illustrate the active evolution of animal RoV strains and underline the need for surveillance of both animal and human strains in public health-monitoring programs. PMID:20517624

  17. Diversity and relationships of cocirculating modern human rotaviruses revealed using large-scale comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Sarah M; McKell, Allison O; Rippinger, Christine M; McAllen, John K; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Payne, Daniel C; Edwards, Kathryn M; Chappell, James D; Patton, John T

    2012-09-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVs) are 11-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses and are primary causes of gastroenteritis in young children. Despite their medical relevance, the genetic diversity of modern human RVs is poorly understood, and the impact of vaccine use on circulating strains remains unknown. In this study, we report the complete genome sequence analysis of 58 RVs isolated from children with severe diarrhea and/or vomiting at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) in Nashville, TN, during the years spanning community vaccine implementation (2005 to 2009). The RVs analyzed include 36 G1P[8], 18 G3P[8], and 4 G12P[8] Wa-like genogroup 1 strains with VP6-VP1-VP2-VP3-NSP1-NSP2-NSP3-NSP4-NSP5/6 genotype constellations of I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. By constructing phylogenetic trees, we identified 2 to 5 subgenotype alleles for each gene. The results show evidence of intragenogroup gene reassortment among the cocirculating strains. However, several isolates from different seasons maintained identical allele constellations, consistent with the notion that certain RV clades persisted in the community. By comparing the genes of VUMC RVs to those of other archival and contemporary RV strains for which sequences are available, we defined phylogenetic lineages and verified that the diversity of the strains analyzed in this study reflects that seen in other regions of the world. Importantly, the VP4 and VP7 proteins encoded by VUMC RVs and other contemporary strains show amino acid changes in or near neutralization domains, which might reflect antigenic drift of the virus. Thus, this large-scale, comparative genomic study of modern human RVs provides significant insight into how this pathogen evolves during its spread in the community. PMID:22696651

  18. Diversity and Relationships of Cocirculating Modern Human Rotaviruses Revealed Using Large-Scale Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    McKell, Allison O.; Rippinger, Christine M.; McAllen, John K.; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Payne, Daniel C.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Chappell, James D.; Patton, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVs) are 11-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses and are primary causes of gastroenteritis in young children. Despite their medical relevance, the genetic diversity of modern human RVs is poorly understood, and the impact of vaccine use on circulating strains remains unknown. In this study, we report the complete genome sequence analysis of 58 RVs isolated from children with severe diarrhea and/or vomiting at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) in Nashville, TN, during the years spanning community vaccine implementation (2005 to 2009). The RVs analyzed include 36 G1P[8], 18 G3P[8], and 4 G12P[8] Wa-like genogroup 1 strains with VP6-VP1-VP2-VP3-NSP1-NSP2-NSP3-NSP4-NSP5/6 genotype constellations of I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. By constructing phylogenetic trees, we identified 2 to 5 subgenotype alleles for each gene. The results show evidence of intragenogroup gene reassortment among the cocirculating strains. However, several isolates from different seasons maintained identical allele constellations, consistent with the notion that certain RV clades persisted in the community. By comparing the genes of VUMC RVs to those of other archival and contemporary RV strains for which sequences are available, we defined phylogenetic lineages and verified that the diversity of the strains analyzed in this study reflects that seen in other regions of the world. Importantly, the VP4 and VP7 proteins encoded by VUMC RVs and other contemporary strains show amino acid changes in or near neutralization domains, which might reflect antigenic drift of the virus. Thus, this large-scale, comparative genomic study of modern human RVs provides significant insight into how this pathogen evolves during its spread in the community. PMID:22696651

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of VP1 gene sequences of waterfowl parvoviruses from the Mainland of China revealed genetic diversity and recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao; Cheng, Xiao-Xia; Chen, Shao-Ying; Lin, Feng-Qiang; Chen, Shi-Long; Zhu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Jin-Xiang; Huang, Mei-Qing; Zheng, Min

    2016-03-01

    To determine the origin and evolution of goose parvovirus (GPV) and Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) in the Mainland of China, phylogenetic and recombination analyses in the present study were performed on 32 complete VP1 gene sequences from China and other countries. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 gene, GPV strains studied here from Mainland China (PRC) could be divided into three genotypes, namely PRC-I, PRC-II and PRC-III. Genotype PRC-I is indigenous to Mainland China. Only one GPV strain from Northeast China was of Genotype PRC-II and was thought to be imported from Europe. Genotype PRC-III, which was the most isolated genotype during 1999-2012, is related to GPVs in Taiwan and has been the predominant pathogen responsible for recent Derzy's disease outbreaks in Mainland China. Current vaccine strains used in Mainland China belong to Genotype PRC-I that is evolutionary distant from Genotypes PRC-II and PRC-III. In comparison, MDPV strains herein from Mainland China are clustered in a single group which is closely related to Taiwanese MDPV strains, and the full-length sequences of the VP1 gene of China MDPVs are phylogenetic closely related to the VP1 sequence of a Hungarian MDPV strain. Moreover, We also found that homologous recombination within VP1 gene plays a role in generating genetic diversity in GPV evolution. The GPV GDFSh from Guangdong Province appears to be the evolutionary product of a recombination event between parental GPV strains GD and B, while the major parent B proved to be a reference strain for virulent European GPVs. Our findings provide valuable information on waterfowl parvoviral evolution in Mainland China.

  20. Development of a Rotavirus-Shedding Model in Rhesus Macaques, Using a Homologous Wild-Type Rotavirus of a New P Genotype

    PubMed Central

    McNeal, Monica M.; Sestak, Karol; Choi, Anthony H.-C.; Basu, Mitali; Cole, Michael J.; Aye, Pyone P.; Bohm, Rudolf P.; Ward, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Although there are several reports on rotavirus inoculation of nonhuman primates, no reliable model exists. Therefore, this study was designed to develop a rhesus macaque model for rotavirus studies. The goals were to obtain a wild-type macaque rotavirus and evaluate it as a challenge virus for model studies. Once rotavirus was shown to be endemic within the macaque colony at the Tulane National Primate Research Center, stool specimens were collected from juvenile animals (2.6 to 5.9 months of age) without evidence of previous rotavirus infection and examined for rotavirus antigen. Six of 10 animals shed rotavirus during the 10-week collection period, and the electropherotypes of all isolates were identical to each other but distinct from those of prototype simian rotaviruses. These viruses were characterized as serotype G3 and subgroup 1, properties typical of many animal rotaviruses, including simian strains. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP4 gene was performed with a culture-grown isolate from the stool of one animal, designated the TUCH strain. Based on both genotypic and phylogenetic comparisons between TUCH VP4 and cognate proteins of representatives of the reported 22 P genotypes, the TUCH virus belongs to a new genotype, P[23]. A pool of wild-type TUCH was prepared and intragastrically administered to eight cesarean section-derived, specific-pathogen-free macaques 14 to 42 days of age. All animals were kept in a biocontainment level 2 facility. Although no diarrhea was observed and the animals remained clinically normal, all animals shed large quantities of rotavirus antigen in their feces after inoculation, which resolved by the end of the 14-day observation period. Therefore, TUCH infection of macaques provides a useful nonhuman primate model for studies on rotavirus protection. PMID:15613323

  1. [Chemosynthetic peptides against foot-and-mouth disease--immune response to free and carrier bound peptides of the VP1 of O1-Kaufbeuren].

    PubMed

    Liebermann, H; Reimann, I; Bartels, T; Nöckler, A; Thalmann, G; Furkert, J; Dölling, R

    1990-01-01

    Three peptides of main epitope of FMD virus O1-Kaufbeuren, VP1 (16, 21, 31), were found to induce in the 130-160 sequence range, in free and/or carrier-bonded form, virus-neutralising antibodies in guinea pig, rabbit, mouse, swine, and cattle. Five carrier proteins were tested, with thyroglobulin, next to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), being most effective for 16-peptides (145-160) and 21-peptides (141-160 Tyr161). To protect guinea pig from FMD, minimum dosage of 21-peptide was found to be 2 x 8 micrograms. The immunogenic spectrum of peptides and conjugates proved to be broader than that of monovalent vaccines of inactivated virus. Free peptides were found to be also capable in vitro of inhibiting virus infection. PMID:1696803

  2. Group B rotaviruses similar to strain CAL-1, have been circulating in Western India since 1993.

    PubMed Central

    Kelkar, S. D.; Zade, J. K.

    2004-01-01

    Generally, group A rotaviruses are the most common cause of paediatric diarrhoea. However, group B rotavirus, adult diarrhoea rotavirus (ADRV), was found to be involved in epidemics of severe gastroenteritis in several areas of China during 1982-1983 and had resulted in more than one million cases among adults as well as older children. Human group B rotavirus has been rarely reported outside China, but has been detected first from five adults with diarrhoea in Kolkata, India during 1997-1998 (strain CAL-1). During epidemiological studies at the National Institute of Virology (NIV) on hospitalized diarrhoea patients at Pune, India, faecal specimens from patients of >5 years age, which were negative for group A rotavirus by ELISA were tested by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). We detected rotavirus RNA migration patterns similar to that of group B rotavirus in three faecal specimens from adults, two from the specimens collected in 1993 and one in 1998 from sporadic diarrhoea cases. RT-PCR was carried out using primers derived from gene 8 which codes for the NS2 protein, followed by nested PCR, which confirmed the presence of group B rotavirus in all three specimens. The sequences of the PCR products of NIV specimens were compared with that of CAL-1, ADRV and IDIR (infectious diarrhoea of infant rat) belonging to group B rotaviruses. The sequence analysis of the PCR products showed the highest identity with CAL-1, which was reported from Kolkata, India during 1997--1998. The finding suggests that human group B rotaviruses have been circulating in Pune. India, since 1993. This emerging virus may lead to more severe disease among adults in India. There is a need for surveillance of group B rotavirus infections, especially in adult diarrhoea cases and seroepidemiological studies on group B rotavirus are required among humans and animals of Western Maharashtra, India. PMID:15310177

  3. Reassortment of Human and Animal Rotavirus Gene Segments in Emerging DS-1-Like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strains.

    PubMed

    Komoto, Satoshi; Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Tsuji, Takao; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Tharmaphornpilas, Piyanit; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of novel DS-1-like G1P[8] human rotaviruses in Japan were recently reported. More recently, such intergenogroup reassortant strains were identified in Thailand, implying the ongoing spread of unusual rotavirus strains in Asia. During rotavirus surveillance in Thailand, three DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains having G3P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-281/2013/G3P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-289/2013/G3P[8]) and G2P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/LS-04/2013/G2P[8]) genotypes were identified in fecal samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genomes of strains SKT-281, SKT-289, and LS-04. On whole genomic analysis, all three strains exhibited unique genotype constellations including both genogroup 1 and 2 genes: G3-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strains SKT-281 and SKT-289, and G2-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strain LS-04. Except for the G genotype, the unique genotype constellation of the three strains (P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2) is commonly shared with DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. On phylogenetic analysis, nine of the 11 genes of strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 (VP4, VP6, VP1-3, NSP1-3, and NSP5) appeared to have originated from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains, while the remaining VP7 and NSP4 genes appeared to be of equine and bovine origin, respectively. Thus, strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 appeared to be reassortant strains as to DS-1-like G1P[8], animal-derived human, and/or animal rotaviruses. On the other hand, seven of the 11 genes of strain LS-04 (VP7, VP6, VP1, VP3, and NSP3-5) appeared to have originated from locally circulating DS-1-like G2P[4] human rotaviruses, while three genes (VP4, VP2, and NSP1) were assumed to be derived from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Notably, the remaining NSP2 gene of strain LS-04 appeared to be of bovine origin. Thus, strain LS-04 was assumed to be a multiple reassortment strain as to DS-1-like G1P[8], locally circulating

  4. Reassortment of Human and Animal Rotavirus Gene Segments in Emerging DS-1-Like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Satoshi; Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Tsuji, Takao; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Tharmaphornpilas, Piyanit; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of novel DS-1-like G1P[8] human rotaviruses in Japan were recently reported. More recently, such intergenogroup reassortant strains were identified in Thailand, implying the ongoing spread of unusual rotavirus strains in Asia. During rotavirus surveillance in Thailand, three DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains having G3P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-281/2013/G3P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-289/2013/G3P[8]) and G2P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/LS-04/2013/G2P[8]) genotypes were identified in fecal samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genomes of strains SKT-281, SKT-289, and LS-04. On whole genomic analysis, all three strains exhibited unique genotype constellations including both genogroup 1 and 2 genes: G3-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strains SKT-281 and SKT-289, and G2-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strain LS-04. Except for the G genotype, the unique genotype constellation of the three strains (P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2) is commonly shared with DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. On phylogenetic analysis, nine of the 11 genes of strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 (VP4, VP6, VP1-3, NSP1-3, and NSP5) appeared to have originated from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains, while the remaining VP7 and NSP4 genes appeared to be of equine and bovine origin, respectively. Thus, strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 appeared to be reassortant strains as to DS-1-like G1P[8], animal-derived human, and/or animal rotaviruses. On the other hand, seven of the 11 genes of strain LS-04 (VP7, VP6, VP1, VP3, and NSP3-5) appeared to have originated from locally circulating DS-1-like G2P[4] human rotaviruses, while three genes (VP4, VP2, and NSP1) were assumed to be derived from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Notably, the remaining NSP2 gene of strain LS-04 appeared to be of bovine origin. Thus, strain LS-04 was assumed to be a multiple reassortment strain as to DS-1-like G1P[8], locally circulating

  5. Molecular evolution of VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions in coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant isolates from acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in 2011 in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nidaira, Minoru; Kuba, Yumani; Saitoh, Mika; Taira, Katsuya; Maeshiro, Noriyuki; Mahoe, Yoko; Kyan, Hisako; Takara, Taketoshi; Okano, Sho; Kudaka, Jun; Yoshida, Hiromu; Oishi, Kazunori; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2014-04-01

    A large acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) outbreak occurred in 2011 in Okinawa Prefecture in Japan. Ten strains of coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant (CA24v) were isolated from patients with AHC and full sequence analysis of the VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions performed. To assess time-scale evolution, phylogenetic analysis was performed using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In addition, similarity plots were constructed and pairwise distance (p-distance) and positive pressure analyses performed. A phylogenetic tree based on the VP1 coding region showed that the present strains belong to genotype 4 (G4). In addition, the present strains could have divided in about 2010 from the same lineages detected in other countries such as China, India and Australia. The mean rates of molecular evolution of four coding regions were estimated at about 6.15 to 7.86 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year. Similarity plot analyses suggested that nucleotide similarities between the present strains and a prototype strain (EH24/70 strain) were 0.77-0.94. The p-distance of the present strains was relatively short (<0.01). Only one positive selected site (L25H) was identified in the VP1 protein. These findings suggest that the present CA24v strains causing AHC are genetically related to other AHC strains with rapid evolution and emerged in around 2010.

  6. Rotavirus gene silencing by small interfering RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Déctor, Miguel Angel; Romero, Pedro; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2002-01-01

    RNA interference is an evolutionarily conserved double-stranded RNA-triggered mechanism for suppressing gene expression. Rotaviruses, the leading cause of severe diarrhea in young children, are formed by three concentric layers of protein, from which the spike protein VP4 projects. Here, we show that a small interfering RNA corresponding to the VP4 gene efficiently inhibits the synthesis of this protein in virus-infected cells. A large proportion of infected cells had no detectable VP4 and the yield of viral progeny was reduced. Most of the virus particles purified from these cells were triple-layered, but lacked VP4, and were poorly infectious. We also show that VP4 might not be required for the last step of virus morphogenesis. The VP4 gene silencing was specific, since the synthesis of VP4 from rotavirus strains that differ in the target sequence was not affected. These findings offer the possibility of carrying out reverse genetics in rotaviruses. PMID:12446562

  7. Mean Protein Evolutionary Distance: A Method for Comparative Protein Evolution and Its Application

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are under tight evolutionary constraints, so if a protein changes it can only do so in ways that do not compromise its function. In addition, the proteins in an organism evolve at different rates. Leveraging the history of patristic distance methods, a new method for analysing comparative protein evolution, called Mean Protein Evolutionary Distance (MeaPED), measures differential resistance to evolutionary pressure across viral proteomes and is thereby able to point to the proteins’ roles. Different species’ proteomes can also be compared because the results, consistent across virus subtypes, concisely reflect the very different lifestyles of the viruses. The MeaPED method is here applied to influenza A virus, hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), dengue virus, rotavirus A, polyomavirus BK and measles, which span the positive and negative single-stranded, doubled-stranded and reverse transcribing RNA viruses, and double-stranded DNA viruses. From this analysis, host interaction proteins including hemagglutinin (influenza), and viroporins agnoprotein (polyomavirus), p7 (hepatitis C) and VPU (HIV) emerge as evolutionary hot-spots. By contrast, RNA-directed RNA polymerase proteins including L (measles), PB1/PB2 (influenza) and VP1 (rotavirus), and internal serine proteases such as NS3 (dengue and hepatitis C virus) emerge as evolutionary cold-spots. The hot spot influenza hemagglutinin protein is contrasted with the related cold spot H protein from measles. It is proposed that evolutionary cold-spot proteins can become significant targets for second-line anti-viral therapeutics, in cases where front-line vaccines are not available or have become ineffective due to mutations in the hot-spot, generally more antigenically exposed proteins. The MeaPED package is available from www.pam1.bcs.uwa.edu.au/~michaelw/ftp/src/meaped.tar.gz. PMID:23613826

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of probable non-human genes of group A rotaviruses isolated from children with acute gastroenteritis in Belém, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Maestri, Régis Piloni; Kaiano, Jane Haruko Lima; Neri, Darivaldo Luz; Soares, Luana da Silva; Guerra, Sylvia de Fatima Dos Santos; Oliveira, Darleise de Souza; Farias, Yasmin Nascimento; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Linhares, Alexandre da Costa; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira

    2012-12-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are the main cause of acute viral gastroenteritis in both humans and young animals of various species such as calves, horses, pigs, dogs, cats, and birds. The genetic diversity of RVs is related to a variety of evolutionary mechanisms, including point mutation, and genome reassortment. The objective of this study was to characterize molecularly genes that encode structural and nonstructural proteins in unusual RV strains. The clinical specimens selected for this study were obtained from children and newborn with RV gastroenteritis, who participated in research projects on viral gastroenteritis conducted at the Evandro Chagas Institute. Structural (VP1-VP4, VP6, and VP7) and nonstructural (NSP1-NSP6) genes were amplified from stool samples by the polymerase chain reaction and subsequently sequenced. Eight unusual RV strains isolated from children and newborn with gastroenteritis were studied. Reassortment between genes of animal origin were observed in 5/8 (62.5%) strains analyzed. These results demonstrate that, although rare, interspecies (animal-human) transmission of RVs occurs in nature, as observed in the present study in strains NB150, HSP034, HSP180, HST327, and RV10109. This study is the first to be conducted in the Amazon region and supports previous data showing a close relationship between genes of human and animal origin, representing a challenge to the large-scale introduction of RV vaccines in national immunization programs. PMID:23080508

  9. Immunization of DNA vaccine encoding C3d-VP1 fusion enhanced protective immune response against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huiying; Tong, Tiezhu; Chen, Huanchun; Guo, Aizhen

    2007-10-01

    Because foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) remains a great problem to many livestock of agricultural importance, safe, effective vaccines are in great need. DNA vaccine would be a promising candidate but the design remains to be optimized. VP1 gene of FMDV strain O/ES/2001 was linked to three copies of either porcine or murine C3d or four copies of a 28-aa fragment of murine C3d containing the CR2 receptor binding domain (M28). The resultant plasmids encoding C3d/M28-VP1 fusion or only VP1 as control were immunized guinea pigs. Both cellular and humoral immune responses were evaluated and protection was observed after virus challenge. As a result, although the plasmid encoding only VP1 could elicit virus-binding antibody detected by ELISA, splenocyte proliferation, IL-4 and IFN-gamma production, the levels were significantly less than C3d/M28-VP1 fusion. Furthermore, VP1 failed to induce neutralization antibody and protect animals against virus challenge, while murine C3d-VP1 fusion efficiently induced neutralization antibody response and provided 87.50% of the animals with complete protection and 12.50% with partial protection. Among murine C3d, M28, and porcine C3d, the adjuvant effect of murine C3d is strongest, followed by porcine C3d, and last murine M28. In conclusion, the fact that C3d genes, when coupled to VP1 gene, are able to greatly enhance the protective immune response of VP1 DNA in guinea pigs suggests that C3d-VP1 DNA chimera has a significant potential for use as a novel DNA vaccine against FMDV. PMID:17497212

  10. Exotic rotaviruses in animals and rotaviruses in exotic animals.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Souvik; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2014-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are a major cause of viral diarrhea in the young of mammals and birds. RVA strains with certain genotype constellations or VP7-VP4 (G-P) genotype combinations are commonly found in a particular host species, whilst unusual or exotic RVAs have also been reported. In most cases, these exotic rotaviruses are derived from RVA strains common to other host species, possibly through interspecies transmission coupled with reassortment events, whilst a few other strains exhibit novel genotypes/genetic constellations rarely found in other RVAs. The epidemiology and evolutionary patterns of exotic rotaviruses in humans have been thoroughly reviewed previously. On the other hand, there is no comprehensive review article devoted to exotic rotaviruses in domestic animals and birds so far. The present review focuses on the exotic/unusual rotaviruses detected in livestock (cattle and pigs), horses and companion animals (cats and dogs). Avian rotaviruses (group D, group F and group G strains), including RVAs, which are genetically divergent from mammalian RVAs, are also discussed. Although scattered and limited studies have reported rotaviruses in several exotic animals and birds, including wildlife, these data remain to be reviewed. Therefore, a section entitled "rotaviruses in exotic animals" was included in the present review. PMID:25674582

  11. Brief communication: could Kadanuumuu (KSD-VP-1/1) and Lucy (AL 288-1) have walked together comfortably?

    PubMed

    Kramer, Patricia Ann

    2012-12-01

    The estimated lower limb length (0.761-0.793 m) of the partial skeleton of Australopithecus afarensis from Woranso-Mille (KSD-VP-1/1) is outside the previously known range for Australopithecus and within the range of modern humans. The lower limb length of KSD-VP-1/1 is particularly intriguing when juxtaposed against the lower limb length estimate of the other partial skeleton of A. afarensis, AL 288-1 (0.525 m). A sample of 36 children (age, >7 years, trochanteric height = 0.56-0.765 m) and 16 adults (trochanteric height = 0.77-1.00 m) walked at their self-selected slow, preferred, and fast walking velocities, while their oxygen consumption was monitored. Lower limb length and velocity were correlated with slow (P < 0.001, r(2) = 0.44), preferred (P < 0.001, r(2) = 0.55), and fast (P < 0.001, r(2) = 0.69) walking velocity. The relationship between optimal velocity and lower limb length was also determined and lower limb length explained 47% of the variability in optimal velocity. The velocity profile for KSD-VP-1/1 (slow = 0.73-0.75 m/s, preferred = 1.08-1.11 m/s, and fast = 1.48-1.54 m/s) is 36-44% higher than that of AL 288-1 (slow = 0.53 m/s, preferred = 0.78 m/s, and fast = 1.07 m/s). The optimal velocity for AL 288-1 is 1.04 m/s, whereas that for KSD-VP-1/1 is 1.29-1.33 m/s. This degree of lower limb length dimorphism suggests that members of a group would have had to compromise their preferences to walk together or to split into subgroups to walk at their optimal velocity.

  12. Specific Targeting of Proerythroblasts and Erythroleukemic Cells by the VP1u Region of Parvovirus B19.

    PubMed

    Leisi, Remo; von Nordheim, Marcus; Kempf, Christoph; Ros, Carlos

    2015-09-16

    Viruses are evolutionarily developed cell-entering nanomachines, which are frequently used as gene or drug delivery systems. Parvovirus B19 (B19V) shows a remarkably restricted tropism for erythropoietin-dependent erythroid differentiation stages, and thus this virus provides an opportunity to deliver cargo to these intermediate differentiated cells. Here we report the construction of a delivery system from B19V subunits that maintains the highly selective cell-entry of the native virus and offers versatile cargo transport. To obtain this specific carrier, we conjugated the cell-targeting VP1u region of B19V to NeutrAvidin as a loading platform for biotinylated cargos. The VP1u-NeutrAvidin conjugate delivered fluorophores, DNA, and toxic payloads specifically to erythroid cells around the proerythroblast differentiation stage, including erythroleukemic cells. The VP1u-NeutrAvidin represents a unique cell surface marker which exclusively detects intermediate erythroid differentiation stages. Furthermore, the cell-entering property of this viral-based targeting system offers opportunities for erythroid-specific drug delivery or gene therapy.

  13. Rotavirus detection by dot blot hybridization assay using a non-radioactive synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide probe.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, J.; Sandino, A.; Yudelevich, A.; Avendaño, L. F.; Venegas, A.; Hinrichsen, V.; Spencer, E.

    1992-01-01

    A synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide of 40 nucleotides corresponding to nucleotides 33-72 of the gene coding for the viral protein VP7 of rotavirus, was used as a nucleic acid probe to develop a non-radioactive hybridization method for rotavirus detection. The probe was labelled at the 3' end with biotin-7-dATP. The sensitivity and specificity of the dot blot hybridization assay for rotavirus detection was evaluated with 303 stool specimens. The results indicate that the hybridization assay has a higher sensitivity than both PAGE and EIA. Among the rotavirus strains tested 37 different electropherotypes were found. The results suggest that rotavirus diagnosis by dot hybridization using a non-radioactive probe may become routine laboratory procedure because it is simple, highly specific and very sensitive. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1312480

  14. Molecular analysis of the VP7 gene of pheasant rotaviruses identifies a new genotype, designated G23.

    PubMed

    Ursu, Krisztina; Kisfali, Péter; Rigó, Dóra; Ivanics, Eva; Erdélyi, Károly; Dán, Adám; Melegh, Béla; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2009-01-01

    Rotavirus-associated enteritis has been reported in pheasants, but there is no information on the genetic/antigenic features of pheasant rotaviruses. In this study, we sequenced the VP7-encoding genome segment of three pheasant rotavirus strains detected during 2008 in Hungary. The full-length genome segment was 1,070 bp long, while the open reading frame was predicted to encode a 330-aa-long protein. The nucleotide sequence identities among the three pheasant rotavirus strains were high (> or =94%), whereas the range of nucleotide sequence identities to other avian and mammalian rotavirus VP7 genes fell between 68 and 73% and between 60 and 66%, respectively. Our findings indicate that these Hungarian pheasant rotaviruses need to be considered representatives of a new VP7 genotype specificity, designated G23.

  15. Identification of Equine Lactadherin-derived Peptides That Inhibit Rotavirus Infection via Integrin Receptor Competition*

    PubMed Central

    Civra, Andrea; Giuffrida, Maria Gabriella; Donalisio, Manuela; Napolitano, Lorenzo; Takada, Yoshikazu; Coulson, Barbara S.; Conti, Amedeo; Lembo, David

    2015-01-01

    Human rotavirus is the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and children under the age of 5 years in both developed and developing countries. Human lactadherin, a milk fat globule membrane glycoprotein, inhibits human rotavirus infection in vitro, whereas bovine lactadherin is not active. Moreover, it protects breastfed infants against symptomatic rotavirus infections. To explore the potential antiviral activity of lactadherin sourced by equines, we undertook a proteomic analysis of milk fat globule membrane proteins from donkey milk and elucidated its amino acid sequence. Alignment of the human, bovine, and donkey lactadherin sequences revealed the presence of an Asp-Gly-Glu (DGE) α2β1 integrin-binding motif in the N-terminal domain of donkey sequence only. Because integrin α2β1 plays a critical role during early steps of rotavirus host cell adhesion, we tested a minilibrary of donkey lactadherin-derived peptides containing DGE sequence for anti-rotavirus activity. A 20-amino acid peptide containing both DGE and RGD motifs (named pDGE-RGD) showed the greatest activity, and its mechanism of antiviral action was characterized; pDGE-RGD binds to integrin α2β1 by means of the DGE motif and inhibits rotavirus attachment to the cell surface. These findings suggest the potential anti-rotavirus activity of equine lactadherin and support the feasibility of developing an anti-rotavirus peptide that acts by hindering virus-receptor binding. PMID:25814665

  16. Trypsin activation pathway of rotavirus infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Arias, C F; Romero, P; Alvarez, V; López, S

    1996-01-01

    The infectivity of rotaviruses is increased by and most probably is dependent on trypsin treatment of the virus. This proteolytic treatment specifically cleaves VP4, the protein that forms the spikes on the surface of the virions, to polypeptides VP5 and VP8. This cleavage has been reported to occur in rotavirus SA114fM at two conserved, closely spaced arginine residues located at VP4 amino acids 241 and 247. In this work, we have characterized the VP4 cleavage products of rotavirus SA114S generated by in vitro treatment of the virus with increasing concentrations of trypsin and with proteases AspN and alpha-chymotrypsin. The VP8 and VP5 polypeptides were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and by Western blotting (immunoblotting) with antibodies raised to synthetic peptides that mimic the terminal regions of VP4 generated by the trypsin cleavage. It was shown that in addition to arginine residues 241 and 247, VP4 is cleaved at arginine residue 231. These three sites were found to have different susceptibilities to trypsin, Arg-241 > Arg-231 > Arg-247, with the enhancement of infectivity correlating with cleavage at Arg-247 rather than at Arg-231 or Arg-241. Proteases AspN and alpha-chymotrypsin cleaved VP4 at Asp-242 and Tyr-246, respectively, with no significant enhancement of infectivity, although this enhancement could be achieved by further treatment of the virus with trypsin. The VP4 end products of trypsin treatment were a homogeneous VP8 polypeptide comprising VP4 amino acids 1 to 231 and a heterogeneous VP5, which is formed by two polypeptide species (present at a ratio of approximately 1:5) as a result of cleavage at either Arg-241 or Arg-247. A pathway for the trypsin activation of rotavirus infectivity is proposed. PMID:8709201

  17. Analysis by plaque reduction neutralization assay of intertypic rotaviruses suggests that gene reassortment occurs in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Y; Sereno, M M; Midthun, K; Flores, J; Chanock, R M; Kapikian, A Z

    1987-02-01

    The SB-1A rotavirus recovered from a diarrheic piglet in the United States is a naturally occurring intertypic rotavirus. When studied by reciprocal neutralization tests, the SB-1A virus was similar, if not identical, to the porcine Gottfried virus (serotype 4) and the porcine OSU virus (serotype 5). Analysis of reassortant viruses prepared from the SB-1A virus and the serotype 2 human DS-1 virus revealed that the antigenic specificity of the outer capsid protein VP3 of SB-1A was shared with the OSU virus, while the antigenic specificity of another outer capsid protein, VP7, of SB-1A appeared to be shared with the Gottfried virus. This suggests that SB-1A is a naturally occurring reassortant rotavirus between OSU-like and Gottfried-like porcine rotaviruses. In addition, using a genetic approach, we found evidence that the fourth gene was responsible for the predominantly one-way cross-neutralizing reactivity between canine rotavirus strain CU-1 (serotype 3) and porcine rotavirus strains SB-1A (serotypes 4 and 5) and OSU (serotype 5). Assignment of hemagglutination function to the fourth genome segment of porcine rotaviruses SB-1A and OSU and canine rotavirus CU-1 confirmed a similar previous gene assignment established for certain rotaviruses. Analysis of single gene 4 substitution reassortants confirmed our previous finding that VP3 was as potent in stimulating neutralizing antibodies as VP7. The observations confirm the need for a binary system of rotavirus classification and nomenclature similar to that used for the influenza A viruses; in such a system the neutralization specificity of both VP3 and VP7 would be indicated. PMID:2434522

  18. Consensus sequence determination and elucidation of the evolutionary history of a rotavirus Wa variant reveal a close relationship to various Wa variants derived from the original Wa strain.

    PubMed

    Wentzel, Johannes F; Yuan, Lijuan; Rao, Shujing; van Dijk, Alberdina A; O'Neill, Hester G

    2013-12-01

    The consensus nucleotide sequence of a human rotavirus Wa strain, with only a partially known passage history, was determined with sequence-independent amplification and next generation 454® pyrosequencing. This rotavirus Wa strain had the expected genome constellation of G1-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 and was designated RVA/Human-tc/USA/WaCS/1974/G1P[8]. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a close relationship to four human rotavirus Wa variants (Wag5re, Wag7/8re, ParWa and VirWa) derived from the original 1974 human isolate. There were rearrangements in the Wag5re- and Wag7/8re variants in genome segments 5 (Wag5re) and 7 and 8 (Wag7/8re), which were not present in WaCS. Pairwise comparisons and a combined molecular clock for the Wa rotavirus genome indicated a close relationship between WaCS and ParWa and VirWa. These results suggest that WaCS is most probably an early cell culture adapted variant from the initial gnotobiotic pig passaged Wa isolate. Evolutionary pressure analysis identified a possible negative selected amino acid site in VP1 (genome segment 1) and a likely positive selected site in VP4 (genome segment 4). The WaCS may be more appropriate as a rotavirus Wa reference sequence than the current composite Wa reference genome.

  19. JCV GCN in a natalizumab-treated MS patient is associated with mutations of the VP1 capsid gene

    PubMed Central

    Agnihotri, Shruti P.; Dang, Xin; Carter, Jonathan L.; Fife, Terry D.; Bord, Evelyn; Batson, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical, neuroimaging, immunologic, and virologic characteristics of JC virus–associated granule cell neuronopathy (JCV GCN) in a natalizumab-treated patient with multiple sclerosis (MS) who developed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after natalizumab withdrawal. Methods: We obtained longitudinal clinical data as well as MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy from this patient with MS. We measured JCV-specific cellular immune response in his peripheral blood by intracellular cytokine staining and sequenced a fragment of JCV VP1 capsid gene detected in his CSF. We contrast our findings with the first recently reported case. Results: This patient presented with worsening cerebellar symptoms and progressive cerebellar atrophy without new MS lesions on MRI after 63 months of natalizumab monotherapy. JCV DNA was detected in his CSF by PCR and harbored novel GCN-type mutations in the VP1 gene. He developed IRIS upon discontinuation of natalizumab and plasma exchange, which manifested itself by a worsening of clinical symptoms and contrast enhancement in the cerebellum on MRI. Treatment with corticosteroids resulted in resolution of IRIS, as demonstrated by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The patient had a strong JCV-specific T-cell response in his peripheral blood and remains alive after 15 months from onset of symptoms, although with significant disability. He did not have MS relapse on glatiramer acetate. Conclusions: JCV GCN should be considered in patients on natalizumab presenting with progressive cerebellar symptoms and cerebellar atrophy, and is associated with mutations in the JCV VP1 gene. Natalizumab withdrawal may be complicated by JCV GCN IRIS, and require treatment with corticosteroids. PMID:25037207

  20. Rotavirus-Like Particles: A Novel Nanocarrier for the Gut

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Perez, Naima G.; Sapin, Catherine; Jaffrelo, Loïc; Daou, Sabine; Grill, Jean Pierre; Langella, Philippe; Seksik, Philippe; Beaugerie, Laurent; Chwetzoff, Serge; Trugnan, Germain

    2010-01-01

    The delivery of bioactive molecules directly to damaged tissues represents a technological challenge. We propose here a new system based on virus-like particles (VLP) from rotavirus, with a marked tropism for the gut to deliver bio-active molecules to intestinal cells. For this, nonreplicative VLP nanoparticles were constructed using a baculovirus expression system and used to deliver an exogenous biomolecule, the green fluorescent protein (GFP), into either MA104 cells or intestinal cells from healthy and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-treated mice. Our results show that expression of rotavirus capsid proteins in baculovirus led to the auto assembly of VLP that display similar properties to rotavirus. In vitro experiments showed that VLP were able to enter into MA104 cells and deliver the reporter protein. Intragastric administration of fluorescent VLP in healthy and TNBS-treated mice resulted in the detection of GFP and viral proteins in intestinal samples. Our results demonstrate an efficient entry of non-replicative rotavirus VLP into the epithelial cell line MA104 and provide the first in vivo evidence of the potential of these nanoparticles as a promising safe candidate for drug delivery to intestinal cells. PMID:20414353

  1. Serological detection and analysis of anti-VP1 responses against various enteroviruses (EV) (EV-A, EV-B and EV-C) in Chinese individuals.

    PubMed

    Gao, Caixia; Ding, Yingying; Zhou, Peng; Feng, Jiaojiao; Qian, Baohua; Lin, Ziyu; Wang, Lili; Wang, Jinhong; Zhao, Chunyan; Li, Xiangyu; Cao, Mingmei; Peng, Heng; Rui, Bing; Pan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The overall serological prevalence of EV infections based on ELISA remains unknown. In the present study, the antibody responses against VP1 of the EV-A species (enterovirus 71 (EV71), Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), Coxsackievirus A5 (CA5) and Coxsackievirus A6 (CA6)), of the EV-B species (Coxsackievirus B3 (CB3)), and of the EV-C species (Poliovirus 1 (PV1)) were detected and analyzed by a NEIBM (novel evolved immunoglobulin-binding molecule)-based ELISA in Shanghai blood donors. The serological prevalence of anti-CB3 VP1 antibodies was demonstrated to show the highest level, with anti-PV1 VP1 antibodies at the second highest level, and anti-CA5, CA6, CA16 and EV71 VP1 antibodies at a comparatively low level. All reactions were significantly correlated at different levels, which were approximately proportional to their sequence similarities. Antibody responses against EV71 VP1 showed obvious differences with responses against other EV-A viruses. Obvious differences in antibody responses between August 2013 and May 2014 were revealed. These findings are the first to describe the detailed information of the serological prevalence of human antibody responses against the VP1 of EV-A, B and C viruses, and could be helpful for understanding of the ubiquity of EV infections and for identifying an effective approach for seroepidemiological surveillance based on ELISA. PMID:26917423

  2. Protection against Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Guinea Pigs via Oral Administration of Recombinant Lactobacillus plantarum Expressing VP1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miao; Pan, Li; Zhou, Peng; Lv, Jianliang; Zhang, Zhongwang; Wang, Yonglu; Zhang, Yongguang

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination is an effective strategy for generating antigen-specific immune responses against mucosal infections of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). In this study, Lactobacillus plantarum strains NC8 and WCFS1 were used as oral delivery vehicles containing a pSIP411-VP1 recombinant plasmid to initiate mucosal and systemic immune responses in guinea pigs. Guinea pigs were orally vaccinated (three doses) with NC8-pSIP411, NC8-pSIP411-VP1, WCFS1-pSIP411, WCFS1-pSIP411-VP1 or milk. Animals immunized with NC8-pSIP411-VP1 and WCFS1-pSIP411-VP1 developed high levels of antigen-specific serum IgG, IgA, IgM, mucosal secretory IgA (sIgA) and neutralizing antibodies, and revealed stronger cell-mediated immune responses and enhanced protection against FMDV challenge compared with control groups. The recombinant pSIP411-VP1 effectively improved immunoprotection against FMDV in guinea pigs. PMID:26629822

  3. Serological detection and analysis of anti-VP1 responses against various enteroviruses (EV) (EV-A, EV-B and EV-C) in Chinese individuals

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Caixia; Ding, Yingying; Zhou, Peng; Feng, Jiaojiao; Qian, Baohua; Lin, Ziyu; Wang, Lili; Wang, Jinhong; Zhao, Chunyan; Li, Xiangyu; Cao, Mingmei; Peng, Heng; Rui, Bing; Pan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The overall serological prevalence of EV infections based on ELISA remains unknown. In the present study, the antibody responses against VP1 of the EV-A species (enterovirus 71 (EV71), Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), Coxsackievirus A5 (CA5) and Coxsackievirus A6 (CA6)), of the EV-B species (Coxsackievirus B3 (CB3)), and of the EV-C species (Poliovirus 1 (PV1)) were detected and analyzed by a NEIBM (novel evolved immunoglobulin-binding molecule)-based ELISA in Shanghai blood donors. The serological prevalence of anti-CB3 VP1 antibodies was demonstrated to show the highest level, with anti-PV1 VP1 antibodies at the second highest level, and anti-CA5, CA6, CA16 and EV71 VP1 antibodies at a comparatively low level. All reactions were significantly correlated at different levels, which were approximately proportional to their sequence similarities. Antibody responses against EV71 VP1 showed obvious differences with responses against other EV-A viruses. Obvious differences in antibody responses between August 2013 and May 2014 were revealed. These findings are the first to describe the detailed information of the serological prevalence of human antibody responses against the VP1 of EV-A, B and C viruses, and could be helpful for understanding of the ubiquity of EV infections and for identifying an effective approach for seroepidemiological surveillance based on ELISA. PMID:26917423

  4. Uniformity of rotavirus strain nomenclature proposed by the Rotavirus Classification Working Group (RCWG).

    PubMed

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Ciarlet, Max; McDonald, Sarah M; Attoui, Houssam; Bányai, Krisztián; Brister, J Rodney; Buesa, Javier; Esona, Mathew D; Estes, Mary K; Gentsch, Jon R; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren; Johne, Reimar; Kirkwood, Carl D; Martella, Vito; Mertens, Peter P C; Nakagomi, Osamu; Parreño, Viviana; Rahman, Mustafizur; Ruggeri, Franco M; Saif, Linda J; Santos, Norma; Steyer, Andrej; Taniguchi, Koki; Patton, John T; Desselberger, Ulrich; Van Ranst, Marc

    2011-08-01

    In April 2008, a nucleotide-sequence-based, complete genome classification system was developed for group A rotaviruses (RVs). This system assigns a specific genotype to each of the 11 genome segments of a particular RV strain according to established nucleotide percent cutoff values. Using this approach, the genome of individual RV strains are given the complete descriptor of Gx-P[x]-Ix-Rx-Cx-Mx-Ax-Nx-Tx-Ex-Hx. The Rotavirus Classification Working Group (RCWG) was formed by scientists in the field to maintain, evaluate and develop the RV genotype classification system, in particular to aid in the designation of new genotypes. Since its conception, the group has ratified 51 new genotypes: as of April 2011, new genotypes for VP7 (G20-G27), VP4 (P[28]-P[35]), VP6 (I12-I16), VP1 (R5-R9), VP2 (C6-C9), VP3 (M7-M8), NSP1 (A15-A16), NSP2 (N6-N9), NSP3 (T8-T12), NSP4 (E12-E14) and NSP5/6 (H7-H11) have been defined for RV strains recovered from humans, cows, pigs, horses, mice, South American camelids (guanaco), chickens, turkeys, pheasants, bats and a sugar glider. With increasing numbers of complete RV genome sequences becoming available, a standardized RV strain nomenclature system is needed, and the RCWG proposes that individual RV strains are named as follows: RV group/species of origin/country of identification/common name/year of identification/G- and P-type. In collaboration with the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), the RCWG is also working on developing a RV-specific resource for the deposition of nucleotide sequences. This resource will provide useful information regarding RV strains, including, but not limited to, the individual gene genotypes and epidemiological and clinical information. Together, the proposed nomenclature system and the NCBI RV resource will offer highly useful tools for investigators to search for, retrieve, and analyze the ever-growing volume of RV genomic data. PMID:21597953

  5. Modeling of the rotavirus group C capsid predicts a surface topology distinct from other rotavirus species.

    PubMed

    Eren, Elif; Zamuda, Kimberly; Patton, John T

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus C (RVC) causes sporadic gastroenteritis in adults and is an established enteric pathogen of swine. Because RVC strains grow poorly in cell culture, which hinders generation of virion-derived RVC triple-layered-particle (TLP) structures, we used the known Rotavirus A (RVA) capsid structure to model the human RVC (Bristol) capsid. Comparative analysis of RVA and RVC capsid proteins showed major differences at the VP7 layer, an important target region for vaccine development due to its antigenic properties. Our model predicted the presence of a surface extended loop in RVC, which could form a major antigenic site on the capsid. We analyzed variations in the glycosylation patterns among RV capsids and identified group specific conserved sites. In addition, our results showed a smaller RVC VP4 foot, which protrudes toward the intermediate VP6 layer, in comparison to that of RVA. Finally, our results showed major structural differences at the VP8* glycan recognition sites.

  6. Development of a One-Step Duplex RT-PCR Method for the Simultaneous Detection of VP3/VP1 and VP1/P2B Regions of the Hepatitis A Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Ju; Lee, Shin-Young; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Lee, Jeong Su; Joo, In Sun; Kwak, Hyo Sun; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2016-08-28

    The simultaneous detection and accurate identification of hepatitis A virus (HAV) is critical in food safety and epidemiological studies to prevent the spread of HAV outbreaks. Towards this goal, a one-step duplex reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR method was developed targeting the VP1/P2B and VP3/VP1 regions of the HAV genome for the qualitative detection of HAV. An HAV RT-qPCR standard curve was produced for the quantification of HAV RNA. The detection limit of the duplex RT-PCR method was 2.8 × 10(1) copies of HAV. The PCR products enabled HAV genotyping analysis through DNA sequencing, which can be applied for epidemiological investigations. The ability of this duplex RT-PCR method to detect HAV was evaluated with HAV-spiked samples of fresh lettuce, frozen strawberries, and oysters. The limit of detection of the one-step duplex RT-PCR for each food model was 9.4 × 10(2) copies/20 g fresh lettuce, 9.7 × 10(3) copies/20 g frozen strawberries, and 4.1 × 10(3) copies/1.5 g oysters. Use of a one-step duplex RT-PCR method has advantages such as shorter time, decreased cost, and decreased labor owing to the single amplification reaction instead of four amplifications necessary for nested RT-PCR.

  7. Development of a One-Step Duplex RT-PCR Method for the Simultaneous Detection of VP3/VP1 and VP1/P2B Regions of the Hepatitis A Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Ju; Lee, Shin-Young; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Lee, Jeong Su; Joo, In Sun; Kwak, Hyo Sun; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2016-08-28

    The simultaneous detection and accurate identification of hepatitis A virus (HAV) is critical in food safety and epidemiological studies to prevent the spread of HAV outbreaks. Towards this goal, a one-step duplex reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR method was developed targeting the VP1/P2B and VP3/VP1 regions of the HAV genome for the qualitative detection of HAV. An HAV RT-qPCR standard curve was produced for the quantification of HAV RNA. The detection limit of the duplex RT-PCR method was 2.8 × 10(1) copies of HAV. The PCR products enabled HAV genotyping analysis through DNA sequencing, which can be applied for epidemiological investigations. The ability of this duplex RT-PCR method to detect HAV was evaluated with HAV-spiked samples of fresh lettuce, frozen strawberries, and oysters. The limit of detection of the one-step duplex RT-PCR for each food model was 9.4 × 10(2) copies/20 g fresh lettuce, 9.7 × 10(3) copies/20 g frozen strawberries, and 4.1 × 10(3) copies/1.5 g oysters. Use of a one-step duplex RT-PCR method has advantages such as shorter time, decreased cost, and decreased labor owing to the single amplification reaction instead of four amplifications necessary for nested RT-PCR. PMID:27197668

  8. Rotavirus Vaccine -- Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... to these vaccines. The infant's immune response to influenza vaccine administered at the same time as rotavirus vaccine ... previously that an inactivated vaccine (e.g., inactivated influenza vaccine) may be administered either simultaneously or at any ...

  9. Rotavirus Prevalence in the Primary Care Setting in Nicaragua after Universal Infant Rotavirus Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Paniagua, Margarita; Zambrana, Luis Enrique; Bucardo, Filemon; Hudgens, Michael G.; Weber, David J.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Espinoza, Félix

    2011-01-01

    Nicaragua was the first developing nation to implement universal infant rotavirus immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5). Initial studies of vaccine effectiveness in Nicaragua and other developing nations have focused on the prevention of hospitalizations and severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, rotavirus diarrhea is more commonly treated in the primary care setting, with only 1–3% of rotavirus cases receiving hospital care. We measured the prevalence of rotavirus infection in primary care clinics in León, Nicaragua, after introduction of the immunization program. In the post-vaccine period, 3.5% (95% confidence interval = 1.9–5.8) of children seeking care for diarrhea tested positive for rotavirus. A high diversity of rotavirus genotypes was encountered among the few positive samples. In conclusion, rotavirus was an uncommon cause of childhood diarrhea in this primary care setting after implementation of a rotavirus immunization program. PMID:22049057

  10. Rotavirus prevalence in the primary care setting in Nicaragua after universal infant rotavirus immunization.

    PubMed

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Paniagua, Margarita; Zambrana, Luis Enrique; Bucardo, Filemon; Hudgens, Michael G; Weber, David J; Morgan, Douglas R; Espinoza, Félix

    2011-11-01

    Nicaragua was the first developing nation to implement universal infant rotavirus immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5). Initial studies of vaccine effectiveness in Nicaragua and other developing nations have focused on the prevention of hospitalizations and severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, rotavirus diarrhea is more commonly treated in the primary care setting, with only 1-3% of rotavirus cases receiving hospital care. We measured the prevalence of rotavirus infection in primary care clinics in León, Nicaragua, after introduction of the immunization program. In the post-vaccine period, 3.5% (95% confidence interval = 1.9-5.8) of children seeking care for diarrhea tested positive for rotavirus. A high diversity of rotavirus genotypes was encountered among the few positive samples. In conclusion, rotavirus was an uncommon cause of childhood diarrhea in this primary care setting after implementation of a rotavirus immunization program.

  11. The Evolution of Vp1 Gene in Enterovirus C Species Sub-Group That Contains Types CVA-21, CVA-24, EV-C95, EV-C96 and EV-C99

    PubMed Central

    Smura, Teemu; Blomqvist, Soile; Vuorinen, Tytti; Ivanova, Olga; Samoilovich, Elena; Al-Hello, Haider; Savolainen-Kopra, Carita; Hovi, Tapani; Roivainen, Merja

    2014-01-01

    Genus Enterovirus (Family Picornaviridae,) consists of twelve species divided into genetically diverse types by their capsid protein VP1 coding sequences. Each enterovirus type can further be divided into intra-typic sub-clusters (genotypes). The aim of this study was to elucidate what leads to the emergence of novel enterovirus clades (types and genotypes). An evolutionary analysis was conducted for a sub-group of Enterovirus C species that contains types Coxsackievirus A21 (CVA-21), CVA-24, Enterovirus C95 (EV-C95), EV-C96 and EV-C99. VP1 gene datasets were collected and analysed to infer the phylogeny, rate of evolution, nucleotide and amino acid substitution patterns and signs of selection. In VP1 coding gene, high intra-typic sequence diversities and robust grouping into distinct genotypes within each type were detected. Within each type the majority of nucleotide substitutions were synonymous and the non-synonymous substitutions tended to cluster in distinct highly polymorphic sites. Signs of positive selection were detected in some of these highly polymorphic sites, while strong negative selection was indicated in most of the codons. Despite robust clustering to intra-typic genotypes, only few genotype-specific ‘signature’ amino acids were detected. In contrast, when different enterovirus types were compared, there was a clear tendency towards fixation of type-specific ‘signature’ amino acids. The results suggest that permanent fixation of type-specific amino acids is a hallmark associated with evolution of different enterovirus types, whereas neutral evolution and/or (frequency-dependent) positive selection in few highly polymorphic amino acid sites are the dominant forms of evolution when strains within an enterovirus type are compared. PMID:24695547

  12. Protect Your Child from Rotavirus Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... within the first week after the first or second dose of rotavirus vaccine.​ CDC continues to recommend that infants receive rotavirus vaccine. The benefits of the vaccine far outweigh the small risk ...

  13. Rotavirus Infections - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Rotavirus Infections URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Rotavirus Infections - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features ...

  14. Biochemical Characterization of Rotavirus Receptors in MA104 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A.; Zárate, Selene; Corkidi, Gabriel; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2000-01-01

    We have tested the effect of metabolic inhibitors, membrane cholesterol depletion, and detergent extraction of cell surface molecules on the susceptibility of MA104 cells to infection by rotaviruses. Treatment of cells with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of protein N glycosylation, blocked the infectivity of the SA-dependent rotavirus RRV and its SA-independent variant nar3 by about 50%, while the inhibition of O glycosylation had no effect. The inhibitor of glycolipid biosynthesis d,l-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP) blocked the infectivity of RRV, nar3, and the human rotavirus strain Wa by about 70%. Sequestration of cholesterol from the cell membrane with β-cyclodextrin reduced the infectivity of the three viruses by more than 90%. The involvement of N-glycoproteins, glycolipids, and cholesterol in rotavirus infection suggests that the virus receptor(s) might be forming part of lipid microdomains in the cell membrane. MA104 cells incubated with the nonionic detergent octyl-β-glucoside (OG) showed a ca. 60% reduction in their ability to bind rotaviruses, the same degree to which they became refractory to infection, suggesting that OG extracts the potential virus receptor(s) from the cell surface. Accordingly, when preincubated with the viruses, the OG extract inhibited the virus infectivity by more than 95%. This inhibition was abolished when the extract was treated with either proteases or heat but not when it was treated with neuraminidase, indicating the protein nature of the inhibitor. Two protein fractions of around 57 and 75 kDa were isolated from the extract, and these fractions were shown to have rotavirus-blocking activity. Also, antibodies to these fractions efficiently inhibited the infectivity of the viruses in untreated as well as in neuraminidase-treated cells. Five individual protein bands of 30, 45, 57, 75, and 110 kDa, which exhibited virus-blocking activity, were finally isolated from the OG extract. These proteins are

  15. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein induces the detachment of rotavirus particles from the cell surface.

    PubMed

    López, Tomás; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2015-12-01

    Group A rotaviruses are a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in young infants. In this work we evaluated the potential role of protein tyrosine kinases on rotavirus infectivity and viral progeny production. From the broad-spectrum inhibitors tested, only genistein, a flavonoid, inhibited rotavirus infectivity. The inhibition observed was dose and strain dependent, with more than 10-fold IC50 differences for some rotavirus strains, and the effect of the drug was shown to be dependent of their activity as a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, since the inactive analogue of genistein, daidzein, had no effect on virus infection. Investigation of the stage of virus replication blocked by the drug showed that it interferes with the early interactions of the virus with receptors and/or co-receptors, since treatment of the cells with genistein promoted the detachment of the virus from the cell surface.

  16. Novel chimeric foot-and-mouth disease virus-like particles harboring serotype O VP1 protect guinea pigs against challenge.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Li, Zhiyong; Xie, Yinli; Qin, Xiaodong; Qi, Xingcai; Sun, Peng; Bai, Xingwen; Ma, Youji; Zhang, Zhidong

    2016-02-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly contagious, acute viral disease of cloven-hoofed animal species causing severe economic losses worldwide. Among the seven serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), serotype O is predominant, but its viral capsid is more acid sensitive than other serotypes, making it more difficult to produce empty serotype O VLPs in the low pH insect hemolymph. Therefore, a novel chimeric virus-like particle (VLP)-based candidate vaccine for serotype O FMDV was developed and characterized in the present study. The chimeric VLPs were composed of antigenic VP1 from serotype O and segments of viral capsid proteins from serotype Asia1. These VLPs elicited significantly higher FMDV-specific antibody levels in immunized mice than did the inactivated vaccine. Furthermore, the chimeric VLPs protected guinea pigs from FMDV challenge with an efficacy similar to that of the inactivated vaccine. These results suggest that chimeric VLPs have the potential for use in vaccines against serotype O FMDV infection. PMID:26790940

  17. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Toxin B Subunit (LTB) with Enterovirus 71 (EV71) Subunit VP1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Ma, Yongping; Zhou, Huicong; Wu, Mingjun

    2016-01-01

    The nontoxic heat-labile toxin (LT) B subunit (LTB) was used as mucosal adjuvant experimentally. However, the mechanism of LTB adjuvant was still unclear. The LTB and enterovirus 71 (EV71) VP1 subunit (EVP1) were constructed in pET32 and expressed in E. coli BL21, respectively. The immunogenicity of purified EVP1 and the adjuvanticity of LTB were evaluated via intranasal immunization EVP1 plus LTB in Balb/c mice. In order to elucidate the proteome change triggered by the adjuvant of LTB, the proteomic profiles of LTB, EVP1, and LTB plus EVP1 were quantitatively analyzed by iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation; liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) in murine macrophage RAW264.7. The proteomic data were analyzed by bioinformatics and validated by western blot analysis. The predicted protein interactions were confirmed using LTB pull-down and the LTB processing pathway was validated by confocal microscopy. The results showed that LTB significantly boosted EVP1 specific systematic and mucosal antibodies. A total of 3666 differential proteins were identified in the three groups. Pathway enrichment of proteomic data predicted that LTB upregulated the specific and dominant MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signaling pathway and the protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum (PPER) pathway, whereas LTB or EVP1 did not significantly upregulate these two signaling pathways. Confocal microscopy and LTB pull-down assays confirmed that the LTB adjuvant was endocytosed and processed through endocytosis (ENS)-lysosomal-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) system. PMID:27618897

  18. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Toxin B Subunit (LTB) with Enterovirus 71 (EV71) Subunit VP1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Ma, Yongping; Zhou, Huicong; Wu, Mingjun

    2016-01-01

    The nontoxic heat-labile toxin (LT) B subunit (LTB) was used as mucosal adjuvant experimentally. However, the mechanism of LTB adjuvant was still unclear. The LTB and enterovirus 71 (EV71) VP1 subunit (EVP1) were constructed in pET32 and expressed in E. coli BL21, respectively. The immunogenicity of purified EVP1 and the adjuvanticity of LTB were evaluated via intranasal immunization EVP1 plus LTB in Balb/c mice. In order to elucidate the proteome change triggered by the adjuvant of LTB, the proteomic profiles of LTB, EVP1, and LTB plus EVP1 were quantitatively analyzed by iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation; liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) in murine macrophage RAW264.7. The proteomic data were analyzed by bioinformatics and validated by western blot analysis. The predicted protein interactions were confirmed using LTB pull-down and the LTB processing pathway was validated by confocal microscopy. The results showed that LTB significantly boosted EVP1 specific systematic and mucosal antibodies. A total of 3666 differential proteins were identified in the three groups. Pathway enrichment of proteomic data predicted that LTB upregulated the specific and dominant MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signaling pathway and the protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum (PPER) pathway, whereas LTB or EVP1 did not significantly upregulate these two signaling pathways. Confocal microscopy and LTB pull-down assays confirmed that the LTB adjuvant was endocytosed and processed through endocytosis (ENS)-lysosomal-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) system.

  19. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Toxin B Subunit (LTB) with Enterovirus 71 (EV71) Subunit VP1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Ma, Yongping; Zhou, Huicong; Wu, Mingjun

    2016-01-01

    The nontoxic heat-labile toxin (LT) B subunit (LTB) was used as mucosal adjuvant experimentally. However, the mechanism of LTB adjuvant was still unclear. The LTB and enterovirus 71 (EV71) VP1 subunit (EVP1) were constructed in pET32 and expressed in E. coli BL21, respectively. The immunogenicity of purified EVP1 and the adjuvanticity of LTB were evaluated via intranasal immunization EVP1 plus LTB in Balb/c mice. In order to elucidate the proteome change triggered by the adjuvant of LTB, the proteomic profiles of LTB, EVP1, and LTB plus EVP1 were quantitatively analyzed by iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation; liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) in murine macrophage RAW264.7. The proteomic data were analyzed by bioinformatics and validated by western blot analysis. The predicted protein interactions were confirmed using LTB pull-down and the LTB processing pathway was validated by confocal microscopy. The results showed that LTB significantly boosted EVP1 specific systematic and mucosal antibodies. A total of 3666 differential proteins were identified in the three groups. Pathway enrichment of proteomic data predicted that LTB upregulated the specific and dominant MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signaling pathway and the protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum (PPER) pathway, whereas LTB or EVP1 did not significantly upregulate these two signaling pathways. Confocal microscopy and LTB pull-down assays confirmed that the LTB adjuvant was endocytosed and processed through endocytosis (ENS)-lysosomal-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) system. PMID:27618897

  20. Rotavirus vaccination: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, T

    2012-10-01

    Live attenuated oral rotavirus vaccines were tested for proof-of-concept in the early 1980s, the first vaccine (RotaShield, Wyeth) was introduced in 1998 but was subsequently withdrawn because of association with intussusception, and the two currently licensed vaccine (Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline, and RotaTeq, Merck) were introduced in 2006. Before licensure both vaccines were extensively tested for safety (for intussusception) and efficacy in trials comprising in over 60,000 infants each. Rotarix is a single-strain human rotavirus vaccine (RV1) and RotaTeq is a combination of five bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses (RV5). Although the composition of the two vaccines is different, their field effectiveness and, largely, mechanism of action are similar. Both prevent effectively severe rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) but are less efficacious against mild RVGE or rotavirus infection. Field effectiveness of these vaccines in Europe and the USA against severe RVGE has been above 90% and in Latin America around 80%. Trials in Africa have yielded efficacy rates between 50 and 80%. Rotavirus vaccination has been introduced into the national immunization programmes of about 20 countries in Latin America, with Brazil and Mexico as leading countries, as well as in the USA, Australia and South Africa. Introduction into other African countries will start in 2012. In Europe, Belgium, Luxembourg, Austria and Finland and five federal states of Germany have introduced universal rotavirus vaccination. The reasons for the slow progress in Europe include low mortality from RVGE, unfavourable cost-benefit calculations in some countries, and concerns that still exist over intussusception.

  1. Expressions of Bovine IFN-gamma and foot-and-mouth disease VP1 antigen in P. pastoris and their effects on mouse immune response to FMD antigens.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xi-Ju; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Can; Wang, Ming

    2006-01-01

    As a highly contagious disease in cloven-hoofed animals, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) may cause a considerable social-economic loss in those countries affected. IFN-gamma has a wide range of antiviral and immune modulating functions. Thus, to study the immune enhancing effects of recombinant Bovine IFN-gamma (rBoIFN-gamma) on a recombinant FMDV vaccine, BoIFN-gamma, FMDV VP1 and BoIFN-gamma/VP fusion genes were cloned, expressed, co-expressed in pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) respectively, and subsequent immune effects have been evaluated in this study. The results showed that the genes encoding for BoIFN-gamma, VP1 and BoIFN-gamma/VP1 are successfully expressed in P. pastoris and their products are directly secreted into the cultural supernatant at a high level of 1.0 g/L analyzed by thin-layer scanning. In addition, rVP1 alone could induce both humoral and marginal cell-mediated immune responses in mice, while the group with co-inoculations of rBoIFN-gamma could markedly enhance both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses; even more dramatic immune responses were observed with the group inoculated with the fusion product, rBoIFN-gamma/VP1. The fusion product could be further investigated for its utility of FMDV vaccine development.

  2. Candidate new rotavirus species in sheltered dogs, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Mihalov-Kovács, Eszter; Gellért, Ákos; Marton, Szilvia; Farkas, Szilvia L; Fehér, Enikő; Oldal, Miklós; Jakab, Ferenc; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2015-04-01

    We identified unusual rotavirus strains in fecal specimens from sheltered dogs in Hungary by viral metagenomics. The novel rotavirus species displayed limited genome sequence homology to representatives of the 8 rotavirus species, A-H, and qualifies as a candidate new rotavirus species that we tentatively named Rotavirus I.

  3. Candidate new rotavirus species in sheltered dogs, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Mihalov-Kovács, Eszter; Gellért, Ákos; Marton, Szilvia; Farkas, Szilvia L; Fehér, Enikő; Oldal, Miklós; Jakab, Ferenc; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2015-04-01

    We identified unusual rotavirus strains in fecal specimens from sheltered dogs in Hungary by viral metagenomics. The novel rotavirus species displayed limited genome sequence homology to representatives of the 8 rotavirus species, A-H, and qualifies as a candidate new rotavirus species that we tentatively named Rotavirus I. PMID:25811414

  4. Candidate New Rotavirus Species in Sheltered Dogs, Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Mihalov-Kovács, Eszter; Gellért, Ákos; Marton, Szilvia; Farkas, Szilvia L.; Fehér, Enikő; Oldal, Miklós; Jakab, Ferenc; Martella, Vito

    2015-01-01

    We identified unusual rotavirus strains in fecal specimens from sheltered dogs in Hungary by viral metagenomics. The novel rotavirus species displayed limited genome sequence homology to representatives of the 8 rotavirus species, A–H, and qualifies as a candidate new rotavirus species that we tentatively named Rotavirus I. PMID:25811414

  5. Structural Correlates of Rotavirus Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhakim, Aliaa H.; Salgado, Eric N.; Fu, Xiaofeng; Pasham, Mithun; Nicastro, Daniela; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Cell entry by non-enveloped viruses requires translocation into the cytosol of a macromolecular complex—for double-strand RNA viruses, a complete subviral particle. We have used live-cell fluorescence imaging to follow rotavirus entry and penetration into the cytosol of its ∼700 Å inner capsid particle (“double-layered particle”, DLP). We label with distinct fluorescent tags the DLP and each of the two outer-layer proteins and track the fates of each species as the particles bind and enter BSC-1 cells. Virions attach to their glycolipid receptors in the host cell membrane and rapidly become inaccessible to externally added agents; most particles that release their DLP into the cytosol have done so by ∼10 minutes, as detected by rapid diffusional motion of the DLP away from residual outer-layer proteins. Electron microscopy shows images of particles at various stages of engulfment into tightly fitting membrane invaginations, consistent with the interpretation that rotavirus particles drive their own uptake. Electron cryotomography of membrane-bound virions also shows closely wrapped membrane. Combined with high resolution structural information about the viral components, these observations suggest a molecular model for membrane disruption and DLP penetration. PMID:25211455

  6. PPARγ Agonists as an Anti-Inflammatory Treatment Inhibiting Rotavirus Infection of Small Intestinal Villi

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Dory; Muñoz, Natalia; Guerrero, Rafael; Acosta, Orlando; Guerrero, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus infection has been reported to induce an inflammatory response in the host cell accompanied by the increased expression or activation of some cellular molecules including ROS, NF-κB, and COX-2. PPARγ stimulation and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment have been found to interfere with viral infections including rotavirus infection. Small intestinal villi isolated from in vivo infected mice with rotavirus ECwt were analyzed for the percentage of ECwt-infected cells, the presence of rotavirus antigens, and infectious virion yield following treatment with pioglitazone. Isolated villi were also infected in vitro and treated with PPARγ agonists (PGZ, TZD, RGZ, DHA, and ALA), all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), and NAC. After treatments, the expression of cellular proteins including PPARγ, NF-κB, PDI, Hsc70, and COX-2 was analyzed using immunochemistry, ELISA, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting. The results showed that rotavirus infection led to an increased accumulation of the cellular proteins studied and ROS. The virus infection-induced accumulation of the cellular proteins studied and ROS was reduced upon pioglitazone treatment, causing also a concomitant reduction of the infectious virion yield. We hypothesized that rotavirus infection is benefiting from the induction of a host cell proinflammatory response and that the interference of the inflammatory pathways involved leads to decreased infection. PMID:27382365

  7. PPARγ Agonists as an Anti-Inflammatory Treatment Inhibiting Rotavirus Infection of Small Intestinal Villi.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Dory; Muñoz, Natalia; Guerrero, Rafael; Acosta, Orlando; Guerrero, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus infection has been reported to induce an inflammatory response in the host cell accompanied by the increased expression or activation of some cellular molecules including ROS, NF-κB, and COX-2. PPARγ stimulation and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment have been found to interfere with viral infections including rotavirus infection. Small intestinal villi isolated from in vivo infected mice with rotavirus ECwt were analyzed for the percentage of ECwt-infected cells, the presence of rotavirus antigens, and infectious virion yield following treatment with pioglitazone. Isolated villi were also infected in vitro and treated with PPARγ agonists (PGZ, TZD, RGZ, DHA, and ALA), all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), and NAC. After treatments, the expression of cellular proteins including PPARγ, NF-κB, PDI, Hsc70, and COX-2 was analyzed using immunochemistry, ELISA, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting. The results showed that rotavirus infection led to an increased accumulation of the cellular proteins studied and ROS. The virus infection-induced accumulation of the cellular proteins studied and ROS was reduced upon pioglitazone treatment, causing also a concomitant reduction of the infectious virion yield. We hypothesized that rotavirus infection is benefiting from the induction of a host cell proinflammatory response and that the interference of the inflammatory pathways involved leads to decreased infection. PMID:27382365

  8. Epidemiology of rotavirus diarrhoea in Albania.

    PubMed

    Kota, M; Bino, S; Delogu, R; Simaku, A; Neza, B; Ruggeri, F M; Fiore, L

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of rotavirus disease in children<5 years old in Tirana, Albania, and to monitor and characterize the rotavirus genotypes. Rotavirus was detected in 21% of samples, more frequently in children under 2 years of age, which accounted for 80.8% of all positive cases. Among all rotavirus-positive samples collected, G4P[8] was the most prevalent genotype (38%), followed by G1P[8] (36.6%). The use of safe and effective rotavirus vaccines for the prevention of severe diarrhoea and the reduction of treatment costs will be of great importance for Albania.

  9. [Hand-foot-mouth disease pathogen separation and EV71 VP1 gene analysis in Sanmenxia City, Henan Province, China].

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-xing; Wu, Jing-fu; Yang, Jie; Wei, Hai-yan; Xu, Yu-ling; Huang, Xue-yong

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the enterovirus types and biological features of pediatric cases of HFMD in Sanmenxia City during 2011, and compare the latter to a cohort of healthy children. Stool samples of 55 cases of HFMD and 60 healthy children were collected for the isolation and identification of enteroviruses using RNA extraction and real-time RT-PCR assays. EV71 and CA16 were identified by nucleotide sequencing using virus-specific VP1 primers; for the other enteroviruses, 012/011 and 008/013 primers were used for amplification and sequencing. The results were analysed by sequence alignment with known sequences, and the characteristics of the EV71 VP1 gene were also analyzed. The detection rates for enteroviruses in cases of HFMD and healthy children were 52.73% (29/55) and 18.33% (11/60), respectively. Among these, there were 22 cases of EV71, four cases of CA16 and three cases of other enteroviruses in the cases with HFMD. Eleven healthy children had intestinal viruses, of which nine were Coxsackie B virus strains (81.82%, 9/11). Gene sequencing of the 19 EV71 strains illustrated that they were all subgenotype C4a, but the evolutionary tree showed an obvious clustering between cases from Lingbao City and Lushi County. This study demonstrates that the EV71 subgenotype C4a and CA16 strains were the most common cause of HFMD in Sanmenxia City in 2011, and that Coxsackie B strains were prevalent in healthy children. This finding may indicate that there is a widespread source of recessive infection in the community.

  10. In Vitro Neutralisation of Rotavirus Infection by Two Broadly Specific Recombinant Monovalent Llama-Derived Antibody Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Aladin, Farah; Einerhand, Alexandra W. C.; Bouma, Janneke; Bezemer, Sandra; Hermans, Pim; Wolvers, Danielle; Bellamy, Kate; Frenken, Leon G. J.; Gray, Jim; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus is the main cause of viral gastroenteritis in young children. Therefore, the development of inexpensive antiviral products for the prevention and/or treatment of rotavirus disease remains a priority. Previously we have shown that a recombinant monovalent antibody fragment (referred to as Anti-Rotavirus Proteins or ARP1) derived from a heavy chain antibody of a llama immunised with rotavirus was able to neutralise rotavirus infection in a mouse model system. In the present work we investigated the specificity and neutralising activity of two llama antibody fragments, ARP1 and ARP3, against 13 cell culture adapted rotavirus strains of diverse genotypes. In addition, immunocapture electron microscopy (IEM) was performed to determine binding of ARP1 to clinical isolates and cell culture adapted strains. ARP1 and ARP3 were able to neutralise a broad variety of rotavirus serotypes/genotypes in vitro, and in addition, IEM showed specific binding to a variety of cell adapted strains as well as strains from clinical specimens. These results indicated that these molecules could potentially be used as immunoprophylactic and/or immunotherapeutic products for the prevention and/or treatment of infection of a broad range of clinically relevant rotavirus strains. PMID:22403728

  11. Mice develop effective but delayed protective immune responses when immunized as neonates either intranasally with nonliving VP6/LT(R192G) or orally with live rhesus rotavirus vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    VanCott, John L; Prada, Anne E; McNeal, Monica M; Stone, Susan C; Basu, Mitali; Huffer, Bert; Smiley, Kristi L; Shao, Mingyuan; Bean, Judy A; Clements, John D; Choi, Anthony H-C; Ward, Richard L

    2006-05-01

    Rotavirus vaccines are delivered early in life, when the immune system is immature. To determine the effects of immaturity on responses to candidate vaccines, neonatal (7 days old) and adult mice were immunized with single doses of either Escherichia coli-expressed rotavirus VP6 protein and the adjuvant LT(R192G) or live rhesus rotavirus (RRV), and protection against fecal rotavirus shedding following challenge with the murine rotavirus strain EDIM was determined. Neonatal mice immunized intranasally with VP6/LT(R192G) were unprotected at 10 days postimmunization (dpi) and had no detectable rotavirus B-cell (antibody) or CD4(+) CD8(+) T-cell (rotavirus-inducible, Th1 [gamma interferon and interleukin-2 {IL-2}]-, Th2 [IL-5 and IL-4]-, or ThIL-17 [IL-17]-producing spleen cells) responses. However, by 28 and 42 dpi, these mice were significantly (P >or= 0.003) protected and contained memory rotavirus-specific T cells but produced no rotavirus antibody. In contrast, adult mice were nearly fully protected by 10 dpi and contained both rotavirus immunoglobulin G and memory T cells. Neonates immunized orally with RRV were also less protected (P=0.01) than adult mice by 10 dpi and produced correspondingly less rotavirus antibody. Both groups contained few rotavirus-specific memory T cells. Protection levels by 28 dpi for neonates or adults were equal, as were rotavirus antibody levels. This report introduces a neonatal mouse model for active protection studies with rotavirus vaccines. It indicates that, with time, neonatal mice develop full protection after intranasal immunization with VP6/LT(R192G) or oral immunization with a live heterologous rotavirus and supports reports that protection depends on CD4(+) T cells or antibody, respectively. PMID:16641286

  12. Withdrawal of rotavirus vaccine recommendation.

    PubMed

    1999-11-01

    In July 1999, CDC recommended that health-care providers and parents postpone use of the rhesus rotavirus vaccine-tetravalent (RRV-TV) (RotaShield, Wyeth Laboratories, Inc., Marietta, Pennsylvania), for infants, at least until November 1999. This action was based on reports to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System of intussusception (a type of bowel obstruction that occurs when the bowel folds in on itself) among 15 infants who received rotavirus vaccine. Also at that time, the manufacturer, in consultation with the Food and Drug Administration, voluntarily ceased further distribution of the vaccine.

  13. Acute effects of rotavirus and malnutrition on intestinal barrier function in neonatal piglets

    PubMed Central

    Jacobi, Sheila K; Moeser, Adam J; Blikslager, Anthony T; Rhoads, J Marc; Corl, Benjamin A; Harrell, Robert J; Odle, Jack

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of protein-energy malnutrition on intestinal barrier function during rotavirus enteritis in a piglet model. METHODS: Newborn piglets were allotted at day 4 of age to the following treatments: (1) full-strength formula (FSF)/noninfected; (2) FSF/rotavirus infected; (3) half-strength formula (HSF)/noninfected; or (4) HSF/rotavirus infected. After one day of adjustment to the feeding rates, pigs were infected with rotavirus and acute effects on growth and diarrhea were monitored for 3 d and jejunal samples were collected for Ussing-chamber analyses. RESULTS: Piglets that were malnourished or infected had lower body weights on days 2 and 3 post-infection (P < 0.05). Three days post-infection, marked diarrhea and weight loss were accompanied by sharp reductions in villus height (59%) and lactase activity (91%) and increased crypt depth (21%) in infected compared with non-infected pigs (P < 0.05). Malnutrition also increased crypt depth (21%) compared to full-fed piglets. Villus:crypt ratio was reduced (67%) with viral infection. There was a trend for reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance with rotavirus infection and malnutrition (P = 0.1). 3H-mannitol flux was significantly increased (50%; P < 0.001) in rotavirus-infected piglets compared to non-infected piglets, but there was no effect of nutritional status. Furthermore, rotavirus infection reduced localization of the tight junction protein, occludin, in the cell membrane and increased localization in the cytosol. CONCLUSION: Overall, malnutrition had no additive effects to rotavirus infection on intestinal barrier function at day 3 post-infection in a neonatal piglet model. PMID:23964143

  14. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  15. Co-expression of xerophyte Zygophyllum xanthoxylum ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 confers enhanced salinity tolerance in chimeric sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-Qiang; Feng, Rui-Jun; Wang, Suo-Min; Wang, Chun-Mei; Bao, Ai-Ke; Wei, Li; Yuan, Hui-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses that limit the growth and productivity of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). To improve sugar beet's salinity tolerance, the ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 genes encoding tonoplast Na(+)/H(+) antiporter and H(+)-PPase from xerophyte Zygophyllum xanthoxylum were co-expressed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. It is showed here that co-expression of ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 confers enhanced salinity tolerance to the transformed sugar beet plants compared with the wild-type (WT) plants. The chimeric plants grew well in the presence of high salinity (400 mM NaCl), whereas WT plants displayed chlorosis and died within 8 days. Compared to WT plants, the chimeric plants co-expressing ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 accumulated more proline, Na(+) and K(+) in their leaves and petioles when exposed to high salinity, which caused lower solute potential, retained more water and thus subjected to lesser cell membrane damage. Interestingly, the chimeric plants accumulated higher sucrose, glucose and fructose contents in their storage roots than WT plants in the absence or presence of high salinity. Our results suggested that co-expression of ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 improved the osmoregulatory capacity in chimeric sugar beet through increased compartmentalization of ions into the vacuoles by enhancing the activity of proton pumps and thus mitigated Na(+)-toxicity for plants.

  16. Detection, differentiation, and VP1 sequencing of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 and type 3 by a 1-step duplex reverse-transcription PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Wen, X J; Cheng, A C; Wang, M S; Jia, R Y; Zhu, D K; Chen, S; Liu, M F; Liu, F; Chen, X Y

    2014-09-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is an infectious pathogen causing fatal duck viral hepatitis in ducklings. Although both the inactivated vaccines and live attenuated vaccines have been used to protect ducklings, DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 still cause significant serious damage to the duck industry in China and South Korea. For rapid detection, differentiation, and epidemic investigation of DHAV in China, a genotype-specific 1-step duplex reverse-transcription (RT) PCR assay was established in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of the developed RT-PCR assay was evaluated with nucleic acids extracted from 2 DHAV reference strains, and 9 other infectious viruses and bacteria. The genotype-specific primers amplified different size DNA fragments encompassing the complete VP1 gene of the DHAV-1 or DHAV-3. The assay detected the liver samples collected from experimentally infected ducklings and dead ducklings collected from different regions of China. Sequence analysis of these DNA fragments indicated that VP1 sequences of DHAV-1 can be used to distinguish wild type and vaccine strains. The phylogenetic analysis of VP1 sequences indicated that the developed RT-PCR assay can be used for epidemic investigation of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3. The developed RT-PCR assay can be used as a specific molecular tool for simultaneous detection, differentiation, and sequencing the VP1 gene of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, which can be used for understanding the epidemiology and evolution of DHAV.

  17. Co-expression of xerophyte Zygophyllum xanthoxylum ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 confers enhanced salinity tolerance in chimeric sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-Qiang; Feng, Rui-Jun; Wang, Suo-Min; Wang, Chun-Mei; Bao, Ai-Ke; Wei, Li; Yuan, Hui-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses that limit the growth and productivity of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). To improve sugar beet's salinity tolerance, the ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 genes encoding tonoplast Na(+)/H(+) antiporter and H(+)-PPase from xerophyte Zygophyllum xanthoxylum were co-expressed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. It is showed here that co-expression of ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 confers enhanced salinity tolerance to the transformed sugar beet plants compared with the wild-type (WT) plants. The chimeric plants grew well in the presence of high salinity (400 mM NaCl), whereas WT plants displayed chlorosis and died within 8 days. Compared to WT plants, the chimeric plants co-expressing ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 accumulated more proline, Na(+) and K(+) in their leaves and petioles when exposed to high salinity, which caused lower solute potential, retained more water and thus subjected to lesser cell membrane damage. Interestingly, the chimeric plants accumulated higher sucrose, glucose and fructose contents in their storage roots than WT plants in the absence or presence of high salinity. Our results suggested that co-expression of ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 improved the osmoregulatory capacity in chimeric sugar beet through increased compartmentalization of ions into the vacuoles by enhancing the activity of proton pumps and thus mitigated Na(+)-toxicity for plants. PMID:26284097

  18. Heterogeneity of VP4 neutralization epitopes among serotype P1A human rotavirus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, J F; Menchaca, G E; Padilla-Noriega, L; Tamez, R S; Greenberg, H B; López, S; Arias, C F

    1995-01-01

    We have used serotype-specific VP4 and VP7 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (Nt-MAbs), as well as subgroup (SG)-specific MAbs, to characterize by enzyme immunoassay rotavirus strains isolated from diarrheic infants in the city of Monterrey, Mexico, from July 1993 to March 1994. Of a total of 465 children studied, 140 were rotavirus positive, including 3 patients infected with non-group A rotaviruses. The SG and VP7 (G) serotype specificities could be determined for 118 (84%) of the 140 rotavirus-positive stool specimens; 4 rotavirus strains were serotype G1 and SGII; 1 strain was serotype G2 and SGI+II; 112 strains were serotype G3 and SGII; 1 strain was serotype G3 and SGI; and none of the strains was serotype G4. Fifty-eight specimens, representing the 13 different group A rotavirus electropherotypes detected, were chosen for VP4 (P) serotyping. Of these, 48 (83%) strains reacted with the P1A serotype-specific Nt-MAb 1A10. None of the strains reacted with the serotype P2-specific Nt-MAbs tested. Not all viruses that reacted with Nt-MAb 1A10 were recognized by Nt-MAbs 2A3 and 2G1, which also recognize P1A strains, indicating heterogeneity of neutralization epitopes among serotype P1A human rotaviruses. This heterogeneity could be relevant for the specificity of the VP4-mediated neutralizing antibody immune response and indicates the need for antigenic characterization, in addition to genomic typing, of the VP4 proteins of circulating human rotavirus field strains. PMID:7583936

  19. Comparing electron microscopy and a competitive blocking ELISA in the detection of rotaviruses in porcine faeces.

    PubMed

    Rodák, Ladislav; Smítalová, Radka; Šmíd, Bedřich; Nevoránková, Zora; Valíček, Lubomír; Pšikal, Ivan

    2011-02-01

    Analysis of 476 faecal samples from diarrhoeic piglets was performed using electron microscopy (EM) and a competitive blocking (CB)-ELISA based on monoclonal antibodies to the VP6 protein of group A rotavirus. Rotavirus was detected by EM and/or CB-ELISA in 111 (23.3%) samples. Of these, all groups of rotavirus were identified in 83 (74.8%) samples by EM (EM+), while group A rotavirus was identified in 90 (81.1%) samples by CB-ELISA (ELISA+). However, only 62 (55.9%) of samples were positive using both detection methods. The finding of 28 (25.2%) EM-/CB-ELISA+ samples illustrated the high sensitivity of the CB-ELISA method. On PCR analysis, groups B and C rotavirus was found in 3 and 16 of 19 EM+/CB-ELISA- samples, respectively. Although the study illustrates the high sensitivity of a CB-ELISA in rotavirus detection, the findings highlight the need to use a range of diagnostic methods in detecting these viruses in clinical samples.

  20. Temporal and geographical distributions of human rotavirus serotypes, 1983 to 1988.

    PubMed

    Beards, G M; Desselberger, U; Flewett, T H

    1989-12-01

    Between 1983 and 1988, subgroups and serotypes were determined for 907 of 1,084 clinical specimens of rotaviruses collected in various countries of Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia. Enhanced enzyme immunoassays based on monoclonal antibodies specific for rotavirus proteins VP6 and VP7 were used. Significant differences in the prevalent serotypes were detected from year to year in the United Kingdom and Brazil and also in different countries during the same year. Throughout the study, rotavirus serotype 1 was detected most often (53.8%), followed in frequency by serotype 2 (17.8%), serotype 3 (12.1%), serotype 4 (11.1%), and serotypes other than 1 to 4 (5.1%). No individual serotype was found to predominate consistently in any one location. In the United Kingdom, rotavirus serotypes varied in prevalence in a regular but not predictable way. We suggest that a similar epidemiology might be found in other settings. Seventeen unusual strains were detected. Of these, five strains did not react with reference monoclonal antibodies specific for subgroup I and subgroup II, but they reacted with rotavirus group A-specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies; four strains were of subgroup II, serotype 2, and at least one had a "long" electropherotype; two strains were of subgroup I, serotype 2 with a long electropherotype; and one strain was of subgroup I, serotype 3. Five group C rotaviruses were detected.

  1. A reverse evidence of rotavirus vaccines impact

    PubMed Central

    Martinón-Torres, Federico; Aramburo, Angela; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Cebey, Miriam; Seoane-Pillado, María Teresa; Redondo-Collazo, Lorenzo; Martinón-Sánchez, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, and due to a quality problem identified in the vaccine manufacture, the rotavirus (RV) vaccination was withheld in Spain during 5 months. Our study aimed to evaluate the impact that this sudden cease had on rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (RAGE) hospitalizations. An increase in RAGE hospitalization was observed in parallel to the drop in vaccine coverage. Here, we report the first reverse evidence of rotavirus vaccine impact. PMID:23836258

  2. The impact of rotavirus disease in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Schael, I

    1996-09-01

    Information concerning the disease burden of rotavirus, particularly in developing countries, has important implications for the use and for monitoring the impact of rotavirus vaccines. Although rotavirus has been recognized as the most frequent cause of hospitalization in the world, national estimates and specific information about the incidence of hospitalization for rotavirus gastroenteritis are very limited. Consequently, estimates of the incidence of hospitalization among children during the first 2 years of life in Venezuela were determined by extrapolation of data from a community-based study carried out in Caracas.

  3. Prospects for development of a rotavirus vaccine against rotavirus diarrhea in infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Kapikian, A Z; Flores, J; Hoshino, Y; Midthun, K; Gorziglia, M; Green, K Y; Chanock, R M; Potash, L; Sears, S D; Clements, M L

    1989-01-01

    Major advances have been made in elucidating the etiologic agents of severe infantile diarrhea, and it is clear that rotaviruses are the single most important etiologic agents. Progress in the development of rotavirus vaccine candidates has also moved swiftly with the "Jennerian" approach, in which a related live, attenuated rotavirus strain from a nonhuman host is used as the immunizing antigen. If this strategy is not effective against all rotavirus serotypes, reassortant rotaviruses hold great promise for the development of a multivalent vaccine. Field trials with the "Jennerian" approach vaccines are under way, and phase 1 trials with the reassortants have been initiated.

  4. Comparative study on the mechanisms of rotavirus inactivation by sodium dodecyl sulfate and ethylenediaminetetraacetate

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.L.; Ashley, C.S.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes a comparative study on the effects of the anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate and the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate on purified rotavirus SA-11 particles. Both chemicals readily inactivated rotavirus at quite low concentrations and under very mild conditions. In addition, both agents modified the viral capsid and prevented the adsorption of inactivated virions to cells. Capsid damage by ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused a shift in the densities of rotavirions from about l.35 to about 1.37 g/ml and a reduction in their sedimentation coefficients. Sodium dodcyl sulfate, on the other hand, did not detectably alter either of these physical properties of rotavirions. Both agents caused some alteration of the isoelectric points of the virions. Finally, analysis of rotavirus proteins showed that ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused the loss of two protein peaks from the electrophoretic pattern of virions but sodium dodecyl sulfate caused the loss of only one of these same protein peaks.

  5. A rapid method to produce high yields of purified rotavirus particles.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Guillermo Adolfo; Argüelles, Marcelo Horacio; Castello, Alejandro Andrés; Mas, Neus Jiménez; Glikmann, Graciela

    2002-06-01

    A rapid purification method of rotavirus particles to high yield retaining the double shelled structure of infectious virus is described. Group A rotavirus (UK strain) was concentrated through a cushion of colloidal silica (rho=1.10 g/cm(3)) or by precipitating with polyethylene glycol 8000. After concentration, infectious rotavirus was cleared from host cell proteins by density equilibrium centrifugation in gradients of colloidal silica using near vertical rotors. Characterisation of purified virus assessed by electron microscopy and poliacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) revealed the typical wheel shape structure of rotavirus particles and the presence of the 11 segments of dsRNA arranged in the 4-2-3-2 pattern. Presence of rotavirus structural proteins including VP6, VP4 and VP7 from the outer shell, was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and Western blot using polyclonal and VP6-specific monoclonal antibodies. This method achieved a approximately 1500 fold purification, which retained approximately 80% infectivity depending on the concentration protocol used, while yielding 160 microg of viral protein per each litre of infected cell culture medium. The time required for the isopycnic centrifugation was only 25 min and the entire completion of the method required 3.5 h. The method is simple technically and applicable to the purification of large as well as minute amounts of virus.

  6. Heterotypic passive protection induced by synthetic peptides corresponding to VP7 and VP4 of bovine rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, M K; Attah-Poku, S K; Redmond, M J; Parker, M D; Sabara, M I; Frenchick, P; Babiuk, L A

    1991-01-01

    We have evaluated the potential of two peptides derived from highly conserved regions of rotavirus outer capsid proteins (VP7 and VP4) to act as a rotavirus vaccine. The capacity of peptides coupled to rotavirus VP6 spherical particles to provide passive protection in a murine model was compared with the protection induced by peptide-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) conjugates. Female mice were immunized a total of three times before and during pregnancy. Suckling mouse pups were challenged at 7 days of age with either homologous or heterologous rotavirus serotypes. The efficacy of vaccination was determined by analyzing the clinical symptoms and measuring xylose adsorption in the intestine. In this model the VP4 peptide-VP6 conjugate provided protection equal to that obtained using bovine rotavirus (BRV) as the immunogen. The VP7 peptide-VP6 conjugate provided slightly less protection than the VP4 peptide-VP6 conjugate. A mixture of the VP4 peptide-VP6 and VP7 peptide-VP6 conjugates provided better heterologous protection than immunization with BRV. In contrast, KLH-conjugated peptides provided only partial protection. The significance of a synthetic-peptide-based rotavirus vaccine in the prevention of rotavirus infections is discussed. Images PMID:1851871

  7. Innate immune responses to rotavirus infection in macrophages depend on MAVS but involve neither the NLRP3 inflammasome nor JNK and p38 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Di Fiore, Izabel J M; Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S

    2015-10-01

    Rotavirus infection is a major cause of life-threatening infantile gastroenteritis. The innate immune system provides an immediate mechanism of suppressing viral replication and is necessary for an effective adaptive immune response. Innate immunity involves host recognition of viral infection and establishment of a powerful antiviral state through the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as type-1 interferon (IFN). Macrophages, the front-line cells of innate immunity, produce IFN and other cytokines in response to viral infection. However, the role of macrophages during rotavirus infection is not well defined. We demonstrate here that RRV rotavirus triggers the production of proinflammatory cytokines from mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. IFN and antiviral cytokine production was abolished in rotavirus-infected MAVS (-/-) macrophages. This indicates that rotavirus triggers innate immunity in macrophages through RIG-I and/or MDA5 viral recognition, and MAVS signaling is essential for cytokine responses in macrophages. Rotavirus induced IFN expression in both wild type and MDA5 (-/-) macrophages, showing that MDA5 is not essential for IFN secretion following infection, and RIG-I and MDA5 may act redundantly in promoting rotavirus recognition. Interestingly, rotavirus neither stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and JNK nor activated the NLRP3 inflammasome, demonstrating that these components might not be involved in innate responses to rotavirus infection in macrophages. Our results indicate that rotavirus elicits intracellular signaling in macrophages, resulting in the induction of IFN and antiviral cytokines, and advance our understanding of the involvement of these cells in innate responses against rotavirus.

  8. Whole-genomic analysis of a human G1P[9] rotavirus strain reveals intergenogroup-reassortment events.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Souvik; Shintani, Tsuzumi; Urushibara, Noriko; Taniguchi, Koki; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2012-08-01

    Group A rotavirus (RVA) strain K8 (RVA/Human-tc/JPN/K8/1977/G1P[9]) was found to have Wa-like VP7 and NSP1 genes and AU-1-like VP4 and NSP5 genes. To determine the exact origin and overall genetic makeup of this unusual RVA strain, the remaining genes (VP1-VP3, VP6 and NSP2-NSP4) of K8 were analysed in this study. Strain K8 exhibited a G1-P[9]-I1-R3-C3-M3-A1-N1-T3-E3-H3 genotype constellation, not reported previously. The VP6 and NSP2 genes of strain K8 were related closely to those of common human Wa-like G1P[8] and/or G3P[8] strains, whilst its VP1-VP3, NSP3 and NSP4 genes were related more closely to those of AU-1-like RVAs and/or AU-1-like genes of multi-reassortant strains than to those of other RVAs. Therefore, strain K8 might have originated from intergenogroup-reassortment events involving acquisition of four Wa-like genes, possibly from G1P[8] RVAs, by an AU-1-like P[9] strain. Whole-genomic analysis of strain K8 has provided important insights into the complex genetic diversity of RVAs. PMID:22592265

  9. African horse sickness virus serotype 4 antigens, VP1-1, VP2-2, VP4, VP7 and NS3, induce cytotoxic T cell responses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Faber, F E; van Kleef, M; Tshilwane, S I; Pretorius, A

    2016-07-15

    It was shown in a previous study that proliferating CD8+ T cells could be detected in immune horse peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) when stimulated with African horse sickness virus serotype 4 (AHSV4). In this study the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells were tested by using the fluorescent antigen-transfected target cells-cytotoxic T lymphocytes (FATT-CTL) assay, for both the virus and its individual proteins expressed in Escherichia coli. This CTL assay measures the killing of viral protein expressing cells. AHSV proteins were successfully expressed in E. coli using the pET102/D-TOPO expression vector and the effector cells were stimulated with these recombinant proteins or with live viable virulent AHSV4. The AHSV genes were amplified and cloned into the pIRES-hrGFP II (pGFPempty) vector and these plasmid vectors encoding antigen-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins were used to nucleofect PBMC, the target cells. The elimination of antigen-GFP expressing cells by CTL was quantified by flowcytometry. VP1-1, VP2-2, VP4, VP7 and NS3, antigen-specific CD8+ T cells resulted in cell lysis suggesting that CTL may play a role in the immune response induced against the AHSV4 vaccine strain. PMID:27063332

  10. Establishment of indirect immunofluorescence assay for rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Tao, J; Zhang, J; Liu, X; Jin, H; Jiang, C; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most frequent cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide and a significant cause of death in infants and young children, following severe diarrhea and dehydration. Rotavirus vaccines are considered the most effective way to prevent rotavirus infections. In the process of developing rotavirus vaccines, it is crucial to establish a reliable and standardized method to determine vaccine titer. In this study, we developed an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) to determine the infectious titer of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus (LLR) vaccine grown in MA104 cells. The activating concentration of trypsin was 1 µg/ml for healthy monolayers of MA104 cells at 100% confluence. After incubation for 18 hr, a rabbit anti-SA11 polyclonal antibody, diluted at 1:800 in PBS, was added to all wells, followed by an Alexa-488-conjugated secondary antibody diluted at 1:500 in PBS. Cells were examined with a fluorescence microscope. Our results show that IFA was more reproducible, more sensitive, simpler, and more rapid than the log 50% cell culture infectious dose-ELISA (lgCCID50-ELISA) in measuring the rotavirus vaccines. IFA provided a reliable basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of rotavirus, and the certification of rotavirus vaccine production.

  11. Effect of enzymes on rotavirus infectivity.

    PubMed

    Barnett, B B; Spendlove, R S; Clark, M L

    1979-07-01

    The infectivity of a bovine rotavirus was enhanced 140-, 8-, and 3-fold, respectively, by trypsin, protease, and lactase. Ficin, carboxypeptidases A and B, lysozyme, and beta-galactosidase had little effect on the infectivity. Chymotrypsin caused a threefold decrease in the infectivity. Trypsin acts directly on the rotavirus and not on the host cell.

  12. Establishment of indirect immunofluorescence assay for rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Tao, J; Zhang, J; Liu, X; Jin, H; Jiang, C; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most frequent cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide and a significant cause of death in infants and young children, following severe diarrhea and dehydration. Rotavirus vaccines are considered the most effective way to prevent rotavirus infections. In the process of developing rotavirus vaccines, it is crucial to establish a reliable and standardized method to determine vaccine titer. In this study, we developed an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) to determine the infectious titer of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus (LLR) vaccine grown in MA104 cells. The activating concentration of trypsin was 1 µg/ml for healthy monolayers of MA104 cells at 100% confluence. After incubation for 18 hr, a rabbit anti-SA11 polyclonal antibody, diluted at 1:800 in PBS, was added to all wells, followed by an Alexa-488-conjugated secondary antibody diluted at 1:500 in PBS. Cells were examined with a fluorescence microscope. Our results show that IFA was more reproducible, more sensitive, simpler, and more rapid than the log 50% cell culture infectious dose-ELISA (lgCCID50-ELISA) in measuring the rotavirus vaccines. IFA provided a reliable basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of rotavirus, and the certification of rotavirus vaccine production. PMID:26982471

  13. Therapeutics Insight with Inclusive Immunopharmacology Explication of Human Rotavirus A for the Treatment of Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Hashem, Abu; Keya, Chaman Ara; Salimullah, Md

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe infant and childhood diarrhea worldwide, and the morbidity and mortality rate is going to be outnumbered in developing countries like Bangladesh. To mitigate this substantial burden of disease, new therapeutics such as vaccine and drug are swiftly required against rotavirus. The present therapeutics insight study was performed with comprehensive immunoinformatics and pharmacoinformatics approach. T and B-cell epitopes were assessed in the conserved region of outer capsid protein VP4 among the highly reviewed strains from different countries including Bangladesh. The results suggest that epitope SU1 (TLKNLNDNY) could be an ideal candidate among the predicted five epitopes for both T and B-cell epitopes for the development of universal vaccine against rotavirus. This research also suggests five novel drug compounds from medicinal plant Rhizophora mucronata Lamk. for better therapeutics strategies against rotavirus diarrhea based on 3D structure building, pharmacophore, ADMET, and QSAR properties. The exact mode of action between drug compounds and target protein VP4 were revealed by molecular docking analysis. Drug likeness and oral bioavailability further confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed drugs against rotavirus diarrhea. This study might be implemented for experimental validation to facilitate the novel vaccine and drug design.

  14. Therapeutics Insight with Inclusive Immunopharmacology Explication of Human Rotavirus A for the Treatment of Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Hashem, Abu; Keya, Chaman Ara; Salimullah, Md.

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe infant and childhood diarrhea worldwide, and the morbidity and mortality rate is going to be outnumbered in developing countries like Bangladesh. To mitigate this substantial burden of disease, new therapeutics such as vaccine and drug are swiftly required against rotavirus. The present therapeutics insight study was performed with comprehensive immunoinformatics and pharmacoinformatics approach. T and B-cell epitopes were assessed in the conserved region of outer capsid protein VP4 among the highly reviewed strains from different countries including Bangladesh. The results suggest that epitope SU1 (TLKNLNDNY) could be an ideal candidate among the predicted five epitopes for both T and B-cell epitopes for the development of universal vaccine against rotavirus. This research also suggests five novel drug compounds from medicinal plant Rhizophora mucronata Lamk. for better therapeutics strategies against rotavirus diarrhea based on 3D structure building, pharmacophore, ADMET, and QSAR properties. The exact mode of action between drug compounds and target protein VP4 were revealed by molecular docking analysis. Drug likeness and oral bioavailability further confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed drugs against rotavirus diarrhea. This study might be implemented for experimental validation to facilitate the novel vaccine and drug design. PMID:27445802

  15. Therapeutics Insight with Inclusive Immunopharmacology Explication of Human Rotavirus A for the Treatment of Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Hashem, Abu; Keya, Chaman Ara; Salimullah, Md

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe infant and childhood diarrhea worldwide, and the morbidity and mortality rate is going to be outnumbered in developing countries like Bangladesh. To mitigate this substantial burden of disease, new therapeutics such as vaccine and drug are swiftly required against rotavirus. The present therapeutics insight study was performed with comprehensive immunoinformatics and pharmacoinformatics approach. T and B-cell epitopes were assessed in the conserved region of outer capsid protein VP4 among the highly reviewed strains from different countries including Bangladesh. The results suggest that epitope SU1 (TLKNLNDNY) could be an ideal candidate among the predicted five epitopes for both T and B-cell epitopes for the development of universal vaccine against rotavirus. This research also suggests five novel drug compounds from medicinal plant Rhizophora mucronata Lamk. for better therapeutics strategies against rotavirus diarrhea based on 3D structure building, pharmacophore, ADMET, and QSAR properties. The exact mode of action between drug compounds and target protein VP4 were revealed by molecular docking analysis. Drug likeness and oral bioavailability further confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed drugs against rotavirus diarrhea. This study might be implemented for experimental validation to facilitate the novel vaccine and drug design. PMID:27445802

  16. Cleavage of rotavirus VP4 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ludert, J E; Krishnaney, A A; Burns, J W; Vo, P T; Greenberg, H B

    1996-03-01

    The infectivity of rotavirus particles is dependent on proteolytic cleavage of the outer capsid protein, VP4, at a specific site. This cleavage event yields two fragments, identified as VP5* and VP8*. It has been hypothesized that the particle is more stable, but non-infectious, when VP4 is in the uncleaved state. Uncleaved VP4 and the resultant increased stability might be advantageous for the virus to resist environmental degradation until it infects a susceptible host. When VP4 is cleaved in the lumen of the host's gastrointestinal tract, the virus particle would become less stable but more infectious. To test this hypothesis, a series of experiments was undertaken to analyse the cleavage state of VP4 on virus shed by an infected host into the environment. Immunoblots of intestinal wash solutions derived from infant and adult BALB/c mice infected with a virulent cell culture-adapted variant of the EDIM virus (EW) or wild-type murine rotavirus EDIM-Cambridge were analysed. Virtually all of the VP4 in these samples was in the cleaved form. Moreover, cell culture titration of trypsin-treated and untreated intestinal contents from pups infected with EW indicated that excreted virus is fully activated prior to trypsin addition. It was also observed that trypsin-activated virus has no disadvantage in initiating infection in naive animals over virions containing an intact VP4. These studies indicate that VP4 is cleaved upon release from the intestinal cell and that virus shed into the environment does not have an intact VP4.

  17. Zoonotic transmission of rotavirus: surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Dóró, Renáta; Farkas, Szilvia L; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotavirus (Rotavirus A, RVA) is the main cause of acute dehydrating diarrhea in humans and numerous animal species. RVA shows vast diversity and a variety of human strains share genetic and antigenic features with animal origin RVA strains. This finding suggests that interspecies transmission is an important mechanism of rotavirus evolution and contributes to the diversity of human RVA strains. RVA is responsible for half a million deaths and several million hospitalizations worldwide. Globally, two rotavirus vaccines are available for routine use in infants. These vaccines show a great efficacy profile and induce protective immunity against various rotavirus strains. However, little is known about the long-term evolution and epidemiology of RVA strains under selective pressure related to vaccine use. Continuous strain surveillance in the post-vaccine licensure era is needed to help better understand mechanisms that may affect vaccine effectiveness.

  18. Genetic engineering of rotaviruses by reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Komoto, Satoshi; Taniguchi, Koki

    2013-07-01

    The rotavirus genome is composed of 11 gene segments of dsRNA. A recent breakthrough in the field of rotaviruses is the development of a reverse genetics system for generating recombinant rotaviruses possessing a gene segment derived from cloned cDNA. Although this approach is a helper virus-driven system that is technically limited and gives low levels of recombinant viruses, it allows alteration of the rotavirus genome, thus contributing to our understanding of these medically important viruses. So far, this approach has successfully been applied to three of the 11 viral segments in our laboratory and others, and the efficiency of recovery of recombinant viruses has been improved. However, we are still waiting for the development of a helper virus-free reverse genetics system for generating an infectious rotavirus entirely from cDNAs, as has been achieved for other members of the Reoviridae family.

  19. Zoonotic transmission of rotavirus: surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Dóró, Renáta; Farkas, Szilvia L; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotavirus (Rotavirus A, RVA) is the main cause of acute dehydrating diarrhea in humans and numerous animal species. RVA shows vast diversity and a variety of human strains share genetic and antigenic features with animal origin RVA strains. This finding suggests that interspecies transmission is an important mechanism of rotavirus evolution and contributes to the diversity of human RVA strains. RVA is responsible for half a million deaths and several million hospitalizations worldwide. Globally, two rotavirus vaccines are available for routine use in infants. These vaccines show a great efficacy profile and induce protective immunity against various rotavirus strains. However, little is known about the long-term evolution and epidemiology of RVA strains under selective pressure related to vaccine use. Continuous strain surveillance in the post-vaccine licensure era is needed to help better understand mechanisms that may affect vaccine effectiveness. PMID:26428261

  20. Serotypic differentiation of group A rotaviruses with porcine rotavirus gene 9 probes.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, B I; Saif, L J; Jackwood, D J; Gorziglia, M

    1990-01-01

    The serotypic specificities of Gottfried and OSU porcine rotavirus gene 9 probes were investigated in a dot hybridization assay. The probes were reacted with homologous and heterologous serotypes of group A rotaviruses of human and animal origin. Hybridizations were conducted under relatively low-stringency (52 degrees C, no formamide, 5 x SSC) and high-stringency (52 degrees C, 50% formamide, formamide, 5 x SSC) conditions (1 x SSC is 0.15 M NaCl plus 0.015 M sodium citrate). Under conditions of relatively low stringency, the Gottfried and OSU gene 9 probes demonstrated broad cross-reactivity and were useful in the detection of homologous and heterologous serotypes of group A rotaviruses. Under conditions of relatively high stringency, the Gottfried and OSU gene 9 probes were serotype specific. The Gottfried gene 9 probe (serotype 4) hybridized with homologous Gottfried porcine rotavirus as well as the serotype 4 human rotaviruses ST3 and VA70. The OSU gene 9 probe (serotype 5) hybridized with homologous OSU porcine rotavirus and the serotype 5 equine rotavirus H1. Hybridization was not observed with the antigenically distinct group B and C porcine rotaviruses or with other porcine enteric viruses, including calicivirus and a coronavirus, transmissible gastroenteritis virus, regardless of stringency conditions. Analysis of 14 group A rotavirus-positive field samples resulted in the serotypic differentiation, collectively, of six serotype 4 or 5 porcine rotaviruses. No field samples reacted with both the Gottfried and OSU gene 9 probes. Images PMID:2174902

  1. Burden of Norovirus and Rotavirus in Children After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction, Cochabamba, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    McAtee, Casey L; Webman, Rachel; Gilman, Robert H; Mejia, Carolina; Bern, Caryn; Apaza, Sonia; Espetia, Susan; Pajuelo, Mónica; Saito, Mayuko; Challappa, Roxanna; Soria, Richard; Ribera, Jose P; Lozano, Daniel; Torrico, Faustino

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in the field may set the stage for a changing landscape of diarrheal illness affecting children worldwide. Norovirus and rotavirus are the two major viral enteropathogens of childhood. This study describes the prevalence of norovirus and rotavirus 2 years after widespread rotavirus vaccination in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Stool samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and outpatients aged 5-24 months without AGE were recruited from an urban hospital serving Bolivia's third largest city. Both viruses were genotyped, and norovirus GII.4 was further sequenced. Norovirus was found much more frequently than rotavirus. Norovirus was detected in 69/201 (34.3%) of specimens from children with AGE and 13/71 (18.3%) of those without diarrhea. Rotavirus was detected in 38/201 (18.9%) of diarrheal specimens and 3/71 (4.2%) of non-diarrheal specimens. Norovirus GII was identified in 97.8% of norovirus-positive samples; GII.4 was the most common genotype (71.4% of typed specimens). Rotavirus G3P[8] was the most prevalent rotavirus genotype (44.0% of typed specimens) and G2P[4] was second most prevalent (16.0% of typed specimens). This community is likely part of a trend toward norovirus predominance over rotavirus in children after widespread vaccination against rotavirus.

  2. Co-expression of xerophyte Zygophyllum xanthoxylum ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 confers enhanced salinity tolerance in chimeric sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Qiang; Feng, Rui-Jun; Wang, Suo-Min; Wang, Chun-Mei; Bao, Ai-Ke; Wei, Li; Yuan, Hui-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses that limit the growth and productivity of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). To improve sugar beet’s salinity tolerance, the ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 genes encoding tonoplast Na+/H+ antiporter and H+-PPase from xerophyte Zygophyllum xanthoxylum were co-expressed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. It is showed here that co-expression of ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 confers enhanced salinity tolerance to the transformed sugar beet plants compared with the wild-type (WT) plants. The chimeric plants grew well in the presence of high salinity (400 mM NaCl), whereas WT plants displayed chlorosis and died within 8 days. Compared to WT plants, the chimeric plants co-expressing ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 accumulated more proline, Na+ and K+ in their leaves and petioles when exposed to high salinity, which caused lower solute potential, retained more water and thus subjected to lesser cell membrane damage. Interestingly, the chimeric plants accumulated higher sucrose, glucose and fructose contents in their storage roots than WT plants in the absence or presence of high salinity. Our results suggested that co-expression of ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 improved the osmoregulatory capacity in chimeric sugar beet through increased compartmentalization of ions into the vacuoles by enhancing the activity of proton pumps and thus mitigated Na+-toxicity for plants. PMID:26284097

  3. Effectiveness of Monovalent and Pentavalent Rotavirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Immergluck, Lilly Cheng; Held, Melissa; Jain, Shabnam; Chan, Trisha; Grizas, Alexandra P.; Khizer, Saadia; Barrett, Carol; Quaye, Osbourne; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Gautam, Rashi; Bowen, Michael D.; Moore, Jessica; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Vázquez, Marietta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Previous US evaluations have not assessed monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1, a G1P[8] human rotavirus strain) effectiveness, because of its later introduction (2008). Using case-control methodology, we measured the vaccine effectiveness (VE) of the 2-dose RV1 and 3-dose pentavalent vaccine (RV5) series against rotavirus disease resulting in hospital emergency department or inpatient care. METHODS: Children were eligible for enrollment if they presented to 1 of 5 hospitals (3 in Georgia, 2 in Connecticut) with diarrhea of ≤10 days’ duration during January through June 2010 or 2011, and were born after RV1 introduction. Stools were collected; immunization records were obtained from providers and state electronic immunization information system (IIS). Case-subjects (children testing rotavirus antigen-positive) were compared with 2 control groups: children testing rotavirus negative and children selected from IIS. RESULTS: Overall, 165 rotavirus-case subjects and 428 rotavirus-negative controls were enrolled. Using the rotavirus-negative controls, RV1 VE was 91% (95% confidence interval [CI] 80 to 95) and RV5 VE was 92% (CI 75 to 97) among children aged ≥8 months. The RV1 VE against G2P[4] disease was high (94%, CI 78 to 98), as was that against G1P[8] disease (89%, CI 70 to 96). RV1 effectiveness was sustained among children aged 12 through 23 months (VE 91%; CI 75 to 96). VE point estimates using IIS controls were similar to those using rotavirus-negative controls. CONCLUSIONS: RV1 and RV5 were both highly effective against severe rotavirus disease. RV1 conferred sustained protection during the first 2 years of life and demonstrated high effectiveness against G2P[4] (heterotypic) disease. PMID:23776114

  4. Interactions between Multiple Genetic Determinants in the 5′ UTR and VP1 Capsid Control Pathogenesis of Chronic Post-Viral Myopathy caused by Coxsackievirus B1

    PubMed Central

    Sandager, Maribeth M.; Nugent, Jaime L.; Schulz, Wade L.; Messner, Ronald P.; Tam, Patricia E.

    2008-01-01

    Mice infected with coxsackievirus B1 Tucson (CVB1T) develop chronic, post-viral myopathy (PVM) with clinical manifestations of hind limb muscle weakness and myositis. The objective of the current study was to establish the genetic basis of myopathogenicity in CVB1T. Using a reverse genetics approach, full attenuation of PVM could only be achieved by simultaneously mutating four sites located at C706U in the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR) and at Y87F, V136A, and T276A in the VP1 capsid. Engineering these four myopathic determinants into an amyopathic CVB1T variant restored the ability to cause PVM. Moreover, these same four determinants controlled PVM expression in a second strain of mice, indicating that the underlying mechanism is operational in mice of different genetic backgrounds. Modeling studies predict that C706U alters both local and long-range pairing in the 5′ UTR, and that VP1 determinants are located on the capsid surface. However, these differences did not affect viral titers, temperature stability, pH stability, or the antibody response to virus. These studies demonstrate that PVM develops from a complex interplay between viral determinants in the 5′ UTR and VP1 capsid and have uncovered intriguing similarities between genetic determinants that cause PVM and those involved in pathogenesis of other enteroviruses. PMID:18029287

  5. Enhancing immune responses of EV71 VP1 DNA vaccine by co-inoculating plasmid IL-12 or GM-CSF expressing vector in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, X; Fang, X; Li, J; Kong, L; Li, B; Ding, X

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative viral agent for large outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease in children and infants, yet there is no vaccine or effective antiviral treatment for severe EV71 infection. The immunogenicity of EV71 VP1 DNA vaccine and the immunoregulatory activity of interleukin-12 (IL-12) or granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were investigated. DNA vaccine plasmids, pcDNA-VP1, pcDNA-IL-12 and pcDNA-GM-CSF were constructed and inoculated into BALB/c mice with or without pcDNA-IL-12 or pcDNA-GM-CSF by intramuscular injection. Cellular and humoral immune responses were assessed by indirect ELISA, lymphocyte proliferation assays, cytokine release assay and FACS. The VP1 DNA vaccine had good immunogenicity and can induce specific humoral and cellular immunity in BALB/c mice, while IL-2 or GM-CSF plays an immunoadjuvant role and enhances specific immune responses. This study provides a frame of reference for the design of DNA vaccines against EV71. PMID:27188732

  6. Enhancing immune responses of EV71 VP1 DNA vaccine by co-inoculating plasmid IL-12 or GM-CSF expressing vector in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, X; Fang, X; Li, J; Kong, L; Li, B; Ding, X

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative viral agent for large outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease in children and infants, yet there is no vaccine or effective antiviral treatment for severe EV71 infection. The immunogenicity of EV71 VP1 DNA vaccine and the immunoregulatory activity of interleukin-12 (IL-12) or granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were investigated. DNA vaccine plasmids, pcDNA-VP1, pcDNA-IL-12 and pcDNA-GM-CSF were constructed and inoculated into BALB/c mice with or without pcDNA-IL-12 or pcDNA-GM-CSF by intramuscular injection. Cellular and humoral immune responses were assessed by indirect ELISA, lymphocyte proliferation assays, cytokine release assay and FACS. The VP1 DNA vaccine had good immunogenicity and can induce specific humoral and cellular immunity in BALB/c mice, while IL-2 or GM-CSF plays an immunoadjuvant role and enhances specific immune responses. This study provides a frame of reference for the design of DNA vaccines against EV71.

  7. Whole genomic constellation of the first human G8 rotavirus strain detected in Japan.

    PubMed

    Agbemabiese, Chantal Ama; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Doan, Yen Hai; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2015-10-01

    Human G8 Rotavirus A (RVA) strains are commonly detected in Africa but are rarely detected in Japan and elsewhere in the world. In this study, the whole genome sequence of the first human G8 RVA strain designated AU109 isolated in a child with acute gastroenteritis in 1994 was determined in order to understand how the strain was generated including the host species origin of its genes. The genotype constellation of AU109 was G8-P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2. Phylogenetic analyses of the 11 genome segments revealed that its VP7 and VP1 genes were closely related to those of a Hungarian human G8P[14] RVA strain and these genes shared the most recent common ancestors in 1988 and 1982, respectively. AU109 possessed an NSP2 gene closely related to those of Chinese sheep and goat RVA strains. The remaining eight genome segments were closely related to Japanese human G2P[4] strains which circulated around 1985-1990. Bayesian evolutionary analyses revealed that the NSP2 gene of AU109 and those of the Chinese sheep and goat RVA strains diverged from a common ancestor around 1937. In conclusion, AU109 was generated through genetic reassortment event where Japanese DS-1-like G2P[4] strains circulating around 1985-1990 obtained the VP7, VP1 and NSP2 genes from unknown ruminant G8 RVA strains. These observations highlight the need for comprehensive examination of the whole genomes of RVA strains of less explored host species.

  8. Whole genomic constellation of the first human G8 rotavirus strain detected in Japan.

    PubMed

    Agbemabiese, Chantal Ama; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Doan, Yen Hai; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2015-10-01

    Human G8 Rotavirus A (RVA) strains are commonly detected in Africa but are rarely detected in Japan and elsewhere in the world. In this study, the whole genome sequence of the first human G8 RVA strain designated AU109 isolated in a child with acute gastroenteritis in 1994 was determined in order to understand how the strain was generated including the host species origin of its genes. The genotype constellation of AU109 was G8-P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2. Phylogenetic analyses of the 11 genome segments revealed that its VP7 and VP1 genes were closely related to those of a Hungarian human G8P[14] RVA strain and these genes shared the most recent common ancestors in 1988 and 1982, respectively. AU109 possessed an NSP2 gene closely related to those of Chinese sheep and goat RVA strains. The remaining eight genome segments were closely related to Japanese human G2P[4] strains which circulated around 1985-1990. Bayesian evolutionary analyses revealed that the NSP2 gene of AU109 and those of the Chinese sheep and goat RVA strains diverged from a common ancestor around 1937. In conclusion, AU109 was generated through genetic reassortment event where Japanese DS-1-like G2P[4] strains circulating around 1985-1990 obtained the VP7, VP1 and NSP2 genes from unknown ruminant G8 RVA strains. These observations highlight the need for comprehensive examination of the whole genomes of RVA strains of less explored host species. PMID:26275468

  9. Laboratory-Confirmed Rotavirus Disease in Utah Children: Clinical and Economic Impact of Rotavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Angel Herrera; Stockmann, Chris; Pavia, Andrew T.; Hersh, Adam L.; Thorell, Emily A.; Weng, Hsin Yi; Korgenski, Kent; Byington, Carrie L.; Ampofo, Krow

    2012-01-01

    Background. Rotavirus is the most common cause of infectious diarrhea in children worldwide. Recent studies have described changes in the burden of all-cause gastroenteritis; however, there are limited data on the clinical and economic impact of rotavirus vaccine on cases of laboratory-confirmed rotavirus disease. Methods. We performed a retrospective study of laboratory-confirmed rotavirus disease from July 2003 through June 2010 at a children's hospital and a community hospital in Utah. Demographics and hospital costs for children <5 years with rotavirus symptoms and a positive rotavirus enzyme immunoassay test on a stool specimen were abstracted from electronic medical records. We compared the prevaccine period (2003–2007) with the postvaccine period (2008–2010). Results. The overall incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis declined in the postvaccine period, from 26.6 to 5.2 cases per 10 000 person-years for Salt Lake County residents. The largest decrease in the incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis was among children <12 months (−87%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 79–93). Older children (12–23 months) also experienced significant decreases (−81%; 95% CI, 72–88), as did those 24–59 months (−61%; 95% CI, 51–71). In 2009, 3 years after rotavirus vaccine introduction, there was a 79% decrease in emergency department visits and a 78% decrease in hospitalizations across both hospitals. The cost of emergency department visits and hospitalizations for rotavirus gastroenteritis decreased by 79% and 72%, respectively, resulting in annual savings of $790 000 at a children's hospital and $140 000 at a community hospital. Conclusion. Rotavirus vaccination in infants has dramatically decreased the clinical burden and direct medical costs of rotavirus gastroenteritis in both infants and young children. PMID:23687580

  10. Rotavirus infections in Galapagos sea lions.

    PubMed

    Coria-Galindo, Elsa; Rangel-Huerta, Emma; Verdugo-Rodríguez, Antonio; Brousset, Dulce; Salazar, Sandie; Padilla-Noriega, Luis

    2009-07-01

    Group A rotaviruses infect and cause diarrhea in the young of a broad range of terrestrial mammals, but it is unknown, to our knowledge, whether they infect marine mammals. During February and March of 2002 and 2003, we collected 125 serum samples and 18 rectal swab samples from Galapagos sea lion pups (GSL, Zalophus wollebaeki), and 22 serum samples from Galapagos fur seal pups (GFS, Arctocephalus galapagoensis) from nine islands of the Galapagos archipelago, Ecuador. Sera were tested for antibodies (immunoglobulin G [IgG]) to rotavirus by an enzyme immunoassay using rhesus rotavirus as the capture antigen. In addition, rectal swabs were analyzed for the presence of rotavirus genomic double-stranded RNA by silver-stained polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Antibodies to rotavirus were detected in 27 GSL pups (22%) and five GFS pups (23%), and rotavirus RNA was detected in the fecal sample from one GSL pup (6%). These results provide the first evidence that rotavirus infections are prevalent at an early age in Galapagos sea lions and Galapagos fur seals.

  11. Impact of non-routine rotavirus vaccination on hospitalizations for diarrhoea and rotavirus infections in Spain.

    PubMed

    Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Gonzalez-Escalada, Alba; Alvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Garcia-Garcia, Laura; San-Martin, Maria; González-López, Antonio; Gil-de-Miguel, Angel

    2013-10-01

    This study shows hospital discharges related to all-cause diarrhoea and rotavirus infection in children up to five years of age from 2005 to 2009 in Spain. Rotavirus vaccines have been available in Spain since late 2006 and early 2007. They are neither funded nor reimbursed by the National Health Care System. However, they are recommended by the Spanish Association of Pediatricians and prescribed by paediatricians. The vaccination coverage was 17% in 2007, 35% in 2008 and 38% in 2009. Among a total of 111,738 hospitalizations recorded, 24% (N=26,500) were coded as rotavirus and 14% (N=16,217) as diarrhoea of undetermined aetiology. The overall annual incidence of hospitalization was 991,235 and 144 per 100,000 children up to five years of age for all-causes diarrhoea, rotavirus infection and diarrhoea of undetermined aetiology respectively. The annual rate significantly decreased during the study period. Hospitalization rates for all-cause diarrhoea, rotavirus infection and diarrhoea of undetermined aetiology in children under five years of age in 2009 were 35, 37 and 36% lower than in the period 2005-2006, before rotavirus vaccine introduction. This decrease was greater in children <12 months of age: 42% for all-cause diarrhoea and 43% for rotavirus and diarrhoea of undetermined aetiology. The use of rotavirus vaccines, with relatively low vaccination coverage, in Spain has been shown to decrease hospitalizations for rotavirus gastroenteritis and all-cause diarrhoea during the study period.

  12. Protection of agammaglobulinemic piglets from porcine rotavirus infection by antibody against simian rotavirus SA-11.

    PubMed Central

    Lecce, J G; Leary, H L; Clarke, D A; Batema, R P

    1991-01-01

    Rotavirus, a double-stranded RNA virus, has been implicated as a diarrhea-provoking agent in a variety of animal species. Several previous reports have shown that immunization with a single serotype may result in increased in vitro neutralization titers against serotypes not represented in the immunogen. This study was undertaken to determine whether antibody from cows immunized against simian rotavirus strain SA-11 (which is alien to pigs) could protect neonatal piglets from infection with a North Carolina isolate of porcine rotavirus. Accordingly, cows were immunized with SA-11 and an immunoglobulin G (IgG)-rich fraction was isolated from their colostrum. An IgG-rich fraction was similarly isolated from colostrum of nonimmunized cows. At equal concentrations, IgG from SA-11-immunized cows had two- to fourfold higher neutralization titers to seven of eight test strains of rotavirus, including SA-11 (serotype 3); human rotavirus serotypes 1, 3, and 4; North Carolina porcine rotavirus (serotype undetermined); Ohio State porcine rotavirus (serotype 5); and bovine rotavirus (serotype 6). The IgG-rich fractions were fed as dietary supplements to agammaglobulinemic piglets infected with the North Carolina porcine rotavirus. IgG from the SA-11-immunized cows was about eightfold more effective in protecting piglets than was IgG from nonimmunized cows. PMID:1653265

  13. Bovine rotavirus pentavalent vaccine development in India.

    PubMed

    Zade, Jagdish K; Kulkarni, Prasad S; Desai, Sajjad A; Sabale, Rajendra N; Naik, Sameer P; Dhere, Rajeev M

    2014-08-11

    A bovine rotavirus pentavalent vaccine (BRV-PV) containing rotavirus human-bovine (UK) reassortant strains of serotype G1, G2, G3, G4 and G9 has been developed by the Serum Institute of India Ltd, in collaboration with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), USA. The vaccine underwent animal toxicity studies and Phase I and II studies in adults, toddlers and infants. It has been found safe and immunogenic and will undergo a large Phase III study to assess efficacy against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis.

  14. Relative Roles of GM1 Ganglioside, N-Acylneuraminic Acids, and α2β1 Integrin in Mediating Rotavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Fiona E.; Böhm, Raphael; Dang, Vi T.; Holloway, Gavan; Haselhorst, Thomas; Madge, Paul D.; Deveryshetty, Jaigeeth; Yu, Xing; Blanchard, Helen; von Itzstein, Mark

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT N-acetyl- and N-glycolylneuraminic acids (Sia) and α2β1 integrin are frequently used by rotaviruses as cellular receptors through recognition by virion spike protein VP4. The VP4 subunit VP8*, derived from Wa rotavirus, binds the internal N-acetylneuraminic acid on ganglioside GM1. Wa infection is increased by enhanced internal Sia access following terminal Sia removal from main glycan chains with sialidase. The GM1 ligand cholera toxin B (CTB) reduces Wa infectivity. Here, we found sialidase treatment increased cellular GM1 availability and the infectivity of several other human (including RV-3) and animal rotaviruses, typically rendering them susceptible to methyl α-d-N-acetylneuraminide treatment, but did not alter α2β1 usage. CTB reduced the infectivity of these viruses. Aceramido-GM1 inhibited Wa and RV-3 infectivity in untreated and sialidase-treated cells, and GM1 supplementation increased their infectivity, demonstrating the importance of GM1 for infection. Wa recognition of α2β1 and internal Sia were at least partially independent. Rotavirus usage of GM1 was mapped to VP4 using virus reassortants, and RV-3 VP8* bound aceramido-GM1 by saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD NMR). Most rotaviruses recognizing terminal Sia did not use GM1, including RRV. RRV VP8* interacted minimally with aceramido-GM1 by STD NMR. Unusually, TFR-41 rotavirus infectivity depended upon terminal Sia and GM1. Competition of CTB, Sia, and/or aceramido-GM1 with cell binding by VP8* from representative rotaviruses showed that rotavirus Sia and GM1 preferences resulted from VP8*-cell binding. Our major finding is that infection by human rotaviruses of commonly occurring VP4 serotypes involves VP8* binding to cell surface GM1 glycan, typically including the internal N-acetylneuraminic acid. IMPORTANCE Rotaviruses, the major cause of severe infantile gastroenteritis, recognize cell surface receptors through virus spike protein VP4. Several animal

  15. The VP8* Domain of Neonatal Rotavirus Strain G10P[11] Binds to Type II Precursor Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Sasirekha; Cortes-Penfield, Nicolas W.; Hu, Liya; Crawford, Sue E.; Czako, Rita; Smith, David F.; Kang, Gagandeep; Ramig, Robert F.; Le Pendu, Jacques; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses with a P[11] VP4 genotype exhibit a tropism for neonates. Interaction of the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4 with sialic acid was thought to be the key mediator for rotavirus infectivity. However, recent studies have indicated a role for nonsialylated glycoconjugates, including histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), in the infectivity of human rotaviruses. We sought to determine if the bovine rotavirus-derived VP8* of a reassortant neonatal G10P[11] virus interacts with hitherto uncharacterized glycans. In an array screen of >600 glycans, VP8* P[11] showed specific binding to glycans with the Galβ1-4GlcNAc motif, which forms the core structure of type II glycans and is the precursor of H type II HBGA. The specificity of glycan binding was confirmed through hemagglutination assays; GST-VP8* P[11] hemagglutinates type O, A, and B red blood cells as well as pooled umbilical cord blood erythrocytes. Further, G10P[11] infectivity was significantly enhanced by the expression of H type II HBGA in CHO cells. The bovine-origin VP4 was confirmed to be essential for this increased infectivity, using laboratory-derived reassortant viruses generated from sialic acid binding rotavirus SA11-4F and a bovine G10P[11] rotavirus, B223. The binding to a core glycan unit has not been reported for any rotavirus VP4. Core glycan synthesis is constitutive in most cell types, and modification of these glycans is thought to be developmentally regulated. These studies provide the first molecular basis for understanding neonatal rotavirus infections, indicating that glycan modification during neonatal development may mediate the age-restricted infectivity of neonatal viruses. PMID:23616650

  16. Fusion of the mouse IgG1 Fc domain to the VHH fragment (ARP1) enhances protection in a mouse model of rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Günaydın, Gökçe; Yu, Shengze; Gräslund, Torbjörn; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold

    2016-01-01

    A variable fragment of a heavy chain antibody (VHH) directed against rotavirus, also referred to as anti-rotavirus protein 1 (ARP1), was shown to confer protection against rotavirus induced diarrhea in infant mouse model of rotavirus induced diarrhea. In this study, we have fused the mouse IgG1 Fc to ARP1 to improve the protective capacity of ARP1 by inducing an Fc-mediated effector function. We have shown that the Fc-ARP1 fusion protein confers significantly increased protection against rotavirus in a neonatal mouse model of rotavirus-induced diarrhea by reducing the prevalence, duration and severity of diarrhea and the viral load in the small intestines, suggesting that the Fc part of immunoglobulins may be engaged in Fc-mediated neutralization of rotavirus. Engineered conventional-like antibodies, by fusion of the Fc part of immunoglobulins to antigen-specific heavy-chain only VHH fragments, might be applied to novel antibody-based therapeutic approaches to enhance elimination of pathogens by activation of distinct effector signaling pathways. PMID:27439689

  17. Immunogenicity of porcine P[6], P[7]-specific △VP8* rotavirus subunit vaccines with a tetanus toxoid universal T cell epitope.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaobo; Wei, Xiaoman; Ran, Xuhua; Ni, Hongbo; Cao, Si; Zhang, Yao

    2015-08-26

    Currently, commercial porcine rotavirus vaccines remain varied limitations. The objective of this study is to develop an alternative porcine rotavirus subunit vaccine candidate by parenteral administration, which enables to elicit robust immune responses against most prevalence porcine rotavirus strains. The bacterially-expressed porcine rotavirus P[6]- or P[7]-specific truncated VP8* (aa 64-223) recombinant protein with or without a universal tetanus toxoid CD4(+) T cell epitope P2 was generated. All the recombinant subunit proteins △VP8*s or P2-△VP8*s were of high solubility and high yields. The immunogenicity of each purified △VP8* and P2-△VP8* was evaluated in mice (10 μg/dose) or guinea pigs (20 μg/dose) immunized IM with 600 μg aluminum hydroxide three times at 2-week interval. The introduction of P2T cell epitope to P[7]-△VP8* elicited significantly higher IgG titer in mice than its absence. Comparatively, P2 epitope slightly enhanced the immunogenicity of P[6]-△VP8*. P2-P[7]△VP8* elicited high titer of neutralizing antibody against heterotypic P[7]-specific rotaviruses with varied G type combination. Our data indicated that two subunit vaccines could be plausible bivalent rotavirus vaccine candidate to provide antigenic coverage of porcine rotavirus strains of global or regional importance.

  18. Fusion of the mouse IgG1 Fc domain to the VHH fragment (ARP1) enhances protection in a mouse model of rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Günaydın, Gökçe; Yu, Shengze; Gräslund, Torbjörn; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold

    2016-01-01

    A variable fragment of a heavy chain antibody (VHH) directed against rotavirus, also referred to as anti-rotavirus protein 1 (ARP1), was shown to confer protection against rotavirus induced diarrhea in infant mouse model of rotavirus induced diarrhea. In this study, we have fused the mouse IgG1 Fc to ARP1 to improve the protective capacity of ARP1 by inducing an Fc-mediated effector function. We have shown that the Fc-ARP1 fusion protein confers significantly increased protection against rotavirus in a neonatal mouse model of rotavirus-induced diarrhea by reducing the prevalence, duration and severity of diarrhea and the viral load in the small intestines, suggesting that the Fc part of immunoglobulins may be engaged in Fc-mediated neutralization of rotavirus. Engineered conventional-like antibodies, by fusion of the Fc part of immunoglobulins to antigen-specific heavy-chain only VHH fragments, might be applied to novel antibody-based therapeutic approaches to enhance elimination of pathogens by activation of distinct effector signaling pathways. PMID:27439689

  19. Verification of sensitivity and specificity of group a rotavirus detection in piglets faeces with monoclonal blocking ELISA methods.

    PubMed

    Rodák, L; Smíd, B; Nevoránková, Z; Smítalová, R; Valícek, L

    2004-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to group A rotavirus Vp6 protein were prepared and used for verification of three blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) modifications to detect rotavirus A. Selected competitive blocking ELISA (CB-ELISA) and electron microscopy (EM) were used for examination of 194 field faecal samples of piglets affected with diarrhoea. Rotavirus was detected in 43 samples (22.2%) by CB-ELISA method, whereas in 26 (13.4%) samples by EM examination. However, of 26 samples positive by EM, rotavirus A was detected by CB-ELISA in 19 (73.1%) samples; indicating the share of group A rotavirus in all cases of gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. The sensitivity and specificity of the CB-ELISA was verified both by inclusion of control samples containing transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus (PEDV) in each analysis and by comparative examination of samples with the commercial ELISA kit. The CB-ELISA sensitivity was positively affected by examination of samples in the presence of chelating agent.

  20. Effect of monovalent rotavirus vaccine on rotavirus disease burden and circulating rotavirus strains among children in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Benhafid, Mohammed; Elomari, Nezha; Azzouzi Idrissi, Meryem; Rguig, Ahmed; Gentsch, Jon R; Parashar, Umesh; Elaouad, Rajae

    2015-06-01

    Rotarix(TM) vaccine was introduced into the National Program of Immunization of Morocco in October 2010, reaching quickly 87% of the target population of children nationally. The incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis and the prevalence of circulating rotavirus strains has been monitored in three sentinel hospitals since June 2006. The average percentage of rotavirus positive cases among all children under 5 years old hospitalized for gastroenteritis during the pre-vaccine period (2006-2010) was 44%. This percentage dropped to 29%, 15% and 24% in the 3 years post vaccine introduction (2011, 2012 and 2013), which is a decline of 34%, 66%, and 45%, respectively. Declines in prevalence were greatest among children 0-1 years of age (53%) and were most prominent during the winter and autumn rotavirus season. The prevalence of the G2P[4] and G9P[8] genotype sharply increased in the post vaccine period (2011-2013) compared to the previous seasons (2006-2010). Rotavirus vaccines have reduced greatly the number of children hospitalized due to rotavirus infection at the three sentinel hospitals; it is however unclear if the predominance of G2P[4] and G9P[8] genotypes is related to the vaccine introduction, or if this is attributable to normal genotype fluctuations. Continued surveillance will be pivotal to answer this question in the future.

  1. Rotavirus vaccine - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by other germs. Another virus called porcine circovirus (or parts of it) can be found in ... get rotavirus vaccine. Babies who have had a type of bowel blockage called "intussusception" should not get ...

  2. Rotavirus vaccination in Central American children.

    PubMed

    Ulloa-Gutierrez, Rolando; Avila-Aguero, María L

    2014-06-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of acute diarrhea in children younger than five years of age around the world. Severe dehydration and mortality rates are higher in developing countries, especially those from Latin America, Africa, and Asia. The vaccine has been introduced in the national immunization programs of more than half of Latin American countries, and impact data from some of these nations has been already published. The two rotavirus vaccines, the 2-dose monovalent (RV-1) and the 3-dose pentavalent (RV-5) vaccine, have been available in the market to all Central American countries. Rotavirus vaccine has been universally introduced in the expanded immunization national programs of Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Panama, but not in Belize and Costa Rica. This review summarizes what has been published about the epidemiology and impact of universal rotavirus vaccination in Central America.

  3. Efficacy of two doses of RIT 4237 bovine rotavirus vaccine for prevention of rotavirus diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, T; Ruuska, T; Delem, A; André, F E; Beards, G M; Flewett, T H

    1991-02-01

    Candidate oral bovine rotavirus vaccine RIT 4237 or placebo was given to 252 Finnish infants at birth and at 7 months of age. No vaccine-associated reactions were observed. Primary rotavirus ELISA IgM responses were detected in 36% of the infants after the first vaccination; after the second dose 68% of the vaccinees were seropositive for rotavirus ELISA IgG antibody. The infants remained in clinical follow-up over two rotavirus epidemic seasons (total 28 months). Counted from child years in follow-up the overall vaccine protection rate was 43%. The clinical severity of rotavirus episodes was assessed using a numerical score 0-20. Vaccine protection rate for cases with a score greater than or equal to 7 was 57% and for cases with a score greater than or equal to 11 it was 89%. It is concluded that vaccination with a bovine rotavirus vaccine at birth and at 7 months of age, with the second dose given shortly before rotavirus epidemic season, protects infants against moderately severe and severe rotavirus diarrhoea in the first 2 years of life.

  4. Protective effects of natural rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, F Raúl

    2009-03-01

    Rotavirus is a ubiquitous infection that is the leading cause of severe diarrhea worldwide. Severe infections are most commonly observed in the first 2 years of life. Rotavirus-induced diarrhea is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality rates and socioeconomic costs with adverse outcomes particularly prevalent in developing countries. The natural history of rotavirus infection can provide guidance for the development and optimization of an effective vaccine. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that children who acquire natural rotavirus infections develop immunity to subsequent infections, with the protective effect increasing with each natural infection. Natural infections also decrease the severity of any subsequent rotavirus infections. Notably, asymptomatic infections provide protection similar to that induced by symptomatic infections. Data also suggest that the antibody response to natural infection is heterotypic, and therefore may provide protection against multiple serotypes. These data suggest that the development of a vaccine that produces asymptomatic infection at an optimal time point may provide effective immunity. An effective vaccine should mimic protection provided by natural infection and provide protection against the most common rotavirus serotypes (ie, G1, G2, G3, G4, G9) and be able to decrease disease severity, reduce hospitalizations, and decrease disease-related costs.

  5. Measuring indirect effects of rotavirus vaccine in low income countries.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Aisleen; Bar-Zeev, Naor; Cunliffe, Nigel A

    2016-08-17

    Widespread introduction of rotavirus vaccines has led to major reductions in the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis worldwide. Vaccine effectiveness is diminished, however, in low income countries, that harbour the greatest burden of rotavirus attributed morbidity and mortality. Indirect effects of rotavirus vaccine (herd immunity and herd protection) could increase population level impact and improve vaccine cost effectiveness in such settings. While rotavirus vaccine indirect effects have been demonstrated in high and middle income countries, there are very little data from low income countries where force of infection, population structures and vaccine schedules differ. Targeted efforts to evaluate indirect effects of rotavirus vaccine in low income countries are required to understand the total impact of rotavirus vaccine on the global burden of rotavirus disease. PMID:27443593

  6. Effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine against hospitalized rotavirus diarrhea: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Maria Y T; Rodrigues, Laura C; Teles Santos, Carlos A S; Teixeira, Maria da Gloria L C; De Jesus, Sandra R; Alvim De Matos, Sheila M; Gagliardi Leite, Jose P; Barreto, Mauricio L

    2014-05-13

    Rotavirus is one of the leading cause of hospitalization and outpatients visits among children under five years. This study evaluated overall and genotype-specific vaccine effectiveness of oral monovalent rotavirus vaccine (G1P[8] strain) in preventing hospital admission of Brazilian children with rotavirus acute diarrhea. A hospital based case-control study was conducted in five Regions of Brazil using the National Rotavirus Acute Diarrhea Surveillance System from July 2008 to August 2011. A total of 215 cases (aged 4-24 months) admitted with confirmed rotavirus diarrhea were recruited and 1961 controls hospitalized without diarrhea were frequency matched by sex and age group to cases. Two-dose adjusted vaccine effectiveness (adjusted by year of birth and the frequency matching variables) was 76% (95%CI: 58-86) lasting for two years. Effectiveness controlled by the available potential confounders was 72% (95%CI: 44-85), suggesting no appreciable confounding by those factors for which adjustment was made. In a half of the cases the rotavirus genotype was G2P[4] and in 15% G1P[8]. Genotype-specific VE (two doses) was 89% (95%CI: 78-95), for G1P[8] and 76% (95%CI: 64-84) for G2P[4]. For all G1, it was 74% (95%CI: 35-90), for all G2, 76% (95%CI: 63-84), and for all non G1/G2 genotypes, 63% (95%CI: -27-99). Effectiveness for one dose was 62% (95%CI: 39-97). Effectiveness of two-dose monovalent rotavirus vaccine in preventing hospital admission with rotavirus diarrhea was high, lasted for two years and it was similar against both G1P[8] and G2P[4]. Based on the findings of the study we recommend the continued use of rotavirus in the Brazilian National Immunization Program and the monitoring of the early emergence of unusual and novel rotavirus genotypes.

  7. Methods suitable for high-throughput screening of siRNAs and other chemical compounds with the potential to inhibit rotavirus replication.

    PubMed

    López, Tomás; Silva-Ayala, Daniela; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2012-01-01

    Rotaviruses are an important cause of severe gastroenteritis in children under two years of age. Two vaccines have become recently available, however, there are no specific pharmacological interventions of rotavirus disease. Recently, libraries of siRNAs or libraries of chemical compounds that can be tested for their ability to inhibit biological processes have been developed. To search these libraries for drugs or siRNAs that may prevent rotavirus replication it is necessary to have methods for high-throughput screening. In this study several methods to quantify rotavirus replication in cell culture were evaluated; the cell death and viral protein expression assays were compared, and an in-cell Western method based on infrared detection that allows the simultaneous quantification of viral antigen and total protein content in the same cell culture well was developed. This is an easy, inexpensive method for detection of viral replication, and it is compatible with high-throughput screening.

  8. Rotavirus and Norovirus in Pediatric Healthcare-Associated Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jumi; Sederdahl, Bethany K.; Wahl, Kelly; Jerris, Robert R.; Kraft, Colleen S.; McCracken, Courtney; Gillespie, Scott; Kirby, Amy E.; Shane, Andi L.; Moe, Christine L.; Anderson, Evan J.

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus and norovirus are important etiologies of gastroenteritis among hospitalized children. During 2012–2013, we tested 207 residual stool specimens from children with healthcare-associated vomiting and/or diarrhea for rotavirus and norovirus. Twenty (10%) were rotavirus positive, and 3 (3%) were norovirus positive, stressing the importance of these pathogens in hospitalized children. PMID:27807589

  9. Unusual assortment of segments in 2 rare human rotavirus genomes.

    PubMed

    De Grazia, Simona; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Potgieter, Christiaan A; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Banyai, Krisztian; Platia, Maria A; Colomba, Claudia; Martella, Vito

    2010-05-01

    Using full-length genome sequence analysis, we investigated 2 rare G3P[9] human rotavirus strains isolated from children with diarrhea. The genomes were recognized as assortments of genes closely related to rotaviruses originating from cats, ruminants, and humans. Results suggest multiple transmissions of genes from animal to human strains of rotaviruses.

  10. Association of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis with Histo-blood Group Antigens.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, E; Dwibedi, B; Kar, S K; Pandey, R M

    2016-07-01

    Association of rotavirus gastroenteritis with histo-blood group antigens in children younger than 5 years admitted with diarrhea (n=389) was studied. Distribution of blood groups in rotavirus positive (n=96) and rotavirus negative (n=51) diarrhea gastroenteritis cases did not show any susceptibility to any blood group; blood group O seemed to be protective. PMID:27508550

  11. Rotavirus vaccination in central Europe.

    PubMed

    Mészner, Zsófia; Anca, Ioana; André, Francis; Chlibek, Roman; Čižman, Milan; Grzesiowski, Paweł; Mangarov, Atanas; Pokorn, Marko; Prymula, Roman; Richter, Darko; Salman, Nuran; Šimurka, Pavol; Tamm, Eda; Tešović, Goran; Urbancikova, Ingrid; Usonis, Vytautas; Zavadska, Dace

    2013-06-01

    Each year, rotavirus (RV) infection is the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis requiring hospitalisation and of nosocomially transmitted diseases in children younger than 5 years across Central European Vaccination Awareness Group (CEVAG) countries; however, inadequate surveillance systems and lack of routine RV testing still exist in most CEVAG countries, making it difficult to accurately assess the present burden of acute RV gastroenteritis in the younger population. Furthermore, routine immunisation of infants with RV vaccines has not been implemented, and no official and uniform recommendations exist in most of the countries in these territories. The present study provides CEVAG country-specific estimates of the disease burden of RV gastroenteritis among the youngest population and presents evidence-based advice on the use of RV vaccines in the region, while providing a framework for vaccination at the national level.

  12. Variations in DREB1A and VP1.1 Genes Show Association with Salt Tolerance Traits in Wild Tomato (Solanum pimpinellifolium)

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Eguru Sreenivasa; Kadirvel, Palchamy; Symonds, Rachael C.; Geethanjali, Subramaniam; Thontadarya, Ramadihalli N.; Ebert, Andreas W.

    2015-01-01

    Association analysis was conducted in a core collection of 94 genotypes of Solanum pimpinellifolium to identify variations linked to salt tolerance traits (physiological and yield traits under salt stress) in four candidate genes viz., DREB1A, VP1.1, NHX1, and TIP. The candidate gene analysis covered a concatenated length of 4594 bp per individual and identified five SNP/Indels in DREB1A and VP1.1 genes explaining 17.0% to 25.8% phenotypic variation for various salt tolerance traits. Out of these five alleles, one at 297 bp in DREB1A had in-frame deletion of 6 bp (CTGCAT) or 12 bp (CTGCATCTGCAT), resulting in two alleles, viz., SpDREB1A_297_6 and SpDREB1A_297_12. These alleles individually or as haplotypes accounted for maximum phenotypic variance of about 25% for various salt tolerance traits. Design of markers for selection of the favorable alleles/haplotypes will hasten marker-assisted introgression of salt tolerance from S. pimpinellifolium into cultivated tomato. PMID:26161546

  13. Direct evidence of a role for amino acid 101 of VP-1 in central nervous system disease in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, A; Thomas, C; Yamada, M; Roos, R P; Fujinami, R S

    1991-04-01

    The DA virus, a member of the TO subgroup of Theiler's virus, invokes a chronic demyelinating disease in its natural host, the mouse, RNA transcripts from a cDNA clone, pDAFL3, are infectious, and the resulting virus, DAFL3, produces in mice a disease indistinguishable from that caused by the DA virus. Using oligonucleotide-directed site-specific mutagenesis, a single nucleotide, cytosine at position 3305 (viral genome), was changed in this infectious cDNA to a thymine. The mutated nucleotide is located in an area coding for a neutralizing epitope on loop II of VP-1. Virus OSM101, produced from the mutagenized plasmid pDA101, had the same growth characteristics and plaque phenotype in vitro as the virus DAFL3 produced from clone pDAFL3. However, in vivo in the mouse, virus OSM101 was markedly less neurovirulent than DAFL3. Central nervous system tissues from mice infected 4 to 6 weeks previously with the OSM101 virus contained less infectious virus and fewer infected cells than central nervous system tissues from animals infected with the control virus, DAFL3. Thus, we demonstrated that the single nucleotide change resulting in an amino acid substitution at position 101 (threonine to isoleucine) of VP-1 determines one aspect of Theiler's virus persistence and disease in mice.

  14. Direct evidence of a role for amino acid 101 of VP-1 in central nervous system disease in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Zurbriggen, A; Thomas, C; Yamada, M; Roos, R P; Fujinami, R S

    1991-01-01

    The DA virus, a member of the TO subgroup of Theiler's virus, invokes a chronic demyelinating disease in its natural host, the mouse, RNA transcripts from a cDNA clone, pDAFL3, are infectious, and the resulting virus, DAFL3, produces in mice a disease indistinguishable from that caused by the DA virus. Using oligonucleotide-directed site-specific mutagenesis, a single nucleotide, cytosine at position 3305 (viral genome), was changed in this infectious cDNA to a thymine. The mutated nucleotide is located in an area coding for a neutralizing epitope on loop II of VP-1. Virus OSM101, produced from the mutagenized plasmid pDA101, had the same growth characteristics and plaque phenotype in vitro as the virus DAFL3 produced from clone pDAFL3. However, in vivo in the mouse, virus OSM101 was markedly less neurovirulent than DAFL3. Central nervous system tissues from mice infected 4 to 6 weeks previously with the OSM101 virus contained less infectious virus and fewer infected cells than central nervous system tissues from animals infected with the control virus, DAFL3. Thus, we demonstrated that the single nucleotide change resulting in an amino acid substitution at position 101 (threonine to isoleucine) of VP-1 determines one aspect of Theiler's virus persistence and disease in mice. Images PMID:1705992

  15. Variations in DREB1A and VP1.1 Genes Show Association with Salt Tolerance Traits in Wild Tomato (Solanum pimpinellifolium).

    PubMed

    Rao, Eguru Sreenivasa; Kadirvel, Palchamy; Symonds, Rachael C; Geethanjali, Subramaniam; Thontadarya, Ramadihalli N; Ebert, Andreas W

    2015-01-01

    Association analysis was conducted in a core collection of 94 genotypes of Solanum pimpinellifolium to identify variations linked to salt tolerance traits (physiological and yield traits under salt stress) in four candidate genes viz., DREB1A, VP1.1, NHX1, and TIP. The candidate gene analysis covered a concatenated length of 4594 bp per individual and identified five SNP/Indels in DREB1A and VP1.1 genes explaining 17.0% to 25.8% phenotypic variation for various salt tolerance traits. Out of these five alleles, one at 297 bp in DREB1A had in-frame deletion of 6 bp (CTGCAT) or 12 bp (CTGCATCTGCAT), resulting in two alleles, viz., SpDREB1A_297_6 and SpDREB1A_297_12. These alleles individually or as haplotypes accounted for maximum phenotypic variance of about 25% for various salt tolerance traits. Design of markers for selection of the favorable alleles/haplotypes will hasten marker-assisted introgression of salt tolerance from S. pimpinellifolium into cultivated tomato. PMID:26161546

  16. Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program annual report, 2014.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Carl D; Roczo-Farkas, Suzie

    2015-09-30

    The Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program, together with collaborating laboratories Australia-wide, reports the rotavirus genotypes responsible for the hospitalisation of children with acute gastroenteritis. During the survey period of 1 January to 31 December 2014, 1,022 faecal samples were referred for rotavirus G and P genotype analysis, and of these 733 were confirmed as rotavirus positive. A total of 480 specimens were collected from children under 5 years of age, while 253 were from older children and adults. Genotype analysis of the 733 rotavirus samples collected from both children and adults revealed that G12P[8] was the dominant genotype in this reporting period, identified in 29.6% of strains nationally. Genotype G1P[8] was the 2nd most common strain nationally, representing 22.9% of samples, followed by genotype G3P[8] (14.9%). This report highlights the continued significance of G12P[8] strains as the major cause of disease in this population. The genotype distribution was slightly altered when the analysis was restricted to samples collected from children under 5 years of age, with G1P[8] being the dominant genotype (29%) followed by G12P[8] as the 2nd most common genotype (26%). Fluctuations in genotype distribution were also observed based on the vaccine type in use. Genotype G12P[8] was more common in states and territories using RotaTeq, while G1P[8] was more common in the locations using Rotarix. This survey highlights the yearly fluctuations in rotavirus genotypes observed since vaccine introduction. The continuation of G12P[8] as the dominant genotype further illustrates the dynamic and diversity present in the wild-type rotavirus population evident in the Australian population since vaccine introduction.

  17. Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program annual report, 2013.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Carl D; Roczo-Farkas, Susie

    2014-12-31

    This report from the Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program, together with collaborating laboratories Australia-wide, describes the rotavirus genotypes responsible for the hospitalisation of children with acute gastroenteritis during the period 1 January to 31 December 2013. During the survey period, 1,035 faecal samples were referred for rotavirus G and P genotype analysis. Of these 828 were confirmed as rotavirus positive. A total of 503 specimens were collected from children under 5 years of age, while 325 were from older children and adults. Genotype analysis of the 828 rotavirus samples collected from both children and adults revealed that G12P[8] was the dominant genotype in this reporting period, identified in 33% of strains nationally. Genotype G3P[8] was the second most common strain nationally, representing 31% of samples, followed by genotype G2P[4] (14%). This represents the first report where G12P[8] strains are the major cause of disease in this population. The genotype distribution was slightly altered when the analysis was restricted to samples collected from children under 5 years of age, with G3P[8] being the dominant genotype (39.2%) followed by G12P[8] as the second most common genotype (31%). Fluctuations in genotype distribution were also observed based on the vaccine type in use. Genotype G12P[8] was more common in states and territories using RotaTeq, while G3P[8] was more common in the locations using Rotarix. This survey highlights the yearly fluctuations in rotavirus genotypes observed since vaccine introduction, with changes in dominant genotypes an annual event. The emergence of G12P[8] as the dominant genotype further illustrates the ongoing changes in the wild type rotavirus population evident in the Australian population since vaccine introduction.

  18. Multiple reassortment and interspecies transmission events contribute to the diversity of feline, canine and feline/canine-like human group A rotavirus strains.

    PubMed

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; De Grazia, Simona; Piessens, Jan; Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Bányai, Krisztián; Buonavoglia, Canio; Ciarlet, Max; Martella, Vito; Van Ranst, Marc

    2011-08-01

    RNA-RNA hybridization assays and complete genome sequence analyses have shown that feline rotavirus (FRV) and canine rotavirus (CRV) strains display at least two distinct genotype constellations (genogroups), represented by the FRV strain RVA/Cat-tc/AUS/Cat97/1984/G3P[3] and the human rotavirus (HRV) strain RVA/Human-tc/JPN/AU-1/1982/G3P3[9], respectively. G3P[3] and G3P[9] strains have been detected sporadically in humans. The complete genomes of two CRV strains (RVA/Dog-tc/ITA/RV198-95/1995/G3P[3] and RVA/Dog-tc/ITA/RV52-96/1996/G3P[3]) and an unusual HRV strain (RVA/Human-tc/ITA/PA260-97/1997/G3P[3]) were determined to further elucidate the complex relationships among FRV, CRV and HRV strains. The CRV strains RV198-95 and RV52-96 were shown to possess a Cat97-like genotype constellation. However, 3 and 5 genes of RV198-95 and RV52-96, respectively, were found in distinct subclusters of the same genotypes, suggesting the occurrence of reassortment events among strains belonging to this FRV/CRV/HRV genogroup. Detailed phylogenetic analyses of the HRV strain PA260-97 showed that (i) 8 genome segments (VP3, VP4, VP6, VP7 and NSP2-5) clustered closely with RV198-95 and/or RV52-96; (ii) 2 genome segments (VP1 and VP2) were more closely related to HRV AU-1; and (iii) 1 genome segment (NSP1) was distantly related to any other established NSP1 genotypes and was ratified as a new NSP1 genotype, A15. These findings suggest that the human strain PA260-97 has a history of zoonotic transmission and is likely a reassortant among FRV/CRV strains from the Cat97 and AU-1-like genogroups. In addition, a potential third BA222-05-like genogroup of FRV and HRV strains should be recognized, consisting of rotavirus strains with a stable genetic genotype constellation of genes also partially related to bovine rotavirus (BRV) and bovine-like rotaviruses. The detailed phylogenetic analysis indicated that three major genotype constellations exist among FRV, CRV and feline/canine-like HRV

  19. Rotavirus-associated hospitalization and emergency department costs and rotavirus vaccine program impact☆

    PubMed Central

    Kilgore, April; Donauer, Stephanie; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Payne, Daniel C.; Szilagyi, Peter G.; Rice, Marilyn; Cassedy, Amy; Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael R.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Staat, Mary Allen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the medical costs of laboratory-confirmed rotavirus hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits and estimate the economic impact of the rotavirus vaccine program. Patients and methods During 4 rotavirus seasons (2006–2009), children <3 years of age hospitalized or seen in the ED with laboratory-confirmed rotavirus were identified through active population-based rotavirus surveillance in three US counties. Medical costs were obtained from hospital and physician billing data, and factors associated with increased costs were examined. Annual national costs were estimated using rotavirus hospitalization and ED visit rates and medical costs for rotavirus hospitalizations and ED visits from our surveillance program for pre- (2006–2007) and post-vaccine (2008–2009) time periods. Results Pre-vaccine, for hospitalizations, the median medical cost per child was $3581, the rotavirus hospitalization rate was 22.1/10,000, with an estimated annual national cost of $91 million. Post-vaccine, the median medical cost was $4304, the hospitalization rate was 6.3/10,000 and the estimated annual national cost was $31 million. Increased costs were associated with study site, age <3 months, underlying medical conditions and an atypical acute gastroenteritis presentation. For ED visits, the pre-vaccine median medical cost per child was $574, the ED visit rate was 291/10,000 resulting in an estimated annual national cost of $192 million. Post-vaccine, the median medical cost was $794, the ED visit rate was 71/10,000 with an estimated annual national cost of $65 million. Conclusions After implementation of rotavirus immunization, the total annual medical costs decreased from $283 million to $96 million, an annual reduction of $187 million PMID:23845802

  20. Rotavirus vaccination within the South African Expanded Programme on Immunisation.

    PubMed

    Seheri, L Mapaseka; Page, Nicola A; Mawela, Mothahadini P B; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Steele, A Duncan

    2012-09-01

    Diarrhoeal diseases are ranked the third major cause of childhood mortality in South African children less than 5 years, where the majority of deaths are among black children. Acute severe dehydrating rotavirus diarrhoea remains an important contributor towards childhood mortality and morbidity and has been well documented in South Africa. As the preventive strategy to control rotavirus diarrhoea, South Africa became the first country in the WHO African Region to adopt the rotavirus vaccine in the national childhood immunisation programme in August 2009. The rotavirus vaccine in use, Rotarix, GSK Biologicals, is given at 6 and 14 weeks of age, along with other vaccines as part of Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI). Studies which facilitated the introduction of rotavirus vaccine in South Africa included the burden of rotavirus disease and strain surveillance, economic burden of rotavirus infection and clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of vaccine candidates. This paper reviews the epidemiology of rotavirus in South Africa, outlines some of the steps followed to introduce rotavirus vaccine in the EPI, and highlights the early positive impact of vaccination in reducing the rotavirus burden of disease based on the post-marketing surveillance studies at Dr George Mukhari hospital, a sentinel site at University of Limpopo teaching hospital in Pretoria, South Africa, which has conducted rotavirus surveillance for >20 years.

  1. Single Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting the VP1 GH Loop of Enterovirus 71 Inhibit both Virus Attachment and Internalization during Viral Entry

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Zhiqiang; Ye, Xiaohua; Shi, Jinping; Wang, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibodies play a critical role in immunity against enterovirus 71 (EV71). However, how EV71-specific antibodies neutralize infections remains poorly understood. Here we report the working mechanism for a group of three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that potently neutralize EV71. We found that these three MAbs (termed D5, H7, and C4, respectively) recognize the same conserved neutralizing epitope within the VP1 GH loop of EV71. Single MAbs in this group, exemplified by D5, could inhibit EV71 infection in cell cultures at both the pre- and postattachment stages in a cell type-independent manner. Specifically, MAb treatment resulted in the blockade of multiple steps of EV71 entry, including virus attachment, internalization, and subsequent uncoating and RNA release. Furthermore, we show that the D5 and C4 antibodies can interfere with EV71 binding to its key receptors, including heparan sulfate, SCARB2, and PSGL-1, thus providing a possible explanation for the observed multi-inhibitory function of the MAbs. Collectively, our study unravels the mechanism of neutralization by a unique group of anti-EV71 MAbs targeting the conserved VP1 GH loop. The findings should enhance our understanding of MAb-mediated immunity against enterovirus infections and accelerate the development of MAb-based anti-EV71 therapeutic drugs. IMPORTANCE Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), which has caused significant morbidities and mortalities in young children. Neither a vaccine nor an antiviral drug is available. Neutralizing antibodies are major protective components in EV71 immunity. Here, we unraveled an unusual mechanism of EV71 neutralization by a group of three neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). All of these MAbs bound the same conserved epitope located at the VP1 GH loop of EV71. Interestingly, mechanistic studies showed that single antibodies in this MAb group could block EV71 attachment and internalization during

  2. Spread and predominance in Japan of novel G1P[8] double-reassortant rotavirus strains possessing a DS-1-like genotype constellation typical of G2P[4] strains.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoshiki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nishimura, Naoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Miura, Sinobu; Ito, Hisato; Doan, Yen Hai; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Ozaki, Takao; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in children <5 years of age worldwide, and two, live attenuated rotavirus vaccines are globally available. As rotavirus vaccines are introduced into national immunization programs, there is an increasing need to monitor circulating wild-type strains. However, few studies have systematically examined their full genotype constellation. This study was therefore undertaken to characterize the whole genotype constellation of circulating rotavirus strains in three widely-separated locations in Japan during the 2012 rotavirus season when rotavirus vaccines became available in the country for the first time. Of 107 rotavirus-positive specimens, 50 (46.7%) strains collected from all three locations possessed an unusual G1-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 constellation in which a typical G2P[4] strain appeared to have acquired its two surface protein genes from the most common G1P[8] strain. These G1P[8] double-reassortant strains were shown to possess the 11 genome segments virtually indistinguishable from each other in their nucleotide sequences and phylogenetic lineages except for two strains that underwent further intra-genotype reassortment. Successful spread to and predominance in broad locations across Japan of novel rotavirus strains possessing a genotype constellation that was previously thought not to be preferred suggests unexpected genomic flexibility of the genotype constellation.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperones are involved in the morphogenesis of rotavirus infectious particles.

    PubMed

    Maruri-Avidal, Liliana; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2008-06-01

    The final assembly of rotavirus particles takes place in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In this work, we evaluated by RNA interference the relevance to rotavirus assembly and infectivity of grp78, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), grp94, calnexin, calreticulin, and ERp57, members of the two ER folding systems described herein. Silencing the expression of grp94 and Erp57 had no effect on rotavirus infectivity, while knocking down the expression of any of the other four chaperons caused a reduction in the yield of infectious virus of about 50%. In grp78-silenced cells, the maturation of the oligosaccharide chains of NSP4 was retarded. In cells with reduced levels of calnexin, the oxidative folding of VP7 was impaired and the trimming of NSP4 was accelerated, and in calreticulin-silenced cells, the formation of disulfide bonds of VP7 was also accelerated. The knockdown of PDI impaired the formation and/or rearrangement of the VP7 disulfide bonds. All these conditions also affected the correct assembly of virus particles, since compared with virions from control cells, they showed an altered susceptibility to EGTA and heat treatments, a decreased specific infectivity, and a diminished reactivity to VP7 with monoclonal antibody M60, which recognizes only this protein when its disulfide bonds have been correctly formed. In the case of grp78-silenced cells, the virus produced bound less efficiently to MA104 cells than virus obtained from control cells. All these results suggest that these chaperones are involved in the quality control of rotavirus morphogenesis. The complexity of the steps of rotavirus assembly that occur in the ER provide a useful model for studying the organization and operation of the complex network of chaperones involved in maintaining the quality control of this organelle.

  4. Rice-based oral antibody fragment prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhara, Daisuke; ρlvarez, Beatriz; Mejima, Mio; Hiroiwa, Tomoko; Takahashi, Yuko; Kurokawa, Shiho; Kuroda, Masaharu; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Nochi, Tomonori; Sagara, Hiroshi; Aladin, Farah; Marcotte, Harold; Frenken, Leon G.J.; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Hammarström, Lennart; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus-induced diarrhea is a life-threatening disease in immunocompromised individuals and in children in developing countries. We have developed a system for prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus disease using transgenic rice expressing the neutralizing variable domain of a rotavirus-specific llama heavy-chain antibody fragment (MucoRice-ARP1). MucoRice-ARP1 was produced at high levels in rice seeds using an overexpression system and RNAi technology to suppress the production of major rice endogenous storage proteins. Orally administered MucoRice-ARP1 markedly decreased the viral load in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice. The antibody retained in vitro neutralizing activity after long-term storage (>1 yr) and boiling and conferred protection in mice even after heat treatment at 94°C for 30 minutes. High-yield, water-soluble, and purification-free MucoRice-ARP1 thus forms the basis for orally administered prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus infections. PMID:23925294

  5. Infectious rotavirus enters cells by direct cell membrane penetration, not by endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kaljot, K.T.; Shaw, R.D.; Greenberg, H.B. Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center, CA ); Rubin, D.H. )

    1988-04-01

    Rotaviruses are icosahedral viruses with a segmented, double-stranded RNA genome. They are the major cause of severe infantile infectious diarrhea. Rotavirus growth in tissue culture is markedly enhanced by pretreatment of virus with trypsin. Trypsin activation is associated with cleavage of the viral hemagglutinin (viral protein 3 (VP3); 88 kilodaltons) into two fragments (60 and 28 kilodaltons). The mechanism by which proteolytic cleavage leads to enhanced growth is unknown. To determine whether trypsin treatment affected rotavirus internalization, the authors studied the kinetics of entry of infectious rhesus rotavirus (RRV) into MA104 cells. Trypsin-activated RRV was internalized with a half-time of 3 to 5 min, while nonactivated virus disappeared from the cell surface with a half-time of 30 to 50 min. In contrast to trypsin-activated RRV, loss of nonactivated RRV from the cell surface did not result in the appearance of infection, as measured by plaque formation. Purified trypsin-activated RRV added to cell monolayers at pH 7.4 mediated {sup 51}Cr, ({sup 14}C)choline, and ({sup 3}H)inositol released from prelabeled MA104 cells. This release could be specifically blocked by neutralizing antibodies to VP3. These results suggest that MA104 cell infection follows the rapid entry of trypsin-activated RRV by direct cell membrane penetration. Cell membrane penetration of infectious RRV is initiated by trypsin cleavage of VP3. Neutralizing antibodies can inhibit this direct membrane penetration.

  6. Understanding internalization of rotavirus VP6 nanotubes by cells: towards a recombinant vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mabel; Wood, Christopher; Sanchez-López, Rosana; Castro-Acosta, Ricardo M; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2014-05-01

    Rotavirus VP6 nanotubes are an attractive option for a recombinant vaccine against rotavirus disease. Protection against rotavirus infection and an adjuvant effect have been observed upon immunization with VP6 nanotubes. However, little information exists on how VP6 nanotubes interact with cells and trigger an immune response. In this work, the interaction between VP6 nanotubes and different cell lines was characterized. VP6 nanotubes were not cytotoxic to any of the animal or human cell lines tested. Uptake of nanotubes into cells was cell-line-dependent, as only THP1 and J774 macrophage cells internalized them. Moreover, the size and spatial arrangement of VP6 assembled into nanotubes allowed their uptake by macrophages, as double-layered rotavirus-like particles also displaying VP6 in their surface were not taken up. The internalization of VP6 nanotubes was inhibited by methyl-β-cyclodextrin, but not by genistein, indicating that nanotube entry is specific, depends on the presence of cholesterol in the plasma membrane, and does not require the activity of tyrosine kinases. The information generated here expands our understanding of the interaction of protein nanotubes with cells, which is useful for the application of VP6 nanotubes as a vaccine.

  7. Molecular analysis of non structural rotavirus group A enterotoxin gene of bovine origin from India.

    PubMed

    Malik, Yashpal Singh; Kumar, Naveen; Sharma, Kuldeep; Ghosh, Souvik; Bányai, Krisztián; Balasubramanian, Ganesh; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2014-07-01

    The rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 (nonstructural protein 4), plays a pivotal role in viral morphogenesis as well as pathogenesis. In this study, the NSP4 gene of rotavirus group A (RVA) isolates of bovine origin isolated in several states of India from 2008 to 2011 were characterized. The complete open reading frame of 23 RVA strains were sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. Genotype E1 was detected for the first time in bovines from India, in addition to the more common bovine genotype E2. Sequence similarity analysis of the E1 sequences showed a close genetic relatedness to human strains. Six of the bovine E2 genotypes strains clustered near bovine and unusual human strains (possible human animal reassortant) from Thailand, while the remaining E2 sequences clustered with Indian bovine strains. Analysis pointed out one positively selected site (154aa), believe to be part of an antigenic region and 123 negatively selected sites. Unexpectedly, a pentameric NSP4 structure of the coiled coil domain in the E1 carrying strains and a monomeric NSP4 in RVA strain P14 (E2) was predicted based on homology modeling, potentially affecting the biological properties of NSP4. The close relationship between bovine and human rotavirus strains further highlights the complex interaction among rotaviruses of different species. PMID:24747605

  8. Pathogenesis of rotavirus infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Little, L M; Shadduck, J A

    1982-01-01

    Three parameters of rotavirus infection, i.e., clinical disease, viral antigen in infected intestines, and infectious virus in feces, were assessed in infant mice nursed by mothers with or without preexisting rotavirus antibody. Diarrhea was the only consistent sign of clinical disease, and its course followed that of infection by about 1 day. Infected intestinal epithelial cells, except crypt cells, were observed by immunofluorescence microscopy in the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon. Infection progressed in a proximal-to-distal direction with time. Viral antigen appeared in intestinal tissue later, was present in lower amounts, and disappeared sooner from infants nursed by mothers with preexisting rotavirus antibody, indicating that protection was passively transferred to these infants although the course of clinical disease was not changed. Images PMID:6292110

  9. Human rotavirus HCR3 possesses a genomic RNA constellation indistinguishable from that of feline and canine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Nakagomi, T; Nakagomi, O

    2000-01-01

    Infection and spread of group A rotaviruses under natural conditions are mostly limited to one animal host species. However, rare molecular evidence exists for interspecies transmission by whole virions of animal rotaviruses to humans. Human rotavirus strain HCR3, which was isolated in 1984 from a healthy infant in Philadelphia, U.S.A. was shown by RNA-RNA hybridization to form 11 hybrid bands with feline rotavirus strain FRV64 and canine rotavirus strains CU-1 and K9, but not with rotaviruses commonly found in humans. Thus, HCR3 was concluded to be originally a rotavirus circulating in cats and dogs and accidental interspecies transmission by whole virions to humans was likely to have occurred in the past. PMID:11205126

  10. Solubility as a limiting factor for expression of hepatitis A virus proteins in insect cell-baculovirus system

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Haroldo Cid; Pestana, Cristiane Pinheiro; Galler, Ricardo; Medeiros, Marco Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The use of recombinant proteins may represent an alternative model to inactivated vaccines against hepatitis A virus (HAV). The present study aimed to express the VP1 protein of HAV in baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS). The VP1 was expressed intracellularly with molecular mass of 35 kDa. The VP1 was detected both in the soluble fraction and in the insoluble fraction of the lysate. The extracellular expression of VP1 was also attempted, but the protein remained inside the cell. To verify if hydrophobic characteristics would also be present in the HAV structural polyprotein, the expression of P1-2A protein was evaluated. The P1-2A polyprotein remained insoluble in the cellular extract, even in the early infection stages. These results suggest that HAV structural proteins are prone to form insoluble aggregates. The low solubility represents a drawback for production of large amounts of HAV proteins in BEVS. PMID:27581123

  11. Solubility as a limiting factor for expression of hepatitis A virus proteins in insect cell-baculovirus system.

    PubMed

    Silva, Haroldo Cid da; Pestana, Cristiane Pinheiro; Galler, Ricardo; Medeiros, Marco Alberto

    2016-08-01

    The use of recombinant proteins may represent an alternative model to inactivated vaccines against hepatitis A virus (HAV). The present study aimed to express the VP1 protein of HAV in baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS). The VP1 was expressed intracellularly with molecular mass of 35 kDa. The VP1 was detected both in the soluble fraction and in the insoluble fraction of the lysate. The extracellular expression of VP1 was also attempted, but the protein remained inside the cell. To verify if hydrophobic characteristics would also be present in the HAV structural polyprotein, the expression of P1-2A protein was evaluated. The P1-2A polyprotein remained insoluble in the cellular extract, even in the early infection stages. These results suggest that HAV structural proteins are prone to form insoluble aggregates. The low solubility represents a drawback for production of large amounts of HAV proteins in BEVS. PMID:27581123

  12. Reduction in Rotavirus Disease and Sustained Predominance of G2P[4] Rotavirus Strain following Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccine in Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Fernanda Maria Ulisses; Falbo, Ana Rodrigues; Germano, Eliane Mendes; Correia, Nancy Barros; Souza, Edvaldo da Silva; Nakagomi, Osamu; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Cuevas, Luis E; Cunliffe, Nigel A; Correia, Jailson B

    2015-06-01

    Rotavirus vaccination was introduced in Brazil in March 2006. We describe the distribution of rotavirus genotypes in children with acute gastroenteritis in a hospital in Recife, Brazil, during pre- and post-vaccination periods. There was a 43.8% reduction in the proportion of diarrhea episodes due to rotavirus. Nevertheless, we observed a sustained predominance of G2P[4] as the main genotype identified in the post-vaccination period.

  13. Heat shock enhances the susceptibility of BHK cells to rotavirus infection through the facilitation of entry and post-entry virus replication steps.

    PubMed

    López, Tomás; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2006-10-01

    Rotavirus infection is known to induce several cellular stress proteins, although their possible involvement in the replication cycle of the virus has not been studied. In addition, the heat shock cognate protein hsc70 has been shown to function as a post-attachment receptor during virus entry. In this work we have studied the effect of heat shock on the susceptibility of cells to rotavirus infection. BHK cells, which are largely refractory to the virus, became about 100-fold more susceptible when heat-treated, while the rotavirus highly susceptible MA104 cells did not significantly modified their susceptibility upon heat stress, suggesting that heat shock induces factors that are rate-limiting the replication of rotaviruses in BHK but not in MA104 cells. The heat treatment was shown to facilitate the rotavirus infection of BHK cells at the penetration and post-penetration levels, and each of these stages seems to contribute comparably to the overall observed 100-fold increase in infectivity. Since the binding of the virus to the cell surface was not affected, the caloric stress probably facilitates the penetration and/or uncoating of the virus. The pathway of virus entry into heat-shocked BHK cells seems to be similar to that used in MA104 cells, since treatments that affect MA104 cell infection also affected rotavirus infectivity in heat-treated BHK cells.

  14. Spectrum of VP1 region genetic variants in the foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O populations derived from infected cattle tongue epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sarangi, L N; Mohapatra, J K; Subramaniam, S; Pandey, L K; Das, B; Sanyal, A; Misri, J; Pattnaik, B

    2015-09-01

    RNA virus population exists as a complex distribution of non-identical but closely related sequences known as viral quasispecies. Variant strains are selected from this quasispecies population in response to changing environment. The quasispecies dynamics of a virus existing within an infected host differs from that in a cell culture-adapted population. This study was carried out to explore the genetic variations present in the VP1 coding region of the foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus serotype O derived directly from infected cattle tongue epithelium. Molecular clonal populations of two serotype O strains belonging to lineages Ind2001 (IND 30/2011) and PanAsia2 (IND 5/2011) were sequenced at VP1 coding region. For IND 30/2011, 19 clones were sequenced and analysis showed variations at 12 nucleotide positions (nt) resulting in 8 amino acid (aa) replacements. Similarly, for IND 5/2011 virus, 18 clones were sequenced, of which six showed nt variations leading to 3 aa replacements. Most of the variable positions mapped to the surface-exposed loops and some of them were found in the neutralizing antigenic sites (position 81, 149, 169, 186 and 202 of IND 30/2011 and 141 of IND 5/2011), which potentially could be beneficial in rapid adaptive evolution of the virus by giving rise to antigenic variants to overcome neutralizing antibodies. These findings encourage further research into the landscape of the viral quasispecies population in vivo and its implication for viral ecology.

  15. Genetic characterization of VP1 gene of seven Sacbrood virus isolated from three provinces in northern China during the years 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Mingxiao, Ma; Yanna, Yin; Xiaoli, Xu; Lin, Zhang; Yongfei, Li; Zhidong, Luan

    2013-09-01

    The genetic diversity of seven northern China isolated Sacbrood virus strains (SBV) has been analyzed, and hypervariable regions of the VP1 gene of 7 SBV were sequenced and characterized, in order to obtain epidemiological and immunological information, and to suggest typing criteria for SBV. Sequence analysis of hypervariable regions of the VP1 gene in the genome of these isolates revealed a sequence homology of 91.0-99.3% among all seven local SBV isolates from Apis cerana from China, with a similarity of 93.3-100.0% in deduced amino acid sequences. These local isolates shared 87.4-92.8% sequence homology with six SBV reference strains in GenBank (including two SBV reference strains from Apis cerana from China), which represents a 91.8-97.6% similarity in deduced amino acid sequences. Genetic analysis also showed that five SBV strains from Apis cerana from China had a 13-amino-acid deletion at amino acid positions 287-299, and two SBV strains infecting the Korean honeybee had a 17-amino-acid deletion at amino acid positions 284-300 in comparison with other SBV. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major groups (AC genotype SBV infecting Apis cerana and AM genotype SBV infecting Apis mellifera). The AC genotype could be further divided into subgroups. Based on the results of phylogenetic analysis, a similarity scan of SBV nucleotide sequences was carried out by using Simplot software and results in similar results. Our results suggest possible typing criteria for SBV based on the phylogenetic tree and sequence homology, and also that the virus has host specificity and regional variations.

  16. The effect of rotavirus immunization on rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalization rates in military dependents.

    PubMed

    Eberly, Matthew D; Gorman, Greg H; Eide, Matilda B; Olsen, Cara H; Rajnik, Michael

    2011-01-17

    We conducted a retrospective review of all U.S. military dependents less than 5 years old hospitalized with rotavirus-associated gastroenteritis from July 2003 to June 2009. The two post-vaccine seasons showed a significant reduction of 62.4% (95% CI, 58.6-65.8, P<0.001) in rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalization rate compared to the three pre-vaccine seasons. Infants less than 12 months old showed the greatest reduction in incidence at 75.3%. A substantial decrease was also seen in unvaccinated children as well. Vaccine efficacy against hospitalization was 86.0% (95% CI, 77.7-91.3) after just a single dose. The overwhelming majority of children hospitalized for rotavirus since the introduction of the vaccine (ranging from 91.8 to 100% per season) had not received any of the rotavirus vaccine series.

  17. Rotavirus vaccines: targeting the developing world.

    PubMed

    Glass, Roger I; Bresee, Joseph S; Turcios, Reina; Fischer, Thea K; Parashar, Umesh D; Steele, A Duncan

    2005-09-01

    For the past 2 decades, rotavirus infection, the most common cause of severe diarrhea in children, has been a priority target for vaccine development. This decision to develop rotavirus vaccines is predicated on the great burden associated with fatal rotavirus disease (i.e., 440,000 deaths/year), the firm scientific basis for developing live oral vaccines, the belief that increased investment in development at this time could speed the introduction of vaccines in developing countries, and the appreciation that implementation of a vaccine program should result in a measurable decrease in the number of hospitalizations and deaths associated with rotavirus disease within 2-3 years. RotaShield (Wyeth-Ayerst), the first rotavirus vaccine licensed in the United States, was withdrawn after 9 months because of a rare association of the vaccine with the development of intussusception. In the developing world, this vaccine could still have had a measurable effect, because the benefits of preventing deaths due to rotavirus disease would have been substantially greater than the rare risk of intussusception. Two live oral vaccines being prepared by GlaxoSmithKline and Merck have completed large-scale clinical trials. The GlaxoSmithKline vaccine has been licensed in Mexico and the Dominican Republic, and the Merck vaccine could be licensed in the United States within 1 year; several other candidate vaccines are in earlier stages of testing. However, many challenges remain before any of these vaccines can be incorporated into childhood immunization programs in the developing world. First, vaccine efficacy, which has already been demonstrated in children in industrialized and middle-income countries, needs to be proven in poor developing countries in Africa and Asia. The safety of vaccines with regard to the associated risk of intussusception must be demonstrated as well. Novel financing strategies will be needed to ensure that new vaccines are affordable and available in the

  18. Analysis of Human Rotavirus Mixed Electropherotypes

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Eugenio G.; Avendaño, Luis F.; García, Bernardo I.

    1983-01-01

    Mixed human rotavirus electropherotypes were detected in stool samples from patients with acute gastroenteritis in Santiago, Chile. These electropherotypes accounted for 10% of 149 samples studied. The finding of extra RNA fragments with respect to the regular 11 genome segments suggests the possibility of simultaneous or sequential infection by more than one electropherotype in a single diarrhea event or occurrence of modification in the length of the RNA segments during an infection. These possibilities arose from gel electrophoretic analysis of unique and sequential samples of human rotavirus genome RNA. Images PMID:6299944

  19. Adsorption of Rotavirus, MS2 Bacteriophage and Surface-Modified Silica Nanoparticles to Hydrophobic Matter.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Kata; Varsani, Arvind; Pang, Liping

    2015-09-01

    Adsorption to aquifer media is an important process in the removal of viruses from groundwater. Even though hydrophobic interactions have been shown to contribute to adsorption, little is known about the hydrophobicity of viruses found in groundwater. In this study, the hydrophobicity of rotavirus, MS2 bacteriophage and DNA-labelled silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) coated with glycoprotein, protein A and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor (AMBP) was investigated. The hydrophobicity was experimentally determined by using a modified microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) assay. The results were compared with the theoretical hydrophobicity of the viral capsid proteins and the proteins used to coat the nanoparticles, and with the results of adsorption tests with unmodified and organosilane-coated (hydrophobic) silica sand. While most theoretical protein hydrophobicity values were similar, the results of the MATH assay suggested fundamental differences in the hydrophobicity of the viruses and the SiNPs. MS2 was found to be highly hydrophobic as based on the MATH hydrophobicity and a significantly enhanced adsorption to hydrophobic sand, whereas rotavirus was relatively hydrophilic. The MATH assay revealed that protein-coating of SiNP introduced some degree of hydrophobicity to hydrophilic SiNPs, enabling them to more closely mimic viral hydrophobicity. Our study also demonstrated that the protein-coated SiNPs better mimicked rotavirus adsorption to sand media (coated or not coated with hydrophobic organic matter) than the MS2. This further supports previous findings that these surface-modified SiNPs are useful surrogates in mimicking rotavirus retention and transport in porous media.

  20. Oral immunization with live Lactococcus lactis expressing rotavirus VP8 subunit induces specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Belkis; Perez, Ana Rosa; Banchio, Claudia; de Mendoza, Diego; Magni, Christian

    2011-07-01

    Rotaviruses are the major cause of worldwide infectious diarrhea in children and vaccination is considered to be the most effective way to control these infections. The development of a mucosal live vaccine using the food-grade lactic acid bacteria Lactococcus lactis as antigen vehicle is an attractive and safe vaccination strategy against rotavirus. In this study, the construction of recombinant L. lactis strains able to produce the rotavirus spike-protein subunit VP8 in cytoplasmic, secreted and cell wall-anchored forms is reported. Evaluation of the immune response generated after immunization was conducted in a mouse model. The present study shows that animals inoculated orally with the L. lactis strain producing the cytoplasmic form of VP8 (LL1) developed significant levels of intestinal IgA antibodies while animals receiving L. lactis producing the cell wall-anchored VP8 form (LL3) exhibited anti-VP8 antibodies at both intestinal and systemic levels. Furthermore, it was observed that intestinal antibodies of the LL1-treated group and serum antibodies of the LL3-treated group were able to block rotavirus infection by 50% and 100%, respectively. These encouraging results represent a step towards the development of a new and safe mucosal vaccine against rotavirus.

  1. Geographic distribution of human rotavirus VP4 genotypes and VP7 serotypes in five South African regions.

    PubMed Central

    Steele, A D; van Niekerk, M C; Mphahlele, M J

    1995-01-01

    The rotavirus outer capsid proteins elicit the production of neutralizing antibodies and are known to play a role in inducing resistance to disease. In this study, cDNA probes directed at the six most common human rotavirus VP7 serotypes (G1 to G4, G8, and G9) and five human rotavirus VP4 genotypes (P4, P6, P8, P9, and P10) were utilized. Hybridization analysis of 572 human rotavirus strains collected from five regions in South Africa was performed to determine the distribution of the VP7 serotypes and VP4 genotypes in nature. VP7 serotype G1 was identified most frequently, occurring in 51% of the rotavirus strains tested. VP7 serotypes G2 and G4 occurred in similar numbers, although their distribution varied regionally. Few serotype G3 strains and no G8 or G9 strains were identified. The P8 VP4 genotype occurred most frequently overall (66%), and the P4 genotype was detected next most frequently. The P6 genotype was identified in 28 symptomatically infected neonates and in 8 symptomatic infants. Few P9 strains were identified. The potential for reassortment events was demonstrated by dual infections with different viruses. PMID:7650177

  2. Dissecting the role of integrin subunits alpha 2 and beta 3 in rotavirus cell entry by RNA silencing.

    PubMed

    Isa, Pavel; Sánchez-Alemán, Miguel Angel; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2009-11-01

    Several cell surface molecules have been implicated in rotavirus cell entry, however, their individual relevance during this process is unknown. In this work, the expression of integrins alpha2, beta2, and alpha v beta 3, the heat shock cognate protein 70, and of ganglioside GM1 in different cell lines of human and simian origin was correlated with the infectivity of four rotavirus strains. We observed that different combinations of receptor expression correlated with the infectivity of rotavirus strains, suggesting that the participation of several receptors is important for rotavirus infection. To characterize the relevance of integrins alpha2 and alpha v beta 3 in more detail, their expression was silenced using RNA interference. About 80% decrease in the cell content of integrins resulted in 15-30% decrease of infectivity of strains RRV and Wa when measured by a focus-forming assay, while there was no decrease of infectivity when measured by flow cytometry in integrin-deficient cells. Altogether these data suggest that integrins alpha2 and alpha v beta 3 do not play a major role in the rotavirus entry process.

  3. Rotavirus-host cell interactions: an arms race.

    PubMed

    López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2012-08-01

    As obligate parasites, viruses depend on the synthetic machinery of the cell to translate their proteins and on the cell's energy and building blocks to replicate their genomes. Cells respond to virus invasions by eliciting diverse responses to eliminate the incoming parasitic agents. In turn, to establish a successful infection, viruses have developed different strategies to take over the cellular metabolic machinery and to cope with the defense mechanisms of the cell. The characterization of this battle has allowed the discovery of the different elements that viruses and cells have developed in the attempt to overcome the enemy. Here some of the strategies used by rotaviruses to hijack the protein synthesis apparatus of the cell to ensure the translation of their mRNAs, and to deal with the cellular stress and antiviral responses will be reviewed.

  4. Genetic analysis of Group A rotaviruses: evidence for interspecies transmission of rotavirus genes.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Enzo A

    2002-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the major cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children and animals. The rotavirus genome is composed of eleven segments of double-stranded RNA and can undergo genetic reassortment during mixed infections, leading to progeny viruses with novel or atypical phenotypes. There are numerous descriptions of rotavirus strains isolated from human and animals that share genetic and antigenic features of viruses from heterologous species. In many cases, genetic analysis by hybridization has clearly demonstrated the genetic relatedness of gene segments to those from viruses isolated from different species. Together with the observation that some virus strains appear to have been transmitted to a different species as a whole genome constellation, these data suggest that interspecies transmission occurs naturally, albeit at low frequencies. Although interspecies transmission has not been documented directly, there is an increasing number of reports of atypical rotaviruses that are apparently derived from transmission between: humans, cats and dogs; humans and cattle; humans and pigs; pigs and cattle; and pigs and horses. Interspecies evolutionary relationships are supported by phylogenetic analysis of rotavirus genes from different species. The emergence of novel strains derived from interspecies transmission has implications for the design and implementation of successful human rotavirus vaccine strategies. PMID:11928984

  5. Rotavirus Seasonal Distribution and Prevalence Before and After the Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccine in a Peri-Urban Community of Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Millie R.; Velapatiño, Grace; Campos, Miguel; Chea-Woo, Elsa; Baiocchi, Nelly; Cleary, Thomas G.; Ochoa, Theresa J.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the monthly distribution of rotavirus diarrhea in a cohort of children 12–24 months of age followed as part of a diarrhea clinical trial in a peri-urban community of Lima. We observed a peak of rotavirus diarrhea in the winter months and a decrease in rotavirus prevalence after the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in Peru. PMID:25778507

  6. [Genomic Characterization of an Unusual Human G3P[3] Rotavirus with Multiple Cross-species Reassortment].

    PubMed

    Dong, Huijin; Qian, Yuan; Nong, Yi; Zhang, You; Mo, Zhaojun; Li, Rongcheng

    2016-03-01

    One unusual human G3P[3] group A rotavirus (RVA) strain M2-102 was identified in stool sample collected from a child with diarrhea in Guangxi Province, China in 2014. It is well known that G3P[3] is a genotype commonly identified in feline and canine RVAs. However, the preliminary phylogenetic analyses of the VP7 and VP4 genes of strain M2-102 indicated that these two genes were closely related to bat RVA strain MYAS33 and simian strain RRV, respectively, whereas both clustered distantly to feline/canine-like RVA strains. In this study, full genome sequencing and molecular analyses were conducted to obtain the true origin of strain M2-102. It was revealed that strain RVA/Human-wt/CHN/M2-102/2014/G3P[3] exhibited a G3-P[3]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A9-N3-T3-E3-H6 genotype constellation for VP7-VP4-VP6-VP1-VP2-VP3-NSP1-NSP2-NSP3-NSP4-NSP5 genes. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that 5 genes (VP7, VP1, VP2, NSP2 and NSP3) from strain M2-102 were closely related to those of bat strain MYAS33 from Yunnan Province which was thought a true bat RVA strain rather than a virus transmitted between species, while another 5 genes (VP4, VP3, NSP1, NSP4 and NSP5) clustered closely with those of simian strain RRV, yet the VP6 gene was closely related to that of human G3P[9] strain AU-1 and AU-1-like RVAs. The epidemiological data indicated that the child infected with M2-102 came from a countryside village, located in Dong Autonomous County of Sanjiang (subtropical hilly wooded area), Liuzhou city in Guangxi Province which might provide natural environment for reassortment events occurring among animal and human RVAs. Therefore, the data suggest that human strain M2-102 might originate from multiple reassortment events among bat, simian and human AU-1-like RVAs, yet it is not clear whether the genomic backbone based on bat MYAS33 (5 genes) and simian RRV (5 genes) like rotaviruses had been obtained through reassortment before being transmitted to the human. This is the first report on whole

  7. Cooperation of structural proteins during late events in the life cycle of polyomavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Forstová, J; Krauzewicz, N; Wallace, S; Street, A J; Dilworth, S M; Beard, S; Griffin, B E

    1993-01-01

    The polyomavirus minor late capsid antigen, VP2, is myristylated on its N-terminal glycine, this modification being required for efficient infection of mouse cells. To study further the functions of this antigen, as well as those of the other minor late antigen, VP3, recombinant baculoviruses carrying genes for VP1, VP2, and VP3 have been constructed and the corresponding proteins have been synthesized in insect cells. A monoclonal antibody recognizing VP1, alpha-PyVP1-A, and two monoclonal antibodies against the common region of VP2 and VP3, alpha-PyVP2/3-A and alpha-PyVP2/3-B, have been generated. Reactions of antibodies with antigens were characterized by indirect immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and immunoblot analysis. Immunofluorescent staining of mouse cells infected with polyomavirus showed all antigens to be localized in nuclei. When the late polyomavirus proteins were expressed separately in insect cells, however, only VP1 was efficiently transported into the nucleus; VP2 was localized discretely around the outside of the nucleus, and VP3 exhibited a diffused staining pattern in the cytoplasm. Coexpression of VP2, or VP3, with VP1 restored nuclear localization. Immunoprecipitation of infected mouse cells with either anti-VP1 or anti-VP2/3 antibodies precipitated complexes containing all three species, consistent with the notion that VP1 is necessary for efficient transport of VP2 and VP3 into the nucleus. Purified empty capsid-like particles, formed in nuclei of insect cells coinfected with all three baculoviruses, contained VP2 and VP3 proteins in amounts comparable to those found in empty capsids purified from mouse cells infected with wild-type polyomavirus. Two-dimensional gel analysis of VP1 species revealed that coexpression with VP2 affects posttranslational modification of VP1. Images PMID:8382302

  8. Structural characterization of rotavirus-directed synthesis and assembly of metallic nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Medina, Ariosto; Palomares, Laura A; Ramírez, Octavio T; Ascencio, Jorge A

    2013-08-01

    Self-assembled structures derived of viral proteins display sophisticated structures that are difficult to obtain with even advanced synthesis methods and the use of protein nanotubes for synthesis and organization of inorganic nanoarrays into well-defined architectures are here reported. Nanoparticle arrays derived of rotavirus VP6 nanotubes were synthesized by in situ functionalization with silver and gold nanoparticles. The size and morphology of metal nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HR-TEM). Processing of micrographs to obtain fast Fourier transforms (FFT) patterns of nanoparticles shown that the preferred morphologies are fcc-like and multiple twinned ones. Micrographs were used to assign structure and orientation, and the elemental composition analysis was performed with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Structural characterization of functionalized rotavirus VP6 demonstrated its utility for directed construction of hybrid anisotropic nanomaterials formed by arrays of metallic nanoparticles.

  9. Virulence-Associated Genome Mutations of Murine Rotavirus Identified by Alternating Serial Passages in Mice and Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Masatoshi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although significant clinical efficacy and safety of rotavirus vaccines were recently revealed in many countries, the mechanism of their attenuation is not well understood. We passaged serially a cell culture-adapted murine rotavirus EB strain in mouse pups or in cell cultures alternately and repeatedly and fully sequenced all 11 genes of 21 virus samples passaged in mice or in cell cultures. Sequence analysis revealed that mouse-passaged viruses that regained virulence almost consistently acquired four kinds of amino acid (aa) substitutions in VP4 and substitution in aa 37 (Val to Ala) in NSP4. In addition, they gained and invariably conserved the 3′ consensus sequence in NSP1. The molecular changes occurred along with the acquisition of virulence during passages in mice and then disappeared following passages in cell cultures. Intraperitoneal injection of recombinant NSP4 proteins confirmed the aa 37 site as important for its diarrheagenic activity in mice. These genome changes are likely to be correlated with rotavirus virulence. IMPORTANCE Serial passage of a virulent wild-type virus in vitro often results in loss of virulence of the virus in an original animal host, while serial passage of a cell culture-adapted avirulent virus in vivo often gains virulence in an animal host. Actually, live attenuated virus vaccines were originally produced by serial passage in cell cultures. Although clinical efficacy and safety of rotavirus vaccines were recently revealed, the mechanism of their attenuation is not well understood. We passaged serially a murine rotavirus by alternating switch of host (mice or cell cultures) repeatedly and sequenced the eleven genes of the passaged viruses to identify mutations associated with the emergence or disappearance of virulence. Sequence analysis revealed that changes in three genes (VP4, NSP1, and NSP4) were associated with virulence in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of recombinant NSP4 proteins confirmed its

  10. Improved characteristics and protective efficacy in an animal model of E. coli-derived recombinant double-layered rotavirus virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingdong; Lin, Haijun; Zhang, Yue; Li, Min; Wang, Daning; Che, Yaojian; Zhu, Yinbin; Li, Shaowei; Zhang, Jun; Ge, Shengxiang; Zhao, Qinjian; Xia, Ningshao

    2014-04-01

    Live rotavirus vaccines that are effective in middle- and high-income countries have been found to be less immunogenic and effective in infants in resource-limited settings. The virus-like particle (VLP) approach is promising for rotavirus vaccine development, but challenges remain for VLP production at large scale. In this study, rotavirus capsid VP2 and VP6 proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and were assembled with high efficiency into homogeneous single-layered VP6-VLPs or double-layered VP2/6-VLPs (dl2/6-VLPs) through a post-purification assembly process. The dl2/6-VLPs were observed to have better thermal stability and antigenicity. Although the immunogenicity of VP6 trimers, VP6-VLPs and dl2/6-VLPs was comparable, the efficacy of the dl2/6-VLPs to protect against rotavirus-induced diarrhea in pups was significantly higher than that of the trimeric VP6 or the VP6-VLPs when assessed using a mouse maternal antibody model. Taken together, the recombinant dl2/6-VLP antigen, which is highly analogous to rotavirus virion-derived double-layered particles, is a viable candidate for vaccine development and has the potential to be a parenterally administered safe and efficacious rotavirus vaccine.

  11. Gene expression analysis in children with complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or rotavirus gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Mitsuru; Oka, Takashi; Yamashita, Nobuko; Saito, Yukie; Fujii, Yosuke; Nagaoka, Yoshiharu; Yashiro, Masato; Tsukahara, Hirokazu; Morishima, Tsuneo

    2014-02-01

    Viral infections have been implicated as a cause of complex seizures in children. The pathogenic differences in complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or rotavirus gastroenteritis remain unclear. This study analyzed the gene expression profiles in the peripheral whole blood from pediatric patients with complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or rotavirus gastroenteritis. The gene expression profiles of ten patients (five with seizures and five without) with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and six patients (three with seizures and three without) with rotavirus gastroenteritis were examined. Gene expression profiles in the whole blood were different in complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or rotavirus gastroenteritis. Transcripts related to the immune response were significantly differentially expressed in complex seizures with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, and transcripts related to the stress response were significantly differentially expressed in complex seizures with rotavirus gastroenteritis. Pathway analysis showed that the mitogen-activated protein kinases in the T cell receptor signaling pathway were activated in complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. Dysregulation of the genes related to immune response or stress response could contribute to the pathogenic differences of the complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or rotavirus gastroenteritis.

  12. Conquering rotavirus: from discovery to global vaccine implementation.

    PubMed

    Bines, Julie E; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus, the commonest cause of severe dehydrating gastroenteritis world-wide, was discovered less than 50 years ago. It causes about 450,000 deaths per year in children <5 years of age and hospitalises millions more. Rotavirus vaccines have been shown to have a major impact on hospital admissions due to rotavirus gastroenteritis and all-cause gastroenteritis and reduce mortality in developing countries. In Australia, there has been a 71% decrease in rotavirus hospitalisations in children 0-5 years of age. From the discovery of rotavirus as the major causative agent for severe gastroenteritis, through vaccine development and vaccine post-marketing surveillance activities, Australian scientists and clinicians have played a significant role in the global effort to reduce the burden of rotavirus infection. PMID:25586843

  13. A lattice-based model of rotavirus epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Sagahón, A.; Govezensky, T.; Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.; José, M. V.

    2006-01-01

    The cyclic recurrence of childhood rotavirus epidemics in unvaccinated populations provides one of the best documented phenomena in population dynamics and can become a paradigm for epidemic studies. Herein we analyse the monthly incidence of rotavirus infection from the city of Melbourne, Australia during 1976-2003. We show that there is an inverse nonlinear relationship of the cumulative distribution of the number of cases per month in a log-log plot. It is also shown that the rate of transmission of rotavirus infection follows a symmetric distribution centered on zero. A wavelet phase analysis of rotavirus epidemics is also carried out. We test the hypothesis that rotavirus dynamics could be a realization of a forest-fire model with sparks and with immune trees. Some statistical properties of this model turn out to be similar to the above results of actual rotavirus data.

  14. Genotypification of bovine group A rotavirus in México.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Limas, William A; Flores-Samaniego, Beatriz; de la Mora, Germán; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2009-10-30

    Bovine scours, frequently provoked by rotavirus infection, causes significant economic losses. Nevertheless, no information exists about the bovine rotavirus genotypes present in Mexico. This information is necessary for designing efficient vaccines. In this work, 128 samples from diarrheic calves were collected between 2005 and 2006 in 26 dairy and/or beef cattle herds located in 10 regions of Mexico, and analyzed for the presence of group A rotavirus. G and P genotypes were determined by PCR in rotavirus-positive samples (12/128). Three different genotype combinations were found, G10, P[11]; G6, P[5]; and G10, P[5]; in 67, 25 and 8% of the positive samples, respectively. Some rotavirus-positive animals had been vaccinated with an inactivated rotavirus strain of a different genotype.

  15. The cytokine osteopontin modulates the severity of rotavirus diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Rollo, Ellen E; Hempson, Scott J; Bansal, Ajay; Tsao, Ernest; Habib, Iman; Rittling, Susan R; Denhardt, David T; Mackow, Erich R; Shaw, Robert D

    2005-03-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a sialated phosphoprotein found in tissues and secreted into body fluids. It is an integrin ligand with pleiotropic functions as an extracellular matrix protein in mineralized tissues and a cytokine that is active in cell signaling (A. B. Tuck, C. Hota, S. M. Wilson, and A. F. Chambers, Oncogene 22:1198-1205, 2003). To determine whether OPN may be important in mucosal defense against viral pathogens, we evaluated the OPN response to rotavirus infection and the extent of diarrhea manifested by infected opn null mutant (opn-/-) mice. Reverse transcription-PCR, Northern and Western blots, and immunohistochemical studies of the HT-29 intestinal epithelial cell line and murine intestine were used to evaluate OPN mRNA and product. Intestinal closed loops and diarrheal observations determined disease severity and duration. OPN mRNA levels increased after infection of HT-29 cells, peaking in 4 to 6 h. Infected cultures contained 925 microg of OPN/ml, while for controls the levels were below detection (50 microg/ml). Infection increased OPN mRNA levels in intestinal tissue between 2 and 24 h postinoculation and increased OPN protein in intestinal fluid. The cellular localization of OPN was supranuclear and apical, and responding cells were diffusely distributed on the villus surface. Three days after infection, closed intestinal loops from opn-/- mice contained more fluid than loops from controls, although secretion levels at the onset of illness were similar. Null mutant mice experienced more intense and prolonged diarrhea than controls. Rotavirus infection of intestinal epithelial cells and murine intestine caused marked increases in OPN mRNA levels and secreted OPN protein. OPN-deficient mice suffered prolonged disease.

  16. The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in preventing acute gastroenteritis during rotavirus seasons among Polish children

    PubMed Central

    Kieltyka, Agnieszka; Majewska, Renata; Augustyniak, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rotavirus is the main etiological cause of intestinal infections in children. Voluntary rotavirus vaccines were included in the Polish vaccination schedule in 2007. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a completed rotavirus vaccination course in preventing acute gastroenteritis in Polish infants during their first five years of life. Material and methods This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in Lesser Poland (Malopolska Province). The sample population included a group of 303 children who received the completed rotavirus vaccination course and 303 children not vaccinated against rotavirus. The date of the child's acute gastroenteritis diagnosis and his or her vaccination history were extracted from the physicians’ records. Each kind of diagnosed acute gastroenteritis during winter-spring rotavirus seasons was treated as the endpoint. The relative risk of having gastrointestinal infection was assessed using the hazard ratio from the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results In the examined group, 96 (15.8%) children had winter-spring gastrointestinal infections. In the non-vaccinated children, the cumulative incidence of these infections in the first 5 years of life was 20.8%, whereas in the children vaccinated with Rotarix it was only 10.9%. Those who were vaccinated with Rotarix had a 44% reduction in the risk of a winter-spring acute gastroenteritis infection compared to those not vaccinated with Rotarix (p = 0.005). Birth weight less than 2500 g increased the risk of the infection twofold and also reached statistical significance (p = 0.044). Conclusions The results showed that Rotarix is effective in preventing acute gastroenteritis in Polish children during rotavirus seasons. PMID:27279856

  17. Association of rotavirus viroplasms with microtubules through NSP2 and NSP5.

    PubMed

    Cabral-Romero, Claudio; Padilla-Noriega, Luis

    2006-09-01

    Rotavirus replication and virus assembly take place in electrodense spherical structures known as viroplasms whose main components are the viral proteins NSP2 and NSP5. The viroplasms are produced since early times after infection and seem to grow by stepwise addition of viral proteins and by fusion, however, the mechanism of viropIasms formation is unknown. In this study we found that the viroplasms surface colocalized with microtubules, and seem to be caged by a microtubule network. Moreover inhibition of microtubule assembly with nocodazole interfered with viroplasms growth in rotavirus infected cells. We searched for a physical link between viroplasms and microtubules by co-immunoprecipitation assays, and we found that the proteins NSP2 and NSP5 were co-immunoprecipitated with anti-tubulin in rotavirus infected cells and also when they were transiently co-expressed or individually expressed. These results indicate that a functional microtubule network is needed for viroplasm growth presumably due to the association of viroplasms with microtubules via NSP2 and NSP5.

  18. Separation and quantification of double- and triple-layered rotavirus-like particles by CZE.

    PubMed

    Castro-Acosta, Ricardo M; Revilla, Alma L; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2010-04-01

    Virus-like particles have been successfully used as safe vaccines, as their structure is identical to their native counterparts but devoid of the viral genetic material. However, production of these complex structures is not easy, as recombinant proteins must assemble into virus-like particles. Techniques to differentiate assembled and soluble proteins, as well as assembly intermediaries often present in a sample, are required. An example of complex virus-like particles mixture occurs when rotavirus proteins are recombinantly expressed. Rotavirus-like particles (RLP) can be single (sl), double (dl), or triple layered (tl). The use of RLP preparations as vaccines requires their complete characterization, including separation and quantification of each RLP in a sample. In this work, CZE was evaluated for the separation and quantification of dl and triple-layered rotavirus-like particles (tlRLP). A fused-silica capillary with a deoxycholate running buffer efficiently separated dl and tlRLP in RLP preparations, as they migrated in two discrete peaks with electrophoretic mobilities of 1.24+/-0.04 and 2.95+/-0.03 Ti, respectively. Standard curves for dl and tlRLP were generated, and the response was linearly proportional to analyte concentration. The methodology developed was quantitative, specific, accurate, precise, and reproducible. CZE allowed the quantitative characterization of RLP preparations, which is required for evaluation of immunogens, for process development, and for quality control protocols.

  19. Three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoshiki; Miura, Hiroki; Mori, Yuji; Sugata, Ken; Nakajima, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Yasuto; Morooka, Masashi; Tsuge, Ikuya; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Taniguchi, Koki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide in children. We report three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by various severity of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two patients (cases 1 and 2) recovered completely without any specific treatments. One patient (case 3) died despite extensive treatments including a red blood cell transfusion and endoscopic hemostatic therapy. Rotavirus genotypes G1P[8] and G9P[8] were detected in cases 2 and 3, respectively. Rotavirus antigenemia levels were not high at the onset of melena, suggesting that systemic rotaviral infection does not play an important role in causing melena.

  20. Human rotavirus detection by agglutination of antibody-coated erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sanekata, T; Okada, H

    1983-06-01

    We sensitized sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) with antibodies against human rotavirus strain Wa (SRBC-antiWa) and antibodies against calf rotavirus strain NCDV (SRBC-antiNCDV). These were readily agglutinated in the presence of homologous antigens, i.e., human rotavirus and calf rotavirus. By the hemagglutination of SRBC-antiWa and SRBC-antiNCDV (reverse passive hemagglutination [RPHA]), titration of rotavirus in extracts from feces of children suffering from diarrhea (61 specimens) was carried out. We found that the ratio of titers determined with SRBC-antiWa and SRBC-antiNCDV varied remarkably from specimen to specimen. This indicated that the antigenic determinants on human rotavirus in patients feces cross-react with antibodies against NCDV to varying extents. To express the cross-reactivity of human rotavirus with antibodies to NCDV, we propose a Wa/NCDV rotavirus index which can be calculated from the RPHA titer with SRBC-antiWa and SRBC-antiNCDV as follows: Wa/NCDV rotavirus index = (antiWa-RPHA titer of specimen/antiWa-RPHA titer of NCDV)/(antiNCDV-RPHA titer of specimen/antiNCDV-RPHA titer of NCDV).

  1. Assortment and packaging of the segmented rotavirus genome.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Sarah M; Patton, John T

    2011-03-01

    The rotavirus (RV) genome comprises 11 segments of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and is contained within a non-enveloped, icosahedral particle. During assembly, a highly coordinated selective packaging mechanism ensures that progeny RV virions contain one of each genome segment. Cis-acting signals thought to mediate assortment and packaging are associated with putative panhandle structures formed by base-pairing of the ends of RV plus-strand RNAs (+RNAs). Viral polymerases within assembling core particles convert the 11 distinct +RNAs to dsRNA genome segments. It remains unclear whether RV +RNAs are assorted before or during encapsidation, and the functions of viral proteins during these processes are not resolved. However, as reviewed here, recent insights gained from the study of RV and two other segmented RNA viruses, influenza A virus and bacteriophage Φ6, reveal potential mechanisms of RV assortment and packaging.

  2. Stress Response and Translation Control in Rotavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    López, Susana; Oceguera, Alfonso; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The general stress and innate immune responses are closely linked and overlap at many levels. The outcomes of these responses serve to reprogram host expression patterns to prevent viral invasions. In turn, viruses counter attack these cell responses to ensure their replication. The mechanisms by which viruses attempt to control host cell responses are as varied as the number of different virus families. One of the most recurrent strategies used by viruses to control the antiviral response of the cell is to hijack the translation machinery of the host, such that viral proteins are preferentially synthesized, while the expression of the stress and antiviral responses of the cell are blocked at the translation level. Here, we will review how rotaviruses, an important agent of acute severe gastroenteritis in children, overcome the stress responses of the cell to establish a productive infectious cycle. PMID:27338442

  3. Impact of rotavirus disease in Spain: an estimate of hospital admissions due to rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Visser, L E; Cano Portero, R; Gay, N J; Martínez Navarro, J F

    1999-01-01

    The epidemiology of rotavirus infection in Spain was investigated using information from existing surveillance systems. Reports from laboratories and data on hospital admissions were used to estimate the number of hospital admissions due to rotavirus infection. Between January 1989 and December 1995 there were 8265 reports of rotavirus identification in the Sistema de Información Microbiológica, a voluntary national laboratory surveillance system. Where age was reported, 89.2% were in children under 5 y old. This represents 21.8% of all pathogens identified in faecal specimens in children of this age group. Between January and December 1994 there were 5639 admissions coded as "infectious intestinal disease" and 8225 as "non-infective gastroenteritis" in children under 5 y of age in the Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos, an obligatory hospital admissions surveillance system which covers 83% of public hospitals. Using regression analysis of admission data and laboratory reports it was estimated that rotavirus infection accounted for 3519 (25.3%) of the hospital admissions. We estimate that 4239 admissions attributable to rotavirus occurred in children under 5 y of age in Spain in 1994, a rate of 2.5/1000 population in this age group. These estimates are lower than those published for other countries, where the burden of disease is considered high enough to warrant a national vaccination programme. A cost-effectiveness study with Spanish information is essential before embarking on a national vaccination programme. PMID:10088916

  4. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Nordgren, Johan; Karlsson, Thommie; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Svensson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s) is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4) significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10) infants, but no (0/8) adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM) diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days). Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11) had significantly (p < 0.05) less diarrhoea, lower diarrhoea severity score and lower total diarrhoea output as compared to mock-treated mice (n = 9). Similarly, Ondansetron-treated mice had better weight gain than mock-treated animals (p < 0.05). A most surprising finding was that the serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p < 0.05) also attenuated total viral shedding. In summary, we show that intracellularly expressed NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron. PMID:27459372

  5. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Bialowas, Sonja; Hagbom, Marie; Nordgren, Johan; Karlsson, Thommie; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Svensson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s) is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4) significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10) infants, but no (0/8) adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM) diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days). Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11) had significantly (p < 0.05) less diarrhoea, lower diarrhoea severity score and lower total diarrhoea output as compared to mock-treated mice (n = 9). Similarly, Ondansetron-treated mice had better weight gain than mock-treated animals (p < 0.05). A most surprising finding was that the serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p < 0.05) also attenuated total viral shedding. In summary, we show that intracellularly expressed NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron. PMID:27459372

  6. Human G3P[4] rotavirus obtained in Japan, 2013, possibly emerged through a human-equine rotavirus reassortment event.

    PubMed

    Malasao, Rungnapa; Saito, Mayuko; Suzuki, Akira; Imagawa, Toshifumi; Nukiwa-Soma, Nao; Tohma, Kentaro; Liu, Xiaofang; Okamoto, Michiko; Chaimongkol, Natthawan; Dapat, Clyde; Kawamura, Kazuhisa; Kayama, Yasuko; Masago, Yoshifumi; Omura, Tatsuo; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-02-01

    Two novel G3P[4] rotavirus strains were detected from children with acute diarrhea in Sendai, Japan, identified as a G3-P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 genotype constellation by whole-genome sequence analysis. The VP7 gene of the two strains displayed the highest nucleotide sequence identity (91 %) and showed a close genetic relationship (99 % bootstrap value) to an equine rotavirus reported in India. The other gene segments were related to human group A rotaviruses. This report suggests a possible reassortment event between human and equine rotaviruses. PMID:25352228

  7. Comparative genetic analysis of VP4, VP1 and 3D gene regions of enterovirus 71 and coxsackievirus A16 circulating in Malaysia between 1997-2008.

    PubMed

    Chan, Y F; Wee, K L; Chiam, C W; Khor, C S; Chan, S Y; Amalina W, M Z; Sam, I C

    2012-09-01

    Three genomic regions, VP4 capsid, VP1 capsid and 3D RNA polymerase of human enterovirus 71 (EV-71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) were sequenced to understand the evolution of these viruses in Malaysia. A total of 42 EV-71 and 36 CV-A16 isolates from 1997- 2008 were sequenced. Despite the presence of many EV-71 subgenotypes worldwide, only subgenotypes B3, B4, B5, C1 and C2 were present in Malaysia. Importation of other subgenotypes such as C3, C4/D and C5 from other countries was infrequent. For CV-A16, the earlier subgenotype B1 was replaced by subgenotypes B2a and the recent B2c. Subgenotype B2a was present throughout the study while B2c only emerged in 2005. No genetic signatures could be attributed to viral virulence suggesting that host factors have a major role in determining the outcome of infection. Only three EV-71 B3 isolates showed non-consistent phylogeny in the 3D RNA polymerase region which indicated occurrence of recombination in EV-71. High genetic diversity was observed in the Malaysian EV-71 but Malaysian CV-A16 showed low genetic diversity in the three genomic regions sequenced. EV-71 showed strong purifying selection, but that occurred to a lesser extent in CV-A16.

  8. Development, characterization, and diagnostic applications of monoclonal antibodies against bovine rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Al-Yousif, Y; Al-Majhdi, F; Chard-Bergstrom, C; Anderson, J; Kapil, S

    2000-03-01

    Hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the Nebraska calf diarrhea strain of bovine rotavirus (BRV) were characterized. Indirect fluorescent-antibody assay, immunodot assay, and immunoprecipitation were used to select hybridomas that produced anti-BRV MAbs. Seven of the MAbs were shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot assay to be reactive with the BRV outer capsid protein, VP7, which has a molecular mass of 37.5 kDa. None of the seven MAbs were reactive with canine rotavirus, bovine coronavirus, or uninfected Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells. Two clones, 8B4 (immunoglobulin G2a [IgG2a]) and 2B11 (IgG1), were found suitable for use in an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting BRV in bovine fecal samples. Both were subtype A specific (G6 subtype) but did not react with all isolates of BRV group A. PMID:10702506

  9. Rotavirus P[8] Infections in Persons with Secretor and Nonsecretor Phenotypes, Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ayouni, Siwar; Sdiri-Loulizi, Khira; de Rougemont, Alexis; Estienney, Marie; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Aho, Serge; Hamami, Sabeur; Aouni, Mahjoub; Neji-Guediche, Mohamed; Pothier, Pierre; Belliot, Gaël

    2015-11-01

    To determine whether rotavirus infections are linked to secretor status, we studied samples from children in Tunisia with gastroenteritis. We phenotyped saliva for human blood group antigens and tested feces for rotavirus. Rotavirus was detected in 32/114 patients. Secretor genotyping showed that P[8] rotavirus infected secretors and nonsecretors, and infection correlated with presence of Lewis antigen.

  10. Rotavirus P[8] Infections in Persons with Secretor and Nonsecretor Phenotypes, Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Ayouni, Siwar; Sdiri-Loulizi, Khira; de Rougemont, Alexis; Estienney, Marie; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Aho, Serge; Hamami, Sabeur; Aouni, Mahjoub; Neji-Guediche, Mohamed; Pothier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether rotavirus infections are linked to secretor status, we studied samples from children in Tunisia with gastroenteritis. We phenotyped saliva for human blood group antigens and tested feces for rotavirus. Rotavirus was detected in 32/114 patients. Secretor genotyping showed that P[8] rotavirus infected secretors and nonsecretors, and infection correlated with presence of Lewis antigen. PMID:26488868

  11. Heat Shock Protein 70 Enhances Mucosal Immunity against Human Norovirus When Coexpressed from a Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuanmei; Duan, Yue; Wei, Yongwei; Liang, Xueya; Niewiesk, Stefan; Oglesbee, Michael

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human norovirus (NoV) accounts for 95% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Currently, there is no vaccine available to combat human NoV as it is not cultivable and lacks a small-animal model. Recently, we demonstrated that recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) expressing human NoV capsid protein (rVSV-VP1) induced strong immunities in mice (Y. Ma and J. Li, J. Virol. 85:2942–2952, 2011). To further improve the safety and efficacy of the vaccine candidate, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was inserted into the rVSV-VP1 backbone vector. A second construct was generated in which the firefly luciferase (Luc) gene was inserted in place of HSP70 as a control for the double insertion. The resultant recombinant viruses (rVSV-HSP70-VP1 and rVSV-Luc-VP1) were significantly more attenuated in cell culture and viral spread in mice than rVSV-VP1. At the inoculation dose of 1.0 × 106 PFU, rVSV-HSP70-VP1 triggered significantly higher vaginal IgA than rVSV-VP1 and significantly higher fecal and vaginal IgA responses than rVSV-Luc-VP1, although serum IgG and T cell responses were similar. At the inoculation dose of 5.0 × 106 PFU, rVSV-HSP70-VP1 stimulated significantly higher T cell, fecal, and vaginal IgA responses than rVSV-VP1. Fecal and vaginal IgA responses were also significantly increased when combined vaccination of rVSV-VP1 and rVSV-HSP70 was used. Collectively, these data indicate that (i) insertion of an additional gene (HSP70 or Luc) into the rVSV-VP1 backbone further attenuates the VSV-based vaccine in vitro and in vivo, thus improving the safety of the vaccine candidate, and (ii) HSP70 enhances the human NoV-specific mucosal and T cell immunities triggered by a VSV-based human NoV vaccine. IMPORTANCE Human norovirus (NoV) is responsible for more than 95% of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Currently, there is no vaccine for this virus. Development of a live attenuated vaccine for human NoV has not been possible because it is

  12. New approaches in oral rotavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kuate Defo, Zenas; Lee, Byong

    2016-05-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe dehydrating diarrhea worldwide, and affects primarily developing nations, in large part because of the inaccessibility of vaccines and high rates of mortality present therein. At present, there exist two oral rotaviral vaccines, Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™. These vaccines are generally effective in their actions: however, associated costs often stymie their effectiveness, and they continue to be associated with a slight risk of intussusception. While different programs are being implemented worldwide to enhance vaccine distribution and monitor vaccine administration for possible intussusception in light of recent WHO recommendation, another major problem persists: that of the reduced efficacy of the existing rotaviral vaccines in developing countries over time. The development of new oral rotavirus vaccine classes - live-attenuated vaccines, virus-like particles, lactic acid bacteria-containing vaccines, combination therapy with immunoglobulins, and biodegradable polymer-encapsulated vaccines - could potentially circumvent these problems.

  13. Rotavirus in India: Forty Years of Research.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gagandeep

    2016-07-01

    Rotavirus was first identified as a human pathogen just over 40 years ago, and work on this pathogen in India started shortly thereafter. Subsequent studies have confirmed its pre-eminent role in gastroenteritis in children in India. Standardized surveillance has enabled the documentation of the high burden of disease, and has demonstrated that there is considerable geographic and temporal variation in strain circulation. Internationally licensed vaccines, vaccine candidates based on indigenous strains and out-licensed strains have been tested for safety, immunogenicity and efficacy; three vaccines are now licensed in India and are used in the private sector. Public sector vaccination has begun, and it will be path-breaking for Indian vaccinologists to measure impact of vaccine introduction in terms of safety and effectiveness. So far, India has kept pace with international epidemiologic and vaccine research on rotavirus, and these efforts should continue. PMID:27508532

  14. Impact of rotavirus vaccination on hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea: the IVANHOE study.

    PubMed

    Gagneur, Arnaud; Nowak, Emmanuel; Lemaitre, Thomas; Segura, Jean-Francois; Delaperrière, Nadège; Abalea, Lydie; Poulhazan, Elise; Jossens, Anne; Auzanneau, Lucie; Tran, Adissa; Payan, Christopher; Jay, Nadine; de Parscau, Loic; Oger, Emmanuel

    2011-05-12

    The aim of the IVANHOE study was to determine the real-world impact of the rotavirus vaccine, controlling for epidemic-to-epidemic variation in disease burden. A population-based prospective cohort study was conducted in Brest City and 7 suburban districts (CUB area), North-western Brittany, France (210,000 inhabitants; 5500 births per year). The vaccination program started in May 2007 for a 2-year period for all infants born in the Brest birth zone through pediatricians, public outpatient clinics and general practitioners. To determine vaccine impact we monitored trends in hospitalizations for rotavirus-specific diarrhea using an active hospital-based surveillance system initiated 5 years before vaccine introduction. The number of hospitalizations for rotavirus-specific diarrhea during the 2008/2009 epidemic in infants less than 2 years of age whose parents lived within the CUB area was modelled as a function of (1) the number of hospitalizations in infants 2-5 years of age to control for epidemic-to-epidemic variation and (2) vaccine introduction. A total of 4684 infants received at least one dose. Of these, 2635 lived within the CUB area. Vaccine coverage for a complete schedule in the CUB area was 47.1%. Poisson modelling revealed a reduction by a factor of 2.04 (1.56-2.66) in the number of hospitalizations during the last epidemic season (2008/2009), the number of observed cases being equal to 30, against an expected number of 61. Relative risk reduction for hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea was 98% (95% CI: 83-100%). We observed a noticeable impact of vaccination on rotavirus diarrhea hospitalizations within 2 years of vaccine introduction integrating for the first time rotavirus epidemics variation. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number, NCT00740935. PMID:21443962

  15. Impact of rotavirus vaccination on hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea: the IVANHOE study.

    PubMed

    Gagneur, Arnaud; Nowak, Emmanuel; Lemaitre, Thomas; Segura, Jean-Francois; Delaperrière, Nadège; Abalea, Lydie; Poulhazan, Elise; Jossens, Anne; Auzanneau, Lucie; Tran, Adissa; Payan, Christopher; Jay, Nadine; de Parscau, Loic; Oger, Emmanuel

    2011-05-12

    The aim of the IVANHOE study was to determine the real-world impact of the rotavirus vaccine, controlling for epidemic-to-epidemic variation in disease burden. A population-based prospective cohort study was conducted in Brest City and 7 suburban districts (CUB area), North-western Brittany, France (210,000 inhabitants; 5500 births per year). The vaccination program started in May 2007 for a 2-year period for all infants born in the Brest birth zone through pediatricians, public outpatient clinics and general practitioners. To determine vaccine impact we monitored trends in hospitalizations for rotavirus-specific diarrhea using an active hospital-based surveillance system initiated 5 years before vaccine introduction. The number of hospitalizations for rotavirus-specific diarrhea during the 2008/2009 epidemic in infants less than 2 years of age whose parents lived within the CUB area was modelled as a function of (1) the number of hospitalizations in infants 2-5 years of age to control for epidemic-to-epidemic variation and (2) vaccine introduction. A total of 4684 infants received at least one dose. Of these, 2635 lived within the CUB area. Vaccine coverage for a complete schedule in the CUB area was 47.1%. Poisson modelling revealed a reduction by a factor of 2.04 (1.56-2.66) in the number of hospitalizations during the last epidemic season (2008/2009), the number of observed cases being equal to 30, against an expected number of 61. Relative risk reduction for hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea was 98% (95% CI: 83-100%). We observed a noticeable impact of vaccination on rotavirus diarrhea hospitalizations within 2 years of vaccine introduction integrating for the first time rotavirus epidemics variation. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number, NCT00740935.

  16. Rotavirus vaccines: viral shedding and risk of transmission.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Evan J

    2008-10-01

    Rotavirus causes gastroenteritis in almost all children by 5 years of age. Immunity to rotavirus is incomplete, with potential for recurrent infections occurring throughout life. Live rotavirus vaccines have been developed for the protection of children from severe wildtype rotavirus infections. Transmission of vaccine virus strains from vaccinated children to unvaccinated contacts harbours the potential for herd immunity, but also the risk of vaccine-derived disease in immunocompromised contacts. A review of rotavirus vaccine prelicensure studies shows that viral shedding and transmission were higher with the old tetravalent rhesus rotavirus vaccine than with the current human attenuated monovalent rotavirus vaccine and the pentavalent bovine-human reassortant vaccine. Immunocompromised contacts should be advised to avoid contact with stool from the immunised child if possible, particularly after the first vaccine dose for at least 14 days. Since the risk of vaccine transmission and subsequent vaccine-derived disease with the current vaccines is much less than the risk of wildtype rotavirus disease in immunocompromised contacts, vaccination should be encouraged.

  17. The detection of rotaviruses in products of wastewater treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Bates, J.; Goddard, M. R.; Butler, M.

    1984-01-01

    Rotaviruses present in products of wastewater treatment were assayed in MA104 cells by indirect immunofluorescence. Levels in settled sewage, activated sludge and effluent were greater than 10(3) per litre in March and April but virus was not detected during later months. This pattern correlated with the decline in laboratory reports of human rotavirus infection. PMID:6096445

  18. Hospitalizations associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis in Spain, 2001–2005

    PubMed Central

    López-de-Andrés, Ana; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; Alvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Galarza, Patricia Graciela; de Miguel, Ángel Gil

    2008-01-01

    Background This study aims to describe and analyze hospital admissions in Spain due to rotavirus infections among children aged 5 years or under during the period 2001–2005, along with the associated health cost. Methods To update estimates of rotavirus hospitalizations rates in Spain, we conducted a retrospective study of 5 years of national hospitalization data associated with acute gastroenteritis using the Minimum Basic Data Set. Results During the study period, a total of 17.1% of all admissions due to acute gastroenteritis of any etiology in children aged ≤ 5 years were attributable to rotavirus infection as determined by the rotavirus-specific International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision, Clinical Modification code. A mean incidence of 135 hospital admissions attributable to rotavirus per 100,000 children aged ≤ 5 years was found. Hospitalizations associated with rotavirus had a marked winter-time seasonality. The estimated cost of hospital admission attributable to rotavirus has risen from 3 million euros estimated for 2001 to almost 7 million euros estimated in 2005. Conclusion Rotavirus gastroenteritis remains an important cause of hospitalizations in Spanish children, mostly during the winter season. PMID:18397512

  19. [Rotavirus infection in Brazil: epidemiology and challenges for its control].

    PubMed

    Linhares, A C

    2000-01-01

    Worldwide, rotaviruses account for 600,000 to 870,000 deaths per year among infants and young children. In Brazil, rotaviruses were first seen in 1976 by scanning electron microscopy of stool samples from diarrheic infants in Belém, Pará. Hospital-based studies have shown that rotaviruses are associated with 12-42% of cases of acute diarrhea. In addition, community-based studies yielded an average of 0.25 rotavirus-related diarrheal episodes per child per year. G types 1 to 4 account for about two-thirds of circulating strains, but the (unusual) P[8],G5 genotype has been claimed to cause over 10% of rotavirus diarrheal episodes. It has been shown that over 70% of children develop rotavirus antibodies by the age of 4-5 years. The tetravalent rhesus-human rotavirus vaccine (RRV-TV) conferred 35% protection according to a two-year follow-up study in Belém, Pará, Brazil, but reached an efficacy of 60% during the first year of life. RRV-TV was also shown to be 75% protective against very severe gastroenteritis in northern Brazil. Vaccination with RRV-TV has been suspended recently in the United States because of the detection of intussusception as a side effect. Therefore, further vaccine trials in Brazil will probably involve rotavirus candidate vaccines other than RRV-TV.

  20. Rotavirus epidemiology in San Luis Potosí, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Noyola, Daniel E; Herrera, Ismael F

    2005-07-01

    The epidemiology of rotavirus infections was investigated in San Luis Potosí, Mexico during a 6-year period. In each of the study years, the epidemic period started in October or November; peak activity was detected between December and February, and the end of the epidemic occurred in March or April. Rotavirus infections show a consistent temporal pattern in our community.

  1. Immunochromatography-based Diagnosis of Rotavirus Infection in Acute Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Vashishtha, Vipin M; Thacker, Sandeep; Namjoshi, Gajanan Sudhir

    2016-07-01

    Documentation of rotavirus diarrhea in a rural, resource-poor setting is a difficult task. We analyzed stool samples of 103 children admitted for acute diarrhea in a pediatric hospital in Bijnor, UP, India, using a simple bedside immunochromatography kit. Rotavirus infection was detected in 47 out of total of 103 children (45.6%). PMID:27508549

  2. Whole Genomic Analysis of an Unusual Human G6P[14] Rotavirus Strain Isolated from a Child with Diarrhea in Thailand: Evidence for Bovine-To-Human Interspecies Transmission and Reassortment Events.

    PubMed

    Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Komoto, Satoshi; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Haga, Kei; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kato, Takema; Ouchi, Yuya; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Tsuji, Takao; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2015-01-01

    An unusual rotavirus strain, SKT-27, with the G6P[14] genotypes (RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-27/2012/G6P[14]), was identified in a stool specimen from a hospitalized child aged eight months with severe diarrhea. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genome of strain SKT-27. On whole genomic analysis, strain SKT-27 was found to have a unique genotype constellation: G6-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3. The non-G/P genotype constellation of this strain (I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3) is commonly shared with rotavirus strains from artiodactyls such as cattle. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that nine of the 11 genes of strain SKT-27 (VP7, VP4, VP6, VP2-3, NSP1, NSP3-5) appeared to be of artiodactyl (likely bovine) origin, while the remaining VP1 and NSP2 genes were assumed to be of human origin. Thus, strain SKT-27 was found to have a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone, and thus is likely to be of bovine origin. Furthermore, strain SKT-27 appeared to be derived through interspecies transmission and reassortment events involving bovine and human rotavirus strains. Of note is that the VP7 gene of strain SKT-27 was located in G6 lineage-5 together with those of bovine rotavirus strains, away from the clusters comprising other G6P[14] strains in G6 lineages-2/6, suggesting the occurrence of independent bovine-to-human interspecies transmission events. To our knowledge, this is the first report on full genome-based characterization of human G6P[14] strains that have emerged in Southeast Asia. Our observations will provide important insights into the origin of G6P[14] strains, and into dynamic interactions between human and bovine rotavirus strains.

  3. Whole Genomic Analysis of an Unusual Human G6P[14] Rotavirus Strain Isolated from a Child with Diarrhea in Thailand: Evidence for Bovine-To-Human Interspecies Transmission and Reassortment Events

    PubMed Central

    Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Komoto, Satoshi; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Haga, Kei; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kato, Takema; Ouchi, Yuya; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Tsuji, Takao; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2015-01-01

    An unusual rotavirus strain, SKT-27, with the G6P[14] genotypes (RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-27/2012/G6P[14]), was identified in a stool specimen from a hospitalized child aged eight months with severe diarrhea. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genome of strain SKT-27. On whole genomic analysis, strain SKT-27 was found to have a unique genotype constellation: G6-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3. The non-G/P genotype constellation of this strain (I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3) is commonly shared with rotavirus strains from artiodactyls such as cattle. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that nine of the 11 genes of strain SKT-27 (VP7, VP4, VP6, VP2-3, NSP1, NSP3-5) appeared to be of artiodactyl (likely bovine) origin, while the remaining VP1 and NSP2 genes were assumed to be of human origin. Thus, strain SKT-27 was found to have a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone, and thus is likely to be of bovine origin. Furthermore, strain SKT-27 appeared to be derived through interspecies transmission and reassortment events involving bovine and human rotavirus strains. Of note is that the VP7 gene of strain SKT-27 was located in G6 lineage-5 together with those of bovine rotavirus strains, away from the clusters comprising other G6P[14] strains in G6 lineages-2/6, suggesting the occurrence of independent bovine-to-human interspecies transmission events. To our knowledge, this is the first report on full genome-based characterization of human G6P[14] strains that have emerged in Southeast Asia. Our observations will provide important insights into the origin of G6P[14] strains, and into dynamic interactions between human and bovine rotavirus strains. PMID:26421718

  4. The impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis on the family

    PubMed Central

    Mast, T Christopher; DeMuro-Mercon, Carla; Kelly, Claudia M; Floyd, Leigh Ellen; Walter, Emmanuel B

    2009-01-01

    Background Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea in young children and causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Although the clinical aspects have been well described, little information is available regarding the emotional, social, and economic impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis on the family of a sick child. The objectives of this study were to: 1) assess the family impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis through qualitative interviews with parents; 2) compare the clinical severity of rotavirus-positive and negative gastroenteritis; 3) test a questionnaire asking parents to rank the importance of various factors associated with a case of rotavirus gastroenteritis. Methods The study enrolled parents and children (2–36 months of age) brought to one of the study sites (outpatient clinic or ER) if the child experienced ≥ 3 watery or looser-than normal stools and/or forceful vomiting within any 24-hour period within the prior 3 days. The clinical severity of each child's illness was rated using a clinical scoring system and stool samples were tested for rotavirus antigen. Parents of rotavirus-positive children were invited to participate in focus group or individual interviews and subsequently completed a questionnaire regarding the impact of their child's illness. Results Of 62 enrolled children, 43 stool samples were collected and 63% tested positive for rotavirus. Illness was more severe in children with rotavirus-positive compared to rotavirus-negative gastroenteritis (92% vs. 37.5% rated as moderate/severe). Seventeen parents of rotavirus-positive children participated in the interviews and completed the written questionnaire. Parents were frightened by the severity of vomiting and diarrhea associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis, and noted that family life was impacted in several ways including loss of sleep, missed work, and an inability to complete normal household tasks. They expressed frustration at the lack of a specific medication and the

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the sialic acid-binding domain (VP8*) of porcine rotavirus strain CRW-8

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Stacy A.; Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S.; Szyczew, Alex J.; Kiefel, Milton J.; Itzstein, Mark von; Blanchard, Helen

    2005-06-01

    The sialic acid-binding domain (VP8*) component of the porcine CRW-8 rotavirus spike protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and co-crystallized with an N-acetylneuraminic acid derivative. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.3 Å, which has enabled determination of the structure by molecular replacement. Rotavirus recognition and attachment to host cells involves interaction with the spike protein VP4 that projects outwards from the surface of the virus particle. An integral component of these spikes is the VP8* domain, which is implicated in the direct recognition and binding of sialic acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates and facilitates subsequent invasion by the virus. The expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of VP8* from porcine CRW-8 rotavirus is reported. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.3 Å resolution, enabling the determination of the VP8* structure by molecular replacement.

  6. Whole genomic analyses of asymptomatic human G1P[6], G2P[6] and G3P[6] rotavirus strains reveal intergenogroup reassortment events and genome segments of artiodactyl origin.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Souvik; Urushibara, Noriko; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta; Krishnan, Triveni; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2013-06-01

    Although P[6] group A rotaviruses (RVA) cause diarrhoea in humans, they have been also associated with endemics of predominantly asymptomatic neonatal infections. Interestingly, strains representing the endemic and asymptomatic P[6] RVAs were found to possess one of the four common human VP7 serotypes (G1-G4), and exhibited little antigenic/genetic differences with the VP4 proteins/VP4 encoding genome segments of P[6] RVAs recovered from diarrhoeic children, raising interest on their complete genetic constellations. In the present study, we report the overall genetic makeup and possible origin of three such asymptomatic human P[6] RVA strains, RVA/Human-tc/VEN/M37/1982/G1P2A[6], RVA/Human-tc/SWE/1076/1983/G2P2A[6] and RVA/Human-tc/AUS/McN13/1980/G3P2A[6]. G1P[6] strain M37 exhibited an unusual genotype constellation (G1-P[6]-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T2-E1-H1), not reported previously, and was found to originate from possible intergenogroup reassortment events involving acquisition of a DS-1-like NSP3 encoding genome segment by a human Wa-like RVA strain. On the other hand, G2P[6] strain 1076 exhibited a DS-1-like genotype constellation, and was found to possess several genome segments (those encoding VP1, VP3, VP6 and NSP4) of possible artiodactyl (ruminants) origin on a human RVA genetic backbone. The whole genome of G3P[6] strain McN13 was closely related to that of asymptomatic human Wa-like G3P[6] strain RV3, and both strains shared unique amino acid changes, which might have contributed to their attenuation. Taken together, the present study provided insights into the origin and complex genetic diversity of P[6] RVAs possessing the common human VP7 genotypes. This is the first report on the whole genomic analysis of a G1P[6] RVA strain. PMID:23347969

  7. [The rotavirus disease and the oral human rotavirus vaccination in the Brazilian scenario: an integrative literature review].

    PubMed

    Salvador, Pétala Tuani Candido de Oliveira; de Almeida, Taciana Jacinto de; Alves, Kisna Yasmin Andrade; Dantas, Cilene Nunes

    2011-02-01

    Due to the epidemiological relevance of rotavirus disease on the worldwide panorama as an important cause of morbid-mortality in the infantile public and to the still incipient production of studies concerning the problematic in the nationwide scenario, not to mention the unique necessity of encouraging the promotion of care and education as inseparable factors in the health spaces, it was delimited as study object of the present article the rotavirus disease in the Brazilian scenario, emphasizing the vaccination as preventive measure against this ill. Thus it is aimed to analyze the publications about rotavirus disease in our country's contexture, stressing the vaccination against the Rotavirus (VORH) as the strategy mentioned. It is a bibliographic research performed on the BDENF, Lilacs, SciELO and Medline databases, in February 2010. During the study the following thematic pillars were discussed: rotavirus characteristics; the rotavirus disease as a public health issue; and the vaccination against rotavirus as primordial action of health care. The study evidenced the epidemiological importance of rotavirus disease in the worldwide scenario and the relevance of vaccination as preventive measure against such problematics.

  8. Characterization of RotaTeq® vaccine-derived rotaviruses in South Korean infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Than, Van Thai; Jeong, Sunyoung; Kim, Wonyong

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping of human rotaviruses was performed in 191 rotavirus-positive fecal samples collected from infants with acute gastroenteritis, 3 years after the introduction of two rotavirus vaccines in South Korea. Among these samples, the most prevalent rotavirus genotype was G3P[8] (30.9%), followed by G1P[8] (27.7%), G4P[6] (15.2%), and G9P[8] (5.8%). Sequence analysis identified RotaTeq® vaccine-derived strains in 12 samples (6.3%), comprising 11 G1P[8] human-bovine double reassortant rotaviruses and 1 G1P[5] human-bovine single reassortant rotavirus. It is of note that cross-reactivity between the current G4-specific typing primer and RotaTeq®-specific G1 genotypes was found. A trace of the clinical and environmental routes of the rotavirus vaccine strains revealed unexpected complexity, and the diagnostic protocol for rotaviruses may require modification by using either another typing primer set or nucleotide sequence analysis.

  9. Diarrheal Diseases Hospitalization in Yemen before and after Rotavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Al-Areqi, Lina; Mujally, Abulatif; Alkarshy, Fawzya; Nasser, Arwa; Jumaan, Aisha O.

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on diarrheal diseases hospitalization and to identify the rotavirus genotypes most prevalent before and after vaccine introduction among children ≤ 5 years of age. Rotarix™ ® rotavirus vaccine is currently licensed for infants in Yemen and was introduced in 2012. The vaccination course consists of two doses. The first dose is administrated at 6 weeks of age and the second dose is completed by 10 weeks. Based on a longitudinal observational study, we assessed the impact of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalization before and after vaccination among children ≤ 5 years of age at the Yemeni-Swedish Hospital (YSH) in Taiz, Yemen. Prevaccination covered January 2009–July 2012 during which 2335 fecal samples were collected from children ≤ 5 years old. Postvaccination covered January 2013–December 2014 during which 1114 fecal samples were collected. Rotavirus was detected by Enzyme Linkage Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The incidence of rotavirus hospitalization decreased from 43.79% in 2009 to 10.54% in 2014. Hospitalization due to rotavirus diarrhea was reduced by 75.93%. Vaccine coverage increased from 23% in 2012 to 72% in 2014. Also, the results showed that the most predominant genotypes in prevaccination period were G2P[4] (55.0%), followed by G1P[8] (15.0%), while in postvaccination period G1P[8] (31%) was the predominant genotype, followed by G9P[8] (27.5%). In conclusion, rotavirus vaccination in Yemen resulted in sharp reduction in diarrheal hospitalization. A successful rotavirus vaccination program in Yemen will rely upon efficient vaccine delivery systems and sustained vaccine efficacy against diverse and evolving rotavirus strains. PMID:27437161

  10. Diarrheal Diseases Hospitalization in Yemen before and after Rotavirus Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Amood Al-Kamarany, Mohammed; Al-Areqi, Lina; Mujally, Abulatif; Alkarshy, Fawzya; Nasser, Arwa; Jumaan, Aisha O

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on diarrheal diseases hospitalization and to identify the rotavirus genotypes most prevalent before and after vaccine introduction among children ≤ 5 years of age. Rotarix™ ® rotavirus vaccine is currently licensed for infants in Yemen and was introduced in 2012. The vaccination course consists of two doses. The first dose is administrated at 6 weeks of age and the second dose is completed by 10 weeks. Based on a longitudinal observational study, we assessed the impact of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalization before and after vaccination among children ≤ 5 years of age at the Yemeni-Swedish Hospital (YSH) in Taiz, Yemen. Prevaccination covered January 2009-July 2012 during which 2335 fecal samples were collected from children ≤ 5 years old. Postvaccination covered January 2013-December 2014 during which 1114 fecal samples were collected. Rotavirus was detected by Enzyme Linkage Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The incidence of rotavirus hospitalization decreased from 43.79% in 2009 to 10.54% in 2014. Hospitalization due to rotavirus diarrhea was reduced by 75.93%. Vaccine coverage increased from 23% in 2012 to 72% in 2014. Also, the results showed that the most predominant genotypes in prevaccination period were G2P[4] (55.0%), followed by G1P[8] (15.0%), while in postvaccination period G1P[8] (31%) was the predominant genotype, followed by G9P[8] (27.5%). In conclusion, rotavirus vaccination in Yemen resulted in sharp reduction in diarrheal hospitalization. A successful rotavirus vaccination program in Yemen will rely upon efficient vaccine delivery systems and sustained vaccine efficacy against diverse and evolving rotavirus strains. PMID:27437161

  11. Distribution of VP4 gene alleles in human rotaviruses by using probes to the hyperdivergent region of the VP4 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Steele, A D; Garcia, D; Sears, J; Gerna, G; Nakagomi, O; Flores, J

    1993-01-01

    The rotavirus VP4 protein elicits the production of neutralizing antibodies and is known to play a role in inducing resistance to disease. At least five human rotavirus VP4 gene alleles have been described on the basis of antigenic polymorphism and/or nucleotide sequence differences. In the present study, we developed cDNA probes directed at the hyperdivergent region of the VP4 gene of the five described human rotavirus VP4 alleles (Wa, DS1, M37, AU228, and 69M) and used them in hybridization assays with human rotavirus strains from Latin America and Europe to determine the distribution of the VP4 gene alleles in nature. The Wa-like allele was detected most frequently, occurring in 57% of the 402 rotavirus strains tested, and the DS1-like allele was the next most common, occurring in 14% of the strains tested. The M37- and AU228-like alleles were detected in only 4 and 3% of the rotavirus strains tested, respectively, whereas the 69M-like VP4 gene allele was not detected. Several rotavirus strains from Europe did not react with any of the VP4 gene probes, although they did hybridize to a probe generated from a representative strain from the group. These data indicate the global distribution of various VP4 gene alleles and raise the possibility that other, unrecognized human VP4 alleles exist in nature because almost one-fourth of the strains could not be classified into any of the established VP4 groups. Images PMID:8394374

  12. Analysis of gene selection in reassortant formation between canine rotavirus K9 and human rotaviruses with different antigenic specificities.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, N; Taniguchi, K; Urasawa, T; Urasawa, S

    1993-01-01

    A number of antigenic mosaic reassortants which have neutralization proteins VP4 and VP7 derived from different parental strains were analysed in order to study gene selection in reassortant formation between animal and human rotaviruses (HRV). These reassortants were isolated from mixed infection of MA-104 cells with canine rotavirus strain K9 (subgroup I and G serotype 3) and HRV strains (with subgroup I or II antigen and G serotype 1-4, 9 or 12 antigen), through repeated selections with anti-VP4 and anti-VP7 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies directed specifically at HRV and K9, respectively. By serological and genomic analyses, all the isolated clones were found to be antigenic mosaic reassortants possessing VP4 of K9 and VP7 of HRV. In the reassortants between strain K9 and one of the six strains of subgroup II HRV, a single or a few genotypes with particular constellations of RNA segments were predominant, with only a few RNA segments including gene 4 (encoding VP4) being derived from K9. In contrast, in the reassortants between strain K9 and any one of the subgroup I HRV, more than nine different genotypes were identified and various RNA segments, except for segments 8 and 10, were derived from K9. These findings indicated that the RNA segments of K9 might be reassorted more readily with those of subgroup I HRV than with those of subgroup II HRV, suggesting the possible existence of functional mechanisms which determine the extent of diversity of genome selection depending on the pairs of parent strains in the reassortant formation. PMID:7506839

  13. Analysis of codon usage pattern evolution in avian rotaviruses and their preferred host.

    PubMed

    Kattoor, Jobin Jose; Malik, Yashpal Singh; Sasidharan, Aravind; Rajan, Vishnuraj Mangalathu; Dhama, Kuldeep; Ghosh, Souvik; Bányai, Krisztián; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Rotavirus infection is a worldwide problem, with occurrence of highly divergent viruses classified in 8 species (A-H). We report here the evolution assessment of codon usage patterns in virus-host system in avian rotavirus (AvRV) of species RVA, RVD, RVF and RVG (preferentially affecting birds). The nucleotide contents, codon usage bias (CUB), relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU), and effective number of codons (ENCs) values were investigated targeting overexpressing major inner capsid viral protein (VP6) of these AvRV species. The results confirm that the evolutionary characteristics influences the rotavirus (RV) genetic diversity and impact of host's natural selection on the AvRVs codons. Synonymous codon usage patterns were evaluated following multivariate statistical procedures on all available AvRV coding gene sequences. RSCU trees accommodated all AvRV species and preferred host sequences in one topology confirming greater imminence of AvRVs with the host chicken cell genes. Similarly, the codon adaptation index (CAI) results also displayed a higher adaptation of AvRVs to its chicken host. The codon preference analysis of RVs revealed that VP6 gene express more proficiently in the yeast system, whereas, codon optimization might be required for the effectual expression in Escherichia coli and Homo sapiens. The findings provide basic evidence on the dynamics of AvRV evolution and its host adaptation, which could be exploited for additional research on avian species in future. PMID:26086995

  14. VP4-specific intestinal antibody response to rotavirus in a murine model of heterotypic infection.

    PubMed

    Shaw, R D; Groene, W S; Mackow, E R; Merchant, A A; Cheng, E H

    1991-06-01

    We have adapted a murine model of heterotypic rotavirus infection for the purpose of evaluating the intestinal antibody response to an infection that mimics human vaccination. Neonatal mice were infected with the rhesus rotavirus (RRV). The enzyme-linked immunospot assay was used in order to avoid common artifacts in the quantitation of intestinal immune responses inherent in measurements of luminal or serum immunoglobulins and to obtain easily quantifiable data in a flexible and convenient format. Functionally active lymphocytes were harvested from the spleen, small intestinal lamina propria, Peyer's patches, and mesenteric lymph nodes and processed into single-cell suspensions. Antibody-secreting cells (ASC) were quantitated from 5 to 50 days after infection for total, RRV-specific, baculovirus-expressed VP4-specific, and single-shell RRV-specific ASC secreting either immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, or IgA. The response to VP4 constituted less than 1.5% of the total virus-specific response, which was located almost exclusively in the gut and was 90% IgA. Intestinal ASC were directed overwhelmingly toward proteins incorporated in the single-shell particle, predominantly VP2 and VP6. We conclude that the antibody response to VP4, thought to be the site of the important neutralization sites conserved among several rotavirus serotypes, is an extremely small portion of the overall antibody response in the intestinal tract.

  15. Identification of nonspecific reactions in laboratory rodent specimens tested by Rotazyme rotavirus ELISA.

    PubMed

    Jure, M N; Morse, S S; Stark, D M

    1988-06-01

    Fecal specimens from several laboratory animal species were tested for rotavirus antigen by Rotazyme II, a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that is widely used in human diagnostic studies. Fecal samples from rabbits, hamsters, guinea pigs, dogs, and cats tested negative; whereas those from rats and mice yielded a high proportion of positive results. Rats had the highest rate with 82% of the samples being positive. However, the presence of rotavirus in positive rodent samples could not be confirmed by virus isolation, electron microscopy or blocking ELISA using anti-EDIM mouse rotavirus serum. Several lines of evidence indicated that these positive reactions were false positives, apparently due to a non-specifically reacting substance in the diet of rats and mice. All the positive fecal samples were from rats and mice that had been fed nonautoclaved diet. Samples from rodents fed autoclaved diet were consistently negative in the Rotazyme test. When rats fed autoclaved diet were subsequently fed nonautoclaved diet, their stool converted from negative to positive within 6 hours. Conversely, rats with positive stool samples converted to negative within 15 hours when fed autoclaved diet. Similar results were found with mice. Positive fecal specimens and nonautoclaved rodent diet both contained a substance that apparently attached nonspecifically to the antibody coated beads used in the ELISA and reacted directly with the substrate in the absence of the conjugate. This substance was heat labile and trypsin sensitive, suggesting that it was a protein. PMID:2842540

  16. Rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 (Rotarix™): a pharmacoeconomic review of its use in the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in developed countries.

    PubMed

    Plosker, Greg L

    2011-05-01

    The most common cause of severe diarrhoea in infants and young children is rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE), which is associated with significant morbidity, healthcare resource use and direct and indirect costs in industrialized nations. The monovalent rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 (Rotarix™) is administered as a two-dose oral series in infants and has demonstrated protective efficacy against RVGE in clinical trials conducted in developed countries. In addition, various naturalistic studies have demonstrated 'real-world' effectiveness after the introduction of widespread rotavirus vaccination programmes in the community setting. Numerous cost-effectiveness analyses have been conducted in developed countries in which a universal rotavirus vaccination programme using RIX4414 was compared with no universal rotavirus vaccination programme. There was a high degree of variability in base-case results across studies even when conducted in the same country, often reflecting differences in the selection of data sources or assumptions used to populate the models. In addition, results were sensitive to plausible changes in a number of key input parameters. As such, it is not possible to definitively state whether a universal rotavirus vaccination programme with RIX4414 is cost effective in developed countries, although results of some analyses in some countries suggest this is the case. In addition, international guidelines advocate universal vaccination of infants and children against rotavirus. It is also difficult to draw conclusions regarding the cost effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 relative to that of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, which is administered as a three-dose oral series. Although indirect comparisons in cost-effectiveness analyses indicate that RIX4414 provided more favourable incremental cost-effectiveness ratios when each vaccine was compared with no universal rotavirus vaccination programme, results were generally sensitive to vaccine costs

  17. Large-scale whole genome sequencing identifies country-wide spread of an emerging G9P[8] rotavirus strain in Hungary, 2012.

    PubMed

    Dóró, Renáta; Mihalov-Kovács, Eszter; Marton, Szilvia; László, Brigitta; Deák, Judit; Jakab, Ferenc; Juhász, Ágnes; Kisfali, Péter; Martella, Vito; Melegh, Béla; Molnár, Péter; Sántha, Ildikó; Schneider, Ferenc; Bányai, Krisztián

    2014-12-01

    With the availability of rotavirus vaccines routine strain surveillance has been launched or continued in many countries worldwide. In this study relevant information is provided from Hungary in order to extend knowledge about circulating rotavirus strains. Direct sequencing of the RT-PCR products obtained by VP7 and VP4 genes specific primer sets was utilized as routine laboratory method. In addition we explored the advantage of random primed RT-PCR and semiconductor sequencing of the whole genome of selected strains. During the study year, 2012, we identified an increase in the prevalence of G9P[8] strains across the country. This genotype combination predominated in seven out of nine study sites (detection rates, 45-83%). In addition to G9P[8]s, epidemiologically major strains included genotypes G1P[8] (34.2%), G2P[4] (13.5%), and G4P[8] (7.4%), whereas unusual and rare strains were G3P[8] (1%), G2P[8] (0.5%), G1P[4] (0.2%), G3P[4] (0.2%), and G3P[9] (0.2%). Whole genome analysis of 125 Hungarian human rotaviruses identified nine major genotype constellations and uncovered both intra- and intergenogroup reassortment events in circulating strains. Intergenogroup reassortment resulted in several unusual genotype constellations, including mono-reassortant G1P[8] and G9P[8] strains whose genotype 1 (Wa-like) backbone gene constellations contained DS1-like NSP2 and VP3 genes, respectively, as well as, a putative bovine-feline G3P[9] reassortant strain. The conserved genomic constellations of epidemiologically major genotypes suggested the clonal spread of the re-emerging G9P[8] genotype and several co-circulating strains (e.g., G1P[8] and G2P[4]) in many study sites during 2012. Of interest, medically important G2P[4] strains carried bovine-like VP1 and VP6 genes in their genotype constellation. No evidence for vaccine associated selection, or, interaction between wild-type and vaccine strains was obtained. In conclusion, this study reports the reemergence of G9P[8

  18. In silico study of potential autoimmune threats from rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Tapati; Das, Sukhen; Nandy, Papiya; Bhowmick, Rahul; Nandy, Ashesh

    2014-08-01

    Rotavirus, the major cause of infantile nonbacterial diarrhea, was found to be associated with development of diabetes-associated auto-antibodies. In our study we tried to find out further potential autoimmune threats of this virus using bioinformatics approach. We took rotaviral proteins to study similarity with Homo sapiens proteome and found most conserved structural protein VP6 matches at two regions with ryanodine receptor, an autoimmune target associated with myasthenia gravis. Myasthenia gravis, a chronic neurodegenerative autoimmune disorder with no typical known reason, is characterized by fluctuating muscle weakness which is typically enhanced during muscular effort. Affected patients generate auto antibodies against mainly acetyl choline receptor and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-release channel protein ryanodine receptor. Further, we observed that two regions which matched with ryanodine receptor remain conserved in all circulating rotaviral strains and showed significant antigenecity with respect to myasthenia gravis associated HLA haplotypes. Overall, our study detected rotaviral VP6 as a potential threat for myasthenia gravis and enlighten an area of virus associated autoimmune research.

  19. Rotavirus-associated immune thrombocytopenic purpura in children: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Qi; Yin, Jing; Chen, Sen; Qiao, Lijin; Luo, Na

    2016-01-01

    Certain studies have previously indicated that an association may exist between rotavirus infection and primary immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The present retrospective study aimed to investigate whether rotavirus may cause ITP in children. Firstly, the incidence of ITP in children with or without rotavirus diarrhea was compared. A 14.58% incident rate was observed in children with rotavirus diarrhea compared with a 7.22% incident rate in children without rotavirus diarrhea. Subsequently, the clinical features of ITP children with or without rotavirus infection were compared. The results indicated that ITP children with rotavirus infection were significantly younger, showed significantly decreased mean platelet volume (MPV) levels and presented a significantly higher frequency of bleeding score of 3 against ITP children without rotavirus infection. In conclusion, these findings suggest that rotavirus serves a causative role in ITP.

  20. Detection of G3P[3] and G3P[9] rotavirus strains in American Indian children with evidence of gene reassortment between human and animal rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Grant, Lindsay; Esona, Mathew; Gentsch, Jon; Watt, James; Reid, Raymond; Weatherholtz, Robert; Santosham, Mathuram; Parashar, Umesh; O'Brien, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    The distribution and evolution of human rotavirus strains is important for vaccine development and effectiveness. In settings where rotavirus vaccine coverage is high, vaccine pressure could select for replacement of common strains (similar to those included in rotavirus vaccines) with uncommon strains, some of which could be generated by reassortment between human and animal rotaviruses. Between 2002 and 2004, a phase-III rotavirus vaccine clinical trial was conducted among American Indian children of the Navajo and White Mountain Apache tribes, which are known to be at high risk for rotavirus diarrhea. We evaluated the rotavirus strains collected from study participants who received placebo during the trial to determine the distribution of rotavirus genotypes and to detect emerging strains that contribute to disease and could influence rotavirus vaccine effectiveness. Three uncommon strains of human rotavirus, two G3P[3] and one G3P[9] strains were detected in stools of children aged 3 to 6 months of age. Segments of all 11 rotavirus genes were sequenced and genotyped by comparison of cognate gene fragments with reference strains. The G3P[3] strains had similar genotypes to each other and to reference dog and cat strains. The G3P[9] strain had similar genotypes to cow, cat and dog reference strains. Genetic analyses of these three strains support the known diversity generating mechanisms of rotavirus. PMID:21567432

  1. The Prevalence of Rotavirus and Adenovirus in the Childhood Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Ozsari, Tamer; Bora, Gulhan; Kaya, Bulent; Yakut, Kahraman

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute gastroenteritis stemming from viral causes is very common during the childhood period. Rotavirus and enteric adenovirus are the most common factors of acute gastroenteritis encountered in infants and children. However, the epidemiology of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus gastroenteritis in the east Anatolia region is not well-known. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the relationship between the distribution of antigen positivity in rotavirus and enteric adenovirus antigen tests required cases and demographic data retrospectively in pediatric patients admitted to our hospital. Patients and Methods The records of stool sample analyses for 1154 patients admitted to our hospital from June 2011 to December 2011 with complaints of diarrhea were retrospectively examined. The presence of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus antigens in stool specimens was investigated by means of an immunochromatographic test. Results Viral antigens were detected in 327 (28.3%) stool specimens out of 1154. Among the positive results, the frequency was 73.7% for rotavirus and 26.2% for adenovirus. While the detected rotavirus antigen rate was high for all age groups, it was highest for children under the age of 2, with a rate of 57.1%. Moreover, the rotavirus infections were observed at a rate of 44.3% in winter and of 24.6% in autumn. Conclusions The most important factor in childhood acute gastroenteritis in east Anatolia is the rotavirus. Rotavirus and adenovirus antigens should be routinely investigated as a factor in fresh stool samples for the accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastroenteritis in children in the winter and autumn months. PMID:27635215

  2. Avian rotavirus enteritis - an updated review.

    PubMed

    Dhama, Kuldeep; Saminathan, Mani; Karthik, Kumaragurubaran; Tiwari, Ruchi; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Kumar, Naveen; Malik, Yashpal Singh; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are among the leading causes of enteritis and diarrhea in a number of mammalian and avian species, and impose colossal loss to livestock and poultry industry globally. Subsequent to detection of rotavirus in mammalian hosts in 1973, avian rotavirus (AvRV) was first reported in turkey poults in USA during 1977 and since then RVs of group A (RVA), D (RVD), F (RVF) and G (RVG) have been identified around the globe. Besides RVA, other AvRV groups (RVD, RVF and RVG) may also contribute to disease. However, their significance has yet to be unraveled. Under field conditions, co-infection of AvRVs occurs with other infectious agents such as astroviruses, enteroviruses, reoviruses, paramyxovirus, adenovirus, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, cryptosporidium and Eimeria species prospering severity of disease outcome. Birds surviving to RV disease predominantly succumb to secondary bacterial infections, mostly E. coli and Salmonella spp. Recent developments in molecular tools including state-of-the-art diagnostics and vaccine development have led to advances in our understanding towards AvRVs. Development of new generation vaccines using immunogenic antigens of AvRV has to be explored and given due importance. Till now, no effective vaccines are available. Although specific as well as sensitive approaches are available to identify and characterize AvRVs, there is still need to have point-of-care detection assays to review disease burden, contemplate new directions for adopting vaccination and follow improvements in public health measures. This review discusses AvRVs, their epidemiology, pathology and pathogenesis, immunity, recent trends in diagnostics, vaccines, therapeutics as well as appropriate prevention and control strategies.

  3. Avian rotavirus enteritis - an updated review.

    PubMed

    Dhama, Kuldeep; Saminathan, Mani; Karthik, Kumaragurubaran; Tiwari, Ruchi; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Kumar, Naveen; Malik, Yashpal Singh; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are among the leading causes of enteritis and diarrhea in a number of mammalian and avian species, and impose colossal loss to livestock and poultry industry globally. Subsequent to detection of rotavirus in mammalian hosts in 1973, avian rotavirus (AvRV) was first reported in turkey poults in USA during 1977 and since then RVs of group A (RVA), D (RVD), F (RVF) and G (RVG) have been identified around the globe. Besides RVA, other AvRV groups (RVD, RVF and RVG) may also contribute to disease. However, their significance has yet to be unraveled. Under field conditions, co-infection of AvRVs occurs with other infectious agents such as astroviruses, enteroviruses, reoviruses, paramyxovirus, adenovirus, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, cryptosporidium and Eimeria species prospering severity of disease outcome. Birds surviving to RV disease predominantly succumb to secondary bacterial infections, mostly E. coli and Salmonella spp. Recent developments in molecular tools including state-of-the-art diagnostics and vaccine development have led to advances in our understanding towards AvRVs. Development of new generation vaccines using immunogenic antigens of AvRV has to be explored and given due importance. Till now, no effective vaccines are available. Although specific as well as sensitive approaches are available to identify and characterize AvRVs, there is still need to have point-of-care detection assays to review disease burden, contemplate new directions for adopting vaccination and follow improvements in public health measures. This review discusses AvRVs, their epidemiology, pathology and pathogenesis, immunity, recent trends in diagnostics, vaccines, therapeutics as well as appropriate prevention and control strategies. PMID:25917772

  4. A hypervariable region in VP1 of chicken infectious anemia virus mediates rate of spread and cell tropism in tissue culture.

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, R W; Soiné, C; Weinkle, T; O'Connell, P H; Ohashi, K; Watson, S; Lucio, B; Harrington, S; Schat, K A

    1996-01-01

    Chicken infectious anemia virus (CIAV) is a unique infectious agent with an amino acid composition that has been found to be remarkably conserved even in isolates from different parts of the world. We have characterized field isolates of CIAV which vary significantly in terms of their abilities to replicate in culture, demonstrating a biological difference between isolates. Two sublines of MDCC-MSB1 cells that differ in their abilities to support CIAV were identified. In the MSB1(S) subline the CIA-1 isolate of CIAV was found to be less cytopathogenic than the prototype Cux-1(C) isolate; the MSB1(L) subline, which supports Cux-1(C) replication, was found to be nonpermissive for CIA-1. Alignments of the VP1 sequences of previously examined isolates with those of the field isolates CIA-1 and L-028 and the culture-adapted ConnB isolate revealed a previously unreported hypervariable region spanning amino acid positions 139 to 151. Chimeras of Cux-1(C) and CIA-1 were constructed to examine the potential for this region to affect cytopathogenicity. Transfer of a 316-bp region of Cux-1(C) open reading frame 1 into CIA-1 produced a virus with a cytopathogenic profile typical of Cux-1(C), indicating that one or both of the amino acid differences at positions 139 and 144 affect the rate of replication or the spread of infection. Transfection experiments with additional chimeras indicated that the inability of CIA-1 to replicate in MSB1(L) cells is mediated by a larger region of the genome which contains the hypervariable region in addition to upstream amino acid differences. Analysis of chimeras excluding the entire region of open reading frame 1 suggested the presence of a secondary mediator in the progression of infection in culture that was localized to a region containing a single nucleotide difference which results in amino acid differences in both VP2 (V-153) and the nuclear localization signal of VP3 (C-118). Immunofluorescence assays indicated an increased

  5. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, J.M.; Chen, Y.S.; Lindburg, K.; Morales, D.

    1987-09-01

    The inactivation of simian rotavirus Sa-11 and human rotavirus type 2 (Wa) by ozone was compared at 4/sup 0/C by using single-particle virus stocks. Although the human strain was clearly more sensitive, both virus types were rapidly inactivated by ozone concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater at all pH levels tested. Comparison of the virucidal activity of ozone with that of chlorine in identical experiments indicated little significant difference in rotavirus-inactivating efficiencies when the disinfectants were used at concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater.

  6. Functional analysis of the heterologous NSP1 genes in the genetic background of simian rotavirus SA11.

    PubMed

    Okada, J; Kobayashi, N; Taniguchi, K; Shiomi, H

    1999-01-01

    Function of rotavirus NSP1 was analyzed by using single-NSP1 gene-substitution reassortants, SKF, SDF, and SNF which have the NSP1 gene derived from human rotaviruses KU, DS-1, and canine rotavirus K9, respectively, in the genetic background of simian rotavirus SA11. The NSP1 genes from KU, DS-1, K9, and SA11 exhibited 58-76% nucleotide sequence identity to one another. No substantial difference in viral growth was observed among the reassortants and SA11. However, production of NSP1 was not detected in SNF when viral proteins were labelled with 35S-methionine during replication in MA104 cells, in contrast to SA11, SKF and SDF which exhibited evident expression of NSP1. Difference in reassortant formation was examined among the reassortant clones generated between human rotavirus strain 69M and either of SA11, SKF or SNF. Although reassortant formation rate was significantly lower in the cross 69M x SNF than the other crosses, selection rates of RNA segments from parent strain 69M in the resultant reassortants was similar among the crosses. Selectivity of homologous and heterologous NSP1 genes in SA11 background was also analyzed by mixed infection and multiple passages among the single-NSP1 gene-reassortants and/or SA11, KU NSP1 gene was selected most frequently, whereas homologous (SA11) NSP1 gene was least efficiently segregated. These results indicated that viral growth and genome segment reassortment with other viruses may not be influenced by the presence of heterologous NSP1 and its expression level, while genomic diversity of NSP1 genes might have been associated with the relative adaptability to the genetic background of SA11. PMID:10481750

  7. Prevalence of Rotavirus Genotypes in Children Younger than 5 Years of Age before the Introduction of a Universal Rotavirus Vaccination Program: Report of Rotavirus Surveillance in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Durmaz, Riza; Kalaycioglu, Atila Taner; Acar, Sumeyra; Bakkaloglu, Zekiye; Karagoz, Alper; Korukluoglu, Gulay; Ertek, Mustafa; Torunoglu, Mehmet Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background Group A rotaviruses are the most common causative agent of acute gastroenteritis among children less than 5 years of age throughout the world. This sentinel surveillance study was aimed to obtain baseline data on the rotavirus G and P genotypes across Turkey before the introduction of a universal rotavirus vaccination program. Methods Rotavirus antigen-positive samples were collected from 2102 children less than 5 years of age who attended hospitals participating in the Turkish Rotavirus Surveillance Network. Rotavirus antigen was detected in the laboratories of participating hospitals by commercial serological tests such as latex agglutination, immunochromatographic test or enzyme immunoassay. Rotavirus G and P genotypes were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using consensus primers detecting the VP7 and VP4 genes, followed by semi-nested type-specific multiplex PCR. Results RT-PCR found rotavirus RNA in 1644 (78.2%) of the samples tested. The highest rate of rotavirus positivity (38.7%) was observed among children in the 13 to 24 month age group, followed by children in the age group of 25 to 36 months (28.3%). A total of eight different G types, six different P types, and 42 different G–P combinations were obtained. Four common G types (G1, G2, G3, and G9) and two common P types (P[8] and P[4]) accounted for 95.1% and 98.8% of the strains, respectively. G9P[8] was the most common G/P combination found in 40.5% of the strains followed by G1P[8] (21.6%), G2P[8] (9.3%), G2P[4] (6.5%), G3P[8] (3.5%), and finally, G4P[8] (3.4%). These six common genotypes included 83.7% of the strains tested in this study. The rate of uncommon genotypes was 14%. Conclusion The majority of the strains analyzed belonged to the G1–G4 and G9 genotypes, suggesting high coverage of current rotavirus vaccines. This study also demonstrates a dramatic increase in G9 genotype across the country. PMID:25437502

  8. Production of rotavirus core-like particles in Sf9 cells using recombinase-mediated cassette exchange.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fabiana; Dias, Mafalda M; Vidigal, João; Sousa, Marcos F Q; Patrone, Marco; Teixeira, Ana P; Alves, Paula M

    2014-02-10

    A flexible Sf9 insect cell line was recently developed leveraging the recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) technology, which competes with the popular baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) in terms of speed to produce new proteins. Herein, the ability of this cell platform to produce complex proteins, such as rotavirus core-like particles, was evaluated. A gene construct coding for a VP2-GFP fusion protein was targeted to a pre-characterized high recombination efficiency locus flanked by flipase (Flp) recognition target sites and, after three weeks in selection, an isogenic cell population was obtained. Despite the lower cell specific productivities with respect to those obtained by baculovirus infection, the titers of VP2-GFP reached in shake flask batch cultures were comparable as a result of higher cell densities. To further improve the VP2-GFP levels from stable expression, analysis of exhausted medium was undertaken to design feeding strategies enabling higher cell densities as well as increased culture duration. The implementation of the best strategy allowed reaching 20 million cells per ml in bioreactor cultures; the integrity of the rotavirus core-like particles could be confirmed by electron microscopy. Overall, we show that this Sf9-Flp cell platform represents a valuable alternative to the BEVS for producing complex recombinant proteins, such as rotavirus core-like particles. PMID:24333128

  9. Rotavirus prevents the expression of host responses by blocking the nucleocytoplasmic transport of polyadenylated mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Rosa M; Mora, Silvia I; Romero, Pedro; Arias, Carlos F; López, Susana

    2013-06-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important agent of severe gastroenteritis in young children. Early in infection, these viruses take over the host translation machinery, causing a severe shutoff of cell protein synthesis while viral proteins are efficiently synthesized. In infected cells, there is an accumulation of the cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein in the nucleus, induced by the viral protein NSP3. Here we found that poly(A)-containing mRNAs also accumulate and become hyperadenylated in the nuclei of infected cells. Using reporter genes bearing the untranslated regions (UTRs) of cellular or viral genes, we found that the viral UTRs do not determine the efficiency of translation of mRNAs in rotavirus-infected cells. Furthermore, we showed that while a polyadenylated reporter mRNA directly delivered into the cytoplasm of infected cells was efficiently translated, the same reporter introduced as a plasmid that needs to be transcribed and exported to the cytoplasm was poorly translated. Altogether, these results suggest that nuclear retention of poly(A)-containing mRNAs is one of the main strategies of rotavirus to control cell translation and therefore the host antiviral and stress responses.

  10. Rotavirus infection in hospitalized children and estimates of disease burden in Kyrgyzstan, 2005-2007.

    PubMed

    Flem, Elmira T; Kasymbekova, Kaliya T; Vainio, Kirsti; Gentsch, Jon; Abdikarimov, Sabirjan T; Glass, Roger I; Bresee, Joseph S

    2009-11-20

    To estimate the rotavirus-associated burden in Kyrgyzstan, we conducted hospital surveillance among children <5 years old with diarrhoea during 2005-2007. Of 3756 children hospitalized with diarrhoea, 26% had rotavirus detected in stool samples by an enzyme immunoassay. The virus genotype G1P[8] was identified in 60% of 190 characterized samples from 2005 to 2006. The estimated risk for rotavirus hospitalization by age 5 years was 1 in 28 children. One quarter of all gastroenteritis hospitalizations in children <5 years old in Kyrgyzstan may be attributable to rotavirus. Rotavirus vaccination could be an important health intervention to reduce the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis.

  11. Rotavirus Increases Levels of Lipidated LC3 Supporting Accumulation of Infectious Progeny Virus without Inducing Autophagosome Formation

    PubMed Central

    Arnoldi, Francesca; De Lorenzo, Giuditta; Mano, Miguel; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Wild, Peter; Eichwald, Catherine; Burrone, Oscar R.

    2014-01-01

    Replication of many RNA viruses benefits from subversion of the autophagic pathway through many different mechanisms. Rotavirus, the main etiologic agent of pediatric gastroenteritis worldwide, has been recently described to induce accumulation of autophagosomes as a mean for targeting viral proteins to the sites of viral replication. Here we show that the viral-induced increase of the lipidated form of LC3 does not correlate with an augmented formation of autophagosomes, as detected by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. The LC3-II accumulation was found to be dependent on active rotavirus replication through the use of antigenically intact inactivated viral particles and of siRNAs targeting viral genes that are essential for viral replication. Silencing expression of LC3 or of Atg7, a protein involved in LC3 lipidation, resulted in a significant impairment of viral titers, indicating that these elements of the autophagic pathway are required at late stages of the viral cycle. PMID:24736649

  12. Binding Patterns of Rotavirus Genotypes P[4], P[6], and P[8] in China with Histo-Blood Group Antigens.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Li, Dan-di; Sun, Xiao-Man; Guo, Yan-Qing; Xiang, Jing-Yao; Wang, Wei-Huan; Zhang, Li-Xia; Gu, Qing-Jiu; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are an important cause of severe gastroenteritis in children. It has been found that RV may recognize the histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as ligands or receptors and bind HBGAs in a type-dependent manner. In this study, we investigated the binding specificity of VP8* proteins from human rotaviruses (RV) that are prevalent in China including genotypes P[4], P[6], and P[8]. Through the saliva- and oligosaccharide-based binding assays, we found that the VP8* proteins of P[4] and P[8] RV showed similar reactivity with the Leb and H type 1 antigens, while P[6] RV weakly bound the Leb antigen. These findings may facilitate further research into RV host specificity and vaccine development. PMID:26274396

  13. Binding Patterns of Rotavirus Genotypes P[4], P[6], and P[8] in China with Histo-Blood Group Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Li, Dan-di; Sun, Xiao-man; Guo, Yan-qing; Xiang, Jing-yao; Wang, Wei-huan; Zhang, Li-xia; Gu, Qing-jiu; Duan, Zhao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are an important cause of severe gastroenteritis in children. It has been found that RV may recognize the histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as ligands or receptors and bind HBGAs in a type-dependent manner. In this study, we investigated the binding specificity of VP8* proteins from human rotaviruses (RV) that are prevalent in China including genotypes P[4], P[6], and P[8]. Through the saliva- and oligosaccharide-based binding assays, we found that the VP8* proteins of P[4] and P[8] RV showed similar reactivity with the Leb and H type 1 antigens, while P[6] RV weakly bound the Leb antigen. These findings may facilitate further research into RV host specificity and vaccine development. PMID:26274396

  14. Complement-fixing antibody response to rotavirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Gust, I D; Pringle, R C; Barnes, G L; Davidson, G P; Bishop, R F

    1977-01-01

    A human rotavirus complement-fixing (CF) antigen, prepared by purification of large volumes of fluid feces collected from children with winter diarrhea, was used to study the development and persistence of antibody in children with diarrhea and the prevalence of rotavirus antibody in Melbourne. In children with diarrhea, antibody rises were detectable within 4 to 6 weeks of the onset of illness, and the titers usually remained elevated for the next 1 to 2 years. CF antibody did not develop in two children with proven rotavirus infection aged less than 6 months, an age at which poor CF responses to other viruses have also been observed. A study of CF antibody levels in the general community showed that in Melbourne, most children have been infected with human rotavirus by the age of 3 years. PMID:403196

  15. The rotavirus experience in Mexico: discovery to control.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manish M; Parashar, Umesh D; Santosham, Mathuram; Richardson, Vesta

    2013-02-01

    The recent introduction of a rotavirus vaccine program in Mexico to control rotavirus disease, a common killer of children worldwide, has dramatically reduced the number of Mexican children dying and being hospitalized because of diarrhea. The successful introduction of a rotavirus vaccine program was preceded by several decades of focused research efforts to document the burden of disease and to generate the knowledge base to develop and deploy a vaccine. The postlicensure experience from Mexico demonstrates that evaluating the impact and safety of the vaccination program is vitally necessary for sustaining it. All in all, the immensely successful Mexico experience with control of rotavirus disease, if copied, could yield tremendously favorable results for children and parents worldwide.

  16. The control of rotavirus gastroenteritis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Glass, Roger I; Parashar, Umesh; Patel, Manish; Tate, Jacqueline; Jiang, Baoming; Gentsch, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Since 2006, two new vaccines have been licensed to prevent rotavirus, the cause of 20% to 50% of severe acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. These vaccines have been implemented in national immunization programs in about 30 high- and middle-income countries, including the United States, and vaccine use has led to substantial decreases in diarrhea-related health care visits. In addition to reductions in diarrhea burden in vaccinated children, decreases have been observed in older, unvaccinated age groups in many settings, suggesting indirect benefits (i.e., herd immunity) from vaccination. Although the efficacy of these oral rotavirus vaccines is expectedly lower in developing countries in Asia and Africa, the public health benefits of vaccination in these settings, where more than 90% of the estimated 453,000 annual deaths from rotavirus occur, are likely to be substantial. Efforts continue to develop alternative rotavirus vaccines that could have a better efficacy and safety profile and may be less expensive.

  17. [Isolation of canine rotavirus and study of its immunobiological properties].

    PubMed

    Ramishvili, L G; Maglakelidze, D A; Labadze, T N

    2001-01-01

    Canine rotavirus was isolated in MA104 roller culture of rhesus macaque cells. Two passages in gnotobiotic puppies and two in colostrum-free puppies resulted in isolation of strain P of canine rotavirus. After 20 passages in MA104 culture the virus was adapted to MDCK culture. Optimal conditions for accumulation of canine rotavirus and its antigen (9.01 g TCD50/ml) in MDCK culture are trypsin pretreatment of the virus inoculate in the final concentration of 50 mcg/ml for 30 min at 37 degrees C, presence of trypsin (10 mcg/ml) in the maintenance medium, multiplicity of infection 0.1 TCD50/ml, and incubation in roller culture at 37 degrees C during 24-30 h. After 60 passages in cell culture, canine rotavirus completely lost its virulence for colostrum-free puppies but retained antigenic activity and induced manifest seroconversion in infected. PMID:11449799

  18. Characterization of the antibody response against EV71 capsid proteins in Chinese individuals by NEIBM-ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yingying; Chen, Xuguang; Qian, Baohua; Wu, Guorong; He, Ting; Feng, Jiaojiao; Gao, Caixia; Wang, Lili; Wang, Jinhong; Li, Xiangyu; Cao, Mingmei; Peng, Heng; Zhao, Chunyan; Pan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) has become the major pathogen of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) worldwide, while the anti-EV71 antibody responses other than neutralizing epitopes have not been characterized. In this study, EV71 capsid proteins VP1, VP3, VP0 and various VP1 antigens were constructed to analyze anti-EV71 response in severe HFMD cases, non-HFMD outpatient children and normal adults using a novel evolved immunoglobulin-binding molecule (NEIBM)-based ELISA. The high prevalence of antibody responses against all three capsid proteins was demonstrated, and anti-EV71 VP1 showed the main antibody response. Anti-EV71 VP1 antibody response was found to predominantly target to epitopes based on the common enterovirus cross-reactive sequence. Moreover, inhibition pattern against anti-EV71 VP1 reactions in three groups was obviously different. Taken together, these results firstly characterized the anti-EV71 antibody responses which are predominantly against VP1 epitopes based on common enterovirus cross-reactive sequence. This finding could be helpful for the better understanding of anti-EV71 humoral immunity and useful for seroepidemiological surveillance. PMID:26023863

  19. Characterization of the antibody response against EV71 capsid proteins in Chinese individuals by NEIBM-ELISA.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yingying; Chen, Xuguang; Qian, Baohua; Wu, Guorong; He, Ting; Feng, Jiaojiao; Gao, Caixia; Wang, Lili; Wang, Jinhong; Li, Xiangyu; Cao, Mingmei; Peng, Heng; Zhao, Chunyan; Pan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) has become the major pathogen of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) worldwide, while the anti-EV71 antibody responses other than neutralizing epitopes have not been characterized. In this study, EV71 capsid proteins VP1, VP3, VP0 and various VP1 antigens were constructed to analyze anti-EV71 response in severe HFMD cases, non-HFMD outpatient children and normal adults using a novel evolved immunoglobulin-binding molecule (NEIBM)-based ELISA. The high prevalence of antibody responses against all three capsid proteins was demonstrated, and anti-EV71 VP1 showed the main antibody response. Anti-EV71 VP1 antibody response was found to predominantly target to epitopes based on the common enterovirus cross-reactive sequence. Moreover, inhibition pattern against anti-EV71 VP1 reactions in three groups was obviously different. Taken together, these results firstly characterized the anti-EV71 antibody responses which are predominantly against VP1 epitopes based on common enterovirus cross-reactive sequence. This finding could be helpful for the better understanding of anti-EV71 humoral immunity and useful for seroepidemiological surveillance.

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Rotavirus in Cats in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Iturriza-Gómara, M.; Dove, W.; Sandrasegaram, M.; Nakagomi, T.; Nakagomi, O.; Cunliffe, N.; Radford, A. D.; Morgan, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    Rotaviruses are leading causes of gastroenteritis in the young of many species. Molecular epidemiological studies in children suggest that interspecies transmission contributes to rotavirus strain diversity in people. However, population-based studies of rotaviruses in animals are few. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors for infection, and genetic diversity of rotavirus A in a cross-sectional survey of cats housed within 25 rescue catteries across the United Kingdom. Morning litter tray fecal samples were collected during the winter and summer in 2012 from all pens containing kittens and a random sample of those housing adult cats. Group A rotavirus RNA was detected by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and positive samples were G and P genotyped using nested VP4 and VP7 PCR assays. A total of 1,727 fecal samples were collected from 1,105 pens. Overall, the prevalence of rotavirus was 3.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2 to 4.9%). Thirteen out of 25 (52%; 95% CI, 31.3 to 72.2%) centers housed at least one rotavirus-positive cat. The prevalence of rotavirus was associated with season (odds ratio, 14.8 [95% CI, 1.1 to 200.4]; P = 0.04) but not age or diarrhea. It was higher during the summer (4.7%; 95% CI, 1.2 to 8.3%) than in winter (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 1.5%). Asymptomatic epidemics of infection were detected in two centers. G genotypes were characterized for 19 (33.3%) of the 57 rotavirus-positive samples and P genotypes for 36 (59.7%). Two rotavirus genotypes were identified, G3P[9] and G6P[9]. This is the first population-based study of rotavirus in cats and the first report of feline G6P[9], which questions the previous belief that G6P[9] in people is of bovine origin. PMID:25411173

  1. Molecular epidemiology of rotavirus in cats in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    German, A C; Iturriza-Gómara, M; Dove, W; Sandrasegaram, M; Nakagomi, T; Nakagomi, O; Cunliffe, N; Radford, A D; Morgan, K L

    2015-02-01

    Rotaviruses are leading causes of gastroenteritis in the young of many species. Molecular epidemiological studies in children suggest that interspecies transmission contributes to rotavirus strain diversity in people. However, population-based studies of rotaviruses in animals are few. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors for infection, and genetic diversity of rotavirus A in a cross-sectional survey of cats housed within 25 rescue catteries across the United Kingdom. Morning litter tray fecal samples were collected during the winter and summer in 2012 from all pens containing kittens and a random sample of those housing adult cats. Group A rotavirus RNA was detected by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and positive samples were G and P genotyped using nested VP4 and VP7 PCR assays. A total of 1,727 fecal samples were collected from 1,105 pens. Overall, the prevalence of rotavirus was 3.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2 to 4.9%). Thirteen out of 25 (52%; 95% CI, 31.3 to 72.2%) centers housed at least one rotavirus-positive cat. The prevalence of rotavirus was associated with season (odds ratio, 14.8 [95% CI, 1.1 to 200.4]; P = 0.04) but not age or diarrhea. It was higher during the summer (4.7%; 95% CI, 1.2 to 8.3%) than in winter (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 1.5%). Asymptomatic epidemics of infection were detected in two centers. G genotypes were characterized for 19 (33.3%) of the 57 rotavirus-positive samples and P genotypes for 36 (59.7%). Two rotavirus genotypes were identified, G3P[9] and G6P[9]. This is the first population-based study of rotavirus in cats and the first report of feline G6P[9], which questions the previous belief that G6P[9] in people is of bovine origin. PMID:25411173

  2. Change in incidence of clinic visits for all-cause and rotavirus gastroenteritis in young children following the introduction of universal rotavirus vaccination in Israel.

    PubMed

    Muhsen, Khitam; Chodick, Gabriel; Goren, Sophy; Anis, Emilia; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Shalev, Varda; Cohen, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Both rotavirus vaccines RotaTeq and Rotarix were efficacious against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in clinical trials; yet real-world data on the effect of rotavirus vaccines on mild to moderate disease are limited. We used a large computerised database of Maccabi Health Services Health Maintenance Organisation (HMO), the second largest HMO in Israel covering 25% of the Israeli population, to compare the incidence of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) clinic visits in community settings (n=302,445) before (2005-10) and after (2011-13) the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation in Israel. We retrieved laboratory results of rotavirus antigen tests (n=18,133) and using a weighted analysis, we estimated the impact of rotavirus immunisation on the disease burden of rotavirus AGE clinic visits. Following the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation, the typical winter peaks of rotavirus AGE were substantially lower and significant reductions of 14.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 13.5-16.1) in all-cause AGE clinic visits and of 59.7% (95% CI: 59.8-62.6) in rotavirus AGE clinic visits were observed. The decrease was observed in all age groups, but it was greater in children aged 0 to 23 months than those aged 24 to 59 months. Continued rotavirus laboratory surveillance is warranted to monitor the sustainability of these changes.

  3. Change in incidence of clinic visits for all-cause and rotavirus gastroenteritis in young children following the introduction of universal rotavirus vaccination in Israel.

    PubMed

    Muhsen, Khitam; Chodick, Gabriel; Goren, Sophy; Anis, Emilia; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Shalev, Varda; Cohen, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Both rotavirus vaccines RotaTeq and Rotarix were efficacious against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in clinical trials; yet real-world data on the effect of rotavirus vaccines on mild to moderate disease are limited. We used a large computerised database of Maccabi Health Services Health Maintenance Organisation (HMO), the second largest HMO in Israel covering 25% of the Israeli population, to compare the incidence of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) clinic visits in community settings (n=302,445) before (2005-10) and after (2011-13) the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation in Israel. We retrieved laboratory results of rotavirus antigen tests (n=18,133) and using a weighted analysis, we estimated the impact of rotavirus immunisation on the disease burden of rotavirus AGE clinic visits. Following the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation, the typical winter peaks of rotavirus AGE were substantially lower and significant reductions of 14.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 13.5-16.1) in all-cause AGE clinic visits and of 59.7% (95% CI: 59.8-62.6) in rotavirus AGE clinic visits were observed. The decrease was observed in all age groups, but it was greater in children aged 0 to 23 months than those aged 24 to 59 months. Continued rotavirus laboratory surveillance is warranted to monitor the sustainability of these changes. PMID:26538450

  4. Molecular and biological characterization of the 5 human-bovine rotavirus (WC3)-based reassortant strains of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq (registered)

    SciTech Connect

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Joelsson, Daniel B.; Warakomski, Donald J.; Zhou, Tingyi; Mathis, Pamela K.; Maanen, Marc-Henri van; Ranheim, Todd S.; Ciarlet, Max

    2010-08-01

    RotaTeq (registered) is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine that contains five human-bovine reassortant strains (designated G1, G2, G3, G4, and P1) on the backbone of the naturally attenuated tissue culture-adapted parental bovine rotavirus (BRV) strain WC3. The viral genomes of each of the reassortant strains were completely sequenced and compared pairwise and phylogenetically among each other and to human rotavirus (HRV) and BRV reference strains. Reassortants G1, G2, G3, and G4 contained the VP7 gene from their corresponding HRV parent strains, while reassortants G1 and G2 also contained the VP3 gene (genotype M1) from the HRV parent strain. The P1 reassortant contained the VP4 gene from the HRV parent strain and all the other gene segments from the BRV WC3 strain. The human VP7s had a high level of overall amino acid identity (G1: 95-99%, G2: 94-99% G3: 96-100%, G4: 93-99%) when compared to those of representative rotavirus strains of their corresponding G serotypes. The VP4 of the P1 reassortant had a high identity (92-97%) with those of serotype P1A[8] HRV reference strains, while the BRV VP7 showed identities ranging from 91% to 94% to those of serotype G6 HRV strains. Sequence analyses of the BRV or HRV genes confirmed that the fundamental structure of the proteins in the vaccine was similar to those of the HRV and BRV references strains. Sequences analyses showed that RotaTeq (registered) exhibited a high degree of genetic stability as no mutations were identified in the material of each reassortant, which undergoes two rounds of replication cycles in cell culture during the manufacturing process, when compared to the final material used to fill the dosing tubes. The infectivity of each of the reassortant strains of RotaTeq (registered) , like HRV strains, did not require the presence of sialic acid residues on the cell surface. The molecular and biologic characterization of RotaTeq (registered) adds to the significant body of clinical data supporting the

  5. Prevalence and characteristics of severe rotavirus infections in Nicaraguan children.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, F; Paniagua, M; Hallander, H; Hedlund, K O; Svensson, L

    1997-03-01

    We analyzed the prevalence of rotavirus in 296 children age between 3 and 36 months who were hospitalized in 1994 with severe gastro-enteritis at two health centres for diarrhoea treatment in León, Nicaragua. Enteric viruses were detected in 96 (32.4%) of the children and rotaviruses were the most common pathogens detected in 84 (28%). The majority of rotavirus infections occurred in children less than 1 year old and all strains isolated belonged to subgroup II and had 'long' RNA patterns. Molecular epidemiology of 55 rotavirus strains revealed that all had the same RNA migration pattern and serotyping of 37 strains by PCR technology revealed that all isolates belonged to serotype 3. A significant observation was that only one electropherotype of rotavirus circulated. No non-group A rotaviruses were found by RNA gel electrophoresis. Adenoviruses were found by ELISA in 14 of 265 (5%) children and were most frequently detected during the 1st year of life. Of 103 faecal samples analyzed by electron microscopy, four contained small round structured viruses. PMID:9176574

  6. Economic Impact of a Rotavirus Vaccine in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Constenla, Dagna O.; Linhares, Alexandre C.; Rheingans, Richard D.; Antil, Lynn R.; Waldman, Eliseu A.; da Silva, Luiz J.

    2008-01-01

    The study was done to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a national rotavirus vaccination programme in Brazilian children from the healthcare system perspective. A hypothetical annual birth-cohort was followed for a five-year period. Published and national administrative data were incorporated into a model to quantify the consequences of vaccination versus no vaccination. Main outcome measures included the reduction in disease burden, lives saved, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted. A rotavirus vaccination programme in Brazil would prevent an estimated 1,804 deaths associated with gastroenteritis due to rotavirus, 91,127 hospitalizations, and 550,198 outpatient visits. Vaccination is likely to reduce 76% of the overall healthcare burden of rotavirus-associated gastroenteritis in Brazil. At a vaccine price of US$ 7-8 per dose, the cost-effectiveness ratio would be US$ 643 per DALY averted. Rotavirus vaccination can reduce the burden of gastroenteritis due to rotavirus at a reasonable cost-effectiveness ratio. PMID:19069617

  7. Characteristics of Rotavirus Diarrhea in Hospitalized Children in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Shala, Muje; Azemi, Mehmedali; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta; Avdiu, Muharrem; Spahiu, Shqipe; Jaha, Luan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diarrhea is a leading cause of child mortality worldwide. Rotavirus is one of the most common causes of severe diarrhea and dehydration in children. Authors reviewed epidemiological and clinical data of the rotavirus diarrhea in Kosovo. Methods: This is a prospective study carried between January 1st and December 31st 2011. All data, comprising demographics, nutrition, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, management and outcome of the rotavirus diarrhea are collected on the specially designed form. Results: 116 children with rotavirus diarrhea are included in the study. The majority boys (74.4%) and children aged 0 – 12 months (82.75%). Mean age of children in the study was 16.38 months. Almost every third child in the study was hypotrophic (29.2%). More than half of the infants (55.2%) were on mixed food, somewhat more than every third was breast feeding (36.45%), and every twelfth (8.33%) was on artificial milk (animal or formula). Apart from diarrhea, present in all patients, vomiting (97.41%) and fever (43.96%) were characteristics of the clinical presentation of the diarrhea. Two thirds of the children had mild grade dehydration (70.7%). All patients recovered with no sequels. Conclusion: Rotavirus continues to be responsible for a significant portion of acute diarrhea in Kosovo. Clinical features, epidemiological data and the agglutination test are safe enough to establish the diagnosis. Treated correctly rotavirus diarrhea has a favorable outcome. PMID:25568634

  8. Estimating rotavirus vaccine effectiveness in Japan using a screening method

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Kaoru; Hara, Megumi; Sakanishi, Yuta; Shimanoe, Chisato; Nishida, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Muneaki; Tanaka, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    abstract Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a highly contagious, acute viral disease that imposes a significant health burden worldwide. In Japan, rotavirus vaccines have been commercially available since 2011 for voluntary vaccination, but vaccine coverage and effectiveness have not been evaluated. In the absence of a vaccination registry in Japan, vaccination coverage in the general population was estimated according to the number of vaccines supplied by the manufacturer, the number of children who received financial support for vaccination, and the size of the target population. Patients with rotavirus gastroenteritis were identified by reviewing the medical records of all children who consulted 6 major hospitals in Saga Prefecture with gastroenteritis symptoms. Vaccination status among these patients was investigated by reviewing their medical records or interviewing their guardians by telephone. Vaccine effectiveness was determined using a screening method. Vaccination coverage increased with time, and it was 2-times higher in municipalities where the vaccination fee was supported. In the 2012/13 season, vaccination coverage in Saga Prefecture was 14.9% whereas the proportion of patients vaccinated was 5.1% among those with clinically diagnosed rotavirus gastroenteritis and 1.9% among those hospitalized for rotavirus gastroenteritis. Thus, vaccine effectiveness was estimated as 69.5% and 88.8%, respectively. This is the first study to evaluate rotavirus vaccination coverage and effectiveness in Japan since vaccination began. PMID:26680277

  9. Experimental Adaptation of Rotaviruses to Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A.; Guerrero, Rafael A.; Silva, Elver; Acosta, Orlando; Barreto, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    A number of viruses show a naturally extended tropism for tumor cells whereas other viruses have been genetically modified or adapted to infect tumor cells. Oncolytic viruses have become a promising tool for treating some cancers by inducing cell lysis or immune response to tumor cells. In the present work, rotavirus strains TRF-41 (G5) (porcine), RRV (G3) (simian), UK (G6-P5) (bovine), Ym (G11-P9) (porcine), ECwt (murine), Wa (G1-P8), Wi61 (G9) and M69 (G8) (human), and five wild-type human rotavirus isolates were passaged multiple times in different human tumor cell lines and then combined in five different ways before additional multiple passages in tumor cell lines. Cell death caused by the tumor cell-adapted isolates was characterized using Hoechst, propidium iodide, 7-AAD, Annexin V, TUNEL, and anti-poly-(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) and -phospho-histone H2A.X antibodies. Multiple passages of the combined rotaviruses in tumor cell lines led to a successful infection of these cells, suggesting a gain-of-function by the acquisition of greater infectious capacity as compared with that of the parental rotaviruses. The electropherotype profiles suggest that unique tumor cell-adapted isolates were derived from reassortment of parental rotaviruses. Infection produced by such rotavirus isolates induced chromatin modifications compatible with apoptotic cell death. PMID:26828934

  10. Scope for rotavirus vaccination in India: revisiting the scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    Neogi, Sutapa Bandyopadhyay; Hasan, Habib; Sheikh, Kabir; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2011-10-01

    Rotavirus vaccines have been developed to prevent deaths resulting from severe diarrhea of rotavirus origin. The use of vaccines as an intervention at scale to prevent and control the burden of rotavirus diarrhea is supported by the argument that prevailing public health measures such as hygiene and sanitation, breast feeding and use of ORS have failed to prevent severe dehydration resulting from diarrhea. The article reviews the existing evidence on the rationale of using rotavirus vaccine as against the feasibility of scaling it up in developing countries like India. The vaccines currently available may not cover the strains circulating in Indian population. The diversity of Rotavirus infection in the country is tremendous and since the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy data has not been collected for India, there is first a need to conduct studies to measure the extent of protection and cross-protection provided by the available vaccines for local strains, before venturing into Rotavirus vaccination program. The potential benefits of immunization have to be first vetted against the risks involved by the policymakers and other stakeholders.

  11. Rotavirus landscape in Africa-Towards prevention and control: A report of the 8th African rotavirus symposium, Livingstone, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Cheryl; Mwenda, Jason; Chilengi, Roma

    2015-06-26

    The 8th African Rotavirus Symposium was held in Livingstone, Zambia from the 12-13 June 2014. Over 130 delegates from 35 countries - 28 from African nations - participated in this symposium, which included scientists, clinicians, immunisation managers, public health officials, policymakers and vaccine manufacturers. The theme for the symposium was Rotavirus Landscape in Africa-Towards Prevention and Control. At the time of the symposium, a total of 21 African countries had introduced the rotavirus vaccine into their national immunisation schedules. This meeting was particularly timely and relevant to review early data on vaccine adoption and impact from these countries. The concluding panel discussion proposed several recommendations for areas of focus moving forward in rotavirus advocacy and research.

  12. Monovalent rotavirus vaccine provides protection against an emerging fully heterotypic G9P[4] rotavirus strain in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Yen, Catherine; Figueroa, Jesùs Reyna; Uribe, Edgar Sánchez; Carmen-Hernández, Luz Del; Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D; Patel, Manish M; Richardson López-Collado, Vesta

    2011-09-01

    After the introduction of monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1) in Mexico in 2006-2007, diarrhea mortality and morbidity declined substantially among Mexican children under 5 years of age. In January 2010, surveillance identified the emergence of a novel G9P[4] rotavirus strain nationwide. We conducted a case-control study to assess the field effectiveness of RV1 against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis caused by this unusual strain and to determine whether the G9P[4] emergence was related to vaccine failure or failure to vaccinate. RV1 was 94% effective (95% confidence interval, 16%-100%) against G9P[4] rotavirus-related hospitalization, indicating that its emergence was likely unrelated to vaccine pressure.

  13. Report of the 7th African Rotavirus Symposium, Cape Town, South Africa, 8th November 2012.

    PubMed

    Seheri, L M; Mwenda, J M; Page, N

    2014-11-12

    The 7th African Rotavirus Symposium was held in Cape Town, South Africa, on the 8th November 2012 as a Satellite Symposium at the First International African Vaccinology Conference. Over 150 delegates participated in this symposium including scientists, clinicians, health officials, policymakers and vaccine manufacturers from across Africa. Key topics discussed included rotavirus surveillance, rotavirus vaccine introduction, post rotavirus vaccine impact analysis and intussusception data and surveillance in Africa. The symposium provided early rotavirus vaccine adopter countries in Africa (South Africa, Ghana and Botswana) an opportunity to share up-to-date information on vaccine introduction, and allowed colleagues to share experiences in establishing routine rotavirus surveillance (Tanzania, Niger and Rwanda). Overall, the symposium highlighted the high burden of rotavirus in Africa, and the need to continue to strengthen efforts in preventing rotavirus diarrhoea in Africa.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Rotavirus Group C Isolated in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Uk; Park, Kwi-Sung; Kim, Jae-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus group C is the major etiological agent associated with acute gastroenteritis in all human age groups. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of human group C rotavirus (GpC-RV) isolated in South Korea. PMID:26404599

  15. Rotavirus A-specific single-domain antibodies produced in baculovirus-infected insect larvae are protective in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs), also known as nanobodies or VHHs, are characterized by high stability and solubility, thus maintaining the affinity and therapeutic value provided by conventional antibodies. Given these properties, VHHs offer a novel alternative to classical antibody approaches. To date, VHHs have been produced mainly in E. coli, yeast, plants and mammalian cells. To apply the single-domain antibodies as a preventive or therapeutic strategy to control rotavirus infections in developing countries (444,000 deaths in children under 5 years of age) has to be minimized their production costs. Results Here we describe the highly efficient expression of functional VHHs by the Improved Baculovirus Expression System (IBES® technology), which uses a baculovirus expression vector in combination with Trichoplusia ni larvae as living biofactories. Two VHHs, named 3B2 and 2KD1, specific for the inner capsid protein VP6 of Group A rotavirus, were expressed in insect larvae. The IBES® technology achieved very high expression of 3B2 and 2KD1, reaching 2.62% and 3.63% of the total soluble protein obtained from larvae, respectively. These expression levels represent up to 257 mg/L of protein extract after insect processing (1 L extract represents about 125 g of insect biomass or about 375 insect larvae). Larva-derived antibodies were fully functional when tested in vitro and in vivo, neutralizing Group A rotaviruses and protecting offspring mice against rotavirus-induced diarrhea. Conclusions Our results open up the possibility of using insects as living biofactories (IBES® technology) for the cost-efficient production of these and other fully functional VHHs to be used for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes, thereby eliminating concerns regarding the use of bacterial or mammalian cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that insects have been used as living biofactories to produce a VHH molecule. PMID:22953695

  16. Clinical efficacy of the RIT 4237 live attenuated bovine rotavirus vaccine in infants vaccinated before a rotavirus epidemic.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, T; Isolauri, E; Delem, A; d'Hondt, E; André, F E; Beards, G M; Flewett, T H

    1985-08-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 331 infants aged 6 to 12 months received orally, at an interval of 1 month, either two doses of live attenuated bovine rotavirus vaccine strain RIT 4237 or equivalent placebo. The vaccinations were carried out during September to November, a non-rotavirus season; only three cases of rotavirus diarrhea occurred in the study group before the vaccinations were completed. During the epidemic season from December to May, 31 patients with clinically significant rotavirus diarrhea required therapy. Five of these were among the 168 vaccine recipients, and 26 among the 160 placebo recipients (P less than 0.001), giving a vaccine protection rate of 82%. The incidence of clinically significant diarrhea from all causes was reduced by 76% in the vaccinees. As determined by an enzyme immunoassay antibody test with homologous virus antigen, seroconversion after vaccination was obtained in 53% of the initially seronegative infants. Clinical protection correlated well with seroconversion, but the vaccinees who failed to seroconvert also had less rotavirus diarrhea than the placebo recipients, suggesting that immunity may be mediated by factors other than serum EIA antibody. Seventeen of the 23 rotavirus isolates in the epidemic season that were typed were of serotype 1, two were of serotype 2, and four were of serotype 3. The protection rates against clinically significant diarrhea were 72%, 100%, and 100% for serotypes 1, 2, and 3, respectively. We conclude that epidemic infantile winter diarrhea associated with human rotaviruses can be significantly reduced by vaccination with the live attenuated RIT 4237 bovine rotavirus vaccine before the epidemic season.

  17. Comparative analysis of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine strains and G8 rotaviruses identified during vaccine trial in Africa.

    PubMed

    Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Ciarlet, Max; Lawrence, Jody; Steele, Duncan; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-10-06

    RotaTeqTM is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine based on a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone in vitro reassorted with human outer capsid genes. During clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, the vaccine efficacy over a 2-year follow-up was lower against the genotypes contained in the vaccine than against the heterotypic G8P[6] and G8P[1] rotavirus strains of which the former is highly prevalent in Africa. Complete genome analyses of 43 complete rotavirus genomes collected during phase III clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, were conducted to gain insight into the high level of cross-protection afforded by RotaTeqTM against these G8 strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a high number of bovine rotavirus gene segments in these human G8 strains. In addition, we performed an in depth analysis on the individual amino acid level which showed that G8 rotaviruses were more similar to the RotaTeqTM vaccine than non-G8 strains. Because RotaTeqTM possesses a bovine genetic backbone, the high vaccine efficacy against G8 strains might be partially explained by the fact that all these strains contain a complete or partial bovine-like backbone. Altogether, this study supports the hypothesis that gene segments other than VP7 and VP4 play a role in vaccine-induced immunity.

  18. Determining the effectiveness of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine against rotavirus hospitalizations and emergency department visits using two study designs

    PubMed Central

    Donauer, Stephanie; Payne, Daniel C.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Szilagyi, Peter G.; Hornung, Richard W.; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Chappell, James; Hall, Caroline B.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Staat, Mary Allen

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the vaccine effectiveness (VE) of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) for preventing rotavirus-related hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits during the 2006–07 and 2007–08 rotavirus seasons using two study designs. Active, prospective population-based surveillance was conducted to identify cases of laboratory-confirmed rotavirus-related hospitalizations and ED visits to be used in case-cohort and case-control designs. VE was calculated using one comparison group for the case-cohort method and two comparison groups for the case-control method. The VE estimates produced by the three analyses were similar. Three doses of RV5 were effective for preventing rotavirus-related hospitalizations and ED visits in each analysis, with VE estimated as 92% in all three analyses. Two doses of RV5 were also effective, with VE ranging from 79% to 83%. A single dose was effective in the case-cohort analysis, but was not significant in either of the case-control analyses. The case-cohort and the case-control study designs produced the same VE point estimates for completion of the three dose series. Two and three doses of RV5 were effective in preventing rotavirus-related hospitalizations and ED visits. PMID:23583814

  19. Comparative analysis of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine strains and G8 rotaviruses identified during vaccine trial in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Ciarlet, Max; Lawrence, Jody; Steele, Duncan; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    RotaTeqTM is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine based on a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone in vitro reassorted with human outer capsid genes. During clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, the vaccine efficacy over a 2-year follow-up was lower against the genotypes contained in the vaccine than against the heterotypic G8P[6] and G8P[1] rotavirus strains of which the former is highly prevalent in Africa. Complete genome analyses of 43 complete rotavirus genomes collected during phase III clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, were conducted to gain insight into the high level of cross-protection afforded by RotaTeqTM against these G8 strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a high number of bovine rotavirus gene segments in these human G8 strains. In addition, we performed an in depth analysis on the individual amino acid level which showed that G8 rotaviruses were more similar to the RotaTeqTM vaccine than non-G8 strains. Because RotaTeqTM possesses a bovine genetic backbone, the high vaccine efficacy against G8 strains might be partially explained by the fact that all these strains contain a complete or partial bovine-like backbone. Altogether, this study supports the hypothesis that gene segments other than VP7 and VP4 play a role in vaccine-induced immunity. PMID:26440913

  20. Comparative analysis of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine strains and G8 rotaviruses identified during vaccine trial in Africa.

    PubMed

    Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Ciarlet, Max; Lawrence, Jody; Steele, Duncan; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    RotaTeqTM is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine based on a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone in vitro reassorted with human outer capsid genes. During clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, the vaccine efficacy over a 2-year follow-up was lower against the genotypes contained in the vaccine than against the heterotypic G8P[6] and G8P[1] rotavirus strains of which the former is highly prevalent in Africa. Complete genome analyses of 43 complete rotavirus genomes collected during phase III clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, were conducted to gain insight into the high level of cross-protection afforded by RotaTeqTM against these G8 strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a high number of bovine rotavirus gene segments in these human G8 strains. In addition, we performed an in depth analysis on the individual amino acid level which showed that G8 rotaviruses were more similar to the RotaTeqTM vaccine than non-G8 strains. Because RotaTeqTM possesses a bovine genetic backbone, the high vaccine efficacy against G8 strains might be partially explained by the fact that all these strains contain a complete or partial bovine-like backbone. Altogether, this study supports the hypothesis that gene segments other than VP7 and VP4 play a role in vaccine-induced immunity. PMID:26440913

  1. Evidence of Vaccine-related Reassortment of Rotavirus, Brazil, 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Marques da Silva, Marcelle Figueira; Goméz, Mariela Martinéz; Resque, Hugo Reis; Ichihara, Maria Yury Travassos; Volotão, Eduardo de Mello; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of 27 rotavirus strains from vaccinated and unvaccinated children revealed reassortment events in 3 strains: a gene derived from a vaccine; a gene acquired from a circulating strain; and reassortment between circulating strains. Data suggest that the widespread use of this monovalent rotavirus vaccine may introduce vaccine genes into circulating human rotaviruses or vice versa. PMID:24188273

  2. Determinants of Parents' Decision to Vaccinate Their Children against Rotavirus: Results of a Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, E.; Bettinger, J. A.; Halperin, B.; Bradet, R.; Lavoie, F.; Sauvageau, C.; Gilca, V.; Boulianne, N.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus disease is a common cause of health care utilization and almost all children are affected by the age of 5 years. In Canada, at the time of this survey (2008-09), immunization rates for rotavirus were less than 20%. We assessed the determinants of a parent's acceptance to have their child immunized against rotavirus. The survey…

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Seven Commercial Assays for Rapid Detection of Group A Rotavirus Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Fremy, Céline; Pillet, Sylvie; Mendes Martins, Lucile; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Aho, Serge L.; Pothier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Seven commercial immunochromatographic assays intended for the detection of group A rotavirus antigens in human stool samples were evaluated. These assays showed similar levels of diagnostic accuracy and were suitable for the detection of rotavirus in patients with acute gastroenteritis but missed some asymptomatic rotavirus shedding identified by real-time reverse transcription-PCR. PMID:26378280

  4. Rotavirus genotypes in Belarus, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Semeiko, Galina V; Yermalovich, Marina A; Poliakova, Nadezhda; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Kerin, Tara K; Wasley, Annemarie; Videbaek, Dovile; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D; Samoilovich, Elena O

    2014-12-01

    This study describes group A rotavirus (RVA) genotype prevalence in Belarus from 2008 to 2012. In 2008, data from 3 sites in Belarus (Brest, Mogilev, Minsk) indicated that G4P[8] was the predominant genotype. Data from Minsk (2008-2012) showed that G4P[8] was the predominant RVA genotype in all years except in 2011 when G3P[8] was most frequently detected. Other RVA genotypes common in Europe (G1P[8], G2P[4]) were detected each year of the study. This study reveals the dominance of genotype G4P[8] in Belarus and helps to establish the baseline genotype prevalence prior to RVA vaccine introduction in the country.

  5. Comparison of pathogenicities and nucleotide changes between porcine and bovine reassortant rotavirus strains possessing the same genotype constellation in piglets and calves.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Gyu; Kim, Deok-Song; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kwon, Hyoung-Jun; Zeller, Mark; Alfajaro, Mia Madel; Son, Kyu-Yeol; Hosmillo, Myra; Ryu, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ji-Yun; Lee, Ju-Hwan; Park, Su-Jin; Kang, Mun-Il; Kwon, Joseph; Choi, Jong-Soon; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2014-08-01

    Although reassortment is one of the most important characteristics of group A rotavirus (RVA) evolution, the host range restriction and/or virulence of reassortant RVAs remain largely unknown. The porcine 174-1 strain isolated from a diarrheic piglet was identified as a reassortant strain, harboring the same genotype constellation as the previously characterized bovine strain KJ56-1. Owing to its same genotype constellation, the pathogenicity of the porcine strain 174-1 in piglets and calves was examined for comparison with that of the bovine reassortant KJ56-1 strain, whose pathogenicity has already been demonstrated in piglets and calves. The porcine 174-1 strain induced diarrhea and histopathological changes in the small intestine of piglets and calves, whereas KJ56-1 had been reported to be virulent only in piglets, but not in calves. Therefore, full genomic sequences of 174-1 and KJ56-1 strains were analyzed to determine whether specific mutations might be associated with clinical and pathological phenotypes. Sequence alignment between the 174-1 and KJ56-1 strains detected one nucleotide substitution at the 3' untranslated region of the NSP3 gene and 16 amino acid substitutions at the VP7, VP4, VP1, VP3, NSP1 and NSP4 genes. These mutations may be critical molecular determinants for different virulence and/or pathogenicity of each strain. This study presents new insights into the host range restriction and/or virulence of RVAs.

  6. Novel porcine-like human G26P[19] rotavirus identified in hospitalized paediatric diarrhoea patients in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    My, Phan Vu Tra; Rabaa, Maia A; Donato, Celeste; Cowley, Daniel; Phat, Voong Vinh; Dung, Tran Thi Ngoc; Anh, Pham Hong; Vinh, Ha; Bryant, Juliet E; Kellam, Paul; Thwaites, Guy; Woolhouse, Mark E J; Kirkwood, Carl D; Baker, Stephen

    2014-12-01

    During a hospital-based diarrhoeal disease study conducted in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam from 2009 to 2010, we identified four symptomatic children infected with G26P[19] rotavirus (RV)--an atypical variant that has not previously been reported in human gastroenteritis. To determine the genetic structure and investigate the origin of this G26P[19] strain, the whole genome of a representative example was characterized, revealing a novel genome constellation: G26-P[19]-I5-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T1-E1-H1. The genome segments were most closely related to porcine (VP7, VP4, VP6 and NSP1) and Wa-like porcine RVs (VP1-3 and NSP2-5). We proposed that this G26P[19] strain was the product of zoonotic transmission coupled with one or more reassortment events occurring in human and/or animal reservoirs. The identification of such strains has potential implications for vaccine efficacy in south-east Asia, and outlines the utility of whole-genome sequencing for studying RV diversity and zoonotic potential during disease surveillance. PMID:25121549

  7. Molecular identification by RNA-RNA hybridization of a human rotavirus that is closely related to rotaviruses of feline and canine origin.

    PubMed

    Nakagomi, O; Ohshima, A; Aboudy, Y; Shif, I; Mochizuki, M;