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Sample records for roundup tolerant fodder

  1. Nutrient digestibility in sheep fed diets containing Roundup Ready or conventional fodder beet, sugar beet, and beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Hartnell, G F; Hvelplund, T; Weisbjerg, M R

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this digestibility assessment was to determine whether there are significant differences in the digestibility of Roundup Ready (glyphosate-tolerant) and conventional sugar beet, fodder beet, and beet pulp produced from sugar beet varieties when fed to sheep (seven wethers per treatment group). Three experiments were conducted in this assessment. Experiment 1 (35 wethers) compared one glyphosate-tolerant fodder beet variety with four conventional varieties, Exp. 2 (42 wethers) compared one glyphosate-tolerant sugar beet variety with five conventional varieties, and Exp. 3 (42 wethers) compared beet pulp derived from glyphosate-tolerant sugar beet with beet pulp from five European locations. The experimental phase consisted of a 2-wk preliminary period followed by a 1-wk collection period for Exp. 1 and 2, and a 1-wk preliminary period followed by a 1-wk digestibility collection period for Exp. 3. Diets were comprised of grass hay at 30, 30, and 20% of DM for Exp. 1, 2, and 3, respectively, with the balance being beet components. Urea and sodium sulfate were supplemented (8 and 2.9 g, respectively, for Exp. 1 and 2; and 6 g and 2.16 g, respectively, for Exp. 3) to supply sufficient dietary N and S. Each diet was fed to sheep (96 +/- 0.9 kg) in the three experiments to at or near maintenance energy levels. Treatment differences were considered significant at P < 0.05. Apparent digestibilities of DM, OM, CP, NDF, ADF, and DE for glyphosate-tolerant fodder and sugar beets did not differ from those for commercial fodder and sugar beets in Exp. 1 and 2. There were differences (P < 0.05) in DM, OM, CP, NDF, ADF, and DE digestibilities influenced by the different varieties of beet pulp in Exp. 3, but these were not unique to just the Roundup Ready sugar beet variety. Digestibilities and feeding values of Roundup Ready fodder beet, sugar beet, and beet pulp produced from Roundup Ready sugar beet varieties were not influenced by the introduction of the

  2. Long term toxicity of a Roundup herbicide and a Roundup-tolerant genetically modified maize.

    PubMed

    Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Clair, Emilie; Mesnage, Robin; Gress, Steeve; Defarge, Nicolas; Malatesta, Manuela; Hennequin, Didier; de Vendômois, Joël Spiroux

    2012-11-01

    The health effects of a Roundup-tolerant genetically modified maize (from 11% in the diet), cultivated with or without Roundup, and Roundup alone (from 0.1 ppb in water), were studied 2 years in rats. In females, all treated groups died 2-3 times more than controls, and more rapidly. This difference was visible in 3 male groups fed GMOs. All results were hormone and sex dependent, and the pathological profiles were comparable. Females developed large mammary tumors almost always more often than and before controls, the pituitary was the second most disabled organ; the sex hormonal balance was modified by GMO and Roundup treatments. In treated males, liver congestions and necrosis were 2.5-5.5 times higher. This pathology was confirmed by optic and transmission electron microscopy. Marked and severe kidney nephropathies were also generally 1.3-2.3 greater. Males presented 4 times more large palpable tumors than controls which occurred up to 600 days earlier. Biochemistry data confirmed very significant kidney chronic deficiencies; for all treatments and both sexes, 76% of the altered parameters were kidney related. These results can be explained by the non linear endocrine-disrupting effects of Roundup, but also by the overexpression of the transgene in the GMO and its metabolic consequences.

  3. Republished study: long-term toxicity of a Roundup herbicide and a Roundup-tolerant genetically modified maize.

    PubMed

    Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Clair, Emilie; Mesnage, Robin; Gress, Steeve; Defarge, Nicolas; Malatesta, Manuela; Hennequin, Didier; de Vendômois, Joël Spiroux

    2014-01-01

    The health effects of a Roundup-tolerant NK603 genetically modified (GM) maize (from 11% in the diet), cultivated with or without Roundup application and Roundup alone (from 0.1 ppb of the full pesticide containing glyphosate and adjuvants) in drinking water, were evaluated for 2 years in rats. This study constitutes a follow-up investigation of a 90-day feeding study conducted by Monsanto in order to obtain commercial release of this GMO, employing the same rat strain and analyzing biochemical parameters on the same number of animals per group as our investigation. Our research represents the first chronic study on these substances, in which all observations including tumors are reported chronologically. Thus, it was not designed as a carcinogenicity study. We report the major findings with 34 organs observed and 56 parameters analyzed at 11 time points for most organs. Biochemical analyses confirmed very significant chronic kidney deficiencies, for all treatments and both sexes; 76% of the altered parameters were kidney-related. In treated males, liver congestions and necrosis were 2.5 to 5.5 times higher. Marked and severe nephropathies were also generally 1.3 to 2.3 times greater. In females, all treatment groups showed a two- to threefold increase in mortality, and deaths were earlier. This difference was also evident in three male groups fed with GM maize. All results were hormone- and sex-dependent, and the pathological profiles were comparable. Females developed large mammary tumors more frequently and before controls; the pituitary was the second most disabled organ; the sex hormonal balance was modified by consumption of GM maize and Roundup treatments. Males presented up to four times more large palpable tumors starting 600 days earlier than in the control group, in which only one tumor was noted. These results may be explained by not only the non-linear endocrine-disrupting effects of Roundup but also by the overexpression of the EPSPS transgene or

  4. Answers to critics: Why there is a long term toxicity due to a Roundup-tolerant genetically modified maize and to a Roundup herbicide.

    PubMed

    Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Mesnage, Robin; Defarge, Nicolas; Gress, Steeve; Hennequin, Didier; Clair, Emilie; Malatesta, Manuela; de Vendômois, Joël Spiroux

    2013-03-01

    Our recent work (Séralini et al., 2012) remains to date the most detailed study involving the life-long consumption of an agricultural genetically modified organism (GMO). This is true especially for NK603 maize for which only a 90-day test for commercial release was previously conducted using the same rat strain (Hammond et al., 2004). It is also the first long term detailed research on mammals exposed to a highly diluted pesticide in its total formulation with adjuvants. This may explain why 75% of our first criticisms arising within a week, among publishing authors, come from plant biologists, some developing patents on GMOs, even if it was a toxicological paper on mammals, and from Monsanto Company who owns both the NK603 GM maize and Roundup herbicide (R). Our study has limits like any one, and here we carefully answer to all criticisms from agencies, consultants and scientists, that were sent to the Editor or to ourselves. At this level, a full debate is biased if the toxicity tests on mammals of NK603 and R obtained by Monsanto Company remain confidential and thus unavailable in an electronic format for the whole scientific community to conduct independent scrutiny of the raw data. In our article, the conclusions of long-term NK603 and Roundup toxicities came from the statistically highly discriminant findings at the biochemical level in treated groups in comparison to controls, because these findings do correspond in an blinded analysis to the pathologies observed in organs, that were in turn linked to the deaths by anatomopathologists. GM NK603 and R cannot be regarded as safe to date. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. An integrated multi-omics analysis of the NK603 Roundup-tolerant GM maize reveals metabolism disturbances caused by the transformation process.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, Robin; Agapito-Tenfen, Sarah Z; Vilperte, Vinicius; Renney, George; Ward, Malcolm; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Nodari, Rubens O; Antoniou, Michael N

    2016-12-19

    Glyphosate tolerant genetically modified (GM) maize NK603 was assessed as 'substantially equivalent' to its isogenic counterpart by a nutrient composition analysis in order to be granted market approval. We have applied contemporary in depth molecular profiling methods of NK603 maize kernels (sprayed or unsprayed with Roundup) and the isogenic corn to reassess its substantial equivalence status. Proteome profiles of the maize kernels revealed alterations in the levels of enzymes of glycolysis and TCA cycle pathways, which were reflective of an imbalance in energy metabolism. Changes in proteins and metabolites of glutathione metabolism were indicative of increased oxidative stress. The most pronounced metabolome differences between NK603 and its isogenic counterpart consisted of an increase in polyamines including N-acetyl-cadaverine (2.9-fold), N-acetylputrescine (1.8-fold), putrescine (2.7-fold) and cadaverine (28-fold), which depending on context can be either protective or a cause of toxicity. Our molecular profiling results show that NK603 and its isogenic control are not substantially equivalent.

  6. An integrated multi-omics analysis of the NK603 Roundup-tolerant GM maize reveals metabolism disturbances caused by the transformation process

    PubMed Central

    Mesnage, Robin; Agapito-Tenfen, Sarah Z.; Vilperte, Vinicius; Renney, George; Ward, Malcolm; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Nodari, Rubens O.; Antoniou, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate tolerant genetically modified (GM) maize NK603 was assessed as ‘substantially equivalent’ to its isogenic counterpart by a nutrient composition analysis in order to be granted market approval. We have applied contemporary in depth molecular profiling methods of NK603 maize kernels (sprayed or unsprayed with Roundup) and the isogenic corn to reassess its substantial equivalence status. Proteome profiles of the maize kernels revealed alterations in the levels of enzymes of glycolysis and TCA cycle pathways, which were reflective of an imbalance in energy metabolism. Changes in proteins and metabolites of glutathione metabolism were indicative of increased oxidative stress. The most pronounced metabolome differences between NK603 and its isogenic counterpart consisted of an increase in polyamines including N-acetyl-cadaverine (2.9-fold), N-acetylputrescine (1.8-fold), putrescine (2.7-fold) and cadaverine (28-fold), which depending on context can be either protective or a cause of toxicity. Our molecular profiling results show that NK603 and its isogenic control are not substantially equivalent. PMID:27991589

  7. Effect of feeding glyphosate-tolerant (roundup-ready events GA21 or nk603) corn compared with reference hybrids on feedlot steer performance and carcass characteristics.

    PubMed

    Erickson, G E; Robbins, N D; Simon, J J; Berger, L L; Klopfenstein, T J; Stanisiewski, E P; Hartnell, G F

    2003-10-01

    Three experiments were conducted to compare the feeding value of genetically enhanced corn (Roundup Ready corn events GA21 and nk603) with nontransgenic hybrids. The four treatments included two separate reference hybrids (REF), the near-isogenic control hybrid (CON), and the genetically enhanced corn (RR), resulting in two preplanned comparisons of CON vs. RR and RR vs. the average of REF. In Exp. 1 (RR event GA21), 175 steers (BW = 427 kg) were fed in 25 pens with seven pens per corn hybrid, except CON, which contained four pens due to limited quantities of that hybrid. In Exp. 2 (RR event nk603), 196 steers (BW = 420 kg) were fed in 28 pens with seven pens per corn. In Exp. 3 (RR event nk603), 200 steers were fed in 20 pens, with a similar treatment design to Exp. 2 and five pens per corn. All experiments were conducted as completely randomized designs and utilized corn produced at University of Illinois (Exp. 1 and 2) and University of Nebraska (Exp. 3) research farms under identity-preserved protocols. In all experiments, DMI, ADG, and feed efficiency were similar (P > 0.30) between RR and REF. In Exp. 1 and Exp. 2, RR was not different (P > 0.25) than CON for growth performance. In Exp. 3, RR was not different from CON for ADG and DMI (P > 0.15) or for feed efficiency (P = 0.08). No differences were observed between RR and CON or RR and REF for carcass weight, longissimus dorsi area, and marbling scores in any of the experiments. Subtle differences were observed between RR and either CON or REF for fat depth in each experiment; however, cattle fed RR were not consistently greater and varied from either the CON or the REF (but not both contrasts) within an experiment. Based on these results, insertion of glyphosate-tolerant genes had no significant effect on nutritive quality of corn. Performance and carcass characteristics were not influenced, which suggests that Roundup Ready corn is similar to conventional, nontransgenic corn when fed to finishing feedlot

  8. Ethanol production from fodder beet

    SciTech Connect

    Kosaric, M.; Wieczorek, A.; Kliza, S.

    1983-07-01

    Various yeasts such as two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces diastaticus, and Kluyveromyces marxianus were investigated for their ability to ferment fodder beet juice to alcohol. Juice extracted from fodder beet roots without any additives was used as a fermentation substrate. The fermentation kinetic parameters were determined and compared for each species of yeast tested. The best species for fodder beet juice fermentation was chosen and products obtained by fermentation of one hectare of fodder beet plants are given. (Refs. 8).

  9. Herbicide (Roundup) pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Pushnoy, L A; Avnon, L S; Carel, R S

    1998-12-01

    A case of acute intoxication presented as toxic pneumonitis after exposure to Roundup (glyphosate) (Solaris Group, Monsanto; San Ramon, CA) herbicide in an agriculture worker. The correct etiologic factor causing this specific clinical picture was identified only 2 weeks later, after a thorough occupational history was taken and meticulous delineation of the working conditions and exposures of the involved worker were made. As a rule, occupational related diseases are not readily elucidated by nonoccupational physicians. However, most acute intoxication events are first encountered by such physicians. In these situations, rapid and comprehensive evaluation is necessary in order to clearly identify the causative agent(s) and to initiate the appropriate treatment. Consulting occupational physicians at this early stage may facilitate early and accurate diagnosis.

  10. Differential Effects of Glyphosate and Roundup on Human Placental Cells and Aromatase

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Sophie; Moslemi, Safa; Sipahutar, Herbert; Benachour, Nora; Seralini, Gilles-Eric

    2005-01-01

    Roundup is a glyphosate-based herbicide used worldwide, including on most genetically modified plants that have been designed to tolerate it. Its residues may thus enter the food chain, and glyphosate is found as a contaminant in rivers. Some agricultural workers using glyphosate have pregnancy problems, but its mechanism of action in mammals is questioned. Here we show that glyphosate is toxic to human placental JEG3 cells within 18 hr with concentrations lower than those found with agricultural use, and this effect increases with concentration and time or in the presence of Roundup adjuvants. Surprisingly, Roundup is always more toxic than its active ingredient. We tested the effects of glyphosate and Roundup at lower nontoxic concentrations on aromatase, the enzyme responsible for estrogen synthesis. The glyphosate-based herbicide disrupts aromatase activity and mRNA levels and interacts with the active site of the purified enzyme, but the effects of glyphosate are facilitated by the Roundup formulation in microsomes or in cell culture. We conclude that endocrine and toxic effects of Roundup, not just glyphosate, can be observed in mammals. We suggest that the presence of Roundup adjuvants enhances glyphosate bioavailability and/or bioaccumulation. PMID:15929894

  11. Differential effects of glyphosate and roundup on human placental cells and aromatase.

    PubMed

    Richard, Sophie; Moslemi, Safa; Sipahutar, Herbert; Benachour, Nora; Seralini, Gilles-Eric

    2005-06-01

    Roundup is a glyphosate-based herbicide used worldwide, including on most genetically modified plants that have been designed to tolerate it. Its residues may thus enter the food chain, and glyphosate is found as a contaminant in rivers. Some agricultural workers using glyphosate have pregnancy problems, but its mechanism of action in mammals is questioned. Here we show that glyphosate is toxic to human placental JEG3 cells within 18 hr with concentrations lower than those found with agricultural use, and this effect increases with concentration and time or in the presence of Roundup adjuvants. Surprisingly, Roundup is always more toxic than its active ingredient. We tested the effects of glyphosate and Roundup at lower nontoxic concentrations on aromatase, the enzyme responsible for estrogen synthesis. The glyphosate-based herbicide disrupts aromatase activity and mRNA levels and interacts with the active site of the purified enzyme, but the effects of glyphosate are facilitated by the Roundup formulation in microsomes or in cell culture. We conclude that endocrine and toxic effects of Roundup, not just glyphosate, can be observed in mammals. We suggest that the presence of Roundup adjuvants enhances glyphosate bioavailability and/or bioaccumulation.

  12. Reforming the Kindergarten Round-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Susan Sidney

    1999-01-01

    Many schools host kindergarten roundups to facilitate children's transition from home to formal education. Roundups should not assess school readiness, but could be a valuable tool to help teachers' meet students' diverse needs. Roundups should open up parent-teacher communications, check for correctable learning impairments, and share meaningful…

  13. Review of Roundup Ready Alfalfa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Roundup Ready (RR) alfalfa is the first forage species commercially released with a genetically modified trait. While not needed by all farmers who grow alfalfa, RR alfalfa may allow some farmers to more effectively establish alfalfa and control certain weed problems. Gene flow potential in alfalf...

  14. Hybrid sugarbeets - fuel from fodder

    SciTech Connect

    Yarris, L.

    1980-05-01

    Plant geneticists at Utah University are exploring the possibility of developing a hybrid sugarbeet especially bred for use in making alcohol fuel. They are aiming at increasing sugar quantity in the beet without having to worry about the quality factors that affect sugar crystallization. A cross between European fodder beets and U.S. sugarbeets which would be resistant to curly top virus disease is envisaged.

  15. Effect of roundup ultra on microbial activity and biomass from selected soils.

    PubMed

    Haney, R L; Senseman, S A; Hons, F M

    2002-01-01

    Herbicides applied to soils potentially affect soil microbial activity. The quantity and frequency of Roundup Ultra [RU; N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine; Monsanto, St. Louis, MO] applications have escalated with the advent of Roundup-tolerant crops. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of Roundup Ultra on soil microbial biomass and activity across a range of soils varying in fertility. The isoproplyamine salt of glyphosate was applied in the form of RU at a rate of 234 mg active ingredient kg(-1) soil based on an assumed 2-mm glyphosate-soil interaction depth. Roundup Ultra significantly stimulated soil microbial activity as measured by C and N mineralization, as well as soil microbial biomass. Cumulative C mineralization as well as mineralization rate increased above background levels for all soils tested with addition of RU. There were strong linear relationships between C and N mineralized, as well as between soil microbial C and N (r2 = 0.96 and 0.95, respectively). The slopes of the relationships with RU addition approximated three. Since the isopropylamine salt of glyphosate has a C to N ratio of 3:1, the data strongly suggest that RU was the direct cause of the enhanced microbial activity. An increase in the C mineralization rate occurred the first day following RU addition and continued for 14 d. Roundup Ultra appeared to be rapidly degraded by soil microbes regardless of soil type or organic matter content, even at high application rates, without adversely affecting microbial activity.

  16. Preschool Roundup: Costly Rodeo or Primary Prevention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asbed, Ruth Alice; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Assessment of the Montgomery County (Maryland) preschool health roundup indicated that this standardized screening program is cost-effective for early identification of preschool children who will need health and/or educational intervention to achieve their maximum potential. (MJB)

  17. Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intercom, 1970

    1970-01-01

    A brief review of the important resources, recent developments, and organizational activity in the field of world affairs, including arms control and disarmament; international organization and world order; aid, trade, and development; ethics and war. Many items mentioned are appropriate for use in the classroom. (Author/JB)

  18. Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intercom, 1971

    1971-01-01

    This consists of several topical selections: World Affairs. General; Arms Control and Disarmament; International Organizations; Regional Problems and how they relate to World Stability; Air, Trade and Development; and Ethics and War. Each section covers organizational activity and resources. (JB)

  19. Time- and dose-dependent effects of roundup on human embryonic and placental cells.

    PubMed

    Benachour, N; Sipahutar, H; Moslemi, S; Gasnier, C; Travert, C; Séralini, G E

    2007-07-01

    Roundup is the major herbicide used worldwide, in particular on genetically modified plants that have been designed to tolerate it. We have tested the toxicity and endocrine disruption potential of Roundup (Bioforce on human embryonic 293 and placental-derived JEG3 cells, but also on normal human placenta and equine testis. The cell lines have proven to be suitable to estimate hormonal activity and toxicity of pollutants. The median lethal dose (LD(50)) of Roundup with embryonic cells is 0.3% within 1 h in serum-free medium, and it decreases to reach 0.06% (containing among other compounds 1.27 mM glyphosate) after 72 h in the presence of serum. In these conditions, the embryonic cells appear to be 2-4 times more sensitive than the placental ones. In all instances, Roundup (generally used in agriculture at 1-2%, i.e., with 21-42 mM glyphosate) is more efficient than its active ingredient, glyphosate, suggesting a synergistic effect provoked by the adjuvants present in Roundup. We demonstrated that serum-free cultures, even on a short-term basis (1 h), reveal the xenobiotic impacts that are visible 1-2 days later in serum. We also document at lower non-overtly toxic doses, from 0.01% (with 210 microM glyphosate) in 24 h, that Roundup is an aromatase disruptor. The direct inhibition is temperature-dependent and is confirmed in different tissues and species (cell lines from placenta or embryonic kidney, equine testicular, or human fresh placental extracts). Furthermore, glyphosate acts directly as a partial inactivator on microsomal aromatase, independently of its acidity, and in a dose-dependent manner. The cytotoxic, and potentially endocrine-disrupting effects of Roundup are thus amplified with time. Taken together, these data suggest that Roundup exposure may affect human reproduction and fetal development in case of contamination. Chemical mixtures in formulations appear to be underestimated regarding their toxic or hormonal impact.

  20. Current methods for assessing safety of genetically modified crops as exemplified by data on Roundup Ready soybeans.

    PubMed

    Nair, Rashmi S; Fuchs, Roy L; Schuette, Sheila A

    2002-01-01

    Several laboratories have used recombinant DNA technology in plant breeding to improve compositional, processing, and agronomic characteristics of plants. These transformed plants have been extensively tested in field trials, have gained full regulatory approvals and are currently being marketed in a number of countries around the world. This paper briefly summarizes the approach used to assure the safety of foods and feeds derived from these genetically modified crops, as exemplified by data on Roundup Ready soybeans that has been developed by Monsanto Company using biotechnology in order to confer tolerance to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup herbicide, by the production of the CP4 enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase protein. The results of the studies demonstrate that Roundup Ready soybeans are as safe as traditional soybeans with respect to food and feed safety.

  1. Soybean meal from roundup ready or conventional soybeans in diets for growing-finishing swine.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, G L; Lindemann, M D; Randolph, J H; Parker, G R; Coffey, R D; Laurent, K M; Armstrong, C L; Mikel, W B; Stanisiewski, E P; Hartnell, G F

    2002-03-01

    Dehulled soybean meal prepared from genetically modified, herbicide (glyphosate)-tolerant Roundup Ready soybeans containing the CP4 EPSPS protein and near-isogenic conventional soybeans were assessed in an experiment with growing-finishing pigs. The soybeans were grown in the yr 2000 under similar agronomic conditions except that the Roundup Ready soybeans were sprayed with Roundup herbicide. Both were processed at the same plant. The composition of the two types of soybeans and the processed soybean meal were similar. Corn-soybean meal diets containing conventional or Roundup Ready soybean meal and fortified with minerals and vitamins were fed to 100 cross-bred pigs from 24 to 111 kg BW. Diets contained approximately 0.95% lysine initially and were reduced to 0.80 and 0.65% lysine when pigs reached 55 and 87 kg BW, respectively. There were 10 pens (five pens of barrows and five pens of gilts) per treatment with five pigs per pen. All pigs were scanned at 107 kg mean BW and all barrows were killed at the end of the test for carcass measurements and tissue collection. Rate and efficiency of weight gain, scanned backfat and longissimus area, and calculated carcass lean percentage were not different (P > 0.05) for pigs fed diets containing conventional or Roundup Ready soybean meal. Gilts gained slower, but they were more efficient and leaner (P < 0.05) than barrows. Responses to the type of soybean meal were similar for the two sexes with no evidence of a diet x sex interaction for any of the traits. In most instances, carcass traits of barrows were similar for the two types of soybean meal. Longissimus muscle samples from barrows fed conventional soybean meal tended (P = 0.06) to have less fat than those fed Roundup Ready soybean meal, but water, protein, and ash were similar. Sensory scores of cooked longissimus muscles were not influenced (P > 0.05) by diet. The results indicate that Roundup Ready soybean meal is essentially equivalent in composition and

  2. Fern rhizomes as fodder in Norway.

    PubMed

    Alm, Torbjørn

    2016-09-06

    Although ferns are often known under collective names in Norway, e.g. blom, a substantial number of vernacular names for individual fern species are known, in particular for useful or poisonous taxa. In the past, the rhizomes (Norwegian: moldfôr) of selected species were collected for fodder. Only scattered records of such use are available from southern Norway, and the tradition's core area is found in the two North Norwegian counties of Nordland and Troms, in accordance with the longer winters encountered in the north, frequently leading to fodder shortage in early spring. The tradition extends northeastwards into Finnmark, but is less well documented there. Although numerous sources mention the use of fern rhizomes for fodder, the fern species hiding behind the tradition are incompletely known. This paper aims at reviewing available data in terms of identifyng the species used for fodder, the history and geographical distribution of such use, and other relevant traditions, e.g. the timing and mode of collection, and the way the rhizomes were used. The study is based on data extracted from a variety of archival and literature sources; the latter retrived from my database of more than 7500 publications providing information on plant names and plant uses in Norway. More than 200 individual records mention the use of fern rhizomes for fodder in Norway. Only a fraction of these, typically made by botanist recording data on plant uses, provides information on the identity of the species used. Based on these, Dryopteris filix-mas and Matteuccia struthiopteris stand out as the most important species serving as sources of fern rhizomes for fodder. Locally, Dryopteris expansa was the preferred species, and this taxon may to some extent be overlooked in the records so far available. With a few exceptions, Norwegian folk tradition singles out Athyrium filix-femina as a harmful and poisonous species, causing livestock to go blind and lame, but whether this is true or not

  3. 34th Annual SWAT Round-Up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-15

    NASA Kennedy Space Center's Emergency Response Team competes in the 34th Annual SWAT Round-up International at the Lawson Lamar Firearms and Tactical Training Center in Orlando, Florida. The competition was held Nov. 15 to 18, and featured five different competition categories. Kennedy's ERT members exchanged best practices and competed with 60 teams from the U.S. and around the world.

  4. 34th Annual SWAT Round-Up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-15

    NASA Kennedy Space Center's Emergency Response Team members prepare to compete in the 34th Annual SWAT Round-up International at the Lawson Lamar Firearms and Tactical Training Center in Orlando, Florida. The competition was held Nov. 15 to 18, and featured five different competition categories. Kennedy's ERT members exchanged best practices and competed with 60 teams from the U.S. and around the world.

  5. 34th Annual SWAT Round-Up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-15

    A member of NASA Kennedy Space Center's Emergency Response Team competes in the 34th Annual SWAT Round-up International at the Lawson Lamar Firearms and Tactical Training Center in Orlando, Florida. The competition was held Nov. 15 to 18, and featured five different competition categories. Kennedy's ERT members exchanged best practices and competed with 60 teams from the U.S. and around the world.

  6. 34th Annual SWAT Round-Up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-15

    NASA Kennedy Space Center's Emergency Response Team members are timed as they exit a security vehicle during the 34th Annual SWAT Round-up International at the Lawson Lamar Firearms and Tactical Training Center in Orlando, Florida. The competition was held Nov. 15 to 18, and featured five different competition categories. Kennedy's ERT members exchanged best practices and competed with 60 teams from the U.S. and around the world.

  7. 34th Annual SWAT Round-Up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-15

    NASA Kennedy Space Center's Emergency Response Team members prepare compete in target shooting during the 34th Annual SWAT Round-up International at the Lawson Lamar Firearms and Tactical Training Center in Orlando, Florida. The competition was held Nov. 15 to 18, and featured five different competition categories. Kennedy's ERT members exchanged best practices and competed with 60 teams from the U.S. and around the world.

  8. 34th Annual SWAT Round-Up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-15

    NASA Kennedy Space Center's Emergency Response Team members compete in the 34th Annual SWAT Round-up International at the Lawson Lamar Firearms and Tactical Training Center in Orlando, Florida. The competition was held Nov. 15 to 18, and featured five different competition categories. Kennedy's ERT members exchanged best practices and competed with 60 teams from the U.S. and around the world.

  9. 34th Annual SWAT Round-Up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-15

    NASA Kennedy Space Center's Emergency Response Team members check their firearms before competing in the 34th Annual SWAT Round-up International at the Lawson Lamar Firearms and Tactical Training Center in Orlando, Florida. The competition was held Nov. 15 to 18, and featured five different competition categories. Kennedy's ERT members exchanged best practices and competed with 60 teams from the U.S. and around the world.

  10. 34th Annual SWAT Round-Up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-15

    NASA Kennedy Space Center's Emergency Response Team members scale a wall during the 34th Annual SWAT Round-up International at the Lawson Lamar Firearms and Tactical Training Center in Orlando, Florida. The competition was held Nov. 15 to 18, and featured five different competition categories. Kennedy's ERT members exchanged best practices and competed with 60 teams from the U.S. and around the world.

  11. 34th Annual SWAT Round-Up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-15

    The entrance to the Lawson Lamar Firearms and Tactical Training Center in Orlando, Florida. NASA Kennedy Space Center's Emergency Response Team members will compete in the 34th Annual SWAT Round-up International from Nov. 15 to 18. The event features five different competition categories. Kennedy's ERT members exchanged best practices and competed with 60 teams from the U.S. and around the world.

  12. 77 FR 27148 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Roundup, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Roundup...). SUMMARY: This action proposes to establish Class E airspace at Roundup Airport, Roundup, MT. Controlled... (GPS) standard instrument approach procedures at Roundup Airport. The FAA is proposing this action to...

  13. 40 CFR 180.646 - Ipconazole; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances..., undelinted seed 0.01 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice 0.01 Grain, cereal...

  14. Reproductive toxicity of Roundup herbicide exposure in male albino rat.

    PubMed

    Owagboriaye, Folarin O; Dedeke, Gabriel A; Ademolu, Kehinde O; Olujimi, Olarenwaju O; Ashidi, Joseph S; Adeyinka, Aladesida A

    2017-09-05

    The incidence of infertility in human is on the increase and the use of Roundup herbicide and presence of its residues in foodstuff is a major concern. This study therefore aim to assess the effect of Roundup on the reproductive capacity of 32 adult male albino rats randomized into 4 groups of 8 rats per group orally exposed to Roundup at 3.6mg/kg body weight(bw), 50.4mg/kgbw and 248.4mg/kgbw of glyphosate concentrations for 12 weeks while the control group was given distilled water. Serum level of reproductive hormone (testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and prolactin), oxidative stress indices in the testicular tissue, epididymal sperm morphology assessment and testicular histopathology of the rats were used as a diagnostic marker of reproductive dysfunction. Significant (p<0.05) alterations in the level of all the reproductive hormones and oxidative stress markers assayed were observed in rats exposed to Roundup. Significant reductions (p<0.05) in sperm count, percentage motility and significant (p<0.05) increased in abnormal sperm cells were observed in the exposed rats. Histopathologically, severe degenerative testicular architectural lesions were seen in the Roundup exposed rats. Roundup may interfere with spermatogenesis and impair fertility in male gonad. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of broiler performance when fed diets containing grain from roundup ready (NK603), yieldgard x roundup ready (MON810 x NK603), non-transgenic control, or commercial corn.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M L; Hartnell, G F; Riordan, S G; Nemeth, M A; Karunanandaa, K; George, B; Astwood, J D

    2003-03-01

    Two 42-d experiments compared the nutritional value of the glyphosate-tolerant corn event NK603 (Roundup Ready corn) (experiment 1) and the combined traits, insect-protected corn event MON 810 (YieldGard com) x glyphosate-tolerant corn event NK603 (experiment 2) to their respective non-transgenic controls and to commercial reference corn, when fed to growing broilers. For each experiment, a randomized complete block design was used with eight dietary treatments in each of five replicated blocks of pens (eight pens for males and eight pens for females per block). Final live weights and feed conversion were not different (P > 0.05) across all treatments in both experiments. In experiment 1, broilers fed diets containing Roundup Ready corn had similar feed conversion adjusted for mortalities to those fed the non-transgenic control and one of the commercial corn diets. Chill weights and thigh, drum, and wing weights were not affected by diets. Differences (P < 0.05) were noted for breast meat and fat pad weights across treatments. In experiment 2, the adjusted feed conversion and carcass parameters were not affected by diets. Differences (P < 0.05) were noted only for protein content of breast meat. Differences observed in both experiments were consistent with natural variability. Broilers in general performed consistently and had similar carcass yields and meat compositions when fed diets containing Roundup Ready corn or YieldGard x Roundup Ready corn as compared with their respective non-transgenic control and commercial diets supporting similar feeding values among diets.

  16. Preparation of fodder dicalcium phosphate from phosphorous-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Teplov, Y.A.; Dmitrevskii, B.A.; Maksimenko, N.F.; Olifson, A.L.; Yarosh, E.B.

    1985-02-01

    Fodder dicalcium phosphate is produced in chemical plants by neutralization of electrothermal phosphoric acid with chalk, or by high-temperature defluorination of a mixture of phosphate raw material with phosphoric acid. The deficiencies of the first technology include the scarcity and high cost of phosphoric acid, and the disadvantages of the second include the high expenditure of energy and low concentration of useful substance in the product. This paper reports on studies which demonstrate the possibility of preparing fodder dicalcium phosphate from different types of phosphate raw material which is not inferior in quality to the product produced from expensive and scarce electrothermal phosphoric acid.

  17. Effects of glyphosate and the glyphosate based herbicides Roundup Original(®) and Roundup Transorb(®) on respiratory morphophysiology of bullfrog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Rissoli, Rafael Zanelli; Abdalla, Fabio Camargo; Costa, Monica Jones; Rantin, Francisco Tadeu; McKenzie, David John; Kalinin, Ana Lucia

    2016-08-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are widely used in agriculture and are commonly found in water bodies. Roundup Original(®) (RO) contains an isopropylamine glyphosate (GLY) salt containing the surfactant POEA, while Roundup Transorb R(®) (RTR) contains a potassium salt of GLY with unknown surfactants. Both contain different compositions of so-called "inert" ingredients, more toxic than glyphosate. Amphibian tadpoles often experience variations in O2 availability in their aquatic habitats; an ability to tolerate hypoxia can condition their survival and fitness. We evaluated the impacts of sublethal concentrations of GLY (1 mg L(-1)), RO (1 mg L(-1) GLY a.e) and RTR (1 mg L(-1) GLY a.e) on metabolic rate (V·O2 - mLO2 Kg1 h(-1)) of bullfrog tadpoles during normoxia and graded hypoxia, and related this to morphology of their skin, their major site of gas exchange. In control (CT) V·O2 remained unaltered from normoxia until 40 mmHg, indicating a critical O2 tension between 40 and 20 mmHg. GLY significantly reduced V·O2, possibly due to epidermal hypertrophy, which increased O2 diffusion distance to O2 uptake. In contrast, RTR increased V·O2 during hypoxia, indicating an influence of "inert" compounds and surfactants. V·O2 of RO did not differ from CT, suggesting that any increase in V·O2 caused by exposure was antagonized by epidermal hypertrophy. Indeed, all herbicides caused marked alterations in skin morphology, with cell and epithelium wall presenting hyperplasia or hypertrophy and chromatid rupture. In summary, GLY, RO and RTR exert different effects in bullfrog tadpoles, in particular the surfactants and inert compounds appear to influence oxygen uptake. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 77 FR 44120 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Roundup, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Roundup, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action establishes Class E... Association (NBAA). The NBAA comments recommended that the FAA lower some of the adjacent Class E...

  19. 40 CFR 180.583 - Triticonazole; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Commodity Parts per million Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice 0.10 Grain, cereal, group 15, except rice 0.01 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with...

  20. 40 CFR 180.583 - Triticonazole; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Commodity Parts per million Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice 0.10 Grain, cereal, group 15, except rice 0.01 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with...

  1. 40 CFR 180.583 - Triticonazole; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Commodity Parts per million Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice 0.10 Grain, cereal, group 15, except rice 0.01 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with...

  2. 40 CFR 180.583 - Triticonazole; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Commodity Parts per million Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice 0.10 Grain, cereal, group 15, except rice 0.01 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with...

  3. 40 CFR 180.583 - Triticonazole; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Commodity Parts per million Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice 0.10 Grain, cereal, group 15, except rice 0.01 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with...

  4. Fodder beets as a feedstock for alcohol production

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, W.

    1981-09-01

    Fodder beets have been shown to be an attractive feedstock for alcohol production, yielding sufficient sugar to produce approximately 1000 gallons of alcohol per acre. Resistance to diseases found in a given region would have to be evaluated. Storage tests have demonstrated that beets can be stored long enough to make them of interest as a feedstock for alcohol production. Further testing is required to evaluate techniques for reducing sugar losses due to sprouting, respiration, and molding.

  5. Innovative Equipment and Production Method for Mixed Fodder in the Conditions of Agricultural Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabiev, U. K.; Demchuk, E. V.; Myalo, V. V.; Soyunov, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    It is recommended to feed the cattle and poultry with grain fodder in the form of feed mixture balanced according to the content. Feeding of grain fodder in the form of stock feed is inefficient and economically unreasonable. The article is devoted to actual problem - the preparation of mixed fodder in the conditions of agricultural enterprises. Review and critical analyses of mixed fodder assemblies and aggregates are given. Structural and technical schemes of small-size mixed fodder aggregate with intensified attachments of vibrating and percussive action for preparation of bulk feed mixture in the conditions of agricultural enterprises were developed. The mixed fodder aggregate for its preparation in the places of direct consumption from own grain fodder production and purchased protein and vitamin supplements is also suggested. Mixed fodder aggregate allows to get prepared mixed fodder of high uniformity at low cost of energy and price of production that is becoming profitable for livestock breeding. Model line-up of suggested mixed fodder aggregate with different productivity both for small and big agricultural enterprises is considered.

  6. First international alternative fueled vehicle round-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The state of Kansas hosted the First International Alternative Fueled Vehicle Round-Up June 8-9, 1992. This event was conceived and initiated in the Alternative Fuels Program of the Energy Section of the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC). The objective was to emphasize and publicize the need for and the current viability of alternative fuels to the general public, fleet operators, environmentalists, utility operators, government officials, school systems, transportation providers and others interested in moving toward the usage of cost effective clean-burning domestic fuels. When judging this original objective by the parameters of the participation of industry, media coverage, attendance at the event, satisfaction of the participants and exhibitors, feedback from the public and new activity generated by the high exposure, the Round-Up can be declared and outstanding success which exceeded the hopes and designs originally sought.

  7. Comparative toxicity of two glyphosate formulations (original formulation of Roundup® and Roundup WeatherMAX®) to six North American larval anurans.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Latice; Moore, Lindsay J; Rodgers, John H; Bowerman, William W; Yarrow, Gregory K; Chao, Wayne Y

    2011-12-01

    The toxicity of two glyphosate formulations (the original formulation of Roundup® and Roundup WeatherMAX®) to six species of North American larval anurans was evaluated by using 96-h static, nonrenewal aqueous exposures. The 96-h median lethal concentration values (LC50) ranged from 1.80 to 4.22 mg acid equivalent (ae)/L and 1.96 to 3.26 mg ae/L for the original formulation of Roundup and Roundup WeatherMAX, respectively. Judged by LC50 values, four species were more sensitive to Roundup WeatherMAX exposures, and two species were more sensitive to the original formulation. Two of six species, Bufo fowleri (p < 0.05, F = 14.89, degrees of freedom [df] = 1) and Rana clamitans (p < 0.05, F = 18.46, df = 1), had significantly different responses to the two formulations tested. Increased sensitivity to Roundup WeatherMAX likely was due to differences in the surfactants or relative amounts of the surfactants in the two formulations. Potency slopes for exposures of the original formulation ranged from 24.3 to 92.5% mortality/mg ae/L. Thresholds ranged from 1.31 to 3.68 mg ae/L, showing an approximately three times difference in the initiation of response among species tested. For exposures of Roundup WeatherMAX, slopes ranged from 49.3 to 84.2% mortality/mg ae/L. Thresholds ranged from 0.83 to 2.68 mg ae/L. Margins of safety derived from a simulated direct overspray were above 1, except for one species in exposures of Roundup WeatherMAX. Laboratory data based on aqueous exposures are conservative because of the lack of environmental ligands; however, these tests provide information regarding the relative toxicity between these two Roundup formulations. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  8. Comparative effects of the Roundup and glyphosate on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Francisco

    2005-12-01

    The potential toxicity of the herbicide Roundup and its fundamental substance (glyphosate) was tested in bioenergetic functions of isolated rat liver mitochondria. Roundup stimulates succinate-supported respiration twice, with simultaneous collapse of transmembrane electrical potential, while glyphosate used in the same concentrations does not induce any significant effect. Additionally, Roundup depresses state 3 respiration by about 40%, at 15 mM, whereas uncoupled respiration in the presence of FCCP is depressed by about 50%. Depression of uncoupled respiratory activity is mediated through partial inhibition of mitochondrial complexes II and III, but not of complex IV. The phosphorylative system was affected by both a direct and an indirect effect on the F0F1 ATPase activity. The addition of uncoupled concentrations of Roundup to Ca2+-loaded mitochondria treated with Ruthenium Red resulted in non-specific membrane permeabilization, as evidenced by mitochondrial swelling in isosmotic sucrose medium. Therefore, the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation is also related to the non-specific membrane permeabilization induced by Roundup. Glyphosate alone does not show any relevant effect on the mitochondrial bioenergetics, in opposition to Roundup formulation products. The differences in the toxicity observed could be either attributed to some products of Roundup or to a synergic effect of glyphosate and formulation products. Bearing in mind that mitochondria is provided with a variety of bioenergetic functions mandatory for the regulation of intracellular aerobic energy production and electrolyte homeostasis, these results question the safety of Roundup on animal health.

  9. Identification of yeasts present in sour fermented foods and fodders.

    PubMed

    Middelhoven, Wouter J

    2002-07-01

    This paper deals with rapid methods for identification of 50 yeast species frequently isolated from foods and fodders that underwent a lactic acid fermentation. However, many yeast species present in olive brine, alpechin, and other olive products were not treated. The methods required for identification include light microscopy, physiological growth tests (ID32C system of BioMérieux), assimilation of nitrate and of ethylamine as sole nitrogen sources, vitamin requirement, and maximum growth temperature. An identification key to treated yeast species is provided. In another table characteristics of all yeast species treated are listed.

  10. Comparison of broiler performance when fed diets containing grain from YieldGard (MON810), YieldGard x Roundup Ready (GA21), nontransgenic control, or commercial corn.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M L; Hartnell, G F; Riordan, S G; Nemeth, M A; Karunanandaa, K; George, B; Astwood, J D

    2003-05-01

    This 42-day experiment was undertaken to compare the nutritional value of insect-protected corn event MON810 (YieldGard) and YieldGard x herbicide-tolerant corn event GA21 (Roundup Ready) to their nontransgenic controls as well as four different commercial reference corns, when fed to growing Cobb x Cobb broilers. A randomized complete block design was used, and each treatment was replicated with five pens of males and five pens of females with 10 broilers per pen. Broilers were fed approximately 55% wt/wt corn during the first 20 d and approximately 60% wt/wt corn thereafter. The corn component of diets fed to broilers was supplied entirely with grain from the eight hybrids included in the experiment. Final live weights averaged 2.09 kg/bird fed YieldGard corn and 2.15 kg/bird fed YieldGard x Roundup Ready corn and were not different (P > 0.05) from final weights for birds fed control or commercial corn. Feed conversion was not affected (P > 0.05) by YieldGard (1.72) or YieldGard x Roundup Ready (1.77) corn feeding when compared with the feeding of other corn diets. Chill weights, fat pad, thigh weights, and wing weights were not affected by diets (P > 0.05). Differences (P < 0.05) were noted for breast and drum weights across treatments. Broilers overall performed consistently and had similar carcass yield and meat composition when fed diets containing YieldGard (event MON810) or YieldGard (event MON810) x Roundup Ready (event GA21) as compared with their nontransgenic controls and commercial diets.

  11. Lack of glyphosate resistance gene transfer from Roundup Ready soybean to Bradyrhizobium japonicum under field and laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Isaza, Laura Arango; Opelt, Katja; Wagner, Tobias; Mattes, Elke; Bieber, Evi; Hatley, Elwood O; Roth, Greg; Sanjuán, Juan; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Sandermann, Heinrich; Hartmann, Anton; Ernst, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    A field study was conducted at the Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center to determine the effect of transgenic glyphosate-resistant soybean in combination with herbicide (Roundup) application on its endosymbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum. DNA of bacteroids from isolated nodules was analysed for the presence of the transgenic 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (CP4-EPSPS) DNA sequence using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To further assess the likelihood that the EPSPS gene may be transferred from the Roundup Ready (RR) soybean to B. japonicum, we have examined the natural transformation efficiency of B. japonicum strain 110spc4. Analyses of nodules showed the presence of the transgenic EPSPS DNA sequence. In bacteroids that were isolated from nodules of transgenic soybean plants and then cultivated in the presence of glyphosate this sequence could not be detected. This indicates that no stable horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of the EPSPS gene had occurred under field conditions. Under laboratory conditions, no natural transformation was detected in B. japonicum strain 110spc4 in the presence of various amounts of recombinant plasmid DNA. Our results indicate that no natural competence state exists in B. japonicum 110spc4. Results from field and laboratory studies indicate the lack of functional transfer of the CP4-EPSPS gene from glyphosate-tolerant soybean treated with glyphosate to root-associated B. japonicum.

  12. Pesticide Roundup provokes cell division dysfunction at the level of CDK1/cyclin B activation.

    PubMed

    Marc, Julie; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Boulben, Sandrine; Hureau, Dorothée; Durand, Gaël; Bellé, Robert

    2002-03-01

    To assess human health risk from environmental chemicals, we have studied the effect on cell cycle regulation of the widely used glyphosate-containing pesticide Roundup. As a model system we have used sea urchin embryonic first divisions following fertilization, which are appropriate for the study of universal cell cycle regulation without interference with transcription. We show that 0.8% Roundup (containing 8 mM glyphosate) induces a delay in the kinetic of the first cell cleavage of sea urchin embryos. The delay is dependent on the concentration of Roundup. The delay in the cell cycle could be induced using increasing glyphosate concentrations (1-10 mM) in the presence of a subthreshold concentration of Roundup 0.2%, while glyphosate alone was ineffective, thus indicating synergy between glyphosate and Roundup formulation products. The effect of Roundup was not lethal and involved a delay in entry into M-phase of the cell cycle, as judged cytologically. Since CDK1/cyclin B regulates universally the M-phase of the cell cycle, we analyzed CDK1/cyclin B activation during the first division of early development. Roundup delayed the activation of CDK1/cyclin B in vivo. Roundup inhibited also the global protein synthetic rate without preventing the accumulation of cyclin B. In summary, Roundup affects cell cycle regulation by delaying activation of the CDK1/cyclin B complex, by synergic effect of glyphosate and formulation products. Considering the universality among species of the CDK1/cyclin B regulator, our results question the safety of glyphosate and Roundup on human health.

  13. Effects of Roundup formulations, nutrient addition, and Western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) on aquatic communities.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Rebecca L; Smith, Geoffrey R; Rettig, Jessica E

    2016-06-01

    Aquatic communities can be affected by herbicides, nutrient addition, and non-native fish species. We conducted a mesocosm experiment to examine the direct and interactive effects of three stressors: (1) Roundup formulations (Roundup Weed and Grass Killer(®) and Roundup Poison Ivy and Tough Brush Killer Plus(®)), (2) nutrient addition, and (3) the presence of the non-native Western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis), on experimental pond communities. Roundup formulations had the most widespread effects on the zooplankton community, but effects varied between formulations and among taxa. The only significant effect of nutrient addition was a lowering of Daphnia abundance in the nutrient addition treatments. The abundances of Daphnia, mid-sized cladocerans, and total zooplankton were lowered by mosquitofish, but no other taxa showed significant mosquitofish effects. We found several two-way and three-way interactions among the stressors, but these varied among zooplankton taxa. Chlorophyll a levels were higher with nutrient addition but were not significantly affected by Roundup formulation or mosquitofish. Our results suggest toxicity of Roundup formulations varies among taxa, and Roundup formulations differ in their toxicity to zooplankton, but with no cascading effects on primary producers. In addition, interactions among stressors affected the zooplankton community.

  14. Physiological and biochemical responses of Microcystis aeruginosa to glyphosate and its Roundup® formulation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Huimin; Geng, Jinju; Ren, Hongqiang; Xia, Xiaomeng; Wang, Xiaorong; Yu, Yang

    2013-03-15

    Glyphosate may have dual effect on bloom algae as a phosphorus source or pesticide. The physiological and biochemical responses of Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) to glyphosate and its formulation in the common herbicide, Roundup(®), were compared. The result suggested that both the cell numbers and Chl-a content of M. aeruginosa increased when the glyphosate concentration increased from 0.01 to 5mg P L(-1). However, Roundup(®) showed low-dose (below 1mg P L(-1)) stimulation and high-dose (above 1mg P L(-1)) inhibition on M. aeruginosa cell density and Chl-a content (hormesis effect). Phosphate was more available than glyphosate or Roundup(®), and Roundup(®) was more toxic than glyphosate itself at 3mg P L(-1). Analysis of the maximum yield of PSII indicated that glyphosate stimulated the photosynthesis process while Roundup(®) inhibited the photosynthesis of M. aeruginosa. The photosynthesis process was enhanced on the 21st day compared with that on the 14th day in all P mediums. The extracellular alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) decreased with the increasing glyphosate or Roundup(®) concentration. The change pattern of APA was similar in both the glyphosate and Roundup(®) mediums. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Low toxic herbicide Roundup induces mild oxidative stress in goldfish tissues.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Oleh V; Kubrak, Olha I; Storey, Janet M; Storey, Kenneth B; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2009-08-01

    The formulation of Roundup consists of the herbicide glyphosate as the active ingredient with polyethoxylene amine added as a surfactant. The acute toxicity of Roundup (particularly of glyphosate) to animals is considered to be low according to the World Health Organization, but the extensive use of Roundup may still cause environmental problems with negative impact on wildlife, particularly in an aquatic environment where chemicals may persist for a long time. Therefore, we studied the effects of Roundup on markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in goldfish, Carassius auratus. The fish were given 96 h exposure to Roundup at concentrations of 2.5-20 mg L(-1). Exposure to Roundup did not affect levels of lipid peroxides (LOOH) in goldfish brain or liver, and in kidney only the 10 mg L(-1) treatment elevated LOOH by 3.2-fold. Herbicide exposure also had no effect on the concentrations of protein thiols or low molecular mass thiols in kidney, but selective suppression of low molecular mass thiols by 26-29% occurred at some treatment levels in brain and liver. Roundup exposure generally suppressed the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in fish tissues. For example, SOD activities were reduced by 51-68% in brain, 58-67% in liver and 33-53% in kidney of Roundup treated fish. GST activity decreased by 29-34% in liver. However, catalase activity increased in both liver and kidney of herbicide-exposed fish. To our knowledge this is the first study to demonstrate a systematic response by the antioxidant systems of fish to Roundup exposure.

  16. Oxidative stress responses of rats exposed to Roundup and its active ingredient glyphosate.

    PubMed

    El-Shenawy, Nahla S

    2009-11-01

    Glyphosate is the active ingredient and polyoxyethyleneamine, the major component, is the surfactant present in the herbicide Roundup formulation. The objective of this study was to analyze potential cytotoxicity of the Roundup and its fundamental substance (glyphosate). Albino male rats were intraperitoneally treated with sub-lethal concentration of Roundup (269.9mg/kg) or glyphosate (134.95mg/kg) each 2 days, during 2 weeks. Hepatotoxicity was monitored by quantitative analysis of the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities, total protein, albumin, triglyceride and cholesterol. Creatinine and urea were used as the biochemical markers of kidney damages. The second aim of this study to investigate how glyphosate alone or included in herbicide Roundup affected hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels of animals as an index of antioxidant status and oxidative stress, respectively, as well as the serum nitric oxide (NO) and alpha tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α) were measured. Treatment of animals with Roundup induced the leakage of hepatic intracellular enzymes, ALT, AST and ALP suggesting irreversible damage in hepatocytes starting from the first week. It was found that the effects were different on the enzymes in Roundup and glyphosate-treated groups. Significant time-dependent depletion of GSH levels and induction of oxidative stress in liver by the elevated levels of LPO, further confirmed the potential of Roundup to induce oxidative stress in hepatic tissue. However, glyphosate caused significant increases in NO levels more than Roundup after 2 weeks of treatment. Both treatments increased the level of TNF-α by the same manner. The results suggest that excessive antioxidant disruptor and oxidative stress is induced with Roundup than glyphosate. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular basis for the herbicide resistance of Roundup Ready crops.

    PubMed

    Funke, Todd; Han, Huijong; Healy-Fried, Martha L; Fischer, Markus; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2006-08-29

    The engineering of transgenic crops resistant to the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate has greatly improved agricultural efficiency worldwide. Glyphosate-based herbicides, such as Roundup, target the shikimate pathway enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase, the functionality of which is absolutely required for the survival of plants. Roundup Ready plants carry the gene coding for a glyphosate-insensitive form of this enzyme, obtained from Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4. Once incorporated into the plant genome, the gene product, CP4 EPSP synthase, confers crop resistance to glyphosate. Although widely used, the molecular basis for this glyphosate-resistance has remained obscure. We generated a synthetic gene coding for CP4 EPSP synthase and characterized the enzyme using kinetics and crystallography. The CP4 enzyme has unexpected kinetic and structural properties that render it unique among the known EPSP synthases. Glyphosate binds to the CP4 EPSP synthase in a condensed, noninhibitory conformation. Glyphosate sensitivity can be restored through a single-site mutation in the active site (Ala-100-Gly), allowing glyphosate to bind in its extended, inhibitory conformation.

  18. Molecular basis for the herbicide resistance of Roundup Ready crops

    PubMed Central

    Funke, Todd; Han, Huijong; Healy-Fried, Martha L.; Fischer, Markus; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2006-01-01

    The engineering of transgenic crops resistant to the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate has greatly improved agricultural efficiency worldwide. Glyphosate-based herbicides, such as Roundup, target the shikimate pathway enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase, the functionality of which is absolutely required for the survival of plants. Roundup Ready plants carry the gene coding for a glyphosate-insensitive form of this enzyme, obtained from Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4. Once incorporated into the plant genome, the gene product, CP4 EPSP synthase, confers crop resistance to glyphosate. Although widely used, the molecular basis for this glyphosate-resistance has remained obscure. We generated a synthetic gene coding for CP4 EPSP synthase and characterized the enzyme using kinetics and crystallography. The CP4 enzyme has unexpected kinetic and structural properties that render it unique among the known EPSP synthases. Glyphosate binds to the CP4 EPSP synthase in a condensed, noninhibitory conformation. Glyphosate sensitivity can be restored through a single-site mutation in the active site (Ala-100–Gly), allowing glyphosate to bind in its extended, inhibitory conformation. PMID:16916934

  19. The effect of microwave treatment on animal fodder.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Graham; Rath, Craig; Devanny, Merita; Reeve, Jessica; Lancaster, Carmel; Doherty, Timothy; Harris, Gerry; Chaplin, Sarah; Laird, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary research has suggested that in vitro dry matter disappearance (DMD) of some poor quality animal fodder materials can be improved by microwave treatment. Laboratory scale experiments revealed that dry matter percentage of Lucerne hay increased by 1.7% as microwave treatment time increased from 0 to 80 seconds. The in vitro DMD of lucerne hay increased by 14.9% during the same microwave treatment. In addition it was also demonstrated that microwave treatment significantly increased starch digestion of oats compared to the control samples. These experiments were followed up with a larger sample experiment in which 25 kg bags of Lucerne fodder were treated for 7.5, 15, 22.5 or 30 minutes in an experimental 6 kW microwave chamber. Dry matter percentage increased by 7.2% as microwave treatment time increased from 0 to 30 minutes. Microwave treatment significantly increased DMD during an in vitro digestion study; however there were no significant differences between the various microwave treatment times. The 15 minute treatment resulted in the greatest increase in dry matter disappearance (5.9%). The crude protein retained in the digestion residues increased by 19.2% as microwave treatment increased from 0 to 30 minutes. These laboratory studies were followed up with an animal response study in which a Merino sheep group being fed the microwave treated lucerne gained 8.1% of their initial body weight by the end of the trial compared to a 0.4% increase in body weight for the control group.

  20. Cs-137 concentration in reindeer and its fodder plants.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, K; Rahola, T

    1989-09-01

    Radionuclides, especially the long-lived 137Cs (physical half-life 30 years), are accumulated efficiently in the northern, subarctic, lichen-reindeer-man foodchain. Until the Chernobyl accident the fallout nuclides studied originated from nuclear weapons tests. After this accident some fresh fallout was deposited in Finnish Lapland. Lichens grow very slowly and collect nutrients very efficiently from air, rain and snow. During winter the basic fodder plants for reindeer are lichens and some winter-green plants, shrubs and dry leaves. During the bare-ground season, the reindeer eat various grasses, herbs and leaves etc. Lichens constitute 30-50 per cent of the entire vegetable mass consumed by the reindeer in a year. The highest 137Cs-concentration 2500 Bq/kg dry weight was found in lichen in the middle of the 1960s. In 1985 the concentration had decreased to about 240 Bq/kg dry weight. After the Chernobyl accident the 137Cs-concentration in lichen varied from 200 to 2000 Bq/kg dry weight in Finnish Lapland. In reindeer fodder plant samples collected in the 1980s before the Chernobyl accident the 137Cs-concentration varied from 5 to 970 Bq/kg dry weight. The highest 137Cs-concentration in reindeer meat, about 2500 Bq/kg fresh weight, was found in 1965 and thereafter decreased to about 300 Bq/kg fresh weight in the winter before the Chernobyl accident. After the accident the mean 137Cs-concentration in reindeer meat from the 1986-87 slaughtering period was 720 Bq/kg fresh weight and in 1987-88, 630 Bq/kg fresh weight.

  1. In vitro cytotoxicity assessment of roundup (glyphosate) in L-02 hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lei; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yiyuan; Zeng, Ming; Zhong, Caigao; Xiao, Fang

    2017-06-03

    The goal of the present study was to elucidate the in vitro cytotoxicity of Roundup and to reveal the possible related mechanisms in L-02 hepatocytes. By detecting reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH)/superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) open rate, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) release, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, and alanine aminotransferease (ALT)/aspartate aminotransferase (AST) leakage, we determined that Roundup induced anti-oxidant system inhibition, mitochondria damage, DNA damage, membrane integrity and permeability changes, and apoptosis in L-02 hepatocytes. By revealing the mechanistic insights of Roundup-induced cytotoxicity, our results are valuable for the design of preventive and therapeutic strategies for the occupational population exposed to Roundup and other pesticides.

  2. Effects of glyphosate and its formulation, roundup, on reproduction in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Uren Webster, Tamsyn M; Laing, Lauren V; Florance, Hannah; Santos, Eduarda M

    2014-01-21

    Roundup and its active ingredient glyphosate are among the most widely used herbicides worldwide and may contaminate surface waters. Research suggests both Roundup and glyphosate induce oxidative stress in fish and may also cause reproductive toxicity in mammalian systems. We aimed to investigate the reproductive effects of Roundup and glyphosate in fish and the potential associated mechanisms of toxicity. To do this, we conducted a 21-day exposure of breeding zebrafish (Danio rerio) to 0.01, 0.5, and 10 mg/L (glyphosate acid equivalent) Roundup and 10 mg/L glyphosate. 10 mg/L glyphosate reduced egg production but not fertilization rate in breeding colonies. Both 10 mg/L Roundup and glyphosate increased early stage embryo mortalities and premature hatching. However, exposure during embryogenesis alone did not increase embryo mortality, suggesting that this effect was caused primarily by exposure during gametogenesis. Transcript profiling of the gonads revealed 10 mg/L Roundup and glyphosate induced changes in the expression of cyp19a1 and esr1 in the ovary and hsd3b2, cat, and sod1 in the testis. Our results demonstrate that these chemicals cause reproductive toxicity in zebrafish, although only at high concentrations unlikely to occur in the environment, and likely mechanisms of toxicity include disruption of the steroidogenic biosynthesis pathway and oxidative stress.

  3. Organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticide residues in fodder and milk samples along Musi river belt, India

    PubMed Central

    Kotinagu, Korrapati; Krishnaiah, Nelapati

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to find the organochlorine pesticide (OCP) and organophosphorus pesticide (OPP) residues in fodder and milk samples along Musi river belt, India. Materials and Methods: Fodder and milk samples collected from the six zones of Musi river belt, Hyderabad India were analyzed by gas chromatography with electron capture detector for OCP residues and pulsated flame photometric detector for the presence of OPP residues. Results: The gas chromatographic analysis of fodder samples of Zone 5 of Musi river showed the residues of dicofol at concentration of 0.07±0.0007 (0.071-0.077). Among organophosphorus compounds, dimetheoate was present in milk samples collected from Zone 6 at a level of 0.13±0.006 (0.111-0.167). The residues of OCPs, OPPs and cyclodies were below the detection limit in the remaining fodder and milk samples collected from Musi river belt in the present study. Conclusion: The results indicate that the pesticide residues in fodder and milk samples were well below the maximum residue level (MRL) values, whereas dicofol in fodder and dimethoate in milk were slightly above the MRL values specified by EU and CODEX. PMID:27047132

  4. Results of a 13 week safety assurance study with rats fed grain from glyphosate tolerant corn.

    PubMed

    Hammond, B; Dudek, R; Lemen, J; Nemeth, M

    2004-06-01

    The current study presents the results of a 13 week feeding study in rats with grain from Roundup Ready corn which is tolerant to the herbicide glyphosate. Herbicide tolerance was accomplished through the introduction of cp4 epsps coding sequences into the corn genome for in planta production of CP4 EPSPS enzymes. Unlike related corn EPSPS enzymes, CP4 EPSPS enzymes are not inhibited by the herbicide glyphosate. Purina TestDiets formulated Roundup Ready corn grain into rodent diets at levels of 11 and 33% (w/w). The responses of rats fed diets containing Roundup Ready corn grain were compared to that of rats fed diets containing non-transgenic grain (controls). All diets were nutritionally balanced and conformed to Purina Mills, Inc. specifications for Certified LabDiet 5002. There were 400 rats in the study divided into 10 groups of 20 rats/sex/group. Overall health, body weight, food consumption, clinical pathology parameters (hematology, blood chemistry, urinalysis), organ weights, gross and microscopic appearance of tissues were comparable between groups fed diets containing Roundup Ready and control corn grain. This study complements extensive agronomic, compositional and farm animal feeding studies with Roundup Ready corn grain, confirming it is as safe and nutritious as existing commercial corn hybrids.

  5. Comparison of broiler performance when fed diets containing roundup ready (event RT73), nontransgenic control, or commercial canola meal.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M L; Stanisiewski, E P; Riordan, S G; Nemeth, M A; George, B; Hartnell, G F

    2004-03-01

    A 42-d experiment compared the nutritional value of genetically modified glyphosate-tolerant (Roundup Ready event RT73) canola meal to that of conventional canola meal when fed to rapidly growing Ross x Ross 508 broilers using a randomized complete block design. Five pens of males and 5 pens of females were used in each of 8 canola meal treatments (glyphosate-tolerant, nontransgenic control, and 6 commercial varieties). Broilers (10 birds/pen) were fed approximately 25% wt/wt canola meal during the first 20 d and 20% wt/wt canola meal thereafter. In general, performance response variables for glyphosate-tolerant canola meal were not different (P > 0.05) than those for the nontransgenic and commercial canola meals. Carcass fat pad, breast meat, thighs, legs, and wings (on a percentage basis) were similar across treatments (P > 0.05). Expressed as percentage of live weight, chill weight of the broilers fed diets containing glyphosate-tolerant canola meal was not different from those fed all other diets, but some differences were observed between the nontransgenic control and commercial diets. No major differences were observed in percentage of moisture, protein, and fat in breast or thigh meat (P > 0.05) across treatments. Comparisons of the glyphosate-tolerant canola diet to the population of all other diets (combining sexes) showed no major differences (P > 0.05) in performance, carcass yields, or moisture, protein, and fat in breast and thigh meat. Broilers fed diets containing glyphosate-tolerant canola meal had similar growth performance to birds fed nontransgenic control and commercial canola diets.

  6. Comparison of Biogenic Amines and Mycotoxins in Alfalfa and Red Clover Fodder Depending on Additives.

    PubMed

    Skladanka, Jiri; Adam, Vojtech; Zitka, Ondrej; Mlejnkova, Veronika; Kalhotka, Libor; Horky, Pavel; Konecna, Klara; Hodulikova, Lucia; Knotova, Daniela; Balabanova, Marie; Slama, Petr; Skarpa, Petr

    2017-04-14

    In the production of fermented feed, each crop can be contaminated with a variety of microorganisms that may produce natural pollutants. Biogenic amines, mycotoxins, and undesirable organic acids can decrease health feed safety. The aim of this study was to compare the counts of microorganisms, levels of biogenic amines, and the mycotoxins in forage legumes, and also to compare the occurrence of microorganisms and levels of mycotoxins in green fodder and subsequently produced silage and the influence of additives on the content of natural harmful substances in silage. The experimental plot was located in Troubsko and Vatín, in the Czech Republic. Two varieties of Medicago sativa and one variety of Trifolium pratense were compared. Green fodder and subsequently produced silage reaching up to 23% of dry matter were evaluated and prepared using a bio-enzymatic additive and a chemical additive. Green fodder of Medicago sativa was more contaminated by Enterococci than Trifolium pratense fodder. The obvious difference was determined by the quality of silage leachate. The silage prepared from Medicago sativa fodder was more contaminated with butyric acid. Fungi were present in higher counts in the anaerobic environment of green fodder and contaminated it with zearalenone and deoxynivalenol. Lower counts of fungi were found in silage, although the zearalenone content did not change. Lower content of deoxynivalenol was detected in silage, compared with green fodder. Silages treated with a chemical additive were found not to contain butyric acid. Lower ethanol content was determined, and the tendency to reduce the risk of biogenic amines occurrence was evident. The additives proved to have no influence on the content of mycotoxins.

  7. Comparison of Biogenic Amines and Mycotoxins in Alfalfa and Red Clover Fodder Depending on Additives

    PubMed Central

    Skladanka, Jiri; Adam, Vojtech; Zitka, Ondrej; Mlejnkova, Veronika; Kalhotka, Libor; Horky, Pavel; Konecna, Klara; Hodulikova, Lucia; Knotova, Daniela; Balabanova, Marie; Slama, Petr; Skarpa, Petr

    2017-01-01

    In the production of fermented feed, each crop can be contaminated with a variety of microorganisms that may produce natural pollutants. Biogenic amines, mycotoxins, and undesirable organic acids can decrease health feed safety. The aim of this study was to compare the counts of microorganisms, levels of biogenic amines, and the mycotoxins in forage legumes, and also to compare the occurrence of microorganisms and levels of mycotoxins in green fodder and subsequently produced silage and the influence of additives on the content of natural harmful substances in silage. The experimental plot was located in Troubsko and Vatín, in the Czech Republic. Two varieties of Medicago sativa and one variety of Trifolium pratense were compared. Green fodder and subsequently produced silage reaching up to 23% of dry matter were evaluated and prepared using a bio-enzymatic additive and a chemical additive. Green fodder of Medicago sativa was more contaminated by Enterococci than Trifolium pratense fodder. The obvious difference was determined by the quality of silage leachate. The silage prepared from Medicago sativa fodder was more contaminated with butyric acid. Fungi were present in higher counts in the anaerobic environment of green fodder and contaminated it with zearalenone and deoxynivalenol. Lower counts of fungi were found in silage, although the zearalenone content did not change. Lower content of deoxynivalenol was detected in silage, compared with green fodder. Silages treated with a chemical additive were found not to contain butyric acid. Lower ethanol content was determined, and the tendency to reduce the risk of biogenic amines occurrence was evident. The additives proved to have no influence on the content of mycotoxins. PMID:28420109

  8. Toxic effects of the herbicide Roundup in the guppy Poecilia vivipara acclimated to fresh water.

    PubMed

    Harayashiki, Cyntia Ayumi Yokota; Varela, Antonio Sergio; Machado, Anderson Abel de Souza; Cabrera, Liziara da Costa; Primel, Ednei Gilberto; Bianchini, Adalto; Corcini, Carine Dahl

    2013-10-15

    Although it is believed that glyphosate-based herbicides are relatively nontoxic to humans, its broad use in agriculture and consequent contamination of aquatic systems is a concern. In the present study, reproductive (sperm quality) and biochemical parameters (acetylcholinesterase and glutathione S-transferase activity, lipoperoxidation, and antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals) were evaluated in adult guppies (Poecilia vivipara) acclimated to fresh water and exposed (96 h) to environmentally realistic concentrations of glyphosate (130 and 700 μg L(-1)) as the commercial formulation Roundup. Male guppies exposed to Roundup showed a poorer sperm quality, measured as reduced plasmatic membrane integrity, mitochondrial functionality, DNA integrity, motility, motility period and concentration of spermatic cells, than those kept under control condition (no Roundup addition to the water). Most of the spermatic parameters analyzed showed strong association to each other, which may help to understand the mechanisms underlying the observed reduction in sperm quality. Exposure to Roundup did not alter the biochemical parameters analyzed, though differences between genders were observed and deserve further investigations. Findings from the present study suggest that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of Roundup may negatively affect at long-term the reproduction of P. vivipara, with consequent changes in fish populations inhabiting environments contaminated with the herbicide.

  9. Role of bioinoculants and organic fertilizers in fodder production and quality of leguminous tree species.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Seema; Sharma, Satyawati; Vasudevan, Padma

    2011-01-01

    The comparative effect of dual inoculation of native N fixer (Rhizobium) and AM fungi consortia with different organic fertilizers (vermicompost and farm yard manure) on fodder production and quality of two leguminous tree species (Leucaena leucocephala (Lam) de. Wit. and Sesbania sesban (L.) Merr.) in silvopastoral system and their impact on the fodder production of un-inoculated Panicum maximum Jacq. under cut and carry system. After three years of plantation maximum tree survival was in L. leucocephala in all the treatments in comparison to S. sesban while fodder production was more in S. sesban for initial two years and in third year it accelerated in L. leucocephala. Dual inoculation with vermicompost significantly improved fodder production, fodder quality and rhizosphere microflora in L. leucocephala but in S. sesban dual inoculation was at par with single inoculation of N fixer, AM fungi and control (without inoculation). The grass production was higher with L. leucocephala for two years while in third year it was more with S. sesban. The association of Rhizobium with AM fungi in L. leucocephala was better than in S. sesban.

  10. Qualitative PCR method for Roundup Ready soybean: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Takashi; Kasahara, Masaki; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Futo, Satoshi; Sawada, Chihiro; Watai, Masatoshi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Kurosawa, Yasunori; Furui, Satoshi; Hino, Akihiro; Kitta, Kazumi

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative methods based on PCR have been developed for genetically modified organisms (GMO). Interlaboratory studies were previously conducted for GMO quantitative methods; in this study, an interlaboratory study was conducted for a qualitative method for a GM soybean, Roundup Ready soy (RR soy), with primer pairs designed for the quantitative method of RR soy studied previously. Fourteen laboratories in Japan participated. Each participant extracted DNA from 1.0 g each of the soy samples containing 0, 0.05, and 0.10% of RR soy, and performed PCR with primer pairs for an internal control gene (Le1) and RR soy followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The PCR product amplified in this PCR system for Le1 was detected from all samples. The sensitivity, specificity, and false-negative and false-positive rates of the method were obtained from the results of RR soy detection. False-negative rates at the level of 0.05 and 0.10% of the RR soy samples were 6.0 and 2.3%, respectively, revealing that the LOD of the method was somewhat below 0.10%. The current study demonstrated that the qualitative method would be practical for monitoring the labeling system of GM soy in kernel lots.

  11. Nutritional assessment and fate of DNA of soybean meal from roundup ready or conventional soybeans using rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanzhao; Li, Defa; Wang, Fenglai; Yin, Jingdong; Jin, Hong

    2004-08-01

    This study was conducted to compare the safety of soybean meal prepared from genetically modified (GM) glyphosate-tolerant (Roundup Ready; RR) soybeans and conventional soybeans. Eighty Sprague-Dawley rats (40 males and 40 females) were randomly allotted to one of four groups according to sex and body weight for a 13-week feeding experiment. The rats were fed corn-based diets containing 60% conventional soybean meal, a mixture of 30% conventional and 30% RR soybean meal, 60% or 90% RR soybean meal. All diets were adjusted to an identical nutrient level except the 90% RR diet. The two soybean meals were similar in chemical analysis and amino acid composition. During the 13-week growth trial, body weight (P < 0.05) and feed intake (P < 0.05) decreased only in rats fed with 90% RR soybean meal at the first week. No treatment-related deaths occurred during the experiment. Gross necropsy findings, haematological or urinalysis values and clinical serum parameters showed no meaningful differences between rats fed the control and RR soybean meals. A 145 bp of cp4 epsps gene specific for the GM constructs from RR soybean meal or a 407 bp of lec gene from endogenous soybean DNA could not be detected in investigated masseter muscle samples. No adverse effects of glyphosate-tolerant soybean meal on rats were seen even at levels as high as 90% of the diet.

  12. Human ocular effects from self-reported exposures to Roundup herbicides.

    PubMed

    Acquavella, J F; Weber, J A; Cullen, M R; Cruz, O A; Martens, M A; Holden, L R; Riordan, S; Thompson, M; Farmer, D

    1999-08-01

    We evaluated ocular effects from reported human exposures to Roundup herbicides based on 1513 calls to an American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) certified regional poison center during the years 1993 through 1997. The preponderance of reported exposures were judged by poison center specialists to result in either no injury (21%) or transient minor symptoms (70%). There was some temporary injury in 2% of cases; one injury took more than 2 weeks to resolve. In no instance did exposure result in permanent change to the structure or function of the eye. Since the representativeness of calls to poison control centers is unknown, several interpretations of these findings are possible. The most conservative interpretation is that there were no serious ocular effects from exposure to Roundup herbicides during a 5 year period among callers to a single regional poison center. A less conservative interpretation would be that severe ocular effects from Roundup exposures are rare among users of these products.

  13. Roundup 2.0: enabling comparative genomics for over 1800 genomes

    PubMed Central

    DeLuca, Todd F.; Cui, Jike; Jung, Jae-Yoon; St. Gabriel, Kristian Che; Wall, Dennis P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Roundup is an online database of gene orthologs for over 1800 genomes, including 226 Eukaryota, 1447 Bacteria, 113 Archaea and 21 Viruses. Orthologs are inferred using the Reciprocal Smallest Distance algorithm. Users may query Roundup for single-linkage clusters of orthologous genes based on any group of genomes. Annotated query results may be viewed in a variety of ways including as clusters of orthologs and as phylogenetic profiles. Genomic results may be downloaded in formats suitable for functional as well as phylogenetic analysis, including the recent OrthoXML standard. In addition, gene IDs can be retrieved using FASTA sequence search. All source code and orthologs are freely available. Availability: http://roundup.hms.harvard.edu Contact: dpwall@hms.harvard.edu; todd_deluca@hms.harvard.edu PMID:22247275

  14. Effect of glyphosate application on foliar diseases in glyphosate-tolerant alfalfa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup herbicide, inhibits 5-enol-pyruvyl shikimate 3-phophate synthase (EPSPS), an enzyme found in plants, fungi, and bacteria. Plants engineered for glyphosate tolerance with a glyphosate-insensitive EPSPS take up and translocate the herbicide throughout the p...

  15. Effects of Roundup formulations on biochemical biomarkers and male sperm quality of the livebearing Jenynsia multidentata.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jessica Andrea Albañil; Varela, Antonio Sergio; Corcini, Carine Dahl; da Silva, Janaina Camacho; Primel, Ednei Gilberto; Caldas, Sergiane; Klein, Roberta Daniele; Martins, Camila De Martinez Gaspar

    2017-06-01

    Roundup(®) formulations are the most consumed glyphosate-based herbicides in the world. When applied, they may reach water bodies and exert toxicity toward non-target species. This study evaluated and compared the effects of different variations of Roundup on biochemical biomarkers as oxidative parameters and Acethylchorinesterase (AChE) activity, and sperm quality of the livebearing Jenynsia multidentata. Fish were acutely (96 h) exposed to Roundup Original(®) (RO), Roundup Transorb(®) (RT) and Roundup WG(®) (RWG) at 0.0, 0.5, 1 and 5 mg L(-1) of nominal glyphosate. The highest mortality (60%) was observed for fish exposed to RT at the highest concentration tested and at 0.5 mg L(-1) non-mortality was observed, so this concentration was chosen for the experiments. Fish exposed to RO and RT (24 and 96 h) presented a state of oxidative imbalance, which caused lipid peroxidation (LPO) in their livers. Oxidative stress was more severe in RO treatment, which may be resulted in the highest hepathosomatic index at 96 h. However, fish exposed to RT presented a marked inhibition of AChE activity from membrane cells of muscle and brain tissues. Sperm quality was investigated in livebearing exposed (24 and 96 h) to the three formulations. Spermatozoa motility and concentration were affected by all formulations. Overall, Roundup formulations are harmful to the fish J. multidentata at 0.5 mg L(-1) of glyphosate; however, mechanisms and potential of toxicity are different between formulations. The J. multidentata also represents a sensitive species and a good regional bio-monitor.

  16. Effects of the herbicide Roundup on the polychaeta Laeonereis acuta: Cholinesterases and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    de Melo Tarouco, Fábio; de Godoi, Filipe Guilherme Andrade; Velasques, Robson Rabelo; da Silveira Guerreiro, Amanda; Geihs, Marcio Alberto; da Rosa, Carlos Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Glyphosate based herbicides, including Roundup, are widely employed in agriculture and urban spaces. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicological effects of Roundup on the estuarine polychaeta Laeonereis acuta. Biomarkers of oxidative stress as well as acetylcholinesterase and propionilcholinesterase activities were analyzed. Firstly, the LC50 96h for L. acuta was established (8.19mg/L). After, the animals were exposed to two Roundup concentrations: 3.25mg/L (non-observed effect concentration - NOEC) and 5.35mg/L (LC10) for 24h and 96h. Oxygen consumption was determined and the animals were divided into three body regions (anterior, middle and posterior) for biochemical analysis. An inhibition of both cholinesterase isoforms were observed in animals exposed to both Roundup concentrations after 96h. A significant reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction was observed in the posterior region of animals in both periods, while antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals (ACAP) was reduced in the posterior region of animals exposed for 24h. Considering the antioxidant defense system, both GSH levels and enzyme activities (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione s-transferase, glutathione peroxidase and glutamate cysteine ligase) were not altered after exposure. Lipid peroxidation was reduced in all analyzed body regions in both Roundup concentrations after 24h. Animals exposed to the highest concentration presented a reduction in lipid peroxidation in the anterior region after 96h, while animals exposed to the lowest concentration presented a reduction in the middle region. Overall results indicate that Roundup exposure presents toxicity to L. acuta, causing a disruption in ROS and ACAP levels as well as affects the cholinergic system of this invertebrate species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of Roundup on the marine microbial community, as shown by an in situ microcosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Stachowski-Haberkorn, Sabine; Becker, Beatriz; Marie, Dominique; Haberkorn, Hansy; Coroller, Louis; de la Broise, Denis

    2008-09-29

    The effects of the herbicide Roundup (glyphosate) on natural marine microbial communities were assessed in a 7-day field experiment using microcosms. Bottles were maintained underwater at 6m depth, and 10% of their water content was changed every other day. The comparison of control microcosms and surrounding surface water showed that the microcosm system tested here can be considered as representative of the natural surrounding environment. A temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) was run on 16S and 18S rDNA-amplified extracts from the whole microbial community. Cluster analysis of the 16S gel showed differences between control and treatment fingerprints for Roundup at 1 microg L(-1) (ANOSIM, p=0.055; R=0.53), and 10 microg L(-1) (ANOSIM, p=0.086; R=0.40). Flow cytometry analysis revealed a significant increase in the prasinophyte-like population when Roundup concentration was increased to 10 microg L(-1). This study demonstrates that a disturbance was caused to the marine microbial community exposed to 1 microg L(-1) Roundup concentration, a value typical of those reported in coastal waters during a run-off event.

  18. Optimum Timing for Spraying Out Greenbridge with Roundup to Control Rhizoctonia in Barley

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A field experiment was conducted in 2007 in a field at the ARS Palouse Conservation Farm with a high level of both R. solani and R. oryzae. Volunteer and weeds were allowed to grow over the winter, and plots were sprayed out with Roundup at 8 wks, 6 wks, 4 wks, 2 wks, 1 wk, and 2 days before plantin...

  19. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Roundup Quadrangle, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-31

    Field and laboratory data are presented for 1263 water samples and 961 sediment samples from the Roundup Quadrangle, Montana. The samples were collected by Los Alamos National Laboratory; laboratory analysis and data reporting were performed by the Uranium Resource Evaluation Project at Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  20. [Yeast irrigation enhances the nutritional content in hydroponic green maize fodder].

    PubMed

    Bedolla-Torres, Martha H; Palacios Espinosa, Alejandro; Palacios, Oskar A; Choix, Francisco J; Ascencio Valle, Felipe de Jesús; López Aguilar, David R; Espinoza Villavicencio, José Luis; de Luna de la Peña, Rafael; Guillen Trujillo, Ariel; Avila Serrano, Narciso Y; Ortega Pérez, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of irrigation with yeasts (Debaryomyces hansenii var. Fabry, Yarowia lipolytica YIBCS002, Yarowia lipolytica var. BCS and Candida pseudointermedia) on the final nutritional content of hydroponic green maize fodder (Zea Zea mays L.), applied at different fodder growth stages (1. seed-seedling stage, 2. seedling-plant 20cm, 3. during all the culture). Irrespective of the fodder growth stages at which they were applied, all yeasts tested enhanced the content of raw protein, lipids, ash, moisture and energy. The percentage of electrolytes (Na, K, Cl, sulphates, Ca and Mg) showed different responses depending on the kind of yeast applied; D. hansenii exhibited the highest increment in all electrolytes, except for phosphorous. We conclude that the addition of yeasts belonging to the genera Debaryomyces, Candida and Yarowia to the irrigation solution of hydroponic systems enhances the nutrient content of green fodder. This kind of irrigation can be applied to generate high commercial value cultures in limited spaces. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Fodder Resource Uses and Assessment of Nitrogen Flows on Livestock Farming with Crop Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirahase, Kyoko; Kobayashi, Hisashi

    With understanding the livestock farming on cattle breeding practiced increasing of self-production of fodders by the farmland's operation as “Livestock Farming with crop production”, we investigated the utilizations of actual fodder resources and farmland for two selected different types of livestock farming systems: “Multiple Type” which practices cattle raising with fodder cultivation, and “Grazing Type” which practices grazing and fodder cultivation with similar feed self-sufficiency rates. We also prepared and compared material and nitrogen flow of both livestock farming systems. The amount of nitrogen flow is clearly different between the two types though feed self-sufficiency rates are at similar level. Moreover, we defined “Internal Nitrogen Rate (INR)” which indicates the rate of internal nitrogen use to total nitrogen use in cattle raising, “Internal Nitrogen Circulation Rate (NCR)” which indicates the ratio of nitrogen amount in internal circulation to the nitrogen amount introduced from outside, and Nitrogen Outflow Potential (Op), which is the balance of nitrogen amount between input to farmlands and uptake by plants, and analyzed the balance of the amounts of nitrogen flows in both livestock farming type. It is suggested that “Grazing type”, which had the values of relatively high NCR and absolutely low Op, was the livestock farming type with high rates of nitrogen procurement from the interregional farming and low risk of nitrogen outflow.

  2. Effects of Inoculum Size on Solid-Phase Fermentation of Fodder Beets for Fuel Ethanol Production

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, William R.; Westby, Carl A.

    1986-01-01

    This fuel ethanol study examined the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae inoculum size on solid-phase fermentation of fodder beet pulp. A 5% inoculum (wt/wt) resulted in rapid yeast and ethanol (9.1% [vol/vol]) production. Higher inocula showed no advantages. Lower inocula resulted in lowered final yeast populations and increased fermentation times. PMID:16347193

  3. Effects of inoculum size on solid-phase fermentation of fodder beets for fuel ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, W.R.; Westby, C.A.

    1986-10-01

    This fuel ethanol study examined the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae inoculum size on solid-phase fermentation of fodder beet pulp. A 5% inoculum (wt/wt) resulted in rapid yeast and ethanol (9.1% (vol/vol)) production. Higher inocula showed no advantages. Lower inocula resulted in lowered final yeast populations and increased fermentation times.

  4. Probiotic preparation reduces the faecal water genotoxicity in chickens fed with aflatoxin B1 contaminated fodder.

    PubMed

    Slizewska, Katarzyna; Nowak, Adriana; Libudzisz, Zdzislawa; Blasiak, Janusz

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of a probiotic preparation on the genotoxicity of faecal water of broiler chickens fed with a fodder contaminated with aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) at 1 or 5mg per kg. Human blood lymphocytes were exposed to chicken's faecal water samples and DNA damage was measured using the comet assay. Genotoxicity of faecal water did not depend on the AFB(1) concentration in the fodder. The mean DNA damage, measured as the percentage of DNA in the tail of the comets, for chickens fed with fodder with AFB(1) at 1 mg/kg was 16.80±0.66, at 5 mg/kg - 16.73±1.51 and in the controls - 12.79±0.66. The supplementation of fodder with the probiotic preparation decreased the extent of DNA damage to 10.02±0.39 for 1 mg/kg AFB(1) and to 11.89±0.72 for 5 mg/kg.

  5. Improved fodder tree management in the agroforestry systems of central and western Nepal

    SciTech Connect

    Karki, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    Ten, three year old, fodder tree species were evaluated at four on-station and three on-farm sites in Nepal. Ficus semicordata (Buchattam. ex Sm.) growth was found to be significantly higher than the rest in diameter and dry foliage weight values. Species were significantly different in height, diameter, and foliage and wood growth. Sites were significantly different in total height growth only. On-farm species evaluation indicated that A. lakoocha and F. semicordata had significantly higher growth. Allometric regression equations were developed to predict foliage, total wood, and total biomass yield of F. semicordata, and B. variegata. Individual-tree models were developed. For B. variegata, diameter at 50 cm. and for F. semicordata, crown diameter and height gave the best fitted equations. Regression equations for three sites did not differ significantly. Therefore, data were pooled and a common model was estimated for each species. In on-farm regression models, height and crown diameter were the best predictors for F. semicordata and dbh gave the best fit for B. variegata. The models for the two species were used to construct regional fodder and fuelwood biomass tables. An improved crop-livestock-fodder agroforestry system was designed for a village in Nepal. Linear programming was used to demonstrate the use of a tool to optimize land allocation maximizing net returns while satisfying the supply of minimum needs of food, fodder, and fuelwood. The optimal solution indicated that, by improving the returns to labor and by applying more compost, the village should be able to increase the annual net farm returns from NRs. 2.94 million to NRs. 3.85 million. The food, fodder and fuelwood production levels were shown to increase by 17%, 130%, and 537% respectively. The labor and compost requirements were up by 138% and 59% respectively, over the five year period. The soil loss through run-off was estimated to decrease by about 15% over the same period.

  6. Forest biomass flow for fuel wood, fodder and timber security among tribal communities of Jharkhand.

    PubMed

    Islam, M A; Quli, S M S; Rai, R; Ali, Angrej; Gangoo, S A

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated extraction and consumption pattern of fuel wood, fodder and timber and forest biomass flow for fuel wood, fodder and timber security among tribal communities in Bundu block of Ranchi district in Jharkhand (India). The study is based on personal interviews of the selected respondents through structured interview schedule, personal observations and participatory rural appraisal tools i.e. key informant interviews and focus group discussions carried out in the sample villages, using multi-stage random sampling technique. The study revealed that the total extraction of fuel wood from different sources in villages was 2978.40 tons annum(-1), at the rate of 0.68 tons per capita annum(-1), which was mostly consumed in cooking followed by cottage industries, heating, community functions and others. The average fodder requirement per household was around 47.77 kg day(-1) with a total requirement of 14227.34 tons annum(-1). The average timber requirement per household was computed to be 0.346 m3 annum(-1) accounting for a total timber demand of 282.49 m3 annum(-1), which is mostly utilized in housing, followed by agricultural implements, rural furniture, carts and carriages, fencing, cattle shed/ store house and others. Forest biomass is the major source of fuel wood, fodder and timber for the primitive societies of the area contributing 1533.28 tons annum(-1) (51.48%) of the total fuel wood requirement, 6971.55 tons annum(-1) (49.00%) of the total fodder requirement and 136.36 m3 annum(-1) (48.27%) of the total timber requirement. The forest biomass is exposed to enormous pressure for securing the needs by the aboriginal people, posing great threat to biodiversity and environment of the region. Therefore, forest biomass conservation through intervention of alternative avenues is imperative to keep pace with the current development and future challenges in the area.

  7. Testing the interaction between analytical modules: an example with Roundup Ready® soybean line GTS 40-3-2

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The modular approach to analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) relies on the independence of the modules combined (i.e. DNA extraction and GM quantification). The validity of this assumption has to be proved on the basis of specific performance criteria. Results An experiment was conducted using, as a reference, the validated quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) module for detection of glyphosate-tolerant Roundup Ready® GM soybean (RRS). Different DNA extraction modules (CTAB, Wizard and Dellaporta), were used to extract DNA from different food/feed matrices (feed, biscuit and certified reference material [CRM 1%]) containing the target of the real-time PCR module used for validation. Purity and structural integrity (absence of inhibition) were used as basic criteria that a DNA extraction module must satisfy in order to provide suitable template DNA for quantitative real-time (RT) PCR-based GMO analysis. When performance criteria were applied (removal of non-compliant DNA extracts), the independence of GMO quantification from the extraction method and matrix was statistically proved, except in the case of Wizard applied to biscuit. A fuzzy logic-based procedure also confirmed the relatively poor performance of the Wizard/biscuit combination. Conclusions For RRS, this study recognises that modularity can be generally accepted, with the limitation of avoiding combining highly processed material (i.e. biscuit) with a magnetic-beads system (i.e. Wizard). PMID:20687918

  8. Testing the interaction between analytical modules: an example with Roundup Ready soybean line GTS 40-3-2.

    PubMed

    Bellocchi, Gianni; De Giacomo, Marzia; Foti, Nicoletta; Mazzara, Marco; Palmaccio, Eleonora; Savini, Cristian; Di Domenicantonio, Chiara; Onori, Roberta; Van den Eede, Guy

    2010-08-05

    The modular approach to analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) relies on the independence of the modules combined (i.e. DNA extraction and GM quantification). The validity of this assumption has to be proved on the basis of specific performance criteria. An experiment was conducted using, as a reference, the validated quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) module for detection of glyphosate-tolerant Roundup Ready(R) GM soybean (RRS). Different DNA extraction modules (CTAB, Wizard and Dellaporta), were used to extract DNA from different food/feed matrices (feed, biscuit and certified reference material [CRM 1%]) containing the target of the real-time PCR module used for validation. Purity and structural integrity (absence of inhibition) were used as basic criteria that a DNA extraction module must satisfy in order to provide suitable template DNA for quantitative real-time (RT) PCR-based GMO analysis. When performance criteria were applied (removal of non-compliant DNA extracts), the independence of GMO quantification from the extraction method and matrix was statistically proved, except in the case of Wizard applied to biscuit. A fuzzy logic-based procedure also confirmed the relatively poor performance of the Wizard/biscuit combination. For RRS, this study recognises that modularity can be generally accepted, with the limitation of avoiding combining highly processed material (i.e. biscuit) with a magnetic-beads system (i.e. Wizard).

  9. Effects of Roundup and glyphosate formulations on intracellular transport, microtubules and actin filaments in Xenopus laevis melanophores.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Daniel; Wallin, Margareta

    2010-04-01

    Glyphosate containing herbicides, such as Roundup, are commonly used and generally considered to be safe. However, some toxic effects are found on amphibians in vivo and human and mouse cells in vitro. In this study the effects of Roundup, glyphosate, glyphosateisopropylamine and isopropylamine were studied on intracellular transport by measuring aggregation capacity in Xenopus laevis melanophores. The chemicals inhibited retrograde transport of melanosomes in the range of 0.5-5mM. Cellular morphology and localization of microtubules and actin filaments were affected as determined by immunocytochemistry. Both glyphosate and Roundup decreased pH in the media. Acidic pH inhibited melanosome transport and altered microtubule and actin morphology in the absence of chemicals, while transport inhibiting concentrations of glyphosate, Roundup and glyphosateisopropylamine disassembled both microtubules and actin filaments. At physiological pH the effects of Roundup decreased whereas glyphosate failed to inhibit transport. Physiological pH decreases glyphosate lipophilicity and its diffusion into the cytoplasm. The Roundup formulation contains surfactants, such as POEA (polyetylated tallow amine) that increases membrane permeability allowing cellular uptake at physiological pH. Our results show that the effects of glyphosate containing compounds are pH-dependent and that they inhibit intracellular transport through disassembly of the cytoskeleton possibly by interfering with intracellular Ca(2+)-balance. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of sediments in modifying the toxicity of two Roundup formulations to six species of larval anurans.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Latice; Moore, Lindsay J; Rodgers, John H; Bowerman, William W; Yarrow, Gregory K; Chao, Wayne Y

    2014-11-01

    The role of sediment in modifying the toxicity of the original formulation of Roundup® and Roundup WeatherMAX® was examined in aqueous laboratory tests. Six species of anurans (Bufo fowleri, Hyla chrysoscelis, Rana catesbeiana, Rana clamitans, Rana sphenocephala, and Rana pipiens) were exposed at Gosner stage 25 to concentrations of the 2 herbicide formulations in 96-h, static, nonrenewal experiments in the presence and absence of sediment. All species tested had lower median lethal concentration values in water-only exposures of both formulations compared with exposures with sediment. Sediment significantly altered the potency slopes in all tests with the exceptions of H. chrysoscelis and R. clamitans when exposed to the original formulation of Roundup and H. chrysoscelis and R. sphenocephala when exposed to Roundup WeatherMAX. Thresholds were significantly different in all tests, including those in which potency slopes did not differ. Based on water-sediment exposures of the original formulation of Roundup, all 6 species tested had a margin of safety when compared with the predicted environmental concentration of the highest label application rate. Of the 6 species, 5 had a margin of safety when exposed to Roundup WeatherMAX. During incidental exposures in the field, sediments and organic matter present in aquatic systems provide significant sources of environmental ligands. If used according to label instructions, both herbicides should pose minimal risk to anuran amphibians in actual field applications. Environ Toxicol Chem 2014;33:2616-2620. © 2014 SETAC. © 2014 SETAC.

  11. Improving the properties of fodder potato protein concentrate by enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Miedzianka, J; Pęksa, A; Pokora, M; Rytel, E; Tajner-Czopek, A; Kita, A

    2014-09-15

    Protein hydrolysates of profitable properties were prepared from the fodder potato protein concentrate. The hydrolysis process was performed with the use of commercial available enzyme (Alcalase) over a 2 and 4 h incubation period. Chemical and amino acid composition as well as functional properties of resultant hydrolysates were determined. A 2 h long process occurred profitable to obtain preparations of well balanced amino acid composition as well as proved functional properties. The industrial preparation, modified within proteolytic enzyme, totally soluble (average 98%), was characterised by fivefold higher oil holding capacity (average 5.4 cm(3)/g) and much better foam capacity (more than 150%) as compared to the material underwent modification (13.00%, 2.1 cm(3)/g and 5.33%, respectively). Presented results suggested potential use of fodder potato protein not destined directly for food purposes as the suitable product for preparations characterised by high nutritive value and functional properties.

  12. Proteomic analysis of the soil filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans exposed to a Roundup formulation at a dose causing no macroscopic effect: a functional study.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Florence; Boursier, Céline; Mesnage, Robin; Oestreicher, Nathalie; Nicolas, Valérie; Vélot, Christian

    2017-09-23

    Roundup® is a glyphosate-based herbicide (GBH) used worldwide both in agriculture and private gardens. Thus, it constitutes a substantial source of environmental contaminations, especially for water and soil, and may impact a number of non-target organisms essential for ecosystem balance. The soil filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans has been shown to be highly affected by a commercial formulation of Roundup® (R450), containing 450 g/L of glyphosate (GLY), at doses far below recommended agricultural application rate. In the present study, we used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined to mass spectrometry to analyze proteomic pattern changes in A. nidulans exposed to R450 at a dose corresponding to the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for macroscopic parameters (31.5 mg/L GLY among adjuvants). Comparative analysis revealed a total of 82 differentially expressed proteins between control and R450-treated samples, and 85% of them (70) were unambiguously identified. Their molecular functions were mainly assigned to cell detoxification and stress response (16%), protein synthesis (14%), amino acid metabolism (13%), glycolysis/gluconeogenesis/glycerol metabolism/pentose phosphate pathway (13%) and Krebs TCA cycle/acetyl-CoA synthesis/ATP metabolism (10%). These results bring new insights into the understanding of the toxicity induced by higher doses of this herbicide in the soil model organism A. nidulans. To our knowledge, this study represents the first evidence of protein expression modulation and, thus, possible metabolic disturbance, in response to an herbicide treatment at a dose that does not cause any visible effect. These data are likely to challenge the concept of "substantial equivalence" when applied to herbicide-tolerant plants.

  13. Feasibility of conventional and Roundup Ready® soybeans discrimination by different near infrared reflectance technologies.

    PubMed

    Esteve Agelet, Lidia; Gowen, Aoife A; Hurburgh, Charles R; O'Donell, Colm P

    2012-09-15

    Identification and proper labelling of genetically modified organisms is required and increasingly demanded by legislation and consumers worldwide. In this study, the feasibility of three near infrared reflectance technologies (a chemical imaging unit, a commercial diode array instrument, and a light tube non-commercial instrument) were compared for discriminating Roundup Ready® and not genetically modified soybean seeds. Over 200 seeds of each class (Roundup Ready® and conventional) were used. Principal Component Analysis with Artificial Neural Networks (PCA-ANN) and Locally Weighted Principal Component Regression (LW-PCR) were used for creating the discrimination models. Discrimination accuracies when new tested seeds belonged to samples included in the training sets achieved accuracies over 90% of correctly classified seeds for LW-PCR models. The light tube performed the best, while the imaging unit showed the worse accuracies overall. Models validated with new seeds from samples not included in the training set had accuracies of 72-79%.

  14. Direct fermentation of fodder maize, chicory fructans and perennial ryegrass to hydrogen using mixed microflora.

    PubMed

    Kyazze, G; Dinsdale, R; Hawkes, F R; Guwy, A J; Premier, G C; Donnison, I S

    2008-12-01

    This study examined the feasibility of producing hydrogen by direct fermentation of fodder maize, chicory fructooligosaccharides and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) in batch culture (pH 5.2-5.3, 35 degrees C, heat-treated anaerobically digested sludge inoculum). Gas was produced from each substrate and contained up to 50-80% hydrogen during the peak periods of gas production with the remainder carbon dioxide. Hydrogen yields obtained were 62.4+/-6.1mL/g dry matter added for fodder maize, 218+/-28mL/g chicory fructooligosaccharides added, 75.6+/-8.8mL H(2)/g dry matter added for wilted perennial ryegrass and 21.8+/-8mL H(2)/g dry matter added for fresh perennial ryegrass. Butyrate, acetate and ethanol were the main soluble fermentation products. Hydrogen yields of 392-501m(3)/hectare of perennial ryegrass per year and 1060-1309m(3)/hectare of fodder maize per year can be obtained based on the UK annual yield per hectare of these crops. These results significantly extend the range of substrates that can be used for hydrogen production without pre-treatment.

  15. Immunotoxicological, biochemical, and histopathological studies on Roundup and Stomp herbicides in Nile catfish (Clarias gariepinus)

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Gihan G.; Shaaban, F. E.; Hadeed, A. H. Abo; Elhady, Walaa M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The current study was directed to investigate the immunotoxic and oxidative stress effects of Roundup and Stomp herbicides and their combination on Nile catfish (Clarias gariepinus). Materials and Methods: The experiment was carried out on 120 fish that randomly divided into four equal groups with three replicates: The first group kept as control, the second group exposed to 1/2 96 h lethal concentration 50 (LC50) of Roundup, the third group exposed to 1/2 96 h LC50 of Stomp, and the fourth one exposed to a combination of Roundup and Stomp at previously-mentioned doses. The experiment was terminated after 15 days; blood samples were obtained at 1st, 8th, and 15th days of treatment where the sera were separated for estimation of antioxidant enzymes. Meanwhile, at 15th day of exposure part of blood was collected from all groups with an anticoagulant for evaluation of phagocytic activity, then the fish were sacrificed, and specimens from the liver of all groups were obtained for histopathological examination. Results: Our results indicated that both herbicides either individually or in combination elucidated significant decrease in phagocytic activity that was highly marked in group exposed to both herbicides. Furthermore, our data elicited an obvious elevation in the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Meanwhile, the data depicted reduction in levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Histopathological investigation of liver proved the aforementioned results. Conclusion: It could be concluded that either Roundup or Stomp alone cause significant deleterious effects on aquatic vertebrates. However, the use of their combination enhanced their toxic effects. Toxicity can end up in humans through the food chain. PMID:27397989

  16. Using a toxicity test with Ruppia maritima (Linnaeus) to assess the effects of Roundup.

    PubMed

    Castro, Aline de Jesus Veloso; Colares, Ioni Gonçalves; Franco, Teresa Cristina Rodrigues dos Santos; Cutrim, Marco Valerio Jansen; Luvizotto-Santos, Ricardo

    2015-02-28

    Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto's broad-spectrum herbicide Roundup, consists of one of the most used pesticides worldwide, but its effects on the marine flora are still not well understood. Were examined Roundup toxic effects on Ruppia maritima specimens collected from Jansen Lagoon (São Luís, MA, Brazil) and acclimatized under laboratory conditions. The numbers of new and dead leaves, the root and leaf length, the chlorophyll a content, and the weight of R. maritima branches were determined before and after exposure to different Roundup concentrations for seven days. High concentrations caused a significant lethal effect. In addition, significant changes were observed in the wet and dry weights, the number and length of the leaves, and the chlorophyll a content. Leaf elongation was observed in the branches exposed to low concentrations, and this change was likely activated as a compensatory mechanism. The results indicate that high concentrations of this herbicide may compromise estuarine flora. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. New effects of Roundup on amphibians: predators reduce herbicide mortality; herbicides induce antipredator morphology.

    PubMed

    Relyea, Rick A

    2012-03-01

    The use of pesticides is important for growing crops and protecting human health by reducing the prevalence of targeted pest species. However, less attention is given to the potential unintended effects on nontarget species, including taxonomic groups that are of current conservation concern. One issue raised in recent years is the potential for pesticides to become more lethal in the presence of predatory cues, a phenomenon observed thus far only in the laboratory. A second issue is whether pesticides can induce unintended trait changes in nontarget species, particularly trait changes that might mimic adaptive responses to natural environmental stressors. Using outdoor mesocosms, I created simple wetland communities containing leaf litter, algae, zooplankton, and three species of tadpoles (wood frogs [Rana sylvatica or Lithobates sylvaticus], leopard frogs [R. pipiens or L. pipiens], and American toads [Bufo americanus or Anaxyrus americanus]). I exposed the communities to a factorial combination of environmentally relevant herbicide concentrations (0, 1, 2, or 3 mg acid equivalents [a.e.]/L of Roundup Original MAX) crossed with three predator-cue treatments (no predators, adult newts [Notophthalmus viridescens], or larval dragonflies [Anax junius]). Without predator cues, mortality rates from Roundup were consistent with past studies. Combined with cues from the most risky predator (i.e., dragonflies), Roundup became less lethal (in direct contrast to past laboratory studies). This reduction in mortality was likely caused by the herbicide stratifying in the water column and predator cues scaring the tadpoles down to the benthos where herbicide concentrations were lower. Even more striking was the discovery that Roundup induced morphological changes in the tadpoles. In wood frog and leopard frog tadpoles, Roundup induced relatively deeper tails in the same direction and of the same magnitude as the adaptive changes induced by dragonfly cues. To my knowledge, this

  18. The effect of sub-acute and sub-chronic exposure of rats to the glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup.

    PubMed

    Cağlar, Sinan; Kolankaya, Dürdane

    2008-01-01

    Roundup is a glyphosate-based herbicide that includes 78.5% glyphosate and surfactant at lower toxic concentrations. Glyphosate is an organophosphorated non-selective agrochemical widely used in many countries including Turkey and acts after the sprout in a systemic way. The objective of this study was to analyze toxic effects of the herbicide Roundup in rat liver. Animals were treated with 56mg/kg (p.o.) and 560mg/kg (p.o.) of Roundup (78% glyphosate+surfactant) each day, during 5 and 13 weeks. Hepatotoxicity was monitored by quantitative analysis of the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities and measured amount of serum lipoprotein (LDL, HDL), total cholesterol and creatinine were used as the biochemical markers of liver damages. Besides the biochemical analysis, we also investigated liver tissues histopathologically. Sub-chronic treatment, starting from the low and high doses of Roundup, it was observed that there were mild effects on activity of ALT, AST and LDH enzymes indicating the hepatic toxicity induced by Roundup. It was found that the mild effects were different on the enzymes in male and female rats of treatment groups. Also it was found some difference in serum lipoprotein (LDL, HDL) and t-cholesterol. There was no difference creatinine value between control and treatment groups but it was observed that degenerative formation such as mononuclear cell infiltration and congestion of the liver tissues of treatment groups. Copyright © 2007. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. In vitro evaluation of different varieties of maize fodder for their methane generation potential and digestibility with goat rumen liquor

    PubMed Central

    Vaswani, Shalini; Kumar, Ravindra; Kumar, Vinod; Roy, Debashis; Kumar, Muneendra

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the methane generation potential and digestibility of different (normal and three high-quality protein maize [HQPM]) varieties of maize fodder with goat rumen liquor in vitro. Materials and Methods: Methane production potential and digestibility of different varieties of maize fodder were tested in in vitro gas production test. Seven varieties of maize, four normal (HTHM 5101, DHM 117, HM 5, and Shaktiman/900 M Gold), and three high-quality protein (HQPM 5, HQPM 7, and HQPM 9/Vivek) were grown in different plots under the same environmental and agro-climatic conditions. Fodders were harvested at 45-50 days of sowing, and the representative samples of fodder from different varieties of maize were collected for analysis. Dried and grinded form of these maize fodder varieties was tested for gas, methane, and digestibility using goat rumen microflora in in vitro gas syringes. Results: Gas production (ml/g dry matter [DM]) was highest for HM5 variety (97.66, whereas lowest for HQPM 9 variety (64.22). Gas production (ml/g degraded DM [DDM]) and methane (%) were statistically similar in different varieties of maize fodder. The methane production expressed as ml/g DM and ml/g DDM was significantly (p<0.05) highest for HM 5 (14.22 and 26.62) and lowest for DHM 117 variety (7.47 and 14.13). The in vitro DM digestibility (%) and in vitro organic matter digestibility (%) varied from 47.48 (HQPM 5) to 52.05 (HQPM 9) and 50.03 (HQPM 7) to 54.22 (HM 5), respectively. Conclusion: The present study concluded that DHM 117 maize variety fodder has lowest methane generation potential and incorporating it in the dietary regime of ruminants may contribute to lower methane production. PMID:27956770

  20. Real-time polymerase chain reaction monitoring of recombinant DNA entry into soil from decomposing roundup ready leaf biomass.

    PubMed

    Levy-Booth, David J; Campbell, Rachel G; Gulden, Robert H; Hart, Miranda M; Powell, Jeff R; Klironomos, John N; Pauls, K Peter; Swanton, Clarence J; Trevors, Jack T; Dunfield, Kari E

    2008-08-13

    Glyphosate-tolerant, Roundup Ready (RR) soybeans account for about 57% of all genetically modified (GM) crops grown worldwide. The entry of recombinant DNA into soil from GM crops has been identified as an environmental concern due to the possibility of their horizontal transfer to soil microorganisms. RR soybeans contain recombinant gene sequences that can be differentiated from wild-type plant and microbial genes in soil by using a sequence-specific molecular beacon and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A molecular beacon-based real-time PCR system to quantify a wild-type soybean lectin ( le1) gene was designed to compare amounts of endogenous soybean genes to recombinant DNA in soil. Microcosm studies were carried out to develop methodologies for the detection of recombinant DNA from RR soybeans in soil. RR soybean leaf litterbags were imbedded in the soil under controlled environmental conditions (60% water holding capacity, 10/15 degrees C, and 8/16 h day/night) for 30 days. The soybean biomass decomposition was described using a single-phase exponential equation, and the DNA concentration in planta and in soil was quantified using real-time PCR using sequence-specific molecular beacons for the recombinant cp4 epsps and endogenous soybean lectin ( le1) genes. The biomass of RR soybean leaves was 8.6% less than nontransgenic (NT) soybean leaves after 30 days. The pooled half-disappearance time for cp4 epsps and le1 in RR and of le1 in NT soybean leaves was 1.4 days. All genes from leaves were detected in soil after 30 days. This study provides a methodology for monitoring the entry of RR and NT soybean DNA into soil from decomposing plant residues.

  1. Stachybotrys atra Growth and Toxin Production in Some Building Materials and Fodder under Different Relative Humidities

    PubMed Central

    Nikulin, Marjo; Pasanen, Anna-Liisa; Berg, Seija; Hintikka, Eeva-Liisa

    1994-01-01

    Growth of Stachybotrys atra and its toxin production on some building materials and in animal fodder were studied at relative humidities ranging from 78 to 100%. Toxins were detected by biological assays and chemical methods. Strong growth of the fungus and presence of macrocyclic trichothecenes, mainly satratoxins G and H, were detected on wallpaper and gypsum boards and in hay and straw at saturation conditions. On pine panels, S. atra grew well, but neither biological toxicity nor production of macrocyclic trichothecenes was observed. PMID:16349391

  2. Real-time polymerase chain reaction quantification of the transgenes for roundup ready corn and roundup ready soybean in soil samples.

    PubMed

    Lerat, S; England, L S; Vincent, M L; Pauls, K P; Swanton, C J; Klironomos, J N; Trevors, J T

    2005-03-09

    A method for quantification of recombinant DNA for Roundup Ready (RR) corn and RR soybean in soil samples is described. Soil DNA from experimental field samples was extracted using a soil DNA extraction kit with a modified protocol. For the detection and quantification of recombinant DNA of RR corn and RR soybean, a molecular beacon and two pairs of specific primers were designed to differentially target recombinant DNA in these two genetically modified crops. Soil DNA extracts were spiked with RR corn or RR soybean DNA, and recombinant DNA was quantified using real-time PCR with a molecular beacon. As few as one copy of RR corn genome or one copy of RR soybean genome was detected in the soil DNA extract.

  3. Effects of sodium meta bisulfite on diffusion fermentation of fodder beets for fuel ethanol production. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, W.R.; Westby, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors designed and tested a new process for converting fodder beets to ethanol: continuous diffusion-fermentation. This process utilizes the simultaneous diffusion-fermentation concept of the EX-FERM design; however, it overcomes the material handling problems inherent in that system by utilizing a counterflow tubular auger system. This process also eliminates the need for roller mills or presses and dryers which are required for alcohol recovery from solid phase fermentation. The latter is the only other currently feasible procedure for producing distillably worthwhile amounts of ethanol from fodder beets, sweet sorghum, and other similar feedstocks. Results on the use of sodium meta bisulfite (SMB) for contamination control with fermenting fodder beet cubes are reported.

  4. The toxicity of Roundup Original Max to 13 species of larval amphibians.

    PubMed

    Relyea, Rick A; Jones, Devin K

    2009-09-01

    With the increased use of glyphosate-based herbicides (marketed under several names, including Roundup and Vision), there has been a concomitant increased concern about the unintended impacts that particular formulations containing the popular surfactant polyethoxylated tallowamine (POEA) might have on amphibians. Published studies have examined a relatively small number of anuran species (primarily from Australia and eastern North America) and, surprisingly, no species of salamanders. Using a popular formulation of glyphosate (Roundup Original Max), the goal of the present study was to conduct tests of lethal concentrations estimated to kill 50% of a population after 96 h (LC50(96-h)) on a wider diversity of species from both eastern and western North America. Tests were conducted on nine species of stage 25, larval anurans from three families (Ranidae: Rana pipiens, R. clamitans, R. sylvatica, R. catesbeiana, R. cascadae; Bufonidae: Bufo americanus, B. boreas; and Hylidae: Hyla versicolor, Pseudacris crucifer) and four species of larval salamanders from two families (Ambystomatidae: Ambystoma gracile, A. maculatum, A. laterale; and Salamandridae: Notophthalmus viridescens). For the nine species of larval anurans, LC50(96-h) values ranged from 0.8- to 2.0-mg acid equivalents per liter with relatively little pattern in differential sensitivity among the species or families. The four species of larval salamanders were less sensitive than the anurans, with LC50(96-h) values ranging from 2.7- to 3.2-mg acid equivalents per liter and no substantial differences among the species of salamanders. This work substantially increases the available data on amphibian sensitivity to glyphosate formulations that include either POEA surfactants or the equally moderately to highly toxic surfactants of Roundup Original Max and should be useful for improving future risk assessments.

  5. Effects of the herbicide Roundup on freshwater microbial communities: a mesocosm study.

    PubMed

    Pérez, G L; Torremorell, A; Mugni, H; Rodríguez, P; Solange Vera, M; do Nascimento, M; Allende, L; Bustingorry, J; Escaray, R; Ferraro, M; Izaguirre, I; Pizarro, H; Bonetto, C; Morris, Donald P; Zagarese, H

    2007-12-01

    The impact of the widely used herbicide glyphosate has been mainly studied in terrestrial weed control, laboratory bioassays, and field studies focusing on invertebrates, amphibians, and fishes. Despite the importance of phytoplankton and periphyton communities at the base of the aquatic food webs, fewer studies have investigated the effects of glyphosate on freshwater microbial assemblages. We assessed the effect of the commercial formulation Roundup using artificial earthen mesocosms. The herbicide was added at three doses: a control (without Roundup) and two treatments of 6 and 12 mg/L of the active ingredient (glyphosate). Estimates of the dissipation rate (k) were similar in the two treatments (half-lives of 5.77 and 7.37 d, respectively). The only two physicochemical parameters showing statistically significant differences between treatments and controls were the downward vertical spectral attenuation coefficient kd(lambda), where lambda is wavelength, and total phosphorus concentration (TP). At the end of the experiment, the treated mesocosms showed a significant increase in the ratio kd(490 nm)/k(d)(550 nm) and an eightfold increase in TP. Roundup affected the structure of phytoplankton and periphyton assemblages. Total micro- and nano-phytoplankton decreased in abundance in treated mesocosms. In contrast, the abundance of picocyanobacteria increased by a factor of about 40. Primary production also increased in treated mesocosms (roughly by a factor of two). Similar patterns were observed in the periphytic assemblages, which showed an increased proportion of dead: live individuals and increased abundances of cyanobacteria (about 4.5-fold). Interestingly, the observed changes in the microbial assemblages were captured by the analysis of the pigment composition of the phytoplankton, the phytoplankton absorption spectra, and the analysis of the optical properties of the water. The observed changes in the structure of the microbial assemblages are more

  6. Derivation of South African water quality guidelines for Roundup(®) using species sensitivity distribution.

    PubMed

    Mensah, Paul K; Palmer, Caroline G; Muller, Wilhelmine J

    2013-10-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are among the leading products used in South Africa to control weeds and invading alien plant species. Although these herbicides ultimately find their way into aquatic ecosystems, South Africa has no water quality guideline based on indigenous species to protect the country's aquatic biota against these biocides. In this study, South African water quality guidelines (SAWQGs) for Roundup(®) based on species sensitivity distribution (SSD) using indigenous aquatic biota were developed. Short-term and long-term toxicity tests were conducted with eight different aquatic species belonging to five different taxonomic groups. Static non-renewal experimental methods were employed for short-term lethal tests (≤4 days), and static renewal for long-term sublethal tests (≥4 days ≤21 days). LC50 values for animal exposure and EC50 values for algae were calculated using probit analysis and linear regression of transformed herbicide concentration as natural logarithm data against percentage growth inhibition, respectively. No effect concentration (NEC) was determined based on the dynamic energy budget model, using survival data. The LC50, EC50 and NEC values were used to develop species sensitivity distribution (SSD) concentrations for Roundup(®). Based on the SSD concentrations, the short-term and long-term SAWQGs for Roundup(®) were derived as 0.250 (0.106-0.589) mg/L, and 0.002 (0.000-0.021) mg/L, respectively. These WQGs may be useful in protecting South African aquatic life against transient or long-term exposure to glyphosate-based chemicals as part of integrated water resources management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute toxicity and sublethal effects of the mixture glyphosate (Roundup Active) and Cosmo-Flux 411F to anuran embryos and tadpoles of four Colombian species.

    PubMed

    Henao Muñoz, Liliana Marcela; Montes Rojas, Claudia Marsela; Bernal Bautista, Manuel Hernando

    2015-03-01

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the world with application in agriculture, forestry, industrial weed control, garden and aquatic environments. However, its use is highly controversial for the possible impact on not-target organisms, such as amphibians, which are vanishing at an alarming and rapid rate. Due to the high solubility in water and ionic nature, the glyphosate requires of surfactants to increase activity. In addition, for the control of coca (Erythroxylum coca) and agricultural weeds in Colombia, formulated glyphosate is mixed and sprayed with the adjuvant Cosmo-Flux 411F to increase the penetration and activity of the herbicide. This study evaluates the acute toxic and sublethal effects (embryonic development, tadpole body size, tadpole swimming performance) of the mixture of the formulated glyphosate Roundup Active and Cosmo-Flux 411F to anuran embryos and tadpoles of four Colombian species under 96h laboratory standard tests and microcosms, which are more similar to field conditions as they include soil, sand and macrophytes. In the laboratory, embryos and tadpoles of Engystomops pustulosus were the most tolerant (LC50 = 3904 microg a.e./L; LC50=2 799 pg a.e./L, respectively), while embryos and tadpoles of Hypsiboas crepitans (LC50=2 203 microg a.e./L; LC50=1424 microgg a.e./L, respectively) were the most sensitive. R. humboldti and R. marina presented an intermediate toxicity. Embryos were significantly more tolerant to the mixture than tadpoles, which could be likely attributed to the exclusion of chemicals by the embryonic membranes and the lack of organs, such as gills, which are sensitive to surfactants. Sublethal effects were observed for the tadpole body size, but not for the embryonic development and tadpole swimming performance. In microcosms, no toxicity (LC50 could not be estimated), or sublethal responses were observed at concentrations up to fourfold (14.76 kg glyphosate a.e./ha) the highest field application rate of 3

  8. Bioremediation and fodder potentials of two Sargassum spp. in coastal waters of Shenzhen, South China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zonghe; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Jiang, Yuelu; Luo, Peng; Hu, Chaoqun

    2014-08-30

    In this study, the bioremediation potentials of two seaweeds (Sargassum hemiphyllum and S. henslowianum) against pollution in a coastal mariculture area of Shenzhen, South China, were investigated by comparing the growth, nutrient bioaccumulation capacity of plants from the seaweed bed (control site) with plants from the fish farm. Results indicated that both species are potential candidates for bioremediation in the fish farm areas in terms of their high growth rates and high bioaccumulation capacities on inorganic nutrients. Both Sargassum spp. contain high levels of crude protein (11.7-14.0%) and crude fat (2.2-2.7%), suggesting high nutritional values. The S. hemiphyllum may serve as a good aquaculture fodder with high nutritional compositions and low heavy metal contents. However, heavy metals (Cr, Pb and Cd) of S. henslowianum exceed the maximum allowable concentrations as aquatic feed, which restricts its fodder application. In general, the results of this study may contribute to the marine pollution bioremediation in the coastal areas of South China, especially in mariculture zones.

  9. Bioaccumulation of glyphosate and its formulation Roundup Ultra in Lumbriculus variegatus and its effects on biotransformation and antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Contardo-Jara, Valeska; Klingelmann, Eva; Wiegand, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    The bioaccumulation potential of glyphosate and the formulation Roundup Ultra, as well as possible effects on biotransformation and antioxidant enzymes in Lumbriculus variegatus were compared by four days exposure to concentrations between 0.05 and 5 mg L(-1) pure glyphosate and its formulation. Bioaccumulation was determined using (14)C labeled glyphosate. The bioaccumulation factor (BCF) varied between 1.4 and 5.9 for the different concentrations, and was higher than estimated from logP(ow). Glyphosate and its surfactant POEA caused elevation of biotransformation enzyme soluble glutathione S-transferase at non-toxic concentrations. Membrane bound glutathione S-transferase activity was significantly elevated in Roundup Ultra exposed worms, compared to treatment with equal glyphosate concentrations, but did not significantly differ from the control. Antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase was significantly increased by glyphosate but in particular by Roundup Ultra exposure indicating oxidative stress. The results show that the formulation Roundup Ultra is of more ecotoxicological relevance than the glyphosate itself.

  10. Glyphosate-tolerant corn: the composition and feeding value of grain from glyphosate-tolerant corn is equivalent to that of conventional corn (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Sidhu, R S; Hammond, B G; Fuchs, R L; Mutz, J N; Holden, L R; George, B; Olson, T

    2000-06-01

    Glyphosate-tolerant (Roundup Ready) corn line GA21 has been developed by genetic modification to tolerate glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup herbicide. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compositional and nutritional safety of corn line GA21 compared to that of conventional corn. Compositional analyses were conducted to measure proximate, fiber, amino acid, fatty acid, and mineral contents of grain and proximate, fiber, and mineral contents of forage collected from 16 field sites over two growing seasons. The nutritional safety of corn line GA21 was evaluated in a poultry feeding study conducted with 2-day old, rapidly growing broiler chickens, at a dietary concentration of 50-60% w/w. Compositional analysis results showed that, except for a few minor differences that are unlikely to be of biological significance, the grain and forage of GA21 corn were comparable in their composition to that of the control corn line and to conventional corn. Results from the poultry feeding study showed that there were no differences in growth, feed efficiency, adjusted feed efficiency, and fat pad weights between chickens fed with GA21 grain or with parental control grain. These data taken together demonstrate that Roundup Ready corn is as safe and nutritious as conventional corn for food and feed use.

  11. Chemical composition of glyphosate-tolerant soybean 40-3-2 grown in Europe remains equivalent with that of conventional soybean (Glycine max L.).

    PubMed

    Harrigan, George G; Ridley, William P; Riordan, Susan G; Nemeth, Margaret A; Sorbet, Roy; Trujillo, William A; Breeze, Matthew L; Schneider, Ronald W

    2007-07-25

    The composition of glyphosate-tolerant (Roundup Ready) soybean 40-3-2 was compared with that of conventional soybean grown in Romania in 2005 as part of a comparative safety assessment program. Samples were collected from replicated field trials, and compositional analyses were performed to measure proximates (moisture, fat, ash, protein, and carbohydrates by calculation), fiber, amino acids, fatty acids, isoflavones, raffinose, stachyose, phytic acid, trypsin inhibitor, and lectin in grain as well as proximates and fiber in forage. The mean values for all biochemical components assessed for Roundup Ready soybean 40-30-2 were similar to those of the conventional control and were within the published range observed for commercial soybean. The compositional profile of Roundup Ready soybean 40-3-2 was also compared to that of conventional soybean varieties grown in Romania by calculating a 99% tolerance interval to describe compositional variability in the population of traditional soybean varieties already on the marketplace. These comparisons, together with the history of the safe use of soybean as a common component of animal feed and human food, lead to the conclusion that Roundup Ready soybean 40-3-2 is compositionally equivalent to and as safe and nutritious as conventional soybean varieties grown commercially.

  12. 40 CFR 180.481 - Prosulfuron; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Parts per million Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice, fodder 0.01 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice, forage 0.10 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice, hay 0.20 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice...

  13. 40 CFR 180.481 - Prosulfuron; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Parts per million Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice, fodder 0.01 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice, forage 0.10 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice, hay 0.20 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice...

  14. 40 CFR 180.481 - Prosulfuron; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Parts per million Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice, fodder 0.01 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice, forage 0.10 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice, hay 0.20 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice...

  15. 40 CFR 180.481 - Prosulfuron; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Parts per million Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice, fodder 0.01 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice, forage 0.10 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice, hay 0.20 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice...

  16. 40 CFR 180.481 - Prosulfuron; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Parts per million Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice, fodder 0.01 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice, forage 0.10 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice, hay 0.20 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, except rice...

  17. Roundup disrupts male reproductive functions by triggering calcium-mediated cell death in rat testis and Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    de Liz Oliveira Cavalli, Vera Lúcia; Cattani, Daiane; Heinz Rieg, Carla Elise; Pierozan, Paula; Zanatta, Leila; Benedetti Parisotto, Eduardo; Wilhelm Filho, Danilo; Mena Barreto Silva, Fátima Regina; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina; Zamoner, Ariane

    2013-12-01

    Glyphosate is the primary active constituent of the commercial pesticide Roundup. The present results show that acute Roundup exposure at low doses (36 ppm, 0.036 g/L) for 30 min induces oxidative stress and activates multiple stress-response pathways leading to Sertoli cell death in prepubertal rat testis. The pesticide increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration by opening L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels as well as endoplasmic reticulum IP3 and ryanodine receptors, leading to Ca(2+) overload within the cells, which set off oxidative stress and necrotic cell death. Similarly, 30 min incubation of testis with glyphosate alone (36 ppm) also increased (45)Ca(2+) uptake. These events were prevented by the antioxidants Trolox and ascorbic acid. Activated protein kinase C, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and the mitogen-activated protein kinases such as ERK1/2 and p38MAPK play a role in eliciting Ca(2+) influx and cell death. Roundup decreased the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased the amounts of thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS) and protein carbonyls. Also, exposure to glyphosate-Roundup stimulated the activity of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase, γ-glutamyltransferase, catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, supporting downregulated GSH levels. Glyphosate has been described as an endocrine disruptor affecting the male reproductive system; however, the molecular basis of its toxicity remains to be clarified. We propose that Roundup toxicity, implicated in Ca(2+) overload, cell signaling misregulation, stress response of the endoplasmic reticulum, and/or depleted antioxidant defenses, could contribute to Sertoli cell disruption in spermatogenesis that could have an impact on male fertility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. New evidences of Roundup (glyphosate formulation) impact on the periphyton community and the water quality of freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Vera, María S; Lagomarsino, Leonardo; Sylvester, Matías; Pérez, Gonzalo L; Rodríguez, Patricia; Mugni, Hernán; Sinistro, Rodrigo; Ferraro, Marcela; Bonetto, Carlos; Zagarese, Horacio; Pizarro, Haydée

    2010-04-01

    Argentina is the second largest world producer of soybeans (after the USA) and along with the increase in planted surface and production in the country, glyphosate consumption has grown in the same way. We investigated the effects of Roundup (glyphosate formulation) on the periphyton colonization. The experiment was carried out over 42 days in ten outdoor mesocosms of different typology: "clear" waters with aquatic macrophytes and/or metaphyton and "turbid" waters with great occurrence of phytoplankton or suspended inorganic matter. The herbicide was added at 8 mg L(-1) of the active ingredient (glyphosate) in five mesocosms while five were left as controls (without Roundup addition). The estimate of the dissipation rate (k) of glyphosate showed a half-life value of 4.2 days. Total phosphorus significantly increased in treated mesocosms due to Roundup degradation what favored eutrophication process. Roundup produced a clear delay in periphytic colonization in treated mesocosms and values of the periphytic mass variables (dry weight, ash-free dry weight and chlorophyll a) were always higher in control mesocosms. Despite the mortality of algae, mainly diatoms, cyanobacteria was favored in treated mesocosms. It was observed that glyphosate produced a long term shift in the typology of mesocosms, "clear" turning to "turbid", which is consistent with the regional trend in shallow lakes in the Pampa plain of Argentina. Based on our findings it is clear that agricultural practices that involve the use of herbicides such as Roundup affect non-target organisms and the water quality, modifying the structure and functionality of freshwater ecosystems.

  19. Performance of growing-finishing pigs fed diets containing Roundup Ready corn (event nk603), a nontransgenic genetically similar corn, or conventional corn lines.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Y; Bressner, G E; Ellis, M; Lewis, A J; Fischer, R; Stanisiewski, E P; Hartnell, G F

    2004-02-01

    Two studies were conducted at two locations to evaluate growth performance and carcass characteristics of growing-finishing pigs fed diets containing either glyphosate-tolerant Roundup Ready (event nk603) corn, a nontransgenic genetically similar control corn (RX670), or two conventional sources of nontransgenic corn (RX740 and DK647). A randomized complete block design (three and four blocks in Studies 1 and 2, respectively) with a 2 x 4 factorial arrangement of treatments (two genders and four corn lines) was used. Study 1 used 72 barrows and 72 gilts (housed in single-gender groups of six; six pens per dietary treatment) with initial and final BW of approximately 22 and 116 kg, respectively. Study 2 used 80 barrows and 80 gilts (housed in single-gender groups of five; eight pens per dietary treatment) with initial and final BW of approximately 30 and 120 kg, respectively. Pigs were housed in a modified open-front building in Study 1 and in an environmentally controlled finishing building in Study 2. The test corns were included at a fixed proportion of the diet in both studies. Animals had ad libitum access to feed and water. Pigs were slaughtered using standard procedures and carcass measurements were taken. In Study 1, overall ADG, ADFI (as-fed basis), and gain:feed (G:F) were not affected (P > 0.05) by corn line. In Study 2, there was no effect of corn line on overall ADFI (as-fed basis) or G:F ratio. In addition, overall ADG of barrows fed the four corn lines did not differ (P > 0.05); however, overall ADG of gilts fed corn DK647 was greater (P < 0.05) than that of pigs fed the other corn lines. There was no effect (P > 0.05) of corn line on carcass yield or fatness measurements in either study. Differences between barrows and gilts for growth and carcass traits were generally similar for both studies and in line with previous research. Overall, these results indicate that Roundup Ready corn (nk603) gives equivalent animal performance to conventional corn

  20. Metal levels in fodder, milk, dairy products, and tissues sampled in ovine farms of Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Caggiano, Rosa; Sabia, Serena; D'Emilio, Mariagrazia; Macchiato, Maria; Anastasio, Aniello; Ragosta, Maria; Paino, Salvatore

    2005-09-01

    We measured Cd, Cr, Hg, Mn, and Pb levels in samples of fodder, milk, dairy products, and tissues collected from 12 ovine farms in the regions of Campania and Calabria (Southern Italy). The areas in which the farms are located show different levels of anthropogenic pressure. The main purpose of this study is the identification and the analysis of relationships among metal concentrations observed in samples representative of different links in the food chain. Particularly, we apply univariate, bivariate, and multivariate statistical techniques to identify the correlation structure of our data set and to evaluate the influence of anthropogenic activity. We discuss the results, focusing the analysis on the spatial and the temporal patterns of metal concentrations.

  1. Tropical tannin-rich fodder intake modifies saliva-binding capacity in growing sheep.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Magaña, J J; Aguilar-Caballero, A J; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Sandoval-Castro, C A; Hoste, H; Capetillo-Leal, C M

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated the effect of feeding dietary tannins from Lysiloma latisiliquum fresh forage on the saliva tannin-binding capacity of hair sheep lambs without previous exposure to tannin-rich (TR) fodder. Twenty-four hair sheep lambs (13.6±3.04 kg LW) were fed a tannin-free diet at the beginning of the experimental period (from day 10 to 13). On day 14, lambs were distributed into three groups (n=8): control group (CG), fed with the tannin-free diet (from D10 to D112); tannin short-term group (TST), fed the basal diet and 650 g of L. latisiliquum forage (from D14 to D55); tannin long-term group (TLT), fed the basal diet and 650 g of L. latisiliquum forage (from D14 to D112). Saliva samples were collected from the mouth of each lamb in the morning before feeding time on D10 and D14 (baseline period), on D49 and D56 (period 1) and on D97 and D112 (period 2). The tannin binding response of salivary protein (∆% turbidity) was determined with the haze development test (HDT) using either tannic acid or L. latisiliquum forage acetone extract. A turbidity protein index (TPI) was calculated as (∆% turbidity/[salivary protein (mg)]). Differences in HDT and TPI in the different groups were compared by repeated measures ANOVA using Proc Mixed. All groups had similar ∆% turbidity throughout the experiment (P>0.05). At baseline and period 1, the TPI of the different groups was similar (P>0.05). On period 2 the TLT group showed higher TPI compared with CG (P<0.05). Meanwhile, CG and TST showed similar salivary TPI. The saliva of hair sheep lambs consuming TR L. latisiliquum fresh fodder (TLT group) increased their TPI compared with control lambs not exposed to tannins.

  2. Quantification and persistence of recombinant DNA of Roundup Ready corn and soybean in rotation.

    PubMed

    Lerat, Sylvain; Gulden, Robert H; Hart, Miranda M; Powell, Jeff R; England, Laura S; Pauls, K Peter; Swanton, Clarence J; Klironomos, John N; Trevors, Jack T

    2007-12-12

    The presence of the recombinant cp4 epsps gene from Roundup Ready (RR) corn and RR soybean was quantified using real-time PCR in soil samples from a field experiment growing RR and conventional corn and soybean in rotation. RR corn and RR soybean cp4 epsps persisted in soil for up to 1 year after seeding. The concentration of recombinant DNA in soil peaked in July and August in RR corn and RR soybean plots, respectively. A small fraction of soil samples from plots seeded with conventional crops contained recombinant DNA, suggesting transgene dispersal by means of natural process or agricultural practices. This research will aid in the understanding of the persistence of recombinant DNA in agricultural cropping systems.

  3. Evaluation of Stage-Dependent Genotoxic Effect of Roundup(®) (Glyphosate) on Caiman latirostris Embryos.

    PubMed

    Burella, Pamela Mariana; Simoniello, Maria Fernanda; Poletta, Gisela Laura

    2017-01-01

    The agricultural expansion over the past decades, along with the associated increase in the use of pesticides, represents a high risk for many wild species. Caiman latirostris is a South American caiman with many features that make it highly vulnerable to pesticide exposure. Considering previous finding on the genotoxicity of the glyphosate-based formulation Roundup(®) in this species, the aim of this study was to evaluate the possible stage-dependent effect of this compound on C. latirostris embryos through the Comet assay (CA), micronuclei (MN), and nuclear abnormalities (NA) tests. Caiman eggs were exposed to three effective concentrations of Roundup® (750, 1250, 1750 µg/egg) in three different stages of the incubation period (total duration 70 ± 3 days at 31 ± 2 °C) of approximately 23 days each. A statistically significant difference in DNA damage determined by the CA was found between groups exposed to different concentrations of RU (p < 0.05) and the negative control, but no difference was observed among the three stages of exposure within any treatment (p > 0.05). There was no differences in the MN or NA frequencies between the different groups and the negative control (p > 0.05), nor among the different stages within each treatment. The results obtained in this study indicate that RU produce DNA damage on C. latirostris embryos independently of the developmental stage where the exposure occurs, implying an important risk for the species during all its period of development, when pesticide application is at maximum rate.

  4. Roundup inhibits steroidogenesis by disrupting steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein expression.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, L P; McCormick, C; Martin, C; Stocco, D M

    2000-01-01

    Recent reports demonstrate that many currently used pesticides have the capacity to disrupt reproductive function in animals. Although this reproductive dysfunction is typically characterized by alterations in serum steroid hormone levels, disruptions in spermatogenesis, and loss of fertility, the mechanisms involved in pesticide-induced infertility remain unclear. Because testicular Leydig cells play a crucial role in male reproductive function by producing testosterone, we used the mouse MA-10 Leydig tumor cell line to study the molecular events involved in pesticide-induced alterations in steroid hormone biosynthesis. We previously showed that the organochlorine insecticide lindane and the organophosphate insecticide Dimethoate directly inhibit steroidogenesis in Leydig cells by disrupting expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein. StAR protein mediates the rate-limiting and acutely regulated step in steroidogenesis, the transfer of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane where the cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc) enzyme initiates the synthesis of all steroid hormones. In the present study, we screened eight currently used pesticide formulations for their ability to inhibit steroidogenesis, concentrating on their effects on StAR expression in MA-10 cells. In addition, we determined the effects of these compounds on the levels and activities of the P450scc enzyme (which converts cholesterol to pregnenolone) and the 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) enzyme (which converts pregnenolone to progesterone). Of the pesticides screened, only the pesticide Roundup inhibited dibutyryl [(Bu)(2)]cAMP-stimulated progesterone production in MA-10 cells without causing cellular toxicity. Roundup inhibited steroidogenesis by disrupting StAR protein expression, further demonstrating the susceptibility of StAR to environmental pollutants. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7

  5. Cost-effective cloud computing: a case study using the comparative genomics tool, roundup.

    PubMed

    Kudtarkar, Parul; Deluca, Todd F; Fusaro, Vincent A; Tonellato, Peter J; Wall, Dennis P

    2010-12-22

    Comparative genomics resources, such as ortholog detection tools and repositories are rapidly increasing in scale and complexity. Cloud computing is an emerging technological paradigm that enables researchers to dynamically build a dedicated virtual cluster and may represent a valuable alternative for large computational tools in bioinformatics. In the present manuscript, we optimize the computation of a large-scale comparative genomics resource-Roundup-using cloud computing, describe the proper operating principles required to achieve computational efficiency on the cloud, and detail important procedures for improving cost-effectiveness to ensure maximal computation at minimal costs. Utilizing the comparative genomics tool, Roundup, as a case study, we computed orthologs among 902 fully sequenced genomes on Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud. For managing the ortholog processes, we designed a strategy to deploy the web service, Elastic MapReduce, and maximize the use of the cloud while simultaneously minimizing costs. Specifically, we created a model to estimate cloud runtime based on the size and complexity of the genomes being compared that determines in advance the optimal order of the jobs to be submitted. We computed orthologous relationships for 245,323 genome-to-genome comparisons on Amazon's computing cloud, a computation that required just over 200 hours and cost $8,000 USD, at least 40% less than expected under a strategy in which genome comparisons were submitted to the cloud randomly with respect to runtime. Our cost savings projections were based on a model that not only demonstrates the optimal strategy for deploying RSD to the cloud, but also finds the optimal cluster size to minimize waste and maximize usage. Our cost-reduction model is readily adaptable for other comparative genomics tools and potentially of significant benefit to labs seeking to take advantage of the cloud as an alternative to local computing infrastructure.

  6. Remote sensing of canopy dynamics and biochemical variables estimation of fodder crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Suchit K.; Das, S. K.; Rai, A. K.

    2010-04-01

    Non-destructive monitoring and diagnosis of plant nitrogen (N) concentration status is necessary for precision in N management. Leaf -N and chlorophyll (Chl) concentration of fodder crops are important indicators of plant N status. Studies were conducted to determine the relationship between canopy hyperspectral reflectance (325 to 1075 nm) and Chl or N concentration in field grown fodder crops [bajra (Pennisetum typhoides, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) in Kharif season and oat (Avena sativa) in Rabi season] without and with recommended dose of nitrogen of different crops. Nitrogen fertilizer application mainly affected leaf reflectance at 575 and 623 nm in sorghum, 565 and 657 nm in bajra and 563 and 716 nm in oat. The reflectance ratio at R581/R397 (R2=0.46**) and R619/R462 nm (R2=0.79***) had the highest correlation with sorghum and bajra leaf N concentration respectively with greatest R2 values. However in oat single reflectance at R542 (R2=0.53**) had the highest correlation with leaf N concentration. Similarly, sorghum, bajra and oat leaf Chl concentration were highly correlated with R677/R527 (R2=0.63**), R688/R409 (R2=0.71***) and R695 (R2=0.56** ), respectively. A linear relationship was found between sorghum leaf N and a simple ratio at R581/R397 (Intercept=8.85, slope=-2.64, R2=0.44). Bajra leaf N concentration was associated closely with ratio of R619/ R462, (R2= 0.78***). Oat leaf N concentration could be best estimate through single reflectance at R695 (Slope=-0.48, Intercept=0.15; R2=0.56). Similarly sorghum, bajra and oat leaf Chl could be best-estimated using reflectance ratio of R677/R527, R615/R411 and R695, respectively. Thus our results suggest that spectral reflectance measurements hold promise for the assessment of some physiological parameter at the leaf level real time monitoring of sorghum and bajra N status and N fertilizer management.

  7. Real-time quantitative PCR detection of genetically modified Maximizer maize and Roundup Ready soybean in some representative foods.

    PubMed

    Vaïtilingom, M; Pijnenburg, H; Gendre, F; Brignon, P

    1999-12-01

    A fast and quantitative method was developed to detect transgenic "Maximizer" maize "event 176" (Novartis) and "Roundup Ready" soybean (Monsanto) in food by real-time quantitative PCR. The use of the ABI Prism 7700 sequence detection system allowed the determination of the amplified product accumulation through a fluorogenic probe (TaqMan). Fluorescent dyes were chosen in such a way as to coamplify total and transgenic DNA in the same tube. Using real-time quantitative PCR, 2 pg of transgenic or total DNA per gram of starting sample was detected in 3 h after DNA extraction and the relative amounts of "Maximizer" maize and "Roundup Ready" soybean in some representative food products were quantified.

  8. Soil microbial activity is affected by Roundup WeatherMax and pesticides applied to cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Sarah H; Haney, Richard L; Senseman, Scott A; Hons, Frank M; Chandler, James M

    2006-09-20

    Adoption of glyphosate-based weed control systems has led to increased use of the herbicide with continued use of additional pesticides. Combinations of pesticides may affect soil microbial activity differently than pesticides applied alone. Research was conducted to evaluate the influence of glyphosate-based cotton pest management systems on soil microbial activity. Soil was treated with commercial formulations of trifluralin, aldicarb, and mefenoxam + pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) with or without glyphosate (applied as Roundup WeatherMax). The soil microbial activity was measured by quantifying C and N mineralization. Soil microbial biomass was determined using the chloroform fumigation-incubation method. Soils treated with glyphosate alone exhibited greater cumulative C mineralization 30 days after treatment than all other treatments, which were similar to the untreated control. The addition of Roundup WeatherMax reduced C mineralization in soils treated with fluometuron, aldicarb, or mefenoxam + PCNB formulations. These results indicate that glyphosate-based herbicides alter the soil microbial response to other pesticides.

  9. Influence of glyphosate and its formulation (Roundup) on the toxicity and bioavailability of metals to Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Martin T K; Wang, Wen-Xiong; Chu, L M

    2005-11-01

    This study examined the toxicological interaction between glyphosate (or its formulation, Roundup) and several heavy metals to a freshwater cladoceran, Ceriodaphnia dubia. We demonstrated that all binary combinations of Roundup and metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb, Se and Zn) exhibited "less than additive" mixture toxicity, with 48-h LC50 toxic unit > 1. Addition of glyphosate alone could significantly reduce the acute toxicity of Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn (but not Hg and Se). The ratio between glyphosate and metal ions was important in determining the mitigation of metal toxicity by glyphosate. A bioaccumulation study showed that in the presence of glyphosate the uptake of some metals (e.g. Ag) was halted but that of others (e.g. Hg) was increased significantly. Therefore, our study strongly suggests that glyphosate and its commercial formulations can control the toxicity as well as the bioavailability of heavy metals in aquatic ecosystems where both groups of chemicals can co-occur.

  10. [Usefulness of an immunoassay test TRAIT for detection of genetically modified Roundup ready soybean in food products].

    PubMed

    Urbanek-Karłowska, B; Fonberg-Broczek, M; Sawilska-Rautenstrauch, D; Badowski, P; Jedra, M

    2001-01-01

    The test based on immunoassay TRAIT Test for the specific detection of Roundup Ready Soybean was used for reference material in the form of dried powdered soy beans contained 0, 0.3, 1.25, 2.5% of genetically modified material, for soy beans declared as Roundup Ready and for soy products from Warsaw market. The detection limit was approximately 0.1% GMO on dry weight basis. Experiment was also carried out on heated soybeans. The positive results was obtained since temperature was under 65 degrees C during 15 minutes of heating grounded beans; above this temperature specific protein was not recognisable by the antibody. The TRAIT Test should be regarded as a qualitative method and could be recommended for screening purposes. Investigation demonstrated that above mentioned test was useful for detection of protein of genetically modified soybean in unprocessed products.

  11. Determination of sulfur and chlorine in fodder by X-ray fluorescence spectral analysis and comparison with other analytical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nečemer, Marijan; Kump, Peter; Rajčevič, Marija; Jačimović, Radojko; Budič, Bojan; Ponikvar, Maja

    2003-07-01

    Sulfur and chlorine are essential elements in the metabolic processes of ruminants, and correct planning strategy of ruminant nutrition should provide a sufficient content of S and Cl in the animal's body. S and Cl can be found in various types of animal fodder in the form of organic compounds and minerals. In this work, the Cl and S content in forage was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), and its performance was then compared in parallel analyses by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and potentiometric methods. The results were compared and critically evaluated in order to assess the performance and capability of the XRF technique in analysis of animal fodder.

  12. Evaluation of Factors Contributing to Excessive Nitrate Accumulation in Fodder Crops Leading to Ill-Health in Dairy Animals

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, P. K.; Bedi, G. K.; Meenakshi; Mahajan, V.; Sharma, S.; Sandhu, K. S.; Gupta, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to estimate nitrate content in commonly used fodder crops, viz., berseem (Trifolium alexandrinum), bajra (Pennisetum glaucum), maize (Zea mays), oats (Avena sativa), sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) and toriya (Brassica napus), collected from the fields of different villages of Punjab and farms of the university, and to evaluate the factors associated with nitrate accumulation in these crops. The nitrate level was highest in sorghum on dry matter basis, followed by oats and toriya, berseem, maize and bajra. The nitrate content was also determined in fodder samples harvested from young and mature stages and in different parts of plants. The stem part of forages had higher content than leaves; however, concentrations were low in mature crops as compared to immature ones. The environmental and soil factors associated with it are discussed and correlated with the experimental findings. PMID:21430916

  13. Roundworm Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Elaine

    1991-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students use microscopes to examine the diversity of the roundworm species that they obtained from water and soil samples. Discusses the role of roundworms in the ecosystem. Provides a lesson plan for teacher use that includes preparation information, materials needed, lesson procedures, and suggestions to extend the…

  14. Dinosaur Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiser, Leslie

    1990-01-01

    The use of programs on the topic of dinosaurs in interdisciplinary exercises which may include mathematics, science, history, and language arts is described. Reviews of 16 different computer programs are included. Possible misconceptions and how they are dealt with in various programs are discussed. (CW)

  15. Roof Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The roof management program at the University of Wyoming involved a consulting firm that provided a computer analysis of the condition of each roof on campus and trained university personnel to act as inspectors in the future. (MLF)

  16. Reference Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Linda; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Briefly describes the nature and availability of reference books for children and adolescents and then reviews some recent publications of this type, including works of a general nature and works on social science, science, the arts, language, history and geography, and biography. (JL)

  17. Roadkill Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krakauer, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Fifth Grade Roadkill Study that was designed to make students aware of the types of animals, chiefly mammals, that live in the central piedmont area of North Carolina. Involves students taking a survey of roadkills. Enables students to learn about animals as well as become more familiar with the scientific process. (JRH)

  18. Roundworm Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Elaine

    1991-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students use microscopes to examine the diversity of the roundworm species that they obtained from water and soil samples. Discusses the role of roundworms in the ecosystem. Provides a lesson plan for teacher use that includes preparation information, materials needed, lesson procedures, and suggestions to extend the…

  19. Digital Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    State policy is crucial to the spread of digital-learning opportunities at the elementary and secondary level. A review of recent legislative action reveals policies that are constantly in flux and differ quite markedly from one state to another. Some have hoped for model digital-learning legislation that could handle all the various issues…

  20. Acute toxicity of Roundup® herbicide to three life stages of the freshwater shrimp Caridina nilotica (Decapoda: Atyidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, P. K.; Muller, W. J.; Palmer, C. G.

    Glyphosate based herbicides, including Roundup®, are frequently used in the chemical control of weeds and invading alien plant species in South Africa. These herbicides ultimately get into water courses directly or indirectly through processes such as drifting, leaching, surface runoff and foliar spray of aquatic nuisance plants. Despite their widespread use, no water quality guideline exists to protect indigenous South African freshwater organisms from the toxic effects of these herbicides. The toxicity of the herbicide Roundup® was assessed using three different life stages of the freshwater shrimp Caridina nilotica, a prevalent species in South African freshwater ecosystems. Neonate (<7 days post hatching (dph)), juvenile (>7 dph and <20 dph) and adult (>40 dph) shrimps were exposed to varying concentrations (1.5-50 mg/L acid equivalence (a.e.)) of the herbicide in 48 and 96 h acute toxicity tests in order to determine the most sensitive life-stage. The results showed neonates to be more sensitive to Roundup® than both juveniles and adults with mean 96 h LC 50 values of 2.5, 7.0 and 25.3 mg/L a.e. respectively. The estimated 96 h LC 50 of neonates is much lower than the application rate (20-30 mg/L a.e.), although the application’s impact will depend on the dilution rate of the applied concentration in the environment. All three life-stages of unexposed animals exhibited active and coordinated movement but exposed shrimps were erratic and slow in their movements, with neonates showing most of these behavioral irregularities. This study shows that low levels of the herbicide Roundup® may adversely affect C. nilotica health and survival. Thus, the herbicide should be carefully managed to minimize any negative impact on non-target freshwater organisms.

  1. A fluorescence-based hydrolytic enzyme activity assay for quantifying toxic effects of Roundup® to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Ørsted, Michael; Roslev, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Daphnia magna is a widely used model organism for aquatic toxicity testing. In the present study, the authors investigated the hydrolytic enzyme activity of D. magna after exposure to toxicant stress. In vivo enzyme activity was quantified using 15 fluorogenic enzyme probes based on 4-methylumbelliferyl or 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin. Probing D. magna enzyme activity was evaluated using short-term exposure (24-48 h) to the reference chemical K2 Cr2 O7 or the herbicide formulation Roundup®. Toxicant-induced changes in hydrolytic enzyme activity were compared with changes in mobility (International Organization for Standardization standard 6341). The results showed that hydrolytic enzyme activity was quantifiable as a combination of whole body fluorescence of D. magna and the fluorescence of the surrounding water. Exposure of D. magna to lethal and sublethal concentrations of Roundup resulted in loss of whole body enzyme activity and release of cell constituents, including enzymes and DNA. Roundup caused comparable inhibition of mobility and alkaline phosphatase activity with median effective concentration values at 20 °C of 8.7 mg active ingredient (a.i.)/L to 11.7 mg a.i./L. Inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity by Roundup was lowest at 14 °C and greater at 20 °C and 26 °C. The results suggest that the fluorescence-based hydrolytic enzyme activity assay (FLEA assay) can be used as an index of D. magna stress. Combining enzyme activity with fluorescence measurements may be applied as a simple and quantitative supplement for toxicity testing with D. magna.

  2. Influence of barn drying of fodder on respiratory symptoms and function in dairy farmers of the Doubs region of France.

    PubMed Central

    Dalphin, J. C.; Polio, J. C.; Pernet, D.; Maheu, M. F.; Toson, B.; Dubiez, A.; Monnet, E.; Laplante, J. J.; Depierre, A.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--A previous study showed there to be fewer microorganisms (especially thermophilic actinomycetes) on farms with artificial barn drying of fodder than on those using traditional storage methods. A cross sectional study was performed to see whether barn drying provides protection against respiratory problems in dairy farmers. METHODS--The respiratory symptoms and function of a group of 123 farmers with daily exposure to cattle foddering from farms which had had a barn drying system for at least three years were compared with those of a representative sample of 274 farmers working in farms with traditional storage in five districts in the Doubs region of France. RESULTS--Both groups were comparable for mean age, weight, height, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, past history of respiratory disease, history of allergy, geographical location of the farm, and length of exposure. Retrospectively estimated exposure to fodder was greater in the group using a barn drying system than in the group working with traditional storage. Acute symptoms at exposure (rhinitis, eye irritation, dry cough, asthma symptoms) and chronic symptoms all tended to be less frequent in the barn drying group, although not individually significantly so. Mean (SD) respiratory function parameters were higher in the barn drying group than in the traditional group: % vital capacity (VC) 104 (14) v 102 (15); % forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 99 (14) v 94 (18); % FEV1/VC 96 (11) v 92 (16); % forced mid expiratory flow (FEF25-75) 87 (24) v 79 (25). CONCLUSION--The results of this cross sectional study suggest that barn drying of fodder may protect respiratory function in dairy farmers. PMID:8153940

  3. Effect of Roundup® (glyphosate formulation) in the energy metabolism and reproductive traits of Hyalella castroi (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Dogielinotidae).

    PubMed

    Dutra, Bibiana Kaiser; Fernandes, Felipe Amorim; Failace, Daniela Motta; Oliveira, Guendalina Turcato

    2011-01-01

    Roundup(®) (glyphosate formulation) is a nonselective and posts emergent herbicide used for controlling aquatic weeds and different concentrations are used in cultures around the world. The objective of this investigation was to examine the effects of Roundup(®) (glyphosate formulation) on the biochemical composition, levels of lipoperoxidation, Na(+)/K(+)ATPase activity and reproductive traits in the Hyalella castroi. Amphipods were collected in summer 2009, in the southern Brazilian highlands. In the laboratory, the animals were kept in aquariums under controlled conditions for 7 days, and after this period they were exposed to 0.36, 0.52, 1.08 and 2.16 mg/l of glyphosate for 7 days. After the period of exposure, the animals were immediately frozen for determination of glycogen, proteins, lipids, triglycerides, cholesterol, levels of lipoperoxidation, and Na(+)/K(+)ATPase activity. During each day of the cultivation reproductive traits (number of reproductive pairs, ovigerous females and eggs in the marsupium) were observed. All concentrations of Roundup(®) induced significant decreases in all biochemical parameters and Na(+)/K(+)ATPase activity, and significant increase in lipoperoxidation levels. Showing this form a potentially toxic effect at very low concentrations, this pattern of results can lead to significant changes in trophic structure of limnic environments because these amphipods are important links in food chain in these habitats.

  4. Toxic and genotoxic effects of Roundup on tadpoles of the Indian skittering frog (Euflictis cyanophlyctis) in the presence and absence of predator stress.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sushama Singh; Giri, Sarbani; Singha, Utsab; Boro, Freeman; Giri, Anirudha

    2013-05-15

    Glyphosate, a post emergent herbicide, has become the backbone of no-till agriculture and is considered safe for animals. However, the impact of glyphosate on non-target organisms, especially on amphibians, is the subject of major concern and debate in recent times. We examined the toxic and genotoxic effects of Roundup, a commercial formulation of glyphosate, in the tadpoles of the Indian skittering frog (Euflictis cyanophlyctis). Roundup at different concentrations (0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 8mg acid equivalent (ae)/L), tested in a 2×6 factorial design in the presence and absence of predator stress, induced concentration-dependent lethality in tadpoles. The 96-h LC50 for Roundup in the absence and presence of predator stress were 3.76mgae/L and 3.39mgae/L, respectively. The 10-day LC50 value for Roundup was significantly lower, 2.12mgae/L and 1.91mgae/L in the absence and presence of predator stress, respectively. Lower concentrations of Roundup (1, 2 and 3mgae/L) induced the formation of micronuclei (MN) in the erythrocytes of tadpoles at 24-h (F3,56=10.286, p<0.001), 48-h (F3,56=48.255, p<0.001), 72-h (F3,56=118.933, p<0.001) and 96-h (F3,56=85.414, p<0.001) in a concentration-dependent manner. Presence of predator stress apparently increased the toxicity and genotoxicity of Roundup; but these effects were not statistically significant. These findings suggest that Roundup at environmentally relevant concentrations has lethal and genotoxic impact on E. cyanophlyctis; which may have long-term fitness consequence to the species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Continuous, farm-scale, solid-phase fermentation process for fuel ethanol and protein feed production from fodder beets

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, W.R.; Westby, C.A.; Dobbs, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    Fuel ethanol (95%) was produced from fodder beets in two farm-scale processes. In the first process, involving conventional submerged fermentation of the fodder beets in a mash, ethanol and a feed (PF) rich in protein, fat, and fiber were produced. Ethanol yields of 70 L/metric ton (17 gal/ton) were obtained; however, resulting beers had low ethanol concentrations )3-5% (v/v)). The high viscosity of medium and low sugar, beet mashes caused mixing problems which prevented any further increase of beet sugar in the mash. This severely limited the maximum attainable ethanol concentration during fermentation, thereby making the beer costly to distill into fuel ethanol and the process energy inefficient. In order to achieve distillably worthwhile ethanol concentrations of 8-10% (v/v), a solid phase fermentation process (continuous) was developed and tested. In preliminary trials, this system produced fermented pulp with over 8% (v/v) ethanol corresponding to an ethanol yield of 87 L/metric ton (21 gal/ton). Production costs with this novel process are $0.47/L ($1.77/gal) and the energy balance is 2.11. These preliminary cost estimates indicate that fodder beets are potentially competitive with corn as an ethanol feedstock. Additional research, however, is warranted to more precisely refine individual costs, energy balances and the actual value of the PF.

  6. A continuous, farm-scale, solid-phase fermentation process for fuel ethanol and protein feed production from fodder beets.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, W R; Westby, C A; Dobbs, T L

    1984-09-01

    Fuel ethanol (95%) was produced from fodder beets in two farm-scale processes. In the first process, involving conventional submerged fermentation of the fodder beets in a mash, ethanol and a feed (PF) rich in protein, fat, and fiber were produced. Ethanol yields of 70 L/metric ton (7 gal/ton) were obtained; however, resulting beers had low ethanol concentrations [3-5% (v/v)]. The high viscosity of medium and low sugar, beet mashes caused mixing problems which prevented any further increase of beet sugar in the mash. The severely limited the maximum attainable ethanol concentration during fermentation, thereby making the beer costly to distill into fuel ethanol and the process energy inefficient. In order to achieve distillably worthwhile ethanol concentrations of 8-10% (v/v), we developed and tested a solid-phase fermentation process (continuous). In preliminary trials, this system produced fermented pulp with over 8% (v/v) ethanol corresponding to an ethanol yield of 87 L/metric ton (21 gal/ton). Production costs with this novel process are $0.47/L ($1.77/gal) and the energy balance is 2.11. These preliminary cost estimates indicate that fodder beets are potentially competitive with corn as an ethanol feedstock. Additional research, however, is warranted to more precisely refine individual costs, energy balances and the actual value of the PF.

  7. The influence of the feeding Flour Beetle Tribolium confusum-infested fodder on the selected indices of the health status of rats.

    PubMed

    Lis, Ł B; Bakuła, T

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to demonstrate differences in the degree of fodder contamination with benzoquinones at various Tribolium confusum levels, the impact of infested feed on the beetle population and the impact of infested feed on the health status of rats. The feeding studies were done on female rats divided into 3 groups: a control group and two experimental groups. Experimental groups were fed with a fodder infested by 150 individuals of T. confusum per kg (group D1) and 300 individuals of T. confusum per kg (group D2). The insects were grown in the fodder for 5 months and the contaminated fodder was given to the laboratory animals for 8 weeks. After that period the rats were sacrificed, blood was drawn for morphological, biochemical and immunological analyses, as well as the samples of internal organs were taken for histopathology. Regardless of initial degree of infestation, after 5 months incubation period the content of benzoquinones in fodder reached the maximum level that reduced beetle population. The resulting concentration to benzoquinones had no effect upon feed intake nor growth of rate, whereas caused the presence of these substances in feces, urine and also in tissues which was indicated by pathological lesions observed in the study. The results obtained point to the possibility of the benzoquinones accumulation in the organisms of farm animals fed fodder containing pests.

  8. Local knowledge about fodder plants in the semi-arid region of Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Alissandra Trajano; Paivade Lucena, Reinaldo Farias; Ferreira dos Santos, Mércia Virgínia; Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino

    2015-02-10

    This study evaluated local knowledge of the fodder plants of the Caatinga in northeast Brazil (seasonal dry forest). Specifically, the goal was to catalog local knowledge regarding the use of native and exotic forage plants in two rural communities located in the state of Paraíba (northeast Brazil), to provide information for nutritional investigations and to verify how the knowledge of these resources is distributed. The communities were followed for three consecutive years, and interviews were conducted with 44 families (20 men and 24 women). Nine of these individuals were determined by the snowball technique to be key informants who held more specific knowledge about the topic. The data were structured into a database and statistically analyzed. Overall, 136 plants from 37 families and 113 genera were cited, and the knowledge of men was at a higher level than that of women (p < 0.05). Participants demonstrated a sophisticated knowledge of nutritional characteristics such as nutritional value, palatability, availability and productivity. Native plants were highlighted over the exotic, especially for species of the families Cactaceae, Bromeliaceae and Fabaceae. The great diversity of plants cited by the informants demonstrates the potential of local vegetation and the importance of traditional knowledge in the research process and in the characterization of forage resources. This diversity also favors the selection of promising species for future biotechnological investigations.

  9. Effects silver nanoparticles and magnetic field on growth of fodder maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Berahmand, Ali Asghar; Ghafariyan Panahi, Ali; Sahabi, Hossein; Feizi, Hassan; Rezvani Moghaddam, Parviz; Shahtahmassebi, Nasser; Fotovat, Amir; Karimpour, Hossein; Gallehgir, Omran

    2012-12-01

    Two experiments were done in 2008 and 2009 to study the effects of magnetic field and silver nanoparticles on fodder maize (Zea mays L.). These experiments were done with seven treatments based on a randomized complete block design in four replications. The treatments were as follows: magnetic field and silver nanoparticles + Kemira fertilizer (T1), magnetic field and silver nanoparticles + Humax fertilizer (T2), magnetic field and silver nanoparticles (T3), Kemira fertilizer (T4), Librel fertilizer (T5), Humax fertilizer (T6), and a control (T7). Results showed that fresh yield was higher in treatments T3 and T4. Treatments T3 and T4 had increased maize fresh yields of 35 and 17.5 % in comparison to the control, respectively. The dry matter yield of those plants exposed to magnetic field and silver nanoparticles was significantly higher than that from any of the other treatments. Magnetic field and silver nanoparticle treatments (T3 and T1) showed higher percentages for ears, and the lowest percentages were found in treatments T7 and T5. In general, the soil conditions for crop growth were more favorable in 2009 than in 2008, which caused the maize to respond better to treatments tested in the study; therefore, treatments had more significant effects on studied traits in 2008 than in 2009.

  10. Characterization of faecal microbial communities of dairy cows fed diets containing ensiled Moringa oleifera fodder

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiajie; Zeng, Bin; Chen, Zujing; Yan, Shijuan; Huang, Wenjie; Sun, Baoli; He, Qian; Chen, Xiaoyang; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Qingyan; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang

    2017-01-01

    Moringa oleifera (M. oleifera) is a remarkable species with high nutritional value and good biomass production, which can be used as livestock fodder. In this study, we examined changes in the faecal microbiota of thirty dairy cows in response to alternative M. oleifera diets and their effects on nutrient digestion, milk traits and the faecal concentrations of short-chain fatty acids. No differences in milk yield and constituents were found between the control and the M. oleifera alternative groups. Cows fed M. oleifera silage had lower dry matter digestibility, as well as the propionate and isovalerate concentrations in M. oleifera treated group. Using 16S rDNA gene sequencing, 1,299,556 paired-end reads were obtained. Clustering analysis revealed 13 phyla and 93 genera across all samples. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the co-dominant phyla. Ten taxa displayed a significant difference in response to the high M. oleifera diet. In addition, strong correlations between Akkermansia and Prevotella with milk yield and protein indicated that some bacterial groups could be used to improve milk traits. Our results provided an insight into the microbiome-associated responses to M. oleifera in livestock diets, and could aid the development of novel applications of M. oleifera. PMID:28134261

  11. Characterization of faecal microbial communities of dairy cows fed diets containing ensiled Moringa oleifera fodder.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiajie; Zeng, Bin; Chen, Zujing; Yan, Shijuan; Huang, Wenjie; Sun, Baoli; He, Qian; Chen, Xiaoyang; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Qingyan; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang

    2017-01-30

    Moringa oleifera (M. oleifera) is a remarkable species with high nutritional value and good biomass production, which can be used as livestock fodder. In this study, we examined changes in the faecal microbiota of thirty dairy cows in response to alternative M. oleifera diets and their effects on nutrient digestion, milk traits and the faecal concentrations of short-chain fatty acids. No differences in milk yield and constituents were found between the control and the M. oleifera alternative groups. Cows fed M. oleifera silage had lower dry matter digestibility, as well as the propionate and isovalerate concentrations in M. oleifera treated group. Using 16S rDNA gene sequencing, 1,299,556 paired-end reads were obtained. Clustering analysis revealed 13 phyla and 93 genera across all samples. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the co-dominant phyla. Ten taxa displayed a significant difference in response to the high M. oleifera diet. In addition, strong correlations between Akkermansia and Prevotella with milk yield and protein indicated that some bacterial groups could be used to improve milk traits. Our results provided an insight into the microbiome-associated responses to M. oleifera in livestock diets, and could aid the development of novel applications of M. oleifera.

  12. Effect of Terminalia arjuna bark powder on some diagnostic enzymes in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) ingesting arsenic contaminated water and fodder

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Subrat Kumar; Nayyar, Shashi; Jindal, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study investigated the effect of Terminalia arjuna bark powder on some diagnostic enzymes related to hepatic and muscle function in buffaloes ingesting arsenic contaminated water and fodder in an arsenic affected area. Materials and Methods: A total of 25 samples of tube well water, fodder and buffalo blood were collected through a survey from arsenic contaminated areas and 20 samples from the uncontaminated, i.e., control areas of Ludhiana district, Punjab for determination of arsenic concentration. A total of 30 buffaloes (selected from above 45 animals) were divided into three groups of 10 each on the basis of blood arsenic level, viz., control group: Clinically healthy buffaloes from the uncontaminated area with the blood arsenic level within the normal limit (0-0.05 ppm); Arsenic exposed group: Buffaloes exposed to arsenic through intake of contaminated water and fodder in the arsenic affected area with the blood arsenic level above the normal limit of 0-0.05 ppm; treatment group: Arsenic exposed buffaloes treated with T. arjuna bark powder orally at 42 mg/kg b.w. OD for 30 days. Single blood samples were collected from control and arsenic exposed groups. Blood samples from the treatment group were collected on 0, 15th, and 30th day of treatment along with one sample on the 45th day, i.e., after withdrawal of treatment. Activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and creatine kinase (CK) were assayed in plasma. Results: Significantly (p<0.05) higher arsenic concentration was observed in tube well water, fodder and buffalo blood samples collected from the arsenic contaminated area. A significant positive correlation was noticed between arsenic concentrations of tube well water, fodder and untreated buffalo blood samples, collected from the arsenic affected area. ALP, GGT, LDH, and CK activities were significantly (p<0.05) increased in the arsenic exposed buffaloes compared to control

  13. Effect of Terminalia arjuna bark powder on some diagnostic enzymes in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) ingesting arsenic contaminated water and fodder.

    PubMed

    Dash, Subrat Kumar; Nayyar, Shashi; Jindal, Rajesh

    2016-10-01

    The study investigated the effect of Terminalia arjuna bark powder on some diagnostic enzymes related to hepatic and muscle function in buffaloes ingesting arsenic contaminated water and fodder in an arsenic affected area. A total of 25 samples of tube well water, fodder and buffalo blood were collected through a survey from arsenic contaminated areas and 20 samples from the uncontaminated, i.e., control areas of Ludhiana district, Punjab for determination of arsenic concentration. A total of 30 buffaloes (selected from above 45 animals) were divided into three groups of 10 each on the basis of blood arsenic level, viz., control group: Clinically healthy buffaloes from the uncontaminated area with the blood arsenic level within the normal limit (0-0.05 ppm); Arsenic exposed group: Buffaloes exposed to arsenic through intake of contaminated water and fodder in the arsenic affected area with the blood arsenic level above the normal limit of 0-0.05 ppm; treatment group: Arsenic exposed buffaloes treated with T. arjuna bark powder orally at 42 mg/kg b.w. OD for 30 days. Single blood samples were collected from control and arsenic exposed groups. Blood samples from the treatment group were collected on 0, 15(th), and 30(th) day of treatment along with one sample on the 45(th) day, i.e., after withdrawal of treatment. Activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and creatine kinase (CK) were assayed in plasma. Significantly (p<0.05) higher arsenic concentration was observed in tube well water, fodder and buffalo blood samples collected from the arsenic contaminated area. A significant positive correlation was noticed between arsenic concentrations of tube well water, fodder and untreated buffalo blood samples, collected from the arsenic affected area. ALP, GGT, LDH, and CK activities were significantly (p<0.05) increased in the arsenic exposed buffaloes compared to control. Treatment with T. arjuna bark powder

  14. Cowpea and Groundnut Haulms Fodder Trading and Its Lessons for Multidimensional Cowpea Improvement for Mixed Crop Livestock Systems in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Samireddypalle, Anandan; Boukar, Ousmane; Grings, Elaine; Fatokun, Christian A.; Kodukula, Prasad; Devulapalli, Ravi; Okike, Iheanacho; Blümmel, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cowpea is an important legume crop in Africa, valued highly for its grain and also haulms, which are a tradable commodity in fodder markets. Fodder market surveys in Northern Nigeria showed that groundnut haulms were priced higher than cowpea haulms, probably because of their superior nutritive value. The economic value of haulms has prompted cowpea breeders and livestock nutritionists to explore haulm fodder traits as additional selection and breeding criteria. Fifty cowpea genotypes cultivated across five locations in Nigeria in 2013 and 2014 were evaluated for food fodder traits. Significant (P < 0.05) genotypic dependent variations were observed in yields (kg/ha) of grains (537–1082) and haulms (1173–3368), though significant (P < 0.05) effects of location and year were observed. Grain and fodder yield had a tendency to be positively correlated (r = 0.26, P = 0.07). Haulms were analyzed for nitrogen (N), fiber fractions, in vitro digestibility, and metabolizable energy content. Highly significant variations were observed in all genotypic and livestock nutrition traits, although location and year had significant effects. Trade-offs between grain yield and haulm fodder quality traits were largely absent and haulm acid detergent lignin and grain yield were even inversely correlated (r = -0.28, P = 0.05), that is high grain yielders had decreased haulm lignin. However, haulm N and grain yield also tended to be negatively associated (r = -0.26, P = 0.07). Haulm fodder quality traits and haulm yield were mostly positively correlated (P < 0.05). Broad sense heritabilities for grain and fodder yield were 0.50 and 0.29, respectively, while heritability for haulm fodder quality traits ranged from 0.61 to 0.67, providing opportunities for concomitant increase in grain yield and haulm fodder quality traits. Selection of the 10 highest ranking genotypes for grain yield, haulm yield, haulm N, and haulm in vitro organic matter digestibility showed selection groups

  15. Cowpea and Groundnut Haulms Fodder Trading and Its Lessons for Multidimensional Cowpea Improvement for Mixed Crop Livestock Systems in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Samireddypalle, Anandan; Boukar, Ousmane; Grings, Elaine; Fatokun, Christian A; Kodukula, Prasad; Devulapalli, Ravi; Okike, Iheanacho; Blümmel, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cowpea is an important legume crop in Africa, valued highly for its grain and also haulms, which are a tradable commodity in fodder markets. Fodder market surveys in Northern Nigeria showed that groundnut haulms were priced higher than cowpea haulms, probably because of their superior nutritive value. The economic value of haulms has prompted cowpea breeders and livestock nutritionists to explore haulm fodder traits as additional selection and breeding criteria. Fifty cowpea genotypes cultivated across five locations in Nigeria in 2013 and 2014 were evaluated for food fodder traits. Significant (P < 0.05) genotypic dependent variations were observed in yields (kg/ha) of grains (537-1082) and haulms (1173-3368), though significant (P < 0.05) effects of location and year were observed. Grain and fodder yield had a tendency to be positively correlated (r = 0.26, P = 0.07). Haulms were analyzed for nitrogen (N), fiber fractions, in vitro digestibility, and metabolizable energy content. Highly significant variations were observed in all genotypic and livestock nutrition traits, although location and year had significant effects. Trade-offs between grain yield and haulm fodder quality traits were largely absent and haulm acid detergent lignin and grain yield were even inversely correlated (r = -0.28, P = 0.05), that is high grain yielders had decreased haulm lignin. However, haulm N and grain yield also tended to be negatively associated (r = -0.26, P = 0.07). Haulm fodder quality traits and haulm yield were mostly positively correlated (P < 0.05). Broad sense heritabilities for grain and fodder yield were 0.50 and 0.29, respectively, while heritability for haulm fodder quality traits ranged from 0.61 to 0.67, providing opportunities for concomitant increase in grain yield and haulm fodder quality traits. Selection of the 10 highest ranking genotypes for grain yield, haulm yield, haulm N, and haulm in vitro organic matter digestibility showed selection groups overlapping

  16. Tolerating Zero Tolerance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Brian N.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of zero tolerance dates back to the mid-1990s when New Jersey was creating laws to address nuisance crimes in communities. The main goal of these neighborhood crime policies was to have zero tolerance for petty crime such as graffiti or littering so as to keep more serious crimes from occurring. Next came the war on drugs. In federal…

  17. Exposure to a commercial glyphosate formulation (Roundup®) alters normal gill and liver histology and affects male sexual activity of Jenynsia multidentata (Anablepidae, Cyprinodontiformes).

    PubMed

    Hued, Andrea Cecilia; Oberhofer, Sabrina; de los Ángeles Bistoni, María

    2012-01-01

    Roundup is the most popular commercial glyphosate formulation applied in the cultivation of genetically modified glyphosate-resistant crops. The aim of this study was to evaluate the histological lesions of the neotropical native fish, Jenynsia multidentata, in response to acute and subchronic exposure to Roundup and to determine if subchronic exposure to the herbicide causes changes in male sexual activity of individuals exposed to a sublethal concentration (0.5 mg/l) for 7 and 28 days. The estimated 96-h LC50 was 19.02 mg/l for both male and female fish. Gill and liver histological lesions were evaluated through histopathological indices allowing quantification of the histological damages in fish exposed to different concentrations of the herbicide. Roundup induced different histological alterations in a concentration-dependent manner. In subchronic-exposure tests, Roundup also altered normal histology of the studied organs and caused a significant decrease in the number of copulations and mating success in male fish exposed to the herbicide. It is expected that in natural environments contaminated with Roundup, both general health condition and reproductive success of J. multidenatata could be seriously affected.

  18. Genotoxicity induced by Roundup® (Glyphosate) in tegu lizard (Salvator merianae) embryos.

    PubMed

    Schaumburg, Laura G; Siroski, Pablo A; Poletta, Gisela L; Mudry, Marta D

    2016-06-01

    Environmental contaminants produce multiple adverse consequences at individual, population and ecosystem levels. High volumes of agrochemicals applied to great variety of crops, together with agricultural expansion, generate great concerns due to the impact for the environment and large risk implicated for wildlife. The lack of data on these threats is striking. The tegu lizard (Salvator merianae) is one of the species that live in environments under contaminant effects. Several characteristics allow proposing this species as a potential sentinel organism for the monitoring of pesticides in their habitat. The present study is the first report about genotoxicity in tegu lizard neonates after embryonic exposure to Roundup® (glyphosate 66.2%). The micronucleus test (MN), nuclear abnormalities (NAs) assay and comet assay (CA) were used as biomarkers of genotoxic effects induced in erythrocytes by topical exposure of the eggs to the glyphosate commercial formulation Roundup® (RU), in laboratory controlled conditions. A total of 96 eggs were distributed in six groups exposed to RU (50, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600μg/egg), one positive control (PC; 200μg cyclophosphamide/egg) and one negative control (NC; distilled water). No teratogenic effects were observed in any of the exposed or control neonates. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed in all concentrations higher than 100μg/egg with respect to NC (p<0.05). However, no statistical differences were found in the frequencies of MN and NAs in any group exposed to RU compared to the NC. No statistically significant differences were found in the size of the lizards at birth or after six months post-exposure (p>0.05). Our results provide new information about the undesirable effects of the glyphosate-based herbicide formulations RU on this lizard species that inhabits areas permanently exposed to several pesticide formulations. We consider of utmost necessity a strict regulation of the agrochemical application

  19. Effect of Fodder Tree Species with Condensed Tannin Contents on In vitro Methane Production.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Ernestina Gutiérrez; Medina, Leonardo Hernández; Benavides, Liliana Márquez; Caratachea, Aureliano Juárez; Razo, Guillermo Salas; Burgos, Armin Javier Ayala; Rodríguez, Ruy Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of fodder tree species (FTS) with condensed tannin contents: Cordia elaeagnoides, Platymiscium lasiocarpum, Vitex mollis, and Haematoxylon brasiletto, on in vitro methane (CH4) production at 24 h post incubation. The analysis was performed using the in vitro gas production technique, with three levels of inclusion/species: 600, 800, and 1,000 mg and with 4 replicates/species/level of inclusion. The substrate was incubated at 39°C, and the gas and CH4 production were recorded at 4, 8, 12, and 24 h post incubation. The data collected was analyzed through Pearson correlation, polinomial regression and fixed effects models. There were negative correlations between FTS-total gas volume (r = -0.40; p<0.001); FTS-volume of CH4 produced (r = -0.40; p<0.001) and between the inclusion level-volume of CH4 produced (r = -0.20; p<0.001). As well as a positive correlation between hours post incubation-total gas volume (r = 0.42; p<0.001) and between hours post incubation-volume of CH4 produced (r = 0.48; p<0.001). The FTS: C. elaeagnoides, V. mollis, and H. brasiletto have potential, in the three inclusion levels analyzed, to reduce CH4 emission on in vitro trials (>32.7%), taking into account the total CH4 production at 24 h of the forage used as reference (Avena sativa). It's suggested that C. elaeagnoides-according to its crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and condensed tannins content- is the best alternative within the FTS analyzed, for feeding ruminants and for the control of CH4 emissions during the dry season.

  20. Effect of Fodder Tree Species with Condensed Tannin Contents on In vitro Methane Production

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Ernestina Gutiérrez; Medina, Leonardo Hernández; Benavides, Liliana Márquez; Caratachea, Aureliano Juárez; Razo, Guillermo Salas; Burgos, Armin Javier Ayala; Rodríguez, Ruy Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of fodder tree species (FTS) with condensed tannin contents: Cordia elaeagnoides, Platymiscium lasiocarpum, Vitex mollis, and Haematoxylon brasiletto, on in vitro methane (CH4) production at 24 h post incubation. The analysis was performed using the in vitro gas production technique, with three levels of inclusion/species: 600, 800, and 1,000 mg and with 4 replicates/species/level of inclusion. The substrate was incubated at 39°C, and the gas and CH4 production were recorded at 4, 8, 12, and 24 h post incubation. The data collected was analyzed through Pearson correlation, polinomial regression and fixed effects models. There were negative correlations between FTS-total gas volume (r = −0.40; p<0.001); FTS-volume of CH4 produced (r = −0.40; p<0.001) and between the inclusion level-volume of CH4 produced (r = −0.20; p<0.001). As well as a positive correlation between hours post incubation-total gas volume (r = 0.42; p<0.001) and between hours post incubation-volume of CH4 produced (r = 0.48; p<0.001). The FTS: C. elaeagnoides, V. mollis, and H. brasiletto have potential, in the three inclusion levels analyzed, to reduce CH4 emission on in vitro trials (>32.7%), taking into account the total CH4 production at 24 h of the forage used as reference (Avena sativa). It’s suggested that C. elaeagnoides-according to its crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and condensed tannins content- is the best alternative within the FTS analyzed, for feeding ruminants and for the control of CH4 emissions during the dry season. PMID:26732330

  1. Effects of in vivo exposure to Roundup® on immune system of Caiman latirostris.

    PubMed

    Latorre, María Agustina; López González, Evelyn Cecilia; Larriera, Alejandro; Poletta, Gisela Laura; Siroski, Pablo Ariel

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of Roundup(®) (RU, glyphosate-based formulation) on some parameters of the immune system and growth of Caiman latirostris. Seventy-two caimans (20-day-old) from Proyecto Yacaré (Gob. Santa Fe/MUPCN) were used. Two groups were exposed for 2 months to different concentrations of RU (11 or 21 mg/L; taking into account the concentration recommended for its application in the field), while one group was maintained as control. The RU concentration was progressively decreased through the exposure period to simulate glyphosate degradation in water. Animals were measured and weighed at the beginning and end of the experiment, and blood samples taken after exposure to determine total and differential white blood cell (WBC) counts as well as total protein concentration (TPC), and for performing protein electrophoresis. The results showed that, compared against control hosts, there was a decrease in WBC counts, a higher percentage of heterophils, a higher TPC (with a low percentage of F2 protein fraction), and a negative effect on growth in the young caimans exposed to RU. These results demonstrate that in vivo exposure to RU induced alterations in the selected immune parameters, plasma proteins, and growth of caimans, thereby providing relevant information about the effects of this type of pesticide in this important species in the Argentinian wetlands.

  2. Roundup effects on oxidative stress parameters and recovery pattern of Rhamdia quelen.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Charlene Cavalheiro; da Fonseca, Milene Braga; Loro, Vânia Lúcia; Santi, Adriana; Cattaneo, Roberta; Clasen, Bárbara; Pretto, Alexandra; Morsch, Vera Maria

    2011-05-01

    Antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress indicators were evaluated in fish exposed to different concentrations of the herbicide Roundup 48% (Monsanto, St. Louis, MO): control (none), 0.45, or 0.95 mg/l. After exposure for 8 days to herbicide, fish were transferred to clean water for a recovery response period (also 8 days). Herbicide increased thiobarbituric acid reactive species in liver and muscle at the higher concentration and in the brain at both concentrations. Protein carbonyl in liver increased after exposure. Catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and ascorbic acid levels in liver did not change in fish exposed to both concentrations. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) levels decreased at both concentrations. The nonprotein thiol levels decreased at the 0.95 mg/l concentration. During the recovery period, some of the parameters that had altered, such as protein carbonyl content, later recovered. However, some enzymes reacted during this period, e.g., GST increased its activity, possibly indicating a compensatory response against the toxic conditions. In contrast, CAT and SOD activities decreased during the recovery period, indicating herbicide toxicity. Oxidative stress that occurred during the exposure period was likely due to the increased lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content. The results concerning oxidative and antioxidant profiles indicate that short-term exposure to herbicide is capable of causing oxidative stress in fish tissues.

  3. Presence of CP4-EPSPS Component in Roundup Ready Soybean-Derived Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Honghong; Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Changqing; Xiao, Xiao; Zhou, Xinghu; Xu, Sheng; Shen, Wenbiao; Huang, Ming

    2012-01-01

    With the widespread use of Roundup Ready soya (event 40-3-2) (RRS), the traceability of transgenic components, especially protein residues, in different soya-related foodstuffs has become an important issue. In this report, transgenic components in commercial soya (including RRS) protein concentrates were firstly detected by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot. The results illustrated the different degradation patterns of the cp4-epsps gene and corresponding protein in RRS-derived protein concentrates. Furthermore, western blot was applied to investigate the single factor of food processing and the matrix on the disintegration of CP4-EPSPS protein in RRS powder and soya-derived foodstuffs, and trace the degradation patterns during the food production chain. Our results suggested that the exogenous full length of CP4-EPSPS protein in RRS powder was distinctively sensitive to various heat treatments, including heat, microwave and autoclave (especially), and only one degradation fragment (23.4 kD) of CP4-EPSPS protein was apparently observed when autoclaving was applied. By tracing the protein degradation during RRS-related products, including tofu, tou-kan, and bean curd sheets, however, four degradation fragments (42.9, 38.2, 32.2 and 23.4 kD) were displayed, suggesting that both boiling and bittern adding procedures might have extensive effects on CP4-EPSPS protein degradation. Our results thus confirmed that the distinctive residues of the CP4-EPSPS component could be traced in RRS-related foodstuffs. PMID:22408431

  4. Presence of CP4-EPSPS component in roundup ready soybean-derived food products.

    PubMed

    Wu, Honghong; Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Changqing; Xiao, Xiao; Zhou, Xinghu; Xu, Sheng; Shen, Wenbiao; Huang, Ming

    2012-01-01

    With the widespread use of Roundup Ready soya (event 40-3-2) (RRS), the traceability of transgenic components, especially protein residues, in different soya-related foodstuffs has become an important issue. In this report, transgenic components in commercial soya (including RRS) protein concentrates were firstly detected by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot. The results illustrated the different degradation patterns of the cp4-epsps gene and corresponding protein in RRS-derived protein concentrates. Furthermore, western blot was applied to investigate the single factor of food processing and the matrix on the disintegration of CP4-EPSPS protein in RRS powder and soya-derived foodstuffs, and trace the degradation patterns during the food production chain. Our results suggested that the exogenous full length of CP4-EPSPS protein in RRS powder was distinctively sensitive to various heat treatments, including heat, microwave and autoclave (especially), and only one degradation fragment (23.4 kD) of CP4-EPSPS protein was apparently observed when autoclaving was applied. By tracing the protein degradation during RRS-related products, including tofu, tou-kan, and bean curd sheets, however, four degradation fragments (42.9, 38.2, 32.2 and 23.4 kD) were displayed, suggesting that both boiling and bittern adding procedures might have extensive effects on CP4-EPSPS protein degradation. Our results thus confirmed that the distinctive residues of the CP4-EPSPS component could be traced in RRS-related foodstuffs.

  5. [Detection of genetically modified soy (Roundup-Ready) in processed food products].

    PubMed

    Hagen, M; Beneke, B

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the application of a qualitative and a quantitative method of analysis to detect genetically modified RR-Soy (Roundup-Ready Soy) in processed foods is described. A total of 179 various products containing soy such as baby food and diet products, soy drinks and desserts, tofu and tofu products, soy based meat substitutes, soy protein, breads, flour, granules, cereals, noodles, soy bean sprouts, fats and oils as well as condiments were investigated following the pattern of the section 35 LMBG-method L 23.01.22-1. The DNA was extracted from the samples and analysed using a soybean specific lectin gene PCR as well as a PCR, specific for the genetic modification. Additional, by means of PCR in combination with fluorescence-detection (TaqMan 5'-Nuclease Assay), suspicious samples were subjected to a real-time quantification of the percentage of genetically modified RR-Soy. The methods of analysis proved to be extremely sensitive and specific in regard to the food groups checked. The fats and oils, as well as the condiments were the exceptions in which amplifiable soy DNA could not be detected. The genetic modification of RR-Soy was detected in 34 samples. Eight of these samples contained more than 1% of RR-Soy. It is necessary to determine the percentage of transgenic soy in order to assess whether genetically modified ingredients were deliberately added, or whether they were caused by technically unavoidable contamination (for example during transportation and processing).

  6. Genotoxicity testing of the herbicide Roundup and its active ingredient glyphosate isopropylamine using the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test, Salmonella mutagenicity test, and Allium anaphase-telophase test.

    PubMed

    Rank, J; Jensen, A G; Skov, B; Pedersen, L H; Jensen, K

    1993-06-01

    The genotoxic potential of the herbicide Roundup and its active agent, glyphosate isopropylamine salt, was studied in three different assays. No clastogenic effects were found in the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test for either of the two agents. In the Salmonella assay only Roundup was tested. It showed a weak mutagenic effect for the concentrations 360 micrograms/plate in TA98 (without S9) and 720 micrograms/plate in TA100 (with S9). These concentrations are close to the toxic level. The anaphase-telophase Allium test showed no effect for the glyphosate isopropylamine salt, but a significant increase in chromosome aberrations appeared after treatment with Roundup at concentrations of 1.44 and 2.88 mg/l when calculated as glyphosate isopropylamine. The most frequent aberrations observed could be characterized as disturbances of the spindle.

  7. European eel (Anguilla anguilla) genotoxic and pro-oxidant responses following short-term exposure to Roundup--a glyphosate-based herbicide.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, S; Gaivão, I; Santos, M A; Pacheco, M

    2010-09-01

    The glyphosate-based herbicide, Roundup, is among the most used pesticides worldwide. Due to its extensive use, it has been widely detected in aquatic ecosystems representing a potential threat to non-target organisms, including fish. Despite the negative impact of this commercial formulation in fish, as described in literature, the scarcity of studies assessing its genotoxicity and underlying mechanisms is evident. Therefore, as a novel approach, this study evaluated the genotoxic potential of Roundup to blood cells of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) following short-term (1 and 3 days) exposure to environmentally realistic concentrations (58 and 116 microg/l), addressing also the possible association with oxidative stress. Thus, comet and erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENAs) assays were adopted, as genotoxic end points, reflecting different types of genetic damage. The pro-oxidant state was assessed through enzymatic (catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase) and non-enzymatic (total glutathione content) antioxidants, as well as by lipid peroxidation (LPO) measurements. The Roundup potential to induce DNA strand breaks for both concentrations was demonstrated by the comet assay. The induction of chromosome breakage and/or segregational abnormalities was also demonstrated through the ENA assay, though only after 3-day exposure to both tested concentrations. In addition, the two genotoxic indicators were positively correlated. Antioxidant defences were unresponsive to Roundup. LPO levels increased only for the high concentration after the first day of exposure, indicating that oxidative stress caused by this agrochemical in blood was not severe. Overall results suggested that both DNA damaging effects induced by Roundup are not directly related with an increased pro-oxidant state. Moreover, it was demonstrated that environmentally relevant concentrations of Roundup can pose a health risk for fish populations.

  8. Global transcriptomic profiling demonstrates induction of oxidative stress and of compensatory cellular stress responses in brown trout exposed to glyphosate and Roundup.

    PubMed

    Uren Webster, Tamsyn M; Santos, Eduarda M

    2015-01-31

    Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup formulations, is the most widely used herbicide worldwide, and as a result contaminates surface waters and has been detected in food residues, drinking water and human urine, raising concerns for potential environmental and human health impacts. Research has shown that glyphosate and Roundup can induce a broad range of biological effects in exposed organisms, particularly via generation of oxidative stress. However, there has been no comprehensive investigation of the global molecular mechanisms of toxicity of glyphosate and Roundup for any species. We aimed to characterise and compare the global mechanisms of toxicity of glyphosate and Roundup in the liver of brown trout (Salmo trutta), an ecologically and economically important vertebrate species, using RNA-seq on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. To do this, we exposed juvenile female brown trout to 0, 0.01, 0.5 and 10 mg/L of glyphosate and Roundup (glyphosate acid equivalent) for 14 days, and sequenced 6 replicate liver samples from each treatment. We assembled the brown trout transcriptome using an optimised de novo approach, and subsequent differential expression analysis identified a total of 1020 differentially-regulated transcripts across all treatments. These included transcripts encoding components of the antioxidant system, a number of stress-response proteins and pro-apoptotic signalling molecules. Functional analysis also revealed over-representation of pathways involved in regulating of cell-proliferation and turnover, and up-regulation of energy metabolism and other metabolic processes. These transcriptional changes are consistent with generation of oxidative stress and the widespread induction of compensatory cellular stress response pathways. The mechanisms of toxicity identified were similar across both glyphosate and Roundup treatments, including for environmentally relevant concentrations. The significant alterations in transcript expression observed

  9. Carbon-based stock feed additives: a research methodology that explores ecologically delivered C biosequestration, alongside live weights, feed use efficiency, soil nutrient retention, and perennial fodder plantations.

    PubMed

    McHenry, Mark P

    2010-01-30

    There is considerable interest in reliable and practical methods to sequester carbon (C) into agricultural soils to both reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations and improve conventional productivity. This article outlines a research methodology to refine the efficacy and economics of using long-lived C species (biochars) as stock feed additives, produced from farm waste biomass, for ecologically delivered soil biosequestration, while generating renewable bioenergy. This article also draws attention to potential parallel outputs including annual feed use efficiency, fodder species expansion, soil nutrient retention, aquatic habitat protection, and forestry revegetation, using nitrogen-fixing perennial fodder plant species. A methodology to generate parallel results including standing fodder tree C sequestration, optimised production of Acacia spp. biochar, animal growth on high-tannin fodder with biochar feed additives, soil nutrient and stable C fractions, and economics of Acacia spp. bioenergy production. This form of research is contextually dependent on the regional agricultural production system, legislation, and surrounding ecosystem. Therefore, this article suggests the use of a scenario approach to include regionally specific levels of biochar integration with respect to the local prices for C, fossil fuels, meat and livestock, fertilisers, fodder, feed additives, water, renewable energy, revegetation and capital. (c) 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Maize supplementation of Pelibuey sheep in a silvopastoral system: fodder selection, nutrient intake and resilience against gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Retama-Flores, C; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Sandoval-Castro, C A; Aguilar-Caballero, A J; Cámara-Sarmiento, R; Canul-Ku, H L

    2012-01-01

    This trial evaluated the effect of maize supplementation on the ingestive behavior, nutrient intake and the resilience against gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection of hair sheep in a silvopastoral system containing tropical grasses and legume trees. In addition, it attempted to determine the metabolic cost of the natural GIN infection in supplemented and non-supplemented animals. Twenty-nine 3-month-old lambs (male and female), raised nematode free, were allocated to four groups: I-NS (infected, not supplemented, n = 8), I-S (infected, supplemented with maize at 1.5% live weight (LW), n = 7), T-NS (treated with moxidectin 0.2 mg/kg LW every 28 days, and not supplemented, n = 7) and T-S (treated with moxidectin and supplemented with maize at 1.5% LW, n = 7). During the 70-day trial, fodder intake, fodder selection, LW change (LWC), red blood cell counts (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Ht) and eggs per gram of feces (EPG) were measured every 14 days. Supplement consumption was recorded daily. Metabolizable energy (ME) and protein (MP) consumption from the feeds were estimated. Maize supplementation helped to improve the resilience of hair sheep lambs against GIN infections. The I-S and T-NS groups showed similar LWC, RBC, Hb and Ht (P > 0.05) and both were higher than those in the I-NS group (P < 0.05). No difference was found in EPG between the I-NS and the I-S groups (P > 0.05). No effect of sex was observed in the different variables. Although all groups showed low dry matter intake (DMI) (< 2% LW), supplemented groups (T-S and I-S) showed higher total DMI (fodder + maize; P < 0.05), hence higher ME and MP intakes than the non-supplemented groups (T-NS and I-NS). All groups showed similar fodder selection patterns. The estimated metabolic cost of parasitism was ME = 0.70 MJ/day and MP = 9.2 g/day in the I-S animals. Meanwhile, the cost in the I-NS animals was ME = 1.46 MJ/day and MP = 12.71 g/day. Maize supplementation was an economically viable strategy

  11. [The effect of fodder on the susceptibility of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) to nuclear polyhedrosis virus].

    PubMed

    Bakhvalov, S A; Bakhvalova, V N

    2009-01-01

    Gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) growing on different feeding substrates was shown to affect their susceptibility to nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV). The insects feeding on birch leaves had the lowest sensitivity to NPV than those on willow leaves, but the insects growing on pine needles showed the highest susceptibility. The sensitivity of the gypsy moths on willow leaves was higher than that of the gypsy moths on birch leaves and lower than that of those on pine needles. At the same time, it did not differ from that of the caterpillars on artificial feeding. The virus polyhedrons formed in the caterpillars on birch or willow leaves were more than those on another fodder.

  12. Environmental fate and non-target impact of glyphosate-based herbicide (Roundup) in a subtropical wetland.

    PubMed

    Tsui, M T K; Chu, L M

    2008-03-01

    Mai Po Nature Reserve (Hong Kong) is an internationally important wetland for waterbirds. Roundup, a formulation based on glyphosate, has been used to control the widespread weeds within the reserve for many years but the fate and non-target impact of the herbicide is unknown. To fill this knowledge gap, we applied Roundup by hand-held sprayer to an estuarine and a freshwater pond in the dry season of year 2002. The surface water and sediment were sampled routinely for glyphosate concentrations following one month of application. In situ bioassays using local edible fish species were performed along with the herbicide application. Up to 52% of glyphosate in the surface water was transported to the unapplied regions by wind-driven current in the estuarine pond at 1 DPT (day post treatment). For both ponds, glyphosate concentrations in the water decreased rapidly after 1-3 DPT, but then decreased gradually over time. Both physical adsorption to the bottom sediments and microbial degradation are thought to contribute to these decreases. Interestingly, the persistence of glyphosate in the freshwater pond was longer than in the estuarine system, which is likely due to the considerably higher concentrations of chelating metals (i.e. Cu and Fe) present in the sediment (4.5 and 11-fold higher, respectively) which potentially reduced the bioavailability of glyphosate to the microbial decomposers. Lastly, fishes used in the in situ bioassays (both in applied and unapplied areas) showed similar survival rates, indicating that the use of Roundup at the provided application rate posed no serious hazard.

  13. Prioritizing fodder species based on traditional knowledge: a case study of mithun (Bos frontalis) in Dulongjiang area, Yunnan Province, Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yanfei; Hu, Guoxiong; Ranjitkar, Sailesh; Wang, Yuhua; Bu, Dengpan; Pei, Shengji; Ou, Xiaokun; Lu, Yang; Ma, Xuelan; Xu, Jianchu

    2017-05-04

    Livestock rearing is one of the oldest and most important types of smallholder farming worldwide. The sustainability of livestock production depends on the efficient utilization of locally available resources. Some traditional methods of raising livestock may offer valuable lessons in this regard. This study documented and evaluated local knowledge of wild forage plants in the Dulongjiang area in Southwest China in the context of rearing mithun (Bos frontalis) in order to provide a sound evidence base for tree fodder selection and the establishment of integrated tree-crop-livestock systems. The snowball technique was used to identify key informants with specific knowledge about the topic. Free listing and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 58 households. Participatory investigation and transit walks were used to investigate potential fodder species. Ethnobotanical information was collected, documented and organized. Overall, 142 wild forage plants from 58 families and 117 genera were identified. Species of the Poaceae, Rosaceae and Urticaceae families were most abundant, with 16, 14 and 11 species respectively identified as fodder plants. Our results indicated that tree/shrub forage plays a major role in the diet of mithun, unlike that of other ruminants. Mithun prefers to browse and move around the forest in search of food, particularly rough and even barbed leaves. Tree species like Debregeasia orientalis, Saurauia polyneura and Rubus species were identified as being important fodder sources. Farmers in this area have traditionally relied on common property resources such as community-managed forests and grasslands to feed their livestock. Farmers have strong incentive to raise mithuns rather than other livestock species due to Dulong people's cultural preferences. The wide variety of plants cited by the informants demonstrate the importance of traditional knowledge in gathering information about forage resources. This diversity also offers the

  14. Genotoxic effects of Roundup Full II® on lymphocytes of Chaetophractus villosus (Xenarthra, Mammalia): In vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Luaces, Juan Pablo; Rossi, Luis Francisco; Chirino, Mónica Gabriela; Browne, Melanie; Merani, María Susana; Mudry, Marta Dolores

    2017-01-01

    In Argentina, Chaetophractus villosus has a wide distribution that overlaps with agricultural areas where soybean is the predominant crop. In such areas the pesticide Roundup Full II® (RU) is widely applied. The genotoxic effect of its active ingredient glyphosate (RU is 66.2% glyphosate) on the peripheral blood lymphocytes of C. villosus was tested over a range of concentrations (280, 420, 560, 1120 μmol/L). Culture medium without glyphosate served as negative control, while medium containing mitomycin C served as positive control. Genetic damage was characterized in terms of the percentage of cells with chromosome aberrations (CA), the mean number of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) per cell, and the modification of cell proliferation kinetics via the calculation of the replication index. Significant increases (p < 0.0001) were seen in the CA frequency and the mean number of SCEs per cell compared to negative controls at all the RU concentrations tested. Chromatid breaks, the only form of CA observed, under the 560 μmol/L RU conditions and in presence of mitomycin C were four to five times more common than at lower concentrations, while no viable cells were seen in the 1120 μmol/L treatment. The mean number of SCEs per cell was significantly higher under the 280 μmol/L RU conditions than the 420 or 560 μmol/L RU conditions; cells cultivated in the presence of MMC also showed significantly more SCEs. All the RU concentrations tested (except in the 1120 μmol/L RU treatment [no viable cells]) induced a significant reduction in the replication index (p < 0.0001). The present results confirm the genotoxic effects of RU on C. villosus lymphocytes in vitro, strongly suggesting that exposure to RU could induce DNA damage in C. villosus wildlife.

  15. Competitive stress can make the herbicide Roundup® more deadly to larval amphibians.

    PubMed

    Jones, Devin K; Hammond, John I; Relyea, Rick A

    2011-02-01

    Toxicity assessments on nontarget organisms have largely been addressed using short-term, single-species laboratory experiments. Although extremely helpful, these experiments inherently lack many pervasive ecological stressors found in nature. Though a substantial challenge, incorporating these ecological stressors in contaminant studies would shed light on potential synergistic effects. For the world's leading herbicide, glyphosate, we know little about how natural stressors affect the toxicity to nontarget organisms. To explore how the natural stress of competition might interact with a glyphosate-based herbicide, we used outdoor mesocosms containing three tadpole species that were exposed to a factorial combination of three glyphosate concentrations (0, 1, 2, or 3 mg acid equivalent (a.e.)/L of the commercial formulation Roundup Original MAX®) and three tadpole densities (low, medium, or high). We found that increased tadpole density caused declines in tadpole growth, but also made the herbicide significantly more lethal to one species. Whereas the median lethal concentration (LC50) values were similar across all densities for gray treefrogs (Hyla versicolor; 1.7-2.3 mg a.e./L) and green frogs (Rana clamitans; 2.2-2.6 mg a.e./L), the LC50 values for bullfrogs (R. catesbeiana) were 2.1 to 2.2 mg a.e./L at low and medium densities, but declined to 1.6 mg a.e./L at high densities. The large decrease in amphibian survival with increased herbicide concentration was associated with increases in periphyton abundance. We also found evidence that temperature stratification lead to herbicide stratification in the water column, confirming the results of a previous study and raising important questions about exposure risk in natural systems. © 2010 SETAC.

  16. Genotoxic effects of Roundup Full II® on lymphocytes of Chaetophractus villosus (Xenarthra, Mammalia): In vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    Chirino, Mónica Gabriela; Browne, Melanie; Mudry, Marta Dolores

    2017-01-01

    In Argentina, Chaetophractus villosus has a wide distribution that overlaps with agricultural areas where soybean is the predominant crop. In such areas the pesticide Roundup Full II® (RU) is widely applied. The genotoxic effect of its active ingredient glyphosate (RU is 66.2% glyphosate) on the peripheral blood lymphocytes of C. villosus was tested over a range of concentrations (280, 420, 560, 1120 μmol/L). Culture medium without glyphosate served as negative control, while medium containing mitomycin C served as positive control. Genetic damage was characterized in terms of the percentage of cells with chromosome aberrations (CA), the mean number of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) per cell, and the modification of cell proliferation kinetics via the calculation of the replication index. Significant increases (p < 0.0001) were seen in the CA frequency and the mean number of SCEs per cell compared to negative controls at all the RU concentrations tested. Chromatid breaks, the only form of CA observed, under the 560 μmol/L RU conditions and in presence of mitomycin C were four to five times more common than at lower concentrations, while no viable cells were seen in the 1120 μmol/L treatment. The mean number of SCEs per cell was significantly higher under the 280 μmol/L RU conditions than the 420 or 560 μmol/L RU conditions; cells cultivated in the presence of MMC also showed significantly more SCEs. All the RU concentrations tested (except in the 1120 μmol/L RU treatment [no viable cells]) induced a significant reduction in the replication index (p < 0.0001). The present results confirm the genotoxic effects of RU on C. villosus lymphocytes in vitro, strongly suggesting that exposure to RU could induce DNA damage in C. villosus wildlife. PMID:28817615

  17. Cost-Effective Cloud Computing: A Case Study Using the Comparative Genomics Tool, Roundup

    PubMed Central

    Kudtarkar, Parul; DeLuca, Todd F.; Fusaro, Vincent A.; Tonellato, Peter J.; Wall, Dennis P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Comparative genomics resources, such as ortholog detection tools and repositories are rapidly increasing in scale and complexity. Cloud computing is an emerging technological paradigm that enables researchers to dynamically build a dedicated virtual cluster and may represent a valuable alternative for large computational tools in bioinformatics. In the present manuscript, we optimize the computation of a large-scale comparative genomics resource—Roundup—using cloud computing, describe the proper operating principles required to achieve computational efficiency on the cloud, and detail important procedures for improving cost-effectiveness to ensure maximal computation at minimal costs. Methods Utilizing the comparative genomics tool, Roundup, as a case study, we computed orthologs among 902 fully sequenced genomes on Amazon’s Elastic Compute Cloud. For managing the ortholog processes, we designed a strategy to deploy the web service, Elastic MapReduce, and maximize the use of the cloud while simultaneously minimizing costs. Specifically, we created a model to estimate cloud runtime based on the size and complexity of the genomes being compared that determines in advance the optimal order of the jobs to be submitted. Results We computed orthologous relationships for 245,323 genome-to-genome comparisons on Amazon’s computing cloud, a computation that required just over 200 hours and cost $8,000 USD, at least 40% less than expected under a strategy in which genome comparisons were submitted to the cloud randomly with respect to runtime. Our cost savings projections were based on a model that not only demonstrates the optimal strategy for deploying RSD to the cloud, but also finds the optimal cluster size to minimize waste and maximize usage. Our cost-reduction model is readily adaptable for other comparative genomics tools and potentially of significant benefit to labs seeking to take advantage of the cloud as an alternative to local computing

  18. Contamination of soil, medicinal, and fodder plants with lead and cadmium present in mine-affected areas, Northern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Nawab, Javed; Khan, Sardar; Shah, Mohammad Tahir; Qamar, Zahir; Din, Islamud; Mahmood, Qaisar; Gul, Nayab; Huang, Qing

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) concentrations in the soil and plants (medicinal and fodder) grown in chromite mining-affected areas, Northern Pakistan. Soil and plant samples were collected and analyzed for Pb and Cd concentrations using atomic absorption spectrometer. Soil pollution load indices (PLIs) were greater than 2 for both Cd and Pb, indicating high level of contamination in the study area. Furthermore, Cd concentrations in the soil surrounding the mining sites exceeded the maximum allowable limit (MAL) (0.6 mg kg(-1)), while the concentrations of Pb were lower than the MAL (350 mg kg(-1)) set by State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA) for agriculture soil. The concentrations of Cd and Pb were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the soil of the mining-contaminated sites as compared to the reference site, which can be attributed to the dispersion of toxic heavy metals, present in the bed rocks and waste of the mines. The concentrations of Pb and Cd in majority of medicinal and fodder plant species grown in surrounding areas of mines were higher than their MALs set by World Health Organization/Food Agriculture Organization (WHO/FAO) for herbal (10 and 0.3 mg kg(-1), respectively) and edible (0.3 and 0.2 mg kg(-1), respectively) plants. The high concentrations of Cd and Pb may cause contamination of the food chain and health risk.

  19. Comparison of the nutritional profile of glyphosate-tolerant corn event NK603 with that of conventional corn (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Ridley, William P; Sidhu, Ravinder S; Pyla, Paul D; Nemeth, Margaret A; Breeze, Matthew L; Astwood, James D

    2002-12-04

    The composition of glyphosate-tolerant (Roundup Ready) corn event NK603 was compared with that of conventional corn grown in the United States in 1998 and in the European Union in 1999 to assess compositional equivalence. Grain and forage samples were collected from both replicated and nonreplicated field trials, and compositional analyses were performed to measure proximates, fiber, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamin E, nine minerals, phytic acid, trypsin inhibitor, and secondary metabolites in grain as well as proximates and fiber in forage. Statistical analysis of the data was conducted to assess statistical significance at the p < 0.05 level. The values for all of the biochemical components assessed for corn event NK603 were similar to those of the nontransgenic control or were within the published range observed for nontransgenic commercial corn hybrids. In addition, the compositional profile of Roundup Ready corn event NK603 was compared with that of traditional corn hybrids grown in Europe by calculating a 99% tolerance interval to describe compositional variability in the population of traditional corn varieties in the marketplace. These comparisons, together with the history of the safe use of corn as a common component of animal feed and human food, support the conclusion that Roundup Ready corn event NK603 is compositionally equivalent to, and as safe and nutritious as, conventional corn hybrids grown commercially today.

  20. Effects of glyphosate acid and the glyphosate-commercial formulation (Roundup) on Dimorphandra wilsonii seed germination: Interference of seed respiratory metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marcelo Pedrosa; da Silva Cruz, Fernanda Vieira; Bicalho, Elisa Monteze; Borges, Felipe Viègas; Fonseca, Marcia Bacelar; Juneau, Philippe; Garcia, Queila Souza

    2017-01-01

    Glyphosate-formulations are widely used in the Brazilian Cerrado (neotropical savanna) with little or no control, threatening population of the endangered species Dimorphandra wilsonii. We investigated the toxicity of different concentrations (0, 5, 25 and 50 mg l(-1)) of glyphosate acid and one of its formulations (Roundup(®)) on seed germination in D. wilsonii. Glyphosate acid and Roundup drastically decreased seed germination by decreasing seed respiration rates. The activation of antioxidant enzymes, ascorbate peroxidase and catalase assure no hydrogen peroxide accumulation in exposed seeds. Glyphosate acid and the Roundup-formulation negatively affected the activities of enzymes associated with the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), with Complex III as its precise target. The toxicity of Roundup-formulation was greater than that of glyphosate acid due to its greater effects on respiration. The herbicide glyphosate must impair D. wilsonii seed germination by disrupting the mitochondrial ETC, resulting in decreased energy (ATP) production. Our results therefore indicate the importance of avoiding (or closely regulating) the use of glyphosate-based herbicides in natural Cerrado habitats of D. wilsonni as they are toxic to seed germination and therefore threaten conservation efforts. It will likewise be important to investigate the effects of glyphosate on the seeds of other species and to investigate the impacts of these pesticides elsewhere in the world.

  1. Detection and quantification of roundup ready soy in foods by conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Rott, Michael E; Lawrence, Tracy S; Wall, Erika M; Green, Margaret J

    2004-08-11

    Transgenic soybean line GTS-40-3-2, marketed under the trade name Roundup Ready (RR) soy, was developed by Monsanto (USA) to allow for the use of glyphosate, the active ingredient of the herbicide Roundup, as a weed control agent. RR soy was first approved in Canada for environmental release and for feed products in 1995 and later for food products in 1996 and is widely grown in Canada. Consumer concern issues have resulted in proposed labeling regulations in Canada for foods derived from genetically engineered crops. One requirement for labeling is the ability to detect and accurately quantify the amount of transgenic material present in foods. Two assays were evaluated. A conventional qualitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) assay to detect the presence of soy and RR soy and a real-time PCR to quantify the amount of RR soy present in samples that tested positive in the first assay. PCR controls consisted of certified RR soy reference material, single transgenic soybeans, and a processed food sample containing a known amount of RR soy. To test real-world applicability, a number of common grocery store food items that contain soy-based products were tested. For some samples, significant differences in amplification efficiencies during the quantitative PCR assays were observed compared to the controls, resulting in potentially large errors in quantification. A correction factor was used to try to compensate for these differences.

  2. The toxicity of Roundup® 360 SL formulation and its main constituents: glyphosate and isopropylamine towards non-target water photoautotrophs.

    PubMed

    Lipok, Jacek; Studnik, Hanna; Gruyaert, Steven

    2010-10-01

    The toxicity of commercial formulation of Roundup® 360 SL, widely used, nonselective herbicide and its main constituents, glyphosate (PMG), equimolar (1:1) isopropylamine salt of glyphosate (GIPA) and isopropylamine (IPA) was examined towards eight aquatic microphotoautotrophs; seven cyanobacterial strains representing either saline or freshwater communities, and common eukaryotic algae Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck. Autotrophs were cultured 21 days in their appropriate standard media supplemented with various amounts of Roundup®, glyphosate, GIPA and IPA. The determination of the growth of examined photoautotrophs was performed by time-course measurements of total chlorophyll content in experimental cultures. The growth rates related to corresponding concentrations of chemicals, the EC(50) values and generation doubling time were determined in order to present the toxicity Roundup® 360 SL formulation and its main constituents. Market available formulation of Roundup® was found to possess toxicity significantly higher than this, attributed to its main constituents; however both these compounds, isopropylamine and glyphosate, also inhibited the growth of examined strains in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, the interpretation of toxicity of the examined substances was found to be significantly dependent on the method of EC(50) calculation. The choice of molar or weight concentration of substances tested separately and in specific formulation was found to be essential in this matter. Due to these findings the EC(50) values were calculated based either on molar or on weight concentrations. Considering Roundup® 360 SL formulation, these values ranged from 10(-3) up to 10(-1) mM and they were one order of magnitude lower than those found for isopropylamine. Quite surprisingly the minimum EC(50) values found for glyphosate did not reach micromolar concentrations, whereas most of the EC(50) values revealed to IPA did not exceed this range. Notably, in all the cases

  3. Determining whether transgenic and endogenous plant DNA and transgenic protein are detectable in muscle from swine fed Roundup Ready soybean meal.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J C; Kolwyck, D C; Kays, S B; Whetsell, A J; Surber, J B; Cromwell, G L; Lirette, R P; Glenn, K C

    2003-06-01

    Questions regarding the digestive fate of DNA and protein from transgenic feed have been raised in regard to human consumption and commercial trade of animal products (e.g., meat, milk, and eggs) from farm animals fed transgenic crops. Using highly sensitive, well-characterized analytical methods, pork loin samples were analyzed for the presence of fragments of transgenic and endogenous plant DNA and transgenic protein from animals fed meal prepared from conventional or glyphosate-tolerant Roundup Ready (RR) soybeans. Pigs were fed diets containing 24, 19, and 14% RR or conventional soybean meal during grower, early-finisher, and late-finisher phases of growth, respectively, and longissimus muscle samples were collected (12 per treatment) after slaughter. Total DNA was extracted from the samples and analyzed by PCR, followed by Southern blot hybridization for the presence of a 272-bp fragment of the cp4 epsps coding region (encoding the synthetic enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase derived from Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4) and a 198-bp fragment of the endogenous soybean gene le1 (encoding soy lectin). Using 1 microgram of input DNA per reaction, none of the extracted samples was positive for cp4 epsps or le1 at the limit of detection (LOD) for these PCR/Southern blot assays. The LOD for these assays was shown to be approximately one diploid genome equivalent of RR soybean DNA, even in the presence of 10 micrograms of pork genomic DNA. A 185-bp fragment of the porcine preprolactin (prl) gene, used as a positive control, was amplified from all samples showing that the DNA preparations were amenable to PCR amplification. Using a competitive immunoassay with an LOD of approximately 94 ng of CP4 EPSPS protein/g of pork muscle, neither the CP4 EPSPS protein nor the immunoreactive peptide fragments were detected in loin muscle homogenates from pigs fed RR soybean meal. Taken together, these results show that neither small fragments of transgenic DNA nor

  4. Fresh and preserved green fodder modify effects of urinary acidifiers on urine pH of horses.

    PubMed

    Goren, G; Fritz, J; Dillitzer, N; Hipp, B; Kienzle, E

    2014-04-01

    Hay stabilises urine pH in horses. It is unknown whether this is an effect of structure or of chemical composition. In this study, four ponies (230-384 kg body weight [BW]) were fed six different diets with either a structure or a composition similar to hay with and without acidifiers in a cross-over experimental design in amounts to maintain body weight with the following main compounds: Fresh grass (GRASS), alfalfa hay (ALF), grass cobs (COBS), grass silage (SIL), straw (STR) or extruded straw (STRe) for 2 to 10 days. Urine pH was measured in all trials, blood pH, blood base excess and bicarbonate as well as mineral balance were determined in GRASS, ALF, STR and STRe. In the trials with straw and extruded straw, urine pH decreased significantly (STR control: 7.8 ± 0.23, acidifier: 5.2 ± 0.38) when acidifiers were added, whereas in all other diets that were based on fresh or preserved green fodder, pH did not decrease below 7. Blood pH was similarly affected by diet and acidifiers. Acidifiers had little effect on the pre-prandial blood pH, only in diet STR there was a significant reduction in relation to control. Post-prandial blood pH was significantly reduced by acidifiers in all diets. Blood bicarbonate and base excess showed corresponding effects. Faecal and renal mineral excretion and apparent mineral digestibility were not systematically affected by diet or acidifiers except for chloride. Chloride added as inorganic chloride salt had an even better apparent digestibility than chloride originating from feed. Because only green plant material stabilised acid base balance, chlorophyll and its metabolites are discussed as potential mediators of the effect of green fodder on acid base balance.

  5. Transcriptome profile analysis reflects rat liver and kidney damage following chronic ultra-low dose Roundup exposure.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, Robin; Arno, Matthew; Costanzo, Manuela; Malatesta, Manuela; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Antoniou, Michael N

    2015-08-25

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) are the major pesticides used worldwide. Converging evidence suggests that GBH, such as Roundup, pose a particular health risk to liver and kidneys although low environmentally relevant doses have not been examined. To address this issue, a 2-year study in rats administering 0.1 ppb Roundup (50 ng/L glyphosate equivalent) via drinking water (giving a daily intake of 4 ng/kg bw/day of glyphosate) was conducted. A marked increased incidence of anatomorphological and blood/urine biochemical changes was indicative of liver and kidney structure and functional pathology. In order to confirm these findings we have conducted a transcriptome microarray analysis of the liver and kidneys from these same animals. The expression of 4224 and 4447 transcript clusters (a group of probes corresponding to a known or putative gene) were found to be altered respectively in liver and kidney (p < 0.01, q < 0.08). Changes in gene expression varied from -3.5 to 3.7 fold in liver and from -4.3 to 5.3 in kidneys. Among the 1319 transcript clusters whose expression was altered in both tissues, ontological enrichment in 3 functional categories among 868 genes were found. First, genes involved in mRNA splicing and small nucleolar RNA were mostly upregulated, suggesting disruption of normal spliceosome activity. Electron microscopic analysis of hepatocytes confirmed nucleolar structural disruption. Second, genes controlling chromatin structure (especially histone-lysine N-methyltransferases) were mostly upregulated. Third, genes related to respiratory chain complex I and the tricarboxylic acid cycle were mostly downregulated. Pathway analysis suggests a modulation of the mTOR and phosphatidylinositol signalling pathways. Gene disturbances associated with the chronic administration of ultra-low dose Roundup reflect a liver and kidney lipotoxic condition and increased cellular growth that may be linked with regeneration in response to toxic effects causing damage

  6. Differential impact of Limnoperna fortunei-herbicide interaction between Roundup Max® and glyphosate on freshwater microscopic communities.

    PubMed

    Gattás, F; Vinocur, A; Graziano, M; Dos Santos Afonso, M; Pizarro, H; Cataldo, D

    2016-09-01

    Multiple anthropogenic stressors act simultaneously on the environment, with consequences different from those caused by single-stressor exposure. We investigated how the combination of the invasive mussel Limnoperna fortunei and a widely applied herbicide, Roundup Max®, affected freshwater microscopic communities and water quality. Further, we compared these results with those induced by the combination of the mussel and technical-grade glyphosate. We carried out a 34-day experiment in outdoor mesocosms, applying the following six treatments: 6 mg L(-1) of technical-grade glyphosate (G), the equivalent concentration of glyphosate in Roundup Max® (R), 100 mussels (M), the combination of mussels and herbicide either in the technical-grade or formulated form (MG and MR, respectively), and control (C). Herbicides significantly increased total phosphorus in water; R and MR showed greater initial total nitrogen and ammonium. R increased picoplankton abundance and caused an eightfold increase in phytoplankton, with high turbidity values; G had a lower effect on these variables. Herbicide-mussel combination induced an accelerated dissipation of glyphosate in water (MG 6.36 ± 0.83 mg G g DW(-1) day(-1) and MR 5.16 ± 1.26 mg G g DW(-1) day(-1)). A synergistic effect on ammonium was observed in MR but not in MG. MR and MG had an antagonistic effect on phytoplankton, which showed a drastic reduction due to grazing, as revealed by M. We provide evidence of differential effects of Roundup Max® and technical-grade glyphosate over water quality and microscopic communities, and in combination with mussels. However, in the combination of mussels and herbicides, mussels seem to play a leading role. In the presence of L. fortunei, the effects of higher nutrient availability provided by herbicides addition were counteracted by the filtration activity of mussels, which released nutrients, grazed on picoplankton and phytoplankton, and boosted the development of other

  7. Genotoxic effects of the herbicide Roundup Transorb and its active ingredient glyphosate on the fish Prochilodus lineatus.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Natália Cestari; Sofia, Silvia Helena; Martinez, Claudia B R

    2014-01-01

    Roundup Transorb (RT) is a glyphosate-based herbicide and despite its wide use around the world there are few studies comparing the effects of the active ingredient with the formulated product. In this context the purpose of this study was to compare the genotoxicity of the active ingredient glyphosate with the formulated product RT in order to clarify whether the active ingredient and the surfactant of the RT formula may exert toxic effects on the DNA molecule in juveniles of fish Prochilodus lineatus. Erythrocytes and gill cells of fish exposed to glyphosate and to RT showed DNA damage scores significantly higher than control animals. These results revealed that both glyphosate itself and RT were genotoxic to gill cells and erythrocytes of P. lineatus, suggesting that their use should be carefully monitored considering their potential impact on tropical aquatic biota. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Glyphosate-Based Herbicide Roundup® Does Not Elevate Genome-Wide Mutagenesis of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tincher, Clayton; Long, Hongan; Behringer, Megan G; Walker, Noah; Lynch, Michael

    2017-08-09

    Mutations induced by pollutants may promote pathogen evolution for example by accelerating mutations conferring antibiotic resistance. Generally, evaluating the genome-wide mutagenic effects of long-term sublethal pollutant exposure at single-nucleotide resolution is extremely difficult. To overcome this technical barrier, we use the mutation accumulation/whole genome sequencing (MA/WGS) method as a mutagenicity test, to quantitatively evaluate genome-wide mutagenesis of Escherichia coli after long-term exposure to a wide gradient of the glyphosate-based herbicide (GBH) Roundup® Concentrate Plus. The genome-wide mutation rate decreases as GBH concentration increases, suggesting that even long-term GBH exposure does not compromise the genome stability of bacteria. Copyright © 2017, G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics.

  9. Evaluation of biochemical, hematological and oxidative parameters in mice exposed to the herbicide glyphosate-Roundup®

    PubMed Central

    Jasper, Raquel; Locatelli, Gabriel Olivo; Pilati, Celso

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the toxicity of hepatic, hematological, and oxidative effects of glyphosate-Roundup® on male and female albino Swiss mice. The animals were treated orally with either 50 or 500 mg/kg body weight of the herbicide, on a daily basis for a period of 15 days. Distilled water was used as control treatment. Samples of blood and hepatic tissue were collected at the end of the treatment. Hepatotoxicity was monitored by quantitative analysis of the serum enzymes ALT, AST, and γ-GT and renal toxicity by urea and creatinine. We also investigated liver tissues histopathologically. Alterations of hematological parameters were monitored by RBC, WBC, hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCV, MCH, and MCHC. TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) and NPSH (non-protein thiols) were analyzed in the liver to assess oxidative damage. Significant increases in the levels of hepatic enzymes (ALT, AST, and γ-GT) were observed for both herbicide treatments, but no considerable differences were found by histological analysis. The hematological parameters showed significant alterations (500 mg/kg body weight) with reductions of RBC, hematocrit, and hemoglobin, together with a significant increase of MCV, in both sexes of mice. In males, there was an important increase in lipid peroxidation at both dosage levels, together with an NPSH decrease in the hepatic tissue, whereas in females significant changes in these parameters were observed only at the higher dose rate. The results of this study indicate that glyphosate-Roundup® can promote hematological and hepatic alterations, even at subacute exposure, which could be related to the induction of reactive oxygen species. PMID:23554553

  10. Evaluation of biochemical, hematological and oxidative parameters in mice exposed to the herbicide glyphosate-Roundup(®).

    PubMed

    Jasper, Raquel; Locatelli, Gabriel Olivo; Pilati, Celso; Locatelli, Claudriana

    2012-09-01

    We evaluated the toxicity of hepatic, hematological, and oxidative effects of glyphosate-Roundup(®) on male and female albino Swiss mice. The animals were treated orally with either 50 or 500 mg/kg body weight of the herbicide, on a daily basis for a period of 15 days. Distilled water was used as control treatment. Samples of blood and hepatic tissue were collected at the end of the treatment. Hepatotoxicity was monitored by quantitative analysis of the serum enzymes ALT, AST, and γ-GT and renal toxicity by urea and creatinine. We also investigated liver tissues histopathologically. Alterations of hematological parameters were monitored by RBC, WBC, hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCV, MCH, and MCHC. TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) and NPSH (non-protein thiols) were analyzed in the liver to assess oxidative damage. Significant increases in the levels of hepatic enzymes (ALT, AST, and γ-GT) were observed for both herbicide treatments, but no considerable differences were found by histological analysis. The hematological parameters showed significant alterations (500 mg/kg body weight) with reductions of RBC, hematocrit, and hemoglobin, together with a significant increase of MCV, in both sexes of mice. In males, there was an important increase in lipid peroxidation at both dosage levels, together with an NPSH decrease in the hepatic tissue, whereas in females significant changes in these parameters were observed only at the higher dose rate. The results of this study indicate that glyphosate-Roundup(®) can promote hematological and hepatic alterations, even at subacute exposure, which could be related to the induction of reactive oxygen species.

  11. [The transfer of 90Sr and of 137Cs radionuclides in the chain of soil-fodder-animal products in the area contaminated as a consequence of the Chernobyl AES accident].

    PubMed

    Spirin, E V; Aleksakhin, R M; Kalmykov, M V; Ageets, V Iu; Averin, V S; Lazarev, N M; Cavellin, G D; Biesold, H

    2006-01-01

    The database on 137Cs and or 90Sr transfer factors in the soil-fodder-animal products chain compiled in the framework of the project "Radioecological Consequences of the Chernobyl Accident" under the French-German Initiative was analyzed. The 137Cs transfer factors were determined into 10 fodder types for farm animals. The 137Cs and 90Sr transfer from daily diet to milk is practically independent from milk yield and season and is about 0.83% and 0.16%. 137Cs transfer factor into beef (adult animals) is about to 2.4% from the daily uptake with fodder per 1 kg meat.

  12. Salinity tolerance turfgrass: history and prospects.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Kamal; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor

    2013-01-01

    Land and water resources are becoming scarce and are insufficient to sustain the burgeoning population. Salinity is one of the most important abiotic stresses affecting agricultural productions across the world. Cultivation of salt-tolerant turfgrass species may be promising option under such conditions where poor quality water can also be used for these crops. Coastal lands in developing countries can be used to grow such crops, and seawater can be used for irrigation of purposes. These plants can be grown using land and water unsuitable for conventional crops and can provide food, fuel, fodder, fibber, resin, essential oils, and pharmaceutical products and can be used for landscape reintegration. There are a number of potential turfgrass species that may be appropriate at various salinity levels of seawater. The goal of this review is to create greater awareness of salt-tolerant turfgrasses, their current and potential uses, and their potential use in developing countries. The future for irrigating turf may rely on the use of moderate- to high-salinity water and, in order to ensure that the turf system is sustainable, will rely on the use of salt-tolerant grasses and an improved knowledge of the effects of salinity on turfgrasses.

  13. Salinity Tolerance Turfgrass: History and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Kamal; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor

    2013-01-01

    Land and water resources are becoming scarce and are insufficient to sustain the burgeoning population. Salinity is one of the most important abiotic stresses affecting agricultural productions across the world. Cultivation of salt-tolerant turfgrass species may be promising option under such conditions where poor quality water can also be used for these crops. Coastal lands in developing countries can be used to grow such crops, and seawater can be used for irrigation of purposes. These plants can be grown using land and water unsuitable for conventional crops and can provide food, fuel, fodder, fibber, resin, essential oils, and pharmaceutical products and can be used for landscape reintegration. There are a number of potential turfgrass species that may be appropriate at various salinity levels of seawater. The goal of this review is to create greater awareness of salt-tolerant turfgrasses, their current and potential uses, and their potential use in developing countries. The future for irrigating turf may rely on the use of moderate- to high-salinity water and, in order to ensure that the turf system is sustainable, will rely on the use of salt-tolerant grasses and an improved knowledge of the effects of salinity on turfgrasses. PMID:24222734

  14. Multiple effects of a commercial Roundup® formulation on the soil filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans at low doses: evidence of an unexpected impact on energetic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Valérie; Oestreicher, Nathalie; Vélot, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Soil microorganisms are highly exposed to glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH), especially to Roundup® which is widely used worldwide. However, studies on the effects of GBH formulations on specific non-rhizosphere soil microbial species are scarce. We evaluated the toxicity of a commercial formulation of Roundup® (R450), containing 450 g/L of glyphosate (GLY), on the soil filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, an experimental model microorganism. The median lethal dose (LD50) on solid media was between 90 and 112 mg/L GLY (among adjuvants, which are also included in the Roundup® formulation), which corresponds to a dilution percentage about 100 times lower than that used in agriculture. The LOAEL and NOAEL (lowest- and no-observed-adverse-effect levels) associated to morphology and growth were 33.75 and 31.5 mg/L GLY among adjuvants, respectively. The formulation R450 proved to be much more active than technical GLY. At the LD50 and lower concentrations, R450 impaired growth, cellular polarity, endocytosis, and mitochondria (average number, total volume and metabolism). In contrast with the depletion of mitochondrial activities reported in animal studies, R450 caused a stimulation of mitochondrial enzyme activities, thus revealing a different mode of action of Roundup® on energetic metabolism. These mitochondrial disruptions were also evident at a low dose corresponding to the NOAEL for macroscopic parameters, indicating that these mitochondrial biomarkers are more sensitive than those for growth and morphological ones. Altogether, our data indicate that GBH toxic effects on soil filamentous fungi, and thus potential impairment of soil ecosystems, may occur at doses far below recommended agricultural application rate.

  15. Lipid peroxidation in the freshwater shrimp Caridina nilotica as a biomarker of Roundup(®) herbicide pollution of freshwater systems in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mensah, P K; Palmer, C G; Muller, W J

    2012-01-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides used to control weeds and invading alien plant species in South Africa ultimately end up in freshwater ecosystems, but no South African environmental water quality guideline exists to regulate these bio-active chemicals. Ecotoxicological tests to assess the possibility of using lipid peroxidation (LPx) in Caridina nilotica as a potential biomarker of Roundup(®), a glyphosate-based herbicide, pollution were conducted. In two separate tests, 40 days post hatch shrimps were exposed to different concentrations of 4.3, 6.7, 10.5, 16.4, 25.6 and 40.0 mg/L in a 96 h acute toxicity test; and 2.2, 2.8, 3.4, 4.3 and 5.4 mg/L in a 21 d chronic toxicity test, using static-non renewal and static-renewal methods, respectively. Shrimp whole body LPx was estimated by thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) assay, performed by a malondialdehyde (MDA) reaction with 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBA) measured spectrophotometrically. Final MDA concentrations were expressed as nmol MDA produced/mg protein. Results showed that LPx was significantly lower in control animals than in animals exposed to different Roundup(®) concentrations, (p < 0.05). The present work provides an ecotoxicological basis for the possible use of LPx in Caridina nilotica as a biomarker for monitoring Roundup(®) pollution in freshwater ecosystems.

  16. Genotoxicity of the herbicide formulation Roundup (glyphosate) in broad-snouted caiman (Caiman latirostris) evidenced by the Comet assay and the Micronucleus test.

    PubMed

    Poletta, G L; Larriera, A; Kleinsorge, E; Mudry, M D

    2009-01-31

    The genotoxicity of pesticides is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the genotoxic potential of a widely used herbicide formulation, Roundup (glyphosate), in erythrocytes of broad-snouted caiman (Caiman latirostris) after in ovo exposure. Caiman embryos were exposed at early embryonic stage to different sub-lethal concentrations of Roundup (50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 750, 1000, 1250 and 1750microg/egg). At time of hatching, blood samples were obtained from each animal and two short-term tests, the Comet assay and the Micronucleus (MN) test, were performed on erythrocytes to assess DNA damage. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed at a concentration of 500microg/egg or higher, compared to untreated control animals (p<0.05). Results from both the Comet assay and the MN test revealed a concentration-dependent effect. This study demonstrated adverse effects of Roundup on DNA of C. latirostris and confirmed that the Comet assay and the MN test applied on caiman erythrocytes are useful tools in determining potential genotoxicity of pesticides. The identification of sentinel species as well as sensitive biomarkers among the natural biota is imperative to thoroughly evaluate genetic damage, which has significant consequences for short- and long-term survival of the natural species.

  17. Genotoxic effects of the herbicide Roundup(®) in the fish Corydoras paleatus (Jenyns 1842) after short-term, environmentally low concentration exposure.

    PubMed

    de Castilhos Ghisi, Nédia; Cestari, Marta Margarete

    2013-04-01

    The glyphosate-based herbicide, Roundup(®), is one of the most used pesticides worldwide. In concert with the advent of transgenic crops resistant to glyphosate, the use of this pesticide has led to an increase in agricultural yields. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effect that the herbicide Roundup(®) (at a concentration of 6.67 μg/L, corresponding to 3.20 μg/L glyphosate) can have on the fish Corydoras paleatus. Treatment groups were exposed for 3, 6, and 9 days, and effects were analyzed using the piscine micronucleus test (PMT) and comet assay. A group subjected to filtered water only was used as a negative control. The PMT did not show differences between the control and exposed groups for any of the treatment times. In contrast, the comet assay showed a high rate of DNA damage in group exposed to Roundup(®) for all treatment times, both for blood and hepatic cells. We conclude that for the low concentration used in this research, the herbicide shows potential genotoxic effects. Future research will be important in evaluating the effects of this substance, whose presence in the environment is ever-increasing.

  18. Effect of sugar beet tubers as a partial replacer to green fodder on production performance and economics of lactating Surti buffaloes in lean period.

    PubMed

    Sorathiya, L M; Patel, M D; Tyagi, K K; Fulsoundar, A B; Raval, A P

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of sugar beet tubers as a replacer to green fodder on production performance and economics of lactating Surti buffaloes. This trial was conducted at the Livestock Research Station, Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari. Twenty lactating Surti buffaloes in a changeover experimental design were selected to assess the effects of replacing green fodder with sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) tubers on production performance, economics of feeding sugar beet and blood biochemical profile. Half (50%) of the hybrid Napier was replaced with sliced sugar beet tubers in the ration of experimental animals. Partial replacement of hybrid Napier with that of sugar beet tubers numerically improved dry matter intake, milk yield, 4% fat corrected milk and milk composition parameters such as fat, solid non-fat, protein and lactose, but not significantly. The blood parameters were in normal range and non-significant except that of glucose and triglycerides, which were increased in the sugar beet group. Replacing sugar beet tubers also proved to be cost-effective with improved net profit around Rs. 6.63/day. It can be concluded that 50% hybrid Napier fodder can be replaced with sugar beet tubers without any adverse effect on animal production performance, milk composition blood biochemical profile and economics of feeding.

  19. Effect of sugar beet tubers as a partial replacer to green fodder on production performance and economics of lactating Surti buffaloes in lean period

    PubMed Central

    Sorathiya, L. M.; Patel, M. D.; Tyagi, K. K.; Fulsoundar, A. B.; Raval, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of sugar beet tubers as a replacer to green fodder on production performance and economics of lactating Surti buffaloes. Materials and Methods: This trial was conducted at the Livestock Research Station, Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari. Twenty lactating Surti buffaloes in a changeover experimental design were selected to assess the effects of replacing green fodder with sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) tubers on production performance, economics of feeding sugar beet and blood biochemical profile. Half (50%) of the hybrid Napier was replaced with sliced sugar beet tubers in the ration of experimental animals. Results: Partial replacement of hybrid Napier with that of sugar beet tubers numerically improved dry matter intake, milk yield, 4% fat corrected milk and milk composition parameters such as fat, solid non-fat, protein and lactose, but not significantly. The blood parameters were in normal range and non-significant except that of glucose and triglycerides, which were increased in the sugar beet group. Replacing sugar beet tubers also proved to be cost-effective with improved net profit around Rs. 6.63/day. Conclusion: It can be concluded that 50% hybrid Napier fodder can be replaced with sugar beet tubers without any adverse effect on animal production performance, milk composition blood biochemical profile and economics of feeding. PMID:27046988

  20. 40 CFR 180.626 - Prothioconazole; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and rice; forage 8.0 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except sorghum, and rice; hay 7.0 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except sorghum, and rice; stover 10 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except sorghum, and rice; straw 5.0 Grain, cereal, group 15...

  1. 40 CFR 180.586 - Clothianidin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., group 16, except rice, forage 0.35 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice, hay 0.07 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice, stover 0.1 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice, straw 0.05 Grain, cereal, group 15, except rice 0.01 Grape 0.60...

  2. 40 CFR 180.586 - Clothianidin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and straw, group 16, except rice, forage 0.35 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice, hay 0.07 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice, stover 0.1 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice, straw 0.05 Grain, cereal, group 15, except rice...

  3. 40 CFR 180.626 - Prothioconazole; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and rice; forage 8.0 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except sorghum, and rice; hay 7.0 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except sorghum, and rice; stover 10 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except sorghum, and rice; straw 5.0 Grain, cereal, group 15...

  4. 40 CFR 180.493 - Dimethomorph; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... specified in the following table. Commodity Parts per million Expiration/revocation date Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, forage 0.05 5/12/04 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, hay 0.10 5/12/04 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, stover 0.15 5/12/04 Grain,...

  5. Transfer of nitrogen from a tropical legume tree to an associated fodder grass via root exudation and common mycelial networks.

    PubMed

    Jalonen, Riina; Nygren, Pekka; Sierra, Jorge

    2009-10-01

    Symbiotic dinitrogen fixation by legume trees represents a substantial N input in agroforestry systems, which may benefit the associated crops. Applying (15)N labelling, we studied N transfer via common mycelial networks (CMN) and root exudation from the legume tree Gliricidia sepium to the associated fodder grass Dichantium aristatum. The plants were grown in greenhouse in shared pots in full interaction (treatment FI) or with their root systems separated with a fine mesh that allowed N transfer via CMN only (treatment MY). Tree root exudation was measured separately with hydroponics. Nitrogen transfer estimates were based on the isotopic signature of N (delta(15)N) transferred from the donor. We obtained a range for estimates by calculating transfer with delta(15)N of tree roots and exudates. Nitrogen transfer was 3.7-14.0 and 0.7-2.5% of grass total N in treatments FI and MY, respectively. Root delta(15)N gave the lower and exudate delta(15)N the higher estimates. Transfer in FI probably occurred mainly via root exudation. Transfer in MY correlated negatively with grass root N concentration, implying that it was driven by source-sink relationships between the plants. The range of transfer estimates, depending on source delta(15)N applied, indicates the need of understanding the transfer mechanisms as a basis for reliable estimates.

  6. Effect of replacing oat fodder with fresh and chopped oak leaves on in vitro rumen fermentation, digestibility and metabolizable energy.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, K; Bhar, R; Kannan, A; Jadhav, R V; Singh, Birbal; Mal, And G

    2015-08-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of replacing oat fodder (OF) with fresh oak leaves (FOL) or chopped oak leaves (COL) on rumen fermentation and digestibility through in vitro gas production technique (IVGPT). Nine different diets were prepared by mixing OF with oak leaves (either FOL or COL) in different ratios (100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100). The rations were evaluated through Hohenheim IVGPT with 200 mg substrate and 30 ml of buffered rumen liquor. All the syringes were incubated at 39°C for 24 h in buffered rumen liquor of cattle. After 24 h, the total gas production was recorded, and the contents were analyzed for in vitro methane production, protozoa no. and ammonia-N. Chopping (p<0.01) reduced the tannin fractions as well as non-tannin phenol. Increase in levels of oak decreased total gas production, methane, organic matter (OM) digestibility, and metabolizable energy (ME) values. The polyphenol content of the substrate did not show any significant difference on the protozoal count. In vitro studies revealed that the addition of oak leaves reduced the methane production and ammonia nitrogen levels; however, it also decreased the OM digestibility and ME values linearly as the level of the oak leaves increased in the diet. Chopping was effective only at lower inclusion levels. Further studies, especially in vivo studies, are needed to explore the safe inclusion levels of oak leaves in the diet of ruminants.

  7. Versatile synthesis of PHMB-stabilized silver nanoparticles and their significant stimulating effect on fodder beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Gusev, Alexander А; Kudrinsky, Alexey A; Zakharova, Olga V; Klimov, Alexey I; Zherebin, Pavel M; Lisichkin, George V; Vasyukova, Inna A; Denisov, Albert N; Krutyakov, Yurii A

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are well-known bactericidal agents. However, information about the influence of AgNPs on the morphometric parameters and biochemical status of most important agricultural crops is limited. The present study reports the influence of AgNPs stabilized with cationic polymer polyhexamethylene biguanide hydrochloride (PHMB) on growth, development, and biochemical status of fodder beet Beta vulgaris L. under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. PHMB-stabilized AgNPs were obtained via sodium borohydride reduction of silver nitrate in an aqueous solution. The average diameter of thus prepared AgNPs was 10 nm. It appears that the results of experiments with laboratory-grown beets in the nanosilver-containing medium, where germination of seeds and growth of roots were suppressed, do not correlate with the results of greenhouse experiments. The observed growth-stimulating action of PHMB-stabilized AgNPs can be explained by the change of activity of oxidases and, consequently, by the change of auxins amount in plant tissues. In beets grown in the presence of PHMB-stabilized AgNPs no negative deviations of biological parameters from normal values were registered. Furthermore, the SEM/EDS examination revealed no presence of silver in the tissues of the studied plants.

  8. Assisted phytoremediation of mixed metal(loid)-polluted pyrite waste: effects of foliar and substrate IBA application on fodder radish.

    PubMed

    Vamerali, Teofilo; Bandiera, Marianna; Hartley, William; Carletti, Paolo; Mosca, Giuliano

    2011-06-01

    Exogenous application of plant-growth promoting substances may potentially improve phytoremediation of metal-polluted substrates by increasing shoot and root growth. In a pot-based study, fodder radish (Raphanus sativus L. var. oleiformis Pers.) was grown in As-Zn-Cu-Co-Pb-contaminated pyrite waste, and treated with indolebutyric acid (IBA) either by foliar spraying (10 mgL(-1)), or by direct application of IBA to the substrate (0.1 and 1 mgkg(-1)) in association, or not, with foliar spraying. With the exception of foliar spraying, IBA reduced above-ground biomass, whilst direct application of IBA to the substrate surface reduced root biomass (-59%). Trace element concentrations were generally increased, but removals (mg per plant) greatly reduced with IBA application, together with greater metal leaching from the substrate. It is concluded that, in our case, IBA had a negative effect on plant growth and phytoextraction of trace elements, possibly due to unsuitable root indoleacetic acid concentration following soil IBA application, the direct chelating effect of IBA and the low microbial activity in the pyrite waste affecting its breakdown. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Using growth measures in the freshwater shrimp Caridina nilotica as biomarkers of Roundup® pollution of South African freshwater systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, P. K.; Muller, W. J.; Palmer, C. G.

    There has been global concern about the effect of toxic chemicals on aquatic biota due to the upsurge in contamination of aquatic ecosystems by these chemicals, which includes pesticides. Roundup® and other glyphosate-based herbicides are frequently used in the chemical control of weeds and invading alien plant species in South Africa. These bio-active chemicals ultimately get into water courses directly or indirectly through processes such as drifting, leaching, surface runoff and foliar spray of aquatic nuisance plants. However, there is no South African water quality guideline to protect indigenous freshwater non-target organisms from the toxic effects of glyphosate-based herbicides. This study evaluated the possible use of growth measures in Caridina nilotica as biomarkers of Roundup® pollution as part of developing glyphosate water quality guideline for the protection of aquatic life in South Africa. Using static-renewal methods in a 25-day growth toxicity test, 40 days post hatch shrimps were exposed to different sub-lethal Roundup® concentrations of 0.0 (control), 2.2, 2.8, 3.4, 4.3 and 5.4 mg/L. Shrimps were fed daily with TetraMin® flake food and test solutions changed every third day. Shrimp total lengths and wet weights were measured every fifth day. These data were used to determine the shrimp’s growth performance and feed utilization in terms of percent weight gain (PWG), percent length gain (PLG), specific growth rate (SGR), condition factor (CF), feed intake (FI), feed conversion ratio (FCR) and feed conversion efficiency (FCE). Moulting was observed for 14 days and the data used to determine the daily moult rate for each concentration. Results of growth performance and food utilization indices showed that growth was significantly impaired in all exposed groups compared to control (p < 0.05). Moulting frequency was also higher in all exposed groups than in control (p < 0.05). Although all the tested growth measures proved to be possible

  10. Selenium Supplementation Affects Physiological and Biochemical Processes to Improve Fodder Yield and Quality of Maize (Zea mays L.) under Water Deficit Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Fahim; Naeem, Muhammad; Ashraf, Muhammad Y.; Tahir, Muhammad N.; Zulfiqar, Bilal; Salahuddin, Muhammad; Shabbir, Rana N.; Aslam, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is one of the most complex challenges that pose serious threats to livelihoods of poor people who rely heavily on agriculture and livestock particularly in climate-sensitive developing countries of the world. The negative effects of water scarcity, due to climate change, are not limited to productivity food crops but have far-reaching consequences on livestock feed production systems. Selenium (Se) is considered essential for animal health and has also been reported to counteract various abiotic stresses in plants, however, understanding of Se regulated mechanisms for improving nutritional status of fodder crops remains elusive. We report the effects of exogenous selenium supply on physiological and biochemical processes that may influence green fodder yield and quality of maize (Zea mays L.) under drought stress conditions. The plants were grown in lysimeter tanks under natural conditions and were subjected to normal (100% field capacity) and water stress (60% field capacity) conditions. Foliar spray of Se was carried out before the start of tasseling stage (65 days after sowing) and was repeated after 1 week, whereas, water spray was used as a control. Drought stress markedly reduced the water status, pigments and green fodder yield and resulted in low forage quality in water stressed maize plants. Nevertheless, exogenous Se application at 40 mg L-1 resulted in less negative leaf water potential (41%) and enhanced relative water contents (30%), total chlorophyll (53%), carotenoid contents (60%), accumulation of total free amino acids (40%) and activities of superoxide dismutase (53%), catalase (30%), peroxidase (27%), and ascorbate peroxidase (27%) with respect to control under water deficit conditions. Consequently, Se regulated processes improved fodder yield (15%) and increased crude protein (47%), fiber (10%), nitrogen free extract (10%) and Se content (36%) but did not affect crude ash content in water stressed maize plants. We propose that Se

  11. Selenium Supplementation Affects Physiological and Biochemical Processes to Improve Fodder Yield and Quality of Maize (Zea mays L.) under Water Deficit Conditions.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Fahim; Naeem, Muhammad; Ashraf, Muhammad Y; Tahir, Muhammad N; Zulfiqar, Bilal; Salahuddin, Muhammad; Shabbir, Rana N; Aslam, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is one of the most complex challenges that pose serious threats to livelihoods of poor people who rely heavily on agriculture and livestock particularly in climate-sensitive developing countries of the world. The negative effects of water scarcity, due to climate change, are not limited to productivity food crops but have far-reaching consequences on livestock feed production systems. Selenium (Se) is considered essential for animal health and has also been reported to counteract various abiotic stresses in plants, however, understanding of Se regulated mechanisms for improving nutritional status of fodder crops remains elusive. We report the effects of exogenous selenium supply on physiological and biochemical processes that may influence green fodder yield and quality of maize (Zea mays L.) under drought stress conditions. The plants were grown in lysimeter tanks under natural conditions and were subjected to normal (100% field capacity) and water stress (60% field capacity) conditions. Foliar spray of Se was carried out before the start of tasseling stage (65 days after sowing) and was repeated after 1 week, whereas, water spray was used as a control. Drought stress markedly reduced the water status, pigments and green fodder yield and resulted in low forage quality in water stressed maize plants. Nevertheless, exogenous Se application at 40 mg L(-1) resulted in less negative leaf water potential (41%) and enhanced relative water contents (30%), total chlorophyll (53%), carotenoid contents (60%), accumulation of total free amino acids (40%) and activities of superoxide dismutase (53%), catalase (30%), peroxidase (27%), and ascorbate peroxidase (27%) with respect to control under water deficit conditions. Consequently, Se regulated processes improved fodder yield (15%) and increased crude protein (47%), fiber (10%), nitrogen free extract (10%) and Se content (36%) but did not affect crude ash content in water stressed maize plants. We propose that

  12. Co-expression of G2-EPSPS and glyphosate acetyltransferase GAT genes conferring high tolerance to glyphosate in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Bingfu; Guo, Yong; Hong, Huilong; Jin, Longguo; Zhang, Lijuan; Chang, Ru-Zhen; Lu, Wei; Lin, Min; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Glyphosate is a widely used non-selective herbicide with broad spectrum of weed control around the world. At present, most of the commercial glyphosate tolerant soybeans utilize glyphosate tolerant gene CP4-EPSPS or glyphosate acetyltransferase gene GAT separately. In this study, both glyphosate tolerant gene G2-EPSPS and glyphosate degraded gene GAT were co-transferred into soybean and transgenic plants showed high tolerance to glyphosate. Molecular analysis including PCR, Sothern blot, qRT-PCR, and Western blot revealed that target genes have been integrated into genome and expressed effectively at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, the glyphosate tolerance analysis showed that no typical symptom was observed when compared with a glyphosate tolerant line HJ06-698 derived from GR1 transgenic soybean even at fourfold labeled rate of Roundup. Chlorophyll and shikimic acid content analysis of transgenic plant also revealed that these two indexes were not significantly altered after glyphosate application. These results indicated that co-expression of G2-EPSPS and GAT conferred high tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate in soybean. Therefore, combination of tolerant and degraded genes provides a new strategy for developing glyphosate tolerant transgenic crops. PMID:26528311

  13. Co-expression of G2-EPSPS and glyphosate acetyltransferase GAT genes conferring high tolerance to glyphosate in soybean.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bingfu; Guo, Yong; Hong, Huilong; Jin, Longguo; Zhang, Lijuan; Chang, Ru-Zhen; Lu, Wei; Lin, Min; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Glyphosate is a widely used non-selective herbicide with broad spectrum of weed control around the world. At present, most of the commercial glyphosate tolerant soybeans utilize glyphosate tolerant gene CP4-EPSPS or glyphosate acetyltransferase gene GAT separately. In this study, both glyphosate tolerant gene G2-EPSPS and glyphosate degraded gene GAT were co-transferred into soybean and transgenic plants showed high tolerance to glyphosate. Molecular analysis including PCR, Sothern blot, qRT-PCR, and Western blot revealed that target genes have been integrated into genome and expressed effectively at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, the glyphosate tolerance analysis showed that no typical symptom was observed when compared with a glyphosate tolerant line HJ06-698 derived from GR1 transgenic soybean even at fourfold labeled rate of Roundup. Chlorophyll and shikimic acid content analysis of transgenic plant also revealed that these two indexes were not significantly altered after glyphosate application. These results indicated that co-expression of G2-EPSPS and GAT conferred high tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate in soybean. Therefore, combination of tolerant and degraded genes provides a new strategy for developing glyphosate tolerant transgenic crops.

  14. Effects of DNA extraction and purification methods on real-time quantitative PCR analysis of Roundup Ready soybean.

    PubMed

    Demeke, Tigst; Ratnayaka, Indira; Phan, Anh

    2009-01-01

    The quality of DNA affects the accuracy and repeatability of quantitative PCR results. Different DNA extraction and purification methods were compared for quantification of Roundup Ready (RR) soybean (event 40-3-2) by real-time PCR. DNA was extracted using cetylmethylammonium bromide (CTAB), DNeasy Plant Mini Kit, and Wizard Magnetic DNA purification system for food. CTAB-extracted DNA was also purified using the Zymo (DNA Clean & Concentrator 25 kit), Qtip 100 (Qiagen Genomic-Tip 100/G), and QIAEX II Gel Extraction Kit. The CTAB extraction method provided the largest amount of DNA, and the Zymo purification kit resulted in the highest percentage of DNA recovery. The Abs260/280 and Abs260/230 ratios were less than the expected values for some of the DNA extraction and purification methods used, indicating the presence of substances that could inhibit PCR reactions. Real-time quantitative PCR results were affected by the DNA extraction and purification methods used. Further purification or dilution of the CTAB DNA was required for successful quantification of RR soybean. Less variability of quantitative PCR results was observed among experiments and replications for DNA extracted and/or purified by CTAB, CTAB+Zymo, CTAB+Qtip 100, and DNeasy methods. Correct and repeatable results for real-time PCR quantification of RR soybean were achieved using CTAB DNA purified with Zymo and Qtip 100 methods.

  15. Recreation, consumption of wild game, risk, and the Department of Energy sites: Perceptions of people attending the Lewiston, ID, Roundup

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J. )

    1999-02-26

    In this article, recreational rates of people attending the Lewiston Roundup rodeo in northwestern Idaho were examined, as well as their perceptions of the safety of consuming fish and game form two Department of Energy (DOE) facilities: the Hanford Site and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These are two of DOE's largest sites. Lewiston is closer to Hanford, but is in the same state as INEEL. Men engaged in significantly higher hunting and fishing rates than women, but there were no gender differences in camping and hiking rates. Rates of hunting and camping decreased significantly with age, while rates of hiking were lowest for 31- to 45-yr-olds. Level of education generally was not related to rates of recreation. Over 70% of the subjects ate deer, elk, and self-caught fish; 30--50% ate grouse, moose, and waterfowl; and fewer people ate other game species. Overall, subjects were less concerned about eating the fish and game from INEEL than from Hanford, and more people thought Hanford should be cleaned up completely compared to INEEL. Mean rates of fishing, hiking, and camping all exceeded the DOE's maximum recreational exposure assumption of 14 d/yr used in their future use documents.

  16. Evaluation of broiler performance when fed Roundup-Ready wheat (event MON 71800), control, and commercial wheat varieties.

    PubMed

    Kan, C A; Hartnell, G F

    2004-08-01

    We evaluated the nutritional value of broiler diets containing approximately 40% wheat grain from Roundup Ready wheat (MON 71800), its similar nontransgenic control (MON 71900), or reference commercial wheat varieties. The feeding trial lasted 40 d, and each treatment consisted of 10 replicates of 1-d-old Ross 308 broilers (5 pens of males and 5 pens of females). Each pen contained 12 birds, and at d 13 birds were randomly removed until 9 birds remained. Body weight and feed intake were measured on pen basis at 40 d. At d 41, four broilers per pen were slaughtered. The carcasses were dissected, and cut-up yields were determined. Dry matter, protein, and fat contents of breast meat were determined. The data were analyzed by an ANOVA procedure. The BW and feed conversion at d 40 averaged 2,450 g and 1.52, respectively. There were no significant treatment x sex interactions, except for evisceration yield with significant differences (P < 0.05) in yield between birds fed 2 commercial wheat varieties. Data for final BW, feed conversion, carcass yield, and breast meat were not statistically different (P < 0.05) between broilers fed MON 71800 or MON 71900 or the population of birds fed commercial wheat varieties, except a lower carcass yield at d 41 for birds fed the nontransgenic control wheat. Thus MON 71800 was nutritionally equivalent to nongenetically modified wheat varieties when fed to broilers.

  17. Plant characterization of Roundup Ready 2 Yield ® soybean, MON 89788, for use in ecological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Horak, Michael J; Rosenbaum, Eric W; Kendrick, Daniel L; Sammons, Bernard; Phillips, Samuel L; Nickson, Thomas E; Dobert, Raymond C; Perez, Tim

    2015-04-01

    During the development of a genetically modified (GM) crop product, extensive phenotypic and agronomic data are collected to characterize the plant in comparison to a conventional control with a similar genetic background. The data are evaluated for potential differences resulting from the genetic modification process or the GM trait, and the differences--if any--are subsequently considered in the context of contributing to the pest potential of the GM crop. Ultimately, these study results and those of other studies are used in an ecological risk assessment of the GM crop. In the studies reported here, seed germination, vegetative and reproductive growth, and pollen morphology of Roundup Ready 2 Yield(®) soybean, MON 89788, were compared to those of A3244, a conventional control soybean variety with the same genetic background. Any statistically significant differences were considered in the context of the genetic variation known to occur in soybean and were evaluated as indicators of an effect of the genetic modification process and assessed for impact on plant pest (weed) characteristics and adverse ecological impact (ecological risk). The results of these studies revealed no effects attributable to the genetic modification process or to the GM trait in the plant that would result in increased pest potential or adverse ecological impact of MON 89788 compared with A3244. These results and the associated risk assessments obtained from diverse geographic and environmental conditions in the United States and Argentina can be used by regulators in other countries to inform various assessments of ecological risk.

  18. Effect of replacing oat fodder with fresh and chopped oak leaves on in vitro rumen fermentation, digestibility and metabolizable energy

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, K.; Bhar, R.; Kannan, A.; Jadhav, R.V.; Singh, Birbal; Mal, and G.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of replacing oat fodder (OF) with fresh oak leaves (FOL) or chopped oak leaves (COL) on rumen fermentation and digestibility through in vitro gas production technique (IVGPT). Materials and Methods: Nine different diets were prepared by mixing OF with oak leaves (either FOL or COL) in different ratios (100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100). The rations were evaluated through Hohenheim IVGPT with 200 mg substrate and 30 ml of buffered rumen liquor. All the syringes were incubated at 39°C for 24 h in buffered rumen liquor of cattle. After 24 h, the total gas production was recorded, and the contents were analyzed for in vitro methane production, protozoa no. and ammonia-N. Results: Chopping (p<0.01) reduced the tannin fractions as well as non-tannin phenol. Increase in levels of oak decreased total gas production, methane, organic matter (OM) digestibility, and metabolizable energy (ME) values. The polyphenol content of the substrate did not show any significant difference on the protozoal count. Conclusion: In vitro studies revealed that the addition of oak leaves reduced the methane production and ammonia nitrogen levels; however, it also decreased the OM digestibility and ME values linearly as the level of the oak leaves increased in the diet. Chopping was effective only at lower inclusion levels. Further studies, especially in vivo studies, are needed to explore the safe inclusion levels of oak leaves in the diet of ruminants. PMID:27047192

  19. Functional traits as indicators of fodder provision over a short time scale in species-rich grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Ansquer, Pauline; Duru, Michel; Theau, Jean Pierre; Cruz, Pablo

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Fodder provision in species-rich grasslands, i.e. herbage growth, proportion of leaf, and leaf and stem digestibility, is difficult to predict for short periods of time, such as between two defoliations or less. The value of two methods based on plant traits for evaluating these agronomic properties was examined. Methods One method is based on plant trait measurements on the plant community (leaf dry matter content, plant height, flowering date); the other is on vegetation composition expressed as plant functional types (acquisitive versus conservative PFTs) established by measuring leaf dry matter content on pure grass stands. The experiment consisted of 18 fields with three different defoliation regimes (combinations of cutting and grazing) and two levels of fertilization. To establish a growth curve over the first growth cycle, herbage was sampled about 10 times in spring. Key Results Coefficients of correlation between agronomic properties of the vegetation and its functional composition were higher when the latter was assessed through PFT and an indicator of the plant nutrient status (Ni) instead of measured plant traits. The date at which the ceiling yield occurred for the standing herbage mass or only the leaf component, which varied by up to 500 degree-days between treatments, and the leaf proportion, depended entirely on the PFT, and largely so for the leaf digestibility. The standing herbage mass at the time of ceiling yield depended only on Ni, or mainly so in the case of the daily herbage growth rate. Similar plant digestibility between plant communities was found at flowering time, although there were big differences in PFT composition. The shape of the growth curve was flatter when there was great functional diversity in the plant community. Conclusions The PFT composition and the Ni were more reliable than the plant functional traits measured in the field for evaluating herbage growth pattern and digestibility in spring. PMID

  20. A simple analytical method for dhurrin content evaluation in cyanogenic plants for their utilization in fodder and biofumigation.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Leoni, Onofrio; Malaguti, Lorena; Bernardi, Roberta; Lazzeri, Luca

    2011-08-10

    Cyanogenic plants have some potential as biocidal green manure crops in limiting several soilborne pests and pathogens. Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and Sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor subsp. sudanense (P.) Stapf), in fact, contain the cyanogenic glucoside p-hydroxy-(S)-mandelonitrile-β-D-glucoside (dhurrin) as a substrate of its secondary defensive system able to release hydrogen cyanide following tissue lesions due to biotic or abiotic factors. Given that dhurrin content is correlated with the biofumigant efficacy of the plants, a high dhurrin content could be a positive character for utilization of sorghum and Sudangrass as biocidal green manure plants. For chemical characterization of the available germplasm, a simple, safe, and accurate method is necessary. In this paper, a new method for dhurrin analysis, based on methanol extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography, is reported and discussed. The feasibility of this analytical procedure was tested by evaluating dhurrin level in roots and stems during cultivation of four different sorghum and Sudangrass varieties in agronomic trials performed in 2008 in the Po valley (Italy). The dhurrin content ranged from 0.16 ± 0.04 to 7.14 ± 0.32 mg g(-1) on dried matter (DM) in stems and from 1.38 ± 0.02 to 6.57 ± 0.09 mg g(-1) on DM in roots, showing statistical differences among the tested germplasms that could be linked to the efficacy of their utilization as biofumigant plants. The method also opens new perspectives for the characterization of sorgum plants as fodder, for which the presence of dhurrin is considered to be negative for its well-known toxicity.

  1. Import-export balance of nitrogen and phosphorus in food, fodder and fertilizers in the Baltic Sea drainage area.

    PubMed

    Asmala, Eero; Saikku, Laura; Vienonen, Sanna

    2011-11-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are essential elements for life, but in excess they contribute to aquatic eutrophication. The Baltic Sea is a brackish semi-enclosed sea that is heavily influenced by anthropogenic loading of nutrients, resulting in a major environmental problem, eutrophication. In this study, the nutrient balance of the food production and consumption system in seven countries in the Baltic Sea drainage area was quantified for the period 2002-2005. The food production and consumption system accumulates nutrients in the Baltic Sea drainage area, due to extensive imports to the system. The average annual net surplus of nutrients was 1,800,000 tons N and 320,000 tons P in 2002-2005, or annually 28 kg N and 5 kg P per capita. The average total annual import was 2,100,000 tons N and 340,000 tons P during 2002-2005. The largest imports to the system were fertilizers, totaling 1,700,000 tons N and 290,000 tons P. Traded nutrients in food and fodder amounted to a net annual surplus of 180,000 tons N and 25,000 tons P. The nutrient load to the Baltic Sea due to the food consumption and production system was 21% N and 6% P of the respective annual net inputs to the region. This study shows that large amounts of nutrients to Baltic Sea drainage area are inputs from outside the region, eventually contributing to eutrophication. To reduce the nutrient imports, fertilizers should be used more efficiently, nutrients should be recycled more efficiently inside the region, and food system should be guided toward low-nutrient intensive diets.

  2. Are You Ready for [a] Roundup?--What Chemistry Has to Do with Genetic Modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöpping, Bert

    2001-06-01

    Genetically modified crops are grown in most parts of the world nowadays. These transgenic plants have new properties such as herbicide tolerance or insect resistance that often cannot be introduced by conventional breeding. Using examples of very common transgenic varieties, the article explains how the knowledge of metabolic pathways and genetic information is used to design these plants and how the same knowledge is used to detect them. It reviews why detection of genetic modifications in plants has become necessary and describes the most common detection methods, from immunological assays to polymerase chain reaction and real-time detection.

  3. Differential genotoxicity of Roundup(®) formulation and its constituents in blood cells of fish (Anguilla anguilla): considerations on chemical interactions and DNA damaging mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, S; Santos, M A; Barroso, C; Gaivão, I; Pacheco, M

    2012-07-01

    It has been widely recognized that pesticides represent a potential threat in aquatic ecosystems. However, the knowledge on the genotoxicity of pesticides to fish is still limited. Moreover, genotoxic studies have been almost exclusively focused on the active ingredients, whereas the effect of adjuvants is frequently ignored. Hence, the present study addressed the herbicide Roundup®, evaluating the relative contribution of the active ingredient (glyphosate) and the surfactant (polyethoxylated amine; POEA) to the genotoxicity of the commercial formulation on Anguilla anguilla. Fish were exposed to equivalent concentrations of Roundup® (58, 116 μg L⁻¹), glyphosate (17.9, 35.7 μg L⁻¹) and POEA (9.3, 18.6 μg L⁻¹), during 1 and 3 days. The comet assay was applied to blood cells, either as the standard procedure, or with an extra step involving DNA lesion-specific repair enzymes in an attempt to clarify DNA damaging mechanisms. The results confirmed the genotoxicity of Roundup®, also demonstrating the genotoxic potential of glyphosate and POEA individually. Though both components contributed to the overall genotoxicity of the pesticide formulation, the sum of their individual effects was never observed, pointing out an antagonistic interaction. Although POEA is far from being considered biologically inert, it did not increase the risk associated to glyphosate when the two were combined. The analysis of oxidatively induced breaks suggested that oxidation of DNA bases was not a dominant mechanism of damage. The present findings highlighted the risk posed to fish populations by the assessed chemicals, jointly or individually, emphasizing the need to define regulatory thresholds for all the formulation components and recommending, in particular, the revision of the hazard classification of POEA.

  4. Data on milk dioxin contamination linked with the location of fodder croplands allow to hypothesize the origin of the pollution source in an Italian valley.

    PubMed

    Desiato, Rosanna; Bertolini, Silvia; Baioni, Elisa; Crescio, Maria Ines; Scortichini, Giampiero; Ubaldi, Alessandro; Sparagna, Bruno; Cuttica, Giancarlo; Ru, Giuseppe

    2014-11-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) have similar toxic, endocrine-disrupting, and carcinogenic activity. They are classified as persistent organic pollutants accumulating in the environment and the tissues of living organisms. High concentrations of PCDD/F and dl-PCB have been detected in bovine milk collected in a Piedmont valley (Northwestern Italy) since 2004. This geographic study describes the local distribution of pollution from PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs. Since their presence in animal products could be traced back to the ingestion of contaminated fodder, dioxin levels in cow milk were related to the distribution of fodder cropland parcels. Specifically, the aim of the study was to determine, through an exploratory approach, whether the contamination was consistent with one common point source of contamination or different scattered sources. Data for PCDD/F and dl-PCB concentrations in the bulk milk from 27 herds, sampled over a 4-year period (2004-2007), were matched to the georeferenced land parcels the dairy farmers used for growing fodder. Isopleth maps of dioxin concentrations were estimated with ordinary kriging. The highest level of pollution for both PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs was geographically juxtaposed: in both instances, the location of the local steel plant was within this extremely highly polluted area. The study results support the hypothesis for one common point source of contamination in the valley. The exploratory spatial analysis applied in this research may provide a valuable, novel approach to straightforward identification of a highly likely source of dioxin contamination of dairy products (even in the absence of top soil contamination data).

  5. Are DNA-damaging effects induced by herbicide formulations (Roundup® and Garlon®) in fish transient and reversible upon cessation of exposure?

    PubMed

    Guilherme, S; Santos, M A; Gaivão, I; Pacheco, M

    2014-10-01

    Owing to the seasonality of crop cultivation and subsequent periodic/seasonal application of herbicides, their input to the aquatic systems is typically intermittent. Consequently, exposure of fish to this type of contaminants can be short and followed by a period of permanence in non-contaminated areas. Thus, the assessment of genotoxic endpoints in fish after removal of the contamination source appears as a crucial step to improve the knowledge on the dynamics of herbicide genotoxicity, as well as to determine the actual magnitude of risk posed by these agrochemicals. Therefore, the present study intended to shed light on the ability of fish to recover from the DNA damage induced by short-term exposures to the herbicide formulations Roundup(®) (glyphosate-based) and Garlon(®) (triclopyr-based) upon the exposure cessation. European eel (Anguilla anguilla) was exposed to the above commercial formulations for 3 days, and allowed to recover for 1, 7 and 14 days (post-exposure period). The comet assay was used to identify the DNA damage in blood cells during both exposure and post-exposure periods. As an attempt to clarify the DNA damaging mechanisms involved, an extra-step including the incubation of the nucleotides with DNA lesion-specific repair enzyme was added to the standard comet. The genotoxic potential of both herbicides was confirmed, concerning the exposure period. In addition, the involvement of oxidative DNA damage on the action of Roundup(®) (pointed out as pyrimidine bases oxidation) was demonstrated, while for Garlon(®) this damaging mechanism was less evident. Fish exposed to Garlon(®), though presenting some evidence towards a tendency of recovery, did not achieve a complete restoration of DNA integrity. In what concerns to Roundup(®), a recovery was evident when considering non-specific DNA damage on day 14 post-exposure. In addition, this herbicide was able to induce a late oxidative DNA damage (day 14). Blood cells of A. anguilla exposed to

  6. In vivo and in vitro effects of the herbicide Roundup(®) on developmental stages of the trematode Echinostoma paraensei.

    PubMed

    Monte, Tainá C de C; Garcia, Juberlan; Gentile, Rosana; de Vasconcellos, Maurício Carvalho; Souza, Joyce; Braga, Brunna V; Maldonado, Arnaldo

    2016-10-01

    The exposure of wildlife and humans to toxic residues of Roundup(®) through agricultural practices or the food chain has been reported since the herbicide was found contaminating rivers. Glyphosate, N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine acid, is a nonselective post-emergent herbicide and is formulated as an isopropylamine salt with the surfactant taloamine polyethoxylate (POEA) representing the commercial formulation of Roundup(®). There is little knowledge about the effects of the herbicide on helminth parasites, particularly those whose life cycle is related to water bodies. Here we investigated the effects of the Roundup(®) on the food-borne trematode Echinostoma paraensei in experimental conditions using different developmental stages (eggs, miracidia, cercariae, metacercariae, newly excysted larvae (NEL), helminths at seven days and helminths at fourteen days). Three different herbicide concentrations were tested based on concentrations typically applied in the field: 225, 450 and 900 mg/L. Specimens were analyzed in vitro for hatching miracidia, mortality and excystment rate of metacercariae and in vivo for parasitic load and egg production. There was a significant difference in the hatching miracidia rate only for the newly embryonated eggs. The mortality of specimens and excystment rate of metacercariae were concentration-dependent. There was a significant difference in the miracidia mortality with respect to concentration until 56.3 mg/L. The same effect was observed for cercariae, and mortality was observed from 15 min onwards at concentrations of 225-900 mg/L. At low concentrations, mortality was detected after 30 min. The effects of the herbicide concentration on NEL and on helminths at seven and fourteen days showed a significant difference after 24 h. There was no significant difference in parasitic load and egg production after infection of rodents with exposed metacercariae. All developmental stages of the trematode E. paraensei were affected by

  7. Detection of transgenic and endogenous plant DNA in digesta and tissues of sheep and pigs fed Roundup Ready canola meal.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ranjana; Damgaard, Dana; Alexander, Trevor W; Dugan, Mike E R; Aalhus, Jennifer L; Stanford, Kim; McAllister, Tim A

    2006-03-08

    The persistence of plant-derived recombinant DNA in sheep and pigs fed genetically modified (Roundup Ready) canola was assessed by PCR and Southern hybridization analysis of DNA extracted from digesta, gastrointestinal (GI) tract tissues, and visceral organs. Sheep (n = 11) and pigs (n = 36) were fed to slaughter on diets containing 6.5 or 15% Roundup Ready canola. Native plant DNA (high- and low-copy-number gene fragments) and the cp4 epsps transgene that encodes 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase were tracked in ruminal, abomasal, and large intestinal digesta and in tissue from the esophagus, rumen, abomasum, small and large intestine, liver, and kidney of sheep and in cecal content and tissue from the duodenum, cecum, liver, spleen, and kidney of pigs. High-copy chloroplast-specific DNA (a 520-bp fragment) was detected in all digesta samples, the majority (89-100%) of intestinal tissues, and at least one of each visceral organ sample (frequencies of 3-27%) from sheep and swine. Low-copy rubisco fragments (186- and 540-bp sequences from the small subunit) were present at slightly lower, variable frequencies in digesta (18-82%) and intestinal tissues (9-27% of ovine and 17-25% of porcine samples) and infrequently in visceral organs (1 of 88 ovine samples; 3 of 216 porcine samples). Each of the five cp4 epsps transgene fragments (179-527 bp) surveyed was present in at least 27% of ovine large intestinal content samples (maximum = 64%) and at least 33% of porcine cecal content samples (maximum = 75%). In sheep, transgene fragments were more common in intestinal digesta than in ruminal or abomasal content. Transgene fragments were detected in 0 (esophagus) to 3 (large intestine) GI tract tissues from the 11 sheep and in 0-10 of the duodenal and cecal tissues collected from 36 pigs. The feed-ingested recombinant DNA was not detected in visceral tissues (liver, kidney) of lambs or in the spleen from pigs. Of note, however, one liver and one kidney sample from

  8. Cardiotoxic Electrophysiological Effects of the Herbicide Roundup(®) in Rat and Rabbit Ventricular Myocardium In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Gress, Steeve; Lemoine, Sandrine; Puddu, Paolo-Emilio; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Rouet, René

    2015-10-01

    Roundup (R), a glyphosate (G)-based herbicide (GBH), containing unknown adjuvants is widely dispersed around the world. Used principally by farmers, intoxications have increasingly been reported. We have studied R effects (containing 36 % of G) on right ventricular tissues (male Sprague-Dawley rats, up to 20,000 ppm and female New Zealand rabbits, at 25 and 50 ppm), to investigate R cardiac electrophysiological actions in vitro. We tested the reduced Ca(++) intracellular uptake mechanism as one potential cause of the electrical abnormalities after GBH superfusion, using the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor ouabain or the 1,4-dihydropyridine L-type calcium channel agonist BAY K 8644 which increases I Ca. R concentrations were selected based on human blood ranges found after acute intoxication. The study showed dose-dependent V max, APD50 and APD90 variations during 45 min of R superfusion. At the highest concentrations tested, there was a high incidence of conduction blocks, and 30-min washout with normal Tyrode solution did not restore excitability. We also observed an increased incidence of arrhythmias at different doses of R. Ouabain and BAY K 8644 prevented V max decrease, APD90 increase and the cardiac inexcitability induced by R 50 ppm. Glyphosate alone (18 and 180 ppm) had no significant electrophysiological effects. Thus, the action potential prolonging effect of R pointing to I Ca interference might explain both conduction blocks and proarrhythmia in vitro. These mechanisms may well be causative of QT prolongation, atrioventricular conduction blocks and arrhythmias in man after GBH acute intoxications as reported in retrospective hospital records.

  9. Development of one novel multiple-target plasmid for duplex quantitative PCR analysis of roundup ready soybean.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haibo; Yang, Litao; Guo, Jinchao; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Lingxi; Zhang, Dabing

    2008-07-23

    To enforce the labeling regulations of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), the application of reference molecules as calibrators is becoming essential for practical quantification of GMOs. However, the reported reference molecules with tandem marker multiple targets have been proved not suitable for duplex PCR analysis. In this study, we developed one unique plasmid molecule based on one pMD-18T vector with three exogenous target DNA fragments of Roundup Ready soybean GTS 40-3-2 (RRS), that is, CaMV35S, NOS, and RRS event fragments, plus one fragment of soybean endogenous Lectin gene. This Lectin gene fragment was separated from the three exogenous target DNA fragments of RRS by inserting one 2.6 kb DNA fragment with no relatedness to RRS detection targets in this resultant plasmid. Then, we proved that this design allows the quantification of RRS using the three duplex real-time PCR assays targeting CaMV35S, NOS, and RRS events employing this reference molecule as the calibrator. In these duplex PCR assays, the limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 10 and 50 copies, respectively. For the quantitative analysis of practical RRS samples, the results of accuracy and precision were similar to those of simplex PCR assays, for instance, the quantitative results were at the 1% level, the mean bias of the simplex and duplex PCR were 4.0% and 4.6%, respectively, and the statistic analysis ( t-test) showed that the quantitative data from duplex and simplex PCR had no significant discrepancy for each soybean sample. Obviously, duplex PCR analysis has the advantages of saving the costs of PCR reaction and reducing the experimental errors in simplex PCR testing. The strategy reported in the present study will be helpful for the development of new reference molecules suitable for duplex PCR quantitative assays of GMOs.

  10. Cytotoxic and DNA-damaging properties of glyphosate and Roundup in human-derived buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Koller, Verena J; Fürhacker, Maria; Nersesyan, Armen; Mišík, Miroslav; Eisenbauer, Maria; Knasmueller, Siegfried

    2012-05-01

    Glyphosate (G) is the largest selling herbicide worldwide; the most common formulations (Roundup, R) contain polyoxyethyleneamine as main surfactant. Recent findings indicate that G exposure may cause DNA damage and cancer in humans. Aim of this investigation was to study the cytotoxic and genotoxic properties of G and R (UltraMax) in a buccal epithelial cell line (TR146), as workers are exposed via inhalation to the herbicide. R induced acute cytotoxic effects at concentrations > 40 mg/l after 20 min, which were due to membrane damage and impairment of mitochondrial functions. With G, increased release of extracellular lactate dehydrogenase indicative for membrane damage was observed at doses > 80 mg/l. Both G and R induced DNA migration in single-cell gel electrophoresis assays at doses > 20 mg/l. Furthermore, an increase of nuclear aberrations that reflect DNA damage was observed. The frequencies of micronuclei and nuclear buds were elevated after 20-min exposure to 10-20 mg/l, while nucleoplasmatic bridges were only enhanced by R at the highest dose (20 mg/l). R was under all conditions more active than its active principle (G). Comparisons with results of earlier studies with lymphocytes and cells from internal organs indicate that epithelial cells are more susceptible to the cytotoxic and DNA-damaging properties of the herbicide and its formulation. Since we found genotoxic effects after short exposure to concentrations that correspond to a 450-fold dilution of spraying used in agriculture, our findings indicate that inhalation may cause DNA damage in exposed individuals.

  11. Compositional analysis of glyphosate-tolerant soybeans treated with glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Taylor, N B; Fuchs, R L; MacDonald, J; Shariff, A R; Padgette, S R

    1999-10-01

    The compositional analyses and safety assessment of glyphosate-tolerant soybeans (GTS) were previously described. These analyses were extensive and included addressing the potential effects on seed composition from the genetic modification. Detailed compositional analyses established that GTS, which had not been treated with glyphosate, were comparable to the parental soybean line and to other conventional soybeans. In this study, two GTS lines, 40-3-2 and 61-67-1, were treated with commercial levels of glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup herbicide. The composition of the seed from soybeans sprayed with glyphosate was compared to that of a nonsprayed parental control cultivar, A5403. The nutrients measured in the seed included protein, oil, ash, fiber, carbohydrates, and amino acids. The concentration of isoflavones (also referred to as phytoestrogens) was also measured as these compounds are derived from the same biochemical pathway that was engineered for glyphosate tolerance. The analytical results from these studies demonstrate that the GTS soybeans treated with glyphosate were comparable to the parental soybean cultivar, A5403, and other conventional soybean varieties.

  12. Intolerant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Khushf, G

    1994-04-01

    The Hyde Amendment and Roman Catholic attempts to put restrictions on Title X funding have been criticized for being intolerant. However, such criticism fails to appreciate that there are two competing notions of tolerance, one focusing on the limits of state force and accepting pluralism as unavoidable, and the other focusing on the limits of knowledge and advancing pluralism as a good. These two types of tolerance, illustrated in the writings of John Locke and J.S. Mill, each involve an intolerance. In a pluralistic context where the free exercise of religion is respected, John Locke's account of tolerance is preferable. However, it (in a reconstructed form) leads to a minimal state. Positive entitlements to benefits like artificial contraception or nontherapeutic abortions can legitimately be resisted, because an intolerance has already been shown with respect to those that consider the benefit immoral, since their resources have been coopted by taxation to advance an end that is contrary to their own. There is a sliding scale from tolerance (viewed as forbearance) to the affirmation of communal integrity, and this scale maps on to the continuum from negative to positive rights.

  13. Pesticide Tolerances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA regulates pesticides used to protect crops and sets limits on the amount of pesticide remaining in or on foods in the U.S. The limits on pesticides on foods are called tolerances in the U.S. (maximum residue limits (MRLs) in many other countries).

  14. Religious Tolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue looks at three issues of religious tolerance. The first article examines a case recently decided by the United States Supreme Court on student-led prayers at school events. The second article explores the persecution suffered by members of the Mormon religion during the 19th century. The final article looks at Martin Luther and…

  15. Killers, Fillers and Fodder.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-02

    good agility, hand-eye coordina- tion"ae4- manual dexterity -’All tankers should also be required to-have excellent vision and not wear glasses. Tests...should be required to possess good agility, hand-eye coordina- tion, and manual dexterity. All tankers should also be required to have excellent vision...reason- ably good vision, but they ma wer glanses. Agility, ,han-ye coordi- nation and manual dimftrity are not tested. Who they are, and the standards

  16. Compositional differences in soybeans on the market: glyphosate accumulates in Roundup Ready GM soybeans.

    PubMed

    Bøhn, T; Cuhra, M; Traavik, T; Sanden, M; Fagan, J; Primicerio, R

    2014-06-15

    This article describes the nutrient and elemental composition, including residues of herbicides and pesticides, of 31 soybean batches from Iowa, USA. The soy samples were grouped into three different categories: (i) genetically modified, glyphosate-tolerant soy (GM-soy); (ii) unmodified soy cultivated using a conventional "chemical" cultivation regime; and (iii) unmodified soy cultivated using an organic cultivation regime. Organic soybeans showed the healthiest nutritional profile with more sugars, such as glucose, fructose, sucrose and maltose, significantly more total protein, zinc and less fibre than both conventional and GM-soy. Organic soybeans also contained less total saturated fat and total omega-6 fatty acids than both conventional and GM-soy. GM-soy contained high residues of glyphosate and AMPA (mean 3.3 and 5.7 mg/kg, respectively). Conventional and organic soybean batches contained none of these agrochemicals. Using 35 different nutritional and elemental variables to characterise each soy sample, we were able to discriminate GM, conventional and organic soybeans without exception, demonstrating "substantial non-equivalence" in compositional characteristics for 'ready-to-market' soybeans. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Glyphosate-tolerant alfalfa is compositionally equivalent to conventional alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    McCann, Melinda C; Rogan, Glennon J; Fitzpatrick, Sharie; Trujillo, William A; Sorbet, Roy; Hartnell, Gary F; Riodan, Susan G; Nemeth, Margaret A

    2006-09-20

    Glyphosate-tolerant alfalfa (GTA) was developed to withstand over-the-top applications of glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup agricultural herbicides. As a part of the safety assessment, GTA (designated J101 x J163) was grown under controlled field conditions at geographically diverse locations within the United States during the 2001 and 2003 field seasons along with control and other conventional alfalfa varieties for compositional assessment. Field trials were conducted using a randomized complete block design with four replication blocks at each site. Alfalfa forage was harvested at the late bud to early bloom stage from each plot at five field sites in 2001 (establishment year) and from four field sites in 2003 (third year of stand). The concentration of proximate constituents, fibers, amino acids, coumestrol, and minerals in the forage was measured. The results showed that the forage from GTA J101 x J163 is compositionally equivalent to forage from the control and conventional alfalfa varieties.

  18. Multiomics reveal non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats following chronic exposure to an ultra-low dose of Roundup herbicide.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, Robin; Renney, George; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Ward, Malcolm; Antoniou, Michael N

    2017-01-09

    The impairment of liver function by low environmentally relevant doses of glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) is still a debatable and unresolved matter. Previously we have shown that rats administered for 2 years with 0.1 ppb (50 ng/L glyphosate equivalent dilution; 4 ng/kg body weight/day daily intake) of a Roundup GBH formulation showed signs of enhanced liver injury as indicated by anatomorphological, blood/urine biochemical changes and transcriptome profiling. Here we present a multiomic study combining metabolome and proteome liver analyses to obtain further insight into the Roundup-induced pathology. Proteins significantly disturbed (214 out of 1906 detected, q < 0.05) were involved in organonitrogen metabolism and fatty acid β-oxidation. Proteome disturbances reflected peroxisomal proliferation, steatosis and necrosis. The metabolome analysis (55 metabolites altered out of 673 detected, p < 0.05) confirmed lipotoxic conditions and oxidative stress by showing an activation of glutathione and ascorbate free radical scavenger systems. Additionally, we found metabolite alterations associated with hallmarks of hepatotoxicity such as γ-glutamyl dipeptides, acylcarnitines, and proline derivatives. Overall, metabolome and proteome disturbances showed a substantial overlap with biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its progression to steatohepatosis and thus confirm liver functional dysfunction resulting from chronic ultra-low dose GBH exposure.

  19. Multiomics reveal non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats following chronic exposure to an ultra-low dose of Roundup herbicide

    PubMed Central

    Mesnage, Robin; Renney, George; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Ward, Malcolm; Antoniou, Michael N.

    2017-01-01

    The impairment of liver function by low environmentally relevant doses of glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) is still a debatable and unresolved matter. Previously we have shown that rats administered for 2 years with 0.1 ppb (50 ng/L glyphosate equivalent dilution; 4 ng/kg body weight/day daily intake) of a Roundup GBH formulation showed signs of enhanced liver injury as indicated by anatomorphological, blood/urine biochemical changes and transcriptome profiling. Here we present a multiomic study combining metabolome and proteome liver analyses to obtain further insight into the Roundup-induced pathology. Proteins significantly disturbed (214 out of 1906 detected, q < 0.05) were involved in organonitrogen metabolism and fatty acid β-oxidation. Proteome disturbances reflected peroxisomal proliferation, steatosis and necrosis. The metabolome analysis (55 metabolites altered out of 673 detected, p < 0.05) confirmed lipotoxic conditions and oxidative stress by showing an activation of glutathione and ascorbate free radical scavenger systems. Additionally, we found metabolite alterations associated with hallmarks of hepatotoxicity such as γ-glutamyl dipeptides, acylcarnitines, and proline derivatives. Overall, metabolome and proteome disturbances showed a substantial overlap with biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its progression to steatohepatosis and thus confirm liver functional dysfunction resulting from chronic ultra-low dose GBH exposure. PMID:28067231

  20. Effects of Roundup(®) and glyphosate on three food microorganisms: Geotrichum candidum, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Clair, Emilie; Linn, Laura; Travert, Carine; Amiel, Caroline; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Panoff, Jean-Michel

    2012-05-01

    Use of many pesticide products poses the problem of their effects on environment and health. Amongst them, the effects of glyphosate with its adjuvants and its by-products are regularly discussed. The aim of the present study was to shed light on the real impact on biodiversity and ecosystems of Roundup(®), a major herbicide used worldwide, and the glyphosate it contains, by the study of their effects on growth and viability of microbial models, namely, on three food microorganisms (Geotrichum candidum, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus) widely used as starters in traditional and industrial dairy technologies. The presented results evidence that Roundup(®) has an inhibitory effect on microbial growth and a microbicide effect at lower concentrations than those recommended in agriculture. Interestingly, glyphosate at these levels has no significant effect on the three studied microorganisms. Our work is consistent with previous studies which demonstrated that the toxic effect of glyphosate was amplified by its formulation adjuvants on different human cells and other eukaryotic models. Moreover, these results should be considered in the understanding of the loss of microbiodiversity and microbial concentration observed in raw milk for many years.

  1. Determination of the herbicide glyphosate and its metabolite in biological specimens by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A case of poisoning by roundup herbicide.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yasushi; Fujisawa, Manami; Shimada, Kenji; Hirose, Yasuo

    2003-04-01

    In Japan, poisonings by the glyphosate (GLYP)-containing herbicide Roundup and the gluphosinate (GLUF)-based herbicide BASTA have been increasing since about 1987. We applied the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method of analysis, on which we have already reported in regard to the determination of the blood serum level of GLUF and its metabolite, for the determination of serum and urinary levels of GLYP and its metabolite aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA). Derivatization using N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide was completed at a temperature of 80 degrees C after 30 min, and the detection limit of GLYP was 10 pg using m/z 454 and that of AMPA was 1 pg using m/z 396. The full mass spectra of 100 pg GLYP and of 10 pg AMPA were obtained easily. In extractions for which the Isolute HAX cartridge was employed, the mean recovery rate of GLYP and AMPA added to serum to yield concentrations of 10-0.1 microg/mL (n = 5) was 91.6 +/- 10.6% (or better), whereas that of GLYP and AMPA added to urine to yield concentrations of 100-1.0 microg/mL (n = 10) was 93.3 +/- 6.6% (or better), both of which were good rates. Also, using this method of analysis, the presence of GLYP was identified in the full mass spectra obtained from the serum of a patient who may or may not have ingested Roundup.

  2. Alterations in fatty acids of polar lipids in Salmo trutta on long-term exposure to a glyphosate-based herbicide (Roundup).

    PubMed

    Bayir, Mehtap; Sirkecioglu, A Necdet; Bayir, Abdulkadir; Aras, Mevlut

    2013-10-15

    Abstract: In present study, the effects of sublethal doses (10 and 20 mg L(-1)) of Roundup on fatty acid pattern in muscle and liver of brown trout were investigated. For this purpose, fish were held in experiment tanks for 1 month. While total MUFA wasn't influenced, the highest total SFA and total n-6 PUFA were determined in group 10 mg L(-1) and the lowest values were determined in control group and group 20 mg L(-1) in muscle, respectively. The highest and the lowest total n-3 PUFA was found in control group and group of 10 mg L(-1) in muscle, respectively. Total n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio and EPA+DHA level of group 10 mg L(-1) were lower than other groups in muscle. The amount of total n-3/n-6 PUFA, EPA + DHA and total n-3 PUFA of control group were found higher than treatment groups in liver. While the highest total SFA was determined in group 10 mg L(-1), there wasn't difference between control group and group 20 mg L(-1) in liver. Both of doses herbicide had higher value than control for total MUFA in liver. While Roundup didn't inhibit n-3 PUFA synthesis in the muscle, both concentrations, exhibited inhibitory effect on n-3 PUFA synthesis in the liver. This result probably consequence of its indirect effect on the some enzyme activities or gene expressions in fatty acid metabolism of brown trout.

  3. The effect of glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup and its co-formulant, POEA, on the motoric activity of rat intestine - In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Chłopecka, Magdalena; Mendel, Marta; Dziekan, Natalia; Karlik, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of Roundup, polyoxyethylene tallow amine (POEA) and mixture of glyphosate and POEA in different levels on the motoric activity of jejunum strips. The incubation in the Roundup solutions caused a significant, mostly miorelaxant, reversible reaction of smooth muscle; only in the highest tested dose which is equivalent to the agricultural concentration (1% corresponding to 1.7g glyphosate/L) there was an irreversible disturbance of the spontaneous contractility and reactivity. The incubation in POEA solutions in the range of low doses (0.256; 1.28; 6.4mg/L) resulted in a biphasic muscle reaction (relaxation and contraction); whereas in the range of high doses, i.e. 32; 160 and 800mg/L (agricultural spray concentrations) induced only a miorelaxant, irreversible response. The results indicate very high toxicity of POEA which exceeds the toxicity of the commercial formulations. Besides, it is postulated that glyphosate and POEA may display antagonistic interaction towards the motoric activity of gastrointestinal tract. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Parker, J O

    1987-11-16

    The organic nitrates are the most widely used agents in the management of patients with angina pectoris. When initially administered by the oral route, the nitrates produce profound changes in systemic hemodynamics and significant and prolonged improvement in exercise duration. It has been shown that during short periods of regular oral nitrate administration, the hemodynamic, antiischemic and antianginal effects of the nitrates are greatly reduced. Thus, when initially administered, oral isosorbide dinitrate prolongs exercise duration for a period of several hours, but during sustained 4-times-daily therapy, exercise tolerance is improved for only 2 hours after administration. Studies with transdermal preparations of isosorbide dinitrate and nitroglycerin also show improvement during short-term administration for up to 8 hours, but after several days of once-daily therapy, the effects of these agents are similar to placebo. It is apparent that nitrate tolerance is a clinically relevant problem. Although tolerance develops rapidly during nitrate therapy, it is reversed promptly during nitrate-free periods. Oral nitrates maintain their antianginal effects when given 2 or 3 times daily with provision of a nitrate-free period. Studies are currently underway to investigate the effects of intermittent administration schedules with transdermal nitrate preparations.

  5. Influence of a Roundup formulation on glyphosate effects on steroidogenesis and proliferation of bovine granulosa cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Perego, Maria Chiara; Caloni, Francesca; Cortinovis, Cristina; Schutz, Luis F; Albonico, Marco; Tsuzukibashi, Denise; Spicer, Leon J

    2017-09-04

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl-glycine) is a non-selective systemic herbicide widely used worldwide. The purpose of this study is to determine if glyphosate alone (GLPH) or in formulation with Roundup (G-RU) can affect granulosa cell proliferation and steroid production. Four experiments were conducted. In Exp. 1, 10 and 300 μg/mL of GLPH had no effect (P > 0.05) on cell numbers, estradiol or progesterone production, whereas 10 and 300 μg/mL of G-RU dramatically decreased (P < 0.05) cell numbers and estradiol and progesterone production. In Exp. 2, G-RU at 0.1 μg/mL had no significant effect whereas G-RU at 10 μg/mL decreased (P < 0.05) GC numbers, progesterone and estradiol production. In the absence of IGF1 but presence of FSH, 1 μg/mL of G-RU decreased (P < 0.05) estradiol production, whereas in the presence of IGF1 and FSH, 1 μg/mL of G-RU increased (P < 0.05) cell numbers, progesterone and estradiol production. In Exp. 3, IGF1 significantly increased cell numbers (by 2.8-fold) and estradiol (by 17.8-fold) and progesterone (by 6.1-fold) production. GLPH at 10 μg/mL alone had no significant effect on FSH-induced (i.e., basal) or FSH plus IGF1-induced cell numbers, estradiol or progesterone production. However, G-RU at 10 μg/mL significantly inhibited FSH plus IGF1-induced cell numbers, estradiol and progesterone production by 65%-91%. In Exp. 4, 48 h treatment of G-RU had no significant effect on viability of attached cells. In conclusion, the present studies demonstrate that GLPH and particularly G-RU may have the potential to impair reproductive function in cattle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Breed effect between Mos rooster (Galician indigenous breed) and Sasso T-44 line and finishing feed effect of commercial fodder or corn.

    PubMed

    Franco, D; Rois, D; Vázquez, J A; Purriños, L; González, R; Lorenzo, J M

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this research was to study the Mos rooster breed growth performance, carcass, and meat quality. The breed effect (Mos vs. Sasso T-44) and finishing feed in the last month (fodder vs. corn) on animal growth, carcass characteristics, meat quality, and fatty and amino acid profiles were studied using a randomized block design with initial weight as covariance. In total, 80 roosters (n = 30 of Sasso T-44 line and n = 50 of Mos breed) were used. They were separated by breed and allocated to 2 feeding treatment groups (concentrate and corn). Each feeding treatment group consisted of 15 and 25 roosters, for Sasso T-44 line and Mos breed, respectively. Finishing feeding did not affect growth parameters in the 2 genotypes of rooster tested (P > 0.05). Nonetheless, the comparison between both types of roosters led to significant differences in growth parameters (P < 0.05). Regarding carcass characteristics, no significant influences of finishing feeding treatment (P > 0.05) were found, and as expected, carcass weight clearly differed between genotypes due to the lower growth rate of Mos roosters. However, drumstick, thigh, and wing percentages were greater in the Mos breed than in the hybrid line. In color instrumental traits, roosters feeding with corn showed breast meat with significantly (P < 0.001) higher a* and b* values than those of cocks feeding with commercial fodder. Values of shear force were less than 2 kg for both genotypes, thus it can be classified as very tender meat. Finishing with corn significantly increased (P < 0.001) the polyunsaturated fatty acid content in the breast; the Mos breed had a polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratio of 0.73. The amino acid profile of the indigenous breed was not similar to that of the commercial strain. Finishing feeding treatment had a greater influence than breed effect on amino acid profile.

  7. Modulative influence of lysozyme dimer on defence mechanisms in the carp (Cyprinus carpio) and European sheatfish (Silurus glanis) after suppression induced by herbicide Roundup.

    PubMed

    Terech-Majewska, E; Siwicki, A K; Szweda, W

    2004-01-01

    Immunomodulation is a commonly used method of prophylaxis in humans and animals. Lysozyme dimer (KLP-602) was used at a dose of 50 ug/kg b.w. in order to correct the immunosuppression caused by the action of herbicide glyphosate (Roundup- Monsanto), which was used in a single bath for 10 minutes in a concentration of 100 mg/l of water. The investigations were carried out on 2 species of fish: the carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) and european catfish (Silurus glanis L.). Herbicide glyphosate caused a decrease in metabolic and phagocytic activity (RBA and PKA) and in proliferative response stimulated by Con A and LPS in carp and european catfish. The immunosuppression sustained for about 2 weeks. The results obtained indicate the possibility of correction of immunosuppression applying lysozyme dimmer (KLP-602) after use of which, the level of the studied indexes increased.

  8. Metabolic parameters and oxidative balance in juvenile Rhamdia quelen exposed to rice paddy herbicides: Roundup(®), Primoleo(®), and Facet(®).

    PubMed

    Persch, Tanilene Sotero Pinto; Weimer, Rodrigo Nizolli; Freitas, Betânia Souza; Oliveira, Guendalina Turcato

    2017-05-01

    The present study sought to assess the response of Rhamdia quelen juveniles (6-8 cm total body length) to exposure to different concentrations of three herbicides: Roundup(®) Original (18, 36, 72, and 144 μg/L), Primoleo(®) (2.5, 5, 10, and 15 μg/L), and Facet(®) (1.75, 3.5, 7, and 14 μg/L). Total protein (TP), glycogen (GG), total lipids (TL), triacylglycerols (TAG), lipid peroxidation (TBARS), and activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in gills, liver, kidneys, and muscle were measured by spectrophotometry. Roundup(®) (glyphosate) reduced the TP, GG, and TL in gills and TL in liver and kidney and increased TP in liver and increased GG in muscle. In contrast to Primoleo(®) (atrazine), all tissues stored TAG and consumed LT, besides the gills also reduced PT. There was still an increase in GG in the kidneys and muscle. Facet(®) (quinclorac) induced changes mainly in the liver (increased TP, TL, and TAG content) and muscle (increased GG, TL, and TAG depletion). Gill tissue exhibited TP depletion alone, and kidney tissue metabolism was unchanged. This fish species appears capable of modulating its enzymes to the point where it sustains no oxidative damage as a result of exposure to the herbicides glyphosate (possibly due to increased CAT activity), atrazine (despite no changes in SOD or CAT activity), and quinclorac (with increased lipid peroxidation, particularly in gill, kidney, and muscle tissue, despite elevated SOD activity). Although it is not considered a target species, R. quelen suffers harmful effects from interaction with these herbicides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of the glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup WeatherMax® on metamorphosis of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) in natural wetlands.

    PubMed

    Lanctôt, C; Robertson, C; Navarro-Martín, L; Edge, C; Melvin, S D; Houlahan, J; Trudeau, V L

    2013-09-15

    Amphibian tadpoles develop in aquatic environments where they are susceptible to the effects of pesticides and other environmental contaminants. Glyphosate-based herbicides are currently the most commonly used herbicide in the world and have been shown to affect survival and development of tadpoles under laboratory and mesocosm conditions. In the present study, whole wetland manipulations were used to determine if exposure to an agriculturally relevant application of Roundup WeatherMax(®), a herbicide formulation containing the potassium salt of glyphosate and an undisclosed surfactant, influences the development of wood frog tadpoles (Lithobates sylvaticus) under natural conditions. Wetlands were divided in half with an impermeable curtain so that each wetland contained a treatment and control side. Tadpoles were exposed to two pulses of this herbicide at an environmentally realistic concentration (ERC, 0.21 mg acid equivalent (a.e.)/L) and the predicted maximum environmental concentration (PMEC, 2.89 mg a.e./L), after which abundance, growth, development, and mRNA levels of genes involved in tadpole metamorphosis were measured. Results present little evidence that exposure to this herbicide affects abundance, growth and development of wood frog tadpoles. As part of the Long-term Experimental Wetlands Area (LEWA) project, this research demonstrates that typical agricultural use of Roundup WeatherMax(®) poses minimal risk to larval amphibian development. However, our gene expression data (mRNA levels) suggests that glyphosate-based herbicides have the potential to alter hormonal pathways during tadpole development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Encyclopedia Roundup 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Library Association, Chicago, IL.

    This second annual encyclopedia summary updates the American Library Association's (ALA) evaluation of 10 sets and analyzes the deletions and additions made to each encyclopedia within the context of each publisher's revision plans. The board looked specifically for significant changes in purpose, arrangement, content style, general quality, and…

  11. ROUNDUP - GEMINI XII - RECOVERY

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-01

    S66-59940 (15 Nov. 1966) --- Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (right), command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot, are welcomed aboard the aircraft carrier USS Wasp after their Gemini-12 spacecraft splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean recovery area at 2:21 p.m. (EST), Nov. 15, 1966, to conclude a four-day mission in space. Photo credit: NASA

  12. Science Learning Centres Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    A recent YouGov poll indicated that almost half of eight to 18-year-olds aspire to a career in science. The latest Association of Colleges enrolment survey indicates a large increase in uptake of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) at further education (FE) colleges. These reports, along with other findings that suggest an…

  13. Graphic Novels: A Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Katherine L.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews graphic novels for young adults, including five titles from "The Adventures of Tintin," a French series that often uses ethnic and racial stereotypes which reflect the time in which they were published, and "Wolverine," a Marvel comic character adventure. (Contains six references.) (LRW)

  14. The Optical Disc Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbreath, Jeremy

    1993-01-01

    Provides an update on optical disk technology as a means of digital media storage and explains why it may become a standard storage technology for telemedia technology. Topics discussed include read-only formats; write-once formats, including WORM and CD-WORM; rewritable formats; videodiscs; and future possibilities. (LRW)

  15. Supreme Court Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles F.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses U.S. Supreme Court cases during the 2000-01 term. Focuses on federalism, such as the case Solid Waste Agency v. Army Corps of Engineers, No. 99-1178, and cases related to the U.S. Bill of Rights First Amendment, such as United States and Department of Agriculture v. United Foods, Inc., No. 00-276. (CMK)

  16. Supreme Court Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles F.

    2005-01-01

    Reactions to the retirement of Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and debate over the president's replacement nomination, Judge John Roberts, Jr., of the D.C. Circuit, dominated this summer's Supreme Court recess. Subsequently, after Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist's death on September 3, 2005, President Bush nominated Roberts for the chief justice…

  17. Hazardous Waste Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Joyce, Beverly A.; Ness, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Americans generate approximately 1.6 million tons of hazardous household waste every year. When most people think of hazardous waste, they generally think of materials used in construction, the defense industry, mining, manufacturing, and agriculture. Few people think of hazardous substances…

  18. Storage research roundup

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With so much research being done in the areas of potato production, variety development, genetics, disease resistance and pest management it is easy to miss some of the research being done on potato storage. Below are highlights from a few of the noteworthy papers published recently that relate to t...

  19. The Optical Disc Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbreath, Jeremy

    1993-01-01

    Provides an update on optical disk technology as a means of digital media storage and explains why it may become a standard storage technology for telemedia technology. Topics discussed include read-only formats; write-once formats, including WORM and CD-WORM; rewritable formats; videodiscs; and future possibilities. (LRW)

  20. Supreme Court Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles F.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses U.S. Supreme Court cases during the 2000-01 term. Focuses on federalism, such as the case Solid Waste Agency v. Army Corps of Engineers, No. 99-1178, and cases related to the U.S. Bill of Rights First Amendment, such as United States and Department of Agriculture v. United Foods, Inc., No. 00-276. (CMK)

  1. Classroom Discipline. Research Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielefeldt, Talbot

    1989-01-01

    Recent research in classroom discipline tends to show that discipline is a by-product of effective instruction and classroom management. The five publications reviewed in this annotated bibliography explore aspects of the complex classroom environment that relate to student discipline. Walter Doyle's chapter on "Classroom Organization and…

  2. Supreme Court Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles F.

    2005-01-01

    Reactions to the retirement of Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and debate over the president's replacement nomination, Judge John Roberts, Jr., of the D.C. Circuit, dominated this summer's Supreme Court recess. Subsequently, after Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist's death on September 3, 2005, President Bush nominated Roberts for the chief justice…

  3. Hazardous Waste Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Joyce, Beverly A.; Ness, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Americans generate approximately 1.6 million tons of hazardous household waste every year. When most people think of hazardous waste, they generally think of materials used in construction, the defense industry, mining, manufacturing, and agriculture. Few people think of hazardous substances…

  4. ROUNDUP - APOLLO TEST - BOILERPLATE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-05-16

    The first test of Apollo boilerplate equipped with landing rockets took place at Ellington AFB, 05/16. Spacecraft was dropped at 30-ft. p/s with 23-ft. p/s horizontal velocity. A force of 6 g's was measured inside the spacecraft during the landing. ELLINGTON AFB, HOUSTON, TX B&W

  5. Rangeland Research Roundup -1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Welcome to the inaugural edition of “Rangeland Research Roundup”. Please allow me to introduce myself and provide an overview of our rangeland research in this edition. My name is Justin Derner and I have been the Research Leader for the USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Rangeland Resources...

  6. Science Learning Centres Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    A recent YouGov poll indicated that almost half of eight to 18-year-olds aspire to a career in science. The latest Association of Colleges enrolment survey indicates a large increase in uptake of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) at further education (FE) colleges. These reports, along with other findings that suggest an…

  7. Computer Software Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter, Gary; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-five outstanding new computer software programs for drill and practice, simulation, and tutoring are reviewed. Programs deal with classroom management and with the teaching of language arts, computer literacy, social studies, science and logic, and mathematics. (PP)

  8. Supreme Court Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles F.

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on two U.S. Supreme Court cases involving unreasonable searches and seizures: (1) Kyllo v. United States, No. 99-8508; and (2) Indianapolis v. Edmond, No. 99-1030. Includes information about the first case and the basis and decision of the second case. (CMK)

  9. Science Learning Centres Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The national network of Science Learning Centres aims to raise the quality of science teaching from Key Stage 1 through post-16 (ages 5-19). Short courses are provided locally through the regional Science Learning Centres and longer, more intensive programmes are available at the National Science Learning Centre in York. There are a growing number…

  10. CD-ROM Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Nancy Melin

    1990-01-01

    Describes new CD-ROM products, services, software and data enhancements, and products with unique or interesting features. The discussion covers the extent of CD-ROM use in libraries; issues relating to networking, budgeting, evaluation, training and licensing; and factors to consider when selecting products or services. A directory of producers…

  11. Evaluating Principals. Research Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Carl

    1990-01-01

    Five recent studies included in this annotated bibliography highlight the diverse facets of an effective principal evaluation system. A technical report by Jerry W. Valentine and Michael L. Bowman includes a clinical instrument for assessing teachers' perception of principals' effectiveness. In a second report, Daniel L. Duke and Richard J.…

  12. The Black Books Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Scholar, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Lists "Black and Black related" books available from American and some British publishing companies. Also provides lists of publishers and bookstores that carry works relevant to Blacks and Black studies. (GC)

  13. Graphic Novels: A Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Katherine L.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews graphic novels for young adults, including five titles from "The Adventures of Tintin," a French series that often uses ethnic and racial stereotypes which reflect the time in which they were published, and "Wolverine," a Marvel comic character adventure. (Contains six references.) (LRW)

  14. 40 CFR 180.552 - Sulfosulfuron; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Cattle, meat byproducts 0.3 Goat, fat 0.02 Goat, meat 0.01 Goat, meat byproducts 0.3 Grass, forage, fodder and hay, group 17, forage 14 Grass, forage, fodder and hay, group 17, hay 25 Hog, fat 0.005 Hog...

  15. 40 CFR 180.552 - Sulfosulfuron; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Cattle, meat byproducts 0.3 Goat, fat 0.02 Goat, meat 0.01 Goat, meat byproducts 0.3 Grass, forage, fodder and hay, group 17, forage 14 Grass, forage, fodder and hay, group 17, hay 25 Hog, fat 0.005 Hog...

  16. 40 CFR 180.552 - Sulfosulfuron; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Cattle, meat byproducts 0.3 Goat, fat 0.02 Goat, meat 0.01 Goat, meat byproducts 0.3 Grass, forage, fodder and hay, group 17, forage 14 Grass, forage, fodder and hay, group 17, hay 25 Hog, fat 0.005...

  17. Transgenic rice expressing a codon-modified synthetic CP4-EPSPS confers tolerance to broad-spectrum herbicide, glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Chhapekar, Sushil; Raghavendrarao, Sanagala; Pavan, Gadamchetty; Ramakrishna, Chopperla; Singh, Vivek Kumar; Phanindra, Mullapudi Lakshmi Venkata; Dhandapani, Gurusamy; Sreevathsa, Rohini; Ananda Kumar, Polumetla

    2015-05-01

    Highly tolerant herbicide-resistant transgenic rice was developed by expressing codon-modified synthetic CP4--EPSPS. The transformants could tolerate up to 1% commercial glyphosate and has the potential to be used for DSR (direct-seeded rice). Weed infestation is one of the major biotic stress factors that is responsible for yield loss in direct-seeded rice (DSR). Herbicide-resistant rice has potential to improve the efficiency of weed management under DSR. Hence, the popular indica rice cultivar IR64, was genetically modified using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation with a codon-optimized CP4-EPSPS (5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase) gene, with N-terminal chloroplast targeting peptide from Petunia hybrida. Integration of the transgenes in the selected rice plants was confirmed by Southern hybridization and expression by Northern and herbicide tolerance assays. Transgenic plants showed EPSPS enzyme activity even at high concentrations of glyphosate, compared to untransformed control plants. T0, T1 and T2 lines were tested by herbicide bioassay and it was confirmed that the transgenic rice could tolerate up to 1% of commercial Roundup, which is five times more in dose used to kill weeds under field condition. All together, the transgenic rice plants developed in the present study could be used efficiently to overcome weed menace.

  18. Experimental determination of transfer coefficients of sup 137 Cs and sup 131 I from fodder into milk of cows and sheep after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, G.; Mueller, H.P.; Proehl, G.P.; Paretzke, H.G.; Propstmeier, G.; Roehrmoser, G.H.; Hofmann, P. )

    1989-12-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident in April 1986, the transfer of {sup 131}I and {sup 137}Cs from feed to milk was studied under experimental and common agricultural conditions. From measurements in different dairy farms in Southern Bavaria, equilibrium transfer coefficients for cow's milk were calculated to be 0.003 d L-1 (range 0.0015 to 0.005) for {sup 131}I and 0.003 d L-1 (range 0.0025 to 0.004) for {sup 137}Cs. In feeding experiments with cows and sheep under more controlled conditions, milk transfer coefficients of 0.007 d L-1 (range 0.0055 to 0.0081) for {sup 131}I and 0.003 d L-1 (range 0.0023 to 0.0053) for {sup 137}Cs were obtained for cows, while for sheep the {sup 137}Cs transfer coefficient was higher: 0.06 d L-1. The kinetics of the Cs transfer from fodder to cow's milk can be described by two exponential terms assuming biological half-lives in milk of 1-2 d and 10-20 d. The use of a fast component with 1.5 d and a fraction of 0.8, and a slow component with 15 d, gives a good approximation to the kinetics for all cows in this experiment.

  19. The combination of quantitative PCR and western blot detecting CP4-EPSPS component in Roundup Ready soy plant tissues and commercial soy-related foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Wu, Honghong; Zhou, Xinghu; Xu, Sheng; He, Jian; Shen, Wenbiao; Zhou, Guanghong; Huang, Ming

    2012-06-01

    With the widespread use of Roundup Ready soy (event 40-3-2) (RRS), the comprehensive detection of genetically modified component in foodstuffs is of significant interest, but few protein-based approaches have been found useful in processed foods. In this report, the combination of quantitative PCR (qPCR) and western blot was used to detect cp4-epsps gene and its protein product in different RRS plant tissues and commercial soy-containing foodstuffs. The foods included those of plant origin produced by different processing procedures and also some products containing both meat and plant protein concentrates. The validity of the 2 methods was confirmed first. We also showed that the CP4-EPSPS protein existed in different RRS plant tissues. In certain cases, the results from the western blot and the qPCR were not consistent. To be specific, at least 2 degraded fragments of CP4-EPSPS protein (35.5 and 24.6 kDa) were observed. For dried bean curd crust and deep-fried bean curd, a degraded protein fragment with the size of 24.6 kDa appeared, while cp4-epsps gene could not be traced by qPCR. In contrast, we found a signal of cp4-epsps DNA in 3 foodstuffs, including soy-containing ham cutlet product, meat ball, and sausage by qPCR, while CP4-EPSPS protein could not be detected by western blot in such samples. Our study therefore concluded that the combination of DNA- and protein-based methods would compensate each other, thus resulting in a more comprehensive detection from nucleic acid and protein levels. The combination of quantitative PCR (qPCR) and western blot was used to detect cp4-epsps gene and its protein product in different Roundup Ready soy (event 40-3-2) plant tissues and commercial soy-containing foodstuffs. The foods included those of plant origin produced by different processing procedures and also some products containing a combination of both meat and plant protein concentrates. This study indicated that the combination of DNA- and protein-based methods

  20. Development of a Rapid Point-of-Use DNA Test for the Screening of Genuity® Roundup Ready 2 Yield® Soybean in Seed Samples

    PubMed Central

    Chandu, Dilip; Paul, Sudakshina; Parker, Mathew; Dudin, Yelena; King-Sitzes, Jennifer; Perez, Tim; Mittanck, Don W.; Shah, Manali; Glenn, Kevin C.; Piepenburg, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Testing for the presence of genetically modified material in seed samples is of critical importance for all stakeholders in the agricultural industry, including growers, seed manufacturers, and regulatory bodies. While rapid antibody-based testing for the transgenic protein has fulfilled this need in the past, the introduction of new variants of a given transgene demands new diagnostic regimen that allows distinguishing different traits at the nucleic acid level. Although such molecular tests can be performed by PCR in the laboratory, their requirement for expensive equipment and sophisticated operation have prevented its uptake in point-of-use applications. A recently developed isothermal DNA amplification technique, recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), combines simple sample preparation and amplification work-flow procedures with the use of minimal detection equipment in real time. Here, we report the development of a highly sensitive and specific RPA-based detection system for Genuity Roundup Ready 2 Yield (RR2Y) material in soybean (Glycine max) seed samples and present the results of studies applying the method in both laboratory and field-type settings. PMID:27314015

  1. Characterization of the ecological interactions of Roundup Ready 2 Yield® soybean, MON 89788, for use in ecological risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Horak, Michael J; Rosenbaum, Eric W; Phillips, Samuel L; Kendrick, Daniel L; Carson, David; Clark, Pete L; Nickson, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As part of an ecological risk assessment, Roundup Ready 2 Yield® soybean (MON 89788) was compared to a conventional control soybean variety, A3244, for disease and arthropod damage, plant response to abiotic stress and cold, effects on succeeding plant growth (allelopathic effects), plant response to a bacterial symbiont, and effects on the ability of seed to survive and volunteer in a subsequent growing season. Statistically significant differences between MON 89788 and A3244 were considered in the context of the genetic variation known to occur in soybean and were assessed for their potential impact on plant pest (weed) potential and adverse environmental impact. The results of these studies revealed no effects of the genetic modification that would result in increased pest potential or adverse environmental impact of MON 89788 compared with A3244. This paper illustrates how such characterization studies conducted in a range of environments where the crop is grown are used in an ecological risk assessment of the genetically modified (GM) crop. Furthermore, risk assessors and decision makers use this information when deciding whether to approve a GM crop for cultivation in—or grain import into—their country. PMID:26177011

  2. Development of a Rapid Point-of-Use DNA Test for the Screening of Genuity® Roundup Ready 2 Yield® Soybean in Seed Samples.

    PubMed

    Chandu, Dilip; Paul, Sudakshina; Parker, Mathew; Dudin, Yelena; King-Sitzes, Jennifer; Perez, Tim; Mittanck, Don W; Shah, Manali; Glenn, Kevin C; Piepenburg, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Testing for the presence of genetically modified material in seed samples is of critical importance for all stakeholders in the agricultural industry, including growers, seed manufacturers, and regulatory bodies. While rapid antibody-based testing for the transgenic protein has fulfilled this need in the past, the introduction of new variants of a given transgene demands new diagnostic regimen that allows distinguishing different traits at the nucleic acid level. Although such molecular tests can be performed by PCR in the laboratory, their requirement for expensive equipment and sophisticated operation have prevented its uptake in point-of-use applications. A recently developed isothermal DNA amplification technique, recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), combines simple sample preparation and amplification work-flow procedures with the use of minimal detection equipment in real time. Here, we report the development of a highly sensitive and specific RPA-based detection system for Genuity Roundup Ready 2 Yield (RR2Y) material in soybean (Glycine max) seed samples and present the results of studies applying the method in both laboratory and field-type settings.

  3. Comparison of three DNA extraction methods for feed products and four amplification methods for the 5'-junction fragment of Roundup Ready soybean.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiumin; Teng, Da; Tian, Fang; Guan, Qingfeng; Wang, Jianhua

    2012-05-09

    Three methods of DNA extraction from feed products and four detection methods for the 5'-junction fragment of genetically modified (GM) Roundup Ready soybean (RRS) were compared and evaluated. The DNA extraction methods, including cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and guanidine hydrochloride (Kit), were assessed for their yields and purity of DNA, extraction time, and reagent cost. The DNA yields of CTAB, SDS, and Kit were 52-694, 164-1750 and 23-105 ng/mg sample, and their extraction time was 2.5-3, 2-2.5, and 1.5-2 h with reagent cost about US dollar 0.24, 0.13, and 1.9 per extraction, respectively. The SDS method was generally well suited to all kinds of feed matrices tested. The limits of detection for the four amplification protocols, including loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), hyperbranched rolling circle amplification (HRCA), conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and real-time PCR, were 48.5, 4.85, 485, and 9 copies of the pTLH10 plasmid, respectively. The ranked results of the four detection methods were based on multiattribute utility theory as follows (from best to worse): HRCA, LAMP, PCR, and real-time PCR. This comparative evaluation was specifically useful for selection of a highly efficient DNA extraction or amplification method for detecting different GM ingredients.

  4. Characterization of the ecological interactions of Roundup Ready 2 Yield® soybean, MON 89788, for use in ecological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Horak, Michael J; Rosenbaum, Eric W; Phillips, Samuel L; Kendrick, Daniel L; Carson, David; Clark, Pete L; Nickson, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    As part of an ecological risk assessment, Roundup Ready 2 Yield® soybean (MON 89788) was compared to a conventional control soybean variety, A3244, for disease and arthropod damage, plant response to abiotic stress and cold, effects on succeeding plant growth (allelopathic effects), plant response to a bacterial symbiont, and effects on the ability of seed to survive and volunteer in a subsequent growing season. Statistically significant differences between MON 89788 and A3244 were considered in the context of the genetic variation known to occur in soybean and were assessed for their potential impact on plant pest (weed) potential and adverse environmental impact. The results of these studies revealed no effects of the genetic modification that would result in increased pest potential or adverse environmental impact of MON 89788 compared with A3244. This paper illustrates how such characterization studies conducted in a range of environments where the crop is grown are used in an ecological risk assessment of the genetically modified (GM) crop. Furthermore, risk assessors and decision makers use this information when deciding whether to approve a GM crop for cultivation in-or grain import into-their country.

  5. Phosphate Fertilizer and Growing Environment Change the Phytochemicals, Oil Quality, and Nutritional Composition of Roundup Ready Genetically Modified and Conventional Soybean.

    PubMed

    Scilewski da Costa Zanatta, Tatiane; Manica-Berto, Roberta; Ferreira, Cristiano Dietrich; Cardozo, Michele Maciel Crizel; Rombaldi, Cesar Valmor; Zambiazi, Rui Carlos; Dias, Álvaro Renato Guerra

    2017-04-05

    Phosphorus (P) intake, genotype, and growth environment in soybean cultivation can affect the composition of the soybean. This experiment was conducted in two locations (microregions I and II) using a randomized complete block design, including conventional soybean (BRS Sambaíba) and genetically modified (GM) [Msoy 9144 Roundup Ready (RR)] cultivars and varying doses of phosphorus fertilizer (0, 60, 120, and 240 kg/ha P2O5). Soybeans were evaluated for chemical composition, total phenols, phytic acid content, individual isoflavone content, antioxidant activity, oil quality, fatty acid profile, total carotenoid content, and individual tocopherol contents. Multivariate analysis facilitated reduction in the number of variables with respect to soybean genotype (conventional BRS Sambaíba and GM Msoy 9144 RR), dose of P2O5 fertilizer, and place of cultivation (microregion I and II). BRS Sambaíba had higher concentrations of β-glucosides, malonylglucosides, glycitein, and genistein than Msoy 9144 RR, which showed a higher concentration of daidzein. The highest concentrations of isoflavones and fatty acids were observed in soybeans treated with 120 and 240 kg/ha P2O5, regardless of the location and cultivar.

  6. Toxic, cytotoxic, and genotoxic effects of a glyphosate formulation (Roundup®SL-Cosmoflux®411F) in the direct-developing frog Eleutherodactylus johnstonei.

    PubMed

    Meza-Joya, Fabio Leonardo; Ramírez-Pinilla, Martha Patricia; Fuentes-Lorenzo, Jorge Luis

    2013-06-01

    The aerial spraying of glyphosate formulations in Colombia to eradicate illegal crops has generated great concern about its possible impact on nontarget organisms, particularly amphibians. This study evaluated the toxic, cytotoxic, and genotoxic effects of a glyphosate formulation (Roundup®SL-Cosmoflux®411F) in the direct-developing frog Eleutherodactylus johnstonei by estimating the median lethal application rate (LC50 ), median hemolytic application rate (HD50 ), and extent of DNA damage using the in vitro and in vivo Comet assays. Toxicity results indicated that the application rate [37.4 µg acid equivalent (a.e.)/cm(2) ] equivalent to that used in aerial spraying (3.74 kg a.e./ha) is not lethal in male and female adult frogs, whereas neonates are highly sensitive. Glyphosate formulation at application rates above 5.4 µg a.e./cm(2) (in vivo) and concentrations above 95 µg a.e./mL (in vitro) showed clear evidence of cytotoxicity. In vivo and in vitro exposure of E. johnstonei erythrocytes to the glyphosate formulation induced DNA breaks in a dose-dependent manner with statistically significant values (P < 0.05) at all doses tested. DNA damage initially increased with the duration of exposure and then decreased, suggesting that DNA repair events were occurring during in vivo and in vitro exposures. These results are discussed from the perspective of possible ecotoxicological risks to anuran species from exposure to glyphosate formulation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Revoking Pesticide Tolerances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA revokes pesticide tolerances when all registrations of a pesticide have been canceled in the U.S. and the tolerances are not needed for imported foods or when there are no registered uses for certain crops.

  8. Lactose tolerance tests

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrogen breath test for lactose tolerance ... Two common methods include: Lactose tolerance blood test Hydrogen breath test The hydrogen breath test is the preferred method. It measures the amount of hydrogen in the air you breathe out. ...

  9. Identification, Characterization, and Expression Analysis of Cell Wall Related Genes in Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, a Food, Fodder, and Biofuel Crop

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Krishan M.; Thu, Sandi W.; Balasubramanian, Vimal K.; Cobos, Christopher J.; Disasa, Tesfaye; Mendu, Venugopal

    2016-01-01

    Biomass based alternative fuels offer a solution to the world's ever-increasing energy demand. With the ability to produce high biomass in marginal lands with low inputs, sorghum has a great potential to meet second-generation biofuel needs. Despite the sorghum crop importance in biofuel and fodder industry, there is no comprehensive information available on the cell wall related genes and gene families (biosynthetic and modification). It is important to identify the cell wall related genes to understand the cell wall biosynthetic process as well as to facilitate biomass manipulation. Genome-wide analysis using gene family specific Hidden Markov Model of conserved domains identified 520 genes distributed among 20 gene families related to biosynthesis/modification of various cell wall polymers such as cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, and lignin. Chromosomal localization analysis of these genes revealed that about 65% of cell wall related genes were confined to four chromosomes (Chr. 1–4). Further, 56 tandem duplication events involving 169 genes were identified in these gene families which could be associated with expansion of genes within families in sorghum. Additionally, we also identified 137 Simple Sequence Repeats related to 112 genes and target sites for 10 miRNAs in some important families such as cellulose synthase, cellulose synthase-like, and laccases, etc. To gain further insight into potential functional roles, expression analysis of these gene families was performed using publically available data sets in various tissues and under abiotic stress conditions. Expression analysis showed tissue specificity as well as differential expression under abiotic stress conditions. Overall, our study provides a comprehensive information on cell wall related genes families in sorghum which offers a valuable resource to develop strategies for altering biomass composition by plant breeding and genetic engineering approaches. PMID:27630645

  10. Zero Tolerance in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henault, Cherry

    2001-01-01

    Questions the effectiveness of the widespread use of zero-tolerance policies enacted by school boards to punish students who violate weapon and drug rules. Suggests that enforcement of zero-tolerance policies has not been equitable. Reviews proposal for alternative to zero tolerance. (PKP)

  11. Need for Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions for Minimum Risk Pesticides

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ingredients used in minimum risk products used on food, food crops, food contact surfaces, or animal feed commodities generally have a tolerance or tolerance exemption. Learn about tolerances and tolerance exemptions for minimum risk ingredients.

  12. Effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on survival, development, growth and sex ratios of wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) tadpoles. II: agriculturally relevant exposures to Roundup WeatherMax® and Vision® under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Lanctôt, C; Navarro-Martín, L; Robertson, C; Park, B; Jackman, P; Pauli, B D; Trudeau, V L

    2014-09-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are currently the most commonly used herbicides in the world. They have been shown to affect survival, growth, development and sexual differentiation of tadpoles under chronic laboratory exposures but this has not been investigated under more environmentally realistic conditions. The purpose of this study is (1) to determine if an agriculturally relevant exposure to Roundup WeatherMax®, a relatively new and understudied formulation, influences the development of wood frog tadpoles (Lithobates sylvaticus) through effects on the mRNA levels of genes involved in the control of metamorphosis; (2) to compare results to the well-studied Vision® formulation (containing the isopropylamine salt of glyphosate [IPA] and polyethoxylated tallowamine [POEA] surfactant) and to determine which ingredient(s) in the formulations are responsible for potential effects on development; and (3) to compare results to recent field studies that used a similar experimental design. In the present laboratory study, wood frog tadpoles were exposed to an agriculturally relevant application (i.e., two pulses) of Roundup WeatherMax® and Vision® herbicides as well as the active ingredient (IPA) and the POEA surfactant of Vision®. Survival, development, growth, sex ratios and mRNA levels of genes involved in tadpole metamorphosis were measured. Results show that Roundup WeatherMax® (2.89 mg acid equivalent (a.e.)/L) caused 100% mortality after the first pulse. Tadpoles treated with a lower concentration of Roundup WeatherMax® (0.21 mg a.e./L) as well as Vision® (2.89 mg a.e./L), IPA and POEA had an increased condition factor (based on length and weight measures in the tadpoles) relative to controls at Gosner stage (Gs) 36/38. At Gs42, tadpoles treated with IPA and POEA had a decreased condition factor. Also at Gs42, the effect on condition factor was dependent on the sex of tadpoles and significant treatment effects were only detected in males. In most cases

  13. [Selenium tolerance of yeasts].

    PubMed

    Golubev, V I; Golubev, N V

    2002-01-01

    Selenium tolerance of yeasts widely varies: the growth of some yeasts can be inhibited by a selenium concentration as low as 10(-4) M, whereas others can grow in the presence of 10(-1) M selenium. Homogeneous yeast taxa are characterized by a certain level of selenium tolerance, and heterogeneous taxa show a variable level of tolerance to selenium. In general, ascomycetous yeasts are more tolerant to selenium than basidiomycetous yeasts. Among the ascomycetous yeasts, the genera Dekkera and Schizosaccharomyces exhibited the lowest and the species Candida maltosa, Hanseniaspora valbyensis, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica the highest tolerance to selenium. Among the basidiomycetous yeasts, the genera Bullera, Cryptococcus, and Holtermannia showed the lowest and the species Cryptococcus curvatus, Cr. humicola, and Trichosporon spp. the highest tolerance to selenium. The selenium tolerance of yeasts depends on the composition of the growth medium, in particular, on the presence of sulfate, sulfur-containing amino acids, and glutamine in the medium.

  14. Conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction assessment of the fate of transgenic DNA in sheep fed Roundup Ready rapeseed meal.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Trevor W; Reuter, Tim; Okine, Erasmus; Sharma, Ranjana; McAllister, Tim A

    2006-12-01

    Conventional and real-time PCR were used to detect transgenic DNA in digesta, faeces and blood collected from six ruminally and duodenally cannulated sheep fed forage-based (F) or concentrate-based (C) diets containing 15% Roundup Ready (RR) rapeseed meal (n 3). The sheep were adapted for 14 d to F or C diets containing non-GM rapeseed, then fed the RR diets for 11 d. On day 12, they were switched back to non-GM diets for a further 11 d. Ruminal and duodenal fluids (RF, DF) and faecal samples were collected at 3 or 4 h intervals over the 4 d immediately following the last feeding of GM diets. DNA was isolated from whole RF and DF, from the cell-free supernatant fraction, and from culture fermentation liquid. Blood was collected on days 1, 5 and 9 of feeding the RR rapeseed meal. The 1363 bp 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase transgene (epsps) was quantifiable in whole RF and DF for up to 13 h, and a 108 bp epsps fragment for up to 29 h. Transgenic DNA was not detectable in faeces or blood, or in microbial DNA. Diet type (F v. C) did not affect (P>0.05) the quantity of transgenic DNA in digesta. More (P<0.05) transgenic DNA was detected in RF than in DF, but there was an interaction (P<0.05) between sample type and collection time. In supernatant fractions from RF and DF, three different fragments of transgenic DNA ranging in size from 62 to 420 bp were not amplifiable.

  15. The response of amphibian larvae to exposure to a glyphosate-based herbicide (Roundup WeatherMax) and nutrient enrichment in an ecosystem experiment.

    PubMed

    Edge, Christopher; Thompson, Dean; Hao, Chunyan; Houlahan, Jeff

    2014-11-01

    Herbicides and fertilizers are widely used throughout the world and pose a threat to aquatic ecosystems. Using a replicated, whole ecosystem experiment in which 24 small wetlands were split in half with an impermeable barrier we tested whether exposure to a glyphosate-based herbicide, Roundup WeatherMax™, alone or in combination with nutrient enrichment has an effect on the survival, growth or development of amphibians. The herbicide was applied at one of two concentrations (low=210 μg a.e./L, high=2880 μg a.e./L) alone and in combination with nutrient enrichment to one side of wetlands and the other was left as an untreated control. Each treatment was replicated with six wetlands, and the experiment was repeated over two years. In the high glyphosate and nutrient enrichment treatment the survival of wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) larvae was lower in enclosures placed in situ on the treated sides than the control sides of wetlands. However, these results were not replicated in the second year of study and they were not observed in free swimming wood frog larvae in the wetlands. In all treatments, wood frog larvae on the treated sides of wetlands were slightly larger (<10%) than those on the control side, but no effect on development was observed. The most dramatic finding was that the abundance of green frog larvae (Lithobates clamitans) was higher on the treated sides than the control sides of wetlands in the herbicide and nutrient treatments during the second year of the study. The results observed in this field study indicate that caution is necessary when extrapolating results from artificial systems to predict effects in natural systems. In this experiment, the lack of toxicity to amphibian larvae was probably due to the fact the pH of the wetlands was relatively low and the presence of sediments and organic surfaces which would have mitigated the exposure duration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 40 CFR 180.552 - Sulfosulfuron; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... on the raw agricultural commodities. Commodity Parts per million Cattle, fat 0.02 Cattle, meat 0.01 Cattle, meat byproducts 0.3 Goat, fat 0.02 Goat, meat 0.01 Goat, meat byproducts 0.3 Grass, forage, fodder and hay, group 17, forage 14 Grass, forage, fodder and hay, group 17, hay 25 Hog, fat 0.005 Hog...

  17. 40 CFR 180.552 - Sulfosulfuron; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... on the raw agricultural commodities. Commodity Parts per million Cattle, fat 0.02 Cattle, meat 0.01 Cattle, meat byproducts 0.3 Goat, fat 0.02 Goat, meat 0.01 Goat, meat byproducts 0.3 Grass, forage, fodder and hay, group 17, forage 14 Grass, forage, fodder and hay, group 17, hay 25 Hog, fat 0.005 Hog...

  18. 40 CFR 180.226 - Diquat; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 0.05 Sheep, fat 0.05 Sheep, meat 0.05 Sheep, meat byproducts 0.05 Sorghum, grain, grain 2.0 Soybean..., group 10 0.05 Fruit, pome, group 11 0.02 Fruit, stone, group 12 0.02 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16 0.02 Grain, cereal, group 15 0.02 Grape 0.05 Grass, forage, fodder and hay, group 17 0.2...

  19. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  20. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  1. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  2. Relative effect of glyphosate on glyphosate-tolerant maize rhizobacterial communities is not altered by soil properties.

    PubMed

    Barriuso, Jorge; Mellado, Rafael P

    2012-02-01

    The rhizobacterial composition varies according to the soil properties. To test if the effect of herbicides on the rhizobacterial communities of genetically modified NK603 glyphosate-tolerant maize varies according to different soil locations, a comparison was made between the effects of glyphosate (Roundup Plus), a post-emergence applied herbicide, and a pre-emergence applied herbicide (GTZ) versus untreated soil. The potential effect was monitored by direct amplification, cloning, and sequencing of the soil DNA encoding 16S rRNA, and high-throughput DNA pyrosequencing of the bacterial DNA coding for the 16S rRNA hypervariable V6 region. The results obtained using three different methods to analyze the herbicide effect on the rhizobacterial communities of genetically modified NK603 maize were comparable to those previously obtained when glyphosate-tolerant maize was grown in soil with different characteristics. Both herbicides decreased the bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere, with Actinobacteria being the taxonomic group most affected. The results suggest that both herbicides affected the structure of the maize rhizobacterial community, but glyphosate was environmentally less aggressive.

  3. Maize aluminum tolerance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maize is one of the most economically important food crops grown on acid soils, where aluminum (Al) toxicity greatly limits crop yields. Considerable variation for Al tolerance exists in maize, and this variation has been exploited for many years by plant breeders to enhance maize Al tolerance. Curr...

  4. A Lesson in Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnt, Marlene

    2004-01-01

    This article describes one classroom's experience integrating a three-part lesson that focused on tolerance. In the lesson, students examined works by American folk-art painter Edward Hicks, researched quotes about tolerance in society, and applied calligraphy skills to an original composition.

  5. The Paradoxes of Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasamonik, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Teachers who endeavor to build tolerant attitudes in their students often fall into the trap of political correctness. Political correctness can suspend free reflection on the differences inherent in otherness, which is the subject of tolerance, and creates an ideology of the generalized, abstract Other. As a result, teachers prefer to talk about…

  6. Improving crop salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Flowers, T J

    2004-02-01

    Salinity is an ever-present threat to crop yields, especially in countries where irrigation is an essential aid to agriculture. Although the tolerance of saline conditions by plants is variable, crop species are generally intolerant of one-third of the concentration of salts found in seawater. Attempts to improve the salt tolerance of crops through conventional breeding programmes have met with very limited success, due to the complexity of the trait: salt tolerance is complex genetically and physiologically. Tolerance often shows the characteristics of a multigenic trait, with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with tolerance identified in barley, citrus, rice, and tomato and with ion transport under saline conditions in barley, citrus and rice. Physiologically salt tolerance is also complex, with halophytes and less tolerant plants showing a wide range of adaptations. Attempts to enhance tolerance have involved conventional breeding programmes, the use of in vitro selection, pooling physiological traits, interspecific hybridization, using halophytes as alternative crops, the use of marker-aided selection, and the use of transgenic plants. It is surprising that, in spite of the complexity of salt tolerance, there are commonly claims in the literature that the transfer of a single or a few genes can increase the tolerance of plants to saline conditions. Evaluation of such claims reveals that, of the 68 papers produced between 1993 and early 2003, only 19 report quantitative estimates of plant growth. Of these, four papers contain quantitative data on the response of transformants and wild-type of six species without and with salinity applied in an appropriate manner. About half of all the papers report data on experiments conducted under conditions where there is little or no transpiration: such experiments may provide insights into components of tolerance, but are not grounds for claims of enhanced tolerance at the whole plant level. Whether enhanced

  7. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substratum material, or the speciation of the microorganisms. Tolerance factors do depend on the areal cell density of the biofilm at the time of treatment and on the age of the biofilm as grown in a particular experimental system. This suggests that there is something that happens during biofilm maturation, either physical or physiological, that is essential for full biofilm tolerance. Experimental measurements of antimicrobial penetration times in biofilms range over orders of magnitude, with slower penetration (>12 min) observed for reactive oxidants and cationic molecules. These agents are retarded through the interaction of reaction, sorption, and diffusion. The specific physiological status of microbial cells in a biofilm contributes to antimicrobial tolerance. A conceptual framework for categorizing physiological cell states is discussed in the context of antimicrobial susceptibility. It is likely that biofilms harbor cells in multiple states simultaneously (e.g., growing, stress-adapted, dormant, inactive) and that this physiological heterogeneity is an important factor in the tolerance of the biofilm state. PMID:26185072

  8. Comparative environmental impact assessment of herbicides used on genetically modified and non-genetically modified herbicide-tolerant canola crops using two risk indicators.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Danielle P; Kookana, Rai S; Miller, Rosalind B; Correll, Raymond L

    2016-07-01

    Canola (Brassica napus L.) is the third largest field crop in Australia by area sown. Genetically modified (GM) and non-GM canola varieties released or being developed in Australia include Clearfield® (imidazolinone tolerant), TT (triazine tolerant), InVigor® (glufosinate-ammonium tolerant), Roundup Ready® - RR® (glyphosate tolerant) and Hyola® RT® (tolerant to both glyphosate and triazine). We used two risk assessment approaches - the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ) and the Pesticide Impact Rating Index (PIRI) - to compare the environmental risks associated with herbicides used in the canola varieties (GM and non-GM) that are currently grown or may be grown in the future. Risk assessments found that from an environmental impact viewpoint a number of herbicides used in the production of TT canola showed high relative risk in terms of mobility and ecotoxicity of herbicides. The EIQ field use rating values for atrazine and simazine in particular were high compared with those for glyphosate and trifluralin. Imazapic and imazapyr, which are only used in Clearfield® canola, had extremely low EIQ field use rating values, likely reflecting the very low application rates used for these chemicals (0.02 to 0.04kg/ha) compared with those used for atrazine and simazine (1.2 to 1.5kg/ha). The PIRI assessment showed that irrespective of the canola variety grown, trifluralin posed a high toxicity risk to fish (Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss), algae and Daphnia sp. While the replacement of trifluralin with propyzamide had little effect on the mobility score, it greatly decreased the ecotoxicity score to fish, algae and Daphnia sp. due to the lower LC50 values for propyzamide compared with trifluralin. This study has shown that based on likelihood of off-site transport of herbicides in surface water and potential toxicity to non-target organisms, the GM canola varieties have no advantage over non-herbicide tolerant (non HT) or Clearfield® canola.

  9. Application Date Affects Herbicide Tolerance of Hybrid Poplars

    Treesearch

    William Danfield; James Martishus; Edward Hansen

    1983-01-01

    Several herbicides -- glyphosate (Roundup), Linuron (Lorox), pronamide (Kerb), and dichlobenil (Casoron) -- controlled weeds in a 1-year-old Populus plantation and did not seriously injure the trees when applied in early spring or late fall. Casoron was most effective but is expensive.

  10. Tolerance analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, H. K.

    1971-01-01

    Digital computer program determines tolerance values of end to end signal chain or flow path, given preselected probability value. Technique is useful in the synthesis and analysis phases of subsystem design processes.

  11. Radiation Tolerant Antifuse FPGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jih-Jong; Cronquist, Brian; McCollum, John; Parker, Wanida; Katz, Rich; Kleyner, Igor; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The total dose performance of the antifuse FPGA for space applications is summarized. Optimization of the radiation tolerance in the fabless model is the main theme. Mechanisms to explain the variation in different products are discussed.

  12. [INABILITY TO TOLERATE COSMETICS].

    PubMed

    Piérard, G E; Piérard-Franchimont, C

    2016-05-01

    Inability to tolerate cosmetics can result from distinct mechanisms which appear as the so-called sensitive skin corresponding to one aspect of invisible dermatosis, or which corresponds to manifestations of a contact allergic or irritation dermatitis.

  13. Composites Damage Tolerance Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The Composite Damage Tolerance Workshop included participants from NASA, academia, and private industry. The objectives of the workshop were to begin dialogue in order to establish a working group within the Agency, create awareness of damage tolerance requirements for Constellation, and discuss potential composite hardware for the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) Upper Stage (US) and Crew Module. It was proposed that a composites damage tolerance working group be created that acts within the framework of the existing NASA Fracture Control Methodology Panel. The working group charter would be to identify damage tolerance gaps and obstacles for implementation of composite structures into manned space flight systems and to develop strategies and recommendations to overcome these obstacles.

  14. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  15. Damage Tolerance of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Fracture control requirements have been developed to address damage tolerance of composites for manned space flight hardware. The requirements provide the framework for critical and noncritical hardware assessment and testing. The need for damage threat assessments, impact damage protection plans, and nondestructive evaluation are also addressed. Hardware intended to be damage tolerant have extensive coupon, sub-element, and full-scale testing requirements in-line with the Building Block Approach concept from the MIL-HDBK-17, Department of Defense Composite Materials Handbook.

  16. Selection for salt tolerance in tidal freshwater swamp species: Advances using baldcypress as a model for restoration: Chapter 14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krauss, Ken W.; Chambers, Jim L.; Creech, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Worldwide, the intrusion of salinity into irrigated and natural landscapes has major economic and cultural impacts and has resulted in large reductions in crop yields (Epstein et al. 1980; Flowers 2003). Losses have prompted wide-scale programs to improve the salt tolerance of many agronomic species or to identify crop species that can tolerate lands affected by low levels of salinity. Few historic research efforts have considered forest tree species in the United States, especially in nonurban areas. Newer programs have focused on identifying salt tolerance in forest tree species but have mainly limited these efforts to compiling lists of salt tolerant species to be used in afforestation projects (Gogate et al. 1984; Shrivastava et al. 1988; Beckmann 1991; Bell 1999). Gogate et al. (1984), for instance, listed 26 potential species from Australia with silvicultural application to salt affected lands in India. More comprehensive efforts have considered species lists along with specific site requirements (Bell 1999); species tolerant to saline irrigation waters on dry land, for example, will not often be tolerant of salinity increases in wetland settings. Similar ideas have spawned field trials of native and nonnative tree species in India, Pakistan, Thailand, Australia, and the United States (Thomson 1988; Beckmann 1991; Krauss et al. 2000; Conner and Ozalp 2002; Marcar and Crawford 2004; Conner and Inabinette 2005). Concerted attempts at salt tolerance improvement of forest tree species have been limited, owing in part to the diversity of regional issues that such programs must consider. Whereas food, fodder, and pulp yield may be the major improvement goal on salt affected lands in India (Mathur and Sharma 1984), identifying trees that can survive deicing salts (Townsend 1989), oil and gas brine discharges (Auchmoody and Walters 1988), or sea-level rise induced salinity changes (Pezeshki et al. 1987, 1990) are of greater interest to larger industrial nations

  17. Rangeland Research Roundup - October 2011

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conducting rangeland research that is relevant for, and can be applied by, land managers is the core foundation for research projects involving the Rangeland Resources Research Unit. We are continually evaluating our research program to determine which research projects are meeting the needs of land...

  18. Bulk materials handling equipment roundup

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2007-07-15

    The article reports recent product developments in belt conveyors. Flexco Steel Lancing Co. (Flexco) has a range of light, portable maintenance tools and offers training modules on procedures for belt conveyor maintenance on its website www.flexcosafe.com. Siemens recently fitted a 19 km long conveyor belt drive system at a Texan aluminium plant with five 556-kW Simovent Masterdrive VC drives. Voith recently launched the TPKL-T turbo coupling for users who want an alignment-free drive solution. Belt cleaners newly on the market include the RemaClean SGB brush and ASGCO Manufacturing's Razor-Back with Spray bar. Continental Conveyor has introduced a new line of dead-shaft pulleys offering increased bearing protection. 6 photos.

  19. Results of a 13-week safety assurance study with rats fed grain from corn rootworm-protected, glyphosate-tolerant MON 88017 corn.

    PubMed

    Healy, C; Hammond, B; Kirkpatrick, J

    2008-07-01

    Presented are the results of a 13-week rat feeding study with grain from MON 88017 corn (brand name YieldGard VT Rootworm/RR2), protected from feeding damage caused by corn rootworm and tolerant to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup agricultural herbicides. Corn rootworm protection is accomplished through the introduction of cryBb1 coding sequence from Bacillus thuringiensis into the corn genome for in planta production of a bioactive form of Cry3Bb1 protein. Also included in the genome is the coding sequence for the CP4 EPSPS protein from Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 that confers glyphosate herbicidal tolerance. MON 88017 was formulated into rodent diets at 11 or 33% (w/w) levels with its near isogenic control at a level of 33% (w/w). Additionally, six diets containing grain from different conventional (non-biotechnology-derived), reference hybrids were formulated, each at 33% (w/w) levels of one of six reference grains. All diets were nutritionally balanced and conformed to PMI specifications for Certified LabDiet 5002 (PMI Certified LabDiet 5002 is a registered trademark of Purina Mills, Inc.). The responses of rats fed diets containing MON 88017 were comparable to those of rats fed a diet containing grain from its near isogenic control. This study complements extensive agronomic, compositional, and farm animal feeding studies with MON 88017 grain, confirming that it is as safe and nutritious as grain from existing commercial corn hybrids.

  20. Glucose Tolerance and Hyperkinesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langseth, Lillian; Dowd, Judith

    Examined were medical records of 265 hyperkinetic children (7-9 years old). Clinical blood chemistries, hematology, and 5-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) results indicated that hematocrit levels were low in 27% of the Ss, eosinophil levels were abnormally high in 86% of the Ss, and GTT results were abnormal in a maority of Ss. (CL)

  1. Glucose Tolerance and Hyperkinesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langseth, Lillian; Dowd, Judith

    Examined were medical records of 265 hyperkinetic children (7-9 years old). Clinical blood chemistries, hematology, and 5-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) results indicated that hematocrit levels were low in 27% of the Ss, eosinophil levels were abnormally high in 86% of the Ss, and GTT results were abnormal in a maority of Ss. (CL)

  2. Zero Tolerance versus Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

    2000-01-01

    In a case involving questionable canine search-and-seizure practices, a circuit court upheld a school board's decision to terminate a teacher's contract. While touting zero tolerance, the board fired an honored teacher 3 years from retirement who may not have known about the marijuana cigarette in her car. (MLH)

  3. Cuphea tolerates clopyralid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cuphea is a new crop of temperate regions that produces seed oil with medium-chain length fatty acids, which can substitute for imported coconut and palm kernels oils. Only four herbicides are known to be tolerated by cuphea to date. More herbicides, especially POST products, are needed for continue...

  4. A little toleration, please

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, C.

    2000-01-01

    Value pluralism does not imply relativism or subjectivism about values. What it does is allow respect for an at least limited toleration of values with which one may profoundly disagree. Thus a doctor can respect the autonomy of a patient whose values he does not share. Key Words: Pluralism • multiculturalism • relativism • subjectivism • patient autonomy PMID:11129842

  5. Teaching Tolerance Magazine, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnes, Jim, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This magazine provides teachers with classroom learning materials to help children learn to be tolerant with others. Articles in the magazine are: "A Standard to Sustain" (Mary M. Harrison); "Let's Just Play" (Janet Schmidt); "Who's Helen Keller?" (Ruth Shagoury Hubbard); "Margins of Error" (Joe Parsons);…

  6. Tolerant (parallel) Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiNucci, David C.; Bailey, David H. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    In order to be truly portable, a program must be tolerant of a wide range of development and execution environments, and a parallel program is just one which must be tolerant of a very wide range. This paper first defines the term "tolerant programming", then describes many layers of tools to accomplish it. The primary focus is on F-Nets, a formal model for expressing computation as a folded partial-ordering of operations, thereby providing an architecture-independent expression of tolerant parallel algorithms. For implementing F-Nets, Cooperative Data Sharing (CDS) is a subroutine package for implementing communication efficiently in a large number of environments (e.g. shared memory and message passing). Software Cabling (SC), a very-high-level graphical programming language for building large F-Nets, possesses many of the features normally expected from today's computer languages (e.g. data abstraction, array operations). Finally, L2(sup 3) is a CASE tool which facilitates the construction, compilation, execution, and debugging of SC programs.

  7. Oilseed cuphea tolerates bromoxynil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weed management is a critical feature of all crop production, but especially for new and alternative crops with which most growers have little experience. Oilseed cuphea is a new annual crop for temperate regions and, at present, it is known to tolerate only a narrow spectrum of herbicides. Addition...

  8. Radiation Tolerant Embedded Memory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 ...currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1 . REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 27-06-2003 2. REPORT TYPE SBIR...Tolerant Embedded Memory 1 Table of Contents: Table of Contents

  9. Pesticide tolerance in amphibians: induced tolerance in susceptible populations, constitutive tolerance in tolerant populations.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jessica; Morehouse, Nathan I; Relyea, Rick

    2013-11-01

    The role of plasticity in shaping adaptations is important to understanding the expression of traits within individuals and the evolution of populations. With increasing human impacts on the environment, one challenge is to consider how plasticity shapes responses to anthropogenic stressors such as contaminants. To our knowledge, only one study (using mosquitoes) has considered the possibility of induced insecticide tolerance. Using populations of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) located close to and far from agricultural fields, we discovered that exposing some populations of embryos and hatchlings to sublethal concentrations of the insecticide carbaryl induced higher tolerance to a subsequent lethal concentration later in life. Interestingly, the inducible populations were located >800 m from agricultural areas and were the most susceptible to the insecticide. In contrast, the noninducible populations were located close to agricultural areas and were the least susceptible. We also found that sublethal concentrations of carbaryl induced higher tadpole AChE concentrations in several cases. This is the first study to demonstrate inducible tolerance in a vertebrate species and the pattern of inducible and constitutive tolerance among populations suggests the process of genetic assimilation.

  10. Zero Tolerance versus Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

    2000-01-01

    In a case involving questionable canine search-and-seizure practices, a circuit court upheld a school board's decision to terminate a teacher's contract. While touting zero tolerance, the board fired an honored teacher 3 years from retirement who may not have known about the marijuana cigarette in her car. (MLH)

  11. Why Tolerate Conscience?

    PubMed

    Boucher, François; Laborde, Cécile

    In Why Tolerate Religion?, Brian Leiter argues against the special legal status of religion, claiming that religion should not be the only ground for exemptions to the law and that this form of protection should be, in principle, available for the claims of secular conscience as well. However, in the last chapter of his book, he objects to a universal regime of exemptions for both religious and secular claims of conscience, highlighting the practical and moral flaws associated with it. We believe that Leiter identifies a genuine and important contemporary legal and philosophical problem. We find much to admire in his reasoning. However, we raise questions about two claims that are crucial for his argument. The first claim is that it is not religion as such, but conscience that deserves toleration and respect. The second claim is that respect for religion and conscience demands 'principled toleration' but does not entail stronger policies of legal exemptions. Against the first claim, we argue that Leiter does not successfully distinguish religious belief from secular conscience and morality; and he does not explain why secular conscience (which shares many of religious conscience's epistemic features) deserves respect. Against the second claim, we argue that the most promising theories of legal exemptions are not classical theories of liberal toleration.

  12. Biocide tolerance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ortega Morente, Elena; Fernández-Fuentes, Miguel Angel; Grande Burgos, Maria José; Abriouel, Hikmate; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    Biocides have been employed for centuries, so today a wide range of compounds showing different levels of antimicrobial activity have become available. At the present time, understanding the mechanisms of action of biocides has also become an important issue with the emergence of bacterial tolerance to biocides and the suggestion that biocide and antibiotic resistance in bacteria might be linked. While most of the mechanisms providing antibiotic resistance are agent specific, providing resistance to a single antimicrobial or class of antimicrobial, there are currently numerous examples of efflux systems that accommodate and, thus, provide tolerance to a broad range of structurally unrelated antimicrobials, both antibiotics and biocides. If biocide tolerance becomes increasingly common and it is linked to antibiotic resistance, not only resistant (even multi-resistant) bacteria could be passed along the food chain, but also there are resistance determinants that can spread and lead to the emergence of new resistant microorganisms, which can only be detected and monitored when the building blocks of resistance traits are understood on the molecular level. This review summarizes the main advances reached in understanding the mechanism of action of biocides, the mechanisms of bacterial resistance to both biocides and antibiotics, and the incidence of biocide tolerance in bacteria of concern to human health and the food industry.

  13. Fault tolerant magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Maslen, E.H.; Sortore, C.K.; Gillies, G.T.; Williams, R.D.; Fedigan, S.J.; Aimone, R.J.

    1999-07-01

    A fault tolerant magnetic bearing system was developed and demonstrated on a large flexible-rotor test rig. The bearing system comprises a high speed, fault tolerant digital controller, three high capacity radial magnetic bearings, one thrust bearing, conventional variable reluctance position sensors, and an array of commercial switching amplifiers. Controller fault tolerance is achieved through a very high speed voting mechanism which implements triple modular redundancy with a powered spare CPU, thereby permitting failure of up to three CPU modules without system failure. Amplifier/cabling/coil fault tolerance is achieved by using a separate power amplifier for each bearing coil and permitting amplifier reconfiguration by the controller upon detection of faults. This allows hot replacement of failed amplifiers without any system degradation and without providing any excess amplifier kVA capacity over the nominal system requirement. Implemented on a large (2440 mm in length) flexible rotor, the system shows excellent rejection of faults including the failure of three CPUs as well as failure of two adjacent amplifiers (or cabling) controlling an entire stator quadrant.

  14. Tolerance through Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Carolyn

    In this project, eighth grade students are exposed to black history, literature, music, and art to enhance the understanding of diversity and to establish an atmosphere of tolerance for diversity. Students are asked to choose a personality or significant historical event to research and present to the class. They focus on issues such as prejudice,…

  15. Ethanol tolerance in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Casey, G P; Ingledew, W M

    1986-01-01

    It is now certain that the inherent ethanol tolerance of the Saccharomyces strain used is not the prime factor regulating the level of ethanol that can be produced in a high sugar brewing, wine, sake, or distillery fermentation. In fact, in terms of the maximum concentration that these yeasts can produce under batch (16 to 17% [v/v]) or fed-batch conditions, there is clearly no difference in ethanol tolerance. This is not to say, however, that under defined conditions there is no difference in ethanol tolerance among different Saccharomyces yeasts. This property, although a genetic determinant, is clearly influenced by many factors (carbohydrate level, wort nutrition, temperature, osmotic pressure/water activity, and substrate concentration), and each yeast strain reacts to each factor differently. This will indeed lead to differences in measured tolerance. Thus, it is extremely important that each of these be taken into consideration when determining "tolerance" for a particular set of fermentation conditions. The manner in which each alcohol-related industry has evolved is now known to have played a major role in determining traditional thinking on ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces yeasts. It is interesting to speculate on how different our thinking on ethanol tolerance would be today if sake fermentations had not evolved with successive mashing and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of rice carbohydrate, if distillers' worts were clarified prior to fermentation but brewers' wort were not, and if grape skins with their associated unsaturated lipids had not been an integral part of red wine musts. The time is now ripe for ethanol-related industries to take advantage of these findings to improve the economies of production. In the authors' opinion, breweries could produce higher alcohol beers if oxygenation (leading to unsaturated lipids) and "usable" nitrogen source levels were increased in high gravity worts. White wine fermentations could also, if

  16. Deconstructing tolerance with clobazam

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Robert T.; Sankar, Raman; Montouris, Georgia D.; White, H. Steve; Cloyd, James C.; Kane, Mary Clare; Peng, Guangbin; Tworek, David M.; Shen, Vivienne; Isojarvi, Jouko

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate potential development of tolerance to adjunctive clobazam in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Methods: Eligible patients enrolled in open-label extension study OV-1004, which continued until clobazam was commercially available in the United States or for a maximum of 2 years outside the United States. Enrolled patients started at 0.5 mg·kg−1·d−1 clobazam, not to exceed 40 mg/d. After 48 hours, dosages could be adjusted up to 2.0 mg·kg−1·d−1 (maximum 80 mg/d) on the basis of efficacy and tolerability. Post hoc analyses evaluated mean dosages and drop-seizure rates for the first 2 years of the open-label extension based on responder categories and baseline seizure quartiles in OV-1012. Individual patient listings were reviewed for dosage increases ≥40% and increasing seizure rates. Results: Data from 200 patients were included. For patients free of drop seizures, there was no notable change in dosage over 24 months. For responder groups still exhibiting drop seizures, dosages were increased. Weekly drop-seizure rates for 100% and ≥75% responders demonstrated a consistent response over time. Few patients had a dosage increase ≥40% associated with an increase in seizure rates. Conclusions: Two-year findings suggest that the majority of patients do not develop tolerance to the antiseizure actions of clobazam. Observed dosage increases may reflect best efforts to achieve seizure freedom. It is possible that the clinical development of tolerance to clobazam has been overstated. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00518713 and NCT01160770. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that the majority of patients do not develop tolerance to clobazam over 2 years of treatment. PMID:27683846

  17. Validated Fault Tolerant Architectures for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on validated fault tolerant architectures for space station are presented. Topics covered include: fault tolerance approach; advanced information processing system (AIPS); and fault tolerant parallel processor (FTPP).

  18. Effect of concentrate supplementation on feed consumption, nutrient utilization and blood metabolite profile in captive spotted deer (Axis axis) fed oat (Avena sativa) and berseem (Trifolium alexandrinum) fodders based diet.

    PubMed

    Suresh, C; Das, A; Katole, Shrikant; Saini, Mohini; Swarup, D

    2013-03-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the optimum level of a maize-soybean meal-wheat bran concentrate supplement fed to captive spotted deer fed an oat and berseem fodder-based diet. Twelve adult spotted deer [64-76 kg body weight (BW)] were distributed into three groups of four each and were housed individually. A diet consisting of 5 kg of oat fodder and 5.5 kg of berseem fodder was offered to each one of the experimental animals. The animal in group I received no supplementary concentrate, whereas, those in groups II and III received 0.5 and 1 kg of supplementary concentrate, respectively. A 60 days digestibility trial was conducted with a 5 days collection period on Days 55-59 of the trial. Blood samples were collected from all animals on Day 60 of the experiment. Average daily dry matter intake (DMI) was 1,224, 1,613, and 1,574 g/day in groups I, II, and III, respectively. Dry matter (DM) and organic matter (OM) intake was lowest (P < 0.01) in group I. Intake of P, Cu, and Zn was highest (P < 0.01) in group III, followed by groups II and I. Digestibility of neutral detergent fiber was highest (P < 0.05) in group II. Digestibility of OM and CP was lowest (P < 0.05) in group I. Digestibility of gross energy was highest (P < 0.01) in group III (74.9%), followed by groups II (69.3%) and I (66.2%). Digestible energy (DE) intake (kcal/kg BW(0.75) ) was highest (P < 0.01) in group III (195.4), followed by groups II (180.9) and I (129.8). Initial BW was 72.7, 72.5, and 71.0 kg, whereas, final BW was 71.0, 72.7, and 73.5 kg, in groups I, II and III, respectively. Average daily change in body mass was significantly (P < 0.01) different among the groups. The body mass was lost (-29.2 g/day), maintained (4.1 g/day) and gained (41.6 g/day) in groups I, II, and III, respectively. Blood glucose and cholesterol concentration was highest (P < 0.05) in group III, followed by groups II and I. Serum concentration of Cu and

  19. Zero Tolerance Policies. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Much of this brief comes from the ERIC Digest on Zero Tolerance Policies (ERIC #: ED451579). State legislatures and school boards are adopting a growing number of zero-tolerance polices toward weapons, guns, and violence. Zero-tolerance polices are rules intended to address specific school-safety issues. Despite the controversies that it has…

  20. Implementing fault-tolerant sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzullo, Keith

    1989-01-01

    One aspect of fault tolerance in process control programs is the ability to tolerate sensor failure. A methodology is presented for transforming a process control program that cannot tolerate sensor failures to one that can. Additionally, a hierarchy of failure models is identified.

  1. Full Tolerant Archiving System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapic, C.; Molinaro, M.; Smareglia, R.

    2013-10-01

    The archiving system at the Italian center for Astronomical Archives (IA2) manages data from external sources like telescopes, observatories, or surveys and handles them in order to guarantee preservation, dissemination, and reliability, in most cases in a Virtual Observatory (VO) compliant manner. A metadata model dynamic constructor and a data archive manager are new concepts aimed at automatizing the management of different astronomical data sources in a fault tolerant environment. The goal is a full tolerant archiving system, nevertheless complicated by the presence of various and time changing data models, file formats (FITS, HDF5, ROOT, PDS, etc.) and metadata content, even inside the same project. To avoid this unpleasant scenario a novel approach is proposed in order to guarantee data ingestion, backward compatibility, and information preservation.

  2. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  3. Abuse Tolerance Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Orendorff, Christopher J.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle R.; Allcorn, Eric

    2015-10-01

    As lithium-ion battery technologies mature, the size and energy of these systems continues to increase (> 50 kWh for EVs); making safety and reliability of these high energy systems increasingly important. While most material advances for lithium-ion chemistries are directed toward improving cell performance (capacity, energy, cycle life, etc.), there are a variety of materials advancements that can be made to improve lithium-ion battery safety. Issues including energetic thermal runaway, electrolyte decomposition and flammability, anode SEI stability, and cell-level abuse tolerance continue to be critical safety concerns. This report highlights work with our collaborators to develop advanced materials to improve lithium-ion battery safety and abuse tolerance and to perform cell-level characterization of new materials.

  4. Fault Tolerant Paradigms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0105 BRI) Fault Tolerant Paradigms BENJAMIN ONG MICHIGAN STATE UNIV EAST LANSING Final Report 02/26/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...property allows the algorithm to outperform FFTW over a wide range of sparsity and noise values, and is to the best of our knowledge novel in the...best of our knowledge novel. The new algorithm gives excellent performance in the noisy setting without significantly increasing the computational

  5. Ethanol tolerance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ingram, L O

    1990-01-01

    The adverse effects of ethanol on bacterial growth, viability, and metabolism are caused primarily by ethanol-induced leakage of the plasma membrane. This increase in membrane leakage is consistent with known biophysical properties of membranes and ethanolic solutions. The primary actions of ethanol result from colligative effects of the high molar concentrations rather than from specific interactions with receptors. The ethanol tolerance of growth in different microorganisms appears to result in large part from adaptive and evolutionary changes in cell membrane composition. Different cellular activities vary in their tolerance to ethanol. Therefore, it is essential that the aspect of cellular function under study be specifically defined and that comparisons of ethanol tolerance among systems share this common definition. Growth is typically one of the most sensitive cellular activities to inhibition by ethanol, followed by survival, or loss of reproductive ability. Glycolysis is the most resistant of these three activities. Since glycolysis is an exergonic process, a cell need not be able to grow or remain viable for glycolysis to occur.

  6. Drought Tolerance in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Prodhan, Zakaria Hossain; Faruq, Golam

    2013-01-01

    Drought is one of the most important phenomena which limit crops' production and yield. Crops demonstrate various morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular responses to tackle drought stress. Plants' vegetative and reproductive stages are intensively influenced by drought stress. Drought tolerance is a complicated trait which is controlled by polygenes and their expressions are influenced by various environmental elements. This means that breeding for this trait is so difficult and new molecular methods such as molecular markers, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping strategies, and expression patterns of genes should be applied to produce drought tolerant genotypes. In wheat, there are several genes which are responsible for drought stress tolerance and produce different types of enzymes and proteins for instance, late embryogenesis abundant (lea), responsive to abscisic acid (Rab), rubisco, helicase, proline, glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and carbohydrates during drought stress. This review paper has concentrated on the study of water limitation and its effects on morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular responses of wheat with the possible losses caused by drought stress. PMID:24319376

  7. Biocular image misalignment tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalich, Melvyn E.; Rash, Clarence E.; van de Pol, Corina; Rowe, Terri L.; Lont, Lisa M.; Peterson, R. David

    2003-09-01

    Biocular helmet-mounted display (HMD) design flexibility and cost are directly related to image misalignment tolerance standards. Currently recommended tolerance levels are based on highly variable data from a number of studies. This paper presents progress of an ongoing study to evaluate optometric measures sensitive to misalignment in partial-overlap biocular optical systems like that proposed for the Comanche RAH-66 helicopter helmet integrated display sighting system (HIDSS). Horizontal divergent and relative vertical misalignments (offsets) of see-through biocular symbology viewed against a simulated daytime background were chosen for this study. Misalignments within and just beyond current tolerance recommendations were evaluated using pre, pre and post, and during measures of visual performance. Data were obtained from seven experimental and four control subjects. The diplopia responses from experimental and control subjects were essentially the same. However, accommodative facility showed a rate decrement following exposure to both types of misalignment. Horizontal heterophorias showed definite post-misalignment increases. Subject responses to questionnaires universally indicated increased adaptation to (ease with) visual tasks over the testing period.

  8. Fault tolerant control laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, U. L.; Ho, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic procedure for the synthesis of fault tolerant control laws to actuator failure has been presented. Two design methods were used to synthesize fault tolerant controllers: the conventional LQ design method and a direct feedback controller design method SANDY. The latter method is used primarily to streamline the full-state Q feedback design into a practical implementable output feedback controller structure. To achieve robustness to control actuator failure, the redundant surfaces are properly balanced according to their control effectiveness. A simple gain schedule based on the landing gear up/down logic involving only three gains was developed to handle three design flight conditions: Mach .25 and Mach .60 at 5000 ft and Mach .90 at 20,000 ft. The fault tolerant control law developed in this study provides good stability augmentation and performance for the relaxed static stability aircraft. The augmented aircraft responses are found to be invariant to the presence of a failure. Furthermore, single-loop stability margins of +6 dB in gain and +30 deg in phase were achieved along with -40 dB/decade rolloff at high frequency.

  9. Real-time quantification of wild-type contaminants in glyphosate tolerant soybean

    PubMed Central

    Battistini, Elena; Noli, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Background Trait purity is a key factor for the successful utilization of biotech varieties and is currently assessed by analysis of individual seeds or plants. Here we propose a novel PCR-based approach to test trait purity that can be applied to bulk samples. To this aim the insertion site of a transgene is characterized and the corresponding sequence of the wild-type (wt) allele is used as diagnostic target for amplification. As a demonstration, we developed a real-time quantitative PCR method to test purity of glyphosate tolerant (Roundup Ready®, RR) soybean. Results The soybean wt sequence at the RR locus was characterized and found to be highly conserved among conventional genotypes, thus allowing the detection of possibly any soybean non-trait contaminant. On the other hand, no amplification product was obtained from RR soybean varieties, indicating that the wt sequence is single copy and represents a suitable marker of conventional soybean presence. In addition, results obtained from the analysis of wt-spiked RR samples demonstrate that it is possible to use the real-time PCR assay to quantify the non-trait contamination with an acceptable degree of accuracy. Conclusion In principle this approach could be successfully applied to any transgenic event, provided that the wild-type sequence is conserved and single copy. The main advantages of the assay here described derive from its applicability to bulk samples, which would allow to increase the number of single seeds or plants forming the analytical sample, thus improving accuracy and throughput while containing costs. For these reasons this application of quantitative PCR could represent a useful tool in agricultural biotechnology. PMID:19267904

  10. Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Potts, M

    1994-01-01

    The removal of cell-bound water through air drying and the addition of water to air-dried cells are forces that have played a pivotal role in the evolution of the prokaryotes. In bacterial cells that have been subjected to air drying, the evaporation of free cytoplasmic water (Vf) can be instantaneous, and an equilibrium between cell-bound water (Vb) and the environmental water (vapor) potential (psi wv) may be achieved rapidly. In the air-dried state some bacteria survive only for seconds whereas others can tolerate desiccation for thousands, perhaps millions, of years. The desiccated (anhydrobiotic) cell is characterized by its singular lack of water--with contents as low as 0.02 g of H2O g (dry weight)-1. At these levels the monolayer coverage by water of macromolecules, including DNA and proteins, is disturbed. As a consequence the mechanisms that confer desiccation tolerance upon air-dried bacteria are markedly different from those, such as the mechanism of preferential exclusion of compatible solutes, that preserve the integrity of salt-, osmotically, and freeze-thaw-stressed cells. Desiccation tolerance reflects a complex array of interactions at the structural, physiological, and molecular levels. Many of the mechanisms remain cryptic, but it is clear that they involve interactions, such as those between proteins and co-solvents, that derive from the unique properties of the water molecule. A water replacement hypothesis accounts for how the nonreducing disaccharides trehalose and sucrose preserve the integrity of membranes and proteins. Nevertheless, we have virtually no insight into the state of the cytoplasm of an air-dried cell. There is no evidence for any obvious adaptations of proteins that can counter the effects of air drying or for the occurrence of any proteins that provide a direct and a tangible contribution to cell stability. Among the prokaryotes that can exist as anhydrobiotic cells, the cyanobacteria have a marked capacity to do so. One

  11. Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Potts, M

    1994-12-01

    The removal of cell-bound water through air drying and the addition of water to air-dried cells are forces that have played a pivotal role in the evolution of the prokaryotes. In bacterial cells that have been subjected to air drying, the evaporation of free cytoplasmic water (Vf) can be instantaneous, and an equilibrium between cell-bound water (Vb) and the environmental water (vapor) potential (psi wv) may be achieved rapidly. In the air-dried state some bacteria survive only for seconds whereas others can tolerate desiccation for thousands, perhaps millions, of years. The desiccated (anhydrobiotic) cell is characterized by its singular lack of water--with contents as low as 0.02 g of H2O g (dry weight)-1. At these levels the monolayer coverage by water of macromolecules, including DNA and proteins, is disturbed. As a consequence the mechanisms that confer desiccation tolerance upon air-dried bacteria are markedly different from those, such as the mechanism of preferential exclusion of compatible solutes, that preserve the integrity of salt-, osmotically, and freeze-thaw-stressed cells. Desiccation tolerance reflects a complex array of interactions at the structural, physiological, and molecular levels. Many of the mechanisms remain cryptic, but it is clear that they involve interactions, such as those between proteins and co-solvents, that derive from the unique properties of the water molecule. A water replacement hypothesis accounts for how the nonreducing disaccharides trehalose and sucrose preserve the integrity of membranes and proteins. Nevertheless, we have virtually no insight into the state of the cytoplasm of an air-dried cell. There is no evidence for any obvious adaptations of proteins that can counter the effects of air drying or for the occurrence of any proteins that provide a direct and a tangible contribution to cell stability. Among the prokaryotes that can exist as anhydrobiotic cells, the cyanobacteria have a marked capacity to do so. One

  12. 40 CFR 180.646 - Ipconazole; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... per million Cotton, gin byproducts 0.01 Cotton, undelinted seed 0.01 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice 0.01 Grain, cereal group 15, except rice 0.01 Peanut 0.01 Soybean, forage...

  13. 40 CFR 180.646 - Ipconazole; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., undelinted seed 0.01 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice 0.01 Grain, cereal group 15, except rice 0.01 Pea and bean, dried shelled, except soybean, subgroup 6C 0.01 Peanut 0.01...

  14. 40 CFR 180.226 - Diquat; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., group 12 0.02 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16 0.02 Grain, cereal, group 15 0.02 Grape... on the following food commodites: Commodity Parts per million Banana1 0.05 Coffee, bean, green1 0.05...

  15. 40 CFR 180.226 - Diquat; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., group 12 0.02 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16 0.02 Grain, cereal, group 15 0.02 Grape... on the following food commodites: Commodity Parts per million Banana1 0.05 Coffee, bean, green1 0.05...

  16. 40 CFR 180.226 - Diquat; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., group 12 0.02 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16 0.02 Grain, cereal, group 15 0.02 Grape... on the following food commodites: Commodity Parts per million Banana1 0.05 Coffee, bean, green1 0.05...

  17. 40 CFR 180.473 - Glufosinate ammonium; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)butanoic acid equivalents. Commodity Parts per million Barley, hay 0.40 Barley, straw 0.40 Buckwheat, fodder 0.40 Buckwheat, forage 0.40 Oat, forage 0.40 Oat, hay 0.40...

  18. 40 CFR 180.669 - Picoxystrobin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... picoxystrobin, methyl (αE)-α-(methoxymethylene)-2- oxy]methyl]benzeneacetate. Commodity Parts permillion Barley, bran 0.5 Barley, grain 0.3 Cattle, fat 0.01 Cattle, meat 0.01 Cattle, meat byproducts 0.01 Corn, field..., cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, straw 2 Grain, cereal, group 15, except rice and barley...

  19. 40 CFR 180.669 - Picoxystrobin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... picoxystrobin, methyl (αE)-α-(methoxymethylene)-2- oxy]methyl]benzeneacetate. Commodity Parts permillion Barley, bran 0.5 Barley, grain 0.3 Cattle, fat 0.01 Cattle, meat 0.01 Cattle, meat byproducts 0.01 Corn, field..., cereal, forage, fodder, and straw, group 16, straw 2 Grain, cereal, group 15, except rice and barley...

  20. Do copper tolerant fathead minnows produce copper tolerant adult offspring?

    PubMed Central

    Kolok, Alan S.; L’Etoile-Lopes, Darcy

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if the relative Cu tolerance of fathead minnow parents determines the, relative Cu tolerance of their adult offspring. It was hypothesized that the adult offspring of Cu-tolerant minnows would inherit Cu tolerance from their parents. The relative Cu tolerance of 96 adult fish was determined based upon their reduction in swim performance following a sublethal exposure to 150 μg Cu/l. Control, Cu-tolerant and Cu-susceptible lines of fish were produced and fish within each line were allowed to breed. The offspring were raised to adults, then exposed to one of two sublethal Cu concentrations (150 or 225 (μg Cu/l) for 8 days. There were no significant differences in relative Cu tolerance, as measured by reduction in swim performance, among the three lines of fish at either dose. However, significant differences in whole body Na+ occurred among the fish lines after exposure to 150 μg Cu/l, but not after exposure to 225 μg Cu/l. Significant differences in whole body Cu occurred between Cu-tolerant and Cu-susceptible fish lines after exposure to either Cu dose. The offspring did not inherit the relative Cu tolerance of their parents, however, the selection lines had diverged from each other, particularly with respect to their whole body Cu concentrations after exposure. PMID:15820103

  1. Efficacy and tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Goetzke, Edda; Findeisen, P.; Welbers, Inés B.

    1983-01-01

    1 Efficacy of and tolerance to 0.25 mg brotizolam and 2.0 mg flunitrazepam were compared over a period of 6 days in ambulatory patients complaining of sleep disturbance. The study was double-blind and randomised with a parallel group design. 2 Both drugs improved sleep. More patients assessed sleep latency as shorter during the first night of ingestion with flunitrazepam than with brotizolam, but assessments were comparable over the next 5 days. The number of patients who considered that the frequency of nocturnal awakenings was less did not differ significantly between drugs. 3 Tolerance to brotizolam (0.25 mg) was assessed more favourably than with flunitrazepam (2.0 mg). 4 The study suggests that brotizolam (0.25 mg) is indicated for patients who have difficulty in falling asleep and staying asleep, and who must preserve their alertness during the early part of the next day. Flunitrazepam (2.0 mg) is equally effective, but at this dose there is a higher incidence of adverse effects. PMID:6362698

  2. SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Petrini, Fabrizio; Nieplocha, Jarek; Tipparaju, Vinod

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we will present a new technology that we are currently developing within the SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance FastOS project which seeks to implement fault tolerance at the operating system level. Major design goals include dynamic reallocation of resources to allow continuing execution in the presence of hardware failures, very high scalability, high efficiency (low overhead), and transparency—requiring no changes to user applications. Our technology is based on a global coordination mechanism, that enforces transparent recovery lines in the system, and TICK, a lightweight, incremental checkpointing software architecture implemented as a Linux kernel module. TICK is completely user-transparent and does not require any changes to user code or system libraries; it is highly responsive: an interrupt, such as a timer interrupt, can trigger a checkpoint in as little as 2.5μs; and it supports incremental and full checkpoints with minimal overhead—less than 6% with full checkpointing to disk performed as frequently as once per minute.

  3. Intelligent failure-tolerant control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of failure-tolerant control is presented, beginning with robust control, progressing through parallel and analytical redundancy, and ending with rule-based systems and artificial neural networks. By design or implementation, failure-tolerant control systems are 'intelligent' systems. All failure-tolerant systems require some degrees of robustness to protect against catastrophic failure; failure tolerance often can be improved by adaptivity in decision-making and control, as well as by redundancy in measurement and actuation. Reliability, maintainability, and survivability can be enhanced by failure tolerance, although each objective poses different goals for control system design. Artificial intelligence concepts are helpful for integrating and codifying failure-tolerant control systems, not as alternatives but as adjuncts to conventional design methods.

  4. Physical fault tolerance of nanoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Szkopek, Thomas; Roychowdhury, Vwani P; Antoniadis, Dimitri A; Damoulakis, John N

    2011-04-29

    The error rate in complementary transistor circuits is suppressed exponentially in electron number, arising from an intrinsic physical implementation of fault-tolerant error correction. Contrariwise, explicit assembly of gates into the most efficient known fault-tolerant architecture is characterized by a subexponential suppression of error rate with electron number, and incurs significant overhead in wiring and complexity. We conclude that it is more efficient to prevent logical errors with physical fault tolerance than to correct logical errors with fault-tolerant architecture.

  5. The Dilemma of Zero Tolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, John H.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews research on the impact of zero-tolerance policies on student behavior and achievement. Concludes that policies are generally ineffective and often counterproductive. (Contains 14 references.) (PKP)

  6. [Radiation Tolerant Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Research work in the providing radiation tolerant electronics to NASA and the commercial sector is reported herein. There are four major sections to this report: (1) Special purpose VLSI technology section discusses the status of the VLSI projects as well as the new background technologies that have been developed; (2) Lossless data compression results provide the background and direction of new data compression pursued under this grant; (3) Commercial technology transfer presents an itemization of the commercial technology transfer; and (4) Delivery of VLSI to the Government is a solution and progress report that shows how the Government and Government contractors are gaining access to the technology that has been developed by the MRC.

  7. Fault Tolerant Cache Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, H.-Yu.; Tasneem, Sarah

    Most of modern microprocessors employ on—chip cache memories to meet the memory bandwidth demand. These caches are now occupying a greater real es tate of chip area. Also, continuous down scaling of transistors increases the possi bility of defects in the cache area which already starts to occupies more than 50% of chip area. For this reason, various techniques have been proposed to tolerate defects in cache blocks. These techniques can be classified into three different cat egories, namely, cache line disabling, replacement with spare block, and decoder reconfiguration without spare blocks. This chapter examines each of those fault tol erant techniques with a fixed typical size and organization of L1 cache, through extended simulation using SPEC2000 benchmark on individual techniques. The de sign and characteristics of each technique are summarized with a view to evaluate the scheme. We then present our simulation results and comparative study of the three different methods.

  8. Fault Tolerant State Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Gary R.; Taft, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    State machines are commonly used to control sequential logic in FPGAs and ASKS. An errant state machine can cause considerable damage to the device it is controlling. For example in space applications, the FPGA might be controlling Pyros, which when fired at the wrong time will cause a mission failure. Even a well designed state machine can be subject to random errors us a result of SEUs from the radiation environment in space. There are various ways to encode the states of a state machine, and the type of encoding makes a large difference in the susceptibility of the state machine to radiation. In this paper we compare 4 methods of state machine encoding and find which method gives the best fault tolerance, as well as determining the resources needed for each method.

  9. [Autoantibodies, tolerance and autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Oppezzo, Pablo; Dighiero, Guillaume

    2003-07-01

    In 1900, the group from Metchnikoff suggested the concept of autoimmunization by demonstrating the presence of autoantibodies in normal conditions; which was opposed to the concept of horror autotoxicus raised by Ehrlich. Landsteiner's description of the transfusion compatibility rules and 50 year-later work from Burnett's and Medawar's groups lead to the clonal deletion theory as a general explanation of tolerance and autoimmunity. However, more recent work succeeded demonstrating that autoreactive B cells constitute a substantial part of the B-cell repertoire and that this autoreactive repertoire secretes the so-called natural autoantibodies (NAA) characterized by their broad reactivity mainly directed against very well conserved public epitopes. They fulfill the definition of an autoantibody since they are self-reactive, but they are not self-specific. As yet, NAA directed against determinants of polymorphism have not been reported. The presence of this repertoire in normal conditions challenges the clonal deletion theory as a unique explanation for self-tolerance. However, if we take into account that this autoreactive B-cell repertoire is not self-specific, this contradiction may not be a real one opposition. Indeed, the Lansteiner's rule that a subject belonging to group A will never produce anti-A antibodies and will always produce natural antibodies against the B-cell group, could never be challenged. Clonal deletion is probably accounting for this phenomenum. However, the serum of healthy adult individuals frequently exhibits low titers of anti-I antibodies, which is a precursor molecule of AB0 antigen system. The mechanism accounting for deletion of B cells directed against critical determinants like antigens A and B in the red blood cell system and allowing the production of autoantibodies against I remain elusive.

  10. Comparison of the forage and grain composition from insect-protected and glyphosate-tolerant MON 88017 corn to conventional corn (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    McCann, Melinda C; Trujillo, William A; Riordan, Susan G; Sorbet, Roy; Bogdanova, Natalia N; Sidhu, Ravinder S

    2007-05-16

    The next generation of biotechnology-derived products with the combined benefit of herbicide tolerance and insect protection (MON 88017) was developed to withstand feeding damage caused by the coleopteran pest corn rootworm and over-the-top applications of glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup herbicides. As a part of a larger safety and characterization assessment, MON 88017 was grown under field conditions at geographically diverse locations within the United States and Argentina during the 2002 and 2003-2004 field seasons, respectively, along with a near-isogenic control and other conventional corn hybrids for compositional assessment. Field trials were conducted using a randomized complete block design with three replication blocks at each site. Corn forage samples were harvested at the late dough/early dent stage, ground, and analyzed for the concentration of proximate constituents, fibers, and minerals. Samples of mature grain were harvested, ground, and analyzed for the concentration of proximate constituents, fiber, minerals, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, antinutrients, and secondary metabolites. The results showed that the forage and grain from MON 88017 are compositionally equivalent to forage and grain from control and conventional corn hybrids.

  11. Behavioral Tolerance to Anticholinergic Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-20

    tolerance to marihuana in rats. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 1, 73-76. 43 40. Olson, J. and Carder, B. (1974) Behavioral tolerance to... marihuana as a function of amount of prior training. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 2, 243-247. 41. Sidman, M. (1960) Tactics of Scientific

  12. Pathways to Tolerance: Student Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Dorothy, Ed.; Stanhope, Victoria, Ed.

    Ideas for schools to support tolerance and celebrate student diversity are presented in this volume of reprinted articles. Titles include: (1) "One of Us, One of Them: Lessons in Diversity for a School Psychologist" (M. M. Chittooran); (2) "The Tolerance-in-Action Campaign" (H. M. Knoff); (3) "Immigrant Parents and the…

  13. Pathways to Tolerance: Student Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Dorothy, Ed.; Stanhope, Victoria, Ed.

    Ideas for schools to support tolerance and celebrate student diversity are presented in this volume of reprinted articles. Titles include: (1) "One of Us, One of Them: Lessons in Diversity for a School Psychologist" (M. M. Chittooran); (2) "The Tolerance-in-Action Campaign" (H. M. Knoff); (3) "Immigrant Parents and the…

  14. Tolerance Issue in Kazakh Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aubakirova, Saltanat S.; Ismagambetova, Zukhra N.; Karabayeva, Aliya G.; Rysbekova, Shamshiya S.; Mirzabekova, Alma Sh.

    2016-01-01

    In this article the authors reveal the basic cultural mechanisms that influence the formation of the tolerance strategy in Kazakh and Kazakhstan society, show its basic directions, as well as its importance for the modern Kazakhstan society and the formation of intercultural communication with foreign countries. Tolerance is a necessary element of…

  15. [Postgenomic analysis of desiccation tolerance].

    PubMed

    Buitink, Julia; Leprince, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Desiccation tolerance is the capacity to survive complete drying. It is an ancient trait that can be found in prokaryotes, fungi, primitive animals (often at the larval stages), whole plants, pollens and seeds. In the dry state, metabolism is suspended and the duration that anhydrobiotes can survive ranges from years to centuries. Whereas genes induced by drought stress have been successfully enumerated in tissues that are sensitive to cellular desiccation, we have little knowledge as to the adaptive role of these genes in establishing desiccation tolerance at the cellular level. This paper reviews postgenomic approaches in a variety of desiccation tolerant organisms in which the genetic responses have been investigated when they acquire the capacity of tolerating extremes of dehydration or when they are dry. Accumulation of non-reducing sugars, LEA proteins and a coordinated repression of metabolism appear to be the essential and universal attributes that can confer desiccation tolerance. The protective mechanisms of these attributes are described. Furthermore, it is most likely that other mechanisms have evolved since the function of about 30% of the genes involved in desiccation tolerance remains to be elucidated. The question of the overlap between desiccation tolerance and drought tolerance is briefly addressed.

  16. 7 CFR 51.1306 - Tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tolerances. 51.1306 Section 51.1306 Agriculture... Standards for Winter Pears 1 Tolerances § 51.1306 Tolerances. (a) In order to allow for variations incident... applying the foregoing tolerances to the combination grade no part of any tolerance shall be used to...

  17. 7 CFR 51.1265 - Tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tolerances. 51.1265 Section 51.1265 Agriculture... Standards for Summer and Fall Pears 1 Tolerances § 51.1265 Tolerances. (a) In order to allow for variations... applying the foregoing tolerances to the combination grade no part of any tolerance shall be used to...

  18. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-01-01

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components may play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made toward engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future. PMID:24630845

  19. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-06-01

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

  20. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I

    2014-06-01

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

  1. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    DOE PAGES

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; ...

    2014-06-01

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selectionmore » and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.« less

  2. Cold tolerance in Arabidopsis kamchatica.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jessica J; Takebayashi, Naoki; Sformo, Todd; Wolf, Diana E

    2015-03-01

    • Cold tolerance is a critically important factor determining how plants will be influenced by climate change, including changes in snowcover and extreme weather events. Although a great deal is known about cold tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is not highly cold tolerant. This study examined cold tolerance and its genetic diversity in an herbaceous subarctic relative, Arabidopsis kamchatica, which generally occurs in much colder climates.• Thermal analysis and electrolyte leakage were used to estimate supercooling points and lethal temperatures (LT50) in cold-acclimated and nonacclimated families from three populations of A. kamchatica.• Arabidopsis kamchatica was highly cold tolerant, with a mean LT50 of -10.8°C when actively growing, and -21.8°C when cold acclimated. It also was able to supercool to very low temperatures. Surprisingly, actively growing plants supercooled more than acclimated plants (-14.7 vs. -12.7°C). There was significant genetic variation for cold tolerance both within and among populations. However, both cold tolerance and genetic diversity were highest in the midlatitude population rather than in the far north, indicating that adaptations to climate change are most likely to arise in the center of the species range rather than at the edges.• Arabidopsis kamchatica is highly cold tolerant throughout its range. It is far more freeze tolerant than A. thaliana, and supercooled to lower temperatures, suggesting that A. kamchatica provides a valuable complement to A. thaliana for cold tolerance research. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  3. From immunosuppression to tolerance.

    PubMed

    Adams, David H; Sanchez-Fueyo, Alberto; Samuel, Didier

    2015-04-01

    The past three decades have seen liver transplantation becoming a major therapeutic approach in the management of end-stage liver diseases. This is due to the dramatic improvement in survival after liver transplantation as a consequence of the improvement of surgical and anaesthetic techniques, of post-transplant medico-surgical management and of prevention of disease recurrence and other post-transplant complications. Improved use of post-transplant immunosuppression to prevent acute and chronic rejection is a major factor in these improved results. The liver has been shown to be more tolerogenic than other organs, and matching of donor and recipients is mainly limited to ABO blood group compatibility. However, long-term immunosuppression is required to avoid severe acute and chronic rejection and graft loss. With the current immunosuppression protocols, the risk of acute rejection requiring additional therapy is 10-40% and the risk of chronic rejection is below 5%. However, the development of histological lesions in the graft in long-term survivors suggest atypical forms of graft rejection may develop as a consequence of under-immunosuppression. The backbone of immunosuppression remains calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) mostly in association with steroids in the short-term and mycophenolate mofetil or mTOR inhibitors (everolimus). The occurrence of post-transplant complications related to the immunosuppressive therapy has led to the development of new protocols aimed at protecting renal function and preventing the development of de novo cancer and of dysmetabolic syndrome. However, there is no new class of immunosuppressive drugs in the pipeline able to replace current protocols in the near future. The aim of a full immune tolerance of the graft is rarely achieved since only 20% of selected patients can be weaned successfully off immunosuppression. In the future, immunosuppression will probably be more case oriented aiming to protect the graft from rejection and at

  4. Glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003466.htm Glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant To use the sharing features on this ... is broken) Alternative Names Oral glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant; OGTT - non-pregnant; Diabetes - glucose tolerance test; ...

  5. 40 CFR 180.319 - Interim tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.319 Interim... pesticide chemicals in or on the following raw agricultural commodities: Substances Uses Tolerance in...

  6. Contingencies promote delay tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ghaemmaghami, Mahshid; Hanley, Gregory P; Jessel, Joshua

    2016-09-01

    The effectiveness of functional communication training as treatment for problem behavior depends on the extent to which treatment can be extended to typical environments that include unavoidable and unpredictable reinforcement delays. Time-based progressive delay (TBPD) often results in the loss of acquired communication responses and the resurgence of problem behavior, whereas contingency-based progressive delay (CBPD) appears to be effective for increasing tolerance for delayed reinforcement. No direct comparison of TBPD and CBPD has, however, been conducted. We used single-subject designs to compare the relative efficacy of TBPD and CBPD. Four individuals who engaged in problem behavior (e.g., aggression, vocal and motor disruptions, self-injury) participated. Results were consistent across all participants, and showed lower rates of problem behavior and collateral responses during CBPD than during TBPD. The generality of CBPD treatment effects, including optimal rates of communication and compliance with demands, was demonstrated across a small but heterogeneous group of participants, reinforcement contingencies, and contexts.

  7. Crop management and agronomic context of the Farm Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops.

    PubMed Central

    Champion, G T; May, M J; Bennett, S; Brooks, D R; Clark, S J; Daniels, R E; Firbank, L G; Haughton, A J; Hawes, C; Heard, M S; Perry, J N; Randle, Z; Rossall, M J; Rothery, P; Skellern, M P; Scott, R J; Squire, G R; Thomas, M R

    2003-01-01

    The Farm Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops (GMHT) were conducted in the UK from 2000 to 2002 on beet (sugar and fodder), spring oilseed rape and forage maize. The management of the crops studied is described and compared with current conventional commercial practice. The distribution of field sites adequately represented the areas currently growing these crops, and the sample contained sites operated at a range of management intensities, including low intensity. Herbicide inputs were audited, and the active ingredients used and the rates and the timings of applications compared well with current practice for both GMHT and conventional crops. Inputs on sugar beet were lower than, and inputs on spring oilseed rape and forage maize were consistent with, national averages. Regression analysis of herbicide-application strategies and weed emergence showed that inputs applied by farmers increased with weed densities in beet and forage maize. GMHT crops generally received only one herbicide active ingredient per crop, later and fewer herbicide sprays and less active ingredient (for beet and maize) than the conventional treatments. The audit of inputs found no evidence of bias. PMID:14561315

  8. Reproducibility of +Gz tolerance testing.

    PubMed

    Whinnery, J E; Jackson, W G

    1979-08-01

    The +Gz tolerance of USAF aircrewmen undergoing medical evaluation has been tested at the USAF School of Aerospace Medicine since 1973. For various reasons, the test protocol can usually be carried out only once on these patients. Accurate determination of the +Gz tolerance of aircrewmen who fly high performance fighter aircraft is very important in assuring aero-medical safety, since loss of consciousness as a result of exceeding a pilot's G tolerance may result in loss of life and loss of aircraft. It is, therefore, necessary to estimate the variability associated with each profile of the test so that a more accurate assessment of +Gz tolerance can be made. Multiple repeat medical evaluation test protocols were performed on 17 centrifuge acceleration panel members. The standard deviations in the +Gz measurements for the four centrifuge profiles were GOR(1) = 0.38 Gz, ROR=0.22 Gz, GOR(2)=0.34 Gz, and GOR(S)=0.39 Gz. A statistically significant learning effect, which increases +Gz tolerance, was observed in both experienced and inexperienced subjects. Knowledge of the variability associated with each test profile will allow a more accurate definition of an individual +Gz tolerance when only a single centrifuge test protocol can be performed. In addition, possible future use of this centrifuge protocol in the selection of individuals with above- or below-average +Gz tolerance is facilitated with an accurate assessment of the variability associated with the test.

  9. MECHANISMS OF ENDOTOXIN TOLERANCE

    PubMed Central

    Greisman, Sheldon E.; Woodwards, William E.

    1965-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxins were administered by continuous intravenous infusions at constant rates to normal man and rabbits. An initial progressive febrile reaction was followed by progressive defervescence to baseline. The resulting pyrogenic refractory state was characterized as follows: (a) reticuloendothelial blockade with thorotrast neither prevented nor reversed its course; (b) passive transfer was unsuccessful with refractory phase plasma; (c) infusions of normal plasma or fresh whole blood failed to restore responsiveness; (d) a minimum of 4 hours of continuous endotoxin infusion was required for full development of unresponsiveness; (e) circulating antibody titers to endotoxin remained unaltered; (f) peripheral leukocytosis appeared; (g) infusion of febrile phase plasma reevoked an immediate, monophasic fever; (h) endotoxinemia could be demonstrated by pyrogen bioassay; (i) 10-fold increases in endotoxin infusion rates reevoked fever; (j) impaired responsiveness extended to heterologous endotoxins; (k) dermal inflammatory responses to endotoxin were suppressed in man while tuberculin reactivity remained unimpaired; dermal inflammatory responses to endotoxin were enhanced in rabbits; and (l) pyrogenic reactivity to endotoxin reappeared within 24 hours in man; refractoriness persisted in rabbits. It is concluded that the pyrogenic refractory state reflects an inability of the host to continue to mobilize endogenous pyrogen during sustained endotoxinemia. Such observations, together with previous studies, are consistent with two distinct immunologic mechanisms of resistance to endotoxin pyrogenicity: (a) desensitization at the cellular level; and (b) elaboration of circulating antibodies which assist reticuloendothelial clearance and destruction of endotoxin. Whereas both such mechanisms may contribute to pyrogenic tolerance, the characteristics of the pyrogenic refractory state suggest the participation only of the former. PMID:14319407

  10. Patenting drought tolerance in organisms.

    PubMed

    Somvanshi, Vishal S

    2009-01-01

    Dehydration is a major form of osmotic stress in cells. Physiological and molecular basis of dehydration stress responses in cells and organisms has been intensively researched over past years. Almost all of the patented dehydration stress tolerance genes from different organisms were used in engineering drought tolerance in crop plants. In spite of the moral, religious and ethical controversies surrounding use of foreign DNA sequences in crop plants, the numbers of such patents has grown tremendously in recent years. In future, we might witness another rise in patents on use of dehydration stress related gene sequences in creating environmental stress tolerant biological control agents for plant disease and insect pest management in agriculture. This review summarizes some of the recent published patents related to drought tolerance genes and their use.

  11. Exploiting Tolerance Processes in Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Herman; Cobbold, Stephen

    2004-07-01

    The full potential of organ transplantation has not yet been realized because of the hazards associated with the long-term use of immunosuppressive drugs. Modern research into mechanisms of immune tolerance offers the promise of reprogramming the immune system, so as to harness the body's natural tolerance mechanisms in the service of graft acceptance. This would allow the minimization of immunosuppressive treatment and offers the prospect of eventually weaning transplant recipients off their drugs.

  12. Fault-tolerant rotary actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2006-10-17

    A fault-tolerant actuator module, in a single containment shell, containing two actuator subsystems that are either asymmetrically or symmetrically laid out is provided. Fault tolerance in the actuators of the present invention is achieved by the employment of dual sets of equal resources. Dual resources are integrated into single modules, with each having the external appearance and functionality of a single set of resources.

  13. Effects of feeding silage and grain from glyphosate-tolerant or insect-protected corn hybrids on feed intake, ruminal digestion, and milk production in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Donkin, S S; Velez, J C; Totten, A K; Stanisiewski, E P; Hartnell, G F

    2003-05-01

    Lactating dairy cows were used to determine effects of feeding glyphosate-tolerant or insect-protected corn hybrids on feed intake, milk production, milk composition, and ruminal digestibility. Corn resistant to European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) infestation (Bt-MON810), or its nontransgenic control (Bt-CON), were planted in alternating fields during two successive years. One-half of each strip was harvested for whole plant corn silage and the remainder was allowed to mature and harvested as grain. Effects of feeding diets containing either Bt-MON810 or Bt-CON grain and silage were determined in two experiments (1 and 2) conducted during successive years. In experiment 3, glyphosate-tolerant Roundup Ready corn (RR-GA21) or its nontransgenic control (RR-CON) corn were grown in alternating fields during one cropping season. Diets contained 42 to 60% corn silage and 20 to 34% corn grain from Bt-MON810, RR-GA21, or the appropriate nontransgenic counterpart; treatments were applied using a switchback design. Cows were fed ad libitum and milked twice daily. There were no differences for nutrient composition between silage sources or between grain sources within an experiment. Data for experiments 1 and 2 indicated similar dry matter intake (DMI), 4% fat-corrected milk (FCM) production, and milk composition between Bt-MON810 and Bt-CON diets. There were no differences for DMI, 4% FCM production, and milk composition between RR-GA21 and RR-CON diets. There was no difference in ruminal degradability, determined separately for corn silage and corn grain, for RR-GA21 or Bt-MON810-hybrids compared with their respective controls. These data demonstrate equivalence of nutritional value and production efficiency for corn containing Bt-MON810 compared with its control and for RR-GA21 corn compared with its control.

  14. Comparison of broiler performance and carcass parameters when fed diets containing soybean meal produced from glyphosate-tolerant (MON 89788), control, or conventional reference soybeans.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M; Hartnell, G; Lucas, D; Davis, S; Nemeth, M

    2007-12-01

    A 42-d floor pen study was conducted to compare broiler (Ross x Ross 308) performance and carcass measurements when fed diets containing meal produced from glyphosate-tolerant soybeans (MON 89788) with those of broilers fed diets containing meal produced from control soybean (A3244) that has similar genetic background to MON 89788. Soybean meal produced from 6 conventional soybean varieties was included in the study to provide comparison measurements for broilers fed meal derived from conventional soybeans. It has been found that MON 89788 produces the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase protein from Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 (cp4 epsps), which confers tolerance to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup agricultural herbicides. Broilers were fed starter diets (approximately 33% wt/wt dehulled soybean meal) from d 0 to 21 and grower-finisher diets (approximately 30% wt/wt dehulled soybean meal) from d 21 to 42. The study utilized a randomized complete block design with 8 dietary treatments assigned randomly within 5 blocks of 16 pens each (8 male and 8 female) with 10 birds per pen. There were 10 pens per treatment group (5 male and 5 female). No treatment differences (P > 0.05) were detected among dietary treatments for feed intake, weight gain, adjusted feed conversion, or any measured carcass and meat quality parameters. Comparison of all performance, carcass, and meat quality parameters measured showed no differences (P > 0.05) between birds fed the MON 89788 soybean meal diet and the population of birds fed the control and 6 conventional reference soybean meal diets. It is concluded that the diets containing soybean meal produced from MON 89788 were nutritionally equivalent to diets containing soybean meal produced from the control and conventional reference soybean varieties when fed to broilers.

  15. 40 CFR 180.472 - Imidacloprid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Artichoke, globe 2.5 Aspirated grain fractions 240 Atemoya 0.30 Avocado 1.0 Banana 0.50 Beet, sugar... byproducts 0.30 Cherimoya 0.30 Citrus, dried pulp 5.0 Coffee, bean, green 0.80 Cotton, gin byproducts 4.0... Gooseberry 3.5 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, forage, except rice 7.0 Grain, cereal...

  16. 40 CFR 180.649 - Saflufenacil; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or on the commodities. Commodity Parts per million Almond, hulls 0.10 Banana 1 0.03 Coffee, green..., pome, group 11 0.03 Fruit, stone, group 12 0.03 Grain, aspirated fractions 10 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw group 16 0.10 Grain, cereal, group 15 0.03 Grape 0.03 Mango 1 0.03 Nut, tree, group 14 0...

  17. 40 CFR 180.472 - Imidacloprid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Artichoke, globe 2.5 Aspirated grain fractions 240 Atemoya 0.30 Avocado 1.0 Banana 0.50 Beet, sugar... byproducts 0.30 Cherimoya 0.30 Citrus, dried pulp 5.0 Coffee, bean, green 0.80 Cotton, gin byproducts 4.0... Gooseberry 3.5 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, forage, except rice 7.0 Grain, cereal...

  18. 40 CFR 180.649 - Saflufenacil; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or on the commodities. Commodity Parts per million Almond, hulls 0.10 Banana 1 0.03 Coffee, green..., pome, group 11 0.03 Fruit, stone, group 12 0.03 Grain, aspirated fractions 10 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw group 16 0.10 Grain, cereal, group 15 0.03 Grape 0.03 Mango 1 0.03 Nut, tree, group 14 0...

  19. 40 CFR 180.649 - Saflufenacil; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or on the commodities. Commodity Parts per million Almond, hulls 0.10 Banana 1 0.03 Coffee, green..., pome, group 11 0.03 Fruit, stone, group 12 0.03 Grain, aspirated fractions 10 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw group 16 0.10 Grain, cereal, group 15 0.03 Grape 0.03 Mango 1 0.03 Nut, tree, group 14 0...

  20. 40 CFR 180.472 - Imidacloprid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Artichoke, globe 2.5 Aspirated grain fractions 240 Atemoya 0.30 Avocado 1.0 Banana 0.50 Beet, sugar... byproducts 0.30 Cherimoya 0.30 Citrus, dried pulp 5.0 Coffee, bean, green 0.80 Cotton, gin byproducts 4.0... Gooseberry 3.5 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, forage, except rice 7.0 Grain, cereal...

  1. 40 CFR 180.472 - Imidacloprid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Artichoke, globe 2.5 Aspirated grain fractions 240 Atemoya 0.30 Avocado 1.0 Banana 0.50 Beet, sugar... byproducts 0.30 Cherimoya 0.30 Citrus, dried pulp 5.0 Coffee, bean, green 0.80 Cotton, gin byproducts 4.0... Goat, meat byproducts 0.30 Gooseberry 3.5 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, forage...

  2. 40 CFR 180.472 - Imidacloprid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Artichoke, globe 2.5 Aspirated grain fractions 240 Atemoya 0.30 Avocado 1.0 Banana 0.50 Beet, sugar... byproducts 0.30 Cherimoya 0.30 Citrus, dried pulp 5.0 Coffee, bean, green 0.80 Cotton, gin byproducts 4.0... Goat, meat byproducts 0.30 Gooseberry 3.5 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, forage...

  3. 40 CFR 180.226 - Diquat; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... following food commodities: Commodity Parts per million Avocado 0.2 Berry group 13 0.05 Cotton, undelinted seed 0.2 Cranberry 0.05 Fish 2.0 Fruit, citrus, group 10 0.05 Fruit, pome, group 11 0.02 Fruit, stone... 0.05 Grass, forage, fodder and hay, group 17 0.2 Hop, dried cones 0.2 Nut, tree, group 14...

  4. 40 CFR 180.420 - Fluridone; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...(1H)-pyridinone, in or on the commodity. Commodity Parts per million Animal feed, nongrass, group 18 0... 0.1 Fruit, pome, group 11 0.1 Fruit, stone, group 12 0.1 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16 0.1 Grain, cereal, group 15 0.1 Grape 0.1 Grass, forage 0.15 Hop, dried cones 0.1 Nut,...

  5. Flooding tolerance of forage legumes.

    PubMed

    Striker, Gustavo G; Colmer, Timothy D

    2016-06-20

    We review waterlogging and submergence tolerances of forage (pasture) legumes. Growth reductions from waterlogging in perennial species ranged from >50% for Medicago sativa and Trifolium pratense to <25% for Lotus corniculatus, L. tenuis, and T. fragiferum For annual species, waterlogging reduced Medicago truncatula by ~50%, whereas Melilotus siculus and T. michelianum were not reduced. Tolerant species have higher root porosity (gas-filled volume in tissues) owing to aerenchyma formation. Plant dry mass (waterlogged relative to control) had a positive (hyperbolic) relationship to root porosity across eight species. Metabolism in hypoxic roots was influenced by internal aeration. Sugars accumulate in M. sativa due to growth inhibition from limited respiration and low energy in roots of low porosity (i.e. 4.5%). In contrast, L. corniculatus, with higher root porosity (i.e. 17.2%) and O2 supply allowing respiration, maintained growth better and sugars did not accumulate. Tolerant legumes form nodules, and internal O2 diffusion along roots can sustain metabolism, including N2 fixation, in submerged nodules. Shoot physiology depends on species tolerance. In M. sativa, photosynthesis soon declines and in the longer term (>10 d) leaves suffer chlorophyll degradation, damage, and N, P, and K deficiencies. In tolerant L corniculatus and L. tenuis, photosynthesis is maintained longer, shoot N is less affected, and shoot P can even increase during waterlogging. Species also differ in tolerance of partial and complete shoot submergence. Gaps in knowledge include anoxia tolerance of roots, N2 fixation during field waterlogging, and identification of traits conferring the ability to recover after water subsides.

  6. Desiccation tolerance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Chaibenjawong, Plykaeow; Foster, Simon J

    2011-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a multidrug-resistant pathogen that not only causes a diverse array of human diseases, but also is able to survive in potentially dry and stressful environments, such as the human nose, on skin and on inanimate surfaces such as clothing and surfaces. This study investigated parameters governing desiccation tolerance of S. aureus and identified several components involved in the process. Initially, the role of environmental parameters such as temperature, growth phase, cell density, desiccation time and protectants in desiccation tolerance were determined. This established a robust model of desiccation tolerance in which S. aureus has the ability to survive on dry plastic surfaces for more than 1,097 days. Using a combination of a random screen and defined mutants, clpX, sigB and yjbH were identified as being required for desiccation tolerance. ClpX is a part of the ATP-dependent ClpXP protease, important for protein turnover, and YjbH has a proposed linked function. SigB is an accessory sigma factor with a role in generalized stress resistance. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that govern desiccation tolerance may determine the break points to be exploited to prevent the spread of this dangerous pathogen in hospitals and communities.

  7. Tolerance - One Transplant for Life

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Tatsuo; Leventhal, Joseph; Madsen, Joren C.; Strober, Samuel; Turka, Laurence A.; Wood, Kathryn J.

    2014-01-01

    A recent TTS workshop was convened to address the question: “What do we need to have in place to make tolerance induction protocols a “standard of care” for organ transplant recipients over the next decade?” In a productive two day meeting there was wide-ranging discussion on a broad series of topics resulting in five consensus recommendations: (1) Establish a registry of results for patients enrolled in tolerance trials; (2) Establish standardized protocols for sample collection and storage; (3) Establish standardized biomarkers and assays; (4) Include children aged 12 and older in protocols that have been validated in adults; (5) a task force to engage third party payers in discussions of how to fund tolerance trials. Future planned workshops will focus on progress in implementing these recommendations and identifying other steps that the community needs to take. PMID:24926829

  8. Neuropilin-1 in Transplantation Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Mora, Mauricio; Morales, Rodrigo A.; Gajardo, Tania; Catalán, Diego; Pino-Lagos, Karina

    2013-01-01

    In the immune system, Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) is a molecule that plays an important role in establishing the immunological synapse between dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells. Recently, Nrp1 has been identified as a marker that seems to distinguish natural T regulatory (nTreg) cells, generated in the thymus, from inducible T regulatory (iTreg) cells raised in the periphery. Given the crucial role of both nTreg and iTreg cells in the generation and maintenance of immune tolerance, the ability to phenotypically identify each of these cell populations in vivo is needed to elucidate their biological properties. In turn, these properties have the potential to be developed for therapeutic use to promote immune tolerance. Here we describe the nature and functions of Nrp1, including its potential use as a therapeutic target in transplantation tolerance. PMID:24324469

  9. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  10. Statistical Tolerance and Clearance Analysis for Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Yi, C.

    1996-01-01

    Tolerance is inevitable because manufacturing exactly equal parts is known to be impossible. Furthermore, the specification of tolerances is an integral part of product design since tolerances directly affect the assemblability, functionality, manufacturability, and cost effectiveness of a product. In this paper, we present statistical tolerance and clearance analysis for the assembly. Our proposed work is expected to make the following contributions: (i) to help the designers to evaluate products for assemblability, (ii) to provide a new perspective to tolerance problems, and (iii) to provide a tolerance analysis tool which can be incorporated into a CAD or solid modeling system.

  11. Statistical Tolerance and Clearance Analysis for Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Yi, C.

    1996-01-01

    Tolerance is inevitable because manufacturing exactly equal parts is known to be impossible. Furthermore, the specification of tolerances is an integral part of product design since tolerances directly affect the assemblability, functionality, manufacturability, and cost effectiveness of a product. In this paper, we present statistical tolerance and clearance analysis for the assembly. Our proposed work is expected to make the following contributions: (i) to help the designers to evaluate products for assemblability, (ii) to provide a new perspective to tolerance problems, and (iii) to provide a tolerance analysis tool which can be incorporated into a CAD or solid modeling system.

  12. Civic Tolerance among Honors Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Gordon; Shepherd, Gary

    2014-01-01

    As important as cognitive outcomes are in assessing the educational merits of honors programs, the authors ask whether honors programs affect the values and social attitudes of their students differently than other students: in particular, whether honors students are more or less tolerant than other students and, if so, in what ways and why. There…

  13. Stepping Back from Zero Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne-Dianis, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Schools' use of zero tolerance policies has been increasing since the 1980s as part of a societal movement to crack down on drug abuse and violence among youth. But far from making schools safer, this harsh, inflexible approach to discipline has been eroding the culture of schools and creating devastating consequences for children, writes…

  14. Toleration, Multiculturalism and Mistaken Belief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standish, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Doubts have been expressed about the virtue of toleration, especially in view of what some have seen as its complicity with a morality of anything goes. More rigorous arguments have been provided by Peter Gardner and Harvey Siegel against the relativism evident in certain versions of multiculturalism and in the new religious studies. This article…

  15. Tolerance of snakes to hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillywhite, H. B.; Ballard, R. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    Sensitivity of carotid blood flow to increased gravitational force acting in the head-to-tail direction(+Gz) was studied in diverse species of snakes hypothesized to show adaptive variation of response. Tolerance to increased gravity was measured red as the maximum graded acceleration force at which carotid blood flow ceased and was shown to vary according to gravitational adaptation of species defined by their ecology and behavior. Multiple regression analysis showed that gravitational habitat, but not body length, had a significant effect on Gz tolerance. At the extremes, carotid blood flow decreased in response to increasing G force and approached zero near +1 Gz in aquatic and ground-dwelling species, whereas in climbing species carotid flow was maintained at forces in excess of +2 Gz. Tolerant (arboreal) species were able to withstand hypergravic forces of +2 to +3 Gz for periods up to 1 h without cessation of carotid blood flow or loss of body movement and tongue flicking. Data suggest that the relatively tight skin characteristic of tolerant species provides a natural antigravity suit and is of prime importance in counteracting Gz stress on blood circulation.

  16. Assessing Your Board's Risk Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, John S.; Jarvis, William F.

    2014-01-01

    In the wake of the financial crisis, trustees of many endowed nonprofit institutions realized that their portfolio was riskier than they thought and their own ability to tolerate loss wasn't as strong as they imagined. What can board and investment committee members do to improve their ability to assess their--and their institution's--capacity for…

  17. Stepping Back from Zero Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne-Dianis, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Schools' use of zero tolerance policies has been increasing since the 1980s as part of a societal movement to crack down on drug abuse and violence among youth. But far from making schools safer, this harsh, inflexible approach to discipline has been eroding the culture of schools and creating devastating consequences for children, writes…

  18. Developing Political Tolerance. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Patricia G.

    Political tolerance is the willingness to extend basic rights and civil liberties to persons and groups whose viewpoints differ from one's own. It is a central tenet of a liberal democracy. The individual rights and freedoms that U.S. citizens value encourage a wide array of ideas and beliefs, some of which may offend segments of the population.…

  19. Vegetable soybean tolerance to pyroxasulfone

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    If registered for use on vegetable soybean, pyroxasulfone would fill an important gap in weed management systems in the crop. In order to determine the potential crop injury risk of pyroxasulfone on vegetable soybean, the objective of this work was to quantify vegetable soybean tolerance to pyroxasu...

  20. Biocatalysts with enhanced inhibitor tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Shihui; Linger, Jeffrey; Franden, Mary Ann; Pienkos, Philip T.; Zhang, Min

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed herein are biocatalysts for the production of biofuels, including microorganisms that contain genetic modifications conferring tolerance to growth and fermentation inhibitors found in many cellulosic feedstocks. Methods of converting cellulose-containing materials to fuels and chemicals, as well as methods of fermenting sugars to fuels and chemicals, using these biocatalysts are also disclosed.

  1. Promoting Tolerance in Preservice Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swearingen, Judith A.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a social science methods course where preservice teachers taught a unit on controversial topics involving tolerance and intolerance. Students were forbidden to lecture. Permitted methods included cooperative learning, inquiry, simulations, jackdaws, documents, and sociodrama. Student response was generally positive. (MJP)

  2. "Zero Tolerance" for Free Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hils, Lynda

    2001-01-01

    Argues that school policies of "zero tolerance" of threatening speech may violate a student's First Amendment right to freedom of expression if speech is less than a "true threat." Suggests a two-step analysis to determine if student speech is a "true threat." (PKP)

  3. Urbanism, Migration, and Tolerance: A Reassessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Thomas C.

    1991-01-01

    Urbanism's impact on the personality may be stronger than previously thought. Finds that urban residence has a strong positive effect on tolerance. Migration also promotes tolerance, regardless of the size of the destination community. (DM)

  4. Increased tolerance to humans among disturbed wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Samia, Diogo S. M.; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Nomura, Fausto; Rangel, Thiago F.; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    Human disturbance drives the decline of many species, both directly and indirectly. Nonetheless, some species do particularly well around humans. One mechanism that may explain coexistence is the degree to which a species tolerates human disturbance. Here we provide a comprehensive meta-analysis of birds, mammals and lizards to investigate species tolerance of human disturbance and explore the drivers of this tolerance in birds. We find that, overall, disturbed populations of the three major taxa are more tolerant of human disturbance than less disturbed populations. The best predictors of the direction and magnitude of bird tolerance of human disturbance are the type of disturbed area (urbanized birds are more tolerant than rural or suburban populations) and body mass (large birds are more tolerant than small birds). By identifying specific features associated with tolerance, these results guide evidence-based conservation strategies to predict and manage the impacts of increasing human disturbance on birds. PMID:26568451

  5. 7 CFR 51.2928 - Tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apricots Tolerances § 51.2928 Tolerances. In order to allow for variations incident..., by count, of the apricots in any sample may be below the minimum size specified. Application of...

  6. 7 CFR 51.2928 - Tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apricots Tolerances § 51.2928 Tolerances. In... minimum size: Not more than 10 percent, by count, of the apricots in any sample may be below the minimum...

  7. 7 CFR 51.2928 - Tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apricots Tolerances § 51.2928 Tolerances. In order to allow for variations incident..., by count, of the apricots in any sample may be below the minimum size specified. Application of...

  8. 7 CFR 51.2928 - Tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apricots Tolerances § 51.2928 Tolerances. In order to allow for variations incident..., by count, of the apricots in any sample may be below the minimum size specified. Application of...

  9. 7 CFR 51.2928 - Tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apricots Tolerances § 51.2928 Tolerances. In... minimum size: Not more than 10 percent, by count, of the apricots in any sample may be below the minimum...

  10. 78 FR 78738 - Pendimethalin; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... pendimethalin on almond hulls to be higher under this revised tolerance, EPA recalculated the ruminant... increase in the ruminant dietary burden. Furthermore, the increase in tolerance on almond hulls will...

  11. Increased tolerance to humans among disturbed wildlife.

    PubMed

    Samia, Diogo S M; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Nomura, Fausto; Rangel, Thiago F; Blumstein, Daniel T

    2015-11-16

    Human disturbance drives the decline of many species, both directly and indirectly. Nonetheless, some species do particularly well around humans. One mechanism that may explain coexistence is the degree to which a species tolerates human disturbance. Here we provide a comprehensive meta-analysis of birds, mammals and lizards to investigate species tolerance of human disturbance and explore the drivers of this tolerance in birds. We find that, overall, disturbed populations of the three major taxa are more tolerant of human disturbance than less disturbed populations. The best predictors of the direction and magnitude of bird tolerance of human disturbance are the type of disturbed area (urbanized birds are more tolerant than rural or suburban populations) and body mass (large birds are more tolerant than small birds). By identifying specific features associated with tolerance, these results guide evidence-based conservation strategies to predict and manage the impacts of increasing human disturbance on birds.

  12. A Developmental View of Children's Behavioral Tolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safran, Joan S.; Safran, Stephen P.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of scores of 469 third to sixth graders on the Children's Tolerance Scale yielded significant grade level differences with older children generally the most tolerant. The more outer-directed behaviors were rated as most disturbing. (CL)

  13. 40 CFR 180.460 - Benoxacor; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances...-metolachlor in or on raw agricultural commodities for which tolerances have been established for...

  14. "Bringing Up Baby" to Tolerate Germs.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Keisuke; Segre, Julia A

    2015-11-17

    How immune tolerance is maintained in the skin remains unclear. In this issue of Immunity, Rosenblum and colleagues demonstrate that tolerance to commensal bacteria is established during the neonatal period via regulatory T cells. Defining the crucial window during which commensal-specific tolerance is achieved has strategic implications for the induction of tolerance in allergic diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Invertebrate responses to the management of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant and conventional spring crops. I. Soil-surface-active invertebrates.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, D R; Bohan, D A; Champion, G T; Haughton, A J; Hawes, C; Heard, M S; Clark, S J; Dewar, A M; Firbank, L G; Perry, J N; Rothery, P; Scott, R J; Woiwod, I P; Birchall, C; Skellern, M P; Walker, J H; Baker, P; Bell, D; Browne, E L; Dewar, A J G; Fairfax, C M; Garner, B H; Haylock, L A; Horne, S L; Hulmes, S E; Mason, N S; Norton, L R; Nuttall, P; Randle, Z; Rossall, M J; Sands, R J N; Singer, E J; Walker, M J

    2003-01-01

    The effects of herbicide management of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) beet, maize and spring oilseed rape on the abundance and diversity of soil-surface-active invertebrates were assessed. Most effects did not differ between years, environmental zones or initial seedbanks or between sugar and fodder beet. This suggests that the results may be treated as generally applicable to agricultural situations throughout the UK for these crops. The direction of the effects was evenly balanced between increases and decreases in counts in the GMHT compared with the conventional treatment. Most effects involving a greater capture in the GMHT treatments occurred in maize, whereas most effects involving a smaller capture were in beet and spring oilseed rape. Differences between GMHT and conventional crop herbicide management had a significant effect on the capture of most surface-active invertebrate species and higher taxa tested in at least one crop, and these differences reflected the phenology and ecology of the invertebrates. Counts of carabids that feed on weed seeds were smaller in GMHT beet and spring oilseed rape but larger in GMHT maize. In contrast, collembolan detritivore counts were significantly larger under GMHT crop management. PMID:14561318

  16. 76 FR 38036 - Propylene Oxide; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ...). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This regulation amends the propylene oxide tolerance on ``nut, tree, group...), announcing the Agency's proposal to amend the propylene oxide tolerance (40 CFR 180.491) on ``nut, tree... the propylene oxide tolerance (40 CFR 180.491) on ``nut, tree, group 14'' to read ``nutmeat,...

  17. Unique preservative tolerance in Tyromyces palustris

    Treesearch

    Frederick Green; Rachel A. Arango; Carol A. Clausen

    2005-01-01

    Fungal tolerance to wood preservatives has been critically important for many years. The tolerance of type cultures to common wood preservatives is, in fact, noted in the AWPA Standards [1]. Gloeophyllum trabeum Mad-617, for example, is particularly tolerant to phenolic and arsenic compounds. One important group of decay fungi that has been studied extensively are...

  18. Tolerance to insect defoliation: biocenotic aspects

    Treesearch

    Andrey A. Pleshanov; Victor I. Voronin; Elena S. Khlimankova; Valentina I. Epova

    1991-01-01

    Woody plant resistance to insect damage is of great importance in forest protection, and tree tolerance is an important element of this resistance. The compensating mechanisms responsible for tolerance are nonspecific as a rule and develop after damage has been caused by phytophagous animals or other unfavorable effects. Beyond that, plant tolerance depends on duration...

  19. 47 CFR 74.464 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.464 Section 74.464....464 Frequency tolerance. For operations on frequencies above 25 MHz using authorized bandwidths up to... frequency of each station in compliance with the frequency tolerance requirements of § 90.213 of this...

  20. 47 CFR 74.561 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.561 Section 74.561... § 74.561 Frequency tolerance. In the bands above 944 MHz, the operating frequency of the transmitter shall be maintained in accordance with the following table: Frequency band (MHz) Tolerance as percentage...

  1. 47 CFR 74.161 - Frequency tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerances. 74.161 Section 74.161... Technical Operation and Operators § 74.161 Frequency tolerances. The departure of the carrier frequency or frequencies of an experimental broadcast station must not exceed the tolerance specified in the instrument of...

  2. 47 CFR 74.464 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.464 Section 74.464....464 Frequency tolerance. For operations on frequencies above 25 MHz using authorized bandwidths up to... frequency of each station in compliance with the frequency tolerance requirements of § 90.213 of this...

  3. 47 CFR 74.464 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.464 Section 74.464....464 Frequency tolerance. For operations on frequencies above 25 MHz using authorized bandwidths up to... frequency of each station in compliance with the frequency tolerance requirements of § 90.213 of this...

  4. 47 CFR 74.161 - Frequency tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerances. 74.161 Section 74.161... Technical Operation and Operators § 74.161 Frequency tolerances. The departure of the carrier frequency or frequencies of an experimental broadcast station must not exceed the tolerance specified in the instrument of...

  5. 47 CFR 74.464 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.464 Section 74.464....464 Frequency tolerance. For operations on frequencies above 25 MHz using authorized bandwidths up to... frequency of each station in compliance with the frequency tolerance requirements of § 90.213 of this...

  6. 47 CFR 74.561 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.561 Section 74.561... § 74.561 Frequency tolerance. In the bands above 944 MHz, the operating frequency of the transmitter shall be maintained in accordance with the following table: Frequency band (MHz) Tolerance as percentage...

  7. 47 CFR 74.561 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.561 Section 74.561... § 74.561 Frequency tolerance. In the bands above 944 MHz, the operating frequency of the transmitter shall be maintained in accordance with the following table: Frequency band (MHz) Tolerance as percentage...

  8. 47 CFR 74.561 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.561 Section 74.561... § 74.561 Frequency tolerance. In the bands above 944 MHz, the operating frequency of the transmitter shall be maintained in accordance with the following table: Frequency band (MHz) Tolerance as percentage...

  9. 47 CFR 74.561 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.561 Section 74.561... § 74.561 Frequency tolerance. In the bands above 944 MHz, the operating frequency of the transmitter shall be maintained in accordance with the following table: Frequency band (MHz) Tolerance as percentage...

  10. 47 CFR 74.464 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.464 Section 74.464....464 Frequency tolerance. For operations on frequencies above 25 MHz using authorized bandwidths up to... frequency of each station in compliance with the frequency tolerance requirements of § 90.213 of this...

  11. 47 CFR 74.161 - Frequency tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerances. 74.161 Section 74.161... Technical Operation and Operators § 74.161 Frequency tolerances. The departure of the carrier frequency or frequencies of an experimental broadcast station must not exceed the tolerance specified in the instrument of...

  12. 40 CFR 180.5 - Zero tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Definitions and Interpretative Regulations § 180.5 Zero tolerances. A zero tolerance means that no amount of the pesticide chemical may remain on the raw...

  13. 40 CFR 180.5 - Zero tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Definitions and Interpretative Regulations § 180.5 Zero tolerances. A zero tolerance means that no amount of the pesticide chemical may remain on the raw...

  14. 40 CFR 180.5 - Zero tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Definitions and Interpretative Regulations § 180.5 Zero tolerances. A zero tolerance means that no amount of the pesticide chemical may remain on the raw...

  15. 75 FR 26668 - Flutriafol; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ...: Tolerance- level residues, 100% crop treated (CT), and DEEM\\TM\\ version 7.81 default processing factors were... chronic exposure assessment: Tolerance-level residues, 100% CT, and DEEM\\TM\\ version 7.81 default... information in the dietary assessment for flutriafol. Tolerance level residues and 100% CT were assumed for...

  16. Increasing ideological tolerance in social psychology.

    PubMed

    Inbar, Yoel; Lammers, Joris

    2015-01-01

    We argue that recognizing current ideological diversity in social psychology and promoting tolerance of minority views is just as important as increasing the number of non-liberal researchers. Increasing tolerance will allow individuals in the minority to express dissenting views, which will improve psychological science by reducing bias. We present four recommendations for increasing tolerance.

  17. 78 FR 42693 - Hexythiazox; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... established tolerances for ruminant meat byproducts from 0.05 ppm to 0.5 ppm (PP 2F8054); and by amending the... the ruminant meat byproduct tolerances to 0.5 ppm and an increase in the current egg tolerance to...

  18. Zero Tolerance in Tennessee Schools: An Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Kim; Njie, Bintou; Detch, Ethel R.; Walton, Jason

    As required by Tennessee law, this report examines the state's zero-tolerance disciplinary data collected by the Tennessee Department of Education for school years 1999-00, 2000-01, and 2001-02. The first section displays statewide zero-tolerance statistics. The second section focuses on the zero-tolerance statistics of Tennessee's five major…

  19. 7 CFR 51.3744 - Tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Tolerances § 51.3744 Tolerances. In order to... following tolerances, by count, are provided as specified: (a) U.S. No. 1. 10 percent for melons in any lot... not more than 1 percent for melons affected by decay. (b) U.S. Commercial. 20 percent for melons in...

  20. 7 CFR 51.3744 - Tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Tolerances § 51.3744 Tolerances. In order to... following tolerances, by count, are provided as specified: (a) U.S. No. 1. 10 percent for melons in any lot... not more than 1 percent for melons affected by decay. (b) U.S. Commercial. 20 percent for melons in...

  1. 7 CFR 51.3744 - Tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Tolerances § 51.3744 Tolerances. In order to... following tolerances, by count, are provided as specified: (a) U.S. No. 1. 10 percent for melons in any lot... not more than 1 percent for melons affected by decay. (b) U.S. Commercial. 20 percent for melons in...

  2. Enhancement of chronic acceleration tolerance by selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    A review is presented of experiments concerning the physiological consequences of chronic acceleration and of studies of selection for acceleration tolerance over many generations. It is shown that acceleration selection is effective in improving chronic acceleration tolerance. However, it is determined that the variable selection procedure employed in developing this acceleration-tolerant line limits the confidence in the quantitative evaluation of the procedure.

  3. 7 CFR 51.3150 - Tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... grade. 10 percent for nectarines in any lot which fail to meet the requirements of the grade. (ii) U.S... Standards for Grades of Nectarines Tolerances § 51.3150 Tolerances. In order to allow for variations incident to proper grading and handling in each of the following grades, the following tolerances, by count...

  4. Toleration and Recognition: What Should We Teach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Peter Nigel

    2010-01-01

    Generally we think it good to tolerate and to accord recognition. Yet both are complex phenomena and our teaching must acknowledge and cope with that complexity. We tolerate only what we object to, so our message to students cannot be simply, "promote the good and prevent the bad". Much advocacy of toleration is not what it pretends to be. Nor is…

  5. Perceptions of Tolerance within a Canadian University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luppicini, Rocci; Sajnani, Nisha

    2003-01-01

    Sought to determine the definition of the word "tolerance" as used within a Canadian university's mission statement. Gauged the climate of tolerance within this university and connected it to sociocultural challenges faced by similar universities. The qualitative case study explored tolerance through the experiences of administrators,…

  6. 7 CFR 993.602 - Maximum tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum tolerances. 993.602 Section 993.602... CALIFORNIA Grade Regulations § 993.602 Maximum tolerances. In lieu of the provision prescribed in I C of § 993.97 that the tolerance allowances prescribed therein shall be on a weight basis, the...

  7. Enhancement of chronic acceleration tolerance by selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    A review is presented of experiments concerning the physiological consequences of chronic acceleration and of studies of selection for acceleration tolerance over many generations. It is shown that acceleration selection is effective in improving chronic acceleration tolerance. However, it is determined that the variable selection procedure employed in developing this acceleration-tolerant line limits the confidence in the quantitative evaluation of the procedure.

  8. Zero Tolerance: Advantages and Disadvantages. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2009-01-01

    What are the positives and negatives of zero tolerance? What should be considered when examining a school's program? Although there are no definitive definitions of zero tolerance, two commonly used ones are as follows: "Zero tolerance means that a school will automatically and severely punish a student for a variety of infractions" (American Bar…

  9. Statistical computation of tolerance limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Based on a new theory, two computer codes were developed specifically to calculate the exact statistical tolerance limits for normal distributions within unknown means and variances for the one-sided and two-sided cases for the tolerance factor, k. The quantity k is defined equivalently in terms of the noncentral t-distribution by the probability equation. Two of the four mathematical methods employ the theory developed for the numerical simulation. Several algorithms for numerically integrating and iteratively root-solving the working equations are written to augment the program simulation. The program codes generate some tables of k's associated with the varying values of the proportion and sample size for each given probability to show accuracy obtained for small sample sizes.

  10. Radiation and temperature tolerant hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, D. W.; Draper, B. L.

    1981-12-01

    The nuclear and space industries require electronics with higher tolerance to radiation than that commercially available. The recently developed 300 C electronics technology based on junction field-effect transistors and thick film hybridization was tested beyond 10 to the 9th power rad (Si) in a cobalt 60 gamma source and 10 to the 16th power neutrons/sq cm in an annular core rector. Circuits and individual components from this technology all survived these total doses although often required annealing at 200 C or 300 C to regain functionality. Radiation tolerance comparisons were made with military radhard CMOS, simplified linear I2L, and JFET technologies. Real time 200 to 300 C annealing should allow circuit functionality to even higher radiation levels.

  11. Radiation and temperature tolerant hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.W.; Draper, B.L.

    1981-12-01

    The nuclear and space industries require electronics with higher tolerance to radiation than that commercially available. The recently developed 300/sup 0/C electronics technology based on junction field-effect transistors and thick film hybridization was tested beyond 10/sup 9/ rad (Si) in a cobalt 60 gamma source and 10/sup 16/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/ in an annular core reactor. Circuits and individual components from this technology all survived these total doses although often required annealing at 200/sup 0/C or 300/sup 0/C to regain functionality. Radiation tolerance comparisons were made with military radhard CMOS, simplified linear I/sup 2/L, and JFET technologies. Real time 200 to 300/sup 0/C annealing should allow circuit functionality to even higher radiation levels.

  12. Some species tolerate ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-12-01

    Increasing carbon dioxide levels lead to rising ocean acidity, which can harm corals and many other species of ocean life. Acidification causes calcium carbonate, which corals usually need to build skeletons, to dissolve. “Every day, ocean acidification is taking up the weight of 6 million midsize cars' worth of carbon, said Nina Keul, a graduate student at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in Germany during a 7 December press conference at the AGU Fall Meeting. Somewhat surprising, though, is that some species are more tolerant of acidic conditions than scientists had expected. For instance, Keul exposed a species of foraminifera, Ammonia tepida, to seawater with varying acidity and varying carbonate ion concentrations. Previous studies had found that foraminifera growth declined with decreasing carbonate levels, but Keul's foraminifera continued to grow in the acidic conditions. She said that the mechanism that allows this species to tolerate the low carbonate conditions is as yet unknown.

  13. Behavioral Tolerance to Anticholinergic Agents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    negative reinforcement (avoidance of brief electric shocks). Each procedure was designed to allow within-subject determination of drug effects. In the...maintained by negative reinforcement ; c) eating of the food pellets used as positive reinforcers was suppressed by atropine, sometimes for more than a...also resulted in decreased responding. Evidence of antagonism between atropine and physostigmine was observed for behavior maintained alternatly by positive and negative reinforcement . Keywords: Tolerances(physiology);

  14. Historical overview of immunological tolerance.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ronald H

    2012-04-01

    A fundamental property of the immune system is its ability to mediate self-defense with a minimal amount of collateral damage to the host. The system uses several different mechanisms to achieve this goal, which is collectively referred to as the "process of immunological tolerance." This article provides an introductory historical overview to these various mechanisms, which are discussed in greater detail throughout this collection, and then briefly describes what happens when this process fails, a state referred to as "autoimmunity."

  15. Fault tolerant control of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard

    Autonomous multiple spacecraft formation flying space missions demand the development of reliable control systems to ensure rapid, accurate, and effective response to various attitude and formation reconfiguration commands. Keeping in mind the complexities involved in the technology development to enable spacecraft formation flying, this thesis presents the development and validation of a fault tolerant control algorithm that augments the AOCS on-board a spacecraft to ensure that these challenging formation flying missions will fly successfully. Taking inspiration from the existing theory of nonlinear control, a fault-tolerant control system for the RyePicoSat missions is designed to cope with actuator faults whilst maintaining the desirable degree of overall stability and performance. Autonomous fault tolerant adaptive control scheme for spacecraft equipped with redundant actuators and robust control of spacecraft in underactuated configuration, represent the two central themes of this thesis. The developed algorithms are validated using a hardware-in-the-loop simulation. A reaction wheel testbed is used to validate the proposed fault tolerant attitude control scheme. A spacecraft formation flying experimental testbed is used to verify the performance of the proposed robust control scheme for underactuated spacecraft configurations. The proposed underactuated formation flying concept leads to more than 60% savings in fuel consumption when compared to a fully actuated spacecraft formation configuration. We also developed a novel attitude control methodology that requires only a single thruster to stabilize three axis attitude and angular velocity components of a spacecraft. Numerical simulations and hardware-in-the-loop experimental results along with rigorous analytical stability analysis shows that the proposed methodology will greatly enhance the reliability of the spacecraft, while allowing for potentially significant overall mission cost reduction.

  16. Carisoprodol Tolerance and Precipitated Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Gatch, Michael B.; Nguyen, Jacques D.; Carbonaro, Theresa; Forster, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Carisoprodol is a muscle relaxant that acts at the GABAA receptor. Concerns about the abuse liability of carisoprodol are increasing, but evidence that carisoprodol produces tolerance and a significant withdrawal syndrome has yet to be established. The purpose of the current study was to determine if repeated administration of carisoprodol produces tolerance and withdrawal signs in a mouse model. Methods Carisoprodol (0, 100, 200, 300, or 500 mg/kg bid, i.p.) was administered to Swiss-Webster mice for 4 days and loss-of-righting reflex was measured 20 to 30 minutes following each administration. On the fourth day, bemegride (20 mg/kg), flumazenil (20 mg/kg), or vehicle was administered following carisoprodol and withdrawal signs were measured. Separate groups of mice receiving the same treatment regimen and dose range were tested for spontaneous withdrawal at 6, 12 and 24 hr after the last dose of carisoprodol. Results The righting reflex was dose-dependently impaired following the first administration of carisoprodol. A 75 to 100% decrease in the magnitude of the impairment occurred over the four days of exposure, indicating the development of tolerance to the carisoprodol-elicited loss-of-righting reflex. Withdrawal signs were not observed within 24 hours following spontaneous withdrawal; however, bemegride and flumazenil each precipitated withdrawal within 15 to 30 min of administration. Conclusions Carisoprodol treatment resulted in tolerance and antagonist-precipitated withdrawal, suggesting it may have an addiction potential similar to that of other long-acting benzodiazepine or barbiturate compounds. PMID:22055010

  17. Fault Tolerance of Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    Systematic Ap - proach, Proc. Government Microcircuit Application Conf. (GOMAC), San Diego, Nov. 1986. [10] D.E.Goldberg, Genetic Algorithms in Search...s l m n ttempt to develop fault tolerant neural networks. The lows. Given a well-trained network, we first eliminate temp todevlopfaut tlernt eurl ...both ap - proaches, and this resulted in very slight improve- ments over the addition/deletion procedure. 103 Fisher’s Iris data in average case Fisher’s

  18. Modelling Accident Tolerant Fuel Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, Jason Dean; Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence

    2016-05-01

    The catastrophic events that occurred at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in 2011 have led to widespread interest in research of alternative fuels and claddings that are proposed to be accident tolerant. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) through its Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program has funded an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) High Impact Problem (HIP). The ATF HIP is a three-year project to perform research on two accident tolerant concepts. The final outcome of the ATF HIP will be an in-depth report to the DOE Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) giving a recommendation on whether either of the two concepts should be included in their lead test assembly scheduled for placement into a commercial reactor in 2022. The two ATF concepts under investigation in the HIP are uranium silicide fuel and iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloy cladding. Utilizing the expertise of three national laboratory participants (Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory), a comprehensive multiscale approach to modeling is being used that includes atomistic modeling, molecular dynamics, rate theory, phase-field, and fuel performance simulations. Model development and fuel performance analysis are critical since a full suite of experimental studies will not be complete before AFC must prioritize concepts for focused development. In this paper, we present simulations of the two proposed accident tolerance fuel systems: U3Si2 fuel with Zircaloy-4 cladding, and UO2 fuel with FeCrAl cladding. Sensitivity analyses are completed using Sandia National Laboratories’ Dakota software to determine which input parameters (e.g., fuel specific heat) have the greatest influence on the output metrics of interest (e.g., fuel centerline temperature). We also outline the multiscale modelling approach being employed. Considerable additional work is required prior to preparing the recommendation report for the Advanced

  19. Fault Tolerant Frequent Pattern Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Shohdy, Sameh; Vishnu, Abhinav; Agrawal, Gagan

    2016-12-19

    FP-Growth algorithm is a Frequent Pattern Mining (FPM) algorithm that has been extensively used to study correlations and patterns in large scale datasets. While several researchers have designed distributed memory FP-Growth algorithms, it is pivotal to consider fault tolerant FP-Growth, which can address the increasing fault rates in large scale systems. In this work, we propose a novel parallel, algorithm-level fault-tolerant FP-Growth algorithm. We leverage algorithmic properties and MPI advanced features to guarantee an O(1) space complexity, achieved by using the dataset memory space itself for checkpointing. We also propose a recovery algorithm that can use in-memory and disk-based checkpointing, though in many cases the recovery can be completed without any disk access, and incurring no memory overhead for checkpointing. We evaluate our FT algorithm on a large scale InfiniBand cluster with several large datasets using up to 2K cores. Our evaluation demonstrates excellent efficiency for checkpointing and recovery in comparison to the disk-based approach. We have also observed 20x average speed-up in comparison to Spark, establishing that a well designed algorithm can easily outperform a solution based on a general fault-tolerant programming model.

  20. Tolerance of Snakes to Hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillywhite, H. B.; Ballard, R. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitivity of carotid blood flow to +Gz (head-to-tail) acceleration was studied in six species of snakes hypothesized to show varied adaptive cardiovascular responses to gravity. Blood flow in the proximal carotid artery was measured in 15 snakes before, during and following stepwise increments of +0.25Gz force produced on a 2.4 m diameter centrifuge. During centrifugation each snake was confined to a straight position within an individually- fitted acrylic tube with the head facing the center of rotation. We measured the centrifugal force at the tail of the snake in order to quantify the maximum intensity of force gradient promoting antero-posterior pooling of blood. Tolerance to increased gravity was quantified as the acceleration force at which carotid blood flow ceased. This parameter varied according to the gravitational adaptation of species defined by their ecology and behavior. At the extremes, carotid blood flow decreased in response to increasing gravity and approached zero near +1Gz in aquatic and ground-dwelling species, whereas in climbing species carotid flow was maintained at forces in excess of +2Gz. Surprisingly, tolerant (arboreal) species withstood hypergravic forces of +2 to +3 G. for periods up to 1 h without cessation of carotid blood flow or apparent loss of consciousness. Data suggest that relatively tight skin of the tolerant species provides a natural antigravity suit which is of prime importance in counteracting Gz stress on blood circulation.

  1. Extreme flooding tolerance in Rorippa.

    PubMed

    Akman, Melis; Bhikharie, Amit; Mustroph, Angelika; Sasidharan, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    Low oxygen stress imposed by floods creates a strong selection force shaping plant ecosystems in flood-prone areas. Plants inhabiting these environments adopt various adaptations and survival strategies to cope with increasing water depths. Two Rorippa species, R. sylvestris and R. amphibia that grow in naturally flooded areas, have high submergence tolerance achieved by the so-called quiescence and escape strategies, respectively. In order to dissect the molecular mechanisms involved in these strategies, we investigated submergence-induced changes in gene expression in flooded roots of Rorippa species. There was a higher induction of glycolysis and fermentation genes and faster carbohydrate reduction in R. amphibia, indicating a higher demand for energy potentially leading to faster mortality by starvation. Moreover, R. sylvestris showed induction of genes improving submergence tolerance, potentially enhancing survival in prolonged floods. Additionally, we compared transcript profiles of these 2 tolerant species to relatively intolerant Arabidopsis and found that only Rorippa species induced various inorganic pyrophosphate dependent genes, alternatives to ATP demanding pathways, thereby conserving energy, and potentially explaining the difference in flooding survival between Rorippa and Arabidopsis.

  2. Radiation tolerance in water bears.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, D. D.; Sakashita, T.; Katagiri, C.; Watanabe, M.; Nakahara, Y.; Okuda, T.; Hamada, N.; Wada, S.; Funayama, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    Tardigrades water bears are tiny invertebrates forming a phylum and inhabit various environments on the earth Terrestrial tardigrades enter a form called as anhydrobiosis when the surrounding water disappears Anhyydrobiosis is defined as an ametabolic dry state and followed by recovering their activity when rehydrated Anhydrobiotic tardigrades show incredible tolerance to a variety of extreme environmental conditions such as temperatures -273 r C to 151 r C vacuum high pressure 600 MPa and chemicals that include alcohols and methyl bromide In these views there have been some discussions about their potential for surviving outer space In the present study we demonstrated the survival limit not merely against gamma-rays but against heavy ions in the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum in order to evaluate the effects of radiations on them The animals were exposure to 500 to 7000 Gy of gamma-rays or 500 to 8000 Gy of heavy ions 4 He in their hydrated or anhydrobiotic state The results showed that both of hydrated and anhydrobiotic animals have high radio-tolerance median lethal dose LD50 48 h of gamma-rays or heavy ions in M tardigradum was more than 4000 Gy indicating that this species is categorized into the most radio-tolerant animals We suggest that tardigrades will be suitable model animals for extremophilic multicellular organisms and may provide a survival strategy in extraterrestrial environments

  3. Software Fault Tolerance: A Tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2000-01-01

    Because of our present inability to produce error-free software, software fault tolerance is and will continue to be an important consideration in software systems. The root cause of software design errors is the complexity of the systems. Compounding the problems in building correct software is the difficulty in assessing the correctness of software for highly complex systems. After a brief overview of the software development processes, we note how hard-to-detect design faults are likely to be introduced during development and how software faults tend to be state-dependent and activated by particular input sequences. Although component reliability is an important quality measure for system level analysis, software reliability is hard to characterize and the use of post-verification reliability estimates remains a controversial issue. For some applications software safety is more important than reliability, and fault tolerance techniques used in those applications are aimed at preventing catastrophes. Single version software fault tolerance techniques discussed include system structuring and closure, atomic actions, inline fault detection, exception handling, and others. Multiversion techniques are based on the assumption that software built differently should fail differently and thus, if one of the redundant versions fails, it is expected that at least one of the other versions will provide an acceptable output. Recovery blocks, N-version programming, and other multiversion techniques are reviewed.

  4. Liver transplant center risk tolerance.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Scott R; Karp, Seth J; Curry, Michael P; Barugel, Martin; Rodrigue, James R; Mandelbrot, Didier A; Rogers, Christin P; Hanto, Douglas W

    2012-01-01

    Recent changes in Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) condition for participation, using benchmark volume/outcomes requirements for certification, have been implemented. Consequently, the ability of a transplant center to assess its risk tolerance is important in successful management. An analysis of SRTR data was performed to determine donor/recipient risk factors for graft loss or patient death in the first year. Each transplant performed was then assigned a prospective relative risk (RR) of failure. Using a Monte-Carlo simulation, transplants were selected at random that met the centers' acceptable risk tolerance. Transplant center volume was fixed and its risk tolerance was adjusted to determine the impact on outcomes. The model was run 1000 times on centers with varying volume. The modeling demonstrates that centers with smaller annual volumes must use a more risk taking strategy than larger volume centers to avoid being flagged for CMS volume requirements. The modeling also demonstrates optimal risk taking strategies for centers based upon volume to minimize the probability of being flagged for not meeting volume or outcomes benchmarks. Small volume centers must perform higher risk transplants to meet current CMS requirements and are at risk for adverse action secondary to chance alone.

  5. Extreme flooding tolerance in Rorippa

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Melis; Bhikharie, Amit V; Mustroph, Angelika; Sasidharan, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    Low oxygen stress imposed by floods creates a strong selection force shaping plant ecosystems in flood-prone areas. Plants inhabiting these environments adopt various adaptations and survival strategies to cope with increasing water depths. Two Rorippa species, R. sylvestris and R. amphibia that grow in naturally flooded areas, have high submergence tolerance achieved by the so-called quiescence and escape strategies, respectively. In order to dissect the molecular mechanisms involved in these strategies, we investigated submergence-induced changes in gene expression in flooded roots of Rorippa species. There was a higher induction of glycolysis and fermentation genes and faster carbohydrate reduction in R. amphibia, indicating a higher demand for energy potentially leading to faster mortality by starvation. Moreover, R. sylvestris showed induction of genes improving submergence tolerance, potentially enhancing survival in prolonged floods. Additionally, we compared transcript profiles of these 2 tolerant species to relatively intolerant Arabidopsis and found that only Rorippa species induced various inorganic pyrophosphate dependent genes, alternatives to ATP demanding pathways, thereby conserving energy, and potentially explaining the difference in flooding survival between Rorippa and Arabidopsis. PMID:24525961

  6. Pillar III--optimisation of anaemia tolerance.

    PubMed

    Meier, Jens; Gombotz, Hans

    2013-03-01

    In the case of acute bleeding, the use of the anaemia tolerance of a patient enables the physician to either avoid blood transfusions or delay them after bleeding has ceased. This concept is the cornerstone of the third pillar of modern patient blood management programmes. Its efficacy depends on the degree of utilisation of anaemia tolerance, which is not constant but depends on the compensatory capacity of the individual patient in a given situation. Fortunately, the specifications of anaemia tolerance can be influenced by the anaesthesiologist. This article presents the concept of anaemia tolerance and highlights the options for how anaemia tolerance can be optimised in the pre-, intra-, and postoperative periods.

  7. Prospects and strategies for clinical tolerance.

    PubMed

    Monaco, A P

    2004-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality associated with chronic immunosuppression provide a strong motivation for development of clinical tolerance. This paper discusses the definition(s) of clinical (operational) tolerance, the role of chimerism in experimental and clinical tolerance, and the special role of bone marrow in tolerance induction. The states of microchimerism and macrochimerism are defined and related to certain clinical observations in solid organ transplantation. Current clinical strategies already being tested in the clinic are briefly reviewed. Certain principles for induction of clinical (operational) tolerance are elaborated.

  8. IRON-TOLERANT CYANOBACTERIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASTROBIOLOGY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Igor I.; Allen, Carlton C.; Mummey, Daniel L.; Sarkisova, Svetlana A.; McKay, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The review is dedicated to the new group of extremophiles - iron tolerant cyanobacteria. The authors have analyzed earlier published articles about the ecology of iron tolerant cyanobacteria and their diversity. It was concluded that contemporary iron depositing hot springs might be considered as relative analogs of Precambrian environment. The authors have concluded that the diversity of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria is understudied. The authors also analyzed published data about the physiological peculiarities of iron tolerant cyanobacteria. They made the conclusion that iron tolerant cyanobacteria may oxidize reduced iron through the photosystem of cyanobacteria. The involvement of both Reaction Centers 1 and 2 is also discussed. The conclusion that iron tolerant protocyanobacteria could be involved in banded iron formations generation is also proposed. The possible mechanism of the transition from an oxygenic photosynthesis to an oxygenic one is also discussed. In the final part of the review the authors consider the possible implications of iron tolerant cyanobacteria for astrobiology.

  9. Damage Tolerance: Assessment Handbook. Volume 2: Airframe Damage Tolerance Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    Airframe Damage Tolerance Evaluation NJ 084u5 DTIC FLE 15 1994 Research and Special Programs Administration John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems...permission of John Wiley and Sons, New York, N.Y.] (4-5] CORRODED END Magnes;um Magnesium alloys Zinc Galvanized steel or galvanized wrought iron Aluminum...Reprinted from M M. Ratwani and D.P. Wilhem , iDeelopment andEvaluation of Methods of Plane Strain Fractuire Analysis, Northrop Corporation, AFFDL-TR-73-42

  10. Comparison of broiler performance when fed diets containing corn grain with insect-protected (corn rootworm and European corn borer) and herbicide-tolerant (glyphosate) traits, control corn, or commercial reference corn--revisited.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M L; Hartnell, G; Nemeth, M; Karunanandaa, K; George, B

    2005-12-01

    A 42-d feeding experiment with growing Ross x Ross 508 broilers showed that the nutritional value of insect-protected and herbicide-tolerant corn was comparable to that of the genetically similar control and 5 commercial reference corn hybrids. MON 88017 provides protection from feeding damage by coleopteran pest corn rootworm and is tolerant to the action of glyphosate, the active ingredient in the Roundup family of agricultural herbicides. MON 88017 x MON 810 was developed by the traditional breeding of MON 88017 with MON 810, which provides protection from the European corn borer and other lepidopteran pests. A randomized complete block design was used with 8 dietary treatments in each of 5 replicated blocks of pens. No differences among diets were observed (P > 0.05) in performance (final live weights, feed intake, feed conversion, and adjusted feed conversion), carcass yield (chill, fat pad, breast, thigh, wing, and drum weight), or percentage of moisture, protein, and fat in breast meat and moisture and fat in thigh meat. Thigh protein was similar (P > 0.05) in broilers fed diets containing MON 88017 x MON 810 and conventional control or all commercial reference corns; however, differences (P < 0.05) were noted for the percentage of thigh protein among broilers fed the control and 2 of the 5 reference diets, attributable to biological variability among the conventional corn hybrids. Broilers overall performed consistently and had similar carcass yield and meat composition when fed diets containing MON 88017 or MON 88017 x MON 810 as compared with those fed the conventional control and commercial diets, supporting a conclusion of nutritional equivalence.

  11. Comparison of broiler performance and carcass parameters when fed diets containing combined trait insect-protected and glyphosate-tolerant corn (MON 89034 x NK603), control, or conventional reference corn.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M; Lucas, D; Nemeth, M; Davis, S; Hartnell, G

    2007-09-01

    A 42-d floor pen study was conducted to compare broiler (Ross x Ross 308) performance and carcass measurements when fed diets containing lepidopteran-protected corn combined with glyphosate-tolerant corn (MON 89034 x NK603) with those of broilers fed diets containing corn grain from the conventional control (similar genetic background to the test corn) and 6 conventional corn hybrids. It has been found that MON 89034 produces the Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab2 insecticidal proteins that protect corn plants from feeding damage caused by European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) and other lepidopteran insect pests. In addition, NK603 produces the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase protein from Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 (CP4 EPSPS), which confers tolerance to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup agricultural herbicides. The traditional breeding of plants that express the individual traits produced MON 89034 x NK603. Broilers were fed starter diets (approximately 57% wt/wt corn grain) from d 0 to 21 and grower-finisher diets (approximately 59% wt/wt corn grain) from d 21 to 42. The study utilized a randomized complete block design with 8 dietary treatments assigned randomly within 5 blocks of 16 pens each (8 male and 8 female) with 10 birds per pen. There were 10 pens per treatment group (5 male and 5 female). Weight at d 0 and 42, feed intake, feed conversion, and all measured carcass and meat quality parameters were not different (P > 0.05) for birds fed MON 89034 x NK603 and control corn diets. In addition, comparisons of the MON 89034 x NK603 diet to the population of the control and 6 reference corn diets showed no difference (P > 0.05) in any performance, carcass, or meat quality parameter measured. In conclusion, the diets containing MON 89034 x NK603 were nutritionally equivalent to diets containing the control or conventional reference corn grain when fed to broilers.

  12. Comparison of broiler performance when fed diets containing corn grain with insect-protected (corn rootworm and European corn borer) and herbicide-tolerant (glyphosate) traits, control corn, or commercial reference corn.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M L; Hartnell, G; Nemeth, M; Karunanandaa, K; George, B

    2005-04-01

    A 42-d feeding experiment with growing Ross x Ross 508 broilers showed that the nutritional value of insect-protected and herbicide-tolerant corn was comparable to that of the genetically similar control and 5 commercial reference corn hybrids. MON 88017 provides protection from feeding damage by coleopteran pest corn rootworm and is tolerant to the action of glyphosate, the active ingredient in the Roundup family of agricultural herbicides. MON 88017 x MON 810 was developed by the traditional breeding of MON 88017 with MON 810, which provides protection from the European corn borer and other lepidopteran pests. A randomized complete block design was used with 8 dietary treatments in each of 5 replicated blocks of pens. No differences among diets were observed (P > 0.05) in performance (final live weights, feed intake, feed conversion, and adjusted feed conversion), carcass yield (chill, fat pad, breast, thigh, wing, and drum weight), or percentage of moisture, protein, and fat in breast meat and moisture and fat in thigh meat. Thigh protein was similar (P > 0.05) in broilers fed diets containing MON 88017 x MON 810 and conventional control or all commercial reference corns; however, differences (P < 0.05) were noted for the percentage of thigh protein among broilers fed the control and 2 of the 5 reference diets, attributable to biological variability among the conventional corn hybrids. Broilers overall performed consistently and had similar carcass yield and meat composition when fed diets containing MON 88017 or MON 88017 x MON 810 as compared with those fed the conventional control and commercial diets, supporting a conclusion of nutritional equivalence.

  13. Supreme Court's New Term. Supreme Court Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles F.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the issues addressed in the 2002 U.S. Supreme Court term, such as the First, Fourth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments, cruel and unusual punishment, sex offender registries, fair housing, cross burning, jury selection, affirmative action, abortion protests, and copyrights and the public domain. (CMK)

  14. Roundup of Art Action in Libraryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson Library Bulletin, 1971

    1971-01-01

    A range of creative activities is listed that will aid the librarian in addressing humanity." The range of activities includes rhythm workshops, creative writing, children's art contests, art festivals, film making, photography, and dramatic storytelling. (MF)

  15. Supreme Court's New Term. Supreme Court Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles F.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the issues addressed in the 2002 U.S. Supreme Court term, such as the First, Fourth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments, cruel and unusual punishment, sex offender registries, fair housing, cross burning, jury selection, affirmative action, abortion protests, and copyrights and the public domain. (CMK)

  16. Special roundup feature report on incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Peacy, J.

    1984-04-01

    The document reviews incineration as a means of destroying hazardous and industrial wastes. The designs of several different incinerators are discussed including modular-type incinerators, rotary kilns, fluidized bed incinerators, grate systems, and multiple hearth incinerators. Environmental controls, recovery, ancillary equipment, utilities and services and financing are among the other incineration-related issues discussed.

  17. Electronic Roundup: Emerging Technologies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Byron

    2008-01-01

    The high rate of technological change that libraries are experiencing makes it seem that the future is closer than it used to be. Rather than having some notion of the future, particularly in emerging technologies, librarians need to be kept well informed and up-to-date in the potential uses of these technologies, especially those that apply to…

  18. Mixed Media: A Roundup of Electronic Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Frank Alan

    2002-01-01

    Presents multicultural materials that are useful for elementary, secondary, and college audiences. The selections represent quality electronic and microfilm products that can help educators, librarians, and researchers better understand ethnic and racial diversity nationally and internationally. Includes CD-ROM, CD/Web-based, Web-based, and…

  19. Solving Math Word Problems: A Software Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiser, Leslie

    1988-01-01

    Reviewed are 11 software packages for the Apple II computer designed to help teach elementary and secondary school children how to solve mathword problems. Included in the review are hardware requirements, price, grade level, use of graphics, kinds of problems, tools provided, strengths, and weaknesses of each program. (CW)

  20. Polio roundup. Grappling with the "problem" areas.

    PubMed

    1998-03-01

    As the war against poliomyelitis continues, eradication efforts must now succeed in some countries which have been subjected to natural disasters and in others which are enduring manmade disasters. Subnational immunization days (SNIDs) were most recently conducted in northern Somalia in two 5-day rounds last November and December amid widespread popular and political support. While villages in the arid, drought-plagued country are often inaccessible, flooding from heavy rains was the only real problem encountered by the vaccination campaign. More than 90% of the estimated 375,000 children under age 5 years in the target area were vaccinated and given vitamin A. Careful advance preparations contributed to the campaign's success. A 7-day campaign in mid-February got oral polio vaccine to more than 330,000 children in southern Sudan. Maintaining the vaccine cold chain was the major operational challenge in this setting. To that end, all available means were used, including placing vaccines into running streams to keep them cool. The program in Sudan was coordinated by the UN's Operation Lifeline Sudan. Heat, armed conflict, lack of infrastructure, the need to reach more than 80% of the population by air, infectious diseases, drought, and hungry packs of hyenas were some of the obstacles to overcome. A second round of vaccination is planned for southern Sudan in mid March.