Science.gov

Sample records for routine end-inspiration gated

  1. 20. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE GATE, SHOWING GATE ARMS, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE GATE, SHOWING GATE ARMS, GATE PIERS, TRUNNION PIN AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  2. 21. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ARM, TRUNNION PIN, PIER AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING EAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 10, Guttenberg, Clayton County, IA

  3. 17. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL VIEW OF NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ARMS, PIERS AND DAM BRIDGE, WITH ROLLER GATE HEADHOUSE IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  4. Revisiting Routine Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Rebecca; Monaghan, John; Shingadia, Eisha; Vaughan, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    What is a routine question? The focus of this paper is routine questions and time (in years) since a hitherto routine question was last attempted by the solver. The data comes from undergraduate students' work on solving two calculus questions. The data was selected for reporting purposes because it is well documented and because it threw up…

  5. 16. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ARM, TRUNNION PIN AND PIER, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  6. 18. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL VIEW OF NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ARMS, PIERS AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  7. Outdoor fitness routine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000891.htm Outdoor fitness routine To use the sharing features on this ... you and is right for your level of fitness. Here are some ideas: Warm up first. Get ...

  8. Motivation through Routine Documentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koth, Laurie J.

    2016-01-01

    This informed commentary article offers a simple, effective classroom management strategy in which the teacher uses routine documentation to motivate students both to perform academically and to behave in a manner consistent with established classroom rules and procedures. The pragmatic strategy is grounded in literature, free to implement,…

  9. Learning from Homeschooling Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a rare opportunity to look inside the homeschool and to observe the routines of homeschooling families from across the United States. With more than 1000 survey participants, and nine parents selected for interviews, the compiled data were analyzed through open coding techniques. Meaningful aspects that arose from the routines…

  10. Routine DNA testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Routine DNA testing. It’s done once you’ve Marker-Assisted Breeding Pipelined promising Qantitative Trait Loci within your own breeding program and thereby established the performance-predictive power of each DNA test for your germplasm under your conditions. By then you are ready to screen your par...

  11. PROPER: Optical propagation routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krist, John E.

    2014-05-01

    PROPER simulates the propagation of light through an optical system using Fourier transform algorithms (Fresnel, angular spectrum methods). Distributed as IDL source code, it includes routines to create complex apertures, aberrated wavefronts, and deformable mirrors. It is especially useful for the simulation of high contrast imaging telescopes (extrasolar planet imagers like TPF).

  12. CHR -- Character Handling Routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, A. C.; Rees, P. C. T.; Chipperfield, A. J.; Jenness, T.

    This document describes the Character Handling Routine library, CHR, and its use. The CHR library augments the limited character handling facilities provided by the Fortran 77 standard. It offers a range of character handling facilities: from formatting Fortran data types into text strings and the reverse, to higher level functions such as wild card matching, string sorting, paragraph reformatting and justification. The library may be used simply for building text strings for interactive applications or as a basis for more complex text processing applications.

  13. 49 CFR 234.255 - Gate arm and gate mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gate arm and gate mechanism. 234.255 Section 234....255 Gate arm and gate mechanism. (a) Each gate arm and gate mechanism shall be inspected at least once each month. (b) Gate arm movement shall be observed for proper operation at least once each month....

  14. 49 CFR 234.255 - Gate arm and gate mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gate arm and gate mechanism. 234.255 Section 234....255 Gate arm and gate mechanism. (a) Each gate arm and gate mechanism shall be inspected at least once each month. (b) Gate arm movement shall be observed for proper operation at least once each month....

  15. 49 CFR 234.255 - Gate arm and gate mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gate arm and gate mechanism. 234.255 Section 234... Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.255 Gate arm and gate mechanism. (a) Each gate arm and gate mechanism shall be inspected at least once each month. (b) Gate arm movement shall...

  16. 49 CFR 234.255 - Gate arm and gate mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gate arm and gate mechanism. 234.255 Section 234....255 Gate arm and gate mechanism. (a) Each gate arm and gate mechanism shall be inspected at least once each month. (b) Gate arm movement shall be observed for proper operation at least once each month....

  17. 49 CFR 234.255 - Gate arm and gate mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gate arm and gate mechanism. 234.255 Section 234... Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.255 Gate arm and gate mechanism. (a) Each gate arm and gate mechanism shall be inspected at least once each month. (b) Gate arm movement shall...

  18. CALIPSO User-Provided Routines

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

    ... data files. These routines are written in Interactive Data Language (IDL). A README file demonstrating use of the routines is also available. Interactive Data Language (IDL) is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . ...

  19. 6. DETAIL VIEW OF ENTRANCE GATES, SHOWING IRON GATE, STONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL VIEW OF ENTRANCE GATES, SHOWING IRON GATE, STONE WORK, AND GATE STOP FROM SOUTHEAST OF NORTHWEST ELEMENTS. - William Enston Home, Entrance Gate, 900 King Street, Charleston, Charleston County, SC

  20. 21. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE ARM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE ARM, GATE PIER, TRUNNION PIN AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  1. Parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakago, Kosuke; Hajdušek, Michal; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how a temporally ordered gate sequence can be parallelized in adiabatic implementations of quantum computation, we modify adiabatic gate teleportation, a model of quantum computation proposed by Bacon and Flammia [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 120504 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.120504], to a form deterministically simulating parallelized gate teleportation, which is achievable only by postselection. We introduce a twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian, a Heisenberg-type spin interaction where the coordinates of the second qubit are twisted according to a unitary gate. We develop parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation (PAGT) where a sequence of unitary gates is performed in a single step of the adiabatic process. In PAGT, numeric calculations suggest the necessary time for the adiabatic evolution implementing a sequence of L unitary gates increases at most as O (L5) . However, we show that it has the interesting property that it can map the temporal order of gates to the spatial order of interactions specified by the final Hamiltonian. Using this property, we present a controlled-PAGT scheme to manipulate the order of gates by a control qubit. In the controlled-PAGT scheme, two differently ordered sequential unitary gates F G and G F are coherently performed depending on the state of a control qubit by simultaneously applying the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonians implementing unitary gates F and G . We investigate why the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian allows PAGT. We show that the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian has an ability to perform a transposed unitary gate by just modifying the space ordering of the final Hamiltonian implementing a unitary gate in adiabatic gate teleportation. The dynamics generated by the time-reversed Hamiltonian represented by the transposed unitary gate enables deterministic simulation of a postselected event of parallelized gate teleportation in adiabatic

  2. Standard, routine and non-routine processes in health care.

    PubMed

    Lillrank, Paul; Liukko, Matti

    2004-01-01

    Quality management methods have been introduced into health care with variable success. Industrial approaches, such as standardization, are not always applicable professional services, because of fundamental differences in conceptions of aims and the predictability of the results of action. Processes in health care can be classified into standard, routine and non-routine depending on the level of repetition and amount of variation, variety and uncertainty. Quality problems are different in each type: standard processes may produce deviations from targets, routines errors in classification, and non-routines failures in interpretation. Different management approaches for each type are discussed. A metaphor to assist discussion, The Broom, is introduced.

  3. Quantum gate decomposition algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Slepoy, Alexander

    2006-07-01

    Quantum computing algorithms can be conveniently expressed in a format of a quantum logical circuits. Such circuits consist of sequential coupled operations, termed ''quantum gates'', or quantum analogs of bits called qubits. We review a recently proposed method [1] for constructing general ''quantum gates'' operating on an qubits, as composed of a sequence of generic elementary ''gates''.

  4. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Idzorek, George C.; Atencio, Leroy G.

    1987-01-01

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10.sup.6. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  5. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOEpatents

    Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

    1985-02-19

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10/sup 6/. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  6. Range gated imaging experiments using gated intensifiers

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Yates, G.J.; Cverna, F.H.; Gallegos, R.A.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Numkena, D.M.; Payton, J.; Pena-Abeyta, C.R.

    1999-03-01

    A variety of range gated imaging experiments using high-speed gated/shuttered proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPII) are reported. Range gated imaging experiments were conducted in water for detection of submerged mines in controlled turbidity tank test and in sea water for the Naval Coastal Sea Command/US Marine Corps. Field experiments have been conducted consisting of kilometer range imaging of resolution targets and military vehicles in atmosphere at Eglin Air Force Base for the US Air Force, and similar imaging experiments, but in smoke environment, at Redstone Arsenal for the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). Wavelength of the illuminating laser was 532 nm with pulse width ranging from 6 to 12 ns and comparable gate widths. These tests have shown depth resolution in the tens of centimeters range from time phasing reflected LADAR images with MCPII shutter opening.

  7. Lidar Altitude Data Read Routine

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-19

    ... Profile products. It is written in Interactive Data Language (IDL) and uses HDF routine calls to read the altitude data which are ... Data Read routine  (1.5 KB) Interactive Data Language (IDL) is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . ...

  8. Optical Logic Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.; Dowler, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Logic gates for light signals constructed from combinations of prisms, polarizing plates, and quarterwave plates. Optical logic gate performs elementary logic operation on light signals received along two optical fibers. Whether gate performs OR function or exclusive-OR function depends on orientation of analyzer. Nonbinary truth tables also obtained by rotating polarizer or analyzer to other positions or inserting other quarter-wave plates.

  9. 19. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE ARM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE ARM, PIER, TRUNNION PIN AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING NORTH - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  10. 4. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE PIER AND TAINTER GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE PIER AND TAINTER GATE NO. 7 AND NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATES, LOOKING WEST (UPSTREAM) - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  11. 15. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES AND GATE ARMS, PIERS AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  12. Sliding-gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Usnick, George B.; Ward, Gene T.; Blair, Henry O.; Roberts, James W.; Warner, Terry N.

    1979-01-01

    This invention is a novel valve of the slidable-gate type. The valve is designed especially for long-term use with highly abrasive slurries. The sealing surfaces of the gate are shielded by the valve seats when the valve is fully open or closed, and the gate-to-seat clearance is swept with an inflowing purge gas while the gate is in transit. A preferred form of the valve includes an annular valve body containing an annular seat assembly defining a flow channel. The seat assembly comprises a first seat ring which is slidably and sealably mounted in the body, and a second seat ring which is tightly fitted in the body. These rings cooperatively define an annular gap which, together with passages in the valve body, forms a guideway extending normal to the channel. A plate-type gate is mounted for reciprocation in the guideway between positions where a portion of the plate closes the channel and where a circular aperture in the gate is in register with the channel. The valve casing includes opposed chambers which extend outwardly from the body along the axis of the guideway to accommodate the end portions of the gate. The chambers are sealed from atmosphere; when the gate is in transit, purge gas is admitted to the chambers and flows inwardly through the gate-to-seat-ring, clearance, minimizing buildup of process solids therein. A shaft reciprocated by an external actuator extends into one of the sealed chambers through a shaft seal and is coupled to an end of the gate. Means are provided for adjusting the clearance between the first seat ring and the gate while the valve is in service.

  13. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng Liu, Fang

    2014-06-14

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  14. CCD gate definition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluzer

    1986-02-01

    The present invention utilizes a double masking step in a CCD gate definition process to eliminate the re-entrant oxide by using a thin film layer other than photoresist to define the polysilicon gates used by defining the thin film layer with a double masking process before any of the polysilicon gate layer is etched. It is one object of the present invention, therefore, to provide an improved process for CCD gate definition. It is another object of the invention to provide an improved CCD gate definition process wherein a profiled oxide layer is produced over a polysilicon layer without re-entrant oxide regions. It is another object of the invention to provide an improved CCD gate definition process wherein a thin film layer is utilized to define the polysilicon gate layers. It is another object of the invention to provide an improved CCD gate definition process wherein the thin film layer is defined by a double masking process before any polysilicon layer is etched.

  15. Routines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    Melser and Michie (1970), 135-151. Sacerdoti, Earl D, [1977], A structure for plans and behavior, Elsevier. * Sartre , Jean - Paul , [1976], Critique of...theorem proving to problem solving," Artificial Intelligence, 2 (3) 189-208. Fitts, Paul M and Michael I Posner, [1967], Human performance, Brooks/Cole...Laing, R D and A Esterson, [1964], Sanity, Madness, and the Family, Tavistock. Laird, John E, Paul Rosenbloom, and Allen Newell, [1984], Towards

  16. Optical NAND gate

    DOEpatents

    Skogen, Erik J.; Raring, James; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna

    2011-08-09

    An optical NAND gate is formed from two pair of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each pair of the optical waveguide devices consisting of an electroabsorption modulator and a photodetector. One pair of the optical waveguide devices is electrically connected in parallel to operate as an optical AND gate; and the other pair of the optical waveguide devices is connected in series to operate as an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter). The optical NAND gate utilizes two digital optical inputs and a continuous light input to provide a NAND function output. The optical NAND gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  17. 17. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL VIEW OF NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE AND GATE ARM, GATE PIER AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  18. 18. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL VIEW OF NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE AND GATE ARMS, GATE PIER AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  19. Optical XOR gate

    SciTech Connect

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2013-11-12

    An optical XOR gate is formed as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) from two sets of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each set of the optical waveguide devices including an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical XOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs to generate an XOR function digital optical output. The optical XOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  20. Optical NOR gate

    DOEpatents

    Skogen, Erik J.; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna

    2011-09-06

    An optical NOR gate is formed from two pair of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each pair of the optical waveguide devices consisting of an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical NOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs and a continuous light input to provide a NOR function digital optical output. The optical NOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  1. Learning Routines in Innovation Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoeve, Aimee; Nieuwenhuis, Loek F. M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to generate both a theoretical and an empirical basis for a research model that serves in further research as an analytical tool for understanding the complex phenomenon of learning at different levels in a work organisation. The key concept in this model is the routine concept of Nelson and Winter.…

  2. MISR Conversion to ASCII Routines

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

    ... These routines are written in Exelis Visual Information Solutions IDL programming language. They can be run either with a licensed ... with IDL and is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . The IDL VM software can be downloaded from this site or ordered ...

  3. Implanted bottom gate for epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, D.; Jobst, J.; Fromm, F.; Speck, F.; Seyller, T.; Krieger, M.; Weber, H. B.

    2012-04-01

    We present a technique to tune the charge density of epitaxial graphene via an electrostatic gate that is buried in the silicon carbide substrate. The result is a device in which graphene remains accessible for further manipulation or investigation. Via nitrogen or phosphor implantation into a silicon carbide wafer and subsequent graphene growth, devices can routinely be fabricated using standard semiconductor technology. We have optimized samples for room temperature as well as for cryogenic temperature operation. Depending on implantation dose and temperature we operate in two gating regimes. In the first, the gating mechanism is similar to a MOSFET, the second is based on a tuned space charge region of the silicon carbide semiconductor. We present a detailed model that describes the two gating regimes and the transition in between.

  4. The human respiratory gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this 'respiratory gating' is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R-R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R-R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms.

  5. Advanced insulated gate bipolar transistor gate drive

    DOEpatents

    Short, James Evans; West, Shawn Michael; Fabean, Robert J.

    2009-08-04

    A gate drive for an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) includes a control and protection module coupled to a collector terminal of the IGBT, an optical communications module coupled to the control and protection module, a power supply module coupled to the control and protection module and an output power stage module with inputs coupled to the power supply module and the control and protection module, and outputs coupled to a gate terminal and an emitter terminal of the IGBT. The optical communications module is configured to send control signals to the control and protection module. The power supply module is configured to distribute inputted power to the control and protection module. The control and protection module outputs on/off, soft turn-off and/or soft turn-on signals to the output power stage module, which, in turn, supplies a current based on the signal(s) from the control and protection module for charging or discharging an input capacitance of the IGBT.

  6. Memos trace routine radiation overexposures

    SciTech Connect

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-03-09

    Workers at the Energy Department's Fernald plant routinely received [open quotes]gross,[close quotes] [open quotes]unacceptable[close quotes] and [open quotes]undue[close quotes] radiation exposures during uranium processing operations from the 1950s through the early 1970s, according to internal Fernald memos. The documents come to light as DOE continues to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars every month to defend its former Fernald contractor, NLO Inc., from a workers' lawsuit seeking compensation for alleged injuries from poor safety practices at the Ohio facility. DOE officials have contended the NLO defense effort is justified because there is no evidence that any former Fernald workers have suffered injury as a result of radiation exposures at the plant. However, the internal Fernald memos document major concerns expressed by Fernald health officials about unsafe working conditions at the plant and what appear in some cases to be routine overexposures of workers.

  7. CFTR Gating I

    PubMed Central

    Bompadre, Silvia G.; Ai, Tomohiko; Cho, Jeong Han; Wang, Xiaohui; Sohma, Yoshiro; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2005-01-01

    The CFTR chloride channel is activated by phosphorylation of serine residues in the regulatory (R) domain and then gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis at the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). Studies of the ATP-dependent gating process in excised inside-out patches are very often hampered by channel rundown partly caused by membrane-associated phosphatases. Since the severed ΔR-CFTR, whose R domain is completely removed, can bypass the phosphorylation-dependent regulation, this mutant channel might be a useful tool to explore the gating mechanisms of CFTR. To this end, we investigated the regulation and gating of the ΔR-CFTR expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. In the cell-attached mode, basal ΔR-CFTR currents were always obtained in the absence of cAMP agonists. Application of cAMP agonists or PMA, a PKC activator, failed to affect the activity, indicating that the activity of ΔR-CFTR channels is indeed phosphorylation independent. Consistent with this conclusion, in excised inside-out patches, application of the catalytic subunit of PKA did not affect ATP-induced currents. Similarities of ATP-dependent gating between wild type and ΔR-CFTR make this phosphorylation-independent mutant a useful system to explore more extensively the gating mechanisms of CFTR. Using the ΔR-CFTR construct, we studied the inhibitory effect of ADP on CFTR gating. The Ki for ADP increases as the [ATP] is increased, suggesting a competitive mechanism of inhibition. Single channel kinetic analysis reveals a new closed state in the presence of ADP, consistent with a kinetic mechanism by which ADP binds at the same site as ATP for channel opening. Moreover, we found that the open time of the channel is shortened by as much as 54% in the presence of ADP. This unexpected result suggests another ADP binding site that modulates channel closing. PMID:15767295

  8. DNA logic gates.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Akimitsu; Tanaka, Kazuo; Saito, Isao

    2004-08-04

    A conceptually new logic gate based on DNA has been devised. Methoxybenzodeazaadenine ((MD)A), an artificial nucleobase which we recently developed for efficient hole transport through DNA, formed stable base pairs with T and C. However, a reasonable hole-transport efficiency was observed in the reaction for the duplex containing an (MD)A/T base pair, whereas the hole transport was strongly suppressed in the reaction using a duplex where the base opposite (MD)A was replaced by C. The influence of complementary pyrimidines on the efficiency of hole transport through (MD)A was quite contrary to the selectivity observed for hole transport through G. The orthogonality of the modulation of these hole-transport properties by complementary pyrimidine bases is promising for the design of a new molecular logic gate. The logic gate system was executed by hole transport through short DNA duplexes, which consisted of the "logic gate strand", containing hole-transporting nucleobases, and the "input strand", containing pyrimidines which modulate the hole-transport efficiency of logic bases. A logic gate strand containing multiple (MD)A bases in series provided the basis for a sharp AND logic action. On the other hand, for OR logic and combinational logic, conversion of Boolean expressions to standard sum-of-product (SOP) expressions was indispensable. Three logic gate strands were designed for OR logic according to each product term in the standard SOP expression of OR logic. The hole-transport efficiency observed for the mixed sample of logic gate strands exhibited an OR logic behavior. This approach is generally applicable to the design of other complicated combinational logic circuits such as the full-adder.

  9. 7. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER GATES, GATE PIERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER GATES, GATE PIERS, HEADHOUSES AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, UPSTREAM - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  10. 2. CANNON GATES. DETAIL OF NORTHWEST GATE STONE WALL TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CANNON GATES. DETAIL OF NORTHWEST GATE STONE WALL TO LEFT IS A REMNANT OF THE ORIGINAL FACILITY BOUNDARY FENCE. IT IS CONSTRUCTED IN BLUE PUDDING STONE. - Picatinny Arsenal, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  11. Adiabatic gate teleportation.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T

    2009-09-18

    The difficulty in producing precisely timed and controlled quantum gates is a significant source of error in many physical implementations of quantum computers. Here we introduce a simple universal primitive, adiabatic gate teleportation, which is robust to timing errors and many control errors and maintains a constant energy gap throughout the computation above a degenerate ground state space. This construction allows for geometric robustness based upon the control of two independent qubit interactions. Further, our piecewise adiabatic evolution easily relates to the quantum circuit model, enabling the use of standard methods from fault-tolerance theory for establishing thresholds.

  12. Exterior, looking northwest towards Main Gate, Gate House on left, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior, looking northwest towards Main Gate, Gate House on left, Technical Equipment Building (Building 5760) in background to right - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Gate House, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  13. Exterior, looking southeast from within compound towards Main Gate, Gate ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior, looking southeast from within compound towards Main Gate, Gate House center left - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Gate House, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  14. Stanford, Duke, Rice,... and Gates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an open letter to Bill Gates. In his letter, the author suggests that Bill Gates should build a brand-new university, a great 21st-century institution of higher learning. This university will be unlike anything the world has ever seen. He asks Bill Gates not to stop helping existing colleges create the higher-education system…

  15. The four-gate transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, M. M.; Cristoveanu, S.; Allibert, F.; France, G.; Blalock, B.; Durfrene, B.

    2002-01-01

    The four-gate transistor or G4-FET combines MOSFET and JFET principles in a single SOI device. Experimental results reveal that each gate can modulate the drain current. Numerical simulations are presented to clarify the mechanisms of operation. The new device shows enhanced functionality, due to the combinatorial action of the four gates, and opens rather revolutionary applications.

  16. Routine Checkup Should Assess Fitness, Too

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_162856.html Routine Checkup Should Assess Fitness, Too Cardiorespiratory test would help gauge patients' heart ... checked regularly, but an exercise expert says cardiorespiratory fitness should also be part of a routine medical ...

  17. Program sustainability: focus on organizational routines.

    PubMed

    Pluye, P; Potvin, L; Denis, J L; Pelletier, J

    2004-12-01

    Program sustainability is an ongoing concern for most people in health promotion. However, the current notion of sustainability in organizations, namely routinization, needs refinement. This article examines organizational routines. In so doing, it refines the notion of sustainability and the assessment of routines. Drawing on the organizational literature, a routinized program is defined by the presence of routinized activities, meaning that these activities exhibit four characteristics of organizational routines: memory, adaptation, values and rules. To answer the question of how these characteristics are useful, we conducted an empirical study of the routinization of the Quebec Heart Health Demonstration Project in five community health centers. Our method consisted of a multiple-case study. We observed project activities in each center in 2000. The data came from documents and interviews with project actors. Our results show that, in one of the centers, no resources had been officially committed to project activities. Even so, the actors continued some activities on an informal basis. In another center, the activities satisfied three of the four routine characteristics. In the three others, activities satisfied all of the characteristics. These results suggest focusing the study of program sustainability on the routinization of activities resulting from it. They indicate four distinct degrees of sustainability: (1) the absence of sustainability; no program activity is continued; (2) precarious sustainability; some residual activities are pursued, at least unofficially; (3) weak sustainability; the program produces some official activities that are not routinized; and (4) sustainability through routinization; routinized activities result from the program.

  18. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...

  19. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...

  20. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...

  1. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...

  2. Evolutionary Dynamics of Digitized Organizational Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Peng

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation explores the effects of increased digitization on the evolutionary dynamics of organizational routines. Do routines become more flexible, or more rigid, as the mix of digital technologies and human actors changes? What are the mechanisms that govern the evolution of routines? The dissertation theorizes about the effects of…

  3. Universal Superreplication of Unitary Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiribella, G.; Yang, Y.; Huang, C.

    2015-03-01

    Quantum states obey an asymptotic no-cloning theorem, stating that no deterministic machine can reliably replicate generic sequences of identically prepared pure states. In stark contrast, we show that generic sequences of unitary gates can be replicated deterministically at nearly quadratic rates, with an error vanishing on most inputs except for an exponentially small fraction. The result is not in contradiction with the no-cloning theorem, since the impossibility of deterministically transforming pure states into unitary gates prevents the application of the gate replication protocol to states. In addition to gate replication, we show that N parallel uses of a completely unknown unitary gate can be compressed into a single gate acting on O (log2N ) qubits, leading to an exponential reduction of the amount of quantum communication needed to implement the gate remotely.

  4. Global Routine Vaccination Coverage, 2015.

    PubMed

    Casey, Rebecca M; Dumolard, Laure; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Diallo, Mamadou S; Hampton, Lee M; Wallace, Aaron S

    2016-11-18

    In 1974, the World Health Organization (WHO) established the Expanded Program on Immunization* to provide protection against six vaccine-preventable diseases through routine infant immunization (1). Based on 2015 WHO and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) estimates, global coverage with the third dose of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine (DTP3), the first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) and the third dose of polio vaccine (Pol3) has remained stable (84%-86%) since 2010. From 2014 to 2015, estimated global coverage with the second MCV dose (MCV2) increased from 39% to 43% by the end of the second year of life and from 58% to 61% when older age groups were included. Global coverage was higher in 2015 than 2010 for newer or underused vaccines, including rotavirus vaccine, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), rubella vaccine, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine, and 3 doses of hepatitis B (HepB3) vaccine. Coverage estimates varied widely by WHO Region, country, and district; in addition, for the vaccines evaluated (MCV, DTP3, Pol3, HepB3, Hib3), wide disparities were found in coverage by country income classification. Improvements in equity of access are necessary to reach and sustain higher coverage and increase protection from vaccine-preventable diseases for all persons.

  5. Routine outcome measures in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kisely, Steve; Adair, Carol E; Lin, Elizabeth; Marriott, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Canada is a federal country of 10 provinces and three territories. High level information on mental health conditions and service use has mostly been generated from administrative data collected by provinces and territories. These include four major types - hospital admissions and discharges, physician billings, ambulatory care services, and drug databases. At the national level, the Canadian Institute for Health Information brings together this information to produce indicators of outcome. Although these data provide information on patient and health system characteristics, they do not capture the full spectrum of formal and informal mental healthcare. These include changes in health status, functioning, community integration and quality of life. As a result, some jurisdictions have begun to implement more standardized measures of outcome such as the clinician-rated Health of the Nation Outcome Scales or the inpatient Resident Assessment Instrument - Mental Health. In this paper we provide an overview of mental-health-related data sources in Canada, highlight some of the more progressive practices beginning to emerge, and conclude with some thoughts about how the routine measurement and reporting of mental health outcomes in Canada might be advanced including efforts at engaging both clinicians and decision-makers.

  6. Routine CMV screening during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Collinet, P; Subtil, D; Houfflin-Debarge, V; Kacet, N; Dewilde, A; Puech, F

    2004-05-10

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) screening during pregnancy has been widely discussed for several years, but still no consensus has been agreed. With a number of live births of 750,000 per year in France, we would expect 7500 infected infants at birth per year (rate of congenital infection of 1%). Among infected infants at birth, the number of severely infected foetuses would be approximately 75, the number of infants with severe sequelae would be 480, 675 approximately would present with hearing loss and the number of asymptomatic infants would be 6270. Five different preventive methods for congenital CMV infection are possible: (1) Routine CMV screening at the beginning of pregnancy for primary prevention. (2) Secondary prevention by antenatal diagnosis of congenital CMV infection complications. (3) Tertiary prevention by serological testing during pregnancy. (4) Tertiary prevention by serological screening at birth. (5) Tertiary prevention: Hearing loss screening at birth. The aims of this review are to define the advantages and disadvantages of these different methods of CMV screening during pregnancy and to determine if the current available information would make systematic testing acceptable.

  7. A quantum Fredkin gate.

    PubMed

    Patel, Raj B; Ho, Joseph; Ferreyrol, Franck; Ralph, Timothy C; Pryde, Geoff J

    2016-03-01

    Minimizing the resources required to build logic gates into useful processing circuits is key to realizing quantum computers. Although the salient features of a quantum computer have been shown in proof-of-principle experiments, difficulties in scaling quantum systems have made more complex operations intractable. This is exemplified in the classical Fredkin (controlled-SWAP) gate for which, despite theoretical proposals, no quantum analog has been realized. By adding control to the SWAP unitary, we use photonic qubit logic to demonstrate the first quantum Fredkin gate, which promises many applications in quantum information and measurement. We implement example algorithms and generate the highest-fidelity three-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states to date. The technique we use allows one to add a control operation to a black-box unitary, something that is impossible in the standard circuit model. Our experiment represents the first use of this technique to control a two-qubit operation and paves the way for larger controlled circuits to be realized efficiently.

  8. A quantum Fredkin gate

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Raj B.; Ho, Joseph; Ferreyrol, Franck; Ralph, Timothy C.; Pryde, Geoff J.

    2016-01-01

    Minimizing the resources required to build logic gates into useful processing circuits is key to realizing quantum computers. Although the salient features of a quantum computer have been shown in proof-of-principle experiments, difficulties in scaling quantum systems have made more complex operations intractable. This is exemplified in the classical Fredkin (controlled-SWAP) gate for which, despite theoretical proposals, no quantum analog has been realized. By adding control to the SWAP unitary, we use photonic qubit logic to demonstrate the first quantum Fredkin gate, which promises many applications in quantum information and measurement. We implement example algorithms and generate the highest-fidelity three-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states to date. The technique we use allows one to add a control operation to a black-box unitary, something that is impossible in the standard circuit model. Our experiment represents the first use of this technique to control a two-qubit operation and paves the way for larger controlled circuits to be realized efficiently. PMID:27051868

  9. Gated SIT Vidicon Streak Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, D. L.; Yates, G. J.; Black, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    A recently developed prototype streak tube designed to produce high gain and resolution by incorporating the streak and readout functions in one envelope thereby minimizing photon-to-charge transformations and eliminating external coupling losses is presented. The tube is based upon a grid-gated Silicon-Intensified-Target Vidicon (SITV) with integral Focus Projection Scan (FPS) TV readout. Demagnifying electron optics (m=0.63) in the image section map the 40-mm-diameter photocathode image unto a 25-mm-diameter silicon target where gains >= 103 are achieved with only 10 KV accelerating voltage. This is compared with much lower gains (~ 50) at much higher voltages (~ 30 KV) reported for streak tubes using phosphor screens. Because SIT technology is well established means for electron imaging in vacuum, such fundamental problems as "backside thinning" required for electron imaging unto CCDs do not exist. The high spatial resolution (~ 30 1p/mm), variable scan formats, and high speed electrostatic deflection (250 mm2 areas are routinely rastered with 256 scan lines in 1.6 ms) available from FPS readout add versatility not available in CCD devices. Theoretical gain and spatial resolution for this design (developed jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and General Electric Co.) are compared with similar calculations and measured data obtained for RCA 73435 streaks fiber optically coupled to (1) 25-mm-diameter SIT FPS vidicons and (2) 40-mm-diameter MCPTs (proximity-focused microchannel plate image intensifier tubes) fiber optically coupled to 18-mm-diameter Sb2S3 FPS vidicons. Sweep sensitivity, shutter ratio, and record lengths for nanosecond duration (20 to 200 ns) streak applications are discussed.

  10. Impact of gate geometry on ionic liquid gated ionotronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, A. T.; Noh, J. H.; Pudasaini, P. R.; Wolf, B.; Balke, N.; Herklotz, A.; Sharma, Y.; Haglund, A. V.; Dai, S.; Mandrus, D.; Rack, P. D.; Ward, T. Z.

    2017-04-01

    Ionic liquid electrolytes are gaining widespread application as a gate dielectric used to control ion transport in functional materials. This letter systematically examines the important influence that device geometry in standard "side gate" 3-terminal geometries plays in device performance of a well-known oxygen ion conductor. We show that the most influential component of device design is the ratio between the area of the gate electrode and the active channel, while the spacing between these components and their individual shapes has a negligible contribution. These findings provide much needed guidance in device design intended for ionotronic gating with ionic liquids.

  11. Multibit gates for quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Sørensen, A; Mølmer, K

    2001-04-23

    We present a general technique to implement products of many qubit operators communicating via a joint harmonic oscillator degree of freedom in a quantum computer. By conditional displacements and rotations we can implement Hamiltonians which are trigonometric functions of qubit operators. With such operators we can effectively implement higher order gates such as Toffoli gates and C(n)-NOT gates, and we show that the entire Grover search algorithm can be implemented in a direct way.

  12. A statistical model of catheter motion from interventional x-ray images: application to image-based gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayiotou, M.; King, A. P.; Ma, Y.; Housden, R. J.; Rinaldi, C. A.; Gill, J.; Cooklin, M.; O'Neill, M.; Rhode, K. S.

    2013-11-01

    The motion and deformation of catheters that lie inside cardiac structures can provide valuable information about the motion of the heart. In this paper we describe the formation of a novel statistical model of the motion of a coronary sinus (CS) catheter based on principal component analysis of tracked electrode locations from standard mono-plane x-ray fluoroscopy images. We demonstrate the application of our model for the purposes of retrospective cardiac and respiratory gating of x-ray fluoroscopy images in normal dose x-ray fluoroscopy images, and demonstrate how a modification of the technique allows application to very low dose scenarios. We validated our method on ten mono-plane imaging sequences comprising a total of 610 frames from ten different patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. For normal dose images we established systole, end-inspiration and end-expiration gating with success rates of 100%, 92.1% and 86.9%, respectively. For very low dose applications, the method was tested on the same ten mono-plane x-ray fluoroscopy sequences without noise and with added noise at signal to noise ratio (SNR) values of √50, √10, √8, √6, √5, √2 and √1 to simulate the image quality of increasingly lower dose x-ray images. The method was able to detect the CS catheter even in the lowest SNR images with median errors not exceeding 2.6 mm per electrode. Furthermore, gating success rates of 100%, 71.4% and 85.7% were achieved at the low SNR value of √2, representing a dose reduction of more than 25 times. Thus, the technique has the potential to extract useful information whilst substantially reducing the radiation exposure.

  13. Compact gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Bobo, Gerald E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a double-disc gate valve which is compact, comparatively simple to construct, and capable of maintaining high closing pressures on the valve discs with low frictional forces. The valve casing includes axially aligned ports. Mounted in the casing is a sealed chamber which is pivotable transversely of the axis of the ports. The chamber contains the levers for moving the valve discs axially, and an actuator for the levers. When an external drive means pivots the chamber to a position where the discs are between the ports and axially aligned therewith, the actuator for the levers is energized to move the discs into sealing engagement with the ports.

  14. ONE SHAKE GATE FORMER

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, R.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1957-08-20

    An improved circuit for forming square pulses having substantially short and precise durations is described. The gate forming circuit incorporates a secondary emission R. F. pentode adapted to receive input trigger pulses amd having a positive feedback loop comnected from the dynode to the control grid to maintain conduction in response to trigger pulses. A short circuited pulse delay line is employed to precisely control the conducting time of the tube and a circuit for squelching spurious oscillations is provided in the feedback loop.

  15. Active Movement Warm-Up Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Teri; Quint, Ashleigh; Fischer, Kim; Kiger, Joy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents warm-ups that are designed to physiologically and psychologically prepare students for vigorous physical activity. An active movement warm-up routine is made up of three parts: (1) active warm-up movement exercises, (2) general preparation, and (3) the energy system. These warm-up routines can be used with all grade levels…

  16. SVI: Super-VIOR interface routines

    SciTech Connect

    Alleva, D.

    1987-10-21

    This document describes a set of routines for a VME DMA module called the Super-VIOR. The Super-VIOR interface routines, also called the SVI routines, are written in PILS and run under a Valet-plus system. These routines enable a program to set up, execute, and monitor DMA operations. The Super-VIOR Interface Routines are written in PILS, a high level language similar to BASIC and Pascal which is powerful and fast enough for most applications. One of the most powerful features of the Valet/PILS system is the ability to set up exception vectors and exception handlers directly in a program. This feature is used to handle interrupts from the MC68450 (a 4 channel, 16 bit DMA controller) and the interface's front panel. This document is divided into ten sections, the first being the introduction. The remaining sections detail the interface registers, channel initiation, polling and interrupts, status reporting, front panel interrupts, the configuration routines, the operation control routines, the status reporting routines, and special comments on the MC68450.

  17. 10 CFR 1017.20 - Routine access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Routine access. 1017.20 Section 1017.20 Energy DEPARTMENT... INFORMATION Access to Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.20 Routine access. (a) Authorized... access to the UCNI, subject to limitations in paragraph (b) of this section, and who may...

  18. Making Routine Letters Have Positive Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, S. M.

    While few business people dispute the importance of carefully crafting persuasive, demanding, conciliatory, and bad-news letters, the regular flow of routine communications receives very little meaningful consideration or scrutiny. These routine communications (letters, inquiries, requests, collection letters, complaints, confirmations,…

  19. Daily Routines of Young Children. (Draft).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossbach, Hans-Guenther

    This pilot study of the structural characteristics of daily routines of young children also explored aspects of conceptual framework and research instruments. Four data collection instruments were developed. Two of the three retrospective measures used were questionnaires for mothers about their child's routine on the previous day. The other…

  20. Unlearning Established Organizational Routines--Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiol, Marlena; O'Connor, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this two-part paper is to develop a process model of unlearning established organizational routines. The model traces the interactions among three unlearning sub-processes: ostensive aspects of initial destabilization of an established routine; performative aspects of ongoing discarding-from-use of old behaviors and…

  1. Metadata extraction routines for improving infobutton performance.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Nathan C; Haug, Peter J

    2010-11-13

    Infobuttons have been proven as an effective means for providing quick, context-specific links to pertinent information resources at the point of care. Current infobutton manager implementations, however, lack the ability to exchange metadata, are limited to a relatively small set of information providers, and are targeted primarily for a clinician audience. As part of a local effort to implement infobuttons for patient use via a tethered personal health record, we present a series of metadata extraction routines. These routines were constructed to extract key pieces of information from health information providers on the Internet, including content coverage, language availability, and readability scores. The extraction routines were tested using thirty different disease conditions against eight different providers. The routines yielded 183 potential infobutton targets and associated metadata for each. The capabilities of the extraction routines will be expanded to cover new types of metadata in the future.

  2. Gates Learns to Think Big

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how the philanthropy of Microsoft Corp software magnate co-chairs, Bill Gates and his wife Melinda, are reshaping the American high school nowadays. Gates and his wife have put the issue on the national agenda like never before, with a commitment of more than 1.3 billion US dollars this decade toward the foundation's agenda…

  3. Penn State DOE GATE Program

    SciTech Connect

    Anstrom, Joel

    2012-08-31

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) was established in October 1998 pursuant to an award from the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE). The focus area of the Penn State GATE Program is advanced energy storage systems for electric and hybrid vehicles.

  4. Cooperative gating between ion channels.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kee-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative gating between ion channels, i.e. the gating of one channel directly coupled to the gating of neighboring channels, has been observed in diverse channel types at the single-channel level. Positively coupled gating could enhance channel-mediated signaling while negative coupling may effectively reduce channel gating noise. Indeed, the physiological significance of cooperative channel gating in signal transduction has been recognized in several in vivo studies. Moreover, coupled gating of ion channels was reported to be associated with some human disease states. In this review, physiological roles for channel cooperativity and channel clustering observed in vitro and in vivo are introduced, and stimulation-induced channel clustering and direct channel cross linking are suggested as the physical mechanisms of channel assembly. Along with physical clustering, several molecular mechanisms proposed as the molecular basis for functional coupling of neighboring channels are covered: permeant ions as a channel coupling mediator, concerted channel activation through the membrane, and allosteric mechanisms. Also, single-channel analysis methods for cooperative gating such as the binomial analysis, the variance analysis, the conditional dwell time density analysis, and the maximum likelihood fitting analysis are reviewed and discussed.

  5. Image-based view-angle independent cardiorespiratory motion gating and coronary sinus catheter tracking for x-ray-guided cardiac electrophysiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Maria; Rhode, Kawal S; King, Andrew P; Ma, Yingliang; Cooklin, Michael; O'Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C A; Housden, R James

    2015-10-21

    Determination of the cardiorespiratory phase of the heart has numerous applications during cardiac imaging. In this article we propose a novel view-angle independent near-real time cardiorespiratory motion gating and coronary sinus (CS) catheter tracking technique for x-ray fluoroscopy images that are used to guide cardiac electrophysiology procedures. The method is based on learning CS catheter motion using principal component analysis and then applying the derived motion model to unseen images taken at arbitrary projections, using the epipolar constraint. This method is also able to track the CS catheter throughout the x-ray images in any arbitrary subsequent view. We also demonstrate the clinical application of our model on rotational angiography sequences. We validated our technique in normal and very low dose phantom and clinical datasets. For the normal dose clinical images we established average systole, end-expiration and end-inspiration gating success rates of 100%, 85.7%, and 92.3%, respectively. For very low dose applications, the technique was able to track the CS catheter with median errors not exceeding 1 mm for all tracked electrodes. Average gating success rates of 80.3%, 71.4%, and 69.2% were established for the application of the technique on clinical datasets, even with a dose reduction of more than 10 times. In rotational sequences at normal dose, CS tracking median errors were within 1.2 mm for all electrodes, and the gating success rate was 100%, for view angles from RAO 90° to LAO 90°. This view-angle independent technique can extract clinically useful cardiorespiratory motion information using x-ray doses significantly lower than those currently used in clinical practice.

  6. Increased Exposure to Rigid Routines Can Lead to Increased Challenging Behavior Following Changes to Those Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Leah E.; Oliver, Chris; Callaghan, Eleanor; Woodcock, Kate A.

    2015-01-01

    Several neurodevelopmental disorders are associated with preference for routine and challenging behavior following changes to routines. We examine individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome, who show elevated levels of this behavior, to better understand how previous experience of a routine can affect challenging behavior elicited by disruption to…

  7. Impact of gate geometry on ionic liquid gated ionotronic systems

    DOE PAGES

    Wong, Anthony T.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; ...

    2017-01-23

    Ionic liquid electrolytes are gaining widespread application as a gate dielectric used to control ion transport in functional materials. This letter systematically examines the important influence that device geometry in standard “side gate” 3-terminal geometries plays in device performance of a well-known oxygen ion conductor. We show that the most influential component of device design is the ratio between the area of the gate electrode and the active channel, while the spacing between these components and their individual shapes has a negligible contribution. Finally, these findings provide much needed guidance in device design intended for ionotronic gating with ionic liquids.

  8. A statistical method for retrospective cardiac and respiratory motion gating of interventional cardiac x-ray images

    SciTech Connect

    Panayiotou, Maria King, Andrew P.; Housden, R. James; Ma, YingLiang; Rhode, Kawal S.; Cooklin, Michael; O'Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. Aldo

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Image-guided cardiac interventions involve the use of fluoroscopic images to guide the insertion and movement of interventional devices. Cardiorespiratory gating can be useful for 3D reconstruction from multiple x-ray views and for reducing misalignments between 3D anatomical models overlaid onto fluoroscopy. Methods: The authors propose a novel and potentially clinically useful retrospective cardiorespiratory gating technique. The principal component analysis (PCA) statistical method is used in combination with other image processing operations to make our proposed masked-PCA technique suitable for cardiorespiratory gating. Unlike many previously proposed techniques, our technique is robust to varying image-content, thus it does not require specific catheters or any other optically opaque structures to be visible. Therefore, it works without any knowledge of catheter geometry. The authors demonstrate the application of our technique for the purposes of retrospective cardiorespiratory gating of normal and very low dose x-ray fluoroscopy images. Results: For normal dose x-ray images, the algorithm was validated using 28 clinical electrophysiology x-ray fluoroscopy sequences (2168 frames), from patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and cardiac resynchronization therapy procedures for heart failure. The authors established end-systole, end-expiration, and end-inspiration success rates of 97.0%, 97.9%, and 97.0%, respectively. For very low dose applications, the technique was tested on ten x-ray sequences from the RFA procedures with added noise at signal to noise ratio (SNR) values of√(5)0, √(1)0, √(8), √(6), √(5), √(2), and √(1) to simulate the image quality of increasingly lower dose x-ray images. Even at the low SNR value of √(2), representing a dose reduction of more than 25 times, gating success rates of 89.1%, 88.8%, and 86.8% were established. Conclusions: The proposed

  9. Habitual routines in task-performing groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gersick, C. J.; Hackman, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Groups, like individuals, often develop habitual routines for dealing with frequently encountered stimuli. Although such routines are consequential for group life and work, little is known about them. This paper reconnoiters the territory of habitual behavior in groups that perform work within organizations. We offer a definition of group habits, identify their functions and dysfunctions, suggest how they develop and are maintained, and identify the circumstances when they are likely to be altered or abandoned. Throughout, we give special attention to the social nature of habitual routines in groups, to the interaction between habitual behavior and group life cycle phenomena, and to the role of the organizational context in prompting, shaping, and terminating habitual routines.

  10. Taking medicine at home - create a routine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000613.htm Taking medicine at home - create a routine To use the ... teeth. Find Ways to Help You Remember Your Medicines You can: Set the alarm on your clock, ...

  11. Robust Soldier Crab Ball Gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunji, Yukio-Pegio; Nishiyama, Yuta; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Based on the field observation of soldier crabs, we previously proposed a model for a swarm of soldier crabs. Here, we describe the interaction of coherent swarms in the simulation model, which is implemented in a logical gate. Because a swarm is generated by inherent perturbation, a swarm can be generated and maintained under highly perturbed conditions. Thus, the model reveals a robust logical gate rather than stable one. In addition, we show that the logical gate of swarms is also implemented by real soldier crabs (Mictyris guinotae).

  12. Superconducting gates with fluxon logics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacak, H.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2010-10-01

    We have developed several logic gates (OR, XOR, AND and NAND) made of superconducting Josephson junctions. The gates based of the flux cloning phenomenon and high speed of fluxons moving in Josephson junctions of different shapes. In a contrast with previous design the gates operates extremely fast since fluxons are moving with the speed close to the speed of light. We have demonstrated their operations and indicated several ways to made a more complicated logic elements which have at the same time a compact form.

  13. Commentary on WHO GATE Initiative.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Rory A

    2017-01-01

    Assistive technology is essential to people with spinal cord injuries (SCI) for living and participating in their communities. However, many people with SCI do not have access to adequate assistive technology and qualified services. The World Health Organization (WHO) is addressing this need through the Global Cooperation on Assistive Technology (GATE). The GATE initiative is focused on improving access to high-quality affordable AT world-wide. GATE working to meet the AT sector needs in response to the call by WHO to increase access to essential, high-quality, safe, effective and affordable medical devices, which is one of the six WHO leadership priorities.

  14. 49 CFR 234.223 - Gate arm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gate arm. 234.223 Section 234.223 Transportation... Maintenance Standards § 234.223 Gate arm. Each gate arm, when in the downward position, shall extend across... clearly viewed by approaching highway users. Each gate arm shall start its downward motion not less...

  15. 49 CFR 234.223 - Gate arm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gate arm. 234.223 Section 234.223 Transportation... SYSTEMS Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.223 Gate arm. Each gate arm, when... maintained in a condition sufficient to be clearly viewed by approaching highway users. Each gate arm...

  16. 49 CFR 234.223 - Gate arm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gate arm. 234.223 Section 234.223 Transportation... SYSTEMS Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.223 Gate arm. Each gate arm, when... maintained in a condition sufficient to be clearly viewed by approaching highway users. Each gate arm...

  17. 49 CFR 234.223 - Gate arm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gate arm. 234.223 Section 234.223 Transportation... Maintenance Standards § 234.223 Gate arm. Each gate arm, when in the downward position, shall extend across... clearly viewed by approaching highway users. Each gate arm shall start its downward motion not less...

  18. 49 CFR 234.223 - Gate arm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gate arm. 234.223 Section 234.223 Transportation... SYSTEMS Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.223 Gate arm. Each gate arm, when... maintained in a condition sufficient to be clearly viewed by approaching highway users. Each gate arm...

  19. Unified framework for magic state distillation and multiqubit gate synthesis with reduced resource cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Earl T.; Howard, Mark

    2017-02-01

    The standard approach to fault-tolerant quantum computation is to store information in a quantum error correction code, such as the surface code, and process information using a strategy that can be summarized as distill then synthesize. In the distill step, one performs several rounds of distillation to create high-fidelity logical qubits in a magic state. Each such magic state provides one good T gate. In the synthesize step, one seeks the optimal decomposition of an algorithm into a sequence of many T gates interleaved with Clifford gates. This gate-synthesis problem is well understood for multiqubit gates that do not use any Hadamards. We present an in-depth analysis of a unified framework that realizes one round of distillation and multiqubit gate synthesis in a single step. We call these synthillation protocols, and show they lead to a large reduction in resource overheads. This is because synthillation can implement a general class of circuits using the same number of T states as gate synthesis, yet with the benefit of quadratic error suppression. This general class includes all circuits primarily dominated by control-control-Z gates, such as adders and modular exponentiation routines used in Shor's algorithm. Therefore, synthillation removes the need for a costly round of magic state distillation. We also present several additional results on the multiqubit gate-synthesis problem. We provide an efficient algorithm for synthesizing unitaries with the same worst-case resource scaling as optimal solutions. For the special case of synthesizing controlled unitaries, our techniques are not just efficient but exactly optimal. We observe that the gate-synthesis cost, measured by T count, is often strictly subadditive. Numerous explicit applications of our techniques are also presented.

  20. The Gates, 1979-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts: The Art Education Magazine for Teachers, 2005

    2005-01-01

    One art critic called it pure Despite the mixed reviews of Christo and Jeanne-Claude's temporary art installation in New York's Central Park, the public reaction to The Gates was largely positive.The Gates consisted of 7,500 orange PVC frames straddling the park's walkways that varied in widths from 5 1/2 feet to 18 feet. Eight-foot-long ripstop…

  1. Quantum gates with topological phases

    SciTech Connect

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2003-09-01

    We investigate two models for performing topological quantum gates with the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) effects. Topological one- and two-qubit Abelian phases can be enacted with the AB effect using charge qubits, whereas the AC effect can be used to perform all single-qubit gates (Abelian and non-Abelian) for spin qubits. Possible experimental setups suitable for a solid-state implementation are briefly discussed.

  2. Latest design of gate valves

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzhofer, U.; Stolte, J.; Weyand, M.

    1996-12-01

    Babcock Sempell, one of the most important valve manufacturers in Europe, has delivered valves for the nuclear power industry since the beginning of the peaceful application of nuclear power in the 1960s. The latest innovation by Babcock Sempell is a gate valve that meets all recent technical requirements of the nuclear power technology. At the moment in the United States, Germany, Sweden, and many other countries, motor-operated gate and globe valves are judged very critically. Besides the absolute control of the so-called {open_quotes}trip failure,{close_quotes} the integrity of all valve parts submitted to operational forces must be maintained. In case of failure of the limit and torque switches, all valve designs have been tested with respect to the quality of guidance of the gate. The guidances (i.e., guides) shall avoid a tilting of the gate during the closing procedure. The gate valve newly designed by Babcock Sempell fulfills all these characteristic criteria. In addition, the valve has cobalt-free seat hardfacing, the suitability of which has been proven by friction tests as well as full-scale blowdown tests at the GAP of Siemens in Karlstein, West Germany. Babcock Sempell was to deliver more than 30 gate valves of this type for 5 Swedish nuclear power stations by autumn 1995. In the presentation, the author will report on the testing performed, qualifications, and sizing criteria which led to the new technical design.

  3. Subjective refraction: the mechanism underlying the routine.

    PubMed

    Harris, W F

    2007-11-01

    The routine of subjective refraction is usually understood, explained and taught in terms of the relative positions of line or point foci and the retina. This paper argues that such an approach makes unnecessary and sometimes invalid assumptions about what is actually happening inside the eye. The only assumption necessary in fact is that the subject is able to guide the refractionist to (or close to) the optimum power for refractive compensation. The routine works even in eyes in which the interval of Sturm does not behave as supposed; it would work, in fact, regardless of the structure of the eye. The idealized subjective refraction routine consists of two steps: the first finds the best sphere (the stigmatic component) and the second finds the remaining Jackson cross-cylinder (the antistigmatic component). The model makes use of the concept of symmetric dioptric power space. The second part of the refraction routine can be performed with Jackson cross-cylinders alone. However, it is usually taught and practiced using spheres, cylinders and Jackson cross-cylinders in a procedure that is not easy to understand and learn. Recognizing that this part of the routine is equivalent to one involving Jackson cross-cylinders only allows one to teach and understand the procedure more naturally and easily.

  4. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  5. Analysis of routine pilot-controller communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Daniel G.; Lee, Alfred; Rodvold, Michelle

    1990-01-01

    Although pilot-controller communication is central to aviation safety, this area of aviation human factors has not been extensively researched. Most research has focused on what kinds of communication problems occur. A more complete picture of communication problems requires understanding how communication usually works in routine operations. A sample of routine pilot-controller communication in the TRACON environment is described. After describing several dimensions of routine communication, three kinds of communication problems are treated: inaccuracies such as incorrect readbacks, procedural deviations such as missing callsigns and readbacks, and nonroutine transactions where pilot and controller must deal with misunderstandings or other communication problems. Preliminary results suggest these problems are not frequent events in daily operations. However, analysis of the problems that do occur suggest some factors that may cause them.

  6. Quantum gate-set tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin

    2014-03-01

    Quantum information technology is built on (1) physical qubits and (2) precise, accurate quantum logic gates that transform their states. Developing quantum logic gates requires good characterization - both in the development phase, where we need to identify a device's flaws so as to fix them, and in the production phase, where we need to make sure that the device works within specs and predict residual error rates and types. This task falls to quantum state and process tomography. But until recently, protocols for tomography relied on a pre-existing and perfectly calibrated reference frame comprising the measurements (and, for process tomography, input states) used to characterize the device. In practice, these measurements are neither independent nor perfectly known - they are usually implemented via exactly the same gates that we are trying to characterize! In the past year, several partial solutions to this self-consistency problem have been proposed. I will present a framework (gate set tomography, or GST) that addresses and resolves this problem, by self-consistently characterizing an entire set of quantum logic gates on a black-box quantum device. In particular, it contains an explicit closed-form protocol for linear-inversion gate set tomography (LGST), which is immune to both calibration error and technical pathologies like local maxima of the likelihood (which plagued earlier methods). GST also demonstrates significant (multiple orders of magnitude) improvements in efficiency over standard tomography by using data derived from long sequences of gates (much like randomized benchmarking). GST has now been applied to qubit devices in multiple technologies. I will present and discuss results of GST experiments in technologies including a single trapped-ion qubit and a silicon quantum dot qubit. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U

  7. ANSYS duplicate finite-element checker routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, R.

    1995-01-01

    An ANSYS finite-element code routine to check for duplicated elements within the volume of a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element mesh was developed. The routine developed is used for checking floating elements within a mesh, identically duplicated elements, and intersecting elements with a common face. A space shuttle main engine alternate turbopump development high pressure oxidizer turbopump finite-element model check using the developed subroutine is discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided for duplicate element checking of 3D finite-element models.

  8. Examination of the Circle Spline Routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolin, R. M.; Jaeger, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Circle Spline routine is currently being used for generating both two and three dimensional spline curves. It was developed for use in ESCHER, a mesh generating routine written to provide a computationally simple and efficient method for building meshes along curved surfaces. Circle Spline is a parametric linear blending spline. Because many computerized machining operations involve circular shapes, the Circle Spline is well suited for both the design and manufacturing processes and shows promise as an alternative to the spline methods currently supported by the Initial Graphics Specification (IGES).

  9. Routine environmental monitoring schedule, calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, S.M.

    1997-11-24

    This document provides the Environmental Restorations Contractor (ERC) and the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC) a schedule in accordance with the HNF-PRO-454, Inactive Waste Sites` HNF-PRO-455, Solid Waste 3 Management4 and BHI-EE-02, Environmental Requirements, of monitoring and sampling, routines for the near-facility environmental monitoring program during calendar year (CY) 1998. Every attempt will be made to consistently follow this schedule; any deviation from this schedule will be documented by an internal memorandum (DSI) explaining the reason for the deviation. The DSI will be issued by the scheduled performing organization and directed to Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of Environmental Monitoring and investigations and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive wastes sites are scheduled to be surveyed at least annually. Any newly discovered wastes sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1999. The outside perimeter road surveys of 200 East and West Area and the rail survey from the 300 Area to Columbia Center will be performed in the year 2000 per agreement with Department of Energy, Richland Field Office. This schedule does not discuss staffing needs, nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines. Personnel performing routines to meet this schedule shall communicate any need for 1332 assistance in completing these routines to Radiological Control management and Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. After each routine survey is completed, a copy of the survey record, maps, and data sheets will be forwarded to Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. These routine surveys will not be considered complete until this

  10. Prospectively gated cardiac computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Moore, S C; Judy, P F; Garnic, J D; Kambic, G X; Bonk, F; Cochran, G; Margosian, P; McCroskey, W; Foote, F

    1983-01-01

    A fourth-generation scanner has been modified to perform prospectively gated cardiac computed tomography (CT). A computer program monitors the electrocardiogram (ECG) and predicts when to initiate the next scan in a gated series in order to acquire all projection data for a desired phase of the heart cycle. The system has been tested with dogs and has produced cross-sectional images of all phases of the cardiac cycle. Eight to ten scans per series were sufficient to obtain reproducible images of each transverse section in the end-diastolic and end-systolic phases. The radiation dose to the skin was approximately 1.4 cGy per scan. The prospectively gated system is more than twice as efficient as a retrospectively gated system in obtaining complete angular projection data for a 10% heart cycle window. A temporal smoothing technique to suppress reconstruction artifacts due to sorting inconsistent projection data was developed and evaluated. Image noise was reduced by averaging together any overlapping projection data. Prospectively gated cardiac CT has also been used to demonstrate that the error in attenuation measured with a single nongated CT scan through the heart can be as large as 50-60 CT numbers outside the heart in the lung field.

  11. An Examination of Latino Students' Homework Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Homework appears to be positively associated with better student outcomes. Although some researchers have explored the connection between time spent on homework and minority student achievement, few have examined the homework routines of Latino youth. Interviews with Latino high school students show that they have some difficulty completing daily…

  12. The Daily Routine of the Oldest Old.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barer, Barbara M.

    Individuals who are beyond the age of 85 have to confront the decrements of aging that are commonly recognized. This study examined the daily routine of the oldest old through interviews. Subjects were asked about the logistics of their daily lives, what they liked best to do, what they didn't like to do, what made a day good for them, and what…

  13. Modular thermal analyzer routine, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, J. A.; Phillips, M. A.; Williams, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The Modular Thermal Analyzer Routine (MOTAR) is a general thermal analysis routine with strong capabilities for performing thermal analysis of systems containing flowing fluids, fluid system controls (valves, heat exchangers, etc.), life support systems, and thermal radiation situations. Its modular organization permits the analysis of a very wide range of thermal problems for simple problems containing a few conduction nodes to those containing complicated flow and radiation analysis with each problem type being analyzed with peak computational efficiency and maximum ease of use. The organization and programming methods applied to MOTAR achieved a high degree of computer utilization efficiency in terms of computer execution time and storage space required for a given problem. The computer time required to perform a given problem on MOTAR is approximately 40 to 50 percent that required for the currently existing widely used routines. The computer storage requirement for MOTAR is approximately 25 percent more than the most commonly used routines for the most simple problems but the data storage techniques for the more complicated options should save a considerable amount of space.

  14. Action Selection in Complex Routinized Sequential Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruh, Nicolas; Cooper, Richard P.; Mareschal, Denis

    2010-01-01

    We report two experiments in which errors and interaction latencies were recorded during routinization of hierarchically structured computer-based tasks. Experiment 1 demonstrates that action selection is slowed at subtask transitions, especially when selecting lower frequency actions. This frequency effect is compounded by concurrent performance…

  15. 10 CFR 71.87 - Routine determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Operating Controls and Procedures § 71.87 Routine determinations. Before each shipment of licensed material, the licensee shall... accordance with written procedures; (g) For fissile material, any moderator or neutron absorber, if...

  16. Individual Values, Learning Routines and Academic Procrastination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Franziska; Hofer, Manfred; Fries, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Background: Academic procrastination, the tendency to postpone learning activities, is regarded as a consequence of postmodern values that are prominent in post-industrialized societies. When students strive for leisure goals and have no structured routines for academic tasks, delaying strenuous learning activities becomes probable. Aims: The…

  17. Routines. Infant/Toddler Caregiving: A Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    Intended for use in conjunction with videos illustrating key concepts and caregiving techniques, this guide focuses on how the daily routines of caring for infants and toddlers can become opportunities for promoting the child's learning and development and for deepening the relationship between child and caregiver. Special attention is given to…

  18. libvaxdata: VAX data format conversion routines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Lawrence M.

    2005-01-01

    libvaxdata provides a collection of routines for converting numeric data-integer and floating-point-to and from the formats used on a Digital Equipment Corporation1 (DEC) VAX 32-bit minicomputer (Brunner, 1991). Since the VAX numeric data formats are inherited from those used on a DEC PDP-11 16-bit minicomputer, these routines can be used to convert PDP-11 data as well. VAX numeric data formats are also the default data formats used on DEC Alpha 64-bit minicomputers running OpenVMS The libvaxdata routines are callable from Fortran or C. They require that the caller use two's-complement format for integer data and IEEE 754 format (ANSI/IEEE, 1985) for floating-point data. They also require that the 'natural' size of a C int type (integer) is 32 bits. That is the case for most modern 32-bit and 64-bit computer systems. Nevertheless, you may wish to consult the Fortran or C compiler documentation on your system to be sure. Some Fortran compilers support conversion of VAX numeric data on-the-fly when reading or writing unformatted files, either as a compiler option or a run-time I/O option. This feature may be easier to use than the libvaxdata routines. Consult the Fortran compiler documentation on your system to determine if this alternative is available to you. 1Later Compaq Computer Corporation, now Hewlett-Packard Company

  19. The first year of routine Herschel observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-06-01

    MEETING REPORT The successful completion of the first year of routine science operations of ESA's Herschel Space Observatory was marked by a Specialist Discussion Meeting of the RAS held in January 2011. A few of the early science highlights from the mission were presented. Derek Ward-Thompson and David Clements summarize.

  20. Electrostatic Gating of Ultrathin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, A. M.

    2014-07-01

    Electrostatic gating of ultrathin films can be used to modify electronic and magnetic properties of materials by effecting controlled alterations of carrier concentration while, in principle, not changing the level of disorder. As such, electrostatic gating can facilitate the development of novel devices and can serve as a means of exploring the fundamental properties of materials in a manner far simpler than is possible with the conventional approach of chemical doping. The entire phase diagram of a compound can be traversed by changing the gate voltage. In this review, we survey results involving conventional field effect devices as well as more recent progress, which has involved structures that rely on electrochemical configurations such as electric double-layer transistors. We emphasize progress involving thin films of oxide materials such as high-temperature superconductors, magnetic oxides, and oxides that undergo metal-insulator transitions.

  1. Ionic thermoelectric gating organic transistors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dan; Fabiano, Simone; Berggren, Magnus; Crispin, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental stimuli to record and amplify. While traditional thermoelectric materials are attractive for temperature/heat flow sensing applications, their sensitivity is limited by their low Seebeck coefficient (∼100 μV K−1). Here we take advantage of the large ionic thermoelectric Seebeck coefficient found in polymer electrolytes (∼10,000 μV K−1) to introduce the concept of ionic thermoelectric gating a low-voltage organic transistor. The temperature sensing amplification of such ionic thermoelectric-gated devices is thousands of times superior to that of a single thermoelectric leg in traditional thermopiles. This suggests that ionic thermoelectric sensors offer a way to go beyond the limitations of traditional thermopiles and pyroelectric detectors. These findings pave the way for new infrared-gated electronic circuits with potential applications in photonics, thermography and electronic-skins. PMID:28139738

  2. Ionic thermoelectric gating organic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dan; Fabiano, Simone; Berggren, Magnus; Crispin, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental stimuli to record and amplify. While traditional thermoelectric materials are attractive for temperature/heat flow sensing applications, their sensitivity is limited by their low Seebeck coefficient (~100 μV K-1). Here we take advantage of the large ionic thermoelectric Seebeck coefficient found in polymer electrolytes (~10,000 μV K-1) to introduce the concept of ionic thermoelectric gating a low-voltage organic transistor. The temperature sensing amplification of such ionic thermoelectric-gated devices is thousands of times superior to that of a single thermoelectric leg in traditional thermopiles. This suggests that ionic thermoelectric sensors offer a way to go beyond the limitations of traditional thermopiles and pyroelectric detectors. These findings pave the way for new infrared-gated electronic circuits with potential applications in photonics, thermography and electronic-skins.

  3. Quantum gates by periodic driving

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Z. C.; Wang, W.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Topological quantum computation has been extensively studied in the past decades due to its robustness against decoherence. One way to realize the topological quantum computation is by adiabatic evolutions—it requires relatively long time to complete a gate, so the speed of quantum computation slows down. In this work, we present a method to realize single qubit quantum gates by periodic driving. Compared to adiabatic evolution, the single qubit gates can be realized at a fixed time much shorter than that by adiabatic evolution. The driving fields can be sinusoidal or square-well field. With the sinusoidal driving field, we derive an expression for the total operation time in the high-frequency limit, and an exact analytical expression for the evolution operator without any approximations is given for the square well driving. This study suggests that the period driving could provide us with a new direction in regulations of the operation time in topological quantum computation. PMID:26911900

  4. Localizing a gate in CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaolong; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and computational studies have painted a picture of the chloride permeation pathway in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) as a short narrow tunnel flanked by wider inner and outer vestibules. Although these studies also identified a number of transmembrane segments (TMs) as pore-lining, the exact location of CFTR’s gate(s) remains unknown. Here, using a channel-permeant probe, [Au(CN)2]−, we provide evidence that CFTR bears a gate that coincides with the predicted narrow section of the pore defined as residues 338–341 in TM6. Specifically, cysteines introduced cytoplasmic to the narrow region (i.e., positions 344 in TM6 and 1148 in TM12) can be modified by intracellular [Au(CN)2]− in both open and closed states, corroborating the conclusion that the internal vestibule does not harbor a gate. However, cysteines engineered to positions external to the presumed narrow region (e.g., 334, 335, and 337 in TM6) are all nonreactive toward cytoplasmic [Au(CN)2]− in the absence of ATP, whereas they can be better accessed by extracellular [Au(CN)2]− when the open probability is markedly reduced by introducing a second mutation, G1349D. As [Au(CN)2]− and chloride ions share the same permeation pathway, these results imply a gate is situated between amino acid residues 337 and 344 along TM6, encompassing the very segment that may also serve as the selectivity filter for CFTR. The unique position of a gate in the middle of the ion translocation pathway diverges from those seen in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and thus distinguishes CFTR from other members of the ABC transporter family. PMID:25675504

  5. Localizing a gate in CFTR.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaolong; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2015-02-24

    Experimental and computational studies have painted a picture of the chloride permeation pathway in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) as a short narrow tunnel flanked by wider inner and outer vestibules. Although these studies also identified a number of transmembrane segments (TMs) as pore-lining, the exact location of CFTR's gate(s) remains unknown. Here, using a channel-permeant probe, [Au(CN)2](-), we provide evidence that CFTR bears a gate that coincides with the predicted narrow section of the pore defined as residues 338-341 in TM6. Specifically, cysteines introduced cytoplasmic to the narrow region (i.e., positions 344 in TM6 and 1148 in TM12) can be modified by intracellular [Au(CN)2](-) in both open and closed states, corroborating the conclusion that the internal vestibule does not harbor a gate. However, cysteines engineered to positions external to the presumed narrow region (e.g., 334, 335, and 337 in TM6) are all nonreactive toward cytoplasmic [Au(CN)2](-) in the absence of ATP, whereas they can be better accessed by extracellular [Au(CN)2](-) when the open probability is markedly reduced by introducing a second mutation, G1349D. As [Au(CN)2](-) and chloride ions share the same permeation pathway, these results imply a gate is situated between amino acid residues 337 and 344 along TM6, encompassing the very segment that may also serve as the selectivity filter for CFTR. The unique position of a gate in the middle of the ion translocation pathway diverges from those seen in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and thus distinguishes CFTR from other members of the ABC transporter family.

  6. Reading Gate Positions with a Smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Overloop, Peter-Jules; Hut, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Worldwide many flow gates are built in water networks in order to direct water to appropriate locations. Most of these gates are adjusted manually by field operators of water management organizations and it is often centrally not known what the new position of the gate is. This makes centralized management of the entire water network difficult. One of the reasons why the measurement of the gate position is usually not executed, is that for certain gates it is not easy to do such a reading. Tilting weirs or radial gates are examples where operators need special equipment (measuring rod and long level) to determine the position and it could even be a risky procedure. Another issue is that once the measurement is done, the value is jotted down in a notebook and later, at the office, entered in a computer system. So the entire monitoring procedure is not real-time and prone to human errors. A new way of monitoring gate positions is introduced. It consists of a level that is attached to the gate and an app with which a picture can be taken from the level. Using dedicated pattern recognition algorithms, the gate position can be read by using the angle of the level versus reference points on the gate, the radius of that gate and the absolute level of the joint around which the gate turn. The method uses gps-localization of the smartphone to store the gate position in the right location in the central database.

  7. Radial gate evaluation: Olympus Dam, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The report presents a structural analysis of the radial gates of Olympus Dam in eastern Colorado. Five 20-foot wide by 17-foot high radial gates are used to control flow through the spillway at Olympus Dam. The spillway gates were designed in 1947. The gate arm assemblies consist of two separate wide flange beams, with a single brace between the arms. The arms pivot about a 4.0-inch diameter pin and bronze graphite-insert bushing. The pin is cantilevered from the pier anchor girder. The radial gates are supported by a pin bearing on a pier anchor birder bolted to the end of the concrete pier. The gates are operated by two-part wire rope 15,000-pound capacity hoise. Stoplog slots upstream of the radial gates are provided in the concrete piers. Selected drawings of the gates and hoists are located in appendix A.

  8. Routine Operational Environmental Monitoring schedule, CY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This document provides Health Physics (HP) a schedule in accordance with the Environmental Compliance Manual, WHC-CM-7-5, of monitoring and sampling routines for the Operational Environmental Monitoring (OEM) Program during calendar year (CY) 1994. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of EES and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive waste sites are scheduled to be surveyed annually at a minimum. Any newly discovered waste sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1995. This schedule does not discuss the manpower needs nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines.

  9. ROUTINE CHOLANGIOGRAPHY DURING OPERATION FOR GALLSTONES

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C. C.; Faris, George A.

    1959-01-01

    Cholangiography done routinely during operation was found valuable for detection of stones in the bile ducts. Operation for stone not seen in the operative cholangiogram was seldom necessary. When no stone is demonstrated, it seems proper to spare the patient the additional trauma of common duct exploration. ImagesFigure 1 (Case 1).Figure 2 (Case 1).Figure 3 (Case 2).Figure 4 (Case 3).Figure 5 (Case 5).Figure 6 (Case 6). PMID:13651956

  10. Double-disc gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, Seth J.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to an improvement in a conventional double-disc gate valve having a vertically movable gate assembly including a wedge, spreaders slidably engaged therewtih, a valve disc carried by the spreaders. When the gate assembly is lowered to a selected point in the valve casing, the valve discs are moved transversely outward to close inlet and outlet ports in the casing. The valve includes hold-down means for guiding the disc-and-spreader assemblies as they are moved transversely outward and inward. If such valves are operated at relatively high differential pressures, they sometimes jam during opening. Such jamming has been a problem for many years in gate valves used in gaseous diffusion plants for the separtion of uranium isotopes. The invention is based on the finding that the above-mentioned jamming results when the outlet disc tilts about its horizontal axis in a certain way during opening of the valve. In accordance with the invention, tilting of the outlet disc is maintained at a tolerable value by providing the disc with a rigid downwardly extending member and by providing the casing with a stop for limiting inward arcuate movement of the member to a preselected value during opening of the valve.

  11. Developing ICALL Tools Using GATE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the use of the General Architecture for Text Engineering (GATE) as a tool for the development of ICALL and NLP applications. It outlines a paradigm shift in software development, which is mainly influenced by projects such as the Free Software Foundation. It looks at standards that have been proposed to facilitate the…

  12. Talking with Microsoft's Bill Gates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCOM Review, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Presents the transcript of an interview with William Gates, chairman of Microsoft Corporation. Topics discussed include continued support from the information technology industry for higher education; experiences with recent college graduates in the industry; new technologies developing in the near future; alliances in the computer industry; and…

  13. GATED PORES IN THE FERRITIN PROTEIN NANOCAGE

    PubMed Central

    Theil, Elizabeth C.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis and pictogram: Gated pores in the ferritin family of protein nanocages, illustrated in the pictogram, control transfer of ferrous iron into and out of the cages by regulating contact between hydrated ferric oxide mineral inside the protein cage, and reductants such as FMNH2 on the outside. The structural and functional homology between the gated ion channel proteins in inaccessible membranes and gated ferritin pores in the stable, water soluble nanoprotein, make studies of ferritin pores models for gated pores in many ion channel proteins. Properties of ferritin gated pores, which control rates of FMNH2 reduction of ferric iron in hydrated oxide minerals inside the protein nanocage, are discussed in terms of the conserved pore gate residues (arginine 72-apspartate 122 and leucine 110-leucine 134), of pore sensitivity to heat at temperatures 30 °C below that of the nanocage itself, and of pore sensitivity to physiological changes in urea (1–10 mM). Conditions which alter ferritin pore structure/function in solution, coupled with the high evolutionary conservation of the pore gates, suggest the presence of molecular regulators in vivo that recognize the pore gates and hold them either closed or open, depending on biological iron need. The apparent homology between ferrous ion transport through gated pores in the ferritin nanocage and ion transport through gated pores in ion channel proteins embedded in cell membranes, make studies of water soluble ferritin and the pore gating folding/unfolding a useful model for other gated pores. PMID:19262678

  14. Quantum Circuit Synthesis using a New Quantum Logic Gate Library of NCV Quantum Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiqiang; Chen, Sai; Song, Xiaoyu; Perkowski, Marek; Chen, Hanwu; Zhu, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Since Controlled-Square-Root-of-NOT (CV, CV‡) gates are not permutative quantum gates, many existing methods cannot effectively synthesize optimal 3-qubit circuits directly using the NOT, CNOT, Controlled-Square-Root-of-NOT quantum gate library (NCV), and the key of effective methods is the mapping of NCV gates to four-valued quantum gates. Firstly, we use NCV gates to create the new quantum logic gate library, which can be directly used to get the solutions with smaller quantum costs efficiently. Further, we present a novel generic method which quickly and directly constructs this new optimal quantum logic gate library using CNOT and Controlled-Square-Root-of-NOT gates. Finally, we present several encouraging experiments using these new permutative gates, and give a careful analysis of the method, which introduces a new idea to quantum circuit synthesis.

  15. Quantum Circuit Synthesis using a New Quantum Logic Gate Library of NCV Quantum Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiqiang; Chen, Sai; Song, Xiaoyu; Perkowski, Marek; Chen, Hanwu; Zhu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Since Controlled-Square-Root-of-NOT (CV, CV‡) gates are not permutative quantum gates, many existing methods cannot effectively synthesize optimal 3-qubit circuits directly using the NOT, CNOT, Controlled-Square-Root-of-NOT quantum gate library (NCV), and the key of effective methods is the mapping of NCV gates to four-valued quantum gates. Firstly, we use NCV gates to create the new quantum logic gate library, which can be directly used to get the solutions with smaller quantum costs efficiently. Further, we present a novel generic method which quickly and directly constructs this new optimal quantum logic gate library using CNOT and Controlled-Square-Root-of-NOT gates. Finally, we present several encouraging experiments using these new permutative gates, and give a careful analysis of the method, which introduces a new idea to quantum circuit synthesis.

  16. Optimization of side gate length and side gate voltage for sub-100-nm double-gate MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-hong; Kim, Geun-ho; Ko, Suk-woong; Jung, Hak-kee

    2002-11-01

    In this paper, we have investigated double gate (DG) MOSFET structure, which has main gate (MG) and two side gates (SG). We know that optimum side gate voltage for each side gate length is about 2V in the main gate 50nm. Also, we know that optimum side gate length for each main gate length is 70nm above. DG MOSFET shows a small threshold voltage (Vth) roll-off. From the I-V characteristics, we obtained IDsat=510μA/μm at VMG=VDS=1.5V and VSG=3.0V for DG MOSFET with the main gate length of 50nm and the side gate length of 70nm. The subthreshold slope is 86mV/decade, transconductance is 111μA/V and DIBL (Drain Induced Barrier Lowering) is 51.3mV. Then, we have investigated the advantage of this structure for the application to multi-input NAND gate logic. Also, we have presented that TCAD simulator is suitable for device simulation.

  17. Parent routines for managing cystic fibrosis in children

    PubMed Central

    Grossoehme, Daniel H.; Filigno, Stephanie Spear; Bishop, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Management of cystic fibrosis (CF) is burdensome and adherence is often suboptimal. Family routines are associated with adherence and health outcomes in other disease populations. Few studies have examined routines in CF. The study's aim was to describe parent experiences developing and utilizing CF care routines. Semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of 25 parents of children under 13 years of age with CF were analyzed using phenomenological analysis. Three domains emerged: parent experiences developing a routine, support systems facilitating maintenance of routines, and challenges with maintaining care routines. Parents found routines difficult to establish, used trial and error, encountered barriers, and found support helpful to manage care demands. Some parents chose to deviate from their routine. Providing anticipatory guidance to promote the use of care routines and strategies to manage potential challenges may facilitate use of routines and improve CF management. PMID:24838648

  18. Environmental noise reduction for holonomic quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Parodi, Daniele; Zanghi, Nino; Sassetti, Maura; Solinas, Paolo

    2007-07-15

    We study the performance of holonomic quantum gates, driven by lasers, under the effect of a dissipative environment modeled as a thermal bath of oscillators. We show how to enhance the performance of the gates by a suitable choice of the loop in the manifold of the controllable parameters of the laser. For a simplified, albeit realistic model, we find the surprising result that for a long time evolution the performance of the gate (properly estimated in terms of average fidelity) increases. On the basis of this result, we compare holonomic gates with the so-called stimulated raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) gates.

  19. RGB-NIR active gated imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooren, Nick; Geelen, Bert; Tack, Klaas; Lambrechts, Andy; Jayapala, Murali; Ginat, Ran; David, Yaara; Levi, Eyal; Grauer, Yoav

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents multispectral active gated imaging in relation to the transportation and security fields. Active gated imaging is based on a fast gated camera and pulsed illuminator, synchronized in the time domain to provide range based images. We have developed a multispectral pattern deposited on a gated CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) with a pulsed Near Infrared VCSEL module. This paper will cover the component-level description of the multispectral gated CIS including the camera and illuminator units. Furthermore, the design considerations and characterization results of the spectral filters are presented together with a newly developed image processing method.

  20. Quantum computing gates via optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atia, Yosi; Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate the use of optimal control to design two entropy-manipulating quantum gates which are more complex than the corresponding, commonly used, gates, such as CNOT and Toffoli (CCNOT): A two-qubit gate called polarization exchange (PE) and a three-qubit gate called polarization compression (COMP) were designed using GRAPE, an optimal control algorithm. Both gates were designed for a three-spin system. Our design provided efficient and robust nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency (RF) pulses for 13C2-trichloroethylene (TCE), our chosen three-spin system. We then experimentally applied these two quantum gates onto TCE at the NMR lab. Such design of these gates and others could be relevant for near-future applications of quantum computing devices.

  1. Unifying Gate Synthesis and Magic State Distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Earl T.; Howard, Mark

    2017-02-01

    The leading paradigm for performing a computation on quantum memories can be encapsulated as distill-then-synthesize. Initially, one performs several rounds of distillation to create high-fidelity magic states that provide one good T gate, an essential quantum logic gate. Subsequently, gate synthesis intersperses many T gates with Clifford gates to realize a desired circuit. We introduce a unified framework that implements one round of distillation and multiquibit gate synthesis in a single step. Typically, our method uses the same number of T gates as conventional synthesis but with the added benefit of quadratic error suppression. Because of this, one less round of magic state distillation needs to be performed, leading to significant resource savings.

  2. [When life needs routine, imagination, listening].

    PubMed

    Tognoni, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    When life needs routine, imagination, listening. Barbara is a 44 years old oncologist, married and with two children, that tells through others but also with her own words of her cancer, until death. Giuseppe is a laboratory technician, researcher, mountaineer, promoter of humanitarian initiatives Bosnia and Croatia; his lateral amyotrophic sclerosis is told by his wife, in a booklet written after his death. Their two stories are the occasions for reflecting on the importance and role of closeness, listening, dreaming, narrating in improving the quality of life and care: none of these words are included in the guidelines.

  3. Microscale Digital Vacuum Electronic Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Mojarradi, Mohammed M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement microscale digital vacuum electronic gates. In one embodiment, a microscale digital vacuum electronic gate includes: a microscale field emitter that can emit electrons and that is a microscale cathode; and a microscale anode; where the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode are disposed within at least a partial vacuum; where the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode are separated by a gap; and where the potential difference between the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode is controllable such that the flow of electrons between the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode is thereby controllable; where when the microscale anode receives a flow of electrons, a first logic state is defined; and where when the microscale anode does not receive a flow of electrons, a second logic state is defined.

  4. Voltage-Gated Hydrophobic Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobicity is a fundamental property that is responsible for numerous physical and biophysical aspects of molecular interactions in water. Peculiar behavior is expected for water in the vicinity of hydrophobic structures, such as nanopores. Indeed, hydrophobic nanopores can be found in two distinct states, dry and wet, even though the latter is thermodynamically unstable. Transitions between these two states are kinetically hindered in long pores but can be much faster in shorter pores. As it is demonstrated for the first time in this paper, these transitions can be induced by applying a voltage across a membrane with a single hydrophobic nanopore. Such voltage-induced gating in single nanopores can be realized in a reversible manner through electrowetting of inner walls of the nanopores. The resulting I-V curves of such artificial hydrophobic nanopores mimic biological voltage-gated channels.

  5. Cyclic networks of quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabauy, Peter

    In this thesis we first give an introduction to the basic aspects of quantum computation followed by an analysis of networks of quantum logic gates where the qubit lines are loops (cyclic). Thus far, investigations into cyclic networks of quantum logic gates have not been examined (as far as we know) by the quantum information community. In our investigations of cyclic quantum networks we have studied simple, one and two qubit systems. The analysis includes: classifying networks into groups, the dynamics of the qubits in a cyclic quantum network, and the perturbation effects of an external qubit acting on a cyclic quantum network. The analysis will be followed by a discussion on quantum algorithms and quantum information processing with cyclic quantum networks, a novel implementation of a cyclic network quantum memory and a discussion of quantum sensors via cyclic quantum networks.

  6. Gated high speed optical detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S. I.; Carson, L. M.; Neal, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and test of two gated, high speed optical detectors for use in high speed digital laser communication links are discussed. The optical detectors used a dynamic crossed field photomultiplier and electronics including dc bias and RF drive circuits, automatic remote synchronization circuits, automatic gain control circuits, and threshold detection circuits. The equipment is used to detect binary encoded signals from a mode locked neodynium laser.

  7. MATHEMATICAL ROUTINES FOR ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this package is to provide the scientific and engineering community with a library of programs useful for performing routine mathematical manipulations. This collection of programs will enable scientists to concentrate on their work without having to write their own routines for solving common problems, thus saving considerable amounts of time. This package contains sixteen subroutines. Each is separately documented with descriptions of the invoking subroutine call, its required parameters, and a sample test program. The functions available include: maxima, minima, and sort of vectors; factorials; random number generator (uniform or Gaussian distribution); complimentary error function; fast Fourier Transformation; Simpson's Rule integration; matrix determinate and inversion; Bessel function (J Bessel function for any order, and modified Bessel function for zero order); roots of a polynomial; roots of non-linear equation; and the solution of first order ordinary differential equations using Hamming's predictor-corrector method. There is also a subroutine for using a dot matrix printer to plot a given set of y values for a uniformly increasing x value. This package is written in FORTRAN 77 (Super Soft Small System FORTRAN compiler) for batch execution and has been implemented on the IBM PC computer series under MS-DOS with a central memory requirement of approximately 28K of 8 bit bytes for all subroutines. This program was developed in 1986.

  8. CPU timing routines for a CONVEX C220 computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bynum, Mary Ann

    1989-01-01

    The timing routines available on the CONVEX C220 computer system in the Structural Mechanics Division (SMD) at NASA Langley Research Center are examined. The function of the timing routines, the use of the timing routines in sequential, parallel, and vector code, and the interpretation of the results from the timing routines with respect to the CONVEX model of computing are described. The timing routines available on the SMD CONVEX fall into two groups. The first group includes standard timing routines generally available with UNIX 4.3 BSD operating systems, while the second group includes routines unique to the SMD CONVEX. The standard timing routines described in this report are /bin/csh time,/bin/time, etime, and ctime. The routines unique to the SMD CONVEX are getinfo, second, cputime, toc, and a parallel profiling package made up of palprof, palinit, and palsum.

  9. Modes of glutamate receptor gating

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Gabriela K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The time course of excitatory synaptic currents, the major means of fast communication between neurons of the central nervous system, is encoded in the dynamic behaviour of post-synaptic glutamate-activated channels. First-pass attempts to explain the glutamate-elicited currents with mathematical models produced reaction mechanisms that included only the most basic functionally defined states: resting vs. liganded, closed vs. open, responsive vs. desensitized. In contrast, single-molecule observations afforded by the patch-clamp technique revealed an unanticipated kinetic multiplicity of transitions: from microseconds-lasting flickers to minutes-long modes. How these kinetically defined events impact the shape of the synaptic response, how they relate to rearrangements in receptor structure, and whether and how they are physiologically controlled represent currently active research directions. Modal gating, which refers to the slowest, least frequently observed ion-channel transitions, has been demonstrated for representatives of all ion channel families. However, reaction schemes have been largely confined to the short- and medium-range time scales. For glutamate receptors as well, modal gating has only recently come under rigorous scrutiny. This article reviews the evidence for modal gating of glutamate receptors and the still developing hypotheses about the mechanism(s) by which modal shifts occur and the ways in which they may impact the time course of synaptic transmission. PMID:22106181

  10. Hydrophobic gating in ion channels.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Prafulla; Sansom, Mark S P; Tucker, Stephen J

    2015-01-16

    Biological ion channels are nanoscale transmembrane pores. When water and ions are enclosed within the narrow confines of a sub-nanometer hydrophobic pore, they exhibit behavior not evident from macroscopic descriptions. At this nanoscopic level, the unfavorable interaction between the lining of a hydrophobic pore and water may lead to stochastic liquid-vapor transitions. These transient vapor states are "dewetted", i.e. effectively devoid of water molecules within all or part of the pore, thus leading to an energetic barrier to ion conduction. This process, termed "hydrophobic gating", was first observed in molecular dynamics simulations of model nanopores, where the principles underlying hydrophobic gating (i.e., changes in diameter, polarity, or transmembrane voltage) have now been extensively validated. Computational, structural, and functional studies now indicate that biological ion channels may also exploit hydrophobic gating to regulate ion flow within their pores. Here we review the evidence for this process and propose that this unusual behavior of water represents an increasingly important element in understanding the relationship between ion channel structure and function.

  11. Gating of two pore domain potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Mathie, Alistair; Al-Moubarak, Ehab; Veale, Emma L

    2010-09-01

    Two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels are responsible for background leak currents which regulate the membrane potential and excitability of many cell types. Their activity is modulated by a variety of chemical and physical stimuli which act to increase or decrease the open probability of individual K2P channels. Crystallographic data and homology modelling suggest that all K(+) channels possess a highly conserved structure for ion selectivity and gating mechanisms. Like other K(+) channels, K2P channels are thought to have two primary conserved gating mechanisms: an inactivation (or C-type) gate at the selectivity filter close to the extracellular side of the channel and an activation gate at the intracellular entrance to the channel involving key, identified, hinge glycine residues. Zinc and hydrogen ions regulate Drosophila KCNK0 and mammalian TASK channels, respectively, by interacting with the inactivation gate of these channels. In contrast, the voltage dependence of TASK3 channels is mediated through its activation gate. For KCNK0 it has been shown that the gates display positive cooperativity. It is of much interest to determine whether other K2P regulatory compounds interact with either the activation gate or the inactivation gate to alter channel activity or, indeed, whether additional regulatory gating pathways exist.

  12. Gating of two pore domain potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Mathie, Alistair; Al-Moubarak, Ehab; Veale, Emma L

    2010-01-01

    Two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels are responsible for background leak currents which regulate the membrane potential and excitability of many cell types. Their activity is modulated by a variety of chemical and physical stimuli which act to increase or decrease the open probability of individual K2P channels. Crystallographic data and homology modelling suggest that all K+ channels possess a highly conserved structure for ion selectivity and gating mechanisms. Like other K+ channels, K2P channels are thought to have two primary conserved gating mechanisms: an inactivation (or C-type) gate at the selectivity filter close to the extracellular side of the channel and an activation gate at the intracellular entrance to the channel involving key, identified, hinge glycine residues. Zinc and hydrogen ions regulate Drosophila KCNK0 and mammalian TASK channels, respectively, by interacting with the inactivation gate of these channels. In contrast, the voltage dependence of TASK3 channels is mediated through its activation gate. For KCNK0 it has been shown that the gates display positive cooperativity. It is of much interest to determine whether other K2P regulatory compounds interact with either the activation gate or the inactivation gate to alter channel activity or, indeed, whether additional regulatory gating pathways exist. PMID:20566661

  13. Monolithic transistor gate energy recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Energy is recovered from an insulated gate semiconductor switch, such as a MOSFET, that is otherwise lost in the gate capacitance by producing a notch in the gate control voltage for an interval B following an interval A after initial application of a gate control voltage pulse for turning the switch on, and a notch for an interval C following termination of the gate control voltage pulse followed by interval D during which the switch is turned on again, where each interval is a period .DELTA.T given by ##EQU1## L.sub.s is the inductance (discrete and/or parasitic) in series with the gate electrode of the insulated gate semiconductor switch, and C.sub.in is the capacitance of that switch between its gate and source electrodes. The interval .DELTA.T may be provided directly by timing in a pulse forming circuit for the gate control voltage applied, or adaptively by sensing the gate voltage v.sub.g and comparing it with fixed progressively higher voltages v.sub.1, v.sub.2 and v.sub.3, where v.sub.2 is intermediate v.sub.1 and v.sub.3 which correspond to the lower and upper levels of v.sub.g as the switch is turned off and on.

  14. Hafnium zirconate gate dielectric for advanced gate stack applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, R. I.; Triyoso, D. H.; Samavedam, S. B.; White, B. E.

    2007-04-01

    We report on the development of a hafnium zirconate (HfZrO4) alloy gate dielectric for advanced gate stack applications. The HfZrO4 and hafnium dioxide (HfO2) films were formed by atomic layer deposition using metal halides and heavy water as precursors. The HfZrO4 material properties were examined and compared with those of HfO2 by a wide variety of analytical methods. The dielectric properties, device performance, and reliability of HfZrO4 were investigated by fabricating HfZrO4/tantalum carbide (TaxCy) metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor. The HfZrO4 dielectric film has smaller band gap, smaller and more uniform grains, less charge traps, and more uniform film quality than HfO2. The HfZrO4 dielectric films exhibited good thermal stability with silicon. Compared to HfO2, the HfZrO4 gate dielectric showed lower capacitance equivalent thickness value, higher transconductance, less charge trapping, higher drive current, lower threshold voltage (Vt), reduced capacitance-voltage (C-V ) hysteresis, lower interface state density, superior wafer level thickness uniformity, and longer positive bias temperature instability lifetime. Incorporation of zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) into HfO2 enhances the dielectric constant (k ) of the resulting HfZrO4 which is associated with structural phase transformation from mainly monoclinic to tetragonal. The tetragonal phase increases the k value of HfZrO4 dielectric to a large value as predicted. The improved device characteristics are attributed to less oxygen vacancy in the fine grained microstructure of HfZrO4 films.

  15. Adiponectin as a routine clinical biomarker.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Ken; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin is a protein synthesized and secreted predominantly by adipocytes into the peripheral blood. However, circulating adiponectin level is inversely related with body weight, especially visceral fat accumulation. The mechanism of this paradoxical relation remains obscure. Low circulating adiponectin concentrations (hypoadiponectinemia; <4 μg/mL) are associated with a variety of diseases, including dysmetabolism (type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, hyperuricemia), atherosclerosis (coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease), sleep apnea, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, gastritis and gastro-esophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel diseases, pancreatitis, osteoporosis, and cancer (endometrial cancer, postmenopausal breast cancer, leukemia, colon cancer, gastric cancer, prostate cancer). On the other hand, hyperadiponectinemia is associated with cardiac, renal and pulmonary diseases. This review article focuses on the significance of adiponectin as a clinical biomarker of obesity-related diseases. Routine measurement of adiponectin in patients with lifestyle-related diseases is highly recommended.

  16. [Management of aflibercept in routine clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Cabrera López, F

    2015-03-01

    Aflibercept is a new anti-vegf drug that, unlike ranibizumab and bevacizumab blocks both vegf-A and placental growth factor. Moreover, it binds with much greater strength and affinity to human VEGF-A165 than other endogenous vegf receptors, conferring it with a more extended effect and allowing a lower frequency of intravitreal injections. This facilitates the adoption of fixed treatment regimens other than monthly or individual regimens such as "treat and extend". Aflibercept is indicated for the treatment of neovascular (exudative) age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), visual alteration due to macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and visual alteration due to diabetic macular edema (DME). The present article reviews the management of aflibercept in routine clinical practice, based on the specifications of its new core data sheet, which includes all the therapeutic indications in which its use has been approved and evaluating the distinct alternatives and treatment regimens after the initial loading doses.

  17. Experimental superposition of orders of quantum gates.

    PubMed

    Procopio, Lorenzo M; Moqanaki, Amir; Araújo, Mateus; Costa, Fabio; Alonso Calafell, Irati; Dowd, Emma G; Hamel, Deny R; Rozema, Lee A; Brukner, Časlav; Walther, Philip

    2015-08-07

    Quantum computers achieve a speed-up by placing quantum bits (qubits) in superpositions of different states. However, it has recently been appreciated that quantum mechanics also allows one to 'superimpose different operations'. Furthermore, it has been shown that using a qubit to coherently control the gate order allows one to accomplish a task--determining if two gates commute or anti-commute--with fewer gate uses than any known quantum algorithm. Here we experimentally demonstrate this advantage, in a photonic context, using a second qubit to control the order in which two gates are applied to a first qubit. We create the required superposition of gate orders by using additional degrees of freedom of the photons encoding our qubits. The new resource we exploit can be interpreted as a superposition of causal orders, and could allow quantum algorithms to be implemented with an efficiency unlikely to be achieved on a fixed-gate-order quantum computer.

  18. Contact gating at GHz frequency in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Wilmart, Q.; Inhofer, A.; Boukhicha, M.; Yang, W.; Rosticher, M.; Morfin, P.; Garroum, N.; Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm of graphene transistors is based on the gate modulation of the channel carrier density by means of a local channel gate. This standard architecture is subject to the scaling limit of the channel length and further restrictions due to access and contact resistances impeding the device performance. We propose a novel design, overcoming these issues by implementing additional local gates underneath the contact region which allow a full control of the Klein barrier taking place at the contact edge. In particular, our work demonstrates the GHz operation of transistors driven by independent contact gates. We benchmark the standard channel and novel contact gating and report for the later dynamical transconductance levels at the state of the art. Our finding may find applications in electronics and optoelectronics whenever there is need to control independently the Fermi level and the electrostatic potential of electronic sources or to get rid of cumbersome local channel gates. PMID:26879709

  19. Experimental superposition of orders of quantum gates

    PubMed Central

    Procopio, Lorenzo M.; Moqanaki, Amir; Araújo, Mateus; Costa, Fabio; Alonso Calafell, Irati; Dowd, Emma G.; Hamel, Deny R.; Rozema, Lee A.; Brukner, Časlav; Walther, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Quantum computers achieve a speed-up by placing quantum bits (qubits) in superpositions of different states. However, it has recently been appreciated that quantum mechanics also allows one to ‘superimpose different operations'. Furthermore, it has been shown that using a qubit to coherently control the gate order allows one to accomplish a task—determining if two gates commute or anti-commute—with fewer gate uses than any known quantum algorithm. Here we experimentally demonstrate this advantage, in a photonic context, using a second qubit to control the order in which two gates are applied to a first qubit. We create the required superposition of gate orders by using additional degrees of freedom of the photons encoding our qubits. The new resource we exploit can be interpreted as a superposition of causal orders, and could allow quantum algorithms to be implemented with an efficiency unlikely to be achieved on a fixed-gate-order quantum computer. PMID:26250107

  20. Cognitive mechanisms associated with auditory sensory gating.

    PubMed

    Jones, L A; Hills, P J; Dick, K M; Jones, S P; Bright, P

    2016-02-01

    Sensory gating is a neurophysiological measure of inhibition that is characterised by a reduction in the P50 event-related potential to a repeated identical stimulus. The objective of this work was to determine the cognitive mechanisms that relate to the neurological phenomenon of auditory sensory gating. Sixty participants underwent a battery of 10 cognitive tasks, including qualitatively different measures of attentional inhibition, working memory, and fluid intelligence. Participants additionally completed a paired-stimulus paradigm as a measure of auditory sensory gating. A correlational analysis revealed that several tasks correlated significantly with sensory gating. However once fluid intelligence and working memory were accounted for, only a measure of latent inhibition and accuracy scores on the continuous performance task showed significant sensitivity to sensory gating. We conclude that sensory gating reflects the identification of goal-irrelevant information at the encoding (input) stage and the subsequent ability to selectively attend to goal-relevant information based on that previous identification.

  1. A bistable electromagnetically actuated rotary gate microvalve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luharuka, Rajesh; Hesketh, Peter J.

    2008-03-01

    Two types of rotary gate microvalves are developed for flow modulation in microfluidic systems. These microvalves have been tested for an open flow rate of up to 100 sccm and operate under a differential pressure of 6 psig with flow modulation of up to 100. The microvalve consists of a suspended gate that rotates in the plane of the chip to regulate flow through the orifice. The gate is suspended by a novel fully compliant in-plane rotary bistable micromechanism (IPRBM) that advantageously constrains the gate in all degrees of freedom except for in-plane rotational motion. Multiple inlet/outlet orifices provide flexibility of operating the microvalve in three different flow configurations. The rotary gate microvalve is switched with an external electromagnetic actuator. The suspended gate is made of a soft magnetic material and its electromagnetic actuation is based on the operating principle of a variable-reluctance stepper motor.

  2. Cognitive mechanisms associated with auditory sensory gating

    PubMed Central

    Jones, L.A.; Hills, P.J.; Dick, K.M.; Jones, S.P.; Bright, P.

    2016-01-01

    Sensory gating is a neurophysiological measure of inhibition that is characterised by a reduction in the P50 event-related potential to a repeated identical stimulus. The objective of this work was to determine the cognitive mechanisms that relate to the neurological phenomenon of auditory sensory gating. Sixty participants underwent a battery of 10 cognitive tasks, including qualitatively different measures of attentional inhibition, working memory, and fluid intelligence. Participants additionally completed a paired-stimulus paradigm as a measure of auditory sensory gating. A correlational analysis revealed that several tasks correlated significantly with sensory gating. However once fluid intelligence and working memory were accounted for, only a measure of latent inhibition and accuracy scores on the continuous performance task showed significant sensitivity to sensory gating. We conclude that sensory gating reflects the identification of goal-irrelevant information at the encoding (input) stage and the subsequent ability to selectively attend to goal-relevant information based on that previous identification. PMID:26716891

  3. When Routines Are Not so Routine: Exploring Coordination Work in Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haque, Saira Naim

    2010-01-01

    Many work processes take place through routines, or recurrent patterns of action. These activities involve individuals from several occupations working across spatial, temporal, and organizational boundaries. Crossing these professional, temporal and spatial boundaries has unique challenges which can lead to coordination failures. In these…

  4. Floating gate transistors as biosensors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisbie, C. Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Electrolyte gated transistors (EGTs) are a sub-class of thin film transistors that are extremely promising for biological sensing applications. These devices employ a solid electrolyte as the gate insulator; the very large capacitance of the electrolyte results in low voltage operation and high transconductance or gain. This talk will describe the fabrication of floating gate EGTs and their use as ricin sensors. The critical performance metrics for EGTs compared with other types of TFTs will also be reviewed.

  5. Family Routines and School Readiness during the Transition to Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferretti, Larissa K.; Bub, Kristen L.

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: Using data from 3,250 participants in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort, we used structural equation modeling to investigate whether family routines (e.g., bedtime routine, reading routine) established in preschool predict children's school readiness (i.e., academic skills, social-emotional skills, and…

  6. Rituals and Routines: Supporting Infants and Toddlers and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Linda; Petersen, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    The words "routine" and "ritual" are sometimes used interchangeably. Yet there are some important differences. Routines are repeated, predictable events that provide a foundation for the daily tasks in a child's life. Teachers can create a predictable routine in early childhood settings for infants and toddlers, and they can individualize those…

  7. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493....1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, §...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493....1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, §...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493....1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, §...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493....1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, §...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493....1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, §...

  12. [The controversy of routine articulator mounting in orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Han, Xianglong; Bai, Ding

    2013-06-01

    Articulators have been widely used by clinicians of dentistry. But routine articulator mounting is still controversial in orthodontics. Orthodontists oriented by gnathology approve routine articulator mounting while nongnathologic orthodontists disapprove it. This article reviews the thoughts of orthodontist that they agree or disagree with routine articulator mounting based on the considerations of biting, temporomandibular disorder (TMD), periodontitis, and so on.

  13. Routines and Transitions: A Guide for Early Childhood Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malenfont, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    In early childhood settings, children spend over 50 percent of their time on handwashing, dressing, napping, and other routines and transitions. "Routines and Transitions" is a guide to help turn these routine daily activities into learning experiences. By using transitions wisely, providers not only help children develop skills, but also run a…

  14. Correlates of Family Routines in Head Start Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Susan L.; Stoneman, Zolinda

    2004-01-01

    The popular parenting literature places great importance on the role of routines in children's lives. Empirical research on family routines, however, is limited. This study examined correlates of family routines in a Head Start population in order to better understand their significance in the lives of families. Weak correlations were found…

  15. Four Great Gates: Dilemmas, Directions and Distractions in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delamont, Sara

    2005-01-01

    In James Elroy Flecker's poem "The Gates of Damascus", the poet imagines four exits from the safe comfortable city to the outside world. Each gate takes the traveller into a different set of temptations and dangers. The Aleppo Gate leads to trade and commerce, the Mecca Gate is for faith and pilgrimage, the Lebanon Gate is for exploration and the…

  16. Picosecond Optoelectronic AND-GATE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    SOTA. The bias, gate. and 13 ground probes make contact to their respective bond pads. Fig. 12 Temporal response of the SOTA. 14 Fig. 13 Sheet resistance for...post-annealed, lattice matched LT-GaAs, LT- 18 In0.35GaO. 65 As, LT-In0.53Ga0 .4 7As. The sheet resistance for polycrystalline LT-In0 .35Ga0...65As is also shown. The minimum acceptable values for sheet resistance for detector areas of 50x50 ptm 2 and 8x8 4tm 2 are shown and correspond to a dark

  17. Stimuli-responsive smart gating membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuang; Wang, Wei; Xie, Rui; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2016-02-07

    Membranes are playing paramount roles in the sustainable development of myriad fields such as energy, environmental and resource management, and human health. However, the unalterable pore size and surface properties of traditional porous membranes restrict their efficient applications. The performances of traditional membranes will be weakened upon unavoidable membrane fouling, and they cannot be applied to cases where self-regulated permeability and selectivity are required. Inspired by natural cell membranes with stimuli-responsive channels, artificial stimuli-responsive smart gating membranes are developed by chemically/physically incorporating stimuli-responsive materials as functional gates into traditional porous membranes, to provide advanced functions and enhanced performances for breaking the bottlenecks of traditional membrane technologies. Smart gating membranes, integrating the advantages of traditional porous membrane substrates and smart functional gates, can self-regulate their permeability and selectivity via the flexible adjustment of pore sizes and surface properties based on the "open/close" switch of the smart gates in response to environmental stimuli. This tutorial review summarizes the recent developments in stimuli-responsive smart gating membranes, including the design strategies and the fabrication strategies that are based on the introduction of the stimuli-responsive gates after or during membrane formation, and the positively and negatively responsive gating models of versatile stimuli-responsive smart gating membranes, as well as the advanced applications of smart gating membranes for regulating substance concentration in reactors, controlling the release rate of drugs, separating active molecules based on size or affinity, and the self-cleaning of membrane surfaces. With self-regulated membrane performances, smart gating membranes show great power for use in global sustainable development.

  18. CULA: hybrid GPU accelerated linear algebra routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, John R.; Price, Daniel K.; Spagnoli, Kyle E.; Paolini, Aaron L.; Kelmelis, Eric J.

    2010-04-01

    The modern graphics processing unit (GPU) found in many standard personal computers is a highly parallel math processor capable of nearly 1 TFLOPS peak throughput at a cost similar to a high-end CPU and an excellent FLOPS/watt ratio. High-level linear algebra operations are computationally intense, often requiring O(N3) operations and would seem a natural fit for the processing power of the GPU. Our work is on CULA, a GPU accelerated implementation of linear algebra routines. We present results from factorizations such as LU decomposition, singular value decomposition and QR decomposition along with applications like system solution and least squares. The GPU execution model featured by NVIDIA GPUs based on CUDA demands very strong parallelism, requiring between hundreds and thousands of simultaneous operations to achieve high performance. Some constructs from linear algebra map extremely well to the GPU and others map poorly. CPUs, on the other hand, do well at smaller order parallelism and perform acceptably during low-parallelism code segments. Our work addresses this via hybrid a processing model, in which the CPU and GPU work simultaneously to produce results. In many cases, this is accomplished by allowing each platform to do the work it performs most naturally.

  19. Routine polysomnography in an epilepsy monitoring unit.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Matthew C L; Costello, Craig A; White, Elise J; Smit, Michelle; Carino, John; Strawhorn, Andrew; Jackson, Brianna; Kwan, Patrick; French, Christopher R; Yerra, S Raju; Tan, K Meng; O'Brien, Terence J; Goldin, Jeremy

    2013-08-01

    Up to 13% of patients with epilepsy have moderate or severe sleep-disordered breathing, in particular obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a disorder associated with reduced quality of life, worsened seizure control, and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Combining video-EEG monitoring with polysomnography (VPSG) provides the opportunity to diagnose clinically significant OSA as well as relate the occurrence of seizures and the epilepsy diagnosis to the presence and severity of sleep-disordered breathing. We have established routine VPSG in our inpatient video-EEG monitoring unit and present our findings in 87 patients. Clinically significant sleep-disordered breathing was diagnosed in 19 of 87 (22%) patients. Patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) had poorer sleep quality compared to patients with epilepsy and those with neither diagnosis, whereas the prevalence of clinically significant sleep-disordered breathing in patients with PNES (29%) did not differ significantly compared to patients with epilepsy (21%) and those with neither diagnosis (22%). The differences in sleep quality are not explained by differences in body mass index (BMI) or anti-epileptic drug (AED) effects.

  20. Antinuclear antibody determination in a routine laboratory.

    PubMed Central

    Feltkamp, T E

    1996-01-01

    Pitfalls in the method for demonstrating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by the indirect immunofluorescence technique are described and the use of international standard preparations outlined. Determination of the optimal border dilution dividing positive from negative results is discussed. Each laboratory is a unique setting; it must define its own method, which should rarely be changed. One should not rely on copying methods from other laboratories or commercial firms, but the reproducibility of the nuclear substrate, the conjugate, and other variables should be controlled daily by the use of a control serum which has been related to the WHO standard preparation for ANA of the homogeneous type. Since many sera contain mixtures of different ANA, the results of routine tests are best expressed in titres or expressions of the intensity of fluorescence. The ANA test using the immunofluorescence technique should be used as a screening method for other tests allowing a more defined interpretation of the ANA. Each laboratory should individually determine the border between positive and negative results. Therefore about 200 sera from local healthy controls equally distributed over sex and age, and 100 sera from local patients with definite SLE should be tested. Since the local clinicians should become acquainted with this border it should rarely be changed. Finally each laboratory should participate regularly in national and international quality control rounds, where sera known to be difficult to interpret are tested. The judgment of the organisers of these rounds should stimulate improvements in the participating laboratories. PMID:8984936

  1. Antinuclear antibody determination in a routine laboratory.

    PubMed

    Feltkamp, T E

    1996-10-01

    Pitfalls in the method for demonstrating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by the indirect immunofluorescence technique are described and the use of international standard preparations outlined. Determination of the optimal border dilution dividing positive from negative results is discussed. Each laboratory is a unique setting; it must define its own method, which should rarely be changed. One should not rely on copying methods from other laboratories or commercial firms, but the reproducibility of the nuclear substrate, the conjugate, and other variables should be controlled daily by the use of a control serum which has been related to the WHO standard preparation for ANA of the homogeneous type. Since many sera contain mixtures of different ANA, the results of routine tests are best expressed in titres or expressions of the intensity of fluorescence. The ANA test using the immunofluorescence technique should be used as a screening method for other tests allowing a more defined interpretation of the ANA. Each laboratory should individually determine the border between positive and negative results. Therefore about 200 sera from local healthy controls equally distributed over sex and age, and 100 sera from local patients with definite SLE should be tested. Since the local clinicians should become acquainted with this border it should rarely be changed. Finally each laboratory should participate regularly in national and international quality control rounds, where sera known to be difficult to interpret are tested. The judgment of the organisers of these rounds should stimulate improvements in the participating laboratories.

  2. 23. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING TRUNNION PIN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING TRUNNION PIN, GATE ARM AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 10, Guttenberg, Clayton County, IA

  3. 17. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE, SHOWING SUBMERSIBLE (LEFT) AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE, SHOWING SUBMERSIBLE (LEFT) AND NONSUBMERSIBLE (RIGHT) GATES, PIERS AND DAM BRIDGE, WITH ROLLER GATE HEADHOUSE IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 10, Guttenberg, Clayton County, IA

  4. Nanosecond gating properties of proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, N. S. P.; King, N. S. P.; Yates, G. J.; Jaramillo, S. A.; Noel, B. W.; Detch, J. L., Jr.; Ogle, J. W.

    The optical gating properties of Multichannel plate image intensifiers were characterized. Emphasis was placed on parameters relevant to gating speed and correlations between the applied electrical and resultant optical gates.

  5. A gate drive circuit for gate-turn-off (GTO) devices in series stack.

    SciTech Connect

    Despe, O.

    1999-04-13

    A gate-turn-off (GTO) switch is under development at the Advanced Photon Source as a replacement for a thyratron switch in high power pulsed application. The high voltage in the application requires multiple GTOs connected in series. One component that is critical to the success of GTO operation is the gate drive circuit. The gate drive circuit has to provide fast high-current pulses to the GTO gate for fast turn-on and turn-off. It also has to be able to operate while floating at high voltage. This paper describes a gate drive circuit that meets these requirements.

  6. Assisted extraction of the energy level spacings and lever arms in direct current bias measurements of one-dimensional quantum wires, using an image recognition routine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesage, A. A. J.; Smith, L. W.; Al-Taie, H.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Kelly, M. J.; Smith, C. G.

    2015-01-01

    A multiplexer technique is used to individually measure an array of 256 split gates on a single GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. This results in the generation of large volumes of data, which requires the development of automated data analysis routines. An algorithm is developed to find the spacing between discrete energy levels, which form due to transverse confinement from the split gate. The lever arm, which relates split gate voltage to energy, is also found from the measured data. This reduces the time spent on the analysis. Comparison with estimates obtained visually shows that the algorithm returns reliable results for subband spacing of split gates measured at 1.4 K. The routine is also used to assess direct current bias spectroscopy measurements at lower temperatures (50 mK). This technique is versatile and can be extended to other types of measurements. For example, it is used to extract the magnetic field at which Zeeman-split 1D subbands cross one another.

  7. Assisted extraction of the energy level spacings and lever arms in direct current bias measurements of one-dimensional quantum wires, using an image recognition routine

    SciTech Connect

    Lesage, A. A. J. Smith, L. W. Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Smith, C. G.; Al-Taie, H.; Kelly, M. J.; See, P.

    2015-01-07

    A multiplexer technique is used to individually measure an array of 256 split gates on a single GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. This results in the generation of large volumes of data, which requires the development of automated data analysis routines. An algorithm is developed to find the spacing between discrete energy levels, which form due to transverse confinement from the split gate. The lever arm, which relates split gate voltage to energy, is also found from the measured data. This reduces the time spent on the analysis. Comparison with estimates obtained visually shows that the algorithm returns reliable results for subband spacing of split gates measured at 1.4 K. The routine is also used to assess direct current bias spectroscopy measurements at lower temperatures (50 mK). This technique is versatile and can be extended to other types of measurements. For example, it is used to extract the magnetic field at which Zeeman-split 1D subbands cross one another.

  8. Protected gates for topological quantum field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beverland, Michael E.; Buerschaper, Oliver; Koenig, Robert; Pastawski, Fernando; Preskill, John; Sijher, Sumit

    2016-02-01

    We study restrictions on locality-preserving unitary logical gates for topological quantum codes in two spatial dimensions. A locality-preserving operation is one which maps local operators to local operators — for example, a constant-depth quantum circuit of geometrically local gates, or evolution for a constant time governed by a geometrically local bounded-strength Hamiltonian. Locality-preserving logical gates of topological codes are intrinsically fault tolerant because spatially localized errors remain localized, and hence sufficiently dilute errors remain correctable. By invoking general properties of two-dimensional topological field theories, we find that the locality-preserving logical gates are severely limited for codes which admit non-abelian anyons, in particular, there are no locality-preserving logical gates on the torus or the sphere with M punctures if the braiding of anyons is computationally universal. Furthermore, for Ising anyons on the M-punctured sphere, locality-preserving gates must be elements of the logical Pauli group. We derive these results by relating logical gates of a topological code to automorphisms of the Verlinde algebra of the corresponding anyon model, and by requiring the logical gates to be compatible with basis changes in the logical Hilbert space arising from local F-moves and the mapping class group.

  9. Reconstruction of dynamic gated cardiac SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Mingwu; Yang Yongyi; King, Michael A.

    2006-11-15

    In this paper we propose an image reconstruction procedure which aims to unify gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and dynamic SPECT into a single method. We divide the cardiac cycle into a number of gate intervals as in gated SPECT, but treat the tracer distribution for each gate as a time-varying signal. By using both dynamic and motion-compensated temporal regularization, our reconstruction procedure will produce an image sequence that shows both cardiac motion and time-varying tracer distribution simultaneously. To demonstrate the proposed reconstruction method, we simulated gated cardiac perfusion imaging using the gated mathematical cardiac-torso (gMCAT) phantom with Tc99m-Teboroxime as the imaging agent. Our results show that the proposed method can produce more accurate reconstruction of gated dynamic images than independent reconstruction of individual gate frames with spatial smoothness alone. In particular, our results show that the former could improve the contrast to noise ratio of a simulated perfusion defect by as much as 100% when compared to the latter.

  10. Channel gating pore: a new therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Kornilov, Polina; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2013-09-01

    Each subunit of voltage-gated cation channels comprises a voltage-sensing domain and a pore region. In a paper recently published in Cell Research, Li et al. showed that the gating charge pathway of the voltage sensor of the KCNQ2 K+ channel can accommodate small opener molecules and offer a new target to treat hyperexcitability disorders.

  11. Using Gates to Enhance Your Paddling Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, Robert B.; Mason, David W.

    1995-01-01

    Describes methods for constructing gates and slalom courses to teach paddling skills to young campers. Describes how the English Gate system, a standardized course, can be used both for instruction and to test camper's paddling skills. Recommends the use of a three-level award system (novice, intermediate, and expert) to recognize camper…

  12. Protected gates for topological quantum field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Beverland, Michael E.; Pastawski, Fernando; Preskill, John; Buerschaper, Oliver; Koenig, Robert; Sijher, Sumit

    2016-02-15

    We study restrictions on locality-preserving unitary logical gates for topological quantum codes in two spatial dimensions. A locality-preserving operation is one which maps local operators to local operators — for example, a constant-depth quantum circuit of geometrically local gates, or evolution for a constant time governed by a geometrically local bounded-strength Hamiltonian. Locality-preserving logical gates of topological codes are intrinsically fault tolerant because spatially localized errors remain localized, and hence sufficiently dilute errors remain correctable. By invoking general properties of two-dimensional topological field theories, we find that the locality-preserving logical gates are severely limited for codes which admit non-abelian anyons, in particular, there are no locality-preserving logical gates on the torus or the sphere with M punctures if the braiding of anyons is computationally universal. Furthermore, for Ising anyons on the M-punctured sphere, locality-preserving gates must be elements of the logical Pauli group. We derive these results by relating logical gates of a topological code to automorphisms of the Verlinde algebra of the corresponding anyon model, and by requiring the logical gates to be compatible with basis changes in the logical Hilbert space arising from local F-moves and the mapping class group.

  13. Automatically closing swing gate closure assembly

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Chih; Schuck, William J.; Gilmore, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    A swing gate closure assembly for nuclear reactor tipoff assembly wherein the swing gate is cammed open by a fuel element or spacer but is reliably closed at a desired closing rate primarily by hydraulic forces in the absence of a fuel charge.

  14. Retaining latch for a water pit gate

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, A.R.

    1997-11-18

    A retaining latch is described for use in a hazardous materials storage or handling facility to adjustably retain a water pit gate in a gate frame. A retaining latch is provided comprising a latch plate which is rotatably mounted to each end of the top of the gate and a recessed opening, formed in the gate frame, for engaging an edge of the latch plate. The latch plate is circular in profile with one side cut away or flat, such that the latch plate is D-shaped. The remaining circular edge of the latch plate comprises steps of successively reduced thickness. The stepped edge of the latch plate fits inside a recessed opening formed in the gate frame. As the latch plate is rotated, alternate steps of the latch plate are engaged by the recessed opening. When the latch plate is rotated such that the flat portion of the latch plate faces the recessed opening in the gate frame, there is no connection between the opening and the latch plate and the gate is unlatched from the gate frame. 4 figs.

  15. Retaining latch for a water pit gate

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    The present invention relates to retaining devices which are used to latch two elements or parts together and, more particularly, to gate latches for use in locking a gate to a wall bracket in a water pit utilized to store or handle hazardous materials. A retaining latch is provided comprising a latch plate which is rotatably mounted to each end of the top of the gate and a recessed opening, formed in the gate frame, for engaging an edge of the latch plate. The latch plate is circular in profile with one side cut away or flat, such that the latch plate is D-shaped. The remaining circular edge of the latch plate comprises steps of successively reduced thickness. The stepped edge of the latch plate fits inside a recessed opening formed in the gate frame. As the latch plate is rotated, alternate steps of the latch plate are engaged by the recessed opening. When the latch plate is rotated such that the flat portion of the latch plate faces the recessed opening in the gate frame, there is no connection between the opening and the latch plate and the gate is unlatched from the gate frame.

  16. Retaining latch for a water pit gate

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, Arden R.

    1997-01-01

    A retaining latch for use in a hazardous materials storage or handling facility to adjustably retain a water pit gate in a gate frame. A retaining latch is provided comprising a latch plate which is rotatably mounted to each end of the top of the gate and a recessed opening, formed in the gate frame, for engaging an edge of the latch plate. The latch plate is circular in profile with one side cut away or flat, such that the latch plate is D-shaped. The remaining circular edge of the latch plate comprises steps of successively reduced thickness. The stepped edge of the latch plate fits inside a recessed opening formed in the gate frame. As the latch plate is rotated, alternate steps of the latch plate are engaged by the recessed opening. When the latch plate is rotated such that the flat portion of the latch plate faces the recessed opening in the gate frame, there is no connection between the opening and the latch plate and the gate is unlatched from the gate frame.

  17. Routine Processing and Evaluation of HST Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, S. B.; Wilson, I. R.; Crawford, J. R.; Dempsey, R. C.; Ewald, R. A.; Gillam, S. D.; Giovane, E. A.; Kochte, M. C.; Schultz, A. B.; Scott, J. F.; Swade, D. A.

    1993-05-01

    All WFPC, FOC, FOS, GHRS, HSP observations taken by the Hubble Space Telescope are automatically processed by the Routine Science Data Processing (RSDP) ``pipeline'' at STScI, under the Post Observation Data Processing System (PODPS) branch. Over 36,000 readouts have been processed since launch, 97% of these within two days of execution. Packetized science data enter the pipeline after telemetry bit-error correction at the Data Capture Facility, GSFC. Software sorts the data by observation, inserts fill packets as needed, and examines the data structure for errors. If none, the Edited Information Set is converted into a generic (waivered FITS) format. If repair is required (1-2% of observations), tested procedures are used to modify erroneous bits or keywords. The observation is then calibrated, and a film file or laser plot is generated. The HST instrument teams supply all information for calibration performed by RSDP. As calibration evolves, PODPS updates the flat fields and other files and tables for subsequent pipeline processing. Also, the observer may recalibrate the data with STSDAS tools. PODPS staff astronomers, using STSDAS IRAF tasks and SAOimage, evaluate the quality of each observation and provide keywords such as `OK' or `UNDEREXP' plus informative comments to the archive catalog. Comments often include information from the Observation Support Branch (OSS) regarding guide star acquisition success, centering slews, high jitter, etc. Observation data (in packetized, reformatted, and calibrated form) and their comments are placed in the HST science and ancillary optical disk archives (now by DMF, to be superseded by DADS). FITS tapes containing both uncalibrated and calibrated files are written for the GO by the Data Systems Operations Branch (DSOB), and prints or plots plus OSS and PODPS comments are mailed with the tapes. The authors are staff members of the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  18. Evaluation of macrocytosis in routine hemograms.

    PubMed

    Veda, P

    2013-03-01

    Macrocytosis, a condition in which erythrocytes are larger than normal manifests as an increase in mean corpuscular volume (MCV) more than 100 fl. The aim of this study was to identify the underlying causes of macrocytosis, detected in routine hemograms and to evaluate the hematological features in different etiologies. This study included 178 adult patients whose detailed medical history was recorded, and Vitamin B12 assay, folate assay, thyroid function tests, liver function tests, complete blood counts and peripheral smear evaluation was performed. Alcoholism was identified as the etiological factor in 65 cases (36.5%), Vitamin B12 deficiency in 43 cases (24.1%) and drug related in 23 cases (12.9%). These three conditions accounted for 73.6% of macrocytosis. Other causes identified were folate deficiency, liver disease, Myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic renal failure and Aplastic anemia. In 41 cases, the cause of macrocytosis could not be explained. Anemia was observed in 95 cases (53.3%) being most common in Vitamin B12 deficiency. 9 cases (20.9%) of Vitamin B12 deficiency presented with isolated macrocytosis without anemia. It was observed that mean hemoglobin was lower and red cell distribution width (RDW) higher in megaloblastic conditions. Peripheral smear revealed hypersegmented neutrophils in 86% and macro-ovalocytes in 72% of the megaloblastic cases. Complete medical history, red cell parameters and peripheral blood smear are simple, inexpensive tools which assist in identifying the underlying cause of macrocytosis, particularly in resource limited settings. Macrocytosis needs to be evaluated even in the absence of anemia, as it may be the first clue to an underlying pathology.

  19. Dual-Gate p-GaN Gate High Electron Mobility Transistors for Steep Subthreshold Slope.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jong-Ho; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2016-05-01

    A steep subthreshold slope characteristic is achieved through p-GaN gate HEMT with dual-gate structure. Obtained subthreshold slope is less than 120 μV/dec. Based on the measured and simulated data obtained from single-gate device, breakdown of parasitic floating-base bipolar transistor and floating gate charged with holes are responsible to increase abruptly in drain current. In the dual-gate device, on-current degrades with high temperature but subthreshold slope is not changed. To observe the switching speed of dual-gate device and transient response of drain current are measured. According to the transient responses of drain current, switching speed of the dual-gate device is about 10(-5) sec.

  20. Terahertz plasmon amplification in RTD-gated HEMTs with a grating-gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condori Quispe, Hugo O.; Encomendero, Jimy; Xing, Huili Grace; Sensale Rodriguez, Berardi

    2016-09-01

    We analyze amplification of terahertz plasmons in a grating-gate semiconductor hetero-structure. The device consists of a resonant-tunneling-diode gated high-electron-mobility transistor (RTD-gated HEMT), i.e. a HEMT structure with a double-barrier gate stack enabling resonant tunneling from gate to channel. In these devices, the key element enabling substantial power gain is the coupling of terahertz waves into and out of plasmons in the RTD-gated HEMT channel, i.e. the gain medium, via the grating-gate itself, part of the active device, rather than by an external antenna structure as in previous works, enabling amplification with associated power gain >> 30 dB at room temperature.

  1. Logic gates based on ion transistors.

    PubMed

    Tybrandt, Klas; Forchheimer, Robert; Berggren, Magnus

    2012-05-29

    Precise control over processing, transport and delivery of ionic and molecular signals is of great importance in numerous fields of life sciences. Integrated circuits based on ion transistors would be one approach to route and dispense complex chemical signal patterns to achieve such control. To date several types of ion transistors have been reported; however, only individual devices have so far been presented and most of them are not functional at physiological salt concentrations. Here we report integrated chemical logic gates based on ion bipolar junction transistors. Inverters and NAND gates of both npn type and complementary type are demonstrated. We find that complementary ion gates have higher gain and lower power consumption, as compared with the single transistor-type gates, which imitates the advantages of complementary logics found in conventional electronics. Ion inverters and NAND gates lay the groundwork for further development of solid-state chemical delivery circuits.

  2. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

  3. Locking apparatus for gate valves

    DOEpatents

    Fabyan, Joseph; Williams, Carl W.

    1988-01-01

    A locking apparatus for fluid operated valves having a piston connected to the valve actuator which moves in response to applied pressure within a cylinder housing having a cylinder head, a catch block is secured to the piston, and the cylinder head incorporates a catch pin. Pressure applied to the cylinder to open the valve moves the piston adjacent to the cylinder head where the catch pin automatically engages the catch block preventing futher movement of the piston or premature closure of the valve. Application of pressure to the cylinder to close the valve, retracts the catch pin, allowing the valve to close. Included are one or more selector valves, for selecting pressure application to other apparatus depending on the gate valve position, open or closed, protecting such apparatus from damage due to premature closing caused by pressure loss or operational error.

  4. Locking apparatus for gate valves

    DOEpatents

    Fabyan, J.; Williams, C.W.

    A locking apparatus for fluid operated valves having a piston connected to the valve actuator which moves in response to applied pressure within a cylinder housing having a cylinder head, a catch block is secured to the piston, and the cylinder head incorporates a catch pin. Pressure applied to the cylinder to open the valve moves the piston adjacent to the cylinder head where the catch pin automatically engages the catch block preventing further movement of the piston or premature closure of the valve. Application of pressure to the cylinder to close the valve, retracts the catch pin, allowing the valve to close. Included are one or more selector valves, for selecting pressure application to other apparatus depending on the gate valve position, open or closed, protecting such apparatus from damage due to premature closing caused by pressure loss or operational error.

  5. Mechanosensitive gating of Kv channels.

    PubMed

    Morris, Catherine E; Prikryl, Emil A; Joós, Béla

    2015-01-01

    K-selective voltage-gated channels (Kv) are multi-conformation bilayer-embedded proteins whose mechanosensitive (MS) Popen(V) implies that at least one conformational transition requires the restructuring of the channel-bilayer interface. Unlike Morris and colleagues, who attributed MS-Kv responses to a cooperative V-dependent closed-closed expansion↔compaction transition near the open state, Mackinnon and colleagues invoke expansion during a V-independent closed↔open transition. With increasing membrane tension, they suggest, the closed↔open equilibrium constant, L, can increase >100-fold, thereby taking steady-state Popen from 0→1; "exquisite sensitivity to small…mechanical perturbations", they state, makes a Kv "as much a mechanosensitive…as…a voltage-dependent channel". Devised to explain successive gK(V) curves in excised patches where tension spontaneously increased until lysis, their L-based model falters in part because of an overlooked IK feature; with recovery from slow inactivation factored in, their g(V) datasets are fully explained by the earlier model (a MS V-dependent closed-closed transition, invariant L≥4). An L-based MS-Kv predicts neither known Kv time courses nor the distinctive MS responses of Kv-ILT. It predicts Kv densities (hence gating charge per V-sensor) several-fold different from established values. If opening depended on elevated tension (L-based model), standard gK(V) operation would be compromised by animal cells' membrane flaccidity. A MS V-dependent transition is, by contrast, unproblematic on all counts. Since these issues bear directly on recent findings that mechanically-modulated Kv channels subtly tune pain-related excitability in peripheral mechanoreceptor neurons we undertook excitability modeling (evoked action potentials). Kvs with MS V-dependent closed-closed transitions produce nuanced mechanically-modulated excitability whereas an L-based MS-Kv yields extreme, possibly excessive (physiologically

  6. Technical Report: TG-142 compliant and comprehensive quality assurance tests for respiratory gating

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Kyle; Rong, Yi

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To develop and establish a comprehensive gating commissioning and quality assurance procedure in compliance with TG-142. Methods: Eight Varian TrueBeam Linacs were used for this study. Gating commissioning included an end-to-end test and baseline establishment. The end-to-end test was performed using a CIRS dynamic thoracic phantom with a moving cylinder inside the lung, which was used for carrying both optically simulated luminescence detectors (OSLDs) and Gafchromic EBT2 films while the target is moving, for a point dose check and 2D profile check. In addition, baselines were established for beam-on temporal delay and calibration of the surrogate, for both megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) beams. A motion simulation device (MotionSim) was used to provide periodic motion on a platform, in synchronizing with a surrogate motion. The overall accuracy and uncertainties were analyzed and compared. Results: The OSLD readings were within 5% compared to the planned dose (within measurement uncertainty) for both phase and amplitude gated deliveries. Film results showed less than 3% agreement to the predicted dose with a standard sinusoid motion. The gate-on temporal accuracy was averaged at 139 ± 10 ms for MV beams and 92 ± 11 ms for kV beams. The temporal delay of the surrogate motion depends on the motion speed and was averaged at 54.6 ± 3.1 ms for slow, 24.9 ± 2.9 ms for intermediate, and 23.0 ± 20.1 ms for fast speed. Conclusions: A comprehensive gating commissioning procedure was introduced for verifying the output accuracy and establishing the temporal accuracy baselines with respiratory gating. The baselines are needed for routine quality assurance tests, as suggested by TG-142.

  7. Performance Analysis of Apollo Navigational Starter Routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, Stoyan I.; Holt, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this project is to recreate and analyze the effectiveness of the original Apollo Starter Routine (ASR) which was used to generate the state vector of the Apollo spacecraft based on a series of radiometric observations. The original Apollo navigation software is unavailable in a modern programming language and the original coding has not been preserved. This necessitates its recreation using the original software documentation. Space Shuttle navigation software does not typically use the ASR or an algorithm like it since the Shuttle s state vector is easily deduced from GPS information or other sources. However, this tactic will be ineffective when trying to determine the state vector of a craft approaching, departing or in orbit around the Moon since the GPS network faces the surface of the Earth, not outer space. The recreation of the ASR from the original documentation is therefore vital as a simulation baseline for the navigation software under development for the Constellation program. The algorithms that make up the ASR will be extracted from the original documentation and adapted for and then implemented in a modern programming language; the majority of it will be coded in Matlab. The ASR s effectiveness will then be tested using simulated tracking data. The ability of the ASR to handle realistically noisy data and the accuracy with which it generates state vectors were analyzed. The ASR proved to be robust enough to process data with range and angle noise as large as 10,000 meters and 10(exp -6) radians together and 300,000 meters and 5x10(exp -4) radians separately at Lunar distances. The ASR was able to handle marginally more noise at distances closer to the Earth where the angle noise was less significant. The ASR is capable of effectively processing 40-80 data points gathered at a rate of one per 20 seconds at close Earth orbit and up to 28-40 data points gathered at a rate of one per minute at distant Earth orbit and Lunar orbit.

  8. The environmental heat flux routine, version 4 (EHFR-4) and Multiple Reflections Routine (MRR), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    The environmental heat flux routine version 4, (EHFR-4) is a generalized computer program which calculates the steady state and/or transient thermal environments experienced by a space system during lunar surface, deep space, or thermal vacuum chamber operation. The specific environments possible for EHFR analysis include: lunar plain, lunar crater, combined lunar plain and crater, lunar plain in the region of spacecraft surfaces, intervehicular, deep space in the region of spacecraft surfaces, and thermal vacuum chamber generation. The EHFR was used for Extra Vehicular Mobility Unit environment analysis of the Apollo 11-17 missions, EMU manned and unmanned thermal vacuum qualification testing, and EMU-LRV interface environmental analyses.

  9. Gated escaping of ligand out of protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen

    2000-01-01

    We construct a new gating model and develop a new theory to study the escaping process of a ligand out of a spherical cavity with a puncture (or gate) on the surface. The gate undulation can be regulated by any time-dependent function and the motion of the ligand inside the spherical cavity is mapped into a two-dimensional entropy potential surface. Hence the driving force of our model is entropy only. For a static gate, the escaping process corresponds to climbing a two-dimensional entropy barrier. When the gate open angle is small, the escaping rate is proportional to the square of the opening angle. The prefactor of the escaping rate constant depends on the curvature of the entropy potential surface. For coherent gating, the survival time depends not only on the gate undulation frequency but also on how the initial state is defined. On the escaping from protein, our escaping rate shows it is qualitatively consistent with the experimental result of ligand recombination in myoglobin.

  10. Range gating experiments through a scattering media

    SciTech Connect

    Payton, J.; Cverna, F.; Gallegos, R.; McDonald, T.; Numkena, D.; Obst, A.; Pena-Abeyta, C.; Yates, G.

    1998-12-31

    This paper discusses range-gated imaging experiments performed recently at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. Range gating is an imaging technique that uses a pulsed laser and gated camera to image objects at specific ranges. The technique can be used for imaging through scattering media such as dense smoke or fog. Range gating uses the fact that light travels at 3 x 10{sup 8} m/s. Knowing the speed of light the authors can calculate the time it will take the laser light to travel a known distance, then gate open a Micro Channel Plate Image Intensifier (MCPII) at the time the reflected light returns from the target. In the Redstone experiment the gate width on the MCPII was set to equal the laser pulse width ({approximately} 8 ns) for the highest signal to noise ratio. The gate allows the light reflected form the target and a small portion of the light reflected from the smoke in the vicinity of the target to be imaged. They obtained good results in light and medium smoke but the laser they were used did not have sufficient intensity to penetrate the thickest smoke. They did not diverge the laser beam to cover the entire target in order to maintain a high flux that would achieve better penetration through the smoke. They were able to image an Armored Personnel Carrier (APC) through light and medium smoke but they were not able to image the APC through heavy smoke. The experiment and results are presented.

  11. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Hodgson; David Irick

    2005-09-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its sixth year of operation. During this period the Center has involved thirteen GATE Fellows and ten GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center's focus area: hybrid drive trains and control systems. Eighteen GATE students have graduated, and three have completed their course work requirements. Nine faculty members from three departments in the College of Engineering have been involved in the GATE Center. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as internships, equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $4,000,000. Problem areas are discussed in the hope that future activities may benefit from the operation of the current program.

  12. Adaptive quantum gate-set tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin

    2013-03-01

    Quantum information hardware needs to be characterized and calibrated. This is the job of quantum state and process tomography, but standard tomographic methods have an Achilles heel: to characterize an unknown process, they rely on a set of absolutely calibrated measurements. But many technologies (e.g., solid-state qubits) admit only a single native measurement basis, and other bases are measured using unitary control. So tomography becomes circular - tomographic protocols are using gates to calibrate themselves! Gate-set tomography confronts this problem head-on and resolves it by treating gates relationally. We abandon all assumptions about what a given gate operation does, and characterize entire universal gate sets from the ground up using only the observed statistics of an [unknown] 2-outcome measurement after various strings of [unknown] gate operations. The accuracy and reliability of the resulting estimate depends critically on which gate strings are used, and benefits greatly from adaptivity. Sandia National Labs is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000

  13. A quantum Fredkin gate (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Raj B.; Ho, Joseph; Ferreyrol, Franck; Ralph, Timothy C.; Pryde, Geoff J.

    2016-10-01

    One of the greatest challenges in modern science is the realisation of quantum computers which, as their scale increases, will allow enhanced performance of tasks across many areas of quantum information processing. Quantum logic gates play a vital role in realising these applications by carrying out the elementary operations on the qubits; a key aim is minimising the resources needed to build these gates into useful circuits. While the salient features of a quantum computer have been shown in proof-of-principle experiments, e.g., single- and two-qubit gates, difficulties in scaling quantum systems to encode and manipulate multiple qubits has hindered demonstrations of more complex operations. This is exemplified by the classical Fredkin (or controlled-SWAP) gate [1] for which, despite many theoretical proposals [2,3] relying on concatenating multiple two-qubit gates, a quantum analogue has yet to be realised. Here, by directly adding control to a two-qubit SWAP unitary [4], we use photonic qubit logic to report the first experimental demonstration of a quantum Fredkin gate [5]. Our scheme uses linear optics and improves on the overall probability of success by an order of magnitude over previous proposals [2,3]. This optical approach allows us to add control an arbitrary black-box unitary which is otherwise forbidden in the standard circuit model [6]. Additionally, the action of our gate exhibits quantum coherence allowing the generation of the highest fidelity three-photon GHZ states to date. The quantum Fredkin gate has many applications in quantum computing, quantum measurements [7] and cryptography [8,9]. Using our scheme, we apply the Fredkin gate to the task of direct measurements of the purity and state overlap of a quantum system [7] without recourse to quantum state tomography.

  14. Gated cardiac imaging using a continuously rotating CT scanner: clinical evaluation of 91 patients.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Y; Uji, T; Hirayama, T; Inada, Y; Ishikawa, T; Fujii, M

    1984-05-01

    To produce electrocardiographically (ECG)-gated computed tomographic (CT) images of the heart, a post-data-acquisition ECG correlation technique was used in which data for missing angular projections are derived from the original scan data to complete 360 angular projections. Improved image quality and clinical usefulness were demonstrated compared with routine nongated CT and two-dimensional echocardiography. Gated CT was better than nongated CT in 26 of 41 positive and three of five negative cases of suspected myocardial infarction, four of 10 positive and one of 12 negative cases of suspected left atrial mass, three of 10 cases with pericardial fluid collection, and three other cases. Compared with echocardiography, CT was of additional value in eight of 10 cases of myocardial infarction, five of nine positive and one of 10 negative cases of suspected left atrial mass, four of 10 positive and one of three negative cases of suspected pericardial fluid collection, and two other cases. The equipment required for CT gating is of low cost, but the examination time is lengthy and less conveniently performed than echocardiography. However, when echocardiography is indecisive or suspected to be falsely negative, gated CT imaging of the heart is recommended.

  15. Support Routines for In Situ Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Pariser, Oleg; Yeates, Matthew C.; Lee, Hyun H.; Lorre, Jean

    2013-01-01

    This software consists of a set of application programs that support ground-based image processing for in situ missions. These programs represent a collection of utility routines that perform miscellaneous functions in the context of the ground data system. Each one fulfills some specific need as determined via operational experience. The most unique aspect to these programs is that they are integrated into the large, in situ image processing system via the PIG (Planetary Image Geometry) library. They work directly with space in situ data, understanding the appropriate image meta-data fields and updating them properly. The programs themselves are completely multimission; all mission dependencies are handled by PIG. This suite of programs consists of: (1)marscahv: Generates a linearized, epi-polar aligned image given a stereo pair of images. These images are optimized for 1-D stereo correlations, (2) marscheckcm: Compares the camera model in an image label with one derived via kinematics modeling on the ground, (3) marschkovl: Checks the overlaps between a list of images in order to determine which might be stereo pairs. This is useful for non-traditional stereo images like long-baseline or those from an articulating arm camera, (4) marscoordtrans: Translates mosaic coordinates from one form into another, (5) marsdispcompare: Checks a Left Right stereo disparity image against a Right Left disparity image to ensure they are consistent with each other, (6) marsdispwarp: Takes one image of a stereo pair and warps it through a disparity map to create a synthetic opposite- eye image. For example, a right eye image could be transformed to look like it was taken from the left eye via this program, (7) marsfidfinder: Finds fiducial markers in an image by projecting their approximate location and then using correlation to locate the markers to subpixel accuracy. These fiducial markets are small targets attached to the spacecraft surface. This helps verify, or improve, the

  16. Gate-assisted turn-off thyristor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, L. R.; Page, D. J.; Schlegel, E. S.

    1978-01-01

    1,000-volt, 200-ampere gate-assisted turn-off thyristor has been developed for power circuits requiring high efficiency, small size, and low weight. Design features include shunted cathode for high dV/dt capability. Cathode in interdigitated with dynamic gate for fast, low-loss switching. Operating frequency exceeds 20 kHz with overall energy dissipation of less that 12 mJ per pulse for typical 20-microsecond half-sine waveform. Device has turn-on time of 2 microseconds and turn-off time as short as 3 microseconds with only 2 amperes of gate drive.

  17. Quantum gates and their coexisting geometric phases

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Lianao; Bishop, C. Allen; Byrd, Mark S.

    2011-08-15

    Geometric phases arise naturally in a variety of quantum systems with observable consequences. They also arise in quantum computations when dressed states are used in gating operations. Here we show how they arise in these gating operations and how one may take advantage of the dressed states producing them. Specifically, we show that for a given, but arbitrary Hamiltonian, and at an arbitrary time {tau}, there always exists a set of dressed states such that a given gate operation can be performed by the Hamiltonian up to a phase {phi}. The phase is a sum of a dynamical phase and a geometric phase. We illustrate the dressed phase for several systems.

  18. GADL: A gate array description language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippens, P. E. R.; Slenter, A. G. J.

    1987-01-01

    A way to map digital networks onto gate array images is described. A language to describe gate array images, design rules for the wiring, and arbitrary specified macros from image dependent libraries is defined. A data base is generated by compiling the description of a gate array family in terms of the above items. Place and route software is automatically conditioned to implement arbitrary specifications of a digital system in terms of a netlist. The performance of the system is demonstrated for various practical situations.

  19. Stay vane and wicket gate relationship study

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2005-01-19

    This report evaluates potential environmental and performance gains that can be achieved in a Kaplan turbine through non-structural modifications to stay vane and wicket gate assemblies. This summary is based primarily on data and conclusions drawn from models and studies of Lower Granite Dam. Based on this investigation, the study recommends (1) a proof of concept at Lower Granite Dam to establish predicted improvements for the existing turbine and to further refine the stay vane wicket gate designs for fish passage; and (2) consideration of the stay vane wicket gate systems in any future turbine rehabilitation studies.

  20. Diagonal gates in the Clifford hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shawn X.; Gottesman, Daniel; Krishna, Anirudh

    2017-01-01

    The Clifford hierarchy is a set of gates that appears in the theory of fault-tolerant quantum computation, but its precise structure remains elusive. We give a complete characterization of the diagonal gates in the Clifford hierarchy for prime-dimensional qudits. They turn out to be pmth roots of unity raised to polynomial functions of the basis state to which they are applied, and we determine which level of the Clifford hierarchy a given gate sits in based on m and the degree of the polynomial.

  1. The gating of the CFTR channel.

    PubMed

    Moran, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel expressed in the apical membrane of epithelia. Mutations in the CFTR gene are the cause of cystsic fibrosis. CFTR is the only ABC-protein that constitutes an ion channel pore forming subunit. CFTR gating is regulated in complex manner as phosphorylation is mandatory for channel activity and gating is directly regulated by binding of ATP to specific intracellular sites on the CFTR protein. This review covers our current understanding on the gating mechanism in CFTR and illustrates the relevance of alteration of these mechanisms in the onset of cystic fibrosis.

  2. Taking a new biomarker into routine use – A perspective from the routine clinical biochemistry laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Sturgeon, Catharine; Hill, Robert; Hortin, Glen L; Thompson, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing pressure to provide cost-effective healthcare based on “best practice.” Consequently, new biomarkers are only likely to be introduced into routine clinical biochemistry departments if they are supported by a strong evidence base and if the results will improve patient management and outcome. This requires convincing evidence of the benefits of introducing the new test, ideally reflected in fewer hospital admissions, fewer additional investigations and/or fewer clinic visits. Carefully designed audit and cost-benefit studies in relevant patient groups must demonstrate that introducing the biomarker delivers an improved and more effective clinical pathway. From the laboratory perspective, pre-analytical requirements must be thoroughly investigated at an early stage. Good stability of the biomarker in relevant physiological matrices is essential to avoid the need for special processing. Absence of specific timing requirements for sampling and knowledge of the effect of medications that might be used to treat the patients in whom the biomarker will be measured is also highly desirable. Analytically, automation is essential in modern high-throughput clinical laboratories. Assays must therefore be robust, fulfilling standard requirements for linearity on dilution, precision and reproducibility, both within- and between-run. Provision of measurements by a limited number of specialized reference laboratories may be most appropriate, especially when a new biomarker is first introduced into routine practice. PMID:21137030

  3. Gate assisted turn-off thyristor with cathode shunts and dynamic gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, E. S.; Page, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    A 1,000-V, 200-A gate-assisted turn-off thyristor (GATT) is described, whose design features include an interdigitated shunted cathode, a dynamic gate, a means for optimizing the carrier lifetime level, and a bypass diode. The device physics of gate-assisted turn-off are reviewed. Based on this, improvements in the design are described. It is shown that a prime failure mode can be eliminated and that the gate-assist signal voltage can be substantially decreased by employing a shunted cathode emitter. The test data show excellent turn-on characteristics due to the dynamic gate and the long perimeter of the edge of the main cathode. Turn-off times as short as 3 microsec are obtained. The combination of controlling the carrier lifetime with a precisely controlled and easily variable irradiation dose of high energy electrons with gate assist current provides for simple, precision tailoring of the device characteristics to the intended application.

  4. Mechanosensitive Gating of Kv Channels

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Catherine E.; Prikryl, Emil A.; Joós, Béla

    2015-01-01

    K-selective voltage-gated channels (Kv) are multi-conformation bilayer-embedded proteins whose mechanosensitive (MS) Popen(V) implies that at least one conformational transition requires the restructuring of the channel-bilayer interface. Unlike Morris and colleagues, who attributed MS-Kv responses to a cooperative V-dependent closed-closed expansion↔compaction transition near the open state, Mackinnon and colleagues invoke expansion during a V-independent closed↔open transition. With increasing membrane tension, they suggest, the closed↔open equilibrium constant, L, can increase >100-fold, thereby taking steady-state Popen from 0→1; “exquisite sensitivity to small…mechanical perturbations”, they state, makes a Kv “as much a mechanosensitive…as…a voltage-dependent channel”. Devised to explain successive gK(V) curves in excised patches where tension spontaneously increased until lysis, their L-based model falters in part because of an overlooked IK feature; with recovery from slow inactivation factored in, their g(V) datasets are fully explained by the earlier model (a MS V-dependent closed-closed transition, invariant L≥4). An L-based MS-Kv predicts neither known Kv time courses nor the distinctive MS responses of Kv-ILT. It predicts Kv densities (hence gating charge per V-sensor) several-fold different from established values. If opening depended on elevated tension (L-based model), standard gK(V) operation would be compromised by animal cells’ membrane flaccidity. A MS V-dependent transition is, by contrast, unproblematic on all counts. Since these issues bear directly on recent findings that mechanically-modulated Kv channels subtly tune pain-related excitability in peripheral mechanoreceptor neurons we undertook excitability modeling (evoked action potentials). Kvs with MS V-dependent closed-closed transitions produce nuanced mechanically-modulated excitability whereas an L-based MS-Kv yields extreme, possibly excessive

  5. 7. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE PIER AND NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE PIER AND NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATES DURING ERECTION, SHOWING LEFT GATE IN OPEN POSITION AND RIGHT GATE IN CLOSED POSITION, LOOKING NORTH (UPSTREAM). NOTE TEMPORARY SERVICE BRIDGE. - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  6. FIO/RIO -- FORTRAN file I/O routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, P. M.; Chipperfield, A. J.

    FIO/RIO is a subroutine package that allows a FORTRAN programmer to access sequential and direct access data files in a machine independent manner. The package consists of stand alone FIO and RIO routines, which can be used independently of the Starlink software environment, plus routines to interface to the Starlink parameter system.

  7. Recapturing Desired Family Routines: A Parent-Professional Behavioral Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buschbacher, Pamelazita; Fox, Lise; Clarke, Shelley

    2004-01-01

    Children with complex disabilities such as autism spectrum disorders and Landau Kleffner syndrome often lack means to participate in everyday family routines. Serious problem behaviors may result from their challenges in responding to and initiating communicative interactions. These behaviors can change routine family activities such that the…

  8. What Impact Does Developmental Coordination Disorder Have on Daily Routines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Janet; Larkin, Dawne; Dewey, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand how age and motor difficulties impact on daily routines, this qualitative investigation used focus groups and in-depth interviews with Australian and Canadian parents to examine the daily routines of younger (5 to 7 years of age) and older children (8 to 9 years of age) with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder…

  9. Computer routine adds plotting capabilities to existing programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. C.; Linnekin, J. S.

    1966-01-01

    PLOTAN, a generalized plot analysis routine written for the IBM 7094 computer, minimizes the difficulties in adding plot capabilities to large existing programs. PLOTAN is used in conjunction with a binary tape writing routine and has the ability to plot any variable on the intermediate binary tape as a function of any other.

  10. Changing Urban Bureaucracies: How New Practices Become Routinized.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.; And Others

    The goal of this report is to describe the process by which new service practices in urban bureaucracies become routinized. The routinization process is studied by examining the life histories of six types of innovations: computer-assisted instruction; police computer systems; mobile intensive care units; closed circuit television systems; breath…

  11. Factors for Radical Creativity, Incremental Creativity, and Routine, Noncreative Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madjar, Nora; Greenberg, Ellen; Chen, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    This study extends theory and research by differentiating between routine, noncreative performance and 2 distinct types of creativity: radical and incremental. We also use a sensemaking perspective to examine the interplay of social and personal factors that may influence a person's engagement in a certain level of creative action versus routine,…

  12. Thinking Routines: Replicating Classroom Practices within Museum Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolberg, Rochelle Ibanez; Goff, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This article describes thinking routines as tools to guide and support young children's thinking. These learning strategies, developed by Harvard University's Project Zero Classroom, actively engage students in constructing meaning while also understanding their own thinking process. The authors discuss how thinking routines can be used in both…

  13. Routine Activities and Victimization at School: The Significance of Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popp, Ann Marie; Peguero, Anthony A.

    2011-01-01

    Routine activities theory has not fully considered the role of gender in shaping victimization and yet, the research literature clearly demonstrates that gender is associated with an individual's risk of victimization. In addition to the pervasive effect of gender on victimization, gender shapes an individual's daily routines and thus may create a…

  14. Parental Involvement Routines and Former Head Start Children's Literacy Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dove, Meghan Kicklighter; Neuharth-Pritchett, Stacey; Wright, David W.; Wallinga, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between parental involvement routines and former Head Start children's literacy outcomes. Former Head Start children (n = 3, 808) from the National Head Start/Public School Transition Demonstration Research Project comprised the sample. Family routines and literacy outcomes in kindergarten were examined,…

  15. An Element of Practical Knowledge in Education: Professional Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacourse, France

    2011-01-01

    The question of practical knowledge and its teaching has arisen more perceptibly since the appearance of the aim to professionalize teachers. How can imperceptible knowledge such as professional routines be taught? To establish a social fabric and effective class management, it is essential to call on creative and adaptive professional routines.…

  16. 42 CFR 493.1267 - Standard: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Routine chemistry. 493.1267 Section 493.1267 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1267 Standard: Routine chemistry. For blood gas analyses, the laboratory must perform...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1267 - Standard: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard: Routine chemistry. 493.1267 Section 493.1267 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1267 Standard: Routine chemistry. For blood gas analyses, the laboratory must perform...

  18. 42 CFR 493.841 - Standard; Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard; Routine chemistry. 493.841 Section 493.841 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.841 Standard; Routine chemistry. (a) Failure to attain a score of at least 80...

  19. 42 CFR 493.841 - Standard; Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard; Routine chemistry. 493.841 Section 493.841 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.841 Standard; Routine chemistry. (a) Failure to attain a score of at least 80...

  20. 42 CFR 493.841 - Standard; Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard; Routine chemistry. 493.841 Section 493.841 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.841 Standard; Routine chemistry. (a) Failure to attain a score of at least 80...

  1. 42 CFR 493.1267 - Standard: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard: Routine chemistry. 493.1267 Section 493.1267 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1267 Standard: Routine chemistry. For blood gas analyses, the laboratory must perform...

  2. 42 CFR 493.841 - Standard; Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard; Routine chemistry. 493.841 Section 493.841 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.841 Standard; Routine chemistry. (a) Failure to attain a score of at least 80...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1267 - Standard: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard: Routine chemistry. 493.1267 Section 493.1267 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1267 Standard: Routine chemistry. For blood gas analyses, the laboratory must perform...

  4. 42 CFR 493.841 - Standard; Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Routine chemistry. 493.841 Section 493.841 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.841 Standard; Routine chemistry. (a) Failure to attain a score of at least 80...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1267 - Standard: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard: Routine chemistry. 493.1267 Section 493.1267 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1267 Standard: Routine chemistry. For blood gas analyses, the laboratory must perform...

  6. See, Say, Write: A Writing Routine for the Preschool Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copp, Stefanie B.; Cabell, Sonia Q.; Tortorelli, Laura S.

    2016-01-01

    See, Say, Write is an adaptable classroom writing routine that teachers can use across a range of activities in the preschool classroom. This preschool writing routine offers an opportunity for teachers to build on a shared experience through engagement in rich conversation and writing. After a shared experience, teachers will provide a visual…

  7. Routines in School Organizations: Creating Stability and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, Sharon; Enomoto, Ernestine K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents routinized action theory as a way to examine the regular, habitual activities that occur in school organizations. Using this theoretical lens, school routines were analyzed in order to understand organizational stability and change. Design/methodology/approach: Using case study methods, three discrete cases are…

  8. Extending Double Optical Gating to the Midinfrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, Timothy; Camper, Antoine; Agostini, Pierre; Dimauro, Louis

    2015-05-01

    In the past decade there has been great interest in creating broadband isolated attosecond pulses (IAPs). Primarily these IAPs have been generated using Ti:Sapphire 800nm short pulses, namely through spatiotemporal gating with the attosecond lighthouse technique, amplitude gating, polarization gating, and double optical gating (DOG). Here we present theoretical calculations and experimental investigations into extending DOG to using a 2 μm driving wavelength, the benefits of which include extended harmonic cutoff and longer input driving pulse durations. It is proposed that broadband IAPs with cutoffs extending up to 250 eV can be generated in Argon by using >30 fs pulses from the passively-CEP stabilized 2 μm idler out of an optical parametric amplifier combined with a collinear DOG experimental setup.

  9. Synthesizing Biomolecule-based Boolean Logic Gates

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Takafumi; Razavi, Shiva; DeRose, Robert; Inoue, Takanari

    2012-01-01

    One fascinating recent avenue of study in the field of synthetic biology is the creation of biomolecule-based computers. The main components of a computing device consist of an arithmetic logic unit, the control unit, memory, and the input and output devices. Boolean logic gates are at the core of the operational machinery of these parts, hence to make biocomputers a reality, biomolecular logic gates become a necessity. Indeed, with the advent of more sophisticated biological tools, both nucleic acid- and protein-based logic systems have been generated. These devices function in the context of either test tubes or living cells and yield highly specific outputs given a set of inputs. In this review, we discuss various types of biomolecular logic gates that have been synthesized, with particular emphasis on recent developments that promise increased complexity of logic gate circuitry, improved computational speed, and potential clinical applications. PMID:23526588

  10. Mechanical gating of a mechanochemical reaction cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junpeng; Kouznetsova, Tatiana B.; Boulatov, Roman; Craig, Stephen L.

    2016-11-01

    Covalent polymer mechanochemistry offers promising opportunities for the control and engineering of reactivity. To date, covalent mechanochemistry has largely been limited to individual reactions, but it also presents potential for intricate reaction systems and feedback loops. Here we report a molecular architecture, in which a cyclobutane mechanophore functions as a gate to regulate the activation of a second mechanophore, dichlorocyclopropane, resulting in a mechanochemical cascade reaction. Single-molecule force spectroscopy, pulsed ultrasonication experiments and DFT-level calculations support gating and indicate that extra force of >0.5 nN needs to be applied to a polymer of gated gDCC than of free gDCC for the mechanochemical isomerization gDCC to proceed at equal rate. The gating concept provides a mechanism by which to regulate stress-responsive behaviours, such as load-strengthening and mechanochromism, in future materials designs.

  11. Funding announcements from federal government, Gates Foundation.

    PubMed

    Garmaise, David

    2007-05-01

    In two separate announcements, in December 2006 and February 2007, the federal government allocated new funding for HIV/AIDS. The latter announcement was accompanied by a pledge from the Gates Foundation.

  12. Current profiles in gated graphene ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresti, Alessandro; Grosso, Giuseppe; Pastori Parravicini, Giuseppe

    2008-03-01

    We simulate stationary current distribution in graphene ribbons in the presence of top gate potentials, by means of the nonequilibrium Keldysh-Green's function formalism within a tight-binding model. In the absence of magnetic fields and in the presence of a model potential barrier, we observe the Klein paradox, where electrons turn into holes in the gated region and again into electrons beyond it. We establish a connection between the band structure at the corner points of the Brillouin zone and Klein paradox, and give a pictorial description of conductive channels. In the presence of high magnetic fields, transport currents are chiral and flow along the edges of the ribbon. The intensity and sign of the potential barrier with respect to the Fermi energy influence the nature (electron/hole) of the carriers inside the gated region and determine the edge involved in the transport process. We demonstrate that manipulation of currents in the ribbon can be obtained by external gates.

  13. Integrated photonic quantum gates for polarization qubits

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Sansoni, Linda; Bongioanni, Irene; Sciarrino, Fabio; Vallone, Giuseppe; Mataloni, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The ability to manipulate quantum states of light by integrated devices may open new perspectives both for fundamental tests of quantum mechanics and for novel technological applications. However, the technology for handling polarization-encoded qubits, the most commonly adopted approach, is still missing in quantum optical circuits. Here we demonstrate the first integrated photonic controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate for polarization-encoded qubits. This result has been enabled by the integration, based on femtosecond laser waveguide writing, of partially polarizing beam splitters on a glass chip. We characterize the logical truth table of the quantum gate demonstrating its high fidelity to the expected one. In addition, we show the ability of this gate to transform separable states into entangled ones and vice versa. Finally, the full accessibility of our device is exploited to carry out a complete characterization of the CNOT gate through a quantum process tomography. PMID:22127062

  14. Mechanical gating of a mechanochemical reaction cascade

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junpeng; Kouznetsova, Tatiana B.; Boulatov, Roman; Craig, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Covalent polymer mechanochemistry offers promising opportunities for the control and engineering of reactivity. To date, covalent mechanochemistry has largely been limited to individual reactions, but it also presents potential for intricate reaction systems and feedback loops. Here we report a molecular architecture, in which a cyclobutane mechanophore functions as a gate to regulate the activation of a second mechanophore, dichlorocyclopropane, resulting in a mechanochemical cascade reaction. Single-molecule force spectroscopy, pulsed ultrasonication experiments and DFT-level calculations support gating and indicate that extra force of >0.5 nN needs to be applied to a polymer of gated gDCC than of free gDCC for the mechanochemical isomerization gDCC to proceed at equal rate. The gating concept provides a mechanism by which to regulate stress-responsive behaviours, such as load-strengthening and mechanochromism, in future materials designs. PMID:27848956

  15. Greening the Golden Gate National Recreation Area

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Golden Gate National Recreation Area was recognized a 2016 Federal Green Challenge Award for making significant strides to reduce its carbon footprint with the goal of becoming a carbon neutral park.

  16. Active gated imaging in driver assistance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauer, Yoav

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we shall present the active gated imaging system (AGIS) in relation to the automotive field. AGIS is based on a fast-gated camera and pulsed illuminator, synchronized in the time domain to record images of a certain range of interest. A dedicated gated CMOS imager sensor and near infra-red (NIR) pulsed laser illuminator, is presented in this paper to provide active gated technology. In recent years, we have developed these key components and learned the system parameters, which are most beneficial to nighttime (in all weather conditions) driving in terms of field of view, illumination profile, resolution, and processing power. We shall present our approach of a camera-based advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) named BrightEye™, which makes use of the AGIS technology in the automotive field.

  17. Digital gate pulse generator for cycloconverter control

    DOEpatents

    Klein, Frederick F.; Mutone, Gioacchino A.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention provides a digital gate pulse generator which controls the output of a cycloconverter used for electrical power conversion applications by determining the timing and delivery of the firing pulses to the switching devices in the cycloconverter. Previous gate pulse generators have been built with largely analog or discrete digital circuitry which require many precision components and periodic adjustment. The gate pulse generator of the present invention utilizes digital techniques and a predetermined series of values to develop the necessary timing signals for firing the switching device. Each timing signal is compared with a reference signal to determine the exact firing time. The present invention is significantly more compact than previous gate pulse generators, responds quickly to changes in the output demand and requires only one precision component and no adjustments.

  18. Smart gating membranes with in situ self-assembled responsive nanogels as functional gates

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Feng; Xie, Rui; Liu, Zhuang; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Wei; Lin, Shuo; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Smart gating membranes, inspired by the gating function of ion channels across cell membranes, are artificial membranes composed of non-responsive porous membrane substrates and responsive gates in the membrane pores that are able to dramatically regulate the trans-membrane transport of substances in response to environmental stimuli. Easy fabrication, high flux, significant response and strong mechanical strength are critical for the versatility of such smart gating membranes. Here we show a novel and simple strategy for one-step fabrication of smart gating membranes with three-dimensionally interconnected networks of functional gates, by self-assembling responsive nanogels on membrane pore surfaces in situ during a vapor-induced phase separation process for membrane formation. The smart gating membranes with in situ self-assembled responsive nanogels as functional gates show large flux, significant response and excellent mechanical property simultaneously. Because of the easy fabrication method as well as the concurrent enhancement of flux, response and mechanical property, the proposed smart gating membranes will expand the scope of membrane applications, and provide ever better performances in their applications. PMID:26434387

  19. The effect of pregabalin on sensorimotor gating in 'low' gating humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Acheson, Dean T; Stein, Murray B; Paulus, Martin P; Geyer, Mark A; Risbrough, Victoria B

    2012-09-01

    Pregabalin, an anticonvulsant and anxiolytic compound that binds to α2-δ auxiliary subunit Types 1 and 2 of voltage-gated calcium channels, has been shown to reduce excitatory neurotransmission partially through modulation of glutamatergic signaling. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle is an operational measure of sensorimotor gating impacted by disruption of the glutamatergic system and is reduced in schizophrenia patients. Dysregulation of the glutamatergic system has also been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Here we tested the hypothesis that pregabalin may ameliorate PPI in a model of deficient gating in humans and mice. In study 1, 14 healthy human subjects participated in a within subjects, cross-over study with placebo, 50 mg or 200 mg pregabalin treatment prior to undergoing a PPI task. In study 2, 24 C57BL/6 mice underwent a similar procedure with vehicle, 30 and 100 mg/kg dose treatments. In both studies, subjects were assigned to a "Low" or "High" gating group using a median split procedure based on their PPI performance during placebo/vehicle. Drug effects were then examined across these groups. In humans, pregabalin treatment significantly increased PPI performance in the "low gating" group. In mice, pregabalin treatment significantly increased PPI in the low gating group but reduced PPI in the high gating group. Across species, pregabalin treatment improves PPI in subjects with low gating. These data support further exploration of pregabalin as a potential treatment for disorders characterized by sensorimotor gating deficits and glutamatergic hypersignaling, such as schizophrenia.

  20. Deletion of cytosolic gating ring decreases gate and voltage sensor coupling in BK channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guohui; Geng, Yanyan; Jin, Yakang; Shi, Jingyi; McFarland, Kelli; Magleby, Karl L; Salkoff, Lawrence; Cui, Jianmin

    2017-03-06

    Large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK channels) gate open in response to both membrane voltage and intracellular Ca(2+) The channel is formed by a central pore-gate domain (PGD), which spans the membrane, plus transmembrane voltage sensors and a cytoplasmic gating ring that acts as a Ca(2+) sensor. How these voltage and Ca(2+) sensors influence the common activation gate, and interact with each other, is unclear. A previous study showed that a BK channel core lacking the entire cytoplasmic gating ring (Core-MT) was devoid of Ca(2+) activation but retained voltage sensitivity (Budelli et al. 2013. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1313433110). In this study, we measure voltage sensor activation and pore opening in this Core-MT channel over a wide range of voltages. We record gating currents and find that voltage sensor activation in this truncated channel is similar to WT but that the coupling between voltage sensor activation and gating of the pore is reduced. These results suggest that the gating ring, in addition to being the Ca(2+) sensor, enhances the effective coupling between voltage sensors and the PGD. We also find that removal of the gating ring alters modulation of the channels by the BK channel's β1 and β2 subunits.

  1. Electron transporting water-gated thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Naim, Abdullah; Grell, Martin

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate an electron-transporting water-gated thin film transistor, using thermally converted precursor-route zinc-oxide (ZnO) intrinsic semiconductors with hexamethyldisilazene (HMDS) hydrophobic surface modification. Water gated HMDS-ZnO thin film transistors (TFT) display low threshold and high electron mobility. ZnO films constitute an attractive alternative to organic semiconductors for TFT transducers in sensor applications for waterborne analytes. Despite the use of an electrolyte as gate medium, the gate geometry (shape of gate electrode and distance between gate electrode and TFT channel) is relevant for optimum performance of water-gated TFTs.

  2. Evaluation of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Intensity-Modulated and Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy Techniques for Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Geld, Ylanga G. van der; Triest, Baukelien van; Verbakel, Wilko; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van; Senan, Suresh; Slotman, Ben J.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To compare conformal radiotherapy (CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and respiration-gated radiotherapy (RGRT) planning techniques for pancreatic cancer. All target volumes were determined using four-dimensional computed tomography scans (4D CT). Methods and Materials: The pancreatic tumor and enlarged regional lymph nodes were contoured on all 10 phases of a planning 4D CT scan for 10 patients, and the planning target volumes (PTV{sub allphases}) were generated. Three consecutive respiratory phases for RGRT delivery in both inspiration and expiration were identified, and the corresponding PTVs (PTV{sub inspiration} and PTV{sub expiration}) and organ at risk volumes created. Treatment plans using CRT and IMRT, with and without RGRT, were created for each PTV. Results: Compared with the CRT plans, IMRT significantly reduced the mean volume of right kidney exposed to 20 Gy from 27.7% {+-} 17.7% to 16.0% {+-} 18.2% (standard deviation) (p < 0.01), but this was not achieved for the left kidney (11.1% {+-} 14.2% to 5.7% {+-} 6.5%; p = 0.1). The IMRT plans also reduced the mean gastric, hepatic, and small bowel doses (p < 0.01). No additional reductions in the dose to the kidneys or other organs at risk were seen when RGRT plans were combined with either CRT or IMRT, and the findings for RGRT in end-expiration and end-inspiration were similar. Conclusion: 4D CT-based IMRT plans for pancreatic tumors significantly reduced the radiation doses to the right kidney, liver, stomach, and small bowel compared with CRT plans. The additional dosimetric benefits from RGRT appear limited in this setting.

  3. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  4. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  5. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  6. GaTe semiconductor for radiation detection

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Burger, Arnold; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2009-06-23

    GaTe semiconductor is used as a room-temperature radiation detector. GaTe has useful properties for radiation detectors: ideal bandgap, favorable mobilities, low melting point (no evaporation), non-hygroscopic nature, and availability of high-purity starting materials. The detector can be used, e.g., for detection of illicit nuclear weapons and radiological dispersed devices at ports of entry, in cities, and off shore and for determination of medical isotopes present in a patient.

  7. Quantum teleportation of optical quantum gates.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Stephen D; Munro, William J

    2003-03-21

    We show that a universal set of gates for quantum computation with optics can be quantum teleported through the use of EPR entangled states, homodyne detection, and linear optics and squeezing operations conditioned on measurement outcomes. This scheme may be used for fault-tolerant quantum computation in any optical scheme (qubit or continuous-variable). The teleportation of nondeterministic nonlinear gates employed in linear optics quantum computation is discussed.

  8. Hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

    PubMed

    Villalba-Galea, Carlos A

    2016-09-30

    Ion channels constitute a superfamily of membrane proteins found in all living creatures. Their activity allows fast translocation of ions across the plasma membrane down the ion's transmembrane electrochemical gradient, resulting in a difference in electrical potential across the plasma membrane, known as the membrane potential. A group within this superfamily, namely voltage-gated channels, displays activity that is sensitive to the membrane potential. The activity of voltage-gated channels is controlled by the membrane potential, while the membrane potential is changed by these channels' activity. This interplay produces variations in the membrane potential that have evolved into electrical signals in many organisms. These signals are essential for numerous biological processes, including neuronal activity, insulin release, muscle contraction, fertilization and many others. In recent years, the activity of the voltage-gated channels has been observed not to follow a simple relationship with the membrane potential. Instead, it has been shown that the activity of voltage-gated channel displays hysteresis. In fact, a growing number of evidence have demonstrated that the voltage dependence of channel activity is dynamically modulated by activity itself. In spite of the great impact that this property can have on electrical signaling, hysteresis in voltage-gated channels is often overlooked. Addressing this issue, this review provides examples of voltage-gated ion channels displaying hysteretic behavior. Further, this review will discuss how Dynamic Voltage Dependence in voltage-gated channels can have a physiological role in electrical signaling. Furthermore, this review will elaborate on the current thoughts on the mechanism underlying hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

  9. Advanced logic gates for ultrafast network interchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammed N.

    1995-08-01

    By overcoming speed bottlenecks from electronic switching as well as optical/electronic conversions, all-optical logic gates can permit further exploitation of the nearly 40 THz of bandwidth available from optical fibers. We focus on the use of optical solitons and all-optical logic gates to implement ultrafast ``interchanges'' or switching nodes on packet networks with speeds of 100 Gbit/s or greater. For example, all-optical logic gates have been demonstrated with speeds up to 200 Gbit/s, and they may be used to decide whether to add or drop a data packet. The overall goal of our effort is to demonstrate the key enabling technologies and their combination for header processing in 100 Gbit/s, time-division-multiplexed, packed switched networks. Soliton-based fiber logic gates are studied with the goal of combining attractive features of soliton-dragging logic gates, nonlinear loop mirrors, and erbium-doped fiber amplifiers to design logic gates with optimum switching energy, contrast ratio, and timing sensitivity. First, the experimental and numerical work studies low-latency soliton logic gates based on frequency shifts associated with cross-phase modulation. In preliminary experiments, switching in 15 m long low-birefringent fibers has been demonstrated with a contrast ratio of 2.73:1. Using dispersion-shifted fiber in the gate should lower the switching energy and improve the contrast ratio. Next, the low-birefringent fiber can be cross-spliced and wrapped into a nonlinear optical loop mirror to take advantage of mechanisms from both soliton dragging and loop mirrors. The resulting device can have low switching energy and a timing window that results from a combination of soliton dragging and the loop mirror mechanisms.

  10. Fast phase gates with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmero, M.; Martínez-Garaot, S.; Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D. J.; Muga, J. G.

    2017-02-01

    We implement faster-than-adiabatic two-qubit phase gates using smooth state-dependent forces. The forces are designed to leave no final motional excitation, independently of the initial motional state in the harmonic small-oscillations limit. They are simple, explicit functions of time and the desired logical phase of the gate, and are based on quadratic invariants of motion and Lewis-Riesenfeld phases of the normal modes.

  11. Multipulse interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C.W.; Siders, J.L.W.; Omenetto, F.G.; Taylor, A.J.

    1999-04-01

    The authors review multipulse interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating (MI-FROG) as a technique, uniquely suited for pump-probe coherent spectroscopy using amplified visible and near-infrared short-pulse systems and/or emissive targets, for time-resolving ultrafast phase shifts and intensity changes. Application of polarization-gate MI-FROG to the study of ultrafast ionization in gases is presented.

  12. Modulation of CFTR gating by permeant ions

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Han-I; Yeh, Jiunn-Tyng

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is unique among ion channels in that after its phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA), its ATP-dependent gating violates microscopic reversibility caused by the intimate involvement of ATP hydrolysis in controlling channel closure. Recent studies suggest a gating model featuring an energetic coupling between opening and closing of the gate in CFTR’s transmembrane domains and association and dissociation of its two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). We found that permeant ions such as nitrate can increase the open probability (Po) of wild-type (WT) CFTR by increasing the opening rate and decreasing the closing rate. Nearly identical effects were seen with a construct in which activity does not require phosphorylation of the regulatory domain, indicating that nitrate primarily affects ATP-dependent gating steps rather than PKA-dependent phosphorylation. Surprisingly, the effects of nitrate on CFTR gating are remarkably similar to those of VX-770 (N-(2,4-Di-tert-butyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide), a potent CFTR potentiator used in clinics. These include effects on single-channel kinetics of WT CFTR, deceleration of the nonhydrolytic closing rate, and potentiation of the Po of the disease-associated mutant G551D. In addition, both VX-770 and nitrate increased the activity of a CFTR construct lacking NBD2 (ΔNBD2), indicating that these gating effects are independent of NBD dimerization. Nonetheless, whereas VX-770 is equally effective when applied from either side of the membrane, nitrate potentiates gating mainly from the cytoplasmic side, implicating a common mechanism for gating modulation mediated through two separate sites of action. PMID:25512598

  13. Sensory gating deficits in parents of schizophrenics

    SciTech Connect

    Waldo, M.; Madison, A.; Freedman, R.

    1995-12-18

    Although schizophrenia clusters in families, it is not inherited in Mendelian fashion. This suggests that there may be alternative phenotypic expressions of genes that convey risk for schizophrenia, such as more elementary physiological or biochemical defects. One proposed phenotype is impaired inhibitory gating of the auditory evoked potential to repeated stimuli. Normally, the amplitude of the P50 response to the second stimulus is significantly less than the response to the first, but this gating of response is generally impaired in schizophrenia. Clinically unaffected individuals within a pedigree who have both an ancestral and descendant history of schizophrenia may be useful for studying whether this physiological defect is a possible alternative phenotype. We have studied inhibitory gating of the auditory P50 response to pairs of auditory stimuli in 17 nuclear families. In 11, there was one parent who had another relative with a chronic psychotic illness, in addition to the schizophrenic proband. AR of the parents with family histories of schizophrenia had gating of the P50 response similar to their schizophrenia offspring, whereas only 7% of the parents without family history had gating of the P50 response in the abnormal range. These results support loss of gating of the auditory P50 wave as an inherited deficit related to schizophrenia and suggest that studies of parents may help elucidate the neurobiological expression of genes that convey risk for schizophrenia. 36 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Radiation-Insensitive Inverse Majority Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Mojarradi, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    To help satisfy a need for high-density logic circuits insensitive to radiation, it has been proposed to realize inverse majority gates as microscopic vacuum electronic devices. In comparison with solid-state electronic devices ordinarily used in logic circuits, vacuum electronic devices are inherently much less adversely affected by radiation and extreme temperatures. The proposed development would involve state-of-the-art micromachining and recent advances in the fabrication of carbon-nanotube-based field emitters. A representative three-input inverse majority gate would be a monolithic, integrated structure that would include three gate electrodes, six bundles of carbon nanotubes (serving as electron emitters) at suitable positions between the gate electrodes, and an overhanging anode. The bundles of carbon nanotubes would be grown on degenerately doped silicon substrates that would be parts of the monolithic structure. The gate electrodes would be fabricated as parts of the monolithic structure by means of a double-silicon-on-insulator process developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The tops of the bundles of carbon nanotubes would lie below the plane of the tops of the gate electrodes. The particular choice of shapes, dimensions, and relative positions of the electrodes and bundles of carbon nanotubes would provide for both field emission of electrons from the bundles of carbon nanotubes and control of the electron current to obtain the inverse majority function, which is described in the paper.

  15. Shielded silicon gate complementary MOS integrated circuit.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H. C.; Halsor, J. L.; Hayes, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    An electrostatic shield for complementary MOS integrated circuits was developed to minimize the adverse effects of stray electric fields created by the potentials in the metal interconnections. The process is compatible with silicon gate technology. N-doped polycrystalline silicon was used for all the gates and the shield. The effectiveness of the shield was demonstrated by constructing a special field plate over certain transistors. The threshold voltages obtained on an oriented silicon substrate ranged from 1.5 to 3 V for either channel. Integrated inverters performed satisfactorily from 3 to 15 V, limited at the low end by the threshold voltages and at the high end by the drain breakdown voltage of the n-channel transistors. The stability of the new structure with an n-doped silicon gate as measured by the shift in C-V curve under 200 C plus or minus 20 V temperature-bias conditions was better than conventional aluminum gate or p-doped silicon gate devices, presumably due to the doping of gate oxide with phosphorous.

  16. Gate-set tomography and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin

    Four years ago, there was no reliable way to characterize and debug quantum gates. Process tomography required perfectly pre-calibrated gates, while randomized benchmarking only yielded an overall error rate. Gate-set tomography (GST) emerged around 2012-13 in several variants (most notably at IBM; see PRA 87, 062119) to address this need, providing complete and calibration-free characterization of gates. At Sandia, we have pushed the capabilities of GST well beyond these initial goals. In this talk, I'll demonstrate our open web interface, show how we characterize gates with accuracy at the Heisenberg limit, discuss how we put error bars on the results, and present experimental GST estimates with 1e-5 error bars. I'll also present preliminary results of GST on 2-qubit gates, including a brief survey of the tricks we use to make it possible. I'll conclude with an analysis of GST's limitations (e.g., it scales poorly), and the techniques under development for characterizing and debugging larger (3+ qubit) systems.

  17. Controlled Logic Gates-Switch Gate and Fredkin Gate Based on Enzyme-Biocatalyzed Reactions Realized in Flow Cells.

    PubMed

    Fratto, Brian E; Katz, Evgeny

    2016-04-04

    Controlled logic gates, where the logic operations on the Data inputs are performed in the way determined by the Control signal, were designed in a chemical fashion. Specifically, the systems where the Data output signals directed to various output channels depending on the logic value of the Control input signal have been designed based on enzyme biocatalyzed reactions performed in a multi-cell flow system. In the Switch gate one Data signal was directed to one of two possible output channels depending on the logic value of the Control input signal. In the reversible Fredkin gate the routing of two Data signals between two output channels is controlled by the third Control signal. The flow devices were created using a network of flow cells, each modified with one enzyme that biocatalyzed one chemical reaction. The enzymatic cascade was realized by moving the solution from one reacting cell to another which were organized in a specific network. The modular design of the enzyme-based systems realized in the flow device allowed easy reconfiguration of the logic system, thus allowing simple extension of the logic operation from the 2-input/3-output channels in the Switch gate to the 3-input/3-output channels in the Fredkin gate. Further increase of the system complexity for realization of various logic processes is feasible with the use of the flow cell modular design.

  18. Analytical drain current formulation for gate dielectric engineered dual material gate-gate all around-tunneling field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madan, Jaya; Gupta, R. S.; Chaujar, Rishu

    2015-09-01

    In this work, an analytical drain current model for gate dielectric engineered (hetero dielectric)-dual material gate-gate all around tunnel field effect transistor (HD-DMG-GAA-TFET) has been developed. Parabolic approximation has been used to solve the two-dimensional (2D) Poisson equation with appropriate boundary conditions and continuity equations to evaluate analytical expressions for surface potential, electric field, tunneling barrier width and drain current. Further, the analog performance of the device is studied for three high-k dielectrics (Si3N4, HfO2, and ZrO2), and it has been investigated that the problem of lower ION, can be overcome by using the hetero-gate architecture. Moreover, the impact of scaling the gate oxide thickness and bias variations has also been studied. The HD-DMG-GAA-TFET shows an enhanced ION of the order of 10-4 A. The effectiveness of the proposed model is validated by comparing it with ATLAS device simulations.

  19. Factors for radical creativity, incremental creativity, and routine, noncreative performance.

    PubMed

    Madjar, Nora; Greenberg, Ellen; Chen, Zheng

    2011-07-01

    This study extends theory and research by differentiating between routine, noncreative performance and 2 distinct types of creativity: radical and incremental. We also use a sensemaking perspective to examine the interplay of social and personal factors that may influence a person's engagement in a certain level of creative action versus routine, noncreative work. Results demonstrate that willingness to take risks, resources for creativity, and career commitment are associated primarily with radical creativity; that the presence of creative coworkers and organizational identification are associated with incremental creativity; and that conformity and organizational identification are linked with routine performance. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed.

  20. Floating-point function generation routines for 16-bit microcomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackin, M. A.; Soeder, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Several computer subroutines have been developed that interpolate three types of nonanalytic functions: univariate, bivariate, and map. The routines use data in floating-point form. However, because they are written for use on a 16-bit Intel 8086 system with an 8087 mathematical coprocessor, they execute as fast as routines using data in scaled integer form. Although all of the routines are written in assembly language, they have been implemented in a modular fashion so as to facilitate their use with high-level languages.

  1. Gallium arsenide processing for gate array logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Eric D.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a reliable and reproducible GaAs process was initiated for applications in gate array logic. Gallium Arsenide is an extremely important material for high speed electronic applications in both digital and analog circuits since its electron mobility is 3 to 5 times that of silicon, this allows for faster switching times for devices fabricated with it. Unfortunately GaAs is an extremely difficult material to process with respect to silicon and since it includes the arsenic component GaAs can be quite dangerous (toxic) especially during some heating steps. The first stage of the research was directed at developing a simple process to produce GaAs MESFETs. The MESFET (MEtal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor) is the most useful, practical and simple active device which can be fabricated in GaAs. It utilizes an ohmic source and drain contact separated by a Schottky gate. The gate width is typically a few microns. Several process steps were required to produce a good working device including ion implantation, photolithography, thermal annealing, and metal deposition. A process was designed to reduce the total number of steps to a minimum so as to reduce possible errors. The first run produced no good devices. The problem occurred during an aluminum etch step while defining the gate contacts. It was found that the chemical etchant attacked the GaAs causing trenching and subsequent severing of the active gate region from the rest of the device. Thus all devices appeared as open circuits. This problem is being corrected and since it was the last step in the process correction should be successful. The second planned stage involves the circuit assembly of the discrete MESFETs into logic gates for test and analysis. Finally the third stage is to incorporate the designed process with the tested circuit in a layout that would produce the gate array as a GaAs integrated circuit.

  2. Gallium arsenide processing for gate array logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Eric D.

    1989-09-01

    The development of a reliable and reproducible GaAs process was initiated for applications in gate array logic. Gallium Arsenide is an extremely important material for high speed electronic applications in both digital and analog circuits since its electron mobility is 3 to 5 times that of silicon, this allows for faster switching times for devices fabricated with it. Unfortunately GaAs is an extremely difficult material to process with respect to silicon and since it includes the arsenic component GaAs can be quite dangerous (toxic) especially during some heating steps. The first stage of the research was directed at developing a simple process to produce GaAs MESFETs. The MESFET (MEtal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor) is the most useful, practical and simple active device which can be fabricated in GaAs. It utilizes an ohmic source and drain contact separated by a Schottky gate. The gate width is typically a few microns. Several process steps were required to produce a good working device including ion implantation, photolithography, thermal annealing, and metal deposition. A process was designed to reduce the total number of steps to a minimum so as to reduce possible errors. The first run produced no good devices. The problem occurred during an aluminum etch step while defining the gate contacts. It was found that the chemical etchant attacked the GaAs causing trenching and subsequent severing of the active gate region from the rest of the device. Thus all devices appeared as open circuits. This problem is being corrected and since it was the last step in the process correction should be successful. The second planned stage involves the circuit assembly of the discrete MESFETs into logic gates for test and analysis. Finally the third stage is to incorporate the designed process with the tested circuit in a layout that would produce the gate array as a GaAs integrated circuit.

  3. 32 CFR 552.109 - Routine security controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... center where the visitor's name, vehicle license number, purpose and duration of visit will be recorded prior to granting access. Visitor's passes for visitors to Madigan Army Medical Center and the Logistics Center/Civilian Personnel Office will be issued at the Madigan and Logistics Center gates...

  4. 32 CFR 552.109 - Routine security controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... center where the visitor's name, vehicle license number, purpose and duration of visit will be recorded prior to granting access. Visitor's passes for visitors to Madigan Army Medical Center and the Logistics Center/Civilian Personnel Office will be issued at the Madigan and Logistics Center gates...

  5. 32 CFR 552.109 - Routine security controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... center where the visitor's name, vehicle license number, purpose and duration of visit will be recorded prior to granting access. Visitor's passes for visitors to Madigan Army Medical Center and the Logistics Center/Civilian Personnel Office will be issued at the Madigan and Logistics Center gates...

  6. The routine pre-employment screening chest radiograph: Should it be routine?

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, V John; Gibikote, Sridhar; Kirupakaran, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: A routine chest radiograph is mandatory in many institutions as a part of pre-employment screening. The usefulness of this has been studied over the years keeping in mind the added time, cost, and radiation concerns. Studies conducted outside India have shown different results, some for and some against it. To our knowledge, there is no published data from India on this issue. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of the reports of 4113 pre-employment chest radiographs done between 2007 and 2009 was conducted. Results: Out of 4113 radiographs, 24 (0.58%) candidates required further evaluation based on findings from the screening chest radiograph. Out of these, 7 (0.17%) candidates required appropriate further treatment. Interpretation and Conclusions: The percentage of significant abnormalities detected which needed further medical intervention was small (0.17%). Although the individual radiation exposure is very small, the large numbers done nation-wide would significantly add to the community radiation, with added significant cost and time implications. We believe that pre-employment chest radiographs should be restricted to candidates in whom there is relevant history and/or clinical findings suggestive of cardiopulmonary disease. PMID:27857470

  7. Sliding-gate valve for use with abrasive materials

    DOEpatents

    Ayers, Jr., William J.; Carter, Charles R.; Griffith, Richard A.; Loomis, Richard B.; Notestein, John E.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is a flow and pressure-sealing valve for use with abrasive solids. The valve embodies special features which provide for long, reliable operating lifetimes in solids-handling service. The valve includes upper and lower transversely slidable gates, contained in separate chambers. The upper gate provides a solids-flow control function, whereas the lower gate provides a pressure-sealing function. The lower gate is supported by means for (a) lifting that gate into sealing engagement with its seat when the gate is in its open and closed positions and (b) lowering the gate out of contact with its seat to permit abrasion-free transit of the gate between its open and closed positions. When closed, the upper gate isolates the lower gate from the solids. Because of this shielding action, the sealing surface of the lower gate is not exposed to solids during transit or when it is being lifted or lowered. The chamber containing the lower gate normally is pressurized slightly, and a sweep gas is directed inwardly across the lower-gate sealing surface during the vertical translation of the gate.

  8. Most U.S. Adults Support Routine Child Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163392.html Most U.S. Adults Support Routine Child Vaccine Survey finds 80 percent have positive view of ... Americans believe that the benefits of the MMR vaccine outweigh any risks. Nearly three-quarters of the ...

  9. User's Manual: Routines for Radiative Heat Transfer and Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risch, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the intensity and spectral distribution of radiation emanating from a heated surface has applications in many areas of science and engineering. Areas of research in which the quantification of spectral radiation is used routinely include thermal radiation heat transfer, infrared signature analysis, and radiation thermometry. In the analysis of radiation, it is helpful to be able to predict the radiative intensity and the spectral distribution of the emitted energy. Presented in this report is a set of routines written in Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) and incorporating functions specific to Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) that are useful for predicting the radiative behavior of heated surfaces. These routines include functions for calculating quantities of primary importance to engineers and scientists. In addition, the routines also provide the capability to use such information to determine surface temperatures from spectral intensities and for calculating the sensitivity of the surface temperature measurements to unknowns in the input parameters.

  10. VIEW OF BUILDING 122 EXAMINATION FACILITIES THAT SUPPORT ROUTINE EMPLOYEE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BUILDING 122 EXAMINATION FACILITIES THAT SUPPORT ROUTINE EMPLOYEE AND SUBCONTRACTOR PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS. (10/85) - Rocky Flats Plant, Emergency Medical Services Facility, Southwest corner of Central & Third Avenues, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  11. Noisy signaling through promoter logic gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstung, Moritz; Timmer, Jens; Fleck, Christian

    2009-01-01

    We study the influence of noisy transcription factor signals on cis-regulatory promoter elements. These elements process the probability of binary binding events analogous to computer logic gates. At equilibrium, this probability is given by the so-called input function. We show that transcription factor noise causes deviations from the equilibrium value due to the nonlinearity of the input function. For a single binding site, the correction is always negative resulting in an occupancy below the mean-field level. Yet for more complex promoters it depends on the correlation of the transcription factor signals and the geometry of the input function. We present explicit solutions for the basic types of AND and OR gates. The correction size varies among these different types of gates and signal types, mainly being larger in AND gates and for correlated fluctuations. In all cases we find excellent agreement between the analytical results and numerical simulations. We also study the E. coli Lac operon as an example of an AND NOR gate. We present a consistent mathematical method that allows one to separate different sources of noise and quantifies their effect on promoter occupation. A surprising result of our analysis is that Poissonian molecular fluctuations, in contrast to external fluctuations, do no contribute to the correction.

  12. Ion-dependent gating of kainate receptors.

    PubMed

    Bowie, Derek

    2010-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels are an important class of signalling protein that depend on small chemical neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, l-glutamate, glycine and gamma-aminobutyrate for activation. Although numerous in number, neurotransmitter substances have always been thought to drive the receptor complex into the open state in much the same way and not rely substantially on other factors. However, recent work on kainate-type (KAR) ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) has identified an exception to this rule. Here, the activation process fails to occur unless external monovalent anions and cations are present. This absolute requirement of ions singles out KARs from all other ligand-gated ion channels, including closely related AMPA- and NMDA-type iGluR family members. The uniqueness of ion-dependent gating has earmarked this feature of KARs as a putative target for the development of selective ligands; a prospect all the more compelling with the recent elucidation of distinct anion and cation binding pockets. Despite these advances, much remains to be resolved. For example, it is still not clear how ion effects on KARs impacts glutamatergic transmission. I conclude by speculating that further analysis of ion-dependent gating may provide clues into how functionally diverse iGluRs families emerged by evolution. Consequently, ion-dependent gating of KARs looks set to continue to be a subject of topical inquiry well into the future.

  13. Hydraulics characteristics of tipping sediment flushing gate.

    PubMed

    Bong, C H J; Lau, T L; Ab Ghani, A

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights a preliminary study on the potential of a tipping flush gate to be used in an open storm drain to remove sediment. The investigation was carried out by using a plasboard model of the tipping flush gate installed in a rectangular flume. A steady flow experiment was carried out to determine the discharge coefficients and also the outflow relationship of the tipping flush gate. The velocity produced by the gate at various distances downstream of the gate during flushing operation was measured using a flowmeter and the velocity at all the points was higher than the recommended self-cleansing design available in the literature. A preliminary experiment on the efficiency of flushing was conducted using uniform sediment with d50 sizes of 0.81, 1.53 and 4.78 mm. Results generally showed that the number of flushes required to totally remove the sediment from the initial position by a distance of 1 m increased by an average of 1.50 times as the sediment deposit bed thickness doubled. An equation relating the number of flushes required to totally remove the sediment bed for 1 m with the sediment bed deposit thickness was also developed for the current study.

  14. BK channels: multiple sensors, one activation gate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Guohui; Cui, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport across cell membranes is essential to cell communication and signaling. Passive ion transport is mediated by ion channels, membrane proteins that create ion conducting pores across cell membrane to allow ion flux down electrochemical gradient. Under physiological conditions, majority of ion channel pores are not constitutively open. Instead, structural region(s) within these pores breaks the continuity of the aqueous ion pathway, thereby serves as activation gate(s) to control ions flow in and out. To achieve spatially and temporally regulated ion flux in cells, many ion channels have evolved sensors to detect various environmental stimuli or the metabolic states of the cell and trigger global conformational changes, thereby dynamically operate the opening and closing of their activation gate. The sensors of ion channels can be broadly categorized as chemical sensors and physical sensors to respond to chemical (such as neural transmitters, nucleotides and ions) and physical (such as voltage, mechanical force and temperature) signals, respectively. With the rapidly growing structural and functional information of different types of ion channels, it is now critical to understand how ion channel sensors dynamically control their gates at molecular and atomic level. The voltage and Ca(2+) activated BK channels, a K(+) channel with an electrical sensor and multiple chemical sensors, provide a unique model system for us to understand how physical and chemical energy synergistically operate its activation gate.

  15. Dosimetric Analysis of Organs at Risk During Expiratory Gating in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Cullen M.; Murphy, James D.; Eclov, Neville; Atwood, Todd F.; Kielar, Kayla N.; Christman-Skieller, Claudia; Mok, Ed; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To determine how the respiratory phase impacts dose to normal organs during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with SBRT were included in this study. On the treatment planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (CT) scan, the planning target volume (PTV), defined as the gross tumor volume plus 3-mm margin, the duodenum, and the stomach were contoured on the end-expiration (CT{sub exp}) and end-inspiration (CT{sub insp}) phases for each patient. A separate treatment plan was constructed for both phases with the dose prescription of 33 Gy in 5 fractions with 95% coverage of the PTV by the 100% isodose line. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) endpoints, volume of duodenum that received 20 Gy (V{sub 20}), V{sub 25}, and V{sub 30} and maximum dose to 5 cc of contoured organ (D{sub 5cc}), D{sub 1cc}, and D{sub 0.1cc}, were evaluated. Results: Dosimetric parameters for the duodenum, including V{sub 25}, V{sub 30}, D{sub 1cc}, and D{sub 0.1cc} improved by planning on the CT{sub exp} compared to those on the CT{sub insp}. There was a statistically significant overlap of the PTV with the duodenum but not the stomach during the CT{sub insp} compared to the CT{sub exp} (0.38 ± 0.17 cc vs 0.01 ± 0.01 cc, P=.048). A larger expansion of the PTV, in accordance with a Danish phase 2 trial, showed even more overlapping volume of duodenum on the CT{sub insp} compared to that on the CT{sub exp} (5.5 ± 0.9 cc vs 3.0 ± 0.8 cc, P=.0003) but no statistical difference for any stomach dosimetric DVH parameter. Conclusions: Dose to the duodenum was higher when treating on the inspiratory than on the expiratory phase. These data suggest that expiratory gating may be preferable to inspiratory breath-hold and free breathing strategies for minimizing risk of toxicity.

  16. Survey of US Correctional Institutions for Routine HCV Testing

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Ann E.; Bazerman, Lauri; Solomon, Liza; Patry, Emily; Rich, Josiah D.; Kuo, Irene

    2015-01-01

    To ascertain HCV testing practices among US prisons and jails, we conducted a survey study in 2012, consisting of medical directors of all US state prisons and 40 of the largest US jails, that demonstrated a minority of US prisons and jails conduct routine HCV testing. Routine voluntary HCV testing in correctional facilities is urgently needed to increase diagnosis, enable risk-reduction counseling and preventive health care, and facilitate evaluation for antiviral treatment. PMID:25393180

  17. Work routinization and implications for ergonomic exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Gold, Judith E; Park, Jung-Soon; Punnett, Laura

    2006-01-15

    Jobs in many modern settings, including manufacturing, service, agriculture and construction, are variable in their content and timing. This prompts the need for exposure assessment methods that do not assume regular work cycles. A scheme is presented for classifying levels of routinization to inform development of an appropriate exposure assessment strategy for a given occupational setting. Five levels of routinization have been defined based on the tasks of which the job is composed: 1) a single scheduled task with a regular work cycle; 2) multiple cyclical tasks; 3) a mix of cyclical and non-cyclical tasks; 4) one non-cyclical task; 5) multiple non-cyclical tasks. This classification, based primarily on job observation, is illustrated through data from a study of automobile manufacturing workers (n = 1200), from which self-assessed exposures to physical and psychosocial stressors were also obtained. In this cohort, decision latitude was greater with higher routinization level (p < 0.0001), and the least routinized jobs showed the lowest self-reported exposure to physical ergonomic stressors. The job analysis checklist developed for non-routinized jobs is presented, and limitations of the task analysis method utilized in the study are discussed. A work sampling approach to job analysis is recommended as the most efficient way to obtain a comparable unbiased exposure estimate across all routinization levels.

  18. Transversal Clifford gates on folded surface codes

    SciTech Connect

    Moussa, Jonathan E.

    2016-10-12

    Surface and color codes are two forms of topological quantum error correction in two spatial dimensions with complementary properties. Surface codes have lower-depth error detection circuits and well-developed decoders to interpret and correct errors, while color codes have transversal Clifford gates and better code efficiency in the number of physical qubits needed to achieve a given code distance. A formal equivalence exists between color codes and folded surface codes, but it does not guarantee the transferability of any of these favorable properties. However, the equivalence does imply the existence of constant-depth circuit implementations of logical Clifford gates on folded surface codes. We achieve and improve this result by constructing two families of folded surface codes with transversal Clifford gates. This construction is presented generally for qudits of any dimension. Lastly, the specific application of these codes to universal quantum computation based on qubit fusion is also discussed.

  19. Transversal Clifford gates on folded surface codes

    DOE PAGES

    Moussa, Jonathan E.

    2016-10-12

    Surface and color codes are two forms of topological quantum error correction in two spatial dimensions with complementary properties. Surface codes have lower-depth error detection circuits and well-developed decoders to interpret and correct errors, while color codes have transversal Clifford gates and better code efficiency in the number of physical qubits needed to achieve a given code distance. A formal equivalence exists between color codes and folded surface codes, but it does not guarantee the transferability of any of these favorable properties. However, the equivalence does imply the existence of constant-depth circuit implementations of logical Clifford gates on folded surfacemore » codes. We achieve and improve this result by constructing two families of folded surface codes with transversal Clifford gates. This construction is presented generally for qudits of any dimension. Lastly, the specific application of these codes to universal quantum computation based on qubit fusion is also discussed.« less

  20. The Airport Gate Assignment Problem: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ghaleb, Mageed A.; Salem, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    The airport gate assignment problem (AGAP) is one of the most important problems operations managers face daily. Many researches have been done to solve this problem and tackle its complexity. The objective of the task is assigning each flight (aircraft) to an available gate while maximizing both conveniences to passengers and the operational efficiency of airport. This objective requires a solution that provides the ability to change and update the gate assignment data on a real time basis. In this paper, we survey the state of the art of these problems and the various methods to obtain the solution. Our survey covers both theoretical and real AGAP with the description of mathematical formulations and resolution methods such as exact algorithms, heuristic algorithms, and metaheuristic algorithms. We also provide a research trend that can inspire researchers about new problems in this area. PMID:25506074

  1. Transversal Clifford gates on folded surface codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Jonathan E.

    2016-10-01

    Surface and color codes are two forms of topological quantum error correction in two spatial dimensions with complementary properties. Surface codes have lower-depth error detection circuits and well-developed decoders to interpret and correct errors, while color codes have transversal Clifford gates and better code efficiency in the number of physical qubits needed to achieve a given code distance. A formal equivalence exists between color codes and folded surface codes, but it does not guarantee the transferability of any of these favorable properties. However, the equivalence does imply the existence of constant-depth circuit implementations of logical Clifford gates on folded surface codes. We achieve and improve this result by constructing two families of folded surface codes with transversal Clifford gates. This construction is presented generally for qudits of any dimension. The specific application of these codes to universal quantum computation based on qubit fusion is also discussed.

  2. Four-gate transistor analog multiplier circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad M. (Inventor); Blalock, Benjamin (Inventor); Cristoloveanu, Sorin (Inventor); Chen, Suheng (Inventor); Akarvardar, Kerem (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A differential output analog multiplier circuit utilizing four G.sup.4-FETs, each source connected to a current source. The four G.sup.4-FETs may be grouped into two pairs of two G.sup.4-FETs each, where one pair has its drains connected to a load, and the other par has its drains connected to another load. The differential output voltage is taken at the two loads. In one embodiment, for each G.sup.4-FET, the first and second junction gates are each connected together, where a first input voltage is applied to the front gates of each pair, and a second input voltage is applied to the first junction gates of each pair. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  3. Active gated imaging for automotive safety applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauer, Yoav; Sonn, Ezri

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents the Active Gated Imaging System (AGIS), in relation to the automotive field. AGIS is based on a fast gated-camera equipped with a unique Gated-CMOS sensor, and a pulsed Illuminator, synchronized in the time domain to record images of a certain range of interest which are then processed by computer vision real-time algorithms. In recent years we have learned the system parameters which are most beneficial to night-time driving in terms of; field of view, illumination profile, resolution and processing power. AGIS provides also day-time imaging with additional capabilities, which enhances computer vision safety applications. AGIS provides an excellent candidate for camera-based Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) and the path for autonomous driving, in the future, based on its outstanding low/high light-level, harsh weather conditions capabilities and 3D potential growth capabilities.

  4. Operational life prediction on gating image intensifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yu-hui; Shen, Zhi-guo; Li, Zhong-li

    2009-07-01

    Operational life is one of the important parameters to evaluate second and super second generation image intensifiers. It can be used not only to monitor manufacturing technique in product line, then the technology on photocathode processing, MCP degassing and MCP producing can be adjusted promptly, but also to eliminate the image intensifiers which have hidden risk on operational life as early as possible. Recently gating image intensifiers are used widely, method to estimate the operational life of gating image intensifier related to its practical operate mode and working condition need to be established urgently. The least square method to analyze the operational life test data in product line was introduced in this paper. Now the data can be analyzed with convenient statistic analyze function on Excel. Using "worksheet function" and "chart wizard" and "data analysis" on Excel to do the least square method calculation, spreadsheets are established to do complex data calculation with worksheet functions. Based on them, formulas to monitor the technology parameters were derived, and the conclusion that the operational life was only related to the decrease slope of photocathode exponential fit curve was made. The decrease slope of photocathode sensitivity exponential fit curve and the decrease percent of the exponential fit photocathode sensitivity can be used to evaluate the qualification of the operational life rapidly. The mathematic models for operational life prediction on image intensifier and gating image intensifier are established respectively based on the acceptable values of the decrease percent of the exponential fit photocathode sensitivity and the expecting signal to noise ratio. The equations predicting the operational life related to duty cycle and input light level on gating image intensifier were derived, and the relationship between them were discussed too. The theory foundation were made herein, so the user can select proper gating image

  5. Maritime target identification in gated viewing imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Marcus; Hebel, Marcus; Arens, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The growing interest in unmanned surface vehicles, accident avoidance for naval vessels and automated maritime surveillance leads to a growing need for automatic detection, classification and pose estimation of maritime objects in medium and long ranges. Laser radar imagery is a well proven tool for near to medium range, but up to now for higher distances neither the sensor range nor the sensor resolution was satisfying. As a result of the mentioned limitations of laser radar imagery the potential of laser illuminated gated viewing for automated classification and pose estimation was investigated. The paper presents new techniques for segmentation, pose estimation and model-based identification of naval vessels in gated viewing imagery in comparison with the corresponding results of long range data acquired with a focal plane array laser radar system. The pose estimation in the gated viewing data is directly connected with the model-based identification which makes use of the outline of the object. By setting a sufficient narrow gate, the distance gap between the upper part of the ship and the background leads to an automatic segmentation. By setting the gate the distance to the object is roughly known. With this distance and the imaging properties of the camera, the width of the object perpendicular to the line of sight can be calculated. For each ship in the model library a set of possible 2D appearances in the known distance is calculated and the resulting contours are compared with the measured 2D outline. The result is a match error for each reasonable orientation of each model of the library. The result gained from the gated viewing data is compared with the results of target identification by laser radar imagery of the same maritime objects.

  6. Coupling between Voltage Sensors and Activation Gate in Voltage-gated K+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhe; Klem, Angela M.; Ramu, Yajamana

    2002-01-01

    Current through voltage-gated K+ channels underlies the action potential encoding the electrical signal in excitable cells. The four subunits of a voltage-gated K+ channel each have six transmembrane segments (S1–S6), whereas some other K+ channels, such as eukaryotic inward rectifier K+ channels and the prokaryotic KcsA channel, have only two transmembrane segments (M1 and M2). A voltage-gated K+ channel is formed by an ion-pore module (S5–S6, equivalent to M1–M2) and the surrounding voltage-sensing modules. The S4 segments are the primary voltage sensors while the intracellular activation gate is located near the COOH-terminal end of S6, although the coupling mechanism between them remains unknown. In the present study, we found that two short, complementary sequences in voltage-gated K+ channels are essential for coupling the voltage sensors to the intracellular activation gate. One sequence is the so called S4–S5 linker distal to the voltage-sensing S4, while the other is around the COOH-terminal end of S6, a region containing the actual gate-forming residues. PMID:12407078

  7. Lipid-dependent gating of a voltage-gated potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Liu, Weiran; Anderson, Lingyan Y.; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies hypothesized that phospholipids stabilize two voltage-sensing arginine residues of certain voltage-gated potassium channels in activated conformations. It remains unclear how lipids directly affect these channels. Here, by examining the conformations of the KvAP in different lipids, we showed that without voltage change, the voltage-sensor domains switched from the activated to the resting state when their surrounding lipids were changed from phospholipids to nonphospholipids. Such lipid-determined conformational change was coupled to the ion-conducting pore, suggesting that parallel to voltage gating, the channel is gated by its annular lipids. Our measurements recognized that the energetic cost of lipid-dependent gating approaches that of voltage gating, but kinetically it appears much slower. Our data support that a channel and its surrounding lipids together constitute a functional unit, and natural nonphospholipids such as cholesterol should exert strong effects on voltage-gated channels. Our first observation of lipid-dependent gating may have general implications to other membrane proteins. PMID:21427721

  8. Ultralow turnoff loss dual-gate SOI LIGBT with trench gate barrier and carrier stored layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi-Tao; Qiao, Ming; Zhang, Bo

    2016-12-01

    A novel ultralow turnoff loss dual-gate silicon-on-insulator (SOI) lateral insulated gate bipolar transistor (LIGBT) is proposed. The proposed SOI LIGBT features an extra trench gate inserted between the p-well and n-drift, and an n-type carrier stored (CS) layer beneath the p-well. In the on-state, the extra trench gate acts as a barrier, which increases the carrier density at the cathode side of n-drift region, resulting in a decrease of the on-state voltage drop (Von). In the off-state, due to the uniform carrier distribution and the assisted depletion effect induced by the extra trench gate, large number of carriers can be removed at the initial turnoff process, contributing to a low turnoff loss (Eoff). Moreover, owing to the dual-gate field plates and CS layer, the carrier density beneath the p-well can greatly increase, which further improves the tradeoff between Eoff and Von. Simulation results show that Eoff of the proposed SOI LIGBT can decrease by 77% compared with the conventional trench gate SOI LIGBT at the same Von of 1.1 V. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61376080 and 61674027) and the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province, China (Grant Nos. 2014A030313736 and 2016A030311022).

  9. Optimizing the fast Rydberg quantum gate

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M.S.; Williams, Carl J.; Clark, Charles W.

    2003-04-01

    The fast phase gate scheme, in which the qubits are atoms confined in sites of an optical lattice, and gate operations are mediated by excitation of Rydberg states, was proposed by Jaksch et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2208 (2000)]. A potential source of decoherence in this system derives from motional heating, which occurs if the ground and Rydberg states of the atom move in different optical lattice potentials. We propose to minimize this effect by choosing the lattice photon frequency {omega}, so that the ground and Rydberg states have the same frequency-dependent polarizability {alpha}({omega}). The results are presented for the case of Rb.

  10. Coherent spaces, Boolean rings and quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourdas, A.

    2016-10-01

    Coherent spaces spanned by a finite number of coherent states, are introduced. Their coherence properties are studied, using the Dirac contour representation. It is shown that the corresponding projectors resolve the identity, and that they transform into projectors of the same type, under displacement transformations, and also under time evolution. The set of these spaces, with the logical OR and AND operations is a distributive lattice, and with the logical XOR and AND operations is a Boolean ring (Stone's formalism). Applications of this Boolean ring into classical CNOT gates with n-ary variables, and also quantum CNOT gates with coherent states, are discussed.

  11. Fidelity of adiabatic holonomic quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovsky, Vladimir; Rudin, Sergey

    2016-05-01

    During last few years non-Abelian geometric phases are attracting increasing interest due to possible experimental applications in quantum computation. Here we discuss universal set of holonomic quantum gates using the geometric phase that the qubit wave function acquires after a cyclic evolution. The proposed scheme utilizes ultrafast pulses and provides a possibility to substantially suppress transient population of the ancillary states. Fidelity of the holonomic quantum gates in the presence of dephasing and dissipation is discussed. Example of electron spin qubit system in the InGaN/GaN, GaN/AlN quantum dot is considered in details.

  12. Cyclic groups and quantum logic gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourkia, Arash; Batle, J.; Raymond Ooi, C. H.

    2016-10-01

    We present a formula for an infinite number of universal quantum logic gates, which are 4 by 4 unitary solutions to the Yang-Baxter (Y-B) equation. We obtain this family from a certain representation of the cyclic group of order n. We then show that this discrete family, parametrized by integers n, is in fact, a small sub-class of a larger continuous family, parametrized by real numbers θ, of universal quantum gates. We discuss the corresponding Yang-Baxterization and related symmetries in the concomitant Hamiltonian.

  13. Gated IR Images of Shocked Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    S. S. Lutz; W. D. Turley; P. M. Rightley; L. E. Primas

    2001-06-01

    Gated infrared (IR) images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin. Metal coupons machined with steps and flats were mounted directly to the high explosive. The explosive was point-initiated and 500-ns to 1-microsecond-wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb camera (SBF-134). Spatial distributions of surface radiance were extracted from the images of the shocked samples and found to be non-single-valued. Several geometries were modeled using CTH, a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode.

  14. Gated IR images of shocked surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, S. S.; Turley, W. D.; Rightley, P. M.; Primas, L. E.

    2001-01-01

    Gated infrared (IR) images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin. Metal coupons machined with steps and flats were mounted directly to the high explosive. The explosive was point-initiated and 500-ns to 1-microsecond-wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb camera (SBF-134). Spatial distributions of surface radiance were extracted from the images of the shocked samples and found to be non-single-valued. Several geometries were modeled using CTH, a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode.

  15. Gate dependent electronic Raman scattering in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, E.; Méasson, M.-A.; Kazayous, M.; Sacuto, A.; Gallais, Y.; Spectroscopy Of Quasi-Particles (Squap) Team

    We report the direct observation of polarization resolved electronic Raman scattering in a gated monolayer graphene device. The evolution of the electronic Raman scattering spectra with gate voltage and its polarization dependence are in full agreement with theoretical expectations for non-resonant Raman processes involving interband electron-hole excitations across the Dirac cone. We further show that the spectral dependence of the electronic Raman scattering signal can be simply described by the dynamical polarizability of graphene in the long wavelength limit. The possibility to directly observe Dirac fermion excitations in graphene opens the way to promising Raman investigations of electronic properties of graphene and other 2D materials.

  16. Gate dependent electronic Raman scattering in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, E.; Méasson, M.-A.; Kazayous, M.; Sacuto, A.; Gallais, Y.; Spectroscopy Of Quasi-Particles (Squap) Team

    We report the direct observation of polarization resolved electronic Raman scattering in a gated monolayer graphene device. The evolution of the electronic Raman scattering spectra with gate voltage and its polarization dependence are in full agreement with theoretical expectations for non-resonant Raman processes involving interband electron-hole excitations across the Dirac cone [1]. We further show that the spectral dependence of the electronic Raman scattering signal can be simply described by the dynamical polarizability of graphene in the long wavelength limit [2]. The possibility to directly observe Dirac fermion excitations in graphene opens the way to promising Raman investigations of electronic properties of graphene and other 2D materials.

  17. Ultrafast quantum gates in circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Romero, G; Ballester, D; Wang, Y M; Scarani, V; Solano, E

    2012-03-23

    We present a method to implement ultrafast two-qubit gates valid for the ultrastrong coupling and deep strong coupling regimes of light-matter interaction, considering state-of-the-art circuit quantum electrodynamics technology. Our proposal includes a suitable qubit architecture and is based on a four-step sequential displacement of the intracavity field, operating at a time proportional to the inverse of the resonator frequency. Through ab initio calculations, we show that these quantum gates can be performed at subnanosecond time scales while keeping a fidelity above 99%.

  18. Gate-Controlled WSe2 Transistors Using a Buried Triple-Gate Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M. R.; Salazar, R.; Fathipour, S.; Xu, H.; Kallis, K.; Künzelmann, U.; Seabaugh, A.; Appenzeller, J.; Knoch, J.

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper, we show tungsten diselenide (WSe2) devices that can be tuned to operate as n-type and p-type field-effect transistors (FETs) as well as band-to-band tunnel transistors on the same flake. Source, channel, and drain areas of the WSe2 flake are adjusted, using buried triple-gate substrates with three independently controllable gates. The device characteristics found in the tunnel transistor configuration are determined by the particular geometry of the buried triple-gate structure, consistent with a simple estimation of the expected off-state behavior.

  19. Determination of prospective displacement-based gate threshold for respiratory-gated radiation delivery from retrospective phase-based gate threshold selected at 4D CT simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Vedam, S.; Archambault, L.; Starkschall, G.; Mohan, R.; Beddar, S.

    2007-11-15

    Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) imaging has found increasing importance in the localization of tumor and surrounding normal structures throughout the respiratory cycle. Based on such tumor motion information, it is possible to identify the appropriate phase interval for respiratory gated treatment planning and delivery. Such a gating phase interval is determined retrospectively based on tumor motion from internal tumor displacement. However, respiratory-gated treatment is delivered prospectively based on motion determined predominantly from an external monitor. Therefore, the simulation gate threshold determined from the retrospective phase interval selected for gating at 4D CT simulation may not correspond to the delivery gate threshold that is determined from the prospective external monitor displacement at treatment delivery. The purpose of the present work is to establish a relationship between the thresholds for respiratory gating determined at CT simulation and treatment delivery, respectively. One hundred fifty external respiratory motion traces, from 90 patients, with and without audio-visual biofeedback, are analyzed. Two respiratory phase intervals, 40%-60% and 30%-70%, are chosen for respiratory gating from the 4D CT-derived tumor motion trajectory. From residual tumor displacements within each such gating phase interval, a simulation gate threshold is defined based on (a) the average and (b) the maximum respiratory displacement within the phase interval. The duty cycle for prospective gated delivery is estimated from the proportion of external monitor displacement data points within both the selected phase interval and the simulation gate threshold. The delivery gate threshold is then determined iteratively to match the above determined duty cycle. The magnitude of the difference between such gate thresholds determined at simulation and treatment delivery is quantified in each case. Phantom motion tests yielded coincidence of simulation

  20. 10. UPSTREAM SIDE OF UPPER MITER GATES SHOWING STOWED LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. UPSTREAM SIDE OF UPPER MITER GATES SHOWING STOWED LEFT WING OF UPPER GUARD GATE (FAR LEFT). VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  1. 19. STAIRWAY TO TAINTER GATE SECTION OF SPILLWAY, SHOWING STEAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. STAIRWAY TO TAINTER GATE SECTION OF SPILLWAY, SHOWING STEAM PIPES EMERGING FROM BOILERHOUSE (RIGHT) AND CONCRETE TAINTER GATE COUNTER WEIGHTS (BACKGROUND RIGHT). VIEW TO SOUTH. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  2. 15. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF LIFT GATE SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF LIFT GATE SECTION WITH TAINTER GATE SECTION OF SPILLWAY TO THE LEFT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  3. 6. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE PIER AND NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE PIER AND NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING MAIN LOCK IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTH (UPSTREAM) - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  4. Improved Classical Simulation of Quantum Circuits Dominated by Clifford Gates.

    PubMed

    Bravyi, Sergey; Gosset, David

    2016-06-24

    We present a new algorithm for classical simulation of quantum circuits over the Clifford+T gate set. The runtime of the algorithm is polynomial in the number of qubits and the number of Clifford gates in the circuit but exponential in the number of T gates. The exponential scaling is sufficiently mild that the algorithm can be used in practice to simulate medium-sized quantum circuits dominated by Clifford gates. The first demonstrations of fault-tolerant quantum circuits based on 2D topological codes are likely to be dominated by Clifford gates due to a high implementation cost associated with logical T gates. Thus our algorithm may serve as a verification tool for near-term quantum computers which cannot in practice be simulated by other means. To demonstrate the power of the new method, we performed a classical simulation of a hidden shift quantum algorithm with 40 qubits, a few hundred Clifford gates, and nearly 50 T gates.

  5. 2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL PURIFICATION TANK IN DISTANCE FOR KEEPING DOWN GROWTH OF ALGAE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, Alabama Gates, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Washington Water Power Spokane River Upper Falls Hydroelectric Development, Gates ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Washington Water Power Spokane River Upper Falls Hydroelectric Development, Gates & Gate-Lifting Mechanisms, Spokane River, approximately 0.5 mile northeast of intersection of Spokane Falls Boulevard & Post Street, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  7. Micromachined mold-type double-gated metal field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yongjae; Kang, Seokho; Chun, Kukjin

    1997-12-01

    Electron field emitters with double gates were fabricated using micromachining technology and the effect of the electric potential of the focusing gate (or second gate) was experimentally evaluated. The molybdenum field emission tip was made by filling a cusplike mold formed when a conformal film was deposited on the hole-trench that had been patterned on stacked metals and dielectric layers. The hole-trench was patterned by electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. Each field emitter has a 0960-1317/7/4/009/img1 diameter extraction gate (or first gate) and a 0960-1317/7/4/009/img2 diameter focusing gate (or second gate). To make a path for the emitted electrons, silicon bulk was etched anisotropically in KOH and EDP (ethylene-diamine pyrocatechol) solution successively. The I - V characteristics and anode current change due to the focusing gate potential were measured.

  8. UPSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL AND DOG HOUSE. NOTE ARM AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    UPSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL AND DOG HOUSE. NOTE ARM AND GEARING FOR CONTROLLING LOCK GATE. LOOKING WEST SOUTHWEST. - Illinois Waterway, Brandon Road Lock and Dam , 1100 Brandon Road, Joliet, Will County, IL

  9. DOWNSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL VIEW WITH DOG HOUSE. NOTE CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DOWNSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL VIEW WITH DOG HOUSE. NOTE CONTROL ARM AND GEAR FOR GATE. LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Illinois Waterway, Dresden Island Lock and Dam , 7521 North Lock Road, Channahon, Will County, IL

  10. NORTH GATE AT 11TH AVENUE (490 NORTH & 900 EAST), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH GATE AT 11TH AVENUE (490 NORTH & 900 EAST), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT CEMETERY'S NORTH GATE (WPA PROJECT, 1938-1941). - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  11. WEST PIER OF NORTH GATE (490 NORTH & 900 EAST), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST PIER OF NORTH GATE (490 NORTH & 900 EAST), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE WEST PIER OF THE CEMETERY'S NORTH GATE. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  12. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF RADIAN GATE (LEFT, IN RAISED POSITION) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF RADIAN GATE (LEFT, IN RAISED POSITION) AND HAND- OPERATED GATE HOISTS (RIGHT), LOOKING WEST - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 87, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  13. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER AND TAINTER GATES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER AND TAINTER GATES, GATE PIERS, HEADHOUSES AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, UPSTREAM - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  14. 14. DETAILS OF GATE OPERATING MECHANISM, SHOWING RACK SECTION, CUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAILS OF GATE OPERATING MECHANISM, SHOWING RACK SECTION, CUT TEETH, CAST TEETH, GATE PINION (1907) - Nine Mile Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, State Highway 291 along Spokane River, Nine Mile Falls, Spokane County, WA

  15. 11. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF SLUICE GATE CONTROLS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF SLUICE GATE CONTROLS FROM CATWALK, SHOWING GATE LIFTING GEARS (TOP) AND GEAR SHAFTS (BOTTOM). VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  16. 7. South gate to Migel Estate and Farm along original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. South gate to Migel Estate and Farm along original alignment. Gate located at intersection of Orange Turnpike and Harriman Heights Road. View looking north. - Orange Turnpike, Parallel to new Orange Turnpike, Monroe, Orange County, NY

  17. 12. DETAIL VIEW OF CIRCULAR BRONZE ROLLER GATE POSITION GAUGE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW OF CIRCULAR BRONZE ROLLER GATE POSITION GAUGE, ROLLER GATE PIER HOUSE, TYPE 2A, DAM - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 11, Upper Mississippi River, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  18. 7. VIEW OF UPRIGHT OUTLET GATE, WHEEL STEM AND STEM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF UPRIGHT OUTLET GATE, WHEEL STEM AND STEM GUIDE (14' DIAMETER CIRCULAR CALCO CAST IRON SLIDE GATE), LOOKING SOUTHEAST - High Mountain Dams in Bonneville Unit, Fire Lake Dam, Wasatch National Forest, Kamas, Summit County, UT

  19. 5. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM GUIDE, (12' DIAMETER HARDESTY MODEL 112 CIRCULAR GATE), LOOKING NORTHEAST - High Mountain Dams in Bonneville Unit, Island Lake Dam, Wasatch National Forest, Kamas, Summit County, UT

  20. 4. VIEW NORTHWEST, INTERIOR OF GATEHOUSE, SHOWING ROW OF GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHWEST, INTERIOR OF GATEHOUSE, SHOWING ROW OF GATE OPERATING MECHANISMS; HEIGHT OF STEMS INDICATES FOREGROUND GATE IS OPEN - Norwich Water Power Company, Headgates, West bank of Shetucket River opposite Fourteenth Street, Greenville section, Norwich, New London County, CT

  1. 6. VIEW SHOWING INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW SHOWING INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM GUIDE (18' HARDESTY GATE), LOOKING SOUTHEAST - High Mountain Dams in Bonneville Unit, Long Lake Dam, Wasatch National Forest, Kamas, Summit County, UT

  2. 5. VIEW OF UPRIGHT OUTLET GATE, STEM, STEM GUIDE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF UPRIGHT OUTLET GATE, STEM, STEM GUIDE AND WHEEL (10' HARDESTY CAST IRON VERTICAL LIFT GATE), LOOKING WEST - High Mountain Dams in Bonneville Unit, Weir Lake Dam, Wasatch National Forest, Kamas, Summit County, UT

  3. 7. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM GUIDE (15' HARDESTY MODEL 115 GATE), LOOKING NORTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Bonneville Unit, Marjorie Lake Dam, Wasatch National Forest, Kamas, Summit County, UT

  4. 4. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE, STEM, STEM GUIDE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE, STEM, STEM GUIDE AND WHEEL (10' HARDESTY VERTICAL LIFT GATE), LOOKING NORTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Bonneville Unit, Pot Lake Dam, Wasatch National Forest, Kamas, Summit County, UT

  5. 5. VIEW OF UPRIGHT OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF UPRIGHT OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM GUIDE (HARDESTY CAST IRON RECTANGULAR SLIDE GATE), LOOKING SOUTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Bonneville Unit, Lost Lake Dam, Kamas, Summit County, UT

  6. Corticostriatal output gating during selection from working memory.

    PubMed

    Chatham, Christopher H; Frank, Michael J; Badre, David

    2014-02-19

    Convergent evidence suggests that corticostriatal interactions act as a gate to select the input to working memory (WM). However, not all information in WM is relevant for behavior simultaneously. For this reason, a second "output gate" might advantageously govern which contents of WM influence behavior. Here, we test whether frontostriatal circuits previously implicated in input gating also support output gating during selection from WM. fMRI of a hierarchical rule task with dissociable input and output gating demands demonstrated greater lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) recruitment and frontostriatal connectivity during output gating. Moreover, PFC and striatum correlated with distinct behavioral profiles. Whereas PFC recruitment correlated with mean efficiency of selection from WM, striatal recruitment and frontostriatal interactions correlated with its reliability, as though such dynamics stochastically gate WM's output. These results support the output gating hypothesis, suggesting that contextual representations in PFC influence striatum to select which information in WM drives responding.

  7. Routine outcome measures in Norway: Only partly implemented.

    PubMed

    Ruud, Torleif

    2015-01-01

    Norway has not had any strategy exclusively for the implementation of routine outcome measurement in the mental health services, but some efforts have been made as part of strategies for a national patient register and quality indicators. Fifteen years after the decision to make the rating of the Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF) mandatory at admission and discharge of each treatment episode in adult mental health services, this is still not fully implemented. An unknown and probably very low proportion of mental health services use GAF as a routine outcome measure in everyday clinical practice. Well-established electronic patient records in the mental health services and established procedures for reporting routine data to the National Patient Register should make it possible to collect and use routine outcome data. Implementation of routine outcome measurement in mental health services must be done with due emphasis on the critical steps in the various phases of the implementation process. The regional health authorities have a key role in establishing electronic systems that make relevant outcome measurements available in a seamless way for clinicians as well as for patients, and by contributing to a culture where quality and outcome are valued and given priority.

  8. Cyclophosphamide administration routine in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Teles, Kaian Amorim; Medeiros-Souza, Patrícia; Lima, Francisco Aires Correa; Araújo, Bruno Gedeon de; Lima, Rodrigo Aires Correa

    2016-09-17

    Cyclophosphamide (CPM) is an alkylating agent widely used for the treatment of malignant neoplasia and which can be used in the treatment of multiple rheumatic diseases. Medication administration errors may lead to its reduced efficacy or increased drug toxicity. Many errors occur in the administration of injectable drugs. The present study aimed at structuring a routine for cyclophosphamide use, as well as creating a document with pharmacotherapeutic guidelines for the patient. The routine is schematized in three phases: pre-chemotherapy (pre-ChT), administration of cyclophosphamide, and post-chemotherapy (post-ChT), taking into account the drugs to be administered before and after cyclophosphamide in order to prevent adverse effects, including nausea and hemorrhagic cystitis. Adverse reactions can alter laboratory tests; thus, this routine included clinical management for changes in white blood cells, platelets, neutrophils, and sodium, including cyclophosphamide dose adjustment in the case of kidney disease. Cyclophosphamide is responsible for other rare-but serious-side effects, for instance, hepatotoxicity, severe hyponatremia and heart failure. Other adverse reactions include hair loss, amenorrhea and menopause. In this routine, we also entered guidelines to post-chemotherapy patients. The compatibility of injectable drugs with the vehicle used has been described, as well as stability and infusion times. The routine aimed at the rational use of cyclophosphamide, with prevention of adverse events and relapse episodes, factors that may burden the health care system.

  9. Clinician's Attitudes to the Introduction of Routine Weighing in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Michael M.; Wilkinson, Shelley A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Excessive gestational weight gain poses significant short- and long-term health risks to both mother and baby. Professional bodies and health services increasingly recommend greater attention be paid to weight gain in pregnancy. A large Australian tertiary maternity hospital plans to facilitate the (re)introduction of routine weighing of all women at every antenatal visit. Objective. To identify clinicians' perspectives of barriers and enablers to routinely weighing pregnant women and variations in current practice, knowledge, and attitudes between different staff groups. Method. Forty-four maternity staff from three professional groups were interviewed in four focus groups. Staff included midwives; medical staff; and dietitians. Transcripts underwent qualitative content analysis to identify and examine barriers and enablers to the routine weighing of women throughout pregnancy. Results. While most staff supported routine weighing, various concerns were raised. Issues included access to resources and staff; the ability to provide appropriate counselling and evidence-based interventions; and the impact of weighing on patients and the therapeutic relationship. Conclusion. Many clinicians supported the practice of routine weighing in pregnancy, but barriers were also identified. Implementation strategies will be tailored to the discrete professional groups and will address identified gaps in knowledge, resources, and clinician skills and confidence. PMID:27446614

  10. Reliability study of refractory gate gallium arsenide MESFETS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, J. C. W.; Portnoy, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    Refractory gate MESFET's were fabricated as an alternative to aluminum gate devices, which have been found to be unreliable as RF power amplifiers. In order to determine the reliability of the new structures, statistics of failure and information about mechanisms of failure in refractory gate MESFET's are given. Test transistors were stressed under conditions of high temperature and forward gate current to enhance failure. Results of work at 150 C and 275 C are reported.

  11. Learning robust pulses for generating universal quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Daoyi; Wu, Chengzhi; Chen, Chunlin; Qi, Bo; Petersen, Ian R.; Nori, Franco

    2016-10-01

    Constructing a set of universal quantum gates is a fundamental task for quantum computation. The existence of noises, disturbances and fluctuations is unavoidable during the process of implementing quantum gates for most practical quantum systems. This paper employs a sampling-based learning method to find robust control pulses for generating a set of universal quantum gates. Numerical results show that the learned robust control fields are insensitive to disturbances, uncertainties and fluctuations during the process of realizing universal quantum gates.

  12. Learning robust pulses for generating universal quantum gates

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Daoyi; Wu, Chengzhi; Chen, Chunlin; Qi, Bo; Petersen, Ian R.; Nori, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Constructing a set of universal quantum gates is a fundamental task for quantum computation. The existence of noises, disturbances and fluctuations is unavoidable during the process of implementing quantum gates for most practical quantum systems. This paper employs a sampling-based learning method to find robust control pulses for generating a set of universal quantum gates. Numerical results show that the learned robust control fields are insensitive to disturbances, uncertainties and fluctuations during the process of realizing universal quantum gates. PMID:27782219

  13. Protected gates for topological quantum field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We give restrictions on the locality-preserving unitary automorphisms U, which are protected gates, for topologically ordered systems. For arbitrary anyon models, we show that such unitaries only generate a finite group, and hence do not provide universality. For abelian anyon models, we find that the logical action of U is contained in a proper subgroup of the generalized Clifford group. In the case D(?2), which describes Kitaev's toric code, this represents a tightening of statement previously obtained within the stabilizer framework (PRL 110:170503). For non-abelian models, we find that such automorphisms are very limited: for example, there is no non-trivial gate for Fibonacci anyons. For Ising anyons, protected gates are elements of the Pauli group. These results are derived by relating such automorphisms to symmetries of the underlying anyon model: protected gates realize automorphisms of the Verlinde algebra. We additionally use the compatibility with basis changes to characterize the logical action. This is joint work with M. Beverland, F. Pastawski, J. Preskill and S. Sijher.

  14. Redesign of the GATE PET coincidence sorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strydhorst, Jared; Buvat, Irène

    2016-09-01

    The GATE software platform, based on the Geant4 toolkit for simulating particle interactions with matter, enables simulation of, among other medical imaging and treatment systems, positron emission tomography. However, at least one publication (Moraes et al 2015 Phys. Med. 31 43-8) has reported discrepancies between the expected results and those obtained using GATE simulations, specifically with respect to the coincidence sorter which processes single events detected by the scanner to find coincidence pairs. In particular, the current software appears to overestimate the number of ‘true’ coincidence pairs when in multi-window mode, while the delayed coincidence window, used to estimate the randoms present in the prompt coincidence window, underestimates the randoms. Both effects are particularly evident at high count rates. We have investigated this discrepancy and reproduced the reported problems. We have also rewritten the relevant portion of the GATE code to correct the issue. In this note we describe the modifications to the coincidence sorter and repeat the simulations which previously showed unexpected results. Some discrepancies remain in the estimation of the randoms with the single-window mode which are a consequence of the algorithm itself. In multi-window mode however, the simulation agrees exactly with the expected results. The modifications to the coincidence sorter code will be incorporated into the next release of GATE (> version 7.2).

  15. Gates Fund Creates Plan for College Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gose, Ben

    2008-01-01

    The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation plans to spend several hundred million dollars over the next five years to double the number of low-income young people who complete a college degree or certificate program by age 26. Foundation officials described the ambitious plan to an exclusive group of education leaders, citing 2025 as a target goal. If…

  16. Corner Office Interview: Gates Foundation's Deborah Jacobs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    U.S. libraries gave the world a top talent when Deborah Jacobs left her transformational role as City Librarian of Seattle in 2008 to head the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's Global Libraries program, the international sibling to the U.S. Libraries program. The initiative fosters national-scale projects with grantees in transitioning countries…

  17. Pulse Shaping Entangling Gates and Error Supression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucul, D.; Hayes, D.; Clark, S. M.; Debnath, S.; Quraishi, Q.; Monroe, C.

    2011-05-01

    Control of spin dependent forces is important for generating entanglement and realizing quantum simulations in trapped ion systems. Here we propose and implement a composite pulse sequence based on the Molmer-Sorenson gate to decrease gate infidelity due to frequency and timing errors. The composite pulse sequence uses an optical frequency comb to drive Raman transitions simultaneously detuned from trapped ion transverse motional red and blue sideband frequencies. The spin dependent force displaces the ions in phase space, and the resulting spin-dependent geometric phase depends on the detuning. Voltage noise on the rf electrodes changes the detuning between the trapped ions' motional frequency and the laser, decreasing the fidelity of the gate. The composite pulse sequence consists of successive pulse trains from counter-propagating frequency combs with phase control of the microwave beatnote of the lasers to passively suppress detuning errors. We present the theory and experimental data with one and two ions where a gate is performed with a composite pulse sequence. This work supported by the U.S. ARO, IARPA, the DARPA OLE program, the MURI program; the NSF PIF Program; the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI; the European Commission AQUTE program; and the IC postdoc program administered by the NGA.

  18. Penumbras of Care beyond the Schoolhouse Gate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagenau, W. Paul

    1980-01-01

    Examines the responsibility of care owed to students by the school when the student is off the school premises. Concludes that prudent administrators must never presume that students automatically shed the protective mantle of the school's duty of care when they leave the schoolhouse gate. (Author/IRT)

  19. Modelling and extraction procedure for gate insulator and fringing gate capacitance components of an MIS structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinoco, J. C.; Martinez-Lopez, A. G.; Lezama, G.; Mendoza-Barrera, C.; Cerdeira, A.; Estrada, M.

    2016-07-01

    CMOS technology has been guided by the continuous reduction of MOS transistors used to fabricate integrated circuits. Additionally, the use of high-k dielectrics as well as a metal gate electrode have promoted the development of nanometric MOS transistors. Under this scenario, the proper modelling of the gate capacitance, with the aim of adequately evaluating the dielectric film thickness, becomes challenging for nanometric metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures due to the presence of extrinsic fringing capacitance components which affect the total gate capacitance. In this contribution, a complete intrinsic-extrinsic model for gate capacitance under accumulation of an MIS structure, together with an extraction procedure in order to independently determine the different capacitance components, is presented. ATLAS finite element simulation has been used to validate the proposed methodology.

  20. Capacitance modeling of gate material engineered cylindrical/surrounded gate MOSFETs for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Jay Hind Kumar; Pratap, Yogesh; Haldar, Subhasis; Gupta, R. S.; Gupta, Mridula

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents charge based analytical drain current and capacitance model of material engineered Cylindrical/Surrounded Gate (CGT/SGT) MOSFET with nanogap cavity region for sensor applications. Material engineered i.e. dual material gate provides improvement in Short Channel Effects (SCEs) and cylindrical shape nanogap cavity region is used for sensing of biomolecule strength. The material engineered CGT/SGT MOSFET sensor electrically detect the targeted biomolecules of different strength by change in drain current and gate capacitance. Analysis has been carried out by using unified charge control based model derived from Poisson's equation. It is shown that sensitivity of changing biomolecules strength is more in gate capacitance than the drain current. The results so obtained are in good agreement with the 3D simulated data which validate the model.

  1. 15. VIEW SHOWING WATER FLOWING THROUGH THE ORIGINAL DIVERSION GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW SHOWING WATER FLOWING THROUGH THE ORIGINAL DIVERSION GATE FROM THE OUTLET CHANNEL INTO THE BY-PASS CHANNEL LEADING TO THE ORIGINAL SOURIS RIVER CHANNEL (Note: this gate has since been replaced with concrete diversion gates, see HAER Photograph No ND-3-A-7) - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  2. 2. CLOSEUP OF SOUTH FACADE OF UPPER FALLS GATE HOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CLOSEUP OF SOUTH FACADE OF UPPER FALLS GATE HOUSE, SHOWING TRASH RACKS, REMOVABLE STEEL DOORS, TRASH RAKE STRUCTURE, AND DERRICK, WINCH AND CABLE GATE LIFTING DEVICE, LOOKING SOUTH/SOUTHWEST. - Washington Water Power Spokane River Upper Falls Hydroelectric Development, Gate House, Spokane River, approximately 0.5 mile northeast of intersection of Spokane Falls Boulevard & Post Street, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  3. 30 CFR 57.19100 - Shaft landing gates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shaft landing gates. 57.19100 Section 57.19100... Shafts § 57.19100 Shaft landing gates. Shaft landings shall be equipped with substantial safety gates so... unloading shaft conveyances....

  4. 30 CFR 56.19100 - Shaft landing gates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shaft landing gates. 56.19100 Section 56.19100... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personnel Hoisting Shafts § 56.19100 Shaft landing gates. Shaft landings shall be equipped with substantial safety gates...

  5. 30 CFR 56.19070 - Closing cage doors or gates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Closing cage doors or gates. 56.19070 Section 56.19070 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19070 Closing cage doors or gates. Cage doors or gates shall be...

  6. 30 CFR 57.19070 - Closing cage doors or gates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Closing cage doors or gates. 57.19070 Section 57.19070 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19070 Closing cage doors or gates. Cage doors or gates shall be...

  7. 30 CFR 56.19070 - Closing cage doors or gates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Closing cage doors or gates. 56.19070 Section 56.19070 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19070 Closing cage doors or gates. Cage doors or gates shall be...

  8. 30 CFR 57.19070 - Closing cage doors or gates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Closing cage doors or gates. 57.19070 Section 57.19070 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19070 Closing cage doors or gates. Cage doors or gates shall be...

  9. Rapidly Reconfigurable All-Optical Universal Logic Gates

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, L L; Kallman, J S; Bond, T C

    2006-06-21

    We present designs and simulations for a highly cascadable, rapidly reconfigurable, all-optical, universal logic gate. We will discuss the gate's expected performance, e.g. speed, fanout, and contrast ratio, as a function of the device layout and biasing conditions. The gate is a three terminal on-chip device that consists of: (1) the input optical port, (2) the gate selection port, and (3) the output optical port. The device can be built monolithically using a standard multiple quantum well graded index separate confinement heterostructure laser configuration. The gate can be rapidly and repeatedly reprogrammed to perform any of the basic digital logic operations by using an appropriate analog electrical or optical signal at the gate selection port. Specifically, the same gate can be selected to execute one of the 2 basic unary operations (NOT or COPY), or one of the 6 binary operations (OR, XOR, AND, NOR, XNOR, or NAND), or one of the many logic operations involving more than two inputs. The speed of the gate for logic operations as well as for reprogramming the function of the gate is primarily limited to the small signal modulation speed of a laser, which can be on the order of tens of GHz. The reprogrammable nature of the universal gate offers maximum flexibility and interchangeability for the end user since the entire application of a photonic integrated circuit built from cascaded universal logic gates can be changed simply by adjusting the gate selection port signals.

  10. SUPPRESSION OF AFTERPULSING IN PHOTOMULTIPLIERS BY GATING THE PHOTOCATHODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of gating schemes to minimize the long-term afterpulse signal in photomultipliers have been evaluated. Blocking the excitation pulse by gating the photocathode was found to reduce the gate-on afterpulse background by a factor of 230 over that for nongated operation. Thi...

  11. High-fidelity gates in quantum dot spin qubits

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Teck Seng; Coppersmith, S. N.; Friesen, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Several logical qubits and quantum gates have been proposed for semiconductor quantum dots controlled by voltages applied to top gates. The different schemes can be difficult to compare meaningfully. Here we develop a theoretical framework to evaluate disparate qubit-gating schemes on an equal footing. We apply the procedure to two types of double-dot qubits: the singlet–triplet and the semiconducting quantum dot hybrid qubit. We investigate three quantum gates that flip the qubit state: a DC pulsed gate, an AC gate based on logical qubit resonance, and a gate-like process known as stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. These gates are all mediated by an exchange interaction that is controlled experimentally using the interdot tunnel coupling g and the detuning ϵ, which sets the energy difference between the dots. Our procedure has two steps. First, we optimize the gate fidelity (f) for fixed g as a function of the other control parameters; this yields an that is universal for different types of gates. Next, we identify physical constraints on the control parameters; this yields an upper bound that is specific to the qubit-gate combination. We show that similar gate fidelities should be attainable for singlet-triplet qubits in isotopically purified Si, and for hybrid qubits in natural Si. Considerably lower fidelities are obtained for GaAs devices, due to the fluctuating magnetic fields ΔB produced by nuclear spins. PMID:24255105

  12. Routine Work Environment Stress and PTSD Symptoms in Police Officers

    PubMed Central

    Maguen, Shira; Metzler, Thomas J.; McCaslin, Shannon E.; Inslicht, Sabra S.; Henn-Haase, Clare; Neylan, Thomas C.; Marmar, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between routine work environment stress and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a sample of police officers (N = 180) who were first assessed during academy training and reassessed 1-year later. In a model that included gender, ethnicity, traumatic exposure prior to entering the academy, current negative life events, and critical incident exposure over the last year, routine work environment stress was most strongly associated with PTSD symptoms. We also found that routine work environment stress mediated the relationship between critical incident exposure and PTSD symptoms and between current negative life events and PTSD symptoms. Ensuring that the work environment is functioning optimally protects against the effects of duty-related critical incidents and negative life events outside police service. PMID:19829204

  13. Pulse processing routines for neutron time-of-flight data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žugec, P.; Weiß, C.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Vlachoudis, V.; Sabate-Gilarte, M.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Wright, T.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Mingrone, F.; Ryan, J. A.; Warren, S. G.; Tsinganis, A.; Barbagallo, M.

    2016-03-01

    A pulse shape analysis framework is described, which was developed for n_TOF-Phase3, the third phase in the operation of the n_TOF facility at CERN. The most notable feature of this new framework is the adoption of generic pulse shape analysis routines, characterized by a minimal number of explicit assumptions about the nature of pulses. The aim of these routines is to be applicable to a wide variety of detectors, thus facilitating the introduction of the new detectors or types of detectors into the analysis framework. The operational details of the routines are suited to the specific requirements of particular detectors by adjusting the set of external input parameters. Pulse recognition, baseline calculation and the pulse shape fitting procedure are described. Special emphasis is put on their computational efficiency, since the most basic implementations of these conceptually simple methods are often computationally inefficient.

  14. Guide to good practices for shift routines and operating practices

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, ``Shift Routines and Operating Practices,`` Chapter 2 of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing shift routines and operating practices. ``Shift Routines and Operating Practices`` is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for a high standard of professional conduct and sound operating practices to promote safe and efficient operations. Recently, guidance pertaining to this element has been strengthened for nuclear power reactors. This additional guidance is given in Appendix C for information purposes. Though this guidance and good practices pertain to nuclear power reactors, DOE sites may choose to use a graded approach for implementing these in nuclear facilities.

  15. Implementing routine outcome measurement in psychiatric rehabilitation services in Israel.

    PubMed

    Roe, David; Gelkopf, Marc; Gornemann, Miriam Isolde; Baloush-Kleinman, Vered; Shadmi, Efrat

    2015-01-01

    In this article we present the design, development and implementation of the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Routine Outcome Measurement (PR-ROM) project, the first systematic effort to implement mental health routine outcome measures in Israel. The goal of the PR-ROM is to provide updated information about the process and impact of psychiatric rehabilitation services in Israel and to establish a sustainable infrastructure and foundation for routine outcome monitoring of rehabilitation services to improve care, inform policy, generate incentives for service improvement, increase informed decision-making and provide data for research purposes. The rehabilitation services evaluated and the characteristics of the population being served are described and the methods and nature of the collected data as well as some preliminary findings are presented. We discuss the major barriers encountered, our efforts to deal with them and lessons learned during the process. We conclude with a description of the current state of the initiative and plans for the future.

  16. Computer routines for probability distributions, random numbers, and related functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    Use of previously codes and tested subroutines simplifies and speeds up program development and testing. This report presents routines that can be used to calculate various probability distributions and other functions of importance in statistical hydrology. The routines are designed as general-purpose Fortran subroutines and functions to be called from user-written main programs. The probability distributions provided include the beta, chisquare, gamma, Gaussian (normal), Pearson Type III (tables and approximation), and Weibull. Also provided are the distributions of the Grubbs-Beck outlier test, Kolmogorov 's and Smirnov 's D, Student 's t, noncentral t (approximate), and Snedecor F tests. Other mathematical functions include the Bessel function I (subzero), gamma and log-gamma functions, error functions and exponential integral. Auxiliary services include sorting and printer plotting. Random number generators for uniform and normal numbers are provided and may be used with some of the above routines to generate numbers from other distributions. (USGS)

  17. Computer routines for probability distributions, random numbers, and related functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, W.

    1983-01-01

    Use of previously coded and tested subroutines simplifies and speeds up program development and testing. This report presents routines that can be used to calculate various probability distributions and other functions of importance in statistical hydrology. The routines are designed as general-purpose Fortran subroutines and functions to be called from user-written main progress. The probability distributions provided include the beta, chi-square, gamma, Gaussian (normal), Pearson Type III (tables and approximation), and Weibull. Also provided are the distributions of the Grubbs-Beck outlier test, Kolmogorov 's and Smirnov 's D, Student 's t, noncentral t (approximate), and Snedecor F. Other mathematical functions include the Bessel function, I sub o, gamma and log-gamma functions, error functions, and exponential integral. Auxiliary services include sorting and printer-plotting. Random number generators for uniform and normal numbers are provided and may be used with some of the above routines to generate numbers from other distributions. (USGS)

  18. Routine nasal packing follwoing nasal surgery-Is it necessary?

    PubMed

    Basha, S I; Gupta, D; Kaluskar, S K

    2005-01-01

    The practice of routine nasal packing after nasal surgery is usually customary and not evidence based. Post operative complications, while uncoumon, are sometimes pack related. A retrospective analysis of 110 patients who underwent a variety of nasal operations was performed to determine the incidence of complications when nasal packs were not routinely inserted 9 cases (8.2%) [6 out of these were revision surgeries] needed nasal packing for haemostasis at the end of surgery. 4 cases (3.6%) required to be packed in the immediate post operative period. One patient who required nasal packing developed a unilateral adhesion. No patient developed septal hematoma. The need for routine nasal packing is not supported. Packing should be indicated where there continuous bleeding at.

  19. Hafnium dioxide gate dielectrics, metal gate electrodes, and phenomena occurring at their interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, James Kenyon, III

    As metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) gate lengths scale down below 45 nm, the gate oxide thickness approaches 1 nm equivalent oxide thickness. At this thickness, conventional silicon dioxide (SiO 2) gate dielectrics suffer from excessive gate leakage. Higher permittivity dielectrics are required to counter the increase in gate leakage. Hafnium dioxide (HfO2) has emerged as a promising dielectric candidate. HfO2 films deposited using metal organic chemical vapor deposition are being studied to determine the impact of process and annealing conditions on the physical and electrical properties of the gate dielectric. This study indicates that deposition and annealing temperatures influence the microstructure, density, impurity concentration, chemical environment of the impurities, and band-gap of the HfO2 dielectric. Correlations of the electrical and physical properties of the films indicate that impurities in the form of segregated carbon clusters, and low HfO2 density are detrimental to the leakage properties of the gate dielectric. Additionally, as the HfO2 thickness scales, the additional series capacitance due to poly-silicon depletion plays a larger roll in reducing the total gate capacitance. To solve this problem, high performance bulk MOSFETs will require dual metal gate electrodes possessing work functions near the silicon band edges for optimized drive current. This investigation evaluates TiN, Ta-Si-N, Ti-Al-N, WN, TaN, TaSi, Ir and IrO2 electrodes as candidate electrodes on HfO2 dielectrics. The metal-dielectric compatibility was studied by annealing the gate stacks at different temperatures. The physical stability and effective work functions of metal electrodes on HfO2 are discussed. Finally, Fermi level pinning of the metal is a barrier to identifying materials with appropriate threshold voltages. The contributions to the Fermi level pinning of platinum electrodes on HfO2 gate dielectrics are investigated by examining the

  20. Gating current harmonics. III. Dynamic transients and steady states with intact sodium inactivation gating.

    PubMed Central

    Fohlmeister, J F; Adelman, W J

    1986-01-01

    Internally perfused squid giant axons with intact sodium inactivation gating were prepared for gating current experiments. Gating current records were obtained in sinusoidally driven dynamic steady states and as dynamic transients as functions of the mean membrane potential and the frequency of the command sinusoid. Controls were obtained after internal protease treatment of the axons that fully removed inactivation. The nonlinear analysis consisted of determining and interpreting the harmonic content in the current records. The results indicate the presence of three kinetic processes, two of which are associated with activation gating (the so-called primary and secondary processes), and the third with inactivation gating. The dynamic steady state data show that inactivation gating does not contribute a component to the gating current, and has no direct voltage-dependence of its own. Rather, the inactivation kinetics appear to be coupled to the primary activation kinetics, and the coupling mechanism appears to be one of reciprocal steric hindrance between two molecular components. The mechanism allows the channel to become inactivated without first entering the conducting state, and will do so in about 40 percent of depolarizing voltage-clamp steps to 0 mV. The derived model kinetics further indicate that the conducting state may flicker between open and closed with the lifetime of either state being 10 microseconds. Dynamic transients generated by the model kinetics (i.e., the behavior of the harmonic components as a function of time after an instantaneous change in the mean membrane potential from a holding potential of -80 mV) match the experimental dynamic transients in all details. These transients have a duration of 7-10 ms (depending on the level of depolarization), and are the result of the developing inactivation following the discontinuous voltage change. A detailed hypothetical molecular model of the channel and gating machinery is presented. PMID

  1. Allosteric gating mechanism underlies the flexible gating of KCNQ1 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Osteen, Jeremiah D; Barro-Soria, Rene; Robey, Seth; Sampson, Kevin J; Kass, Robert S; Larsson, H Peter

    2012-05-01

    KCNQ1 (Kv7.1) is a unique member of the superfamily of voltage-gated K(+) channels in that it displays a remarkable range of gating behaviors tuned by coassembly with different β subunits of the KCNE family of proteins. To better understand the basis for the biophysical diversity of KCNQ1 channels, we here investigate the basis of KCNQ1 gating in the absence of β subunits using voltage-clamp fluorometry (VCF). In our previous study, we found the kinetics and voltage dependence of voltage-sensor movements are very similar to those of the channel gate, as if multiple voltage-sensor movements are not required to precede gate opening. Here, we have tested two different hypotheses to explain KCNQ1 gating: (i) KCNQ1 voltage sensors undergo a single concerted movement that leads to channel opening, or (ii) individual voltage-sensor movements lead to channel opening before all voltage sensors have moved. Here, we find that KCNQ1 voltage sensors move relatively independently, but that the channel can conduct before all voltage sensors have activated. We explore a KCNQ1 point mutation that causes some channels to transition to the open state even in the absence of voltage-sensor movement. To interpret these results, we adopt an allosteric gating scheme wherein KCNQ1 is able to transition to the open state after zero to four voltage-sensor movements. This model allows for widely varying gating behavior, depending on the relative strength of the opening transition, and suggests how KCNQ1 could be controlled by coassembly with different KCNE family members.

  2. Monochromatic, Rosseland mean, and Planck mean opacity routine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, D.

    2006-11-01

    Several FORTRAN77 codes were developed to compute frequency-dependent, Rosseland and Planck mean opacities of gas and dust in protoplanetary disks. The opacities can be computed for an ensemble of dust grains having various compositions (ices, silicates, organics, etc), sizes, topologies (homogeneous/composite aggregates, homogeneous/layered/composite spheres, etc.), porosities, and dust-to-gas ratio. Several examples are available. In addition, a very fast opacity routine to be used in modeling of the radiative transfer in hydro simulations of disks is available upon request (10^8 routine calls require about 30s on Pentium 4 3.0GHz).

  3. Gating motions in voltage-gated potassium channels revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Treptow, Werner; Marrink, Siewert-J; Tarek, Mounir

    2008-03-20

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are ubiquitous transmembrane proteins involved in electric signaling of excitable tissues. A fundamental property of these channels is the ability to open or close in response to changes in the membrane potential. To date, their structure-based activation mechanism remains unclear, and there is a large controversy on how these gates function at the molecular level, in particular, how movements of the voltage sensor domain are coupled to channel gating. So far, all mechanisms proposed for this coupling are based on the crystal structure of the open voltage-gated Kv1.2 channel and structural models of the closed form based on electrophysiology experiments. Here, we use coarse-grain (CG) molecular dynamics simulations that allow conformational changes from the open to the closed form of the channel (embedded in its membrane environment) to be followed. Despite the low specificity of the CG force field, the obtained closed structure satisfies several experimental constraints. The overall results suggest a gating mechanism in which a lateral displacement the S4-S5 linker leads to a closing of the gate. Only a small up-down movement of the S4 helices is noticed. Additionally, the study suggests a peculiar upward motion of the intracellular tetramerization domain of the channel, hence providing a molecular view on how this domain may further regulate conduction in Kv channels.

  4. Statistical Determination of the Gating Windows for Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy Using a Visible Guiding System.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se An; Yea, Ji Woon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) is used to minimize the radiation dose to normal tissue in lung-cancer patients. Although determining the gating window in the respiratory phase of patients is important in RGRT, it is not easy. Our aim was to determine the optimal gating window when using a visible guiding system for RGRT. Between April and October 2014, the breathing signals of 23 lung-cancer patients were recorded with a real-time position management (RPM) respiratory gating system (Varian, USA). We performed statistical analysis with breathing signals to find the optimal gating window for guided breathing in RGRT. When we compared breathing signals before and after the breathing training, 19 of the 23 patients showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05). The standard deviation of the respiration signals after breathing training was lowest for phases of 30%-70%. The results showed that the optimal gating window in RGRT is 40% (30%-70%) with respect to repeatability for breathing after respiration training with the visible guiding system. RGRT was performed with the RPM system to confirm the usefulness of the visible guiding system. The RPM system and our visible guiding system improve the respiratory regularity, which in turn should improve the accuracy and efficiency of RGRT.

  5. Statistical Determination of the Gating Windows for Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy Using a Visible Guiding System

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se An; Yea, Ji Woon

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) is used to minimize the radiation dose to normal tissue in lung-cancer patients. Although determining the gating window in the respiratory phase of patients is important in RGRT, it is not easy. Our aim was to determine the optimal gating window when using a visible guiding system for RGRT. Between April and October 2014, the breathing signals of 23 lung-cancer patients were recorded with a real-time position management (RPM) respiratory gating system (Varian, USA). We performed statistical analysis with breathing signals to find the optimal gating window for guided breathing in RGRT. When we compared breathing signals before and after the breathing training, 19 of the 23 patients showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05). The standard deviation of the respiration signals after breathing training was lowest for phases of 30%–70%. The results showed that the optimal gating window in RGRT is 40% (30%–70%) with respect to repeatability for breathing after respiration training with the visible guiding system. RGRT was performed with the RPM system to confirm the usefulness of the visible guiding system. The RPM system and our visible guiding system improve the respiratory regularity, which in turn should improve the accuracy and efficiency of RGRT. PMID:27228097

  6. G4-FETs as Universal and Programmable Logic Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Travis; Fijany, Amir; Mojarradi, Mohammad; Vatan, Farrokh; Toomarian, Nikzad; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Cristoloveanu, Sorin; Blalock, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of a patented generic silicon- on-insulator (SOI) electronic device called a G4-FET has revealed that the device could be designed to function as a universal and programmable logic gate. The universality and programmability could be exploited to design logic circuits containing fewer discrete components than are required for conventional transistor-based circuits performing the same logic functions. A G4-FET is a combination of a junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and a metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) superimposed in a single silicon island and can therefore be regarded as two transistors sharing the same body. A G4-FET can also be regarded as a single transistor having four gates: two side junction-based gates, a top MOS gate, and a back gate activated by biasing of the SOI substrate. Each of these gates can be used to control the conduction characteristics of the transistor; this possibility creates new options for designing analog, radio-frequency, mixed-signal, and digital circuitry. With proper choice of the specific dimensions for the gates, channels, and ancillary features of the generic G4-FET, the device could be made to function as a three-input, one-output logic gate. As illustrated by the truth table in the top part of the figure, the behavior of this logic gate would be the inverse (the NOT) of that of a majority gate. In other words, the device would function as a NOT-majority gate. By simply adding an inverter, one could obtain a majority gate. In contrast, to construct a majority gate in conventional complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry, one would need four three-input AND gates and a four-input OR gate, altogether containing 32 transistors.

  7. Accuracy and Consistency of Respiratory Gating in Abdominal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Jiajia; Santanam, Lakshmi; Yang, Deshan; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate respiratory gating accuracy and intrafractional consistency for abdominal cancer patients treated with respiratory gated treatment on a regular linear accelerator system. Methods and Materials: Twelve abdominal patients implanted with fiducials were treated with amplitude-based respiratory-gated radiation therapy. On the basis of daily orthogonal fluoroscopy, the operator readjusted the couch position and gating window such that the fiducial was within a setup margin (fiducial-planning target volume [f-PTV]) when RPM indicated “beam-ON.” Fifty-five pre- and post-treatment fluoroscopic movie pairs with synchronized respiratory gating signal were recorded. Fiducial motion traces were extracted from the fluoroscopic movies using a template matching algorithm and correlated with f-PTV by registering the digitally reconstructed radiographs with the fluoroscopic movies. Treatment was determined to be “accurate” if 50% of the fiducial area stayed within f-PTV while beam-ON. For movie pairs that lost gating accuracy, a MATLAB program was used to assess whether the gating window was optimized, the external-internal correlation (EIC) changed, or the patient moved between movies. A series of safety margins from 0.5 mm to 3 mm was added to f-PTV for reassessing gating accuracy. Results: A decrease in gating accuracy was observed in 44% of movie pairs from daily fluoroscopic movies of 12 abdominal patients. Three main causes for inaccurate gating were identified as change of global EIC over time (∼43%), suboptimal gating setup (∼37%), and imperfect EIC within movie (∼13%). Conclusions: Inconsistent respiratory gating accuracy may occur within 1 treatment session even with a daily adjusted gating window. To improve or maintain gating accuracy during treatment, we suggest using at least a 2.5-mm safety margin to account for gating and setup uncertainties.

  8. Free-exciton states in crystalline GaTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, J. Z.; Brebner, J. L.; Leonelli, R.

    1995-12-01

    Polarized properties of both the singlet and triplet ground exciton states in the photoluminescence and transmission spectra of crystalline GaTe are explained based on the possible symmetry properties of the energy band edge of GaTe. Some experimental results about excited exciton states in GaTe are presented and discussed. The energy positions of exciton series in GaTe follow the three-dimensional direct allowed Wannier exciton formula just as in the the other III-VI layered compounds of GaSe and InSe. The nonthermalized, ``hot'' nature of excitons inside GaTe under higher optical excitation intensities is also discussed.

  9. Characterization of a Common-Gate Amplifier Using Ferroelectric Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Mitchell; Sayyah, Rana; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the empirical data collected through experiments performed using a FeFET in the common-gate amplifier circuit is presented. The FeFET common-gate amplifier was characterized by varying all parameters in the circuit, such as load resistance, biasing of the transistor, and input voltages. Due to the polarization of the ferroelectric layer, the particular behavior of the FeFET common-gate amplifier presents interesting results. Furthermore, the differences between a FeFET common-gate amplifier and a MOSFET common-gate amplifier are examined.

  10. Experimental teleportation of a quantum controlled-NOT gate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun-Feng; Ren, Xi-Feng; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Duan, Lu-Ming; Guo, Guang-Can

    2004-12-10

    Teleportation of quantum gates is a critical step for the implementation of quantum networking and teleportation-based models of quantum computation. We report an experimental demonstration of teleportation of the prototypical quantum controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate. Assisted with linear optical manipulations, photon entanglement produced from parametric down-conversion, and postselection from the coincidence measurements, we teleport the quantum CNOT gate from acting on local qubits to acting on remote qubits. The quality of the quantum gate teleportation is characterized through the method of quantum process tomography, with an average fidelity of 0.84 demonstrated for the teleported gate.

  11. Gate-controlled ultraviolet photo-etching of graphene edges

    SciTech Connect

    Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Nouchi, Ryo

    2013-11-11

    The chemical reactivity of graphene under ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation is investigated under positive and negative gate electric fields. Graphene edges are selectively etched when negative gate voltages are applied while the reactivity is significantly suppressed for positive gate voltages. Oxygen adsorption onto graphene is significantly affected by the Fermi level of the final state achieved during previous electrical measurements. UV irradiation after negative-to-positive gate sweeps causes predominant oxygen desorption while UV irradiation after gate sweeps in the opposite direction causes etching of graphene edges.

  12. 101. Photocopied August 1978. GENERAL VIEW OF COMPLETED COMPENSATING GATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    101. Photocopied August 1978. GENERAL VIEW OF COMPLETED COMPENSATING GATES LOOKING NORTHWEST, AUGUST 5, 1916. THE COMPLETED 8 AMERICAN GATES ARE IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTO: THE FIRST 4 CANADIAN GATES ARE IN THE BACKGROUND AT THE RIGHT. GATES 5-8 HAVE NOT BEEN BUILT, NEITHER HAS THE DIKE CONNECTING GATE 16 (FAR LEFT) WITH THE DIKE OF THE GOVERNMENT HYDROELECTRIC PLANT HEAD RACE. THE BREAKWATER IN FRONT OF THE WORKS HAS NOT YET BEEN DREDGED OUT. (708) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  13. Parent routines, child routines, and family demographics associated with obesity in parents and preschool-aged children.

    PubMed

    Jones, Blake L; Fiese, Barbara H

    2014-01-01

    Many daily routines and behaviors are related to the prevalence of obesity. This study investigated the association between routines and behaviors that act as protective factors related to lower prevalence of obesity in parents (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) and overweight in preschool children (BMI ≥ 85th percentile). Socio-demographic characteristics were assessed in relation to protective routines (PRs), and prevalence of obesity/overweight data from 337 preschool children and their parents. The two PRs assessed with parents included adequate sleep (≥7 h/night) and family mealtime routine (scoring higher than the median score). The four PRs assessed in children included adequate sleep (≥10 h/night), family mealtime routine, limiting screen-viewing time (≤2 h/day of TV, video, DVD), and not having a bedroom TV. Overall, 27.9% of parents were obese and 22.8% of children were overweight, and 39.8% of the parents had both parent PRs, and only 11.6% of children had all four child PRs. Results demonstrated that several demographic factors were significantly related to the use of PRs for parents and children. The lack of PRs was related to increased risk for overweight in children, but not for obesity in parents. However, in the adjusted models the overall cumulative benefits of using PRs was not significant in children either. In the multivariate adjusted logistic regression models, the only significant individual PR for children was adequate sleep. In a path analysis model, parent sleep was related to child sleep, which was in turn related to decreased obesity. Overall, findings suggest that parent and child PRs, especially sleep routines, within a family can be associated and may play an important role in the health outcomes of both parents and children. Understanding the mechanisms that influence how and when parents and children use these PRs may be promising for developing targeted family-based obesity-prevention efforts.

  14. Gating of Permanent Molds for Aluminum Casting

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-011D13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was to determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings. Equipment and procedure for real time X-Ray radiography of molten aluminum flow into permanent molds have been developed. Other studies have been conducted using water flow and behavior of liquid aluminum in sand mold using real time photography. This investigation utilizes graphite molds transparent to X-Rays making it possible to observe the flow pattern through a number of vertically oriented grating systems. These have included systems that are choked at the base of a rounded vertical sprue and vertical gating systems with a variety of different ingates into the bottom of a mold cavity. These systems have also been changed to include gating systems with vertical and horizontal gate configurations. Several conclusions can be derived from this study. A sprue-well, as designed in these experiments, does not eliminate the vena contracta. Because of the swirling at the sprue-base, the circulating metal begins to push the entering metal stream toward the open runner mitigating the intended effect of the sprue-well. Improved designs of

  15. Back to Schooling: Challenging Implicit Routines and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorodetsky, Malka; Barak, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Engestrom and others have suggested that major barriers towards school change are rooted in the hidden, implicit aspects of daily school life that are taken for granted. These constitute the school's taken-for-granted routines, which mold teachers' affordances and constraints within the school, without their awareness. The present paper provides…

  16. Matrix algebra routines for the Acorn Archimedes microcomputer: example applications.

    PubMed

    Fielding, A

    1988-08-01

    A set of matrix algebra routines have been written, as BASICV procedures, for the Acorn Archimedes microcomputer. It is shown that these procedures are executed so quickly that programs, which require matrix algebra computations, can be written in interpreted BASIC. Two example applications, reciprocal averaging and principal components analysis, are demonstrated.

  17. 32 CFR 318.14 - Blanket routine uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...—Disclosure When Requesting Information. A record from a system of records maintained by a Component may be..., or other benefit. (d) Routine Use—Disclosure of Requested Information. A record from a system of... of Personnel Management. A record from a system of records subject to the Privacy Act and...

  18. Preschool Children's Memory for Repeated Changes in the Lunch Routine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krackow, Elisa

    An experiment examined the possibilities that: (1) repeated deviations in a routine event become fused into the general event representation (GER) for that event; and (2) when deviations go unreported, it is because they have been forgotten. Preschool children were interviewed to get their script reports before and after repeated deviations in the…

  19. Developing Corpus-Based Materials to Teach Pragmatic Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardovi-Harlig, Kathleen; Mossman, Sabrina; Vellenga, Heidi E.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how to develop teaching materials for pragmatics based on authentic language by using a spoken corpus. The authors show how to use the corpus in conjunction with textbooks to identify pragmatic routines for speech acts and how to extract appropriate language samples and adapt them for classroom use. They demonstrate how to…

  20. Increasing Day Care Staff Members' Interactions during Caregiving Routines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venn, Martha L.; Wolery, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Four paraprofessional staff members in a mainstreamed day care program were trained to engage in positive interactive behaviors during diaper changing. Results indicated that staff increased frequency of game playing and other interactive behaviors during diapering, but increases were not generalized to feeding routines. (Author/JDD)

  1. The Effect of Instruction on Pragmatic Routines in Academic Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardovi-Harlig, Kathleen; Mossman, Sabrina; Vellenga, Heidi E.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of instruction on the acquisition of pragmatic routines used in academic discussion, specifically expressions of agreement, disagreement, and clarification. Thirty-seven learners, including an experimental group of 26 students and a control group of 11 students, participated in the study. Five intact classes…

  2. 32 CFR 1701.31 - General routine uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE ADMINISTRATION OF RECORDS UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 Routine Uses Applicable to More Than One..., criminal, administrative or regulatory in nature, and whether arising by general statute, particular... ODNI in connection with potential or actual civil, criminal, administrative, judicial or...

  3. 32 CFR 1701.31 - General routine uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE ADMINISTRATION OF RECORDS UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 Routine Uses Applicable to More Than One..., criminal, administrative or regulatory in nature, and whether arising by general statute, particular... ODNI in connection with potential or actual civil, criminal, administrative, judicial or...

  4. Routine Activities and Sexual Harassment in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Coster, Stacy; Estes, Sarah Beth; Mueller, Charles W.

    1999-01-01

    In criminology, routine activities of potential victims can be used to predict victimization. Application to organizational sexual harassment data shows that organizational features (proximity in job location, supervisor or work group guardianship) and individual characteristics (target attractiveness) can predict sexual harassment victimization,…

  5. Routine Metabolic Rate of Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus Fry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish eggs are typically incubated at high density and are often subjected to sub-optimum dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations while in the hatchery. Since DO plays an important role in the development, hatch rate, and growth of catfish eggs and fry, we measured routine metabolic rate of ...

  6. Keeping Track: Using Routine-Based Instruction and Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raver, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews routine-based teaching and monitoring and offers guidelines for using these strategies to track the progress of individual children with disabilities. The Individual Activity-Objective Matrix and the Group-Objective Matrix are explained as ways to help teachers to structure opportunities for a child to learn and practice…

  7. HATS: A Design Procedure for Routine Business Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William H.

    2001-01-01

    Describes an approach to teaching students a basic design process for routine business documents like memos, letters, and reports. Outlines the design principles of HATS (Headings, Access, Typography, and Spacing), how they apply in before-and-after fashion to various documents, and discusses an assignment in which students redesign an existing…

  8. Rasch Analysis of the Routines-Based Interview Implementation Checklist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boavida, Tânia; Akers, Kate; McWilliam, R. A.; Jung, Lee Ann

    2015-01-01

    The Routines-­Based Interview (RBI) is useful for developing functional outcomes/goals, for establishing strong relationships with families, and for assessing the family's true needs. In this study, the authors investigated the psychometric properties of the RBI Implementation Checklist, conducted by 120 early intervention professionals,…

  9. School Bus Crash Rates on Routine and Nonroutine Routes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Elizabeth; Ramirez, Marizen; Hamann, Cara; Young, Tracy; Stahlhut, Mary; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although prior research has established that school buses are a safe form of transportation, crashes can produce catastrophic consequences. School buses have 2 types of routes: predictable, routine routes that take children to and from school and less predictable, nonroutine routes for school events. No studies have examined school bus…

  10. Rethinking the Hidden Curriculum: Daily Routine in Slovene Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorec, Marcela Batistic; Došler, Anita Jug

    2016-01-01

    In Slovenia there is a unitary system of early education for all preschool-aged children. Since the vast majority of children attend full-day programmes, the daily routine represents a significant part of life for children in kindergarten. When systemic and curricular reform of preschools was introduced at the end of the twentieth century, lot of…

  11. Creating Masterpieces: How Course Structures and Routines Enable Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Kathy Lund; Fornaciari, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Over a five-year period, we made a persistent observation: Course structures and routines, such as assignment parameters, student group process rules, and grading schemes were being consistently ignored. As a result, we got distracted by correcting these structural issues and were spending less time on student assignment performance. In this…

  12. Daily Routines and Sleep Disorders in Visually Impaired Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troster, Heinrich; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Assessed sleep disorders in 265 visually impaired and 67 non-disabled 10- to 72-month olds. Found that infants with visual impairments had more difficulties in falling asleep and in sleeping through the night than nonhandicapped children. Also found a relationship between sleep disorders and the regularity of children's daily routine and…

  13. 32 CFR 318.14 - Blanket routine uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... interest of simplicity, economy and to avoid redundancy. (b) Routine Use—Law Enforcement. If a system of... to the OMB in connection with the review of private relief legislation as set forth in OMB Circular A-19 at any stage of the legislative coordination and clearance process as set forth in that...

  14. 32 CFR 318.14 - Blanket routine uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... interest of simplicity, economy and to avoid redundancy. (b) Routine Use—Law Enforcement. If a system of... to the OMB in connection with the review of private relief legislation as set forth in OMB Circular A-19 at any stage of the legislative coordination and clearance process as set forth in that...

  15. 32 CFR 318.14 - Blanket routine uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... interest of simplicity, economy and to avoid redundancy. (b) Routine Use—Law Enforcement. If a system of... to the OMB in connection with the review of private relief legislation as set forth in OMB Circular A-19 at any stage of the legislative coordination and clearance process as set forth in that...

  16. 32 CFR 318.14 - Blanket routine uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... interest of simplicity, economy and to avoid redundancy. (b) Routine Use—Law Enforcement. If a system of... to the OMB in connection with the review of private relief legislation as set forth in OMB Circular A-19 at any stage of the legislative coordination and clearance process as set forth in that...

  17. Optimization of Routine Monitoring of Workers Exposed to Plutonium Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Davesne, Estelle; Quesne, Benoit; De Vita, Antoine; Chojnacki, Eric; Blanchardon, Eric; Franck, Didier

    2016-10-01

    In case of incidental confinement failure, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel preparation may expose workers to plutonium aerosols. Due to its potential toxicity, occupational exposure to plutonium compounds should be kept as low as reasonably achievable. To ensure the absence of significant intake of radionuclides, workers at risk of internal contamination are monitored by periodic bioassay planned in a routine monitoring programme. From bioassay results, internal dose may be estimated. However, accurate dose calculation relies on known exposure conditions, which are rarely available when the exposure is demonstrated by routine monitoring only. Therefore, internal dose calculation is subject to uncertainty from unknown exposure conditions and from activity measurement variability. The present study calculates the minimum detectable dose (MDD) for a routine monitoring programme by considering all plausible conditions of exposure and measurement uncertainty. The MDD evaluates the monitoring quality and can be used for optimization. Here, MDDs were calculated for the monitoring of workers preparing MOX fuel. Uncertain parameters were modelled by probability distributions defined according to information provided by experts of routine monitoring, of workplace radiological protection and of bioassay analysis. Results show that the current monitoring is well adapted to potential exposure. A sensitivity study of MDD highlights high dependence on exposure condition modelling. Integrating all expert knowledge is therefore crucial to obtain reliable MDD estimates, stressing the value of a holistic approach to worker monitoring.

  18. [Prenatal ultrasound diagnosis of complex heart abnormality in routine screening].

    PubMed

    Kronich, W; Salzer-Muhar, U; Strigl, E; Gerstner, G J

    1990-02-01

    Case report on a severe cardial malformation associated with trisomia 21, diagnosed by ultrasound-screening in the 34th week of gestation. Further diagnostic evaluation of the case and therapeutic management are described. The problems of modern malformation diagnostics by routine ultrasound scanning in pregnancy are discussed.

  19. Asymptomatic Gastric Band Erosion Detected during Routine Gastroduodenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Gee Young; Kim, Woo Sub; Kim, Hye Jin; Kang, Sun Hyung; Moon, Hee Seok; Sung, Jae Kyu; Jeong, Hyun Yong

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of gastric band erosion has decreased to 1%. Gastric band erosion can manifest with various clinical symptoms, although some patients remain asymptomatic. We present a case of a mostly asymptomatic patient who was diagnosed with gastric band erosion during a routine health check-up. A 32-year-old man without any underlying diseases except for non-alcoholic fatty liver underwent laparoscopic adjustable gastric band surgery in 2010. He had no significant complications postoperatively. He underwent routine health check-ups with near-normal gastroduodenoscopic findings through 2014. However, in 2015, routine gastroduodenoscopy showed that the gastric band had eroded into the stomach. His gastric band was removed laparoscopically, and the remaining gastric ulcer perforation was repaired using an omental patch. Due to the early diagnosis, the infection was not serious. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 3 with oral antibiotics. This patient was fortunately diagnosed early by virtue of a routine health check-up; thus, eliminating the possibility of serious complications. PMID:26867553

  20. Infant/Toddler Caregiving: A Guide to Routines. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    Intended for use in conjunction with videos illustrating key concepts and caregiving techniques, this guide focuses on how the daily routines of caring for infants and toddlers can become opportunities for promoting the child's learning and development and for deepening the relationship between child and caregiver. Special attention is given to…

  1. Validating soil phosphorus routines in the SWAT model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus transfer from agricultural soils to surface waters is an important environmental issue. Commonly used models like SWAT have not always been updated to reflect improved understanding of soil P transformations and transfer to runoff. Our objective was to validate the ability of the P routin...

  2. Vigilance, Precaution and Routine Behavior - The Socio-cultural Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    H., Mort, J. and Eilam, D. Obsessive - Compulsive Disorder ( OCD ): A disorder of pessimal (non-functional) motor behavior. Acta Psychiatrica... compulsive cleaning and compulsive checking in obsessive - compulsive disorder . European Neuropsychopharmacology, in press. 4. Eilam, D., Izhar, R., and...everyday routines: The counterpart of compulsive rituals. Behavioural Brain Research, 212 (2010): 90-95. 2. Zor, R., Keren, H., Hermesh, H., Szechtman

  3. Glogs as Non-Routine Problem Solving Tools in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Matthew T.

    2013-01-01

    In mathematical problem solving, American students are falling behind their global peers because of a lack of foundational and reasoning skills. A specific area of difficulty with problem solving is working non-routine, heuristic-based problems. Many students are not provided with effective instruction and often grow frustrated and dislike math.…

  4. Optimized pulse shapes for a resonator-induced phase gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Andrew W.; Gambetta, Jay M.

    2015-03-01

    The resonator-induced phase gate is a multiqubit controlled-phase gate for fixed-frequency superconducting qubits. Through off-resonant driving of a bus resonator, statically coupled qubits acquire a state-dependent phase. However, photon loss leads to dephasing during the gate, and any residual entanglement between the resonator and qubits after the gate leads to decoherence. Here we consider how to shape the drive pulse to minimize these unwanted effects. First, we review how the gate's entangling and dephasing rates depend on the system parameters and validate closed-form solutions against direct numerical solution of a master equation. Next, we propose spline pulse shapes that reduce residual qubit-bus entanglement, are robust to imprecise knowledge of the resonator shift, and can be shortened by using higher-degree polynomials. Finally, we present a procedure that optimizes over the subspace of pulses that leave the resonator unpopulated. This finds shaped drive pulses that further reduce the gate duration. Assuming realistic parameters, we exhibit shaped pulses that have the potential to realize ˜212 ns spline pulse gates and ˜120 ns optimized gates with ˜6 ×10-4 average gate infidelity. These examples do not represent fundamental limits of the gate and, in principle, even shorter gates may be achievable.

  5. Quasi-specific access of the potassium channel inactivation gate.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Gaurav; Srikumar, Deepa; Holmgren, Miguel

    2014-06-09

    Many voltage-gated potassium channels open in response to membrane depolarization and then inactivate within milliseconds. Neurons use these channels to tune their excitability. In Shaker K(+) channels, inactivation is caused by the cytoplasmic amino terminus, termed the inactivation gate. Despite having four such gates, inactivation is caused by the movement of a single gate into a position that occludes ion permeation. The pathway that this single inactivation gate takes into its inactivating position remains unknown. Here we show that a single gate threads through the intracellular entryway of its own subunit, but the tip of the gate has sufficient freedom to interact with all four subunits deep in the pore, and does so with equal probability. This pathway demonstrates that flexibility afforded by the inactivation peptide segment at the tip of the N-terminus is used to mediate function.

  6. Local Ambipolar Graphene Field Effect Transistors via Metal Side Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jifa; Jauregui, Luis; Lopez, Gabriel; Cao, Helin; Chen, Yong

    2010-03-01

    We fabricated local graphene field effect transistors (FET) based on metal side gates. The characteristic ambipolar field effect of graphene device was observed by sweeping only the voltage of a local metal side gate. The local charge neutrality point of the side-gate graphene FET can be tuned in a large voltage range from positive to negative by a second side gate. Furthermore, we observed that the field effect due to the side gate can be appreciably weakened by electrically grounding the back gate compared to floating the back gate. The experimental results can be well explained by electrostatic simulation using COMSOL. Our technique offers a simple method for local tuning of charge density of graphene nanodevices while avoiding coating graphene surface with dielectrics, which may cause contamination and degradation of graphene.

  7. Nonadiabatic holonomic gates realized by a single-shot implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G. F.; Liu, C. L.; Zhao, P. Z.; Tong, D. M.

    2015-11-01

    Nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation has received increasing attention due to its robustness against control errors. However, all the previous schemes have to use at least two sequentially implemented gates to realize a general one-qubit gate. In this paper we put forward a scheme by which one can directly realize an arbitrary holonomic one-qubit gate with a single-shot implementation, avoiding the extra work of combining two gates into one. Based on a three-level model driven by laser pulses, we show that any single-qubit holonomic gate can be realized by varying the detuning, amplitude, and phase of lasers. Our scheme is compatible with previously proposed nonadiabatic holonomic two-qubit gates, combining with which the arbitrary holonomic one-qubit gates can play universal nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation. We also investigate the effects of some unavoidable realistic errors on our scheme.

  8. Visual routines are associated with specific graph interpretations.

    PubMed

    Michal, Audrey L; Franconeri, Steven L

    2017-01-01

    We argue that people compare values in graphs with a visual routine - attending to data values in an ordered pattern over time. Do these visual routines exist to manage capacity limitations in how many values can be encoded at once, or do they actually affect the relations that are extracted? We measured eye movements while people judged configurations of a two-bar graph based on size only ("[short tall] or [tall short]?") and contrast only ("[light dark] or [dark light]?"). Participants exhibited visual routines in which they systematically attended to a specific feature (or "anchor point") in the graph; in the size task, most participants inspected the taller bar first, and in the contrast task, most participants attended to the darker bar first. Participants then judged configurations that varied in both size and contrast (e.g., [short-light tall-dark]); however, only one dimension was task-relevant (varied between subjects). During this orthogonal task, participants overwhelmingly relied on the same anchor point used in the single-dimension version, but only for the task-relevant dimension (e.g., taller bar for the size-relevant task). These results suggest that visual routines are associated with specific graph interpretations. Responses were also faster when task-relevant and task-irrelevant anchor points appeared on the same object (congruent) than on different objects (incongruent). This interference from the task-irrelevant dimension suggests that top-down control may be necessary to extract relevant relations from graphs. The effect of visual routines on graph comprehension has implications for both science, technology, engineering, and mathematics pedagogy and graph design.

  9. Cost effectiveness of routine duodenal biopsies in iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Broide, Efrat; Matalon, Shay; Kriger-Sharabi, Ofra; Richter, Vered; Shirin, Haim; Leshno, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the cost effectiveness of routine small bowel biopsies (SBBs) in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) independent of their celiac disease (CD) serology test results. METHODS We used a state transition Markov model. Two strategies were compared: routine SBBs during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in all patients with IDA regardless their celiac serology status (strategy A) vs SBBs only in IDA patients with positive serology (strategy B). The main outcomes were quality adjusted life years (QALY), average cost and the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER). One way sensitivity analysis was performed on all variables and two way sensitivity analysis on selected variables were done. In order to validate the results, a Monte Carlo simulation of 100 sample trials with 10, and an acceptability curve were performed. RESULTS Strategy A of routine SBBs yielded 19.888 QALYs with a cost of $218.10 compared to 19.887 QALYs and $234.17 in strategy B. In terms of cost-effectiveness, strategy A was the dominant strategy, as long as the cost of SBBs stayed less than $67. In addition, the ICER of strategy A was preferable, providing the cost of biopsy stays under $77. Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that strategy A yielded the same QALY but with lower costs than strategy B. CONCLUSION Our model suggests that EGD with routine SBBs is a cost-effective approach with improved QALYs in patients with IDA when the prevalence of CD is 5% or greater. SBBs should be a routine screening tool for CD among patients with IDA, regardless of their celiac antibody status. PMID:27678365

  10. Site-Directed Spin Labeling Reveals Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel Gating Motions

    PubMed Central

    Dellisanti, Cosma D.; Ghosh, Borna; Hanson, Susan M.; Raspanti, James M.; Grant, Valerie A.; Diarra, Gaoussou M.; Schuh, Abby M.; Satyshur, Kenneth; Klug, Candice S.; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are neurotransmitter-activated receptors that mediate fast synaptic transmission. In pLGICs, binding of agonist to the extracellular domain triggers a structural rearrangement that leads to the opening of an ion-conducting pore in the transmembrane domain and, in the continued presence of neurotransmitter, the channels desensitize (close). The flexible loops in each subunit that connect the extracellular binding domain (loops 2, 7, and 9) to the transmembrane channel domain (M2–M3 loop) are essential for coupling ligand binding to channel gating. Comparing the crystal structures of two bacterial pLGIC homologues, ELIC and the proton-activated GLIC, suggests channel gating is associated with rearrangements in these loops, but whether these motions accurately predict the motions in functional lipid-embedded pLGICs is unknown. Here, using site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and functional GLIC channels reconstituted into liposomes, we examined if, and how far, the loops at the ECD/TMD gating interface move during proton-dependent gating transitions from the resting to desensitized state. Loop 9 moves ∼9 Å inward toward the channel lumen in response to proton-induced desensitization. Loop 9 motions were not observed when GLIC was in detergent micelles, suggesting detergent solubilization traps the protein in a nonactivatable state and lipids are required for functional gating transitions. Proton-induced desensitization immobilizes loop 2 with little change in position. Proton-induced motion of the M2–M3 loop was not observed, suggesting its conformation is nearly identical in closed and desensitized states. Our experimentally derived distance measurements of spin-labeled GLIC suggest ELIC is not a good model for the functional resting state of GLIC, and that the crystal structure of GLIC does not correspond to a desensitized state. These findings advance our

  11. Gate Set Tomography on two qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Erik; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Gamble, John; Rudinger, Kenneth

    Gate set tomography (GST) is a method for characterizing quantum gates that does not require pre-calibrated operations, and has been used to both certify and improve the operation of single qubits. We analyze the performance of GST applied to a simulated two-qubit system, and show that Heisenberg scaling is achieved in this case. We present a GST analysis of preliminary two-qubit experimental data, and draw comparisons with the simulated data case. Finally, we will discuss recent theoretical developments that have improved the efficiency of GST estimation procedures, and which are particularly beneficial when characterizing two qubit systems. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Philosophy of voltage-gated proton channels

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.; Hosler, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In this review, voltage-gated proton channels are considered from a mainly teleological perspective. Why do proton channels exist? What good are they? Why did they go to such lengths to develop several unique hallmark properties such as extreme selectivity and ΔpH-dependent gating? Why is their current so minuscule? How do they manage to be so selective? What is the basis for our belief that they conduct H+ and not OH–? Why do they exist in many species as dimers when the monomeric form seems to work quite well? It is hoped that pondering these questions will provide an introduction to these channels and a way to logically organize their peculiar properties as well as to understand how they are able to carry out some of their better-established biological functions. PMID:24352668

  13. Method for voltage-gated protein fractionation

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, Anson [Tracy, CA; Singh, Anup K [Danville, CA

    2012-04-24

    We report unique findings on the voltage dependence of protein exclusion from the pores of nanoporous polymer exclusion membranes. The pores are small enough that proteins are excluded from passage with low applied electric fields, but increasing the field enables proteins to pass through. The requisite field necessary for a change in exclusion is protein-specific with a correlation to protein size. The field-dependence of exclusion is important to consider for preconcentration applications. The ability to selectively gate proteins at exclusion membranes is also a promising means for manipulating and characterizing proteins. We show that field-gated exclusion can be used to selectively remove proteins from a mixture, or to selectively trap protein at one exclusion membrane in a series.

  14. SWNT array resonant gate MOS transistor.

    PubMed

    Arun, A; Campidelli, S; Filoramo, A; Derycke, V; Salet, P; Ionescu, A M; Goffman, M F

    2011-02-04

    We show that thin horizontal arrays of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) suspended above the channel of silicon MOSFETs can be used as vibrating gate electrodes. This new class of nano-electromechanical system (NEMS) combines the unique mechanical and electronic properties of SWNTs with an integrated silicon-based motion detection. Its electrical response exhibits a clear signature of the mechanical resonance of SWNT arrays (120-150 MHz) showing that these thin horizontal arrays behave as a cohesive, rigid and elastic body membrane with a Young's modulus in the order of 1-10 GPa and ultra-low mass. The resonant frequency can be tuned by the gate voltage and its dependence is well understood within the continuum mechanics framework.

  15. Water-gel for gating graphene transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Joon; Um, Soong Ho; Song, Woo Chul; Kim, Yong Ho; Kang, Moon Sung; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2014-05-14

    Water, the primary electrolyte in biology, attracts significant interest as an electrolyte-type dielectric material for transistors compatible with biological systems. Unfortunately, the fluidic nature and low ionic conductivity of water prevents its practical usage in such applications. Here, we describe the development of a solid state, megahertz-operating, water-based gate dielectric system for operating graphene transistors. The new electrolyte systems were prepared by dissolving metal-substituted DNA polyelectrolytes into water. The addition of these biocompatible polyelectrolytes induced hydrogelation to provide solid-state integrity to the system. They also enhanced the ionic conductivities of the electrolytes, which in turn led to the quick formation of an electric double layer at the graphene/electrolyte interface that is beneficial for modulating currents in graphene transistors at high frequencies. At the optimized conditions, the Na-DNA water-gel-gated flexible transistors and inverters were operated at frequencies above 1 MHz and 100 kHz, respectively.

  16. Structure of molten Ga-Te eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Dutchak, Ya.I.; Mudryi, S.I.; Kozyrenko, V.N.

    1988-02-01

    We have made an x-ray study of the Ga-Te eutectic liquid. The phase diagram shows a series of compounds as well as immiscibility regions for two liquid phases and the eutectic. The compounds GaTe and Ga/sub 2/Te/sub 3/ melt congruently. The phase diagram is complicated, and the phase state varies substantially with the component ratio. The liquid eutectic (87 at. % Te) was examined with a high-temperature diffractometer intended particularly for liquids; Cu K..cap alpha.. radiation was used, which was monochromatized with LiF. An integral Fourier transformation was used to calculate the radial distributions for the atoms and the density; the first were used to derive the most likely shortest interatomic distances, while the second gave the mean coordination numbers.

  17. Surface conduction in encapsulated topological gated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshko, Yury; Korzhovska, Inna; Zhao, Lukas; Arefe, Ghidewon; Konczykowski, Marcin; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia

    2015-03-01

    In three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs), the surface Dirac fermions intermix with the conducting bulk, thereby complicating access to the low-energy surface charge transport or magnetic response. The subsurface 2D states of bulk origin are vulnerable to bandbending due to surface adatoms, a band modification thought to be responsible for the `ageing' effect. To minimize this effect, we have developed an inert environment mechanical exfoliation technique to fabricate transistor-like gated structures in which prototypical binary TIs as well as ultra-low bulk carrier density ternaries (such as Bi2Te2Se) were encapsulated by thin h-BN layers, with electrical contacts made using exfoliated graphene. The effects of electrostatic tuning by the gate bias voltage on surface conductivity as a function of thickness of the TI layers and the variation with disorder will be presented. Supported by NSF-DMR-1312483, and DOD-W911NF-13-1-0159.

  18. DIFMOS - A floating-gate electrically erasable nonvolatile semiconductor memory technology. [Dual Injector Floating-gate MOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosney, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    Electrically alterable read-only memories (EAROM's) or reprogrammable read-only memories (RPROM's) can be fabricated using a single-level metal-gate p-channel MOS technology with all conventional processing steps. Given the acronym DIFMOS for dual-injector floating-gate MOS, this technology utilizes the floating-gate technique for nonvolatile storage of data. Avalanche injection of hot electrons through gate oxide from a special injector diode in each bit is used to charge the floating gates. A second injector structure included in each bit permits discharge of the floating gate by avalanche injection of holes through gate oxide. The overall design of the DIFMOS bit is dictated by the physical considerations required for each of the avalanche injector types. The end result is a circuit technology which can provide fully decoded bit-erasable EAROM-type circuits using conventional manufacturing techniques.

  19. Cortical Gating of Oropharyngeal Sensory Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler-Hegland, Karen; Pitts, Teresa; Davenport, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials provide a measure of cortical neuronal activation in response to various types of sensory stimuli. In order to prevent flooding of the cortex with redundant information various sensory stimuli are gated cortically such that response to stimulus 2 (S2) is significantly reduced in amplitude compared to stimulus 1 (S1). Upper airway protective mechanisms, such as swallowing and cough, are dependent on sensory input for triggering and modifying their motor output. Thus, it was hypothesized that central neural gating would be absent for paired-air puff stimuli applied to the oropharynx. Twenty-three healthy adults (18–35 years) served as research participants. Pharyngeal sensory evoked potentials (PSEPs) were measured via 32-electrode cap (10–20 system) connected to SynAmps2 Neuroscan EEG System. Paired-pulse air puffs were delivered with an inter-stimulus interval of 500 ms to the oropharynx using a thin polyethylene tube connected to a flexible laryngoscope. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a repeated measures analysis of variance. There were no significant differences found for the amplitudes S1 and S2 for any of the four component PSEP peaks. Mean gating ratios were above 0.90 for each peak. Results supports our hypothesis that sensory central neural gating would be absent for component PSEP peaks with paired-pulse stimuli delivered to the oropharynx. This may be related to the need for constant sensory monitoring necessary for adequate airway protection associated with swallowing and coughing. PMID:21423402

  20. Advantages of gated silicon single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legré, Matthieu; Lunghi, Tommaso; Stucki, Damien; Zbinden, Hugo

    2013-05-01

    We present gated silicon single photon detectors based on two commercially available avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and one customised APD from ID Quantique SA. This customised APD is used in a commercially available device called id110. A brief comparison of the two commercial APDs is presented. Then, the charge persistence effect of all of those detectors that occurs just after a strong illumination is shown and discussed.

  1. Cluster computing software for GATE simulations.

    PubMed

    De Beenhouwer, Jan; Staelens, Steven; Kruecker, Dirk; Ferrer, Ludovic; D'Asseler, Yves; Lemahieu, Ignace; Rannou, Fernando R

    2007-06-01

    Geometry and tracking (GEANT4) is a Monte Carlo package designed for high energy physics experiments. It is used as the basis layer for Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear medicine acquisition systems in GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). GATE allows the user to realistically model experiments using accurate physics models and time synchronization for detector movement through a script language contained in a macro file. The downside of this high accuracy is long computation time. This paper describes a platform independent computing approach for running GATE simulations on a cluster of computers in order to reduce the overall simulation time. Our software automatically creates fully resolved, nonparametrized macros accompanied with an on-the-fly generated cluster specific submit file used to launch the simulations. The scalability of GATE simulations on a cluster is investigated for two imaging modalities, positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Due to a higher sensitivity, PET simulations are characterized by relatively high data output rates that create rather large output files. SPECT simulations, on the other hand, have lower data output rates but require a long collimator setup time. Both of these characteristics hamper scalability as a function of the number of CPUs. The scalability of PET simulations is improved here by the development of a fast output merger. The scalability of SPECT simulations is improved by greatly reducing the collimator setup time. Accordingly, these two new developments result in higher scalability for both PET and SPECT simulations and reduce the computation time to more practical values.

  2. Voltage Gated Ion Channel Function: Gating, Conduction, and the Role of Water and Protons

    PubMed Central

    Kariev, Alisher M.; Green, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Ion channels, which are found in every biological cell, regulate the concentration of electrolytes, and are responsible for multiple biological functions, including in particular the propagation of nerve impulses. The channels with the latter function are gated (opened) by a voltage signal, which allows Na+ into the cell and K+ out. These channels have several positively charged amino acids on a transmembrane domain of their voltage sensor, and it is generally considered, based primarily on two lines of experimental evidence, that these charges move with respect to the membrane to open the channel. At least three forms of motion, with greatly differing extents and mechanisms of motion, have been proposed. There is a “gating current”, a capacitative current preceding the channel opening, that corresponds to several charges (for one class of channel typically 12–13) crossing the membrane field, which may not require protein physically crossing a large fraction of the membrane. The coupling to the opening of the channel would in these models depend on the motion. The conduction itself is usually assumed to require the “gate” of the channel to be pulled apart to allow ions to enter as a section of the protein partially crosses the membrane, and a selectivity filter at the opposite end of the channel determines the ion which is allowed to pass through. We will here primarily consider K+ channels, although Na+ channels are similar. We propose that the mechanism of gating differs from that which is generally accepted, in that the positively charged residues need not move (there may be some motion, but not as gating current). Instead, protons may constitute the gating current, causing the gate to open; opening consists of only increasing the diameter at the gate from approximately 6 Å to approximately 12 Å. We propose in addition that the gate oscillates rather than simply opens, and the ion experiences a barrier to its motion across the channel that is tuned

  3. Engineering integrated photonics for heralded quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meany, Thomas; Biggerstaff, Devon N.; Broome, Matthew A.; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Delanty, Michael; Steel, M. J.; Gilchrist, Alexei; Marshall, Graham D.; White, Andrew G.; Withford, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    Scaling up linear-optics quantum computing will require multi-photon gates which are compact, phase-stable, exhibit excellent quantum interference, and have success heralded by the detection of ancillary photons. We investigate the design, fabrication and characterisation of the optimal known gate scheme which meets these requirements: the Knill controlled-Z gate, implemented in integrated laser-written waveguide arrays. We show device performance to be less sensitive to phase variations in the circuit than to small deviations in the coupler reflectivity, which are expected given the tolerance values of the fabrication method. The mode fidelity is also shown to be less sensitive to reflectivity and phase errors than the process fidelity. Our best device achieves a fidelity of 0.931 ± 0.001 with the ideal 4 × 4 unitary circuit and a process fidelity of 0.680 ± 0.005 with the ideal computational-basis process.

  4. Gated Luminescence Imaging of Silicon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jinmyoung; Liu, Xiangyou; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Nam, Yoonkey; Sailor, Michael J

    2015-06-23

    The luminescence lifetime of nanocrystalline silicon is typically on the order of microseconds, significantly longer than the nanosecond lifetimes exhibited by fluorescent molecules naturally present in cells and tissues. Time-gated imaging, where the image is acquired at a time after termination of an excitation pulse, allows discrimination of a silicon nanoparticle probe from these endogenous signals. Because of the microsecond time scale for silicon emission, time-gated imaging is relatively simple to implement for this biocompatible and nontoxic probe. Here a time-gated system with ∼10 ns resolution is described, using an intensified CCD camera and pulsed LED or laser excitation sources. The method is demonstrated by tracking the fate of mesoporous silicon nanoparticles containing the tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, administered by retro-orbital injection into live mice. Imaging of such systemically administered nanoparticles in vivo is particularly challenging because of the low concentration of probe in the targeted tissues and relatively high background signals from tissue autofluorescence. Contrast improvements of >100-fold (relative to steady-state imaging) is demonstrated in the targeted tissues.

  5. Flux-gate magnetometer for Mars exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hua; Zhu, G. W.; Yu, P.; Wang, J. D.; Yu, M. F.; Li, L.; Sun, Y. Q.; Chen, S. W.; Liao, H. Z.; Zhou, B.; Feng, Y. Y.

    2008-10-01

    A micro-satellite, Yinghuo-1, would be launched with Russian spacecraft, Phobos-Grunt in October, 2009 to investigate the space environment around Mars. YH-1 and Phobos-Grunt forms a two-point measurement configuration in the Martian space environment. YH-1 and Phobos-Grunt are equipped with similar magnetic field and plasma detecting payload on two spacecraft would give some coordinated exploration around Mars. YH-1 would orbit Mars with periapsis of 800 km above the Martian surface, and apoapsis about 80000km to the center of Mars. The orbit inclination is in the range of 0~7° to the Martian equator. A flux-gate type magnetometer, with two tri-axial sensors, is developed for YH-1 spacecraft. Two sensors are mounted on one-side of the deployable solar panel with a radial separation about 45cm to function as a gradiometer to minimize the affects of platform remanence. The dynamic range of the magnetometer is +/-256nT with a 16-bit ADC converter, and the noise level is better than 0.01nT/√Hz, to measure three-component magnetic field from DC to 10Hz. Flux-gate magnetometer would work together with the Plasma Package onboard of YH-1 to investigate the Martian bow shock, magnetosheath, magnetic pileup region (MPR). A detail description of the flux-gate magnetometer is presented in this paper, with test and calibration results.

  6. Gate manipulation of DNA capture into nanopores.

    PubMed

    He, Yuhui; Tsutsui, Makusu; Fan, Chun; Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2011-10-25

    Understanding biophysics governing DNA capture into a nanopore and establishing a manipulation system for the capture process are essential for nanopore-based genome sequencing. In this work, the functionality of extended electric field and electroosmotic flow (EOF) during the capture stage and their dependence on gate voltage, U(G), are investigated. We demonstrate that while both the electric field and EOF within a cis chamber make long-distance contributions to DNA capture around the pore mouth, the former effect is always capturing, while the latter causes trapping or blocking of the molecule depending on the magnitude of the gate voltage, U(G): an anionic EOF induced by high U(G) is capable of doubling the DNA trapping speed and thus the absorption radius in the cis chamber, whereas a cationic EOF by low U(G) would substantially offset the trapping effort by the electric field and even totally block DNA entrance into the pore. Based on the analysis, a gate regulation is proposed with the objective of achieving a high DNA capture rate while maintaining a low error rate.

  7. Gate-Tunable Conducting Oxide Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Wei; Lee, Ho Wai Howard; Sokhoyan, Ruzan; Pala, Ragip A; Thyagarajan, Krishnan; Han, Seunghoon; Tsai, Din Ping; Atwater, Harry A

    2016-09-14

    Metasurfaces composed of planar arrays of subwavelength artificial structures show promise for extraordinary light manipulation. They have yielded novel ultrathin optical components such as flat lenses, wave plates, holographic surfaces, and orbital angular momentum manipulation and detection over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum. However, the optical properties of metasurfaces developed to date do not allow for versatile tunability of reflected or transmitted wave amplitude and phase after their fabrication, thus limiting their use in a wide range of applications. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a gate-tunable metasurface that enables dynamic electrical control of the phase and amplitude of the plane wave reflected from the metasurface. Tunability arises from field-effect modulation of the complex refractive index of conducting oxide layers incorporated into metasurface antenna elements which are configured in reflectarray geometry. We measure a phase shift of 180° and ∼30% change in the reflectance by applying 2.5 V gate bias. Additionally, we demonstrate modulation at frequencies exceeding 10 MHz and electrical switching of ±1 order diffracted beams by electrical control over subgroups of metasurface elements, a basic requirement for electrically tunable beam-steering phased array metasurfaces. In principle, electrically gated phase and amplitude control allows for electrical addressability of individual metasurface elements and opens the path to applications in ultrathin optical components for imaging and sensing technologies, such as reconfigurable beam steering devices, dynamic holograms, tunable ultrathin lenses, nanoprojectors, and nanoscale spatial light modulators.

  8. Engineering integrated photonics for heralded quantum gates.

    PubMed

    Meany, Thomas; Biggerstaff, Devon N; Broome, Matthew A; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Delanty, Michael; Steel, M J; Gilchrist, Alexei; Marshall, Graham D; White, Andrew G; Withford, Michael J

    2016-06-10

    Scaling up linear-optics quantum computing will require multi-photon gates which are compact, phase-stable, exhibit excellent quantum interference, and have success heralded by the detection of ancillary photons. We investigate the design, fabrication and characterisation of the optimal known gate scheme which meets these requirements: the Knill controlled-Z gate, implemented in integrated laser-written waveguide arrays. We show device performance to be less sensitive to phase variations in the circuit than to small deviations in the coupler reflectivity, which are expected given the tolerance values of the fabrication method. The mode fidelity is also shown to be less sensitive to reflectivity and phase errors than the process fidelity. Our best device achieves a fidelity of 0.931 ± 0.001 with the ideal 4 × 4 unitary circuit and a process fidelity of 0.680 ± 0.005 with the ideal computational-basis process.

  9. Voltage-gated proton channels: what' next?

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    This review is an attempt to identify and place in context some of the many questions about voltage-gated proton channels that remain unsolved. As the gene was identified only 2 years ago, the situation is very different than in fields where the gene has been known for decades. For the proton channel, most of the obvious and less obvious structure–function questions are still wide open. Remarkably, the proton channel protein strongly resembles the voltage-sensing domain of many voltage-gated ion channels, and thus offers a novel approach to study gating mechanisms. Another surprise is that the proton channel appears to function as a dimer, with two separate conduction pathways. A number of significant biological questions remain in dispute, unanswered, or in some cases, not yet asked. This latter deficit is ascribable to the intrinsic difficulty in evaluating the importance of one component in a complex system, and in addition, to the lack, until recently, of a means of performing an unambiguous lesion experiment, that is, of selectively eliminating the molecule in question. We still lack a potent, selective pharmacological inhibitor, but the identification of the gene has allowed the development of powerful new tools including proton channel antibodies, siRNA and knockout mice. PMID:18801839

  10. Gated Luminescence Imaging of Silicon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jinmyoung; Liu, Xiangyou; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Nam, Yoonkey; Sailor, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence lifetime of nanocrystalline silicon is typically on the order of microseconds, significantly longer than the nanosecond lifetimes exhibited by fluorescent molecules naturally present in cells and tissues. Time-gated imaging, where the image is acquired at a time after termination of an excitation pulse, allows discrimination of a silicon nanoparticle probe from these endogenous signals. Because of the microsecond time scale for silicon emission, time-gated imaging is relatively simple to implement for this biocompatible and nontoxic probe. Here a time-gated system with ~10 ns resolution is described, using an intensified CCD camera and pulsed LED or laser excitation sources. The method is demonstrated by tracking the fate of mesoporous silicon nanoparticles containing the tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, administered by retro-orbital injection into live mice. Imaging of such systemically administered nanoparticles in vivo is particularly challenging because of the low concentration of probe in the targeted tissues and relatively high background signals from tissue autofluorescence. Contrast improvements of >100-fold (relative to steady-state imaging) is demonstrated in the targeted tissues. PMID:26034817

  11. Engineering integrated photonics for heralded quantum gates

    PubMed Central

    Meany, Thomas; Biggerstaff, Devon N.; Broome, Matthew A.; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Delanty, Michael; Steel, M. J.; Gilchrist, Alexei; Marshall, Graham D.; White, Andrew G.; Withford, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Scaling up linear-optics quantum computing will require multi-photon gates which are compact, phase-stable, exhibit excellent quantum interference, and have success heralded by the detection of ancillary photons. We investigate the design, fabrication and characterisation of the optimal known gate scheme which meets these requirements: the Knill controlled-Z gate, implemented in integrated laser-written waveguide arrays. We show device performance to be less sensitive to phase variations in the circuit than to small deviations in the coupler reflectivity, which are expected given the tolerance values of the fabrication method. The mode fidelity is also shown to be less sensitive to reflectivity and phase errors than the process fidelity. Our best device achieves a fidelity of 0.931 ± 0.001 with the ideal 4 × 4 unitary circuit and a process fidelity of 0.680 ± 0.005 with the ideal computational-basis process. PMID:27282928

  12. Gated Silica Mesoporous Materials in Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sancenón, Félix; Pascual, Lluís; Oroval, Mar; Aznar, Elena; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Silica mesoporous supports (SMSs) have a large specific surface area and volume and are particularly exciting vehicles for delivery applications. Such container-like structures can be loaded with numerous different chemical substances, such as drugs and reporters. Gated systems also contain addressable functions at openings of voids, and cargo delivery can be controlled on-command using chemical, biochemical or physical stimuli. Many of these gated SMSs have been applied for drug delivery. However, fewer examples of their use in sensing protocols have been reported. The approach of applying SMSs in sensing uses another concept—that of loading pores with a reporter and designing a capping mechanism that is selectively opened in the presence of a target analyte, which results in the delivery of the reporter. According to this concept, we provide herein a complete compilation of published examples of probes based on the use of capped SMSs for sensing. Examples for the detection of anions, cations, small molecules and biomolecules are provided. The diverse range of gated silica mesoporous materials presented here highlights their usefulness in recognition protocols. PMID:26491626

  13. A CNOT gate in a glass chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsing, Paul M.; Kreymerman, Grigoriy; Miller, Warner A.

    2015-05-01

    In our earlier work we posited that simple quantum gates and quantum algorithms can be designed utilizing the diffraction phenomena of a photon within a multiplexed holographic element. The quantum eigenstates we use are the photons transverse linear momentum (LM) as measured by the number of waves of tilt across the aperture. Two properties of linear optical quantum computing (LOQC) within the circuit model make this approach attractive. First, any conditional measurement can be commuted in time with any unitary quantum gate; and second, photon entanglement can be encoded as a superposition state of a single photon in a higher-dimensional state space afforded by LM. We describe here our experimental results for construction a controlled NOT (CNOT) gate logic within a holographic medium, and present the quantum state tomography for this device. Our theoretical and numerical results indicate that OptiGrates photo-thermal refractive (PTR) glass is an enabling technology. This work has been grounded on coupled-mode theory and numerical simulations, all with parameters consistent with PTR glass. We discuss the strengths (high efficiencies, robustness to environment) and limitations (scalability, crosstalk) of this technology. While not scalable, the utility and robustness of such optical elements for broader quantum information processing applications can be substantial.

  14. Quantum superreplication of states and gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiribella, Giulio; Yang, Yuxiang

    2016-06-01

    Although the no-cloning theorem forbids perfect replication of quantum information, it is sometimes possible to produce large numbers of replicas with vanishingly small error. This phenomenon, known as quantum superreplication, can occur for both quantum states and quantum gates. The aim of this paper is to review the central features of quantum superreplication and provide a unified view of existing results. The paper also includes new results. In particular, we show that when quantum superreplication can be achieved, it can be achieved through estimation up to an error of size O( M/ N 2), where N and M are the number of input and output copies, respectively. Quantum strategies still offer an advantage for superreplication in that they allow for exponentially faster reduction of the error. Using the relation with estimation, we provide i) an alternative proof of the optimality of Heisenberg scaling in quantum metrology, ii) a strategy for estimating arbitrary unitary gates with a mean square error scaling as log N/ N 2, and iii) a protocol that generates O( N 2) nearly perfect copies of a generic pure state U |0> while using the corresponding gate U only N times. Finally, we point out that superreplication can be achieved using interactions among k systems, provided that k is large compared to M 2/ N 2.

  15. Charge movement in gating-locked HCN channels reveals weak coupling of voltage sensors and gate.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sujung; Yellen, Gary

    2012-11-01

    HCN (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated) pacemaker channels have an architecture similar to that of voltage-gated K(+) channels, but they open with the opposite voltage dependence. HCN channels use essentially the same positively charged voltage sensors and intracellular activation gates as K(+) channels, but apparently these two components are coupled differently. In this study, we examine the energetics of coupling between the voltage sensor and the pore by using cysteine mutant channels for which low concentrations of Cd(2+) ions freeze the open-closed gating machinery but still allow the sensors to move. We were able to lock mutant channels either into open or into closed states by the application of Cd(2+) and measure the effect on voltage sensor movement. Cd(2+) did not immobilize the gating charge, as expected for strict coupling, but rather it produced shifts in the voltage dependence of voltage sensor charge movement, consistent with its effect of confining transitions to either closed or open states. From the magnitude of the Cd(2+)-induced shifts, we estimate that each voltage sensor produces a roughly three- to sevenfold effect on the open-closed equilibrium, corresponding to a coupling energy of ∼1.3-2 kT per sensor. Such coupling is not only opposite in sign to the coupling in K(+) channels, but also much weaker.

  16. Gating the glutamate gate of CLC-2 chloride channel by pore occupancy

    PubMed Central

    De Jesús-Pérez, José J.; Castro-Chong, Alejandra; Shieh, Ru-Chi; Hernández-Carballo, Carmen Y.; De Santiago-Castillo, José A.

    2016-01-01

    CLC-2 channels are dimeric double-barreled chloride channels that open in response to hyperpolarization. Hyperpolarization activates protopore gates that independently regulate the permeability of the pore in each subunit and the common gate that affects the permeability through both pores. CLC-2 channels lack classic transmembrane voltage–sensing domains; instead, their protopore gates (residing within the pore and each formed by the side chain of a glutamate residue) open under repulsion by permeant intracellular anions or protonation by extracellular H+. Here, we show that voltage-dependent gating of CLC-2: (a) is facilitated when permeant anions (Cl−, Br−, SCN−, and I−) are present in the cytosolic side; (b) happens with poorly permeant anions fluoride, glutamate, gluconate, and methanesulfonate present in the cytosolic side; (c) depends on pore occupancy by permeant and poorly permeant anions; (d) is strongly facilitated by multi-ion occupancy; (e) is absent under likely protonation conditions (pHe = 5.5 or 6.5) in cells dialyzed with acetate (an impermeant anion); and (f) was the same at intracellular pH 7.3 and 4.2; and (g) is observed in both whole-cell and inside-out patches exposed to increasing [Cl−]i under unlikely protonation conditions (pHe = 10). Thus, based on our results we propose that hyperpolarization activates CLC-2 mainly by driving intracellular anions into the channel pores, and that protonation by extracellular H+ plays a minor role in dislodging the glutamate gate. PMID:26666914

  17. Gating the glutamate gate of CLC-2 chloride channel by pore occupancy.

    PubMed

    De Jesús-Pérez, José J; Castro-Chong, Alejandra; Shieh, Ru-Chi; Hernández-Carballo, Carmen Y; De Santiago-Castillo, José A; Arreola, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    CLC-2 channels are dimeric double-barreled chloride channels that open in response to hyperpolarization. Hyperpolarization activates protopore gates that independently regulate the permeability of the pore in each subunit and the common gate that affects the permeability through both pores. CLC-2 channels lack classic transmembrane voltage-sensing domains; instead, their protopore gates (residing within the pore and each formed by the side chain of a glutamate residue) open under repulsion by permeant intracellular anions or protonation by extracellular H(+). Here, we show that voltage-dependent gating of CLC-2: (a) is facilitated when permeant anions (Cl(-), Br(-), SCN(-), and I(-)) are present in the cytosolic side; (b) happens with poorly permeant anions fluoride, glutamate, gluconate, and methanesulfonate present in the cytosolic side; (c) depends on pore occupancy by permeant and poorly permeant anions; (d) is strongly facilitated by multi-ion occupancy; (e) is absent under likely protonation conditions (pHe = 5.5 or 6.5) in cells dialyzed with acetate (an impermeant anion); and (f) was the same at intracellular pH 7.3 and 4.2; and (g) is observed in both whole-cell and inside-out patches exposed to increasing [Cl(-)]i under unlikely protonation conditions (pHe = 10). Thus, based on our results we propose that hyperpolarization activates CLC-2 mainly by driving intracellular anions into the channel pores, and that protonation by extracellular H(+) plays a minor role in dislodging the glutamate gate.

  18. The cooperative voltage sensor motion that gates a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Medha; Kurtz, Lisa; Tombola, Francesco; Isacoff, Ehud

    2005-01-01

    The four arginine-rich S4 helices of a voltage-gated channel move outward through the membrane in response to depolarization, opening and closing gates to generate a transient ionic current. Coupling of voltage sensing to gating was originally thought to operate with the S4s moving independently from an inward/resting to an outward/activated conformation, so that when all four S4s are activated, the gates are driven to open or closed. However, S4 has also been found to influence the cooperative opening step (Smith-Maxwell et al., 1998a), suggesting a more complex mechanism of coupling. Using fluorescence to monitor structural rearrangements in a Shaker channel mutant, the ILT channel (Ledwell and Aldrich, 1999), that energetically isolates the steps of activation from the cooperative opening step, we find that opening is accompanied by a previously unknown and cooperative movement of S4. This gating motion of S4 appears to be coupled to the internal S6 gate and to two forms of slow inactivation. Our results suggest that S4 plays a direct role in gating. While large transmembrane rearrangements of S4 may be required to unlock the gating machinery, as proposed before, it appears to be the gating motion of S4 that drives the gates to open and close.

  19. Cryogenic Neutron Protein Crystallography: routine methods and potential benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Kevin L; Tomanicek, Stephen J; NG, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    The use of cryocooling in neutron diffraction has been hampered by several technical challenges such as the need for specialized equipment and techniques. Recently we have developed and deployed equipment and strategies that allow for routine neutron data collection on cryocooled crystals using off the shelf components. This system has several advantages, compared to a closed displex cooling system such as fast cooling coupled with easier crystal mounting and centering. The ability to routinely collect cryogenic neutron data for analysis will significantly broaden the range of scientific questions that can be examined by neutron protein crystallography. Cryogenic neutron data collection for macromolecules has recently become available at the new Biological Diffractometer BIODIFF at FRM II and the Macromolecular Diffractometer (MaNDi) at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. To evaluate the benefits of a cryocooled neutron structure we collected a full neutron data set on the BIODIFF instrument on a Toho-1 lactamase structure at 100K.

  20. Limiting the use of routine radiography for acute ankle injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cockshott, W. P.; Jenkin, J. K.; Pui, M.

    1983-01-01

    In the diagnosis of ankle injuries routine radiography is often productive. An international survey of the average number of radiographs made of injured ankles suggested that two projections are adequate to detect fractures. This was confirmed in a prospective study of 242 patients coming to a hospital emergency department with recent ankle injuries. All the fractures could be identified on an anteroposterior or a lateral projection, although some were more obvious on an oblique view. As well, all the fractures were associated with malleolar soft-tissue swelling. Thus, radiography for acute ankle injuries could safely be restricted to patients with soft-tissue swelling, and fractures could be diagnosed using only two routine projections, though for management purposes additional projections might be needed. With a policy of limiting the use of radiography substantial cost reductions are possible. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6407744

  1. Analysis of routine communication in the air traffic control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Herbert H.; Morrow, Daniel; Rodvoid, Michelle

    1990-01-01

    The present project has three related goals. The first is to describe the organization of routine controller-pilot communication. This includes identifying the basic units of communication and how they are organized into discourse, how controllers and pilots use language to achieve their goals, and what topics they discuss. The second goal is to identify the type and frequency of problems that interrupt routine information transfer and prompt pilots and controllers to focus on the communication itself. The authors analyze the costs of these problems in terms of communication efficiency, and the techniques used to resolve these problems. Third, the authors hope to identify factors associated with communication problems, such as deviations from conventional air traffic control procedures.

  2. The concentration of criminal victimization and patterns of routine activities.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shih-Ya; Cuvelier, Steven J; Sheu, Chuen-Jim; Zhao, Jihong Solomon

    2012-06-01

    Although many repeat victimization studies have focused on describing the prevalence of the phenomenon, this study attempted to explain variations in the concentration of victimization by applying routine activities as a theoretical model. A multivariate analysis of repeat victimization based on the 2005 Taiwan criminal victimization data supported the general applicability of the routine activity model developed in Western culture for predicting repeat victimization. Findings that diverged from Western patterns included family income to assault, gender to robbery, and marital status, family income, and major activity to larceny incidents. These disparities illustrated the importance of considering the broader sociocultural context in the association between risk predictors and the concentration of criminal victimization. The contradictory results and nonsignificant variance also reflected untapped information on respondents' biological features and psychological tendencies. Future victimization research would do well to integrate measurements that are sensitive to salient sociocultural elements of the society being studied and individuals' biological and psychological traits.

  3. Analysis of routine communication in the air traffic control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Herbert H.; Morrow, Daniel; Rodvoid, Michelle

    1990-08-01

    The present project has three related goals. The first is to describe the organization of routine controller-pilot communication. This includes identifying the basic units of communication and how they are organized into discourse, how controllers and pilots use language to achieve their goals, and what topics they discuss. The second goal is to identify the type and frequency of problems that interrupt routine information transfer and prompt pilots and controllers to focus on the communication itself. The authors analyze the costs of these problems in terms of communication efficiency, and the techniques used to resolve these problems. Third, the authors hope to identify factors associated with communication problems, such as deviations from conventional air traffic control procedures.

  4. Quantum gate learning in qubit networks: Toffoli gate without time-dependent control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banchi, Leonardo; Pancotti, Nicola; Bose, Sougato

    2016-07-01

    We put forward a strategy to encode a quantum operation into the unmodulated dynamics of a quantum network without the need for external control pulses, measurements or active feedback. Our optimisation scheme, inspired by supervised machine learning, consists in engineering the pairwise couplings between the network qubits so that the target quantum operation is encoded in the natural reduced dynamics of a network section. The efficacy of the proposed scheme is demonstrated by the finding of uncontrolled four-qubit networks that implement either the Toffoli gate, the Fredkin gate or remote logic operations. The proposed Toffoli gate is stable against imperfections, has a high fidelity for fault-tolerant quantum computation and is fast, being based on the non-equilibrium dynamics.

  5. RNAi as a Routine Route Toward Breast Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    a third -generation shRNA library 2. collection of cell lines for screening within the proposed program 6 3. determination that microRNAs can...08-1-0572 TITLE: RNAi as a routine route toward breast cancer therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gregory J. Hannon, Ph.D... therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH – 08 – 1 - 0572 5b. GRANT NUMBER BC076047 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  6. Fast native-SAD phasing for routine macromolecular structure determination.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Tobias; Olieric, Vincent; Waltersperger, Sandro; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Chen, Lirong; Zhang, Hua; Zhou, Dayong; Rose, John; Ebihara, Akio; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Li, Dianfan; Howe, Nicole; Schnapp, Gisela; Pautsch, Alexander; Bargsten, Katja; Prota, Andrea E; Surana, Parag; Kottur, Jithesh; Nair, Deepak T; Basilico, Federica; Cecatiello, Valentina; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Boland, Andreas; Weichenrieder, Oliver; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Steinmetz, Michel O; Caffrey, Martin; Wang, Meitian

    2015-02-01

    We describe a data collection method that uses a single crystal to solve X-ray structures by native SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction). We solved the structures of 11 real-life examples, including a human membrane protein, a protein-DNA complex and a 266-kDa multiprotein-ligand complex, using this method. The data collection strategy is suitable for routine structure determination and can be implemented at most macromolecular crystallography synchrotron beamlines.

  7. A transportation system for routine visits to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barney B.

    1988-01-01

    A conceptual transportation system designed for routing visits to Mars is described. The system is planned to provide routine support for a base population of roughly 20 people on Mars. The system utilizes in situ resource production to support Mars missions and generates artificial gravity while delivering additional consumables. The system uses cycling space stations for support. Possible lunar resource capabilities, taxi vehicles, and technology and human issues are examined.

  8. C-statistic fitting routines: User's manual and reference guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nousek, John A.; Farwana, Vida

    1991-01-01

    The computer program is discussed which can read several input files and provide a best set of values for the functions provided by the user, using either C-statistic or the chi(exp 2) statistic method. The program consists of one main routine and several functions and subroutines. Detail descriptions of each function and subroutine is presented. A brief description of the C-statistic and the reason for its application is also presented.

  9. Changing the game: exploring infants' participation in early play routines

    PubMed Central

    Fantasia, Valentina; Fasulo, Alessandra; Costall, Alan; López, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Play has proved to have a central role in children's development, most notably in rule learning (Piaget, 1965; Sutton-Smith, 1979) and negotiation of roles and goals (Garvey, 1974; Bruner et al., 1976). Yet very little research has been done on early play. The present study focuses on early social games, i.e., vocal-kinetic play routines that mothers use to interact with infants from very early on. We explored 3-month-old infants and their mothers performing a routine game first in the usual way, then in two violated conditions: without gestures and without sound. The aim of the study is to investigate infants' participation and expectations in the game and whether this participation is affected by changes in the multimodal format of the game. Infants' facial expressions, gaze, and body movements were coded to measure levels of engagement and affective state across the three conditions. Results showed a significant decrease in Limbs Movements and expressions of Positive Affect, an increase in Gaze Away and in Stunned Expression when the game structure was violated. These results indicate that the violated game conditions were experienced as less engaging, either because of an unexpected break in the established joint routine, or simply because they were weaker versions of the same game. Overall, our results suggest that structured, multimodal play routines may constitute interactional contexts that only work as integrated units of auditory and motor resources, representing early communicative contexts which prepare the ground for later, more complex multimodal interactions, such as verbal exchanges. PMID:24936192

  10. New routines for algebraic programming of the Dirac equation

    SciTech Connect

    Cotaescu, I.I.; Vulcanov, D.N.

    1997-04-01

    We present new procedures in the REDUCE language for algebraic programming of the Dirac equation on curved space-time. The main part of the program is a package of routines defining the Pauli and Dirac matrix algebras. Then the Dirac equation is obtained using the facilities of the EXCALC package. Finally we present some results obtained after running our procedures for the Dirac equation on several curved space-times.

  11. Getting through to circadian oscillators: why use constant routines?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Jeanne F.; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2002-01-01

    Overt 24-h rhythmicity is composed of both exogenous and endogenous components, reflecting the product of multiple (periodic) feedback loops with a core pacemaker at their center. Researchers attempting to reveal the endogenous circadian (near 24-h) component of rhythms commonly conduct their experiments under constant environmental conditions. However, even under constant environmental conditions, rhythmic changes in behavior, such as food intake or the sleep-wake cycle, can contribute to observed rhythmicity in many physiological and endocrine variables. Assessment of characteristics of the core circadian pacemaker and its direct contribution to rhythmicity in different variables, including rhythmicity in gene expression, may be more reliable when such periodic behaviors are eliminated or kept constant across all circadian phases. This is relevant for the assessment of the status of the circadian pacemaker in situations in which the sleep-wake cycle or food intake regimes are altered because of external conditions, such as in shift work or jet lag. It is also relevant for situations in which differences in overt rhythmicity could be due to changes in either sleep oscillatory processes or circadian rhythmicity, such as advanced or delayed sleep phase syndromes, in aging, or in particular clinical conditions. Researchers studying human circadian rhythms have developed constant routine protocols to assess the status of the circadian pacemaker in constant behavioral and environmental conditions, whereas this technique is often thought to be unnecessary in the study of animal rhythms. In this short review, the authors summarize constant routine methodology and what has been learned from constant routines and argue that animal and human circadian rhythm researchers should (continue to) use constant routines as a step on the road to getting through to central and peripheral circadian oscillators in the intact organism.

  12. RIALTO (Routine Inflight Assessment of Lower Tropospheric Oxidants)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottenheim, J.; Strapp, W.; Hoenninger, G.; Kobelka, W.; Netcheva, S.; Tarasick, D.; Dalziel, J.; Beauchamp, S.

    2005-12-01

    In spite of large advances in knowledge of tropospheric chemistry in the latter part of the 20th century, the database of routine observations is embarrassingly sparse. The large majority of observations are limited to surface measurements of only a few species, and most of those are in urban/suburban locations. Regularly obtained vertical profile data are limited to ozone from sondes or ozone DIALs. Routine observations from space promise to improve the situation but actual profile information will still be hard to obtain. A major obstacle to a routine measurement program in the vertical is expense, since it requires lifting an observing system to several altitudes above ground, and then having it return to ground level after performing the desired measurements. One solution to this problem is to make use of existing infrastructure, i.e. to mount measurement equipment onboard aircraft already in service. This approach has been pioneered by such programs as MOZAIC and CARIBIC, where systems are incorporated in luggage compartments of large commercial passenger aircraft. RIALTO is based on the same concept. However, instead of large passenger aircraft our design is based on a small, fully automated instrument package that can fly on small planes already in operation. A first instrument package consisting of a 2B ozone monitor, two mini MAXDOAS spectrometers, and assorted control and data storage equipment was assembled and installed in the nose cone of a twin engine King Air aircraft that made routine sorties in the summer of 2004 from Halifax, N.S. out over the Atlantic Ocean. In this presentation we will expand on the RIALTO concept, present first results obtained in 2004, and discuss current and future plans.

  13. Dissociations in routine behaviour across patients and everyday tasks.

    PubMed

    Forde, Emer M E; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2002-01-01

    We present a single case study of a patient, FK, who was severely impaired on routine, everyday tasks, such as preparing a cup of tea. We used the action coding system developed by Schwartz et al. to provide quantitative and qualitative measures of his performance in a number of experimental manipulations. In section A, we established FK's baseline performance on a range of tasks with (a) task-congruent objects only and (b) task-congruent objects and semantic distracters. In section B, we aimed to facilitate FK's performance by (a) giving him a pictorial representation of the goal, (b) giving him a set of written commands to follow, (c) giving him one command at a time, (d) demonstrating how the task should be performed and (e) dividing the task into smaller subgoals. We compared FK's performance with another patient, HG, to establish if there are qualitative differences between patients with 'action disorganization syndrome'. In section C, we aimed to hinder FK's performance by interrupting his execution of routine tasks. By comparing the factors that facilitated and impaired FK's performance in sections B and C, we hoped to isolate the key cognitive processes required to generate and control routine behaviour. In section D, we investigated how task demands impact on our ability to complete different everyday activities. The results of these experiments have important clinical implications for rehabilitation programmes for patients with action disorganization syndrome and can also help to distinguish between contemporary theoretical accounts of routine behaviour. In particular, we propose that patients who can be classified under the umbrella term of 'action disorganization syndrome' do not all have a reduction to 'non-specific cognitive resources' but can have qualitatively different impairments to a specialized action production system.

  14. Pediatric Mastocytosis: Routine Anesthetic Management for a Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Melody C.; Uzzaman, Ashraf; Scott, Linda M.; Metcalfe, Dean D.; Quezado, Zenaide

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pediatric mastocytosis consists of a spectrum of clinical variants characterized by increased numbers of resident mast cells in various organ systems. Mast cells are instrumental in mediating anaphylaxis and patients with mastocytosis are at risk to develop provoked and unprovoked episodes of anaphylaxis. METHODS The authors examined peri-anesthetic records of patients with pediatric mastocytosis who were anesthetized for diagnostic and surgical procedures from 1993 to 2006. In addition, the authors conducted a literature review of the experience of the use anesthetics in pediatric mastocytosis. RESULTS Twenty-two patients with pediatric mastocytosis, with a median age of 3.2 years (range 6 months to 20 years) at the time of the procedure, were anesthetized for 29 diagnostic and surgical procedures. All variants of the disease are represented in this series. Most patients had a history of flushing, pruritus, GERD and abdominal pain; one patient had history of spontaneous anaphylaxis. Routine anesthetic techniques were used and despite the complexity of the disease, the peri-operative courses were uncomplicated and without serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS We review the main features of pediatric mastocytosis, its anesthetic and perioperative implications, and describe a practical approach to the anesthetic management of pediatric patients with the disease. While many drugs used routinely in anesthesia reportedly cause mast cell degranulation, deviations from routine anesthesia techniques are not necessarily warranted. However, an understanding of the anesthetic implications of the disease and meticulous preparation to treat possible adverse events are advised. PMID:18633019

  15. Routine prophylactic antibiotic use in the management of snakebite

    PubMed Central

    Tagwireyi, Dexter D; Ball, Douglas E; Nhachi, Charles FB

    2001-01-01

    Background Routine antibiotic prophylaxis following snakebite is not recommended but evidence suggests that it may be common practice in Zimbabwe. This study set out to determine and describe the extent of this practice at Parirenyatwa Hospital, a large teaching hospital in Zimbabwe Methods A retrospective case review (1996 to 1999 inclusive) of all cases of snakebite was undertaken at Parirenyatwa Hospital. Cases with a diagnosis of snakebite, presenting within 24 hours of the bite and with no complications or concurrent illness were defined as "routine prophylactic antibiotic use". Results From 78 cases which satisfied the inclusion criteria, 69 (88.5%) received antibiotics. Ten different antibiotics from 6 different classes were used with penicillins the most commonly prescribed (benzylpenicillin in 29% of cases, alone or in combination). Over 40% of antibiotics were given parenterally although all patients were conscious on admission. The total cost of antibiotics used was estimated at US$522.98. Conclusion Routine prophylactic use of antibiotics in snakebite at Parirenyatwa Hospital is common practice. This may highlight the lack of a clearly defined policy leading to wasteful inappropriate antibiotic use which is costly and may promote bacterial antibiotic resistance. Further work is required to investigate the reasons for this practice and to design appropriate interventions to counter it. PMID:11710972

  16. CERES: A Set of Automated Routines for Echelle Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahm, Rafael; Jordán, Andrés; Espinoza, Néstor

    2017-03-01

    We present the Collection of Elemental Routines for Echelle Spectra (CERES). These routines were developed for the construction of automated pipelines for the reduction, extraction, and analysis of spectra acquired with different instruments, allowing the obtention of homogeneous and standardized results. This modular code includes tools for handling the different steps of the processing: CCD image reductions; identification and tracing of the echelle orders; optimal and rectangular extraction; computation of the wavelength solution; estimation of radial velocities; and rough and fast estimation of the atmospheric parameters. Currently, CERES has been used to develop automated pipelines for 13 different spectrographs, namely CORALIE, FEROS, HARPS, ESPaDOnS, FIES, PUCHEROS, FIDEOS, CAFE, DuPont/Echelle, Magellan/Mike, Keck/HIRES, Magellan/PFS, and APO/ARCES, but the routines can be easily used to deal with data coming from other spectrographs. We show the high precision in radial velocity that CERES achieves for some of these instruments, and we briefly summarize some results that have already been obtained using the CERES pipelines.

  17. An epilepsy information system to support routine and research.

    PubMed

    Griep, P; van den Berg, N; Doelman, J; Starrenburg, R

    1996-07-01

    An epilepsy information system is described that supports routine patient care, research, and medical management. The patient's clinical data is ordered in time by the date of the patient contact when the data was collected. The clinical data is also classified into six categories. An unrestricted text group has text subjects in each of these groups as well as in a general free text area. The system is integrated with other information subsystems (e.g. patient registration, clinical chemistry laboratory, EEG department and pharmacy) as well as with the routinely used text processor. Data inquiries for research and medical management purposes are programmed in a Structured Query Language (SQL). The data needed to answer these queries are taken from the data collected in daily routine. The integration of the system is very useful because data only have to be entered once and can be used when and where needed. Patient data stored in this system is more accessible in general as well as more usable for research purposes compared with the patient data previously stored only on paper.

  18. Physicians slow to e-mail routinely with patients.

    PubMed

    Boukus, Ellyn R; Grossman, Joy M; O'Malley, Ann S

    2010-10-01

    Some experts view e-mail between physicians and patients as a potential tool to improve physician-patient communication and, ultimately, patient care. Despite indications that many patients want to e-mail their physicians, physician adoption and use of e-mail with patients remains uncommon--only 6.7 percent of office-based physicians routinely e-mailed patients in 2008, according to a new national study from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Overall, about one-third of office-based physicians reported that information technology (IT) was available in their practice for e-mailing patients about clinical issues. Of those, fewer than one in five reported using e-mail with patients routinely; the remaining physicians were roughly evenly split between occasional users and non-users. Physicians in practices with access to electronic medical records and those working in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) or medical school settings were more likely to adopt and use e-mail to communicate with patients compared with other physicians. However, even among the highest users--physicians in group/staff-model HMOs--only 50.6 percent reported routinely e-mailing patients.

  19. Value of routine dengue diagnosis in endemic countries

    PubMed Central

    Ayukekbong, James Ayukepi; Oyero, Olufunmilayo G; Nnukwu, Samuel Ekpesu; Mesumbe, Henry Nzike; Fobisong, Cajetang Nkong

    2017-01-01

    Dengue is one of the most common arthropod-borne viral diseases in humans and it is a leading cause of illness and death in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. It is thought to account for 400 million cases annually among approximately 3.97 billion people at risk of infection in 128 endemic countries. Despite the global prevalence of the disease, the availability of a vaccine is limited in most countries in the endemic areas. Most endemic countries in South America, South East Asia and Africa serve as attractive touristic sites for people from non-endemic countries who become infected and export the virus to dengue-free regions. Dengue fever typically resembles malaria and in endemic countries most cases of dengue are treated as presumptive malaria. Consequently, routine dengue diagnosis among persons with fever will offer early treatment and reduce the burden of the disease. Also, routine testing among travellers from endemic countries will reduce importation and prevent the geographical expansion of dengue. In this essay, we seek to highlight the usefulness of routine dengue testing in endemic countries. PMID:28239567

  20. Gate tunneling current and quantum capacitance in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with graphene gate electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yanbin; Shekhawat, Aniruddh; Behnam, Ashkan; Pop, Eric; Ural, Ant

    2016-11-01

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices with graphene as the metal gate electrode, silicon dioxide with thicknesses ranging from 5 to 20 nm as the dielectric, and p-type silicon as the semiconductor are fabricated and characterized. It is found that Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) tunneling dominates the gate tunneling current in these devices for oxide thicknesses of 10 nm and larger, whereas for devices with 5 nm oxide, direct tunneling starts to play a role in determining the total gate current. Furthermore, the temperature dependences of the F-N tunneling current for the 10 nm devices are characterized in the temperature range 77-300 K. The F-N coefficients and the effective tunneling barrier height are extracted as a function of temperature. It is found that the effective barrier height decreases with increasing temperature, which is in agreement with the results previously reported for conventional MOS devices with polysilicon or metal gate electrodes. In addition, high frequency capacitance-voltage measurements of these MOS devices are performed, which depict a local capacitance minimum under accumulation for thin oxides. By analyzing the data using numerical calculations based on the modified density of states of graphene in the presence of charged impurities, it is shown that this local minimum is due to the contribution of the quantum capacitance of graphene. Finally, the workfunction of the graphene gate electrode is extracted by determining the flat-band voltage as a function of oxide thickness. These results show that graphene is a promising candidate as the gate electrode in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices.

  1. Inversion gate capacitance of undoped single-gate and double-gate field-effect transistor geometries in the extreme quantum limit

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Amlan

    2015-05-28

    We present first-principle analytical derivations and numerically modeled data to show that the gate capacitance per unit gate area C{sub G} of extremely thin undoped-channel single-gate and double-gate field-effect transistor geometries in the extreme quantum limit with single-subband occupancy can be written as 1/C{sub G} = 1/C{sub OX} + N{sub G}/C{sub DOS} + N{sub G}/ηC{sub WF}, where N{sub G} is the number of gates, C{sub OX} is the oxide capacitance per unit area, C{sub DOS} is the density-of-states capacitance per unit area, C{sub WF} is the wave function spreading capacitance per unit area, and η is a constant on the order of 1.

  2. SU-E-T-350: Verification of Gating Performance of a New Elekta Gating Solution: Response Kit and Catalyst System

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, X; Cao, D; Housley, D; Mehta, V; Shepard, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this work, we have tested the performance of new respiratory gating solutions for Elekta linacs. These solutions include the Response gating and the C-RAD Catalyst surface mapping system.Verification measurements have been performed for a series of clinical cases. We also examined the beam on latency of the system and its impact on delivery efficiency. Methods: To verify the benefits of tighter gating windows, a Quasar Respiratory Motion Platform was used. Its vertical-motion plate acted as a respiration surrogate and was tracked by the Catalyst system to generate gating signals. A MatriXX ion-chamber array was mounted on its longitudinal-moving platform. Clinical plans are delivered to a stationary and moving Matrix array at 100%, 50% and 30% gating windows and gamma scores were calculated comparing moving delivery results to the stationary result. It is important to note that as one moves to tighter gating windows, the delivery efficiency will be impacted by the linac's beam-on latency. Using a specialized software package, we generated beam-on signals of lengths of 1000ms, 600ms, 450ms, 400ms, 350ms and 300ms. As the gating windows get tighter, one can expect to reach a point where the dose rate will fall to nearly zero, indicating that the gating window is close to beam-on latency. A clinically useful gating window needs to be significantly longer than the latency for the linac. Results: As expected, the use of tighter gating windows improved delivery accuracy. However, a lower limit of the gating window, largely defined by linac beam-on latency, exists at around 300ms. Conclusion: The Response gating kit, combined with the C-RAD Catalyst, provides an effective solution for respiratorygated treatment delivery. Careful patient selection, gating window design, even visual/audio coaching may be necessary to ensure both delivery quality and efficiency. This research project is funded by Elekta.

  3. Reconfigurable and non-volatile vertical magnetic logic gates

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J. Lee, B.; Shachar, M.; Garcia, D.; Hu, B.; Hong, J.; Amos, N.; Khizroev, S.

    2014-04-28

    In this paper, we discuss the concept and prototype fabrication of reconfigurable and non-volatile vertical magnetic logic gates. These gates consist of two input layers and a RESET layer. The RESET layer allows the structure to be used as either an AND or an OR gate, depending on its magnetization state. To prove this concept, the gates were fabricated using a multi-layered patterned magnetic media, in which three magnetic layers are stacked and exchange-decoupled via non-magnetic interlayers. We demonstrate the functionality of these logic gates by conducting atomic force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) analysis of the multi-layered patterned magnetic media. The logic gates operation mechanism and fabrication feasibility are both validated by the MFM imaging results.

  4. Efficient measurement of quantum gate error by interleaved randomized benchmarking.

    PubMed

    Magesan, Easwar; Gambetta, Jay M; Johnson, B R; Ryan, Colm A; Chow, Jerry M; Merkel, Seth T; da Silva, Marcus P; Keefe, George A; Rothwell, Mary B; Ohki, Thomas A; Ketchen, Mark B; Steffen, M

    2012-08-24

    We describe a scalable experimental protocol for estimating the average error of individual quantum computational gates. This protocol consists of interleaving random Clifford gates between the gate of interest and provides an estimate as well as theoretical bounds for the average error of the gate under test, so long as the average noise variation over all Clifford gates is small. This technique takes into account both state preparation and measurement errors and is scalable in the number of qubits. We apply this protocol to a superconducting qubit system and find a bounded average error of 0.003 [0,0.016] for the single-qubit gates X(π/2) and Y(π/2). These bounded values provide better estimates of the average error than those extracted via quantum process tomography.

  5. Investigation of field induced trapping on floating gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosney, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a technology for building electrically alterable read only memories (EAROMs) or reprogrammable read only memories (RPROMs) using a single level metal gate p channel MOS process with all conventional processing steps is outlined. Nonvolatile storage of data is achieved by the use of charged floating gate electrodes. The floating gates are charged by avalanche injection of hot electrodes through gate oxide, and discharged by avalanche injection of hot holes through gate oxide. Three extra diffusion and patterning steps are all that is required to convert a standard p channel MOS process into a nonvolatile memory process. For identification, this nonvolatile memory technology was given the descriptive acronym DIFMOS which stands for Dual Injector, Floating gate MOS.

  6. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J; Liu, Chi

    2014-10-21

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p < 0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p < 0.05) compared to EXG-SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise

  7. Mutations in the Voltage Sensors of Domains I and II of Nav1.5 that are Associated with Arrhythmias and Dilated Cardiomyopathy Generate Gating Pore Currents.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Adrien; Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Chahine, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Voltage gated sodium channels (Nav) are transmembrane proteins responsible for action potential initiation. Mutations mainly located in the voltage sensor domain (VSD) of Nav1.5, the cardiac sodium channel, have been associated with the development of arrhythmias combined with dilated cardiomyopathy. Gating pore currents have been observed with three unrelated mutations associated with similar clinical phenotypes. However, gating pores have never been associated with mutations outside the first domain of Nav1.5. The aim of this study was to explore the possibility that gating pore currents might be caused by the Nav1.5 R225P and R814W mutations (R3, S4 in DI and DII, respectively), which are associated with rhythm disturbances and dilated cardiomyopathy. Nav1.5 WT and mutant channels were transiently expressed in tsA201 cells. The biophysical properties of the alpha pore currents and the presence of gating pore currents were investigated using the patch-clamp technique. We confirmed the previously reported gain of function of the alpha pores of the mutant channels, which mainly consisted of increased window currents mostly caused by shifts in the voltage dependence of activation. We also observed gating pore currents associated with the R225P and R814W mutations. This novel permeation pathway was open under depolarized conditions and remained temporarily open at hyperpolarized potentials after depolarization periods. Gating pore currents could represent a molecular basis for the development of uncommon electrical abnormalities and changes in cardiac morphology. We propose that this biophysical defect be routinely evaluated in the case of Nav1.5 mutations on the VSD.

  8. Gate-Level Commercial Microelectronics Verification with Standard Cell Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    STANDARD CELL RECOGNITION THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate School of Engineering and Management ...Tools . . . . . . 24 3.2 Phase 2 Methodology - Software Tool Application to Elementary Gates . . 25 3.3 Phase 3 Methodology - Software Tool...Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 4.1.2 Phase 2 Results - Software Tool Application to Elementary Gates . 38 4.1.2.1 NAND2 Gate

  9. Field Programmable Gate Array Hysteresis Control of Parallel Connected Inverters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    voltage with respect to time FPGA Field Programmable Gate Array GIC Generalized Impedance Converter GTO Gate-Turn-Off Transistors HDL...C. Figure 12 SEMIKRON PEBB [After Ref 13] G. FIELD PROGRAMMABLE GATE ARRAYS An FPGA is a generic semiconductor device containing a large... generate reference voltage and current waves for each of the three phases. The time to complete one logical operation inside the FPGA is a function of how

  10. 100. Photocopied August 1978. COMPENSATING GATES, VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST, JULY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    100. Photocopied August 1978. COMPENSATING GATES, VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST, JULY 8, 1916. COMPLETED GATES 13-16 ARE AT THE LEFT. THE PIERS OF GATES 9-12 ARE ON THE RIGHT. SUPER-STRUCTURE ERECTION ON THESE PIERS HAD NOT YET BEGUN. JUST ABOVE THE COFFER DAM, THE BREAKWATER INSTALLED TO PROTECT THE CONSTRUCTION SITE FROM THE RIVER CURRENT CAN BE SEEN. (684) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  11. The Latest Information on Fort Detrick Gate Access Procedures | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    As of Jan. 5, all visitors to Fort Detrick are required to undergo a National Crime Information Center background check prior to entering base. The background checks are conducted at Old Farm Gate. The new access procedures may cause delays at all Fort Detrick gates, but especially at Old Farm Gate. Access requirements have not changed for employees and personnel with a federal/NIH PIV card. Other types of identification badges are no longer acceptable.

  12. Biophysics, pathophysiology, and pharmacology of ion channel gating pores

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Adrien; Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Chahine, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Voltage sensor domains (VSDs) are a feature of voltage gated ion channels (VGICs) and voltage sensitive proteins. They are composed of four transmembrane (TM) segments (S1–S4). Currents leaking through VSDs are called omega or gating pore currents. Gating pores are caused by mutations of the highly conserved positively charged amino acids in the S4 segment that disrupt interactions between the S4 segment and the gating charge transfer center (GCTC). The GCTC separates the intracellular and extracellular water crevices. The disruption of S4–GCTC interactions allows these crevices to communicate and create a fast activating and non-inactivating alternative cation-selective permeation pathway of low conductance, or a gating pore. Gating pore currents have recently been shown to cause periodic paralysis phenotypes. There is also increasing evidence that gating pores are linked to several other familial diseases. For example, gating pores in Nav1.5 and Kv7.2 channels may underlie mixed arrhythmias associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) phenotypes and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH), respectively. There is little evidence for the existence of gating pore blockers. Moreover, it is known that a number of toxins bind to the VSD of a specific domain of Na+ channels. These toxins may thus modulate gating pore currents. This focus on the VSD motif opens up a new area of research centered on developing molecules to treat a number of cell excitability disorders such as epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmias, and pain. The purpose of the present review is to summarize existing knowledge of the pathophysiology, biophysics, and pharmacology of gating pore currents and to serve as a guide for future studies aimed at improving our understanding of gating pores and their pathophysiological roles. PMID:24772081

  13. Non-rigid summing of gated PET via optical flow

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.J.; Reutter, B.W.; Huesman, R.H. |

    1996-12-31

    A method for summing together datasets from gated cardiac PET acquisitions is described. Optical flow techniques are used to accurately model non-rigid motion present during the cardiac cycle so that a one-to-one mapping is found between each voxel of two gated volumes. Using this mapping, image summing can take place, producing a composite dataset with improved statistics and reduced motion-induced blur. Results using a data from a gated cardiac study on a dog are presented.

  14. Charge Transport in Dual Gated Bilayer Graphene with Corbino Geometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    in a back-gated BLG device at finite gate fields, resulting in a doped semiconductor. If on the other hand the device is dual gated, the Fermi energy...30V. At this specific top gate voltage, the two peaks merge into one, indicating that the Fermi energies of the two regions match each 5 other...thank Amir Yacoby, Alberto F. Morpurgo, Shaffique Adam and Enrico Rossi for discussions. This work is supported by the U.S. ONR MURI, the NSF-UMD

  15. Delivery efficiency of an Elekta linac under gated operation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guoqiang; Housley, David J; Chen, Fan; Mehta, Vivek K; Shepard, David M

    2014-09-08

    In this study, we have characterized the efficiency of an Elekta linac in the delivery of gated radiotherapy. We have explored techniques to reduce the beam-on delay and to improve the delivery efficiency, and have investigated the impact of frequent beam interruptions on the dosimetric accuracy of gated deliveries. A newly available gating interface was installed on an Elekta Synergy. Gating signals were generated using a surface mapping system in conjunction with a respiratory motion phantom. A series of gated deliveries were performed using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans previously generated for lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy. Baseline values were determined for the delivery times. The machine was then tuned in an effort to minimize beam-on delays and improve delivery efficiency. After that process was completed, the dosimetric accuracy of the gated deliveries was evaluated by comparing the measured and the planned coronal dose distributions using gamma index analyses. Comparison of the gated and the non-gated deliveries were also performed. The results demonstrated that, with the optimal machine settings, the average beam-on delay was reduced to less than 0.22 s. High dosimetric accuracy was demonstrated with gamma index passing rates no lower than 99.0% for all tests (3%/3 mm criteria). Consequently, Elekta linacs can provide a practical solution for gated VMAT treatments with high dosimetric accuracy and only a moderate increase in the overall delivery time.

  16. Stacked-Gate FET's For Analog Memory Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Anilkumar P.; Moopenn, Alexander W.

    1991-01-01

    Three-terminal, double-stacked-gate field-effect transistor (FET), developed as analog memory element. Particularly suited for use as synapse with variable connection strength in electronic neural network. Provides programmable, nonvolatile resistive connection, somewhat in manner of porous-gate FET described in "Porous-Floating-Gate Field-Effect Transistor" (NPO-17532). Resembles commercial erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM) device, except for thickness of layers of silicon dioxide electrically isolating gates. Either p-channel or n-channel device.

  17. Geometric quantum gates that are robust against stochastic control errors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Shiliang; Zanardi, Paolo

    2005-08-15

    The realistic application of geometric quantum computation is crucially dependent on an unproved robustness conjecture, claiming that geometric quantum gates are more resilient against random noise than dynamic gates. We propose a suitable model that allows a direct and fair comparison between geometrical and dynamical operations. In the presence of stochastic control errors we find that the maximum of gate fidelity corresponds to quantum gates with a vanishing dynamical phase. This is a clear evidence for the robustness of nonadiabatic geometric quantum computation. The predictions here presented can be experimentally tested in almost all of the already existing quantum computer candidates.

  18. Stochastically gated local and occupation times of a Brownian particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2017-01-01

    We generalize the Feynman-Kac formula to analyze the local and occupation times of a Brownian particle moving in a stochastically gated one-dimensional domain. (i) The gated local time is defined as the amount of time spent by the particle in the neighborhood of a point in space where there is some target that only receives resources from (or detects) the particle when the gate is open; the target does not interfere with the motion of the Brownian particle. (ii) The gated occupation time is defined as the amount of time spent by the particle in the positive half of the real line, given that it can only cross the origin when a gate placed at the origin is open; in the closed state the particle is reflected. In both scenarios, the gate randomly switches between the open and closed states according to a two-state Markov process. We derive a stochastic, backward Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) for the moment-generating function of the two types of gated Brownian functional, given a particular realization of the stochastic gate, and analyze the resulting stochastic FPE using a moments method recently developed for diffusion processes in randomly switching environments. In particular, we obtain dynamical equations for the moment-generating function, averaged with respect to realizations of the stochastic gate.

  19. A floating gate MOSFET dosimeter requiring no external bias supply

    SciTech Connect

    Tarr, N.G.; Mackay, G.F.; Thomson, I.; Shortt, K.

    1998-06-01

    MOSFET dosimeters incorporating an electrically floating polysilicon gate have been fabricated in a commercial CMOS technology. Charge is placed on the floating gate by tunneling from a small overlapping injector gate. Subsequent irradiation partially discharges the floating gate, producing a change in threshold voltage which can be used to infer the absorbed dose. No external power source is required during this sensing period. Sensitivities up to 70 mVGy{sup {minus}1} (0.7 mV/rad) have been obtained for temperature-compensated matched-pair dosimeters under {sup 60}Co gamma irradiation.

  20. Speed control system for an access gate

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M [Knoxville, TN

    2012-03-20

    An access control apparatus for an access gate. The access gate typically has a rotator that is configured to rotate around a rotator axis at a first variable speed in a forward direction. The access control apparatus may include a transmission that typically has an input element that is operatively connected to the rotator. The input element is generally configured to rotate at an input speed that is proportional to the first variable speed. The transmission typically also has an output element that has an output speed that is higher than the input speed. The input element and the output element may rotate around a common transmission axis. A retardation mechanism may be employed. The retardation mechanism is typically configured to rotate around a retardation mechanism axis. Generally the retardation mechanism is operatively connected to the output element of the transmission and is configured to retard motion of the access gate in the forward direction when the first variable speed is above a control-limit speed. In many embodiments the transmission axis and the retardation mechanism axis are substantially co-axial. Some embodiments include a freewheel/catch mechanism that has an input connection that is operatively connected to the rotator. The input connection may be configured to engage an output connection when the rotator is rotated at the first variable speed in a forward direction and configured for substantially unrestricted rotation when the rotator is rotated in a reverse direction opposite the forward direction. The input element of the transmission is typically operatively connected to the output connection of the freewheel/catch mechanism.