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Sample records for rough rod bundles

  1. Heat Transfer Enhancement By Three-Dimensional Surface Roughness Technique In Nuclear Fuel Rod Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najeeb, Umair

    This thesis experimentally investigates the enhancement of single-phase heat transfer, frictional loss and pressure drop characteristics in a Single Heater Element Loop Tester (SHELT). The heater element simulates a single fuel rod for Pressurized Nuclear reactor. In this experimental investigation, the effect of the outer surface roughness of a simulated nuclear rod bundle was studied. The outer surface of a simulated fuel rod was created with a three-dimensional (Diamond-shaped blocks) surface roughness. The angle of corrugation for each diamond was 45 degrees. The length of each side of a diamond block is 1 mm. The depth of each diamond block was 0.3 mm. The pitch of the pattern was 1.614 mm. The simulated fuel rod had an outside diameter of 9.5 mm and wall thickness of 1.5 mm and was placed in a test-section made of 38.1 mm inner diameter, wall thickness 6.35 mm aluminum pipe. The Simulated fuel rod was made of Nickel 200 and Inconel 625 materials. The fuel rod was connected to 10 KW DC power supply. The Inconel 625 material of the rod with an electrical resistance of 32.3 kO was used to generate heat inside the test-section. The heat energy dissipated from the Inconel tube due to the flow of electrical current flows into the working fluid across the rod at constant heat flux conditions. The DI water was employed as working fluid for this experimental investigation. The temperature and pressure readings for both smooth and rough regions of the fuel rod were recorded and compared later to find enhancement in heat transfer coefficient and increment in the pressure drops. Tests were conducted for Reynold's Numbers ranging from 10e4 to 10e5. Enhancement in heat transfer coefficient at all Re was recorded. The maximum heat transfer co-efficient enhancement recorded was 86% at Re = 4.18e5. It was also observed that the pressure drop and friction factor increased by 14.7% due to the increased surface roughness.

  2. Forced convection of water in rod-bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Bingjing; El-Genk, M.S. )

    1993-03-01

    Heat transfer of water in rod-bundles is of particular importance in many engineering applications. Although numerous experimental studies have been conducted to develop heat transfer correlations for forced convection in rod-bundles, with either a square or a triangular lattice, most data was taken at high Reynolds numbers (Re > 6,000); only a few data points had been reported at lower Reynolds number [1-5]. Recently, El Genk and co-workers have performed a series of heat transfer experiments of forced convection of water at the low and high Reynolds numbers as well as of natural and combined convection in uniformly heated, triangularly and square arrayed rod-bundles with P/D = 1.25, 1.38, and 1.5 [6-10]. Like all other investigators, they correlated the heat transfer data for square lattice and triangular lattice separately, with P/D as a parameter. This paper shows that forced convection data for both square and triangularly arrayed rod-bundles, when expressed in terms of the bundle porosity, can be represented by a single correlation, one each for forced turbulent convection land forced laminar convection. Also, the experimental values of the Reynolds number at the transition between these two convection regimes is expressed in terms of the bundle porosity, regardless of the lattice type and rod diameter. This approach reduces the number and simplifies the form of the forced convection correlations, making them easy to use in potential engineering applications. Although the effect of the rod diameter and the type of lattice in the bundles is implicit in the expressions of the bundle porosity, it is explicit in the definition of the heated equivalent diameter in both Re and Nu, and hence will influence the heat transfer coefficient.

  3. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients. Progress report, September 1, 1980-November 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Todreas, N.E.; Golay, M.W.; Wolf, L.

    1981-02-01

    Four tasks are reported: bundle geometry (wrapped and bare rods), subchannel geometry (bare rods), subchannel geometry (bare rods), LMFBR outlet plenum flow mixing, and theoretical determination of local temperature fields in LMFBR fuel rod bundles. (DLC)

  4. Critical Power in 7-Rod Tight Lattice Bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Kureta, Masatoshi; Akimoto, Hajime

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) has recently becomes of great concern. The RMWR is expected to promote the effective utilization of uranium recourse. The RMWR is based on water-cooled reactor technology, with achieved under lower core water volume and water flow rate. In comparison with the current light water reactors whose water-to-fuel volume ratio is about 2-3, in the RMWR, this value is reduced to less than 0.5. Thereby, there is a need to research its cooling characteristics. Experimental research on critical power in tight lattice bundle that simulates the RMWR has been carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The bundle consists one center rod and six peripheral rods. The 7 rods are arranged on a 14.3mm equilateral triangular pitch. Each rod is 13mm in outside diameter. An axial 12-step power distribution is employed to simulate the complicate heating condition in RMWR. Experiments are carried out under G=100-1400kg/m2s, Pex=2-8.5MPa. Effects of mass velocity, inlet temperature, pressure, radial peaking factor and axial peaking factor on critical power and critical quality are discussed. Compared with axial uniform heating condition, the axial non-uniform heating condition causes an obvious decrease in critical quality. Arai correlation, which is the only correlation that has been optimized for tight lattice condition, is verified with the present experimental data. The correlation is found to be able to give reasonable prediction only around RMWR nominal operating condition.

  5. Method of bundling rods so as to form an optical fiber preform

    DOEpatents

    Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Koplow, Jeffery P.

    2004-03-30

    The present invention provides a simple method for fabricating fiber-optic glass preforms having complex refractive index configurations and/or dopant distributions in a radial direction with a high degree of accuracy and precision. The method teaches bundling together a plurality of glass rods of specific physical, chemical, or optical properties and wherein the rod bundle is fused in a manner that maintains the cross-sectional composition and refractive-index profiles established by the position of the rods.

  6. CFD analyses of flow structures in air-ingress and rod bundle problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hong-Chan

    Two topics from nuclear engineering field are included in this dissertation. One study is the air-ingress phenomenon during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) scenario, and the other is a 5-by-5 bundle assembly with a PWR design. The objectives were to investigate the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of the gravity-driven stratified flows inside a coaxial pipe and the effects caused by two types of spacers at the downstream of the rod bundle. Richardson extrapolation was used for the grid independent study. The simulation results show good agreements with the experiments. Wavelet analysis and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) were used to study the flow behaviors and flow patterns. For the air-ingress phenomenon, Brunt-Vaisala frequency, or buoyancy frequency, predicts a frequency of 2.34 Hz; this is confirmed by the dominant frequency of 2.4 Hz obtained from the wavelet analysis between times 1.2 s and 1.85 s. For the rod bundle study, the dominant frequency at the center of the subchannel was determined to be 2.4 Hz with a secondary dominant frequency of 4 Hz and a much minor frequency of 6 Hz. Generally, wavelet analysis has much better performance than POD, in the air-ingress phenomenon, for a strongly transient scenario; they are both appropriate for the rod bundle study. Based on this study, when the fluid pair in a real condition is used, the time which air intrudes into the reactor is predictable.

  7. Two-Phase Flow Patterns in a Four by Four Rod Bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshitaka Mizutani; Shigeo Hosokawa; Akio Tomiyama

    2006-07-01

    Air-water two-phase flow patterns in a four by four square lattice rod bundle consisting of an acrylic channel box of 68 mm in width and transparent rods of 12 mm in diameter were observed by utilizing a high speed video camera, FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) tubes for rods, and a fiber-scope inserted in a rod. The FEP possesses the same refractive index as water, and thereby, whole flow patterns in the bundle and local flow patterns in subchannels were successfully visualized with little optical distortion. The ranges of liquid and gas volume fluxes, and , in the present experiments were 0.1 < < 2.0 m/s and 0.04 < < 8.85 m/s, which covered typical two-phase flow patterns appearing in a fuel bundle of a boiling water nuclear reactor. As a result, the following conclusions were obtained: (1) the region of slug flow in the - flow pattern diagram is so narrow that it can be regarded as a boundary between bubbly and churn flows, (2) the boundary between bubbly and churn flows is close to the boundary between bubbly and slug flows of the Mishima and Ishii's flow pattern transition model, and (3) the boundary between churn and annular flows is well predicted by the Mishima and Ishii's model. (authors)

  8. RADGEN: A radiation exchange factor generator for rod bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D.R.

    1987-10-01

    The RADGEN computer program has been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to generate input required for the thermal radiation models used in the COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) computer program. The COBRA-SFS program uses radiation exchange factors to describe the net amount of energy transferred from each surface to every other surface in an enclosure. The RADGEN program generates radiation exchange factors for arrays of rods on a square or triangular pitch as well as open channel geometries. This report describes the input requirements for the RADGEN code, which may be executed in a batch or interactive mode, and outlines the solution procedure used to obtain the exchange factors. 4 refs., 25 figs., 13 tabs.

  9. Two-phase flow interfacial structures in a rod bundle geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Sidharth S.

    Interfacial structure of air-water two-phase flow in a scaled nuclear reactor rod bundle geometry was studied in this research. Global and local flow regimes were obtained for the rod bundle geometry. Local two-phase flow parameters were measured at various axial locations in order to understand the transport of interfacial structures. A one-dimensional two-group interfacial area transport model was evaluated using the local parameter database. Air-water two-phase flow experiments were performed in an 8 X 8 rod bundle test section to obtain flow regime maps at various axial locations. Area averaged void fraction was measured using parallel plate type impedance void meters. The cumulative probability distribution functions of the signals from the impedance void meters were used along with a self organizing neural network to identify flow regimes. Local flow regime maps revealed the cross-sectional distribution of flow regimes in the bundle. Local parameters that characterize interfacial structure, that is, void fraction alpha, interfacial area concentration, ai, bubble Sauter mean diameter, DSm and bubble velocity, vg were measured using four sensor conductivity probe technique. The local data revealed the distribution of the interfacial structure in the radial direction, as well as its development in the axial direction. In addition to this, the effect of spacer grid on the flow structure at different gas and liquid velocities was revealed by local parameter measurements across the spacer grids. A two-group interfacial area transport equation (IATE) specific to rod bundle geometry was derived. The derivation of two-group IATE required certain assumption on the bubble shapes in the subchannels and the bubbles spanning more than a subchannel. It was found that the geometrical relationship between the volume and the area of a cap bubble distorted by rods was similar to the one derived for a confined channel under a specific geometrical transformation. The one

  10. Characteristics of turbulent velocity and temperature in a wall channel of a heated rod bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, T.; Meyer, L.

    1995-09-01

    Turbulent air flow in a wall sub-channel of a heated 37-rod bundle (P/D = 1.12, W/D = 1.06) was investigated. measurements were performed with hot-wire probe with X-wires and a temperature wire. The mean velocity, the mean fluid temperature, the wall shear stress and wall temperature, the turbulent quantities such as the turbulent kinetic energy, the Reynolds-stresses and the turbulent heat fluxes were measured and are discussed with respect to data from isothermal flow in a wall channel and heated flow in a central channel of the same rod bundle. Also, data on the power spectral densities of the velocity and temperature fluctuations are presented. These data show the existence of large scale periodic fluctuations are responsible for the high intersubchannel heat and momentum exchange.

  11. Single- and Two-Phase Turbulent Mixing Rate between Subchannels in Triangle Tight Lattice Rod Bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Akimaro; Sadatomi, Michio; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Kano, Keiko

    In order to obtain the data on turbulent mixing rate between triangle tight lattice subchannels, which will be adopted as the next generation BWR fuel rod bundle, adiabatic experiments were conducted for single- and two-phase flows under hydrodynamic equilibrium flow conditions. The gas and liquid mixing rates measured for two-phase flows were found to be affected by the void fraction and/or flow regime, as reported in our previous study on a simulated square lattice rod bundle channel having hydraulic diameters of about four times larger than the present tight lattice channel. Comparing the present mixing rate data with those for the square lattice channel and a triangle one in other institution, we found that the mixing rate was considerably smaller in the present channel than the other ones, i.e., a channel size effect.

  12. CHF prediction of GE 3 x 3 rod bundle based on BODYFIT-2PE. [BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, T.H.; Chen, B.C.J.; Sha, W.T.; Kim, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    A General Electric 3 x 3 rod bundle critical heat flux (CHF) experiment was analyzed by using BODYFIT-2PE. (Boundary-fitted coordinates-2 phase partially elliptic). BODYFIT-2PE is a three-dimensional, steady-state/transient, single-phase rod-bundle thermal-hydraulic computer program based on the technique of boudnary-fitted coordinate system. In this coordinate system, all the physical boundaries are made to be coincident with the coordinate lines so that the boundary conditions, such as constant heat fluxes and zero velocities, can be accurately represented without interpolation. However, the transformed coordinate system is not unique for a given geometric configuration. The more orthogonal the coordinates are, the faster the rates of calculational convergence. The generation of the transformed coordinates is based on the solution of a set of second-order partial differential equations, subject to a set of geometric boundary conditions. A simple Laplacian is used in the present study.

  13. A thermal-hydraulic code for transient analysis in a channel with a rod bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Khodjaev, I.D.

    1995-09-01

    The paper contains the model of transient vapor-liquid flow in a channel with a rod bundle of core of a nuclear power plant. The computer code has been developed to predict dryout and post-dryout heat transfer in rod bundles of nuclear reactor core under loss-of-coolant accidents. Economizer, bubble, dispersed-annular and dispersed regimes are taken into account. The computer code provides a three-field representation of two-phase flow in the dispersed-annular regime. Continuous vapor, continuous liquid film and entrained liquid drops are three fields. For the description of dispersed flow regime two-temperatures and single-velocity model is used. Relative droplet motion is taken into account for the droplet-to-vapor heat transfer. The conservation equations for each of regimes are solved using an effective numerical technique. This technique makes it possible to determine distribution of the parameters of flows along the perimeter of fuel elements. Comparison of the calculated results with the experimental data shows that the computer code adequately describes complex processes in a channel with a rod bundle during accident.

  14. DESIGN OF WIRE-WRAPPED ROD BUNDLE MATCHED INDEX-OF-REFRACTION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh McIlroy; Hongbin Zhang; Kurt Hamman

    2008-05-01

    Experiments will be conducted in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility [1] to characterize the three-dimensional velocity and turbulence fields in a wire-wrapped rod bundle typically employed in liquid-metal cooled fast reactors and to provide benchmark data for computer code validation. Sodium cooled fast reactors are under consideration for use in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program. The experiment model will be constructed of quartz components and the working fluid will be mineral oil. Accurate temperature control (to within 0.05 oC) matches the index-of-refraction of mineral oil with that of quartz and renders the model transparent to the wavelength of laser light employed for optical measurements. The model will be a scaled 7-pin rod bundle enclosed in a hexagonal canister. Flow field measurements will be obtained with a LaVision 3-D particle image velocimeter (PIV) and complimented by near-wall velocity measurements obtained from a 2-D laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). These measurements will be used as benchmark data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation. The rod bundle model dimensions will be scaled up from the typical dimensions of a fast reactor fuel assembly to provide the maximum Reynolds number achievable in the MIR flow loop. A range of flows from laminar to fully-turbulent will be available with a maximum Reynolds number, based on bundle hydraulic diameter, of approximately 22,000. The fuel pins will be simulated by 85 mm diameter quartz tubes (closed on the inlet ends) and the wire-wrap will be simulated by 25 mm diameter quartz rods. The canister walls will be constructed from quartz plates. The model will be approximately 2.13 m in length. Bundle pressure losses will also be measured and the data recorded for code comparisons. The experiment design and preliminary CFD calculations, which will be used to provide qualitative hydrodynamic

  15. Development of advanced BWR fuel bundle with spectral shift rod - BWR core characteristics with SSR

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, T.; Kondo, T.; Chaki, M.; Ohga, Y.; Makigami, T.

    2012-07-01

    The neutron energy spectrum can be varied during an operation cycle to generate and utilize more plutonium from the non-fissile {sup 238}U by changing the void fraction in the core through control of the core coolant flow rate. This operation method, which is called a spectral shift operation, is practiced in BWRs to save natural uranium. A new component called a spectral shift rod (SSR), which is utilized instead of a conventional water rod, has been introduced to amplify the void fraction change and increase the spectral shift effect. In this study, fuel bundle design with the SSR and core design were carried out for the ABWR and the next generation BWR, HP-ABWR (High-Performance ABWR).The core characteristics with the SSR were evaluated and compared with those when using the conventional water rod. Influences of uncertainty of the water level in the SSR on the safety limit minimum critical power ratio (SLMCPR) were considered for evaluation of the uranium saving effect attained by the SSR. As a result, it was found that the amount of natural uranium needed for an operation cycle could be reduced more than 3% with 20% core coolant flow change and more than 5% with 30% core coolant flow change, in the form of increased discharge exposure by using the SSR compared with the conventional water rod use. (authors)

  16. CFD study of isothermal water flow in rod bundle with split-type spacer grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batta, A.; Class, A. G.

    2014-06-01

    The design of rod bundles in nuclear application nowadays is assessed by CFD (computational fluid dynamics). The accuracy of CFD models need validation. Within the OECD/NEA benchmark MATiS-H (Measurement and Analysis of Turbulent Mixing in Sub-channels - Horizontal) a single-phase water flow in a 5x5 rod bundle is studied. In the benchmark, two types of spacer grids are tested, the swirl type and the split type, where the current study focuses on the split type spacer grid. Comparison of CFD results obtained at Karlsruhe Institut of Technology (KIT) with experimental results of KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) are presented. In the benchmark velocities components along selected lines downstream of the spacer grid are measured and compared to CFD results. The CFD code STAR CCM+ with the Realized k-ɛ model is used. Comparisons with experimental results show quantitative and qualitative agreement for the averaged values of velocity components. Comparisons of results to other benchmark partners using different modeling show that the selected mesh size and models for the analysis of the current case gives relatively accurate results. However, the used turbulent model (Realized k-ɛ does not capture the turbulent intensity correctly. Computation shows that the flow has very high mixing due to the spacer grid, which does not decay within the measurements domain (z/ DH =0-10 downstream of spacer grid). The same conclusion can be drawn from experimental data.

  17. Determination of integral turbulence model parameters as applied to calculation of rod-bundle flows in porous-body approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, M. N.; Korsun, A. S.; Maslov, Yu. A.; Merinov, I. G.; Rachkov, V. I.; Kharitonov, V. S.

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, results of numerical simulation of single-phase flows of heat carrier through square and triangular rod bundles are reported. The simulations were aimed at the determination of parameters involved in an integral model of turbulence being developed for modeling nuclear-reactor cores and heat exchangers in anisotropic porous-body approximation.

  18. Experimental study on convective heat transfer coefficient around a vertical hexagonal rod bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhmalbaf, M. H. M.

    2012-06-01

    Research on convective heat transfer coefficient around a rod bundle has many diverse applications in industry. So far, many studies have been conducted in correlations related to internal and turbulent fully-developed flow. Comparison shows that Dittus-Boelter, Sieder-Tate and Petukhov have so far been the most practical correlations in fully-developed turbulent fluid flow heat transfer. The present study conducts an experimental examination of the validity of these frequently-applied correlations and introduces a manufactured test facility as well. Due to its generalizibility, the unique geometry of this test facility (hexagonal arranged, 7 vertical rods in a hexagonal tube) can fulfil extensive applications. The paper also studies the major deviation sources in data measurements, calibrations and turbulence of fluid flow in this. Finally, regarding to sufficient number of experiments in a vast fluid mean velocity range (3,800 < Re < 40,000), a new curve and correlation are presented and the results are compared with the above mentioned commonly-applied correlations.

  19. Reflooding and boil-off experiments in a VVER-440 like rod bundle and analyses with the CATHARE code

    SciTech Connect

    Korteniemi, V.; Haapalehto, T.; Puustinen, M.

    1995-09-01

    Several experiments were performed with the VEERA facility to simulate reflooding and boil-off phenomena in a VVER-440 like rod bundle. The objective of these experiments was to get experience of a full-scale bundle behavior and to create a database for verification of VVER type core models used with modern thermal-hydraulic codes. The VEERA facility used in the experiments is a scaled-down model of the Russian VVER-440 type pressurized water reactors used in Loviisa, Finland. The test section of the facility consists of one full-scale copy of a VVER-440 reactor rod bundle with 126 full-length electrically heated rod simulators. Bottom and top-down reflooding, different modes of emergency core cooling (ECC) injection and the effect of heating power on the heat-up of the rods was studied. In this paper the results of calculations simulating two reflood and one boil-off experiment with the French CATHARE2 thermal-hydraulic code are also presented. Especially the performance of the recently implemented top-down reflood model of the code was studied.

  20. Development of Design Technology on Thermal-Hydraulic Performance in Tight-Lattice Rod Bundles: II - Rod Bowing Effect on Boiling Transition under Transient Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Tamai, Hidesada; Kureta, Masatoshi; Ohnuki, Akira; Akimoto, Hajime

    A thermal-hydraulic feasibility project for an Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible fuel cycle (FLWR) has been performed since 2002. In this R&D project, large-scale thermal-hydraulic tests, several model experiments and development of advanced numerical analysis codes have been carried out. In this paper, we describe the critical power characteristics in a 37-rod tight-lattice bundle with rod bowing under transient states. It is observed that transient Boiling Transition (BT) always occurs axially at exit elevation of upper high-heat-flux region and transversely in the central area of the bundle, which is same as that under steady state. For the postulated power increase and flow decrease cases that may be possibly met in a normal operation of the FLWR, it is confirmed that no BT occurs when Initial Critical Power Ratio (ICPR) is 1.3. Moreover, when the transients are run under severer ICPR that causes BT, the transient critical powers are generally same as the steady ones. The experiments are analyzed with a modified TRAC-BFI code, where Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) newest critical power correlation is implemented for the BT judgement. The code shows good prediction for the occurrence or the non occurrence of the BT and predicts the BT starting time conservatively. Traditional quasi-steady state prediction of the transient BT is confirmed being applicable for the postulated abnormal transient processes in the tight-lattice bundle with rod bowing.

  1. Scaling of two-phase flow regimes in a rod bundle with freon

    SciTech Connect

    Symolon, P.D.

    1990-07-01

    Fluid to fluid modeling of the thermal-hydraulics of steam/water systems using Freon has been the subject of research for the past 25 years. However, there is as yet no universally accepted set of scaling laws to define the geometry and velocity scaling requirements of an equivalent Freon test of the full scale steam/water system being simulated. This paper describes a scaling concept where the Weber and Froud numbers of the Freon model are matched to that of the prototype being simulated, thus creating a comparable balance among inertia, surface tension and buoyancy forces. In this test it was demonstrated that similar flow regime transitions are observed in a half scale Freon simulation of a full scale steam/water test run at Dynatech. It is also shown using a two fluid analytical model and existing correlations for friction and interfacial momentum exchange from the open literature, that a half scale simulation leads to nearly the same slip ratio as for full scale steam/water, while the slip ratio for a full scale Freon simulation is too high. A comparison of the predicted flow distribution in the 4-rod bundle is made using the COBRA-IV code for a full scale simulation using Freon, a half scale simulation using Freon and full scale test with water. The COBRA results demonstrated that a half scale test section model using Freon yields a subchannel flow distribution similar to the steam/water case, while a full scale Freon simulation results in a distorted subchannel flow distribution. It is concluded that the appropriate geometric scale factor for Freon simulation of two-phase steam/water flow in tube bundles is one-half for a broad range of thermal-hydraulic conditions. 24 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. PWR FLECHT SEASET 163-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task data report. NRC/EPRI/Westinghouse report No. 13, August-October 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Loftus, M J; Hochreiter, L E; McGuire, M F; Valkovic, M M

    1983-10-01

    This report presents data from the 163-Rod Bundle Blow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Systems Effects and Separate Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). The task consisted of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods with a cosine axial power profile to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. These tests were designed to determine effects of flow blockage and flow bypass on reflooding behavior and to aid in the assessment of computational models in predicting the reflooding behavior of flow blockage in rod bundle arrays.

  3. Assessment of the 3-D Thermal-Hydraulic Nuclear Core Computer Code FLICA-IV on Rod Bundle Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, Andre; Caruge, Daniel; Clement, Philippe

    2001-04-15

    The physical validation compared with the hydraulic and two-phase flow experiments of the thermal-hydraulic FLICA-IV nuclear core computer code, in the case of a pressurized water reactor is presented. This three-dimensional two-phase flow code is devoted to steady state and transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactor cores. The four balance equations used by the code and the closure relationships are first presented. Then, the facilities employed for the code validation are described. They are the ones that use either laser velocimetry techniques in the case of hydraulic validation to measure accurately the flow field around rods or isokinetic sampling to carry out the qualities and the axial mass velocities at the outlet of a rod bundle in the case of two-phase flow validation. Comparisons between experimental and computed values are then presented for the axial flow blockage simulation, inlet assemblies flow mixing, axial flow spacer grid disturbance, and an outlet rod bundle map of qualities and axial mass velocities.

  4. Measurement of liquid film flow on nuclear rod bundle in micro-scale by using very high speed camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Son; Kawara, Zensaku; Yokomine, Takehiko; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2012-11-01

    Playing important roles in the mass and heat transfer as well as the safety of boiling water reactor, the liquid film flow on nuclear fuel rods has been studied by different measurement techniques such as ultrasonic transmission, conductivity probe, etc. Obtained experimental data of this annular two-phase flow, however, are still not enough to construct the physical model for critical heat flux analysis especially at the micro-scale. Remain problems are mainly caused by complicated geometry of fuel rod bundles, high velocity and very unstable interface behavior of liquid and gas flow. To get over these difficulties, a new approach using a very high speed digital camera system has been introduced in this work. The test section simulating a 3×3 rectangular rod bundle was made of acrylic to allow a full optical observation of the camera. Image data were taken through Cassegrain optical system to maintain the spatiotemporal resolution up to 7 μm and 20 μs. The results included not only the real-time visual information of flow patterns, but also the quantitative data such as liquid film thickness, the droplets' size and speed distributions, and the tilt angle of wavy surfaces. These databases could contribute to the development of a new model for the annular two-phase flow. Partly supported by the Global Center of Excellence (G-COE) program (J-051) of MEXT, Japan.

  5. Investigation of combined free and forced convection in a 2 x 6 rod bundle during controlled flow transients

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.M.; Khan, E.U.

    1980-10-01

    An experimental study was performed to obtain local fluid velocity and temperature measurements in the mixed (combined free and forced) convection regime for specific flow coastdown transients. A brief investigation of steady-state flows for the purely free-convection regime was also completed. The study was performed using an electrically heated 2 x 6 rod bundle contained in a flow housing. In addition a transient data base was obtained for evaluating the COBRA-WC thermal-hydraulic computer program (a modified version of the COBRA-IV code).

  6. Laboratory manual for static pressure drop experiments in LMFBR wire wrapped rod bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.J.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-07-01

    Purpose of this experiment is to determine both interior and edge subchannel axial pressure drops for a range of Reynolds numbers. The subchannel static pressure drop is used to calculate subchannel and bundle average friction factors, which can be used to verify existing friction factor correlations. The correlations for subchannel friction factors are used as input to computer codes which solve the coupled energy, continuity, and momentum equations, and are also used to develop flow split correlations which are needed as input to codes which solve only the energy equation. The bundle average friction factor is used to calculate the overall bundle pressure drop, which determines the required pumping power.

  7. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todreas, N. E.; Cheng, S. K.; Basehore, K.

    1984-08-01

    The thermal hydraulic performance of wire wrapped fuel bundles of LMFBR configuration was investigated. Results obtained included phenomenological models for friction factors, flow split and mixing characteristics; correlations for predicting these characteristics suitable for insertion in design codes; numerical codes for analyzing bundle behavior both of the lumped subchannel and distributed parameter categories and experimental techniques for pressure velocity, flow split, salt conductivity and temperature measurement in water cooled mockups of bundles and subchannels. Flow regimes investigated included laminar, transition and turbulent flow under forced convection and mixed convection conditions. Forced convections conditions are emphasized. Outlet plenum behavior is also investigated.

  8. Calculation of Inter-Subchannel Turbulent Mixing Rate and Heat Transfer in a Triangular-Arrayed Rod Bundle Using Direct Numerical Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yudov, Yury V.

    2006-07-01

    The direct numerical simulation, extended to boundary - fitted coordinate, has been carried out for a fully-developed turbulent flow thermal hydraulics in a triangular rod bundle. The rod bundle is premised to be an infinite array. The spacer grid effects are ignored. The purpose of this work is to verify DNS methodology to be applied for deriving coefficients for inter-subchannel turbulent mixing and heat transfer on a rod. These coefficients are incorporated in subchannel analysis codes. To demonstrate the validity of this methodology, numerical calculation was performed for the bundle with the pitch to diameter ratio 1.2, at friction Reynolds number of 600 and Prandtl number of 1. The results for the hydraulic parameters are compared with published DNS data, and the results for the heat exchange coefficients -- with those obtained using semi-empirical correlations. (authors)

  9. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Todreas, N.E.; Cheng, S.K.; Basehore, K.

    1984-08-01

    This project principally undertook the investigation of the thermal hydraulic performance of wire wrapped fuel bundles of LMFBR configuration. Results obtained included phenomenological models for friction factors, flow split and mixing characteristics; correlations for predicting these characteristics suitable for insertion in design codes; numerical codes for analyzing bundle behavior both of the lumped subchannel and distributed parameter categories and experimental techniques for pressure velocity, flow split, salt conductivity and temperature measurement in water cooled mockups of bundles and subchannels. Flow regimes investigated included laminar, transition and turbulent flow under forced convection and mixed convection conditions. Forced convections conditions were emphasized. Continuing efforts are underway at MIT to complete the investigation of the mixed convection regime initiated here. A number of investigations on outlet plenum behavior were also made. The reports of these investigations are identified.

  10. PWR FLECHT SEASET 21-rod bundle flow blockage task data and analysis report. NRC/EPRI/Westinghouse Report No. 11. Appendices K-P

    SciTech Connect

    Loftus, M.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Lee, N.; McGuire, M.F.; Wenzel, A.H.; Valkovic, M.M.

    1982-09-01

    This report presents data and limited analysis from the 21-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Separate Effects and Systems Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). The tests consisted of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods with a cosine axial power profile to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. Steam cooling and hydraulic characteristics tests were also conducted. These tests were utilized to determine effects of various flow blockage configurations (shapes and distributions) on reflooding behavior, to aid in development/assessment of computational models in predicting reflooding behavior of flow blockage configurations, and to screen flow blockage configurations for future 163-rod flow blockage bundle tests.

  11. Fluid-mixing studies in a hexagonal 217-pin wire-wrapped rod bundle. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Symolon, P.D.; Todreas, N.E.

    1981-02-01

    Mixing, pressure drop, and flow split experiments were performed on a 217 pin LMFBR fuel bundle with a pitch to diameter ratio of 1.25 and a lead length of 12 inches. It was found that the turbulent flow data could best be characterized by the energy parameter C/sub 1L/=.106, which is 9% higher than the value from the correlation of Chiu et al. Chiu's correlation was developed on a data base of 61 and 91 pins. The spread of existing data about the correlation is +- 25%, but the error band on our data is expected to be less (approx. +- 10% since injection depth effects were not previously considered). This result is consistent with the concept of increased swirl flow in larger bundles (more pins).

  12. Assessment of Biasi and Columbia University CHF correlations with GE 3x3 rod bundle experiment. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.C.J.; Chien, T.H.; Sha, W.T.; Kim, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The critical heat flux (CHF), at which a sudden degradation of heat transfer occurs without corresponding decrease in heat generation, is one of the limiting parameters for safe operation of nuclear reactors. Reactor operation beyond the CHF causes a rapid rise in fuel cladding temperature and thus should be avoided to maintain the fuel element integrity. Reactor power limits are therefore set so that a prescribed safety margin below the CHF is maintained. Two CHF correlations are evaluated for reactor core thermal hydraulic analysis: the Biasi correlation and the Columbia University correlation. The BODYFIT-2PE computer code is used for this assessment. The CHF predicted by the BODYFIT-2PE using the two correlations is compared with GE 3x3 rod bundle CHF experiment.

  13. Steady-state film-boiling data in rod-bundle geometry and non-equilibrium correlation assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, G.L.; Morris, D.G.; Mullins, C.B.; Ott, L.J.; Reed, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    A series of 22 steady-state, rod bundle, dispersed flow film boiling experiments has been performed in the Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF), a pressurized-water loop containing 64 full-length electrically heated rods. Test parameters in the upflow experiments cover a wide range of conditions typical of those which might be encountered during a nuclear reactor loss-of-coolant accident. Local equilibrium fluid conditions were calculated using mass and energy conservation considerations. Experimentally determined heat transfer coefficients were compared to several available film boiling heat transfer correlations: Dougall-Rohsenow, Groeneveld 5.7, Groeneveld-Delorme, Chen, Jones-Zuber, and Yoder-Rohsenow. The Groeneveld 5.7 correlation tended to predict the data better than any other correlation tested. The Dougall-Rohsenow correlation tends to overpredict the data while the Yoder-Rohsenow correlation predicted the data better than the other nonequilibrium correlations examined. However, all of the nonequilibrium correlations generally underpredict the heat transfer.

  14. Scaling of two-phase flow regimes in a rod bundle with Freon

    SciTech Connect

    Symolon, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    A fundamental requirement of Freon modeling is that the same void fraction and spatial phase distribution will exist in the Freon model as in the steam/water system being simulated. It is shown that this requirement is satisfied by comparing flow regime transitions observed in high-pressure steam/water with transitions observed in the half-scale Freon four-rod test. It is also demonstrated through predictions of a two-fluid model for a one-half geometric scale factor that within each flow regime, a similar slip ratio (vapor-to-liquid-velocity ratio) exists for the Freon and water systems.

  15. Studying the vibration and random hydrodynamic loads on the fuel rods bundles in the fuel assemblies of the reactor installations used at nuclear power stations equipped with VVER reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solonin, V. I.; Perevezentsev, V. V.

    2012-05-01

    Random hydrodynamic loads causing vibration of fuel rod bundles in a turbulent flow of coolant are obtained from the results of pressure pulsation measurements carried out over the perimeter of the external row of fuel rods in the bundle of a full-scale mockup of a fuel assembly used in a second-generation VVER-440 reactor. It is shown that the turbulent flow structure is a factor determining the parameters of random hydrodynamic loads and the vibration of fuel rod bundles excited by these loads. The results from a calculation of random hydrodynamic loads are used for estimating the vibration levels of fuel rod bundles used in prospective designs of fuel assemblies for VVER reactors.

  16. GMDH-type neural network modeling and genetic algorithm-based multi-objective optimization of thermal and friction characteristics in heat exchanger tubes with wire-rod bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Masoud; Beigzadeh, Reza; Parvizi, Mehdi; Eiamsa-ard, Smith

    2016-08-01

    The group method of data handling (GMDH) technique was used to predict heat transfer and friction characteristics in heat exchanger tubes equipped with wire-rod bundles. Nusselt number and friction factor were determined as functions of wire-rod bundle geometric parameters and Reynolds number. The performance of the developed GMDH-type neural networks was found to be superior in comparison with the proposed empirical correlations. For optimization, the genetic algorithm-based multi-objective optimization was applied.

  17. PWR FLECHT SEASET 21-rod-bundle flow-blockage task: data and analysis report. NRC/EPRI/Westinghouse report No. 11, main report and appendices A-J

    SciTech Connect

    Loftus, M.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Lee, N.; McGuire, M.F.; Wenzel, A.H.; Valkovic, M.M.

    1982-09-01

    This report presents data and limited analysis from the 21-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Separate Effects and Systems Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). The tests consisted of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods with a cosine axial power profile to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. Steam cooling and hydraulic characteristics tests were also conducted. These tests were utilized to determine effects of various flow blockage configurations (shapes and distributions) on reflooding behavior, to aid in development/assessment of computational models in predicting reflooding behavior of flow blockage configurations, and to screen flow blockage configurations for future 163-rod flow blockage bundle tests.

  18. Assessment of CCFL model of RELAP5/MOD3 against simple vertical tubes and rod bundle tests. International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S.; Arne, N.; Chung, B.D.; Kim, H.J.

    1993-06-01

    The CCFL model used in RELAP5/MOD3 version 5m5 has been assessed against simple vertical tubes and bundle tests performed at a facility of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. The effect of changes in tube diameter and nodalization of tube section were investigated. The roles of interfacial drags on the flooding characteristics are discussed. Differences between the calculation and the experiment are also discussed. A comparison between model assessment results and the test data showed that the calculated value lay well on the experimental flooding curve specified by user, but the pressure jump before onset of flooding was not calculated.

  19. BODYFIT-1FE: a computer code for three-dimensional steady-state/transient single-phase rod-bundle thermal-hydraulic analysis. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.C.J.; Sha, W.T.; Doria, M.L.; Schmitt, R.C.; Thompson, J.F.

    1980-11-01

    The governing equations, i.e., conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy, are solved as a boundary-value problem in space and an initial-value problem in time. BODYFIT-1FE code uses the technique of boundary-fitted coordinate systems where all the physical boundaries are transformed to be coincident with constant coordinate lines in the transformed space. By using this technique, one can prescribe boundary conditions accurately without interpolation. The transformed governing equations in terms of the boundary-fitted coordinates are then solved by using implicit cell-by-cell procedure with a choice of either central or upwind convective derivatives. It is a true benchmark rod-bundle code without invoking any assumptions in the case of laminar flow. However, for turbulent flow, some empiricism must be employed due to the closure problem of turbulence modeling. The detailed velocity and temperature distributions calculated from the code can be used to benchmark and calibrate empirical coefficients employed in subchannel codes and porous-medium analyses.

  20. ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 7. Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility experimental data report for test series 3. 07. 9 - steady-state film boiling in upflow

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, C.B.; Felde, D.K.; Sutton, A.G.; Gould, S.S.; Morris, D.G.; Robinson, J.J.

    1982-05-01

    Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) test series 3.07.9 was conducted by members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pressurized-Water Reactor (ORNL-PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer (BDHT) Separate-Effects Program on September 11, September 18, and October 1, 1980. The objective of the program is to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWRs during accidents, including small- and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test series 3.07.9 was designed to provide steady-state film boiling data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. This report presents the reduced instrument responses for THTF test series 3.07.9. Also included are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers.

  1. Heat and mass transfer in turbulent flow of the N/sub 2/O/sub 4/ /r reversible/ 2NO/sub 2/ /r reversible/ 2NO + O/sub 2/ system in a rod bundle contained in a hexagonal jacket

    SciTech Connect

    Besedina, T.V.; Tverkovkin, B.E.; Udot, A.V.; Yakushev, A.P.

    1988-08-01

    A model is proposed for heat and mass transfer in a flowing dissociating liquid coolant in a nuclear fuel rod bundle in a hexagonal jacket. The temperature pattern in the liquid and in a heat-conducting rod was determined from general solutions to the conduction equations for rods and shells. Calculations are specifically constructed for determining the longitudinal flow and heat transfer of a N/sub 2//sub 4/ coolant in the peripheral (lateral and corner) channels of the rod groups. The turbulent transfer coefficients were calculated from Buleev's model. The finite-element method was used to derive unknown quantities of the velocity and temperature. Expressions were also found for modeling heat transfer in the frozen and chemically reacting flow components of the coolant. The algorithm is intended for reducing the temperature nonuniformity in parametric fuel rod bundle design calculations.

  2. Void Fraction and Pressure Drop in Two-Phase Equilibrium Flows in a Vertical 2 × 3 Rod Bundle Channel ─ Assessment of Correlations against the Present Subchannel Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadatomi, Michio; Kano, Keiko; Kawahara, Akimaro; Mori, Naoki

    In order to increase void fraction and pressure drop data in a multi-subchannel system like an actual fuel rod bundle, air-water experiments have been conducted using a vertical 2 × 3 rod bundle channel made up of two central and four side subchannels as the test channel. Void fraction and pressure drop in each subchannel were measured and the frictional pressure drop was determined mainly for slug and churn flows. The results show that both the void fraction and the frictional pressure drop are higher in the central subchannel than the side one. In order to analyze the data, the data on gas and liquid flow rates in each subchannel under the same flow condition have been used. In the analysis, the calculations by various correlations reported in literatures have been compared with the present data for validation. The recommended correlations respectively for the void fraction and the frictional pressure drop have been clarified. Results of such experiments and analyses are presented and discussed in this paper.

  3. Studies on sodium boiling phenomena in out of pile rod bundles for various accidental situations in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR) experiments and interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, J. M.; Rameau, B.

    Bundle sodium boiling in nominal geometry for different accident conditions is reviewed. Voiding of a subassembly is controlled by not only hydrodynamic effects but mainly by thermal effects. There is a strong influence of the thermal inertia of the bundle material compared to the sodium thermal inertia. Flow instability, during a slow transient, can be analyzed with numerical tools and estimated using simplified approximations. Stable boiling operational conditions under bundle mixed convection (natural convection in the reactor) can be predicted. Voiding during a fast transient can be approximated from single channel calculations. The phenomenology of boiling behavior for a subassembly with inlet completely blocked, submitted to decay heat and lateral cooling; two-phase sodium flow pressure drop in a tube of large hydraulic diameter under adiabatic conditions; critical flow phenomena and voiding rate under high power, slow transient conditions; and onset of dry out under local boiling remains problematical.

  4. Fuel bundle design for enhanced usage of plutonium fuel

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Anthony P.; Stachowski, Russell E.

    1995-01-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle includes a square array of fuel rods each having a concentration of enriched uranium and plutonium. Each rod of an interior array of the rods also has a concentration of gadolinium. The interior array of rods is surrounded by an exterior array of rods void of gadolinium. By this design, usage of plutonium in the nuclear reactor is enhanced.

  5. End-of-life nondestructive examination of Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Gorscak, D.A.; Campbell, W.R.; Clayton, J.C.

    1987-10-01

    In-bundle and out-of-bundle (single rod) nondestructive examinations of Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods were performed. In-bundle examinations included visual examination and measurement of rod bow, rod-to-rod gaps, and rod removal forces. Out-of-bundle examinations included rod visuals and measurement of fuel rod length, diameter and ovality, cladding oxide and crud thickness, support grid induced cladding wear mark depth and volume, and fuel rod free hanging bow. The out-of-bundle examination also included ultrasonic inspection for cladding defects, neutron radiography for pellet integrity and plenum gap measurements, and gamma scans for instack axial gap screening and binary fuel stack length measurements. The measurements confirmed design predictions of fuel rod performance and provided evidence of excellent fuel rod performance for operation of Light Water Breeder Reactor to 29,047 effective full power hours (EFPH).

  6. Fuel bundle design for enhanced usage of plutonium fuel

    DOEpatents

    Reese, A.P.; Stachowski, R.E.

    1995-08-08

    A nuclear fuel bundle includes a square array of fuel rods each having a concentration of enriched uranium and plutonium. Each rod of an interior array of the rods also has a concentration of gadolinium. The interior array of rods is surrounded by an exterior array of rods void of gadolinium. By this design, usage of plutonium in the nuclear reactor is enhanced. 10 figs.

  7. Rodding Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rods can be made of stainless steel or titanium. Regular rods do not expand. They have many ... v regular), the rod materials (stainless steel v titanium) and the age for a first rodding surgery. ...

  8. Rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sable, D.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a rod guide assembly for a sucker rod longitudinally reciprocably movable in a well flow conductor comprising: a pair of longitudinally spaced upper and lower stops rigidly secured to a sucker rod; and a guide body movably mounted on the rod between the stops. The stops being spaced from each other a distance slightly greater than the length of the guide body, the upper stop engaging the guide body to move the guide body downwardly with the rod after an initial short downward movement of the rod after initiation of each downward movement of the rod and the lower stop engaging the guide body to move the second guide body upwardly with the rod after initial short upward movement of the rod after initiation of each upward movement of the rod during the longitudinal reciprocatory movement of the rod in a well flow conductor.

  9. Trivalent Cation Induced Bundle Formation of Filamentous fd Phages.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Park, Eun Jin

    2015-09-01

    Bacteriophages are filamentous polyelectrolyte viral rods infecting only bacteria. In this study, we investigate the bundle formation of fd phages with trivalent cations having different ionic radii (Al(3+) , La(3+) and Y(3+) ) at various phage and counterion concentrations, and at varying bundling times. Aggregated phage bundles were detected at relatively low trivalent counterion concentrations (1 mM). Although 10 mM and 100 mM Y(3+) and La(3+) treatments formed larger and more intertwined phage bundles, Al(3+) and Fe(3+) treatments lead to the formation of networking filaments. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analyses confirmed the presence of C, N and O peaks on densely packed phage bundles. Immunofluorescence labelling and ELISA analyses with anti-p8 antibodies showed the presence of phage filaments after bundling.

  10. On the perfect hexagonal packing of rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostin, E. L.

    2006-04-01

    In most cases the hexagonal packing of fibrous structures or rods extremizes the energy of interaction between strands. If the strands are not straight, then it is still possible to form a perfect hexatic bundle. Conditions under which the perfect hexagonal packing of curved tubular structures may exist are formulated. Particular attention is given to closed or cycled arrangements of the rods like in the DNA toroids and spools. The closure or return constraints of the bundle result in an allowable group of automorphisms of the cross-sectional hexagonal lattice. The structure of this group is explored. Examples of open helical-like and closed toroidal-like bundles are presented. An expression for the elastic energy of a perfectly packed bundle of thin elastic rods is derived. The energy accounts for both the bending and torsional stiffnesses of the rods. It is shown that equilibria of the bundle correspond to solutions of a variational problem formulated for the curve representing the axis of the bundle. The functional involves a function of the squared curvature under the constraints on the total torsion and the length. The Euler-Lagrange equations are obtained in terms of curvature and torsion and due to the existence of the first integrals the problem is reduced to the quadrature. The three-dimensional shape of the bundle may be readily reconstructed by integration of the Ilyukhin-type equations in special cylindrical coordinates. The results are of universal nature and are applicable to various fibrous structures, in particular, to intramolecular liquid crystals formed by DNA condensed in toroids or packed inside the viral capsids. International Workshop on Biopolymers: Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Mechanics of DNA, RNA and Proteins, 30.05.2005-3.06.2005, The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy.

  11. Bundle duct interaction studies for fuel assemblies. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, H.T.S.; Kaplan, S.

    1981-06-01

    It is known that the wire-wrapped rods and duct in an LMFBR are undergoing a gradual structural distortion from the initially uniform geometry under the combined effects of thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling and creep. These deformations have a significant effect on flow characteristics, thus causing changes in thermal behavior such as cladding temperature and temperature distribution within a bundle. The temperature distribution may further enhance or retard irradiation induced deformation of the bundle. This report summarizes the results of the continuing effort in investigating the bundle-duct interaction, focusing on the need for the large development plant.

  12. Gelation and mechanical response of patchy rods.

    PubMed

    Kazem, Navid; Majidi, Carmel; Maloney, Craig E

    2015-10-28

    We perform Brownian dynamics simulations to study the gelation of suspensions of attractive, rod-like particles. We show that in detail the rod-rod surface interactions can dramatically affect the dynamics of gelation and the structure and mechanics of the networks that form. If the attraction between the rods is perfectly smooth along their length, they will collapse into compact bundles. If the attraction is sufficiently corrugated or patchy, over time, a rigid space-spanning network will form. We study the structure and mechanical properties of the networks that form as a function of the fraction of the surface, f, that is allowed to bind. Surprisingly, the structural and mechanical properties are non-monotonic in f. At low f, there are not a sufficient number of cross-linking sites to form networks. At high f, rods bundle and form disconnected clusters. At intermediate f, robust networks form. The elastic modulus and yield stress are both non-monotonic in the surface coverage. The stiffest and strongest networks show an essentially homogeneous deformation under strain with rods re-orienting along the extensional axis. Weaker, more clumpy networks at high f re-orient relatively little with strong non-affine deformation. These results suggest design strategies for tailoring surface interactions between rods to yield rigid networks with optimal mechanical properties.

  13. Implementing sepsis bundles

    PubMed Central

    Jozwiak, Mathieu; Monnet, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis bundles represent key elements of care regarding the diagnosis and treatment of patients with septic shock and allow ones to convert complex guidelines into meaningful changes in behavior. Sepsis bundles endorsed the early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) and their implementation resulted in an improved outcome of septic shock patients. They induced more consistent and timely application of evidence-based care and reduced practice variability. These benefits mainly depend on the compliance with sepsis bundles, highlighting the importance of dedicated performance improvement initiatives, such as multifaceted educational programs. Nevertheless, the interest of early goal directed therapy in septic shock patients compared to usual care has recently been questioned, leading to an update of sepsis bundles in 2015. These new sepsis bundles may also exhibit, as the previous bundles, some limits and pitfalls and the effects of their implementation still needs to be evaluated. PMID:27713890

  14. Preparing for bundled payments.

    PubMed

    Ambres, Cynthia; Jamilkowski, Mark

    2015-06-01

    Providers that are preparing for bundled payments should focus on five areas: Data analytics and benchmarks. Technological components. Care delivery guidelines. Care system redesign. Contractual considerations.

  15. A Mechanistic Approach for the Prediction of Critical Power in BWR Fuel Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandraker, Dinesh Kumar; Vijayan, Pallipattu Krishnan; Sinha, Ratan Kumar; Aritomi, Masanori

    The critical power corresponding to the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) or dryout condition is an important design parameter for the evaluation of safety margins in a nuclear fuel bundle. The empirical approaches for the prediction of CHF in a rod bundle are highly geometric specific and proprietary in nature. The critical power experiments are very expensive and technically challenging owing to the stringent simulation requirements for the rod bundle tests involving radial and axial power profiles. In view of this, the mechanistic approach has gained momentum in the thermal hydraulic community. The Liquid Film Dryout (LFD) in an annular flow is the mechanism of CHF under BWR conditions and the dryout modeling has been found to predict the CHF quite accurately for a tubular geometry. The successful extension of the mechanistic model of dryout to the rod bundle application is vital for the evaluation of critical power in the rod bundle. The present work proposes the uniform film flow approach around the rod by analyzing individual film of the subchannel bounded by rods with different heat fluxes resulting in different film flow rates around a rod and subsequently distributing the varying film flow rates of a rod to arrive at the uniform film flow rate as it has been found that the liquid film has a strong tendency to be uniform around the rod. The FIDOM-Rod code developed for the dryout prediction in BWR assemblies provides detailed solution of the multiple liquid films in a subchannel. The approach of uniform film flow rate around the rod simplifies the liquid film cross flow modeling and was found to provide dryout prediction with a good accuracy when compared with the experimental data of 16, 19 and 37 rod bundles under BWR conditions. The critical power has been predicted for a newly designed 54 rod bundle of the Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR). The selected constitutive models for the droplet entrainment and deposition rates validated for the dryout in tube were

  16. "Bundling" in Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegel, U.; Templeman, J.

    1996-01-01

    Applies the literature of bundling, tie-in sales, and vertical integration to higher education. Students are often required to purchase a package of courses, some of which are unrelated to their major. This kind of bundling policy can be utilized as a profit-maximizing strategy for universities exercising a degree of monopolistic power. (12…

  17. A comprehensive in-pile test of PWR fuel bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Rixin; Zhang, Shucheng; Chen, Dianshan

    1991-02-01

    An in-pile test of PWR fuel bundle has been conducted in HWRR at IAE of China. This paper describes the structure of the test bundle (3 × 3-2), fabrication process and quality control of the fuel rod, irradiation conditions and the main Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) results. The test fuel bundle was irradiated under the PWR operation and water chemistry conditions with an average linear power of 381 W/cm and reached an average burnup of 25010 MWd/tU of the fuel bundle. After the test, destructive and non-destructive examination of the fuel rods was conducted at hot laboratories. The fission gas release was 10.4-23%. The ridge height of cladding was 3 to 8 μm. The hydrogen content of the cladding was 80 to 140 ppm. The fuel stack height was increased by 2.9 to 3.3 mm. The relative irradiation growth was about 0.11 to 0.17% of the fuel rod length. During the irradiation test, no fuel rod failure or other abnormal phenomena had been found by the on-line fuel failure monitoring system of the test loop and water sampling analysis. The structure of the test fuel assembly was left undamaged without twist and detectable deformation.

  18. CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.; Ross, H.V.

    1958-11-18

    A control rod is described for a nuclear reactor. In certaln reactor designs it becomes desirable to use a control rod having great width but relatively llttle thickness. This patent is addressed to such a need. The neutron absorbing material is inserted in a triangular tube, leaving volds between the circular insert and the corners of the triangular tube. The material is positioned within the tube by the use of dummy spacers to achleve the desired absorption pattern, then the ends of the tubes are sealed with suitable plugs. The tubes may be welded or soldered together to form two flat surfaces of any desired width, and covered with sheetmetal to protect the tubes from damage. This design provides a control member that will not distort under the action of outside forces or be ruptured by gases generated within the jacketed control member.

  19. Fiber bundle endocytoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael; Chang, Tou Pin; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Endocytoscopy is an optical biopsy technique which uses a miniaturized camera to capture white light microscopy images through an endoscope. We have developed an alternative design that instead relays images to an external camera via a coherent fiber bundle. In this paper we characterize the device and demonstrate microscopy of porcine tissue ex vivo. One advantage of our approach is the ease with which other bundle-compatible imaging modalities can be deployed simultaneously. We show this by acquiring quasi-simultaneous endocytoscopy and fluorescence confocal endomicroscopy images through a single fiber bundle. This opens up possibilities for multi-modal endomicroscopy, combining white light and fluorescence imaging. PMID:24409380

  20. Bundle Binding in Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, M.J.

    1999-01-21

    Stiff polyelectrolytes are found to spontaneously form oriented bundles. Conditions under which bundling occurs are found. Molecular dynamics simulations show that divalent counterions are necessary, and the chains must be sufficiently long and stiff. No aggregation occurs for monovalent counterions. For flexible or short chains aggregation occurs, but bundle formation does not. Due to dynamical constraints the systems tend to order into a network of connected bundles, not a single bundle.

  1. Experimental study of burnout in channels with twisted fuel rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol'Shakov, V. V.; Bashkirtsev, S. M.; Kobzar', L. L.; Morozov, A. G.

    2007-05-01

    The results of experimental studies of pressure drop and critical heat flux in the models of fuel assemblies (FAs) with fuel rod simulators twisted relative to the longitudinal axis and a three-ray cross section are considered. The experimental data are compared to the results obtained with the use of techniques adopted for design calculations with fuel rod bundles of type-VVER reactors.

  2. Price bundling packs pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Jaklevic, M C

    1995-02-27

    Hospitals thought bundling of healthcare services under one all-inclusive price would have great appeal to payers, bringing in more business. But instead, the concept has brought disappointment as the expected boost in patient volume has failed to materialize. PMID:10140286

  3. The Logic of Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, John; Yang, Taewon

    2015-12-01

    Since the work of Crown (J. Natur. Sci. Math. 15(1-2), 11-25 1975) in the 1970's, it has been known that the projections of a finite-dimensional vector bundle E form an orthomodular poset ( omp) {P}(E). This result lies in the intersection of a number of current topics, including the categorical quantum mechanics of Abramsky and Coecke (2004), and the approach via decompositions of Harding (Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 348(5), 1839-1862 1996). Moreover, it provides a source of omps for the quantum logic program close to the Hilbert space setting, and admitting a version of tensor products, yet having important differences from the standard logics of Hilbert spaces. It is our purpose here to initiate a basic investigation of the quantum logic program in the vector bundle setting. This includes observations on the structure of the omps obtained as {P}(E) for a vector bundle E, methods to obtain states on these omps, and automorphisms of these omps. Key theorems of quantum logic in the Hilbert setting, such as Gleason's theorem and Wigner's theorem, provide natural and quite challenging problems in the vector bundle setting.

  4. The design of the DUPIC spent fuel bundle counter

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O.; Rinard, P.M.; Kroncke, K.E.; Lee, Y.G.

    1997-05-01

    A neutron coincidence detector had been designed to measure the amount of curium in the fuel bundles and associated process samples used in the direct use of plutonium in Canadian deuterium-uranium (CANDU) fuel cycle. All of the sample categories are highly radioactive from the fission products contained in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel feed stock. Substantial shielding is required to protect the He-3 detectors from the intense gamma rays. The Monte Carlo neutron and photon calculational code has been used to design the counter with a uniform response profile along the length of the CANDU-type fuel bundle. Other samples, including cut PWR rods, process powder, waste, and finished rods, can be measured in the system. This report describes the performance characteristics of the counter and support electronics. 3 refs., 23 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Rod examination gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Bacvinskas, W.S.; Bayer, J.E.; Davis, W.W.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Matchett, R.L.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1991-12-31

    The present invention is directed to a semi-automatic rod examination gauge for performing a large number of exacting measurements on radioactive fuel rods. The rod examination gauge performs various measurements underwater with remote controlled machinery of high reliability. The rod examination gauge includes instruments and a closed circuit television camera for measuring fuel rod length, free hanging bow measurement, diameter measurement, oxide thickness measurement, cladding defect examination, rod ovality measurement, wear mark depth and volume measurement, as well as visual examination. A control system is provided including a programmable logic controller and a computer for providing a programmed sequence of operations for the rod examination and collection of data.

  6. Engineering oscillating microtubule bundles.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Timothy; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2013-01-01

    From motility of simple protists to determining the handedness of complex vertebrates, highly conserved eukaryotic cilia and flagella are essential for the reproduction and survival of many biological organisms. Despite extensive studies, the exact mechanism by which individual components coordinate their activity to produce ciliary beating patterns remains unknown. We describe a novel approach toward studying ciliary beating. Instead of deconstructing a fully functional organelle from the top-down, we describe a process by which synthetic cilia-like structures are assembled from the bottom-up and we present methods for engineering such structures. We demonstrate how simple mixtures of microtubules, kinesin clusters, and a bundling agent assemble into structures that produce spontaneous oscillations, suggesting that self-organized beating may be a generic feature of internally driven bundles. Synthetic cilia-like structures can be assembled at high density, leading to synchronization and metachronal traveling waves, reminiscent of the waves seen in biological ciliary fields.

  7. Countercurrent flow-limiting characteristics of a Savannah River Plant control rod septifoil

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.L.

    1992-07-01

    Experiments were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to investigate the counter-current flow limiting characteristics of a Savannah River Plant control rod septifoil assembly. These experiments were unheated, using air and water as the working fluids. Results are presented in terms of the Wallis flooding correlation for several different control rod configurations. Flooding was observed to occur in the vicinity of the inlet slots/holes of the septifoil, rather than within the rod bundle at the location of the minimum flow area. Nearly identical flooding characteristics of the septifoil were observed for configurations with zero, three, and four rods inserted, but significantly different results occurred with 5 rods inserted.

  8. FUEL ROD ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1959-09-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods aod a tubular casing through which a coolant flows in heat-change contact with the ruel rods are described. The casting is of trefoil section and carries the fuel rods, each of which has two fin engaging the serrated fins of the other two fuel rods, whereby the fuel rods are held in the casing and are interlocked against relative longitudinal movement.

  9. Bundled monocapillary optics

    DOEpatents

    Hirsch, Gregory

    2002-01-01

    A plurality of glass or metal wires are precisely etched to form the desired shape of the individual channels of the final polycapillary optic. This shape is created by carefully controlling the withdrawal speed of a group of wires from an etchant bath. The etched wires undergo a subsequent operation to create an extremely smooth surface. This surface is coated with a layer of material which is selected to maximize the reflectivity of the radiation being used. This reflective surface may be a single layer of material, or a multilayer coating for optimizing the reflectivity in a narrower wavelength interval. The collection of individual wires is assembled into a close-packed multi-wire bundle, and the wires are bonded together in a manner which preserves the close-pack configuration, irrespective of the local wire diameter. The initial wires are then removed by either a chemical etching procedure or mechanical force. In the case of chemical etching, the bundle is generally segmented by cutting a series of etching slots. Prior to removing the wire, the capillary array is typically bonded to a support substrate. The result of the process is a bundle of precisely oriented radiation-reflecting hollow channels. The capillary optic is used for efficiently collecting and redirecting the radiation from a source of radiation which could be the anode of an x-ray tube, a plasma source, the fluorescent radiation from an electron microprobe, a synchrotron radiation source, a reactor or spallation source of neutrons, or some other source.

  10. Managing bundled payments.

    PubMed

    Draper, Andrew

    2011-04-01

    Results of Medicare's ACE demonstration project and Geisinger Health System's ProvenCare initiative provide insight into the challenges hospitals will face as bundled payment proliferates. An early analysis of these results suggests that hospitals would benefit from bringing full automation using clinical IT tools to bear in their efforts to meet these challenges. Other important factors contributing to success include board and physician leadership, organizational structure, pricing methodology for bidding, evidence-based medical practice guidelines, supply cost management, process efficiency management, proactive and aggressive case management, business development and marketing strategy, and the financial management system. PMID:21548437

  11. Two-dimensional evaluation of 3D needled Cf/SiC composite fiber bundle surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jinhua; Lin, Bin; Cao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Fang, Sheng

    2015-11-01

    The variations of fiber bundle surface microstructure have direct influence on the material performance, especially the friction and wear properties. Therefore, fiber bundle is the smallest evaluation unit of Cf/SiC composite surface. However, due to the anisotropy and inhomogeneity of Cf/SiC composite, it is difficult to evaluate the surface characteristics. Researchers think that two-dimensional evaluation is not suitable for the composites surface assessment any more because of its complex composition and varied surface structure. In this paper, a novel method is introduced for the evaluation of 3D needled Cf/SiC composite fiber bundle surface. On the level of Cf/SiC composite fiber bundle surface, two-dimensional evaluation method is adopted, with which the fiber bundle surface quality can be quantitatively evaluated by the two-dimensional surface roughness Ra. As long as the extracted surface profiles averagely distributed on Cf/SiC composite fiber bundle surface, with appropriate sampling length and sampling number, the mean value of Ra can estimate the whole surface roughness, thus reflecting the roughness degree of surface accurately. This study not only benefits the detection of 3D needled Cf/SiC composite fiber bundle surface quality, and lays a foundation on the evaluation of material functional features in further. And it corresponds to the convenient application in engineering practice.

  12. Control rod drive

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  13. Piston rod seal

    DOEpatents

    Lindskoug, Stefan

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal of the type comprising a gland through which the piston rod is passed the piston is provided with a sleeve surrounding the piston rod and extending axially so as to axially partly overlap the gland when the piston is in its bottom dead center position.

  14. 1987 Sucker rod tables

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    This reference identifies manufacturers qualified to produce API sucker rods and related equipment, lists chemical and mechanical properties of the various types of rods and provides dimensional characteristics. In addition, similar information is given for non-API products such as fiberglass and hollow rods.

  15. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.; Rogers, I.

    1961-06-27

    Accurate and controlled drive for the control rod is from an electric motor. A hydraulic arrangement is provided to balance a piston against which a control rod is urged by the application of fluid pressure. The electric motor drive of the control rod for normal operation is made through the aforementioned piston. In the event scramming is required, the fluid pressure urging the control rod against the piston is relieved and an opposite fluid pressure is applied. The lack of mechanical connection between the electric motor and control rod facilitates the scramming operation.

  16. Bundle Security Protocol for ION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.; Birrane, Edward J.; Krupiarz, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This software implements bundle authentication, conforming to the Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) Internet Draft on Bundle Security Protocol (BSP), for the Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) implementation of DTN. This is the only implementation of BSP that is integrated with ION.

  17. Large-break LOCA, in-reactor fuel bundle Materials Test MT-6A

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.L.; Hesson, G.M.; Pilger, J.P.; King, L.L.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    This is a report on one of a series of experiments to simulates a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) using full-length fuel rods for pressurized water reactors (PWR). The experiments were conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the LOCA simulation Program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The major objective of this program was causing the maximum possible expansion of the cladding on the fuel rods from a short-term adiabatic temperature transient to 1200 K (1700 F) leading to the rupture of the cladding; and second, by reflooding the fuel rods to determine the rate at which the fuel bundle is cooled.

  18. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1998-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: 3.7 amps per wire, bundle of 15 or more wires, 70 C environment, and vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less. To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  19. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1999-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 degree C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: (1) 3.7 amps per wire (2) bundle of 15 or more wires (3) 70 C environment (4) vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  20. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1998-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: (1) 3.7 amps per wire; (2) bundle of 15 or more wires; (3) 70 C environment: and (4) vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less. To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  1. Sucker rod construction

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Goodman, J.L.; Tickle, J.D.; Liskey, A.K.

    1987-03-31

    A sucker rod construction is described comprising: a connector member being formed to define a rod receptacle having a closed axially inner end and an open axially outer end, the rod receptacle having axially spaced, tapered annular surfaces, a cylindrical fiberglass rod having an end having an outer surface being received within the rod receptacle through the outer end and cooperating therewith to define an annular chamber between the outer surface of the end of the rod and the tapered annular surfaces, and a bonding means positioned in the annular chamber for bonding to the outer surface of the end of the rod to confront the tapered annular surfaces, each annular surface having an angle of taper with respect to the outer surface of the fiberglass rod, and each angle of taper being progressively and uniformly less toward the open end by an amount between one and one-half degrees and two degrees, inclusive, and a collet connected to the connector member adjacent the open axially outer end of the rod receptacle and having an axial bore therethrough retaining the end of the rod in coaxial position within the rod receptacle.

  2. Wear resistant rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, K.W.

    1991-12-03

    This paper describes a sucker rod guide. It comprises: a series of sucker rods connected end to end forming a sucker rod string, the sucker rod string extending down into a tubing string of a producing oil well from a pump jack located on the surface of the ground above the tubing string to a pump located at a bottom end of the tubing string, the pump forces produced fluid collected at the bottom end of the tubing string up to the ground's surface, the produced fluid occupies a space between the rod string and the tubing string through which the fluid is channeled from the bottom end of the tubing string to the ground's surface, the pump jack raises and lowers the rod string in the fluid being pumped up the tubing string while the fluid bathes the rod string within the tubing string, wherein the improvement comprises the following structure in combination with the above.

  3. Sucker rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B.J.; Starks, J.A.

    1989-08-22

    This patent describes a sucker rod guide for mounting on a sucker rod and spacing the sucker rod from the tubing in an oil well. The guide comprising a generally cylindrically-shaped, extruded, ultra-high density polyethylene body having a substantially smooth outside surface; a longitudinal bore provided centrally of the body. The bore having a smaller diameter than the diameter of the sucker rod; a plurality of grooves provided in circumferential relationship in the bore; and a tapered slot extending longitudinally through the body from the outside surface to the bore. The tapered slot further comprising a slot mouth located at the outside surface and a slot throat spaced from the slot mouth. The slot throat lying adjacent to the sucker rod bore and wherein the slot throat is wider than the slot mouth for mounting the sucker rod guide on the sucker rod.

  4. Low turbulence rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, E.L.

    1992-05-26

    This patent describes an improved sucker rod guide for fixedly engaging around a sucker rod at a selected location along the length of the rod. It comprises a substantially cylindrical polymeric body having a longitudinal axis, a terminal end substantially continually tapered to the rod, a radially-inward surface and a radially outward surface, the radially inward surface of the body adjacent to and in tripping engagement with the rod when the rod guide is fixedly engaged around the rod; and a plurality of substantially continuous, longitudinal vanes carried by the body, a vane having a selected length and width, and longitudinally disposed along the radially outward surface of the guide body, extending radially away from the guide body and having a radially outside wear surface.

  5. CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT

    DOEpatents

    Thorp, A.G. II

    1962-08-01

    An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

  6. Effect of interfacial roughness parameters on the fiber pushout behavior of a model composite

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, T.A. ); Barlage, D.R. . Dept. of Engineering); Jero, P.D.; Kerans, R.J. )

    1994-12-01

    The effect of interfacial roughness on the frictional sliding in composites has been studied using fiber pushout and pushback tests on a model composite of Plexiglas rods in an epoxy matrix. Different extents of roughness were introduced on the Plexiglas rods and the resulting roughness profiles measured. The roughness profiles were characterized using six different roughness parameters. An attempt was made to find a correlation between the sliding resistance and the selected roughness parameters. A parameter defined as the maximum coefficient in the Fourier transform of the roughness profile was found to yield the best correlation. If the roughness introduced is periodic, then the pushout traces exhibit periodic dips, but the magnitude of this periodic dip is significantly smaller than the seating drop obtained from pushback tests.

  7. BWR fuel rod performance evaluation program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, T.C.

    1986-05-01

    The joint EPRI/GE fuel performance program, RP510-1, involved thorough preirradiation characterization of fuel used in lead test assemblies, detailed surveillance of their operation, and interim site examinations of the assemblies during reactor outages. The program originally included four GE-5 lead test assemblies operating in the Peach Bottom-2 reactor. The program was later modified to include the pressurized fuel rod test assembly in the Peach Bottom-3 reactor (RP510-2). The program modification also included extending the operation of the Peach Bottom-2 and Peach Bottom-3 lead test assembly fuel beyond normal discharge exposures. Interim site examination results following the first four cycles of operation of the Peach Bottom-2 lead test assemblies up to 35 GWd/MT and the examination of the Peach Bottom-3 pressurized test assembly at 32 GWd/MT are presented in this report. Elements of the examinations included visual examination of the fuel bundles; individual fuel rod visual examinations, rod length measurements, ultrasonic and eddy current nondestructive testing, Zircaloy cladding oxide thickness measurements and fission gas measurements. Channel measurements were made on the PB-2 Lead Test Assemblies after each of the first three operating cycles. All of the bundles were found to be in good condition. Since the pressurized test assembly contained pressurized and nonpressurized fuel rods in symmetric positions, it was possible to make direct comparisons of the fission gas release from pairs of pressurized and nonpressurized fuel rods with identical power histories. With one exception, the release was less from the pressurized fuel rod of each pair. Fuel rod power histories were calculated using new physics methods for all of the fuel rods that were punctured for fission gas release measurements. 28 refs., 41 figs., 16 tabs.

  8. Velocity and turbulence distributions in wall subchannels of a road bundle in three axial planes downstream of a spacer grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehme, K.

    1987-03-01

    The velocity, turbulence, and temperature distributions in nuclear fuel element bundles of nuclear reactors were investigated. The mean velocity, the wall shear stresses, and the turbulence were measured in two wall subchannels of a rod bundle of four parallel rods, arranged in a rectangular channel, for three axial planes. A spacer grid was inserted in the rod bundle, for ratios between the distance spacer grid/measuring plane and the hydraulic diameter (LIDh) of 40.4, 32.8 and 16.9. The Reynolds number was 145,000. The results show that the distributions of the velocity and the turbulence are affected by the spacer grid, already for LIDh = 40.4. The effects of the spacer grid increase with decreasing distance to the spacer grid.

  9. Evaluating big deal journal bundles.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, Theodore C; Courant, Paul N; McAfee, R Preston; Williams, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    Large commercial publishers sell bundled online subscriptions to their entire list of academic journals at prices significantly lower than the sum of their á la carte prices. Bundle prices differ drastically between institutions, but they are not publicly posted. The data that we have collected enable us to compare the bundle prices charged by commercial publishers with those of nonprofit societies and to examine the types of price discrimination practiced by commercial and nonprofit journal publishers. This information is of interest to economists who study monopolist pricing, librarians interested in making efficient use of library budgets, and scholars who are interested in the availability of the work that they publish. PMID:24979785

  10. Evaluating big deal journal bundles

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrom, Theodore C.; Courant, Paul N.; McAfee, R. Preston; Williams, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Large commercial publishers sell bundled online subscriptions to their entire list of academic journals at prices significantly lower than the sum of their á la carte prices. Bundle prices differ drastically between institutions, but they are not publicly posted. The data that we have collected enable us to compare the bundle prices charged by commercial publishers with those of nonprofit societies and to examine the types of price discrimination practiced by commercial and nonprofit journal publishers. This information is of interest to economists who study monopolist pricing, librarians interested in making efficient use of library budgets, and scholars who are interested in the availability of the work that they publish. PMID:24979785

  11. Pull rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Cioletti, O.C.

    1988-04-21

    A pull rod assembly comprising a pull rod having three peripheral grooves, a piston device including an adaptor ring and a seal ring, said piston device being mounted on the pull rod by a split ring retainer situated in one groove and extending into an interior groove in the adaptor and a resilient split ring retained in another groove and positioned to engage the piston device and to retain the seal on its adaptor.

  12. Pull rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Cioletti, Olisse C.

    1990-01-01

    A pull rod assembly comprising a pull rod having three peripheral grooves, a piston device including an adaptor ring and a seal ring, said piston device being mounted on the pull rod by a split ring retainer situated in one groove and extending into an interior groove in the adaptor and a resilient split ring retained in another groove and positioned to engage the piston device and to retain the seal on its adaptor.

  13. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.

    1960-05-24

    BS>A drive mechanism was invented for the control rod of a nuclear reactor. Power is provided by an electric motor and an outside source of fluid pressure is utilized in conjunction with the fluid pressure within the reactor to balance the loadings on the motor. The force exerted on the drive mechanism in the direction of scramming the rod is derived from the reactor fluid pressure so that failure of the outside pressure source will cause prompt scramming of the rod.

  14. Pull rod assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Cioletti, O.C.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a pull rod assembly. It comprises: a pull rod having three peripheral grooves, a piston device including an adaptor ring and a seal ring. The piston device is mounted on the pull rod by a split ring retainer situated in one groove and extending into an interior groove in the adaptor and a resilient split ring retained in another groove and positioned to engage the piston device and to retain the seal on its adaptor.

  15. Tube bundle system

    PubMed Central

    Marchewka, W.; Mohamed, K.; Addis, J.; Karnack, F.

    2015-01-01

    A tube bundle system (TBS) is a mechanical system for continuously drawing gas samples through tubes from multiple monitoring points located in an underground coal mine. The gas samples are drawn via vacuum pump to the surface and are typically analyzed for oxygen, methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. Results of the gas analyses are displayed and recorded for further analysis. Trends in the composition of the mine atmosphere, such as increasing methane or carbon monoxide concentration, can be detected early, permitting rapid intervention that prevents problems, such as a potentially explosive atmosphere behind seals, fire or spontaneous combustion. TBS is a well-developed technology and has been used in coal mines around the world for more than 50 years. Most longwall coal mines in Australia deploy a TBS, usually with 30 to 40 monitoring points as part of their atmospheric monitoring. The primary uses of a TBS are detecting spontaneous combustion and maintaining sealed areas inert. The TBS might also provide mine atmosphere gas composition data after a catastrophe occurs in an underground mine, if the sampling tubes are not damaged. TBSs are not an alternative to statutory gas and ventilation airflow monitoring by electronic sensors or people; rather, they are an option to consider in an overall mine atmosphere monitoring strategy. This paper describes the hardware, software and operation of a TBS and presents one example of typical data from a longwall coal mine PMID:26306052

  16. Atrio-His bundle tracts.

    PubMed Central

    Brechenmacher, C

    1975-01-01

    The atrio-His bundle tracts are very rare; only two have been found in 687 hearts studied histologically. These tracts have a similar appearance to those of the atrioventricular bundle and form a complete bypass of the atrioventricular node. In their presence the electrocardiogram may show a short or normal PR interval. They may be responsible for some cases of very rapid ventricular response to supraventricular arrhythmias. Images PMID:1191446

  17. Experimental investigation of secondary flow vortices in a rod cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonka, V.; Hoornstra, J.; Boersma, P.

    1985-12-01

    Secondary flow vortices were measured in 2 regular subchannels of a triangularly arranged bare rod bundle with pitch-to-diameter ratio = 1.3 at Reynolds numbers Re = 60,000 and 175,000. A laser Doppler anemometer measured total time average velocity vectors in the central subchannels of a four rod bundle. Results show that half the momentum transport in the circumferential direction is due to the secondary flow vortex convection. In nonisothermal situations the secondary vortices contribute to heat transport in radial and circumferential directions. In radial direction, the contribution can improve the heat transfer coefficient and contribute to better economy of heat transfer installations. In circumferential direction, the contribution helps to smooth out circumferential temperature differences, improves the heat removal from heated surfaces thus decreasing the maximum surface temperature, and contributes to passive safety of heat transfer installations.

  18. FUEL ROD CLUSTERS

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, A.B.

    1959-08-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods and a tubular casing therefor through which a coolant flows in heat-exchange contact with the fuel rods is described. The fuel rcds are held in the casing by virtue of the compressive force exerted between longitudinal ribs of the fuel rcds and internal ribs of the casing or the internal surfaces thereof.

  19. Large-eddy simulation, fuel rod vibration and grid-to-rod fretting in pressurized water reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Christon, Mark A.; Lu, Roger; Bakosi, Jozsef; Nadiga, Balasubramanya T.; Karoutas, Zeses; Berndt, Markus

    2016-06-29

    Grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration phenomenon that results in wear and fretting of the cladding material on fuel rods. GTRF is responsible for over 70% of the fuel failures in pressurized water reactors in the United States. Predicting the GTRF wear and concomitant interval between failures is important because of the large costs associated with reactor shutdown and replacement of fuel rod assemblies. The GTRF-induced wear process involves turbulent flow, mechanical vibration, tribology, and time-varying irradiated material properties in complex fuel assembly geometries. This paper presents a new approach for predicting GTRF induced fuelmore » rod wear that uses high-resolution implicit large-eddy simulation to drive nonlinear transient dynamics computations. The GTRF fluid–structure problem is separated into the simulation of the turbulent flow field in the complex-geometry fuel-rod bundles using implicit large-eddy simulation, the calculation of statistics of the resulting fluctuating structural forces, and the nonlinear transient dynamics analysis of the fuel rod. Ultimately, the methods developed here, can be used, in conjunction with operational management, to improve reactor core designs in which fuel rod failures are minimized or potentially eliminated. Furthermore, robustness of the behavior of both the structural forces computed from the turbulent flow simulations and the results from the transient dynamics analyses highlight the progress made towards achieving a predictive simulation capability for the GTRF problem.« less

  20. Large-eddy simulation, fuel rod vibration and grid-to-rod fretting in pressurized water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christon, Mark A.; Lu, Roger; Bakosi, Jozsef; Nadiga, Balasubramanya T.; Karoutas, Zeses; Berndt, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration phenomenon that results in wear and fretting of the cladding material on fuel rods. GTRF is responsible for over 70% of the fuel failures in pressurized water reactors in the United States. Predicting the GTRF wear and concomitant interval between failures is important because of the large costs associated with reactor shutdown and replacement of fuel rod assemblies. The GTRF-induced wear process involves turbulent flow, mechanical vibration, tribology, and time-varying irradiated material properties in complex fuel assembly geometries. This paper presents a new approach for predicting GTRF induced fuel rod wear that uses high-resolution implicit large-eddy simulation to drive nonlinear transient dynamics computations. The GTRF fluid-structure problem is separated into the simulation of the turbulent flow field in the complex-geometry fuel-rod bundles using implicit large-eddy simulation, the calculation of statistics of the resulting fluctuating structural forces, and the nonlinear transient dynamics analysis of the fuel rod. Ultimately, the methods developed here, can be used, in conjunction with operational management, to improve reactor core designs in which fuel rod failures are minimized or potentially eliminated. Robustness of the behavior of both the structural forces computed from the turbulent flow simulations and the results from the transient dynamics analyses highlight the progress made towards achieving a predictive simulation capability for the GTRF problem.

  1. Rod sequence advisor

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.M. ); Lu, Yi ); Furia, R.V.; Thompson, R.J. ); Lin, Ching-lu )

    1992-01-01

    During startup and power shaping maneuvers of boiling water reactors (BWR's), control rods are sequentially withdrawn from the reactor core. The withdrawal sequences determine the overall reactor power and the local core power density and are based on the knowledge of station engineers. It is important that the control rods are withdrawn in such a manner that the local power level does not become excessive while the desired reactor power is generated. Rules that constrain the relative positions of control rod groups have been developed to do this. While these rules are relatively simple, applying them to all possible movements of the 17 control rod groups in a typical BWR is complex and time consuming. SMARTRODS, is a rule based pilot expert system, was developed in LISP for the determination of the rod sequences.

  2. Rod Photoreceptors Detect Rapid Flicker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, J. D.; MacLeod, Donald I. A.

    1977-01-01

    Rod-isolation techniques show that light-adapted human rods detect flicker frequencies as high as 28 hertz, and that the function relating rod critical flicker frequency to stimulus intensity contains two distinct branches. (MLH)

  3. Bundle Formation in Biomimetic Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Maarten; Pape, A C H; Voets, Ilja K; Rowan, Alan E; Portale, Giuseppe; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-08-01

    Bundling of single polymer chains is a crucial process in the formation of biopolymer network gels that make up the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. This bundled architecture leads to gels with distinctive properties, including a large-pore-size gel formation at very low concentrations and mechanical responsiveness through nonlinear mechanics, properties that are rarely observed in synthetic hydrogels. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we study the bundle formation and hydrogelation process of polyisocyanide gels, a synthetic material that uniquely mimics the structure and mechanics of biogels. We show how the structure of the material changes at the (thermally induced) gelation point and how factors such as concentration and polymer length determine the architecture, and with that, the mechanical properties. The correlation of the gel mechanics and the structural parameters obtained from SAXS experiments is essential in the design of future (synthetic) mimics of biopolymer networks.

  4. Control rod driveline and grapple

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A control rod driveline and grapple is disclosed for placement between a control rod drive and a nuclear reactor control rod containing poison for parasitic neutron absorption required for reactor shutdown. The control rod is provided with an enlarged cylindrical handle which terminates in an upwardly extending rod to provide a grapple point for the driveline. The grapple mechanism includes a tension rod which receives the upwardly extending handle and is provided with a lower annular flange. A plurality of preferably six grapple segments surround and grip the control rod handle. Each grapple rod segment grips the flange on the tension rod at an interior upper annular indentation, bears against the enlarged cylindrical handle at an intermediate annulus and captures the upwardly flaring frustum shaped handle at a lower and complementary female segment. The tension rods and grapple segments are surrounded by and encased within a cylinder. The cylinder terminates immediately and outward extending annulus at the lower portion of the grapple segments. Excursion of the tension rod relative to the encasing cylinder causes rod release at the handle by permitting the grapple segments to pivot outwardly and about the annulus on the tension rod so as to open the lower defined frustum shaped annulus and drop the rod. Relative movement between the tension rod and cylinder can occur either due to electromagnetic release of the tension rod within defined limits of travel or differential thermal expansion as between the tension rod and cylinder as where the reactor exceeds design thermal limits.

  5. Why rods and cones?

    PubMed

    Lamb, T D

    2016-02-01

    Under twenty-first-century metropolitan conditions, almost all of our vision is mediated by cones and the photopic system, yet cones make up barely 5% of our retinal photoreceptors. This paper looks at reasons why we additionally possess rods and a scotopic system, and asks why rods comprise 95% of our retinal photoreceptors. It considers the ability of rods to reliably signal the arrival of individual photons of light, as well as the ability of the retina to process these single-photon signals, and it discusses the advantages that accrue. Drawbacks in the arrangement, including the very slow dark adaptation of scotopic vision, are also considered. Finally, the timing of the evolution of cone and rod photoreceptors, the retina, and the camera-style eye is summarised.

  6. Roughness and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    A function map is used to locate applications of roughness in separation-velocity space. The importance of roughness in contact mechanics is demonstrated and versions of the plasticity index are introduced and compared. Case studies of roughness and function are presented from tribology and the life sciences. Tribological examples are taken from the automotive industry and include the manufacture of vehicle bodies, and drive train tribology, particularly cylinder liner, cam and gearbox friction and wear. From the life sciences, problems of prosthetic fixation and tribology are shown to depend on roughness. The interaction of haptics and surface finish is described and illustrated. A number of other areas of application are listed. Finally the likely future importance of structured surfaces is discussed.

  7. Flexible sucker rod unit

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.F.

    1987-02-03

    This patent describes a deep well having: a. an education tube with an inside diameter extending from the surface of the earth to far below the surface, b. a reciprocating pump housing attached to the bottom of the education tube, c. pump jack means at the surface for reciprocating the pump, d. a light sucker rod connected to the pump jack means and extending into the education tube, and e. a series of heavy sinker bars having a large cross sectional area in the education tube connecting the light sucker rod to the pump; f. an improved integral metal flexible rod unit interconnecting the sinker bars comprising in combination with the above: g. a coupling on each end of the integral metal flexible rod unit connecting the flexible rod unit to the contiguous sinker bar, h. a segment which is flexible as compared to the sinker bars connecting one of the couplings to i. an integral metal bearing adjacent to the other of the couplings, the bearing having j. a cylindrical surface with k. a diameter i. only slightly smaller than the inside diameter of the education tube thereby forming a sliding fit therewith, and ii. greater than the diameter of any other portion of the flexible rod unit and the sinker bar, and l. grooves in the cylindrical surface for the passage of fluid between in the education tube around the bearing.

  8. Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J.

    1999-01-14

    Sucker rod pumps are installed in approximately 90% of all oil wells in the U.S. Although they have been widely used for decades, there are many issues regarding the fluid dynamics of the pump that have not been fully investigated. A project was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to develop unimproved understanding of the fluid dynamics inside a sucker rod pump. A mathematical flow model was developed to predict pressures in any pump component or an entire pump under single-phase fluid and pumping conditions. Laboratory flow tests were conducted on instrumented individual pump components and on a complete pump to verify and refine the model. The mathematical model was then converted to a Visual Basic program to allow easy input of fluid, geometry and pump parameters and to generate output plots. Examples of issues affecting pump performance investigated with the model include the effects of viscosity, surface roughness, valve design details, plunger and valve pressure differentials, and pumping rate.

  9. Exploring Bundling Theory with Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckalbar, John C.

    2006-01-01

    The author shows how instructors might successfully introduce students in principles and intermediate microeconomic theory classes to the topic of bundling (i.e., the selling of two or more goods as a package, rather than separately). It is surprising how much students can learn using only the tools of high school geometry. To be specific, one can…

  10. Polished rod liner puller assmbly

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, B.V.

    1990-01-02

    This patent describes a polished rod liner puller assembly operable with a well casing head assembly to remove a polished rod liner member of a polished rod liner assembly from a well. It comprises: a work table assembly operable to be placed around the well casing head assembly and enclose the polished rod liner assembly; a base plate assembly mounted on the work table assembly; a piston and cylinder jack assembly mounted on the base plate assembly and extended upwardly therefrom; and a winged rod clamp assembly connectable to the piston and cylinder jack assembly and to a polished rod member of the polished rod liner assembly and operable on actuation of the piston and cylinder jack assembly to axially move the polished rod member and the polished rod liner member to remove the polished rod liner member from the well.

  11. IR imaging bundles for HWIL testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Brandon; Gibson, Dan; Nguyen, Vinh; Gattass, Rafael; Sanghera, Jas; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2011-06-01

    We report on development and characterization of square registered infrared imaging bundles fabricated from As2S3fiber for HWIL applications. Bundle properties and cross-talk measurements are presented.

  12. Nonlinearity and noise at the rod - rod bipolar cell synapse

    PubMed Central

    Trexler, E. Brady; Casti, Alexander R.R.; Zhang, Yu

    2010-01-01

    In the retina, rod bipolar (RBP) cells synapse with many rods, and suppression of rod outer segment and synaptic noise is necessary for their detection of rod single photon responses (SPRs). Depending on the rods’ signal to noise ratio (SNR), the suppression mechanism will likely eliminate some SPRs as well, resulting in decreased quantum efficiency. We examined this synapse in rabbit, where 100 rods converge onto each RBP. Suction electrode recordings showed that rabbit rod SPRs were difficult to distinguish from noise (independent SNR estimates were 2.3 and 2.8). Nonlinear transmission from rods to RBPs improved response detection (SNR = 8.7), but a large portion of the rod SPRs were discarded. For the dimmest flashes, the loss approached 90%. Despite the high rejection ratio, noise of two distinct types were apparent in the RBP traces: low amplitude rumblings and discrete events that resembled the SPR. The SPR-like event frequency suggests they result from thermal isomerizations of rhodopsin, which occured at the rate 0.033 s−1rod−1. The presence of low amplitude noise is explained by a sigmoidal input-output relationship at the rod - RBP synapse and the input of noisy rods. The rabbit rod SNR and RBP quantum efficiency are the lowest yet reported, suggesting that the quantum efficiency of the rod - RBP synapse may depend on the SNR in rods. These results point to the possibility that fewer photoisomerizations are discarded for species such as primate, which has a higher rod SNR. PMID:21047445

  13. Understanding flame rods

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, J.A. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    The flame rod is probably the least understood method of flame detection. Although it is not recommended for oilfired equipment, it is very common on atmospheric, or {open_quotes}in-shot,{close_quotes} gas burners. It is also possible, although not common, to have an application with a constant gas pilot, monitored by a flame rod, and maintaining an oil main flame. Regardless of the application, chances are that flame rods will be encountered during the course of servicing. The technician today must be versatile and able to work on many different types of equipment. One must understand the basic principles of flame rods, and how to correct potential problems. The purpose of a flame detection system is two-fold: (1) to prove there is no flame when there shouldn`t be one, and (2) to prove there is a flame when there should be one. Flame failure response time is very important. This is the amount of time it takes to realize there is a loss of flame, two to four seconds is typical today. Prior to flame rods, either bi-metal or thermocouple type flame detectors were common. The response time for these detectors was up to three minutes, seldom less than one minute.

  14. Sperm bundle and reproductive organs of carabid beetles tribe Pterostichini (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasakawa, Kôji

    2007-05-01

    The morphological characteristics of sperm and reproductive organs may offer clues as to how reproductive systems have evolved. In this paper, the morphologies of the sperm and male reproductive organs of carabid beetles in the tribe Pterostichini (Coleoptera: Carabidae) are described, and the morphological associations among characters are examined. All species form sperm bundles in which the head of the sperm was embedded in a rod-shaped structure, i.e., spermatodesm. The spermatodesm shape (left-handed spiral, right-handed spiral, or without conspicuous spiral structure) and the condition of the sperm on the spermatodesm surface (with the tail free-moving or forming a thin, sheetlike structure) vary among species. In all species, the spiral directions of the convoluted seminal vesicles and vasa deferentia are the same on both sides of the body; that is, they show an asymmetric structure. The species in which the sperm bundle and the seminal vesicles both have a spiral structure could be classified into two types, with significant differences in sperm-bundle length between the two types. The species with a sperm-bundle spiral and seminal-vesicle spiral of almost the same diameter have longer sperm bundles than the species with a sperm-bundle spiral and seminal-vesicle tube of almost the same diameter. In the former type, the spiral directions of the sperm bundles and seminal vesicles are inevitably the same, whereas they differ in some species with the later type. Therefore, increased sperm bundle length appears to have been facilitated by the concordance of the sperm bundle’s coiling direction with the coiling direction of the seminal vesicle.

  15. Energy efficient one-pot synthesis of durable superhydrophobic coating through nylon micro-rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simovich, T.; Wu, A. H.; Lamb, R. N.

    2014-03-01

    A durable and superhydrophobic coating was fabricated at room temperature through encapsulating nylon micro-rods in a hydrophobic silica shell. This was achieved through the precipitation of miniemulsified nylon under high shear to generate micro-rods with high aspect ratio in the presence of methyltrimethoxysilane. The resultant coating structure resembles a network of highly entangled micro-rods that give rise to both surface roughness and hydrophobicity, resulting in contact angles greater than 155°. The embedded nylon polymer within the micro-rods imparts significant mechanical durability to the surface, resulting in a coating hardness of 2H using the pencil hardness test.

  16. Turbulence analysis of rough wall channel flows based on direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, A. V.; Bolotnov, I. A.

    2012-07-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of rough wall channel flows was performed for various surface roughnesses. The goal of the presented research is to investigate the effect of nucleating bubbles in subcooled boiling conditions on the turbulence. The nucleating bubbles are represented by hemispherical roughness elements at the wall. The stabilized finite element based code, PHASTA, is used to perform the simulations. Validation against theoretical, experimental and numerical data is performed for smooth channel flow and rectangular rod type of roughness. The presence of roughness elements affects the flow structure within the roughness sublayer, which is estimated to be 5 times the height of roughness elements. DNS observations are consistent with this result and demonstrate the flow homogeneity above 50 viscous units. The influence of roughness elements layout and density on the turbulence parameters is also demonstrated and analyzed. (authors)

  17. COMPOSITE CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Rock, H.R.

    1963-12-24

    A composite control rod for use in controlling a nuclear reactor is described. The control rod is of sandwich construction in which finned dowel pins are utilized to hold together sheets of the neutron absorbing material and nonabsorbing structural material thereby eliminating the need for being dependent on the absorbing material for structural support. The dowel pins perform the function of absorbing the forces due to differential thermal expansion, seating further with the fins into the sheets of material and crushing before damage is done either to the absorbing or non-absorbing material. (AEC)

  18. Welded oil well pump rod

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.F.

    1986-06-10

    A friction welded multiple component oil well sucker rod is described which consists of an elongated cylindrical rod section and apposed coupling end portions welded to opposite ends of the rod section, the coupling end portions being of a nominal maximum diameter at least 1.5 times greater than the rod section and including means for connecting the sucker rod to an adjacent rod in end to end relationship. The couplings end portions each include an axial tapered portion between the connecting means and an end face adapted to be butted to the rod section, the coupling end portions being butted against the opposed end portions of the rod section during a friction welding operation to form a radially outward projecting bulge of displaced material on the rod section and the coupling end portions, respectively. A greater cross-sectional area is formed at the transition of the rod section to the coupling end portion to reduce the unit tensile stress on the sucker rod in the vicinity of the weld, wherein the displaced material is machined to form a tapered surface between the rod section and the axial tapered portion of the coupling end portion, the tapered surface having an angle of taper with respect to the longitudinal axis of the sucker rod less than the angle of taper of the coupling end portion.

  19. Simulation of steady-state and transient sodium boiling experiments in a seven-pin bundle under flow rundown conditions by using BODYFIT-1FE code

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.C.J.; Sha, W.T.

    1981-01-01

    A seven-pin rod bundle under flow rundown conditions was simulated by using the computer code BODYFIT-1FE (BOunDarY-FITted Coordinate System - 1 phase, Fully-Elliptic). In this code, the complicated rod bundle configuration is first transformed into rectangular geometry with uniform meshes. The transformed governing equations for all the thermal-hydraulic variables are then solved. The results of the simulation are presented here. All the predicted values agree favorably with the measured data. 7 refs., 20 figs.

  20. Class D sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Woodings, R. T.

    1984-10-23

    It has been found that API Class D sucker rods can be made inexpensively from low-alloy, low-cost steel by following a suitable induction-normalizing process and using a suitable steel to which there has been added 0.07 to 0.15 percent of vanadium.

  1. REACTOR CONTROL ROD OPERATING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Miller, G.

    1961-12-12

    A nuclear reactor control rod mechanism is designed which mechanically moves the control rods into and out of the core under normal conditions but rapidly forces the control rods into the core by catapultic action in the event of an emergency. (AEC)

  2. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flow for grid-to-rod fretting in nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bakosi, J.; Christon, M. A.; Lowrie, R. B.; Pritchett-Sheats, L. A.; Nourgaliev, R. R.

    2013-07-12

    The grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) problem in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration problem that results in wear and failure of the fuel rods in nuclear assemblies. In order to understand the fluid dynamics of GTRF and to build an archival database of turbulence statistics for various configurations, implicit large-eddy simulations of time-dependent single-phase turbulent flow have been performed in 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod bundles with a single grid spacer. To assess the computational mesh and resolution requirements, a method for quantitative assessment of unstructured meshes with no-slip walls is described. The calculations have been carried out using Hydra-TH, a thermal-hydraulics code developed at Los Alamos for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light water reactors, a United States Department of Energy Innovation Hub. Hydra-TH uses a second-order implicit incremental projection method to solve the singlephase incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The simulations explicitly resolve the large scale motions of the turbulent flow field using first principles and rely on a monotonicity-preserving numerical technique to represent the unresolved scales. Each series of simulations for the 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod-bundle geometries is an analysis of the flow field statistics combined with a mesh-refinement study and validation with available experimental data. Our primary focus is the time history and statistics of the forces loading the fuel rods. These hydrodynamic forces are believed to be the key player resulting in rod vibration and GTRF wear, one of the leading causes for leaking nuclear fuel which costs power utilities millions of dollars in preventive measures. As a result, we demonstrate that implicit large-eddy simulation of rod-bundle flows is a viable way to calculate the excitation forces for the GTRF problem.

  3. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flow for grid-to-rod fretting in nuclear reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Bakosi, J.; Christon, M. A.; Lowrie, R. B.; Pritchett-Sheats, L. A.; Nourgaliev, R. R.

    2013-07-12

    The grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) problem in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration problem that results in wear and failure of the fuel rods in nuclear assemblies. In order to understand the fluid dynamics of GTRF and to build an archival database of turbulence statistics for various configurations, implicit large-eddy simulations of time-dependent single-phase turbulent flow have been performed in 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod bundles with a single grid spacer. To assess the computational mesh and resolution requirements, a method for quantitative assessment of unstructured meshes with no-slip walls is described. The calculations have been carriedmore » out using Hydra-TH, a thermal-hydraulics code developed at Los Alamos for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light water reactors, a United States Department of Energy Innovation Hub. Hydra-TH uses a second-order implicit incremental projection method to solve the singlephase incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The simulations explicitly resolve the large scale motions of the turbulent flow field using first principles and rely on a monotonicity-preserving numerical technique to represent the unresolved scales. Each series of simulations for the 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod-bundle geometries is an analysis of the flow field statistics combined with a mesh-refinement study and validation with available experimental data. Our primary focus is the time history and statistics of the forces loading the fuel rods. These hydrodynamic forces are believed to be the key player resulting in rod vibration and GTRF wear, one of the leading causes for leaking nuclear fuel which costs power utilities millions of dollars in preventive measures. As a result, we demonstrate that implicit large-eddy simulation of rod-bundle flows is a viable way to calculate the excitation forces for the GTRF problem.« less

  4. Experimental results of the QUENCH-16 bundle test on air ingress

    SciTech Connect

    Stuckert, J.; Steinbrueck, M.

    2012-07-01

    The out-of-pile bundle experiment QUENCH-16 on air ingress was conducted in the electrically heated 21-rod QUENCH facility at KIT in July 2011. It was performed in the frame of the EC supported LACOMECO program. The test scenario included the oxidation of the Zircaloy-4 claddings in air following a limited pre-oxidation in steam, and involved a long period of oxygen starvation to promote interaction with the nitrogen. The primary aim was to examine the influence of the formed oxide layer structure on bundle coolability and hydrogen release during the terminal flooding phase. QUENCH-16 was thus a companion test to the earlier air ingress experiment, QUENCH-10, which was performed with strongly pre-oxidized bundle. Unlike QUENCH-10, significant temperature escalation and intensive hydrogen release were observed during the reflood phase. Post-test investigations of bundle cross sections reveal residual nitride traces at various elevations. The external part of the oxide scale is of porous structure due to re-oxidation of nitrides during reflood. Relative thick internal oxide scales underneath this porous layer and residual nitrides were formed during reflood. At lower bundle elevations frozen partially oxidized melt was detected, relocated from upper elevations. (authors)

  5. Random rough surface photofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissonneau, Vincent; Escoubas, Ludovic; Flory, François; Berginc, Gérard

    2011-10-01

    Random rough surfaces are of primary interest for their optical properties: reducing reflection at the interface or obtaining specific scattering diagram for example. Thus controlling surface statistics during the fabrication process paves the way to original and specific behaviors of reflected optical waves. We detail an experimental method allowing the fabrication of random rough surfaces showing tuned statistical properties. A two-step photoresist exposure process was developed. In order to initiate photoresist polymerization, an energy threshold needs to be reached by light exposure. This energy is brought by a uniform exposure equipment comprising UV-LEDs. This pre-exposure is studied by varying parameters such as optical power and exposure time. The second step consists in an exposure based on the Gray method.1 The speckle pattern of an enlarged scattered laser beam is used to insolate the photoresist. A specific photofabrication bench using an argon ion laser was implemented. Parameters such as exposure time and distances between optical components are discussed. Then, we describe how we modify the speckle-based exposure bench to include a spatial light modulator (SLM). The SLM used is a micromirror matrix known as Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) which allows spatial modulation by displaying binary images. Thus, the spatial beam shape can be tuned and so the speckle pattern on the photoresist is modified. As the photoresist photofabricated surface is correlated to the speckle pattern used to insolate, the roughness parameters can be adjusted.

  6. SAFETY SYSTEM FOR CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Paget, J.A.

    1963-05-14

    A structure for monitoring the structural continuity of a control rod foi a neutron reactor is presented. A electric conductor readily breakable under mechanical stress is fastened along the length of the control rod at a plurality of positions and forms a closed circuit with remote electrical components responsive to an open circuit. A portion of the conductor between the control rod and said components is helically wound to allow free and normally unrestricted movement of the segment of conductor secured to the control rod relative to the remote components. Any break in the circuit is indicative of control rod breakage. (AEC)

  7. Locked-wrap fuel rod

    DOEpatents

    Kaplan, Samuel; Chertock, Alan J.; Punches, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A method for spacing fast reactor fuel rods using a wire wrapper improved by orienting the wire-wrapped fuel rods in a unique manner which introduces desirable performance characteristics not attainable by previous wire-wrapped designs. Use of this method in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor results in: (a) improved mechanical performance, (b) improved rod-to-rod contact, (c) reduced steel volume, and (d) improved thermal-hydraulic performance. The method produces a "locked wrap" design which tends to lock the rods together at each of the wire cluster locations.

  8. Sucker rod centralizer

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, O.; Newski, A.

    1989-10-03

    This patent describes a device for centralizing at least one sucker rod within a production pipe downhole in a well and for reducing frictional forces between the pipe and at least one sucker rod. It comprises an elongate, substantially cylindrical body member having a longitudinal axis, a plurality of slots within the member and a rotatable member mounted within each slot, each of the plurality of slots has its major dimension along a first axis parallel to the longitudinal axis of the body member and is oriented with respect to the other seats so as to form a helicoidal array for maximizing the total surface contact area between the rotatable members and the pipe and for decreasing the forces acting on each rotatable member.

  9. Sucker rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.C.

    1988-10-25

    This patent describes an improved guide for use in a string of sucker rods for reciprocation in a tubing string in a borehole, the sucker rods having threaded male ends, the guide comprising: an elongated upright cylindrical member of external diameter less than the internal diameter of tubing in which it is to be used, the member having sucker rod receiving female threaded openings at the upper and lower ends, the threaded openings being coaxial of the member cylindrical axis whereby the member may be positioned in a string of sucker rods, and including a plurality of spaced-apart parallel sided slots within the member, each slot being of semi-circular configuration and of depth greater than the radius and less than the diameter of the cylindrical member, the sidewalls of each slot being parallel to and equally spaced from a plane of the member cylindrical axis; the member having an axle bore therein for each of the slots, the axle bores being parallel and spaced apart from each other, a plane of the axis of each bore being perpendicular the member cylindrical axis and the axis of each bore being displaced away from the member cylindrical axis; an axle received in each axle bore; and a wheel received on each axle the diameter of each wheel being approximately the diameter of the cylindrical member, the periphery of each wheel extending beyond the member cylindrical wall whereby the wheels are positioned to engage and roll on the internal cylindrical surface of tubing, the planes of adjacent slots in the member being rotationally displaced from each other, a portion of each wheel extending beyond the cylindrical surface of the member, the opposed portion of each wheel being within the confines of the member cylindrical surface whereby each wheel can contact a tubing wall at only one point on its cylindrical surface.

  10. APPARATUS FOR SHEATHING RODS

    DOEpatents

    Ford, W.K.; Wyatt, M.; Plail, S.

    1961-08-01

    An arrangement is described for sealing a solid body of nuclear fuel, such as a uranium metal rod, into a closelyfitting thin metallic sheath with an internal atmosphere of inert gas. The sheathing process consists of subjecting the sheath, loaded with the nuclear fuel body, to the sequential operations of evacuation, gas-filling, drawing (to entrap inert gas and secure close contact between sheath and body), and sealing. (AEC)

  11. Parallel transport on principal bundles over stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Brian; Lerman, Eugene; Wolbert, Seth

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we introduce a notion of parallel transport for principal bundles with connections over differentiable stacks. We show that principal bundles with connections over stacks can be recovered from their parallel transport thereby extending the results of Barrett, Caetano and Picken, and Schreiber and Waldorf from manifolds to stacks. In the process of proving our main result we simplify Schreiber and Waldorf's original definition of a transport functor for principal bundles with connections over manifolds and provide a more direct proof of the correspondence between principal bundles with connections and transport functors.

  12. Sucker rod coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Klyne, A.A.

    1986-11-11

    An anti-friction sucker rod coupling is described for connecting a pair of sucker rods and centralizing them in a tubing string, comprising: an elongate, rigid, substantially cylindrical body member, each end of the body member forming means for threadably connecting the body member with a sucker rod. The body member further forms a transversely extending, substantially diametric, generally vertical slot extending therethrough. The body member further forms a pin bore, such pin bore extending transversely through the body member so as to intersect the slot substantially perpendicularly; a wheel member positioned within the slot to rotate in a generally vertical plane. The wheel member has a portion thereof extending beyond the periphery of the body member to engage the inner surface of the tubing string and centralize the coupling; and a pin mounted in the pin bore and supporting member thereon, whereby the wheel member is rotatable within the slot; the wheel member having sufficient clearance between its side surfaces and the wall surfaces of the slot, when the wheel member is centered in the slot on the pin, whereby the wheel member may shift along the pin to assist in ejecting sand and oil from the slot.

  13. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small button'' in the latch mechanism had broken off of the lock plunger'' and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  14. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small ``button`` in the latch mechanism had broken off of the ``lock plunger`` and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  15. Rod locking device

    SciTech Connect

    Troxell, J.N. Jr.

    1986-07-22

    A ram locking apparatus used on a blowout preventer is described having a housing, a ram, ram actuating means having a closing side and a retracted side and a tail rod having its inner end connected to the ram actuating means and its outer end engaged by the apparatus to lock the ram. The apparatus consists of: a lock housing having a closed end and a hollow interior connected to the exterior of the preventer housing in which the tail rod is positioned, a body positioned within the lock housing, a primary piston, a lost motion connection between the primary piston and the body, a lock piston associated with the primary piston and movable axially with respect to the primary piston, a tapered split locking ring interconnected to the lock piston, wedging means with the split locking ring, and means for supplying fluid under pressure into the lock housing for movement of the pistons, the initial pressure on the primary pistons causing movement of the body to engage the ram tail rod and subsequently moving the lock piston relative to the wedging means and to thereby wedge the split locking ring against the interior of the lock housing to lock the body therein against movement in the lock housing.

  16. Decontamination of BWR fuel bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Ocken, H.

    1988-01-01

    Decontamination of individual systems in operating reactors, such as recirculation piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs) and steam generators in pressurized water reactors, is becoming an accepted technique to reduce radiation fields and occupational radiation exposure. Because a significant inventory of radioactivity resides on the reactor core, a longer term goal is to effect full plant decontamination with the fuel in place. Full plant decontamination has proved effective in CANDU and steam-generating heavy water reactor plants, but only recently have US plants begun to consider seriously the merits of such an approach. Clearly, a first step is to show that exposure to commercial decontamination solvents of highly irradiated core components will not induce any adverse effects. This paper describes a study of the application of the LOMI and CANDECON solvents to three-cycle discharged fuel bundles from the Quad Cities-2 BWR. Highly irradiated stainless steel specimens cut from a section of a LaCrosse BWR control blade also were decontaminated at the same time as the fuel bundles. CANDECON was selected as being representative of dilute chelant process and LOMI as representative of more strongly reducing processes. Both processes were preceded by the application of an oxidizing alkaline permanganate (AP) oxidizing step to help dissolve chromium.

  17. Microtubule Bundling and Shape Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needleman, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are hollow cylindrical polymers composed of heterodimers of the protein tubulin that align end-to-end in the MT wall, forming linear protofilaments that interact laterally. Placing MTs under osmotic pressure causes them to reversibly buckle to a noncircular shape and pack into rectangular bundles at a critical osmotic pressure; further increases in pressure continue to distort MTs elastically. At higher osmotic pressures stressing polymers may be forced into the MT lumen causing the MTs to revert to a circle cross-section and pack into hexagonal bundles. This SAXRD-osmotic stress study provides a probe of the inter-protofilament bond strength and gives insight into the mechanisms by which microtubule associated proteins and the cancer chemotherapeutic drug Taxol stabilize MTs. We present further measurements of the mechanical properties of MT walls, MT-MT interactions, and the entry of polymers into the microtubule lumen. Supported by NSF DMR- 0203755, NIH GM-59288 and NS-13560, and CTS-0103516. SSRL is supported by the U.S. DOE.

  18. Rough and Tumble Play 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Frances

    2009-01-01

    Many people fear that play-fighting or rough and tumble play is the same as real fighting. There is also a fear that this rough play will become real fighting if allowed to continue. Most of all, parents and teachers fear that during the course of rough and tumble play a child may be hurt. To provide for and allow children to play rough without…

  19. Noise Radiation from Single and Multiple Rod Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were performed on single and multiple rod configurations to study the effect of Reynolds number, surface roughness, freestream turbulence, proximity and wake interference on the radiated noise. The Reynolds number ranged from 3.8 x 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 5). Directivity measurements were performed to determine how well the dipole assumption for the radiation of vortex shedding noise holds for the different model configurations tested. The dependence of the peak Sound Pressure Level on velocity was also examined. Several concepts for the reduction of the noise radiating from cylindrical rods were tested. It was shown that wire wraps and collar distributions could be used to significantly reduce the noise radiating from rods in tandem configurations.

  20. Pavement roughness and skid properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Road roughness and roadway safety as it relates to both surface and air transportation are discussed. The role of road roughness in vehicle ride, the measurement of roughness, the evaluation of riding confort, and the effect of grooving pavements are discussed. The effects of differential pavement friction on the response of cars in skidding maneuvers is discussed.

  1. Determination of Joint Roughness Coefficients Using Roughness Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sic; Kang, Seong-Seung; Jang, Bo-An

    2014-11-01

    This study used precisely digitized standard roughness profiles to determine roughness parameters such as statistical and 2D discontinuity roughness, and fractal dimensions. Our methods were based on the relationship between the joint roughness coefficient (JRC) values and roughness parameters calculated using power law equations. Statistical and 2D roughness parameters, and fractal dimensions correlated well with JRC values, and had correlation coefficients of over 0.96. However, all of these relationships have a 4th profile (JRC 6-8) that deviates by more than ±5 % from the JRC values given in the standard roughness profiles. This indicates that this profile is statistically different than the others. We suggest that fractal dimensions should be measured within the entire range of the divider, instead of merely measuring values within a suitable range. Normalized intercept values also correlated with the JRC values, similarly to the fractal dimension values discussed above. The root mean square first derivative values, roughness profile indexes, 2D roughness parameter, and fractal dimension values decreased as the sampling interval increased. However, the structure function values increased very rapidly with increasing sampling intervals. This indicates that the roughness parameters are not independent of the sampling interval, and that the different relationships between the JRC values and these roughness parameters are dependent on the sampling interval.

  2. Delay Tolerant Networking - Bundle Protocol Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SeGui, John; Jenning, Esther

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the addition of MACHETE models needed to support DTN, namely: the Bundle Protocol (BP) model. To illustrate the useof MACHETE with the additional DTN model, we provide an example simulation to benchmark its performance. We demonstrate the use of the DTN protocol and discuss statistics gathered concerning the total time needed to simulate numerous bundle transmissions.

  3. Damping Properties of the Hair Bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Johannes; Kozlov, Andrei S.; Risler, Thomas; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2011-11-01

    The viscous liquid surrounding a hair bundle dissipates energy and dampens oscillations, which poses a fundamental physical challenge to the high sensitivity and sharp frequency selectivity of hearing. To identify the mechanical forces at play, we constructed a detailed finite-element model of the hair bundle. Based on data from the hair bundle of the bullfrog's sacculus, this model treats the interaction of stereocilia both with the surrounding liquid and with the liquid in the narrow gaps between the individual stereocilia. The investigation revealed that grouping stereocilia in a bundle dramatically reduces the total drag. During hair-bundle deflections, the tip links potentially induce drag by causing small but very dissipative relative motions between stereocilia; this effect is offset by the horizontal top connectors that restrain such relative movements at low frequencies. For higher frequencies the coupling liquid is sufficient to assure that the hair bundle moves as a unit with a low total drag. This work reveals the mechanical characteristics originating from hair-bundle morphology and shows quantitatively how a hair bundle is adapted for sensitive mechanotransduction.

  4. Fock modules and noncommutative line bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    To a line bundle over a noncommutative space there is naturally associated a Fock module. The algebra of corresponding creation and annihilation operators is the total space algebra of a principal U(1) -bundle over the noncommutative space. We describe the general construction and illustrate it with examples.

  5. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE AERODYNAMIC ROUGHNESS LENGTH AND THE ROUGHNESS DENSITY IN CASES OF LOW ROUGHNESS DENSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents measurements of roughness length performed in a wind tunnel for low roughness density. The experiments were performed with both compact and porous obstacles (clusters), in order to simulate the behavior of sparsely vegetated surfaces.

  6. Line bundle embeddings for heterotic theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nibbelin, Stefan Groot; Ruehle, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    In heterotic string theories consistency requires the introduction of a non-trivial vector bundle. This bundle breaks the original ten-dimensional gauge groups E8 × E8 or SO(32) for the supersymmetric heterotic string theories and SO(16) × SO(16) for the non-supersymmetric tachyon-free theory to smaller subgroups. A vast number of MSSM-like models have been constructed up to now, most of which describe the vector bundle as a sum of line bundles. However, there are several different ways of describing these line bundles and their embedding in the ten-dimensional gauge group. We recall and extend these different descriptions and explain how they can be translated into each other.

  7. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  8. Cone rod dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Christian P

    2007-01-01

    Cone rod dystrophies (CRDs) (prevalence 1/40,000) are inherited retinal dystrophies that belong to the group of pigmentary retinopathies. CRDs are characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination, predominantly localized to the macular region. In contrast to typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP), also called the rod cone dystrophies (RCDs) resulting from the primary loss in rod photoreceptors and later followed by the secondary loss in cone photoreceptors, CRDs reflect the opposite sequence of events. CRD is characterized by primary cone involvement, or, sometimes, by concomitant loss of both cones and rods that explains the predominant symptoms of CRDs: decreased visual acuity, color vision defects, photoaversion and decreased sensitivity in the central visual field, later followed by progressive loss in peripheral vision and night blindness. The clinical course of CRDs is generally more severe and rapid than that of RCDs, leading to earlier legal blindness and disability. At end stage, however, CRDs do not differ from RCDs. CRDs are most frequently non syndromic, but they may also be part of several syndromes, such as Bardet Biedl syndrome and Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7 (SCA7). Non syndromic CRDs are genetically heterogeneous (ten cloned genes and three loci have been identified so far). The four major causative genes involved in the pathogenesis of CRDs are ABCA4 (which causes Stargardt disease and also 30 to 60% of autosomal recessive CRDs), CRX and GUCY2D (which are responsible for many reported cases of autosomal dominant CRDs), and RPGR (which causes about 2/3 of X-linked RP and also an undetermined percentage of X-linked CRDs). It is likely that highly deleterious mutations in genes that otherwise cause RP or macular dystrophy may also lead to CRDs. The diagnosis of CRDs is based on clinical history, fundus examination and electroretinogram. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, genetic counseling is always advised. Currently

  9. Reactor control rod timing system

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Peter T. K.

    1982-01-01

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  10. Reactor control rod timing system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, P.T.

    1982-02-09

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (Above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  11. Aerosol behavior during SIC control rod failure in QUENCH-13 test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Terttaliisa; Csordás, Anna Pintér; Nagy, Imre; Stuckert, Juri

    2010-02-01

    In a nuclear reactor severe accident, radioactive fission products as well as structural materials are released from the core by evaporation, and the released gases form particles by nucleation and condensation. In addition, aerosol particles may be generated by droplet formation and fragmentation of the core. In pressurized water reactors (PWR), a commonly used control rod material is silver-indium-cadmium (SIC) covered with stainless steel cladding. The control rod elements, Cd, In and Ag, have relatively low melting temperatures, and especially Cd has also a very low boiling point. Control rods are likely to fail early on in the accident due to melting of the stainless steel cladding which can be accelerated by eutectic interaction between stainless steel and the surrounding Zircaloy guide tube. The release of the control rod materials would follow the cladding failure thus affecting aerosol source term as well as fuel rod degradation. The QUENCH experimental program at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe investigates phenomena associated with reflood of a degrading core under postulated severe accident conditions. QUENCH-13 test was the first in this program to include a silver-indium-cadmium control rod of prototypic PWR design. To characterize the extent of aerosol release during the control rod failure, aerosol particle size distribution and concentration measurements in the off-gas pipe of the QUENCH facility were carried out. For the first time, it was possible to determine on-line the aerosol concentration and size distribution released from the core. These results are of prime importance for model development for the proper calculation of the source term resulting from control rod failure. The on-line measurement showed that the main aerosol release started at the bundle temperature maximum of T ˜ 1570 K at hottest bundle elevation. A very large burst of aerosols was detected 660 s later at the bundle temperature maximum of T ˜ 1650 K, followed by a relatively

  12. Intranuclear bundles of microfilaments and microtubules in chromaffin cells of the auricle of the heart of a lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, D W; Adriaensen, D; De Groodt-Lasseel, M H

    1988-01-01

    Intranuclear microtubular-microfilamentous rod-like inclusions were investigated in chromaffin cells of the auricle of the heart of lungfishes. In conventional electron microscopy, these inclusions reveal a wide variety in appearance, depending on their orientation to the plane of sectioning. Whereas originally they were merely interpreted as a bundle of microfilaments, application of a goniometer stage showed the rod- or spindle-shaped intranuclear inclusions to have a basic substructure of parallel arranged microtubules among microfilaments, which are clearly connected to chromatin granules, occasionally penetrating dense areas of chromatin. The chemical nature and biological significance of these structures, which so far remain enigmatic, are discussed. PMID:3227775

  13. Automatic safety rod for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1988-01-01

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-core flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  14. Piston and connecting rod assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor); Chatten, John K. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A piston and connecting rod assembly includes a piston crown, a piston skirt, a connecting rod, and a bearing insert. The piston skirt is a component separate from the piston crown and is connected to the piston crown to provide a piston body. The bearing insert is a component separate from the piston crown and the piston skirt and is fixedly disposed within the piston body. A bearing surface of a connecting rod contacts the bearing insert to thereby movably associate the connecting rod and the piston body.

  15. Sucker rod assembly and method

    SciTech Connect

    Pagan, A.J.

    1986-07-01

    An improved sucker rod assembly is described comprising, in combination: a. a sucker rod; and b. a pair of fittings secured to opposite ends of the rod, each fitting including: i. a rigid elongated casing having interior surfaces defining an open front end and cavity extending rearwardly from the open front end in which cavity one end of the sucker rod is disposed, the side portions of the interior surfaces being contoured to define, with the side portions of the sucker rod end a single, annular elongated tapered wedge-shaped space; and ii. anchoring means filling the space and bonding to the side portions of the rod end to lock the rod end in place, the anchoring means having a narrower diameter at the front end thereof than at about the rear end thereof and being generally frusto-conical, the anchoring means comprising a plurality of separate rigid inserts, the interior surfaces of which collectively define a central elongated passageway in which the rod end is received, the interior surfaces of the inserts being tightly bonded to the side portions of the rod, and the inserts being bonded to each other along the contact lines therebetween to form a unitary structure.

  16. Optical roughness measurements on specially designed roughness standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danzl, R.; Helmli, F.; Rubert, P.; Prantl, M.

    2008-09-01

    The measurement of surface texture is one of the most common and important ways to judge the quality of a technical surface. In order to verify whether a metrology device is able to measure certain types of roughness accurately, various roughness standards with calibrated roughness values are available. While almost all roughness standards produced so far have been designed for tactile systems we demonstrate how the optical metrology device InfiniteFocus can be applied to special roughness standards that have been artificially roughened. Experiments are performed on standards with periodic structure and the results of the optical system are compared to the calibrated values obtained by tactile systems with different tip radius. Additionally the profile-based measurements are compared to area-based measurements conform to a recently developed ISO standard draft. Finally roughness measurements on real surfaces are presented.

  17. Prioritary omalous bundles on Hirzebruch surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprodu, Marian; Marchitan, Marius

    2016-01-01

    An irreducible algebraic stack is called unirational if there exists a surjective morphism, representable by algebraic spaces, from a rational variety to an open substack. We prove unirationality of the stack of prioritary omalous bundles on Hirzebruch surfaces, which implies also the unirationality of the moduli space of omalous H-stable bundles for any ample line bundle H on a Hirzebruch surface (compare with Costa and Miro-Ŕoig, 2002). To this end, we find an explicit description of the duals of omalous rank-two bundles with a vanishing condition in terms of monads. Since these bundles are prioritary, we conclude that the stack of prioritary omalous bundles on a Hirzebruch surface different from P1 ×P1 is dominated by an irreducible section of a Segre variety, and this linear section is rational (Ionescu, 2015). In the case of the space quadric, the stack has been explicitly described by N. Buchdahl. As a main tool we use Buchdahl's Beilinson-type spectral sequence. Monad descriptions of omalous bundles on hypersurfaces in P4, Calabi-Yau complete intersection, blowups of the projective plane and Segre varieties have been recently obtained by A.A. Henni and M. Jardim (Henni and Jardim, 2013), and monads on Hirzebruch surfaces have been applied in a different context in Bartocci et al. (2015).

  18. Preliminary report: NIF laser bundle review

    SciTech Connect

    Tietbohl, G.L.; Larson, D.W.; Erlandson, A.C.

    1995-08-31

    As requested in the guidance memo {sup 1}, this committe determined whether there are compelling reasons to recommend a change from the NIF CDR baseline laser. The baseline bundle design based on a tradeoff between cost and technical risk, which is replicated four times to create the required 192 beams. The baseline amplifier design uses bottom loading 1{times}4 slab and flashlamp cassettes for amplifier maintenance and large vacuum enclosures (2.5m high {times} 7m wide in cross-section for each of the two spatial filters in each of the four bundles. The laser beams are arranged in two laser bays configured in a u-shape around the target area. The entire bundle review effort was performed in a very short time (six weeks) and with limited resources (15 personnel part-time). This should be compared to the effort that produced the CDR design (12 months, 50 to 100 personnel). This committee considered three alternate bundle configurations (2{times}2, 4{times}2, and 4{times}4 bundles), and evaluated each bundle against the baseline design using the seven requested issues in the guidance memo: Cost; schedule; performance risk; maintainability/operability; hardware failure cost exposure; activation; and design flexibility. The issues were reviewed to identify differences between each alternate bundle configuration and the baseline.

  19. F actin bundles in Drosophila bristles. I. Two filament cross-links are involved in bundling

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Transverse sections though Drosophila bristles reveal 7-11 nearly round, plasma membrane-associated bundles of actin filaments. These filaments are hexagonally packed and in a longitudinal section they show a 12-nm periodicity in both the 1.1 and 1.0 views. From earlier studies this periodicity is attributable to cross-links and indicates that the filaments are maximally cross-linked, singed mutants also have 7-11 bundles, but the bundles are smaller, flattened, and the filaments within the bundles are randomly packed (not hexagonal); no periodicity can be detected in longitudinal sections. Another mutant, forked (f36a), also has 7-11 bundles but even though the bundles are very small, the filaments within them are hexagonally packed and display a 12-nm periodicity in longitudinal section. The singed-forked double mutant lacks filament bundles. Thus there are at least two species of cross-links between adjacent actin filaments. Hints of why two species of cross-links are necessary can be gleaned by studying bristle formation. Bristles sprout with only microtubules within them. A little later in development actin filaments appear. At early stages the filaments in the bundles are randomly packed. Later the filaments in the bundles become hexagonally packed and maximally cross-linked. We consider that the forked proteins may be necessary early in development to tie the filaments together in a bundle so that they can be subsequently zippered together by fascin (the singed gene product). PMID:7622563

  20. Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, Robert P.; Mansure, Arthur J.

    1999-06-01

    Sucker rod pumps are installed in approximately 90% of all oil wells in the U.S. Although they have been widely used for decades, there are many issues regarding the fluid dynamics of the pump that have not been filly investigated. A project was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to develop an improved understanding of the fluid dynamics inside a sucker rod pump. A mathematical flow model was developed to predict pressures in any pump component or an entire pump under single-phase fluid and pumping conditions. Laboratory flow tests were conducted on instrumented individual pump components and on a complete pump to verifi and refine the model. The mathematical model was then converted to a Visual Basic program to allow easy input of fluid, geometry and pump parameters and to generate output plots. Examples of issues affecting pump performance investigated with the model include the effects of viscosity, surface roughness, valve design details, plunger and valve pressure differentials, and pumping rate.

  1. Contraction of cross-linked actomyosin bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Natsuhiko; Marcq, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Cross-linked actomyosin bundles retract when severed in vivo by laser ablation, or when isolated from the cell and micromanipulated in vitro in the presence of ATP. We identify the timescale for contraction as a viscoelastic time τ, where the viscosity is due to (internal) protein friction. We obtain an estimate of the order of magnitude of the contraction time τ ≈ 10-100 s, consistent with available experimental data for circumferential microfilament bundles and stress fibers. Our results are supported by an exactly solvable, hydrodynamic model of a retracting bundle as a cylinder of isotropic, active matter, from which the order of magnitude of the active stress is estimated.

  2. Roughness characteristics of natural channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Harry Hawthorne

    1967-01-01

    Color photographs and descriptive data are presented for 50 stream channels for which roughness coefficients have been determined. All hydraulic computations involving flow in open channels require an evaluation of the roughness characteristics of the channel. In the absence of a satisfactory quantitative procedure this evaluation remains chiefly an art. The ability to evaluate roughness coefficients must be developed through experience. One means of gaining this experience is by examining and becoming acquainted with the appearance of some typical channels whose roughness coefficients are known. The photographs and data contained in this report represent a wide range of channel conditions. Familiarity with the appearance, geometry, and roughness characteristics of these channels will improve the engineer's ability to select roughness coefficients for other channels .

  3. Rod Climbing of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Youjing; Wang, Xiaorong

    We wish to report an unexpected effect observed for particle suspensions sucked to pass through a vertical pipe. Above a critical concentration, the suspension on the outside of the pipe may climb along the outside wall of the pipe and then display a surprising rod-climbing effect. Our study shows that the phenomenon is influenced mainly by the suspension composition, the pipe dimension and the suction speed. The effects of the pipe materials of different kinds are negligible. Increasing the suction force and the concentration increases the climbing height. Increasing the pipe diameter and wall thickness reduces the climbing effect. This behavior may be relevant to that the suspensions of the type described are all displaying markedly shear-thickening.

  4. Sucker rod pump

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, J.R.

    1992-04-14

    This patent describes a subsurface well pump, it comprises: a working barrel; a plunger which reciprocates along the vertical axis within the working barrel between an upper and lower position; a rod connected to the plunger and extending to a means for providing reciprocating force; a well string extending from the top of the working barrel to the surface; an outlet check valve which permits flow to exit the working barrel into the well string and does not permit flow to exit the well string into the working barrel; and an inlet check valve which permits flow into the working barrel from outside of the subsurface pump, the inlet check valve being above the top position of the plunger, the inlet check valve having a cross sectional flow area about equal to or greater than the horizontal cross sectional area of the working barrel, and the inlet check valve being a hinged flapper valve.

  5. Surface roughness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Thomas G.

    1994-01-01

    The Optics Division is currently in the research phase of producing grazing-incidence mirrors to be used in x-ray detector applications. The traditional method of construction involves labor-intensive glass grinding. This also culminates in a relatively heavy mirror. For lower resolution applications, the mirrors may be of a replicated design which involves milling a mandrel as a negative of the final shape and electroplating the cylindrical mirror onto it. The mirror is then separated from the mandrel by cooling. The mandrel will shrink more than the 'shell' (mirror) allowing it to be pulled from the mandrel. Ulmer (2) describes this technique and its variations in more detail. To date, several mirrors have been tested at MSFC by the Optical Fabrication Branch by focusing x-ray energy onto a detector with limited success. Little is known about the surface roughness of the actual mirror. Hence, the attempt to gather data on these surfaces. The test involves profiling the surface of a sample, replicating the surface as described above, and then profiling the replicated surface.

  6. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulev, Assen; Roussev, Ilia; Karpuzov, Simeon; Stoilov, Georgi; Ignatova, Detelina; See, Constantin von; Mitov, Gergo

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  7. Sealed fiber-optic bundle feedthrough

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Carol E.

    2002-01-01

    A sealed fiber-optic bundle feedthrough by which a multitude of fiber-optic elements may be passed through an opening or port in a wall or structure separating two environments at different pressures or temperatures while maintaining the desired pressure or temperature in each environment. The feedthrough comprises a rigid sleeve of suitable material, a bundle of individual optical fibers, and a resin-based sealing material that bonds the individual optical fibers to each other and to the rigid sleeve.

  8. Torsional Behavior of Axonal Microtubule Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Carole; Soheilypour, Mohammad; Mofrad, Mohammad R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Axonal microtubule (MT) bundles crosslinked by microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau are responsible for vital biological functions such as maintaining mechanical integrity and shape of the axon as well as facilitating axonal transport. Breaking and twisting of MTs have been previously observed in damaged undulated axons. Such breaking and twisting of MTs is suggested to cause axonal swellings that lead to axonal degeneration, which is known as “diffuse axonal injury”. In particular, overstretching and torsion of axons can potentially damage the axonal cytoskeleton. Following our previous studies on mechanical response of axonal MT bundles under uniaxial tension and compression, this work seeks to characterize the mechanical behavior of MT bundles under pure torsion as well as a combination of torsional and tensile loads using a coarse-grained computational model. In the case of pure torsion, a competition between MAP tau tensile and MT bending energies is observed. After three turns, a transition occurs in the mechanical behavior of the bundle that is characterized by its diameter shrinkage. Furthermore, crosslink spacing is shown to considerably influence the mechanical response, with larger MAP tau spacing resulting in a higher rate of turns. Therefore, MAP tau crosslinking of MT filaments protects the bundle from excessive deformation. Simultaneous application of torsion and tension on MT bundles is shown to accelerate bundle failure, compared to pure tension experiments. MAP tau proteins fail in clusters of 10–100 elements located at the discontinuities or the ends of MT filaments. This failure occurs in a stepwise fashion, implying gradual accumulation of elastic tensile energy in crosslinks followed by rupture. Failure of large groups of interconnecting MAP tau proteins leads to detachment of MT filaments from the bundle near discontinuities. This study highlights the importance of torsional loading in axonal damage after traumatic brain injury

  9. Simulating Topological Defects in Twisted Fiber Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruss, Isaac R.; Grason, Gregory M.

    2012-02-01

    Twisted bundles are a common motif found in naturally occurring structures of self-assembled fibers, such as collagen and fibrin. By understanding the general principles governing such organizations, new synthetic materials--from the nano to the macroscale--may also be realized. Recently, continuum elasticity theory has been applied to describe generic twisted fiber bundles. This has revealed a relation between a bundle's twist and the presence of topological defects in the cross-sectional packing of the fibers. Here we employ numerical simulations to examine this interdependence. We model a bundle's cross-section as beads confined to a plane. The interactions between beads is governed by a modified Lennard-Jones potential that accounts for the effects of twist. We observe configurations that range from perfect hexagonal packing for cases of no twist, to defect populated structures above a critical amount of twist. For small bundles of less than ˜100 beads, there exists a discrete spectrum of energy ground states corresponding to integer numbers of five-fold disclinations. For larger bundles, we hope to uncover what types of defect arrangements effectively screen the stresses caused by twist, and compare these to current predictions of the internal organization of collagen fibrils.

  10. Rod-to-Globule Transition of pDNA/PEG-Poly(l-Lysine) Polyplex Micelles Induced by a Collapsed Balance Between DNA Rigidity and PEG Crowdedness.

    PubMed

    Tockary, Theofilus A; Osada, Kensuke; Motoda, Yusuke; Hiki, Shigehiro; Chen, Qixian; Takeda, Kaori M; Dirisala, Anjaneyulu; Osawa, Shigehito; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2016-03-01

    The role of poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG) in rod-shaped polyplex micelle structures, having a characteristic core of folded plasmid DNA (pDNA) and a shell of tethered PEG chains, is investigated using PEG-detachable polyplex micelles. Rod shapes undergo change to compacted globule shapes by removal of PEG from polyplex micelles prepared from block copolymer with acid-labile linkage between PEG and poly(l-lysine) (PLys) through exposure to acidic milieu. This structural change supports the previous investigation on the rod shapes that PEG shell prevents the DNA structure from being globule shaped as the most favored structure in minimizing surface area. Noteworthy, despite the PEG is continuously depleted, the structural change does not occur in gradual shortening manner but the rod shapes keep their length unchanged and abruptly transform into globule shapes. Analysis of PEG density reveals the transition occurred when tethered PEG of rod shapes has decreased to a critical crowdedness, i.e., discontacted with neighboring PEG, which eventually illuminates another contribution, rigidity of DNA packaged as bundle in the rod shapes, in addition to the steric repulsion of PEG, in sustaining rod shapes. This investigation affirms significant role of PEG and also DNA rigidity as bundle in the formation of rod-shaped structures enduring the quest of compaction of charge-neutralized DNA in the polyplex micelles.

  11. Regenerative hyperpolarization in rods.

    PubMed Central

    Werblin, F S

    1975-01-01

    1. The electrical properties of the rods in Necturus maculosus were studied at the cell body and the outer segments in dark and light under current and voltage clamp with a pair of intracellular electrodes separated by about 1 mum. 2. The membrane resistance in the dark was voltage- and time-dependent both for the cell body and the outer segment. Slight depolarizations in the cell body reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 10 M omega with a time constant of about 1 sec. Polarization in either direction, at the outer segment, when greater than about 20 mV, reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 30 M omega. The dark potential in the cell body was typically -30 to -35 m V; at the outer segment it was typically only -10 to -15 mV. 3. The light-elicited voltage response in both the cell body and the outer segment was largest with the membrane near the dark potential level. In both regions, the response was reduced when the membrane was polarized in either direction. 4. Under voltage-clamp conditions, a reversal potential for the light response near + 10 mV was measured at the outer segment. At the cell body no reversal potential for the light response was measured; there the clamping current required during the light response was almost of the same magnitude at all potential levels. 5. When the membrane at the cell body was hyperpolarized in the dark under voltage clamp, a transient outward current, typically about one-half the magnitude of the initial inward clamping current was required to maintain the membrane at the clamped potential level. This outward current transient was associated with a decrease in membrane resistance with similar time course. The transient outward current reversed and became inward when the membrane was clamped to potentials more negative than -80 mV. Thus, the transient outward current appears to involve a transient activation initiated by hyperpolarization. I is regenerative in that it is initiated by hyperpolarization and tends to

  12. Eulerian formulation of elastic rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynen, Alexandre; Detournay, Emmanuel; Denoël, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    In numerous biological, medical and engineering applications, elastic rods are constrained to deform inside or around tube-like surfaces. To solve efficiently this class of problems, the equations governing the deflection of elastic rods are reformulated within the Eulerian framework of this generic tubular constraint defined as a perfectly stiff normal ringed surface. This reformulation hinges on describing the rod-deformed configuration by means of its relative position with respect to a reference curve, defined as the axis or spine curve of the constraint, and on restating the rod local equilibrium in terms of the curvilinear coordinate parametrizing this curve. Associated with a segmentation strategy, which partitions the global problem into a sequence of rod segments either in continuous contact with the constraint or free of contact (except for their extremities), this re-parametrization not only trivializes the detection of new contacts but also transforms these free boundary problems into classic two-points boundary-value problems and suppresses the isoperimetric constraints resulting from the imposition of the rod position at the extremities of each rod segment.

  13. Rod coupling for oil well sucker rods and the like

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.

    1986-07-29

    A coupling is described for joining solid reciprocating sucker rods to form a rod string in a well pump or the like comprising a unitary metal sleeve having an axial threaded bore and an irregular outer surface, and a homogeneous and non-fibrous coating on the sleeve over the outer surface providing an externally substantially cylindrical coupling, the coating comprising a flexible and abrasive resistant thermoplastic hydrourethane polymer formed on the irregular outer surface of the sleeve while in the molten state.

  14. Mechanism of Actin Filament Bundling by Fascin

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Silvia; Collins, Agnieszka; Yang, Changsong; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Svitkina, Tatyana; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-03-07

    Fascin is the main actin filament bundling protein in filopodia. Because of the important role filopodia play in cell migration, fascin is emerging as a major target for cancer drug discovery. However, an understanding of the mechanism of bundle formation by fascin is critically lacking. Fascin consists of four {beta}-trefoil domains. Here, we show that fascin contains two major actin-binding sites, coinciding with regions of high sequence conservation in {beta}-trefoil domains 1 and 3. The site in {beta}-trefoil-1 is located near the binding site of the fascin inhibitor macroketone and comprises residue Ser-39, whose phosphorylation by protein kinase C down-regulates actin bundling and formation of filopodia. The site in {beta}-trefoil-3 is related by pseudo-2-fold symmetry to that in {beta}-trefoil-1. The two sites are {approx}5 nm apart, resulting in a distance between actin filaments in the bundle of {approx}8.1 nm. Residue mutations in both sites disrupt bundle formation in vitro as assessed by co-sedimentation with actin and electron microscopy and severely impair formation of filopodia in cells as determined by rescue experiments in fascin-depleted cells. Mutations of other areas of the fascin surface also affect actin bundling and formation of filopodia albeit to a lesser extent, suggesting that, in addition to the two major actin-binding sites, fascin makes secondary contacts with other filaments in the bundle. In a high resolution crystal structure of fascin, molecules of glycerol and polyethylene glycol are bound in pockets located within the two major actin-binding sites. These molecules could guide the rational design of new anticancer fascin inhibitors.

  15. Buckling Behavior of Individual and Bundled Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Soheilypour, Mohammad; Peyro, Mohaddeseh; Peter, Stephen J.; Mofrad, Mohammad R.K.

    2015-01-01

    As the major structural constituent of the cytoskeleton, microtubules (MTs) serve a variety of biological functions that range from facilitating organelle transport to maintaining the mechanical integrity of the cell. Neuronal MTs exhibit a distinct configuration, hexagonally packed bundles of MT filaments, interconnected by MT-associated protein (MAP) tau. Building on our previous work on mechanical response of axonal MT bundles under uniaxial tension, this study is focused on exploring the compression scenarios. Intracellular MTs carry a large fraction of the compressive loads sensed by the cell and therefore, like any other column-like structure, are prone to substantial bending and buckling. Various biological activities, e.g., actomyosin contractility and many pathological conditions are driven or followed by bending, looping, and buckling of MT filaments. The coarse-grained model previously developed in our lab has been used to study the mechanical behavior of individual and bundled in vivo MT filaments under uniaxial compression. Both configurations show tip-localized, decaying, and short-wavelength buckling. This behavior highlights the role of the surrounding cytoplasm and MAP tau on MT buckling behavior, which allows MT filaments to bear much larger compressive forces. It is observed that MAP tau interconnections improve this effect by a factor of two. The enhanced ability of MT bundles to damp buckling waves relative to individual MT filaments, may be interpreted as a self-defense mechanism because it helps axonal MTs to endure harsher environments while maintaining their function. The results indicate that MT filaments in a bundle do not buckle simultaneously implying that the applied stress is not equally shared among the MT filaments, that is a consequence of the nonuniform distribution of MAP tau proteins along the bundle length. Furthermore, from a pathological perspective, it is observed that axonal MT bundles are more vulnerable to failure in

  16. Nerve Bundles and Deep Dyspareunia in Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christina; Hoang, Lien; Yosef, Ali; Alotaibi, Fahad; Allaire, Catherine; Brotto, Lori; Fraser, Ian S; Bedaiwy, Mohamed A; Ng, Tony L; Lee, Anna F; Yong, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    The etiology of deep dyspareunia in endometriosis is unclear. Our objective was to determine whether nerve bundle density in the cul-de-sac/uterosacrals (zone II) is associated with deep dyspareunia in women with endometriosis. We conducted a blinded retrospective immunohistochemistry study (n = 58) at a tertiary referral center (2011-2013). Patients were stringently phenotyped into a study group and 2 control groups. The study group (tender endometriosis, n = 29) consisted of patients with deep dyspareunia, a tender zone II on examination, and an endometriosis lesion in zone II excised at surgery. Control group 1 (nontender endometriosis, n = 17) consisted of patients without deep dyspareunia, a nontender zone II on examination, and an endometriosis lesion in zone II excised at surgery. Control group 2 (tender nonendometriosis, n = 12) consisted of patients with deep dyspareunia, a tender zone II on examination, and a nonendometriosis lesion (eg, normal histology) in zone II excised at surgery. Protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5) immunohistochemistry was performed to identify nerve bundles (nerve fibers surrounded by perineurium) in the excised zone II lesion. PGP9.5 nerve bundle density (bundles/high powered field [HPF]) was then scored by a pathologist blinded to the group. We found a significant difference in PGP9.5 nerve bundle density between the 3 groups (analysis of variance, F2,55 = 6.39, P = .003). Mean PGP9.5 nerve bundle density was significantly higher in the study group (1.16 ± 0.56 bundles/HPF [±standard deviation]) compared to control group 1 (0.65 ± 0.36, Tukey test, P = .005) and control group 2 (0.72 ± 0.56, Tukey test, P = .044). This study provides evidence that neurogenesis in the cul-de-sac/uterosacrals may be an etiological factor for deep dyspareunia in endometriosis.

  17. Anomalous water expulsion from carbon-based rods at high humidity.

    PubMed

    Nune, Satish K; Lao, David B; Heldebrant, David J; Liu, Jian; Olszta, Matthew J; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Gordon, Lyle M; Nandasiri, Manjula I; Whyatt, Greg; Clayton, Chris; Gotthold, David W; Engelhard, Mark H; Schaef, Herbert T

    2016-09-01

    Three water adsorption-desorption mechanisms are common in inorganic materials: chemisorption, which can lead to the modification of the first coordination sphere; simple adsorption, which is reversible; and condensation, which is irreversible. Regardless of the sorption mechanism, all known materials exhibit an isotherm in which the quantity of water adsorbed increases with an increase in relative humidity. Here, we show that carbon-based rods can adsorb water at low humidity and spontaneously expel about half of the adsorbed water when the relative humidity exceeds a 50-80% threshold. The water expulsion is reversible, and is attributed to the interfacial forces between the confined rod surfaces. At wide rod spacings, a monolayer of water can form on the surface of the carbon-based rods, which subsequently leads to condensation in the confined space between adjacent rods. As the relative humidity increases, adjacent rods (confining surfaces) in the bundles are drawn closer together via capillary forces. At high relative humidity, and once the size of the confining surfaces has decreased to a critical length, a surface-induced evaporation phenomenon known as solvent cavitation occurs and water that had condensed inside the confined area is released as a vapour. PMID:27294505

  18. Anomalous water expulsion from carbon-based rods at high humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nune, Satish K.; Lao, David B.; Heldebrant, David J.; Liu, Jian; Olszta, Matthew J.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Gordon, Lyle M.; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Whyatt, Greg; Clayton, Chris; Gotthold, David W.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2016-09-01

    Three water adsorption–desorption mechanisms are common in inorganic materials: chemisorption, which can lead to the modification of the first coordination sphere; simple adsorption, which is reversible; and condensation, which is irreversible. Regardless of the sorption mechanism, all known materials exhibit an isotherm in which the quantity of water adsorbed increases with an increase in relative humidity. Here, we show that carbon-based rods can adsorb water at low humidity and spontaneously expel about half of the adsorbed water when the relative humidity exceeds a 50–80% threshold. The water expulsion is reversible, and is attributed to the interfacial forces between the confined rod surfaces. At wide rod spacings, a monolayer of water can form on the surface of the carbon-based rods, which subsequently leads to condensation in the confined space between adjacent rods. As the relative humidity increases, adjacent rods (confining surfaces) in the bundles are drawn closer together via capillary forces. At high relative humidity, and once the size of the confining surfaces has decreased to a critical length, a surface-induced evaporation phenomenon known as solvent cavitation occurs and water that had condensed inside the confined area is released as a vapour.

  19. Anomalous water expulsion from carbon-based rods at high humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nune, Satish K.; Lao, David B.; Heldebrant, David J.; Liu, Jian; Olszta, Matthew J.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Gordon, Lyle M.; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Whyatt, Greg; Clayton, Chris; Gotthold, David W.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2016-09-01

    Three water adsorption-desorption mechanisms are common in inorganic materials: chemisorption, which can lead to the modification of the first coordination sphere; simple adsorption, which is reversible; and condensation, which is irreversible. Regardless of the sorption mechanism, all known materials exhibit an isotherm in which the quantity of water adsorbed increases with an increase in relative humidity. Here, we show that carbon-based rods can adsorb water at low humidity and spontaneously expel about half of the adsorbed water when the relative humidity exceeds a 50-80% threshold. The water expulsion is reversible, and is attributed to the interfacial forces between the confined rod surfaces. At wide rod spacings, a monolayer of water can form on the surface of the carbon-based rods, which subsequently leads to condensation in the confined space between adjacent rods. As the relative humidity increases, adjacent rods (confining surfaces) in the bundles are drawn closer together via capillary forces. At high relative humidity, and once the size of the confining surfaces has decreased to a critical length, a surface-induced evaporation phenomenon known as solvent cavitation occurs and water that had condensed inside the confined area is released as a vapour.

  20. Rod coupling with mounted guide

    SciTech Connect

    Bair, M.L.

    1987-05-26

    This patent describes a well sucker rod string, in a well bore, the combination comprising: an axially elongated coupling section having threads at axially opposite ends thereof for coupling to and between successive sucker rods in the rod string, to transmit string loading. The section has first and second exposed surfaces adjacent an end of the section, and a third surface located between the first and second exposed surfaces; a rod guide consisting of molded plastic material extending about and bonded to the section third surface to project outwardly therefrom for engagement with the well bore during up and down stroking of the string; and one annular groove sunk in the section between the first and third surfaces, and another annular groove sunk in the section between the second and third surfaces. The depth of the one groove is less than about 15% of the radius of the section at the first surface.

  1. Magnetically directed self-assembly of electrospun superparamagnetic fibrous bundles to form three-dimensional tissues with a highly ordered architecture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Yu; Cheng, Wei-Yuan; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Lai, Chih-Huang; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Hsiao, Chun-Wen; Huang, Chia-Wen; Chen, Mei-Chin; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2011-06-01

    Engineering three-dimensional (3D) cell-dense tissues with a well-organized structure remains a challenge in tissue engineering. In this study, highly oriented fibrous bundles, consisted of composite fibers of poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide)/superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, were fabricated using an electrospinning technique. The magnetic properties of the fabricated fibrous bundles were examined by a vibrating sample magnetometer and a superconducting quantum interference device; the results demonstrate that the fabricated fibrous bundles revealed superparamagnetic behavior without magnetic hysteresis. After seeding C2C12 myoblasts on the fibrous bundles, cells were grown along the direction of the underlying fibers (cell rods), an aligned pattern similar to those in native skeletal muscle tissues. When treated with the differentiation medium, myoblasts were fused together and formed multinucleated myotubes. As soon as applying an external magnetic field, the cell rods can spontaneously response to the magnetic control and self-assemble into 3D tissues with a highly ordered architecture. These findings demonstrate that the magnetically susceptible fibrous bundles not only can serve as a functional unit providing the topographic cue for cell orientation, but also can be magnetically manipulated for the creation of 3D cell-dense constructs. This technique may be applied to various cell types and scaffold configurations, thus advancing the design of engineered tissues that more closely replicate native tissues. PMID:21375393

  2. Photothermal imaging through coherent infrared bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milstein, Yonat; Tepper, Michal; Harrington, James A.; Ben David, Moshe; Gannot, Israel

    2011-03-01

    This study aims to develop a photothermal imaging system through a coherent infrared bundle. This system will be used to determine the oxygenation level of various tissues, suspected malignant tissues in particular. The oxygenation estimation is preformed using a computerized algorithm. In order to evaluate the system, different bundle configurations were used for the determination of the optimal one. Bundle transmittance and the algorithm's estimation ability were measured, measurements were performed using agar phantoms consisting of varying ratios of Methylene Blue and ICG. A bundle consisting of 19 Teflon waveguides with a of 1.1mm was found to be the optimal configuration with an RMS of the error of 9.38%. At a second stage the system was validated on blood samples with varying oxygenation levels and there oxygenation levels were estimated. This stage had an RMS of the error of 10.16% for the oxygenation level estimation for samples with a 50% oxygenation level and higher. Once the basic system was validated successfully on agar phantoms and blood samples a portable system was designed and built in order to fit the system for portable use. The portable system consists of a white light illuminating source followed by filters transmitting certain wavelengths, a transmitting fiber, a thermal imaging bundle and a portable thermal camera. This portable system will be evaluated in order to have an adequate portable system for implementing the method out of the lab.

  3. Nuclear design of Helical Cruciform Fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, K.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    In order to increase the power density of current and new light water reactor designs, the Helical Cruciform Fuel (HCF) rods are proposed. The HCF rods are equivalent to a cylindrical rod, with the fuel in a cruciform shaped, twisted axially. The HCF rods increase the surface area to volume ratio and inter-subchannel mixing behavior due to their cruciform and helical shapes, respectively. In a previous study, the HCF rods have shown the potential to up-rate existing PWRs by 50% and BWRs by 25%. However, HCF rods do display different neutronics modeling and performance. The cruciform cross section of HCF rods creates radially asymmetric heat generation and temperature distribution. The nominal HCF rod's beginning of life reactivity is reduced, compared to a cylindrical rod with the same fuel volume, by 500 pcm, due to increase in absorption in cladding. The rotation of these rods accounts for reactivity changes, which depends on the H/HM ratio of the pin cell. The HCF geometry shows large sensitivities to U{sup 235} or gadolinium enrichments compared to a cylindrical geometry. In addition, the gadolinium-containing HCF rods show a stronger effect on neighboring HCF rods than in case of cylindrical rods, depending on the orientation of the HCF rods. The helical geometry of the rods introduces axial shadowing of about 600 pcm, not seen in typical cylindrical rods. (authors)

  4. Does surface roughness amplify wetting?

    SciTech Connect

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-11-14

    Any solid surface is intrinsically rough on the microscopic scale. In this paper, we study the effect of this roughness on the wetting properties of hydrophilic substrates. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to the well-known Wenzel's law, predict that surface roughness should amplify the wetting properties of such adsorbents. We use a fundamental measure density functional theory to demonstrate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., wetting is hindered. Based on three independent analyses we show that microscopic surface corrugation increases the wetting temperature or even makes the surface hydrophobic. Since for macroscopically corrugated surfaces the solid texture does indeed amplify wetting there must exist a crossover between two length-scale regimes that are distinguished by opposite response on surface roughening. This demonstrates how deceptive can be efforts to extend the thermodynamical laws beyond their macroscopic territory.

  5. Radar-aeolian roughness project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Dobrovolskis, A.; Gaddis, L.; Iversen, J. D.; Lancaster, N.; Leach, Rodman N.; Rasnussen, K.; Saunders, S.; Vanzyl, J.; Wall, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to establish an empirical relationship between measurements of radar, aeolian, and surface roughness on a variety of natural surfaces and to understand the underlying physical causes. This relationship will form the basis for developing a predictive equation to derive aeolian roughness from radar backscatter. Results are given from investigations carried out in 1989 on the principal elements of the project, with separate sections on field studies, radar data analysis, laboratory simulations, and development of theory for planetary applications.

  6. RP cone-rod degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Heckenlively, J R

    1987-01-01

    A group of patients with progressive retinal degeneration and visual field loss, who meet the basic definition of RP were investigated to better define the relationship of the findings on the ERG with clinical characteristics such as visual field size, presence or absence of scotomata or pseudo-altitudinal defects on visual field, amount of night blindness; and presence or absence of macular or optic nerve changes. These studies suggest that cone-rod degeneration patients of the RP type go through the following stages; early, the ERG has a definite cone-rod pattern where the rod ERG is larger than the cone ERG while both are abnormal. As the disease advances, there is more of a reduction in the scotopic ERG such that both the rod and cone ERGs become nearly equal. As the disease further progresses the ERG becomes non-recordable on single-flash technique, but there is good residual rod function and the final rod threshold remains good until the visual field is reduced, typically less than 10 degrees with the IV-4 isopter. Finally with advanced disease the patient becomes night blind and generally becomes very difficult to distinguished from patients who have advanced rod-cone degeneration. While it may seem logical to find that visual field size correlates with various ERG parameters; this has not been as consistent a finding in patients with rod-cone degeneration in the author's experience. The analysis shows several new pieces of information about visual field changes in cone-rod degeneration; enlarged blind spots are seen earlier in cases which have recordable cone-rod patterns (group I), and pseudo-altitudinal changes are more likely to occur in autosomal recessive patients. Patients with macular lesions and central scotomata had larger amplitudes than patients with normal appearing maculae and no central scotomata. Patients with temporal optic atrophy had an earlier onset of symptoms and significant correlation with both photopic a- and b-waves and bright flash

  7. Self-sustained oscillation limit of tube bundle resonant noise. (Phase 1: Evaluation equation of oscillation limit)

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, M.; Fujita, K.; Hasegawa, N.

    1995-12-01

    Self-sustained oscillation limit of tube bundle resonant noise is studied in this paper. Excited acoustic energy and dissipating one in tube bundle are derived theoretically. In the exciting stage, the acoustic field is considered to be fed back to the flow field as the inlet flow fluctuation. And the acoustic damping is considered to induce the dissipating energy. Based on the energy balance of both and dimensional analysis, a new simple evaluation equation of self-sustained oscillation limit is proposed concerning on tube bundle resonant noise. A typical experimental results are evaluated based on this equation. The results are roughly good, but this suggests that model analysis of both exciting energy and dissipating one is necessary for more precise evaluation.

  8. Roughness of Hawaiian volcanic terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Aisha R.; Anderson, F. Scott; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Haldemann, Albert F. C.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Foster, James

    2008-12-01

    We performed analyses of topographic variation (surface roughness) using a new 2-D mapping method which shows that understanding the relationship between data resolution, Hurst exponent, y intercept, RMS deviation, and cell size is important for assessing surface processes. We use this new method to assess flows at six field sites in Kilauea caldera, Hawaii, using three data sets at different resolutions, TOPSAR (10 m/pixel), airborne lidar (1 m/pixel), and tripod-mounted lidar (0.02-0.03 m/pixel). The flows studied include ponded pahoehoe flows, compound pahoehoe flows, and jumbled, slabby pahoehoe. The 2-D quantification of surface roughness for the Kilauea lava flows indicates that features formed during emplacement and modification of the flows exhibit statistically distinct roughness signatures. The 2-D method provides a tool for unit mapping based on surface roughness. Key findings indicate that the new 2-D method provides more robust results than 1-D methods for surface roughness because of larger 2-D sample sizes and the removal of 1-D directional bias leading to a reduction in error. Furthermore, data set resolution relative to the scale of the features under study is important to consider when designing a 2-D surface roughness study. Future applications to topographic data sets from Mars will provide information on flow emplacement conditions and spatial and temporal evolution of volcanic provinces on Mars.

  9. Surface roughness stabilizes the clustering of self-propelled triangles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilse, Sven Erik; Holm, Christian; de Graaf, Joost

    2016-10-01

    Self-propelled particles can spontaneously form dense phases from a dilute suspension in a process referred to as motility-induced phase separation. The properties of the out-of-equilibrium structures that are formed are governed by the specifics of the particle interactions and the strength of the activity. Thus far, most studies into the formation of these structures have focused on spherical colloids, dumbbells, and rod-like particles endowed with various interaction potentials. Only a few studies have examined the collective behavior of more complex particle shapes. Here, we increase the geometric complexity and use molecular dynamics simulations to consider the structures formed by triangular self-propelled particles with surface roughness. These triangles either move towards their apex or towards their base, i.e., they possess a polarity. We find that apex-directed triangles cluster more readily, more stably, and have a smoother cluster interface than their base-directed counterparts. A difference between the two polarities is in line with the results of Wensink et al. [Phys. Rev. E 89, 010302 (2014)]; however, we obtain the reversed result when it comes to clustering, namely, that apex-directed triangles cluster more successfully. We further show that reducing the surface roughness negatively impacts the stability of the base-directed structures, suggesting that their formation is in large part due to surface roughness. Our results lay a solid foundation for future experimental and computational studies into the effect of roughness on the collective dynamics of swimmers.

  10. A Kinetic Model of Active Extensile Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Daniel; Chakraborty, Bulbul; Baskaran, Aparna

    Recent experiments in active filament networks reveal interesting rheological properties (Dan Chen: APS March Meeting 2015 D49.00001). This system consumes ATP to produce an extensile motion in bundles of microtubules. This extension then leads to self generated stresses and spontaneous flows. We propose a minimal model where the activity is modeled by self-extending bundles that are part of a cross linked network. This network can reorganize itself through buckling of extending filaments and merging events that alter the topology of the network. We numerically simulate this minimal kinetic model and examine the emergent rheological properties and determine how stresses are generated by the extensile activity. We will present results that focus on the effects of confinement and network connectivity of the bundles on stress fluctuations and response of an active gel.

  11. Extremal Bundles on Calabi-Yau Threefolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; He, Yang-Hui; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2015-06-01

    We study constructions of stable holomorphic vector bundles on Calabi-Yau threefolds, especially those with exact anomaly cancellation which we call extremal. By going through the known databases we find that such examples are rare in general and can be ruled out for the spectral cover construction for all elliptic threefolds. We then introduce a general Hartshorne-Serre construction and use it to find extremal bundles of general ranks and study their stability, as well as computing their Chern numbers. Based on both existing and our new constructions, we revisit the DRY conjecture for the existence of stable sheaves on Calabi-threefolds, and provide theoretical and numerical evidence for its correctness. Our construction can be easily generalized to bundles with no extremal conditions imposed.

  12. Development of burnup dependent fuel rod model in COBRA-TF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Mine Ozdemir

    The purpose of this research was to develop a burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model within Pennsylvania State University, Reactor Dynamics and Fuel Management Group (RDFMG) version of the subchannel thermal-hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF). The model takes into account first, the degradation of fuel thermal conductivity with high burnup; and second, the fuel thermal conductivity dependence on the Gadolinium content for both UO2 and MOX fuel rods. The modified Nuclear Fuel Industries (NFI) model for UO2 fuel rods and Duriez/Modified NFI Model for MOX fuel rods were incorporated into CTF and fuel centerline predictions were compared against Halden experimental test data and FRAPCON-3.4 predictions to validate the burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF. Experimental test cases from Halden reactor fuel rods for UO2 fuel rods at Beginning of Life (BOL), through lifetime without Gd2O3 and through lifetime with Gd 2O3 and a MOX fuel rod were simulated with CTF. Since test fuel rod and FRAPCON-3.4 results were based on single rod measurements, CTF was run for a single fuel rod surrounded with a single channel configuration. Input decks for CTF were developed for one fuel rod located at the center of a subchannel (rod-centered subchannel approach). Fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF were compared against the measurements from Halden experimental test data and the predictions from FRAPCON-3.4. After implementing the new fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF and validating the model with experimental data, CTF model was applied to steady state and transient calculations. 4x4 PWR fuel bundle configuration from Purdue MOX benchmark was used to apply the new model for steady state and transient calculations. First, one of each high burnup UO2 and MOX fuel rods from 4x4 matrix were selected to carry out single fuel rod calculations and fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF/TORT-TD were compared against CTF /TORT-TD /FRAPTRAN

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ROD DRIVE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Oakes, L.C.; Walker, C.S.

    1959-12-15

    ABS>A suspension mechanism between a vertically movable nuclear reactor control rod and a rod extension, which also provides information for the operator or an automatic control signal, is described. A spring connects the rod extension to a drive shift. The extension of the spring indicates whether (1) the rod is at rest on the reactor, (2) the rod and extension are suspended, or (3) the extension alone is suspended, the spring controlling a 3-position electrical switch.

  14. The counterbend phenomenon in flagellar axonemes and cross-linked filament bundles.

    PubMed

    Gadêlha, Hermes; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Goriely, Alain

    2013-07-23

    Recent observations of flagellar counterbend in sea urchin sperm show that the mechanical induction of curvature in one part of a passive flagellum induces a compensatory countercurvature elsewhere. This apparent paradoxical effect cannot be explained using the standard elastic rod theory of Euler and Bernoulli, or even the more general Cosserat theory of rods. Here, we develop a geometrically exact mechanical model to describe the statics of microtubule bundles that is capable of predicting the curvature reversal events observed in eukaryotic flagella. This is achieved by allowing the interaction of deformations in different material directions, by accounting not only for structural bending, but also for the elastic forces originating from the internal cross-linking mechanics. Large-amplitude static configurations can be described analytically, and an excellent match between the model and the observed counterbend deformation was found. This allowed a simultaneous estimation of multiple sperm flagellum material parameters, namely the cross-linking sliding resistance, the bending stiffness, and the sperm head junction compliance ratio. We further show that small variations on the empirical conditions may induce discrepancies for the evaluation of the flagellar material quantities, so that caution is required when interpreting experiments. Finally, our analysis demonstrates that the counterbend emerges as a fundamental property of sliding resistance in cross-linked filamentous polymer bundles, which also suggests that cross-linking proteins may contribute to the regulation of the flagellar waveform in swimming sperm via counterbend mechanics. PMID:23824293

  15. Heat transfer to water from a vertical tube bundle under natural-circulation conditions. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszczynski, M.J.; Viskanta, R.

    1983-01-01

    The natural circulation heat transfer data for longitudinal flow of water outside a vertical rod bundle are needed for developing correlations which can be used in best estimate computer codes to model thermal-hydraulic behavior of nuclear reactor cores under accident or shutdown conditions. The heat transfer coefficient between the fuel rod surface and the coolant is the key parameter required to predict the fuel temperature. Because of the absence of the required heat transfer coefficient data base under natural circulation conditions, experiments have been performed in a natural circulation loop. A seven-tube bundle having a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.25 was used as a test heat exchanger. A circulating flow was established in the loop, because of buoyancy differences between its two vertical legs. Steady-state and transient heat transfer measurements have been made over as wide a range of thermal conditions as possible with the system. Steady state heat transfer data were correlated in terms of relevant dimensionless parameters. Empirical correlations for the average Nusselt number, in terms of Reynolds number, Rayleigh number and the ratio of Grashof to Reynolds number are given.

  16. Infrared imaging with fiber optic bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Albert R., Sr.; McCord, James; Thompson, W. S.; LeBlanc, Richard A.

    2003-09-01

    Efforts have resumed to improve the image quality of infrared imaging bundles formed at AMI using the ribbon stacking method. The C4 glass has been used to reduce core size, increase packing density and improve flexibility. Ribbons are formed from unclad fiber wound on a drum with pitch, ribbon count and spacing between ribbons computer controlled. A small portion of each ribbon is compressed and fused using thin, dilute Epoxy. Unfortunately, the Epoxy, serving as a clad, absorbs most all the LWIR energy making the bundles unsuited for 8-12 μm cameras. The ribbons are removed from the drum and stacked, one on top of the other observing proper orientation to form the bundle. A typical 1 meter bundle is formed from 50-70 count ribbons for a total of 2500-4900 fibers, made from 2.5-4.9 Km of C4 fiber. Typical core diameters are 60-80 μm. Active surface area ranges from 60-70%. Infrared resolution images formed using a NIR tube camera equipped with a special relay lens demonstrates the resolution limit for the bundle. Currently, the limit is about 10 lp/mm. The bundle end is imaged in the 3-5 μm Agema 210 camera using an Amtir 1 F/1 meniscus, coated 3-5 μm. Video images taken in natural light of an individual, easily recognizable at 50 feet, will be shown. Results of careful evaluation carried out at Lockheed Martin in Orlando using a high performance Raytheon Galileo camera will be presented.

  17. Wetting and Roughness: Pattern Formation in a Rough Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavan, A. A.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; McKinley, G. H.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Wetting phenomena are inherently multiscale; owing to the complex nature of porous and fractured media, immiscible flows in this setting continue to challenge our microscopic and macroscopic descriptions. To gain some insight into the interplay between wettability and roughness of the medium, here we study experimentally the immiscible displacement of one fluid by another in a Hele-Shaw cell (two glass plates separated by a thin gap) with rough surfaces. We use a radial Hele-Shaw cell and saturate it with highly viscous silicone oil; we then inject a less viscous liquid at the center of the cell. Displacement of a more viscous liquid by a less viscous one leads to a hydrodynamic instability, known as viscous fingering. Wettability of the medium, however, has a profound influence on the displacement patterns and can lead to a complete suppression of the viscous fingering instability. Roughness, on the other hand, amplifies the wettability of the medium, making a wetting surface even more wetting and a non-wetting surface even more non-wetting. Roughness can also lead to contact-line pinning and intermittent avalanche-like behavior in the flow. We study the interplay between roughness and wettability of the medium by isolating each effect. We then propose a phase diagram that classifies the different displacement patterns, elucidating the underlying physics at play across scales.

  18. Does the posterolateral bundle influence rotational movement more than the anteromedial bundle in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction?: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Komzák, M; Hart, R; Okál, F; Safi, A

    2012-10-01

    The biomechanical function of the anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral (PL) bundles of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) remains controversial. Some studies report that the AM bundle stabilises the knee joint in anteroposterior (AP) translation and rotational movement (both internal and external) to the same extent as the PL bundle. Others conclude that the PL bundle is more important than the AM in controlling rotational movement. The objective of this randomised cohort study involving 60 patients (39 men and 21 women) with a mean age of 32.9 years (18 to 53) was to evaluate the function of the AM and the PL bundles of the ACL in both AP and rotational movements of the knee joint after single-bundle and double-bundle ACL reconstruction using a computer navigation system. In the double-bundle group the patients were also randomised to have the AM or the PL bundle tensioned first, with knee laxity measured after each stage of reconstruction. All patients had isolated complete ACL tears, and the presence of a meniscal injury was the only supplementary pathology permitted for inclusion in the trial. The KT-1000 arthrometer was used to apply a constant load to evaluate the AP translation and the rolimeter was used to apply a constant rotational force. For the single-bundle group deviation was measured before and after ACL reconstruction. In the double-bundle group deviation was measured for the ACL-deficient, AM- or PL-reconstructed first conditions and for the total reconstruction. We found that the AM bundle in the double-bundle group controlled rotation as much as the single-bundle technique, and to a greater extent than the PL bundle in the double-bundle technique. The double-bundle technique increases AP translation and rotational stability in internal rotation more than the single-bundle technique.

  19. Rod guide/paraffin scraper

    SciTech Connect

    Mabry, J.F.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes improvement in a rod guide and paraffin scraper. It comprises: a body including longitudinal ribs spaced radially and extending out from the body; having two identical halves with the body surrounding a bore to accept a sucker rod, and each of the identical halves having a locking and tightening feature using a tongue and groove concept for interfitting the halves together over the sucker rod. This improvement comprises a rod guide and paraffin scraper with two identical halves comprising; a cylindrical central body including, at each end, three longitudinal ribs radially spaced to form a triad leaving three flow channels, at each end of the body, of essentially the same size and spacing as the ribs; and an angular wedge with opposingly ramped sides at the inside end of each of the ribs for scraping and directing material into the flow channels; and a set of triangular shaped tongues that interfit with a set of triangular shaped grooves for tightening the identical halves together and over the sucker rod; and a pair of cone-shaped male locks at one end of the identical half to mate with a pair of cone-shaped female locks at the opposite end of the other identical half.

  20. Roughness effects in uncompensated antiferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Charilaou, M.; Hellman, F.

    2015-02-28

    Monte Carlo simulations show that roughness in uncompensated antiferromagnets decreases not just the surface magnetization but also the net magnetization and particularly strongly affects the temperature dependence. In films with step-type roughness, each step creates a new compensation front that decreases the global net magnetization. The saturation magnetization decreases non-monotonically with increasing roughness and does not scale with the surface area. Roughness in the form of surface vacancies changes the temperature-dependence of the magnetization; when only one surface has vacancies, the saturation magnetization will decrease linearly with surface occupancy, whereas when both surfaces have vacancies, the magnetization is negative and exhibits a compensation point at finite temperature, which can be tuned by controlling the occupancy. Roughness also affects the spin-texture of the surfaces due to long-range dipolar interactions and generates non-collinear spin configurations that could be used in devices to produce locally modified exchange bias. These results explain the strongly reduced magnetization found in magnetometry experiments and furthers our understanding of the temperature-dependence of exchange bias.

  1. Stuck fuel rod capping sleeve

    DOEpatents

    Gorscak, Donald A.; Maringo, John J.; Nilsen, Roy J.

    1988-01-01

    A stuck fuel rod capping sleeve to be used during derodding of spent fuel assemblies if a fuel rod becomes stuck in a partially withdrawn position and, thus, has to be severed. The capping sleeve has an inner sleeve made of a lower work hardening highly ductile material (e.g., Inconel 600) and an outer sleeve made of a moderately ductile material (e.g., 304 stainless steel). The inner sleeve may be made of an epoxy filler. The capping sleeve is placed on a fuel rod which is then severed by using a bolt cutter device. Upon cutting, the capping sleeve deforms in such a manner as to prevent the gross release of radioactive fuel material

  2. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    DOEpatents

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  3. Optimization of a bundle divertor for FED

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Rothe, K.E.; Minkoff, M.

    1982-01-01

    Optimal double-T bundle divertor configurations have been obtained for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED). On-axis ripple is minimized, while satisfying a series of engineering constraints. The ensuing non-linear optimization problem is solved via a sequence of quadratic programming subproblems, using the VMCON algorithm. The resulting divertor designs are substantially improved over previous configurations.

  4. Mobility of Taxol in Microtubule Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, J.

    2003-06-01

    Mobility of taxol inside microtubules was investigated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) on flow-aligned bundles. Bundles were made of microtubules with either GMPCPP or GTP at the exchangeable site on the tubulin dimer. Recovery times were sensitive to bundle thickness and packing, indicating that taxol molecules are able to move laterally through the bundle. The density of open binding sites along a microtubule was varied by controlling the concentration of taxol in solution for GMPCPP samples. With > 63% sites occupied, recovery times were independent of taxol concentration and, therefore, inversely proportional to the microscopic dissociation rate, k_{off}. It was found that 10*k_{off} (GMPCPP) ~ k_{off} (GTP), consistent with, but not fully accounting for, the difference in equilibrium constants for taxol on GMPCPP and GTP microtubules. With < 63% sites occupied, recovery times decreased as ~ [Tax]^{-1/5} for both types of microtubules. We conclude that the diffusion of taxol along the microtubule interior is hindered by rebinding events when open sites are within ~7 nm of each other.

  5. Meromorphic Higgs bundles and related geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalakov, Peter

    2016-11-01

    The present note is mostly a survey on the generalised Hitchin integrable system and moduli spaces of meromorphic G-Higgs bundles. We also fill minor gaps in the existing literature, outline a calculation of the infinitesimal period map and review some related geometries.

  6. The unintended consequences of bundled payments.

    PubMed

    Weeks, William B; Rauh, Stephen S; Wadsworth, Eric B; Weinstein, James N

    2013-01-01

    Consensus is building that episode-based bundled payments can produce substantial Medicare savings, and the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation's Bundled Payment Initiative endorses this concept. The program generates potential cost savings by reducing the historic cost of time-defined episodes of care, provided through a discount. Although bundled payments can reduce waste primarily in the postacute care setting, concerns arise that, in an effort to maintain income levels that are necessary to cover fixed costs, providers may change their behaviors to increase the volume of episodes. Such actions would mitigate the savings that Medicare might have accrued and may perpetuate the fee-for-service payment mechanism, with episodes of care becoming the new service. Although bundled payments have some advantages over the current reimbursement system, true cost-savings to Medicare will be realized only when the federal government addresses the use issue that underlies much of the waste inherent in the system and provides ample incentives to eliminate capacity and move toward capitation.

  7. The unintended consequences of bundled payments.

    PubMed

    Weeks, William B; Rauh, Stephen S; Wadsworth, Eric B; Weinstein, James N

    2013-01-01

    Consensus is building that episode-based bundled payments can produce substantial Medicare savings, and the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation's Bundled Payment Initiative endorses this concept. The program generates potential cost savings by reducing the historic cost of time-defined episodes of care, provided through a discount. Although bundled payments can reduce waste primarily in the postacute care setting, concerns arise that, in an effort to maintain income levels that are necessary to cover fixed costs, providers may change their behaviors to increase the volume of episodes. Such actions would mitigate the savings that Medicare might have accrued and may perpetuate the fee-for-service payment mechanism, with episodes of care becoming the new service. Although bundled payments have some advantages over the current reimbursement system, true cost-savings to Medicare will be realized only when the federal government addresses the use issue that underlies much of the waste inherent in the system and provides ample incentives to eliminate capacity and move toward capitation. PMID:23277901

  8. Social Bundles: Thinking through the Infant Body

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownlie, Julie; Leith, Valerie M. Sheach

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on a UK research study on immunization, this article investigates parents' understandings of the relationship between themselves, their infants, other bodies, the state, and cultural practices--material and symbolic. The article argues that infant bodies are best thought of as always social bundles, rather than as biobundles made social…

  9. Roughness Perception in Virtual Textures.

    PubMed

    Unger, B; Hollis, R; Klatzky, R

    2011-01-01

    Haptic devices allow the production of virtual textured surfaces for psychophysical experiments. Some studies have shown inconsistencies between virtual and real textures with respect to their psychophysical functions for roughness, leading to speculation that virtual textures differ in some way from real ones. We have determined the psychophysical function for roughness using textures rendered with a high-fidelity magnetic levitation haptic device. A constraint surface algorithm was used to simulate the motion of a spherical probe over trapezoidal gratings and randomly dithered cones. The shape of the psychophysical functions for roughness is consistent between subjects but varies with changes in texture and probe geometry. For dithered cones, inverted "U"-shaped functions were found nearly identical, in maxima and curvature, to those in the literature for real textures with similar geometry. PMID:26963163

  10. Recent Studies of Runway Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Garland; Hall, Albert W.

    1965-01-01

    Recent studies of NASA research related to aircraft operating problems on rough runways are presented. Some of these investigations were conducted cooperatively with the airport operators, with the Federal Aviation Agency, and with the U.S. Air Force. The studies show that criteria based on power spectral levels of runway-profile data are not sufficient to define acceptable levels of runway roughness from the piloting viewpoint. Because of the large variation in response characteristics between various types of aircraft, a runway may be acceptable for some aircraft and unacceptable for others. A criterion for roughness, therefore, should be expressed in terms of aircraft response - preferably, cockpit acceleration. A criterion suggested is that the maximum vertical acceleration in the cockpit should not exceed +/- 0.4 g for sections of the runway where precise aircraft control is required.

  11. Hierarchical Nanostructures Self-Assembled from a Mixture System Containing Rod-Coil Block Copolymers and Rigid Homopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongliang; Jiang, Tao; Lin, Shaoliang; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua; Zhu, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly behavior of a mixture system containing rod-coil block copolymers and rigid homopolymers was investigated by using Brownian dynamics simulations. The morphologies of formed hierarchical self-assemblies were found to be dependent on the Lennard-Jones (LJ) interaction εRR between rod blocks, lengths of rod and coil blocks in copolymer, and mixture ratio of block copolymers to homopolymers. As the εRR value decreases, the self-assembled structures of mixtures are transformed from an abacus-like structure to a helical structure, to a plain fiber, and finally are broken into unimers. The order parameter of rod blocks was calculated to confirm the structure transition. Through varying the length of rod and coil blocks, the regions of thermodynamic stability of abacus, helix, plain fiber, and unimers were mapped. Moreover, it was discovered that two levels of rod block ordering exist in the helices. The block copolymers are helically wrapped on the homopolymer bundles to form helical string, while the rod blocks are twistingly packed inside the string. In addition, the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations. The present work reveals the mechanism behind the formation of helical (experimentally super-helical) structures and may provide useful information for design and preparation of the complex structures. PMID:25965726

  12. Hierarchical Nanostructures Self-Assembled from a Mixture System Containing Rod-Coil Block Copolymers and Rigid Homopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongliang; Jiang, Tao; Lin, Shaoliang; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua; Zhu, Xingyu

    2015-05-01

    Self-assembly behavior of a mixture system containing rod-coil block copolymers and rigid homopolymers was investigated by using Brownian dynamics simulations. The morphologies of formed hierarchical self-assemblies were found to be dependent on the Lennard-Jones (LJ) interaction ɛRR between rod blocks, lengths of rod and coil blocks in copolymer, and mixture ratio of block copolymers to homopolymers. As the ɛRR value decreases, the self-assembled structures of mixtures are transformed from an abacus-like structure to a helical structure, to a plain fiber, and finally are broken into unimers. The order parameter of rod blocks was calculated to confirm the structure transition. Through varying the length of rod and coil blocks, the regions of thermodynamic stability of abacus, helix, plain fiber, and unimers were mapped. Moreover, it was discovered that two levels of rod block ordering exist in the helices. The block copolymers are helically wrapped on the homopolymer bundles to form helical string, while the rod blocks are twistingly packed inside the string. In addition, the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations. The present work reveals the mechanism behind the formation of helical (experimentally super-helical) structures and may provide useful information for design and preparation of the complex structures.

  13. Hierarchical nanostructures self-assembled from a mixture system containing rod-coil block copolymers and rigid homopolymers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongliang; Jiang, Tao; Lin, Shaoliang; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua; Zhu, Xingyu

    2015-05-12

    Self-assembly behavior of a mixture system containing rod-coil block copolymers and rigid homopolymers was investigated by using Brownian dynamics simulations. The morphologies of formed hierarchical self-assemblies were found to be dependent on the Lennard-Jones (LJ) interaction εRR between rod blocks, lengths of rod and coil blocks in copolymer, and mixture ratio of block copolymers to homopolymers. As the εRR value decreases, the self-assembled structures of mixtures are transformed from an abacus-like structure to a helical structure, to a plain fiber, and finally are broken into unimers. The order parameter of rod blocks was calculated to confirm the structure transition. Through varying the length of rod and coil blocks, the regions of thermodynamic stability of abacus, helix, plain fiber, and unimers were mapped. Moreover, it was discovered that two levels of rod block ordering exist in the helices. The block copolymers are helically wrapped on the homopolymer bundles to form helical string, while the rod blocks are twistingly packed inside the string. In addition, the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations. The present work reveals the mechanism behind the formation of helical (experimentally super-helical) structures and may provide useful information for design and preparation of the complex structures.

  14. Interplanetary Overlay Network Bundle Protocol Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) system's BP package, an implementation of the Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) Bundle Protocol (BP) and supporting services, has been specifically designed to be suitable for use on deep-space robotic vehicles. Although the ION BP implementation is unique in its use of zero-copy objects for high performance, and in its use of resource-sensitive rate control, it is fully interoperable with other implementations of the BP specification (Internet RFC 5050). The ION BP implementation is built using the same software infrastructure that underlies the implementation of the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) File Delivery Protocol (CFDP) built into the flight software of Deep Impact. It is designed to minimize resource consumption, while maximizing operational robustness. For example, no dynamic allocation of system memory is required. Like all the other ION packages, ION's BP implementation is designed to port readily between Linux and Solaris (for easy development and for ground system operations) and VxWorks (for flight systems operations). The exact same source code is exercised in both environments. Initially included in the ION BP implementations are the following: libraries of functions used in constructing bundle forwarders and convergence-layer (CL) input and output adapters; a simple prototype bundle forwarder and associated CL adapters designed to run over an IPbased local area network; administrative tools for managing a simple DTN infrastructure built from these components; a background daemon process that silently destroys bundles whose time-to-live intervals have expired; a library of functions exposed to applications, enabling them to issue and receive data encapsulated in DTN bundles; and some simple applications that can be used for system checkout and benchmarking.

  15. Analysis of reciprocating compressor piston rod failures

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, H.A.; Drosjack, M.J.

    1984-02-01

    This report presents the analysis of five piston rod failures which occurred on reciprocating compressors. Calculations are shown for rod stress which includes nominal rod loading sources as well as additional loads due to unusual pressure losses in the compressor valves, flexure of the rods due to misalignment, and manufacturing errors. The additional loads were incorporated on the basis of field measurements. The stress values are used with Baquin's equation to produce fatigue life curves for the rods. Based on the calculations, recommendations for modified rods were made. The calculation procedures are described in a manner which will permit their application to other reciprocating compressors.

  16. All Subdomains of the Talin Rod Are Mechanically Vulnerable and May Contribute To Cellular Mechanosensing.

    PubMed

    Haining, Alexander William M; von Essen, Magdaléna; Attwood, Simon J; Hytönen, Vesa P; Del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-07-26

    Although the relevance of mechanotransduction in cell signaling is currently appreciated, the mechanisms that drive this process remain largely unknown. Mechanical unfolding of proteins may trigger distinct downstream signals in cells, providing a mechanism for cellular mechanotransduction. Force-induced unfolding of talin, a prominent focal adhesion protein, has been demonstrated previously for a small portion of its rod domain. Here, using single-molecule atomic force microscopy (smAFM), we show that the entire talin rod can be unfolded by mechanical extension, over a physiological range of forces between 10 and 40 pN. We also demonstrate, through a combination of smAFM and steered molecular dynamics, that the different bundles within the talin rod exhibit a distinct hierarchy of mechanical stability. These results provide a mechanism by which different force conditions within the cell control a graduated unfolding of the talin rod. Mechanical unfolding of the rod subdomains, and the subsequent effect on talin's binding interactions, would allow for a finely tuned cellular response to internally or externally applied forces. PMID:27380548

  17. Prediction of number of breached rods following a LBLOCA of Candu plants using a BEPU approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Y. S.; Kim, K.; Seul, K. W.; Woo, S. W.; Han, B. S.

    2012-07-01

    Radioactive doses following design basis accidents (DBA) have been important safety criteria of Candu nuclear power plant and they have been predicted in terms of the number of breached fuel rods. To support the licensing review on this concern, an analysis of LBLOCA has been conducted by using the BEPU method of KINS, KINS-REM. Number of Breached Rods (NBR) following a LBLOCA was predicted at 95 percentile probabilistic upper level in 95 percentile confidence level. Peak Cladding Temperatures (PCT) of the 84 bundles in the core pass 4 were calculated from the 124 MARS code runs in which the uncertainties of 10 major parameters including fuel thermal conductivity and break flow model were implemented. The fuel rod breaching criteria, PCT>1477 K, was used to determine the NBR 95/95. From the calculation, the predicted NBR 95/95 was 1591 rods and the calculated maximum NBR was lower than 2000 rods. Through the further improvements in feedback of the channel power behavior to thermalhydraulic calculation and in channel group modeling, NBR in more reliable level can be expected. (authors)

  18. All Subdomains of the Talin Rod Are Mechanically Vulnerable and May Contribute To Cellular Mechanosensing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although the relevance of mechanotransduction in cell signaling is currently appreciated, the mechanisms that drive this process remain largely unknown. Mechanical unfolding of proteins may trigger distinct downstream signals in cells, providing a mechanism for cellular mechanotransduction. Force-induced unfolding of talin, a prominent focal adhesion protein, has been demonstrated previously for a small portion of its rod domain. Here, using single-molecule atomic force microscopy (smAFM), we show that the entire talin rod can be unfolded by mechanical extension, over a physiological range of forces between 10 and 40 pN. We also demonstrate, through a combination of smAFM and steered molecular dynamics, that the different bundles within the talin rod exhibit a distinct hierarchy of mechanical stability. These results provide a mechanism by which different force conditions within the cell control a graduated unfolding of the talin rod. Mechanical unfolding of the rod subdomains, and the subsequent effect on talin’s binding interactions, would allow for a finely tuned cellular response to internally or externally applied forces. PMID:27380548

  19. Turkish and Native English Academic Writers' Use of Lexical Bundles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Öztürk, Yusuf; Köse, Gül Durmusoglu

    2016-01-01

    Lexical bundles such as "on the other hand" and "as a result of" are extremely common and important in academic discourse. The appropriate use of lexical bundles typical of a specific academic discipline is important for writers and the absence of such bundles may not sound fluent and native-like. Recent studies (e.g. Adel…

  20. Reduction of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    SciTech Connect

    Bernitsas, Michael M; Raghavan, Kamaldev

    2014-04-01

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to decrease/suppress Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Suppression is required when fluid-structure interaction becomes destructive as in VIM of flexible cylinders or rigid cylinders on elastic support, such as underwater pipelines, marine risers, tubes in heat exchangers, nuclear fuel rods, cooling towers, SPAR offshore platforms.

  1. A maternal effect rough deal mutation suggests that multiple pathways regulate Drosophila RZZ kinetochore recruitment.

    PubMed

    Défachelles, Lénaïg; Hainline, Sarah G; Menant, Alexandra; Lee, Laura A; Karess, Roger E

    2015-03-15

    Proper kinetochore recruitment and regulation of dynein and the Mad1-Mad2 complex requires the Rod-Zw10-Zwilch (RZZ) complex. Here, we describe rod(Z3), a maternal-effect Drosophila mutation changing a single residue in the Rough Deal (Rod) subunit of RZZ. Although the RZZ complex containing this altered subunit (denoted R(Z3)ZZ) is present in early syncytial stage embryos laid by homozygous rod(Z3) mothers, it is not recruited to kinetochores. Consequently, the embryos have no spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), and syncytial mitoses are profoundly perturbed. The polar body (residual meiotic products) cannot remain in its SAC-dependent metaphase-like state, and decondenses into chromatin. In neuroblasts of homozygous rod(Z3) larvae, R(Z3)ZZ recruitment is only partially reduced, the SAC is functional and mitosis is relatively normal. R(Z3)ZZ nevertheless behaves abnormally: it does not further accumulate on kinetochores when microtubules are depolymerized; it reduces the rate of Mad1 recruitment; and it dominantly interferes with the dynein-mediated streaming of RZZ from attached kinetochores. These results suggest that the mutated residue of rod(Z3) is required for normal RZZ kinetochore recruitment and function and, moreover, that the RZZ recruitment pathway might differ in syncytial stage embryos and post-embryonic somatic cells.

  2. Critical heat flux in natural convection cooled TRIGA reactors with hexagonal bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Avery, M.; De Angelis, M.; Anderson, M.; Corradini, M.; Feldman, E. E.; Dunn, F. E.; Matos, J. E.

    2012-07-01

    A three-rod bundle Critical Heat Flux (CHF) study at low flow, low pressure, and natural convection condition has been conducted, simulating TRIGA reactors with the hexagonally configured core. The test section is a custom-made trefoil shape tube with three identical fuel pin heater rods located symmetrically inside. The full scale fuel rod is electrically heated with a chopped-cosine axial power profile. CHF experiments were carried out with the following conditions: inlet water subcooling from 30 K to 95 K; pressure from 110 kPa to 230 kPa; mass flux up to 150 kg/m{sup 2}s. About 50 CHF data points were collected and compared with a few existing CHF correlations whose application ranges are close to the testing conditions. Some tests were performed with the forced convection to identify the potential difference between the CHF under the natural convection and forced convection. The relevance of the CHF to test parameters is investigated. (authors)

  3. Application of fiberglass sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.G. )

    1991-05-01

    Fiberglass sucker rods are assuming a place in artificial-lift technology. This paper briefly describes the manufacturing process and gives some design and operational hints for practical applications. It also describes some mathematical modeling modifications needed for fiberglass wave-equation design programs.

  4. Plant Communities of Rough Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Linda

    A unit of study on plants grown in the Navajo community of Rough Rock, Arizona, is presented in sketches providing the common Navajo name for the plant, a literal English translation, the English name of the plant, and the Latin name. A brief description of each plant includes where the plant grows, how the Navajos use the plant, and the color and…

  5. Community School at Rough Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Donald A.; Schwartz, Henrietta

    The objective of the evaluation of Rough Rock Demonstration School (RRDS) on the Navajo Reservation was to examine, in terms of its own stated objectives, the school's organizational and social system as a whole. Chapters in the 1969 evaluation report are "What We Did and Why,""The Schools That Were Compared,""Community Relationships,""The…

  6. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  7. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  8. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply...

  9. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  10. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  11. Application of Rough Sets to Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyamoto, Sadaaki

    1998-01-01

    Develops a method of rough retrieval, an application of the rough set theory to information retrieval. The aim is to: (1) show that rough sets are naturally applied to information retrieval in which categorized information structure is used; and (2) show that a fuzzy retrieval scheme is induced from the rough retrieval. (AEF)

  12. Three-Rod Linear Ion Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, Gary R.; Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1993-01-01

    Three-parallel-rod electrode structures proposed for use in linear ion traps and possibly for electrostatic levitation of macroscopic particles. Provides wider viewing angle because they confine ions in regions outside rod-electrode structures.

  13. What operators say about fiberglass sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Bleakley, W.B.

    1984-11-01

    This article presents the results of an informal survey of oil producing companies and one design engineering firm in the Permian Basin about the use and performance of fiberglass sucker rods in sucker rod pumps.

  14. A two-phase flow regime map for a MAPLE-type nuclear research reactor fuel channel: Effect of hexagonal finned bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Harvel, G.D.; Chang, J.S.; Krishnan, V.S.

    1997-05-01

    A two-phase flow regime map is developed experimentally and theoretically for a vertical hexagonal flow channel with and without a 36-finned rod hexagonal bundle. This type of flow channel is of interest to MAPLE-type nuclear research reactors. The flow regime maps are determined by visual observations and observation of waveforms shown by a capacitance-type void fraction meter. The experimental results show that the inclusion of the finned hexagonal bundle shifts the flow regime transition boundaries toward higher water flow rates. Existing flow regime maps based on pipe flow require slight modifications when applied to the hexagonal flow channel with and without a MAPLE-type finned hexagonal bundle. The proposed theoretical model agrees well with experimental results.

  15. Thermoreversible Gels Composed of Colloidal Silica Rods with Short-Range Attractions.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ryan P; Hong, Kunlun; Wagner, Norman J

    2016-08-23

    Dynamic arrest transitions of colloidal suspensions containing nonspherical particles are of interest for the design and processing of various particle technologies. To better understand the effects of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on gel and glass formation, we present a colloidal model system of octadecyl-coated silica rods, termed as adhesive hard rods (AHR), which enables control of rod aspect ratio and temperature-dependent interactions. The aspect ratios of silica rods were controlled by varying the initial TEOS concentration following the work of Kuijk et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 2346-2349) and temperature-dependent attractions were introduced by coating the calcined silica rods with an octadecyl-brush and suspending in tetradecane. The rod length and aspect ratio were found to increase with TEOS concentration as expected, while other properties such as the rod diameter, coating coverage, density, and surface roughness were nearly independent of the aspect ratio. Ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering measurements revealed temperature-dependent attractions between octadecyl-coated silica rods in tetradecane, as characterized by a low-q upturn in the scattered intensity upon thermal quenching. Lastly, the rheology of a concentrated AHR suspension in tetradecane demonstrated thermoreversible gelation behavior, displaying a nearly 5 orders of magnitude change in the dynamic moduli as the temperature was cycled between 15 and 40 °C. The adhesive hard rod model system serves as a tunable platform to explore the combined influence of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on the dynamic arrest transitions in colloidal suspensions with thermoreversible, short-range attractions. PMID:27466883

  16. A rod-shaped vibro touch sensor using PZT thin film.

    PubMed

    Kanda, T; Morita, T; Kurosawa, M K; Higuchi, T

    1999-01-01

    We have fabricated a probe sensor. This sensor is for high precision coordinate measuring machines, surface roughness measuring tools, or scanning probe microscopes (SPM). This sensor consists of a rod vibrating in the axial direction. The longitudinal vibration was excited and also detected by PZT thin film. The PZT thin film was fabricated by a hydrothermal method. The hydrothermal method uses the reaction process in hot and high pressure aqueous solutions. We made a 27.8-mm long sensor. Its resonance frequency was 116 kHz. The sensitivity and resolution were evaluated by experiments. We succeeded in oscillating the rod and detecting the contact.

  17. One-dimensional nanoferroic rods; synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Seddik, U.; Okasha, N.; Imam, N. G.

    2015-11-01

    One-dimensional nanoferroic rods of BaTiO3 were synthesized by improved citrate auto-combustion technology using tetrabutyl titanate. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) have been used to characterize the prepared sample. The results indicated that the crystal structure of BaTiO3 is tetragonal phase with an average crystallite size of 47 nm. SEM image gives a cauliflower-like morphology of the agglomerated nanorods. The stoichiometry of the chemical composition of the BaTiO3 ceramic was confirmed by EDX. TEM micrograph exhibited that BaTiO3 nanoparticles have rod-like shape with an average length of 120 nm and width of 43 nm. AFM was used to investigate the surface topography and its roughness. The topography image in 3D showed that the BaTiO3 particles have a rod shape with an average particle size of 116 nm which in agreement with 3D TEM result.

  18. Solid-state-laser-rod holder

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, D.J.; Barnes, N.P.; Griggs, J.E.

    1981-08-11

    The disclosure relates to a solid state laser rod holder comprising Invar, copper tubing, and epoxy joints. Materials and coefficients of expansion of the components of the holder combine with the rod to produce a joint which will give before the rod itself will. The rod may be lased at about 70 to 80/sup 0/K and returned from such a temperature to room temperature repeatedly without its or the holder's destruction.

  19. Multiwalled carbon nanotube reinforced biomimetic bundled gel fibres.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jin; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Takahashi, Haruko; Sasaki, Naruo; Matsunaga, Yukiko T

    2016-08-19

    This work describes the fabrication and characterization of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC)-based biomimetic bundled gel fibres. The bundled gel fibres were reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). A phase-separated aqueous solution with MWCNT and HPC was transformed into a bundled fibrous structure after being injected into a co-flow microfluidic device and applying the sheath flow. The resulting MWCNT-bundled gel fibres consist of multiple parallel microfibres. The mechanical and electrical properties of MWCNT-bundled gel fibres were improved and their potential for tissue engineering applications as a cell scaffold was demonstrated. PMID:27200527

  20. Anatomic Double-Bundle Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Nitri, Marco; Civitarese, David; Dean, Chase S; Moulton, Samuel G; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is known to be the main posterior stabilizer of the knee. Anatomic single-bundle PCL reconstruction, focusing on reconstruction of the larger anterolateral bundle, is the most commonly performed procedure. Because of the residual posterior and rotational tibial instability after the single-bundle procedure and the inability to restore the normal knee kinematics, an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction has been proposed in an effort to re-create the native PCL footprint more closely and to restore normal knee kinematics. We detail our technique for an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction using Achilles and anterior tibialis tendon allografts. PMID:27284530

  1. A Comparison between Clinical Results of Selective Bundle and Double Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Song, Si Young; Yang, Cheol Jung; Ha, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic anatomical double bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with either selective anteromedial (AM) or posterolateral (PL) bundle reconstruction while preserving a relatively healthy ACL bundle. Materials and Methods The authors evaluated 98 patients with a mean follow-up of 30.8±4.0 months who had undergone DB or selective bundle ACL reconstructions. Of these, 34 cases underwent DB ACL reconstruction (group A), 34 underwent selective AM bundle reconstruction (group B), and 30 underwent selective PL bundle reconstructions (group C). These groups were compared with respect to Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, side-to-side differences of anterior laxity measured by KT-2000 arthrometer at 30 lbs, and stress radiography and Lachman and pivot shift test results. Pre- and post-operative data were objectively evaluated using a statistical approach. Results The preoperative anterior instability measured by manual stress radiography at 90° of knee flexion in group A was significantly greater than that in groups B and C (all p<0.001). At last follow-up, mean side-to-side instrumented laxities measured by the KT-2000 and manual stress radiography were significantly improved from preoperative data in all groups (all p<0.001). There were no significant differences between the three groups in anterior instability measured by KT-2000 arthrometer, pivot shift, or functional scores. Conclusion Selective bundle reconstruction in partial ACL tears offers comparable clinical results to DB reconstruction in complete ACL tears. PMID:27401652

  2. Who makes API sucker rods and couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    This guide identifies manufacturers qualified to produce API sucker rods and related equipment, lists chemical and mechanical properties of the various types of rods and provides dimensional characteristics. In addition, similar information is given for non-API rods such as fiberglass and aluminum.

  3. Inverted Control Rod Lock-In Device

    DOEpatents

    Brussalis, W. G.; Bost, G. E.

    1962-12-01

    A mechanism which prevents control rods from dropping out of the reactor core in the event the vessel in which the reactor is mounted should capsize is described. The mechanism includes a pivoted toothed armature which engages the threaded control rod lead screw and prevents removal of the rod whenever the armature is not attracted by the provided electromagnetic means. (AEC)

  4. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  5. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  6. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  7. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  8. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  9. Phase Slips in Oscillatory Hair Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production. PMID:25167040

  10. Phase slips in oscillatory hair bundles.

    PubMed

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-04-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production. PMID:25167040

  11. Covariance and the hierarchy of frame bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, Frank B.

    1987-01-01

    This is an essay on the general concept of covariance, and its connection with the structure of the nested set of higher frame bundles over a differentiable manifold. Examples of covariant geometric objects include not only linear tensor fields, densities and forms, but affinity fields, sectors and sector forms, higher order frame fields, etc., often having nonlinear transformation rules and Lie derivatives. The intrinsic, or invariant, sets of forms that arise on frame bundles satisfy the graded Cartan-Maurer structure equations of an infinite Lie algebra. Reduction of these gives invariant structure equations for Lie pseudogroups, and for G-structures of various orders. Some new results are introduced for prolongation of structure equations, and for treatment of Riemannian geometry with higher-order moving frames. The use of invariant form equations for nonlinear field physics is implicitly advocated.

  12. Heterotic String Compactification and New Vector Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hai; Wu, Baosen; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2016-07-01

    We propose a construction of Kähler and non-Kähler Calabi-Yau manifolds by branched double covers of twistor spaces. In this construction we use the twistor spaces of four-manifolds with self-dual conformal structures, with the examples of connected sum of n {mathbb{P}2}s. We also construct K3-fibered Calabi-Yau manifolds from the branched double covers of the blow-ups of the twistor spaces. These manifolds can be used in heterotic string compactifications to four dimensions. We also construct stable and polystable vector bundles. Some classes of these vector bundles can give rise to supersymmetric grand unified models with three generations of quarks and leptons in four dimensions.

  13. Phase Slips in Oscillatory Hair Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-04-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production.

  14. Motor-induced sliding of microtubule and actin bundles

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Mogilner, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Interactions of multiple molecular motors with bundles of actin and microtubule filaments form the basis for many cytoskeletal processes including axonal growth, muscle contraction, cell division and platelet formation. Continuum models based on generalized diffusion equations have been suggested to quantify the dynamics of such active bundles. In highly cross-linked and densely packed filament bundles, however, a major complication arises due to the multiple interactions that each filament forms with its neighbors. To explore the effects of these interactions, we used detailed computer simulations and studied the bundles with different types of motors at different densities and boundary conditions. We found that highly cross-linked bundles exhibit effects of long-ranged interactions that are sensitive to the boundary conditions. In open bundles, these give rise to ‘telescopic’ patterns resulting in significant acceleration of the filaments at the edges. In contrast, in ringed bundles, the long-ranged interactions ‘lock’ filaments and slow down their movements. The filaments in loosely connected bundles, on the other hand, undergo local diffusion-drift dynamics consistent with previous continuum models. Our simulations also demonstrate the sorting phenomena in the mixed-polarity bundles and reveal characteristic scales and conditions for spontaneous pattern formation in the bundle. We discuss the relevance of our results for cytoskeleton systems such as microtubules in axons, platelet formation, kinetochore fibers and actin bundles in motile cells. PMID:19506757

  15. Hierarchical scaling law for the strength of composite fibre bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, Soraia; Pinho, Silvestre T.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents an analytical model for size effects on the longitudinal tensile strength of composite fibre bundles. The strength of individual fibres is modelled by a Weibull distribution, while the matrix (or fibre-matrix interface) is represented through a perfectly plastic shear-lag model. A probabilistic analysis of the failure process in hierarchical bundles (bundles of bundles) is performed, so that a scaling law relating the strength distributions and characteristic lengths of consecutive bundle levels is derived. An efficient numerical scheme (based on asymptotic limits) is proposed, hence coupon-sized bundle strength distributions are obtained almost instantaneously. Parametric studies show that both fibre and matrix properties are critical for bundle strength; model predictions at different scales are validated against experimental results available in the literature.

  16. Deformations of Fell bundles and twisted graph algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeburn, Iain

    2016-11-01

    We consider Fell bundles over discrete groups, and the C*-algebra which is universal for representations of the bundle. We define deformations of Fell bundles, which are new Fell bundles with the same underlying Banach bundle but with the multiplication deformed by a two-cocycle on the group. Every graph algebra can be viewed as the C*-algebra of a Fell bundle, and there are are many cocycles of interest with which to deform them. We thus obtain many of the twisted graph algebras of Kumjian, Pask and Sims. We demonstate the utility of our approach to these twisted graph algebras by proving that the deformations associated to different cocycles can be assembled as the fibres of a C*-bundle.

  17. Quantized Mechanics of Nanotubes and Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugno, Nicola M.

    In this chapter, the mechanics of carbon nanotubes and related bundles is reviewed, with an eye to their application as ultra-sharp tips for scanning probe "nanoscopy". In particular, the role of thermodynamically unavoidable, atomistic defects with different sizes and shapes on the fracture strength, fatigue life, and elasticity is quantified, thanks to new quantized fracture mechanics approaches. The reader is introduced in a simple way to such innovative treatments at the beginning of the chapter.

  18. Uncovering Ecosystem Service Bundles through Social Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Martín-López, Berta; Iniesta-Arandia, Irene; García-Llorente, Marina; Palomo, Ignacio; Casado-Arzuaga, Izaskun; Amo, David García Del; Gómez-Baggethun, Erik; Oteros-Rozas, Elisa; Palacios-Agundez, Igone; Willaarts, Bárbara; González, José A.; Santos-Martín, Fernando; Onaindia, Miren; López-Santiago, Cesar; Montes, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Ecosystem service assessments have increasingly been used to support environmental management policies, mainly based on biophysical and economic indicators. However, few studies have coped with the social-cultural dimension of ecosystem services, despite being considered a research priority. We examined how ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs emerge from diverging social preferences toward ecosystem services delivered by various types of ecosystems in Spain. We conducted 3,379 direct face-to-face questionnaires in eight different case study sites from 2007 to 2011. Overall, 90.5% of the sampled population recognized the ecosystem’s capacity to deliver services. Formal studies, environmental behavior, and gender variables influenced the probability of people recognizing the ecosystem’s capacity to provide services. The ecosystem services most frequently perceived by people were regulating services; of those, air purification held the greatest importance. However, statistical analysis showed that socio-cultural factors and the conservation management strategy of ecosystems (i.e., National Park, Natural Park, or a non-protected area) have an effect on social preferences toward ecosystem services. Ecosystem service trade-offs and bundles were identified by analyzing social preferences through multivariate analysis (redundancy analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis). We found a clear trade-off among provisioning services (and recreational hunting) versus regulating services and almost all cultural services. We identified three ecosystem service bundles associated with the conservation management strategy and the rural-urban gradient. We conclude that socio-cultural preferences toward ecosystem services can serve as a tool to identify relevant services for people, the factors underlying these social preferences, and emerging ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs. PMID:22720006

  19. Parafermions in an Interacting Nanowire Bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinovaja, Jelena; Loss, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    We propose a scheme to induce Z3 parafermion modes, exotic zero-energy bound states that possess non-Abelian statistics. We consider a minimal setup consisting of a bundle of four tunnel coupled nanowires hosting spinless electrons that interact strongly with each other. The hallmark of our setup is that it relies only on simple one-dimensional wires, a uniform magnetic field, and strong interactions, but does not require the presence of superconductivity or exotic quantum Hall phases.

  20. Parafermions in an interacting nanowire bundle.

    PubMed

    Klinovaja, Jelena; Loss, Daniel

    2014-06-20

    We propose a scheme to induce Z(3) parafermion modes, exotic zero-energy bound states that possess non-Abelian statistics. We consider a minimal setup consisting of a bundle of four tunnel coupled nanowires hosting spinless electrons that interact strongly with each other. The hallmark of our setup is that it relies only on simple one-dimensional wires, a uniform magnetic field, and strong interactions, but does not require the presence of superconductivity or exotic quantum Hall phases. PMID:24996098

  1. Alpha1 LASSO data bundles Lamont, OK

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gustafson, William Jr; Vogelmann, Andrew; Endo, Satoshi; Toto, Tami; Xiao, Heng; Li, Zhijin; Cheng, Xiaoping; Krishna, Bhargavi (ORCID:000000018828528X)

    2016-08-03

    A data bundle is a unified package consisting of LASSO LES input and output, observations, evaluation diagnostics, and model skill scores. LES input includes model configuration information and forcing data. LES output includes profile statistics and full domain fields of cloud and environmental variables. Model evaluation data consists of LES output and ARM observations co-registered on the same grid and sampling frequency. Model performance is quantified by skill scores and diagnostics in terms of cloud and environmental variables.

  2. CHF Performance of Hybrid Mixing Vane Grid for a Nuclear Fuel Bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Chang-Hwan; Chun, Tae-Hyun; Choo, Yeon-Jun; Moon, Sang-Ki; Chun, Se-Young

    2007-07-01

    Numerous studies have shown that the mixing vanes of the spacer grids in a nuclear fuel rod bundle increase the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) significantly. The amount of the CHF enhancement depends strongly on the design of the mixing vanes such as the vane shape and vane bending angle. Recently a new mixing vane design was developed for an advanced spacer grid. It is called a Hybrid Mixing Vane. The main objective of this work is to evaluate the CHF performance of the hybrid vane grid and to compare it with that of a split vane grid. Three kinds of rod bundles were tested for the above objectives: no mixing vane grids, the hybrid mixing vane grids, and the split mixing vane grids. To measure the CHF data, 5x5 rod bundle experiments were conducted in the FTHEL (Freon Thermal Hydraulic Experiment Loop). Each experiment was performed by maintaining the following system conditions as constant: inlet pressure, inlet temperature, and mass flow rate. The experiments were performed in ranges of the inlet pressure, P{sub in} = 2000{approx}3000 kPa, mass flux, G = 1000{approx}3000 kg/m{sup 2}s, and inlet subcooling, {delta}h{sub in}= 10{approx}55 kJ/kg, which simulates the PWR operating conditions for a water equivalence through a fluid-to-fluid modeling. The CHF performances were compared with the data belonging to a PWR's operating conditions; a pressure of 2000{approx}3000 kPa and a mass flux of 1500{approx}3000 kg/m{sup 2}s. The average of the CHF increase for the hybrid mixing grids for 20 data sets is 18.2% higher than that for the no vane grids. While the average of the CHF increase for the split mixing vane grids for 20 data sets is 14.5% higher than that for the no vane grids. Consequently, the CHF performance of the hybrid mixing vane grid is superior by about 4% to that of the split mixing vane grid near the normal PWR operating conditions even under a longer grid span than usual. (authors)

  3. An analytical fiber bundle model for pullout mechanics of root bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, D.; Schwarz, M.; Or, D.

    2011-09-01

    Roots in soil contribute to the mechanical stability of slopes. Estimation of root reinforcement is challenging because roots form complex biological networks whose geometrical and mechanical characteristics are difficult to characterize. Here we describe an analytical model that builds on simple root descriptors to estimate root reinforcement. Root bundles are modeled as bundles of heterogeneous fibers pulled along their long axes neglecting root-soil friction. Analytical expressions for the pullout force as a function of displacement are derived. The maximum pullout force and corresponding critical displacement are either derived analytically or computed numerically. Key model inputs are a root diameter distribution (uniform, Weibull, or lognormal) and three empirical power law relations describing tensile strength, elastic modulus, and length of roots as functions of root diameter. When a root bundle with root tips anchored in the soil matrix is pulled by a rigid plate, a unique parameter, ?, that depends only on the exponents of the power law relations, dictates the order in which roots of different diameters break. If ? < 1, small roots break first; if ? > 1, large roots break first. When ? = 1, all fibers break simultaneously, and the maximum tensile force is simply the roots' mean force times the number of roots in the bundle. Based on measurements of root geometry and mechanical properties, the value of ? is less than 1, usually ranging between 0 and 0.7. Thus, small roots always fail first. The model shows how geometrical and mechanical characteristics of roots and root diameter distribution affect the pullout force, its maximum and corresponding displacement. Comparing bundles of roots that have similar mean diameters, a bundle with a narrow variance in root diameter will result in a larger maximum force and a smaller displacement at maximum force than a bundle with a wide diameter distribution. Increasing the mean root diameter of a bundle without

  4. Rough Clustering for Cancer Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herawan, Tutut

    Cancer is becoming a leading cause of death among people in the whole world. It is confirmed that the early detection and accurate diagnosis of this disease can ensure a long survival of the patients. Expert systems and machine learning techniques are gaining popularity in this field because of the effective classification and high diagnostic capability. This paper presents the application of rough set theory for clustering two cancer datasets. These datasets are taken from UCI ML repository. The method is based on MDA technique proposed by [11]. To select a clustering attribute, the maximal degree of the rough attributes dependencies in categorical-valued information systems is used. Further, we use a divide-and-conquer method to partition/cluster the objects. The results show that MDA technique can be used to cluster to the data. Further, we present clusters visualization using two dimensional plot. The plot results provide user friendly navigation to understand the cluster obtained.

  5. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.N.

    1958-04-22

    An electromagnetic apparatus for moving a rod-like member in small steps in either direction is described. The invention has particular application in the reactor field where the reactor control rods must be moved only a small distance and where the use of mechanical couplings is impractical due to the high- pressure seals required. A neutron-absorbing rod is mounted in a housing with gripping uaits that engage the rod, and coils for magnetizing the gripping units to make them grip, shift, and release the rod are located outside the housing.

  6. Bundled payment fails to gain a foothold In California: the experience of the IHA bundled payment demonstration.

    PubMed

    Ridgely, M Susan; de Vries, David; Bozic, Kevin J; Hussey, Peter S

    2014-08-01

    To determine whether bundled payment could be an effective payment model for California, the Integrated Healthcare Association convened a group of stakeholders (health plans, hospitals, ambulatory surgery centers, physician organizations, and vendors) to develop, through a consensus process, the methods and means of implementing bundled payment. In spite of a high level of enthusiasm and effort, the pilot did not succeed in its goal to implement bundled payment for orthopedic procedures across multiple payers and hospital-physician partners. An evaluation of the pilot documented a number of barriers, such as administrative burden, state regulatory uncertainty, and disagreements about bundle definition and assumption of risk. Ultimately, few contracts were signed, which resulted in insufficient volume to test hypotheses about the impact of bundled payment on quality and costs. Although bundled payment failed to gain a foothold in California, the evaluation provides lessons for future bundled payment initiatives.

  7. Sensing roughness and polish direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, M. L.; Olesen, A. S.; Larsen, H. E.; Stubager, J.; Hanson, S. G.; Pedersen, T. F.; Pedersen, H. C.

    2016-04-01

    As a part of the work carried out on a project supported by the Danish council for technology and innovation, we have investigated the option of smoothing standard CNC machined surfaces. In the process of constructing optical prototypes, involving custom-designed optics, the development cost and time consumption can become relatively large numbers in a research budget. Machining the optical surfaces directly is expensive and time consuming. Alternatively, a more standardized and cheaper machining method can be used, but then the object needs to be manually polished. During the polishing process the operator needs information about the RMS-value of the surface roughness and the current direction of the scratches introduces by the polishing process. The RMS-value indicates to the operator how far he is from the final finish, and the scratch orientation is often specified by the customer in order to avoid complications during the casting process. In this work we present a method for measuring the RMS-values of the surface roughness while simultaneously determining the polishing direction. We are mainly interested in the RMS-values in the range from 0 - 100 nm, which corresponds to the finish categories of A1, A2 and A3. Based on simple intensity measurements we estimates the RMS-value of the surface roughness, and by using a sectioned annual photo-detector to collect the scattered light we can determine the direction of polishing and distinguish light scattered from random structures and light scattered from scratches.

  8. The effects of crushing surface roughness on the crushing characteristics of composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Wolterman, Richard L.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of crushing-surface roughness on the energy-absorption capability of graphite and glass-epoxy composite tubes were investigated. Fifty different combinations of fiber, matrix, and specimen ply orientation were evaluated. Two different crushing surface roughnesses were used in this investigation. Crushing surface significantly influences the energy-absorption capability only of tubes that crush in the lamina bending crushing mode; tubes that crush in other modes are not influenced because their lamina bundles do not slide against the crushing surface. Those tubes that crush in the lamina bending mode can achieve higher, lower, or no change in energy-absorption capability as crushing surface roughness increases. If the fiber failure strain of tubes that crush in the lamina bending crushing mode exceeds the matrix failure strain then the energy-absorption capability increases as crushing surface roughness increases. However, if the matrix failure strain exceeds the fiber failure strain then the energy-absorption capability increases as crushing surface roughness decreases. Energy-absorption capability is uninfluenced by crushing surface roughness for tubes that have equal fiber and matrix failure strains.

  9. Guide for rotating sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Harrel, R.D.

    1986-11-04

    This patent describes an improved guide for use in a string of sucker rods rotated in a tubing string in a borehole, the sucker rods having threaded male ends, the guide comprising: an elongated upright solid cylindrical coupling body of external diameter less than the internal diameter of tubing in which it is to be used; a pair of spaced apart axle holders positioned in three recess; an axle received in each recess in the coupling body, the axis of each axle being parallel and spaced from the body longitudinal axis; a roller rotatably received on each axle, the periphery of each roller extending exteriorly of the external cylindrical surface of the coupling body; and means to retain each of the holders in the coupling body recess.

  10. Exploiting rod technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-06-01

    ROD development was proceeding apace until recent budgetary decisions caused funding support for ROD development to be drastically reduced. The funding which was originally provided by DARPA and the Balanced Technology Initiative (BTI) Office has been cut back to zero from $800K. To determine the aeroballistic coefficients of a candidate dart, ARDEC is currently supporting development out of its own 6.2 funds at about $100K. ARDEC has made slow progress toward achieving this end because of failures in the original dart during testing. It appears that the next dart design to be tested will diverge from the original concept visualized by DARPA and Science and Technology Associates (STA). STA, the design engineer, takes exception to these changes on the basis of inappropriate test conditions and insufficient testing. At this time, the full resolution of this issue will be difficult because of the current management structure, which separates the developer (ARDEC) from the designer (STA).

  11. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow in a channel with different types of surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnov, Igor A.

    2011-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) was performed for turbulent channel flow (Reτ = 400) for two types of wall surface roughness and well as smooth walls. The roughness elements of first type were assumed to be two-dimensional, transverse square rods positioned on both walls in a non-staggered arrangement. The height of the rods corresponds to y+ = 13.6 and thus extends in the buffer layer. The second type of roughness was represented by a set of hemispherical obstacles (height of y+ = 10) located on both channel walls and arranged on a square lattice. The presented simulations are part of benchmark problems defined by thermal-hydraulics focus area of the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL). This problem simulates the effect of the presence of growing bubbles on the walls of nuclear reactor fuel rods and aimed on evaluating CFD capabilities of various codes before applying them to more advanced problems. Mean turbulent quantities were computed and compared with available analytical and experimental results. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the performance of other LES and RANS codes on this benchmark problem. Supported by Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL).

  12. The rod circuit in the rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Vaney, D I; Young, H M; Gynther, I C

    1991-01-01

    Mammalian retinae have a well-defined neuronal pathway that serves rod vision. In rabbit retina, the different populations of interneurons in the rod pathway can be selectively labeled, either separately or in combination. The rod bipolar cells show protein kinase C immunoreactivity; the rod (AII) amacrine cells can be distinguished in nuclear-yellow labeled retina; the rod reciprocal (S1 & S2) amacrine cells accumulate serotonin; and the dopaminergic amacrine cells show tyrosine-hydroxylase immunoreactivity. Furthermore, intracellular dye injection of the microscopically identified interneurons enables whole-population and single-cell studies to be combined in the same tissue. Using this approach, we have been able to analyze systematically the neuronal architecture of the rod circuit across the rabbit retina and compare its organization with that of the rod circuit in central cat retina. In rabbit retina, the rod interneurons are not organized in a uniform neuronal module that is simply scaled up from central to peripheral retina. Moreover, peripheral fields in superior and inferior retina that have equivalent densities of each neuronal type show markedly different rod bipolar to AII amacrine convergence ratios, with the result that many more rod photoreceptors converge on an AII amacrine cell in superior retina. In rabbit retina, much of the convergence in the rod circuit occurs in the outer retina whereas, in central cat retina, it is more evenly distributed between the inner and outer retina.

  13. Tests pinpoint sucker-rod failures

    SciTech Connect

    Elshawesh, F.; Elhoud, A.; Elagdel, E.

    1997-05-26

    A detailed metallurgical examination of a 7/8-inch and a 1-inch sucker rod revealed corrosion fatigue had caused their failure. The 7 to 8-inch rod had failed after a few months of service while the 1-inch rod failed after 1 year. Both rods had been used in a sweet-oil environment. Both rods failed by corrosion fatigue because of repeated loads during operations. Pitting because of the presence of chloride ions and carbon dioxide was initiated on the rod surface, which in turn acted as a crack origin from which the fatigue crack initiated and propagated during operations. The pitting was on the external surface. These pits were large and penetrated through the rod cross-section. Fatigue cracking is initiated at the bottom of the pit where high stress concentration is expected and propagated because the rods were subjected to the alternating stresses during operation. The extent of the fatigue crack varied in the two examined rods because of the difference in the rod heat treatment and microstructure. The paper discusses fatigue failure, the visual examination, macroscopic and microscopic examinations, rod properties, and future operations.

  14. Fuel rod assembly to manifold attachment

    DOEpatents

    Donck, Harry A.; Veca, Anthony R.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel element is formed with a plurality of fuel rod assemblies detachably connected to an overhead support with each of the fuel rod assemblies having a gas tight seal with the support to allow internal fission gaseous products to flow without leakage from the fuel rod assemblies into a vent manifold passageway system on the support. The upper ends of the fuel rod assemblies are located at vertically extending openings in the support and upper threaded members are threaded to the fuel rod assemblies to connect the latter to the support. The preferred threaded members are cap nuts having a dome wall encircling an upper threaded end on the fuel rod assembly and having an upper sealing surface for sealing contact with the support. Another and lower seal is achieved by abutting a sealing surface on each fuel rod assembly with the support. A deformable portion on the cap nut locks the latter against inadvertent turning off the fuel rod assembly. Orienting means on the fuel rod and support primarily locates the fuel rods azimuthally for reception of a deforming tool for the cap nut. A cross port in the fuel rod end plug discharges into a sealed annulus within the support, which serves as a circumferential chamber, connecting the manifold gas passageways in the support.

  15. Mechanisms resulting in accreted ice roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanin, Alan J.; Chua, Kiat

    1992-01-01

    Icing tests conducted on rotating cylinders in the BF Goodrich's Icing Research Facility indicate that a regular, deterministic, icing roughness pattern is typical. The roughness pattern is similar to kernels of corn on a cob for cylinders of diameter typical of a cob. An analysis is undertaken to determine the mechanisms which result in this roughness to ascertain surface scale and amplitude of roughness. Since roughness and the resulting augmentation of the convected heat transfer coefficient has been determined to most strongly control the accreted ice in ice prediction codes, the ability to predict a priori, location, amplitude and surface scale of roughness would greatly augment the capabilities of current ice accretion models.

  16. Drag of a turbulent boundary layer with transverse 2D circular rods on the wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamruzzaman, Md; Djenidi, L.; Antonia, R. A.; Talluru, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a turbulent boundary layer developing over a rod-roughened wall with a spacing of ( is the spacing between two adjacent roughness elements, and is the rod diameter). Static pressure measurements are taken around a single roughness element to accurately determine the friction velocity, and the error in the origin, , which are the two prominent issues that surround rough-wall boundary layers. In addition, velocity measurements are taken at several streamwise locations using hot-wire anemometry to obtain from the momentum integral equation. Results showed that both methods give consistent values for , indicating that the contribution of the viscous drag over this rough wall is negligible. This supports the results of Perry et al. (J Fluid Mech 177:437-466, 1969) and Antonia and Luxton (J Fluid Mech 48(04):721-761, 1971) in a boundary layer and of Leonardi et al. (2003) in a channel flow but does not agree with those of Furuya et al. (J Fluids Eng 98(4):635-643, 1976). The results show that both and can be unambiguously measured on this particular rough wall. This paves the way for a proper comparison between the boundary layer developing over this wall and the smooth-wall turbulent boundary layer.

  17. Shape control of lipid bilayer membranes by confined actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Feng-Ching; Koenderink, Gijsje Hendrika

    2015-12-01

    In living cells, lipid membranes and biopolymers determine each other's conformation in a delicate force balance. Cellular polymers such as actin filaments are strongly confined by the plasma membrane in cell protrusions such as lamellipodia and filopodia. Conversely, protrusion formation is facilitated by actin-driven membrane deformation and these protrusions are maintained by dense actin networks or bundles of actin filaments. Here we investigate the mechanical interplay between actin bundles and lipid bilayer membranes by reconstituting a minimal model system based on cell-sized liposomes with encapsulated actin filaments bundled by fascin. To address the competition between the deformability of the membrane and the enclosed actin bundles, we tune the bundle stiffness (through the fascin-to-actin molar ratio) and the membrane rigidity (through protein decoration). Using confocal microscopy and quantitative image analysis, we show that actin bundles deform the liposomes into a rich set of morphologies. For liposomes having a small membrane bending rigidity, the actin bundles tend to generate finger-like membrane protrusions that resemble cellular filopodia. Stiffer bundles formed at high crosslink density stay straight in the liposome body, whereas softer bundles formed at low crosslink density are bent and kinked. When the membrane has a large bending rigidity, membrane protrusions are suppressed. In this case, membrane enclosure forces the actin bundles to organize into cortical rings, to minimize the energy cost associated with filament bending. Our results highlight the importance of taking into account mechanical interactions between the actin cytoskeleton and the membrane to understand cell shape control.

  18. Calcium spikes in toad rods.

    PubMed Central

    Fain, G L; Gerschenfeld, H M; Quandt, F N

    1980-01-01

    1. When the retina of the toad, Bufo marinus, was superfused with 6-12 mM-tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA), intracellular recordings from rods showed large, depolarizing regenerative potentials. For brief exposures to TEA, these potentials occurred during the recovery phase of the light responses; whereas, during longer exposures, they were spontaneous in darkness but suppressed during illumination. Similar regenerative potentials were observed during perfusion with 3-10 mM-4-aminopyridine and 1-2 mM-BaCl2. 2. The amplitude of the regenerative potentials depended upon the extracellular Ca concentration ([Ca2+]o). Lowering [Ca2+]o decreased their amplitude and in zero [Ca2+]o they were reversibly abolished. Increasing [Ca2+]o by 1.5-2 times produced a small hyperpolarization of membrane potential and a large augmentation in regenerative response amplitude. However, larger increases in [Ca2+]o produced large membrane hyperpolarizations and reversibly suppressed the regenerative responses. 3. High concentrations of Sr2+ in TEA also enhanced regenerative activity but did not affect the rod resting membrane potential. The amplitude of regenerative potentials increased continuously with increasing [Sr2+]o, and in 28 mM-Sr2+ the rods generated 60-70 mV action potentials, even in the absence of extracellular Na+. 4. The regenerative potentials were blocked by 25 microM-Cd2+, 50-100 microM-Co2+, 5mM-Mg2+, and 100 microM-D-600. They were unaffected by 2 microM-TTX or 2-5 mM-Na aspartate. 5. In Ringer containing 12 mM-TEA, large anode break responses could be recorded from rods at the termination of inward current pulses. These anode break responses were also suppressed by Co2+ and unaffected by TTX or Na aspartate. 6. We conclude that the membrane of toad rods contains a conductance normally selective for Ca2+, which is activated by depolarization. In normal Ringer, the inward current through this conductance produces little effect, since it is balanced by a large outward

  19. Historical dynamics in ecosystem service bundles.

    PubMed

    Renard, Delphine; Rhemtulla, Jeanine M; Bennett, Elena M

    2015-10-27

    Managing multiple ecosystem services (ES), including addressing trade-offs between services and preventing ecological surprises, is among the most pressing areas for sustainability research. These challenges require ES research to go beyond the currently common approach of snapshot studies limited to one or two services at a single point in time. We used a spatiotemporal approach to examine changes in nine ES and their relationships from 1971 to 2006 across 131 municipalities in a mixed-use landscape in Quebec, Canada. We show how an approach that incorporates time and space can improve our understanding of ES dynamics. We found an increase in the provision of most services through time; however, provision of ES was not uniformly enhanced at all locations. Instead, each municipality specialized in providing a bundle (set of positively correlated ES) dominated by just a few services. The trajectory of bundle formation was related to changes in agricultural policy and global trends; local biophysical and socioeconomic characteristics explained the bundles' increasing spatial clustering. Relationships between services varied through time, with some provisioning and cultural services shifting from a trade-off or no relationship in 1971 to an apparent synergistic relationship by 2006. By implementing a spatiotemporal perspective on multiple services, we provide clear evidence of the dynamic nature of ES interactions and contribute to identifying processes and drivers behind these changing relationships. Our study raises questions about using snapshots of ES provision at a single point in time to build our understanding of ES relationships in complex and dynamic social-ecological systems. PMID:26460005

  20. Historical dynamics in ecosystem service bundles.

    PubMed

    Renard, Delphine; Rhemtulla, Jeanine M; Bennett, Elena M

    2015-10-27

    Managing multiple ecosystem services (ES), including addressing trade-offs between services and preventing ecological surprises, is among the most pressing areas for sustainability research. These challenges require ES research to go beyond the currently common approach of snapshot studies limited to one or two services at a single point in time. We used a spatiotemporal approach to examine changes in nine ES and their relationships from 1971 to 2006 across 131 municipalities in a mixed-use landscape in Quebec, Canada. We show how an approach that incorporates time and space can improve our understanding of ES dynamics. We found an increase in the provision of most services through time; however, provision of ES was not uniformly enhanced at all locations. Instead, each municipality specialized in providing a bundle (set of positively correlated ES) dominated by just a few services. The trajectory of bundle formation was related to changes in agricultural policy and global trends; local biophysical and socioeconomic characteristics explained the bundles' increasing spatial clustering. Relationships between services varied through time, with some provisioning and cultural services shifting from a trade-off or no relationship in 1971 to an apparent synergistic relationship by 2006. By implementing a spatiotemporal perspective on multiple services, we provide clear evidence of the dynamic nature of ES interactions and contribute to identifying processes and drivers behind these changing relationships. Our study raises questions about using snapshots of ES provision at a single point in time to build our understanding of ES relationships in complex and dynamic social-ecological systems.

  1. A maternal effect rough deal mutation suggests that multiple pathways regulate Drosophila RZZ kinetochore recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Défachelles, Lénaïg; Hainline, Sarah G.; Menant, Alexandra; Lee, Laura A.; Karess, Roger E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proper kinetochore recruitment and regulation of dynein and the Mad1–Mad2 complex requires the Rod–Zw10–Zwilch (RZZ) complex. Here, we describe rodZ3, a maternal-effect Drosophila mutation changing a single residue in the Rough Deal (Rod) subunit of RZZ. Although the RZZ complex containing this altered subunit (denoted RZ3ZZ) is present in early syncytial stage embryos laid by homozygous rodZ3 mothers, it is not recruited to kinetochores. Consequently, the embryos have no spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), and syncytial mitoses are profoundly perturbed. The polar body (residual meiotic products) cannot remain in its SAC-dependent metaphase-like state, and decondenses into chromatin. In neuroblasts of homozygous rodZ3 larvae, RZ3ZZ recruitment is only partially reduced, the SAC is functional and mitosis is relatively normal. RZ3ZZ nevertheless behaves abnormally: it does not further accumulate on kinetochores when microtubules are depolymerized; it reduces the rate of Mad1 recruitment; and it dominantly interferes with the dynein-mediated streaming of RZZ from attached kinetochores. These results suggest that the mutated residue of rodZ3 is required for normal RZZ kinetochore recruitment and function and, moreover, that the RZZ recruitment pathway might differ in syncytial stage embryos and post-embryonic somatic cells. PMID:25616898

  2. Synchronization of Spontaneous Active Motility of Hair Cell Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tracy-Ying; Ji, Seung; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear exhibit an active process, believed to be crucial for achieving the sensitivity of auditory and vestibular detection. One of the manifestations of the active process is the occurrence of spontaneous hair bundle oscillations in vitro. Hair bundles are coupled by overlying membranes in vivo; hence, explaining the potential role of innate bundle motility in the generation of otoacoustic emissions requires an understanding of the effects of coupling on the active bundle dynamics. We used microbeads to connect small groups of hair cell bundles, using in vitro preparations that maintain their innate oscillations. Our experiments demonstrate robust synchronization of spontaneous oscillations, with either 1:1 or multi-mode phase-locking. The frequency of synchronized oscillation was found to be near the mean of the innate frequencies of individual bundles. Coupling also led to an improved regularity of entrained oscillations, demonstrated by an increase in the quality factor. PMID:26540409

  3. Synchronization of Spontaneous Active Motility of Hair Cell Bundles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tracy-Ying; Ji, Seung; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear exhibit an active process, believed to be crucial for achieving the sensitivity of auditory and vestibular detection. One of the manifestations of the active process is the occurrence of spontaneous hair bundle oscillations in vitro. Hair bundles are coupled by overlying membranes in vivo; hence, explaining the potential role of innate bundle motility in the generation of otoacoustic emissions requires an understanding of the effects of coupling on the active bundle dynamics. We used microbeads to connect small groups of hair cell bundles, using in vitro preparations that maintain their innate oscillations. Our experiments demonstrate robust synchronization of spontaneous oscillations, with either 1:1 or multi-mode phase-locking. The frequency of synchronized oscillation was found to be near the mean of the innate frequencies of individual bundles. Coupling also led to an improved regularity of entrained oscillations, demonstrated by an increase in the quality factor. PMID:26540409

  4. Compression of a bundle of light rays.

    PubMed

    Marcuse, D

    1971-03-01

    The performance of ray compression devices is discussed on the basis of a phase space treatment using Liouville's theorem. It is concluded that the area in phase space of the input bundle of rays is determined solely by the required compression ratio and possible limitations on the maximum ray angle at the output of the device. The efficiency of tapers and lenses as ray compressors is approximately equal. For linear tapers and lenses the input angle of the useful rays must not exceed the compression ratio. The performance of linear tapers and lenses is compared to a particular ray compressor using a graded refractive index distribution.

  5. Heat Transfer Analysis in Wire Bundles for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, S. L.; Iamello, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Design of wiring for aerospace vehicles relies on an understanding of "ampacity" which refers to the current carrying capacity of wires, either, individually or in wire bundles. Designers rely on standards to derate allowable current flow to prevent exceedance of wire temperature limits due to resistive heat dissipation within the wires or wire bundles. These standards often add considerable margin and are based on empirical data. Commercial providers are taking an aggressive approach to wire sizing which challenges the conventional wisdom of the established standards. Thermal modelling of wire bundles may offer significant mass reduction in a system if the technique can be generalized to produce reliable temperature predictions for arbitrary bundle configurations. Thermal analysis has been applied to the problem of wire bundles wherein any or all of the wires within the bundle may carry current. Wire bundles present analytical challenges because the heat transfer path from conductors internal to the bundle is tortuous, relying on internal radiation and thermal interface conductance to move the heat from within the bundle to the external jacket where it can be carried away by convective and radiative heat transfer. The problem is further complicated by the dependence of wire electrical resistivity on temperature. Reduced heat transfer out of the bundle leads to higher conductor temperatures and, hence, increased resistive heat dissipation. Development of a generalized wire bundle thermal model is presented and compared with test data. The steady state heat balance for a single wire is derived and extended to the bundle configuration. The generalized model includes the effects of temperature varying resistance, internal radiation and thermal interface conductance, external radiation and temperature varying convective relief from the free surface. The sensitivity of the response to uncertainties in key model parameters is explored using Monte Carlo analysis.

  6. Intelligent Information Retrieval Using Rough Set Approximations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Padmini

    1989-01-01

    Describes rough sets theory and discusses the advantages it offers for information retrieval, including the implicit inclusion of Boolean logic, term weighting, ranked retrieval output, and relevance feedback. Rough set formalism is compared to Boolean, vector, and fuzzy models of information retrieval and a small scale evaluation of rough sets is…

  7. Electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Moran; Kang, Qinjun

    2008-01-01

    We present a numerical framework to model the electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness. The three-dimensional microstructure of the rough channel is generated by a random generation-growth method with three statistical parameters to control the number density, the total volume fraction, and the anisotropy characteristics of roughness elements. The governing equations for the electrokinetic transport are solved by a high-efficiency lattice Poisson?Boltzmann method in complex geometries. The effects from the geometric characteristics of roughness on the electrokinetic transport in microchannels are therefore modeled and analyzed. For a given total roughness volume fraction, a higher number density leads to a lower fluctuation because of the random factors. The electroosmotic flow rate increases with the roughness number density nearly logarithmically for a given volume fraction of roughness but decreases with the volume fraction for a given roughness number density. When both the volume fraction and the number density of roughness are given, the electroosmotic flow rate is enhanced by the increase of the characteristic length along the external electric field direction but is reduced by that in the direction across the channel. For a given microstructure of the rough microchannel, the electroosmotic flow rate decreases with the Debye length. It is found that the shape resistance of roughness is responsible for the flow rate reduction in the rough channel compared to the smooth channel even for very thin double layers, and hence plays an important role in microchannel electroosmotic flows.

  8. a Comparison of Uav and Tls Data for Soil Roughness Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenković, M.; Karel, W.; Ressl, C.; Pfeifer, N.

    2016-06-01

    Soil roughness represents fine-scale surface geometry which figures in many geophysical models. While static photogrammetric techniques (terrestrial images and laser scanning) have been recently proposed as a new source for deriving roughness heights, there is still need to overcome acquisition scale and viewing geometry issues. By contrast to the static techniques, images taken from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) can maintain near-nadir looking geometry over scales of several agricultural fields. This paper presents a pilot study on high-resolution, soil roughness reconstruction and assessment from UAV images over an agricultural plot. As a reference method, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) was applied on a 10 m x 1.5 m subplot. The UAV images were self-calibrated and oriented within a bundle adjustment, and processed further up to a dense-matched digital surface model (DSM). The analysis of the UAV- and TLS-DSMs were performed in the spatial domain based on the surface autocorrelation function and the correlation length, and in the frequency domain based on the roughness spectrum and the surface fractal dimension (spectral slope). The TLS- and UAV-DSM differences were found to be under ±1 cm, while the UAV DSM showed a systematic pattern below this scale, which was explained by weakly tied sub-blocks of the bundle block. The results also confirmed that the existing TLS methods leads to roughness assessment up to 5 mm resolution. However, for our UAV data, this was not possible to achieve, though it was shown that for spatial scales of 12 cm and larger, both methods appear to be usable. Additionally, this paper suggests a method to propagate measurement errors to the correlation length.

  9. Extensive wetting due to roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.; Michael, J.R.; Eisenmann, E.T. . Center for Solder Science and Technology)

    1995-01-01

    Typically, a small mass of eutectic Sn-Pb solder wets a copper surface and flows radially outward to form a hemispherical shape with a contact angle of approx. 15--20 deg. When a similar mass of solder wets and thick electroless copper coated substrate, rapid radial flow commences and surprising new effects occur. Thick coats of electroless copper have a nodular surface structure and spreading on it does not subside until all solder is consumed. When the nodular structure is wetted by solder a coastline'' with many nearby islands'' are defined. Photos of regions at the wetting front were taken in the backscatter imaging mode of an SEM. These images show that solder wets the valleys between the surface nodules forming a delicate, lacy arrangement. The geometry of this coastal'' solder structure is described as fractal-like having a dimension D = 1.38 making it similar to drying fronts and cloud configurations. The importance of surface roughness in wetting phenomena is discussed in the light of an extensive history on the subject. It is shown that for spontaneous flow, assisted by roughness, the surface geometry must consist of local angles that are larger than the equilibrium contact angle. Kinetics of the wetting process are demonstrated by image analysis of wetted area taken from videotaped experiments. These experimental kinetics are shown to be similar in form to flow in open channel capillaries.

  10. Calibration of surface roughness standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, R.; Nicolet, A.; Meli, F.; Picotto, G. B.; Matus, M.; Carcedo, L.; Hemming, B.; Ganioglu, O.; De Chiffre, L.; Saraiva, F.; Bergstrand, S.; Zelenika, S.; Tonmueanwai, A.; Tsai, C.-L.; Shihua, W.; Kruger, O.; de Souza, M. M.; Salgado, J. A.; Ramotowski, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The key comparison EURAMET.L-K8.2013 on roughness was carried out in the framework of a EURAMET project starting in 2013 and ending in 2015. It involved the participation of 17 National Metrology Institutes from Europe, Asia, South America and Africa representing four regional metrology organisations. Five surface texture standards of different type were circulated and on each of the standards several roughness parameters according to the standard ISO 4287 had to be determined. 32 out of 395 individual results were not consistent with the reference value. After some corrective actions the number of inconsistent results could be reduced to 20, which correspond to about 5% of the total and can statistically be expected. In addition to the material standards, two softgauges were circulated, which allow to test the software of the instruments used in the comparison. The comparison results help to support the calibraton and measurement capabilities (CMCs) of the laboratories involved in the CIPM MRA. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCL, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  11. High temperature control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vollman, Russell E.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  12. Bundle formation in parallel aligned polymers with competing interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Sandipan; Benetatos, P.; Jho, Y. S.

    2016-04-01

    Aggregation of like-charged polymers is widely observed in biological- and soft-matter systems. In many systems, bundles are formed when a short-range attraction of diverse physical origin like charge bridging, hydrogen bonding or hydrophobic interaction, overcomes the longer-range charge repulsion. In this letter, we present a general mechanism of bundle formation in these systems as the breaking of the translational invariance in parallel aligned polymers with competing interactions of this type. We derive a criterion for finite-sized bundle formation as well as for macroscopic phase separation (formation of infinite bundles).

  13. Robust Mapping of Incoherent Fiber-Optic Bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Harry E.; Deason, Brent E.; DePlachett, Charles P.; Pilgrim, Robert A.; Sanford, Harold S.

    2007-01-01

    A method and apparatus for mapping between the positions of fibers at opposite ends of incoherent fiber-optic bundles have been invented to enable the use of such bundles to transmit images in visible or infrared light. The method is robust in the sense that it provides useful mapping even for a bundle that contains thousands of narrow, irregularly packed fibers, some of which may be defective. In a coherent fiber-optic bundle, the input and output ends of each fiber lie at identical positions in the input and output planes; therefore, the bundle can be used to transmit images without further modification. Unfortunately, the fabrication of coherent fiber-optic bundles is too labor-intensive and expensive for many applications. An incoherent fiber-optic bundle can be fabricated more easily and at lower cost, but it produces a scrambled image because the position of the end of each fiber in the input plane is generally different from the end of the same fiber in the output plane. However, the image transmitted by an incoherent fiber-optic bundle can be unscrambled (or, from a different perspective, decoded) by digital processing of the output image if the mapping between the input and output fiber-end positions is known. Thus, the present invention enables the use of relatively inexpensive fiber-optic bundles to transmit images.

  14. Reactor control rod timing system. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Wu, P.T.K.

    1980-03-18

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system is described for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  15. Constrained ripple optimization of Tokamak bundle divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Rome, J.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Lyon, J.F.; Fowler, R.H.; Peng, Y-K.M.; Dory, R.A.

    1983-02-01

    Magnetic field ripple from a tokamak bundle divertor is localized to a small toroidal sector and must be treated differently from the usual (distributed) toroidal field (TF) coil ripple. Generally, in a tokamak with an unoptimized divertor design, all of the banana-trapped fast ions are quickly lost due to banana drift diffusion or to trapping between the 1/R variation in absolute value vector B ..xi.. B and local field maxima due to the divertor. A computer code has been written to optimize automatically on-axis ripple subject to these constraints, while varying up to nine design parameters. Optimum configurations have low on-axis ripple (<0.2%) so that, now, most banana-trapped fast ions are confined. Only those ions with banana tips near the outside region (absolute value theta < or equal to 45/sup 0/) are lost. However, because finite-sized TF coils have not been used in this study, the flux bundle is not expanded.

  16. Emitters of N-photon bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, C. Sánchez; Del Valle, E.; Tudela, A. González; Müller, K.; Lichtmannecker, S.; Kaniber, M.; Tejedor, C.; Finley, J. J.; Laussy, F. P.

    2014-07-01

    Controlling the output of a light emitter is one of the basic tasks in photonics, with landmarks such as the development of the laser and single-photon sources. The ever growing range of quantum applications is making it increasingly important to diversify the available quantum sources. Here, we propose a cavity quantum electrodynamics scheme to realize emitters that release their energy in groups (or `bundles') of N photons (where N is an integer). Close to 100% of two-photon emission and 90% of three-photon emission is shown to be within reach of state-of-the-art samples. The emission can be tuned with the system parameters so that the device behaves as a laser or as an N-photon gun. Here, we develop the theoretical formalism to characterize such emitters, with the bundle statistics arising as an extension of the fundamental correlation functions of quantum optics. These emitters will be useful for quantum information processing and for medical applications.

  17. Development boiling to sprinkled tube bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracík, Petr; Pospíšil, Jiří

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents results of a studied heat transfer coefficient at the surface of a sprinkled tube bundle where boiling occurs. Research in the area of sprinkled exchangers can be divided into two major parts. The first part is research on heat transfer and determination of the heat transfer coefficient at sprinkled tube bundles for various liquids, whether boiling or not. The second part is testing of sprinkle modes for various tube diameters, tube pitches and tube materials and determination of individual modes' interface. All results published so far for water as the falling film liquid apply to one to three tubes for which the mentioned relations studied are determined in rigid laboratory conditions defined strictly in advance. The sprinkled tubes were not viewed from the operational perspective where there are more tubes and various modes may occur in different parts with various heat transfer values. The article focuses on these processes. The tube is located in a low-pressure chamber where vacuum is generated using an exhauster via ejector. The tube consists of smooth copper tubes of 12 mm diameter placed horizontally one above another.

  18. Confinement-dependent friction in peptide bundles.

    PubMed

    Erbaş, Aykut; Netz, Roland R

    2013-03-19

    Friction within globular proteins or between adhering macromolecules crucially determines the kinetics of protein folding, the formation, and the relaxation of self-assembled molecular systems. One fundamental question is how these friction effects depend on the local environment and in particular on the presence of water. In this model study, we use fully atomistic MD simulations with explicit water to obtain friction forces as a single polyglycine peptide chain is pulled out of a bundle of k adhering parallel polyglycine peptide chains. The whole system is periodically replicated along the peptide axes, so a stationary state at prescribed mean sliding velocity V is achieved. The aggregation number is varied between k = 2 (two peptide chains adhering to each other with plenty of water present at the adhesion sites) and k = 7 (one peptide chain pulled out from a close-packed cylindrical array of six neighboring peptide chains with no water inside the bundle). The friction coefficient per hydrogen bond, extrapolated to the viscous limit of vanishing pulling velocity V → 0, exhibits an increase by five orders of magnitude when going from k = 2 to k = 7. This dramatic confinement-induced friction enhancement we argue to be due to a combination of water depletion and increased hydrogen-bond cooperativity.

  19. Automatic safety rod for reactors. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-03-23

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  20. Spontaneous Patterning of Confined Granular Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanis, Jennifer; Harries, Daniel; Sackett, Dan L.; Losert, Wolfgang; Nossal, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Vertically vibrated rod-shaped granular materials confined to quasi-2D containers self-organize into distinct patterns. We find, consistent with theory and simulation, a density dependent isotropic-nematic transition. Along the walls, rods interact sterically to form a wetting layer. For high rod densities, complex patterns emerge as a result of competition between bulk and boundary alignment. A continuum elastic energy accounting for nematic distortion and local wall anchoring reproduces the structures seen experimentally.

  1. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest; Pardini, John A.; Walker, David E.

    1987-01-01

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  2. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1984-03-13

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  3. Improved model for sucker rod pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, D.R.; Schmidt, Z.

    1981-01-01

    An improved model for predicting the behavior of sucker rod pumping installations is presented. This model incorporates the dynamics of the liquid columns as well as the sucker rod string through a system of partial differential equations. The system of equations is solved by a modified method of characteristics on a digital computer. The model predicts the polished rod and pump dynamometer cards and incorporates the effects of liquid inertia and viscosity. It is capable of simulating a wide variety of pumping conditions where liquid physical properties are important. The information predicted by the model is useful in the design and operation of sucker rod pumping installations. Refs.

  4. An improved model for sucker rod pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, D.R.; Schmidt, Z.

    1983-02-01

    An improved model for predicting the behavior of sucker rod pumping installations is presented. This model incorporates the dynamics of the liquid columns as well as the sucker rod string through a system of partial differential equations. This system of equations is solved by a modified method of characteristics on a digital computer. The model predicts the polished-rod and pump dynamometer cards and incorporates the effects of liquid inertia and viscosity. The model is capable of simulating a wide variety of pumping conditions for which liquid physical properties are important. The information predicted by the model is useful in the design and operation of sucker rod pumping installations.

  5. Connexin 36 and rod bipolar cell independent rod pathways drive retinal ganglion cells and optokinetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Cameron S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; van der Heijden, Meike; Lo, Eric M; Paul, David; Bramblett, Debra E; Lem, Janis; Simons, David L; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-02-01

    Rod pathways are a parallel set of synaptic connections which enable night vision by relaying and processing rod photoreceptor light responses. We use dim light stimuli to isolate rod pathway contributions to downstream light responses then characterize these contributions in knockout mice lacking rod transducin-α (Trα), or certain pathway components associated with subsets of rod pathways. These comparisons reveal that rod pathway driven light sensitivity in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is entirely dependent on Trα, but partially independent of connexin 36 (Cx36) and rod bipolar cells. Pharmacological experiments show that rod pathway-driven and Cx36-independent RGC ON responses are also metabotropic glutamate receptor 6-dependent. To validate the RGC findings in awake, behaving animals we measured optokinetic reflexes (OKRs), which are sensitive to changes in ON pathways. Scotopic OKR contrast sensitivity was lost in Trα(-/-) mice, but indistinguishable from controls in Cx36(-/-) and rod bipolar cell knockout mice. Mesopic OKRs were also altered in mutant mice: Trα(-/-) mice had decreased spatial acuity, rod BC knockouts had decreased sensitivity, and Cx36(-/-) mice had increased sensitivity. These results provide compelling evidence against the complete Cx36 or rod BC dependence of night vision's ON component. Further, the findings suggest the parallel nature of rod pathways provides considerable redundancy to scotopic light sensitivity but distinct contributions to mesopic responses through complicated interactions with cone pathways. PMID:26718442

  6. Connexin 36 and rod bipolar cell independent rod pathways drive retinal ganglion cells and optokinetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Cameron S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; van der Heijden, Meike; Lo, Eric M; Paul, David; Bramblett, Debra E; Lem, Janis; Simons, David L; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-02-01

    Rod pathways are a parallel set of synaptic connections which enable night vision by relaying and processing rod photoreceptor light responses. We use dim light stimuli to isolate rod pathway contributions to downstream light responses then characterize these contributions in knockout mice lacking rod transducin-α (Trα), or certain pathway components associated with subsets of rod pathways. These comparisons reveal that rod pathway driven light sensitivity in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is entirely dependent on Trα, but partially independent of connexin 36 (Cx36) and rod bipolar cells. Pharmacological experiments show that rod pathway-driven and Cx36-independent RGC ON responses are also metabotropic glutamate receptor 6-dependent. To validate the RGC findings in awake, behaving animals we measured optokinetic reflexes (OKRs), which are sensitive to changes in ON pathways. Scotopic OKR contrast sensitivity was lost in Trα(-/-) mice, but indistinguishable from controls in Cx36(-/-) and rod bipolar cell knockout mice. Mesopic OKRs were also altered in mutant mice: Trα(-/-) mice had decreased spatial acuity, rod BC knockouts had decreased sensitivity, and Cx36(-/-) mice had increased sensitivity. These results provide compelling evidence against the complete Cx36 or rod BC dependence of night vision's ON component. Further, the findings suggest the parallel nature of rod pathways provides considerable redundancy to scotopic light sensitivity but distinct contributions to mesopic responses through complicated interactions with cone pathways.

  7. As Can Be Seen: Lexical Bundles and Disciplinary Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyland, Ken

    2008-01-01

    An important component of fluent linguistic production is control of the multi-word expressions referred to as clusters, chunks or bundles. These are extended collocations which appear more frequently than expected by chance, helping to shape meanings in specific contexts and contributing to our sense of coherence in a text. Bundles have begun to…

  8. Hair bundle profiles along the chick basilar papilla

    PubMed Central

    DUNCAN, R. K.; ILE, K. E.; DUBIN, M. G.; SAUNDERS, J. C.

    2001-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells play a central role in the transduction of sound into neural output. Anatomical descriptions of these cells, and their protruding hair bundles, are of fundamental interest since hair cell transduction is dependent on hair bundle micromechanics and hair bundle micromechanics depends on hair bundle morphology. In this paper, we describe quantitatively changes in the staircase profile of the hair bundle along the apical portion of the chick's basilar papilla. Images of hair cells from 8 discretely dissected segments of the apical 3rd of the basilar papilla were archived, and the profile contour outlined by the tips of the stereocilia was digitised and curves were fitted by linear and power equations. The hair bundles of tall hair cells exhibited both linear and curvilinear profiles, which were equally distributed along the papilla. All short hair cells in our sample had straight contours. The differences in hair bundle shape among the tall hair cells may lead to differential susceptibility to injury and some variance in the current-displacement transduction curves due to differences in the translation of forces throughout the hair bundle. PMID:11215761

  9. 76 FR 61365 - Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Initiative

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... 25, 2011 we published a notice requesting applications in the Federal Register [76 FR 53137] to... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Initiative.... SUMMARY: This notice extends the deadlines for the submission of the Bundled Payments for Care...

  10. Molecular Architecture of the Chick Vestibular Hair Bundle

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-Bum; Krey, Jocelyn F.; Hassan, Ahmed; Metlagel, Zoltan; Tauscher, Andrew N.; Pagana, James M.; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Jeffery, Erin D.; Spinelli, Kateri J.; Zhao, Hongyu; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; Choi, Dongseok; David, Larry L.; Auer, Manfred; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    Hair bundles of the inner ear have a unique structure and protein composition that underlies their sensitivity to mechanical stimulation. Using mass spectrometry, we identified and quantified >1100 proteins, present from a few to 400,000 copies per stereocilium, from purified chick bundles; 336 of these were significantly enriched in bundles. Bundle proteins that we detected have been shown to regulate cytoskeleton structure and dynamics, energy metabolism, phospholipid synthesis, and cell signaling. Three-dimensional imaging using electron tomography allowed us to count the number of actin-actin crosslinkers and actin-membrane connectors; these values compared well to those obtained from mass spectrometry. Network analysis revealed several hub proteins, including RDX (radixin) and SLC9A3R2 (NHERF2), which interact with many bundle proteins and may perform functions essential for bundle structure and function. The quantitative mass spectrometry of bundle proteins reported here establishes a framework for future characterization of dynamic processes that shape bundle structure and function. PMID:23334578

  11. Strength distribution of planar local load-sharing bundles.

    PubMed

    Habeeb, C N Irfan; Mahesh, Sivasambu

    2015-08-01

    Monte Carlo simulations and probabilistic modeling are employed to understand the strength distribution of a planar bundle of local load-sharing fibers. The fibers are distributed randomly within a unit square according to a Poisson process, and the fiber strengths are Weibull distributed with exponent ρ. Monte Carlo failure simulations of bundles comprised of up to 10(5) fibers suggests that the bundle strength distribution obeys weakest-link scaling for all ρ. Also, a probabilistic model of the weakest-link event is proposed. This model introduces a failure event at a size scale between that of the fiber and that of the bundle, whose failure statistics follows that of equal load-sharing bundles. The weakest-link event is modelled as the growth of a tight cluster of these equal load-sharing bundles. The size of the equal load-sharing bundles increases with decreasing ρ. The simulated bundle strength distributions and those predicted by the model are compared, and excellent agreement is obtained. PMID:26382362

  12. Amplitude death of coupled hair bundles with stochastic channel noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Joong; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2014-04-01

    Hair cells conduct auditory transduction in vertebrates. In lower vertebrates such as frogs and turtles, due to the active mechanism in hair cells, hair bundles (stereocilia) can be spontaneously oscillating or quiescent. Recently an amplitude death phenomenon has been proposed [K.-H. Ahn, J. R. Soc. Interface, 10, 20130525 (2013)] as a mechanism for auditory transduction in frog hair-cell bundles, where sudden cessation of the oscillations arises due to the coupling between nonidentical hair bundles. The gating of the ion channel is intrinsically stochastic due to the stochastic nature of the configuration change of the channel. The strength of the noise due to the channel gating can be comparable to the thermal Brownian noise of hair bundles. Thus, we perform stochastic simulations of the elastically coupled hair bundles. In spite of stray noisy fluctuations due to its stochastic dynamics, our simulation shows the transition from collective oscillation to amplitude death as interbundle coupling strength increases. In its stochastic dynamics, the formation of the amplitude death state of coupled hair bundles can be seen as a sudden suppression of the displacement fluctuation of the hair bundles as the coupling strength increases. The enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio through the amplitude death phenomenon is clearly seen in the stochastic dynamics. Our numerical results demonstrate that the multiple number of transduction channels per hair bundle is an important factor to the amplitude death phenomenon, because the phenomenon may disappear for a small number of transduction channels due to strong gating noise.

  13. Presenting Lexical Bundles for Explicit Noticing with Schematic Linguistic Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Haidee Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Lexical bundles are essential for fluency, but their incompleteness is a stumbling block for learners. In this study, two presentation methods to increase awareness of lexical bundles through explicit noticing are explored and compared with incidental exposure. The three conditions in this study were as follows: noticing with schematic linguistic…

  14. Stable Bundles on Non-Kähler Elliptic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brînzănescu, Vasile; Moraru, Ruxandra

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, we study the moduli spaces of stable rank-2 vector bundles on non-Kähler elliptic surfaces, thus giving a classification of these bundles; in the case of Hopf and Kodaira surfaces, these moduli spaces admit the structure of an algebraically completely integrable Hamiltonian system.

  15. Lexical Bundles in L1 and L2 Academic Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yu-Hua; Baker, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This paper adopts an automated frequency-driven approach to identify frequently-used word combinations (i.e., "lexical bundles") in academic writing. Lexical bundles retrieved from one corpus of published academic texts and two corpora of student academic writing (one L1, the other L2), were investigated both quantitatively and qualitatively.…

  16. Higgs fields on spinor gauge-natural bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palese, Marcella; Winterroth, Ekkehart

    2013-01-01

    We show that the Lie derivative of spinor fields is parametrized by Higgs fields defined by the kernel of a gauge-natural Jacobi morphism associated with the Einstein-Cartan- Dirac Lagrangian. In particular, the generalized Kosmann lift to the total bundle of the theory is constrained by variational Higgs fields on gauge-natural bundles.

  17. His bundle pacing: Initial experience and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Amrish; Deshmukh, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Direct His bundle pacing provides the most physiologic means of artificial pacing of the ventricles with a preserved His-Purkinje system and may play a role in patients with a diseased intrinsic conduction system. We describe our initial motivations and experience with permanent direct His bundle pacing and important lessons learned since that time. PMID:27591359

  18. Kinetics of Turn-offs of Frog Rod Phototransduction Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Astakhova, Luba A.; Firsov, Michael L.; Govardovskii, Victor I.

    2008-01-01

    The time course of the light-induced activity of phototrandsuction effector enzyme cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) is shaped by kinetics of rhodopsin and transducin shut-offs. The two processes are among the key factors that set the speed and sensitivity of the photoresponse and whose regulation contributes to light adaptation. The aim of this study was to determine time courses of flash-induced PDE activity in frog rods that were dark adapted or subjected to nonsaturating steady background illumination. PDE activity was computed from the responses recorded from solitary rods with the suction pipette technique in Ca2+-clamping solution. A flash applied in the dark-adapted state elicits a wave of PDE activity whose rising and decaying phases have characteristic times near 0.5 and 2 seconds, respectively. Nonsaturating steady background shortens both phases roughly to the same extent. The acceleration may exceed fivefold at the backgrounds that suppress ≈70% of the dark current. The time constant of the process that controls the recovery from super-saturating flashes (so-called dominant time constant) is adaptation independent and, hence, cannot be attributed to either of the processes that shape the main part of the PDE wave. We hypothesize that the dominant time constant in frog rods characterizes arrestin binding to rhodopsin partially inactivated by phosphorylation. A mathematical model of the cascade that considers two-stage rhodopsin quenching and transducin inactivation can mimic experimental PDE activity quite well. The effect of light adaptation on the PDE kinetics can be reproduced in the model by concomitant acceleration on both rhodopsin phosphorylation and transducin turn-off, but not by accelerated arrestin binding. This suggests that not only rhodopsin but also transducin shut-off is under adaptation control. PMID:18955597

  19. Vision, healing brush, and fiber bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Todor

    2005-03-01

    The Healing Brush is a tool introduced for the first time in Adobe Photoshop (2002) that removes defects in images by seamless cloning (gradient domain fusion). The Healing Brush algorithms are built on a new mathematical approach that uses Fibre Bundles and Connections to model the representation of images in the visual system. Our mathematical results are derived from first principles of human vision, related to adaptation transforms of von Kries type and Retinex theory. In this paper we present the new result of Healing in arbitrary color space. In addition to supporting image repair and seamless cloning, our approach also produces the exact solution to the problem of high dynamic range compression of17 and can be applied to other image processing algorithms.

  20. Theories of the dorsal bundle extinction effect.

    PubMed

    Mason, S T; Iversen, S D

    1979-07-01

    Selective destruction of the noradrenaline systems in the rat brain using the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine has been found to cause resistance to extinction in a number of behavioural situations. Several theories concerning the behavioural mechanism altered by the lesion, and hence about the role of noradrenaline in normal brain functioning, are proposed and evaluated. Theories suggesting a role for noradrenaline in activity, perseveration, internal inhibition, frustrative non-reward, motivation, or secondary reinforcement, fail to explain all the available evidence and direct tests of each theory fails to support its predictions. A model which suggests that noreadrenaline is involved in attentional behaviour, specifically in filtering out or learning to ignore irrelevant environmental stimuli, is successful in explaining all available data and direct tests of the lesioned rats' attentional capacity serve to confirm many of the predictions of an attentional theory of the dorsal bundle extinction effect.

  1. Bundled automobile insurance coverage and accidents.

    PubMed

    Li, Chu-Shiu; Liu, Chwen-Chi; Peng, Sheng-Chang

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the characteristics of automobile accidents by taking into account two types of automobile insurance coverage: comprehensive vehicle physical damage insurance and voluntary third-party liability insurance. By using a unique data set in the Taiwanese automobile insurance market, we explore the bundled automobile insurance coverage and the occurrence of claims. It is shown that vehicle physical damage insurance is the major automobile coverage and affects the decision to purchase voluntary liability insurance coverage as a complement. Moreover, policyholders with high vehicle physical damage insurance coverage have a significantly higher probability of filing vehicle damage claims, and if they additionally purchase low voluntary liability insurance coverage, their accident claims probability is higher than those who purchase high voluntary liability insurance coverage. Our empirical results reveal that additional automobile insurance coverage information can capture more driver characteristics and driving behaviors to provide useful information for insurers' underwriting policies and to help analyze the occurrence of automobile accidents.

  2. Voltage- and calcium-dependent motility of saccular hair bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiñones, Patricia M.; Meenderink, Sebastiaan W. F.; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-12-01

    Active bundle motility, which is hypothesized to supply feedback for mechanical amplification of signals, is thought to enhance sensitivity and sharpen tuning in vestibular and auditory organs. To study active hair bundle motility, we combined high-speed camera recordings of bullfrog sacculi, which were mounted in a two-compartment chamber, and voltage-clamp of the hair cell membrane potential. Using this paradigm, we measured three types of bundle motions: 1) spontaneous oscillations which can be analyzed to measure the physiological operating range of the transduction channel; 2) a sustained quasi-static movement of the bundle that depends on membrane potential; and 3) a fast, transient and asymmetric movement that resets the bundle position and depends on changes in the membrane potential. These data support a role for both calcium and voltage in the transduction-channel function.

  3. Fiber bundle model under fluid pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitrano, David; Girard, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    Internal fluid pressure often plays an important role in the rupture of brittle materials. This is a major concern for many engineering applications and for natural hazards. More specifically, the mechanisms through which fluid pressure, applied at a microscale, can enhance the failure at a macroscale and accelerate damage dynamics leading to failure remains unclear. Here we revisit the fiber bundle model by accounting for the effect of fluid under pressure that contributes to the global load supported by the fiber bundle. Fluid pressure is applied on the broken fibers, following Biot's theory. The statistical properties of damage avalanches and their evolution toward macrofailure are analyzed for a wide range of fluid pressures. The macroscopic strength of the new model appears to be strongly controlled by the action of the fluid, particularly when the fluid pressure becomes comparable with the fiber strength. The behavior remains consistent with continuous transition, i.e., second order, including for large pressure. The main change concerns the damage acceleration toward the failure that is well modeled by the concept of sweeping of an instability. When pressure is increased, the exponent β characterizing the power-law distribution avalanche sizes significantly decreases and the exponent γ characterizing the cutoff divergence when failure is approached significantly increases. This proves that fluid pressure plays a key role in failure process acting as destabilization factor. This indicates that macrofailure occurs more readily under fluid pressure, with a behavior that becomes progressively unstable as fluid pressure increases. This may have considerable consequences on our ability to forecast failure when fluid pressure is acting.

  4. Birefringence of single and bundled microtubules.

    PubMed Central

    Oldenbourg, R; Salmon, E D; Tran, P T

    1998-01-01

    We have measured the birefringence of microtubules (MTs) and of MT-based macromolecular assemblies in vitro and in living cells by using the new Pol-Scope. A single microtubule in aqueous suspension and imaged with a numerical aperture of 1.4 had a peak retardance of 0.07 nm. The peak retardance of a small bundle increased linearly with the number of MTs in the bundle. Axonemes (prepared from sea urchin sperm) had a peak retardance 20 times higher than that of single MTs, in accordance with the nine doublets and two singlets arrangement of parallel MTs in the axoneme. Measured filament retardance decreased when the filament was defocused or the numerical aperture of the imaging system was decreased. However, the retardance "area," which we defined as the image retardance integrated along a line perpendicular to the filament axis, proved to be independent of focus and of numerical aperture. These results are in good agreement with a theory that we developed for measuring retardances with imaging optics. Our theoretical concept is based on Wiener's theory of mixed dielectrics, which is well established for nonimaging applications. We extend its use to imaging systems by considering the coherence region defined by the optical set-up. Light scattered from within that region interferes coherently in the image point. The presence of a filament in the coherence region leads to a polarization dependent scattering cross section and to a finite retardance measured in the image point. Similar to resolution measurements, the linear dimension of the coherence region for retardance measurements is on the order lambda/(2 NA), where lambda is the wavelength of light and NA is the numerical aperture of the illumination and imaging lenses. PMID:9449366

  5. Historical dynamics in ecosystem service bundles

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Delphine; Rhemtulla, Jeanine M.; Bennett, Elena M.

    2015-01-01

    Managing multiple ecosystem services (ES), including addressing trade-offs between services and preventing ecological surprises, is among the most pressing areas for sustainability research. These challenges require ES research to go beyond the currently common approach of snapshot studies limited to one or two services at a single point in time. We used a spatiotemporal approach to examine changes in nine ES and their relationships from 1971 to 2006 across 131 municipalities in a mixed-use landscape in Quebec, Canada. We show how an approach that incorporates time and space can improve our understanding of ES dynamics. We found an increase in the provision of most services through time; however, provision of ES was not uniformly enhanced at all locations. Instead, each municipality specialized in providing a bundle (set of positively correlated ES) dominated by just a few services. The trajectory of bundle formation was related to changes in agricultural policy and global trends; local biophysical and socioeconomic characteristics explained the bundles’ increasing spatial clustering. Relationships between services varied through time, with some provisioning and cultural services shifting from a trade-off or no relationship in 1971 to an apparent synergistic relationship by 2006. By implementing a spatiotemporal perspective on multiple services, we provide clear evidence of the dynamic nature of ES interactions and contribute to identifying processes and drivers behind these changing relationships. Our study raises questions about using snapshots of ES provision at a single point in time to build our understanding of ES relationships in complex and dynamic social-ecological systems. PMID:26460005

  6. Fiber bundle model under fluid pressure.

    PubMed

    Amitrano, David; Girard, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    Internal fluid pressure often plays an important role in the rupture of brittle materials. This is a major concern for many engineering applications and for natural hazards. More specifically, the mechanisms through which fluid pressure, applied at a microscale, can enhance the failure at a macroscale and accelerate damage dynamics leading to failure remains unclear. Here we revisit the fiber bundle model by accounting for the effect of fluid under pressure that contributes to the global load supported by the fiber bundle. Fluid pressure is applied on the broken fibers, following Biot's theory. The statistical properties of damage avalanches and their evolution toward macrofailure are analyzed for a wide range of fluid pressures. The macroscopic strength of the new model appears to be strongly controlled by the action of the fluid, particularly when the fluid pressure becomes comparable with the fiber strength. The behavior remains consistent with continuous transition, i.e., second order, including for large pressure. The main change concerns the damage acceleration toward the failure that is well modeled by the concept of sweeping of an instability. When pressure is increased, the exponent β characterizing the power-law distribution avalanche sizes significantly decreases and the exponent γ characterizing the cutoff divergence when failure is approached significantly increases. This proves that fluid pressure plays a key role in failure process acting as destabilization factor. This indicates that macrofailure occurs more readily under fluid pressure, with a behavior that becomes progressively unstable as fluid pressure increases. This may have considerable consequences on our ability to forecast failure when fluid pressure is acting. PMID:27078437

  7. Big things come in bundled packages: implications of bundled payment systems in health care reimbursement reform.

    PubMed

    Delisle, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    With passage of the Affordable Care Act, the ever-evolving landscape of health care braces for another shift in the reimbursement paradigm. As health care costs continue to rise, providers are pressed to deliver efficient, high-quality care at flat to minimally increasing rates. Inherent systemwide inefficiencies between payers and providers at various clinical settings pose a daunting task for enhancing collaboration and care coordination. A change from Medicare's fee-for-service reimbursement model to bundled payments offers one avenue for resolution. Pilots using such payment models have realized varying degrees of success, leading to the development and upcoming implementation of a bundled payment initiative led by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation. Delivery integration is critical to ensure high-quality care at affordable costs across the system. Providers and payers able to adapt to the newly proposed models of payment will benefit from achieving cost reductions and improved patient outcomes and realize a competitive advantage.

  8. Computing Temperatures In Optically Pumped Laser Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrukh, Usamah O.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program presents new model solving temperature-distribution problem for laser rods of finite length and calculates both radial and axial components of temperature distributions in these rods. Contains several self-checking schemes to prevent over-writing of memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  9. Sucker rod makers offer a selection

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, D.

    1983-11-01

    In their ongoing effort to produce better, more cost-effective sucker rods, manufacturers have selected one of three materials - fiberglass, aluminum, and steel - that they feel best suits the production system function of the rods, which is to connect the downhole pump to the pumpjack on the surface. Characteristics of each are described.

  10. Longitudinal Impact of Rods: A Continuing Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, W. G. B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate experiment of research potential. The experiment cconsists of measuring the time of contact of a metal rod bouncing on a steel base as a function of the velocity of impact, length, diameter, and material of the rod. (GA)

  11. Tipping Time of a Quantum Rod

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrikar, Onkar

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of a quantum rod, pivoted at its lower end on an impenetrable floor and restricted to moving in the vertical plane under the gravitational potential, is studied analytically under the approximation that the rod is initially localized to a "small-enough" neighbourhood around the point of classical unstable equilibrium. It is shown…

  12. Vortex Noise from Rotating Cylindrical Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, E Z; Deming, A F

    1935-01-01

    A series of round rods of the some diameter were rotated individually about the mid-point of each rod. Vortices are shed from the rods when in motion, giving rise to the emission of sound. With the rotating system placed in the open air, the distribution of sound in space, the acoustical power output, and the spectral distribution have been studied. The frequency of emission of vortices from any point on the rod is given by the formula von Karman. From the spectrum estimates are made of the distribution of acoustical power along the rod, the amount of air concerned in sound production, the "equivalent size" of the vortices, and the acoustical energy content for each vortex.

  13. Attachment for sucker rod depth adjustment

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, N.D.

    1992-04-07

    This patent describes a surface unit of an oil well pumping system, having a walking beam, a suspended carrier bar and an interconnected sucker rod assembly for stroking a reciprocating down-hole pump. It comprises a cross bar having a centrally located passage therein for the sucker rod assembly and adapted to be transversely supported by the carrier bar; a depth adjusting bar, having a centrally located passage therein for the sucker rod assembly, positioned at a selected fixed dimension above and parallel to the cross bar and adapted to operatively support the sucker rod assembly; clamping means for fixing the sucker rod relative to the depth adjusting bar; and hydraulically extendable means supportively connecting the depth adjusting bar to the cross bar on at least each side of the carrier bar for adjusting the selected fixed dimension and maintaining the adjustment during operation.

  14. Rod-Coil Block Polyimide Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Kinder, James D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    This invention is a series of rod-coil block polyimide copolymers that are easy to fabricate into mechanically resilient films with acceptable ionic or protonic conductivity at a variety of temperatures. The copolymers consist of short-rigid polyimide rod segments alternating with polyether coil segments. The rods and coil segments can be linear, branched or mixtures of linear and branched segments. The highly incompatible rods and coil segments phase separate, providing nanoscale channels for ion conduction. The polyimide segments provide dimensional and mechanical stability and can be functionalized in a number of ways to provide specialized functions for a given application. These rod-coil black polyimide copolymers are particularly useful in the preparation of ion conductive membranes for use in the manufacture of fuel cells and lithium based polymer batteries.

  15. Influence of surface roughness on gecko adhesion.

    PubMed

    Huber, Gerrit; Gorb, Stanislav N; Hosoda, Naoe; Spolenak, Ralph; Arzt, Eduard

    2007-07-01

    In this study we show the influence of surface roughness on gecko adhesion on both the nano- and macroscales. We present experimental data for the force necessary to pull off single spatulae from hard rough substrates and also detail observations on living geckos clinging to various surfaces. Both experiments consistently show that the effective adhesion shows a minimum for a root mean square roughness ranging from 100 to 300nm.

  16. Rough set models of Physarum machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancerz, Krzysztof; Schumann, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we consider transition system models of behaviour of Physarum machines in terms of rough set theory. A Physarum machine, a biological computing device implemented in the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum (true slime mould), is a natural transition system. In the behaviour of Physarum machines, one can notice some ambiguity in Physarum motions that influences exact anticipation of states of machines in time. To model this ambiguity, we propose to use rough set models created over transition systems. Rough sets are an appropriate tool to deal with rough (ambiguous, imprecise) concepts in the universe of discourse.

  17. Simplified Approach to Predicting Rough Surface Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Stripf, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Turbine vane heat transfer predictions are given for smooth and rough vanes where the experimental data show transition moving forward on the vane as the surface roughness physical height increases. Consiste nt with smooth vane heat transfer, the transition moves forward for a fixed roughness height as the Reynolds number increases. Comparison s are presented with published experimental data. Some of the data ar e for a regular roughness geometry with a range of roughness heights, Reynolds numbers, and inlet turbulence intensities. The approach ta ken in this analysis is to treat the roughness in a statistical sense , consistent with what would be obtained from blades measured after e xposure to actual engine environments. An approach is given to determ ine the equivalent sand grain roughness from the statistics of the re gular geometry. This approach is guided by the experimental data. A roughness transition criterion is developed, and comparisons are made with experimental data over the entire range of experimental test co nditions. Additional comparisons are made with experimental heat tran sfer data, where the roughness geometries are both regular as well a s statistical. Using the developed analysis, heat transfer calculatio ns are presented for the second stage vane of a high pressure turbine at hypothetical engine conditions.

  18. Eulerian Formulation of Spatially Constrained Elastic Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynen, Alexandre

    Slender elastic rods are ubiquitous in nature and technology. For a vast majority of applications, the rod deflection is restricted by an external constraint and a significant part of the elastic body is in contact with a stiff constraining surface. The research work presented in this doctoral dissertation formulates a computational model for the solution of elastic rods constrained inside or around frictionless tube-like surfaces. The segmentation strategy adopted to cope with this complex class of problems consists in sequencing the global problem into, comparatively simpler, elementary problems either in continuous contact with the constraint or contact-free between their extremities. Within the conventional Lagrangian formulation of elastic rods, this approach is however associated with two major drawbacks. First, the boundary conditions specifying the locations of the rod centerline at both extremities of each elementary problem lead to the establishment of isoperimetric constraints, i.e., integral constraints on the unknown length of the rod. Second, the assessment of the unilateral contact condition requires, in principle, the comparison of two curves parametrized by distinct curvilinear coordinates, viz. the rod centerline and the constraint axis. Both conspire to burden the computations associated with the method. To streamline the solution along the elementary problems and rationalize the assessment of the unilateral contact condition, the rod governing equations are reformulated within the Eulerian framework of the constraint. The methodical exploration of both types of elementary problems leads to specific formulations of the rod governing equations that stress the profound connection between the mechanics of the rod and the geometry of the constraint surface. The proposed Eulerian reformulation, which restates the rod local equilibrium in terms of the curvilinear coordinate associated with the constraint axis, describes the rod deformed configuration

  19. Mesoscale simulation of semiflexible chains. II. Evolution dynamics and stability of fiber bundle networks.

    PubMed

    Groot, Robert D

    2013-06-14

    Network formation of associative semiflexible fibers and mixtures of fibers and colloidal particles is simulated for the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts model of elastic contacts, and a phase diagram in terms of particle elasticity and surface energy is presented. When fibers self-assemble, they form a network for sufficiently large fiber-solvent surface energy. If the surface energy is above the value where single particles crystallize, the adhesion forces drive diffusion-limited aggregation. Two mechanisms contribute to coarsening: non-associated chains joining existing bundles, and fiber bundles merging. Coarsening stops when the length of the network connections is roughly the persistence length, independent of surface energy. If the surface energy is below the value where single particles crystallize, a network can still be formed but at a much slower (reaction limited) rate. Loose (liquid-like) assemblies between chains form when they happen to run more-or-less parallel. These assemblies grow by diffusion and aggregation and form a loose network, which sets in micro-phase separation, i.e., syneresis. Only when the clusters crystallize, the coarsening process stops. In this case, the length of the network connections is larger than the persistence length of a single chain, and depends on the value of the surface energy. All networks of semiflexible homopolymers in this study show syneresis. Mixtures of fibers and colloid particles also form fiber bundle networks, but by choosing the colloid volume fraction sufficiently low, swelling gels are obtained. Applications of this model are in biological systems where fibers self-assemble into cell walls and bone tissue.

  20. Mesoscale simulation of semiflexible chains. II. Evolution dynamics and stability of fiber bundle networks.

    PubMed

    Groot, Robert D

    2013-06-14

    Network formation of associative semiflexible fibers and mixtures of fibers and colloidal particles is simulated for the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts model of elastic contacts, and a phase diagram in terms of particle elasticity and surface energy is presented. When fibers self-assemble, they form a network for sufficiently large fiber-solvent surface energy. If the surface energy is above the value where single particles crystallize, the adhesion forces drive diffusion-limited aggregation. Two mechanisms contribute to coarsening: non-associated chains joining existing bundles, and fiber bundles merging. Coarsening stops when the length of the network connections is roughly the persistence length, independent of surface energy. If the surface energy is below the value where single particles crystallize, a network can still be formed but at a much slower (reaction limited) rate. Loose (liquid-like) assemblies between chains form when they happen to run more-or-less parallel. These assemblies grow by diffusion and aggregation and form a loose network, which sets in micro-phase separation, i.e., syneresis. Only when the clusters crystallize, the coarsening process stops. In this case, the length of the network connections is larger than the persistence length of a single chain, and depends on the value of the surface energy. All networks of semiflexible homopolymers in this study show syneresis. Mixtures of fibers and colloid particles also form fiber bundle networks, but by choosing the colloid volume fraction sufficiently low, swelling gels are obtained. Applications of this model are in biological systems where fibers self-assemble into cell walls and bone tissue. PMID:23781818

  1. Mesoscale simulation of semiflexible chains. II. Evolution dynamics and stability of fiber bundle networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groot, Robert D.

    2013-06-01

    Network formation of associative semiflexible fibers and mixtures of fibers and colloidal particles is simulated for the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts model of elastic contacts, and a phase diagram in terms of particle elasticity and surface energy is presented. When fibers self-assemble, they form a network for sufficiently large fiber-solvent surface energy. If the surface energy is above the value where single particles crystallize, the adhesion forces drive diffusion-limited aggregation. Two mechanisms contribute to coarsening: non-associated chains joining existing bundles, and fiber bundles merging. Coarsening stops when the length of the network connections is roughly the persistence length, independent of surface energy. If the surface energy is below the value where single particles crystallize, a network can still be formed but at a much slower (reaction limited) rate. Loose (liquid-like) assemblies between chains form when they happen to run more-or-less parallel. These assemblies grow by diffusion and aggregation and form a loose network, which sets in micro-phase separation, i.e., syneresis. Only when the clusters crystallize, the coarsening process stops. In this case, the length of the network connections is larger than the persistence length of a single chain, and depends on the value of the surface energy. All networks of semiflexible homopolymers in this study show syneresis. Mixtures of fibers and colloid particles also form fiber bundle networks, but by choosing the colloid volume fraction sufficiently low, swelling gels are obtained. Applications of this model are in biological systems where fibers self-assemble into cell walls and bone tissue.

  2. Enhancement of fiberglass sucker-rod design is offered

    SciTech Connect

    Hallden, D.F.

    1985-09-30

    This paper discribes the effective use of fiberglass-reinforced plastic sucker rods (FRP). FRP sucker rods have proven to be an economical solution to many sucker rod beam pumping problems. Two important characteristics that contribute to the effectiveness of FRP sucker rods are effective modulus of elasticity and fatigue life. Computerized simulations show that FRP sucker rod installations can benefit from using rod designs with a lower modulus of elasticity.

  3. Structure of the 34 kDa F-actin-bundling protein ABP34 from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Kyu; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kim, Ji-Sun; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2015-09-01

    The crystal structure of the 34 kDa F-actin-bundling protein ABP34 from Dictyostelium discoideum was solved by Ca(2+)/S-SAD phasing and refined at 1.89 Å resolution. ABP34 is a calcium-regulated actin-binding protein that cross-links actin filaments into bundles. Its in vitro F-actin-binding and F-actin-bundling activities were confirmed by a co-sedimentation assay and transmission electron microscopy. The co-localization of ABP34 with actin in cells was also verified. ABP34 adopts a two-domain structure with an EF-hand-containing N-domain and an actin-binding C-domain, but has no reported overall structural homologues. The EF-hand is occupied by a calcium ion with a pentagonal bipyramidal coordination as in the canonical EF-hand. The C-domain structure resembles a three-helical bundle and superposes well onto the rod-shaped helical structures of some cytoskeletal proteins. Residues 216-244 in the C-domain form part of the strongest actin-binding sites (193-254) and exhibit a conserved sequence with the actin-binding region of α-actinin and ABP120. Furthermore, the second helical region of the C-domain is kinked by a proline break, offering a convex surface towards the solvent area which is implicated in actin binding. The F-actin-binding model suggests that ABP34 binds to the side of the actin filament and residues 216-244 fit into a pocket between actin subdomains -1 and -2 through hydrophobic interactions. These studies provide insights into the calcium coordination in the EF-hand and F-actin-binding site in the C-domain of ABP34, which are associated through interdomain interactions. PMID:26327373

  4. Cupula displacement, hair bundle deflection, and physiological responses in the transparent semicircular canal of young eel.

    PubMed

    Rüsch, A; Thurm, U

    1989-03-01

    The transparent labyrinth of young eels (Anguilla anguilla L.) was used in toto for studying the configuration of cupula displacement, deflection of the hair bundle, and correlated changes in transepithelial voltage (delta TEV) and nerve activity (delta NA) in the semicircular canal. Microcapillaries were introduced into the canal through holes produced by a microthermocauter. Mechanical stimulation was applied either by injection of fluid into the ampulla or by electromagnetically displacing ferrofluid as a piston within the canal. Motion of individual kinocilia, stained cupulae or the ferrofluid piston was analysed by double-exposed microphotographs, photodiodes, or a video-system. The three-dimensional cupula displacement configuration was found to be piston- to diaphragm-like. Hair bundles at different sites on the crista exhibit differences in amplitude and time course of deflection. The transfer factor between shifts of the canal fluid and the tips of the kinocilia is 0.4-0.6. Displacements in opposite directions induce delta TEV and delta NA of opposite sign. Various tests confirmed delta TEV to reflect receptor potential responses. Nerve activity adapts to a tonic response with a time constant of 6.4 s. No similar adaptation occurred in delta TEV. Stimulus-response curves of TEV- and NA-responses are similar and sigmoid in shape with saturation at ciliary deflections of roughly +6 degrees and -3 degrees.

  5. Stochastic Molecular Transport on Microtubule Bundles with Structural Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramlich, M. W.; Tabei, S. M. Ali

    Intracellular transport involves complex coordination of multiple components such as: the cytoskeletal network and molecular motors. Perturbations in this process can amplify over time and space, thereby affecting transport. One little studied component of transport are structural defects in the cytoskeletal network. In this talk we will present a stochastic model of the interaction of the molecular motor, kinesin-1, and a bundled cystoskeletal network of microtubules, and explicitly explore the role of microtubule ends (a type of defect) on long-range transport. We will show how different types of end distributions can ultimately result in the same observed transport behavior for bundles. We compare transport on completely uniform bundles, found in the axon, to completely random bundles, found in dendrites. Because of the un-biased random bundle nature, defects affect transport on dendrite bundles more than on uniform bundles in the axon. Further, defects act as large spatial-scale traps that result in random wait-times which have been assumed in previous models.

  6. Effectiveness of Hair Bundle Motility as the Cochlear Amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Sul, Bora; Iwasa, Kuni H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The effectiveness of hair bundle motility in mammalian and avian ears is studied by examining energy balance for a small sinusoidal displacement of the hair bundle. The condition that the energy generated by a hair bundle must be greater than energy loss due to the shear in the subtectorial gap per hair bundle leads to a limiting frequency that can be supported by hair-bundle motility. Limiting frequencies are obtained for two motile mechanisms for fast adaptation, the channel re-closure model and a model that assumes that fast adaptation is an interplay between gating of the channel and the myosin motor. The limiting frequency obtained for each of these models is an increasing function of a factor that is determined by the morphology of hair bundles and the cochlea. Primarily due to the higher density of hair cells in the avian inner ear, this factor is ∼10-fold greater for the avian ear than the mammalian ear, which has much higher auditory frequency limit. This result is consistent with a much greater significance of hair bundle motility in the avian ear than that in the mammalian ear. PMID:19917218

  7. Mechanical Amplification Exhibited by Quiescent Saccular Hair Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous oscillations exhibited by free-standing hair bundles from the Bullfrog sacculus suggest the existence of an active process that might underlie the exquisite sensitivity of the sacculus to mechanical stimulation. However, this spontaneous activity is suppressed by coupling to an overlying membrane, which applies a large mechanical load on the bundle. How a quiescent hair bundle utilizes its active process is still unknown. We studied the dynamics of motion of individual hair bundles under different offsets in the bundle position, and observed the occurrence of spikes in hair-bundle motion, associated with the generation of active work. These mechanical spikes can be evoked by a sinusoidal stimulus, leading to an amplified movement of the bundle with respect to the passive response. Amplitude gain reached as high as 100-fold at small stimulus amplitudes. Amplification of motion decreased with increasing amplitude of stimulation, ceasing at ∼6–12 pN stimuli. Results from numerical simulations suggest that the adaptation process, mediated by myosin 1c, is not required for the production of mechanical spikes. PMID:25564852

  8. Spontaneous Oscillation by Hair Bundles of the Bullfrog's Sacculus

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Pascal; Bozovic, D.; Choe, Y.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    One prominent manifestation of mechanical activity in hair cells is spontaneous otoacoustic emission, the unprovoked emanation of sound by an internal ear. Because active hair-bundle motility probably constitutes the active process of non-mammalian hair cells, we investigated the ability of hair bundles in the bullfrog's sacculus to produce oscillations that might underlie spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. When maintained in the ear's normal ionic milieu, many bundles oscillated spontaneously through distances as great as 80 nm at frequencies of 5-50 Hz. Whole-cell recording disclosed that the positive phase of movement was associated with the opening of transduction channels. Gentamicin, which blocks transduction channels, reversibly arrested oscillation; drugs that affect the cAMP phosphorylation pathway and might influence myosin's activity altered the rate of oscillation. Increasing the Ca2+ concentration rendered oscillations faster and smaller until they were suppressed; lowering the Ca2+ concentration moderately with chelators had the opposite effect. When a bundle was offset with a stimulus fiber, oscillations were transiently suppressed but gradually resumed. Loading a bundle by partial displacement clamping, which simulated the presence of the accessory structures to which a bundle is ordinarily attached, increased the frequency and diminished the magnitude of oscillation. These observations accord with a model in which oscillations arise from the interplay of the hair bundle's negative stiffness with the activity of adaptation motors and with Ca2+-dependent relaxation of gating springs. PMID:12805294

  9. Mechanical amplification exhibited by quiescent saccular hair bundles.

    PubMed

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous oscillations exhibited by free-standing hair bundles from the Bullfrog sacculus suggest the existence of an active process that might underlie the exquisite sensitivity of the sacculus to mechanical stimulation. However, this spontaneous activity is suppressed by coupling to an overlying membrane, which applies a large mechanical load on the bundle. How a quiescent hair bundle utilizes its active process is still unknown. We studied the dynamics of motion of individual hair bundles under different offsets in the bundle position, and observed the occurrence of spikes in hair-bundle motion, associated with the generation of active work. These mechanical spikes can be evoked by a sinusoidal stimulus, leading to an amplified movement of the bundle with respect to the passive response. Amplitude gain reached as high as 100-fold at small stimulus amplitudes. Amplification of motion decreased with increasing amplitude of stimulation, ceasing at ∼6-12 pN stimuli. Results from numerical simulations suggest that the adaptation process, mediated by myosin 1c, is not required for the production of mechanical spikes. PMID:25564852

  10. Bundling actin filaments from membranes: some novel players

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Clément

    2012-01-01

    Progress in live-cell imaging of the cytoskeleton has significantly extended our knowledge about the organization and dynamics of actin filaments near the plasma membrane of plant cells. Noticeably, two populations of filamentous structures can be distinguished. On the one hand, fine actin filaments which exhibit an extremely dynamic behavior basically characterized by fast polymerization and prolific severing events, a process referred to as actin stochastic dynamics. On the other hand, thick actin bundles which are composed of several filaments and which are comparatively more stable although they constantly remodel as well. There is evidence that the actin cytoskeleton plays critical roles in trafficking and signaling at both the cell cortex and organelle periphery but the exact contribution of actin bundles remains unclear. A common view is that actin bundles provide the long-distance tracks used by myosin motors to deliver their cargo to growing regions and accordingly play a particularly important role in cell polarization. However, several studies support that actin bundles are more than simple passive highways and display multiple and dynamic roles in the regulation of many processes, such as cell elongation, polar auxin transport, stomatal and chloroplast movement, and defense against pathogens. The list of identified plant actin-bundling proteins is ever expanding, supporting that plant cells shape structurally and functionally different actin bundles. Here I review the most recently characterized actin-bundling proteins, with a particular focus on those potentially relevant to membrane trafficking and/or signaling. PMID:22936939

  11. Method speeds tapered rod design for directional well

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Yongquan; Yuan Xiangzhong

    1995-10-16

    Determination of the minimum rod diameter, from statistical relationships, can decrease the time needed for designing a sucker-rod string for a directional well. A tapered rod string design for a directional well is more complex than for a vertical well. Based on the theory of a continuous beam column, the rod string design in a directional well is a trial and error method. The key to reduce the time to obtain a solution is to rapidly determine the minimum rod diameter. This can be done with a statistical relationship. The paper describes sucker rods, design method, basic analysis rod design, and minimum rod diameter.

  12. Method and device for tensile testing of cable bundles

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Lawrence M; Ardelean, Emil V; Goodding, James C; Babuska, Vit

    2012-10-16

    A standard tensile test device is improved to accurately measure the mechanical properties of stranded cables, ropes, and other composite structures wherein a witness is attached to the top and bottom mounting blocks holding the cable under test. The witness is comprised of two parts: a top and a bottom rod of similar diameter with the bottom rod having a smaller diameter stem on its upper end and the top rod having a hollow opening in its lower end into which the stem fits forming a witness joint. A small gap is present between the top rod and the larger diameter portion of the bottom rod. A standard extensometer is attached to the top and bottom rods of the witness spanning this small witness gap. When a force is applied to separate the mounting blocks, the gap in the witness expands the same length that the entire test specimen is stretched.

  13. Long helical filaments are not seen encircling cells in electron cryotomograms of rod-shaped bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Swulius, Matthew T.; Chen, Songye; Jane Ding, H.; Li, Zhuo; Briegel, Ariane; Pilhofer, Martin; Tocheva, Elitza I.; Lybarger, Suzanne R.; Johnson, Tanya L.; Sandkvist, Maria; Jensen, Grant J.

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} No long helical filaments are seen near or along rod-shaped bacterial inner membranes by electron cryo-tomography. {yields} Electron cryo-tomography has the resolution to detect single filaments in vivo. -- Abstract: How rod-shaped bacteria form and maintain their shape is an important question in bacterial cell biology. Results from fluorescent light microscopy have led many to believe that the actin homolog MreB and a number of other proteins form long helical filaments along the inner membrane of the cell. Here we show using electron cryotomography of six different rod-shaped bacterial species, at macromolecular resolution, that no long (>80 nm) helical filaments exist near or along either surface of the inner membrane. We also use correlated cryo-fluorescent light microscopy (cryo-fLM) and electron cryo-tomography (ECT) to identify cytoplasmic bundles of MreB, showing that MreB filaments are detectable by ECT. In light of these results, the structure and function of MreB must be reconsidered: instead of acting as a large, rigid scaffold that localizes cell-wall synthetic machinery, moving MreB complexes may apply tension to growing peptidoglycan strands to ensure their orderly, linear insertion.

  14. Two-state approach to stochastic hair bundle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Clausznitzer, Diana; Lindner, Benjamin; Jülicher, Frank; Martin, Pascal

    2008-04-01

    Hair cells perform the mechanoelectrical transduction of sound signals in the auditory and vestibular systems of vertebrates. The part of the hair cell essential for this transduction is the so-called hair bundle. In vitro experiments on hair cells from the sacculus of the American bullfrog have shown that the hair bundle comprises active elements capable of producing periodic deflections like a relaxation oscillator. Recently, a continuous nonlinear stochastic model of the hair bundle motion [Nadrowski, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 101, 12195 (2004)] has been shown to reproduce the experimental data in stochastic simulations faithfully. Here, we demonstrate that a binary filtering of the hair bundle's deflection (experimental data and continuous hair bundle model) does not change significantly the spectral statistics of the spontaneous as well as the periodically driven hair bundle motion. We map the continuous hair bundle model to the FitzHugh-Nagumo model of neural excitability and discuss the bifurcations between different regimes of the system in terms of the latter model. Linearizing the nullclines and assuming perfect time-scale separation between the variables we can map the FitzHugh-Nagumo system to a simple two-state model in which each of the states corresponds to the two possible values of the binary-filtered hair bundle trajectory. For the two-state model, analytical expressions for the power spectrum and the susceptibility can be calculated [Lindner and Schimansky-Geier, Phys. Rev. E 61, 6103 (2000)] and show the same features as seen in the experimental data as well as in simulations of the continuous hair bundle model. PMID:18517650

  15. Two-state approach to stochastic hair bundle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausznitzer, Diana; Lindner, Benjamin; Jülicher, Frank; Martin, Pascal

    2008-04-01

    Hair cells perform the mechanoelectrical transduction of sound signals in the auditory and vestibular systems of vertebrates. The part of the hair cell essential for this transduction is the so-called hair bundle. In vitro experiments on hair cells from the sacculus of the American bullfrog have shown that the hair bundle comprises active elements capable of producing periodic deflections like a relaxation oscillator. Recently, a continuous nonlinear stochastic model of the hair bundle motion [Nadrowski , Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 101, 12195 (2004)] has been shown to reproduce the experimental data in stochastic simulations faithfully. Here, we demonstrate that a binary filtering of the hair bundle's deflection (experimental data and continuous hair bundle model) does not change significantly the spectral statistics of the spontaneous as well as the periodically driven hair bundle motion. We map the continuous hair bundle model to the FitzHugh-Nagumo model of neural excitability and discuss the bifurcations between different regimes of the system in terms of the latter model. Linearizing the nullclines and assuming perfect time-scale separation between the variables we can map the FitzHugh-Nagumo system to a simple two-state model in which each of the states corresponds to the two possible values of the binary-filtered hair bundle trajectory. For the two-state model, analytical expressions for the power spectrum and the susceptibility can be calculated [Lindner and Schimansky-Geier, Phys. Rev. E 61, 6103 (2000)] and show the same features as seen in the experimental data as well as in simulations of the continuous hair bundle model.

  16. Induced Current Measurement of Rod Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The longitudinal normal modes of vibration of rods are similar to the modes seen in pipes open at both ends. A maximum of particle displacement exists at both ends and an integral number (n) of half wavelengths fit into the rod length. The frequencies fn of the normal modes is given by Eq. (1), where L is the rod length and V is the wave velocity: fn = nV/2L. Many methods have been used to measure the velocity of these waves. The Kundt's tube method commonly used in student labs will not be discussed here. A simpler related method has been described by Nicklin.2 Kluk3 measured velocities in a wide range of materials using a frequency counter and microphone to study sounds produced by impacts. Several earlier methods4,5 used phonograph cartridges complete with needles to detect vibrations in excited rods. A recent interesting experiment6 used wave-induced changes in magnetization produced in an iron rod by striking one end. The travel time, measured as the impulsive wave reflects back and forth, gave the wave velocity for the iron rod. In the method described here, a small magnet is attached to the rod with epoxy, and vibrations are detected using the current induced in a few loops of wire. The experiment is simple and yields very accurate velocity values.

  17. Control Rod Malfunction at the NRAD Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas L. Maddock

    2010-05-01

    The neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) is a training, research, and isotope (TRIGA) reactor located at the INL. The reactor is normally shut down by the insertion of three control rods that drop into the core when power is removed from electromagnets. During a routine shutdown, indicator lights on the console showed that one of the control rods was not inserted. It was initially thought that the indicator lights were in error because of a limit switch that was out of adjustment. Through further testing, it was determined that the control rod did not drop when the scram switch was initially pressed. The control rod anomaly led to a six month shutdown of the reactor and an in depth investigation of the reactor protective system. The investigation looked into: scram switch operation, console modifications, and control rod drive mechanisms. A number of latent issues were discovered and corrected during the investigation. The cause of the control rod malfunction was found to be a buildup of corrosion in the control rod drive mechanism. The investigation resulted in modifications to equipment, changes to both operation and maintenance procedures, and additional training. No reoccurrences of the problem have been observed since corrective actions were implemented.

  18. DEVICE FOR CONTROLLING INSERTION OF ROD

    DOEpatents

    Beaty, B.J.

    1958-10-14

    A device for rapidly inserting a safety rod into a nuclear reactor upon a given signal or in the event of a power failure in order to prevent the possibility of extensive damage caused by a power excursion is described. A piston is slidably mounted within a vertical cylinder with provision for an electromagnetic latch at the top of the cylinder. This assembly, with a safety rod attached to the piston, is mounted over an access port to the core region of the reactor. The piston is normally latched at the top of the cylinder with the safety rod clear of the core area, however, when the latch is released, the piston and rod drop by their own weight to insert the rod. Vents along the side of the cylinder permit the escape of the air entrapped under the piston over the greater part of the distance, however, at the end of the fall the entrapped air is compressed thereby bringing the safety rod gently to rest, thus providing for a rapid automatic insertion of the rod with a minimum of structural shock.

  19. The potential and reality of permanent his bundle pacing.

    PubMed

    Barba-Pichardo, Rafael; Moriña-Vázquez, Pablo; Venegas-Gamero, José; Frutos-López, Manuel; Moreno-Lozano, Valle; Herrera-Carranza, Manuel

    2008-10-01

    Right ventricular apex pacing can have deleterious effects. Our aims were to investigate how many patients referred for permanent pacing were suitable candidates for permanent His bundle pacing, and to determine the proportion in whom such pacing was successful. All cases of suprahisian block and most cases of infrahisian block (71.4%) were corrected by temporary His bundle pacing. However, permanent His bundle pacing was achieved in only 55% of cases in which it was attempted, and in only 35.4% of all possible cases. PMID:18817687

  20. Systematic evaluation of bundled SPC water for biomolecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Srinivasa M; Kuhn, Alexander B; Schäfer, Lars V

    2015-04-01

    In bundled SPC water models, the relative motion of groups of four water molecules is restrained by distance-dependent potentials. Bundled SPC models have been used in hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained (AA/CG) multiscale simulations, since they enable to couple atomistic SPC water with supra-molecular CG water models that effectively represent more than a single water molecule. In the present work, we systematically validated and critically tested bundled SPC water models as solvent for biomolecular simulations. To that aim, we investigated both thermodynamic and structural properties of various biomolecular systems through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Potentials of mean force of dimerization of pairs of amino acid side chains as well as hydration free energies of single side chains obtained with bundled SPC and standard (unrestrained) SPC water agree closely with each other and with experimental data. Decomposition of the hydration free energies into enthalpic and entropic contributions reveals that in bundled SPC, this favorable agreement of the free energies is due to a larger degree of error compensation between hydration enthalpy and entropy. The Ramachandran maps of Ala3, Ala5, and Ala7 peptides are similar in bundled and unrestrained SPC, whereas for the (GS)2 peptide, bundled water leads to a slight overpopulation of extended conformations. Analysis of the end-to-end distance autocorrelation times of the Ala5 and (GS)2 peptides shows that sampling in more viscous bundled SPC water is about two times slower. Pronounced differences between the water models were found for the structure of a coiled-coil dimer, which is instable in bundled SPC but not in standard SPC. In addition, the hydration of the active site of the serine protease α-chymotrypsin depends on the water model. Bundled SPC leads to an increased hydration of the active site region, more hydrogen bonds between water and catalytic triad residues, and a significantly slower exchange of water

  1. Characterization of a space orbited incoherent fiber optic bundle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewalt, Stephen A.; Taylor, Edward W.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a study performed to determine the effects of adverse space environments on a bundle of over 1800 optical fibers orbited for 69 months are reported. Experimental results are presented on an incoherent fiber optic bundle oriented in low Earth orbit aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite as part of the Space Environment Effects Experiment (M0006). Measurements were performed to determine if space induced radiation effects changed the fiber bundle characteristics. Data demonstrating the success of light transmitting fibers to withstand the adverse space environment are presented.

  2. Structural Transitions of F-Actin:Espin Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, Kirstin; Bartles, James; Wong, Gerard

    2006-03-01

    Espin is an actin bundling protein involved in the formation of the parallel bundles of filamentous actin in hair cell stereocilia. Mutations in espin are implicated in deafness phenotypes in mice and humans. We present measurements of the F-actin structures induced by wild type and by mutated espin obtained via small angle x-ray scattering and fluorescence microscopy. We found that wild type espin induced a paracrystalline hexagonal array of twisted F-actin, whereas the mutated espin only condensed the F-actin into a nematic-like phase. The possibility of coexisting nematic and bundled actin in mixtures containing both mutant and wild type espins was also investigated.

  3. The Mechanical Effect of Rod Contouring on Rod-Screw System Strength in Spine Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Karakasli, Ahmet; Karaarslan, Ahmet A.; Ozcanhan, Mehmet Hilal; Ertem, Fatih; Erduran, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rod-screw fixation systems are widely used for spinal instrumentation. Although many biomechanical studies on rod-screw systems have been carried out, but the effects of rod contouring on the construct strength is still not very well defined in the literature. This work examines the mechanical impact of straight, 20° kyphotic, and 20° lordotic rod contouring on rod-screw fixation systems, by forming a corpectomy model. Methods The corpectomy groups were prepared using ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene samples. Non-destructive loads were applied during flexion/extension and torsion testing. Spine-loading conditions were simulated by load subjections of 100 N with a velocity of 5 mm min-1, to ensure 8.4-Nm moment. For torsional loading, the corpectomy models were subjected to rotational displacement of 0.5° s-1 to an end point of 5.0°, in a torsion testing machine. Results Under both flexion and extension loading conditions the stiffness values for the lordotic rod-screw system were the highest. Under torsional loading conditions, the lordotic rod-screw system exhibited the highest torsional rigidity. Conclusion We concluded that the lordotic rod-screw system was the most rigid among the systems tested and the risk of rod and screw failure is much higher in the kyphotic rod-screw systems. Further biomechanical studies should be attempted to compare between different rod kyphotic angles to minimize the kyphotic rod failure rate and to offer a more stable and rigid rod-screw construct models for surgical application in the kyphotic vertebrae. PMID:27651858

  4. The Mechanical Effect of Rod Contouring on Rod-Screw System Strength in Spine Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Karakasli, Ahmet; Karaarslan, Ahmet A.; Ozcanhan, Mehmet Hilal; Ertem, Fatih; Erduran, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rod-screw fixation systems are widely used for spinal instrumentation. Although many biomechanical studies on rod-screw systems have been carried out, but the effects of rod contouring on the construct strength is still not very well defined in the literature. This work examines the mechanical impact of straight, 20° kyphotic, and 20° lordotic rod contouring on rod-screw fixation systems, by forming a corpectomy model. Methods The corpectomy groups were prepared using ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene samples. Non-destructive loads were applied during flexion/extension and torsion testing. Spine-loading conditions were simulated by load subjections of 100 N with a velocity of 5 mm min-1, to ensure 8.4-Nm moment. For torsional loading, the corpectomy models were subjected to rotational displacement of 0.5° s-1 to an end point of 5.0°, in a torsion testing machine. Results Under both flexion and extension loading conditions the stiffness values for the lordotic rod-screw system were the highest. Under torsional loading conditions, the lordotic rod-screw system exhibited the highest torsional rigidity. Conclusion We concluded that the lordotic rod-screw system was the most rigid among the systems tested and the risk of rod and screw failure is much higher in the kyphotic rod-screw systems. Further biomechanical studies should be attempted to compare between different rod kyphotic angles to minimize the kyphotic rod failure rate and to offer a more stable and rigid rod-screw construct models for surgical application in the kyphotic vertebrae.

  5. Specular Reflection from Rough Surfaces Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasuda, Kensei; Kim, Alvin; Cho, Hayley; Timofejev, Timofej; Walecki, Wojciech J.; Klep, James; Edelson, Amy S.; Walecki, Abigail S.; Walecki, Eve S.; Walecki, Peter S.

    2016-01-01

    In his beautiful paper, Hasan Fakhruddin reported observations of mirror-like reflections in the rough surface of a ground glass plate. Similar effects have been recently employed for metrology of the roughness of optical diffusers used in modern light emitting device illumination systems. We report the observations of specular reflection in…

  6. Computational Methods for Rough Classification and Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, D. A.; Guan, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    Rough set theory is a new mathematical tool to deal with vagueness and uncertainty. Computational methods are presented for using rough sets to identify classes in datasets, finding dependencies in relations, and discovering rules which are hidden in databases. The methods are illustrated with a running example from a database of car test results.…

  7. Roughness configuration matters for aeolian sediment flux

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The parameterisation of surface roughness effects on aeolian sediment transport is a key source of uncertainty in wind erosion models. Roughness effects are typically represented by bulk drag-partitioning schemes that scale the threshold friction velocity (u*t) for soil entrainment by the ratio of s...

  8. Wetting properties of molecularly rough surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin; Malijevský, Alexandr

    2015-09-14

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wettability of nanoscale rough surfaces in systems governed by Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. We consider both smooth and molecularly rough planar surfaces. Solid substrates are modeled as a static collection of LJ particles arranged in a face-centered cubic lattice with the (100) surface exposed to the LJ fluid. Molecularly rough solid surfaces are prepared by removing several strips of LJ atoms from the external layers of the substrate, i.e., forming parallel nanogrooves on the surface. We vary the solid-fluid interactions to investigate strongly and weakly wettable surfaces. We determine the wetting properties by measuring the equilibrium droplet profiles that are in turn used to evaluate the contact angles. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to Wenzel’s law, suggest that surface roughness always amplifies the wetting properties of a lyophilic surface. However, our results indicate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., surface roughness deteriorates the substrate wettability. Adding the roughness to a strongly wettable surface shrinks the surface area wet with the liquid, and it either increases or only marginally affects the contact angle, depending on the degree of liquid adsorption into the nanogrooves. For a weakly wettable surface, the roughness changes the surface character from lyophilic to lyophobic due to a weakening of the solid-fluid interactions by the presence of the nanogrooves and the weaker adsorption of the liquid into the nanogrooves.

  9. VARIABLE AREA CONTROL ROD FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Huston, N.E.

    1960-05-01

    A control rod is described which permits continual variation of its absorbing strength uniformly along the length of the rod. The rod is fail safe and is fully inserted into the core but changes in its absorbing strength do not produce axial flux distortion. The control device comprises a sheet containing a material having a high thermal-neutron absorption cross section. A pair of shafts engage the sheet along the longitudinal axis of the shafts and gears associated with the shafts permit winding and unwinding of the sheet around the shafts.

  10. The effect of hair bundle shape on hair bundle hydrodynamics of inner ear hair cells at low and high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Shatz, L F

    2000-03-01

    The relationship between size and shape of the hair bundle of a hair cell in the inner ear and its sensitivity at asymptotically high and low frequencies was determined, thereby extending the results of an analysis of hair bundle hydrodynamics in two dimensions (Freeman and Weiss, 1990. Hydrodynamic analysis of a two-dimensional model for micromechanical resonance of free-standing hair bundles. Hear. Res. 48, 37-68) to three dimensions. A hemispheroid was used to represent the hair bundle. The hemispheroid had a number of advantages: it could represent shapes that range from thin, pencil-like shapes, to wide, flat, disk-like shapes. Also analytic methods could be used in the high frequency range to obtain an exact solution to the equations of motion. In the low frequency range, where an approximate solution was found using boundary element methods, the sensitivity of the responses of hair cells was mainly proportional to the cube of the heights of their hair bundles, and at high frequencies, the sensitivity of the hair cells was mainly proportional to the inverse of their heights. An excellent match was obtained between measurements of sensitivity curves in the basillar papilla of the alligator and bobtail lizards and the model's predictions. These results also suggest why hair bundles of hair cells in vestibular organs which are sensitive to low frequencies have ranges of heights that are an order of magnitude larger than the range of heights of hair bundles of hair cells found in auditory organs.

  11. Specular Reflection from Rough Surfaces Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Kensei; Kim, Alvin; Cho, Hayley; Timofejev, Timofej; Walecki, Wojciech J.; Klep, James; Edelson, Amy S.; Walecki, Abigail S.; Walecki, Eve S.; Walecki, Peter S.

    2016-10-01

    In his beautiful paper, Hasan Fakhruddin reported observations of mirror-like reflections in the rough surface of a ground glass plate. Similar effects have been recently employed for metrology of the roughness of optical diffusers used in modern light emitting device illumination systems. We report the observations of specular reflection in nontransparent rough surfaces at oblique angles, where roughness was treated as a variable. We present a simple trigonometry-based model explaining the observed phenomenon, which we experimentally validated using aluminum surfaces that have controlled roughness. The reported demonstration requires no special equipment, other than cellphone cameras, dielectric or metal plate, and sandpaper, and serves as an introduction to wave optics. This activity can be used to get further insight into everyday applications of wave optics for students already familiar with wave optics fundamentals.

  12. Modeling surface roughness scattering in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moors, Kristof; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim

    2015-09-28

    Ando's model provides a rigorous quantum-mechanical framework for electron-surface roughness scattering, based on the detailed roughness structure. We apply this method to metallic nanowires and improve the model introducing surface roughness distribution functions on a finite domain with analytical expressions for the average surface roughness matrix elements. This approach is valid for any roughness size and extends beyond the commonly used Prange-Nee approximation. The resistivity scaling is obtained from the self-consistent relaxation time solution of the Boltzmann transport equation and is compared to Prange-Nee's approach and other known methods. The results show that a substantial drop in resistivity can be obtained for certain diameters by achieving a large momentum gap between Fermi level states with positive and negative momentum in the transport direction.

  13. Control rod drive hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Ose, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    A hydraulic system for a control rod drive (CRD) includes a variable output-pressure CR pump operable in a charging mode for providing pressurized fluid at a charging pressure, and in a normal mode for providing the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure, less than the charging pressure. Charging and purge lines are disposed in parallel flow between the CRD pump and the CRD. A hydraulic control unit is disposed in flow communication in the charging line and includes a scram accumulator. An isolation valve is provided in the charging line between the CRD pump and the scram accumulator. A controller is operatively connected to the CRD pump and the isolation valve and is effective for opening the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a charging mode for charging the scram accumulator, and closing the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a normal mode for providing to the CRD through the purge line the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure lower than the charging pressure.

  14. Taylor impact of glass rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmott, G. R.; Radford, D. D.

    2005-05-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of soda-lime and borosilicate glass rods was examined during classic and symmetric Taylor impact experiments for impact pressures to 4 and 10GPa, respectively. High-speed photography and piezoresistive gauges were used to measure the failure front velocities in both glasses, and for impact pressures below ˜2GPa the failure front velocity increases rapidly with increasing pressure. As the pressure was increased above ˜3GPa, the failure front velocities asymptotically approached maximum values between the longitudinal and shear wave velocities of each material; at ˜4GPa, the average failure front velocities were 4.7±0.5 and 4.6±0.5mmμs-1 for the soda-lime and borosilicate specimens, respectively. The observed mechanism of failure in these experiments involved continuous pressure-dependent nucleation and growth of microcracks behind the incident wave. As the impact pressure was increased, there was a decrease in the time to failure. The density of cracks within the failed region was material dependent, with the more open-structured borosilicate glass showing a larger fracture density.

  15. Taylor impact of glass rods

    SciTech Connect

    Willmott, G.R.; Radford, D.D.

    2005-05-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of soda-lime and borosilicate glass rods was examined during classic and symmetric Taylor impact experiments for impact pressures to 4 and 10 GPa, respectively. High-speed photography and piezoresistive gauges were used to measure the failure front velocities in both glasses, and for impact pressures below {approx}2 GPa the failure front velocity increases rapidly with increasing pressure. As the pressure was increased above {approx}3 GPa, the failure front velocities asymptotically approached maximum values between the longitudinal and shear wave velocities of each material; at {approx}4 GPa, the average failure front velocities were 4.7{+-}0.5 and 4.6{+-}0.5 mm {mu}s{sup -1} for the soda-lime and borosilicate specimens, respectively. The observed mechanism of failure in these experiments involved continuous pressure-dependent nucleation and growth of microcracks behind the incident wave. As the impact pressure was increased, there was a decrease in the time to failure. The density of cracks within the failed region was material dependent, with the more open-structured borosilicate glass showing a larger fracture density.

  16. Concise Care Bundles In Acute Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kivlin, Jude; Altemimi, Harith

    2015-01-01

    The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King's Lynn, Norfolk is a 488 bed hospital providing services to approximately 331,000 people across 750 square miles. In 2012 a need was recognised for documentation (pathways) in a practical format to increase usage of national guidelines and facilitate adherence to best practice (gold standards of care) that could be easily version controlled, auditable and provide support in clinical decision-making by junior doctors. BMJ Action Sets[1] fulfilled the brief with expert knowledge, version control and support, though they were deemed too lengthy and unworkable in fast paced settings like the medical assessment unit; they formed the base creation of concise care bundles (CCB). CCB were introduced for 21 clinical presentations and one procedure. Outcomes were fully audited and showed significant improvement in a range of measures, including an increase in completions of CHADVASC score in atrial fibrillation, antibiotics prescribed per protocol in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and Blatchford score recorded for patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleed. PMID:26734437

  17. Method of cleaning and inhibiting sucker rod corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, M. B.; Griffin, J. B.

    1985-01-22

    Method of cleaning tubular goods, especially sucker rods, and inhibiting the sucker rods against corrosion as the rod string is being withdrawn from a borehole. The method is carried out by the provision of an enclosure which is attached to the upper end of a cased borehole. The upper end of the sucker rod string is extended axially through the enclosure as the rod string is withdrawn from the casing. A medial length of the rod string is engaged by a resilient packer device which wipes the rod clean of well fluids and loose debris. The rod string is next cleaned within a second chamber by impacting the outer surface thereof with an abrasive substance. The rod surface is again cleaned of any residual material. The rod is then moved through another chamber where corrosion inhibitor is applied to the external surface of the rod. As each treated joint of rod is withdrawn from the enclosure, the rod joints are sequentially unscrewed and suitably stacked, where the rods are protected from the elements, as well as being protected when the rods are subsequently made up into a rod string as the rod is replaced into a borehole.

  18. Preparation of novel layer-stack hexagonal CdO micro-rods by a pre-oxidation and subsequent evaporation process

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Kun; Jiang, Pan; Zhu, Jiajun; Zhou, Lingping; Li, Deyi

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Layer-stack hexagonal cadmium oxide (CdO) micro-rods were prepared. - Highlights: • Novel hexagonal layer-stack structure CdO micro-rods were synthesized by a thermal evaporation method. • The pre-oxidation, vapor pressure and substrate nature play a key role on the formation of CdO rods. • The formation mechanism of CdO micro-rods was explained. - Abstract: Novel layer-stack hexagonal cadmium oxide (CdO) micro-rods were prepared by pre-oxidizing Cd granules and subsequent thermal oxidation under normal atmospheric pressure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed to characterize the phase structure and microstructure. The pre-oxidation process, vapor pressure and substrate nature were the key factors for the formation of CdO micro-rods. The diameter of micro-rod and surface rough increased with increasing of thermal evaporation temperature, the length of micro-rod increased with the increasing of evaporation time. The formation of hexagonal layer-stack structure was explained by a vapor–solid mechanism.

  19. 15. VIEW OF SHINGLES BUNDLED, PLACED ON PALLET, AND READIED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW OF SHINGLES BUNDLED, PLACED ON PALLET, AND READIED FOR FORKLIFT OPERATOR TO MOVE PALLET OF SHINGLES TO LOADING DOCK - Lester Shingle Mill, 1602 North Eighteenth Street, Sweet Home, Linn County, OR

  20. Mechanical Models of Microtubule Bundle Collapse in Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendek, Austin; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid-beta aggregates initiate Alzheimer's disease, and downstream trigger degradation of tau proteins that act as microtubule bundle stabilizers and mechanical spacers. Currently it is unclear which of tau cutting by proteases, tau phosphorylation, or tau aggregation are responsible for cytoskeleton degradation., We construct a percolation simulation of the microtubule bundle using a molecular spring model for the taus and including depletion force attraction between microtubules and membrane/actin cytoskeletal surface tension. The simulation uses a fictive molecular dynamics to model the motion of the individual microtubules within the bundle as a result of random tau removal, and calculates the elastic modulus of the bundle as the tau concentration falls. We link the tau removal steps to kinetic tau steps in various models of tau degradation. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624

  1. National Partnership for Maternal Safety: Consensus Bundle on Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    D'Alton, Mary E; Friedman, Alexander M; Smiley, Richard M; Montgomery, Douglas M; Paidas, Michael J; D'Oria, Robyn; Frost, Jennifer L; Hameed, Afshan B; Karsnitz, Deborah; Levy, Barbara S; Clark, Steven L

    2016-10-01

    Obstetric venous thromboembolism is a leading cause of severe maternal morbidity and mortality. Maternal death from thromboembolism is amenable to prevention, and thromboprophylaxis is the most readily implementable means of systematically reducing the maternal death rate. Observational data support the benefit of risk-factor-based prophylaxis in reducing obstetric thromboembolism. This bundle, developed by a multidisciplinary working group and published by the National Partnership for Maternal Safety under the guidance of the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care, supports routine thromboembolism risk assessment for obstetric patients, with appropriate use of pharmacologic and mechanical thromboprophylaxis. Safety bundles outline critical clinical practices that should be implemented in every maternity unit. The safety bundle is organized into four domains: Readiness, Recognition, Response, and Reporting and Systems Learning. Although the bundle components may be adapted to meet the resources available in individual facilities, standardization within an institution is strongly encouraged. PMID:27636577

  2. National Partnership for Maternal Safety: Consensus Bundle on Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    D'Alton, Mary E; Friedman, Alexander M; Smiley, Richard M; Montgomery, Douglas M; Paidas, Michael J; D'Oria, Robyn; Frost, Jennifer L; Hameed, Afshan B; Karsnitz, Deborah; Levy, Barbara S; Clark, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Obstetric venous thromboembolism is a leading cause of severe maternal morbidity and mortality. Maternal death from thromboembolism is amenable to prevention, and thromboprophylaxis is the most readily implementable means of systematically reducing the maternal death rate. Observational data support the benefit of risk-factor-based prophylaxis in reducing obstetric thromboembolism. This bundle, developed by a multidisciplinary working group and published by the National Partnership for Maternal Safety under the guidance of the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care, supports routine thromboembolism risk assessment for obstetric patients, with appropriate use of pharmacologic and mechanical thromboprophylaxis. Safety bundles outline critical clinical practices that should be implemented in every maternity unit. The safety bundle is organized into four domains: Readiness, Recognition, Response, and Reporting and Systems Learning. Although the bundle components may be adapted to meet the resources available in individual facilities, standardization within an institution is strongly encouraged. PMID:27619099

  3. Assembly of hair bundles, an amazing problem for cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Barr-Gillespie, Peter-G.

    2015-01-01

    The hair bundle—the sensory organelle of inner-ear hair cells of vertebrates—exemplifies the ability of a cell to assemble complex, elegant structures. Proper construction of the bundle is required for proper mechanotransduction in response to external forces and to transmit information about sound and movement. Bundles contain tightly controlled numbers of actin-filled stereocilia, which are arranged in defined rows of precise heights. Indeed, many deafness mutations that disable hair-cell cytoskeletal proteins also disrupt bundles. Bundle assembly is a tractable problem in molecular and cellular systems biology; the sequence of structural changes in stereocilia is known, and a modest number of proteins may be involved. PMID:26229154

  4. Effects of Tau on Flow-Aligned Microtubule Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer L.; Kuchnir Fygenson, D.

    2003-03-01

    Microtubules are cylindrical crystals of the protein tubulin with 17nm inner diameter and 25nm outer diameter. Recent structural studies suggest that the microtubule wall may be porous to small molecules. We have investigated the mobility of molecules in bundles of flow aligned microtubules. We find the spacing between the microtubules in the bundle is increased by the addition of tau, a microtubule associated protein. In the absence of tau, flow can be used to make tightly packed bundles of microtubules. Adding tau causes the tight bundles to swell and separate. We use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to quantify the mobility of a taxol, a small drug that binds to the microtubule interior.

  5. National Partnership for Maternal Safety: Consensus Bundle on Obstetric Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Main, Elliott K; Goffman, Dena; Scavone, Barbara M; Low, Lisa Kane; Bingham, Debra; Fontaine, Patricia L; Gorlin, Jed B; Lagrew, David C; Levy, Barbara S

    2015-07-01

    Hemorrhage is the most frequent cause of severe maternal morbidity and preventable maternal mortality and therefore is an ideal topic for the initial national maternity patient safety bundle. These safety bundles outline critical clinical practices that should be implemented in every maternity unit. They are developed by multidisciplinary work groups of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety under the guidance of the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care. The safety bundle is organized into four domains: Readiness, Recognition and Prevention, Response, and Reporting and System Learning. Although the bundle components may be adapted to meet the resources available in individual facilities, standardization within an institution is strongly encouraged. References contain sample resources and "Potential Best Practices" to assist with implementation. PMID:26241269

  6. National Partnership for Maternal Safety: consensus bundle on obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Main, Elliott K; Goffman, Dena; Scavone, Barbara M; Low, Lisa Kane; Bingham, Debra; Fontaine, Patricia L; Gorlin, Jed B; Lagrew, David C; Levy, Barbara S

    2015-07-01

    Hemorrhage is the most frequent cause of severe maternal morbidity and preventable maternal mortality and therefore is an ideal topic for the initial national maternity patient safety bundle. These safety bundles outline critical clinical practices that should be implemented in every maternity unit. They are developed by multidisciplinary work groups of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety under the guidance of the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care. The safety bundle is organized into four domains: Readiness, Recognition and Prevention, Response, and Reporting and System Learning. Although the bundle components may be adapted to meet the resources available in individual facilities, standardization within an institution is strongly encouraged. References contain sample resources and "Potential Best Practices" to assist with implementation. PMID:26091046

  7. Bundles of Norms About Teen Sex and Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mollborn, Stefanie; Sennott, Christie

    2015-09-01

    Teen pregnancy is a cultural battleground in struggles over morality, education, and family. At its heart are norms about teen sex, contraception, pregnancy, and abortion. Analyzing 57 interviews with college students, we found that "bundles" of related norms shaped the messages teens hear. Teens did not think their communities encouraged teen sex or pregnancy, but normative messages differed greatly, with either moral or practical rationalizations. Teens readily identified multiple norms intended to regulate teen sex, contraception, abortion, childbearing, and the sanctioning of teen parents. Beyond influencing teens' behavior, norms shaped teenagers' public portrayals and post hoc justifications of their behavior. Although norm bundles are complex to measure, participants could summarize them succinctly. These bundles and their conflicting behavioral prescriptions create space for human agency in negotiating normative pressures. The norm bundles concept has implications for teen pregnancy prevention policies and can help revitalize social norms for understanding health behaviors.

  8. Conformal Geometry of the Supercotangent and Spinor Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, J.-P.

    2012-06-01

    We study the actions of local conformal vector fields {X \\in conf(M,g)} on the spinor bundle of ( M, g) and on its classical counterpart: the supercotangent bundle {{M}} of ( M, g). We first deal with the classical framework and determine the Hamiltonian lift of conf ( M, g) to {{M}} . We then perform the geometric quantization of the supercotangent bundle of ( M, g), which constructs the spinor bundle as the quantum representation space. The Kosmann Lie derivative of spinors is obtained by quantization of the comoment map. The quantum and classical actions of conf ( M, g) turn, respectively, the space of differential operators acting on spinor densities and the space of their symbols into conf ( M, g)-modules. They are filtered and admit a common associated graded module. In the conformally flat case, the latter helps us determine the conformal invariants of both conf ( M, g)-modules, in particular the conformally odd powers of the Dirac operator.

  9. The attenuation of rod signals by bleachings

    PubMed Central

    Alpern, M.; Rushton, W. A. H.; Torii, S.

    1970-01-01

    1. Contrast flash technique allows the rod threshold to be measured even when it lies far above the cone threshold. In this way the rod dark adaptation curve after rhodopsin bleaching can be measured over 6 log units. 2. By retinal densitometry the regeneration of rhodopsin can be measured in the same subject. It is found that the log threshold is raised 1·2 units for each 10% of rhodopsin in the bleached state. 3. We have tried to discover whether bleaching raises the threshold by desensitizing the rods, or (like backgrounds) by attenuating their signals. Neither suggestion satisfies all conditions. 4. All are satisfied by [Formula: see text], where N is the size of rod signal, constant for threshold; θ, θD are steady backgrounds of light and receptor noise; ϕ is the threshold flash with σ a constant of about 2·5 log td sec; B the fraction of pigment in the bleached state. PMID:5499030

  10. Impact of AD995 alumina rods

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Furnish, M.D.; Reinhart, W.D.; Grady, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    Gas guns and velocity interferometric techniques have been used to determine the loading behavior of an AD995 alumina rod 19 mm in diameter by 75 mm and 150 mm long, respectively. Graded-density materials were used to impact both bare and sleeved alumina rods while the velocity interferometer was used to monitor the axial-velocity of the free end of the rods. Results of these experiments demonstrate that (1) a time-dependent stress pulse generated during impact allows an efficient transition from the initial uniaxial strain loading to a uniaxial stress state as the stress pulse propagates through the rod, and (2) the intermediate loading rates obtained in this configuration lie between split Hopkinson bar and shock-loading techniques.

  11. Control rod for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Walter G.; Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1979-01-01

    A control rod assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed having a remotely disengageable coupling between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling is actuated by first lowering then raising the drive shaft. The described motion causes axial repositioning of a pin in a grooved rotatable cylinder, each being attached to different parts of the drive shaft which are axially movable relative to each other. In one embodiment, the relative axial motion of the parts of the drive shaft is used either to couple or to uncouple the connection by forcing resilient members attached to the drive shaft into or out of shouldered engagement, respectively, with an indentation formed in the control rod.

  12. Double-clad nuclear fuel safety rod

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, William H.; Atcheson, Donald B.; Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan

    1984-01-01

    A device for shutting down a nuclear reactor during an undercooling or overpower event, whether or not the reactor's scram system operates properly. This is accomplished by double-clad fuel safety rods positioned at various locations throughout the reactor core, wherein melting of a secondary internal cladding of the rod allows the fuel column therein to shift from the reactor core to place the reactor in a subcritical condition.

  13. Calculator program speeds rod pump design

    SciTech Connect

    Engineer, R.; Davis, C.L.

    1984-02-01

    Matching sucker rod pump characteristics to a specific application is greatly simplified with this program, intended for use with an HP-41CV hand-held computer. The user inputs application data and the program calculates all necessary design criteria, including Mill's acceleration factor, peak and minimum polish rod loads and horsepower required. Sample calculations are provided, together with a thorough discussion of special design considerations involved in huff-and-puff applications.

  14. 1984 tubing and sucker rod tables

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The first section of this handy reference lists companies that produce API tubing and couplings, giving specifications for pipe in sizes from 3/4 to 41/2 in. Also listed and illustrated are special tubing joints, identified by manufacturer Additional tables provide details on API sucker rods, including manufacturers, mechanical and chemical properties, dimensions and make-up recommendations. Similar data are presented for non-API rods.

  15. [Myotonic dystrophy and bundle-branch re-entrant tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Carlos J; Rodríguez, Diego A; Velasco, Víctor M; Rosas, Fernando

    2002-10-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old man diagnosed with myotonic dystrophy who presented atrial fibrillation with high ventricular rate. While being treated with amiodarone, he suffered cardiac arrest. The electrophysiological study disclosed bundle-branch reentrant ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. Catheter ablation of the right bundle branch was performed and a bicameral defibrillator was implanted. The mechanisms and treatment of arrhythmias in these patients are discussed. PMID:12383397

  16. In vitro assembly of filopodia-like bundles.

    PubMed

    Vignjevic, Danijela; Peloquin, John; Borisy, Gary G

    2006-01-01

    A breakthrough in understanding the mechanism of lamellipodial protrusion came from development of an in vitro model system, namely the rocketing movement of microbes and activated beads driven by actin comet tails (Cameron et al., 1999, 2000; Loisel et al., 1999; Theriot et al., 1994). As a model for investigation of the other major protrusive organelle, the filopodium, we developed in vitro systems for producing filopodia-like bundles (Vignjevic et al., 2003), one of which uses cytoplasmic extracts and another that reconstitutes like-like bundles from purified proteins. Beads coated with Arp2/3-activating proteins can induce two distinct types of actin organization in cytoplasmic extracts: (1) comet tails or clouds displaying a dendritic array of actin filaments and (2) stars with filament bundles radiating from the bead. Actin filaments in star bundles, like those in filopodia, are long, unbranched, aligned, uniformly polar, and grow at the barbed end. Like filopodia, star bundles are enriched in fascin and lack Arp2/3 complex and capping protein. Similar to cells, the transition from a dendritic (lamellipodial) to a bundled (filopodial) organization is induced by depletion of capping protein, and add-back of this protein restores the dendritic mode. By use of purified proteins, a small number of components are sufficient for the assembly of filopodia-like bundles: WASP-coated beads, actin, Arp2/3 complex, and fascin. On the basis of analysis of this system, we proposed a model for filopodial formation in which actin filaments of a preexisting dendritic network are elongated by inhibition of capping and subsequently cross-linked into bundles by fascin.

  17. Measurement and prediction of rough wall effects on friction factor - Uniform roughness results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaggs, W. F.; Taylor, Robert P.; Coleman, Hugh W.

    The results of an experimental investigation of the effects of surface roughness on turbulent pipe flow friction factors are presented and compared with predictions from a previously published discrete element roughness model. Friction factor data were acquired over a pipe Reynolds number range from 10,000 to 600,000 for nine different uniformly rough surfaces. These surfaces covered a range of roughness element sizes, spacings and shapes. Predictions from the discrete element roughness model were in very good agreement with the data.

  18. On the roughness measurement on knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Sami Abdel; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Battaglia, Santina; Affatato, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    The majority of total knee replacements currently implanted present an articulation composed of two metal parts, femoral and tibial components, between which there is a polyethylene insert serving as a bearing surface. The finishing surface of the metal components is a very important factor in minimizing the polyethylene wear rate and, later, the gradual production of metal and plastic debris. Considering the role of surface roughness on volumetric wear rates, the purpose of this study is to develop a protocol for the roughness characterization of total knee prosthesis (TKP) metal components, taking into consideration a limited number of points on each surface. Six mobile TKP of different sizes (three size 2 and three size 6) were tested on a knee joint simulator to compare the wear behavior of each group. After 2 million cycles the weight loss by the polyethylene inserts was measured with gravimetric method and the surface roughness of the metallic components was assessed in terms of average surface roughness, Ra, skewness, Rsk, and total roughness, Rt. Roughness measurement involved 29 points on each femoral condyle and 26 points on each metal tibial plate. The data collected has shown an increased roughness upon wear testing for both the investigated TKP sizes. No statistical differences were observed between the two groups for both the parameters Ra, Rsk, and Rt. The surface of all metallic components became more negatively skewed, indicating diminishing peaks. The various parameters were correlated to the volumetric loss using a linear regression analysis. PMID:25588764

  19. Heat transfer to rough turbine blading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarada, Fathi Hasan Ali

    1987-12-01

    The project arose from an industrial interest in the quantification of the effects of external surface roughness on the temperatures, both local and means, of internally cooled gas turbine blades, with a view to estimating the possible changes in operating life. Such roughness may occur due to the process involved in the production of the blades or during operation in hostile environments. A dual theoretical and experimental approach was employed to better understand and predict the complex mechanisms influencing the boundary-layer heat transfer on turbine blade surfaces. In order to quantify typical blade roughness levels, a blade roughness survey was undertaken as a pre-cursor to the experimental investigations. The experimental component consisted of heat transfer measurements to one rotor blade and two nozzle guide vanes, with different levels and types of external surface roughness, and with and without significant free-stream turbulence intensity, using two heat transfer measurement techniques. The (dominant) theoretical component comprised the derivation of a low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model, supplemented by an algebraic stress model, for rough curved boundary layer flow, and the development of topographical models of stochastic surface roughness. Computer programs were written to implement the theoretical models developed, and extensive validation tests were conducted with reference to published data sets.

  20. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-28

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets.

  1. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets.

  2. Oil well sucker rod shock absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, F.B.

    1986-02-18

    An oil well sucker rod shock absorber is described which consists of: an outer cylindrical casing defined by a cylindrical wall and having a removable upper plug and lower plug disposed respectively at upper and lower extremities of the casing. The upper plug has an axial bore and the lower plug defines a closed lower end and has an upwardly facing top surface. The plunger rod is connected to the sucker rod and is slidably disposed in the bore of the upper plug. A piston within the cylindrical casing is coupled to the plunger rod and has a downwardly facing bottom surface. Biasing means have a maximum vertical length disposed vertically within the casing and extending between the downwardly facing surface of the piston and the upwardly facing surface of the lower plug means at all times. This allows vertical reciprocal translation of the plunger rod and the piston within the cylindrical casing downwardly against the biasing means. Apertures are disposed through the cylindrical casing along the entire length thereof opposite the length of the biasing means, allowing downhole fluid pressure to be applied to the piston within the cylindrical casing via the apertures to be added to the force of the biasing means, without causing a fluid lock within the cylinder. Slap and wear of the sucker rod resulting therefrom are reduced and damage prevented.

  3. Crippling Strength of Axially Loaded Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natalis, FR

    1921-01-01

    A new empirical formula was developed that holds good for any length and any material of a rod, and agrees well with the results of extensive strength tests. To facilitate calculations, three tables are included, giving the crippling load for solid and hollow sectioned wooden rods of different thickness and length, as well as for steel tubes manufactured according to the standards of Army Air Services Inspection. Further, a graphical method of calculation of the breaking load is derived in which a single curve is employed for determination of the allowable fiber stress. Finally, the theory is discussed of the elastic curve for a rod subject to compression, according to which no deflection occurs, and the apparent contradiction of this conclusion by test results is attributed to the fact that the rods under test are not perfectly straight, or that the wall thickness and the material are not uniform. Under the assumption of an eccentric rod having a slight initial bend according to a sine curve, a simple formula for the deflection is derived, which shows a surprising agreement with test results. From this a further formula is derived for the determination of the allowable load on an eccentric rod. The resulting relations are made clearer by means of a graphical representation of the relation of the moments of the outer and inner forces to the deflection.

  4. High-throughput rod-induced electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dezhi; Xiao, Zhiming; Teh, Kwok Siong; Han, Zhibin; Luo, Guoxi; Shi, Chuan; Sun, Daoheng; Zhao, Jinbao; Lin, Liwei

    2016-09-01

    A high throughput electrospinning process, directly from flat polymer solution surfaces induced by a moving insulating rod, has been proposed and demonstrated. Different rods made of either phenolic resin or paper with a diameter of 1–3 cm and a resistance of about 100–500 MΩ, has been successfully utilized in the process. The rod is placed approximately 10 mm above the flat polymer solution surface with a moving speed of 0.005–0.4 m s‑1 this causes the solution to generate multiple liquid jets under an applied voltage of 15–60 kV for the tip-less electrospinning process. The local electric field induced by the rod can boost electrohydrodynamic instability in order to generate Taylor cones and liquid jets. Experimentally, it is found that a large rod diameter and a small solution-to-rod distance can enhance the local electrical field to reduce the magnitude of the applied voltage. In the prototype setup with poly (ethylene oxide) polymer solution, an area of 5 cm  ×  10 cm and under an applied voltage of 60 kV, the maximum throughput of nanofibers is recorded to be approximately144 g m‑2 h‑1.

  5. Long-Rod Moving-Plate Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Y.

    2002-07-01

    Understanding the mechanics of interaction of a long rod projectile with a forward moving plate at an angle is essential to understanding long rod interaction with an explosive reactive armor cassette. To investigate the mechanics of such an interaction we use AUTODIN2D/EULER in plane geometry, although the problem is 3D. We assume that this is a satisfactory approximation, as we're only interested in the main features, and are not comparing fine details to experimental results. From the simulations we learn that the interaction never reaches steady state. Initially each material splits into two streams, and the interaction plane is perpendicular to the rod. But with time the interaction plane rotates slowly, until it becomes parallel to the rod, which is then able to continue moving forward without interruption. During this process interacting rod material of length DeltaL is diverted at an angle and becomes ineffective for penetrating the main target. We made many such runs to determine the dependence of DeltaL on the parameters of the problem. This dependence makes it possible to predict DeltaL for a variety of rod-plate situations.

  6. High-throughput rod-induced electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dezhi; Xiao, Zhiming; Teh, Kwok Siong; Han, Zhibin; Luo, Guoxi; Shi, Chuan; Sun, Daoheng; Zhao, Jinbao; Lin, Liwei

    2016-09-01

    A high throughput electrospinning process, directly from flat polymer solution surfaces induced by a moving insulating rod, has been proposed and demonstrated. Different rods made of either phenolic resin or paper with a diameter of 1-3 cm and a resistance of about 100-500 MΩ, has been successfully utilized in the process. The rod is placed approximately 10 mm above the flat polymer solution surface with a moving speed of 0.005-0.4 m s-1 this causes the solution to generate multiple liquid jets under an applied voltage of 15-60 kV for the tip-less electrospinning process. The local electric field induced by the rod can boost electrohydrodynamic instability in order to generate Taylor cones and liquid jets. Experimentally, it is found that a large rod diameter and a small solution-to-rod distance can enhance the local electrical field to reduce the magnitude of the applied voltage. In the prototype setup with poly (ethylene oxide) polymer solution, an area of 5 cm  ×  10 cm and under an applied voltage of 60 kV, the maximum throughput of nanofibers is recorded to be approximately144 g m-2 h-1.

  7. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-28

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets. PMID:27131565

  8. An evaluation of the impact of the ventilator care bundle.

    PubMed

    Crunden, Eddie; Boyce, Carolyn; Woodman, Helen; Bray, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    A number of interventions have been shown to improve the outcomes of patients who are invasively ventilated in intensive care units (ICUs). However, significant problems still exist in implementing research findings into clinical practice. The aim of this study was to assess whether the systematic and methodical implementation of evidence-based interventions encapsulated in a care bundle influenced length of ventilation and ICU length of stay (LOS). A ventilator care bundle was introduced within a general ICU and evaluated 1 year later. The care bundle was composed of four protocols that consisted of prophylaxis against peptic ulceration, prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis, daily cessation of sedation and elevation of the patient's head and chest to at least 30 degrees to the horizontal. Compliance with the bundle was assessed, as was ICU LOS, ICU mortality and ICU/high-dependency unit patient throughput. Mean ICU LOS was reduced from 13-75 [standard deviation (SD) 19.11] days to 8.36 (SD 10.21) days (p<0.05). Mean ventilator days were reduced from 10.8 (SD 15.58) days to 6.1 (SD 8.88) days. Unit patient throughput increased by 30.1% and the number of invasively ventilated patients increased by 39.5%. Care bundles encourage the consistent and systematic application of evidence-based protocols used in particular treatment regimes. Since the introduction of the ventilator care bundle, length of ventilation and ICU LOS have reduced significantly. PMID:16161379

  9. Plantain fibre bundles isolated from Colombian agro-industrial residues.

    PubMed

    Gañán, Piedad; Zuluaga, Robin; Restrepo, Adriana; Labidi, Jalel; Mondragon, Iñaki

    2008-02-01

    Comestible fruit production from Musaceas plants is an important economical activity in developing countries like Colombia. However, it generates a large amount of agro-industrial residues. Some of them are a potential resource of natural fibres, which can be used as reinforcement for composite materials. In this work, a series of commercial plantain (Musa AAB, cv "Dominico Harton") fibre bundles extracted from pseudostem, leaf sheath and rachis agricultural wastes were analyzed. Mechanical decortication and biological retting processes were used during fiber extraction. No significant differences in composition of vascular bundles were observed for both extraction processes. Gross morphological characteristics and mechanical behavior have been evaluated. Conducting tissues with spiral-like arrangement are observed attached to fibre bundles. This fact suggests a big amount of these tissues in commercial plantain plants. Both used extraction methods are not enough to remove them. Pseudostem fibre bundles have higher specific strength and modulus and lower strain at break than leaf sheath and rachis fibre bundles, having values comparable to other lignocellulosic fibres bundles. PMID:17350832

  10. BiSet: Semantic Edge Bundling with Biclusters for Sensemaking.

    PubMed

    Sun, Maoyuan; Mi, Peng; North, Chris; Ramakrishnan, Naren

    2016-01-01

    Identifying coordinated relationships is an important task in data analytics. For example, an intelligence analyst might want to discover three suspicious people who all visited the same four cities. Existing techniques that display individual relationships, such as between lists of entities, require repetitious manual selection and significant mental aggregation in cluttered visualizations to find coordinated relationships. In this paper, we present BiSet, a visual analytics technique to support interactive exploration of coordinated relationships. In BiSet, we model coordinated relationships as biclusters and algorithmically mine them from a dataset. Then, we visualize the biclusters in context as bundled edges between sets of related entities. Thus, bundles enable analysts to infer task-oriented semantic insights about potentially coordinated activities. We make bundles as first class objects and add a new layer, "in-between", to contain these bundle objects. Based on this, bundles serve to organize entities represented in lists and visually reveal their membership. Users can interact with edge bundles to organize related entities, and vice versa, for sensemaking purposes. With a usage scenario, we demonstrate how BiSet supports the exploration of coordinated relationships in text analytics.

  11. Laser speckle imaging of atherosclerotic plaques through optical fiber bundles.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Seemantini K; Bouma, Brett E; Yelin, Dvir; Gulati, Amneet; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2008-01-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI), a new technique that measures an index of plaque viscoelasticity, has been investigated recently to characterize atherosclerotic plaques. These prior studies demonstrated the diagnostic potential of LSI for detecting high-risk plaques and were conducted ex vivo. To conduct intracoronary LSI in vivo, the laser speckle pattern must be transmitted from the coronary wall to the image detector in the presence of cardiac motion. Small-diameter, flexible optical fiber bundles, similar to those used in coronary angioscopy, may be incorporated into an intravascular catheter for this purpose. A key challenge is that laser speckle is influenced by inter-fiber leakage of light, which may be exacerbated during bundle motion. In this study, we tested the capability of optical fiber bundles to transmit laser speckle patterns obtained from atherosclerotic plaques and evaluated the influence of motion on the diagnostic accuracy of fiber bundle-based LSI. Time-varying helium-neon laser speckle images of aortic plaques were obtained while cyclically moving the flexible length of the bundle to mimic coronary motion. Our results show that leached fiber bundles may reliably transmit laser speckle images in the presence of cardiac motion, providing a viable option to conduct intracoronary LSI. PMID:19021396

  12. Plantain fibre bundles isolated from Colombian agro-industrial residues.

    PubMed

    Gañán, Piedad; Zuluaga, Robin; Restrepo, Adriana; Labidi, Jalel; Mondragon, Iñaki

    2008-02-01

    Comestible fruit production from Musaceas plants is an important economical activity in developing countries like Colombia. However, it generates a large amount of agro-industrial residues. Some of them are a potential resource of natural fibres, which can be used as reinforcement for composite materials. In this work, a series of commercial plantain (Musa AAB, cv "Dominico Harton") fibre bundles extracted from pseudostem, leaf sheath and rachis agricultural wastes were analyzed. Mechanical decortication and biological retting processes were used during fiber extraction. No significant differences in composition of vascular bundles were observed for both extraction processes. Gross morphological characteristics and mechanical behavior have been evaluated. Conducting tissues with spiral-like arrangement are observed attached to fibre bundles. This fact suggests a big amount of these tissues in commercial plantain plants. Both used extraction methods are not enough to remove them. Pseudostem fibre bundles have higher specific strength and modulus and lower strain at break than leaf sheath and rachis fibre bundles, having values comparable to other lignocellulosic fibres bundles.

  13. A Radiologist's Primer on Bundles and Care Episodes.

    PubMed

    Seidenwurm, David; Lexa, Frank James

    2016-09-01

    Bundled or episode payments are among the most heavily emphasized approaches to aligning incentives and promoting care coordination, efficiency, and accountability in health care redesign. Bundled or episode payments price a market basket of services for an entire episode of care with both a clearly defined trigger and termination. Because the radiologist is "ancillary" in many bundles, the specialty is often unaware of the phenomenon. This is likely to change rapidly. Radiology is pivotal in high-prevalence, high-impact care areas such as low back pain and stroke that are focuses of widely used system performance metrics. More important, radiology is central to the diagnosis and management of a wide range of important diagnostic issues in areas such as breast cancer, pulmonary nodules, and incidental findings. Three models of bundled care will probably involve radiology intimately in the near future. Pure radiology bundles might be constructed for breast cancer screening and diagnosis, and these could be priced on the basis of guideline-based best-practice frequencies of care events such as recall and biopsy. Clinical bundles, for example low back pain, could be priced on the basis of optimal imaging frequencies. Finally, pricing of imaging studies might include evidence-based frequencies of follow-up imaging for incidental findings. PMID:27210231

  14. Turbulent flow in smooth and rough pipes.

    PubMed

    Allen, J J; Shockling, M A; Kunkel, G J; Smits, A J

    2007-03-15

    Recent experiments at Princeton University have revealed aspects of smooth pipe flow behaviour that suggest a more complex scaling than previously noted. In particular, the pressure gradient results yield a new friction factor relationship for smooth pipes, and the velocity profiles indicate the presence of a power-law region near the wall and, for Reynolds numbers greater than about 400x103 (R+>9x103), a logarithmic region further out. New experiments on a rough pipe with a honed surface finish with krms/D=19.4x10-6, over a Reynolds number range of 57x103-21x106, show that in the transitionally rough regime this surface follows an inflectional friction factor relationship rather than the monotonic relationship given in the Moody diagram. Outer-layer scaling of the mean velocity data and streamwise turbulence intensities for the rough pipe show excellent collapse and provide strong support for Townsend's outer-layer similarity hypothesis for rough-walled flows. The streamwise rough-wall spectra also agree well with the corresponding smooth-wall data. The pipe exhibited smooth behaviour for ks+ < or =3.5, which supports the suggestion that the original smooth pipe was indeed hydraulically smooth for ReD< or =24x106. The relationship between the velocity shift, DeltaU/utau, and the roughness Reynolds number, ks+, has been used to generalize the form of the transition from smooth to fully rough flow for an arbitrary relative roughness krms/D. These predictions apply for honed pipes when the separation of pipe diameter to roughness height is large, and they differ significantly from the traditional Moody curves.

  15. Understanding EUV mask blank surface roughness induced LWR and associated roughness requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pei-Yang; Zhang, Guojing; Gullickson, Eric M.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask multi-layer (ML) blank surface roughness specification historically comes from blank defect inspection tool requirement. Later, new concerns on ML surface roughness induced wafer pattern line width roughness (LWR) arise. In this paper, we have studied wafer level pattern LWR as a function of EUVL mask surface roughness via High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Tool. We found that the blank surface roughness induced LWR at current blank roughness level is in the order of 0.5nm 3σ for NA=0.42 at the best focus. At defocus of ±40nm, the corresponding LWR will be 0.2nm higher. Further reducing EUVL mask blank surface roughness will increase the blank cost with limited benefit in improving the pattern LWR, provided that the intrinsic resist LWR is in the order of 1nm and above.

  16. Mechanical performance of fiberglass sucker-rod strings

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, H.A.

    1988-08-01

    The natural frequencies of fiberglass sucker-rod strings can be calculated by treating the rod strings as modified spring/mass vibration systems. The ratio of the pumping-unit operating speed to the rod-string natural frequency can then be used as a basis for understanding fiberglass-rod performance and for predicting downhole pump stroke lengths.

  17. International symposium on fuel rod simulators: development and application

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.

    1981-05-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning fuel rod simulator operation and performance; simulator design and evaluation; clad heated fuel rod simulators and fuel rod simulators for cladding investigations; fuel rod simulator components and inspection; and simulator analytical modeling. Ten papers have previously been input to the Energy Data Base.

  18. Subdigital setae of chameleon feet: Friction-enhancing microstructures for a wide range of substrate roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinner, Marlene; Westhoff, Guido; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-06-01

    Hairy adhesive systems of microscopic setae with triangular flattened tips have evolved convergently in spiders, insects and arboreal lizards. The ventral sides of the feet and tails in chameleons are also covered with setae. However, chameleon setae feature strongly elongated narrow spatulae or fibrous tips. The friction enhancing function of these microstructures has so far only been demonstrated in contact with glass spheres. In the present study, the frictional properties of subdigital setae of Chamaeleo calyptratus were measured under normal forces in the physical range on plane substrates having different roughness. We showed that chameleon setae maximize friction on a wide range of substrate roughness. The highest friction was measured on asperities of 1 μm. However, our observations of the climbing ability of Ch. calyptratus on rods of different diameters revealed that also claws and grasping feet are additionally responsible for the force generation on various substrates during locomotion.

  19. Subdigital setae of chameleon feet: Friction-enhancing microstructures for a wide range of substrate roughness

    PubMed Central

    Spinner, Marlene; Westhoff, Guido; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-01-01

    Hairy adhesive systems of microscopic setae with triangular flattened tips have evolved convergently in spiders, insects and arboreal lizards. The ventral sides of the feet and tails in chameleons are also covered with setae. However, chameleon setae feature strongly elongated narrow spatulae or fibrous tips. The friction enhancing function of these microstructures has so far only been demonstrated in contact with glass spheres. In the present study, the frictional properties of subdigital setae of Chamaeleo calyptratus were measured under normal forces in the physical range on plane substrates having different roughness. We showed that chameleon setae maximize friction on a wide range of substrate roughness. The highest friction was measured on asperities of 1 μm. However, our observations of the climbing ability of Ch. calyptratus on rods of different diameters revealed that also claws and grasping feet are additionally responsible for the force generation on various substrates during locomotion. PMID:24970387

  20. Subdigital setae of chameleon feet: friction-enhancing microstructures for a wide range of substrate roughness.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Marlene; Westhoff, Guido; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2014-06-27

    Hairy adhesive systems of microscopic setae with triangular flattened tips have evolved convergently in spiders, insects and arboreal lizards. The ventral sides of the feet and tails in chameleons are also covered with setae. However, chameleon setae feature strongly elongated narrow spatulae or fibrous tips. The friction enhancing function of these microstructures has so far only been demonstrated in contact with glass spheres. In the present study, the frictional properties of subdigital setae of Chamaeleo calyptratus were measured under normal forces in the physical range on plane substrates having different roughness. We showed that chameleon setae maximize friction on a wide range of substrate roughness. The highest friction was measured on asperities of 1 μm. However, our observations of the climbing ability of Ch. calyptratus on rods of different diameters revealed that also claws and grasping feet are additionally responsible for the force generation on various substrates during locomotion.

  1. Numerical Schemes for Rough Parabolic Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Deya, Aurelien

    2012-04-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of numerical approximation schemes for a class of parabolic equations on (0,1) perturbed by a non-linear rough signal. It is the continuation of Deya (Electron. J. Probab. 16:1489-1518, 2011) and Deya et al. (Probab. Theory Relat. Fields, to appear), where the existence and uniqueness of a solution has been established. The approach combines rough paths methods with standard considerations on discretizing stochastic PDEs. The results apply to a geometric 2-rough path, which covers the case of the multidimensional fractional Brownian motion with Hurst index H>1/3.

  2. Relationships between topographic roughness and aeolian processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Lancaster, N.; Gaddis, L.; Rasmussen, K. R.; White, B. R.; Saunders, R. S.; Wall, S.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; Iversen, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction between winds and desert surfaces has important implications for sediment transport on Earth, Mars, and Venus, and for understanding the relationships between radar backscatter and aerodynamic roughness as part of the NASA Shuttle Imaging radar (SIR-C) Mission. Here, researchers report results from measurements of boundary layer wind profiles and surface roughness at sites in Death Valley and discuss their implications. The sites included a flat to undulating gravel and sand reg, alluvial fans, and a playa. Estimates of average particle size composition of Death Valley sites and arithmetic mean values of aerodynamic roughness are given in tabular form.

  3. Results of international standard problem No. 36 severe fuel damage experiment of a VVER fuel bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Firnhaber, M.; Yegorova, L.; Brockmeier, U.

    1995-09-01

    International Standard Problems (ISP) organized by the OECD are defined as comparative exercises in which predictions with different computer codes for a given physical problem are compared with each other and with a carefully controlled experimental study. The main goal of ISP is to increase confidence in the validity and accuracy of analytical tools used in assessing the safety of nuclear installations. In addition, it enables the code user to gain experience and to improve his competence. This paper presents the results and assessment of ISP No. 36, which deals with the early core degradation phase during an unmitigated severe LWR accident in a Russian type VVER. Representatives of 17 organizations participated in the ISP using the codes ATHLET-CD, ICARE2, KESS-III, MELCOR, SCDAP/RELAP5 and RAPTA. Some participants performed several calculations with different codes. As experimental basis the severe fuel damage experiment CORA-W2 was selected. The main phenomena investigated are thermal behavior of fuel rods, onset of temperature escalation, material behavior and hydrogen generation. In general, the calculations give the right tendency of the experimental results for the thermal behavior, the hydrogen generation and, partly, for the material behavior. However, some calculations deviate in important quantities - e.g. some material behavior data - showing remarkable discrepancies between each other and from the experiments. The temperature history of the bundle up to the beginning of significant oxidation was calculated quite well. Deviations seem to be related to the overall heat balance. Since the material behavior of the bundle is to a great extent influenced by the cladding failure criteria a more realistic cladding failure model should be developed at least for the detailed, mechanistic codes. Regarding the material behavior and flow blockage some models for the material interaction as well as for relocation and refreezing requires further improvement.

  4. Biomarkers, Bundled Payments, and Colorectal Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Patrick; Raju, Gottumukkala; Rodriguez, Alma; Burke, Thomas; Hafemeister, Lisa; Hawk, Ernest; Wu, Xifeng; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the management of cancers such as colorectal cancer (CRC) are urgently needed, as such cancers continue to be one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers; CRC accounts for 21% of all cancers and is responsible for mortalities second only to lung cancer in the United States. A comprehensive science-driven approach towards markedly improved early detection/screening to efficacious targeted therapeutics with clear diagnostic and prognostic markers is essential. In addition, further changes addressing rising costs, stemming from recent health care reform measures, will be brought about in part by changes in how care is reimbursed. For oncology, the advances in genomics and biomarkers have the potential to define subsets of patients who have a prognosis or response to a particular type of therapy that differs from the mean. Better definition of a cancer’s behavior will facilitate developing care plans tailored to the patient. One method under study is episode-based payment or bundling, where one payment is made to a provider organization to cover all expenses associated with a discrete illness episode. Payments will be based on the average cost of care, with providers taking on a risk for overutilization and outliers. For providers to thrive in this environment, they will need to know what care a patient will require and the costs of that care. A science-driven “personalized approach” to cancer care has the potential to produce better outcomes with reductions in the use of ineffectual therapies and costs. This promising scenario is still in the future, but progress is being made, and the shape of things to come for cancer care in the age of genomics is becoming clearer. PMID:22893787

  5. Nuclear reactor remote disconnect control rod coupling indicator

    DOEpatents

    Vuckovich, Michael

    1977-01-01

    A coupling indicator for use with nuclear reactor control rod assemblies which have remotely disengageable couplings between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling indicator indicates whether the control rod and the control rod drive shaft are engaged or disengaged. A resistive network, utilizing magnetic reed switches, senses the position of the control rod drive mechanism lead screw and the control rod position indicating tube, and the relative position of these two elements with respect to each other is compared to determine whether the coupling is engaged or disengaged.

  6. Combustor having mixing tube bundle with baffle arrangement for directing fuel

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Michael John; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin

    2016-08-23

    A combustor includes a tube bundle that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor. The tube bundle includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface, and a plurality of tubes extend from the upstream surface through the downstream surface to provide fluid communication through the tube bundle. A barrier extends radially inside the tube bundle between the upstream and downstream surfaces, and a baffle extends axially inside the tube bundle between the upstream surface and the barrier.

  7. Surface roughness effects on bidirectional reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T. F.; Hering, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of surface roughness effects on bidirectional reflectance of metallic surfaces is presented. A facility capable of irradiating a sample from normal to grazing incidence and recording plane of incidence bidirectional reflectance measurements was developed. Samples consisting of glass, aluminum alloy, and stainless steel materials were selected for examination. Samples were roughened using standard grinding techniques and coated with a radiatively opaque layer of pure aluminum. Mechanical surface roughness parameters, rms heights and rms slopes, evaluated from digitized surface profile measurements are less than 1.0 micrometers and 0.28, respectively. Rough surface specular, bidirectional, and directional reflectance measurements for selected values of polar angle of incidence and wavelength of incident energy within the spectral range of 1 to 14 micrometers are reported. The Beckmann bidirectional reflectance model is compared with reflectance measurements to establish its usefulness in describing the magnitude and spatial distribution of energy reflected from rough surfaces.

  8. Surface roughness effects on bidirectional reflectance.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T. F.; Hering, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study of surface roughness effects on bidirectional reflectance of metallic surfaces is presented. Samples consisting of glass, aluminum alloy, and stainless steel materials were roughened using standard grinding techniques and coated with a radiatively opaque layer of pure aluminum. Surface roughness parameters, rms height and rms slope, were evaluated from digitized surface profile measurements and are less than 1.0 micron, and 0.28, respectively. Rough-surface specular, bidirectional, and directional reflectance measurements for selected values of polar angle and wavelength of incident energy within the range from 10 to 80 deg and from 1 to 14 microns, respectively, are reported. The influence of surface roughness is discussed in terms of rms height and rms slope.

  9. Effect of Surface Roughness on Hydrodynamic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. C.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical analysis on the performance of hydrodynamic oil bearings is made considering surface roughness effect. The hydrodynamic as well as asperity contact load is found. The contact pressure was calculated with the assumption that the surface height distribution was Gaussian. The average Reynolds equation of partially lubricated surface was used to calculate hydrodynamic load. An analytical expression for average gap was found and was introduced to modify the average Reynolds equation. The resulting boundary value problem was then solved numerically by finite difference methods using the method of successive over relaxation. The pressure distribution and hydrodynamic load capacity of plane slider and journal bearings were calculated for various design data. The effects of attitude and roughness of surface on the bearing performance were shown. The results are compared with similar available solution of rough surface bearings. It is shown that: (1) the contribution of contact load is not significant; and (2) the hydrodynamic and contact load increase with surface roughness.

  10. Surface Roughness, Optical Shadowing, and Radar Backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, M. K.; Campbell, B. A.

    1996-03-01

    The topography of natural surfaces at scales of a few meters or less is commonly referred to as roughness. These variations in height and slope, their magnitude, and the changes in structure as a function of scale length are of fundamental importance to interpretation of geologic emplacement regimes and subsequent modification. For most planetary studies and many terrestrial situations, no in situ observations of the ground are available, and remote sensing data are used to infer the nature of the terrain. For optical, infrared, and microwave measurements, surface roughness and its scale-dependence have a large impact on the brightness, polarization, angular scattering properties, and wavelength-dependence of reflected energy. The link between surface roughness and specific remote sensing properties for many types of observations, however, remains elusive. We focus here on the nature of roughness and its scale-dependence for terrestrial rocky surfaces, and the effect of such changes on optical shadowing and radar backscatter.

  11. Simplified models for mask roughness induced LER

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2011-02-21

    The ITRS requires < 1.2nm line-edge roughness (LER) for the 22nm half-pitch node. Currently, we can consistently achieve only about 3nm LER. Further progress requires understanding the principle causes of LER. Much work has already been done on how both the resist and LER on the mask effect the final printed LER. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which system-level effects such as mask surface roughness, illumination conditions, and defocus couple to speckle at the image plane, and factor into LER limits. Presently, mask-roughness induced LER is studied via full 2D aerial image modeling and subsequent analysis of the resulting image. This method is time consuming and cumbersome. It is, therefore, the goal of this research to develop a useful 'rule-of-thumb' analytic model for mask roughness induced LER to expedite learning and understanding.

  12. Photovoltage of Rods and Cones in the Macaque Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeweis, David M.; Schnapf, Julie L.

    1995-05-01

    The kinetics, gain, and reliability of light responses of rod and cone photoreceptors are important determinants of overall visual sensitivity. In voltage recordings from photoreceptors in an intact primate retina, rods were found to be functionally isolated from each other, unlike the tightly coupled rods of cold-blooded vertebrates. Cones were observed to receive excitatory input from rods, which indicates that the cone pathway also processes rod signals. This input might be expected to degrade the spatial resolution of mesopic vision.

  13. Entrainment and deposition modeling of liquid films with applications for BWR fuel rod dryout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnayake, Ruwan Kumara

    While best estimate computer codes provide the licensing basis for nuclear power facilities, they also serve as analytical tools in overall plant and component design procedures. An ideal best estimate code would comprise of universally applicable mechanistic models for all its components. However, due to the limited understanding in these specific areas, many of the models and correlations used in these codes reflect high levels of empiricism. As a result, the use of such models is strictly limited to the range of parameters within which the experiments have been conducted. Disagreements between best estimate code predictions and experimental results are often explained by the mechanistic inadequacies of embedded models. Significant mismatches between calculated and experimental critical power values are common observations in the analyses of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Based on experimental observations and calculations, these mismatches are attributed to the additional entrainment and deposition caused by spacer grids in BWR fuel assemblies. In COBRA-TF (Coolant Boiling in Rod Arrays-Two Fluid); a state of the art industrial best estimate code, these disagreements are hypothesized to occur due the absence of an appropriate spacer grid model. In this thesis, development of a suitably detailed spacer grid model and integrating it to COBRA-TF is documented. The new spacer grid model is highly mechanistic so that the applicability of it is not seriously affected by geometric variations in different spacer grid designs. COBRA-TF (original version) simulations performed on single tube tests and BWR rod bundles with spacer grids showed that single tube predictions were more accurate than those of the rod bundles. This observation is understood to arise from the non-availability of a suitable spacer grid model in COBRA-TF. Air water entrainment experiments were conducted in a test section simulating two adjacent BWR sub channels to visualize the flow behavior at

  14. Permeability of self-affine rough fractures

    PubMed

    Drazer; Koplik

    2000-12-01

    The permeability of two-dimensional fractures with self-affine fractal roughness is studied via analytic arguments and numerical simulations. The limit where the roughness amplitude is small compared with average fracture aperture is analyzed by a perturbation method, while in the opposite case of narrow aperture, we use heuristic arguments based on lubrication theory. Numerical simulations, using the lattice Boltzmann method, are used to examine the complete range of aperture sizes, and confirm the analytic arguments. PMID:11138092

  15. How supercontinents and superoceans affect seafloor roughness.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Joanne M; Müller, R Dietmar; Roest, Walter R; Wessel, Paul; Smith, Walter H F

    2008-12-18

    Seafloor roughness varies considerably across the world's ocean basins and is fundamental to controlling the circulation and mixing of heat in the ocean and dissipating eddy kinetic energy. Models derived from analyses of active mid-ocean ridges suggest that ocean floor roughness depends on seafloor spreading rates, with rougher basement forming below a half-spreading rate threshold of 30-35 mm yr(-1) (refs 4, 5), as well as on the local interaction of mid-ocean ridges with mantle plumes or cold-spots. Here we present a global analysis of marine gravity-derived roughness, sediment thickness, seafloor isochrons and palaeo-spreading rates of Cretaceous to Cenozoic ridge flanks. Our analysis reveals that, after eliminating effects related to spreading rate and sediment thickness, residual roughness anomalies of 5-20 mGal remain over large swaths of ocean floor. We found that the roughness as a function of palaeo-spreading directions and isochron orientations indicates that most of the observed excess roughness is not related to spreading obliquity, as this effect is restricted to relatively rare occurrences of very high obliquity angles (>45 degrees ). Cretaceous Atlantic ocean floor, formed over mantle previously overlain by the Pangaea supercontinent, displays anomalously low roughness away from mantle plumes and is independent of spreading rates. We attribute this observation to a sub-Pangaean supercontinental mantle temperature anomaly leading to slightly thicker than normal Late Jurassic and Cretaceous Atlantic crust, reduced brittle fracturing and smoother basement relief. In contrast, ocean crust formed above Pacific superswells, probably reflecting metasomatized lithosphere underlain by mantle at only slightly elevated temperatures, is not associated with basement roughness anomalies. These results highlight a fundamental difference in the nature of large-scale mantle upwellings below supercontinents and superoceans, and their impact on oceanic crustal

  16. Effective roughness in meso-scale modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Joakim R.

    2010-05-01

    Effective roughness in meso-scale modeling. J.R. Nielsen, E. Dellwik, A. Hahmann, A. Sogachev, C.B. Hasager, Wind Energy Division, Risø DTU National Laboratory, Denmark Accurate estimation of effective roughness lengths for use in meso-scale models in heterogeneous terrain requires assessment of highly non-linear processes. These non-linear effects are often neglected in meso-scale modeling where, typically, a simple logarithmic average or a dominant vegetation type provide crude estimates of the aggregated aerodynamical roughness length in each grid cell. Although the parameterizations are computationally efficient, improvements are needed since some regional-scale sensitivity studies indicate that grid cell roughnesses strongly influence model predictions (i.e. Hasager and Jensen, 1999). Effective roughness parameterizations can be provided through the use of microscale flow models, which simulate the he local scale effect of orography and roughness changes. Results from two linearized micro-scale models and a k-ω model (Sogachev and Panferov, 2006) are presented for an idealized terrain with roughness changes. Furthermore, sensitivity experiments are performed within the meso-scale model WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) using the standard Community Noah Land Surface model. The same experiment will be performed with a new modified version with multi-physics options (Niu et al.,submitted 2009). The analysis is carried out using different roughness aggregation techniques in WRF and the influence on scalar fluxes such as temperature, humidity and CO2 is investigated. Based on the WRF sensitivity analysis and the results of micro-scale modeling, the potential improvement of using micro-scale models for parameterization of sub-grid scale variability is evaluated.

  17. How supercontinents and superoceans affect seafloor roughness.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Joanne M; Müller, R Dietmar; Roest, Walter R; Wessel, Paul; Smith, Walter H F

    2008-12-18

    Seafloor roughness varies considerably across the world's ocean basins and is fundamental to controlling the circulation and mixing of heat in the ocean and dissipating eddy kinetic energy. Models derived from analyses of active mid-ocean ridges suggest that ocean floor roughness depends on seafloor spreading rates, with rougher basement forming below a half-spreading rate threshold of 30-35 mm yr(-1) (refs 4, 5), as well as on the local interaction of mid-ocean ridges with mantle plumes or cold-spots. Here we present a global analysis of marine gravity-derived roughness, sediment thickness, seafloor isochrons and palaeo-spreading rates of Cretaceous to Cenozoic ridge flanks. Our analysis reveals that, after eliminating effects related to spreading rate and sediment thickness, residual roughness anomalies of 5-20 mGal remain over large swaths of ocean floor. We found that the roughness as a function of palaeo-spreading directions and isochron orientations indicates that most of the observed excess roughness is not related to spreading obliquity, as this effect is restricted to relatively rare occurrences of very high obliquity angles (>45 degrees ). Cretaceous Atlantic ocean floor, formed over mantle previously overlain by the Pangaea supercontinent, displays anomalously low roughness away from mantle plumes and is independent of spreading rates. We attribute this observation to a sub-Pangaean supercontinental mantle temperature anomaly leading to slightly thicker than normal Late Jurassic and Cretaceous Atlantic crust, reduced brittle fracturing and smoother basement relief. In contrast, ocean crust formed above Pacific superswells, probably reflecting metasomatized lithosphere underlain by mantle at only slightly elevated temperatures, is not associated with basement roughness anomalies. These results highlight a fundamental difference in the nature of large-scale mantle upwellings below supercontinents and superoceans, and their impact on oceanic crustal

  18. Regulatory perspective on incomplete control rod insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterton, M.

    1997-01-01

    The incomplete control rod insertions experienced at South Texas Unit 1 and Wolf Creek are of safety concern to the NRC staff because they represent potential precursors to loss of shutdown margin. Even before it was determined if these events were caused by the control rods or by the fuel there was an apparent correlation of the problem with high burnup fuel. It was determined that there was also a correlation between high burnup and high drag forces as well as with rod drop time histories and lack of rod recoil. The NRC staff initial actions were aimed at getting a perspective on the magnitude of the problem as far as the number of plants and the amount of fuel that could be involved, as well as the safety significance in terms of shutdown margin. As tests have been performed and data has been analyzed the focus has shifted more toward understanding the problem and the ways to eliminate it. At this time the staff`s understanding of the phenomena is that it was a combination of factors including burnup, power history and temperature. The problem appears to be very sensitive to these factors, the interaction of which is not clearly understood. The model developed by Westinghouse provides a possible explanation but there is not sufficient data to establish confidence levels and sensitivity studies involving the key parameters have not been done. While several fixes to the problem have been discussed, no definitive fixes have been proposed. Without complete understanding of the phenomena, or fixes that clearly eliminate the problem the safety concern remains. The safety significance depends on the amount of shutdown margin lost due to incomplete insertion of the control rods. Were the control rods to stick high in the core, the reactor could not be shutdown by the control rods and other means such as emergency boration would be required.

  19. Cells preferentially grow on rough substrates.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Francesco; Tirinato, Luca; Battista, Edmondo; Causa, Filippo; Liberale, Carlo; di Fabrizio, Enzo M; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2010-10-01

    Substrate nanotopography affects cell adhesion and proliferation and is fundamental to the rational design of bio-adhesives, to tissue engineering and to the development of assays for in-vitro screening. Cell behavior on rough substrates is still elusive, and the results presented in the open literature remain controversial. Here, the proliferation of cells on electrochemically etched silicon substrates with different roughness and nearly similar surface energy was studied over three days with confocal and atomic force microscopy. The surface profile of the substrates is a self-affine fractal with a roughness R(a) growing with the etching time from approximately 2 to 100 nm and a fractal dimension D ranging between about 2 (nominally flat surface) and 2.6. For four cell types, the number of adhering cells and their proliferation rates exhibited a maximum on moderately rough (R(a) approximately 10-45 nm) nearly Brownian (D approximately 2.5) substrates. The observed cell behavior was satisfactorily interpreted within the theory of adhesion to randomly rough solids. These findings demonstrated the importance of nanogeometry in cell stable adhesion and growth, suggesting that moderately rough substrates with large fractal dimension could selectively boost cell proliferation. PMID:20637503

  20. Rough surface reconstruction for ultrasonic NDE simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Wonjae; Shi, Fan; Lowe, Michael J. S.; Skelton, Elizabeth A.; Craster, Richard V.

    2014-02-18

    The reflection of ultrasound from rough surfaces is an important topic for the NDE of safety-critical components, such as pressure-containing components in power stations. The specular reflection from a rough surface of a defect is normally lower than it would be from a flat surface, so it is typical to apply a safety factor in order that justification cases for inspection planning are conservative. The study of the statistics of the rough surfaces that might be expected in candidate defects according to materials and loading, and the reflections from them, can be useful to develop arguments for realistic safety factors. This paper presents a study of real rough crack surfaces that are representative of the potential defects in pressure-containing power plant. Two-dimensional (area) values of the height of the roughness have been measured and their statistics analysed. Then a means to reconstruct model cases with similar statistics, so as to enable the creation of multiple realistic realizations of the surfaces, has been investigated, using random field theory. Rough surfaces are reconstructed, based on a real surface, and results for these two-dimensional descriptions of the original surface have been compared with those from the conventional model based on a one-dimensional correlation coefficient function. In addition, ultrasonic reflections from them are simulated using a finite element method.

  1. Anatomy of the anterior cruciate ligament with regard to its two bundles.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Wolf; Zantop, Thore

    2007-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) consists of two major fiber bundles, namely the anteromedial and posterolateral bundle. When the knee is extended, the posterolateral bundle (PL) is tight and the anteromedial (AM) bundle is moderately lax. As the knee is flexed, the femoral attachment of the ACL becomes a more horizontal orientation; causing the AM bundle to tighten and the PL bundle to relax. There is some degree of variability for the femoral origin of the anterome-dial and posterolateral bundle. The anteromedial bundle is located proximal and anterior in the femoral ACL origin (high and deep in the notch when the knee is flexed at 90 degrees ); the posterolateral bundle starts in the distal and posterior aspect of the femoral ACL origin (shallow and low when the knee is flexed at 90 degrees ). In the frontal plane the anteromedial bundle origin is in the 10:30 clock position and the postero-lateral bundle origin in the 9:30 clock position. At the tibial insertion the ACL fans out to form the foot region. The anteromedial bundle insertion is in the anterior part of the tibial ACL footprint, the posterolateral bundle in the posterior part. While the anteromedial bundle is the primary restraint against anterior tibial translation, the posterolateral bundle tends to stabilize the knee near full extension, particularly against rotatory loads.

  2. Risk Adjustment for Medicare Total Knee Arthroplasty Bundled Payments.

    PubMed

    Clement, R Carter; Derman, Peter B; Kheir, Michael M; Soo, Adrianne E; Flynn, David N; Levin, L Scott; Fleisher, Lee

    2016-09-01

    The use of bundled payments is growing because of their potential to align providers and hospitals on the goal of cost reduction. However, such gain sharing could incentivize providers to "cherry-pick" more profitable patients. Risk adjustment can prevent this unintended consequence, yet most bundling programs include minimal adjustment techniques. This study was conducted to determine how bundled payments for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) should be adjusted for risk. The authors collected financial data for all Medicare patients (age≥65 years) undergoing primary unilateral TKA at an academic center over a period of 2 years (n=941). Multivariate regression was performed to assess the effect of patient factors on the costs of acute inpatient care, including unplanned 30-day readmissions. This analysis mirrors a bundling model used in the Medicare Bundled Payments for Care Improvement initiative. Increased age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, and the presence of a Medicare Major Complications/Comorbid Conditions (MCC) modifier (typically representing major complications) were associated with increased costs (regression coefficients, $57 per year; $729 per ASA class beyond I; and $3122 for patients meeting MCC criteria; P=.003, P=.001, and P<.001, respectively). Differences in costs were not associated with body mass index, sex, or race. If the results are generalizable, Medicare bundled payments for TKA encompassing acute inpatient care should be adjusted upward by the stated amounts for older patients, those with elevated ASA class, and patients meeting MCC criteria. This is likely an underestimate for many bundling models, including the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement program, incorporating varying degrees of postacute care. Failure to adjust for factors that affect costs may create adverse incentives, creating barriers to care for certain patient populations. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):e911-e916.]. PMID:27359282

  3. End fitting for oil well sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, C.P.

    1984-02-07

    An end fitting for a sucker rod for oil wells is described with the end fitting having a chamber portion extending inwardly from one end thereof and an externally threaded portion at its other end. The chamber portion is defined by a plurality of spaced-apart annular ridges which define frusto-conical shaped cavities therebetween. The end fitting also has a bore extending inwardly thereinto from its other end which communicates with the inner end of the chamber portion. A valve is mounted in the end fitting and has a valve stem positioned in the bore and a valve head positioned at the inner end of the chamber portion. The chamber portion is adapted to receive a glass reinforced resin bonded cylindrical rod which is maintained therein by a two-part epoxy resin which surrounds the rod and is received in the cavities to form epoxy wedges bonded to the rod. The outer end of the bore is provided with internal threads which threadably receive a screw therein which engages the end of the valve stem so that longitudinal force may be applied to the valve thereby transmitting longitudinal force to the end of the rod.

  4. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Mohammad K.; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  5. Dynamic behavior of rod photoreceptor disks.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunhe; Jiang, Yunhai; Koutalos, Yiannis

    2002-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells use membrane organelles, like the endoplasmic reticulum or the Golgi, to carry out different functions. Vertebrate rod photoreceptors use hundreds of membrane sacs (the disks) for the detection of light. We have used fluorescent tracers and single cell imaging to study the properties of rod photoreceptor disks. Labeling of intact rod photoreceptors with membrane markers and polar tracers revealed communication between intradiskal and extracellular space. Internalized tracers moved along the length of the rod outer segment, indicating communication between the disks as well. This communication involved the exchange of both membrane and aqueous phase and had a time constant in the order of minutes. The communication pathway uses approximately 2% of the available membrane disk area and does not allow the passage of molecules larger than 10 kDa. It was possible to load the intradiskal space with fluorescent Ca(2+) and pH dyes, which reported an intradiskal Ca(2+) concentration in the order of 1 microM and an acidic pH 6.5, both of them significantly different than intracellular and extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations and pH. The results suggest that the rod photoreceptor disks are not discrete, passive sacs but rather comprise an active cellular organelle. The communication between disks may be important for membrane remodeling as well as for providing access to the intradiskal space of the whole outer segment. PMID:12202366

  6. External Verification of the Bundle Adjustment in Photogrammetric Software Using the Damped Bundle Adjustment Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börlin, Niclas; Grussenmeyer, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate whether the Matlab-based Damped Bundle Adjustment Toolbox (DBAT) can be used to provide independent verification of the BA computation of two popular software—PhotoModeler (PM) and PhotoScan (PS). For frame camera data sets with lens distortion, DBAT is able to reprocess and replicate subsets of PM results with high accuracy. For lens-distortion-free data sets, DBAT can furthermore provide comparative results between PM and PS. Data sets for the discussed projects are available from the authors. The use of an external verification tool such as DBAT will enable users to get an independent verification of the computations of their software. In addition, DBAT can provide computation of quality parameters such as estimated standard deviations, correlation between parameters, etc., something that should be part of best practice for any photogrammetric software. Finally, as the code is free and open-source, users can add computations of their own.

  7. Time-dependent fiber bundles with local load sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, W. I.; Phoenix, S. L.

    2001-02-01

    Fiber bundle models, where fibers have random lifetimes depending on their load histories, are useful tools in explaining time-dependent failure in heterogeneous materials. Such models shed light on diverse phenomena such as fatigue in structural materials and earthquakes in geophysical settings. Various asymptotic and approximate theories have been developed for bundles with various geometries and fiber load-sharing mechanisms, but numerical verification has been hampered by severe computational demands in larger bundles. To gain insight at large size scales, interest has returned to idealized fiber bundle models in 1D. Such simplified models typically assume either equal load sharing (ELS) among survivors, or local load sharing (LLS) where a failed fiber redistributes its load onto its two nearest flanking survivors. Such models can often be solved exactly or asymptotically in increasing bundle size, N, yet still capture the essence of failure in real materials. The present work focuses on 1D bundles under LLS. As in previous works, a fiber has failure rate following a power law in its load level with breakdown exponent ρ. Surviving fibers under fixed loads have remaining lifetimes that are independent and exponentially distributed. We develop both new asymptotic theories and new computational algorithms that greatly increase the bundle sizes that can be treated in large replications (e.g., one million fibers in thousands of realizations). In particular we develop an algorithm that adapts several concepts and methods that are well-known among computer scientists, but relatively unknown among physicists, to dramatically increase the computational speed with no attendant loss of accuracy. We consider various regimes of ρ that yield drastically different behavior as N increases. For 1/2<=ρ<=1, ELS and LLS have remarkably similar behavior (they have identical lifetime distributions at ρ=1) with approximate Gaussian bundle lifetime statistics and a finite limiting

  8. Variable recruitment in bundles of miniature pneumatic artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    DeLaHunt, Sylvie A; Pillsbury, Thomas E; Wereley, Norman M

    2016-01-01

    The natural compliance and force generation properties of pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs) allow them to operate like human muscles in anthropomorphic robotic manipulators. Traditionally, manipulators use a single PAM or multiple PAMs actuated in unison in place of a human muscle. However, these standard manipulators can experience significant efficiency losses when operated outside their target performance ranges at low actuation pressures. This study considers the application of a variable recruitment control strategy to a parallel bundle of miniature PAMs as an attempt to mimic the selective recruitment of motor units in a human muscle. Bundles of miniature PAMs are experimentally characterized, their actuation behavior is modeled, and the efficiency gains and losses associated with the application of a variable recruitment control strategy are assessed. This bio-inspired control strategy allows muscle bundles to operate the fewest miniature PAMs necessary to achieve a desired performance objective, improving the muscle bundle's operating efficiency over larger ranges of force generation and displacement. The study also highlights the need for improved PAM fabrication techniques to facilitate the production of identical miniature PAMs for inclusion in muscle bundles. PMID:27623216

  9. Hair-bundle friction from transduction channels' gating forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormuth, Volker; Barral, Jérémie; Joanny, Jean-François; Jülicher, Frank; Martin, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Hearing starts when sound-evoked mechanical vibrations of the hair-cell bundle activate mechanosensitive ion channels, giving birth to an electrical signal. As for any mechanical system, friction impedes movements of the hair bundle and thus constrains the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of auditory transduction. We have shown recently that the opening and closing of the transduction channels produce internal frictional forces that can dominate viscous drag on the micrometer-sized hair bundle and thus provide a major source of damping [2]. We develop here a physical theory of passive hair-bundle mechanics that explains the origin of channel friction. We show that channel friction can be understood quantitatively by coupling the dynamics of the conformational change associated with channel gating to tip-link tension. As a result, varying channel properties affects friction, with faster channels producing smaller friction. The analysis emphasizes the dual role of transduction channels' gating forces, which affect both hair-bundle stiffness and drag. Friction originating from gating of ion channels is a general concept that is relevant to all mechanosensitive channels.

  10. Sigmoidal bundles and other tidal features, Curtis Formation (Jurassic), Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Kreisa, R.D.; Moiola, R.J.

    1984-04-01

    Recently, a new suite of tide-generated sedimentary structures has been described, principally from sandy shoals and large excavations associated with flood-control structures in tidal estuaries of the Dutch coast. These sedimentary structures can be less ambiguous than criteria previously used to recognized in the North Sea can be applied to the rock record, in this case the Curtis Formation (Jurassic), San Rafael swell, Utah, to significantly enhance our ability to interpret tidal facies. Our discussion centers on the recognition of tidal bundles, the lateral succession of cross-strata generated by the migration of a large-scale bedform during one dominant tidal episode. Tidal bundles in the Curtis consist of two gently dipping sigmoid-shaped pause planes which enclose avalanche forests. They are up to 80 cm (30 in.) thick and 11 m (36 ft) long. Pause planes may be accentuated by erosion of the megaripple by the subordinate tide, by generation of ripples or small megaripples with opposed inclinations, and/or by a drape of fine sediment which settles during slack water. Systematic variability that occurs within bundles is due to increasing then waning current velocity during a tidal episode. Systematic variability among tidal bundles results from regular fluctuations of tidal current velocities during a lunar month (neap/spring cycles). These include changes in bundle thickness, dip of forest, internal geometry, and lateral extent. Recognition of these features in the Curtis leads to an uncontestable interpretation of its tidal origin.

  11. Dynamic response of fiber bundle under transverse impact.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo

    2010-03-01

    There has been a very high demand in developing efficient soft body armors to protect the military and law enforcement personnel from ballistic or explosive attack. As a basic component in the soft body armor, fibers or fiber bundles play a key role in the performance against ballistic impact. In order to study the ballistic-resistant mechanism of the soft body armor, it is desirable to understand the dynamic response of the fiber bundle under transverse impact. Transverse wave speed is one important parameter because a faster transverse wave speed can make the impact energy dissipate more quickly. In this study, we employed split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) to generate constant high-speed impact on a Kevlar fiber bundle in the transverse direction. The deformation of the fiber bundle was photographed with high-speed digital cameras. The transverse wave speeds were experimentally measured at various transverse impact velocities. The experimental results can also be used to quantitatively verify the current analytical models or to develop new models to describe the dynamic response of fiber bundle under transverse impact.

  12. CRYPTOCHROME2 in Vascular Bundles Regulates Flowering in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Motomu; Mochizuki, Nobuyoshi; Suzuki, Tomomi; Nagatani, Akira

    2007-01-01

    Plants make full use of light signals to determine the timing of flowering. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a blue/UV-A photoreceptor, CRYPTOCHROME 2 (cry2), and a red/far-red photoreceptor, PHYTOCHROME B (phyB), are two major photoreceptors that control flowering. The light stimuli for the regulation of flowering are perceived by leaves. We have recently shown that phyB expression in mesophyll but not in vascular bundles suppresses the expression of a key flowering regulator, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), in vascular bundles. In this study, we asked where in the leaf cry2 perceives light stimuli to regulate flowering. To answer this question, we established transgenic Arabidopsis lines in which the cry2–green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion was expressed under the control of organ/tissue-specific promoters in a cry2-deficient mutant background. Analysis of these lines revealed that expression of cry2-GFP in vascular bundles, but not in epidermis or mesophyll, rescued the late flowering phenotype. We further confirmed that cry2-GFP expressed in vascular bundles increased FT expression only in vascular bundles. Hence, in striking contrast with phyB, cry2 most likely regulates FT expression in a cell-autonomous manner. PMID:17259260

  13. Geometry of the double tangent bundles of Banach manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suri, Ali

    2013-12-01

    In this paper for a vector bundle (v.b.) (p,E,M), we show that at the presence of a (possibly nonlinear) connection on (p,E.M), TE on M admits a v.b. structure. This fact is followed by a suitable converse which asserts that a v.b. structure for TE over M yields a linear connection on the original bundle (p,E,M). Moreover we clarify the relation between v.b. structures and also the induced bundle morphisms which will be used for classification of these v.b. structures. Afterwards the concept of second order connections on a manifold M is introduced which leads us to interesting geometric tools on the bundle of accelerations. In fact by using the v.b. structure for σ:TTM⟶M, we will study the geometric tools on the second order tangent bundle. The concepts of second order covariant derivative, first and second order auto-parallel curve, the appropriate exponential mapping and second order Lie derivative are introduced.

  14. Reaction–diffusion model of hair-bundle morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobo, Adrian; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    The hair bundle, an apical specialization of the hair cell composed of several rows of regularly organized stereocilia and a kinocilium, is essential for mechanotransduction in the ear. Its precise organization allows the hair bundle to convert mechanical stimuli to electrical signals; mutations that alter the bundle’s morphology often cause deafness. However, little is known about the proteins involved in the process of morphogenesis and how the structure of the bundle arises through interactions between these molecules. We present a mathematical model based on simple reaction–diffusion mechanisms that can reproduce the shape and organization of the hair bundle. This model suggests that the boundary of the cell and the kinocilium act as signaling centers that establish the bundle’s shape. The interaction of two proteins forms a hexagonal Turing pattern—a periodic modulation of the concentrations of the morphogens, sustained by local activation and long-range inhibition of the reactants—that sets a blueprint for the location of the stereocilia. Finally we use this model to predict how different alterations to the system might impact the shape and organization of the hair bundle. PMID:25313064

  15. The work budget of rough faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Patrick J.; Ashley Griffith, W.

    2014-12-01

    Faults in nature have measurable roughness at many scales and are not planar as generally idealized. We utilize the boundary element method to model the geomechanical response of synthetic rough faults in an isotropic, linear elastic continuum to external tectonic loading in terms of the work budget. Faults are generated with known fractal roughness parameters, including the root mean square slope (β), a measure of roughness amplitude, and the Hurst exponent (H), a measure of geometric self-similarity. Energy within the fault models is partitioned into external work (Wext), internal elastic strain energy (Wint), gravitational work (Wgrav), frictional work (Wfric), and seismic energy (Wseis). Results confirm that Wext, or work done on the external model boundaries, is smallest for a perfectly planar fault, and steadily increases with increasing β. This pattern is also observed in Wint, the energy expended in deforming the host rock. The opposite is true for gravitational work, or work done against gravity in uplifting host rock, as well as with frictional work, or energy dissipated with frictional slip on the fault, and Wseis, or seismic energy released during slip events. Effects of variation in H are not as large as for β, but Wgrav, Wfric, and Wseis increase with increasing H, with Wint and Wext decreasing across the same range. Remarkably, however, for a narrow range of roughness amplitudes which are commonly observed along natural faults, the total work of the system remains approximately constant, while slightly larger than the total work of a planar fault. Faults evolve toward the most mechanically efficient configuration; therefore we argue that this range of roughness amplitudes may represent an energy barrier, preventing faults from removing asperities and evolving to smooth, planar discontinuities. A similar conclusion is drawn from simulations at relatively shallow depths, with results showing that shallower faults have larger energy barriers, and can

  16. Effect of roughness on water flow through a single rough fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Zhou, Z.; WANG, J.; Guo, Q.; Dou, Z.

    2015-12-01

    A single fracture (SF) usually has rough surfaces with points of contact. Though relative roughness was considered in quantifying flow through a single rough fracture (SRF) previously, additional factors such as the distribution of rough elements and bending degree of streamlines are rarely considered before. Semi-empirical friction factor (f) and discharge per unit width (q) equations are first deduced based on the consideration of relative roughness, roughness elements distribution and streamline reattachment length in this study. A horizontal SRF model is set up and a series of experiments and simulations are performed. Main conclusions are drawn: recirculation of streamlines occurred in the rough element and its intensity increases with the entering angle of the streamlines into the element and Reynolds number (Re); streamlines are discontinuously distributed when asperity height is large, leading to departure from Darcy's law (non-linear flow); the non-linearity of flow increases with the asperity height and Re; the relative roughness for not affecting water flow through a SRF should be much less than 0.033, a benchmark value commonly used previously for neglecting the roughness effect; the revised f and q equations under laminar flow through a SRF are shown to be better than previously proposed equations.

  17. Rod consolidation at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.

    1986-12-01

    A rod consolidation demonstration with irradiated pressurized water reactor fuel was recently conducted by personnel from Nuclear Assurance Corporation and West Valley Nuclear Services Company at the West Valley Demonstration Project in West Valley, New York. The rod consolidation demonstration involved pulling all of the fuel rods from six fuel Assemblies. In general, the rod pulling proceeded smoothly. The highest compaction ratio attained was 1:8:1. Among the total of 1074 fuel rods were some known degraded rods (they had collapsed cladding, a result of in-reactor fuel densification), but no rods were broken or dropped during the demonstration. One aim was to gather information on the effect of rod consolidation operations on the integrity of the fuel rods during subsequent handling and storage. Another goal was to collect information on the condition and handling of intact, damaged, and failed fuel that has been in storage for an extended period. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Interpretation of calculated forces on sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.; Pattillo, P.D. ); Studenmund, W.R. )

    1995-02-01

    The analysis of working loads in a sucker rod string during a pumping cycle has received substantial coverage in the petroleum literature. These load predictions have tended to focus on mechanical design considerations such as excess load and fatigue prediction. In contrast, the current study addresses the issues of buckling associated with working axial/pressure loads in an attempt to clarify the means of both predicting buckling and minimizing its effects. The study begins with a review of the static loads acting near the pump, and proceeds to a discussion of how these loads relate to the tendency of a rod string to buckle on the downstroke. Critical to this discussion is the concept of effective tension. Definition of the effective tension leads to the application of this concept to sinker bar design as a means of mitigating the buckling tendency of a rod string. Key points are reinforced by illustrative examples.

  19. System analysis for sucker-rod pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Z.; Doty, D.R.

    1989-05-01

    Pumping free gas in an oil well can significantly decrease the efficiency of a sucker-rod-pumping installation. Pump placement depth and use of a downhole gas/liquid separator (gas anchor) were found to be significant variables in improving the overall efficiency. A procedure is presented that shows when and to what degree the use of a gas anchor improves the efficiency of a sucker-rod pumping system. It was found that at lower pump intake pressures, the gas anchor usually improves efficiency, but at higher pump intake pressures, use of a gas anchor produces no positive effect. Also, elevating the pump to the highest position that still allows proper pump loading was found to reduce the operating costs of a sucker-rod-pumping installation significantly. Finally, a procedure is presented to calculate directly the pump volumetric efficiency and required volumetric pump displacement rate.

  20. System analysis for sucker rod pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Z.; Doty, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Pumping free gas in an oil well can significantly decrease the efficiency of a sucker rod pumping installation. Pump placement depth and the use of a down hole gas-liquid separator (gas anchor) found to be significant variables in improving the overall efficiency. A procedure is presented which shows when and by how much the use of a gas anchor improves the efficiency of a sucker rod pumping system. It was found that at lower pump intake pressures the gas anchor usually improves efficiency, while at higher pump intake pressures the use of a gas anchor will produce no positive effect. Also, it was found at elevating the pump to the highest position which still allows for proper pump loading can significantly reduce the operating costs for a sucker rod pumping installation. Finally, a procedure is presented for directly calculating pump volumetric efficiency as well as the required volumetric pump displacement rate.

  1. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-09-30

    A magnetic reed switch assembly is described for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electro-magnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  2. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1986-01-01

    A magnetic reed switch assembly for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electromagnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  3. Adhesion-driven buckling of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Changhong; Zheng, Meng; Bae, In-Tae; Zhou, Guangwen

    2010-05-01

    Buckling of a thin single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundle that is partially bound on another straight free-standing SWNT bundle is reported. The buckling of the SWNT bundle is purely due to the adhesion interaction between two SWNT bundles. The deformation curvature of the buckled SWNT bundle is experimentally measured by transmission electron microscopy, and is theoretically modeled by a continuum model based on nonlinear elastica theory. Our results reveal that the binding strength of the bundle interface and the bulk elastic modulus of the SWNT bundle can be associated by its buckling curvature. Our results show that the bulk elastic moduli of the tested SWNT bundles are significantly lower than the Young's modulus of individual SWNTs. The reported adhesion-driven nanotube buckling provides a potential new approach to quantify the elastic modulus and the binding strength of bundled nanotubes.

  4. Hypersonic viscous flow over large roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2011-06-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers, spontaneous absolute instability accompanying by sustained vortex shedding downstream of the roughness is likely to take place at subsonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for both a rectangular and a cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation from the top face of the roughness is observed, despite the presence of flow unsteadiness for the smaller post-shock Mach number case.

  5. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers, spontaneous absolute instability accompanying by sustained vortex shedding downstream of the roughness is likely to take place at subsonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for both a rectangular and a cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation from the top face of the roughness is observed, despite the presence of flow unsteadiness for the smaller post-shock Mach number case.

  6. Identifying Changes in Snowpack Surface Roughness Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassnacht, S. R.; Corrao, M. V.; Deems, J. S.; Stednick, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    The flow of air over a surface is influenced by its roughness. The surface of a snowpack is smooth relative to the underlying ground surface. The relative roughness of the snowpack surface changes directionally, spatially, and temporally, due to deposition, erosion, and melt. To examine these changes in snowpack surface roughness at the microtopographic scale for a Northern Colorado site, the surface was photographed using a darker-coloured roughness board that was inserted into the snowpack so that a black (board) versus white (snow) contrast existed along the entire length of the board. The board was 1-m long and was inserted 11 times at 10-cm intervals to create a 1-m by 1-m mesh. The orientation of the boards was rotated 90 degrees to provide finer resolution data in perpendicular directions. For the 1-m boards, the pixel resolution was approximately 0.4 mm. To measure the snow grain scale, a crystal card was photographed and yielded a pixel resolution of approximately 0.1 mm. Incorporating image processing issues such as image contrast and brightness, the digital images were translated into individual lines. These lines were used to compute semi- variograms in log-log space, from which the magnitude of semi-variance, the fractal dimensions, and the scale break were computed. The semi-variogram characteristics were used to illustrate directional, spatial, and temporal changes in snowpack surface roughness.

  7. Method for producing titanium aluminide weld rod

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Paul C.; Argetsinger, Edward R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing titanium aluminide weld rod comprising: attaching one end of a metal tube to a vacuum line; placing a means between said vacuum line and a junction of the metal tube to prevent powder from entering the vacuum line; inducing a vacuum within the tube; placing a mixture of titanium and aluminum powder in the tube and employing means to impact the powder in the tube to a filled tube; heating the tube in the vacuum at a temperature sufficient to initiate a high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction between the titanium and aluminum; and lowering the temperature to ambient temperature to obtain a intermetallic titanium aluminide alloy weld rod.

  8. Pattern selection dynamics in rod eutectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serefoglu, Melis

    The cooperative or diffusively coupled growth of multiple phases during solidification is one of the most widely observed and generally important classes of phase transformations in materials. Technologically, low melting temperature and small freezing range contribute to excellent casting fluidity and fine composite structures give rise to favorable properties. Both of these features contribute to the wide application of eutectic alloys in the casting, welding, and soldering of engineered components. Despite the broad-based technological importance, many fundamental questions regarding eutectic solidification remain unanswered, severely limiting our ability to employ computational methods in the prediction of microstructure for the effective design of new materials and processes. At the core of the most persistent questions, lie problems involving multicomponent thermodynamics, solid-liquid and solid-solid interfacial phenomena, morphological stability, chemical and thermal diffusion, and nucleation phenomena. In the current study, pattern selection dynamics in rod eutectics are investigated using systematic directional solidification experiments and phase field simulations. Directional solidification of a succinonitrile-camphor (SCN-DC) transparent alloy in thin slab geometries of various thicknesses reveals two main points. First, a velocity is indentified at which a transition in array basis vectors is observed in specimens with many rows of rods (i.e. bulk). This transition amounts to a 90 degree rotation of the rod array, shifting from alignment of 1st nearest neighbors to alignment of 2nd nearest neighbors along the slide wall. Second, significant array distortion is observed with decreasing slide thickness, delta, which ultimately leads to a single-row (quasi-3D) morphology where delta/lambda is on the order of unity. In our analysis of these observations, we use a geometrical model to describe the rod arrangement as a function of slide thickness, providing

  9. Chemical Dosimeter Tube With Coaxial Sensing Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E.

    1993-01-01

    Improved length-of-stain (LOS) chemical dosimeter indicates total dose of chemical vapor in air. Made with rods and tubes of various diameters to obtain various sensitivities and dynamic ranges. Sensitivity larger and dose range smaller when more room for diffusion in gap between tube and rod. Offers greater resistance to changing of color of exposed dye back to color of unexposed condition, greater sensitivity, and higher degree of repeatability. Developed to measure doses of gaseous HCI, dosimeter modified by use of other dyes to indicate doses of other chemical vapors.

  10. Control rod drive for reactor shutdown

    DOEpatents

    McKeehan, Ernest R.; Shawver, Bruce M.; Schiro, Donald J.; Taft, William E.

    1976-01-20

    A means for rapidly shutting down or scramming a nuclear reactor, such as a liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactor, and serves as a backup to the primary shutdown system. The control rod drive consists basically of an in-core assembly, a drive shaft and seal assembly, and a control drive mechanism. The control rod is driven into the core region of the reactor by gravity and hydraulic pressure forces supplied by the reactor coolant, thus assuring that common mode failures will not interfere with or prohibit scramming the reactor when necessary.

  11. Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-09-17

    A reusable system is described for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support member. A locking cap is secured to the fuel rod and a locking strip is fastened to the support member. The locking cap has two opposing fingers shaped to form a socket having a body portion. The locking strip has an extension shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion. The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip causing the extension to temporarily deflect open the fingers to engage the socket's body portion. For removal, the process is reversed.

  12. Energy distributions in rods and beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlever, J. C.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    A hypothesis proposed by Nefske and Sung (1987) that the mechanical energy flow in acoustic/structural systems can be modeled using a thermal energy flow analogy was tested for both longitudinal vibration in rods and transverse flexural vibrations in beams. It was found that the rod behaves according to the energy flow analogy. However, the beam solutions behaved significantly differently than predicted by the thermal analogy, unless spatially averaged energy and power flow were considered. Otherwise, the beam analysis is restricted to frequencies where the near-field terms in the displacement solution are negligible over most of the beam.

  13. HIGH STRENGTH CONTROL RODS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Cohen, I.

    1961-07-11

    Nuclear reactor control rods comprised of highly compressed and sintered finely divided metal alloy panticles and fine metal oxide panticles substantially uniformly distributed theretbrough are described. The metal alloy consists essentially of silver, indium, cadmium, tin, and aluminum, the amount of each being present in centain percentages by weight. The oxide particles are metal oxides of the metal alloy composition, the amount of oxygen being present in certain percentages by weight and all the oxygen present being substantially in the form of metal oxide. This control rod is characterized by its high strength and resistance to creep at elevated temperatures.

  14. Cilia-Like Beating of Active Microtubule Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Timothy; Welch, David; Nicastro, Daniela; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism that drives the regular beating of individual cilia and flagella, as well as dense ciliary fields, remains unclear. We describe a minimal model system, composed of microtubules and molecular motors, which self-assemble into active bundles exhibiting beating patterns reminiscent of those found in eukaryotic cilia and flagella. These observations suggest that hundreds of molecular motors, acting within an elastic microtubule bundle, spontaneously synchronize their activity to generate large-scale oscillations. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that densely packed, actively bending bundles spontaneously synchronize their beating patterns to produce collective behavior similar to metachronal waves observed in ciliary fields. The simple in vitro system described here could provide insights into beating of isolated eukaryotic cilia and flagella, as well as their synchronization in dense ciliary fields. PMID:21778400

  15. DTI Image Registration under Probabilistic Fiber Bundles Tractography Learning

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Tao; Fan, Yangyu; Zhang, Xiuwei

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) image registration is an essential step for diffusion tensor image analysis. Most of the fiber bundle based registration algorithms use deterministic fiber tracking technique to get the white matter fiber bundles, which will be affected by the noise and volume. In order to overcome the above problem, we proposed a Diffusion Tensor Imaging image registration method under probabilistic fiber bundles tractography learning. Probabilistic tractography technique can more reasonably trace to the structure of the nerve fibers. The residual error estimation step in active sample selection learning is improved by modifying the residual error model using finite sample set. The calculated deformation field is then registered on the DTI images. The results of our proposed registration method are compared with 6 state-of-the-art DTI image registration methods under visualization and 3 quantitative evaluation standards. The experimental results show that our proposed method has a good comprehensive performance. PMID:27774455

  16. Stable parabolic Higgs bundles as asymptotically stable decorated swamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Nikolai

    2016-06-01

    Parabolic Higgs bundles can be described in terms of decorated swamps, which we studied in a recent paper. This description induces a notion of stability of parabolic Higgs bundles depending on a parameter, and we construct their moduli space inside the moduli space of decorated swamps. We then introduce asymptotic stability of decorated swamps in order to study the behaviour of the stability condition as one parameter approaches infinity. The main result is the existence of a constant, such that stability with respect to parameters greater than this constant is equivalent to asymptotic stability. This implies boundedness of all decorated swamps which are semistable with respect to some parameter. Finally, we recover the usual stability condition of parabolic Higgs bundles as asymptotic stability.

  17. A class of Poisson Nijenhuis structures on a tangent bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarlet, W.; Vermeire, F.

    2004-06-01

    Equipping the tangent bundle TQ of a manifold with a symplectic form coming from a regular Lagrangian L, we explore how to obtain a Poisson-Nijenhuis structure from a given type (1, 1) tensor field J on Q. It is argued that the complete lift Jc of J is not the natural candidate for a Nijenhuis tensor on TQ, but plays a crucial role in the construction of a different tensor R, which appears to be the pullback under the Legendre transform of the lift of J to T*Q. We show how this tangent bundle view brings new insights and is capable also of producing all important results which are known from previous studies on the cotangent bundle, in the case when Q is equipped with a Riemannian metric. The present approach further paves the way for future generalizations.

  18. Betti numbers of graded modules and cohomology of vector bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenbud, David; Schreyer, Frank-Olaf

    2009-07-01

    In the remarkable paper Graded Betti numbers of Cohen-Macaulay modules and the multiplicity conjecture, Mats Boij and Jonas Soederberg conjectured that the Betti table of a Cohen-Macaulay module over a polynomial ring is a positive linear combination of Betti tables of modules with pure resolutions. We prove a strengthened form of their conjectures. Applications include a proof of the Multiplicity Conjecture of Huneke and Srinivasan and a proof of the convexity of a fan naturally associated to the Young lattice. With the same tools we show that the cohomology table of any vector bundle on projective space is a positive rational linear combination of the cohomology tables of what we call supernatural vector bundles. Using this result we give new bounds on the slope of a vector bundle in terms of its cohomology.

  19. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials. PMID:26821214

  20. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles.

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander M; Weig, Cornelius; Oswald, Peter; Frey, Erwin; Fischer, Peer; Liedl, Tim

    2016-02-10

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials.

  1. System for supporting bundled tube segments within a combustor

    DOEpatents

    Melton, Patrick Benedict

    2016-03-01

    A system for supporting bundled tube segments within a combustor includes an annular sleeve that extends circumferentially and axially within the combustor, a support lug that extends radially inward from the annular sleeve and an annular support frame that is disposed within the annular sleeve. The annular support frame includes an inner ring portion, an outer ring portion and a plurality of spokes that extend radially between the inner and outer ring portions. The inner ring portion, the outer ring portion and the plurality of spokes define an annular array of openings for receiving a respective bundled tube segment. The inner ring portion is connected to each bundled tube segment and the outer ring portion is coupled to the support lug.

  2. Intraoperative pulmonary embolism of Harrington rod during spinal surgery: the potential dangers of rod cutting.

    PubMed

    Aylott, Caspar E W; Hassan, Kamran; McNally, Donal; Webb, John K

    2006-12-01

    This is a case report and laboratory-based biomechanics study. The objective is to report the first case of Titanium rod embolisation during scoliosis surgery into the Pulmonary artery. To investigate the potential of an unconstrained cut Titanium rod fragment to cause wounding with reference to recognised weapons. Embolisation of a foreign body to the heart is rare. Bullet embolisation to the heart and lungs is infrequently reported in the last 80 years. Iatrogenic cases of foreign body embolisation are very rare. Fifty 1-2 cm segments of Titanium rod were cut in an unconstrained manner and a novel method was used to calculate velocity. A high-speed camera (6,000 frames/s) was used to further measure velocity and study projectile motion. The wounding potential was investigated using lambs liver, high-speed photography and local dissection. Rod velocities were measured in excess of 23 m s(-1). Rods were seen to tumble end-over-end with a maximum speed of 560 revolutions/s. The maximum kinetic energy was 0.61 J which is approximately 2% that of a crossbow. This is sufficient to cause significant liver damage. The degree of surface damage and internal disruption was influenced by the orientation of the rod fragment at impact. An unconstrained cut segment of a Titanium rod has a significant potential to wound. Precautions should be taken to avoid this potentially disastrous but preventable complication.

  3. Method and means of packaging nuclear fuel rods for handling

    DOEpatents

    Adam, Milton F.

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear fuel rods, especially spent nuclear fuel rods that may show physical distortion, are encased within a metallic enclosing structure by forming a tube about the fuel rod. The tube has previously been rolled to form an overlapping tubular structure and then unrolled and coiled about an axis perpendicular to the tube. The fuel rod is inserted into the tube as the rolled tube is removed from a coiled strip and allowed to reassume its tubular shape about the fuel rod. Rollers support the coiled strip in an open position as the coiled strip is uncoiled and allowed to roll about the fuel rod.

  4. Discrete Roughness Transition for Hypersonic Flight Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of discrete roughness and the correlations developed to predict the onset of boundary layer transition on hypersonic flight vehicles are discussed. The paper is organized by hypersonic vehicle applications characterized in a general sense by the boundary layer: slender with hypersonic conditions at the edge of the boundary layer, moderately blunt with supersonic, and blunt with subsonic. This paper is intended to be a review of recent discrete roughness transition work completed at NASA Langley Research Center in support of agency flight test programs. First, a review is provided of discrete roughness wind tunnel data and the resulting correlations that were developed. Then, results obtained from flight vehicles, in particular the recently flown Hyper-X and Shuttle missions, are discussed and compared to the ground-based correlations.

  5. Wetting on rough self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasantzas, George

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we present a general investigation of the effective potential for complete wetting on self-affine rough surfaces. The roughness effect is investigated by means of the height-height correlation model in Fourier space ~(1+aξ2q2)-1-H. The parameters H and ξ are, respectively, the roughness exponent and the substrate in-plane correlation length. It is observed that the effect of H on the free interface profile is significant for ξ>ξ) regime is characterized by a power-law scaling ~Y-2.

  6. Thermally activated breakdown in the fiber-bundle model

    PubMed

    Roux

    2000-11-01

    Guarino et al., (cond-Mat/9908329) have recently introduced a fiber bundle model where fiber fracture can be thermally activated. Under a fixed (subcritical) loading, the mean failure time of the bundle is studied. An analytical expression for the latter is obtained as a function of the load. The effect of a (narrow) quenched disorder in the fracture stress of the fibers with a Gaussian distribution is shown to lead to an effective temperature simply translated with respect to the actual one. Finally, some "critical" properties of fracture precursors which have been proposed are investigated within the present model. PMID:11101947

  7. Phase Transition to Bundles of Flexible Supramolecular Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, B. A. H.; Bolhuis, P. G.; Fasolino, A.

    2008-05-01

    We report Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly of supramolecular polymers based on a model of patchy particles. We find a first-order phase transition, characterized by hysteresis and nucleation, toward a solid bundle of polymers, of length much greater than the average gas phase length. We argue that the bundling transition is the supramolecular equivalent of the sublimation transition, which results from a weak chain-chain interaction. We provide a qualitative equation of state that gives physical insight beyond the specific values of the parameters used in our simulations.

  8. One-sided ejaculation of echidna sperm bundles.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S D; Smith, B; Pyne, M; Stenzel, D; Holt, W V

    2007-12-01

    We report for the first time an unusual ejaculatory mechanism in the short-beaked echidna in which each side of the bilaterally symmetrical, rosettelike glans penis is used alternately, with the other being shut down. This is unparalleled in mammals but is reminiscent of the use of hemipenes in squamate reptiles, providing further reproductive evidence of a sauropsidian lineage in the Monotremata. Further, we describe the occurrence of motile sperm bundles in ejaculated echidna semen and provide scanning electron micrographs of their morphology. Sperm bundling appears to confer increased sperm motility, which may provide the potential for sperm competition between males. PMID:18171162

  9. On a Lie Algebraic Characterization of Vector Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecomte, Pierre B. A.; Leuther, Thomas; Zihindula Mushengezi, Elie

    2012-01-01

    We prove that a vector bundle π: E→M is characterized by the Lie algebra generated by all differential operators on E which are eigenvectors of the Lie derivative in the direction of the Euler vector field. Our result is of Pursell-Shanks type but it is remarkable in the sense that it is the whole fibration that is characterized here. The proof relies on a theorem of [Lecomte P., J. Math. Pures Appl. (9) 60 (1981), 229-239] and inherits the same hypotheses. In particular, our characterization holds only for vector bundles of rank greater than 1.

  10. Experimental investigations on decay heat removal in advanced nuclear reactors using single heater rod test facility: Air alone in the annular gap

    SciTech Connect

    Bopche, Santosh B.; Sridharan, Arunkumar

    2010-11-15

    During a loss of coolant accident in nuclear reactors, radiation heat transfer accounts for a significant amount of the total heat transfer in the fuel bundle. In case of heavy water moderator nuclear reactors, the decay heat of a fuel bundle enclosed in the pressure tube and outer concentric calandria tube can be transferred to the moderator. Radiation heat transfer plays a significant role in removal of decay heat from the fuel rods to the moderator, which is available outside the calandria tube. A single heater rod test facility is designed and fabricated as a part of preliminary investigations. The objective is to anticipate the capability of moderator to remove decay heat, from the reactor core, generated after shut down. The present paper focuses mainly on the role of moderator in removal of decay heat, for situation with air alone in the annular gap of pressure tube and calandria tube. It is seen that the naturally aspirated air is capable of removing the heat generated in the system compared to the standstill air or stagnant water situations. It is also seen that the flowing moderator is capable of removing a greater fraction of heat generated by the heater rod compared to a stagnant pool of boiling moderator. (author)

  11. Evaluation of Dry, Rough Vacuum Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This document provides information on the testing and evaluation of thirteen dry rough vacuum pumps of various designs and from various manufacturers. Several types of rough vacuum pumps were evaluated, including scroll, roots, and diaphragm pumps. Tests included long term testing, speed curve generation, voltage variance, vibrations emissions and susceptibility, electromagnetic interference emissions and susceptibility, static leak rate, exhaust restriction, response/recovery time tests, and a contamination analysis for scroll pumps. Parameters were found for operation with helium, which often is not provided from the manufacturer

  12. Surface roughness evolution of nanocomposite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Turkin, A. A.; Pei, Y. T.; Shaha, K. P.; Chen, C. Q.; Vainshtein, D. I.; Hosson, J. Th. M. de

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of dynamic roughening and smoothening mechanisms of thin films grown with pulsed-dc magnetron sputtering is presented. The roughness evolution has been described by a linear stochastic equation, which contains the second- and fourth-order gradient terms. Dynamic smoothening of the growing interface is explained by ballistic effects resulting from impingements of ions to the growing thin film. These ballistic effects are sensitive to the flux and energy of impinging ions. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental data, and it is concluded that the thin film roughness can be further controlled by adjusting waveform, frequency, and width of dc pulses.

  13. ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C.

    2012-03-28

    Surface roughness values for the areas surrounding the H, D and N-Area meteorological towers were computed from archived 2010 meteorological data. These 15-minute-averaged data were measured with cup anemometers and bidirectional wind vanes (bivanes) 61 m above the surface. The results of the roughness calculation using the standard deviation of elevation angle {sigma}{sub E}, and applying the simple formula based on tree canopy height, gave consistent estimates for roughness around the H-Area tower in the range of 1.76 to 1.86 m (95% confidence interval) with a mean value of 1.81 m. Application of the {sigma}{sub E} method for the 61-m level at D and N-Areas gave mean values of 1.71 and 1.81 with confidence ranges of 1.62-1.81 and 1.73-1.88 meters, respectively. Roughness results are azimuth dependent, and thus are presented as averages over compass sectors spanning 22.5 degrees. Calculated values were compared to other methods of determining roughness, including the standard deviation of the azimuth direction, {sigma}{sub A}, and standard deviation of the wind speed, {sigma}{sub U}. Additional data was obtained from a sonic anemometer at 61-m on the H-Area tower during a period of a few weeks in 2010. Results from the sonic anemometer support our use of {sigma}{sub E} to calculate roughness. Based on the H-Area tower results, a surface roughness of 1.8 m using is recommended for use in dispersion modeling applications that consider the impacts of a contaminant release to individuals along the Site boundary. The canopy surrounding the H-Area tower is relatively uniform (i.e., little variance in roughness by upwind direction), and data supplied by the U.S. Forest Service at Savannah River show that the canopy height and composition surrounding the H-Area tower is reasonably representative of forested areas throughout the SRS reservation. For dispersion modeling analyses requiring assessments of a co-located worker within the respective operations area, recommended

  14. Surface roughness effects in elastohydrodynamic contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, J. H.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    Surface roughness effects in full-film EHL contacts were studied. A flow factor modification to the Reynolds equation was applied to piezoviscous-elastic line contacts. Results for ensemble-averaged film shape, pressure distribution, and other mechanical quantities were obtained. Asperities elongated in the flow direction by a factor exceeding two decreased both film shape and pressure extrema at constant load; isotropic or transverse asperities increased these extrema. The largest effects are displayed by traction, which increased by over 5% for isotropic or transverse asperities and by slightly less for longitudinal roughness.

  15. Laws of Flow in Rough Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikuradse, J

    1950-01-01

    An experimental investigation is made of the turbulent flow of water in pipes with various degrees of relative roughness. The pipes range in size from 25 to 100 millimeters in diameter and from 1800 to 7050 millimeters in length. Flow velocities permitted Reynolds numbers from about 10 (sup. 4) to 10 (sup. 6). The laws of resistance and velocity distributions were obtained as a function of relative roughness and Reynolds number. Mixing length, as described by Prandtl's mixing-length formula, is discussed in relation to the experimental results.

  16. Venus surface roughness and Magellan stereo data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurice, Kelly E.; Leberl, Franz W.; Norikane, L.; Hensley, Scott

    1994-01-01

    Presented are results of some studies to develop tools useful for the analysis of Venus surface shape and its roughness. Actual work was focused on Maxwell Montes. The analyses employ data acquired by means of NASA's Magellan satellite. The work is primarily concerned with deriving measurements of the Venusian surface using Magellan stereo SAR. Roughness was considered by means of a theoretical analyses based on digital elevation models (DEM's), on single Magellan radar images combined with radiometer data, and on the use of multiple overlapping Magellan radar images from cycles 1, 2, and 3, again combined with collateral radiometer data.

  17. Fused silica fine grinding with low roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lei; Gu, Yongqiang; Wu, Di

    2014-08-01

    Lithography-optics is one of the most complex optical systems. The fine grinding process is the most important step before polishing. Roughness and sub-surface damage (SSD) are essential outputs of fine grinding. We demonstrate the method that use fix abrasive cup tool with CNC grinding machine to complete the fine grinding process, even instead of lapping process. And experiment sample roughness can reach 23.40nm rms and Ra 18.554nm. The SSD estimate is about 2 μm which is also smaller than commercial lapping process. The fine grinding output can satisfy the lithography optic fabrication demands and efficiently reduce the polishing time.

  18. Roughness Perception of Haptically Displayed Fractal Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Michael A.; Cutkosky, Mark R.; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Surface profiles were generated by a fractal algorithm and haptically rendered on a force feedback joystick, Subjects were asked to use the joystick to explore pairs of surfaces and report to the experimenter which of the surfaces they felt was rougher. Surfaces were characterized by their root mean square (RMS) amplitude and their fractal dimension. The most important factor affecting the perceived roughness of the fractal surfaces was the RMS amplitude of the surface. When comparing surfaces of fractal dimension 1.2-1.35 it was found that the fractal dimension was negatively correlated with perceived roughness.

  19. Tritium Pumps for ITER Roughing System

    SciTech Connect

    Antipenkov, Alexander; Day, Christian; Mack, August; Wagner, Robert; Laesser, Rainer

    2005-07-15

    The ITER roughing system provides for both the initial pump-down of the vessel itself and the regular pump-out of the batch-regenerating cryopumps. This system must have a large pumping speed and cope with the radioactive gas tritium at the same time. The present paper shall highlight the results of the ITER roughing train optimization, discuss the modification of a Roots pump for tritium, and present the results of a ferrofluidic seal test and the first tests of a tailor-made tritium-proof Roots pump with inactive gases.

  20. Modeling and simulation performance of sucker rod beam pump

    SciTech Connect

    Aditsania, Annisa; Rahmawati, Silvy Dewi Sukarno, Pudjo; Soewono, Edy

    2015-09-30

    Artificial lift is a mechanism to lift hydrocarbon, generally petroleum, from a well to surface. This is used in the case that the natural pressure from the reservoir has significantly decreased. Sucker rod beam pumping is a method of artificial lift. Sucker rod beam pump is modeled in this research as a function of geometry of the surface part, the size of sucker rod string, and fluid properties. Besides its length, sucker rod string also classified into tapered and un-tapered. At the beginning of this research, for easy modeling, the sucker rod string was assumed as un-tapered. The assumption proved non-realistic to use. Therefore, the tapered sucker rod string modeling needs building. The numerical solution of this sucker rod beam pump model is computed using finite difference method. The numerical result shows that the peak of polished rod load for sucker rod beam pump unit C-456-D-256-120, for non-tapered sucker rod string is 38504.2 lb, while for tapered rod string is 25723.3 lb. For that reason, to avoid the sucker rod string breaks due to the overload, the use of tapered sucker rod beam string is suggested in this research.