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Sample records for routine patient survey

  1. Real-Time Patient Survey Data During Routine Clinical Activities for Rapid-Cycle Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Background Surveying patients is increasingly important for evaluating and improving health care delivery, but practical survey strategies during routine care activities have not been available. Objective We examined the feasibility of conducting routine patient surveys in a primary care clinic using commercially available technology (Web-based survey creation, deployment on tablet computers, cloud-based management of survey data) to expedite and enhance several steps in data collection and management for rapid quality improvement cycles. Methods We used a Web-based data management tool (survey creation, deployment on tablet computers, real-time data accumulation and display of survey results) to conduct four patient surveys during routine clinic sessions over a one-month period. Each survey consisted of three questions and focused on a specific patient care domain (dental care, waiting room experience, care access/continuity, Internet connectivity). Results Of the 727 available patients during clinic survey days, 316 patients (43.4%) attempted the survey, and 293 (40.3%) completed the survey. For the four 3-question surveys, the average time per survey was overall 40.4 seconds, with a range of 5.4 to 20.3 seconds for individual questions. Yes/No questions took less time than multiple choice questions (average 9.6 seconds versus 14.0). Average response time showed no clear pattern by order of questions or by proctor strategy, but monotonically increased with number of words in the question (<20 words, 21-30 words, >30 words)—8.0, 11.8, 16.8, seconds, respectively. Conclusions This technology-enabled data management system helped capture patient opinions, accelerate turnaround of survey data, with minimal impact on a busy primary care clinic. This new model of patient survey data management is feasible and sustainable in a busy office setting, supports and engages clinicians in the quality improvement process, and harmonizes with the vision of a learning health

  2. Factors Predisposing, Enabling and Reinforcing Routine Screening of Patients for Preventing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Survey of New Jersey Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Carole L.

    1991-01-01

    Survey of 58 physicians revealed that they did not routinely ask their pregnant patients about alcohol consumption for several reasons: physician bias resulting from own abuse, lack of training, poor awareness of problem and effects, denial that Fetal Alcohol Syndrome occurs in private practice, time limitations, disinterest, fear of offending…

  3. The routine collection of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for long-term conditions in primary care: a cohort survey

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Michele; Crocker, Helen; Jenkinson, Crispin; Doll, Helen; Fitzpatrick, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the feasibility of using patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for long-term conditions (LTCs) in primary care. Design A cohort postal survey conducted from September 2010 to April 2012. Setting Primary care practices (n=33) in London and the North-West of England. Participants 4484 patients with a diagnosis of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, epilepsy, heart failure or stroke were sent a survey at baseline. Main outcome The main outcome was to evaluate the feasibility of and the recruitment strategies for collecting PROMs data in LTCs by assessing the response rates for the baseline and follow-up surveys. Secondary outcomes were the evaluation of change scores of the EQ-5D index and visual analogue scale (VAS) between baseline and follow-up surveys. Results The baseline survey achieved a response rate of 38.4% (n=1721/4485) and at follow-up 71.5% (n=1136/1589). Response rates varied by LTC. Little change was found in health-related quality of life for the total sample (−0.001 for the EQ-5D index score and 0.12 for the EQ-5D VAS) between patients responding to both the baseline and follow-up surveys. Conclusions The response rate to the baseline survey was similar to that of other general practice surveys. Current UK policy aims to assess health service performance in LTCs by means of using PROMs. It thus would be desirable to improve response rates by making the invitation to self-reports of health-related quality of life more engaging for patients. Results on the EQ-5D score raise questions about optimal indicators for LTCs and appropriate timelines for assessment. PMID:24561495

  4. Survey of US Correctional Institutions for Routine HCV Testing

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Ann E.; Bazerman, Lauri; Solomon, Liza; Patry, Emily; Rich, Josiah D.; Kuo, Irene

    2015-01-01

    To ascertain HCV testing practices among US prisons and jails, we conducted a survey study in 2012, consisting of medical directors of all US state prisons and 40 of the largest US jails, that demonstrated a minority of US prisons and jails conduct routine HCV testing. Routine voluntary HCV testing in correctional facilities is urgently needed to increase diagnosis, enable risk-reduction counseling and preventive health care, and facilitate evaluation for antiviral treatment. PMID:25393180

  5. Drivers and Barriers to Acceptance of Web-Based Aftercare of Patients in Inpatient Routine Care: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Hennemann, Severin; Beutel, Manfred E

    2016-01-01

    Background Web-based aftercare can help to stabilize treatment effects and support transition after inpatient treatment, yet uptake by patients seems limited in routine care and little is known about the mechanisms of adoption and implementation. Objective The aim of this study was to (1) determine acceptance of Web-based aftercare and (2) explore its drivers and barriers in different subgroups of a mixed inpatient sample. Method In a cross-sectional design, 38.3% (374/977) of the inpatients from a broad spectrum of diagnostic groups (psychosomatic, cardiologic, orthopedic, pediatric, and substance-related disorders) filled out a self-administered questionnaire prior to discharge. Drivers and barriers to patients’ acceptance of Web-based aftercare were examined based on an extension to the “unified theory of acceptance and use of technology” (UTAUT). In total, 16.7% (59/353) of the participants indicated prior use of eHealth interventions. Results Acceptance (min 1, max 5) was low (mean 2.56, SD 1.22) and differed between diagnostic groups (Welch F4,133.10 =7.77, P<.001), with highest acceptance in adolescent patients (mean 3.46, SD 1.42). Acceptance was significantly predicted by 3 UTAUT predictors: social influence (beta=.39, P<.001), performance expectancy (beta=.31, P<.001), and effort expectancy (beta=.22, P<.001). Furthermore, stress due to permanent availability (beta=−.09, P=.01) was negatively associated with acceptance. Conclusion This study demonstrated a limited acceptance of Web-based aftercare in inpatients. Expectations, social environment’s attitude, and negative experience with permanent availability influence eHealth acceptance. Improving implementation, therefore, means increasing eHealth experience and literacy and facilitating positive attitudes in patients and health professionals through education and reduction of misconceptions about effectiveness or usability. PMID:28011445

  6. Oral anticoagulant therapy for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing ablation: results from the First European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA).

    PubMed

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Larsen, Torben B; Deharo, Jean Claude; Rossvoll, Ole; Dagres, Nikolaos; Todd, Derick; Pison, Laurent; Proclemer, Alessandro; Purefellner, Helmut; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-06-01

    The European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA) is a prospective, multicentre snapshot survey of patients undergoing atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, conducted to collect patient-based data on current clinical practices in AF ablation in context of the latest AF Guidelines and contemporary oral anticoagulant therapies. The EP Research Network Centres were asked to prospectively enrol consecutive patients during a 6-week period (September/October 2014). Data were collected via the web-based case report form. We present the results pertinent to the use of antithrombotic therapies. Thirteen countries prospectively enrolled 455 eligible consecutive patients [mean age 59 ± 10.8 years, 131 (28.8%) females]. The mean CHA2DS2-VASc score was 1.12 ± 1.06 [137 patients (30.1%) had a score of ≥2]. Before ablation, 443 patients (97.4%) were on anticoagulant therapy [143 (31.4%) on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and 264 (58.0%) on vitamin K antagonists (VKAs)]. Of the latter, 79.7% underwent ablation without VKA interruption, whilst a variety of strategies were used in patients taking NOAC. After ablation, most patients (89.3%) continued the same anticoagulant as before, and 2 (0.4%) were not prescribed any anticoagulation. At discharge, 280 patients (62.2%) were advised oral anticoagulation for a limited period of mean 3.8 ± 2.2 months. On multivariate analysis, CHA2DS2-VASc, AF duration, prior VKA use, and estimated AF ablation success were significantly associated with the decision on short-term anticoagulation. Our results show the increasing use of NOAC in patients undergoing AF ablation and emphasize the need for more information to guide the periprocedural use of both NOACs and VKAs in real-world setting.

  7. Routine functional assessment for hip fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Tonny J; Lauritsen, Jens M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Pre-fracture functional level has been shown to be a consistent predictor of rehabilitation outcomes in older hip fracture patients. We validated 4 overall pre-fracture functional level assessment instruments in patients aged 65 or more, used the prediction of outcome at 4 months post-fracture, and assessed cutoff values for decision making in treatment and rehabilitation. Patients and methods 165 consecutive patients with acute primary hip fracture were prospectively included in the study. Pre-fracture Barthel-20, Barthel-100, cumulated ambulation score, and new mobility score were scored immediately after admission. Outcome defined as mortality, residential status, and independent walking ability was assessed at 4 months. Results 3 of the assessment instruments, namely Barthel-20, Barthel-100, and new mobility score, correlated with outcome at 4 months post-fracture and were valid predictors. Thresholds were estimated. We found no evidence that Barthel-100, with its finer granularity, performs better than Barthel-20 as a predictor. Interpretation Our findings indicate that pre-fracture scores of Barthel-20 and new mobility score have predictive ability, and further investigation of usage for guidance of clinical and rehabilitation decisions concerning hip fracture patients is warranted. PMID:27329799

  8. A survey of the value of routine intimate examination and related practices in subfertile couples.

    PubMed

    Desai, A K; Jaiyesimi, R A K

    2007-11-01

    The practice of undertaking routine intimate examinations in the management of subfertile couples varies among clinicians. An anonymous self-administered mailed questionnaire survey was carried out to determine the current practices followed by clinicians and the rationale supporting their practice. In the absence of large comparative studies, this survey provides expert opinion regarding this practice. The questionnaire was mailed to the Fellows and members of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists in the Northern, Yorkshire, West Midlands and Wales regions in the UK. A total of 802 questionnaires were posted, of which 516 were returned, giving an overall response rate of 64%. The responses and comments varied. Some 62% of respondents would routinely perform a pelvic examination on all women presenting with subfertility; 23% would do so only in selected cases and 63% of the clinicians would perform a routine transvaginal ultrasound. The male partners are examined by only 19% of the clinicians. A total of 83% of the respondents were of the opinion that the survey made them think about the role and justification of intimate examinations in greater detail. The practice of intimate examination of subfertile couples varies among clinicians in the survey group. There is a need for large prospective comparative studies to study the value of this examination and related practices in the management of subfertile couples. In the absence of comparative trials, this survey provides expert opinion. It may be suggested that an intimate examination should not be carried out routinely in all subfertile couples. It could be done when it has potential to add value to the management of the patient. A pragmatic approach should be adopted in every clinical situation.

  9. Seeking, Delaying and Avoiding Routine Health Care Services: Patient Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Green, Carla A.; Johnson, Kim M.; Yarborough, Bobbi Jo H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To explore/identify patient perspectives regarding seeking, delaying, and avoiding health care services, particularly barriers and facilitators. Design Face-to-face interviews with health plan survey respondents. Setting An integrated health plan providing comprehensive care to 480,000 people in Oregon and Washington. Participants Willing respondents randomly selected to maximize heterogeneity within the following strata: gender, health care utilization, and self-reported alcohol consumption (indicator of health practices). Participants were 75 men and 75 women (150 total), 21–64 years old, with ≥12 months of health plan membership. Method Participants were recruited by letter (52.5% agreed). Data collection stopped when planned interviews were completed; saturation (the point at which additional interviews were not producing novel information) was achieved for key study questions. Semi-structured interviews were recorded, transcribed, and coded. Reviews of codes related to care seeking and feelings/attitudes about providers produced common themes. Results Facilitators of care seeking included welcoming staff, collaborative relationships with providers, and education about the value of preventive care. Barriers included costs, time needed for appointments, and cumbersome processes. Some participants delayed procedures, some avoided care until absolutely necessary, others framed care as routinely necessary. Conclusion Increasing comfort, improving appointment and visit-related processes, having positive patient-physician relationships, and enhancing communication and clinician-provided education may facilitate appropriate use of preventive services. Further research is needed with larger, representative, samples to evaluate findings. PMID:23971522

  10. Physicians slow to e-mail routinely with patients.

    PubMed

    Boukus, Ellyn R; Grossman, Joy M; O'Malley, Ann S

    2010-10-01

    Some experts view e-mail between physicians and patients as a potential tool to improve physician-patient communication and, ultimately, patient care. Despite indications that many patients want to e-mail their physicians, physician adoption and use of e-mail with patients remains uncommon--only 6.7 percent of office-based physicians routinely e-mailed patients in 2008, according to a new national study from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Overall, about one-third of office-based physicians reported that information technology (IT) was available in their practice for e-mailing patients about clinical issues. Of those, fewer than one in five reported using e-mail with patients routinely; the remaining physicians were roughly evenly split between occasional users and non-users. Physicians in practices with access to electronic medical records and those working in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) or medical school settings were more likely to adopt and use e-mail to communicate with patients compared with other physicians. However, even among the highest users--physicians in group/staff-model HMOs--only 50.6 percent reported routinely e-mailing patients.

  11. Dissociations in routine behaviour across patients and everyday tasks.

    PubMed

    Forde, Emer M E; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2002-01-01

    We present a single case study of a patient, FK, who was severely impaired on routine, everyday tasks, such as preparing a cup of tea. We used the action coding system developed by Schwartz et al. to provide quantitative and qualitative measures of his performance in a number of experimental manipulations. In section A, we established FK's baseline performance on a range of tasks with (a) task-congruent objects only and (b) task-congruent objects and semantic distracters. In section B, we aimed to facilitate FK's performance by (a) giving him a pictorial representation of the goal, (b) giving him a set of written commands to follow, (c) giving him one command at a time, (d) demonstrating how the task should be performed and (e) dividing the task into smaller subgoals. We compared FK's performance with another patient, HG, to establish if there are qualitative differences between patients with 'action disorganization syndrome'. In section C, we aimed to hinder FK's performance by interrupting his execution of routine tasks. By comparing the factors that facilitated and impaired FK's performance in sections B and C, we hoped to isolate the key cognitive processes required to generate and control routine behaviour. In section D, we investigated how task demands impact on our ability to complete different everyday activities. The results of these experiments have important clinical implications for rehabilitation programmes for patients with action disorganization syndrome and can also help to distinguish between contemporary theoretical accounts of routine behaviour. In particular, we propose that patients who can be classified under the umbrella term of 'action disorganization syndrome' do not all have a reduction to 'non-specific cognitive resources' but can have qualitatively different impairments to a specialized action production system.

  12. A Minority of Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Routinely Downloads and Retrospectively Reviews Device Data

    PubMed Central

    Neinstein, Aaron B.; Spindler, Matthew; Adi, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: In type 1 diabetes (T1D), periodic review of blood glucose and insulin dosing should be performed, but it is not known how often patients review these data on their own. We describe the proportion of patients with T1D who routinely downloaded and reviewed their data at home. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 155 adults and 185 caregivers of children with T1D at a single academic institution was performed. “Routine Downloaders” (downloaded four or more times in the past year) were also considered “Routine Reviewers” if they reviewed their data most of the time they downloaded from devices. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with being a Routine Reviewer. Results: Only 31% of adults and 56% of caregivers reported ever downloading data from one or more devices, whereas 20% and 40%, respectively, were considered Routine Downloaders. Only 12% of adults and 27% of caregivers were Routine Reviewers. Mean hemoglobin A1c was lower in Routine Reviewers compared with non-Routine Reviewers (7.2±1.0% vs. 8.1±1.6% [P=0.03] in adults and 7.8±1.4% vs. 8.6±1.7% [P=0.001] in children). In adjusted analysis of adults, the odds ratio of being a Routine Reviewer of one or more devices for every 10-year increase in age was 1.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.1, 2.1 [P=0.02]). For every 10 years since diabetes diagnosis, the odds ratio of being a Routine Reviewer was 1.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.2, 2.4 [P=0.01]). For caregivers, there were no statistically significant factors associated with being a Routine Reviewer. Conclusions: A minority of T1D patients routinely downloads and reviews data from their devices on their own. Further research is needed to understand obstacles, provide better education and tools for self-review, and determine if patient self-review is associated with improved glycemic control. PMID:26133226

  13. [Neuroimaging for patients with Alzheimer disease in routine practice].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    In routine practice neuroimaging has been applied as an adjunct technique for early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease in routine practice. Of the several neuroimaging modalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have been commonly used in Japan; further software programs are used to aid statistical analysis of the imaging results. For example voxel-based specific regional analysis system for Alzheimer disease (VSRAD) for MRI and easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS) are used for the analysis of MRI and SPECT. In the early stage of Alzheimer disease, specific findings of regional atrophy and perfusion reduction are observed in some areas. In the posterior cingulate gyrus precuneus and parietal cortex, perfusion reduction was more frequently observed than atrophy. On the other hand, in the medial temporal structures, perfusion reduction was less frequently observed than atrophy. Perfusion reduction in the the posterior cingulate gyrus precuneus and in the parietal cortex was more prominent in the case of patients with early-onset Alzheimer disease than in the case of patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease. Further, atrophy in the medial temporal structures was more prominent in the case of patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease than in the case of those with early-onset Alzheimer disease. These findings are helpful for differentiating of Alzheimer disease from other diseases characterized by dementia.

  14. Routine Imaging after Operatively Repaired Distal Radius and Scaphoid Fractures: A Survey of Hand Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Bohl, Daniel D.; Lese, Andrea B.; Patterson, Joseph T.; Grauer, Jonathan N.; Dodds, Seth D.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is currently no standard of care for imaging after hand and upper-extremity procedures, and current imaging practices have not been characterized. Questions/Purposes To characterize current imaging practices and to compare those practices to the best available evidence. Patients and Methods A survey was distributed to attending-level surgeons at a regional hand and upper-extremity surgery conference in the United States in 2013. 40 out of 75 surgeons completed the survey (53%). Results All results are presented for distal radius and scaphoid fractures, respectively. There was a high degree of variability between respondents in the number of radiographic series routinely ordered during follow-up of asymptomatic patients, with the number of series ranging from 1–6 and 1–6. On average, respondents did not order an excessive number of follow-up radiographs for asymptomatic patients, with means (± standard deviations) of 2.6 ± 1.0 and 3.3 ± 1.2 radiographic series. Radiographic series were taken at only 74% and 81% of postoperative visits with asymptomatic patients. Only 10% and 8% of respondents felt it was acceptable medical practice to save costs by ordering postoperative radiographs only when patients are symptomatic. Conclusions Among a sample of 40 fellowship-trained hand surgeons, these findings demonstrate a high degree of variability in number of radiographs obtained after operative repair of distal radius and scaphoid fractures. On average, respondents were relatively efficient with respect to total number of postoperative radiographs ordered. Level of Evidence Diagnostic study, level IV. PMID:25364636

  15. Different standards for healthy screenees than patients in routine clinics?

    PubMed

    Hoff, Geir

    2013-12-14

    Less than 5% of colorectal adenomas will become malignant, but we do not have sufficient knowledge about their natural course to target removal of these 5% only. Thus, 95% of polypectomies are a waste of time exposing patients to a small risk of complications. Recently, a new type of polyps, sessile serrated polyps, has attracted attention. Previously considered innocuous, they are now found to have molecular similarities to cancer and some guidelines recommend to have them removed. These lesions are often flat, covered by mucous, not easily seen and situated in the proximal colon where the bowel wall is thinner. Thus, polypectomy carries a higher risk of perforation than predominantly left-sided, stalked adenomas - and we do not know what is gained in terms of cancer prevention. Screening is a neat balance between harms and benefit for presumptively healthy participants not interested in risk exposure to obtain confirmation of being healthy. The situation is quite different for patient worried about symptom. Thus, the standards set for evidence-based practice may be higher for screening than for routine clinics - a mechanism which may benefit patients in the long run.

  16. A survey of paediatricians' practice and training in routine infant eye examination

    PubMed Central

    Rahi, J.; Lynn, R.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of a sample of UK paediatricians was carried out to identify the practices and determine the training of those involved in routine surveillance examinations to detect ophthalmic disorders in infants. The findings indicate important variation in current practices and raise concerns about both undergraduate and postgraduate training in ophthalmic assessment of infants.

 PMID:9623402

  17. Impact of Deep Brain Stimulation on Daily Routine Driving Practice in Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Buhmann, Carsten; Vettorazzi, Eik; Oehlwein, Christian; Rikkers, Fred; Poetter-Nerger, Monika; Gulberti, Alessandro; Gerloff, Christian; Moll, Christian K.; Hamel, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the influence of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on daily routine driving behavior in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Methods. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was done in 121 DBS-PD patients. The influences of patient characteristics and DBS on current driving and driving at time of surgery and the predictive value of the preoperative levodopa-test on postoperative driving were evaluated. Results. 50% of 110 driving-license holders currently drove. 63.0% rated themselves as safe drivers, 39.4% reported improvement, and 10.9% noted deterioration in driving after DBS surgery. Inactive drivers had quit driving mainly due to disease burden (90.9%). Active drivers were younger, more often males, and less impaired according to H&Y and MMSE, had surgery more recently, and reported more often overall benefit from DBS. H&Y “on” and UPDRS III “off” scores at time of surgery were lower in pre- and postoperative active than in inactive drivers. Tremor and akinesia were less frequent reasons to quit driving after than before DBS surgery. Postoperatively, 22.7% (10/44) of patients restarted and 10.6% (7/66) of patients discontinued driving, independently of H&Y stage. The preoperative levodopa-test was not predictive for the postoperative driving outcome. Conclusion. 50% of PD patients with DBS drive. DBS surgery changes daily routine driving behavior. PMID:26640738

  18. Oblique Chest Views as a Routine Part of Skeletal Surveys Performed for Possible Physical Abuse--Is This Practice Worthwhile?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Karen Kirhofer; Prince, Jeffrey S.; Nixon, G. William

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the utility of oblique chest views in the diagnosis of rib fractures when used as a routine part of the skeletal survey performed for possible physical abuse. Methods: Oblique chest views have been part of the routine skeletal survey protocol at Primary Children's Medical Center since October 2002. Dictated radiology reports…

  19. The case for routine HIV screening before IVF treatment: a survey of UK IVF centre policies.

    PubMed

    Marcus, S F; Avery, S M; Abusheikha, N; Marcus, N K; Brinsden, P R

    2000-08-01

    The case for routine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening of all couples seeking assisted reproductive treatment is so strong that it should be made obligatory for all couples entering IVF programmes to be given information about HIV transmission, and offered testing. In August 1999, questionnaires regarding routine HIV screening of couples seeking IVF treatment were sent to the medical directors of the 74 licensed assisted conception units in the UK. Of the 45 (60.8%) centres who responded, 19 (42.2%) routinely screen both partners for HIV antibodies, 25 (55.5%) do not screen and one centre selectively screens high-risk patients. There was no significant difference in the proportion of centres that routinely carried out screening with regards to the unit size: six out of 13 (46.2%) small units compared with 13/32 (40.6%) large units. In all, 17 centres (37.8%) rated HIV screening as essential, nine (20%) as desirable, 11 (24.4%) as not required, while eight (17. 8%) centres did not comment. Of the 19 centres that have a routine screening policy, 18 have management protocols in the event that the test is positive. Of these 18 centres, 12 adhere rigidly to the protocol, while five centres adhere to the protocol with few exceptions and the remaining one uses its protocol for guidance only. The main reasons for not employing routine HIV screening were: the lack of cost effectiveness, low prevalence of HIV infection in their population, necessity for and cost of counselling, uncertainty about the need for screening and potential delay to start of treatment.

  20. Evidence of dose saving in routine CT practice using iterative reconstruction derived from a national diagnostic reference level survey

    PubMed Central

    Hayton, A; Beveridge, T; Marks, P; Wallace, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence and significance of the use of iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on patient dose in CT in Australia. Methods: We examined survey data submitted to the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) National Diagnostic Reference Level Service (NDRLS) during 2013 and 2014. We compared median survey dose metrics with categorization by scan region and use of IR. Results: The use of IR results in a reduction in volume CT dose index of between 17% and 44% and a reduction in dose–length product of between 14% and 34% depending on the specific scan region. The reduction was highly significant (p < 0.001, Wilcoxon rank-sum test) for all six scan regions included in the NDRLS. Overall, 69% (806/1167) of surveys included in the analysis used IR. Conclusion: The use of IR in CT is achieving dose savings of 20–30% in routine practice in Australia. IR appears to be widely used by participants in the ARPANSA NDRLS with approximately 70% of surveys submitted employing this technique. Advances in knowledge: This study examines the impact of the use of IR on patient dose in CT on a national scale. PMID:26133224

  1. Medical treatment choices for patients affected by advanced NSCLC in routine clinical practice: results from the Italian observational "SUN" (Survey on the lUng cancer maNagement) study.

    PubMed

    Gridelli, Cesare; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Barni, Sandro; Crinò, Lucio; Caprioli, Alberto; Piazza, Elena; Lorusso, Vito; Barbera, Santi; Zilembo, Nicoletta; Gebbia, Vittorio; Adamo, Vincenzo; Pela, Riccardo; Marangolo, Maurizio; Morena, Raffaella; Filippelli, Gianfranco; Buscarino, Calogero; Alabiso, Oscar; Maione, Paolo; Venturino, Paola; De Marinis, Filippo

    2011-12-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer in the world today, in terms of both incidence and mortality. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for about 85% of all lung cancers, and the majority of people diagnosed with NSCLC have locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment algorithms have rapidly changed in the last 10 years because of the introduction of new chemotherapeutic and targeted agents in clinical practice. SUN is a 1-year longitudinal observational multicenter study that has consecutively enrolled patients affected by stage IIIB or IV NSCLC with the aim to describe the pattern of care and evolving approaches in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. 987 consecutive NSCLC patients were enrolled between January 2007 and March 2008 at the 74 participating centers throughout Italy and a 12-month follow-up was performed. Cyto-histological diagnosis was performed mainly by broncoscopy with only 24% by CT-scan guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy. 91.4% of the patients received a first-line medical treatment and 8.6% supportive care only. Median age of patients receiving first-line treatment was 66 years. First-line chemotherapy consisted of a single agent in 20% of patients and combination chemotherapy in 80%. The most frequently used chemotherapy regimens were cisplatin plus gemcitabine and carboplatin plus gemcitabine. Median survival of patients receiving first-line chemotherapy was 9.1 months. 32% percent of patients received a second-line treatment that consisted of chemotherapy in 71% of cases and erlotinib in 29%. Overall third-line treatment was given to 7.3% of patients. These results showed a pattern of care for advanced NSCLC that reflects the current clinical practice in Italy at the study time with a high adherence to the International guidelines by the Italian Oncologists.

  2. Preliminary Survey of Icing Conditions Measured During Routine Transcontinental Airline Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Porter J.

    1952-01-01

    Icing data collected on routine operations by four DC-4-type aircraft equipped with NACA pressure-type icing-rate meters are presented as preliminary information obtained from a statistical icing data program sponsored by the NACA with the cooperation of many airline companies and the United States Air Force. The program is continuing on a much greater scale to provide large quantities of data from many air routes in the United States and overseas. Areas not covered by established air routes are also being included in the survey. The four aircraft which collected the data presented in this report were operated by United Air Lines over a transcontinental route from January through May, 1951. An analysis of the pressure-type icing-rate meter was satisfactory for collecting statistical data during routine operations. Data obtained on routine flight icing encounters from.these four instrumented aircraft, although insufficient for a conclusive statistical analysis, provide a greater quantity and considerably more realistic information than that obtained from random research flights. A summary of statistical data will be published when the information obtained daring the 1951-52 icing season and that to be obtained during the 1952-53 season can be analyzed and assembled. The 1951-52 data already analyzed indicate that the quantity, quality, and range of icing information being provided by this expanded program should afford a sound basis for ice-protection-system design by defining the important meteorological parameters of the icing cloud.

  3. Review of systems, physical examination, and routine tests for case-finding in ambulatory patients.

    PubMed

    Boland, B J; Wollan, P C; Silverstein, M D

    1995-04-01

    The screening value of the comprehensive review of systems and the complete physical examination in detecting unsuspected diseases for which therapeutic interventions are initiated has not been formally studied in ambulatory patients. The medical records of 100 randomly selected adult patients who had an ambulatory general medical evaluation at the Mayo Clinic in 1990-1991 were surveyed to compare review of systems and physical examination with routine laboratory tests, chest radiography, and electrocardiography as case-finding maneuvers. The main outcome measure was the therapeutic yield of each case-finding maneuver, defined as the proportion of maneuvers leading to a new therapy for a new clinically important diagnosis. The utilization rate of routine tests in the 100 patients (mean age: 59 +/- 16 years; 58% women) was high, ranging from 77 to 98%. Overall, the case-finding maneuvers led to 36 unsuspected clinically important diagnoses and resulted in 25 new therapeutic interventions. Higher therapeutic yield was observed for review of systems (7%), physical examination (5%), and lipid screening (9.2%) than for chemistry group (2.2%), complete blood count (1.8%), thyroid tests (1.5%), urinalysis (1.1%), electrocardiography (0%), or chest radiography (0%). The number of therapeutic interventions was not associated with patient's age (P = 0.55), sex (P = 0.88), comorbidity (P = 0.30) or with the time interval since the last general medical evaluation (P = 0.12). Based on therapeutic yield, these data suggest that review of systems and physical examination are valuable case-finding maneuvers in the periodic medical evaluation of ambulatory patients.

  4. Need to improve routine HIV testing of U.S. Veterans in care: results of an Internet survey.

    PubMed

    Valdiserri, Ronald O; Nazi, Kim; McInnes, D Keith; Ross, David; Kinsinger, Linda

    2010-06-01

    Late diagnosis of HIV infection contributes to poor medical outcomes and helps sustain continued transmission of virus. Published evidence suggests that despite current public health recommendations, patients receiving care in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) system are not being routinely tested for HIV infection. Using a sample of computer-literate veterans, we conducted a survey of recent testing experiences. My HealtheVet (MHV) is a secure website allowing registered Veterans to access limited personal VHA health information. Using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Survey, an electronic questionnaire on "health screening" was conducted in late Fall/early winter 2008-2009. A random sample (4%) of MHV users were surveyed; approximately 17% completed the survey and responses ranged from 31,237 to 33,074. Only 9% of the respondents indicated that they had been offered a test for HIV in the last 12 months compared to 83% who had been offered cholesterol screening, 65% blood sugar screening and 19% who had been offered testing for Hepatitis C virus (HCV). Of those who had been offered HIV testing, 91% indicated that they'd had the test performed. Of note, the percentage of respondents who indicated that they would "very likely" accept a test, if offered, was similar for HIV (73%), HCV (79%), cholesterol (75%), and blood sugar (75%). Although these results cannot be generalized to all Veterans in care, they suggest that routine testing for HIV has not been taking place and support recent VHA policy changes to remove barriers to HIV testing.

  5. Routine feedback of test results to participants in clinic- and survey-based surveillance of HIV.

    PubMed

    Baggaley, Rachel; Johnson, Cheryl; Garcia Calleja, Jesus Maria; Sabin, Keith; Obermeyer, Carla; Taegtmeyer, Miriam; Zaba, Basia; El-Hayek, Carol; Singh, Jerome Amir

    2015-05-01

    Surveillance for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in low- and middle-income countries started in the 1980s. However, the questions of whether the results of HIV tests should be given to participants, and if so how, has still not been resolved. In the absence of effective treatment, it was considered acceptable to withhold results from HIV-positive participants. However, when antiretroviral treatment is available, some argue for beneficence - that it is the researcher's duty to return the test results to all those who provide samples for surveillance. The corollary is that only participants who wish to receive their test results would be eligible to participate in surveys. Others argue for autonomy - that to obtain a more representative result for the general population, surveys should not exclude participants who do not wish to receive their test results. This round table discussion takes a closer look at those two arguments. We believe that the global community should work towards routine feedback of HIV surveillance while ensuring that participants receive and understand their test results.

  6. Routine feedback of test results to participants in clinic- and survey-based surveillance of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Cheryl; Garcia Calleja, Jesus Maria; Sabin, Keith; Obermeyer, Carla; Taegtmeyer, Miriam; Zaba, Basia; El-Hayek, Carol; Singh, Jerome Amir

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Surveillance for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in low- and middle-income countries started in the 1980s. However, the questions of whether the results of HIV tests should be given to participants, and if so how, has still not been resolved. In the absence of effective treatment, it was considered acceptable to withhold results from HIV-positive participants. However, when antiretroviral treatment is available, some argue for beneficence – that it is the researcher’s duty to return the test results to all those who provide samples for surveillance. The corollary is that only participants who wish to receive their test results would be eligible to participate in surveys. Others argue for autonomy – that to obtain a more representative result for the general population, surveys should not exclude participants who do not wish to receive their test results. This round table discussion takes a closer look at those two arguments. We believe that the global community should work towards routine feedback of HIV surveillance while ensuring that participants receive and understand their test results. PMID:26229207

  7. Implementing rapid, robust, cost-effective, patient-centred, routine genetic testing in ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    George, Angela; Riddell, Daniel; Seal, Sheila; Talukdar, Sabrina; Mahamdallie, Shazia; Ruark, Elise; Cloke, Victoria; Slade, Ingrid; Kemp, Zoe; Gore, Martin; Strydom, Ann; Banerjee, Susana; Hanson, Helen; Rahman, Nazneen

    2016-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing have made genetic testing fast and affordable, but limitations of testing processes are impeding realisation of patient benefits. Ovarian cancer exemplifies the potential value of genetic testing and the shortcomings of current pathways to access testing. Approximately 15% of ovarian cancer patients have a germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation which has substantial implications for their personal management and that of their relatives. Unfortunately, in most countries, routine implementation of BRCA testing for ovarian cancer patients has been inconsistent and largely unsuccessful. We developed a rapid, robust, mainstream genetic testing pathway in which testing is undertaken by the trained cancer team with cascade testing to relatives performed by the genetics team. 207 women with ovarian cancer were offered testing through the mainstream pathway. All accepted. 33 (16%) had a BRCA mutation. The result informed management of 79% (121/154) women with active disease. Patient and clinician feedback was very positive. The pathway offers a 4-fold reduction in time and 13-fold reduction in resource requirement compared to the conventional testing pathway. The mainstream genetic testing pathway we present is effective, efficient and patient-centred. It can deliver rapid, robust, large-scale, cost-effective genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 and may serve as an exemplar for other genes and other diseases. PMID:27406733

  8. Agreement of treatment effects for mortality from routinely collected data and subsequent randomized trials: meta-epidemiological survey

    PubMed Central

    Hemkens, Lars G; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, Despina G

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess differences in estimated treatment effects for mortality between observational studies with routinely collected health data (RCD; that are published before trials are available) and subsequent evidence from randomized controlled trials on the same clinical question. Design Meta-epidemiological survey. Data sources PubMed searched up to November 2014. Methods Eligible RCD studies were published up to 2010 that used propensity scores to address confounding bias and reported comparative effects of interventions for mortality. The analysis included only RCD studies conducted before any trial was published on the same topic. The direction of treatment effects, confidence intervals, and effect sizes (odds ratios) were compared between RCD studies and randomized controlled trials. The relative odds ratio (that is, the summary odds ratio of trial(s) divided by the RCD study estimate) and the summary relative odds ratio were calculated across all pairs of RCD studies and trials. A summary relative odds ratio greater than one indicates that RCD studies gave more favorable mortality results. Results The evaluation included 16 eligible RCD studies, and 36 subsequent published randomized controlled trials investigating the same clinical questions (with 17 275 patients and 835 deaths). Trials were published a median of three years after the corresponding RCD study. For five (31%) of the 16 clinical questions, the direction of treatment effects differed between RCD studies and trials. Confidence intervals in nine (56%) RCD studies did not include the RCT effect estimate. Overall, RCD studies showed significantly more favorable mortality estimates by 31% than subsequent trials (summary relative odds ratio 1.31 (95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.65; I2=0%)). Conclusions Studies of routinely collected health data could give different answers from subsequent randomized controlled trials on the same clinical questions, and may substantially overestimate

  9. Quality-assurance results for routine water analysis in US Geological Survey laboratories, water year 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maloney, T.J.; Ludtke, A.S.; Krizman, T.L.

    1994-01-01

    The US. Geological Survey operates a quality- assurance program based on the analyses of reference samples for the National Water Quality Laboratory in Arvada, Colorado, and the Quality of Water Service Unit in Ocala, Florida. Reference samples containing selected inorganic, nutrient, and low ionic-strength constituents are prepared and disguised as routine samples. The program goal is to determine precision and bias for as many analytical methods offered by the participating laboratories as possible. The samples typically are submitted at a rate of approximately 5 percent of the annual environmental sample load for each constituent. The samples are distributed to the laboratories throughout the year. Analytical data for these reference samples reflect the quality of environmental sample data produced by the laboratories because the samples are processed in the same manner for all steps from sample login through data release. The results are stored permanently in the National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System. During water year 1991, 86 analytical procedures were evaluated at the National Water Quality Laboratory and 37 analytical procedures were evaluated at the Quality of Water Service Unit. An overall evaluation of the inorganic (major ion and trace metal) constituent data for water year 1991 indicated analytical imprecision in the National Water Quality Laboratory for 5 of 67 analytical procedures: aluminum (whole-water recoverable, atomic emission spectrometric, direct-current plasma); calcium (atomic emission spectrometric, direct); fluoride (ion-exchange chromatographic); iron (whole-water recoverable, atomic absorption spectrometric, direct); and sulfate (ion-exchange chromatographic). The results for 11 of 67 analytical procedures had positive or negative bias during water year 1991. Analytical imprecision was indicated in the determination of two of the five National Water Quality Laboratory nutrient constituents: orthophosphate as phosphorus and

  10. Development of quality indicators to evaluate the monitoring of SLE patients in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, M.; Tani, C.; Aringer, M.; Bombardieri, S.; Boumpas, D.; Cervera, R.; Doria, A.; Jayne, D.; Khamashta, M. A.; Kuhn, A.; Gordon, C.; Petri, M.; Schneider, M.; Shoenfeld, Y.; Smolen, J. S.; Talarico, R.; Tincani, A.; Ward, M. M.; Werth, V. P.; Carmona, L.

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients in routine clinical practice is mainly based on the experience of the treating physician. This carries the risk of unwanted variability. Variability may have an impact on the quality of care offered to SLE patients, thereby affecting outcomes. Recommendations represent systematically developed statements to help practitioners in reducing variability. However, major difficulties arise in the application of recommendations into clinical practice. In this respect, the use of quality indicators may raise the awareness among rheumatologists regarding potential deficiencies in services and improve the quality of health care. The aim of this study was to develop a set of quality indicators (QI) for SLE by translating into QIs the recently developed EULAR Recommendations for monitoring SLE patients in routine clinical practice and observational studies. Eleven QIs have been developed referring to the use of validated activity and damage indices in routine clinical practice, general evaluation of drug toxicity, evaluation of comorbidities, eye evaluation, laboratory assessment, evaluation of the presence of chronic viral infections, documentation of vaccination and of antibody testing at baseline. A disease specific set of quality assessment tools should help physicians deliver high quality of care across populations. Routine updates will be needed. PMID:21224016

  11. Lack of hygiene routines among patients and family members at patient hotels--a possible route for transmitting puerperal fever.

    PubMed

    Starlander, Gustaf; Lytsy, Birgitta; Melhus, Asa

    2010-07-01

    The use of patient hotels for ambulatory care of women with uncomplicated deliveries has become a routine in Sweden. This report describes a minor outbreak of a group A Streptococcus strain in 2 newly delivered mothers and their newborn babies at a patient hotel.

  12. Is Routine Thromboprophylaxis Needed in Korean Patients Undergoing Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Koh, In Jun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Man Soo; Jang, Sung Won; Kim, Chulkyu; In, Yong

    2016-03-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence and the natural course of venous thromboembolism (VTE) without thromboprophylaxis to ascertain whether routine thromboprophylaxis is necessary following unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) in Korean patients. The medical records and multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) imaging of the consecutive 77 UKAs in 70 patients were reviewed. In all patients, MDCTs were undertaken preoperatively and at 1-week after surgery, and VTE symptoms were evaluated. At postoperative 6-months, follow-up MDCTs were undertaken in all patients in whom VTEs were newly detected after surgery. VTE lesions were newly detected in 18 (26%) of the 70 patients. However, none of the patients complained of VTE-related symptoms and MDCT demonstrated that all VTEs were small and involved limited portion without lower leg edema or pleuroparenchymal complication. At the 6-month follow up MDCT, all types of VTEs were shown to be completely resolved, regardless of their location. All of the VTE lesions maintained an asymptomatic status for 6-month after surgery. VTE following UKA in Korean patients who do not receive thromboprophylaxis seems to occur frequently, but all of the VTEs are clinically insignificant and all VTEs are spontaneously regressed. Routine thromboprophylaxis or thrombolytic treatment in Korean patients undergoing UKA may not be necessary.

  13. Relationship of comorbid substance and alcohol use disorders to disability among patients in routine psychiatric practice.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Joshua; West, Joyce C; Rae, Donald S; Regier, Darrel A

    2006-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to present data on the relationship of mental and comorbid substance use disorders to work disability and functioning in routine psychiatric practice in the United States. Data were used from the 1997 and 1999 American Psychiatric Institute for Research and Education's Practice Research Network Study of Psychiatric Patients and Treatments, totaling 754 psychiatrists and 3,088 patients. Results found patients with comorbid substance use disorders had significantly higher rates of work disability. These findings highlight the critical need to address the disturbing lack of substance use treatment and rehabilitation services for this population.

  14. The significance of routine laboratory parameters in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Yasan, Hasan; Tüz, Mustafa; Yariktaş, Murat; Aynali, Giray; Tomruk, Onder; Akkuş, Omer

    2013-12-01

    There are several factors (viral infections, metabolic and ototoxic disorders etc.) accused for the development of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Some prognostic factors (late onset of treatment etc.) had been evaluated in the literature. There is no sufficient data on the effect of routine laboratory parameters on the development and/or prognosis of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of routine blood chemistry and hematological parameters on the development and prognosis of disease in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. One hundred and forty-seven patients with the diagnosis of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss followed up during the periods of 2000-2010 years were included in this study. One hundred and three septoplasty patients with no otologic complaints were enrolled as control group. Following the clinical and demographic evaluations, patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss and control groups, and patients treated successfully and patients with poor outcome were compared with each other. Data were analyzed by T test. All hematological and biochemical parameters were compared. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, white blood cell count, total and direct bilirubin, fasting blood glucose level and aspartate aminotransferase were significantly different between idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss and control groups. There was no significantly different parameter between patients treated successfully and patients with poor outcome. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, white blood cell count, total and direct bilirubin, fasting blood glucose level and AST all can be risk factors for SHL, or they can be the result of undetermined pathology, because these parameters have no effect on the prognosis. Other routine parameters seem to have no effect on the development and/or prognosis of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

  15. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  16. Usefulness of Routine Periodic Fasting to Lower Risk of Coronary Artery Disease among Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Benjamin D.; May, Heidi T.; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Kfoury, Abdallah G.; Bailey, Beau M.; McClure, Brian S.; Renlund, Dale G.; Lappé, Donald L.; Carlquist, John F.; Fisher, Patrick W.; Pearson, Robert R.; Bair, Tami L.; Adams, Ted D.; Muhlestein, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is common and multi-factorial. Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS, or Mormons) in Utah may have lower cardiac mortality than other Utahns and the US population. While the LDS proscription of smoking likely contributes to lower cardiac risk, it is unknown whether other shared behaviors also contribute. This study evaluated potential CAD-associated effects of fasting. Patients (N1=4,629) enrolled in the Intermountain Heart Collaborative Study registry (1994-2002) were evaluated for association of religious preference with CAD diagnosis (≥70% coronary stenosis on angiography) or no CAD (normal coronaries, <10% stenosis). Consequently, another set of patients (N2=448) were surveyed (2004-2006) for association of behavioral factors with CAD, with the primary variable being routine fasting (i.e., abstinence from food and drink). Secondary survey measures included proscription of alcohol, tea, and coffee, social support, and religious worship patterns. In population 1 (initial), 61% of LDS and 66% of all others had CAD (adjusted [including for smoking]: odds ratio [OR]=0.81; p=0.009). In population 2 (survey), fasting was associated with lower risk of CAD (64% vs. 76% CAD; OR=0.55, CI=0.35, 0.87; p=0.010) and this remained after adjustment for traditional risk factors (OR=0.46, CI=0.27, 0.81; p=0.007). Fasting was also associated with lower diabetes prevalence (p=0.048). In regression models entering other secondary behavioral measures, fasting remained significant with similar effect size. In conclusion, not only proscription of tobacco, but also routine periodic fasting was associated with lower risk of CAD. PMID:18805103

  17. Usefulness of routine periodic fasting to lower risk of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Horne, Benjamin D; May, Heidi T; Anderson, Jeffrey L; Kfoury, Abdallah G; Bailey, Beau M; McClure, Brian S; Renlund, Dale G; Lappé, Donald L; Carlquist, John F; Fisher, Patrick W; Pearson, Robert R; Bair, Tami L; Adams, Ted D; Muhlestein, Joseph B

    2008-10-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is common and multifactorial. Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS, or Mormons) in Utah may have lower cardiac mortality than other Utahns and the US population. Although the LDS proscription of smoking likely contributes to lower cardiac risk, it is unknown whether other shared behaviors also contribute. This study evaluated potential CAD-associated effects of fasting. Patients (n(1) = 4,629) enrolled in the Intermountain Heart Collaborative Study registry (1994 to 2002) were evaluated for the association of religious preference with CAD diagnosis (> or = 70% coronary stenosis using angiography) or no CAD (normal coronaries, <10% stenosis). Consequently, another set of patients (n(2) = 448) were surveyed (2004 to 2006) for the association of behavioral factors with CAD, with routine fasting (i.e., abstinence from food and drink) as the primary variable. Secondary survey measures included proscription of alcohol, tea, and coffee; social support; and religious worship patterns. In population 1 (initial), 61% of LDS and 66% of all others had CAD (adjusted [including for smoking] odds ratio [OR] 0.81, p = 0.009). In population 2 (survey), fasting was associated with lower risk of CAD (64% vs 76% CAD; OR 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.35 to 0.87, p = 0.010), and this remained after adjustment for traditional risk factors (OR 0.46, 95% confidence interval 0.27 to 0.81, p = 0.007). Fasting was also associated with lower diabetes prevalence (p = 0.048). In regression models entering other secondary behavioral measures, fasting remained significant with a similar effect size. In conclusion, not only proscription of tobacco, but also routine periodic fasting was associated with lower risk of CAD.

  18. The significance of routine biochemical markers in patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Peng, You-Fan; Xiang, Yang; Wei, Ye-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study is to examine the levels of routine biochemical markers in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and combine multiple biochemical parameters to assess the discriminative power for patients with MDD. We used the Hamilton Depression (HAMD) score to evaluate the severity of depressive symptoms in 228 patients with MDD. The phase of depression severity was between moderate and severe in MDD patients. There were significant differences between MDD patients and healthy controls in alanine transaminase (ALT), urea nitrogen (UN), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), uric acid (UA), total protein (TP), total bile acid (TBA), creatinine (Cr), total bilirubin (Tbil), direct bilirubin (Dbil) and indirect bilirubin (Ibil), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), fasting blood-glucose (FBG) and fructosamine (SF). Multivariate analysis showed that UN, FBG, HDL-C, SF, TP, Cr and Tbil remained independently association with MDD. Further, a logit equation was established to identify patients with MDD. The composite markers exhibited an area under the curve of 0.810 with cut-off values of 0.410. Our results suggest the associations between UN, FBG, HDL-C, TP, Cr, Tbil, SF and MDD, use of these routine biochemical markers in combination may contribute to improve the complete management for patients with MDD. PMID:27683078

  19. Need for routine delayed radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging in patients with intercurrent disease

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Nelp, W.B.; Rudd, T.G.

    1984-06-01

    A retrospective review was made of all radionuclide hepatobiliary studies performed in a major trauma center over a 27-month period and correlated with the patients' clinical course. In a population of 42 patients (27 of whom were on total parenteral nutrition (TPN)) who had severe intercurrent illness (primarily trauma), and an additional 18 patients who had hepatocellular dysfunction, hepatobiliary imaging confirmed a patent cystic duct in 43 of 60 patients (72%). Of 17 patients who had nonvisualization of the gallbladder, four had surgically proved acute cholecystitis. The presence of gallstones, wall thickening, or sludge on sonograms did not correlate with cystic duct patency, and was not specific for acute cholecystitis. Though gallbladder function is compromised in the population with severe intercurrent disease, radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging is still valuable; it can confirm a patent systic duct in at least 72% of patients if routine imaging is continued for up to 24 hours.

  20. Routine Vaccination Coverage in Northern Nigeria: Results from 40 District-Level Cluster Surveys, 2014-2015

    PubMed Central

    Ogbuanu, Ikechukwu U.; Adegoke, Oluwasegun J.; Scobie, Heather M.; Uba, Belinda V.; Wannemuehler, Kathleen A.; Ruiz, Alicia; Elmousaad, Hashim; Ohuabunwo, Chima J.; Mustafa, Mahmud; Nguku, Patrick; Waziri, Ndadilnasiya Endie; Vertefeuille, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite recent success towards controlling poliovirus transmission, Nigeria has struggled to achieve uniformly high routine vaccination coverage. A lack of reliable vaccination coverage data at the operational level makes it challenging to target program improvement. To reliably estimate vaccination coverage, we conducted district-level vaccine coverage surveys using a pre-existing infrastructure of polio technical staff in northern Nigeria. Methods Household-level cluster surveys were conducted in 40 polio high risk districts of Nigeria during 2014–2015. Global positioning system technology and intensive supervision by a pool of qualified technical staff were used to ensure high survey quality. Vaccination status of children aged 12–23 months was documented based on vaccination card or caretaker’s recall. District-level coverage estimates were calculated using survey methods. Results Data from 7,815 children across 40 districts were analyzed. District-level coverage with the third dose of diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus vaccine (DPT3) ranged widely from 1–63%, with all districts having DPT3 coverage below the target of 80%. Median coverage across all districts for each of eight vaccine doses (1 Bacille Calmette-Guérin dose, 3 DPT doses, 3 oral poliovirus vaccine doses, and 1 measles vaccine dose) was <50%. DPT3 coverage by survey was substantially lower (range: 28%–139%) than the 2013 administrative coverage reported among children aged <12 months. Common reported reasons for non-vaccination included lack of knowledge about vaccines and vaccination services (50%) and factors related to access to routine immunization services (15%). Conclusions Survey results highlighted vaccine coverage gaps that were systematically underestimated by administrative reporting across 40 polio high risk districts in northern Nigeria. Given the limitations of administrative coverage data, our approach to conducting quality district-level coverage surveys and

  1. Is social inequality related to different patient concerns in routine oral cancer follow-up clinics?

    PubMed

    Allen, Sarah; Lowe, Derek; Harris, Rebecca V; Brown, Steve; Rogers, Simon N

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancer has a higher incidence in the lower social strata, and these patients are less likely to engage in supportive interventions and report a poorer quality of life (QoL). The aim of this paper is to compare the Patient Concerns Inventory (PCI) responses across social groups attending routine oral cancer follow-up clinics with particular focus on the deprivation lower quartile. The PCI package is completed by patients as part of their routine review consultation with SNR. Patients were those diagnosed between 2008 and 2012. Deprivation was stratified using the IMD 2010 from postcode. Of the 106 eligible patients, 85 % used the PCI. Just over half (54 %) were living in the most deprived quartile, with two-thirds (68 %) of males in the most deprived quartile, compared with 35 % of females (p = 0.004). In regard to number and type of PCI items selected by patients at their first PCI clinic, there were no notable differences in respect of IMD classification. The two commonest concerns were fear of recurrence (43 %) and sore mouth (43 %). The most deprived quartile reported significant problems in regard to mood (p = 0.004) and recreation (p = 0.02), and a non-significant trend (36 vs 18 %, p = 0.09) in stating their overall QoL as being less than good. It is possible to identify the concerns of patients from lower socioeconomic strata as part of routine follow-up clinics. This allows for targeted multi-professional intervention and supports to improve the outcome in this hard to reach group.

  2. An Effective Machine Learning Approach for Prognosis of Paraquat Poisoning Patients Using Blood Routine Indexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiling; Hu, Lufeng; Li, Huaizhong; Hong, Guangliang; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Jianshe; Lu, Zhongqiu

    2017-01-01

    The early identification of toxic paraquat (PQ) poisoning in patients is critical to ensure timely and accurate prognosis. Although plasma PQ concentration has been reported as a clinical indicator of PQ poisoning, it is not commonly applied in practice due to the inconvenient necessary instruments and operation. In this study, we explored the use of blood routine indexes to identify the degree of PQ toxicity and/or diagnose PQ poisoning in patients via machine learning approach. Specifically, we developed a method based on support vector machine combined with the feature selection technique to accurately predict PQ poisoning risk status, then tested the method on 79 (42 male and 37 female; 41 living and 38 deceased) patients. The detection method was rigorously evaluated against a real-world data set to determine its accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Feature selection was also applied to identify the factors correlated with risk status, and the results showed that there are significant differences in blood routine indexes between dead and living PQ-poisoned individuals (p-value < 0.01). Feature selection also showed that the most important correlated indexes are white blood cell and neutrophils. In conclusion, the toxicity or prognosis of PQ poisoning can be preliminarily ascertained by blood routine testing without PQ concentration data, representing an additional tool and innovative approach to assess the prognosis of PQ poisoning.

  3. Is routine ultrasound examination of the gallbladder justified in critical care patients?

    PubMed

    Myrianthefs, Pavlos; Evodia, Efimia; Vlachou, Ioanna; Petrocheilou, Glykeria; Gavala, Alexandra; Pappa, Maria; Baltopoulos, George; Karakitsos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Objective. We evaluated whether routine ultrasound examination may illustrate gallbladder abnormalities, including acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) in the intensive care unit (ICU). Patients and Methods. Ultrasound monitoring of the GB was performed by two blinded radiologists in mechanically ventilated patients irrespective of clinical and laboratory findings. We evaluated major (gallbladder wall thickening and edema, sonographic Murphy's sign, pericholecystic fluid) and minor (gallbladder distention and sludge) ultrasound criteria. Measurements and Results. We included 53 patients (42 males; mean age 57.6 ± 2.8 years; APACHE II score 21.3 ± 0.9; mean ICU stay 35.9 ± 4.8 days). Twenty-five patients (47.2%) exhibited at least one abnormal imaging finding, while only six out of them had hepatic dysfunction. No correlation existed between liver biochemistry and ultrasound results in the total population. Three male patients (5.7%), on the grounds of unexplained sepsis, were diagnosed with AAC as incited by ultrasound, and surgical intervention was lifesaving. Patients who exhibited ≥2 ultrasound findings (30.2%) were managed successfully under the guidance of evolving ultrasound, clinical, and laboratory findings. Conclusions. Ultrasound gallbladder monitoring guided lifesaving surgical treatment in 3 cases of AAC; however, its routine application is questionable and still entails high levels of clinical suspicion.

  4. Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: results from the first European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA) Part II.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Dagres, Nikolaos; Hocini, Melece; Fauchier, Laurent; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Defaye, Pascal; Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio; Estner, Heidi; Sciaraffia, Elena; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-11-01

    The European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA) is a prospective, multicentre snapshot survey collecting patient-based data on current clinical practices during atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. The participating centres were asked to prospectively enrol consecutive patients during a 6-week period (from September to October 2014). A web-based case report form was employed to collect information of patients and data of procedures. A total of 455 eligible consecutive patients from 13 countries were enrolled (mean age 59 ± 10.8 years, 28.8% women). Distinct strategies and endpoints were collected for AF ablation procedures. Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) was performed in 96.7% and served as the endpoint in 91.3% of procedures. A total of 52 (11.5%) patients underwent ablation as first-line therapy. The cryoballoon technique was employed in 31.4% of procedures. Procedure, ablation, and fluoroscopy times differed among various types of AF ablation. Divergences in patient selection and complications were observed among low-, medium-, and high-volume centres. Adverse events were observed in 4.6% of AF ablation procedures. In conclusion, PVI was still the main strategy for AF ablation. Procedure-related complications seemed not to have declined. The centre volume played an important role in patient selection, strategy choice, and had impact on the rate of periprocedural complication.

  5. Barium swallow study in routine clinical practice: a prospective study in patients with chronic cough*,**

    PubMed Central

    Nin, Carlos Shuler; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Paludo, Artur de Oliveira; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Hochhegger, Daniela Reis; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the routine use of barium swallow study in patients with chronic cough. METHODS: Between October of 2011 and March of 2012, 95 consecutive patients submitted to chest X-ray due to chronic cough (duration > 8 weeks) were included in the study. For study purposes, additional images were obtained immediately after the oral administration of 5 mL of a 5% barium sulfate suspension. Two radiologists systematically evaluated all of the images in order to identify any pathological changes. Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test for categorical data were used in the comparisons. RESULTS: The images taken immediately after barium swallow revealed significant pathological conditions that were potentially related to chronic cough in 12 (12.6%) of the 95 patients. These conditions, which included diaphragmatic hiatal hernia, esophageal neoplasm, achalasia, esophageal diverticulum, and abnormal esophageal dilatation, were not detected on the images taken without contrast. After appropriate treatment, the symptoms disappeared in 11 (91.6%) of the patients, whereas the treatment was ineffective in 1 (8.4%). We observed no complications related to barium swallow, such as contrast aspiration. CONCLUSIONS: Barium swallow improved the detection of significant radiographic findings related to chronic cough in 11.5% of patients. These initial findings suggest that the routine use of barium swallow can significantly increase the sensitivity of chest X-rays in the detection of chronic cough-related etiologies. PMID:24473762

  6. Routine pelvic examinations: A descriptive cross-sectional survey of women's attitudes and beliefs after new guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kling, Juliana M; Vegunta, Suneela; Al-Badri, Mina; Faubion, Stephanie S; Fields, Heather E; Shah, Amit A; Wallace, Mark R; Ruddy, Barbara E; Bryan, Michael J; Temkit, M'hamed; MacLaughlin, Kathy L

    2017-01-01

    Routine pelvic examinations have been a fundamental part of the annual female examination. The 2014 American College of Physicians (ACP) guideline recommends against routine pelvic examinations in asymptomatic, nonpregnant, average-risk women. Our aim was to evaluate women's attitudes and beliefs about pelvic examinations and how knowledge of the new guidelines contributes to attitudes and beliefs. A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed using a self-administered written survey developed through literature review and pretested and revised on the basis of staff suggestions. Nonpregnant women age≥21years presenting to outpatient clinics at Mayo Clinic in Arizona or Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, received the survey. After being asked about pelvic examination practices and beliefs, participants were informed of the ACP guideline, to determine effect on attitudes and beliefs. Demographic characteristics and pertinent medical history questions were collected from participants. In total, 671 women who were predominantly white, married, and educated completed surveys. Participants described pelvic examinations as reassuring, and a majority believed the examinations were useful in detecting ovarian cancer (74.6%), necessary for screening for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (71.0%), or necessary before initiating contraception (67.0%). After reading the 2014 ACP guideline, significantly fewer women planned to continue yearly pelvic examinations (P<0.001). Despite evidence to the contrary, women believed pelvic examinations were necessary for STI screening, contraception initiation, and ovarian cancer detection. After education on the ACP screening guideline, fewer women planned to continue yearly pelvic examinations.

  7. Routine Urine Culture at the Time of Percutaneous Urinary Drainage: Does Every Patient Need One?

    SciTech Connect

    Brody, L.A. Brown, K.T.; Covey, A.M.; Brown, A.E.; Getrajdman, G.I.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. To determine the clinical variables associated with bacteriuria in patients undergoing primary percutaneous antegrade urinary drainage procedures in order to predict the utility of routinely obtaining urine cultures at the time of the procedure. Methods. Between October 1995 and March 1998 urine cultures were prospectively obtained in all patients undergoing a primary percutaneous antegrade urinary drainage procedure. One hundred and eighty-seven patients underwent 264 procedures. Results were available in 252 cases. Culture results were correlated with clinical, laboratory, and demographic variables. Anaerobic cultures were not uniformly performed. Results. Urine cultures were positive in 24 of 252 (9.5%) cases. An indwelling or recently removed ipsilateral device (catheter or stent) and a history of previous cystectomy with urinary diversion were significant predictors of a positive culture. Patients without either of these predictors, and without clinical or laboratory evidence of infection, were rarely found to have positive cultures. Conclusion. The likelihood of a positive urine culture can be predicted on the basis of the aforementioned clinical variables. In the absence of these clinical indicators routine urine cultures are neither useful nor cost-effective.

  8. How to routinely collect data on patient-reported outcome and experience measures in renal registries in Europe: an expert consensus meeting.

    PubMed

    Breckenridge, Kate; Bekker, Hillary L; Gibbons, Elizabeth; van der Veer, Sabine N; Abbott, Denise; Briançon, Serge; Cullen, Ron; Garneata, Liliana; Jager, Kitty J; Lønning, Kjersti; Metcalfe, Wendy; Morton, Rachael L; Murtagh, Fliss E M; Prutz, Karl; Robertson, Susan; Rychlik, Ivan; Schon, Steffan; Sharp, Linda; Speyer, Elodie; Tentori, Francesca; Caskey, Fergus J

    2015-10-01

    Despite the potential for patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) and experience measures (PREMs) to enhance understanding of patient experiences and outcomes they have not, to date, been widely incorporated into renal registry datasets. This report summarizes the main points learned from an ERA-EDTA QUEST-funded consensus meeting on how to routinely collect PROMs and PREMs in renal registries in Europe. In preparation for the meeting, we surveyed all European renal registries to establish current or planned efforts to collect PROMs/PREMs. A systematic review of the literature was performed. Publications reporting barriers and/or facilitators to PROMs/PREMs collection by registries were identified and a narrative synthesis undertaken. A group of renal registry representatives, PROMs/PREMs experts and patient representatives then met to (i) share any experience renal registries in Europe have in this area; (ii) establish how patient-reported data might be collected by understanding how registries currently collect routine data and how patient-reported data is collected in other settings; (iii) harmonize the future collection of patient-reported data by renal registries in Europe by agreeing upon preferred instruments and (iv) to identify the barriers to routine collection of patient-reported data in renal registries in Europe. In total, 23 of the 45 European renal registries responded to the survey. Two reported experience in collecting PROMs and three stated that they were actively exploring ways to do so. The systematic review identified 157 potentially relevant articles of which 9 met the inclusion criteria and were analysed for barriers and facilitators to routine PROM/PREM collection. Thirteen themes were identified and mapped to a three-stage framework around establishing the need, setting up and maintaining the routine collection of PROMs/PREMs. At the consensus meeting some PROMs instruments were agreed for routine renal registry collection (the generic SF

  9. How to routinely collect data on patient-reported outcome and experience measures in renal registries in Europe: an expert consensus meeting

    PubMed Central

    Breckenridge, Kate; Bekker, Hillary L.; Gibbons, Elizabeth; van der Veer, Sabine N.; Abbott, Denise; Briançon, Serge; Cullen, Ron; Garneata, Liliana; Jager, Kitty J.; Lønning, Kjersti; Metcalfe, Wendy; Morton, Rachael L.; Murtagh, Fliss E.M.; Prutz, Karl; Robertson, Susan; Rychlik, Ivan; Schon, Steffan; Sharp, Linda; Speyer, Elodie; Tentori, Francesca; Caskey, Fergus J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the potential for patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) and experience measures (PREMs) to enhance understanding of patient experiences and outcomes they have not, to date, been widely incorporated into renal registry datasets. This report summarizes the main points learned from an ERA-EDTA QUEST-funded consensus meeting on how to routinely collect PROMs and PREMs in renal registries in Europe. In preparation for the meeting, we surveyed all European renal registries to establish current or planned efforts to collect PROMs/PREMs. A systematic review of the literature was performed. Publications reporting barriers and/or facilitators to PROMs/PREMs collection by registries were identified and a narrative synthesis undertaken. A group of renal registry representatives, PROMs/PREMs experts and patient representatives then met to (i) share any experience renal registries in Europe have in this area; (ii) establish how patient-reported data might be collected by understanding how registries currently collect routine data and how patient-reported data is collected in other settings; (iii) harmonize the future collection of patient-reported data by renal registries in Europe by agreeing upon preferred instruments and (iv) to identify the barriers to routine collection of patient-reported data in renal registries in Europe. In total, 23 of the 45 European renal registries responded to the survey. Two reported experience in collecting PROMs and three stated that they were actively exploring ways to do so. The systematic review identified 157 potentially relevant articles of which 9 met the inclusion criteria and were analysed for barriers and facilitators to routine PROM/PREM collection. Thirteen themes were identified and mapped to a three-stage framework around establishing the need, setting up and maintaining the routine collection of PROMs/PREMs. At the consensus meeting some PROMs instruments were agreed for routine renal registry collection (the generic SF

  10. The need for routine delayed radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging in patients with intercurrent disease

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Nelp, W.B.; Rudd, T.G.

    1984-06-01

    A retrospective review was made of all radionuclide hepatobiliary studies performed in a major trauma center over a 27-month period and correlated with the patients' clinical course. In a population of 42 patients (27 of whom were on total parenteral nutrition (TPN)) who had severe intercurrent illness (primarily trauma), and an additional 18 patients who had hepatocellular dysfunction, hepatobiliary imaging confirmed a patent cystic duct in 43 of 60 patients (72%). Fourteen of these 43 patients (33%) had gallbladder visualization at later than one hour after radiotracer administration, and seven of these 14 required imaging from four to 24 hours. Of 17 patients who had nonvisualization of the gallbladder, four had surgically proved acute cholecystitis. Images of nine of the remaining 13 patients with gallbladder nonvisualization were not obtained for 24 hours. The presence of gallstones, wall thickening, or sludge on sonograms did not correlate with cystic duct patency, and was not specific for acute cholecystitis. Though gallbladder function is compromised in the population with severe intercurrent disease, radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging is still valuable; it can confirm a patent cystic duct in at least 72% of patients if routine imaging is continued for up to 24 hours.

  11. Implementation of routine foot check in patients with diabetes on hemodialysis: associations with outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Marn Pernat, Andreja; Peršič, Vanja; Usvyat, Len; Saunders, Lynn; Rogus, John; Maddux, Franklin W; Lacson, Eduardo; Kotanko, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with diabetes are at increased risk of foot ulcers, which may result in limb amputations. While regular foot care prevents ulcerations and amputation in those patients with diabetes not on dialysis, evidence is limited in diabetic hemodialysis patients. We investigated the association between the implementation of a routine foot check program in diabetic incident hemodialysis patients, and major lower limb amputations. Methods In 1/2008, monthly intradialytic foot checks were implemented as part of standard clinic care in all Fresenius Medical Care North America hemodialysis facilities. Patients with diabetes who initiated hemodialysis between 1/2004 and 12/2007 constituted the preimplementation cohort, and patients starting hemodialysis between 1/2008 and 12/2011 comprised the postimplementation cohort. In addition, we conducted a sensitivity analysis where we excluded patients from the clinics with <10 patients in the postimplementation period and where percent difference in patient with diabetes number between postimplementation and preimplementation period was <20%. We compared lower limb amputation rates employing Poisson regression models with offset of exposure time in these two cohorts. Results We studied 35 513 patients in the preimplementation and 25 779 patients in the postimplementation cohort. In the postimplementation cohort, amputation rate decreased by 17% (p=0.0034). The major lower limb amputation rate was 1.30 per 100 patient years in preimplementation and 1.07 in postimplementation cohort. These beneficial results were corroborated in the multivariate analysis (p=0.0175) and were even more pronounced in the sensitivity analysis (p=0.0083). Conclusion Monthly foot checks are associated with reduction of major lower limb amputations in diabetic incident hemodialysis patients. PMID:26958348

  12. Perioperative management of antithrombotic treatment during implantation or revision of cardiac implantable electronic devices: the European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines for Electronic Device Implantation (ESS-PREDI).

    PubMed

    Deharo, Jean-Claude; Sciaraffia, Elena; Leclercq, Christophe; Amara, Walid; Doering, Michael; Bongiorni, Maria G; Chen, Jian; Dagres, Nicolaus; Estner, Heidi; Larsen, Torben B; Johansen, Jens B; Potpara, Tatjana S; Proclemer, Alessandro; Pison, Laurent; Brunet, Caroline; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2016-05-01

    The European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines for Electronic Device Implantation (ESS-PREDI) was a prospective European survey of consecutive adults who had undergone implantation/surgical revision of a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) on chronic antithrombotic therapy (enrolment March-June 2015). The aim of the survey was to investigate perioperative treatment with oral anticoagulants and antiplatelets in CIED implantation or surgical revision and to determine the incidence of complications, including clinically significant pocket haematomas. Information on antithrombotic therapy before and after surgery and bleeding and thromboembolic complications occurring after the intervention was collected at first follow-up. The study population comprised 723 patients (66.7% men, 76.9% aged ≥66 years). Antithrombotic treatment was continued during surgery in 489 (67.6%) patients; 6 (0.8%) had their treatment definitively stopped; 46 (6.4%) were switched to another antithrombotic therapy. Heparin bridging was used in 55 out of 154 (35.8%) patients when interrupting vitamin K antagonist (VKA) treatment. Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant (NOAC) treatment was interrupted in 88.7% of patients, with heparin bridging in 25.6%, but accounted for only 25.3% of the oral anticoagulants used. A total of 108 complications were observed in 98 patients. No intracranial haemorrhage or embolic events were observed. Chronic NOAC treatment before surgery was associated with lower rates of minor pocket haematoma (1.4%; P= 0.042) vs. dual antiplatelet therapy (13.0%), VKA (11.4%), VKA + antiplatelet (9.2%), or NOAC + antiplatelet (7.7%). Similar results were observed for bleeding complications (P= 0.028). Perioperative management of patients undergoing CIED implantation/surgical revision while on chronic antithrombotic therapy varies, with evidence of a disparity between guideline recommendations and practice patterns in Europe. Haemorrhagic complications were significantly

  13. Microbiology of wildfire victims differs significantly from routine burns patients: data from an Australian wildfire disaster.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Norelle L; Padiglione, Alexander A; Spelman, Denis W; Cleland, Heather

    2013-03-01

    The catastrophic wildfires of February 2009 in Victoria, Australia killed 173 people and hospitalised 18 adults with burns. We conducted a case-control study of wildfire victims (WFVs) compared to routine burns patients to assess early differences in bacteriology. Demographic, outcome and bacteriology data (for the first 72 h) were prospectively collected on all 18 WFVs, and compared to those of 36 RBPs matched 2:1 for age, gender, burns severity (total body surface area ≥20%) and ICU admission. We found that WFVs had more positive cultures overall (10/18 [56%] vs 7/36 [19%], p=0.04), and we cultured more Gram negative bacteria from wounds (11/13 [85%] vs 3/12 [25%], p=0.005). Although WFVs were more likely to culture Enterobacteriaceae (5/18 vs 2/36) and Aeromonas spp. (3/18 vs 1/36), and less likely to culture Staphylococcus aureus (2/18 vs 6/36), these differences were not statistically significant. Given the predominance of Gram negative organisms cultured from WFVs, our routine burn wound prophylaxis (intravenous cephazolin) would have been inadequate in the WFV group. We suggest that an alternative regimen of oxacillin/nafcillin/flucloxacillin plus gentamicin (or a fluoroquinolone if renal impairment present) may be more appropriate for burn wound prophylaxis in this complex group of patients.

  14. Preliminary Astrometric Results from the PS1 Demo Month and Routine Survey Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    data.  The cadence optimizes sky coverage in  multiple survey colors ( SDSS  g­,r­,i­,z­,y‐bands) at the  expense of repeated visits to the same field...objects with other catalogs (USNO‐B1.0,  SDSS , Tycho‐2,  2MASS, etc.) so that unique star identification numbers can  be assigned across all catalogs. This

  15. A Clinical Evaluation of Routine Blood Sampling Practices in Patients With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pineau, Mitchel; Pynes, Mary Kate; Katz, Laurence B.; Ginsberg, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a perception that patients with diabetes struggle to produce sufficient blood to fill glucose test strips, including strips with 1-µL fill requirements. The purpose of this study was to determine the volume of blood expressed when these patients perform routine fingersticks using their own lancing device and sampling technique and to evaluate the relationship between blood volume and pain. Methods: Sixty-four patients (type 1 or type 2 diabetes) performed 8 fingersticks using their own lancing device and preferred depth setting and lancing technique. Eight different commercially available lancing systems were used (8 patients/system). Blood volume and perceived pain were recorded after each fingerstick. Results: The mean blood volume across all patients was 3.1 µL (512 fingersticks), with 97% of patients expressing a mean of ≥1.0 µL of blood. There was no correlation between pain response and the volume of blood expressed. Nearly all patients agreed that they could easily and comfortably obtain a 1-µL blood sample, and most patients actually preferred a larger drop size to ease sampling and avoid wasting strips. Conclusion: These results provide evidence across 8 lancing systems that challenge the current perceptions that patients with diabetes struggle to produce sufficient blood samples to fill most test strips, including those with 1-µL fill requirements, and that obtaining larger volumes of blood is more painful. These results are consistent with the previous literature suggesting that patients derive no real benefits from very low strip volumes and generally prefer a blood drop size that enables them to confidently fill their test strip. PMID:24876439

  16. Safety and effectiveness of dabigatran and warfarin in routine care of patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Seeger, John D; Bykov, Katsiaryna; Bartels, Dorothee B; Huybrechts, Krista; Zint, Kristina; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2015-11-25

    The RE-LY study demonstrated the safety and efficacy of dabigatran relative to warfarin for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation. It is important to further evaluate safety and effectiveness of drugs in routine care. This study used a sequential cohort design with propensity score matching to compare dabigatran with warfarin among patients in two commercial health insurance databases. New users of these anticoagulants were followed from initiation until discontinuation, the end of the study, or the occurrence of a study outcome (primary study outcomes were stroke and major bleeding). Proportional hazards regression was conducted separately within each data source and results were pooled. Among 19,189 matched dabigatran and warfarin initiators (mean age: 68 years, 36 % female), as-treated follow-up (average of 5 months for dabigatran, 4 months for warfarin) identified 62 and 69 strokes, respectively (pooled HR = 0.77; 95 % CI = 0.54 to 1.09), and 354 and 395 major haemorrhages, respectively (HR = 0.75; 0.65 to 0.87). No meaningful heterogeneity was identified across subgroups, but numeric trends suggest more pronounced stroke prevention by dabigatran relative to warfarin among patients age 75+ (HR = 0.57; 0.33 to 0.97) or with < 6 months of use (HR = 0.51; 0.19 to 1.42). Major bleeds were reduced more by dabigatran among patients aged < 55 (HR = 0.51; 0.30 to 0.87) and with CHADS2 < 2 (HR = 0.58; 0.44 to 0.77). In conclusion, in routine care of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, dabigatran treatment resulted in improved health outcomes compared with warfarin.

  17. Electronic eRAPID3 (Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data): opportunities and complexities.

    PubMed

    Pincus, Theodore

    2016-01-01

    RAPID3 (routine assessment of patient index data) is an index found within a multi-dimensional health assessment questionnaire (MDHAQ) for routine clinical care, composed only of 3 self-report scores for physical function, pain, and patient global estimate, each scored 0-10, for a total of 0-30. RAPID3 is correlated significantly with DAS28 (Disease Activity Score) and CDAI (Clinical Disease Activity Index), and distinguishes active from control treatments as efficiently as these indices in clinical trials involving adalimumab, abatacept, certolizumab, infliximab, and rituximab. Many versions of an electronic RAPID3 (eRAPID3) have been developed, which are incompatible with one another, as seen for electronic medical records (EMR). Therefore, opportunities are lost to pool data from many sites for advancement of patient care and outcomes. Interfaces for linkage to EMRs and pooling of data are available as Health Level Seven (HL7) standards, FHIR (Fast Health Interoperability Resources), and innovative open platforms like SMART (Substitutable Medical Apps, Reusable Technology), but many eRAPID3 versions do not have this capacity. RAPID3 scores may be elevated in many patients due to damage or distress, rather than, or in addition to, inflammation, a problem that also affects DAS28, CDAI, and all RA indices which include a patient global estimate, even if they include a formal joint count. A full MDHAQ, of which RAPID3 is a component, provides clues to the presence of damage, and/or distress and adds much further information, with no more work for the health professional and little more time for the patient. A RheuMetric physician checklist of global scores for inflammation, damage, and distress is also useful to recognise damage and/or distress, but not available with most available eRAPID3 versions. Many eRAPID3 versions also are limited by the absence of flowsheets to monitor scores over time, the absence of strategies to convey data to health professionals to

  18. Clinical Significance of Commensal Gram-Positive Rods Routinely Isolated from Patient Samples.

    PubMed

    Leal, Sixto M; Jones, Melissa; Gilligan, Peter H

    2016-12-01

    Commensal bacteria from the skin and mucosal surfaces are routinely isolated from patient samples and considered contaminants. The majority of these isolates are catalase-positive Gram-positive rods from multiple genera routinely classified as diphtheroids. These organisms can be seen upon Gram staining of clinical specimens or can be isolated as the predominant or pure species in culture, raising a priori suspicion of a possible involvement in infection. With the development and adoption of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), suspicious isolates are now routinely identified to the species level. In this study, we performed a retrospective data review (2012 to 2015) and utilized site-specific laboratory criteria and chart reviews to identify species within the diphtheroid classification representative of true infection versus contamination. Our data set included 762 isolates from 13 genera constituting 41 bacterial species. Only 18% represented true infection, and 82% were deemed contaminants. Clinically significant isolates were identified in anaerobic wounds (18%), aerobic wounds (30%), blood (5.5%), urine (22%), cerebrospinal fluid (24%), ophthalmologic cultures (8%), and sterile sites (20%). Organisms deemed clinically significant included multiple Actinomyces species in wounds, Propionibacterium species in joints and cerebrospinal fluid associated with central nervous system hardware, Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii (100%) in breast, and Corynebacterium striatum in multiple sites. Novel findings include clinically significant urinary tract infections by Actinomyces neuii (21%) and Corynebacterium aurimucosum (21%). Taken together, these findings indicate that species-level identification of diphtheroids isolated with a priori suspicion of infection is essential to accurately determine whether an isolate belongs to a species associated with specific types of infection.

  19. Are daily routine chest radiographs necessary after pulmonary surgery in adult patients?

    PubMed Central

    Reeb, Jeremie; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Olland, Anne; Massard, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether daily routine (DR) chest radiographs (CXRs) are necessary after pulmonary surgery in adult patients. Of the 66 papers found using a report search, seven presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. Four of these seven studies specifically addressed post-cardiothoracic adult patients. Three of these seven studies addressed intensive care unit (ICU) patients and included post-cardiothoracic adult patients in well-designed studies. Six of these seven studies compared the DR CXRs strategy to the clinically indicated, on-demand (OD) CXRs strategy. Another study analysed the clinical impact of ceasing to perform the DR, postoperative, post-chest tubes removal CXRs. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, study type, group studied, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are given. We conclude that, on the whole, the seven studies are unanimously in favour of forgoing DR CXRs after lung resection and advocate OD CXRs. One study suggested that hypoxic patients could benefit from a DR CXRs strategy, while other studies failed to identify any subgroup for whom performing DR CXRs was beneficial. Indeed, DR CXRs, commonly taken after thoracic surgery, have poor diagnostic and therapeutic value. Eliminating them for adult patients having undergone thoracic surgery significantly decreases the number of CXRs per patient without increasing mortality rates, length of hospital stays (LOSs), readmission rates and adverse events. Hence, current evidence shows that DR CXRs could be forgone after lung resection because OD CXRs, recommended by clinical monitoring, have a better impact on management and have not been proved to negatively affect patient outcomes. Moreover, an OD CXRs strategy lowers the cost of care. Nevertheless, an OD CXRs strategy requires close clinical monitoring by experienced surgeons and dedicated intensivists. However

  20. Using routine inpatient data to identify patients at risk of hospital readmission

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Stuart; Coory, Michael; Martin, Jennifer; Duckett, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Background A relatively small percentage of patients with chronic medical conditions account for a much larger percentage of inpatient costs. There is some evidence that case-management can improve health and quality-of-life and reduce the number of times these patients are readmitted. To assess whether a statistical algorithm, based on routine inpatient data, can be used to identify patients at risk of readmission and who would therefore benefit from case-management. Methods Queensland database study of public-hospital patients, who had at least one emergency admission for a chronic medical condition (e.g., congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes or dementia) during 2005/2006. Multivariate logistic regression was used to develop an algorithm to predict readmission within 12 months. The performance of the algorithm was tested against recorded readmissions using sensitivity, specificity, and Likelihood Ratios (positive and negative). Results Several factors were identified that predicted readmission (i.e., age, co-morbidities, economic disadvantage, number of previous admissions). The discriminatory power of the model was modest as determined by area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (c = 0.65). At a risk score threshold of 50, the algorithm identified only 44.7% (95% CI: 42.5%, 46.9%) of patients admitted with a reference condition who had an admission in the next 12 months; 37.5% (95% CI: 35.0%, 40.0%) of patients were flagged incorrectly (they did not have a subsequent admission). Conclusion A statistical algorithm based on Queensland hospital inpatient data, performed only moderately in identifying patients at risk of readmission. The main problem is that there are too many false negatives, which means that many patients who might benefit would not be offered case-management. PMID:19505342

  1. Evaluation of two different hand hygiene procedures during routine patient care.

    PubMed

    Eksi, F; Mehli, M; Akgun, S; Bayram, A; Balci, I; Aydin, N

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the antimicrobial efficacy of hand washing (HW) and hand washing plus rubbing with an alcohol-based solution (HWR) on numbers of total and transient flora colonies on the hands of healthcare workers (HCWs) during routine patient care was assessed. Samples were collected, using a standard bag broth technique, from the hands of 154 HCWs, before and immediately after carrying out a hand hygiene procedure. The numbers of total and transient flora colonies per plate were counted and transient pathogens were identified. A significant statistical difference between ward speciality was detected with respect to the isolation rate of transient flora. Transient hand flora were recovered from 25.3% of HCWs before carrying out the hand hygiene procedure. With respect to the disappearance and prevention of regrowth of transient flora after hand hygiene, the HWR technique was significantly more effective than HW. In conclusion, a disinfectant should be added to the hand washing process to achieve optimum protection against nosocomial infections in routine hospital practice.

  2. A simple and inexpensive method to routinely produce customized neck supports for patient immobilization during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    McKernan, B; Bydder, S; Ebert, M; Waterhouse, D; Joseph, D

    2008-12-01

    Accurate and reproducible patient positioning is fundamental to the success of fractionated radiotherapy. Poor patient positioning could result in geographic misses. We have recently reported on an improved method of customized face mask production using laser surface scanning. In this report, we sought to identify and develop a method to routinely make customized neck supports for patients prescribed radiotherapy to the brain or head and neck regions. We identified a potentially suitable product--sealed packs containing two liquids that produce expanding polyurethane foam when mixed--and developed a method for their use. The neck supports are inexpensive and simple to produce (taking less than 5 min of radiation therapist labour). We assessed the customized neck supports in several ways. The effect on setup accuracy was assessed by comparing two consecutive cohorts of patients. Statistically significant differences favouring the customized neck supports included a reduced total displacement error (mean 3.4 vs. 2.1 mm) and a reduced left-right setup error (mean 1.8 vs. 1.1 mm). This is consistent with the greater support provided by the customized neck supports. This method could easily be undertaken by other departments.

  3. Rapid learning in practice: A lung cancer survival decision support system in routine patient care data

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, Andre; Vinod, Shalini; Holloway, Lois; Oberije, Cary; George, Armia; Goozee, Gary; Delaney, Geoff P.; Lambin, Philippe; Thwaites, David

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose A rapid learning approach has been proposed to extract and apply knowledge from routine care data rather than solely relying on clinical trial evidence. To validate this in practice we deployed a previously developed decision support system (DSS) in a typical, busy clinic for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Material and methods Gender, age, performance status, lung function, lymph node status, tumor volume and survival were extracted without review from clinical data sources for lung cancer patients. With these data the DSS was tested to predict overall survival. Results 3919 lung cancer patients were identified with 159 eligible for inclusion, due to ineligible histology or stage, non-radical dose, missing tumor volume or survival. The DSS successfully identified a good prognosis group and a medium/poor prognosis group (2 year OS 69% vs. 27/30%, p < 0.001). Stage was less discriminatory (2 year OS 47% for stage I–II vs. 36% for stage IIIA–IIIB, p = 0.12) with most good prognosis patients having higher stage disease. The DSS predicted a large absolute overall survival benefit (~40%) for a radical dose compared to a non-radical dose in patients with a good prognosis, while no survival benefit of radical radiotherapy was predicted for patients with a poor prognosis. Conclusions A rapid learning environment is possible with the quality of clinical data sufficient to validate a DSS. It uses patient and tumor features to identify prognostic groups in whom therapy can be individualized based on predicted outcomes. Especially the survival benefit of a radical versus non-radical dose predicted by the DSS for various prognostic groups has clinical relevance, but needs to be prospectively validated. PMID:25241994

  4. Measuring Social Exclusion in Routine Public Health Surveys: Construction of a Multidimensional Instrument

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Addi P. L.; Hoff, Stella J. M.; van Ameijden, Erik J. C.; van Hemert, Albert M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Social exclusion is considered a major factor in the causation and maintenance of health inequalities, but its measurement in health research is still in its infancy. In the Netherlands the Institute for Social Research (SCP) developed an instrument to measure the multidimensional concept of social exclusion in social and economic policy research. Here, we present a method to construct a similar measure of social exclusion using available data from public health surveys. Methods Analyses were performed on data from the health questionnaires that were completed by 20,877 adults in the four largest cities in the Netherlands. From each of the four questionnaires we selected the items that corresponded to those of the SCP-instrument. These were entered into a nonlinear canonical correlation analysis. The measurement properties of the resulting indices and dimension scales were assessed and compared to the SCP-instrument. Results The internal consistency of the indices and most of the dimension scales were adequate and the internal structure of the indices was as expected. Both generalisabiliy and construct validity were good: in all datasets strong associations were found between the index and a number of known risk factors of social exclusion. A limitation of content validity was that the dimension “lack of normative integration” could not be measured, because no relevant items were available. Conclusions Our findings indicate that a measure for social exclusion can be constructed with available health questionnaires. This provides opportunities for application in public health surveillance systems in the Netherlands and elsewhere in the world. PMID:24878842

  5. Brain measures of nociception using near-infrared spectroscopy in patients undergoing routine screening colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Lino; Aasted, Christopher M; Boas, David A; George, Edward; Yücel, Meryem A; Kussman, Barry D; Kelsey, Peter; Borsook, David

    2016-04-01

    Colonoscopy is an invaluable tool for the screening and diagnosis of many colonic diseases. For most colonoscopies, moderate sedation is used during the procedure. However, insufflation of the colon produces a nociceptive stimulus that is usually accompanied by facial grimacing/groaning while under sedation. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a nociceptive signal elicited by colonic insufflation could be measured from the brain. Seventeen otherwise healthy patients (age 54.8 ± 9.1; 6 female) undergoing routine colonoscopy (ie, no history of significant medical conditions) were monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Moderate sedation was produced using standard clinical protocols for midazolam and meperidine, titrated to effect. Near-infrared spectroscopy data captured during the procedure was analyzed offline to evaluate the brains' responses to nociceptive stimuli evoked by the insufflation events (defined by physician or observing patients' facial responses). Analysis of NIRS data revealed a specific, reproducible prefrontal cortex activity corresponding to times when patients grimaced. The pattern of the activation is similar to that previously observed during nociceptive stimuli in awake healthy individuals, suggesting that this approach may be used to evaluate brain activity evoked by nociceptive stimuli under sedation, when there is incomplete analgesia. Although some patients report recollection of procedural pain after the procedure, the effects of repeated nociceptive stimuli in surgical patients may contribute to postoperative changes including chronic pain. The results from this study indicate that NIRS may be a suitable technology for continuous nociceptive afferent monitoring in patients undergoing sedation and could have applications under sedation or anesthesia.

  6. Patient dose considerations for routine megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, Olivier; Gillis, Amy; Descovich, Martina; Chen, Josephine; Aubin, Michele; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Chen Hong; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Xia Ping; Pouliot, Jean

    2007-05-15

    Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT), the recent addition to the family of in-room CT imaging systems for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), uses a conventional treatment unit equipped with a flat panel detector to obtain a three-dimensional representation of the patient in treatment position. MVCBCT has been used for more than two years in our clinic for anatomy verification and to improve patient alignment prior to dose delivery. The objective of this research is to evaluate the image acquisition dose delivered to patients for MVCBCT and to develop a simple method to reduce the additional dose resulting from routine MVCBCT imaging. Conventional CT scans of phantoms and patients were imported into a commercial treatment planning system (TPS: Phillips, Pinnacle) and an arc treatment mimicking the MVCBCT acquisition process was generated to compute the delivered acquisition dose. To validate the dose obtained from the TPS, a simple water-equivalent cylindrical phantom with spaces for MOSFETs and an ion chamber was used to measure the MVCBCT image acquisition dose. Absolute dose distributions were obtained by simulating MVCBCTs of 9 and 5 monitor units (MU) on pelvis and head and neck patients, respectively. A compensation factor was introduced to generate composite plans of treatment and MVCBCT imaging dose. The article provides a simple equation to compute the compensation factor. The developed imaging compensation method was tested on routinely used clinical plans for prostate and head and neck patients. The quantitative comparison between the calculated dose by the TPS and measurement points on the cylindrical phantom were all within 3%. The dose percentage difference for the ion chamber placed in the center of the phantom was only 0.2%. For a typical MVCBCT, the dose delivered to patients forms a small anterior-posterior gradient ranging from 0.6 to 1.2 cGy per MVCBCT MU. MVCBCT acquisitions in the pelvis and head and neck areas deliver slightly more dose than

  7. Bayesian estimation of cyclosporin exposure for routine therapeutic drug monitoring in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Bourgoin, Hélène; Paintaud, Gilles; Büchler, Matthias; Lebranchu, Yvon; Autret-Leca, Elisabeth; Mentré, France; Guellec, Chantal Le

    2005-01-01

    Aims AUC-based monitoring of cyclosporin A (CsA) is useful to optimize dose adaptation in difficult cases. We developed a population pharmacokinetic model to describe dose-exposure relationships for CsA in renal transplant patients and applied it to the Bayesian estimation of AUCs using three blood concentrations. Methods A total of 84 renal graft recipients treated with CsA microemulsion were included in this study. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using NONMEM. A two-compartment model with zero-order absorption and a lag time best described the data. Bayesian estimation was based on CsA blood concentrations measured before dosing and 1 h and 2 h post dose. Predictive performance was evaluated using a cross-validation approach. Estimated AUCs were compared with AUCs calculated by the trapezoidal method. The Bayesian approach was also applied to an independent group of eight patients exhibiting unusual pharmacokinetic profiles. Results Mean population pharmacokinetic parameters were apparent clearance 30 l h−1, apparent volume of distribution 79.8 l, duration of absorption 52 min, absorption lag time 7 min. No significant relationships were found between any of the pharmacokinetic parameters and individual characteristics. A good correlation was obtained between Bayesian-estimated and experimental AUCs, with a mean prediction error of 2.8% (95% CI [−0.6, 6.2]) and an accuracy of 13.1% (95% CI [7.5, 17.2]). A good correlation was also obtained in the eight patients with unusual pharmacokinetic profiles (r2 = 0.96, P < 0.01). Conclusions Our Bayesian approach enabled a good estimation of CsA exposure in a population of patients with variable pharmacokinetic profiles, showing its usefulness for routine AUC-based therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:15606436

  8. Routine Clinical-Pathologic Correlation of Pigmented Skin Tumors Can Influence Patient Management

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Caterina; Piana, Simonetta; Lallas, Aimilios; Moscarella, Elvira; Lombardi, Mara; Raucci, Margherita; Pellacani, Giovanni; Argenziano, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated the benefit of integrating clinical with pathologic information, to obtain a confident diagnosis for melanocytic tumors. However, all those studies were conducted retrospectively and no data are currently available about the role of a clinical-pathologic correlation approach on a daily basis in clinical practice. Aim of the Study In our study, we evaluated the impact of a routine clinical-pathologic correlation approach for difficult skin tumors seen over 3 years in a tertiary referral center. Results Interestingly, a re-appraisal was requested for 158 out of 2015 (7.7%) excised lesions because clinical-pathologic correlation was missing. Of note, in 0.6% of them (13 out of 2045) the first histologic diagnosis was revised in the light of clinical information that assisted the Pathologist to re-evaluate the histopathologic findings that might be bland or inconspicuous per se. Conclusion In conclusion, our study demonstrated that an integrated approach involving clinicians and pathologists allows improving management of selected patients by shifting from a simply disease-focused management (melanoma versus nevus) to a patient-centered approach. PMID:26325678

  9. Impact of transitioning from HIV clinical trials to routine medical care on clinical outcomes and patient perceptions.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Baligh R; Long, Judith A; Stearns, Cordelia R; French, Benjamin; Tebas, Pablo; Frank, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Participation in antiretroviral therapy clinical trials (ART-RCTs) offers many advantages including access to new drugs, close monitoring, and cost savings. These same benefits may pose a risk to patients ending ART-RCTs and returning to routine care; as they may experience changes to their drug regimen, decreased monitoring, and new out-of-pocket costs. We aimed to evaluate this transition and determine its effects on viral outcomes and patient perceptions. A retrospective cohort was assembled from participants of naïve ART-RCTs at the University of Pennsylvania between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2009. Data were collected in the 12 months prior to and after trial completion. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate viral failure rates and to identify factors associated with viral failure. Qualitative interviews were held with a subset of patients. Content analysis was used to identify thematic differences between patients with viral failure and those with viral suppression. In total, 116 patients enrolled in 5 ART-RCTs from 2000 to 2009. Viral failure was observed in 39 patients (34%). Nonwhites, high enrollment CD4 count, and trial completion in 1999-2002 were risk factors for failure. Patients transitioning from ART-RCTs to routine care had a 20% increased odds of failure (Adjusted Odds Ratio 1.20 (95% CI [0.37, 3.88])). Nine patients with viral suppression and three with viral failure in the year after trail completion were interviewed. Suppressed patients were more eager to continue trial participation, nervous about leaving the trial, and felt prepared to return to routine care. In contrast, those with viral failure were less concerned about the transition. These findings suggest that the posttrial period may be a vulnerable time for patients. Patients without a healthy fear of transitioning from ART-RCTs to routine care may be at increased risk of viral failure. Focus should be given to assisting patients during this transition.

  10. Personality disorders in heart failure patients requiring psychiatric management: comorbidity detections from a routine depression and anxiety screening protocol.

    PubMed

    Tully, Phillip J; Selkow, Terina

    2014-12-30

    Several international guidelines recommend routine depression screening in cardiac disease populations. No previous study has determined the prevalence and comorbidities of personality disorders in patients presenting for psychiatric treatment after these screening initiatives. In the first stage 404 heart failure (HF) patients were routinely screened and 73 underwent structured interview when either of the following criteria were met: (a) Patient Health Questionnaire ≥10; (b) Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire ≥7); (c) Response to one item panic-screener. Or (d) Suicidality. Patients with personality disorders were compared to the positive-screen patients on psychiatric comorbidities. The most common personality disorders were avoidant (8.2%), borderline (6.8%) and obsessive compulsive (4.1%), other personality disorders were prevalent in less than <3% of patients. Personality disorder patients had significantly greater risk of major depression (risk ratio (RR) 1.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-13.3), generalized anxiety disorder (RR 3.2; 95% CI 1.0-10.0), social phobia (RR 3.8; 95% CI 1.3-11.5) and alcohol abuse/dependence (RR 3.2; 95% 1.0-9.5). The findings that HF patients with personality disorders presented with complex psychiatric comorbidity suggest that pathways facilitating the integration of psychiatric services into cardiology settings are warranted when routine depression screening is in place.

  11. Revenue, relationships and routines: the social organization of acute myocardial infarction patient transfers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Veinot, Tiffany C; Bosk, Emily A; Unnikrishnan, K P; Iwashyna, Theodore J

    2012-11-01

    Heart attack, or acute myocardial infarction (AMI), is a leading cause of death in the United States (U.S.). The most effective therapy for AMI is rapid revascularization: the mechanical opening of the clogged artery in the heart. Forty-four percent of patients with AMI who are admitted to a non-revascularization hospital in the U.S. are transferred to a hospital with that capacity. Yet, we know little about the process by which community hospitals complete these transfers, and why publicly available hospital quality data plays a small role in community hospitals' choice of transfer destinations. Therefore, we investigated how community hospital staff implement patient transfers and select destinations. We conducted a mixed methods study involving: interviews with staff at three community hospitals (n = 25) in a Midwestern state and analysis of U.S. national Medicare records for 1996-2006. Community hospitals in the U.S., including our field sites, typically had longstanding relationships with one key receiving hospital. Community hospitals addressed the need for rapid AMI patient transfers by routinizing the collective, interhospital work process. Routinization reduced staff uncertainty, coordinated their efforts and conserved their cognitive resources for patient care. While destination selection was nominally a physician role, the decision was routinized, such that staff immediately contacted a "usual" transfer destination upon AMI diagnosis. Transfer destination selection was primarily driven at an institutional level by organizational concerns and bed supply, rather than physician choice or patient preference. Transfer routinization emerged as a form of social order that invoked tradeoffs between process speed and efficiency and patient-centered, quality-driven decision making. We consider the implications of routinization and institutional imperatives for health policy, quality improvement and health informatics interventions.

  12. The incidence of ocular candidiasis and evaluation of routine opthalmic examination in critically ill patients with candidaemia.

    PubMed

    Gluck, S; Headdon, W G; Tang, Dws; Bastian, I B; Goggin, M J; Deane, A M

    2015-11-01

    Despite a paucity of data regarding both the incidence of ocular candidiasis and the utility of ophthalmic examination in critically ill patients, routine ophthalmic examination is recommended for critically ill patients with candidaemia. The objectives were to estimate the incidence of ocular candidiasis and evaluate whether ophthalmic examination influenced subsequent management of these patients. We conducted a ten-year retrospective observational study. Data were extracted for all ICU patients who were blood culture positive for fungal infection. Risk factors for candidaemia and eye involvement were quantified and details regarding ophthalmic examination were reviewed. Candida species were cultured in 93 patients. Risk factors for ocular candidiasis were present in 57% of patients. Forty-one percent of patients died prior to ophthalmology examination and 2% of patients were discharged before candidaemia was identified. During examination, signs of ocular candidiasis were only present in one (2.9%) patient, who had a risk factor for ocular candidiasis. Based on these findings, the duration of antifungal treatment for this patient was increased. Ocular candidiasis occurs rarely in critically ill patients with candidaemia, but because treatment regimens may be altered when diagnosed, routine ophthalmic examination is still indicated.

  13. Quality-assurance results for routine water analyses in U.S. Geological Survey laboratories, water year 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludtke, Amy S.; Woodworth, Mark T.; Marsh, Philip S.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operates a quality-assurance program based on the analyses of reference samples for two laboratories: the National Water Quality Laboratory and the Quality of Water Service Unit. Reference samples that contain selected inorganic, nutrient, and low-level constituents are prepared and submitted to the laboratory as disguised routine samples. The program goal is to estimate precision and bias for as many analytical methods offered by the participating laboratories as possible. Blind reference samples typically are submitted at a rate of 2 to 5 percent of the annual environmental-sample load for each constituent. The samples are distributed to the laboratories throughout the year. The reference samples are subject to the identical laboratory handling, processing, and analytical procedures as those applied to environmental samples and, therefore, have been used as an independent source to verify bias and precision of laboratory analytical methods and ambient water-quality measurements. The results are stored permanently in the National Water Information System and the Blind Sample Project's data base. During water year 1998, 95 analytical procedures were evaluated at the National Water Quality Laboratory and 63 analytical procedures were evaluated at the Quality of Water Service Unit. An overall evaluation of the inorganic and low-level constituent data for water year 1998 indicated 77 of 78 analytical procedures at the National Water Quality Laboratory met the criteria for precision. Silver (dissolved, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry) was determined to be imprecise. Five of 78 analytical procedures showed bias throughout the range of reference samples: chromium (dissolved, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry), dissolved solids (dissolved, gravimetric), lithium (dissolved, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry), silver (dissolved, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry), and zinc

  14. Clinical value of stool culture in paediatric oncology patients: hospital evaluation and UK survey of practice.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, O; Cooke, R P D; Cunliffe, N A; Pizer, B

    2017-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a frequently occurring symptom in paediatric oncology patients. The role of routine testing for enteric bacteria in hospitalized patients with diarrhoea is considered limited, but the diagnostic value of testing in children with oncological conditions has not been reported. Therefore, we conducted a five-year retrospective service evaluation in our tertiary paediatric oncology unit together with a national survey of 21 centres to estimate the utility of stool cultures in oncology patients with diarrhoea and the national approach to testing. Our local survey demonstrated very low diagnostic yield using routine enteric stool cultures with only one sample out of 842 (0.1%) testing positive. The national survey demonstrated considerable variation in practice. There is little evidence to support the use of conventional stool culture for enteric bacteria in children with cancer in our centre. These findings should inform national testing policies.

  15. CYCLE pilot: a protocol for a pilot randomised study of early cycle ergometry versus routine physiotherapy in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Alexander J; Clarke, France; Herridge, Margaret S; Koo, Karen K Y; Rudkowski, Jill; Seely, Andrew J E; Pellizzari, Joseph R; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Mourtzakis, Marina; Karachi, Timothy; Cook, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Early exercise with in-bed cycling as part of an intensive care unit (ICU) rehabilitation programme has the potential to improve physical and functional outcomes following critical illness. The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of enrolling adults in a multicentre pilot randomised clinical trial (RCT) of early in-bed cycling versus routine physiotherapy to inform a larger RCT. Methods and analysis 60-patient parallel group pilot RCT in 7 Canadian medical-surgical ICUs. We will include all previously ambulatory adult patients within the first 0–4 days of mechanical ventilation, without exclusion criteria. After informed consent, patients will be randomised using a web-based, centralised electronic system, to 30 min of in-bed leg cycling in addition to routine physiotherapy, 5 days per week, for the duration of their ICU stay (28 days maximum) or routine physiotherapy alone. We will measure patients' muscle strength (Medical Research Council Sum Score, quadriceps force) and function (Physical Function in ICU Test (scored), 30 s sit-to-stand, 2 min walk test) at ICU awakening, ICU discharge and hospital discharge. Our 4 feasibility outcomes are: (1) patient accrual of 1–2 patients per month per centre, (2) protocol violation rate <20%, (3) outcome measure ascertainment >80% at the 3 time points and (4) blinded outcomes ascertainment >80% at hospital discharge. Hospital outcome assessors are blinded to group assignment, whereas participants, ICU physiotherapists, ICU caregivers, research coordinators and ICU outcome assessors are not blinded to group assignment. We will analyse feasibility outcomes with descriptive statistics. Ethics and dissemination Each participating centre will obtain local ethics approval, and results of the study will be published to inform the design and conduct of a future multicentre RCT of in-bed cycling to improve physical outcomes in ICU survivors. Trial registration number NCT02377830; Pre

  16. Implementing specific oral tolerance induction to milk into routine clinical practice: experience from first 50 patients

    PubMed Central

    Luyt, David; Bravin, Kristian; Luyt, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the natural history of cow’s milk allergy is to resolve during childhood or adolescence, a small but significant proportion of children will remain allergic. Specific oral tolerance induction to cow’s milk (CM-SOTI) provides a treatment option in these children with continuing allergy with high success rates. However current sentiment limits widespread availability as existing reports advise that it is too soon to translate CM-SOTI into routine clinical practice. Methods In January 2007 we implemented a slow up-dosing CM-SOTI program. Eligible subjects were identified at routine visits to our children’s allergy clinic. Persisting cow’s milk allergy was confirmed from recent contact symptoms or a positive baked milk challenge. As allergic symptoms are common during CM-SOTI, families were provided with ready dietetic access for advice on dosing and symptom treatment. Subjects were continuously monitored at subsequent clinic visits or telephonically, where no longer followed, for a median of 49 months. Results The first 50 subjects (35 males) treated ranged in age from 5.1 to 15.8 years (median 10.3 years). Full tolerance (250 mL) was achieved in 23 subjects, 9 without any symptoms, and a further 9 achieved partial tolerance with continued ingestion. Eighteen children failed to achieve any regular milk ingestion; 11 because of persistent or significant symptoms whilst 8 withdrew against medical advice. Allergic symptoms were predominantly mild to moderate in severity, although 2 cases needed treatment with inhaled salbutamol and a further 2 required intramuscular adrenaline. Clinical tolerance, both full and partial, persists beyond 5 years. Conclusion We have demonstrated that a CM-SOTI program can be successfully and safely implemented as routine clinical practice with acceptable compliance during prolonged home up-dosing, despite frequent allergic symptoms, and for up to 4 years after starting treatment. CM-SOTI can thus be put into

  17. Comprehensive self management and routine monitoring in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in general practice: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Akkermans, Reinier; Bourbeau, Jean; van Weel, Chris; Vercoulen, Jan H; Schermer, Tjard R J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the long term effects of two different modes of disease management (comprehensive self management and routine monitoring) on quality of life (primary objective), frequency and patients’ management of exacerbations, and self efficacy (secondary objectives) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in general practice. Design 24 month, multicentre, investigator blinded, three arm, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial. Setting 15 general practices in the eastern part of the Netherlands. Participants Patients with COPD confirmed by spirometry and treated in general practice. Patients with very severe COPD or treated by a respiratory physician were excluded. Interventions A comprehensive self management programme as an adjunct to usual care, consisting of four tailored sessions with ongoing telephone support by a practice nurse; routine monitoring as an adjunct to usual care, consisting of 2-4 structured consultations a year with a practice nurse; or usual care alone (contacts with the general practitioner at the patients’ own initiative). Outcome measures The primary outcome was the change in COPD specific quality of life at 24 months as measured with the chronic respiratory questionnaire total score. Secondary outcomes were chronic respiratory questionnaire domain scores, frequency and patients’ management of exacerbations measured with the Nijmegen telephonic exacerbation assessment system, and self efficacy measured with the COPD self-efficacy scale. Results 165 patients were allocated to self management (n=55), routine monitoring (n=55), or usual care alone (n=55). At 24 months, adjusted treatment differences between the three groups in mean chronic respiratory questionnaire total score were not significant. Secondary outcomes did not differ, except for exacerbation management. Compared with usual care, more exacerbations in the self management group were managed with bronchodilators (odds ratio 2.81, 95% confidence

  18. The effect of routine rounding by nursing staff on patient satisfaction on a cardiac telemetry unit.

    PubMed

    Sobaski, Tanya; Abraham, Merline; Fillmore, Rhonda; McFall, Dawn E; Davidhizar, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Patients' perception of their care is affected by the attention they receive while hospitalized. It has become a popular metric for improving the quality of care delivered. Rounding is believed to be the key to patients' perception of the care they receive. In this study, nursing administration wanted to increase patient's perception of how well their needs were being met. Regular scheduled rounding provided an opportunity for nursing to interact with patients on a regular schedule. All nursing care categories measured exceeded the goal of 90% in the first month after implementation, with the largest increase of averaged percentages being "attention to special or personal needs.

  19. Comparison of Reconstruction Intervals in Routine ECG-Pulsed 64-Row-MSCT Coronary Angiography in Frequency Controlled Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Frydrychowicz, Alex Pache, Gregor; Saueressig, Ulrich; Foell, Daniela; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Bley, Thorsten A.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. In light of the increasing use and acceptance of multislice computed tomography (MSCT) coronary angiography it was the purpose of this study to compare reconstruction intervals used in a routine ECG-pulsed MSCT coronary artery angiography setting with frequency controlled patients. Methods. Examinations were performed on a Siemens Somatom Sensation 64 scanner with a total of 110 ml of contrast agent and ECG pulsing (interval from 40% to 70%) after oral application of a {beta}-blocker if the heart rate was higher than 65 bpm. All human subjects were referred for the evaluation of suspected coronary artery disease. Coronary artery segments were evaluated by two experienced radiologists in a consensus reading. A ranking of diagnostic image quality (from 1 (no evaluation possible) to 5 (excellent image quality)) was statistically evaluated by Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. Results. In 45 patients (30 male, 15 female, age 63.8 {+-} 12.1 years) we detected a significant advantage of the 60% reconstruction interval over 40%, 50%, and 70% (for each p < 0.05). In cases of sudden arrhythmia or movement during the scan, additional reconstruction intervals within the ECG-pulsed reconstruction intervals remained necessary for diagnosis. Conclusion. In a routine diagnostic setting with frequency controlled patients and ECG pulsing the 60% reconstruction interval can be considered superior for the initial diagnosis in 64-row multislice computed tomography coronary angiography. However, further information can be derived from various reconstruction intervals such as 40% and 70%.

  20. Should All Congestive Heart Failure Patients Have a Routine Sleep Apnea Screening? Pro.

    PubMed

    Sériès, Frédéric

    2015-07-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is highly prevalent in heart failure (HF) patients. These breathing disturbances are independent predictors of increased morbidity and comorbid conditions that improve with SDB treatment. Considering the overlap between SDB-related and HF clinical symptoms reported by patients, objective tests need to be conducted for a diagnosis to be firmly established and to determine the type and severity of SDB that will dictate treatment alternatives. Considering the high success rate and diagnostic value of ambulatory monitoring techniques, they represent a practical, cost-effective, and accurate alternative to diagnosing SDB in HF patients.

  1. Routine clinical evaluation of cerebrovascular reserve capacity using carbogen in patients with intracranial stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Manus J.; Dethrage, Lindsey; Faraco, Carlos C.; Jordan, Lori C.; Clemmons, Paul; Singer, Robert; Mocco, J; Shyr, Yu; Desai, Aditi; O’Duffy, Anne; Riebau, Derek; Hermann, Lisa; Connors, John; Kirshner, Howard; Strother, Megan K.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose A promising method for identifying hemodynamic impairment that may serve as a biomarker for stroke risk in patients with intracranial (IC) stenosis is cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) mapping using non-invasive MRI. Here, abilities to measure CVR safely in the clinic using hypercarbic hyperoxic (carbogen) gas challenges, which increase oxygen delivery to tissue, are investigated. Methods In sequence with structural and angiographic imaging, blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) carbogen-induced CVR scans were performed in patients with symptomatic IC stenosis (n=92) and control (n=10) volunteers, with a subgroup of patients (n=57) undergoing cerebral blood flow-weighted (CBFw) pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) CVR. Subjects were stratified for four sub-studies: to evaluate relationships between (i) carbogen and hyercarbic normoxic (HN) CVR in healthy tissue (n=10), (ii) carbogen CBF CVR and BOLD CVR in IC stenosis patients (n=57), (iii) carbogen CVR and clinical measures of disease in patients with asymmetric IC atherosclerotic (n=31) and moyamoya (n=29) disease, and (iv) the CVR scan and immediate and longer-term complications (n=92). Results Non-invasive BOLD carbogen-induced CVR values correlate with (i) lobar HN gas stimuli in healthy tissue (R=0.92; P<0.001), (ii) carbogen-induced CBF CVR in IC stenosis patients (R=0.30–0.33; P<0.012), and (iii) angiographic measures of disease severity both in atherosclerotic and moyamoya patients after appropriate processing. No immediate stroke-related complications were reported in response to carbogen administration; longer-term neurological events fell within the range for expected events in this patient population. Conclusions Carbogen-induced CVR elicited no added adverse events and provided a surrogate marker of cerebrovascular reserve consistent with IC vasculopathy. PMID:24938845

  2. Routine Histopathologic Examination of Appendectomy Specimens: Retrospective Analysis of 1255 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Emre, Arif; Akbulut, Sami; Bozdag, Zehra; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Kanlioz, Murat; Emre, Rabia; Sahin, Nurhan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical benefit of histopathologic analysis of appendectomy specimens from patients with an initial diagnosis of acute appendicitis. We retrospectively analyzed the demographic and histopathologic data of 1255 patients (712 males, 543 females; age range, 17–85 years) who underwent appendectomy to treat an initial diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients who underwent incidental appendectomy during other surgeries were excluded from the study. Histopathologic findings of the appendectomy specimens were used to confirm the initial diagnosis. Ninety-four percent of the appendectomy specimens were positive for appendicitis. Of those, 880 were phlegmonous appendicitis, 148 were gangrenous appendicitis with perforation, and the remaining 88 showed unusual histopathologic findings. In the 88 specimens with unusual pathology, fibrous obliteration was observed in 57 specimens, carcinoid tumor in 11, Encheliophis vermicularis parasite infection in 8, granulatomous inflammation in 6, appendiceal endometriosis in 2, and 1 specimen each showed mucocele, eosinophilic infiltration, Taenia saginata parasite infection, and appendicular diverticulitis. All carcinoid tumors were located in the distal appendix. Six of the 11 carcinoid tumors were defined by histopathology as involving tubular cells, and the other 5 as involving enterochromaffin cells. Six patients had muscularis propria invasion, 2 patients had submucosa invasion, 2 patients had mesoappendix invasion, and 1 patient had serosal invasion. All patients with tumors remained disease free during the follow-up (range, 1–27 months). We conclude that when the ratio of unusual pathologic findings for appendectomy specimens is considered, it is evident that all surgical specimens should be subjected to careful histologic examination. PMID:24229023

  3. [The peripheral vestibular disorders encountered in the routine out-patient practical work].

    PubMed

    Zamergrad, M V; Parfenov, V A; Morozova, S V; Mel'nikov, O A; Antonenko, L M

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the frequency of causes underlying the development of dizziness and vertigo in the patients seeking advice and care at an outpatient healthcare facility. A total of 590 patients with complaints of dizziness and vertigo were examined. It was found out that the peripheral disorders of the vestibular analyzer were the most frequent causes of dizziness and vertigo in the majority of the examined patients. These conditions were documented to occur in more than 65% of the patients. The most common forms of peripheral vestibular disorders were benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, and vestibular neuronitis. The central vestibular disorders occurred considerably less frequently than peripheral ones and were diagnosed only in 10.9% of the patients. The results of the study provided a basis for the development of the algorithm forthe bedside examination of the patients presenting with vertigo and dizziness associated with peripheral vestibular disorders. It is emphasized that such examination should include, besides the standard neurological studies, the neuro-otological tests making it possible to detect the most common forms of peripheral vestibular disorders.

  4. Routes to diagnosis for cancer – determining the patient journey using multiple routine data sets

    PubMed Central

    Elliss-Brookes, L; McPhail, S; Ives, A; Greenslade, M; Shelton, J; Hiom, S; Richards, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cancer survival in England is lower than the European average, which has been at least partly attributed to later stage at diagnosis in English patients. There are substantial regional and demographic variations in cancer survival across England. The majority of patients are diagnosed following symptomatic or incidental presentation. This study defines a methodology by which the route the patient follows to the point of diagnosis can be categorised to examine demographic, organisational, service and personal reasons for delayed diagnosis. Methods: Administrative Hospital Episode Statistics data are linked with Cancer Waiting Times data, data from the cancer screening programmes and cancer registration data. Using these data sets, every case of cancer registered in England, which was diagnosed in 2006–2008, is categorised into one of eight ‘Routes to Diagnosis'. Results: Different cancer types show substantial differences between the proportion of cases that present by each route, in reasonable agreement with previous clinical studies. Patients presenting via Emergency routes have substantially lower 1-year relative survival. Conclusion: Linked cancer registration and administrative data can be used to robustly categorise the route to a cancer diagnosis for all patients. These categories can be used to enhance understanding of and explore possible reasons for delayed diagnosis. PMID:22996611

  5. Routine use of punch biopsy to diagnose small fiber neuropathy in fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Levine, Todd D; Saperstein, David S

    2015-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is a clinical syndrome that currently does not have any specific pathological finding to aid in diagnosis. Therefore, fibromyalgia is most likely a heterogeneous group of diseases with similar symptoms. Identifying and understanding the pathological basis of fibromyalgia will allow physicians to better categorize patients, increasing prospective treatment options, and improving potential therapeutic endeavors. Recent work has demonstrated that approximately 50% of patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia have damage to their small unmyelinated nerve fibers. A skin punch biopsy is a sensitive and specific diagnostic test for this damage as a reduction in nerve fiber density allows for the diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy. Small fiber neuropathy is a disease with symptoms similar to fibromyalgia, but it often has a definable etiology. Identifying small fiber neuropathy and its underlying cause in fibromyalgia patients provides them with a succinct diagnosis, increases treatment options, and facilitates more specific studies for future therapeutics.

  6. Prognosis of Binet stage A chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients: the strength of routine parameters.

    PubMed

    Letestu, Rémi; Lévy, Vincent; Eclache, Virginie; Baran-Marszak, Fanny; Vaur, Dominique; Naguib, Dina; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Katsahian, Sandrine; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Davi, Frédéric; Merle-Béral, Hélène; Troussard, Xavier; Ajchenbaum-Cymbalista, Florence

    2010-11-25

    Recent developments in the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients have made necessary the availability of dependable prognostic factors. We have developed a prognostic index derived from the multivariate analysis of 339 stage A patients at diagnosis, exhaustively studied for classical and recent predictive markers. Only 4 biologic parameters were found to be independent predictors of progression-free survival (PFS): serum thymidine kinase (sTK), lymphocytosis, β2-microglobulin, and CD38 expression. Two groups were distinguishable: cases with no or 1 risk factor (among whom 85% did not progress after 7 years), and cases with 2 or more factors showing a median PFS of 20 months. Finally, we propose an easy, fast, cost-effective strategy for a trustworthy prognostication in stage A patients, who currently represent more than 80% of the CLL population, allowing physicians to adapt follow-up individually.

  7. The role of routine pre-operative bedside echocardiography in detecting aortic stenosis in patients with a hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Loxdale, S J; Sneyd, J R; Donovan, A; Werrett, G; Viira, D J

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of aortic stenosis in unselected patients admitted with a hip fracture is unknown. Derriford Hospital operates a routine weekday, pre-operative, targeted bedside echocardiography examination on all patients admitted with a hip fracture. We carried out a prospective service evaluation for 13 months from October 2007 on all 501 admissions, of which 374 (75%) underwent pre-operative echocardiography. Of those patients investigated, 8 (2%) had severe, 24 (6%) moderate and 113 (30%) had mild aortic stenosis or aortic sclerosis. Eighty-seven of 278 (31%) patients with no murmur detected clinically on admission had aortic stenosis on echocardiography and of the 96 patients in whom a murmur was heard pre-operatively, 30 (31%) had a normal echocardiogram. Detection of a murmur does not necessarily reflect the presence of underling aortic valve disease. However, if a murmur is heard then the likelihood of the lesion's being moderate or severe aortic stenosis is increased (OR 8.5; 95% CI 3.8-19.5). Forty-four (12%) of our unselected patients with fractured femur had either moderate or severe aortic stenosis (with or without moderate or severe left ventricular failure), or mild stenosis with moderately or severely impaired left ventricular function.

  8. Integrating palliative care into routine care of patients with heart failure: models for clinical collaboration.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Warren H; Schaefer, Kristen G

    2017-02-13

    Heart failure (HF) affects nearly 5.7 million Americans and is described as a chronic incurable illness carrying a poor prognosis. Patients living with HF experience significant symptoms including dyspnea, pain, anxiety, fatigue, and depression. As the illness advances into later stages, symptoms become more intense and refractory to standard treatments, leading to recurrent acute-care utilization and contributing to poor quality of life. Advanced HF symptoms have been described to be as burdensome, if not more than, those in cancer populations. Yet access to and provision of palliative care (PC) for this population has been described as suboptimal. The Institute of Medicine recently called for better access to PC for seriously ill patients. Despite guidelines recommending the inclusion of PC into the multidisciplinary HF care team, there is little data offering guidance on how to best operationalize PC skills in caring for this population. This paper describes the emerging literature describing models of PC integration for HF patients and aims to identify key attributes of these care models that may help guide future multi-site clinical trials to define best practices for the successful delivery of PC for patients living with advanced HF.

  9. Routine surveillance for bloodstream infections in a pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant cohort: Do patients benefit?

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Heather; Fernandez, Conrad V; Langley, Joanne; Mailman, Tim; Crooks, Bruce; Higgins, Ann

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients are at a high risk for late bloodstream infection (BSI). Controversy exists regarding the benefit of surveillance blood cultures in this immunosuppressed population. Despite the common use of this practice, the practical value is not well established in non-neutropenic children following HSCT. METHODS: At the IWK Health Centre (Halifax, Nova Scotia), weekly surveillance blood cultures from central lines are drawn from children following HSCT until the line is removed. A retrospective chart review was performed to determine the utility and cost of this practice. Eligible participants were non-neutropenic HSCT recipients with central venous access lines. The cost of laboratory investigations, nursing time, hospital stay and interventions for positive surveillance cultures was calculated. RESULTS: Forty-three HSCTs were performed in 41 children. Donors were allogenic in 33 cases (77%) and autologous in 10 cases (23%). There were 316 patient contacts for surveillance cultures (mean seven per patient) and 577 central line lumens sampled. Three of 43 patients (7%) had clinically significant positive surveillance blood cultures. Bacteria isolated were Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=2) and Corynebacterium jeikeium (n=1). All follow-up cultures before initiation of antimicrobial therapy were sterile. All three patients were admitted for antimicrobial therapy if they were not already hospitalized and/or had an uncomplicated course. The estimated total cost of BSI surveillance and management of asymptomatic infection over six years was $27,989. CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that BSI surveillance in children following HSCT engraftment has a very low yield and significant cost. It is unclear whether it contributes to improved patient outcomes. PMID:18923737

  10. Can routine information from electronic patient records predict a future diagnosis of alcohol use disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Lid, Torgeir Gilje; Eide, Geir Egil; Dalen, Ingvild; Meland, Eivind

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore whether information regarding potentially alcohol-related health incidents recorded in electronic patient records might aid in earlier identification of alcohol use disorders. Design We extracted potentially alcohol-related information in electronic patient records and tested if alcohol-related diagnoses, prescriptions of codeine, tramadol, ethylmorphine, and benzodiazepines; elevated levels of gamma-glutamyl-transferase (GGT), and mean cell volume (MCV); and new sick leave certificates predicted specific alcohol use disorder. Setting Nine general practitioner surgeries with varying size and stability. Subjects Totally 20,764 patients with active electronic patient record until data gathering and with a history of at least four years without a specific alcohol use disorder after turning 18 years of age. Methods The Cox proportional hazard analysis with time-dependent covariates of potential accumulated risks over the previous four years. Main outcome measures Time from inclusion until the first specific alcohol use disorder, defined by either an alcohol specific diagnostic code or a text fragment documenting an alcohol problem. Results In the unadjusted and adjusted Cox-regression with time-dependent covariates all variables were highly significant with adjusted hazard ratios ranging from 1.25 to 3.50. Addictive drugs, sick leaves, GGT, MCV and International Classification for Primary Care version 2 (ICPC-2), and International Classification of Diseases version 10 (ICD-10) diagnoses were analyzed. Elevated GGT and MCV, ICD-10-diagnoses, and gender demonstrated the highest hazard ratios. Conclusions Many frequent health problems are potential predictors of an increased risk or vulnerability for alcohol use disorders. However, due to the modest hazard ratios, we were unable to establish a clinically useful tool. Key Points Alcohol is potentially relevant for many health problems, but current strategies for identification and intervention in

  11. Factors Associated With Smoking Status among HIV-Positive Patients in Routine Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Zyambo, Cosmas M; Willig, James H; Cropsey, Karen L; Carson, April P; Wilson, Craig; Tamhane, Ashutosh R; Westfall, Andrew O; Burkholder, Greer A

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment-related reductions in morbidity and mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients have been attenuated by cigarette smoking, which increases risk of cardiovascular, respiratory, and neoplastic diseases. This study investigated factors associated with smoking status among HIV-positive patients. Methods This cross-sectional study included 2,464 HIV-positive patients attending the HIV Clinic at the University of Alabama at Birmingham between April 2008 and December 2013. Smoking status (current, former, never), psychosocial factors, and clinical characteristics were assessed. Multinomial logistic regression was used to obtain unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of the various factors with smoking status. Results Among HIV-positive patients (mean age 45 years, 75% male, 55% African-American), the majority reported a history of smoking (39% current and 22% former smokers). In adjusted models, patient characteristics associated with increased odds of current smoking were male gender (OR for heterosexual men, 1.8 [95% CI: 1.3–2.6]; for men who have sex with men, 1.5 [1.1–1.9]), history of respiratory diseases (1.5 [1.2–1.9]), unsuppressed HIV viral load (>50 copies/mL) (1.5 [1.1–1.9]), depression (1.6 [1.3–2.0]), anxiety (1.6 [1.2–2.1]), and prior and current substance abuse (4.7 [3.6–6.1] and 8.3 [5.3–13.3] respectively). Male gender, anxiety, and substance abuse were also associated with being a former smoker. Conclusions Smoking was common among HIV-positive patients, with several psychosocial factors associated with current and former smoking. This suggests smoking cessation programs in HIV clinic settings may achieve greater impact by integrating interventions that also address illicit substance abuse and mental health. PMID:26767146

  12. Colorectal cancer in aged patients. Toward the routine treatment through laparoscopic surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    VECCHIO, R.; MARCHESE, S.; FAMOSO, F.; LA CORTE, F.; MARLETTA, S.; LEANZA, G.; ZANGHÌ, G.; LEANZA, V.; INTAGLIATA, E.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in general population. The incidence seems to be higher in older age. Surgery remains the treatment of choice and laparoscopic approach offers numerous benefits. We report our personal experience in elderly patients operated on for colorectal cancer with laparoscopic resection. Patients and methods From January 2003 to September 2013, out of 160 patients aged 65 years or older and operated with minimally invasive techniques, 30 cases affected by colorectal cancer and operated on with laparoscopic approach were analyzed in this study. Results Male/female ratio was 1.35 and mean age 72 years. Constipation, weight loss, anemia and rectal bleeding were the most commonly reported symptoms. Lesions involved descending-sigmoid colon in 53% of cases, rectum in 37% and ascending colon in 10%. Among laparoscopic colorectal operations laparoscopic left colectomy was the most frequently performed, followed by right colectomy, abdominoperineal resection and Hartmann procedure. Operative times ranged from 3 to 5 hours depending on surgical procedure performed. Mean hospital stay was 6 days (range 4–9). Conversion to open approach occurred only in a case of laparoscopic right colectomy (3%) for uncontrolled bleeding. A single case of mortality was reported. In two cases (7%) anastomotic leakage was observed, conservatively treated in one patient and requiring reoperation in the other one. Conclusions Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is feasible and effective for malignancies in elderly population offering several advantages including immunologic and oncologic ones. However an experienced surgical team is essential in reducing risks and complications. PMID:25827663

  13. Impact of Direct-to-Consumer Predictive Genomic Testing on Risk Perception and Worry Among Patients Receiving Routine Care in a Preventive Health Clinic

    PubMed Central

    James, Katherine M.; Cowl, Clayton T.; Tilburt, Jon C.; Sinicrope, Pamela S.; Robinson, Marguerite E.; Frimannsdottir, Katrin R.; Tiedje, Kristina; Koenig, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of direct-to-consumer (DTC) predictive genomic risk information on perceived risk and worry in the context of routine clinical care. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients attending a preventive medicine clinic between June 1 and December 18, 2009, were randomly assigned to receive either genomic risk information from a DTC product plus usual care (n=74) or usual care alone (n=76). At intervals of 1 week and 1 year after their clinic visit, participants completed surveys containing validated measures of risk perception and levels of worry associated with the 12 conditions assessed by the DTC product. RESULTS: Of 345 patients approached, 150 (43%) agreed to participate, 64 (19%) refused, and 131 (38%) did not respond. Compared with those receiving usual care, participants who received genomic risk information initially rated their risk as higher for 4 conditions (abdominal aneurysm [P=.001], Graves disease [P=.04], obesity [P=.01], and osteoarthritis [P=.04]) and lower for one (prostate cancer [P=.02]). Although differences were not significant, they also reported higher levels of worry for 7 conditions and lower levels for 5 others. At 1 year, there were no significant differences between groups. CONCLUSION: Predictive genomic risk information modestly influences risk perception and worry. The extent and direction of this influence may depend on the condition being tested and its baseline prominence in preventive health care and may attenuate with time. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00782366 PMID:21964170

  14. Routine Chromosomal Microarray Analysis is Necessary in Korean Patients With Unexplained Developmental Delay/Mental Retardation/Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Saeam; Yu, Nae; Choi, Jong Rak; Jeong, Seri

    2015-01-01

    Background All over the world, chromosomal microarray (CMA) is now the first tier diagnostic assay for genetic testing to evaluate developmental delay (DD), mental retardation (MR), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with unknown etiology. The average diagnostic yield of the CMA test is known to be about 12.2%, while that of conventional G-banding karyotype is below 3%. This study aimed to assess the usefulness of CMA for the purpose of clinical diagnostic testing in the Korean population. Methods We performed CMA and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) tests in 96 patients with normal karyotype and unexplained DD, MR, or ASD. The CMA was conducted with CytoScan 750K array (Affymetrix, USA) with an average resolution of 100 kb. Results Pathogenic copy number variations (CNVs) were detected in 15 patients by CMA and in two patients by MLPA for four known microdeletion syndromes (Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome, DiGeorge syndrome, Miller-Dieker syndrome and Williams syndrome) designated by National Health Insurance system in Korea. The diagnostic yield was 15.6% and 2.1%, respectively. Thirteen (13.5%) patients (excluding cases with pathogenic CNVs) had variants of uncertain clinical significance. There was one patient with a 17.1-megabase (Mb) region of homozygosity on chromosome 4q. Conclusions Our findings suggest the necessity of CMA as a routine diagnostic test for unexplained DD, MR, and ASD in Korea. PMID:26206688

  15. Detecting re-infection in patients after an initial diagnosis of gonorrhoea: is routine recall for re-screening useful?

    PubMed

    Fernando, K A; Fowler, T; Harding, J; Flew, S; Caley, M; Phattey, J; Ross, Jdc

    2015-08-01

    To assess the outcome of routine sexually transmitted infection re-screening after a three-month interval in unselected patients diagnosed with gonorrhoea, we sought to assess whether this active approach would result in an increase in the number of people attending clinic and subsequently diagnosed with gonorrhoea re-infection, compared with normal re-presentation rates. A recall group of patients were invited for re-screening three months after their initial diagnosis of gonorrhoea. Permission was sought to send a reminder two weeks prior to their scheduled recall appointment. Comparisons were made with a historical control group of patients with gonorrhoea in the absence of any formal recall. Of the 242 patients in the intervention arm, 96 (40%) re-attended within six months, and 15 (6%) tested gonorrhoea positive. Two hundred and two patients were assessed in the control group, of whom 45 (22%) re-attended within six months, and 13 (6%) tested gonorrhoea positive. Women were more likely than men to re-attend following active recall, but they were not at higher risk of re-attending while re-infected with gonorrhoea. Active recall following a gonorrhoea diagnosis significantly increases re-attendance rates for repeat screening but did not result in an increased number of subsequent gonorrhoea diagnoses.

  16. Learning from Homeschooling Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a rare opportunity to look inside the homeschool and to observe the routines of homeschooling families from across the United States. With more than 1000 survey participants, and nine parents selected for interviews, the compiled data were analyzed through open coding techniques. Meaningful aspects that arose from the routines…

  17. Should routine contrast study be a norm before stoma reversal? A retrospective study of patients with temporary ileostomy.

    PubMed

    Saini, Pradeep; Gupta, Praanjal; Sharma, Ashish; Agarwal, Nitin; Kaur, Navneet; Gupta, Arun

    2013-04-01

    In the developed nations, temporary ileostomies are usually made in order to protect a distal anastomosis after cancer surgery. However, in India and the neighbouring countries ileal perforation is the most common indication for creating a temporary ileostomy after emergency laparotomy. It seems logical to perform a contrast study when a stoma that was made to protect a bowel anastomosis is being reversed in order to check for anastomosis healing, leak or stenosis. Although we do not know precisely when and why we started this practice, it is customary at our institute to do a contrast study before reversal of a temporary ileostomy. At some institutes a routine contrast study is never done. The utility of this practice has not previously been studied at our institute. This study tries to correlate the surgeon's clinical and operative findings with the contrast study report in order to see if it may be reasonable to reverse the stoma without a routine contrast study in selected patients where the surgeon has clearly documented absence of any gross disease in the distal bowel and who have had an uneventful post-operative period. To our knowledge this appears to be the first such attempt from our country.

  18. Circulating Cell Free Tumor DNA Detection as a Routine Tool for Lung Cancer Patient Management

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, Julie A.; Mau-Them, Frédéric Tran; Béganton, Benoît; Godreuil, Sylvain; Coopman, Peter; Solassol, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumoral DNA (ctDNA), commonly named “liquid biopsy”, has emerged as a new promising noninvasive tool to detect biomarker in several cancers including lung cancer. Applications involving molecular analysis of ctDNA in lung cancer have increased and encompass diagnosis, response to treatment, acquired resistance and prognosis prediction, while bypassing the problem of tumor heterogeneity. ctDNA may then help perform dynamic genetic surveillance in the era of precision medicine through indirect tumoral genomic information determination. The aims of this review were to examine the recent technical developments that allowed the detection of genetic alterations of ctDNA in lung cancer. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications in patients with lung cancer including treatment efficiency monitoring, acquired therapy resistance mechanisms and prognosis value. PMID:28146051

  19. Routine Screening for CYP2C19 Polymorphisms for Patients being Treated with Clopidogrel is not Recommended

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Robert A; Khan, Zia R; Valentin, Mona R; Badawi, Ramy A

    2015-01-01

    Recent efforts directed at potential litigation in Hawai‘i have resulted in a renewed interest for genetic screening for cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) polymorphisms in patients treated with clopidogrel. Clopidogrel is an antiplatelet agent, frequently used in combination with aspirin, for the prevention of thrombotic complications with acute coronary syndrome and in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. Cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 2C19 is an enzyme involved in the bioactivation of clopidogrel from a pro-drug to an active inhibitor of platelet action. Patients of Asian and Pacific Island background have been reported to have an increase in CYP2C19 polymorphisms associated with loss-of-function of this enzyme when compared to other ethnicities. This has created an interest in genetic testing for CYP2C19 polymorphisms in Hawai‘i. Based upon our review of the current literature, we do not feel that there is support for the routine screening for CYP2C19 polymorphisms in patients being treated with clopidogrel; furthermore, the results of genetic testing may not be helpful in guiding therapeutic decisions. We recommend that decisions on the type of antiplatelet treatment be made based upon clinical evidence of potential differential outcomes associated with the use of these agents rather than on the basis of genetic testing. PMID:25628978

  20. Effectiveness of betahistine (48 mg/day) in patients with vestibular vertigo during routine practice: The VIRTUOSO study

    PubMed Central

    Parfenov, Vladimir A.; Golyk, Volodymyr A.; Matsnev, Eduard I.; Morozova, Svetlana V.; Melnikov, Oleg A.; Antonenko, Ludmila M.; Sigaleva, Elena E.; Situkho, Maksym I.; Asaulenko, Olena I.; Popovych, Vasyl I.; Zamergrad, Maxim V.

    2017-01-01

    Background Vestibular vertigo is associated with substantially reduced quality of life. Betahistine is effective in improving vertigo-associated symptoms, with longer treatment periods leading to greater improvements; however, it is not known whether these effects persist after treatment cessation. Methods VIRTUOSO was a prospective, multinational, non-comparative, post-marketing observational programme investigating the effectiveness of betahistine (48 mg/day) and the course of vertigo after the discontinuation of treatment. Patients with vestibular vertigo who were prescribed 48 mg/day betahistine were enrolled in Russia and Ukraine. Treatment duration was up to 2 months, and patients were followed up for 2 months after discontinuation of betahistine. Efficacy endpoints included clinical response (assessed by change in vertigo severity), monthly attack frequency, and physician and patient grading of overall clinical response and improvement of vertigo-associated symptoms. Results Overall, 309 patients were enrolled and 305 completed the study. Clinical response was rated as good, very good or excellent in 74.1% of patients at end of treatment, with vertigo severity significantly decreased from baseline (p < 0.001). Monthly vertigo attack frequency decreased significantly during the 2 months of treatment (p < 0.001 from baseline) and further decreased during the 2-month follow-up (p < 0.001 from end of treatment). Overall, clinical response was graded as good or excellent by 94.4% of physicians and 95.4% of patients. Clinical improvement was considered either good or excellent by 82.6–90.5% of physicians and patients for nausea, vomiting and faintness. Only one adverse event was reported, with no serious adverse events. Conclusion Our findings suggest that betahistine (48 mg/day) therapy is effective in treating vertigo in routine clinical settings. The observed effects persisted for 2 months after treatment cessation, suggesting that betahistine may facilitate

  1. Balneological outpatient treatment for patients with knee osteoarthritis; an effective non-drug therapy option in daily routine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkuk, Kaǧan; Gürdal, Hatice; Karagülle, Mine; Barut, Yasemin; Eröksüz, Rıza; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to compare the effects of balneological treatments applied at consecutive and intermittent sessions without interfering with their daily routine in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This is a randomized, controlled, single-blind clinical trial. Fifty patients diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were included. The patients were divided into two groups. All patients were given a total of ten sessions of balneological treatment consisting of hydrotherapy and mud pack therapy. Group 1 received consecutive treatment for 2 weeks, while group 2 received intermittent treatment for 5 weeks. Local peloid packs at 45 °C were applied for 20 min, after a tap water (38 °C) bath. Evaluations were conducted before, after treatment, and at 12th week of post-treatment by Pain (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and Short Form-36 (SF-36). Both balneological treatment regimens of knee osteoarthritis had statistically significant clinical effects as well as effects on the quality of life. Patients' well-being continued at 3 months, except for joint stiffness (WOMAC), role-emotional (SF-36), and vitality (SF-36) in group 1 and for mental health (SF-36) in both groups. Both patient groups had improved compared to baseline. However, at 3 months after the treatment, the well-being of group 2 was unable to be maintained in terms of role-physical (SF-36) parameter, while the well-being of group 1 was unable to be maintained in terms of pain, WOMAC (pain, physical functions, total), and SF-36 (physical functioning, role-physical, pain, role-emotional, and mental health) variables, compared to data obtained immediately after treatment. Our study suggests that traditional and intermittent balneological therapies have similar efficacy in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  2. Evaluation of Subcutaneous Glucose Monitoring Systems under Routine Environmental Conditions in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Aberer, Felix; Hajnsek, Martin; Rumpler, Markus; Zenz, Sabine; Baumann, Petra; Elsayed, Hesham; Puffing, Adelheid; Treiber, Gerlies; Pieber, Thomas R; Sourij, Harald; Mader, Julia K

    2017-02-16

    Continuous and flash glucose monitoring (GM) systems have been established in diabetes care. We compared sensor performance of three commercially available GM systems. 12 patients with type 1 diabetes were included in a single-centre, open-label study where sensor performance of Abbott FreeStyle libre (Abbott), Dexcom G4 Platinum (Dexcom) and Medtronic MiniMed 640G (Medtronic) over 12 hours was compared during mimicked real-life conditions (meals, exercise, hypo- and hyperglycaemia). Sensor performance was determined by fulfilment of ISO 15197:2013 criteria, calculating mean absolute relative difference (MARD) as well as illustrated by Parkes Error grid and Bland-Altman plot. Sensor performance during changes of metabolic parameters (lactate, betahydroxybutyrate, glucagon, non-esterified-fatty-acids) was determined by Spearman`s rank correlation coefficient testing. The systems fulfilled ISO 15197:2013 criteria by 73.2% (Abbott), 56.1% (Dexcom) and 52.0% (Medtronic). MARD in the entire glycaemic range was 13.2% ± 10.9% (Abbott), 16.8% ± 12.3% (Dexcom) and 21.4% ± 17.6% (Medtronic), respectively. All sensors performed less accurately during hypoglycaemia and best during hyperglycaemia. We could not observe an influence of metabolic parameters on sensor performance.

  3. Integrating Patient-Reported Outcome Measures into Routine Cancer Care: Cancer Patients’ and Clinicians’ Perceptions of Acceptability and Value

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Angela; Irwin, Debra E.; Chen, Ronald C.; Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Mayer, Deborah K.; Muss, Hyman B.; Rosenstein, Donald L.; Shea, Thomas C.; Wood, William A.; Lyons, Jessica C.; Reeve, Bryce B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Despite growing interest in integrating patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures of symptoms and functional status into routine cancer care, little attention has been paid to patients’ and clinicians’ perceptions of acceptability and value. Methods: A two-phase qualitative study was conducted to develop a web-based PRO screening system with 21 items assessing symptoms (e.g., nausea) and functional status. Phase 1 involved cognitive interviews with 35 cancer outpatients (n=9 breast chemotherapy, radiation for prostate (n=8) or head and neck cancer (n=10), and n=8 bone marrow transplant [BMT]). In Phase 2, we evaluated the acceptability and perceived value of reviewing a PRO measure during real-time clinical encounters with 39 additional outpatients (n=10 breast, n=9 head and neck, n=10 prostate, n=10 BMT) and 12 clinicians (n=3 breast, n=2 head and neck, n=4 prostate, n=3 BMT). At least 20% of patients were ≥60 years, African American, or ≤ high school. Results: Patients felt that their PRO summary of symptoms and functional status was helpful in discussing health issues with clinicians (92%), wanted to review their results with clinicians during future visits (82%), and would recommend it to other patients (87%). Clinicians found the PRO summary to be easy to interpret (83%), most helpful for documenting the Review of Symptoms (92%), and would recommend it to future patients (92%). Over 90% of clinicians reported that consultation time did not increase. Conclusion: Both cancer patients and clinicians reported that discussing a PRO summary of symptoms and functional status during an outpatient visit was useful, acceptable, and feasible. PMID:26557724

  4. Should excretory urography be used as a routine diagnostic procedure in patients with acute ureteric colic: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Samara, Osama A; Haroun, Dina A; Ashour, Do'a Z; Tarawneh, Emad S; Haroun, Azmi A

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to find an accurate, easily available and safe imaging modality as an alternative to intravenous urography for the diagnosis of acute urinary obstruction. This retrospective study included 332 patients, who underwent both excretory urography (EU) preceeded by plain radiograph as well as ultrasonography for evaluation of acute flank pain. There were 198 male and 134 female patients. The presence or absence of urinary stones, level of obstruction, excretion delay on EU and dilated excretory system on either or both techniques were recorded. The sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and accuracy for plain radiograph, ultrasonography, and for both modalities together were measured considering EU as a standard reference. The sensitivity and specificity of combined plain radiograph and ultrasound were 97% and 67%, respectively, with positive and negative predictive values and accuracy rates of 92%, 99%, and 97%, respectively. Our study suggests that the combination of plain radiograph and ultrasonography yields a high sensitivity, negative predictive value, and accuracy in depiction of urinary stones. Thus, EU need not be used as a routine diagnostic procedure in patients with acute obstructive uropathy.

  5. Therapeutic benefits of cannabis: a patient survey.

    PubMed

    Webb, Charles W; Webb, Sandra M

    2014-04-01

    Clinical research regarding the therapeutic benefits of cannabis ("marijuana") has been almost non-existent in the United States since cannabis was given Schedule I status in the Controlled Substances Act of 1970. In order to discover the benefits and adverse effects perceived by medical cannabis patients, especially with regards to chronic pain, we hand-delivered surveys to one hundred consecutive patients who were returning for yearly re-certification for medical cannabis use in Hawai'i. The response rate was 94%. Mean and median ages were 49.3 and 51 years respectively. Ninety-seven per cent of respondents used cannabis primarily for chronic pain. Average pain improvement on a 0-10 pain scale was 5.0 (from 7.8 to 2.8), which translates to a 64% relative decrease in average pain. Half of all respondents also noted relief from stress/anxiety, and nearly half (45%) reported relief from insomnia. Most patients (71%) reported no adverse effects, while 6% reported a cough or throat irritation and 5% feared arrest even though medical cannabis is legal in Hawai'i. No serious adverse effects were reported. These results suggest that Cannabis is an extremely safe and effective medication for many chronic pain patients. Cannabis appears to alleviate pain, insomnia, and may be helpful in relieving anxiety. Cannabis has shown extreme promise in the treatment of numerous medical problems and deserves to be released from the current Schedule I federal prohibition against research and prescription.

  6. The PRONE score: an algorithm for predicting doctors’ risks of formal patient complaints using routinely collected administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Spittal, Matthew J; Bismark, Marie M; Studdert, David M

    2015-01-01

    Background Medicolegal agencies—such as malpractice insurers, medical boards and complaints bodies—are mostly passive regulators; they react to episodes of substandard care, rather than intervening to prevent them. At least part of the explanation for this reactive role lies in the widely recognised difficulty of making robust predictions about medicolegal risk at the individual clinician level. We aimed to develop a simple, reliable scoring system for predicting Australian doctors’ risks of becoming the subject of repeated patient complaints. Methods Using routinely collected administrative data, we constructed a national sample of 13 849 formal complaints against 8424 doctors. The complaints were lodged by patients with state health service commissions in Australia over a 12-year period. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify predictors of subsequent complaints, defined as another complaint occurring within 2 years of an index complaint. Model estimates were then used to derive a simple predictive algorithm, designed for application at the doctor level. Results The PRONE (Predicted Risk Of New Event) score is a 22-point scoring system that indicates a doctor's future complaint risk based on four variables: a doctor's specialty and sex, the number of previous complaints and the time since the last complaint. The PRONE score performed well in predicting subsequent complaints, exhibiting strong validity and reliability and reasonable goodness of fit (c-statistic=0.70). Conclusions The PRONE score appears to be a valid method for assessing individual doctors’ risks of attracting recurrent complaints. Regulators could harness such information to target quality improvement interventions, and prevent substandard care and patient dissatisfaction. The approach we describe should be replicable in other agencies that handle large numbers of patient complaints or malpractice claims. PMID:25855664

  7. The Bactec FX Blood Culture System Detects Brucella melitensis Bacteremia in Adult Patients within the Routine 1-Week Incubation Period.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Moshe; Nesher, Lior; Yagupsky, Pablo

    2017-03-01

    The performance of the Bactec FX blood culture system for detecting Brucella bacteremia within the routine 1-week incubation period was assessed in a prospective study conducted in an area in southern Israel in which Brucella melitensis is endemic. Aerobic vials (BD Bactec Plus Aerobic/F medium) inoculated with blood specimens obtained from adult patients with positive Rose-Bengal screening test results were monitored for 4 consecutive weeks, and blind subcultures of negative vials were performed on solid media on days 7 and 28. During a 16-month period, a total of 31 (35.2%) of 88 cultures, obtained from 19 (38.0%) of 50 patients, were positive for Brucella melitensis The blood culture instrument identified 30 (96.8%) of 31 positive vials within 7 days of incubation; the single positive vial that was missed by the automated readings was detected only by the blind subculture performed on day 28. It is concluded that the Bactec FX system is able to detect the vast majority of episodes of Brucella bacteremia within the 1-week incubation protocol instituted in most clinical microbiology laboratories and without the need to perform blind subcultures of negative vials, enabling early diagnosis and saving labor and incubation time and space.

  8. A modified Two-BUN method for routine urea modeling: clinical validation in 120 patients on a free diet.

    PubMed

    Casino, F G; Lomonte, C; Russo, R; Di Iorio, B; Chiarulli, G; Manno, C; Lopez, T

    1995-09-01

    Recently, a modified algorithm of the Two-BUN method (MA2p), avoiding dialyzer clearance measurement, was presented for routine assessment of Kt/V and NPCR. To validate MA2p in patients on a free diet (FDP), we studied 120 stable dialysis FDP by measuring Kt/V and NPCR with both MA2p and a modified version of the standard Three-BUN method (MA3p), for the 3 weekly sessions. The NPCR values (g/kg/day), calculated by MA3p for the 3 interdialyses were: 1.286 +/- 0.274, 1.256 +/- 0.276, and 1.116 +/- 0.230, respectively. The correlation coefficient (r) for averaged Kt/V values obtained by the two methods was 0.999 and the percent error (Error%) for MA2p vs. MA3p results ranged from -1.5 to +0.78%. The respective results for NPCR were: r = 0.967, Error% range from -11.7 to +13.9%. In conclusion, MA2p can be safely used in patients on a free diet. The lowest NPCR values were observed during the long interdialysis.

  9. "Sorry Can You Speak It in English with Me?" Managing Routines in Lingua Franca Doctor--Patient Consultations in a Diabetes Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Gillian S.

    2015-01-01

    Research on the routines of doctor-patient consultations has been conducted in language and culture concordant dyads and in dyads where either doctor or patient uses a foreign language; yet there is an absence of scholarly engagement with consultations where both participants are using a foreign language. In seeking to address this gap, this…

  10. Quality-assurance data for routine water analysis in the National Water-Quality Laboratory of the US Geological Survey for water year 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucey, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    The US Geological Survey maintains a quality assurance program based on the analysis of reference samples for its National Water Quality Laboratory located in Denver, Colorado. Reference samples containing selected inorganic, nutrient, and precipitation (low-level concentration) constituents are prepared at the Survey 's Water Quality Services Unit in Ocala, Florida, disguised as routine samples, and sent daily or weekly, as appropriate, to the laboratory through other Survey offices. The results are stored permanently in the National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE), the Survey 's database for all water data. These data are analyzed statistically for precision and bias. An overall evaluation of the inorganic major ion and trace metal constituent data for water year 1988 indicated a lack of precision in the National Water Quality Laboratory for the determination of 8 out of 58 constituents: calcium (inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry), fluoride, iron (atomic absorption spectrometry), iron (total recoverable), magnesium (atomic absorption spectrometry), manganese (total recoverable), potassium, and sodium (inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry). The results for 31 constituents had positive or negative bias during water year 1988. A lack of precision was indicated in the determination of three of the six nutrient constituents: nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen as nitrogen, nitrite nitrogen as nitrogen, and orthophosphate as phosphorus. A biased condition was indicated in the determination of ammonia nitrogen as nitrogen, ammonia plus organic nitrogen as nitrogen, and nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen as nitrogen. There was acceptable precision in the determination of all 10 constituents contained in precipitation samples. Results for ammonia nitrogen as nitrogen, sodium, and fluoride indicated a biased condition. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Predicting frequent asthma exacerbations using blood eosinophil count and other patient data routinely available in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Price, David; Wilson, Andrew M; Chisholm, Alison; Rigazio, Anna; Burden, Anne; Thomas, Michael; King, Christine

    2016-01-01

    .50, 4.01]; P<0.001), and three or more courses increased the odds by >25-fold (OR: 25.7 [95% CI: 23.9, 27.6]; P<0.001). Conclusion Blood eosinophil count and several other variables routinely available in patient records may be used to predict frequent asthma exacerbations. PMID:26793004

  12. Outcomes of Hepatic Resection in Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma Patients with Diabetes, Hypertension, and Dyslipidemia: Significance of Routine Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Nishioka, Takayoshi; Kubo, Shoji; Tanaka, Shogo; Wakasa, Kenichi; Takemura, Shigekazu; Kinoshita, Masahiko; Hamano, Genya; Kuwae, Yuko; Shibata, Toshihiko; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2016-01-01

    Background The outcomes of hepatic resection in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HT), and dyslipidemia (DL) (metabolic components) remain unclear. Methods The outcomes of 43 ICC patients without known risk factors for ICC who underwent hepatic resection were retrospectively reviewed. These patients were divided into three groups: those followed-up for metabolic components at least every 6 months (follow-up group, n=16), those not followed-up for metabolic components (no follow-up group, n=14), and those without metabolic components (control group, n=13). Results In the follow-up group, 13 (81%) patients were further examined for ICC during follow-up because of abnormal screening results, such as elevated serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) concentrations or detection of hepatic tumor on ultrasonography and/or computed tomography, whereas most patients in the other two groups exhibited ICC-related symptoms. No patient in the follow-up group exhibited lymph node metastasis, whereas 43% of those in the no follow-up group and 46% in the control group had lymph node metastasis (p=0.005 and 0.004 vs. the follow-up group, respectively). All 16 patients in the follow-up group were diagnosed as International Union Against Cancer pathologic stage I or II (early stage). There were no significant differences in the incidence of postoperative recurrence between the three groups; however, the incidence of extrahepatic recurrence was lower in the follow-up group than in the no follow-up group and the control group (13% vs. 78% vs. 63%, p=0.0232). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survivalrates in the follow-up group were better than those in the no follow-up and control groups (93/93/66% vs. 77/34/34% and 85/24/0%, p=0.034 and 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Routine measurement of serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and/or CA19-9 levels and imaging examinations every 12 months (or 6

  13. The management of uncomplicated adult gonococcal infection: should test of cure still be routine in patients attending genitourinary medicine clinics?

    PubMed

    Harry, C

    2004-07-01

    .5%). We have now discontinued routine attendance for a test of cure and encourage our patients to telephone for their results with recall only of patients whose antimicrobial susceptibility indicate inappropriate first line therapy or who are still symptomatic.

  14. CCU patient survey tool: all-out recovery.

    PubMed

    Bradford, D; Carvalho, M; Conti, M; Davis, J; Dix, S K; Hartman, E; Iding, L; Mueller, L; Porth, C M; Sunstrom, C

    1998-09-01

    Studies show that patients' recall of their CCU stays is extremely limited due to various factors. To monitor patient satisfaction in this area, a team of CCU managers developed a survey and began an "All-Out Recovery Program."

  15. Do patients with lactose intolerance exhibit more frequent comorbidities than patients without lactose intolerance? An analysis of routine data from German medical practices

    PubMed Central

    Schiffner, Rebecca; Kostev, Karel; Gothe, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Background The increase in food intolerances poses a burgeoning problem in our society. Food intolerances not only lead to physical impairment of the individual patient but also result in a high socio-economic burden due to factors such as the treatment required as well as absenteeism. The present study aimed to explore whether lactose intolerant (LI) patients exhibit more frequent comorbidities than non-LI patients. Methods The study was conducted on a case-control basis and the results were determined using routine data analysis. Routine data from the IMS Disease Analyzer database were used for this purpose. A total of 6,758 data records were processed and analyzed. Results There were significant correlations between LI and the incidence of osteoporosis, changes in mental status, and the presence of additional food intolerances. Comparing 3,379 LI vs. 3,379 non-LI patients, 34.5% vs. 17.7% (P<0.0001) suffered from abdominal pain; 30.6% vs. 17.2% (P<0.0001) from gastrointestinal infections; and 20.9% vs. 16.0% (P=0.0053) from depression. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) were the highest for fructose intolerance (n=229 LI vs. n=7 non-LI; OR 31.06; P<0.0001), irritable bowel syndrome (n=247 LI vs. n=44 non-LI; OR 5.23; P<0.0001), and bloating (n=351 LI vs. n=68 non-LI; OR 4.94; P<0.0001). Conclusion The study confirms that LI should not be regarded as an isolated illness but considered a possible trigger for further diseases. Additional research is necessary to assert more precise statements. PMID:27065730

  16. A cross-platform survey of CT image quality and dose from routine abdomen protocols and a method to systematically standardize image quality

    PubMed Central

    Favazza, Christopher P.; Duan, Xinhui; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James M.; Bruesewitz, Michael R.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-01-01

    Through this investigation we developed a methodology to evaluate and standardize CT image quality from routine abdomen protocols across different manufacturers and models. The influence of manufacturer-specific automated exposure control systems on image quality was directly assessed to standardize performance across a range of patient sizes. We evaluated 16 CT scanners across our health system, including Siemens, GE, and Toshiba models. Using each practice’s routine abdomen protocol, we measured spatial resolution, image noise, and scanner radiation output (CTDIvol). Axial and in-plane spatial resolutions were assessed through slice sensitivity profile (SSP) and modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements, respectively. Image noise and CTDIvol values were obtained for three different phantom sizes. SSP measurements demonstrated a bimodal distribution in slice widths: an average of 6.2 ± 0.2 mm using GE’s “Plus” mode reconstruction setting and 5.0 ± 0.1 mm for all other scanners. MTF curves were similar for all scanners. Average spatial frequencies at 50%, 10%, and 2% MTF values were 3.24 ± 0.37, 6.20 ± 0.34, and 7.84 ± 0.70 lp/cm, respectively. For all phantom sizes, image noise and CTDIvol varied considerably: 6.5–13.3 HU (noise) and 4.8–13.3 mGy (CTDIvol) for the smallest phantom; 9.1–18.4 HU and 9.3–28.8 mGy for the medium phantom; and 7.8–23.4 HU and 16.0–48.1 mGy for the largest phantom. Using these measurements and benchmark SSP, MTF, and image noise targets, CT image quality can be standardized across a range of patient sizes. PMID:26459751

  17. A cross-platform survey of CT image quality and dose from routine abdomen protocols and a method to systematically standardize image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favazza, Christopher P.; Duan, Xinhui; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James M.; Bruesewitz, Michael R.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-11-01

    Through this investigation we developed a methodology to evaluate and standardize CT image quality from routine abdomen protocols across different manufacturers and models. The influence of manufacturer-specific automated exposure control systems on image quality was directly assessed to standardize performance across a range of patient sizes. We evaluated 16 CT scanners across our health system, including Siemens, GE, and Toshiba models. Using each practice’s routine abdomen protocol, we measured spatial resolution, image noise, and scanner radiation output (CTDIvol). Axial and in-plane spatial resolutions were assessed through slice sensitivity profile (SSP) and modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements, respectively. Image noise and CTDIvol values were obtained for three different phantom sizes. SSP measurements demonstrated a bimodal distribution in slice widths: an average of 6.2  ±  0.2 mm using GE’s ‘Plus’ mode reconstruction setting and 5.0  ±  0.1 mm for all other scanners. MTF curves were similar for all scanners. Average spatial frequencies at 50%, 10%, and 2% MTF values were 3.24  ±  0.37, 6.20  ±  0.34, and 7.84  ±  0.70 lp cm-1, respectively. For all phantom sizes, image noise and CTDIvol varied considerably: 6.5-13.3 HU (noise) and 4.8-13.3 mGy (CTDIvol) for the smallest phantom; 9.1-18.4 HU and 9.3-28.8 mGy for the medium phantom; and 7.8-23.4 HU and 16.0-48.1 mGy for the largest phantom. Using these measurements and benchmark SSP, MTF, and image noise targets, CT image quality can be standardized across a range of patient sizes.

  18. Multicenter Survey of Routine Determinations of Resistance of Helicobacter pylori to Antimicrobials over the Last 20 Years (1990 to 2009) in Belgium▿

    PubMed Central

    Miendje Deyi, V. Y.; Bontems, P.; Vanderpas, J.; De Koster, E.; Ntounda, R.; Van den Borre, C.; Cadranel, S.; Burette, A.

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the rates of antimicrobial resistance of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients from 1990 to 2009 and identified risk factors associated with resistance. Gastric biopsy specimens were collected from several digestive disease centers in Brussels, Belgium. We routinely performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing for clarithromycin (CLR), metronidazole, amoxicillin, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin. Evaluable susceptibility testing was obtained for 9,430 strains isolated from patients who were not previously treated for Helicobacter pylori infection (1,527 isolates from children and 7,903 from adults) and 1,371 strains from patients who were previously treated (162 isolates from children and 1,209 from adults). No resistance to amoxicillin was observed, and tetracycline resistance was very rare (<0.01%). Primary metronidazole resistance remained stable over the years, with significantly lower rates for isolates from children (23.4%) than for isolates from adults (30.6%). Ciprofloxacin resistance remained rare in children, while it increased significantly over the last years in adults. Primary clarithromycin resistance increased significantly, reaching peaks in 2000 for children (16.9%) and in 2003 for adults (23.7%). A subsequent decrease of resistance rates down to 10% in both groups corresponded to a parallel decrease in macrolide consumption during the same period. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that female gender, age of the patient of 40 to 64 years, ethnic background, the number of previously unsuccessful eradication attempts, and the different time periods studied were independent risk factors of resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and ciprofloxacin. Our study highlights the need to update local epidemiological data. Thus, the empirical CLR-based triple therapy proposed by the Maastricht III consensus report remains currently applicable to our population. PMID:21450969

  19. Introducing routine HIV screening for patients on an internal medicine residency inpatient service: a quality improvement project

    PubMed Central

    Padrnos, Leslie J; Barr, Patrick J; Klassen, Christine L; Fields, Heather E; Azadeh, Natalya; Mendoza, Neil; Saadiq, Rayya A; Pauwels, Emanuel M; King, Christopher S; Chung, Andrew A; Sakata, Kenneth K; Blair, Janis E

    2016-01-01

    The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening for all persons aged 13 to 64 years who present to a health care provider. We sought to improve adherence to the CDC guidelines on the Internal Medicine Resident Hospital Service. We surveyed residents about the CDC guidelines, sent email reminders, provided education, and engaged them in friendly competition. Credit for guideline adherence was awarded if an offer of HIV screening was documented at admission, if a screening test was performed, or if a notation in the resident sign out sheet indicated why screening was not performed. We examined HIV screening of a postintervention group of patients admitted between August 8, 2012, and June 30, 2013, and compared them to a preintervention group admitted between August 1, 2011, and June 30, 2012. Postintervention offers of HIV screening increased significantly (7.9% [44/559] vs 55.5% [300/541]; P<.001), as did documentation of residents' contemplation of screening (8.9% [50/559] vs 67.5% [365/541]; P<.001). A significantly higher proportion of HIV screening tests was ordered postintervention (7.7% [43/559] vs 44.4% [240/541]; P<.001). Monthly HIV screening documentation ranged from 0% (0/53) to 17% (9/53) preintervention, whereas it ranged from 30.6% (11/36) to 100% (62/62) postintervention. HIV screening adherence can be improved through resident education, friendly competition, and system reminders. Barriers to achieving sustained adherence to the CDC guidelines include a heterogeneous patient population and provider discomfort with the subject. PMID:27239302

  20. Nurse perspectives on the implementation of routine telemonitoring for high-risk diabetes patients in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Vest, Bonnie M; Hall, Victoria M; Kahn, Linda S; Heider, Arvela R; Maloney, Nancy; Singh, Ranjit

    2017-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this qualitative evaluation was to explore the experience of implementing routine telemonitoring (TM) in real-world primary care settings from the perspective of those delivering the intervention; namely the TM staff, and report on lessons learned that could inform future projects of this type.

  1. Role of routine imaging in detecting recurrent lymphoma: A review of 258 patients with relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    El-Galaly, T C; Mylam, Karen Juul; Bøgsted, Martin; Brown, Peter; Rossing, Maria; Gang, Anne Ortved; Haglund, Anne; Arboe, Bente; Clausen, Michael Roost; Jensen, Paw; Pedersen, Michael; Bukh, Anne; Jensen, Bo Amdi; Poulsen, Christian Bjørn; d'Amore, Francesco; Hutchings, Martin

    2014-06-01

    After first-line therapy, patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and aggressive non-HL are followed up closely for early signs of relapse. The current follow-up practice with frequent use of surveillance imaging is highly controversial and warrants a critical evaluation. Therefore, a retrospective multicenter study of relapsed HL and aggressive non-HL (nodal T-cell and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas) was conducted. All included patients had been diagnosed during the period 2002-2011 and relapsed after achieving complete remission on first-line therapy. Characteristics and outcome of imaging-detected relapses were compared with other relapses. A total of 258 patients with recurrent lymphoma were included in the study. Relapse investigations were initiated outside preplanned visits in 52% of the patients. Relapse detection could be attributed to patient-reported symptoms alone or in combination with abnormal blood tests or physical examination in 64% of the patients. Routine imaging prompted relapse investigations in 27% of the patients. The estimated number of routine scans per relapse was 91-255 depending on the lymphoma subtype. Patients with imaging-detected relapse had lower disease burden (P = 0.045) and reduced risk of death following relapse (hazard ratio = 0.62, P = 0.02 in multivariate analysis). Patient-reported symptoms are still the most common factor for detecting lymphoma relapse and the high number of scans per relapse calls for improved criteria for use of surveillance imaging. However, imaging-detected relapse was associated with lower disease burden and a possible survival advantage. The future role of routine surveillance imaging should be defined in a randomized trial.

  2. Learning Difficulties of Diabetic Patients: A Survey of Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Caroline; Gagnayre, Remi; d'Ivernois, Jean-Francois

    1998-01-01

    Surveys 85 health care professionals on the learning difficulties of diabetic patients. Results show that educators find it easy to teach techniques: patients master procedures well and make few mistakes. In contrast, diabetic patients seem to have problems learning skills, such as insulin dose adjustment, that require complex problem-solving.…

  3. Implementing RapidArc into clinical routine: A comprehensive program from machine QA to TPS validation and patient QA

    SciTech Connect

    Van Esch, Ann; Huyskens, Dominique P.; Behrens, Claus F.; Samsoee, Eva; Sjoelin, Maria; Bjelkengren, Ulf; Sjoestroem, David; Clermont, Christian; Hambach, Lionel; Sergent, Francois

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: With the increased commercial availability of intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) comes the need for comprehensive QA programs, covering the different aspects of this newly available technology. This manuscript proposes such a program for the RapidArc (RA) (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto) IMAT solution. Methods: The program was developed and tested out for a Millennium120 MLC on iX Clinacs and a HighDefinition MLC on a Novalis TX, using a variety of measurement equipment including Gafchromic film, 2D ion chamber arrays (Seven29 and StarCheck, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) with inclinometer and Octavius phantom, the Delta4 systam (ScandiDos, Uppsala, Sweden) and the portal imager (EPID). First, a number of complementary machine QA tests were developed to monitor the correct interplay between the accelerating/decelerating gantry, the variable dose rate and the MLC position, straining the delivery to the maximum allowed limits. Second, a systematic approach to the validation of the dose calculation for RA was adopted, starting with static gantry and RA specific static MLC shapes and gradually moving to dynamic gantry, dynamic MLC shapes. RA plans were then optimized on a series of artificial structures created within the homogeneous Octavius phantom and within a heterogeneous lung phantom. These served the double purpose of testing the behavior of the optimization algorithm (PRO) as well as the precision of the forward dose calculation. Finally, patient QA on a series of clinical cases was performed with different methods. In addition to the well established in-phantom QA, we evaluated the portal dosimetry solution within the Varian approach. Results: For routine machine QA, the ''Snooker Cue'' test on the EPID proved to be the most sensitive to overall problem detection. It is also the most practical one. The ''Twinkle'' and ''Sunrise'' tests were useful to obtain well differentiated information on the individual treatment delivery components. The AAA8

  4. Can we routinely measure patient involvement in treatment decision-making in chronic kidney care? A service evaluation in 27 renal units in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Marie-Anne; Bekker, Hilary L.; Casula, Anna; Elias, Robert; Ferraro, Alastair; Lloyd, Amy; van der Veer, Sabine N.; Metcalfe, Wendy; Mooney, Andrew; Thomson, Richard G.; Tomson, Charles R.V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Shared decision making is considered an important aspect of chronic disease management. We explored the feasibility of routinely measuring kidney patients' involvement in making decisions about renal replacement therapy (RRT) in National Health Service settings. Methods We disseminated a 17-item paper questionnaire on involvement in decision-making among adult patients with established kidney failure who made a decision about RRT in the previous 90 days (Phase 1) and patients who had been receiving RRT for 90–180 days (Phase 2). Recruitment rates were calculated as the ratio between the number of included and expected eligible patients (I : E ratio). We assessed our sample's representativeness by comparing demographics between participants and incident patients in the UK Renal Registry. Results Three hundred and five (Phase 1) and 187 (Phase 2) patients were included. For Phase 1, the I : E ratio was 0.44 (range, 0.08–2.80) compared with 0.27 (range, 0.04–1.05) in Phase 2. Study participants were more likely to be white compared with incident RRT patients (88 versus 77%; P < 0.0001). We found no difference in age, gender or social deprivation. In Phases 1 and 2, the majority reported a collaborative decision-making style (73 and 69%), and had no decisional conflict (85 and 76%); the median score for shared decision-making experience was 12.5 (Phase 1) and 10 (Phase 2) out of 20. Conclusion Our study shows the importance of assessing the feasibility of data collection in a chronic disease context prior to implementation in routine practice. Routine measurement of patient involvement in established kidney disease treatment decisions is feasible, but there are challenges in selecting the measure needed to capture experience of involvement, reducing variation in response rate by service and identifying when to capture experience in a service managing people's chronic disease over time. PMID:26985377

  5. Physician and patient survey of allergic rhinitis: methodology.

    PubMed

    Higgins, V; Kay, S; Small, M

    2007-01-01

    Methodology for Disease Specific Programme (DSP) surveys designed by Adelphi Group Products is used each year to survey patients and physicians on their perceptions of treatment effectiveness, symptoms and impact of diseases. These point-in-time surveys, conducted in the USA and Europe (France, Germany, Italy, Spain and UK), provide useful information on the real-world management and treatment of diseases. This paper describes the methodology for the DSP survey in allergic rhinitis, detailing the preparation of materials, recruitment of physicians, data collection and data management.

  6. Patient Suicide: A Survey of Therapists' Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurst, Friedrich Martin; Mueller, Sandra; Petitjean, Sylvie; Euler, Sebastian; Thon, Natasha; Wiesbeck, Gerhard; Wolfersdorf, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    A substantial proportion of therapists will at some point in their professional life experience the loss of a patient to suicide. Our aims were to assess how therapists react to patient's suicide over time and which factors contribute to the reaction. One third of the therapists, mostly women, suffer from severe distress. The impact is not…

  7. Brain metastases detectability of routine whole body (18)F-FDG PET and low dose CT scanning in 2502 asymptomatic patients with solid extracranial tumors.

    PubMed

    Bochev, Pavel; Klisarova, Aneliya; Kaprelyan, Ara; Chaushev, Borislav; Dancheva, Zhivka

    2012-01-01

    As fluorine-18-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( (18)F-FDG PET/CT) is gaining wider availability, more and more patients with malignancies undergo whole body PET/CT, mostly to assess tumor spread in the rest of the body, but not in the brain. Brain is a common site of metastatic spread in patients with solid extracranial tumors. Gold standard in the diagnosis of brain metastases remains magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However MRI is not routinely indicated and is not available for all cancer patients. Fluorine-18-FDG PET is considered as having poor sensitivity in detecting brain metastases, but this may not be true for PET/CT. The aim of our study was to assess the value of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of brain metastases found by whole body scan including the brain, in patients with solid extracranial neoplasms. A total of 2502 patients with solid extracranial neoplasms were studied. All patients underwent a routine whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan with the whole brain included in the scanned field. Patients with known or suspected brain metastases were preliminary excluded from the study. Hypermetabolic and ring-like brain lesions on the PET scan were considered as metastases. Lesions with CT characteristics of brain metastases were regarded as such irrespective of their metabolic pattern. Lesions in doubt were verified by MRI during first testing or on follow-up or by operation. Our results showed that brain lesions, indicative of and verified to be metastases were detected in 25 out of the 2502 patients (1%), with lung cancer being the most common primary. Twenty three out of these 25 patients had no neurological symptoms by the time of the scan. The detection rate of brain metastases was relatively low, but information was obtained with a minimum increase of radiation burden. In conclusion, whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT detected brain metastases in 1% of the patients if brain was included in the scanned field. Brain

  8. Routine Checkup Should Assess Fitness, Too

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_162856.html Routine Checkup Should Assess Fitness, Too Cardiorespiratory test would help gauge patients' heart ... checked regularly, but an exercise expert says cardiorespiratory fitness should also be part of a routine medical ...

  9. Clinical value of routine serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen in follow-up of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation or chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jinju; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lee, Tae Sung; Kim, Ju Hyun; Koh, Suk Bong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical benefits of routine squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) monitoring of patients with locally advanced cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiation or chemoradiation. Methods A total of 53 patients with recurrent cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiation were enrolled in this study. A retrospective review of medical records was conducted. The role of routine monitoring of serum SCC-Ag was evaluated in terms of cost effectiveness and effect on survival after diagnosis of recurrence. Results Serum SCC-Ag abnormality (≥2.5 ng/mL) was observed in 62.3% of patients when recurrent disease was diagnosed. The first indicator of relapse was abnormal serum SCC-Ag level in 21 patients (39.6%), 10 of whom had asymptomatic recurrent disease amenable to salvage therapy. Adding SCC-Ag measurement to the basic follow up protocol improved the sensitivity for detecting recurrence (The sensitivity of the basic protocol vs. addition of SCC-Ag: 49.1% vs. 88.7%, P<0.001). Twenty-three patients who were candidates for salvage therapy with curative intent showed better survival compared with those who were not candidates for therapy (5-year survival: 36.6% vs. 0%, P=0.012). Conclusion Surveillance with routine serum SCC-Ag monitoring can better detect asymptomatic recurrent disease that is potentially amenable to salvage therapy with curative intent. Early diagnosis of recurrent disease that can be treated with salvage therapy may lead to better survival. PMID:27462593

  10. Uniform data collection in routine clinical practice in cardiovascular patients for optimal care, quality control and research: The Utrecht Cardiovascular Cohort.

    PubMed

    Asselbergs, Folkert W; Visseren, Frank Lj; Bots, Michiel L; de Borst, Gert J; Buijsrogge, Marc P; Dieleman, Jan M; van Dinther, Baukje Gf; Doevendans, Pieter A; Hoefer, Imo E; Hollander, Monika; de Jong, Pim A; Koenen, Steven V; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Ruigrok, Ynte M; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Verhaar, Marianne C; Grobbee, Diederick E

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease remains the major contributor to morbidity and mortality. In routine care for patients with an elevated cardiovascular risk or with symptomatic cardiovascular disease information is mostly collected in an unstructured manner, making the data of limited use for structural feedback, quality control, learning and scientific research. Objective The Utrecht Cardiovascular Cohort (UCC) initiative aims to create an infrastructure for uniform registration of cardiovascular information in routine clinical practice for patients referred for cardiovascular care at the University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands. This infrastructure will promote optimal care according to guidelines, continuous quality control in a learning healthcare system and creation of a research database. Methods The UCC comprises three parts. UCC-1 comprises enrolment of all eligible cardiovascular patients in whom the same information will be collected, based on the Dutch cardiovascular management guideline. A sample of UCC-1 will be invited for UCC-2. UCC-2 involves an enrichment through extensive clinical measurements with emphasis on heart failure, cerebral ischaemia, arterial aneurysms, diabetes mellitus and elevated blood pressure. UCC-3 comprises on-top studies, with in-depth measurements in smaller groups of participants typically based on dedicated project grants. All participants are followed up for morbidity and mortality through linkage with national registries. Conclusion In a multidisciplinary effort with physicians, patients and researchers the UCC sets a benchmark for a learning cardiovascular healthcare system. UCC offers an invaluable resource for future high quality care as well as for first-class research for investigators.

  11. Discussing sexuality with patients with Parkinson's disease: a survey among Dutch neurologists.

    PubMed

    van Hees, Petra J M; van der Plas, Anton A; van Ek, Gaby F; Putter, Hein; Den Oudsten, Brenda L; den Ouden, Marjolein E M; Elzevier, Henk W

    2017-03-01

    Sexual functioning is often impaired in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and may affect quality of life of patients and their spouse. However, little is known about the practice patterns of neurologists with regard to discussing sexuality in this field. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate to what extent neurologists discuss sexuality with PD patients. A 22-item questionnaire was sent to 139 neurologists specializing in PD. The survey contained questions about their attitudes, knowledge, and practice patterns with respect to sexual dysfunction (SD) in patients with PD. The response rate of the survey was 66.9%. Most participants (56.8%) stated that they address sexuality in less than half of their PD patients. High age of patients (42.0%), insufficient consultation time (37.5%), and a lack of patients' initiative to raise the topic themselves (36.4%) were frequently reported barriers towards discussing sexuality. The majority of participants considered that discussing sexuality is a responsibility that lay with neurologists (85.2%), nurses (73.9%), and patients (72.7%). One quarter of the neurologists reported to have insufficient or no knowledge on SD. The majority of participants regarded screening for SD important or slightly important (85.2%). A large proportion of Dutch neurologists specializing in PD do not routinely discuss sexuality with their PD patients. Sexual healthcare in PD patients may benefit from time-efficient tools and agreements on who is responsible for discussing SD. Furthermore, recommendations in PD guidelines on screening and managing SD should be adapted to fit everyday practice.

  12. 75 FR 32539 - Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activities Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activities Under OMB Review... Form 10-0503).'' Title: Survey of Healthcare Experiences, Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA...

  13. Utilizing patient satisfaction surveys to prepare for Medicaid managed care.

    PubMed

    Fields, T T; Gomez, P S

    2001-02-01

    To prepare for Medicaid managed care, a community health center incorporated the business principle of continuous quality improvement, often used in the private sector to improve customer service, into its planning process. The initial endeavor was to create a patient satisfaction survey that was appropriate for the uniqueness of the community. The survey, taken monthly, resulted in both staff and patients making active improvements in the clinic environment. Staff showed more enthusiasm, and patients were more assertive in their attitudes toward the clinic. The empowerment of the patient to take ownership in the clinic will be coupled with the next step of the formalized plan, that of educating patients on the steps necessary to ensure that their Medicaid managed care facility will be the local community health center.

  14. Survey among patients with basal cell carcinoma in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, M J P; De Rie, M A; Beljaards, R C; Thissen, M R T M; Kuipers, M V

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the findings of a survey distributed among Dutch patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The questionnaire comprised a list of questions related to demographic characteristics, features of BCC, reason for consulting a dermatologist, anxiety, type of treatment and the satisfaction with this treatment and desired benefits of treatment. In total, 220 patients completed the survey. The age of these responders varied between 27 and 89 years (mean 64.6 years). Half of the patient group had already previously experienced a BCC. Most patients (52%) indicated that the diagnosis 'skin cancer' frightened them, but that they knew it could be treated. Accordingly, most patients (70%) indicated that BCC had no or hardly any influence on their quality of life. From the patient's perspective, efficacy, low recurrence rate and no or minor scarring are important features of a BCC treatment. Surgery was the most popular therapy. The number of BCC patients is growing, which will lead to a definite burden for dermatologists in the near future. Our survey demonstrated that patients are mostly interested in the efficacy, low recurrence rates and cosmetic outcome of their therapies. Newly efficacious and non-invasive therapies, such as the recently introduced photodynamic therapy or home treatment with imiquimod, can help to overcome these concerns.

  15. The use of routine non density calibrated clinical computed tomography data as a potentially useful screening tool for identifying patients with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Christopher John; Didolkar, Manjiri M.; Barnhart, Huiman X.; Vinson, Emily N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives To evaluate whether lumbar vertebral body density CT attenuation values measured in Hounsfield Units (HUs) on routine Computed Tomography (CT) examinations can be reliably measured with limited variability, and to evaluate for a correlation between HUs and bone mineral density as measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Methods Retrospective review of a total of 249 routine MDCT examinations, performed to measure HUs at the first non-rib bearing lumbar vertebral body on axial images, cross-referenced to the lateral scout image. Results The overall ICC and RC for intra-reader variability on CT HU were 0.987 (95% CI 0.973 – 0.999) and 15.664 (95% CI 11.66–16.97). The overall ICC and RDC for inter-reader variability on CT HU were 0.952 (95% CI 0.892 – 0.999) and 30.20 (95% CI 23.73 – 34.48). The ICC and RC for interscanner variability were 0.98 (95% CI 0.95 – 0.99) and 16.67 (95% CI 13.13 – 22.85). The correlation between the L1 HUs and L1 BMD, L1 t-score, and overall t-score was 0.437, 0.392, and 0.400, respectively. Conclusions CT attenuation values of the first lumbar vertebra can be measured on routine abdomen CTs with limited variability despite multiple readers and scanners. Correlation between HU and BMD as measured by DXA scan was only weakly positive, and by this method measuring the density of a lumbar vertebral body from a routine MDCT scan does not provide the sensitivity or specificity necessary for a screening test. However above a certain measured value (180 HU), patients have a low chance of osteoporosis and therefore may not need additional screening, potentially limiting radiation exposure and cost. PMID:27920811

  16. Alarming rates of virological failure and drug resistance in patients on long-term antiretroviral treatment in routine HIV clinics in Togo.

    PubMed

    Konou, Abla A; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Vidal, Nicole; Salou, Mounerou; Adam, Zakillatou; Singo-Tokofai, Assétina; Delaporte, Eric; Prince-David, Mireille; Peeters, Martine

    2015-11-28

    Information on efficacy of long-term antiretroviral treatment (ART) exposure in resource-limited countries is still scarce. In 767 patients attending routine HIV centers in Togo and receiving first-line ART for more than four years, 42% had viral load greater than 1000 copies/ml and either were on a completely ineffective ART regime or were with only a single drug active. The actual conditions to ensure lifelong ART in resource-limited countries can have dramatic long-term outcomes.

  17. [Economy and ethics in daily hospital routine - physicians in conflict between the well-being of patients and profitability].

    PubMed

    Salomon, Fred

    2010-02-01

    Medical decision making is affected by different aims and influencing factors. Nowadays economic aspects are so important that they influence the structure of hospitals, the number and quality of personnel, and the treatment and care of patients. This leads to conflicts with moral aims, especially when the necessary service cannot be provided due to financial reasons or when doubtful offers are supposed to increase revenues. Examples demonstrate cases in which economic aspects become more important than patients' interests because physicians are corruptible. It is necessary to communicate values. Patients' health should be first and economy should be a subordinated service.

  18. Glucose levels and hemodynamic changes in patients submitted to routine dental treatment with and without local anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Manfro, Rafael; Nardi, Anderson

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to (1) observe the extent to which hemodynamic and glucose measurements change in patients submitted to a dental procedure with and without a local anesthetic and a vasoconstrictor (LAVA; 2% mepivacaine with adrenaline 1∶100,000) and (2) correlate those parameters with the patients' anxiety levels. METHOD: This was an unblinded, random, prospective, and observational study with paired groups. Patients were evaluated during two different consultations during which they either did or did not receive a local anesthetic/vasoconstrictor. RESULTS: Thirty‐seven patients ranging in age from 18 to 45 years (mean 30.4 ± 5.5 years) were evaluated. Hemodynamic parameters, including systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, and glucose levels, did not change significantly in healthy patients, regardless of whether a LAVA was administered during the dental treatment. CONCLUSION: The patients' anxiety statuses neither varied significantly nor showed any correlation with the studied hemodynamic parameters and glucose levels, regardless of whether local anesthetics were used. PMID:21120297

  19. An alternative to satisfaction surveys: let the patients talk.

    PubMed

    Alemi, Farrokh; Jasper, Harry

    2014-01-01

    We propose to replace the standardized 27-item hospital version of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) survey with 1-item questionnaire that asks "What worked well and what needs improvement?" Sentiment analysis can take the responses to this single question and reconstruct a report on frequency of dissatisfied customers and reasons for dissatisfaction similar to reports received from longer surveys. This article shows, by way of an example, how benchmarked and quantitative reports can be generated from patients' comments. The CAHPS survey asks more leading questions, is less granular in its feedback, has lower response rate, has costly repeated reminders, and may not be as timely as sentiment analysis of a single, open-ended question. This article also shows the implementation of the proposed approach in one critical access hospital and its affiliated clinic and calls for additional research to compare sentiment analysis and CAHPS satisfaction surveys.

  20. Mind the Gap: Gaps in Antidepressant Treatment, Treatment Adjustments, and Outcomes among Patients in Routine HIV Care in a Multisite U.S. Clinical Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Cholera, Rushina; Pence, Brian W.; Bengtson, Angela M.; Crane, Heidi M.; Christopoulos, Katerina; Cole, Steven R.; Fredericksen, Rob; Gaynes, Bradley N.; Heine, Amy; Mathews, W. Christopher; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Moore, Richard; Napravnik, Sonia; O’Clerigh, Conall; Safren, Steven; Mugavero, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Depression affects 20–30% of HIV-infected patients and is associated with worse HIV outcomes. Although effective depression treatment is available, depression is largely untreated or undertreated in this population. Methods We quantified gaps in antidepressant treatment, treatment adjustments, and outcomes among US patients in routine HIV care in the nationally distributed CNICS observational clinical cohort. This cohort combines detailed clinical data with regular, self-reported depressive severity assessments (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, PHQ-9). We considered whether participants with likely depression received antidepressants, whether participants on antidepressants with persistently high depressive symptoms received timely dose adjustments, and whether participants achieved depression remission. We considered a cross-sectional analysis (6,219 participants in care in 2011–2012) and a prospective analysis (2,936 participants newly initiating CNICS care when PHQ-9 screening was active). Results The cross-sectional sample was 87% male, 53% Caucasian, 25% African American, and 18% Hispanic; the prospective sample was similar. In both samples, 39–44% had likely depression, with 44–60% of those receiving antidepressants. Of participants receiving antidepressants, 20–26% experienced persistently high depressive symptoms; only a small minority of those received antidepressant dose adjustments. Overall, 35–40% of participants on antidepressants achieved full depression remission. Remission among participants with persistently high depressive symptoms was rare regardless of dose adjustments. Conclusions In this large, diverse cohort of US patients engaged in routine HIV care, we observed large gaps in antidepressant treatment, timely dose adjustment to address persistently high depressive symptoms, and antidepressant treatment outcomes. These results highlight the importance of more effective pharmacologic depression treatment models for HIV

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of fesoterodine flexible dose in newly diagnosed patients with overactive bladder in routine clinical practice in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Peral, Carmen; Sánchez-Ballester, Francisco; García-Mediero, José M; Ramos, Jaime; Rejas, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objective To carry out cost-effectiveness analysis from the Spanish National Health System perspective, of treating overactive bladder (OAB), in newly diagnosed patients with two flexible doses of fesoterodine in routine clinical practice. Patients and methods Economic evaluation of flexible-dose fesoterodine in newly diagnosed patients, including two treatment groups: standard escalating from 4 to 8 mg or fast escalating to 8 mg. Costs were estimated from health care resources utilization related to OAB, and were expressed in 2015 Euros. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were obtained from overactive bladder questionnaire-short form. Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were carried out. Results Three hundred and ninety symptomatic OAB patients treated with fesoterodine and newly diagnosed (141 in fast escalating group and 249 in standard escalating) were analyzed. Adjusted health care total costs were not statistically different; difference −€4.1 (confidence interval: −153.3; 25.1) P=0.842. QALYs were higher in fast escalating to high dose vs standard escalating group, resulting in a cost of −€16,020/QALY gained for fast escalating vs standard escalating group. Conclusion When the cost-effectiveness threshold is set at a maximum value of €30,000/QALY gained, fesoterodine fast escalating group was cost-effective vs standard escalating group 67.6% of the time. The treatment with fesoterodine, in female patients newly diagnosed, fast escalating to 8 mg was a cost-effective option relative to escalating traditionally from 4 to 8 mg, in the management of OAB in routine clinical practice, from the Spanish National Health System perspective. PMID:27713646

  2. General practitioners’ perceptions of introducing near-patient testing for common infections into routine primary care: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Christopher C.; Simpson, Sharon; Wood, Fiona

    2008-01-01

    Objective Near-patient tests are promoted for guiding management of common infections in primary care with a view to enhancing the effectiveness of prescribing decisions and containing antimicrobial resistance. Changes in clinical practice should be based on appraisals of the factors that might influence change, viewed from the perspective of those expected to implement the change. We therefore explored the views of general practitioners concerning the possible introduction of near-patient tests for managing common infections. Design Qualitative semi-structured interview study. Interviews were recorded and analysed using thematic content analysis. Setting General practices in south-east Wales, UK. Subjects A total of 26 general practitioners (GPs) from high fluroquinolone antibiotics prescribing practices and 14 GPs from practices that prescribed fluroquinolones close to the south-east Wales mean. Results There was strong enthusiasm for a hypothetical near-patient, finger-prick blood tests that could distinguish viral from bacterial infections. Many GPs emphasized that such tests would be valuable in “selling” decisions not to prescribe antibiotics to patients. Concerns included limited additional useful information to guide prescribing above clinical diagnosis alone, that patients might deteriorate even if the tests correctly identified a viral aetiology, and that GPs would need to be convinced by research evidence supporting uptake. Several indicated that tests would be useful only for a limited number of patients and they were concerned by time pressures, apparatus maintenance and quality control, cost, and possible objections from patients, especially children. Conclusions Despite GP enthusiasm for the concept of a rapid test to distinguish viral from bacterial infection, strategies to promote uptake would be enhanced if concerns were addressed regarding the importance and feasibility of such tests in daily practice. PMID:18297558

  3. Implementation of chronic illness care in German primary care practices – how do multimorbid older patients view routine care? A cross-sectional study using multilevel hierarchical modeling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In primary care, patients with multiple chronic conditions are the rule rather than the exception. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is an evidence-based framework for improving chronic illness care, but little is known about the extent to which it has been implemented in routine primary care. The aim of this study was to describe how multimorbid older patients assess the routine chronic care they receive in primary care practices in Germany, and to explore the extent to which factors at both the practice and patient level determine their views. Methods This cross-sectional study used baseline data from an observational cohort study involving 158 general practitioners (GP) and 3189 multimorbid patients. Standardized questionnaires were employed to collect data, and the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) questionnaire used to assess the quality of care received. Multilevel hierarchical modeling was used to identify any existing association between the dependent variable, PACIC, and independent variables at the patient level (socio-economic factors, weighted count of chronic conditions, instrumental activities of daily living, health-related quality of life, graded chronic pain, no. of contacts with GP, existence of a disease management program (DMP) disease, self-efficacy, and social support) and the practice level (age and sex of GP, years in current practice, size and type of practice). Results The overall mean PACIC score was 2.4 (SD 0.8), with the mean subscale scores ranging from 2.0 (SD 1.0, subscale goal setting/tailoring) to 3.5 (SD 0.7, delivery system design). At the patient level, higher PACIC scores were associated with a DMP disease, more frequent GP contacts, higher social support, and higher autonomy of past occupation. At the practice level, solo practices were associated with higher PACIC values than other types of practice. Conclusions This study shows that from the perspective of multimorbid patients receiving care in German

  4. Survey of Threats and Assaults by Patients on Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dvir, Yael; Moniwa, Emiko; Crisp-Han, Holly; Levy, Dana; Coverdale, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to determine the prevalence of threats and assaults by patients on psychiatry residents, their consequences, and the perceived adequacy of supports and institutional responses. Method: Authors conducted an anonymous survey of 519 psychiatry residents in 13 psychiatry programs across the United States. The survey…

  5. HIV-1 tropism: a comparison between RNA and proviral DNA in routine clinical samples from Chilean patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV in Chile has a notification rate of 0.01%. Coreceptor antagonists are a family of antiretroviral drugs that are used with the prior knowledge of patients HIV-1 tropism. Viral RNA-based tropism detection requires a plasma viral load ≥1000 copies/mL, while proviral DNA-based detection can be performed regardless of plasma viral load. This test is useful in patients with low or undetectable viral loads and would benefit with a proper therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between HIV RNA and proviral genotypic DNA tropism tests. Findings Forty three Chilean patients were examined using population-based V3 sequencing, and a geno2pheno false-positive rate (FPR) cutoff values of 5, 5.75, 10 and 20%. With cutoff 5.75% a concordance of 88.4% in tropism prediction was found after a simultaneous comparison between HIV tropism assessment by RNA and DNA. In total, five discrepancies (11.6%) were found, 3 patients were RNA-R5/DNA-X4 and two were RNA-X4/DNA-R5. Proviral DNA enabled the prediction of tropism in patients with a low or undetectable viral load. For cutoff 5 and 5.75% genotypic testing using proviral DNA showed a similar sensitivity for X4 as RNA. We found that the highest sensitivity for detecting the X4 strain occurred with proviral DNA and cutoff of 10 and 20%. Viral loads were higher among X4 strain carriers than among R5 strain carriers (p < 0.05). Conclusions A high degree of concordance was found between tropism testing with RNA and testing with proviral DNA. Our results suggest that proviral DNA-based genotypic tropism testing is a useful option for patients with low or undetectable viral load who require a different therapy. PMID:24165156

  6. A survey of European and Canadian rheumatologists regarding the treatment of patients with ankylosing spondylitis and extra-articular manifestations.

    PubMed

    Van den Bosch, Filip

    2010-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a disabling inflammatory disease accompanied by a variety of extra-articular manifestations in a significant number of patients. These manifestations, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, psoriasis, and uveitis, share a similar inflammatory mechanism with one another and with AS. Extra-articular manifestations are observed in a larger percentage of patients with AS and spondyloarthritides (SpAs) than the normal population; therefore, it is important to identify these and other inflammatory-mediated conditions and consider them when treating SpAs. How rheumatologists approach patients with both AS and extra-articular manifestations may lead to a better understanding of what treatment approaches could be taken to optimize patient outcomes. Rheumatologists (N = 453) from five European countries and Canada who treat AS were surveyed to determine treatment practices and management of both AS and its associated extra-articular manifestations. Most rheumatologists (93%) believe AS could be diagnosed earlier as the average time between symptom onset and diagnosis was approximately 4 years. In total, 60% routinely screen patients with AS for extra-articular manifestations, although this varied considerably across countries. The majority (97%) agrees that controlling inflammation is critical during treatment, and patients with extra-articular manifestations tend to have poorer prognoses than those patients with only axial AS. Treatment considerations varied depending on whether patients presented with only axial AS or had extra-articular manifestations, where use of biologics became more common. Rheumatologists agree that patients with both AS and extra-articular manifestations require a different treatment strategy than patients with AS alone. Results of this survey highlight areas where rheumatologists differ in their clinical management of patients with AS including tools used for disease assessment and the routine screening, or

  7. Monitoring outcomes of arthritis and longitudinal data collection in routine care using a patient questionnaire that incorporates a clinical note on one piece of paper.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Yusuf

    2007-08-01

    Patient questionnaires are the quantitative tools available to rheumatologists to monitor their patients' health status and responses to therapy. The Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and its derivatives have been shown to be the most significant predictors of functional and work disability, costs, joint replacement surgery, and mortality; generally at higher levels of significance than joint counts, radiographs, and laboratory tests. Every encounter of a patient with a rheumatologist provides an opportunity to collect data. Yet patient questionnaires, which can be used in all rheumatic diseases, including osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, fibromyalgia, scleroderma, and ankylosing spondylitis, are not included in routine care by most rheumatologists. Questionnaires can be adapted to include a simple subjective-objective-assessment-plan (SOAP) clinical encounter note that helps with data entry and also provides all the necessary information for clinical decision making in one sheet of paper. Data that are feasible to collect in clinical care provide the optimal approach to assessing quantitatively how patients are doing. If data are not collected and recorded, that opportunity, on that day, is lost forever. Rheumatologists would find it valuable to adapt questionnaires to the care they provide for all their patients, to document and improve the care they provide, and add quantitative data to standard clinical care.

  8. Current state of hereditary angioedema management: a patient survey.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Aleena; Busse, Paula; Christiansen, Sandra C; Li, Henry; Lumry, William; Davis-Lorton, Mark; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Frank, Michael; Castaldo, Anthony; Long, Janet F; Zuraw, Bruce L; Riedl, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a chronic disease with a high burden of disease that is poorly understood and often misdiagnosed. Availability of treatments, including C1 esterase inhibitor (C1INH) replacement, ecallantide, and icatibant, marks a significant advance for HAE patients. We aimed to better understand the current state of HAE care, from a patient perspective, after the introduction of several novel therapies. One session of the United States Hereditary Angioedema Association 2013 patient summit was devoted to data collection for this study. Patients attending the summit were self-selected, and HAE diagnosis was self-reported. Survey questions assessed patient characteristics, burden of disease, and treatment. Participant responses were captured using an audience response system. We surveyed 149 (80%) type I and II HAE (HAE-C1INH) and 37 (20%) HAE with normal C1INH (HAE-nlC1INH) patients. HAE-C1INH (72%) and HAE-nlCINH patients (76%) equally reported that HAE had a significant impact on quality of life (QOL). A third of HAE-C1INH patients were diagnosed within one year of their first HAE attack, but another third reported a delay of more than 10 years. Most HAE-C1INH (88%) and HAE-nlC1INH (76%) patients had on-demand treatment available. HAE-C1INH patients frequently had an individual treatment plan (76%) compared with 50% of HAE-nlC1INH patients. Most HAE-C1INH patients went to the emergency department (ED) or were hospitalized less than once every six months (80%). Our findings show that HAE management is improving with good access to on-demand and prophylactic treatment options. However, HAE patients still have a significant burden of disease and continued research and educational efforts are needed.

  9. Current state of hereditary angioedema management: A patient survey

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Paula; Christiansen, Sandra C.; Li, Henry; Lumry, William; Davis-Lorton, Mark; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Frank, Michael; Castaldo, Anthony; Long, Janet F.; Zuraw, Bruce L.; Riedl, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a chronic disease with a high burden of disease that is poorly understood and often misdiagnosed. Availability of treatments, including C1 esterase inhibitor (C1INH) replacement, ecallantide, and icatibant, marks a significant advance for HAE patients. We aimed to better understand the current state of HAE care, from a patient perspective, after the introduction of several novel therapies. One session of the United States Hereditary Angioedema Association 2013 patient summit was devoted to data collection for this study. Patients attending the summit were self-selected, and HAE diagnosis was self-reported. Survey questions assessed patient characteristics, burden of disease, and treatment. Participant responses were captured using an audience response system. We surveyed 149 (80%) type I and II HAE (HAE-C1INH) and 37 (20%) HAE with normal C1INH (HAE-nlC1INH) patients. HAE-C1INH (72%) and HAE-nlCINH patients (76%) equally reported that HAE had a significant impact on quality of life (QOL). A third of HAE-C1INH patients were diagnosed within one year of their first HAE attack, but another third reported a delay of more than 10 years. Most HAE-C1INH (88%) and HAE-nlC1INH (76%) patients had on-demand treatment available. HAE-C1INH patients frequently had an individual treatment plan (76%) compared with 50% of HAE-nlC1INH patients. Most HAE-C1INH patients went to the emergency department (ED) or were hospitalized less than once every six months (80%). Our findings show that HAE management is improving with good access to on-demand and prophylactic treatment options. However, HAE patients still have a significant burden of disease and continued research and educational efforts are needed. PMID:25976438

  10. Subcutaneous Facial and Neck Emphysema as First Sign of Intestinal Perforation in a Female Patient After a Routine Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Anyfantakis, Dimitrios; Kastanakis, Miltiades; Karona, Paraskevi; Papadomichelakis, Alexandros; Bobolakis, Emmanouil

    2016-01-01

    Colonoscopy is a safe procedure for the diagnosis and management of colorectal diseases. Colonic perforation due to colonoscopy represents an uncommon complication. Here we present an unusual case of iatrogenic bowel perforation resulting in subcutaneous facial and neck emphysema, pneumomediastinum and pneumoretroperitoneum. Taking a detailed recent medical history information is always required when encountering patients with subcutaneous emphysema after invasive examination procedures. Alertness on iatrogenic complication eventualities may improve prognosis and avoid life-threatening conditions. PMID:28149153

  11. Comparison of Methods for Detection of Blastocystis Infection in Routinely Submitted Stool Samples, and also in IBS/IBD Patients in Ankara, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Dogruman-Al, Funda; Simsek, Zahide; Boorom, Kenneth; Ekici, Eyup; Sahin, Memduh; Tuncer, Candan; Kustimur, Semra; Altinbas, Akif

    2010-01-01

    Background This study compared diagnostic methods for identifying Blastocystis in stool samples, and evaluated the frequency of detection of Blastocystis in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Results and Discussion From a set of 105 stool specimens submitted for routine parasitological analysis, 30 were identified as positive for Blastocystis by the culture method. From that group of 30 positives, Lugol's stain, trichrome staining, and an immunofluorescence assay identified 11, 15, and 26 samples as positive respectively. Using culture as a standard, the sensitivity of Lugol's stain was 36.7%, trichrome staining was 50%, and the IFA stain was 86.7%. The specificity of Lugol's stain was 91%, trichrome staining was 100%, and the IFA stain was 97.3%. In the group of 27 IBS and IBD patients, using all methods combined, we detected Blastocystis in 67% (18/27) of the patients. Blastocystis was detected in 33% (2/6) of IBD patients and 76% (16/21) of IBS patients. For comparison, trichrome staining alone, the method most frequently used in many countries, would have only identified Blastocystis infection in 29% (6/21) of the IBS patients. No parasitic co-infections were identified in the IBS/IBD patients. Most Blastocystis-positive IBS/IBD patients were over 36 with an average length of illness of 4.9 years. Conclusions Most IBS patients in this study were infected with Blastocystis. IFA staining may be a useful alternative to stool culture, especially if stool specimens have been chemically preserved. PMID:21124983

  12. Revisiting Routine Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Rebecca; Monaghan, John; Shingadia, Eisha; Vaughan, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    What is a routine question? The focus of this paper is routine questions and time (in years) since a hitherto routine question was last attempted by the solver. The data comes from undergraduate students' work on solving two calculus questions. The data was selected for reporting purposes because it is well documented and because it threw up…

  13. Treating patients with fibromyalgia in primary care settings under routine medical practice: a claim database cost and burden of illness study

    PubMed Central

    Sicras-Mainar, Antoni; Rejas, Javier; Navarro, Ruth; Blanca, Milagrosa; Morcillo, Ángela; Larios, Raquel; Velasco, Soledad; Villarroya, Carme

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to analyze health care and non-health care resource utilization under routine medical practice in a primary care setting claims database and to estimate the incremental average cost per patient per year of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) compared with a reference population. Methods A 12-month cross-sectional and retrospective study was completed using computerized medical records from a health provider database. Analyses were conducted from the perspective of the provider and from the viewpoint of society. Health care and non-health care resource utilization included drugs, complementary tests, all types of medical visits, referrals, hospitalizations, sick leave, and early retirement because of disability due to FMS. Patients with a diagnosis of FMS in accordance with ICD-10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th revision) criteria were included in the analysis if they had at least one claim for FMS during the 12 months prior to the end of May 2007. A non-FMS comparison group was also created with the remaining subjects. Results Of the 63,526 patients recruited for the study, 1,081 (1.7%) (96.7% of whom were women, 54.2 [10.1] years old) met the criteria for FMS. After an adjustment for age and gender, FMS subjects used significantly more health care resources than the reference population and had more sick leave and the percentage of subjects with premature retirement was also significantly higher (P < 0.001 in all cases). As a result, FMS subjects showed an incremental adjusted per-patient per-year total cost of €5,010 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3,494 to 6,076, +153%, P < 0.001) on average compared with non-FMS subjects. Significantly higher differences were observed in both health care and non-health care adjusted costs: €614 (404 to 823, +66%) and €4,394 (3,373 to 5,420, +189%), respectively (P < 0.001 in both cases). Annual drug expenditure per patient on

  14. Herbal medicine: a survey of use in Nigerian presurgical patients booked for ambulatory anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    any significant difference in use. Conclusion This survey revealed many patients were on one or more herbal preparations in the immediate preoperative period. In consideration of possible untoward drug interactions between conventional medication, herbal preparations and anaesthesia, doctors (especially anaesthetists) should routinely assess all patients booked to be anaesthetized, especially those for day case surgery. The authors recommend surveys with larger respondent numbers to determine prevalence of use and possible interactions between indigenous Nigerian herbs and anaesthesia. PMID:22906201

  15. SU-E-T-408: Evaluation of the Type and Frequency of Variations Discovered During Routine Secondary Patient Chart Review

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, M; Harrison, A; Lockamy, V; Li, J; Peng, C; Potrebko, P; Yu, Y; Doyle, L; Cao, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Desire to improve efficiency and throughput inspired a review of our physics chart check procedures. Departmental policy mandates plan checks pre-treatment, after first treatment and weekly every 3–5 days. This study examined the effectiveness of the “after first” check with respect to improving patient safety and clinical efficiency. Type and frequency of variations discovered during this redundant secondary review was examined over seven months. Methods: A community spreadsheet was created to record variations in care discovered during chart review following the first fraction of treatment and before the second fraction (each plan reviewed prior to treatment). Entries were recorded from August 2014 through February 2015, amounting to 43 recorded variations out of 906 reviewed charts. The variations were divided into categories and frequencies were assessed month-to-month. Results: Analysis of recorded variations indicates an overall variation rate of 4.7%. The initial rate was 13.5%; months 2–7 average 3.7%. The majority of variations related to discrepancies in documentation at 46.5%, followed by prescription, plan deficiency, and dose tracking related variations at 25.5%, 12.8%, and 12.8%, respectively. Minor variations (negligible consequence on patient treatment) outweighed major variations 3 to 1. Conclusion: This work indicates that this redundant secondary check is effective. The first month spike in rates could be due to the Hawthorne/observer effect, but the consistent 4% variation rate suggests the need for periodical re-training on variations noted as frequent to improve awareness and quality of the initial chart review process, which may lead to improved treatment quality, patient safety and increased clinical efficiency. Utilizing these results, a continuous quality improvement process following Deming’s Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) methodology was generated. The first iteration of this PDSA was adding a specific dose tracking

  16. Lactose intolerance genetic testing: is it useful as routine screening? Results on 1426 south-central Italy patients.

    PubMed

    Santonocito, Concetta; Scapaticci, Margherita; Guarino, Donatella; Annicchiarico, Eleonora Brigida; Lisci, Rosalia; Penitente, Romina; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2015-01-15

    Adult-type hypolactasia is a widespread condition throughout the world, causing lactose malabsorption. Several studies suggested that the identification of C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 mutations, located upstream the gene encoding the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH), is a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of hypolactasia. We evaluated the frequencies of C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 variants in a central-south Italian population and the usefulness of lactase deficiency genetic testing in the clinic practice. The genomic DNA of 1426 patients and 1000 healthy controls from central-south Italy was isolated from peripheral whole blood and genotyped for the C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms by high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) and sequencing. The frequencies of genotypes in the 1426 patients analysed were as follows: 1077 CC/GG (75.5%), 287 CT/GA (20.1%), 24 TT/AA (1.7%), 38 CC/GA (2.7%). Only 64 out of 1426 (4.5%) performed also L-BHT test, 29 of which were negative for L-BHT also in presence of different genotypes. Among the 35 individuals with L-BHT positive, 34 were CC/GG and only one CT/GA. Although lactose genetic test is a good predictor of persistence/non-persistence lactase in specific population, its use in the central-south Italy population should be limited given the high prevalence of the CCGG diplotype in normal individuals.

  17. Factors associated with herbal use among urban multiethnic primary care patients: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Grace M; Hawley, Sarah T; Weiss, L Todd; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Volk, Robert J

    2004-01-01

    Background The use of herbal supplements in the United States has become increasingly popular. The prevalence of herbal use among primary care patients varies in previous studies; the pattern of herbal use among urban racially/ethnically diverse primary care patients has not been widely studied. The primary objectives of this study were to describe the use of herbs by ethnically diverse primary care patients in a large metropolitan area and to examine factors associated with such use. The secondary objective was to investigate perceptions about and patterns of herbal use. Methods Data for a cross-sectional survey were collected at primary care practices affiliated with the Southern Primary-care Urban Research Network (SPUR-Net) in Houston, Texas, from September 2002 to March 2003. To participate in the study, patients had to be at least 18 years of age and visiting one of the SPUR-Net clinics for routine, nonacute care. Survey questions were available in both English and Spanish. Results A total of 322 patients who had complete information on race/ethnicity were included in the analysis. Overall, 36% of the surveyed patients (n = 322) indicated use of herbs, with wide variability among ethnic groups: 50% of Hispanics, 50% of Asians, 41% of Whites, and 22% of African-Americans. Significant factors associated with an individual's herbal use were ethnicity other than African-American, having an immigrant family history, and reporting herbal use by other family members. About 40% of survey respondents believed that taking prescription medications and herbal medicines together was more effective than taking either alone. One-third of herbal users reported using herbs on a daily basis. More Whites (67%) disclosed their herbal use to their health-care providers than did African-Americans (45%), Hispanics (31%), or Asians (31%). Conclusions Racial/ethnic differences in herbal use were apparent among this sample of urban multiethnic adult primary care patients. Associated

  18. Safety and effectiveness of controlled-release paroxetine in routine clinical practice: results of a postmarketing surveillance study of patients with depression

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Masaki; Kimura, Toshifumi; Kimura, Takeshi; Hara, Terufumi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are commonly used in the pharmacotherapy of depression. However, adverse events can lead to their early discontinuation. This study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of paroxetine controlled-release (CR) tablets in Japanese patients with depression/depressive state (hereafter referred to as depression) in routine clinical practice in Japan. Patients and methods This was an open-label, noninterventional, prospective, postmarketing surveillance study. A total of 3,213 patients aged 12–92 years with depression were prescribed paroxetine CR for 8 weeks at the physician’s discretion. Safety was evaluated on the basis of the reporting of adverse drug reactions. Effectiveness was evaluated on the basis of the physician’s assessment using the Clinical Global Impression-Global Improvement (CGI-GI) and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness (CGI-SI) scales, as well as on the basis of the patients’ self-reported satisfaction. The primary effectiveness outcome was the improvement rate based on the physician’s assessment using the CGI-GI. Results The incidence of adverse drug reactions was 11.2% (359/3,213; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.1%–12.3%). The common adverse drug reactions that accounted for 1.0% or more of the incidence were nausea (3.5%) and somnolence (2.7%). The proportion of patients who continued paroxetine CR at week 8 was 80.2% (2,577/3,213; 95% CI: 78.8%–81.6%). The improvement rate at week 8 (last observation carried forward) was 72.8% (2,132/2,927; 95% CI: 71.2%–74.4%). The proportion of patients with CGI-SI scores of moderately or severely ill decreased from 63.6% at baseline to 17.9% at week 8. The proportion of patients who were satisfied with paroxetine CR treatment was 69.8% (2,040/2,921; 95% CI: 68.1%–71.5%). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that paroxetine CR is a well-tolerated and efficacious treatment for depression in routine clinical practice. PMID

  19. SU-E-T-407: Evaluation of Four Commercial Dosimetry Systems for Routine Patient-Specific Tomotherapy Delivery Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, A; Arumugam, S; Deshpande, S; George, A; Holloway, L; Vial, P; Goozee, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate the performance of four commercially available dosimetry systems for Tomotherapy delivery quality assurance (DQA). Methods: Eight clinical patient plans were chosen to represent a range of treatment sites and typical clinical plans. Four DQA plans for each patient plan were created using the TomoTherapy DQA Station (Hi-Art version 4.2.1) on CT images of the ScandiDose Delta4, IBA MatriXX Evolution, PTW Octavius 4D and Sun Nuclear ArcCHECK phantoms. Each detector was calibrated following the manufacture-provided procedure. No angular response correction was applied. All DQA plans for each detector were delivered on the Tomotherapy Hi-Art unit in a single measurement session but on different days. The measured results were loaded into the vendor supplied software for each QA system for comparison with the TPS-calculated dose. The Gamma index was calculated using 3%/3mm, 2%/2mm with 10% dose threshold of maximum TPS calculated dose. Results: Four detector systems showed comparable gamma pass rates for 3%/3m, which is recommended by AAPM TG119 and commonly used within the radiotherapy community. The averaged pass rates ± standard deviation for all DQA plans were (98.35±1.97)% for ArcCHECK, (99.9%±0.87)% for Matrix, (98.5%±5.09)% for Octavius 4D, (98.7%±1.27)% for Delata4. The rank of the gamma pass rate for individual plans was consistent between detectors. Using 2%/2mm Gamma criteria for analysis, the Gamma pass rate decreased on average by 9%, 8%, 6.6% and 5% respectively. Profile and Gamma failure map analysis using the software tools from each dosimetry system indicated that decreased passing rate is mainly due to the threading effect of Tomo plan. Conclusion: Despite the variation in detector type and resolution, phantom geometry and software implementation, the four systems demonstrated similar dosimetric performance, with the rank of the gamma pass rate consistent for the plans considered.

  20. National survey on intra-laboratory turnaround time for some most common routine and stat laboratory analyses in 479 laboratories in China

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Yang; Zeng, Rong; Wang, Wei; He, Falin; Zhong, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To investigate the state of the art of intra-laboratory turnaround time (intra-TAT), provide suggestions and find out whether laboratories accredited by International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 15189 or College of American Pathologists (CAP) will show better performance on intra-TAT than non-accredited ones. Materials and methods 479 Chinese clinical laboratories participating in the external quality assessment programs of chemistry, blood gas, and haematology tests organized by the National Centre for Clinical Laboratories in China were included in our study. General information and the median of intra-TAT of routine and stat tests in last one week were asked in the questionnaires. Results The response rate of clinical biochemistry, blood gas, and haematology testing were 36% (479 / 1307), 38% (228 / 598), and 36% (449 / 1250), respectively. More than 50% of laboratories indicated that they had set up intra-TAT median goals and almost 60% of laboratories declared they had monitored intra-TAT generally for every analyte they performed. Among all analytes we investigated, the intra-TAT of haematology analytes was shorter than biochemistry while the intra-TAT of blood gas analytes was the shortest. There were significant differences between median intra-TAT on different days of the week for routine tests. However, there were no significant differences in median intra-TAT reported by accredited laboratories and non-accredited laboratories. Conclusions Many laboratories in China are aware of intra-TAT control and are making effort to reach the target. There is still space for improvement. Accredited laboratories have better status on intra-TAT monitoring and target setting than the non-accredited, but there are no significant differences in median intra-TAT reported by them. PMID:26110033

  1. Association between nutritional risk and routine clinical laboratory measurements and adverse outcomes: a prospective study in hospitalized patients of wuhan tongji hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z Y; Gao, C; Ye, T; Zuo, X Z; Wang, G H; Xu, X S; Yao, Y

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Nutritional risk screening (NRS-2002) and routine clinical laboratory measurements (RCLMs) had been shown to have a predictive value in adverse outcomes in some studies, respectively. This study analyzed the association between NRS-2002 and RCLMs and estimated their prospective value in predicting adverse outcomes. Subjects/Methods: A total of 916 hospitalized patients were screened on admission with NRS-2002 and Subjective Global Assessment; RCLMs, which include blood test, kidney and liver function and electrolytes, were recorded. Diagnosis, nutritional support, surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, complications, mortality and hospital stay during hospitalization were collected. The X2-test, odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals, kappa (k) statistic and regression analyses were conducted. Results: An overall 48.1% of the 916 patients were at nutritional risk on admission. Comparing ‘at risk' with ‘no risk', a significantly higher incidence of abnormality was found not only in nutritional markers but also in other parameters of RCLMs (OR ranged from 1.5 to 3.5). Regression analyses showed that ‘at risk' determined at admission was not a significant predictor of adverse outcomes after adjusting for other confounding factors, although it was a strong predictor in univariate analysis, whereas hypoalbuminemia, low total lymphocyte count, abnormality of hepatic and renal function were predictors after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions: The findings suggest that NRS-2002 might be a global index of ‘sickness' rather than be only a nutritional screening tool. It being rated once at admission is insufficient and should be repeated for using it as a predictor, whereas RCLMs routinely measured at admission may be able to be used to predict adverse outcomes. PMID:25369828

  2. Questionnaire survey on lifestyle of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Noto, Haruka; Tokushige, Katsutoshi; Hashimoto, Etsuko; Taniai, Makiko; Shiratori, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    Lack of exercise and excessive food intake are known to be the important causes of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). To elucidate the relationship between lifestyle and NASH, we surveyed exercise and dietary habits, comparing them among 171 biopsy-proven NASH patients, 29 nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) patients and 49 normal subjects. Dietary habits including the duration of dinner time, amount of rice at dinner, and weekly frequencies of meat, fries, Chinese noodles, sweets, and instant food consumption were significantly different in male NASH patients compared to normal male subjects. In women, differences were seen in the amount of rice at dinner, frequency of eating out, and proclivity for sweets. In male NASH patients, the frequency of physical exercise was significantly lower. The lifestyle tendencies of NASH were almost similar to those of NAFL. In the comparison between obese NASH and non-obese NASH, no clear lifestyle differences were found. In conclusion, the most striking result of this survey was that the lifestyle of males contributed significantly to the development of NASH. These results point to treatment of NASH in males. In female NASH patients, lifestyle differences were minimal, and the effects of other factors such as genetic background will need to be investigated. PMID:25411525

  3. Hospital practices in the collection of patient race, ethnicity, and language data: a statewide survey, California, 2011.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Lichtensztajn, Daphne Y; Parikh, Punam; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana; Ponce, Ninez; Zingmond, David

    2014-08-01

    California mandates hospitals to collect and report patient race, ethnicity, and primary spoken language (REL). A lack of specific guidelines and standardized practices on how data should be collected has contributed to inconsistent and incomplete data.General acute care hospitals in California completed a survey to elucidate practices regarding collection and auditing of patient REL. Nearly all hospitals reported collecting race and/or ethnicity (97%). The majority of hospitals used standardized forms for collection, and 75% audited patient information for completeness. Popular accepted strategies to improve the quality and completeness of REL included collecting data at the first encounter, routine staff training, incorporating REL questions into existing admissions forms, and developing and enforcing hospital policies regarding data collection.California hospitals are collecting information on patient REL as mandated, but variation in data collection exists. Hospitals endorse many reasonable approaches for standardization, and may benefit from standardized data collection and auditing practices.

  4. Discussing prognosis with patients with osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional survey in general practice.

    PubMed

    Clarson, L E; Nicholl, B I; Bishop, A; Daniel, R; Mallen, C D

    2016-04-01

    Osteoarthritis is a leading cause of chronic pain and disability and one of the most common conditions diagnosed and managed in primary care. Despite the evidence that patients would value discussions about the course of osteoarthritis to help them make informed treatment decisions and plan for the future, little is known of GPs' practice of, or views regarding, discussing prognosis with these patients. A cross-sectional postal survey asked 2500 randomly selected UK GPs their views on discussing prognosis with patients with osteoarthritis and potential barriers or facilitators to such discussions. They were also asked if prognostic discussions were part of their current practice and what indicators they considered important in assessing the prognosis associated with osteoarthritis. Of 768 respondents (response rate 30.7 %), the majority felt it necessary to discuss prognosis with osteoarthritis patients (n = 738, 96.1 %), but only two thirds reported that it was part of their routine practice (n = 498, 64.8 %). Most respondents found predicting the course of osteoarthritis (n = 703, 91.8 %) and determining the prognosis of patients difficult (n = 589, 76.7 %). Obesity, level of physical disability and pain severity were considered the most important prognostic indicators in osteoarthritis. Although GPs consider prognostic discussions necessary for patients with osteoarthritis, few prioritise these discussions. Lack of time and perceived difficulties in predicting the disease course and determining prognosis for patients with osteoarthritis may be barriers to engaging in prognostic discussions. Further research is required to identify ways to assist GPs making prognostic predictions for patients with osteoarthritis and facilitate engagement in these discussions.

  5. Evaluation of the limitations of using the University of Washington Quality of Life swallowing domain alone to screen patients in the routine clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Zuydam, A C; Ghazali, N; Lowe, D; Skelly, R; Rogers, S N

    2013-10-01

    A broad patient-completed screening tool in routine clinical practice in head and neck oncology has merit, but clinicians should be aware that its simplicity could lead to some patients and the detail of their problems being missed. The purpose of this study was to compare the University of Washington Quality of Life (UWQoL) swallowing domain with the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) in relation to the need for interventions for swallowing around one year after treatment. The group comprised 112 consecutively referred patients to speech and language therapy between January 2007 and August 2009 after primary operation for previously untreated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). A total of 78 patients completed questionnaires (median time of assessment 11.7 months, IQR 6.1-12.2). There were significant (p<0.001) and moderately strong correlations (rs=0.51-0.62) between the UWQoL swallowing domain score and MDADI subscales and total scores, and also with individual MDADI questions: taking a great deal of effort (rs=0.71); being upset (rs=0.61); and not going out (rs=0.62) were the strongest in regard to swallowing. Use of a gastrostomy tube was associated with worse UWQoL and MDADI scores. In conclusion, patients who score 100 on the UWQoL do not require swallowing to be evaluated further. Those who score 70 could benefit from the detailed MDADI to help to clarify the specific problem and the impact it has before being referred to speech and language therapy. Those who score less than 70 should be brought to the attention of speech and language therapists to confirm that appropriate support and intervention are in place.

  6. Chest Compression Injuries Detected via Routine Post-arrest Care in Patients Who Survive to Admission after Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Boland, Lori L; Satterlee, Paul A; Hokanson, Jonathan S; Strauss, Craig E; Yost, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. To examine injuries produced by chest compressions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients who survive to hospital admission. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among 235 consecutive patients who were hospitalized after nontraumatic OHCA in Minnesota between January 2009 and May 2012 (117 survived to discharge; 118 died during hospitalization). Cases were eligible if the patient had received prehospital compressions from an emergency medical services (EMS) provider. One EMS provider in the area was using a mechanical compression device (LUCAS(TM)) as standard equipment, so the association between injury and use of mechanical compression was also examined. Prehospital care information was abstracted from EMS run sheets, and hospital records were reviewed for injuries documented during the post-arrest hospitalization that likely resulted from compressions. Results. Injuries were identified in 31 patients (13%), the most common being rib fracture (9%) and intrathoracic hemorrhage (3%). Among those who survived to discharge, the mean length of stay was not statistically significantly different between those with injuries (13.5 days) and those without (10.8 days; p = 0.23). Crude injury prevalence was higher in those who died prior to discharge, had received compressions for >10 minutes (versus ≤10 minutes) and underwent computer tomography (CT) imaging, but did not differ by bystander compressions or use of mechanical compression. After multivariable adjustment, only compression time > 10 min and CT imaging during hospitalization were positively associated with detected injury (OR = 7.86 [95% CI = 1.7-35.9] and 6.30 [95% CI = 2.6-15.5], respectively). Conclusion. In patients who survived OHCA to admission, longer duration of compressions and use of CT during the post-arrest course were associated positively with documented compression injury. Compression-induced injuries detected via routine post-arrest care are

  7. Interest in yoga among fibromyalgia patients: an international internet survey.

    PubMed

    Firestone, Kari A; Carson, James W; Mist, Scott D; Carson, Kimberly M; Jones, Kim D

    2014-01-01

    Studies in circumscribed clinical settings have reported the adoption of yoga by many fibromyalgia (FM) patients. However, it is unclear from existing studies which types of yoga practices FM patients are typically engaging in and the extent to which they experience yoga as helpful or not. The purpose of this study was to survey FM patients in many different regions to inquire about their engagement in various yoga practices, the perceived benefits, and the obstacles to further practice. A 13-question Internet survey of persons self-identified as FM patients was conducted among subscribers to 2 electronic newsletters on the topic of FM. Respondents (N = 2543) replied from all 50 U.S. states and also from Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom, and from more than two dozen other countries. On average, respondents were 57 years of age and 96% were female, with an average time since diagnosis of 13 years. Of these respondents, 79.8% had considered trying yoga and 57.8% had attended 1 yoga class. The respondents' classes typically focused almost exclusively on yoga poses, with minimal training in meditation, breathing techniques, or other practices. The most commonly cited benefits were reduced stiffness, relaxation, and better balance. The most frequently cited obstacles were concerns about the poses being too physically demanding and fear that the poses would cause too much pain. These findings confirm strong interest in yoga across a geographically diverse range of FM patients. However, concerns about yoga-induced pain and yoga poses being too difficult are common reasons that FM patients do not engage in yoga exercises. This study supports the need for yoga programs tailored for FM patients to include modification of poses to minimize aggravating movements and substantive training in meditation and other yoga-based coping methods to minimize pain-related fear.

  8. Revascularisation of patients with end-stage renal disease on chronic haemodialysis: bypass surgery versus PCI—analysis of routine statutory health insurance data

    PubMed Central

    Möckel, Martin; Searle, Julia; Baberg, Henning Thomas; Dirschedl, Peter; Levenson, Benny; Malzahn, Jürgen; Mansky, Thomas; Günster, Christian; Jeschke, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to analyse the short-term and long-term outcome of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing percutaneous intervention (PCI) as compared to coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) to evaluate the optimal coronary revascularisation strategy. Design Retrospective analysis of routine statutory health insurance data between 2010 and 2012. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was adjusted all-cause mortality after 30 days and major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events at 1 year. Secondary outcomes were repeat revascularisation at 30 days and 1 year and bleeding events within 7 days. Results The total number of cases was n=4123 (PCI; n=3417), median age was 71 (IQR 62–77), 30.4% were women. The adjusted OR for death within 30 days was 0.59 (95% CI 0.43 to 0.81) for patients undergoing PCI versus CABG. At 1 year, the adjusted OR for major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) was 1.58 (1.32 to 1.89) for PCI versus CABG and 1.47 (1.23 to 1.75) for all-cause death. In the subgroup of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), adjusted all-cause mortality at 30 days did not differ significantly between both groups (OR 0.75 (0.47 to 1.20)), whereas in patients without AMI the OR for 30-day mortality was 0.44 (0.28 to 0.68) for PCI versus CABG. At 1 year, the adjusted OR for MACCE in patients with AMI was 1.40 (1.06 to 1.85) for PCI versus CABG and 1.47 (1.08 to 1.99) for mortality. Conclusions In this cohort of unselected patients with ESRD undergoing revascularisation, the 1-year outcome was better for CABG in patients with and without AMI. The 30-day mortality was higher in non-AMI patients with CABG reflecting an early hazard with surgery. In cases where the patient's characteristics and risk profile make it difficult to decide on a revascularisation strategy, CABG could be the preferred option. PMID:27752331

  9. Effectiveness, durability, and safety of darunavir/ritonavir in HIV-1-infected patients in routine clinical practice in Italy: a postauthorization noninterventional study

    PubMed Central

    Antinori, Andrea; Meraviglia, Paola; Monforte, Antonella d’Arminio; Castagna, Antonella; Mussini, Cristina; Bini, Teresa; Gianotti, Nicola; Rusconi, Stefano; Colella, Elisa; Airoldi, Giuseppe; Mancusi, Daniela; Termini, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Current antiretroviral (ARV) therapy for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients provides long-term control of viral load (VL). Darunavir (DRV) is a nonpeptidomimetic protease inhibitor approved for use with a ritonavir booster (DRV/r). This study evaluated the effectiveness of DRV/r in combination with other ARV agents in routine clinical practice in Italy. In this descriptive observational study, data on utilization of DRV/r, under the conditions described in the marketing authorization, were collected from June 2009 to December 2012. Effectiveness (VL <50 copies/mL), tolerability, and durability in four patient groups (two DRV/r-experienced, one ARV-experienced DRV/r-naïve, and one ARV-naïve) were analyzed. Secondary objectives included immunological response, safety, and persistence/discontinuation rates. In total, 875 of 883 enrolled patients were included in the analysis: of these, 662 (75.7%) completed the follow-up until the end of 2012 and 213 (24.3%) withdrew from the study earlier. Initial DRV dose was 600 mg twice daily (67.1%) or 800 mg once daily (32.9%). Only 16 patients (1.8%) withdrew from the study due to virological failure. Virological response proportions were higher in patients virologically suppressed at study entry versus patients with baseline VL ≥50 copies/mL in each ARV-experienced group, while there was no consistent difference across study groups and baseline VL strata according to baseline CD4+ cell count. CD4+ cell count increased from study entry to last study visit in all the four groups. DRV/r was well tolerated, with few discontinuations due to study-emergent nonfatal adverse events (3.0% overall, including 2.1% drug-related) or deaths (3.0% overall, all non-drug-related); 35.3% of patients reported ≥1 adverse events. These observational data show that DRV/r was effective and well tolerated in the whole patient population described here. The DRV/r-containing regimen provided viral suppression

  10. Circadian Melatonin and Temperature Taus in Delayed Sleep-wake Phase Disorder and Non-24-hour Sleep-wake Rhythm Disorder Patients: An Ultradian Constant Routine Study.

    PubMed

    Micic, Gorica; Lovato, Nicole; Gradisar, Michael; Burgess, Helen J; Ferguson, Sally A; Lack, Leon

    2016-08-01

    Our objectives were to investigate the period lengths (i.e., taus) of the endogenous core body temperature rhythm and melatonin rhythm in delayed sleep-wake phase disorder patients (DSWPD) and non-24-h sleep-wake rhythm disorder patients (N24SWD) compared with normally entrained individuals. Circadian rhythms were measured during an 80-h ultradian modified constant routine consisting of 80 ultrashort 1-h "days" in which participants had 20-min sleep opportunities alternating with 40 min of enforced wakefulness. We recruited a community-based sample of 26 DSWPD patients who met diagnostic criteria (17 males, 9 females; age, 21.85 ± 4.97 years) and 18 healthy controls (10 males, 8 females; age, 23.72 ± 5.10 years). Additionally, 4 full-sighted patients (3 males, 1 female; age, 25.75 ± 4.99 years) were diagnosed with N24SWD and included as a discrete study group. Ingestible core temperature capsules were used to record minute temperatures that were averaged to obtain 80 hourly data points. Salivary melatonin concentration was assessed every half-hour to determine time of dim light melatonin onset at the beginning and end of the 80-h protocol. DSWPD patients had significantly longer melatonin rhythm taus (24 h 34 min ± 17 min) than controls (24 h 22 min ± 15 min, p = 0.03, d = 0.70). These results were further supported by longer temperature rhythm taus in DSWPD patients (24 h 34 min ± 26 min) relative to controls (24 h 13 min ± 15 min, p = 0.01, d = 0.80). N24SWD patients had even longer melatonin (25 h ± 19 min) and temperature (24 h 52 min ± 17 min) taus than both DSWPD (p = 0.007, p = 0.06) and control participants (p < 0.001, p = 0.02, respectively). Between 12% and 19% of the variance in DSWPD patients' sleep timing could be explained by longer taus. This indicates that longer taus of circadian rhythms may contribute to the DSWPD patients' persistent tendency to delay, their frequent failure to respond to treatment, and their relapse following treatment

  11. [Deficits of routine occupational therapy services in rheumatic diseases: results of the RheumaDat study].

    PubMed

    Thieme, H; Löffler, K; Borgetto, B

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of the present study is to describe the frequency and potential determinants of occupational therapy routine services in patients with rheumatic diseases. The study is based on a secondary analysis of the RheumaDat database. The results of the survey on 907 patients were analyzed regarding frequency of occupational therapy routine services and related sociodemographic and disease-specific variables. Approximately 8% of the study population received occupational therapy, patients with rheumatoid arthritis representing the largest proportion of these at 13%. Only patients with osteoarthritis showed a clear treatment pattern. Patients from this group receiving occupational therapy were older, had a longer duration of disease and were more affected. No clear appraisal of the therapy status in the rheumatoid arthritis or fibromyalgia group could be made. The results indicate shortages and the lack of a clear system in occupational therapy routine services in patients with different rheumatic diseases.

  12. 78 FR 79079 - Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey); Activities under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey); Activities under OMB Review... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900- 0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in any correspondence....gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in...

  13. Working while receiving chemotherapy: a survey of patients' experiences and factors that influence these.

    PubMed

    Shewbridge, A; Wiseman, T; Richardson, A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the number of patients who continue to work when undergoing ambulatory chemotherapy and to identify personal or treatment-related factors that influence this. Patients undergoing final cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast or colorectal cancer or first-line chemotherapy for lymphoma at two cancer treatment centres were approached to take part in a cross sectional survey (n= 55, RR 55%). Sixty-four per cent (n= 35) of respondents were working when cancer was diagnosed. Fifty-four per cent (n= 19) of respondents were working when chemotherapy began but as treatment progressed only 29% (n= 10) continued to work in any capacity. The most important influencing factor when making decisions about work was the need to concentrate on looking after oneself. Overall, respondents found their employers and colleagues supportive but there was some evidence they became less supportive as treatment progressed. While this was a small study it highlights the need for health care professionals to understand patient's needs and wishes in relation to work while undergoing chemotherapy by including this issue as part of routine assessment. Strategies to allow those who wish to continue to work during treatment should be put in place early to support this.

  14. Gela histological scoring system for post-treatment biopsies of patients with gastric MALT lymphoma is feasible and reliable in routine practice.

    PubMed

    Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Wotherspoon, Andrew C; Capella, Carlo; Motta, Teresio; Pedrinis, Ennio; Pileri, Stefano A; Bertoni, Francesco; Conconi, Annarita; Zucca, Emanuele; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrés J M

    2013-01-01

    The International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group (IELSG) promoted this study to determine the inter-observer agreement in the application of the Groupe d' Etude des Lymphomes de l' Adulte (GELA) histological scoring system for evaluating residual disease in post-treatment gastric biopsies of patients with gastric Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (MALT) lymphoma (GML). Twenty-one patients with Helicobacter pylori -associated GML and treated with anti-H. pylori therapies were considered. A total of 154 biopsy sets from follow-up endoscopic procedures after H. pylori eradication were examined independently by seven pathologists from four European countries, following histological criteria suggested by the GELA scoring system. The overall concordance rate was 83% with a kappa value of 0·64, indicating a significant agreement among the seven observers. Most non-concordant responses clustered across the border of complete remission (CR) and probable minimal residual disease (pMRD), a distinction that does not imply critical clinical impact. Accordingly, when the analysis considered CR/pMRD as a single entity, the responses showed an overall concordance rate of 89% with kappa value of 0·83, thus indicating a high degree of inter-observer agreement. This study provides additional validation of the GELA histological grading system. This scheme can therefore be recommended in routine practice and deserves to be used in prospective clinical trials.

  15. Changes in drug disposition of lithium during pregnancy: a retrospective observational study of patient data from two routine therapeutic drug monitoring services in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Brekke, Malin; Molden, Espen; Skogvoll, Eirik; Aadal, Marianne; Spigset, Olav

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Pregnancy may cause changes in drug disposition, dose requirements and clinical response. For lithium, changes in disposition during pregnancy have so far been explored in a single-dose study on 4 participants only. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of pregnancy on serum levels of lithium in a larger patient material in a naturalistic setting. Design A retrospective observational study of patient data from 2 routine therapeutic drug monitoring services in Norway, linked to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Setting Norway, October 1999 to December 2011. Measurements Dose-adjusted drug concentrations of lithium during pregnancy were compared with the women's own baseline (non-pregnant) values, using a linear mixed model. Results Overall, coupling 196 726 serum concentration measurements from 54 393 women to the national birth registry identified 25 serum lithium concentration analyses obtained from a total of 14 pregnancies in 13 women, and 63 baseline analyses from the same women. Dose-adjusted serum concentrations in the third trimester were significantly lower than baseline (−34%; CI −44% to −23%, p<0.001). Conclusions Pregnancy causes a clinically relevant decline in maternal lithium serum concentrations. In order to maintain stable lithium concentrations during the third trimester of pregnancy, doses generally need to be increased by 50%. Individual variability in decline implies that lithium levels should be even more closely monitored throughout pregnancy and in the puerperium than in non-pregnant women to ensure adequate dosing. PMID:28249852

  16. Copy number changes of clinically actionable genes in melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer and colorectal cancer-A survey across 822 routine diagnostic cases.

    PubMed

    Pfarr, Nicole; Penzel, Roland; Klauschen, Frederick; Heim, Daniel; Brandt, Regine; Kazdal, Daniel; Jesinghaus, Moritz; Herpel, Esther; Schirmacher, Peter; Warth, Arne; Weichert, Wilko; Endris, Volker; Stenzinger, Albrecht

    2016-11-01

    Targeted deep massive parallel sequencing has been implemented in routine molecular diagnostics for high-throughput genetic profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cancer samples. This approach is widely used to interrogate simple somatic mutations but experience with the analysis of copy number variations (CNV) is limited. Here, we retrospectively analyzed CNV in 822 cancer cases (135 melanoma, 468 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), 219 colorectal cancers (CRC)). We observed a decreasing frequency of CNV in clinically actionable genes from melanoma to NSCLC to CRC. The overall cohort displayed 168 (20%) amplifications in 17 druggable targets. The majority of BRAF mutant melanomas (54%) showed co-occurring CNV in other genes, mainly affecting CDKN2A. Subsets showed clustered deletions in ABL1, NOTCH1, RET or STK11, GNA11, and JAK3. Most NRAS mutant melanomas (49%) harbored CNVs in other genes with CDKN2A and FGFR3 being most frequently affected. Five BRAF/NRASwt tumors had co-amplifications of KDR, KIT, PDGFRA and another six mutated KIT. Among all NSCLC, we identified 14 EGFRamp (with ten EGFRmut) and eight KRASamp (with seven KRASmut). KRASmut tumors displayed frequent amplifications of MYC (n = 10) and MDM2 (n = 5). Fifteen KRAS/EGFR/BRAFwt tumors had MET mutations/amplifications. In CRC, amplified IGF2 was most prevalent (n = 13) followed by MYC (n = 9). Two cases showed amplified KRAS wildtype alleles. Two of the KRASmut cases harbored amplifications of NRAS and three KRASwt cases amplification of EGFR. In conclusion, we demonstrate that our approach i) facilitates detection of CNV, ii) enables detection of known CNV patterns, and iii) uncovers new CNV of clinically actionable genes in FFPE tissue samples across cancers. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Minority ethnicity patient satisfaction and experience: results of the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey in England

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Richard J; Ferguson, Jamie; Møller, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to explore the differential patient satisfaction reported by patients with cancer who are from ethnic minority backgrounds, examining patient-reported experience of interacting with medical and nursing staff. Setting As a secondary analysis, we collated data collected over two consecutive annual rounds of the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES) from September 2012 to November 2013. Participants There were 138 878 responses from 155 hospital trusts across the National Health Service in England, representing a response rate of 63.9% based on the total identified cohort of patients receiving cancer care over those 2 years. Outcomes We used the results of the annual survey, which sought to assess overall patient satisfaction along with patient experience of interacting with clinical nurse specialists, hospital doctors and ward nurses. Results Ethnic minority patients reported lower satisfaction and less positive experiences of care overall. While some of this difference appeared related to demographic and socioeconomic variation, ethnic minority patients remained less positive than those in the White British group, after statistical adjustment. Ethnic minority patients also reported lower confidence in, and less understanding of, healthcare professionals, including clinical nurse specialists, doctors and ward nurses. Conclusions Given the diversity of the British population, as well as the clustering of ethnic minority patients in certain urban areas, a better understanding of the expectations and additional needs of ethnic minority patients is required to improve their experience of and satisfaction with cancer care. PMID:27354083

  18. Survey of patient dose in computed tomography in Syria 2009.

    PubMed

    Kharita, M H; Khazzam, S

    2010-09-01

    The radiation doses to patient in computed tomography (CT) in Syria have been investigated and compared with similar studies in different countries. This work surveyed 30 CT scanners from six different manufacturers distributed all over Syria. Some of the results in this paper were part of a project launched by the International Atomic Energy Agency in different regions of the world covering Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe. The dose quantities covered are CT dose index (CTDI(w)), dose-length product (DLP), effective dose (E) and collective dose. It was found that most CTDI(w) and DLP values were similar to the European reference levels and in line with the results of similar surveys in the world. The results were in good agreement with the UNSCEAR Report 2007. This study concluded a recommendation for national diagnostic reference level for the most common CT protocols in Syria. The results can be used as a base for future optimisation studies in the country.

  19. Patient and family engagement: a survey of US hospital practices

    PubMed Central

    Herrin, Jeph; Harris, Kathleen G; Kenward, Kevin; Hines, Stephen; Joshi, Maulik S; Frosch, Dominick L

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient and family engagement (PFE) in healthcare is an important element of the transforming healthcare system; however, the prevalence of various PFE practices in the USA is not known. Objective We report on a survey of hospitals in the USA regarding their PFE practices during 2013–2014. Results The response rate was 42%, with 1457 acute care hospitals completing the survey. We constructed 25 items to summarise the responses regarding key practices, which fell into three broad categories: (1) organisational practices, (2) bedside practices and (3) access to information and shared decision-making. We found a wide range of scores across hospitals. Selected findings include: 86% of hospitals had a policy for unrestricted visitor access in at least some units; 68% encouraged patients/families to participate in shift-change reports; 67% had formal policies for disclosing and apologising for errors; and 38% had a patient and family advisory council. The most commonly reported barrier to increased PFE was ‘competing organisational priorities’. Summary Our findings indicate that there is a large variation in hospital implementation of PFE practices, with competing organisational priorities being the most commonly identified barrier to adoption. PMID:26082560

  20. The use of patient experience survey data by out-of-hours primary care services: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, John L; Asprey, Anthea; Richards, Suzanne H

    2016-01-01

    Background English National Quality Requirements mandate out-of-hours primary care services to routinely audit patient experience, but do not state how it should be done. Objectives We explored how providers collect patient feedback data and use it to inform service provision. We also explored staff views on the utility of out-of-hours questions from the English General Practice Patient Survey (GPPS). Methods A qualitative study was conducted with 31 staff (comprising service managers, general practitioners and administrators) from 11 out-of-hours primary care providers in England, UK. Staff responsible for patient experience audits within their service were sampled and data collected via face-to-face semistructured interviews. Results Although most providers regularly audited their patients’ experiences by using patient surveys, many participants expressed a strong preference for additional qualitative feedback. Staff provided examples of small changes to service delivery resulting from patient feedback, but service-wide changes were not instigated. Perceptions that patients lacked sufficient understanding of the urgent care system in which out-of-hours primary care services operate were common and a barrier to using feedback to enable change. Participants recognised the value of using patient experience feedback to benchmark services, but perceived weaknesses in the out-of-hours items from the GPPS led them to question the validity of using these data for benchmarking in its current form. Conclusions The lack of clarity around how out-of-hours providers should audit patient experience hinders the utility of the National Quality Requirements. Although surveys were common, patient feedback data had only a limited role in service change. Data derived from the GPPS may be used to benchmark service providers, but refinement of the out-of-hours items is needed. PMID:26490004

  1. Environmental equity, air quality, socioeconomic status, and respiratory health: a linkage analysis of routine data from the Health Survey for England

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, B.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Study objective: To assess relations between socioeconomic status and local air quality, and combined effects on respiratory health, in the context of environmental and health inequality. Design: Data on people taking part in the Health Survey for England were attributed with a small area index of air pollution using annual mean concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, benzene, and particulates (PM10). Regression models were used to measure associations between social class, air quality, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and self reported asthma. Participants: Participants aged 16–79 in the Health Survey for England 1995, 1996, and 1997. Main results: Urban lower social class households were more likely to be located in areas of poor air quality, but the association in rural areas was, if anything reversed. Low social class and poor air quality were independently associated with decreased lung function (FEV1), but not asthma prevalence, after adjustment for a number of potential confounders. Social class effects were not attenuated by adjustment for air quality. In men, a differential effect of air pollution on FEV1 was found, with its effect in social classes III to V about double that in social classes I and II (p value for interaction = 0.04). This effect modification was not seen for women. Conclusions: Further evidence of environmental inequity in the UK is provided. The association between FEV1 and local air quality is of similar magnitude to that with social class, and the adverse effects of air pollution seem to be greater in men in lower social classes. PMID:16234422

  2. Narrow band (light) imaging of oral mucosa in routine dental patients. Part I: Assessment of value in detection of mucosal changes.

    PubMed

    Truelove, Edmond L; Dean, David; Maltby, Samuel; Griffith, Matthew; Huggins, Kimberly; Griffith, Mickealla; Taylor, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the value of adding narrow band (light) imaging (NBI) to the standard oral soft tissue examination process used to detect mucosal change. A total of 620 dental patients who came to the clinic for regular dental evaluation or for treatment of acute dental problems were given a standard oral soft tissue examination by dental students under faculty supervision. The results of the white light examination were recorded after the tissues were examined with NBI, at which point areas with a loss of fluorescence (LOF) were recorded. The nature of the tissue change was classified clinically as normal variation, inflammatory, traumatic, dysplastic, or other, and patients were categorized depending on their clinical findings: normal, need follow-up visit, or immediate biopsy. Risk factors related to oral dysplasia also were recorded. The addition of NBI added between one and two minutes to the examination process. Of the 620 examinations, an area with an LOF suggestive of pathology was detected in 69 subjects (11.1%). After a second immediate evaluation, 28 of the 69 subjects were scheduled for follow-up or biopsy. None of the lesions discovered in these 28 subjects had been detected using standard (white light) examination. Adding NBI to the routine clinical examination resulted in detection of changes not seen with white light examination in 11.1% of patients; of these, a small but important number were found to have otherwise undetected persistent changes representing inflammatory lesions or potentially dangerous oral dysplasia. Adding NBI as an adjunctive diagnostic procedure improved the quality and outcome of the examination process.

  3. Limiting the use of routine radiography for acute ankle injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cockshott, W. P.; Jenkin, J. K.; Pui, M.

    1983-01-01

    In the diagnosis of ankle injuries routine radiography is often productive. An international survey of the average number of radiographs made of injured ankles suggested that two projections are adequate to detect fractures. This was confirmed in a prospective study of 242 patients coming to a hospital emergency department with recent ankle injuries. All the fractures could be identified on an anteroposterior or a lateral projection, although some were more obvious on an oblique view. As well, all the fractures were associated with malleolar soft-tissue swelling. Thus, radiography for acute ankle injuries could safely be restricted to patients with soft-tissue swelling, and fractures could be diagnosed using only two routine projections, though for management purposes additional projections might be needed. With a policy of limiting the use of radiography substantial cost reductions are possible. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6407744

  4. A survey of patients' attitudes to clinical research.

    PubMed

    Desmond, A; Stanton, A; Maher, V; Crean, P; Feely, J; Sullivan, P

    2011-04-01

    Every year hundreds of patients voluntarily participate in clinical trials across Ireland. However, little research has been done as to how patients find the experience. This survey was conducted in an attempt to ascertain clinical trial participants' views on their experience of participating in a clinical trial and to see and how clinical trial participation can be improved. One hundred and sixty-six clinical trial participants who had recently completed a global phase IV cardiovascular endpoint clinical trial were sent a 3-page questionnaire. Ninety-one (91%) respondents found the experience of participating in a clinical trial a good one with 85 (84.16%) respondents saying they would recommend participating in a clinical trial to a friend or relative and eighty-five (87.63%) respondents feeling they received better healthcare because they had participated in a clinical trial.

  5. Outdoor fitness routine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000891.htm Outdoor fitness routine To use the sharing features on this ... you and is right for your level of fitness. Here are some ideas: Warm up first. Get ...

  6. Sleep telemedicine: a survey study of patient preferences.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jessica M; Schwamm, Lee H; Bianchi, Matt T

    2012-01-01

    Telemedicine is an increasingly recognized option for cost-effective management of chronic conditions. We surveyed Sleep Clinic patients about their experiences and preferences regarding different forms of telemedicine. Adult Sleep Clinic patients seen between 2009 and 2011 received a brief survey either by postal mail (n = 156) or, for those with an available email address, electronically (n = 282). The overall response rate was 28.1% (n = 123 responses), with email response rates being higher than postal mail responses. The most commonly reported barriers to in-person physician visits were parking cost (44%), time away from work/school (34%), and cost of gas (26%). Whereas 89% of respondents indicated using telephone and 55% of respondents indicated using email to communicate with providers, none reported experience with video telemedicine. Despite this lack of experience, over 60% reported feeling comfortable or willing to try it. Of those who were uncomfortable about video telemedicine, the two main reasons were that in-person visits feel more natural (48%) and that the doctor might need to perform an examination (24%). More than half of respondents reported willingness to pay a copay for a video visit. Video telemedicine represents a feasible option for chronic sleep disorders management.

  7. Hearing the patient's voice? Factors affecting the use of patient survey data in quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E; Cleary, P

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To develop a framework for understanding factors affecting the use of patient survey data in quality improvement. Design: Qualitative interviews with senior health professionals and managers and a review of the literature. Setting: A quality improvement collaborative in Minnesota, USA involving teams from eight medical groups, focusing on how to use patient survey data to improve patient centred care. Participants: Eight team leaders (medical, clinical improvement or service quality directors) and six team members (clinical improvement coordinators and managers). Results: Respondents reported three types of barriers before the collaborative: organisational, professional and data related. Organisational barriers included lack of supporting values for patient centred care, competing priorities, and lack of an effective quality improvement infrastructure. Professional barriers included clinicians and staff not being used to focusing on patient interaction as a quality issue, individuals not necessarily having been selected, trained or supported to provide patient centred care, and scepticism, defensiveness or resistance to change following feedback. Data related barriers included lack of expertise with survey data, lack of timely and specific results, uncertainty over the effective interventions or time frames for improvement, and consequent risk of perceived low cost effectiveness of data collection. Factors that appeared to have promoted data use included board led strategies to change culture and create quality improvement forums, leadership from senior physicians and managers, and the persistence of quality improvement staff over several years in demonstrating change in other areas. Conclusion: Using patient survey data may require a more concerted effort than for other clinical data. Organisations may need to develop cultures that support patient centred care, quality improvement capacity, and to align professional receptiveness and leadership with

  8. Variations of Surveillance Practice for Patients with Bone Sarcoma: A Survey of Australian Sarcoma Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kate; Bae, Susie; Desai, Jayesh; Strong, Robyn; Caruso, Denise; Howell, Deborah; Herschtal, Alan; Sullivan, Michael; Orme, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. After treatment, bone sarcoma patients carry a high chance of relapse and late effects from multimodal therapy. We hypothesize that significant variation in surveillance practice exists between pediatric medical oncology (PO) and nonpediatric medical oncology (NP) sarcoma disciplines. Methods. Australian sarcoma clinicians were approached to do a web based survey that assessed radiologic surveillance (RS) strategies, late toxicity assessment, and posttreatment psychosocial interventions. Results. In total, 51 clinicians responded. No differences were identified in local disease RS. In metastatic disease response assessment, 100% of POs (23/23) and 93% of NPs (24/26) conducted CT chest. However, this was more likely to occur for NPs in the context of a CT chest/abdomen/pelvis (NP: 10/26; PO: 1/23; p = 0.006). POs were more likely to use CXR for RS (p = 0.006). POs showed more prescriptive intensity in assessment of heart function (p = 0.001), hearing (p < 0.001), and fertility (p = 0.02). POs were more likely to deliver written information for health maintenance/treatment summary (p = 0.04). The majority of respondents described enquiring about psychosocial aspects of health (n = 33/37, 89%), but a routine formal psychosocial screen was only used by 23% (n = 6/26). Conclusion. There is high variability in bone sarcoma surveillance between PO and NP clinicians. Efforts to harmonize approaches would allow early and late effects recognition/intervention and facilitate improved patient care/transition and research. PMID:28348507

  9. Variations of Surveillance Practice for Patients with Bone Sarcoma: A Survey of Australian Sarcoma Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Jeremy; Thompson, Kate; Bae, Susie; Desai, Jayesh; Strong, Robyn; Caruso, Denise; Howell, Deborah; Herschtal, Alan; Sullivan, Michael; Orme, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. After treatment, bone sarcoma patients carry a high chance of relapse and late effects from multimodal therapy. We hypothesize that significant variation in surveillance practice exists between pediatric medical oncology (PO) and nonpediatric medical oncology (NP) sarcoma disciplines. Methods. Australian sarcoma clinicians were approached to do a web based survey that assessed radiologic surveillance (RS) strategies, late toxicity assessment, and posttreatment psychosocial interventions. Results. In total, 51 clinicians responded. No differences were identified in local disease RS. In metastatic disease response assessment, 100% of POs (23/23) and 93% of NPs (24/26) conducted CT chest. However, this was more likely to occur for NPs in the context of a CT chest/abdomen/pelvis (NP: 10/26; PO: 1/23; p = 0.006). POs were more likely to use CXR for RS (p = 0.006). POs showed more prescriptive intensity in assessment of heart function (p = 0.001), hearing (p < 0.001), and fertility (p = 0.02). POs were more likely to deliver written information for health maintenance/treatment summary (p = 0.04). The majority of respondents described enquiring about psychosocial aspects of health (n = 33/37, 89%), but a routine formal psychosocial screen was only used by 23% (n = 6/26). Conclusion. There is high variability in bone sarcoma surveillance between PO and NP clinicians. Efforts to harmonize approaches would allow early and late effects recognition/intervention and facilitate improved patient care/transition and research.

  10. Routine environmental monitoring schedule, calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, S.M.

    1997-11-24

    This document provides the Environmental Restorations Contractor (ERC) and the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC) a schedule in accordance with the HNF-PRO-454, Inactive Waste Sites` HNF-PRO-455, Solid Waste 3 Management4 and BHI-EE-02, Environmental Requirements, of monitoring and sampling, routines for the near-facility environmental monitoring program during calendar year (CY) 1998. Every attempt will be made to consistently follow this schedule; any deviation from this schedule will be documented by an internal memorandum (DSI) explaining the reason for the deviation. The DSI will be issued by the scheduled performing organization and directed to Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of Environmental Monitoring and investigations and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive wastes sites are scheduled to be surveyed at least annually. Any newly discovered wastes sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1999. The outside perimeter road surveys of 200 East and West Area and the rail survey from the 300 Area to Columbia Center will be performed in the year 2000 per agreement with Department of Energy, Richland Field Office. This schedule does not discuss staffing needs, nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines. Personnel performing routines to meet this schedule shall communicate any need for 1332 assistance in completing these routines to Radiological Control management and Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. After each routine survey is completed, a copy of the survey record, maps, and data sheets will be forwarded to Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. These routine surveys will not be considered complete until this

  11. Effects of betahistine on patient-reported outcomes in routine practice in patients with vestibular vertigo and appraisal of tolerability: experience in the OSVaLD study.

    PubMed

    Benecke, Heike; Pérez-Garrigues, Herminio; Bin Sidek, Dinsuhaimi; Uloziene, Ingrida; D, Kuessner; Sondag, Eric; Theeuwes, Ad

    2010-01-01

    This was a 3-month multicentre, open-label post-marketing surveillance study of betahistine (24 mg b.i.d. or 16 mg t.i.d.) in patients with vertigo of peripheral vestibular origin. Study endpoints comprised on-treatment changes in the Dizziness Handicap Index (DHI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) and the Short-Form (SF)-36v2. Total DHI score improved 37.2 points (of a 100-point scale) following betahistine treatment. Corresponding improvements occurred in all three DHI scale domains (all p < 0.001 vs baseline). Betahistine therapy was also accompanied by progressive, significant improvements in both HADS-A and HADS-D scores (p < 0.001), and improvements in the distribution profiles of anxiety and depression scores. Significant improvements in the Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary scores of the SF-36v2 were recorded during betahistine treatment. Betahistine was generally well tolerated. A total of 76 adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were recorded in 49 patients (2.4%), of which 75 were classified as mild or moderate and 54 were possibly related to betahistine. ADRs led to study drug discontinuation in 17 patients. These data illustrate that treatment with betahistine 48 mg/day in patients with recurrent peripheral vestibular vertigo is associated with improvements in objective measures of health-related quality of life and satisfactory tolerability.

  12. Quality-Assurance Data for Routine Water Analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey Laboratory in Troy, New York - July 2005 through June 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; McHale, Michael R.; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2009-01-01

    The laboratory for analysis of low-ionic-strength water at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Science Center in Troy, N.Y., analyzes samples collected by USGS projects throughout the Northeast. The laboratory's quality-assurance program is based on internal and interlaboratory quality-assurance samples and quality-control procedures that were developed to ensure proper sample collection, processing, and analysis. The quality-assurance and quality-control data were stored in the laboratory's Lab Master data-management system, which provides efficient review, compilation, and plotting of data. This report presents and discusses results of quality-assurance and quality control samples analyzed from July 2005 through June 2007. Results for the quality-control samples for 19 analytical procedures were evaluated for bias and precision. Control charts indicate that data for eight of the analytical procedures were occasionally biased for either high-concentration or low-concentration samples but were within control limits; these procedures were: total aluminum, calcium, magnesium, nitrate (colorimetric method), potassium, silicon, sodium, and sulfate. Eight of the analytical procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for the high-concentration sample, but were within control limits; these procedures were: total aluminum, calcium, dissolved organic carbon, chloride, nitrate (ion chromatograph), potassium, silicon, and sulfate. The magnesium and pH procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for the low-concentration sample, but were within control limits. The acid-neutralizing capacity, total monomeric aluminum, nitrite, and specific conductance procedures were biased for the high-concentration and low-concentration samples, but were within control limits. Results from the filter-blank and analytical-blank analyses indicated that the procedures for 16 of 17 analytes were within control limits, although the concentrations for blanks were

  13. Quality-Assurance Data for Routine Water Analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey Laboratory in Troy, New York - July 2003 through June 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; McHale, Michael R.; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2009-01-01

    The laboratory for analysis of low-ionic-strength water at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Science Center in Troy, N.Y., analyzes samples collected by USGS projects throughout the Northeast. The laboratory's quality-assurance program is based on internal and interlaboratory qualityassurance samples and quality-control procedures that were developed to ensure proper sample collection, processing, and analysis. The quality-assurance and quality-control data were stored in the laboratory's Lab Master data-management system, which provides efficient review, compilation, and plotting of data. This report presents and discusses results of quality-assurance and quality control samples analyzed from July 2003 through June 2005. Results for the quality-control samples for 20 analytical procedures were evaluated for bias and precision. Control charts indicate that data for five of the analytical procedures were occasionally biased for either high-concentration or low-concentration samples but were within control limits; these procedures were: acid-neutralizing capacity, total monomeric aluminum, pH, silicon, and sodium. Seven of the analytical procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for the high-concentration sample, but were within control limits; these procedures were: dissolved organic carbon, chloride, nitrate (ion chromatograph), nitrite, silicon, sodium, and sulfate. The calcium and magnesium procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for the low-concentration sample, but were within control limits. The total aluminum and specific conductance procedures were biased for the highconcentration and low-concentration samples, but were within control limits. Results from the filter-blank and analytical-blank analyses indicate that the procedures for 17 of 18 analytes were within control limits, although the concentrations for blanks were occasionally outside the control limits. The data-quality objective was not met for dissolved organic

  14. Quality-Assurance Data for Routine Water Analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey Laboratory in Troy, New York--July 1999 through June 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; McHale, Michael R.; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2006-01-01

    The laboratory for analysis of low-ionic-strength water at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Science Center in Troy, N.Y., analyzes samples collected by USGS projects throughout the Northeast. The laboratory's quality-assurance program is based on internal and interlaboratory quality-assurance samples and quality-control procedures that were developed to ensure proper sample collection, processing, and analysis. The quality-assurance and quality-control data were stored in the laboratory's LabMaster data-management system, which provides efficient review, compilation, and plotting of data. This report presents and discusses results of quality-assurance and quality-control samples analyzed from July 1999 through June 2001. Results for the quality-control samples for 18 analytical procedures were evaluated for bias and precision. Control charts indicate that data for eight of the analytical procedures were occasionally biased for either high-concentration or low-concentration samples but were within control limits; these procedures were: acid-neutralizing capacity, total monomeric aluminum, total aluminum, calcium, chloride and nitrate (ion chromatography and colormetric method) and sulfate. The total aluminum and dissolved organic carbon procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for the high-concentration sample, but were within control limits. The calcium and specific conductance procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for the low-concentration sample, but were within control limits. The magnesium procedure was biased for the high-concentration and low concentration samples, but was within control limits. Results from the filter-blank and analytical-blank analyses indicate that the procedures for 14 of 15 analytes were within control limits, although the concentrations for blanks were occasionally outside the control limits. The data-quality objective was not met for dissolved organic carbon. Sampling and analysis precision are

  15. Quality-assurance data for routine water quality analyses by the U. S. Geological Survey laboratory in Troy, New York; July 1993 through June 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; McHale, Michael R.; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2001-01-01

    A laboratory for analysis of low-ionic strength water has been developed at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) office in Troy, N.Y., to analyze samples collected by USGS projects in the Northeast. The laboratory's quality-assurance program is based on internal and interlaboratory quality-assurance samples and quality-control procedures developed to ensure proper sample collection, processing, and analysis. The quality-assurance/quality-control data are stored in the laboratory's SAS data-management system, which provides efficient review, compilation, and plotting of quality-assurance/quality-control data. This report presents and discusses samples analyzed from July 1993 through June 1995. Quality-control results for 18 analytical procedures were evaluated for bias and precision. Control charts show that data from seven of the analytical procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for either high-concentration or low-concentration samples but were within control limits; these procedures were: acid-neutralizing capacity, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon (soil expulsions), chloride, magnesium, nitrate (colorimetric method), and pH. Three of the analytical procedures were occasionally biased but were within control limits; they were: calcium (high for high-concentration samples for May 1995), dissolved organic carbon (high for highconcentration samples from January through September 1994), and fluoride (high in samples for April and June 1994). No quality-control sample has been developed for the organic monomeric aluminum procedure. Results from the filter-blank and analytical-blank analyses indicate that all analytical procedures in which blanks were run were within control limits, although values for a few blanks were outside the control limits. Blanks were not analyzed for acid-neutralizing capacity, dissolved inorganic carbon, fluoride, nitrate (colorimetric method), or pH. Sampling and analysis precision are evaluated herein in

  16. Quality-Assurance Data for Routine Water Analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey Laboratory in Troy, New York-July 1997 through June 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; McHale, Michael R.; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2006-01-01

    The laboratory for analysis of low-ionic-strength water at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Science Center in Troy, N.Y., analyzes samples collected by USGS projects throughout the Northeast. The laboratory's quality-assurance program is based on internal and interlaboratory quality-assurance samples and quality-control procedures that were developed to ensure proper sample collection, processing, and analysis. The quality-assurance/quality-control data for the time period addressed in this report were stored in the laboratory's SAS data-management system, which provides efficient review, compilation, and plotting of data. This report presents and discusses results of quality-assurance and quality- control samples analyzed from July 1997 through June 1999. Results for the quality-control samples for 18 analytical procedures were evaluated for bias and precision. Control charts indicate that data for eight of the analytical procedures were occasionally biased for either high-concentration and (or) low-concentration samples but were within control limits; these procedures were: acid-neutralizing capacity, total monomeric aluminum, total aluminum, ammonium, calcium, chloride, specific conductance, and sulfate. The data from the potassium and sodium analytical procedures are insufficient for evaluation. Results from the filter-blank and analytical-blank analyses indicate that the procedures for 11 of 13 analytes were within control limits, although the concentrations for blanks were occasionally outside the control limits. Blank analysis results for chloride showed that 22 percent of blanks did not meet data-quality objectives and results for dissolved organic carbon showed that 31 percent of the blanks did not meet data-quality objectives. Sampling and analysis precision are evaluated herein in terms of the coefficient of variation obtained for triplicate samples in the procedures for 14 of the 18 analytes. At least 90 percent of the samples met data

  17. Quality-Assurance Data for Routine Water Analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey Laboratory in Troy, New York - July 2001 Through June 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; McHale, Michael R.; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2009-01-01

    The laboratory for analysis of low-ionic-strength water at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Science Center in Troy, N.Y., analyzes samples collected by USGS projects throughout the Northeast. The laboratory's quality-assurance program is based on internal and interlaboratory quality-assurance samples and quality-control procedures that were developed to ensure proper sample collection, processing, and analysis. The quality-assurance and quality-control data were stored in the laboratory's Lab Master data-management system, which provides efficient review, compilation, and plotting of data. This report presents and discusses results of quality-assurance and quality control samples analyzed from July 2001 through June 2003. Results for the quality-control samples for 19 analytical procedures were evaluated for bias and precision. Control charts indicate that data for six of the analytical procedures were occasionally biased for either high-concentration or low-concentration samples but were within control limits; these procedures were: acid-neutralizing capacity, chloride, magnesium, nitrate (ion chromatography), potassium, and sodium. The calcium procedure was biased throughout the analysis period for the high-concentration sample, but was within control limits. The total monomeric aluminum and fluoride procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for the low-concentration sample, but were within control limits. The total aluminum, pH, specific conductance, and sulfate procedures were biased for the high-concentration and low-concentration samples, but were within control limits. Results from the filter-blank and analytical-blank analyses indicate that the procedures for 16 of 18 analytes were within control limits, although the concentrations for blanks were occasionally outside the control limits. The data-quality objective was not met for the dissolved organic carbon or specific conductance procedures. Sampling and analysis precision are evaluated

  18. Multiplex digital colour-coded barcode technology on RNA extracted from routine cytological samples of patients with non-small cell lung cancer: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sgariglia, Roberta; Pisapia, Pasquale; Nacchio, Mariantonia; De Luca, Caterina; Pepe, Francesco; Russo, Maria; Bellevicine, Claudio; Troncone, Giancarlo; Malapelle, Umberto

    2017-04-06

    In the advanced stages of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), molecular testing is often performed on archival cytological smears. The nCounter system (NanoString Technologies) is a new promising multiplex digital colour-coded barcode technology. However, its feasibility to evaluate the RNA expression of clinical relevant biomarkers on routine cytological smears is still uncertain. To this end, RNA was extracted from 12 NSCLC routine stained cytological smears, and nCounter analysis performed by using a 48-gene panel. Overall, 11/12 (92%) of the smears were adequate for the secondary analysis, fulfilling the quality check parameter analysis of nSolver software. This pilot study shows that RNA nCounter analysis is feasible on routine cytological smears preparing the field for the implementation of this technology in the routine setting.

  19. Simulating a patient's fall as a means to improve routine communication: Joint training for nursing and fifth-year medical students

    PubMed Central

    Flentje, Markus; Müßel, Thomas; Henzel, Bettina; Jantzen, Jan-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physicians and nursing staff interact as a team on a daily basis in hospital settings. However, both educational paths offer few opportunities to establish contact with the other professional group. Neither professional group can practice its later role with the other group in a “safe” learning environment. Routine interprofessional collaboration is described as being in need of great improvement and carries with it the potential for conflict. To improve interprofessional communication and task management, a simulation-based emergency training session for nursing students and fifth-year medical students was developed at the KRH Klinikum Nordstadt in Hanover, Germany. As a pilot project, the course was held twice in the form of a one-day session with ten nursing and four medical students. Project: Using the example of a patient’s fall, course participants were able to observe and actively treat multiple simulated patients. Following each simulation the trainer conducted a comprehensive debriefing. The course was then evaluated using a questionnaire. Results: The evaluation of the team training showed a high level of acceptance among the two participating professional groups. On a scale of 1 (hardly applicable) to 5 (strongly applicable), the course was given a 4 by both professional groups for its relevance to daily work. In the open-ended written responses praise was specifically given for the opportunity to learn how to switch perspectives as a result of the simulation exercises. Conclusion: A common emergency on the hospital ward offers a good opportunity to establish and practice interprofessional team skills. With the knowledge gained about communication and the ability to change viewpoints, participants are able to improve their team skills. Participants demonstrated a high degree of acceptance for the training program. PMID:27280130

  20. Routine failures in the process for blood testing and the communication of results to patients in primary care in the UK: a qualitative exploration of patient and provider perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Ian; Bentham, Louise; Hill, Ann; McManus, Richard J; Lilford, Richard; Greenfield, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Background The testing and result communication process in primary care is complex. Its successful completion relies on the coordinated efforts of a range of staff in primary care and external settings working together with patients. Despite the importance of diagnostic testing in provision of care, this complexity renders the process vulnerable in the face of increasing demand, stretched resources and a lack of supporting guidance. Methods We conducted a series of focus groups with patients and staff across four primary care practices using process-improvement strategies to identify and understand areas where either unnecessary delay is introduced, or the process may fail entirely. We then worked with both patients and staff to arrive at practical strategies to improve the current system. Results A total of six areas across the process were identified where improvements could be introduced. These were: (1) delay in phlebotomy, (2) lack of a fail-safe to ensure blood tests are returned to practices and patients, (3) difficulties in accessing results by telephone, (4) role of non-clinical staff in communicating results, (5) routine communication of normal results and (6) lack of a protocol for result communication. Conclusions A number of potential failures in testing and communicating results to patients were identified, and some specific ideas for improving existing systems emerged. These included same-day phlebotomy sessions, use of modern technology methods to proactively communicate routine results and targeted training for receptionists handling sensitive data. There remains an urgent need for further work to test these and other potential solutions. PMID:26251507

  1. 75 FR 16912 - Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request... measure patients' satisfaction with VA's dental services. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on..., Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10-0503. OMB Control Number: 2900-New (VA Form 10-0503)....

  2. Missed Opportunity: National Survey of Primary Care Physicians and Patients on Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    A national representative survey of primary care physicians (N=648) was conducted to determine how they deal with patients who have substance abuse problems. The survey revealed how physicians identify substance abuse in their patients, what efforts they make to help these patients, and what barriers they find to effective diagnosis and treatment.…

  3. Motivation through Routine Documentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koth, Laurie J.

    2016-01-01

    This informed commentary article offers a simple, effective classroom management strategy in which the teacher uses routine documentation to motivate students both to perform academically and to behave in a manner consistent with established classroom rules and procedures. The pragmatic strategy is grounded in literature, free to implement,…

  4. Routine DNA testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Routine DNA testing. It’s done once you’ve Marker-Assisted Breeding Pipelined promising Qantitative Trait Loci within your own breeding program and thereby established the performance-predictive power of each DNA test for your germplasm under your conditions. By then you are ready to screen your par...

  5. PROPER: Optical propagation routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krist, John E.

    2014-05-01

    PROPER simulates the propagation of light through an optical system using Fourier transform algorithms (Fresnel, angular spectrum methods). Distributed as IDL source code, it includes routines to create complex apertures, aberrated wavefronts, and deformable mirrors. It is especially useful for the simulation of high contrast imaging telescopes (extrasolar planet imagers like TPF).

  6. Rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry in four patients with abnormal routine coagulation studies before removal of epidural catheters after major surgery: a case series and research study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Routine coagulation tests have a low predictability for perioperative bleeding complications, and spinal hematoma after removal of epidural catheters is very infrequent. Thromboelastometry and point-of-care platelet aggregometry may improve hemostatic monitoring but have not been studied in the context of safety around epidural removal. Methods Twenty patients who received an epidural catheter for major thoracoabdominal and abdominal surgery were included prospectively. In addition to routine coagulation tests, rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry were carried out. Results A coagulation deficit was suggested by routine coagulation tests on the intended day of epidural catheter removal in four out of 20 patients. Prothrombin time-international normalized ratio was elevated to 1.5 in one patient (normal range: 0.9 to 1.2) while rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry parameters were within normal limits. Activated partial thromboplastin time was elevated to 47 to 50 seconds in the remaining three patients (normal range 28 to 45 seconds). Rotational thromboelastometry showed that one of the patients’ results was due to heparin effect: the clotting time with the HEPTEM® activator was 154 seconds as compared to 261 seconds with INTEM. The three remaining patients with prolonged routine coagulation test results had all received over 1L of hydroxyethyl starch (Venofundin®) and thrombosis prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaparin). Rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometrygave normal or hypercoagulative signals in most patients. Conclusions This case series is new in that it examines rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry postoperatively in the context of epidural analgesia and shows that they may be clinically useful. These methods should be validated before they can be used for standard patient care

  7. Metadata extraction routines for improving infobutton performance.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Nathan C; Haug, Peter J

    2010-11-13

    Infobuttons have been proven as an effective means for providing quick, context-specific links to pertinent information resources at the point of care. Current infobutton manager implementations, however, lack the ability to exchange metadata, are limited to a relatively small set of information providers, and are targeted primarily for a clinician audience. As part of a local effort to implement infobuttons for patient use via a tethered personal health record, we present a series of metadata extraction routines. These routines were constructed to extract key pieces of information from health information providers on the Internet, including content coverage, language availability, and readability scores. The extraction routines were tested using thirty different disease conditions against eight different providers. The routines yielded 183 potential infobutton targets and associated metadata for each. The capabilities of the extraction routines will be expanded to cover new types of metadata in the future.

  8. Disease Awareness and Management Behavior of Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: A Questionnaire Survey of 313 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Eun; Lee, Young Bok; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Hye Sung; Lee, Kyung Ho; Park, Young Min; Lee, Jun Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) should be relatively well informed about the disorder to control their condition and prevent flare-ups. Thus far, there is no accurate information about the disease awareness levels and therapeutic behavior of AD patients. Objective To collect data on patients' knowledge about AD and their behavior in relation to seeking information about the disease and its treatment. Methods We performed a questionnaire survey on the disease awareness and self-management behavior of AD patients. A total of 313 patients and parents of patients with AD who had visited the The Catholic University of Korea, Catholic Medical Center between November 2011 and October 2012 were recruited. We compared the percentage of correct answers from all collected questionnaires according to the demographic and disease characteristics of the patients. Results Although dermatologists were the most frequent disease information sources and treatment providers for the AD patients, a significant proportion of participants obtained information from the Internet, which carries a huge amount of false medical information. A considerable number of participants perceived false online information as genuine, especially concerning complementary and alternative medicine treatments of AD, and the adverse effects of steroids. Some questions on AD knowledge had significantly different answers according to sex, marriage status, educational level, type of residence and living area, disease duration, disease severity, and treatment history with dermatologists. Conclusion Dermatologists should pay more attention to correcting the common misunderstandings about AD to reduce unnecessary social/economic losses and improve treatment compliance. PMID:25673930

  9. 76 FR 56504 - Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request... spinal cord patients' satisfaction with VA rehabilitation and health care system. Affected Public... of automated collection techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title:...

  10. The Relationship between MX [3-Chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone], Routinely Monitored Trihalomethanes, and Other Characteristics in Drinking Water in a Long-Term Survey.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel B; Bennett, James E; Rantakokko, Panu; Martinez, David; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Toledano, Mireille B

    2015-06-02

    MX (3-Chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone) is a drinking water disinfection byproduct (DBP). It is a potent mutagen and is of concern to public health. Data on MX levels in drinking water, especially in the UK, are limited. Our aim was to investigate factors associated with variability of MX concentrations at the tap, and to evaluate if routinely measured trihalomethanes (THMs) are an appropriate proxy measure for MX. We conducted quarterly water sampling at consumers' taps in eight water supply zones in and around Bradford, UK, between 2007 and 2010. We collected 79 samples which were analyzed for MX using GC-HRMS. Other parameters such as pH, temperature, UV-absorbance and free chlorine were measured concurrently, and total THMs were modeled from regulatory monitoring data. To our knowledge this is the longest MX measurement survey undertaken to date. Concentrations of MX varied between 8.9 and 45.5 ng/L with a median of 21.3 ng/L. MX demonstrated clear seasonality with concentrations peaking in late summer/early fall. Multivariate regression showed that MX levels were associated with total trihalomethanes, UV-absorbance and pH. However, the relationship between TTHM and MX may not be sufficiently consistent across time and location for TTHM to be used as a proxy measure for MX in exposure assessment.

  11. Assessment of Patient Knowledge of Longitudinal Melanonychia: A Survey Study of Patients in Outpatient Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Halteh, Pierre; Scher, Richard; Artis, Amanda; Lipner, Shari

    2017-01-01

    Importance Subungual melanoma (SM) is a rare subtype of cutaneous melanoma but carries a worse prognosis than similarly staged cutaneous melanomas. Assessing patient knowledge of melanonychia is integral to early diagnosis of SM. Objectives The aim of this paper is to determine patient knowledge of longitudinal melanonychia (LM) and warning signs for SM, frequency of nail self-examinations, and satisfaction of patients with their physician's nail examinations. Design, Setting, and Participants We conducted a survey-based study of 363 random patients at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York, USA, performed at 3 different clinics: a general dermatology clinic (n = 167), a nail specialty clinic (n = 44), and a primary care clinic (n = 152). Main Outcomes and Measures Knowledge of the ABCDEF mnemonic for SM was compared to the ABCD mnemonic for cutaneous melanoma. Analyses were performed for patient behavior regarding suspicious nail changes as well as satisfaction with nail counseling and examination. Results Only 5% (18/363) of the patients in our study had heard of the ABCDEF mnemonic. In contrast, 9.9% (36/363) of the patients had heard of the ABCD mnemonic for cutaneous melanoma. In total, 37/363 (10.2%) patients reported having LM, 32.4% (12/37) of the patients noted changes in color or width of the band, and 10.8% (4/37) presented with pain or bleeding of the nail, with only 45.9% (17/37) seeking medical attention. Only 11.8% (43/363) of the patients stated that their physician asked them about nail changes, and 1.4% (5/363) of the patients stated that they were counseled about the ABCDEF mnemonic. In comparison, 13.8% (50/363) of the patients were advised on the ABCD mnemonic for the cutaneous melanoma mnemonic. While 70.2% (255/363) of the patients stated that they used sunscreen or wore sun-protective clothing, only 31.4% (114/363) assessed their nails for color changes, with 54.9% (128/233) of the patients categorizing themselves as “very unsatisfied” with

  12. A Comprehensive Survey of Institutional Patient/Family Educational Practices for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Withycombe, Janice S; Andam-Mejia, Rachel; Dwyer, Annie; Slaven, Abigail; Windt, Katherine; Landier, Wendy

    Patient/family education is an important component of nursing practice and is essential to the care of children newly diagnosed with cancer. Practices regarding patient/family education in Children's Oncology Group (COG) treatment centers have not been well described. We used an Internet-based survey to determine current patient/family educational practices at COG institutions; participation rate was 90.5% (201/222). Patient/family education was delivered primarily by an individual (rather than a team) at 43% of institutions. Advanced practice nurses had primary responsibility for providing education at 32% of institutions. "Fever" was the most frequently reported topic considered mandatory for inclusion in education for newly diagnosed patients. More than half of institutions reported using checklists and/or end-of-shift reports to facilitate health care team communication regarding patient/family education, and 77% reported using the "teach-back" method of assessing readiness for discharge. Thirty-seven percent of institutions reported delays in hospital discharge secondary to the need for additional teaching. An understanding of current practices related to patient/family education is the first step in establishing effective interventions to improve and standardize educational practices in pediatric oncology.

  13. 76 FR 71623 - Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under OMB Review AGENCY.... 2900-New (VA Form 10-0515).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey... Collection. Abstract: Information collected on VA Form 10-0515 will be used to determine spinal cord...

  14. Implementing patient satisfaction survey findings into a customer service action plan.

    PubMed

    Luallin, Meryl D

    2004-01-01

    Patient satisfaction surveys have become popular gauges of practice efficiency and are among the markers used by third-party payers to measure health-care quality. Although surveys may yield valuable information for providers to improve their services, these results most often are assigned a low priority and not applied in actual practice. This article briefly outlines the basic features of a patient satisfaction survey and details specific steps that managers may follow to implement their findings.

  15. Recruiting Ethnically Diverse General Internal Medicine Patients for a Telephone Survey on Physician-Patient Communication

    PubMed Central

    Nápoles-Springer, Anna M; Santoyo, Jasmine; Stewart, Anita L

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Limited evidence exists on the effectiveness of recruitment methods among diverse populations. OBKECTIVE Describe response rates by recruitment stage, ethnic-language group, and type of initial contact letter (for African-American and Latino patients). DESIGN Tracking of response status by recruitment stage and ethnic-language group and a randomized trial of ethnically tailored initial letters nested within a cross-sectional telephone survey on physician-patient communication. PARTICIPANTS Adult general medicine patients with ≥1 visit during the preceding year, stratified by 4 categories: African-American (N= 1,400), English-speaking Latino (N= 894), Spanish-speaking Latino (N= 965), and non-Latino white (N= 1,400). MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS Ethnically tailored initial letters referred to shortages of African-American (or Latino) physicians and the need to learn about the experiences of African-American (or Latino) patients communicating with physicians. Of 2,482 patients contacted, eligible, and able to participate (identified eligibles), 69.9% completed the survey. Thirty-nine percent of the sampling frame was unable to be contacted, with losses higher among non-Latino whites (46.5%) and African Americans (44.2%) than among English-speaking (32.3%) and Spanish-speaking Latinos (25.1%). For identified eligibles, response rates were highest among Spanish-speaking Latinos (75.2%), lowest for non-Latino whites (66.4%), and intermediate for African Americans (69.7%) and English-speaking Latinos (68.1%). There were no differences in overall response rates between patients receiving ethnically tailored letters (72.2%) and those receiving general letters (70.0%). CONCLUSIONS Household contact and individual response rates differed by ethnic-language group, highlighting the importance of tracking losses by stage and subpopulation. Careful attention to recruitment yielded acceptable response rates among all groups. PMID:15963168

  16. Ten Years of Patient Surveys in Accredited Breast Centers in North Rhine-Westphalia

    PubMed Central

    Ansmann, L.; Kowalski, C.; Pfaff, H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patient surveys are an established tool for quality control in healthcare organizations. This report looks at the design and development of the annual patient surveys carried out among breast cancer patients treated in the Breast Centers of North Rhine-Westphalia and discusses selected findings from 10 consecutive years. Material and Methods: Since 2006 the Institute for Medical Sociology, Health Services Research and Rehabilitation Science (IMVR) of the University of Cologne has carried out an annual survey of breast cancer patients using the Cologne Patient Questionnaire for Breast Cancer. The patients included in the survey have been diagnosed with primary breast cancer and undergo surgery between February and July in one of the Breast Centers in North Rhine-Westphalia accredited by the medical association of Westphalia-Lippe. The questionnaire and the type of feedback given to the Breast Centers were comprehensively revised in 2014. Selected results collected over the survey period were analyzed descriptively. Results: The survey period of 10 years provides information on the actual medical care delivered in the Breast Centers based on the data obtained in this period from around 40 000 patients. Some areas showed positive developments over time. Conclusion: The approach used to survey patients, the Cologne Patient Questionnaire for Breast Cancer 2.0 and the benchmark-focused feedback provide an impetus for organizational learning in Breast Centers. The concept could also be used in other healthcare organizations to stimulate learning and improve healthcare services. PMID:26855439

  17. Routine Operational Environmental Monitoring schedule, CY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This document provides Health Physics (HP) a schedule in accordance with the Environmental Compliance Manual, WHC-CM-7-5, of monitoring and sampling routines for the Operational Environmental Monitoring (OEM) Program during calendar year (CY) 1994. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of EES and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive waste sites are scheduled to be surveyed annually at a minimum. Any newly discovered waste sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1995. This schedule does not discuss the manpower needs nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines.

  18. Keeping the customer satisfied: issues in the interpretation and use of patient satisfaction surveys.

    PubMed

    Scott, A; Smith, R D

    1994-12-01

    Patient satisfaction and customer focus are increasingly important objectives set for health services. The patient satisfaction survey is becoming the main method of assessing this aspect of health care. In competitive environments, those institutions that show that they respond to consumers' needs are in a better position to attract funding. The use of patient satisfaction surveys in quality assurance-type activities is also increasing. In these contexts, however, the way in which patient satisfaction surveys should be interpreted and used to maximise the satisfaction of patients has received little critical attention. Problems in interpreting the results of satisfaction surveys arise from the weak conceptual foundation of patient satisfaction, which has been well documented in the literature. The objective of this paper is to show that using current formulations of patient satisfaction surveys in quality assurance-type activities and competitive environments may not lead to the maximisation of patients' satisfaction with health services. If the satisfaction of patients is to be maximised then it is necessary to extend the current conceptual basis of patient satisfaction to recognise explicitly the decision-making contexts in which the results will be used. This paper identifies the manner by which this extension should occur by considering some of the problems and pitfalls of interpreting and using the results of surveys to maximise patients' satisfaction.

  19. CHR -- Character Handling Routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, A. C.; Rees, P. C. T.; Chipperfield, A. J.; Jenness, T.

    This document describes the Character Handling Routine library, CHR, and its use. The CHR library augments the limited character handling facilities provided by the Fortran 77 standard. It offers a range of character handling facilities: from formatting Fortran data types into text strings and the reverse, to higher level functions such as wild card matching, string sorting, paragraph reformatting and justification. The library may be used simply for building text strings for interactive applications or as a basis for more complex text processing applications.

  20. A 2-Year, Phase IV, Multicentre, Observational Study of Ranibizumab 0.5 mg in Patients with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Routine Clinical Practice: The EPICOHORT Study.

    PubMed

    Pagliarini, Sergio; Beatty, Stephen; Lipkova, Blandina; Perez-Salvador Garcia, Eduardo; Reynders, Stefaan; Gekkieva, Margarita; Si Bouazza, Abdelkader; Pilz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the safety profile of ranibizumab 0.5 mg in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in routine clinical practice. Methods. This 2-year, multicentre, observational study was conducted to capture real-world early practice and outcomes across Europe, shortly after European licensing of ranibizumab for nAMD. Being observational in nature, the study did not impose diagnostic/therapeutic interventions/visit schedule. Patients were to be treated as per the EU summary of product characteristics (SmPC) in effect during the study. Key outcome measures were incidence of selected adverse events (AEs), treatment exposure, bilateral treatment, compliance to the EU SmPC, and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) over 2 years. Results. 755 of 770 patients received treatment. Ranibizumab was generally well tolerated with low incidence of selected AEs (0%-1.9%). Patients received 6.2 (mean) injections and 133 patients received bilateral treatment over 2 years. Protocol deviation to treatment compliance was reported in majority of patients. The observed decline in mean BCVA (Month 12, +1.5; Month 24, -1.3 letters) may be associated with undertreatment as suggested by BCVA subgroup analysis. Conclusion. The EPICOHORT study conducted in routine clinical practice reinforces the well-established safety profile of ranibizumab in nAMD. In early European practice it appeared that the nAMD patients were undertreated.

  1. [The National Danish Survey of Patient Experiences has a small positive bias].

    PubMed

    Rosenstjerne Andersen, Angelo; Fuglsang, Marie; Kyed, Daisy

    2012-10-01

    The response rate in The National Danish Survey of Patient Experiences in 2009 was 54%. In order to evaluate bias due to non-responders, The Unit of Patient-perceived Quality merged survey data and data on patient background from Statistics Denmark. The relationships between the responding patients' background and their answers to six questions in the survey questionnaire are estimated with logistic regression analysis and subsequently used for predicting the answers of the non-responders. Results indicate a small positive bias in four of the questions and no bias in the remaining two.

  2. E-mail communication with patients: a survey of the American College of Physicians, Missouri Chapter.

    PubMed

    Siva, Chokkalingam; Lawlor, Kenneth; Smarr, Karen; Ge, Bin; Fleming, David

    2011-01-01

    Numerous surveys have found patients expressing strong interest in e-mail communication with their physicians. However, currently very limited literature is available on physician interest. A survey was e-mailed to the members of the Missouri Chapter of the American College of Physicians to ascertain their specific concerns. Very few physicians use electronic mail with patients. Even fewer use it on a frequent basis and most do not give any written policy guidelines to patients.

  3. [Domestic violence against women and health care demands. Results of a female emergency department patient survey].

    PubMed

    Brzank, P; Hellbernd, H; Maschewsky-Schneider, U; Kallischnigg, G

    2005-03-01

    Domestic violence (DV) is a serious risk for women's health. So far, little attention has been paid to this area in research and medical care in Germany. Acknowledging this deficit, the S.I.G.N.A.L.-Intervention Project has started to develop a program to improve the medical care for victimized women. For the first time in Germany, data on the health care needs of victimized women have been collected within the S.I.G.N.A.L.-Evaluation Research Project. This article presents the results of a female patient survey (n=806) on DV conducted in the emergency department (ED) of a university hospital in Berlin. The results demonstrate that 36.6% of women reported at least one episode of DV after the age of 16. A total of 4.6% were victims of DV over the past year, and 1.5% of women came to the ED for treatment of injuries caused by violence. A total of 57% of the victims of at least one episode of DV in their lifetime after the age of 16 described a negative impact on their health. The most frequently reported sequelae were head injuries, haematomas and fractures, gastrointestinal disorders, headache/migraine and heart disease. The psychological symptoms were anxiety, depression and suicide/self-mutilation attempts. Some 52% of the victims who reported health consequences had received medical care. In case of DV occurring, 67% of all women said that they would discuss it with their physicians. Approximately 80% of all respondents favoured a routine inquiry for DV as part of the medical history protocol of the ED.

  4. CALIPSO User-Provided Routines

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

    ... data files. These routines are written in Interactive Data Language (IDL). A README file demonstrating use of the routines is also available. Interactive Data Language (IDL) is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . ...

  5. Rapid detection of deletions in hotspot C-terminal segment region of MECP2 by routine PCR method: report of two classical Rett syndrome patients of Indian origin.

    PubMed

    Khajuria, Rajni; Sapra, Savita; Ghosh, Manju; Gupta, Neerja; Gulati, Sheffali; Kalra, Veena; Kabra, Madhulika

    2009-04-01

    Rett syndrome (RS) is an X-linked dominant neurodevelopment disorder with normal prenatal and postnatal development till 6-18 months, followed by stagnation and regression of acquired skills. RS primarily manifests in females, and there are a few reports with males having RS. Sporadic or de novo mutations of the methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene have been reported in 70-90% of affected girls. Conventional methods such as fluorescence in situ hybridization, real-time PCR, southern blotting, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and DNA sequencing have been previously reported for the detection of insertions or deletions in the MECP2 gene. Here, we report detection of two deletions of 44 bp (c.1157_1200del44 or p.L386fs) and 38 bp (c.1151_1188del38 or p.P384fs) in exon 4 or C-terminal segment (CTS) region of MECP2 using a simple PCR technique that is rapid, accurate, and cost effective as compared to other techniques. The deletions were detected by routine PCR amplification followed by 2% agarose gel electrophoresis. We suggest that a simple PCR can easily detect deletions in the hotspot CTS region of the MECP2 gene and can be used for routine molecular diagnostics of RS.

  6. Workability and Muscle Strength in Patients With Seropositive Rheumatoid Arthritis: Survey Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Erlacher, Ludwig; Quittan, Michael; Fenzl, Karl Heinrich; Dorner, Thomas Ernst

    2017-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other rheumatic conditions not only fundamentally affect patients’ quality of life and physiological needs but are also negatively associated with work ability. The costs of poor work ability, which, in sum, are more than treatment costs, pose an economic burden to society and patients. Work ability in RA appears to be multifactorial; symptoms such as pain, swelling, and stiffness play a major role, as these directly affect functional disability. Also, RA patients typically suffer from reduced muscle strength. Lower extremity function and grip strengths especially impair their quality of life. However, the role of muscle strength and disease activity as determinants of work ability have not yet been studied. Objective The primary objective of this study is to compare work ability in working-age participants with seropositive RA and with high and low disease activity; the secondary objective is to evaluate the association of muscle strength, functional ability, and frailty with work ability. Methods This monocentric cross-sectional study will be conducted at a rheumatologic outpatient clinic and day hospital with approximately 100 seropositive RA patients aged <65 years. A clinical disease activity index as a measure for rheumatoid disease activity will be assessed during the patients’ routine visits at the clinic. Work ability, frailty, and functional disability will be evaluated with (self-reported) questionnaires as well as with physical tests (Work Ability Index/Score; Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index; Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe Frailty Instrument; Short Physical Performance Battery). Muscle strength will be determined with dynamometer measurements of isometric hand grip strength and quadriceps femoris muscle contraction strength. Sleep quality (Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale) and sexual functioning as physiological needs will additionally be determined with self

  7. Most U.S. Adults Support Routine Child Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163392.html Most U.S. Adults Support Routine Child Vaccine Survey finds 80 percent have positive view of ... Americans believe that the benefits of the MMR vaccine outweigh any risks. Nearly three-quarters of the ...

  8. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-04: Patient Eye-Lens Dose Reduction in Routine Brain CT Examinations Using Organ-Based Tube Current Modulation and In-Plane Bismuth Shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Hui-Yu; Liao, Ying-Lan; Chen, Jun-Rong

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess eye-lens dose for patients who underwent brain CT examinations using two dose reduction Methods: organ-based tube current modulation (OBTCM) and in-plane bismuth shielding method. Methods: This study received institutional review board approval; written informed consent to participate was obtained from all patients. Ninety patients who underwent the routine brain CT examination were randomly assigned to three groups, ie. routine, OBTCM, and bismuth shield. The OBTCM technique reduced the tube current when the X-ray tube rotates in front of patients’ eye-lens region. The patients in the bismuth shield group were covered one-ply bismuth shield in the eyes’ region. Eye-lens doses were measured using TLD-100H chips and the total effective doses were calculated using CT-Expo according to the CT scanning parameters. The surface doses for patients at off-center positions were assessed to evaluate the off-centering effect. Results: Phantom measurements indicates that OBTCM technique could reduced by 26% to 28% of the surface dose to the eye lens, and increased by 25% of the surface dose at the opposed incident direction at the angle of 180°. Patients’ eye-lens doses were reduced 16.9% and 30.5% dose of bismuth shield scan and OBTCM scan, respectively compared to the routine scan. The eye-lens doses were apparently increased when the table position was lower than isocenter. Conclusion: Reducing the dose to the radiosensitive organs, such as eye lens, during routine brain CT examinations could lower the radiation risks. The OBTCM technique and in-plane bismuth shielding could be used to reduce the eye-lens dose. The eye-lens dose could be effectively reduced using OBTCM scan without interfering the diagnostic image quality. Patient position relative the CT gantry also affects the dose level of the eye lens. This study was supported by the grants from the Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan (MOST103-2314-B-182

  9. Prenatal HIV tests. Routine testing or informed choice?

    PubMed Central

    Guenter, Dale; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Carroll, June; Sellors, John

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine how prenatal care providers responded to a new provincial policy of offering HIV testing to all prenatal patients, and to determine factors associated with self-reported high testing rates. DESIGN: Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING: Outpatient practices in three Ontario health-planning regions. PARTICIPANTS: Prenatal care providers: 784 family physicians, 200 obstetricians, and 103 midwives were sent questionnaires and were eligible to participate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported testing of 80% or more prenatal patients ("high testers") and associated practice characteristics, attitudes, and counseling practices. RESULTS: Response rate was 57% (622/1087): 43% of respondents were high testers. Family physicians were most likely and midwives least likely to be high testers. High testers tended to report that they had adequate knowledge of HIV testing, that HIV risk among their patients warranted testing all of them, and that testing should be routine. Encouraging women to test and not providing written information or choice were independently associated with high testing rates. CONCLUSION: Strongest predictors of high prenatal HIV testing rates were attitudes and practices that favoured a routine approach to testing and that placed little emphasis on informed consent. PMID:14594102

  10. Ribosomal PCR and DNA sequencing for detection and identification of bacteria: experience from 6 years of routine analyses of patient samples.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristine Helander; Dargis, Rimtas; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Kemp, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The use of broad range PCR and DNA sequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes for routine diagnostics of bacterial infections was evaluated. Here, the results from more than 2600 analyses during a 6-year period (2003-2009) are presented. Almost half of the samples were from joints and bones, and the second most frequent origin of samples was from the central nervous system. Overall, 26% of all samples were positive for bacterial DNA and bacterial identification was obtained in 80% of the PCR-positive samples by subsequent DNA sequencing. Ambiguous species identification was noticed among non-haemolytic streptococci, especially within the mitis group. The data show that ribosomal PCR with subsequent DNA sequencing of the PCR product is a most valuable supplement to culture for identifying bacterial agents of both acute and prolonged infections. However, some bacteria, including non-haemolytic streptococci, may not be precisely identified.

  11. Bone fragility fractures in hemodialysis patients: Croatian surveys.

    PubMed

    Šimunović, Iva; Pavlović, Draško; Kudumija, Boris; Mihaljević, Dubravka; Lovčić, Vesna; Jakić, Marko

    2015-03-01

    Disturbances of bone mineral metabolism are common complications of chronic kidney disease with bone fractures as one of the most important consequences. The aim of this study was to estimate prevalence of bone fractures among Croatian hemodialysis patients and to determine the possible fracture risk. The study was carried out in 767 hemodialysis patients from nine Croatian hemodialysis centers. Demographic, laboratory and bone fracture data were collected from medical records as well as therapy with vitamin D analogs. Fragility fractures were defined according to the World Health Organization definition. In 31 patient a total of 36 fractures were recorded. The prevalence of patients with bone fractures was 4.0%. The mean age of patients with fractures was 68.6 years. There were 9 male and 22 female patients with frac- tures. The mean hemodialysis duration was 63.3 months. Among all fractures the most common were hip fractures (39%) followed by forearm fractures (22%). This is the first study regarding epidemiology of bone fractures in Croatian hemodialysis patients. The prevalence of patients with bone fractures in our group of hemodialysis patients is high. Fractures were more frequent among women and older patients, patients who have been longer on dialysis and in patients with higher concentration of PTH.

  12. Survey of Infection Control Policies within Dental/Educational Patient Treatment Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Keith Winfield

    1986-01-01

    The article describes a survey of 36 dental education programs to identify educators' reactive policies and procedures in their patient treatment centers to minimize dental contamination and cross-contamination. (Author/CT)

  13. Symptom-modifying effects of oral avocado/soybean unsaponifiables in routine treatment of knee osteoarthritis in Poland. An open, prospective observational study of patients adherent to a 6-month treatment

    PubMed Central

    Głuszko, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Observational studies provide insights into real-life situations. Therefore, we assessed the effects of oral avocado/soybean unsaponifiable (ASU) capsules on pain relief and functional ability in patients, while they were receiving a routine treatment for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Material and methods An open, prospective, observational 6-month study was conducted in 99 centers in Poland in a group of 4822 patients with symptomatic knee OA receiving one 300 mg ASU capsule/day as a routine medication. The patients had no diagnoses of other rheumatic diseases and were not treated with other symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs). Data on OA symptoms and therapy were collected from the initiation of ASU treatment (visit 0) and during 3 consecutive control visits performed every 2 months (visits 1–3). Functional Lequesne index, severity of joint pain of one symptomatic knee (Laitinen index and VAS), use of analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), adherence to treatment and adverse events were evaluated and recorded using electronic Case Report Forms. Results Four thousand one hundred and eighty-six patients (86.8%) attended all 4 visits. In 94.2% of patients (mean age 60.7 ±11.6 years SD, 73.4% female) at least one OA risk factor was identified. There was a significant improvement in functional ability between the last and baseline visits as evidenced by the median Lequesne index decreasing from 8 to 4 points (p < 0.001). Measures of pain intensity also fell significantly (p < 0.001) throughout the study: median Laitinen score decreased from 6 to 3 points, median pain at rest VAS – from 1.8 to 0 cm and median pain during walking VAS – from 5.6 to 1.9 cm. The significant differences were also noted between consecutive visits. The proportion of patients using analgesics and NSAIDs declined from 58.8% at the baseline visit to 24.9% at the last visit 3 (p < 0.001). Defined daily dose of NSAIDs decreased

  14. Patient Engagement Practices in Clinical Research among Patient Groups, Industry, and Academia in the United States: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sophia K.; Selig, Wendy; Harker, Matthew; Roberts, Jamie N.; Hesterlee, Sharon; Leventhal, David; Klein, Richard; Patrick-Lake, Bray; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patient-centered clinical trial design and execution is becoming increasingly important. No best practice guidelines exist despite a key stakeholder declaration to create more effective engagement models. This study aims to gain a better understanding of attitudes and practices for engaging patient groups so that actionable recommendations may be developed. Methods Individuals from industry, academic institutions, and patient groups were identified through Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative and Drug Information Association rosters and mailing lists. Objectives, practices, and perceived barriers related to engaging patient groups in the planning, conduct, and interpretation of clinical trials were reported in an online survey. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis of survey data followed a literature review to inform survey questions. Results Survey respondents (n = 179) valued the importance of involving patient groups in research; however, patient group respondents valued their contributions to research protocol development, funding acquisition, and interpretation of study results more highly than those contributions were valued by industry and academic respondents (all p < .001). Patient group respondents placed higher value in open communications, clear expectations, and detailed contract execution than did non–patient group respondents (all p < .05). Industry and academic respondents more often cited internal bureaucratic processes and reluctance to share information as engagement barriers than did patient group respondents (all p < .01). Patient groups reported that a lack of transparency and understanding of the benefits of collaboration on the part of industry and academia were greater barriers than did non–patient group respondents (all p< .01). Conclusions Despite reported similarities among approaches to engagement by the three stakeholder groups, key differences exist in perceived barriers and benefits to partnering with

  15. Standard, routine and non-routine processes in health care.

    PubMed

    Lillrank, Paul; Liukko, Matti

    2004-01-01

    Quality management methods have been introduced into health care with variable success. Industrial approaches, such as standardization, are not always applicable professional services, because of fundamental differences in conceptions of aims and the predictability of the results of action. Processes in health care can be classified into standard, routine and non-routine depending on the level of repetition and amount of variation, variety and uncertainty. Quality problems are different in each type: standard processes may produce deviations from targets, routines errors in classification, and non-routines failures in interpretation. Different management approaches for each type are discussed. A metaphor to assist discussion, The Broom, is introduced.

  16. Comparison of fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system and routine care with morphine intravenous patient-controlled analgesia in the management of early postoperative mobilisation: results from a randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Langford, Richard M; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Ding, Li; Abraham, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS) (IONSYS®, The Medicines Company, Parsippany, NJ, USA) and morphine intravenous (IV) patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) have demonstrated equivalent pain control in several published studies. The primary objective of the current study was to compare fentanyl ITS with morphine IV PCA with regard to the patient’s ability to mobilise with acute postoperative pain. Methods: In this multicentre, open-label, randomised, active-controlled, prospective phase IV study, postoperative patients initially received IV morphine and were titrated to pain score ⩽ 4out of 10 on a Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) and then received fentanyl ITS (up to 240 µg (6 doses)/hour; up to a maximum of 3.2 mg (80 doses)/24 hours) or morphine IV PCA (doses up to 20 mg morphine/2 hours, up to 240 mg/24 hours). The primary efficacy measure was ability to mobilise, assessed using patient responses to three validated questions regarding mobility on a 6-point Likert scale (0 = no difficulty to mobilise to 5 = a very great deal of difficulty to mobilise). The study was originally planned to include ~200 patients. However, following the early suspension and termination of the study, a total of 108 patients were randomised to study treatment. Results: One hundred and eight patients were recruited prior to undergoing surgical procedures (orthopaedic surgical procedures (72%) or underwent major abdominal procedures (28%)). Postoperatively, 58 were randomised to receive fentanyl ITS, and 50 to morphine IV PCA. Fentanyl ITS patients had a greater ability to mobilise at the time of stopping study drug, with an adjusted mean ability to mobilise score (95% confidence interval (CI)) of 0.14 (−0.19, 0.47) for fentanyl ITS patients and 2.37 (1.98, 2.76) for morphine IV PCA patients (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Patients treated with fentanyl ITS reported that they were better able to mobilise than patients treated with morphine IV PCA, at all time

  17. Treatment of patients with refractory metastatic cancer according to molecular profiling on tumor tissue in the clinical routine: an interim-analysis of the ONCO-T-PROFILE project

    PubMed Central

    Seeber, Andreas; Gastl, Guenther; Ensinger, Christian; Spizzo, Gilbert; Willenbacher, Wolfgang; Kocher, Florian; Leitner, Christoph; Willenbacher, Ella; Amann, Arno; Steiner, Normann; Eisterer, Wolfgang; Voss, Andreas; Russell, Kenneth; Zwierzina, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with refractory metastatic cancer have been shown to benefit from molecular profiling of tumor tissue. The ONCO-T-PROFILE project was launched in March 2014 at the Innsbruck Medical University. Within 2 years our project aims to recruit 110 patients with stage IV cancer refractory to standard therapy. Our data presented here are based on an interim-analysis. Methods Tumor tissue specimens were submitted for molecular profiling to the certified laboratory (Caris Life Science, USA). Druggable tumor targets were selected based on biomarker status to agents with potential clinical benefit. Clinical benefit was defined as a PFS ratio (=PFS upon treatment according to the molecular profile/ PFS upon the last prior therapy) ≥ 1.3. Results As of April 2015, tumors from 50 patients have been molecularly profiled and one or more targets were detectable in 48 specimens (98%). So far, 19 (38%) patients have been treated according to their molecular tumor profile. To date, 8 (42%) patients have reached a PFS ratio of ≥ 1.3. Conclusions We could show that molecular profiling is feasible in the clinical routine. A proportion of patients might benefit from an individualized treatment approach based on molecular profiling. As a result, we will proceed to enroll patients in ONCO-T-PROFILE. PMID:28050231

  18. A convex urostomy pouch with adhesive border: a patient survey.

    PubMed

    McPhail, Jacqueline; Nichols, Thom; Menier, Melissa

    Patients previously using a standard-wear convex skin barrier urostomy pouch were invited by letter from a Dispensing Appliance Contractor to evaluate a similar pouching system, but with the addition of an extended-wear convex barrier and adhesive border. A total of 47 patients agreed to take part. Patients were asked to try three pouches and complete one evaluation form. Study participants found the addition of an extended-wear convex barrier and adhesive border, was easy to use, provided them with security and the potential for longer wear time.

  19. [Epidemiological survey of craniomandibular dysfunction in young thalassemia major patients].

    PubMed

    Caltabiano, M; Verzì, P; Leonardi, R

    1990-01-01

    40 patients with talassemia major treated with blood transfusions were studied by the Authors. The aim of this study was to evaluate tmj signs and symptoms, according to Helkimo questionnaire. From the data collected in this investigation it comes out that clinical signs are more frequent in older subjects, in fact 27% of young patients aged from 9 to 13 years showed at least one clinical sign of dysfunction; on the other hand in the younger patients (aged from 6 to 9 years) dysfunctions were found only in 16% of subjects.

  20. Examining the Role of Patient Experience Surveys in Measuring Health Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Marc N.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Hays, Ron D.; Lehrman, William G.; Rybowski, Lise; Edgman-Levitan, Susan; Cleary, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Patient care experience surveys evaluate the degree to which care is patient-centered. This article reviews the literature on the association between patient experiences and other measures of health care quality. Research indicates that better patient care experiences are associated with higher levels of adherence to recommended prevention and treatment processes, better clinical outcomes, better patient safety within hospitals, and less health care utilization. Patient experience measures that are collected using psychometrically sound instruments, employing recommended sample sizes and adjustment procedures, and implemented according to standard protocols are intrinsically meaningful and are appropriate complements for clinical process and outcome measures in public reporting and pay-for-performance programs. PMID:25027409

  1. Dentists’ Knowledge, Attitude and Practice in Treating Patients Taking Oral Antithrombotic Medications – A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bagadia, Ritvi K; Mohan, Anusha; Kandaswamy, Eswar; Chandrasekaran, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction India lists high on patients suffering from diabetes, hypertension, stroke and myocardial infarction. Hence, a large proportion of the population is on long term Oral Antithrombotic Medications (OAM). Though several guidelines exist on dental management of these patients, previous surveys have shown variation among the dentists. Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of dentists in Chennai, India, towards dental management of patients taking OAM using a questionnaire survey. Materials and Methods The survey was conducted among 256 dentists in Chennai, India using a printed questionnaire containing 16 questions, at their university location. Descriptive statistical analysis was used to analyze the data. Results Of the final population of dentists who were included in the survey (n =212), majority of them were aware about drugs such as warfarin and aspirin compared to other newer drugs (dabigatran, rivaroxaban). Most participants took physician’s opinion before proceeding with any invasive dental procedure and thromboembolic events were their major concern while treating patients on OAM. Conclusion The survey revealed dentists are knowledgeable about management of patients on OAM. However, they tend to overestimate the bleeding risk, thus being cautious in their treatment approach. Based on the results of the study, the authors suggest that continuing dental education programs and further training on management of such medically complex patients will be beneficial in order to provide optimum dental care to people taking OAM. PMID:28274053

  2. A Pilot Survey of Patient-Initiated Assaults on Medical Students during Clinical Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Andrea E.; Katz, Mark R.; Lofchy, Jodi; Bradley, John

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the incidents of patient-initiated assault (PIA) against clinical clerks during the first six months of clinical clerkship. To characterise the assaults with respect to service, location, clerk gender, patient gender. To examine the students' perceptions of the reporting process for PIA. Methods: A brief email survey was sent…

  3. Working with the 'difficult' patient: the use of a contextual cognitive-analytic therapy based training in improving team function in a routine psychiatry service setting.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Rosangela; Biancosino, Bruno; Borghi, Cristiana; Marmai, Luciana; Kerr, Ian B; Grassi, Luigi

    2013-12-01

    The clinical management of 'difficult' patients is a major challenge which exposes mental health teams to an increased risk of frustration and stress and may lead to professional burnout. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a cognitive-analytic therapy (CAT) based training undertaken by a mental health team working with 'difficult' patients reduced professional burnout symptoms, improved patients' service engagement and increased the levels of team-cohesion. Twelve mental health staff members from different professional and educational backgrounds took part in five 2-hour sessions providing a basic CAT training intervention, an integrative and relational model of psychotherapy for the treatment of borderline personality disorders. Participants were administered the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), the Service Engagement Scale (SES) and the Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ) before (T0) and after (T1) CAT training, and at 1-month follow-up (T2). A significant decrease were found, at T2, on the MBI Emotional Exhaustion scores, the SES Availability subscale, the GEQ Attraction to Group-Social and Group Integration-Social, while the MBI-Personal Accomplishment scores increased from baseline.The results of this study suggest that a CAT-based training can facilitate team cohesion and patient engagement with a service and reduce burnout levels among mental health team members dealing with 'difficult' patients.

  4. A survey of user acceptance of electronic patient anesthesia records

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyun Seung; Lee, Suk Young; Jeong, Hui Yeon; Choi, Soo Joo; Lee, Hye Won

    2012-01-01

    Background An anesthesia information management system (AIMS), although not widely used in Korea, will eventually replace handwritten records. This hospital began using AIMS in April 2010. The purpose of this study was to evaluate users' attitudes concerning AIMS and to compare them with manual documentation in the operating room (OR). Methods A structured questionnaire focused on satisfaction with electronic anesthetic records and comparison with handwritten anesthesia records was administered to anesthesiologists, trainees, and nurses during February 2011 and the responses were collected anonymously during March 2011. Results A total of 28 anesthesiologists, 27 trainees, and 47 nurses responded to this survey. Most participants involved in this survey were satisfied with AIMS (96.3%, 82.2%, and 89.3% of trainees, anesthesiologists, and nurses, respectively) and preferred AIMS over handwritten anesthesia records in 96.3%, 71.4%, and 97.9% of trainees, anesthesiologists, and nurses, respectively. However, there were also criticisms of AIMS related to user-discomfort during short, simple or emergency surgeries, doubtful legal status, and inconvenient placement of the system. Conclusions Overall, most of the anesthetic practitioners in this hospital quickly accepted and prefer AIMS over the handwritten anesthetic records in the OR. PMID:22558502

  5. Patient information leaflets for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Askari, A; Shergill, I

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To compare the level of information provided in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) patient information leaflets in the London and East of England Deaneries Design All trusts in the London and East of England Deanery who offer an ESWL service were contacted and leaflets were compared Setting London and East of England Deanery Participants Alan Askari, Iqbal Shergill Main outcome measures Examination of key information that was communicated to ESWL patients via leaflets Results 12 trusts responded across the two deaneries. There was significant variation in the amount of information provided in the leaflets with some leaflets not containing an adequate level of instruction or information to patients Conclusions The authors propose that a national standardised information leaflet should be incorporated with the British Association of Urological Surgeons (BAUS) procedure specific information leaflet for ESWL procedures PMID:22666532

  6. Field Evaluation of Dried Blood Spots for Routine HIV-1 Viral Load and Drug Resistance Monitoring in Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in Africa and Asia

    PubMed Central

    Monleau, Marjorie; Eymard-Duvernay, Sabrina; Dagnra, Anoumou; Kania, Dramane; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Touré-Kane, Coumba; Truong, Lien X. T.; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Delaporte, Eric; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) can be used in developing countries to alleviate the logistic constraints of using blood plasma specimens for viral load (VL) and HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) testing, but they should be assessed under field conditions. Between 2009 and 2011, we collected paired plasma-DBS samples from treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected adults in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Senegal, Togo, Thailand, and Vietnam. The DBS were stored at an ambient temperature for 2 to 4 weeks and subsequently at −20°C before testing. VL testing was performed on the plasma samples and DBS using locally available methods: the Abbott m2000rt HIV-1 test, generic G2 real-time PCR, or the NucliSENS EasyQ version 1.2 test. In the case of virological failure (VF), i.e., a plasma VL of ≥1,000 copies/ml, HIVDR genotyping was performed on paired plasma-DBS samples. Overall, we compared 382 plasma-DBS sample pairs for DBS VL testing accuracy. The sensitivities of the different assays in different laboratories for detecting VF using DBS varied from 75% to 100% for the m2000rt test in labs B, C, and D, 91% to 93% for generic G2 real-time PCR in labs A and F, and 85% for the NucliSENS test in lab E. The specificities varied from 82% to 97% for the m2000rt and NucliSENS tests and reached only 60% for the generic G2 test. The NucliSENS test showed good agreement between plasma and DBS VL but underestimated the DBS VL. The lowest agreement was observed for the generic G2 test. Genotyping was successful for 96/124 (77%) DBS tested, and 75/96 (78%) plasma-DBS pairs had identical HIVDR mutations. Significant discrepancies in resistance interpretations were observed in 9 cases, 6 of which were from the same laboratory. DBS can be successfully used as an alternative to blood plasma samples for routine VL and HIVDR monitoring in African and Asian settings. However, the selection of an adequate VL measurement method and the definition of the VF threshold should be considered, and laboratory

  7. Lidar Altitude Data Read Routine

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-19

    ... Profile products. It is written in Interactive Data Language (IDL) and uses HDF routine calls to read the altitude data which are ... Data Read routine  (1.5 KB) Interactive Data Language (IDL) is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . ...

  8. Ubiquitous Computing for Remote Cardiac Patient Monitoring: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Kambhatla, Kashyap; Hu, Fei; Lifson, Mark; Xiao, Yang

    2008-01-01

    New wireless technologies, such as wireless LAN and sensor networks, for telecardiology purposes give new possibilities for monitoring vital parameters with wearable biomedical sensors, and give patients the freedom to be mobile and still be under continuous monitoring and thereby better quality of patient care. This paper will detail the architecture and quality-of-service (QoS) characteristics in integrated wireless telecardiology platforms. It will also discuss the current promising hardware/software platforms for wireless cardiac monitoring. The design methodology and challenges are provided for realistic implementation. PMID:18604301

  9. Can routine oral care with antiseptics prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia in patients receiving mechanical ventilation? An update meta-analysis from 17 randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longti; Ai, Zhibing; Li, Longzhu; Zheng, Xuesong; Jie, Luo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Whether oral antiseptics could reduce the risk of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) in patients receiving mechanical ventilation remains controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the effect of oral care with antiseptics on the prevalence of ventilator associated pneumonia in adult critically ill patients. Methods: A comprehensive search of PubMed, Embase and Web of Science were performed to identity relevant studies. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials of mechanically ventilated adult patients receiving oral care with antiseptics. The quality of included studies was assessed by the Jadad score. Relative risks (RRs), weighted mean differences (WMDs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated and pooled using a fixed-effects model or random-effects model. Heterogeneity among the studies was assessed with I 2 test. Results: 17 studies with a total number of 4249 met the inclusion criteria. Of the 17 studies, 14 assessed the effect of chlorhexidine, and 3 investigated the effect of povidone-iodine. Overall, oral care with antiseptics significantly reduced the prevalence of VAP (RR=0.72, 95% CI: 0.57, 0.92; P=0.008). The use of chlorhexidine was shown to be effective (RR=0.73, 95% CI: 0.57, 0.93; P=0.012), whereas this effect was not observed in povidone-iodine (RR=0.51, 95% CI: 0.09, 2.82; P=0.438). Subgroup analyses showed that oral antiseptics were most marked in cardiac surgery patients (RR=0.54, 95% CI: 0.39, 0.74; P=0.00). Patients with oral antiseptics did not have a reduction in intensive care unit (ICU) mortality (RR=1.11, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.29; P=0.201), length of ICU stay (WMD=-0.10 days, 95% CI: -0.25, 0.05; P=0.188), or duration of mechanical ventilation (WMD=-0.05 days, 95% CI: -0.14, 0.04; P=0.260). Conclusion: Oral care with antiseptics significantly reduced the prevalence of VAP. Chlorhexidine application prevented the occurrence of VAP in mechanically ventilated patients but povidone-iodine did not

  10. Routine outcome measures in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kisely, Steve; Adair, Carol E; Lin, Elizabeth; Marriott, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Canada is a federal country of 10 provinces and three territories. High level information on mental health conditions and service use has mostly been generated from administrative data collected by provinces and territories. These include four major types - hospital admissions and discharges, physician billings, ambulatory care services, and drug databases. At the national level, the Canadian Institute for Health Information brings together this information to produce indicators of outcome. Although these data provide information on patient and health system characteristics, they do not capture the full spectrum of formal and informal mental healthcare. These include changes in health status, functioning, community integration and quality of life. As a result, some jurisdictions have begun to implement more standardized measures of outcome such as the clinician-rated Health of the Nation Outcome Scales or the inpatient Resident Assessment Instrument - Mental Health. In this paper we provide an overview of mental-health-related data sources in Canada, highlight some of the more progressive practices beginning to emerge, and conclude with some thoughts about how the routine measurement and reporting of mental health outcomes in Canada might be advanced including efforts at engaging both clinicians and decision-makers.

  11. Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma of the Sigmoid Colon Discovered on Routine Screening Colonoscopy in Patient with Hepatitis C and Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bhuta, Rajiv; Bromberg, Michael; Bains, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is predominantly found in the stomach. Rarely, it is found in the proximal colon and even less so in the sigmoid colon. We present a rare case of primary sigmoid colon MALT lymphoma in a patient with concomitant Helicobacter pylori and hepatitis C infection. We also review current imaging, staging, and therapeutic modalities. To our knowledge, this is the first sigmoid colon MALT lymphoma reported in the United States. PMID:27807552

  12. Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma of the Sigmoid Colon Discovered on Routine Screening Colonoscopy in Patient with Hepatitis C and Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Bhuta, Rajiv; Bromberg, Michael; Bains, Ashish; Schey, Ron

    2016-08-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is predominantly found in the stomach. Rarely, it is found in the proximal colon and even less so in the sigmoid colon. We present a rare case of primary sigmoid colon MALT lymphoma in a patient with concomitant Helicobacter pylori and hepatitis C infection. We also review current imaging, staging, and therapeutic modalities. To our knowledge, this is the first sigmoid colon MALT lymphoma reported in the United States.

  13. Consumer Participation in Quality Improvements for Chronic Disease Care: Development and Evaluation of an Interactive Patient-Centered Survey to Identify Preferred Service Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Christine L; Bryant, Jamie; Roos, Ian A; Henskens, Frans A; Paul, David J

    2014-01-01

    ranging from 82.1%-100.0%. The majority of participants indicated the Web-based survey was easy to complete (97.9%, 531/543) and comprehensive (93.1%, 505/543). Participants also reported the interactive relative prioritization exercise was easy to complete (97.0%, 189/195) and helped them to decide which initiatives were of most importance (84.6%, 165/195). Average completion time was 8.54 minutes (SD 3.91) and the Flesch-Kincaid reading level was 6.8. Overall, 84.6% (447/529) of participants indicated a willingness to complete a similar survey again. Conclusions The Web-based Consumer Preferences Survey is sufficiently reliable and highly acceptable to patients. Based on completion times and reading level, this tool could be integrated in routine clinical practice and allows consumers to easily participate in quality evaluation. Results provide a comprehensive list of patient-prioritized initiatives for patients with major chronic conditions and delivers practice-ready evidence to guide improvements in patient-centered care. PMID:25532217

  14. ["SOS SEIN 84" accelerated breast disease management: Patients satisfaction survey].

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Antoine; Dumuids, Magali; Mège, Alice; de Rauglaudre, Gaëtan; Regis Arnaud, Anne; Martin, Nicole; Dupuy Meurat, Françoise; Dolle, Sabine; Gallon, Elise; Serin, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    In case of a new breast symptom or an abnormal result of breast imaging, some women have a problem finding a quick answer to allay their anxiety. The Institut Sainte-Catherine in Avignon has set up a new form of accelerated disease management through the opening of a new dedicated consultation called SOS SEIN 84. We present the result of a prospective quality study of our first new patients.

  15. Do Therapists Google Their Patients? A Survey Among Psychotherapists

    PubMed Central

    Herzberg, Philipp Y

    2016-01-01

    Background The increasing use of the Internet and its array of social networks brings new ways for psychotherapists to find out information about their patients, often referred to as patient-targeted googling (PTG). However, this topic has been subject to little empirical research; there has been hardly any attention given to it in Germany and the rest of Europe and it has not been included in ethical guidelines for psychotherapy despite the complex ethical issues it raises. Objective This study explored German psychotherapists’ behavior and experiences related to PTG, investigated how these vary with sociodemographic factors and therapeutic background, and explored the circumstances in which psychotherapists considered PTG to be appropriate or not. Methods A total of 207 psychotherapists responded to a newly developed questionnaire that assessed their experience of and views on PTG. The study sample was a nonrepresentative convenience sample recruited online via several German-speaking professional therapy platforms. Results Most therapists (84.5%, 174/207) stated that they had not actively considered the topic of PTG. However, 39.6% (82/207) said that they had already looked for patient information online (eg, when they suspected a patient may have been lying) and 39.3% (81/207) knew colleagues or supervisors who had done so. Only 2.4% (5/207) of therapists had come across PTG during their education and training. Conclusions It is essential to provide PTG as a part of therapists’ education and training. Furthermore, the complex problems concerning PTG should be introduced into codes of ethics to provide explicit guidance for psychotherapists in practice. This report provides initial suggestions to open up debate on this topic. PMID:26733210

  16. Monitoring infectious diseases using routine microbiology data. I. Study of gastroenteritis in an urban area.

    PubMed Central

    Tillett, H. E.; Thomas, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    Sources of information for monitoring infectious disease are routine data, special surveys and ad hoc investigations. In practice much use is necessarily made of routine notifications and laboratory records although this reporting is often incomplete and may therefore be biased. In a retrospective study of a 16-year series (up to 1968) of routine records concerning the diagnosis of gastroenteritis at one Public Health Laboratory we found it possible to identify biases. During school outbreaks of dysentery, laboratory investigation of diarrhoea increased appreciably and such response to publicity affects the use of routine data in surveillance. Although the patients examined were probably representative diagnostically, their selection may not have reflected the age incidence of disease. Valid geographical comparisons within the urban area were not feasible because medical practitioners differed in their use of laboratory facilities and in their habits of notification. Nevertheless, as far as can be established retrospectively, these data did reflect time trends in disease incidence and so had value for monitoring purposes. Several of the biases defined are likely to apply to other sets of routine data. A further communication will describe a statistical method of correcting for quantifiable bias. PMID:7007490

  17. Predicting Outcome in Internet-Based Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Major Depression: A Large Cohort Study of Adult Patients in Routine Psychiatric Care

    PubMed Central

    Ljótsson, Brjánn; Hedman, Erik; Svanborg, Cecilia; Kaldo, Viktor; Lindefors, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the effectiveness of therapist-guided internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) for treating depression has been well documented, knowledge of outcome predictors and risk factors associated with lower treatment response is limited, especially when the treatment has been conducted within a naturalistic clinical setting. Identification of such factors is important for clinicians when making treatment recommendations. Methods Data from a large cohort (N = 1738) of adult outpatients having been treated with ICBT for depression at an outpatient psychiatric clinic were analysed. A multilevel modelling approach was used to identify patient and treatment variables associated with the speed of recovery during treatment using weekly measurements of the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale Self-Rated (MADRS-S). Outcomes Adhering to the treatment, perceiving it as credible and working full-time emerged as predictors of a faster pace of recovery and were also associated with a lower level of depression at the end of treatment. Higher pre-treatment depression and sleep problems were associated with a greater improvement rate, but predicted higher depression after treatment. Having a history of psychotropic medication was associated with both slower improvement and higher post-treatment depression. Conclusion Perceived credibility of ICBT is a strong predictor of treatment response. Assessing patient beliefs and expectations may be a useful aid for clinicians when identifying those who are more or less likely to benefit from ICBT. Helping patients improve expectations prior to treatment may be an important goal for clinicians during the initial assessment phase. PMID:27618548

  18. Italian daily platelet transfusion practice for haematological patients undergoing high dose chemotherapy with or without stem cell transplantation: a survey by the GIMEMA Haemostasis and Thrombosis Working Party

    PubMed Central

    Tagariello, Giuseppe; Castaman, Giancarlo; Falanga, Anna; Santoro, Rita; Napolitano, Mariasanta; Storti, Sergio; Veneri, Dino; Basso, Marco; Candiotto, Laura; Tassinari, Cristina; Federici, Augusto B.; De Stefano, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Background Following high-dose chemotherapy/bone marrow transplantation, patients are routinely, prophylactically transfused with platelet concentrates (PC) if they have a platelet count ≤10×109/L or higher in the presence of risk factors for bleeding. However, whether such transfusions are necessary in clinically stable patients with no bleeding, or whether a therapeutic transfusion strategy could be sufficient and safe, is still debated. Materials and methods The GIMEMA Haemostasis and Thrombosis Working Party sent a questionnaire to Italian haematology departments to survey several aspects of daily platelet transfusion practice, such as the cut-off platelet count for transfusion, the evaluation of refractoriness and the type of PC administered. Results The questionnaire was answered by 18 out of 31 centres (58%). A total of 23,162 PC were transfused in 2,396 patients in 2013. The vast majority of centres (95%) transfused PC according to Italian and international guidelines; only a few transfused always at platelet counts ≤20×109/L. The broad agreement on platelet count cut-off for transfusion (≤10×109/L) was not confirmed when the World Health Organization (WHO) bleeding score was considered: only a third of centres (33%) used transfusions as recommended when the bleeding grade was ≥2. Platelet refractoriness was poorly monitored and most centres (89%) evaluated, mostly empirically (67%), response to transfusion only 24 hours later. Thirty percent of centres transfused platelets in asymptomatic refractory patients. Discussion Although most Italian haematology departments transfuse PC according to Italian and international guidelines, our survey shows that in routine daily practice physicians do not comply closely with the WHO recommendations on platelet transfusions and monitoring platelet refractoriness. This causes excessive platelet transfusions, with a resulting increase of costs and waste of public health resources. PMID:27416570

  19. Questionnaire survey on current status of home care and support for patients with hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Akiko; Tsukada, Yuiko; Kondo, Sakiko; Asakura, Keiko; Matsuki, Eri; Kawagoe, Shohei; Hashiguchi, Saori; Nonaka, Hiroshi; Takeda, Junzo; Okamoto, Shinichiro

    2014-11-01

    In order to survey the current status of home care and support for patients with hematological diseases, questionnaires were sent to 3,591 hospitals and home care facilities in Tokyo and surrounding prefectures. The first survey showed that 81.7% of medical staff members at hospitals reported that they had experience with home care and support, but only 24.9% of home care facility staff members had such experience. The second questionnaire, surveying 1,202 personnel, identified four factors hampering successful establishment of home care and support networks for hematological diseases. These included insufficient familial support for patients, difficulty making end of life decisions by family members and patients, limited access to transfusion support, and financial problems.

  20. Measures for improving treatment outcomes for patients with epilepsy--results from a large multinational patient-physician survey.

    PubMed

    Groenewegen, André; Tofighy, Azita; Ryvlin, Philippe; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Dedeken, Peter

    2014-05-01

    In this large-scale, multinational, descriptive survey, we sought to identify measures for improving treatment outcomes for individuals with epilepsy. As a framework, questions relating specifically to each of the five steps of the 'patient-physician journey', namely, patient identification (omitted in this survey), diagnosis, choice of drug, disease and drug information, and patient monitoring were asked. Overall, 337 physicians and 1150 patients across France, Germany, and the United States returned questionnaires. Results indicated that 16% of the patients were initially misdiagnosed. Treatment choice was driven by efficacy, safety, experience with a drug (physician only), and convenience (patient only). Physicians were identified as the primary source of information for patients, and, as expected, better informed patients were found to adhere better to their therapy than those who were less well informed. Approximately 50% of the patients had not seen their specialist in the last year, which indicates poor follow-up; furthermore, important topics such as seizures, treatment, and its side effects were not discussed at every visit. Specialists, but not primary care practitioners (PCPs), consistently reported discussing all topics more frequently than their patients, suggesting that specialists may overestimate the clarity of their questions. There was also substantial disparity in the reasons cited for nonadherence - patients overwhelmingly cited forgetfulness, while both PCPs and specialists cited complacency, forgetfulness, and tolerability. We also noted a disparity between physicians and their patients, as well as between PCPs and specialists, in their views on the impact of epilepsy on patients' lives. Our results indicate multiple opportunities to intervene at all stages of the patient-physician journey to improve treatment outcomes. We provide practical suggestions to achieve the most from these opportunities.

  1. Patient perspective survey of total hip vs total knee arthroplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Justin; Petruccelli, Danielle; Adili, Anthony; Piccirillo, Liz; Wismer, David; Winemaker, Mitch

    2012-06-01

    A 42-item survey was developed and administered to determine patient perception of and satisfaction with total hip arthroplasty (THA) vs total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 153 patients who had both primary THA and TKA for osteoarthritis with 1-year follow-up were identified. Survey response rate was 72%. Patients were more satisfied with THA meeting expectations for improvement in function and quality of life (P < .05), whereas pain relief expectations were equivalent. Most patients (70.9%) reported that TKA required more physiotherapy. One-year Oxford score and improvement in Oxford score from preoperative to 1 year were superior for THAs (P = .000). Despite equivalent pain relief, THAs trend toward higher satisfaction compared with TKAs. THA is more likely to "feel normal" with greater improvement in Oxford score. Recovery from TKA requires more physiotherapy and a longer time to achieve a satisfactory recovery status. Patients should be counseled accordingly.

  2. 78 FR 6851 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program, VA Form 10.... Abstract: VA Form 10-0476 will be used to gather feedback from patients regarding their satisfaction...

  3. Leadership Implications of the Annual Patient Care Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    80 v Illustrations Page Figure 1. Air Force Surgeon General�s Parthenon Concept...satisfaction is seen as the roof of a parthenon resting upon four pillars. The importance of patient satisfaction in the provision of medical care is a high...a r e S y s t e m C u s t o m e r S a t i s f a c t i o n Figure 1. Air Force Surgeon General�s Parthenon Concept 3 The United States Army Surgeon

  4. Arterial surgery for arm ischemia. A survey of 136 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Holleman, J H; Hardy, J D; Williamson, J W; Raju, S; Neely, W A

    1980-01-01

    A series of 136 patients with upper extremity ischemia requiring operative correction is presented. Causes of the ischemia included trauma, atherosclerosis, embolism, iatrogenic causes, radiation injury, and cervical rib syndrome. Operations included primary repair, various bypass grafts and embolectomy. Illustrative case reports are used to emphasize important points. The subclavian, axillary and brachial arteries have been considered separately. In general, ischemia of the arm caused by a discrete lesion is amenable to surgical correction with an excellent change of success. Images Fig. 1. Figs. 5a and b. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:7387235

  5. Frame average optimization of cine-mode EPID images used for routine clinical in vivo patient dose verification of VMAT deliveries

    SciTech Connect

    McCowan, P. M.; McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The in vivo 3D dose delivered to a patient during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery can be calculated using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. These images must be acquired in cine-mode (i.e., “movie” mode) in order to capture the time-dependent delivery information. The angle subtended by each cine-mode EPID image during an arc can be changed via the frame averaging number selected within the image acquisition software. A large frame average number will decrease the EPID’s angular resolution and will result in a decrease in the accuracy of the dose information contained within each image. Alternatively, less EPID images acquired per delivery will decrease the overall 3D patient dose calculation time, which is appealing for large-scale clinical implementation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the optimal frame average value per EPID image, defined as the highest frame averaging that can be used without an appreciable loss in 3D dose reconstruction accuracy for VMAT treatments. Methods: Six different VMAT plans and six different SBRT-VMAT plans were delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. Delivery was carried out on a Varian 2300ix model linear accelerator (Linac) equipped with an aS1000 EPID running at a frame acquisition rate of 7.5 Hz. An additional PC was set up at the Linac console area, equipped with specialized frame-grabber hardware and software packages allowing continuous acquisition of all EPID frames during delivery. Frames were averaged into “frame-averaged” EPID images using MATLAB. Each frame-averaged data set was used to calculate the in vivo dose to the patient and then compared to the single EPID frame in vivo dose calculation (the single frame calculation represents the highest possible angular resolution per EPID image). A mean percentage dose difference of low dose (<20% prescription dose) and high dose regions (>80% prescription dose) was calculated for each frame averaged

  6. The influence of European legislation on the use of diagnostic test allergens for nasal allergen provocation in routine care of patients with allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Klimek, L; Hammerbacher, A S; Hellings, P W; Fokkens, W J; Hoffmann, H J; Muraro, A; Papadopoulos, N

    2015-09-01

    In patients with allergic rhinitis (AR), the nasal provocation test (NPT) is the standard procedure to evaluate the clinical response of the nasal mucosa to allergens with a high specificity and sensitivity. In AR, it is the only test that really measures the response of the diseased mucosa to allergens while skin prick test and serum IgE confirm the clinical suspicion of sensitization. Moreover, it is of special relevance in the detection of patients with Local Allergic Rhinitis (LAR), where general sensitization cannot be measured. For the evaluation of therapeutic interventions, NPT has been used for the clinical monitoring of antiallergic drugs and allergen specific immunotherapy. Legislation within the European Union (EU) defines allergens used for diagnostic tests like NPT to be medicinal products according to Directive 2001/83 EC, but national law is considering these products to be medicinal devices in a number of EU countries. Thus, NPT products are governed by different legislations and therefore standards throughout the EU. In consequence, allergens used for diagnostic purposes need different registrations and Marketing Authorization by national authorities. After a transition period, regulations of EU Directives are to be implemented in national law by all member states. At the moment, most EU countries have not fully implemented these Directives, however, it can be expected that most countries will implement it and enforce their rules within the next years. This development has a tremendous impact on the availability of diagnostic allergens for NPT in Europe and will make make nasal provocation testing very difficult if not impossible. We describe the current situation of diagnostic allergens under the special legislative conditions in the EU with special focus on allergen products used for NPT and the consequences for the diagnosis of AR and LAR.

  7. Cost analysis of bivalirudin versus reference anticoagulants without GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndrome in routine clinical practice. Pompidou registry.

    PubMed

    Puymirat, E; Cohen, S; Védrenne, G; Caruba, T; Sabatier, B; Danchin, N; Durand, E

    2013-04-01

    Randomized controlled trials have shown improved short-term bleeding outcomes for bivalirudin compared to other anticoagulant in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This study analyzed the cost/efficacy profile of bivalirudin-based anticoagulation strategy versus non bivalirudin-based anticoagulant strategy without use of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors in routine clinical practice. From January 2009 to December 2010, 216 patients who underwent PCI for ACS at hospital Georges-Pompidou without GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors were studied. Of these patients, 24 (11%) received bivalirudin and 192 (88%) received others anticoagulants (mainly unfractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin). Ischemic events and bleeding or transfusion were slightly lower in bivalirudin group (0 vs. 4.2%, P=0.60 and 4.2 vs. 8.9%, P=0.70, respectively). In spite of a higher cost of the medication, the overall cost of the bivalirudin strategy was slightly lower (9167±3688 € vs. 14,016±14,749 €, P=0.23), in relation with a shorter average duration of the hospital stay. In conclusion, in this limited, single-center, population of patients with ACS, the clinical efficacy and safety of bivalirudin appeared at least as good as that of reference anticoagulants in real world clinical practice, with no increase in overall costs.

  8. Selection of patients with acute pulmonary embolism for thrombolytic therapy. Thrombolysis in pulmonary embolism (TIPE) patient survey. The TIPE Investigators.

    PubMed

    Terrin, M; Goldhaber, S Z; Thompson, B

    1989-05-01

    During a recent one-year period, 44 clinical centers in the United States saw 2,539 patients with diagnoses of pulmonary embolism as supported by high probability lung scans and/or positive pulmonary angiograms. In developing proposals for a clinical trial of Thrombolysis in Pulmonary Embolism (TIPE), investigators in the 44 clinical centers reviewed the 2,539 patients' medical charts for contraindications to thrombolytic therapy. Overall, 1,345 (53.5%) patients surveyed in the TIPE clinical centers would have been acceptable for treatment with thrombolytic therapy, a proportion higher than generally anticipated. Risks of major blood loss were the most frequent contraindications to thrombolytic therapy and were found in 838 (33.3%) patients. Risks to the CNS were found to contraindicate thrombolytic therapy in 453 (17.9%) patients. Risks of bleeding into special compartments were found to contraindicate thrombolytic therapy in 76 (3.0%) patients. Pulmonary embolism is underdiagnosed in most clinical settings, and even more patients than found in the TIPE survey could benefit from appropriate diagnosis and treatment. The question remains as to whether pulmonary embolism patients will benefit from thrombolytic therapy. Only a randomized clinical trial will provide a satisfactory answer.

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease nurse specialists for patients on biological therapies: a nationwide Italian survey

    PubMed Central

    Guarini, Alessandra; Marinis, Francesca De; Kohn, Anna; Orzes, Nicoletta; D’Incà, Renata; Iannone, Teresa; Giaquinto, Antonella; Rivara, Cinzia; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Zullo, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Background Management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients requires a multidisciplinary approach. Among the working team, the role of IBD nurse is expected to be particularly relevant when managing patients receiving biological therapies. We performed a survey to assess the presence of IBD nurse in centers where patients were receiving biologics. Methods For this Italian nationwide survey a specific questionnaire was prepared. IBD nurse was defined as a nurse directly involved in all phases of biological therapy, from pre-therapy screening, administration and monitoring during therapy, to follow up performed by a dedicated helpline, completed a specific training on biological therapy therapy, and observed international guidelines. Results A total of 53 Italian IBD centers participated in the survey, and 91 valid questionnaires were collected. Overall, 34 (37.4%) nurses could be classified as IBD specialists. IBD nurses had a significantly higher educational level than other nurses, they were more frequently operating in Central or Southern than in Northern Italy, they were working in an Academic center rather than in a General hospital, and in IBD centers with >25 patients on biological therapy. On the contrary, mean age, gender distribution, years of nursing, and years working in the IBD unit did not significantly differ between IBD and other nurses. Conclusions Our nationwide survey showed that the presence of an IBD nurse is still lacking in the majority of Italian IBD centers where patients receive biological therapies, suggesting a prompt implementation. PMID:27708516

  10. Use of deodorants during adjuvant breast radiotherapy: a survey of compliance with standard advice, impact on patients and a literature review on safety.

    PubMed

    Graham, P H; Graham, J L

    2009-12-01

    Proscription of antiperspirant or deodorant use during adjuvant breast radiotherapy is common. The investigators were seeking an information base to facilitate design of an appropriate controlled trial of the use of deodorants during radiotherapy. The first component consisted of a survey of women after adjuvant breast radiotherapy seeking information about routine deodorant use and potential concern if deodorants were not permitted during radiotherapy. The second component comprised a literature search for any existing controlled evidence regarding harm from deodorant use during radiotherapy. Four hundred fourteen women completed surveys. Two hundred eighty recalled advice against deodorants. Two hundred ninety-nine women routinely used deodorants, 70% of whom used roll-on products. Forty-five continued deodorant use during radiation, 20 of these despite recalling advice not to wear a deodorant. Of the 233 women who routinely wore a deodorant but abstained during radiotherapy, 19% expressed a lot of concern about body odour and 45% were slightly concerned. Three controlled studies totalling 310 patients report specific deodorants versus no deodorant use which did not show statistically significantly increased skin reactions, but had only a small subset with axillary irradiation. The proscription of deodorant use during radiotherapy is of unproven benefit and causes body odour concern to the majority of women who are usual deodorant users. The next most appropriate trial would compare use of the usual deodorant versus no deodorant, would encompass a significant number of women with radiotherapy to the axilla or application of deodorant to irradiated skin areas, and include endpoints other than skin reaction alone.

  11. Patients' perception of chemotherapy side effects: Expectations, doctor-patient communication and impact on quality of life - An Italian survey.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Domenica; Bria, Emilio; Costantini, Anna; Di Maio, Massimo; Rosti, Giovanni; Mancuso, Annamaria

    2017-03-01

    Chemotherapy side effects (CSE) have a strong impact on patients' quality of life (QOL). To assess patient perceptions of CSE, their impact on QOL and doctor-patient communication regarding these aspects, a survey was conducted among Italian cancer patients. Patients at least 18 years of age, who received chemotherapy, were administered a dedicated questionnaire to assess their point of view on five domains: expectations about CSE and impact on QOL; doctor-patient communication about CSE; treatments to reduce the impact of CSE; sexual life; family relationships/activities and employment. A total of 761 patients participated. CSE had a considerable impact on patient QOL. Nausea/vomiting was the most feared adverse effect before initiating chemotherapy and the one most commonly experienced during treatment. Patients generally reported good doctor-patient communication regarding information about CSE. In almost all cases, the oncologists prescribed an antiemetic treatment, but the incidence of nausea/vomiting was high. Cancer and CSE severely affected sexual life, daily activities and employment. CSE had a strong negative impact on QOL. Good doctor-patient communication is essential. Improving antiemetic strategies may improve QOL. Doctors' ability to inform patients about delicate issues, such as the impact of CSE on sexual life, needs to be improved.

  12. ROUTINE CHOLANGIOGRAPHY DURING OPERATION FOR GALLSTONES

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C. C.; Faris, George A.

    1959-01-01

    Cholangiography done routinely during operation was found valuable for detection of stones in the bile ducts. Operation for stone not seen in the operative cholangiogram was seldom necessary. When no stone is demonstrated, it seems proper to spare the patient the additional trauma of common duct exploration. ImagesFigure 1 (Case 1).Figure 2 (Case 1).Figure 3 (Case 2).Figure 4 (Case 3).Figure 5 (Case 5).Figure 6 (Case 6). PMID:13651956

  13. Development of a validated patient satisfaction survey for sexual health clinic attendees.

    PubMed

    Weston, R L; Hopwood, B; Harding, J; Sizmur, S; Ross, J D C

    2010-08-01

    Patient experience of and satisfaction with health-care services is increasingly being used to evaluate and guide health-care provision. A recent systematic review failed to identify a validated method of measuring patient satisfaction in sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinics. The aim of this study was to design and validate a specific STI clinic patient satisfaction survey that could be used as a patient-derived outcome measure. Key themes of importance to patients were identified from a recent systematic review of STI clinic patient satisfaction surveys. Semi-structured interviews were performed with patients attending a sexual health clinic to further refine these themes, and then used to compile a patient questionnaire. Cognitive testing was used to provide face validity for the questionnaire design, layout and wording. The questionnaire was further reviewed and revised by the research team prior to being piloted over a five-week period. Five key patient themes were incorporated into the questionnaire and the pilot phase included responses from 936 patients. The completion rate for individual items and the whole questionnaire (95% [885/936]) was high. Internal consistency and validity also scored highly.

  14. Evaluation of quality-control data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey for routine water-quality activities at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, 1996–2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattray, Gordon W.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, collects surface water and groundwater samples at and near the Idaho National Laboratory as part of a routine, site-wide, water-quality monitoring program. Quality-control samples are collected as part of the program to ensure and document the quality of environmental data. From 1996 to 2001, quality-control samples consisting of 204 replicates and 27 blanks were collected at sampling sites. Paired measurements from replicates were used to calculate variability (as reproducibility and reliability) from sample collection and analysis of radiochemical, chemical, and organic constituents. Measurements from field and equipment blanks were used to estimate the potential contamination bias of constituents. The reproducibility of measurements of constituents was calculated from paired measurements as the normalized absolute difference (NAD) or the relative standard deviation (RSD). The NADs and RSDs, as well as paired measurements with censored or estimated concentrations for which NADs and RSDs were not calculated, were compared to specified criteria to determine if the paired measurements had acceptable reproducibility. If the percentage of paired measurements with acceptable reproducibility for a constituent was greater than or equal to 90 percent, then the reproducibility for that constituent was considered acceptable. The percentage of paired measurements with acceptable reproducibility was greater than or equal to 90 percent for all constituents except orthophosphate (89 percent), zinc (80 percent), hexavalent chromium (53 percent), and total organic carbon (TOC; 38 percent). The low reproducibility for orthophosphate and zinc was attributed to calculation of RSDs for replicates with low concentrations of these constituents. The low reproducibility for hexavalent chromium and TOC was attributed to the inability to preserve hexavalent chromium in water samples and high variability with the

  15. Comparison of the antibacterial efficacy and acceptability of an alcohol-based hand rinse with two alcohol-based hand gels during routine patient care.

    PubMed

    Barbut, Frédéric; Maury, Eric; Goldwirt, Laurianne; Boëlle, Piérre-Yves; Neyme, Denis; Aman, Rubina; Rossi, Beatrice; Offenstadt, Georges

    2007-06-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the antibacterial efficacy of handrubbing with an alcoholic rinse (AHRR) and two different alcoholic gels (AHRG) in reducing hand contamination under practical use conditions. We wanted to assess the acceptability of the three products and to determine the effect of each product on overall hand hygiene compliance. A prospective alternating time-series clinical trial was performed in a medical intensive care unit. The study was divided into three six-week periods (P1, P2, P3). Handrubbing was achieved with Sterillium rinse (AHRR) during P1, sterillium gel(AHRG-1) during P2 and Manugel Plus (AHRG-2) during P3. Pre- and post-rubbing hand contaminations were assessed immediately after a direct contact with a patient, using the glove juice technique. Health care workers (HCWs) evaluated the acceptability of the products through a self-administered anonymous questionnaire. Compliance of HCWs with hand hygiene was assessed during the three periods. We studied 242 handrubbing opportunities. The mean reduction factor (expressed as the Log(10) CFU/mL) of the AHRR, AHRG-1 and AHRG-2 were 1.28+/-0.95, 1.29+/-0.84 and 0.51+/-0.73, respectively (p<0.001). Assessment of the three products by HCWs indicated that AHRR and AHRG-1 were significantly better accepted than AHRG-2. The overall compliance of HCWs to hand hygiene was better when gel was available. Under practical use conditions, AHRG-1 and AHRR were more effective than AHRG-2, although all were claimed to pass the European standard EN1500. In vivo trials are essential to compare the antimicrobial efficacy of products for handrubbing.

  16. Routine testing for HIV in the United States: the intersection between recommendations and practice.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Emma; Roberts, Mary; Ma, Mindy; Beckwith, Curt; Carpenter, Charles; Flanigan, Timothy

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the current practices of family practice (FP) providers and their allied staff with regard to routine HIV testing in Rhode Island (RI) and Mississippi (MS). Anonymous experimenter-derived surveys were mailed to both groups of providers in 2002. The questionnaire contained five questions about their current practices and attitudes toward HIV testing as well as patient demographics. Five hundred twenty-one questionnaires were sent to American Academy of Family Practitioners (AAFP) members in RI and MS and to FPs with listings in the phone book in RI. The response rate was 52% in RI and 41% in MS. The vast majority of providers (93%) tested their high-risk patients for HIV, but less tested pregnant (57%) and other sexually active (37%) patients. The FPs in this survey wanted HIV testing to be done in the primary care setting, yet only 7% recommended HIV testing to their sexually active patients aged 18-50 in the previous year. In order not to stigmatize any specific risk group, nor to miss any patients who are unable to be identified as being "at high risk," routine testing in the primary care setting should be encouraged.

  17. Clinical and radiological survey of the incidence of osteoarthrosis among obese patients.

    PubMed Central

    Goldin, R H; McAdam, L; Louie, J S; Gold, R; Bluestone, R

    1976-01-01

    Twenty-five grossly obese males were investigated for evidence of osteoarthrosis. A roentgenological survey of multiple joints obtained from 22 of these patients showed few significant degenerative changes. 6 patients (20%) had previously incurred traumatic rents in their menisci necessitating meniscectomy. Our results refute previous claims that obesity is a factor in the genesis of osteoarthrosis but do indicate that obese individuals are more predisposed to traumatic injury of the knee. PMID:970992

  18. How do disease perception, treatment features, and dermatologist–patient relationship impact on patients assuming topical treatment? An Italian survey

    PubMed Central

    Burroni, Anna Graziella; Fassino, Mariella; Torti, Antonio; Visentin, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Background Psoriasis largely affects daily activities and social interactions and has a strong impact on patients’ quality of life. Psoriatic patients have different attitudes toward their condition. Topical medications are essential for the treatment of psoriasis, but the majority of patients do not adhere to these therapies. Objective The history of treatment success or failure seems to influence patient attitude toward topical therapy. Therefore, it is important to understand the psychological, experiential, and motivational aspects that could be critical for treatment adherence, and to describe the different attitudes toward topical treatment. Furthermore, the physician–patient relationship and the willingness to trust the dermatologist may have a substantial role in encouraging or discouraging patients’ attitudes toward topical therapy. Methods A survey was designed to collect aspects that could be relevant to understanding different patient attitudes toward psoriasis and its treatments. A total of 495 self-administered questionnaires compiled by psoriatic patients were analyzed from 20 Italian specialized hospital centers in order to provide a nationwide picture. Results Psoriatic patients have different perceptions and experiences in relation to their condition: half of them consider psoriasis as a disease, while the other half consider psoriasis as a disorder or a nuisance. Topical therapy is the most widely used treatment, even though it is not considered the most effective one and often perceived to be cosmetic. The main findings are: 1) inadequate patient education about this disease, 2) lack of information about topical treatment, and 3) lack of results within the expected time frame. Furthermore, physicians need to build a good relationship with psoriatic patients in order to motivate them, to trust in their care, and to adhere to treatment. Conclusion This survey adds new and important details about daily life and well-being and the needs of

  19. Routines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    Melser and Michie (1970), 135-151. Sacerdoti, Earl D, [1977], A structure for plans and behavior, Elsevier. * Sartre , Jean - Paul , [1976], Critique of...theorem proving to problem solving," Artificial Intelligence, 2 (3) 189-208. Fitts, Paul M and Michael I Posner, [1967], Human performance, Brooks/Cole...Laing, R D and A Esterson, [1964], Sanity, Madness, and the Family, Tavistock. Laird, John E, Paul Rosenbloom, and Allen Newell, [1984], Towards

  20. Cancer Patient Perception of the Living Will: Report of a Pilot Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Ronald L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Conducted pilot survey of 64 patients with late stage malignancy who had signed living wills. Found that 70.3 percent were grateful for opportunity to sign living will and maintain autonomy over their terminal care, 20.3 percent were either apparently indifferent or unwilling to discuss issue, and 9.4 percent appeared disturbed by their signing of…

  1. Standardized Screening and Assessment of Older Emergency Department Patients: A Survey of Implementation in Quebec

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCusker, Jane; Verdon, Josee; Veillette, Nathalie; Berg, Katherine; Emond, Tina; Belzile, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Cost-effective methods have been developed to help busy emergency department (ED) staff cope with the growing number of older patients, including quick screening and assessment tools to identify those at high risk and note their specific needs. This survey, from a sample of key informants from all EDs (n=111) in the province of Quebec…

  2. The difficult doctor? Characteristics of physicians who report frustration with patients: an analysis of survey data

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Erin E; Garrett, Joanne M; Konrad, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Background Literature on difficult doctor-patient relationships has focused on the "difficult patient." Our objective was to determine physician and practice characteristics associated with greater physician-reported frustration with patients. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of the Physicians Worklife Survey, which surveyed a random national sample of physicians. Participants were 1391 family medicine, general internal medicine, and medicine subspecialty physicians. The survey assessed physician and practice characteristics, including stress, depression and anxiety symptoms, practice setting, work hours, case-mix, and control over administrative and clinical practice. Physicians estimated the percentage of their patients who were "generally frustrating to deal with." We categorized physicians by quartile of reported frustrating patients and compared characteristics of physicians in the top quartile to those in the other three quartiles. We used logistic regression to model physician characteristics associated with greater frustration. Results In unadjusted analyses, physicians who reported high frustration with patients were younger (p < 0.001); worked more hours per week (p = 0.041); and had more symptoms of depression, stress, and anxiety (p < 0.004 for all). In the final model, factors independently associated with high frustration included age < 40 years, work hours > 55 per week, higher stress, practice in a medicine subspeciality, and greater number of patients with psychosocial problems or substance abuse. Conclusion Personal and practice characteristics of physicians who report high frustration with patients differ from those of other physicians. Understanding factors contributing to physician frustration with patients may allow us to improve the quality of patient-physician relationships. PMID:17026762

  3. Patient and physician asthma deterioration terminology: results from the 2009 Asthma Insight and Management survey.

    PubMed

    Blaiss, Michael S; Nathan, Robert A; Stoloff, Stuart W; Meltzer, Eli O; Murphy, Kevin R; Doherty, Dennis E

    2012-01-01

    Long-term achievement of asthma control is dependent in part on the use of mutually understandable asthma terminology in all verbal and written patient-physician communications. Using data from the Asthma Insight and Management (AIM) survey, the objective of this analysis is to provide a contemporary depiction of asthma deterioration terminology as used by current asthma patients and physicians in the United States. As part of the 2009 AIM survey, current asthma patients (≥12 years of age; weighted n = 2499) and physicians (n = 309) were queried about their recognition, understanding, and/or use of the terms "asthma attack," "asthma flare-up," and "asthma exacerbation" in telephone interviews. Nearly all patients had heard the term "asthma attack" (97%), but relatively few had heard the term "asthma exacerbation" (24%); 71% had heard "asthma flare-up." In contrast, physicians reported using the term "asthma attack" least (65%) and the term "asthma exacerbation" most (77%) when discussing asthma with their patients; 70% reported using "asthma flare-up." Among patients familiar with "asthma flare-up" and "asthma exacerbation" (n = 502), only 38% said that the terms mean the same thing; nearly all physicians (94%) said that the terms mean the same thing. Collectively, data from the AIM survey suggest that patients and physicians use different asthma deterioration terminology and, more importantly, that they do not necessarily understand each other's terms. Standardizing asthma deterioration terminology may help optimize asthma patient-physician communication to improve patient understanding of written asthma action plans and therefore, enhance patient outcomes.

  4. Survey of home hemodialysis patients and nursing staff regarding vascular access use and care

    PubMed Central

    Spry, Leslie A; Burkart, John M; Holcroft, Christina; Mortier, Leigh; Glickman, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Vascular access infections are of concern to hemodialysis patients and nurses. Best demonstrated practices (BDPs) have not been developed for home hemodialysis (HHD) access use, but there have been generally accepted practices (GAPs) endorsed by dialysis professionals. We developed a survey to gather information about training provided and actual practices of HHD patients using the NxStage System One HHD machine. We used GAP to assess training used by nurses to teach HHD access care and then assess actual practice (adherence) by HHD patients. We also assessed training and adherence where GAPs do not exist. We received a 43% response rate from patients and 76% response from nurses representing 19 randomly selected HHD training centers. We found that nurses were not uniformly instructing HHD patients according to GAP, patients were not performing access cannulation according to GAP, nor were they adherent to their training procedures. Identification of signs and symptoms of infection was commonly trained appropriately, but we observed a reluctance to report some signs and symptoms of infection by patients. Of particular concern, when aggregating all steps surveyed, not a single nurse or patient reported training or performing all steps in accordance with GAP. We also identified practices for which there are no GAPs that require further study and may or may not impact outcomes such as infection. Further research is needed to develop strategies to implement and expand GAP, measure outcomes, and ultimately develop BDP for HHD to improve infectious complications. PMID:25154423

  5. Profile of e-patients: analysis of their cancer information-seeking from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghye; Kwon, Nahyun

    2010-10-01

    Researchers have yet to fully understand how competent e-patients are in selecting and using health information sources, or, more importantly, who e-patients are. This study attempted to uncover how cancer e-patients differ from other cancer information seekers in terms of their sociodemographic background, social networks, information competence, and selection of cancer information sources. We analyzed data from the National Cancer Institute's 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey, and a series of chi-square tests showed that factors that distinguished cancer e-patients from other cancer information seekers were age, gender, education, employment status, health insurance, and membership in online support groups. They were not different in the other factors measured by the survey. Our logistic regression analysis revealed that the e-patients were older and talked about their health issues with friends or family more frequently compared with online health information seekers without cancer. While preferring information from their doctors over the Internet, e-patients used the Internet as their primary source. In contrast to previous literature, we found little evidence that e-patients were savvy health information consumers who could make informed decisions on their own health. The findings of this study addressed a need for a better design and delivery of health information literacy programs for cancer e-patients.

  6. Survey of risk factors for osteoporosis and osteoprotective behaviors among patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fedorenko, Marianna; Wagner, Mary L; Wu, Brenda Y

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of risk factors for osteoporosis in persons with epilepsy, patients' awareness of their risk, and their engagement in osteoprotective behaviors were assessed in this study. Two hundred and sixty patients with epilepsy (F=51.5%, average age=42) completed a survey tool. Of 106 patients with a dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) result, 52% had low bone mineral density, and 11% had osteoporosis. The results suggest that the majority of patients with epilepsy do not engage in bone-protective behaviors. Those who have undergone a DXA scan may be more likely to take calcium and vitamin D supplementation compared with those who did not undergo a DXA scan, but they do not engage in other osteoprotective behaviors. Many patients did not accurately report their DXA results, indicating that better patient education is warranted.

  7. Patients' consent preferences for research uses of information in electronic medical records: interview and survey data

    PubMed Central

    Willison, Donald J; Keshavjee, Karim; Nair, Kalpana; Goldsmith, Charlie; Holbrook, Anne M

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To assess patients' preferred method of consent for the use of information from electronic medical records for research. Design Interviews and a structured survey of patients in practices with electronic medical records. Setting Family practices in southern Ontario, Canada. Participants 123 patients: 17 were interviewed and 106 completed a survey. Main outcome measures Patients' opinions and concerns on use of information from their medical records for research and their preferences for method of consent. Results Most interviewees were willing to allow the use of their information for research purposes, although the majority preferred that consent was sought first. The seeking of consent was considered an important element of respect for the individual. Most interviewees made little distinction between identifiable and anonymised data. Research sponsored by private insurance firms generated the greatest concern, and research sponsored by foundation the least. Sponsorship by drug companies evoked negative responses during interview and positive responses in the survey. Conclusions Patients are willing to allow information from their medical records to be used for research, but most prefer to be asked for consent either verbally or in writing. What is already known on this topicLegislation is being introduced worldwide to restrict the circumstances under which personal information may be used for secondary purposes without consentLittle empirical information exists about patients' concerns over privacy and preferences for consent for use of such information for researchWhat this study addsPatients are willing to allow personal information to be used for research purposes but want to be actively consulted firstPatients make little distinction between identifiable and non-identifiable informationMost patients prefer a time limit for their consent PMID:12586673

  8. Nature as the Most Important Coping Strategy Among Cancer Patients: A Swedish Survey.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Fereshteh; Ahmadi, Nader

    2015-08-01

    The authors have conducted a quantitative survey to examine the extent to which the results obtained in a qualitative study among cancer patients in Sweden (Ahmadi, Culture, religion and spirituality in coping: The example of cancer patients in Sweden, Uppsala, Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2006) are applicable to a wider population of cancer patients in this country. In addition to questions relating to the former qualitative study, this survey also references the RCOPE questionnaire (designed by Kenneth I Pargament) in the design of the new quantitative study. In this study, questionnaires were distributed among persons diagnosed with cancer; 2,355 people responded. The results show that nature has been the most important coping method among cancer patients in Sweden. The highest mean value (2.9) is the factor 'nature has been an important resource to you so that you could deal with your illnesses'. Two out of three respondents (68 %) affirm that this method helped them feel significantly better during or after illness. The second highest average (2.8) is the factor 'listening to 'natural music' (birdsong and the wind)'. Two out of three respondents (66 %) answered that this coping method significantly helped them feel better during illness. The third highest average (2.7) is the factor 'to walk or engage in any activity outdoors gives you a spiritual sense'. This survey concerning the role of nature as the most important coping method for cancer patients confirms the result obtained from the previous qualitative studies.

  9. [Questionnaire survey of patients comparing the usability of brand-name and generic ketoprofen tapes].

    PubMed

    Saita, Asumi; Inoue, Ayako; Ishibashi, Hisashi; Tominaga, Koji; Hori, Satoko; Miki, Akiko; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Ono, Nobuaki; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2008-05-01

    Since patients who used brand-name and generic ketoprofen (KP) tapes dispensed in the Fukuoka City Pharmaceutical Association Pharmacy complained of a difference in feeling between the two products, we conducted a questionnaire survey in patients using KP tapes to determine the usability of brand-name and generic tapes. Patients receiving the brand-name KP tape (product A) and/or a generic KP tape (product B) in our pharmacy were interviewed concerning 20 items including 1) dosage regimen, 2) outer package, 3) liner, 4) the tape itself, and 5) condition of application sites. A significant difference in usability between products A and B was observed in 4 of the 20 items evaluated, i.e., 1) easiness of opening of the outer pouch, 2) easiness of removing the liner film, 3) condition of the application site after removal of the tape, and 4) relief of pain in the target lesion after application. As suggested by patients who had complained of a difference in usability between products A and B, the participants in the survey tended to prefer the brand-name KP tape to the generic product. The findings of the survey indicate that when a brand-name product is switched to generic products, pharmacists should evaluate the usability of such products carefully to select those that will ensure proper drug use by patients.

  10. Health Status and Health Care Experiences among Homeless Patients in Federally Supported Health Centers: Findings from the 2009 Patient Survey

    PubMed Central

    Lebrun-Harris, Lydie A; Baggett, Travis P; Jenkins, Darlene M; Sripipatana, Alek; Sharma, Ravi; Hayashi, A Seiji; Daly, Charles A; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine health status and health care experiences of homeless patients in health centers and to compare them with their nonhomeless counterparts. Data Sources/Study Setting Nationally representative data from the 2009 Health Center Patient Survey. Study Design Cross-sectional analyses were limited to adults (n = 2,683). We compared sociodemographic characteristics, health conditions, access to health care, and utilization of services among homeless and nonhomeless patients. We also examined the independent effect of homelessness on health care access and utilization, as well as factors that influenced homeless patients' health care experiences. Data Collection Computer-assisted personal interviews were conducted with health center patients. Principal Findings Homeless patients had worse health status—lifetime burden of chronic conditions, mental health problems, and substance use problems—compared with housed respondents. In adjusted analyses, homeless patients had twice the odds as housed patients of having unmet medical care needs in the past year (OR = 1.98, 95 percent CI: 1.24–3.16) and twice the odds of having an ED visit in the past year (OR = 2.00, 95 percent CI: 1.37–2.92). Conclusions There is an ongoing need to focus on the health issues that disproportionately affect homeless populations. Among health center patients, homelessness is an independent risk factor for unmet medical needs and ED use. PMID:23134588

  11. Guardians to Counter Adolescent Drug Use?: Limitations of a Routine Activities Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratt, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Based on suggestions made by routine activities theory and data from two surveys, the present study discusses the use of adult guardians as a means to counter drug use among adolescents who seek out unsupervised routine activities with peers. Two surveys with 13- to 15-year-olds were conducted 4 years apart in a Norwegian town (Ns = 1,455 and…

  12. 76 FR 624 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program.... 2900-New (VA Form 10-0476).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E... their satisfaction with the quality of services/care provided by home care program staff. An agency...

  13. 10 CFR 35.604 - Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote afterloader unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote afterloader unit. 35.604 Section 35.604 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE... Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.604 Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a...

  14. 10 CFR 35.604 - Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote afterloader unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote afterloader unit. 35.604 Section 35.604 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE... Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.604 Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a...

  15. 10 CFR 35.604 - Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote afterloader unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote afterloader unit. 35.604 Section 35.604 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE... Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.604 Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a...

  16. 10 CFR 35.604 - Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote afterloader unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote afterloader unit. 35.604 Section 35.604 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE... Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.604 Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a...

  17. Long-term outcomes of anthroposophic treatment for chronic disease: a four-year follow-up analysis of 1510 patients from a prospective observational study in routine outpatient settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anthroposophic treatment includes special artistic and physical therapies and special medications. We here report an update to a previously published study of anthroposophic treatment for chronic diseases, including more patients and a longer follow up. The Anthroposophic Medicine Outcomes Study (AMOS) was a prospective observational cohort study of anthroposophic treatment for chronic indications in routine outpatient settings in Germany. Anthroposophic treatment was associated with improvements of symptoms and quality of life. Previous follow-up-analyses have been performed after 24 months or, in subgroups of patients enrolled in the period 1999-2001, after 48 months. We conducted a 48-month follow-up analysis of all patients enrolled in AMOS in the period 1999-2005. Methods 1,510 outpatients aged 1-75 years, starting anthroposophic treatment for chronic conditions in routine German outpatient settings, participated in a prospective cohort study. Main outcomes were Symptom Score (primary outcome, mean symptom severity on numerical rating scales), SF-36 Physical and Mental Component scores in adults, and disease-specific outcomes in the six most common diagnosis groups: asthma, anxiety disorders and migraine (numerical rating scales), depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale), attention deficit hyperactivity symptoms (FBB-HKS Total score), and low back pain (Hanover Functional Ability Questionnaire, Low Back Pain Rating Scale). Results Median disease duration at baseline was 3.5 years. From baseline to 48-month follow-up all ten outcomes improved significantly (p < 0.001 for all pre-post comparisons). Standardised Response Mean effect sizes were large (range 0.84-1.24 standard deviations) for seven comparisons, medium for two comparisons (SF-36 Mental Component: 0.60, Low Back Pain Rating Scale: 0.55), and small for one comparison (SF-36 Physical Component: 0.39). Symptom Score improved significantly with large effect

  18. What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitation: A Survey Study.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ya-Xuan; Huang, Pei-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of physical disability, and early, intensive, and repetitive rehabilitation exercises are crucial to the recovery of stroke survivors. Unfortunately, research shows that only one third of stroke patients actually perform recommended exercises at home, because of the repetitive and mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation exercises. Thus, to motivate stroke survivors to engage in monotonous rehabilitation is a significant issue in the therapy process. Game-based rehabilitation systems have the potential to encourage patients continuing rehabilitation exercises at home. However, these systems are still rarely adopted at patients' places. Discovering and eliminating the obstacles in promoting game-based rehabilitation at home is therefore essential. For this purpose, we conducted a study to collect and analyze the opinions and expectations of stroke patients and clinical therapists. The study is composed of 2 parts: Rehab-preference survey - interviews to both patients and therapists to understand the current practices, challenges, and expectations on game-based rehabilitation systems; and Rehab-compatibility survey - a gaming experiment with therapists to elaborate what commercial games are compatible with rehabilitation. The study is conducted with 30 outpatients with stroke and 19 occupational therapists from 2 rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. Our surveys show that game-based rehabilitation systems can turn the rehabilitation exercises more appealing and provide personalized motivation for various stroke patients. Patients prefer to perform rehabilitation exercises with more diverse and fun games, and need cost-effective rehabilitation systems, which are often built on commodity hardware. Our study also sheds light on incorporating the existing design-for-fun games into rehabilitation system. We envision the results are helpful in developing a platform which enables rehab-compatible (i.e., existing, appropriately

  19. Anesthetic practices for patients with preeclampsia or HELLP syndrome: A survey

    PubMed Central

    Başaran, Betül; Çelebioğlu, Bilge; Başaran, Ahmet; Altınel, Seher; Kutlucan, Leyla; Martin, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Substantial controversy exists regarding anesthetic management for patients with preeclampsia or hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. Experts, researchers, clinicians, and residents in Turkey were surveyed about their practices. Material and Methods Questionnaires were distributed to attendees at a national conference, and they were filled out immediately. Anonymous 10-item paper surveys were administered to both residents and non-residents. Descriptive statistics were used in the analysis. Agreement among ≥75% of the respondents was considered a majority opinion. Surveys with missing responses were used to analyze the non-response bias. The Chi-square test was used for comparisons. A historical cohort of obstetricians–gynecologists was used for comparison with anesthesiologists. Results Of 339 surveys distributed, 288 were returned (84.9% response rate). Among the returned surveys, the completion rate was 96.1%. The job experience in years among clinicians and residents was 9±5 and 3±1, respectively. General anesthesia was still significantly preferred by 36.1% among patients with preeclampsia with platelet counts of ≥100,000/μL. Compared to obstetricians–gynecologists, anesthesiologists more often preferred general anesthesia. With platelet counts of <50,000/μL or eclampsia, most respondents preferred general anesthesia 94.4% for very low platelets and 89.5% for eclampsia. Conclusion A preferential trend toward general anesthesia for patients with preeclampsia or HELLP syndrome exists among anesthesiologists in Turkey, particularly for patients with severe thrombocytopenia and/or eclampsia. There exists a need for well-designed and well-executed prospective clinical trials to provide evidence for the best consensus practice. PMID:27651719

  20. Learning Routines in Innovation Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoeve, Aimee; Nieuwenhuis, Loek F. M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to generate both a theoretical and an empirical basis for a research model that serves in further research as an analytical tool for understanding the complex phenomenon of learning at different levels in a work organisation. The key concept in this model is the routine concept of Nelson and Winter.…

  1. MISR Conversion to ASCII Routines

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

    ... These routines are written in Exelis Visual Information Solutions IDL programming language. They can be run either with a licensed ... with IDL and is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . The IDL VM software can be downloaded from this site or ordered ...

  2. The role of public relations for image creating in health services: a sample patient satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Kirdar, YalçIn

    2007-01-01

    This study discusses the role of public relations for image creating in health services. Hospitals require public relations activities to distinguish them from competitors, provide bidirectional communication between the society and the hospital, and assist to create of a strong hospital image and culture. A satisfaction survey was conducted on 264 patients who have received health services at Maltepe University Hospital. The research focused on how the Hospital's examination, care, catering and physical services; doctor and nurse politeness towards patients and patient relatives, their attitudes and behaviors; examination, check-in, bedding and discharge operations; public relations activities in and out of the hospital were perceived. Another subject of the study was the degree of recommendation of patients who have been served by the hospital's health services to prospective patients seeking treatment.

  3. A survey of cancer patient preferences: which types of snacks do they prefer during treatment?

    PubMed

    Danhauer, S C; Keim, J; Hurt, G; Vitolins, M

    2009-01-01

    Cancer patients undergoing treatment may find it difficult to maintain proper caloric intake. This survey sought to characterize food/beverage preferences and services related to nutritional needs for oncology outpatients. A total of 222 adult oncology patients completed surveys while in an oncology clinic for treatment or for a medical appointment. Data were collected on demographic characteristics, cancer diagnosis/treatment, general health behaviours, preferences for various foods and beverages that could feasibly be offered in the clinic setting and interest in nutrition-related services. Foods requested by at least 50% of the respondents included several types of crackers, doughnuts, fruit cups, cookies, applesauce and gelatin cups. Beverages requested by at least 50% of the respondents included filtered water, coffee, soft drinks and various juices. Nearly 50% requested caffeine-free beverages, and nearly 40% requested sugar-free food choices. Regarding nutrition-related services, respondents were most interested in recipes for persons with cancer, nutrition information/brochures and nutrition counselling. We found that assessing patients' nutritional preferences through survey methodology in the oncology clinic setting was feasible. It is important to aid patients' ability to consume food and beverages that they consider most palatable in order to maintain sufficient caloric intake during active treatment.

  4. Are low income patients receiving the benefits of electronic health records? A statewide survey.

    PubMed

    Butler, Matthew J; Harootunian, Gevork; Johnson, William G

    2013-06-01

    There are concerns that physicians serving low-income, Medicaid patients, in the United States are less likely to adopt electronic health records and, if so, that Medicaid patients will be denied the benefits from electronic health record use. This study seeks to determine whether physicians treating Medicaid patients were less likely to have adopted electronic health records. Physician surveys completed during physicians' license renewal process in Arizona were merged with the physician licensing data and Medicaid administrative claims data. Survey responses were received from 50.7 percent (6,780 out of 13,380) of all physicians practicing in Arizona. Physician survey responses were used to identify whether the physician used electronic health records and the degree to which the physician exchanged electronic health records with other health-care providers. Medicaid claims data were used to identify which physicians provided health care to Medicaid beneficiaries. The primary outcome of interest was whether Medicaid providers were more or less likely to have adopted electronic health records. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate average marginal effects. In multivariate analysis, physicians with 20 or more Medicaid patients during the survey cycle were 4.1 percent more likely to use an electronic health record and 5.2 percent more likely to be able to transmit electronic health records to at least one health-care provider outside of their practice. These effects increase in magnitude when the analysis is restricted to solo practice physicians This is the first study to find a pro-Medicaid gap in electronic health record adoption suggesting that the low income patients served by Arizona's Health Care Cost Containment System are not at a disadvantage with regard to electronic health record access and that Arizona's model of promoting electronic health record adoption merits further study.

  5. The Experience of Melanoma Follow-Up Care: An Online Survey of Patients in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Street, Jackie; Neuhaus, Susan; Bessen, Taryn

    2014-01-01

    Investigating patients' reports on the quality and consistency of melanoma follow-up care in Australia would assist in evaluating if this care is effective and meeting patients' needs. The objective of this study was to obtain and explore the patients' account of the technical and interpersonal aspects of melanoma follow-up care received. An online survey was conducted to acquire details of patients' experience. Participants were patients treated in Australia for primary melanoma. Qualitative and quantitative data about patient perceptions of the nature and quality of their follow-up care were collected, including provision of melanoma specific information, psychosocial support, and imaging tests received. Inconsistencies were reported in the provision and quality of care received. Patient satisfaction was generally low and provision of reassurance from health professionals was construed as an essential element of quality of care. “Gaps” in follow-up care for melanoma patients were identified, particularly provision of adequate psychosocial support and patient education. Focus on strategies for greater consistency in the provision of support, information, and investigations received, may generate a cost dividend which could be reinvested in preventive and supportive care and benefit patient well-being. PMID:25535589

  6. Consumers’ Patient Portal Preferences and Health Literacy: A Survey Using Crowdsourcing

    PubMed Central

    Caswell, Kaitlyn; Peterson, Ellen; Aberle, Denise R; Bui, Alex AT; Arnold, Corey W

    2016-01-01

    Background eHealth apps have the potential to meet the information needs of patient populations and improve health literacy rates. However, little work has been done to document perceived usability of portals and health literacy of specific topics. Objective Our aim was to establish a baseline of lung cancer health literacy and perceived portal usability. Methods A survey based on previously validated instruments was used to assess a baseline of patient portal usability and health literacy within the domain of lung cancer. The survey was distributed via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk to 500 participants. Results Our results show differences in preferences and literacy by demographic cohorts, with a trend of chronically ill patients having a more positive reception of patient portals and a higher health literacy rate of lung cancer knowledge (P<.05). Conclusions This article provides a baseline of usability needs and health literacy that suggests that chronically ill patients have a greater preference for patient portals and higher level of health literacy within the domain of lung cancer. PMID:27278634

  7. A survey of patient doses from conventional diagnostic radiology examinations: first results from Serbia and Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Ciraj, Olivera; Kosutic, Dusko; Kovacevic, Milojko; Markovic, Srpko

    Diagnostic reference levels provide framework to reduce variability. The aim of this study is to establish, for the first time, a baseline for national diagnostic reference levels in Serbia and Montenegro for the most common X-ray examination types. Measurements of patient dose using kerma-area product meter and entrance surface air kerma assessment were performed on at least ten patients for each examination type, in each of 16 randomly selected hospitals in Serbia and Montenegro, so that a total of 3,026 procedures for nine different examination categories were included in the survey. Exposure settings and individual data were recorded for each patient. Mean, median and third quartile values of patient doses are reported. Results have shown wide variation of mean hospital doses, with factor of four for barium enema to 23 for thoracic spine radiography. Entrance surface air kerma were compared with previously published diagnostic reference levels (DRL) proposed by Commission of European Communities (CEC). Doses for all studied examination types except chest radiography were within European DRL. The reasons for dose variation are discussed. Survey data are aimed to help in development of an on-going national quality assurance and quality control programme in diagnostic radiology. The findings emphasize the importance of regular patient dose measurement to ensure that patient doses are kept as low as reasonable achievable.

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol to Evaluate the Effectiveness of an Integrated Care Management Approach to Improve Adherence Among HIV-Infected Patients in Routine Clinical Care: Rationale and Design

    PubMed Central

    Fredericksen, Rob J; Church, Anna; Harrington, Anna; Ciechanowski, Paul; Magnani, Jennifer; Nasby, Kari; Brown, Tyler; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Harrington, Robert D; Lober, William B; Simoni, Jane; Safren, Stevan A; Edwards, Todd C; Patrick, Donald L; Saag, Michael S; Crane, Paul K; Kitahata, Mari M

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence to antiretroviral medications is a key determinant of clinical outcomes. Many adherence intervention trials investigated the effects of time-intensive or costly interventions that are not feasible in most clinical care settings. Objective We set out to evaluate a collaborative care approach as a feasible intervention applicable to patients in clinical care including those with mental illness and/or substance use issues. Methods We developed a randomized controlled trial (RCT) investigating an integrated, clinic-based care management approach to improve clinical outcomes that could be integrated into the clinical care setting. This is based on the routine integration and systematic follow-up of a clinical assessment of patient-reported outcomes targeting adherence, depression, and substance use, and adapts previously developed and tested care management approaches. The primary health coach or care management role is provided by clinic case managers allowing the intervention to be generalized to other human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinics that have case managers. We used a stepped-care approach to target interventions to those at greatest need who are most likely to benefit rather than to everyone to maintain feasibility in a busy clinical care setting. Results The National Institutes of Health funded this study and had no role in study design, data collection, or decisions regarding whether or not to submit manuscripts for publication. This trial is currently underway, enrollment was completed in 2015, and follow-up time still accruing. First results are expected to be ready for publication in early 2017. Discussion This paper describes the protocol for an ongoing clinical trial including the design and the rationale for key methodological decisions. There is a need to identify best practices for implementing evidence-based collaborative care models that are effective and feasible in clinical care. Adherence efficacy trials have not led to

  9. Routine clinical assessment of cognitive functioning in schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Belgaied, Wael; Samp, Jennifer; Vimont, Alexandre; Rémuzat, Cécile; Aballéa, Samuel; El Hammi, Emna; Kooli, Amna; Toumi, Mondher; Akhras, Kasem

    2014-01-01

    As more evidence points to the association of cognitive dysfunction with mental health disorders, the assessment of cognitive function in routine clinical care of these disorders is increasingly important. Despite this, it remains unknown how cognitive function is measured in routine clinical practice. The objective of this study was to assess psychiatrists' awareness of cognitive dysfunction in mental health disorders and their methods of cognitive assessment. An online survey was disseminated to psychiatrists in Europe, Asia, Australia and the United States. The survey asked about their perceptions of cognitive dysfunction in several mental health disorders, knowledge of cognitive assessment, method of cognitive assessment, and instruments used to measure cognitive function. Among the 61 respondents, most perceived that schizophrenia was associated with the greatest cognitive dysfunction. Many were unaware whether guidelines were available on cognitive assessment. In schizophrenia, 59% of psychiatrists reportedly used cognitive instruments, while the remainder relied solely on patient history interviews. The use of instruments to assess cognition in major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BPD) was lower, 38% and 37% respectively. Of the reported instruments used, only a few were actually appropriate for use in the diseases of interest (12% in schizophrenia, 3% in MDD and 0% in BPD). Other instruments reported were clinical measures that did not assess cognition. These findings reveal some inconsistencies in psychiatrists' routine clinical evaluation of cognitive function. There appeared to be low use of true cognitive assessment instruments in clinical practice and confusion regarding what constituted a cognitive assessment instrument.

  10. Survey of opioid and barbiturate prescriptions in patients attending a tertiary care headache center

    PubMed Central

    Minen, Mia T.; Wells, Rebecca E.; Suzuki, Joji; Grudzen, Corita; Balcer, Laura; Loder, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Objective To educate physicians about appropriate acute migraine treatment guidelinesby determining 1. Where headache patients were first prescribed opioids and barbiturates, and 2. The characteristics of the patient population who had been prescribed opioids and barbiturates. Background Several specialty societies issued recommendations that caution against the indiscriminate use of opioids or barbiturate containing medications for the treatment of migraine. These medications are still being prescribed in various medical settings and could put headache specialists in a difficult position when patients request these agents. Methods Patients presenting to a headache center comprised of eight physicians were asked to complete a survey that assessed headache types, comorbid conditions, and whether they had ever been prescribed opioids or barbiturates. If they responded affirmatively to the latter question, they were asked about the prescribing doctor, medication effectiveness, and whether they were currently on the medication. Data collection took place over a one month period. Results 244 patients were given the survey and 218 of these patients completed it. The predominant diagnosis was migraine (83.9%). More than half of the patients reported having been prescribed an opioid (54.8%) or a barbiturate (56.7%). About one fifth were on opioids (19.4%) or barbiturates (20.7%) at the time of completing the survey. Most patients reported being on opioids for more than two years (24.6%) or less than one week (32.1%). The reasons most frequently cited for stopping opioids were that the medications did not help (30.9%) or that they saw a new doctor who would not prescribe them (29.4%). Among patients who had previously been on barbiturates, 32.2% had been on these for over 2 years. Most patients (61.8%) stopped barbiturates because they did not find the medication helpful, while 17.6% said they saw a new doctor who would not prescribe them. The physician specialty most

  11. Surgery for gastric cancer patients of age 85 and older: Multicenter survey

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Hirotaka; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Itoh, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Kenichiro; Kakihara, Naoki; Takemura, Manabu; Okugawa, Kaori; Uchiyama, Kiyoshi; Nakata, Masashi; Nishi, Hiroshi; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Komatsu, Shuhei; Okamoto, Kazuma; Otsuji, Eigo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the surgical therapies for gastric cancer (GC) patients of age 85 or older in a multicenter survey. METHODS Therapeutic opportunities for elderly GC patients have expanded in conjunction with extended life expectancy. However, the number of cases encountered in a single institution is usually very small and surgical therapies for elderly GC patients have not yet been standardized completely. In the present study, a total of 134 GC patients of age 85 or older who underwent surgery in 9 related facilities were retrospectively investigated. The relationships between surgical therapies and clinicopathological or prognostic features were analyzed. RESULTS Eighty-nine of the patients (66%) presented with a comorbidity, and 26 (19% overall) presented with more than two comorbidities. Radical lymphadenectomy was performed in 59 patients (44%), and no patient received pre- or post-operative chemotherapy. Forty of the patients (30%) experienced perioperative complications, but no surgical or perioperative mortality occurred. Laparoscopic surgery was performed in only 12 of the patients (9.0%). Univariate and multivariate analyses of the 113 patients who underwent R0 or R1 resection identified the factors of pT3/4 and limited lymphadenectomy as predictive of worse prognosis (HR = 4.68, P = 0.02 and HR =2.19, P = 0.05, respectively). Non-cancer-specific death was more common in cStage I patients than in cStage II or III patients. Limited lymphadenectomy correlated with worse cancer-specific survival (P = 0.01), particularly in cStage II patients (P < 0.01). There were no relationships between limited lymphadenectomy and any comorbidities, except for cerebrovascular disease (P = 0.07). CONCLUSION Non-cancer-specific death was not negligible, particularly in cStage I, and gastrectomy with radical lymphadenectomy appears to be an effective treatment for cStage II elderly GC patients. PMID:28275301

  12. Current practice of glucocorticoid replacement therapy and patient-perceived health outcomes in adrenal insufficiency - a worldwide patient survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim was to survey current practice in glucocorticoid replacement therapy and self-perceived health outcomes in patients with adrenal insufficiency. Methods Participants were recruited via patient organizations to respond anonymously to a web-based survey developed by clinical experts. Unique entries were set up for each patient organization enabling geographical localization of the entries. Results 1245 participants responded (primary adrenal insufficiency: 84%; secondary adrenal insufficiency: 11%; unsure: 5%). Therapies included hydrocortisone (75%), prednisone/prednisolone (11%), cortisone acetate (6%) and dexamethasone (4%). Dosing regimens were once daily (10%), twice daily (42%), thrice daily (32%) or other (17%). Compromised subjective health necessitating changes to physical activity or social-, work- or family life was reported by 64% of the participants. 40% of the participants reported absence from work/school in the last 3 months. Irrespective of diagnosis, 76% were concerned about long-term side-effects of therapy, mainly osteoporosis (78%), obesity (64%) and cardiovascular morbidity (46%). 38% of the participants had been hospitalized in the last year. Conclusions Glucocorticoid replacement therapy among the respondents consisted primarily of hydrocortisone administered twice or thrice daily. A majority reported impact of their disease or treatment on subjective health requiring alterations in e.g. physical activity or family life. Three quarters reported concerns about long-term side-effects of the treatment. These data demonstrate - from the patients' perspective - a need for improvement in the management of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:22695167

  13. Cancer-related neuropathic pain in out-patient oncology clinics: a European survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although pain is frequently experienced by patients with cancer, it remains under-treated. The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of cancer-related neuropathic pain (CRNP) in patients with chronic pain who attended an outpatient clinic for standard care in Europe (irrespective of the reason or stage of the cancer). The secondary aims of this study were to characterise pain and cancer in patients with CRNP (including treatment) and to evaluate the usefulness of the painDETECT (PD-Q) screening tool to help physicians identify a potential neuropathic component of cancer-related pain. Methods An observational, non-interventional, cross-sectional, multi-centre study of adult patients with cancer using patient and physician case report forms (CRFs). Patients with CRNP were identified by physicians’ clinical assessments after examining the completed PD-Q. Results A total of 951 patients visiting outpatient clinics across Europe were enrolled in this study between August 2010 and July 2011. Of these, 310 patients (32.60%; 95% confidence interval 29.62, 35.58) were identified as having CRNP. Twenty-nine of 39 (74.4%) physicians who completed the CRF relating to the PD-Q considered it a useful tool to help detect CRNP in daily practice and 28 of 39 (71.8%) indicated that they would use this tool in the future for most or some of their patients. Data from physicians before and after review of the completed PD-Qs showed a shift in clinical opinion (either to positive CRNP diagnosis [yes] or negative CRNP diagnosis [no]) in respect of 142 patients; about half of which (74) were categorised with an initial diagnosis of unknown. Opinions also shifted from a no to a yes diagnosis in 10 patients and from a yes to a no diagnosis in 51 patients. Conclusions Approximately one-third of adults with cancer experiencing chronic pain attending outpatient clinics as part of routine care were considered to have CRNP in the opinion of the physicians after

  14. Monitoring and treatment of coagulation abnormalities in burn patients. an international survey on current practices.

    PubMed

    Lavrentieva, A; Depetris, N; Kaimakamis, E; Berardino, M; Stella, M

    2016-09-30

    The magnitude of coagulation abnormalities, and the definition and treatment of coagulopathy in burn patients are inadequately understood and continue to be discussed in the literature. We aimed to analyse physicians' views on monitoring and treating coagulation abnormalities in burn patients. A total of 350 questionnaires were distributed electronically to burn ICU physicians. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Responses were analysed electronically and comparisons were made according to the region of the ICU or the specialty of the physician. Of the 350 questionnaires distributed, 55 (15.7%) were returned. The majority of burn specialists consider sepsis-induced coagulopathy to be the most frequent coagulopathy in burn patients, and 74.5% declare that they do not use any specific definition/scoring system in their department to detect coagulopathy. The majority of specialists (70.8%) use standard coagulation tests. The most frequent indications for plasma transfusion are massive bleeding (32.8%) and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation syndrome treatment (20%). The main specific factors reported in our study are cryoprecipitate (23.2%) and fibrinogen concentrate (18.9%). 21.1% of respondents state that they do not use any specific coagulation factor substitution in burn patients. Specific coagulation factor substitution is not a routine practice. The low response rate precludes the generalization of our results.

  15. Moving towards an electronic patient record: a survey to assess the needs of community family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Strasberg, H. R.; Tudiver, F.; Holbrook, A. M.; Geiger, G.; Keshavjee, K. K.; Troyan, S.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the needs of community family physicians regarding electronic patient records (EPRs). DESIGN: A comprehensive survey was sent to 101 community family physicians in Hamilton, Ontario, who had expressed an interest in EPRs. RESULTS: 46 physicians responded (46%). 87% felt that an EPR would result in their providing better patient care. A wide variety of items were deemed to be important to be included on the EPR "front page". Desired functionality emphasized labs, medications, consultation, hospital follow-up and health maintenance. Family physicians tended to prefer templates to other data entry methods such as typing and dictating. Respondents were more willing to view information from the hospital than to let the hospital view information from their own offices. CONCLUSION: This survey provided useful information on the perceived EPR needs of community-based family physicians. It will be repeated post-computerization. PMID:9929216

  16. Knowledge and Apprehension of Dental Patients about MERS-A Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Nipun; Rodrigues, Jean Clare; Azouni, Khalid; Darwish, Shorouk; Abuderman, Abdulwahab; Alkaabba, Abdul Aziz Fahad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a disease caused by beta corona virus. From April 11th to 9th June 2014, World Health Organization (WHO) reported a total of 402 laboratory confirmed cases of MERS from KSA, out of which 132 cases were reported from Riyadh alone. Aim The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and apprehension of patients about MERS visiting Al Farabi College of Dentistry, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire based survey was conducted which consisted of 10 self-prepared questions. A total of 404 patients participated in this study. Results Three hundred and forty patients had heard about MERS. Nearly a quarter of the patients (25.74%) were apprehensive about undergoing dental treatment because of MERS. A little more than half of the patients (50.99%) knew that camel was a source of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Corona virus. Most of the patients (80.72%) were aware of the infection control measures to be followed by dentist and 138 patients claimed they took some precaution when present inside the dental college. Conclusion Majority of the patients had heard about MERS and was aware of the infection control measures. However, some patients were apprehensive about undergoing dental treatment because of MERS. Further steps need to be taken to educate the patient’s about transmission of MERS and infection control measures in a dental hospital. PMID:27437361

  17. Does Socioeconomic Status Affect Patients' Ease of Use of a Touch-Screen (iPad) Patient Survey?

    PubMed

    Zarghom, Saman; Di Fonzo, David; Leung, Fok-Han

    2013-01-11

    Socioeconomic disparities influence the usage rate of advanced communication technologies in Canada. It is important to assess all patient interactions with computers and electronic devices based on these socioeconomic differences. This project studied the ease of use of a touch-screen interface program for collecting patient feedback. The interface collected feedback on physicians' communication skills, an important health concern that has been garnering more and more attention. A concurrent paper survey was used to gather information on the socioeconomic status and the usability of the touchscreen device. As expected, patients who were older, had lower annual household income, and had lower educational attainment were associated with more difficulty using the devices. Surprisingly, 94% of all users (representing a wide range of socioeconomic status backgrounds) rated the device as easy to use.

  18. Unsatisfied patient's rights: A survey on the views of patients, nurses and physicians.

    PubMed

    Parsapoor, Alireza; Mohammad, Kazem; Afzali, Hussein Malek; Ala'eddini, Farshid; Larijani, Bagher

    2012-01-01

    Neglecting patients' rights in a health care system can give rise to a challenging situation between health care providers and patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the views of patients as recipients of healthcare services and physicians and nurses, as healthcare providers, regarding the unsatisfied demands of different aspects of patients' rights in 3 hospitals representing three types of settings (teaching, private, and public). This was a cross-sectional descriptive analytical study. Data were gathered using a questionnaire which was filled out by an interviewer for the patients and self administered for nurses and physicians. The research venues were one general teaching hospital, one first class private hospital, and one non-teaching public hospital, and all 3 were in Tehran. The questionnaire consisted of some general questions about respondents' demographics, and 21 questions concerning the importance of patients' rights, and how well patients' rights were observed. Overall, 143 patients, 143 nurses (response rate: 61%) and 82 physicians (response rate: 27.5%) completed the questionnaire. The degrees of unsatisfied demands were different depending on the various views within each group regarding the degree of importance and observance of each right, which was measured by the Likert's scale ranging from 0.0 (no importance, no observance) to 10.0 (absolutely important, full observance). Concerning the non-normal distribution, the collected data were analyzed by non-parametric tests using the SPSS software (ver. 11.5). Results showed that the studied groups had significantly different views. The most prominent issue concerned patients' to make an informed decision, which was particularly unsatisfactory in the teaching hospital. The results of this research indicate that healthcare providers, especially physicians, need to be informed to show more respect for patients' rights in terms of access to clinical information and making decisions. The

  19. Evaluation of patient safety culture among Malaysian retail pharmacists: results of a self-reported survey

    PubMed Central

    Sivanandy, Palanisamy; Maharajan, Mari Kannan; Rajiah, Kingston; Wei, Tan Tyng; Loon, Tan Wee; Yee, Lim Chong

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient safety is a major public health issue, and the knowledge, skills, and experience of health professionals are very much essential for improving patient safety. Patient safety and medication error are very much associated. Pharmacists play a significant role in patient safety. The function of pharmacists in the medication use process is very different from medical and nursing colleagues. Medication dispensing accuracy is a vital element to ensure the safety and quality of medication use. Objective To evaluate the attitude and perception of the pharmacist toward patient safety in retail pharmacies setup in Malaysia. Methods A Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire was used to assess patient safety culture, developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the convenience sampling method was adopted. Results The overall positive response rate ranged from 31.20% to 87.43%, and the average positive response rate was found to be 67%. Among all the eleven domains pertaining to patient safety culture, the scores of “staff training and skills” were less. Communication openness, and patient counseling are common, but not practiced regularly in the Malaysian retail pharmacy setup compared with those in USA. The overall perception of patient safety of an acceptable level in the current retail pharmacy setup. Conclusion The study revealed that staff training, skills, communication in patient counseling, and communication across shifts and about mistakes are less in current retail pharmacy setup. The overall perception of patient safety should be improved by educating the pharmacists about the significance and essential of patient safety. PMID:27524887

  20. [Proposal for a survey for assisting the family and caregivers of patients with spinal cord injuries].

    PubMed

    Mancussi e Faro, A C

    1999-12-01

    This study proposes a basis survey for assistance to the family and caregivers because we believe there is necessity of family participation on the treatment, trying to understand and share the disease or deficiency situation. We objectified to sketch the relationship degree and the people's gender that accompanied the spinal cord injured hurt medular patient in nursing consultations and to discuss the necessity of basis survey to the assistance family and to the caregiver. 101 nursing consultations were accomplished, in clinic health, to the spinal cord injured patient and his/her relative and 36 patients were totalized, from this number 26 (72.22%) were male and 10 (27.78%), were female. It was verified that the men with medular lesion, in the greater number (27-80.7 O/o), were accompanied with his relatives specially mother and wife, while the women with medular lesion, in the greater number too (7-70%) were accompanied with her relatives of diversified proximity. In reference to the basis survey that comprehend the care at house and the caregiver necessity, we can affirm its relevance, trying to context the family support identified attending the caregivers.

  1. Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 score (RAPID3) correlates well with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity index (BASDAI) in the assessment of disease activity and monitoring progression of axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Danve, Abhijeet; Reddy, Anusha; Vakil-Gilani, Kiana; Garg, Neha; Dinno, Alexis; Deodhar, Atul

    2015-01-01

    Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3) is a composite index, very useful for assessment of disease activity of various rheumatic diseases including RA. If RAPID3 can also reliably measure disease activity in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), it may prove to be a practical and effective quantitative assessment tool in busy practices. We studied the association of RAPID3 with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) seen from 2007 to 2012 were classified as having AS or non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA) using modified New York criteria and Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society criteria, respectively. Patients with simultaneous BASDAI and RAPID3 scores were enrolled (N = 112; 105 with AS, seven with nr-axSpA). Multiple regression and nonparametric receiver operating characteristics were used. Baseline mean (SD) BASDAI and RAPID3 were 4.2 (2.5) and 3.8 (2.3), respectively. Multiple linear regressions modeled a quadratic relationship between BASDAI and RAPID3 for 321 observations in 112 patients with axSpA (1) cross-sectionally: BASDAI predicted by RAPID3 (β = 1.171; s.e. = 0.113, p < 0.001) and RAPID3(2) (β = -0.037; s.e. = 0.014, p = 0.011) with an adjusted R (2) of 0.676; and (2) longitudinally: BASDAI predicted by RAPID3 (β = 1.196; s.e. = 0.111, p < 0.001), RAPID3(2) (β = -0.042; s.e. = 0.014, p = 0.004), and visit number (β = -0.142; s.e. = 0.038, p < 0.001) with an adjusted R (2) of 0.689. RAPID3 (correctly classified) corresponded to BASDAI scores of 2, 4, and 6: 1.40 (85.8 %), 3.33 (81.9 %), and 5.43 (87.1 %), respectively. RAPID3 correlates well with BASDAI in monitoring axSpA patients (including AS) in cross-sectional and longitudinal follow-up. Since it also correlates with measures of disease activity of other rheumatic diseases including RA, RAPID3 could be an attractive measure

  2. A survey on patient perception of reduced-intensity transplantation in adults with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Bareford, D

    2007-04-01

    The development of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and the success of BMT for paediatric sickle cell disease (SCD) have raised the possibility of revisiting this prospect in adults as well. In a chronic debilitating disorder managed with supportive therapy, the patients' perception is critical in the advancement of any potential curative therapy. To explore this aspect, we undertook a questionnaire-based survey on 30 adults with SCD. Sixty two per cent of the patients were ready to accept a transplant-related mortality (TRM) >10%; 30% of them a TRM >30%. A risk of graft failure (GF) >10% was acceptable to 64%, with a risk >30% acceptable to 41%. Infertility was acceptable to only 50%. Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was unacceptable to the majority (80%). Seventy six per cent% of patients had a full sibling and 60% were willing to participate in a clinical trial of RIC transplantation. This survey suggests that the majority of adults with SCD might be willing to consider a curative option such as RIC transplantation even with a high TRM or GF. The major concerns relate to chronic GVHD and infertility. There is an urgent need to explore RIC transplants in SCD patients within the framework of a clinical trial, considering patient perception regarding cure and complications.

  3. Delirium in intensive care unit patients under noninvasive ventilation: a multinational survey

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Lilian Maria Sobreira; Salluh, Jorge Ibrain Figueira; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Barreto, Bruna Brandão; Zantieff, Ricardo; Tobar, Eduardo; Esquinas, Antonio; Quarantini, Lucas de Castro; Gusmao-Flores, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    Objective To conduct a multinational survey of intensive care unit professionals to determine the practices on delirium assessment and management, in addition to their perceptions and attitudes toward the evaluation and impact of delirium in patients requiring noninvasive ventilation. Methods An electronic questionnaire was created to evaluate the profiles of the respondents and their related intensive care units, the systematic delirium assessment and management and the respondents' perceptions and attitudes regarding delirium in patients requiring noninvasive ventilation. The questionnaire was distributed to the cooperative network for research of the Associação de Medicina Intensiva Brasileira (AMIB-Net) mailing list and to researchers in different centers in Latin America and Europe. Results Four hundred thirty-six questionnaires were available for analysis; the majority of the questionnaires were from Brazil (61.9%), followed by Turkey (8.7%) and Italy (4.8%). Approximately 61% of the respondents reported no delirium assessment in the intensive care unit, and 31% evaluated delirium in patients under noninvasive ventilation. The Confusion Assessment Method for the intensive care unit was the most reported validated diagnostic tool (66.9%). Concerning the indication of noninvasive ventilation in patients already presenting with delirium, 16.3% of respondents never allow the use of noninvasive ventilation in this clinical context. Conclusion This survey provides data that strongly reemphasizes poor efforts toward delirium assessment and management in the intensive care unit setting, especially regarding patients requiring noninvasive ventilation. PMID:26761474

  4. Cognitive Dysfunction Survey of the Japanese Patients with Moyamoya Disease (COSMO-JAPAN Study): Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    TAKAGI, Yasushi; MIYAMOTO, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a cerebrovascular occlusive disease characterized by progressive stenosis or by occlusion at the terminal portion of the bilateral internal carotid arteries. The unusual vascular network (moyamoya vessels) at the base of the brain with this disease as collateral channels is developed in this disease. Social independence because of cognitive impairment has recently been recognized as an important unsolved social issue with adult moyamoya disease. The patients with cognitive impairment have difficulty in proving their status because the standard neuroradiological and neuropsychological methods to define cognitive impairment with moyamoya disease are not determined. These patients with cognitive impairment should be supported by social welfare as psychologically handicapped persons. Thus Cognitive Dysfunction Survey of the Japanese Patients with Moyamoya Disease (COSMO-JAPAN study) is planned. In this study, we want to establish a standard finding of the cognitive impairment in patients with moyamoya disease. PMID:25739435

  5. Cognitive Dysfunction Survey of the Japanese Patients with Moyamoya Disease (COSMO-JAPAN Study): study protocol.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yasushi; Miyamoto, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a cerebrovascular occlusive disease characterized by progressive stenosis or by occlusion at the terminal portion of the bilateral internal carotid arteries. The unusual vascular network (moyamoya vessels) at the base of the brain with this disease as collateral channels is developed in this disease. Social independence because of cognitive impairment has recently been recognized as an important unsolved social issue with adult moyamoya disease. The patients with cognitive impairment have difficulty in proving their status because the standard neuroradiological and neuropsychological methods to define cognitive impairment with moyamoya disease are not determined. These patients with cognitive impairment should be supported by social welfare as psychologically handicapped persons. Thus Cognitive Dysfunction Survey of the Japanese Patients with Moyamoya Disease (COSMO-JAPAN study) is planned. In this study, we want to establish a standard finding of the cognitive impairment in patients with moyamoya disease.

  6. Memos trace routine radiation overexposures

    SciTech Connect

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-03-09

    Workers at the Energy Department's Fernald plant routinely received [open quotes]gross,[close quotes] [open quotes]unacceptable[close quotes] and [open quotes]undue[close quotes] radiation exposures during uranium processing operations from the 1950s through the early 1970s, according to internal Fernald memos. The documents come to light as DOE continues to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars every month to defend its former Fernald contractor, NLO Inc., from a workers' lawsuit seeking compensation for alleged injuries from poor safety practices at the Ohio facility. DOE officials have contended the NLO defense effort is justified because there is no evidence that any former Fernald workers have suffered injury as a result of radiation exposures at the plant. However, the internal Fernald memos document major concerns expressed by Fernald health officials about unsafe working conditions at the plant and what appear in some cases to be routine overexposures of workers.

  7. A Promising Tool to Assess Long Term Public Health Effects of Natural Disasters: Combining Routine Health Survey Data and Geographic Information Systems to Assess Stunting after the 2001 Earthquake in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Rydberg, Henny; Marrone, Gaetano; Strömdahl, Susanne; von Schreeb, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Background Research on long-term health effects of earthquakes is scarce, especially in low- and middle-income countries, which are disproportionately affected by disasters. To date, progress in this area has been hampered by the lack of tools to accurately measure these effects. Here, we explored whether long-term public health effects of earthquakes can be assessed using a combination of readily available data sources on public health and geographic distribution of seismic activity. Methods We used childhood stunting as a proxy for public health effects. Data on stunting were attained from Demographic and Health Surveys. Earthquake data were obtained from U.S. Geological Survey’s ShakeMaps, geographic information system-based maps that divide earthquake affected areas into different shaking intensity zones. We combined these two data sources to categorize the surveyed children into different earthquake exposure groups, based on how much their area of residence was affected by the earthquake. We assessed the feasibility of the approach using a real earthquake case – an 8.4 magnitude earthquake that hit southern Peru in 2001. Results and conclusions Our results indicate that the combination of health survey data and disaster data may offer a readily accessible and accurate method for determining the long-term public health consequences of a natural disaster. Our work allowed us to make pre- and post- earthquake comparisons of stunting, an important indicator of the well-being of a society, as well as comparisons between populations with different levels of exposure to the earthquake. Furthermore, the detailed GIS based data provided a precise and objective definition of earthquake exposure. Our approach should be considered in future public health and disaster research exploring the long-term effects of earthquakes and potentially other natural disasters. PMID:26090999

  8. Reduced rates of hospital-acquired UTI in medical patients. Prevalence surveys indicate effect of active infection control programmes.

    PubMed

    Christensen, M; Jepsen, O B

    2001-01-01

    Prevalence surveys have been part of the Danish infection control programme since 1974. Nationwide surveys were carried out in 1978, 1979, 1980, 1991 and 1999. The results indicate a net reduction of approximately 25%, mainly due to a reduction of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in medical patients. Results from the nationwide surveys are validated by results of occasional independent surveys performed in regions or single hospitals. The reduction coincides with preventive programmes focused on catheter policy and UTI. We conclude that the prevalence survey is an important part of our strategic programme for infection control in hospitals.

  9. A tool to evaluate patients' experiences of nursing care in Australian general practice: development of the Patient Enablement and Satisfaction Survey.

    PubMed

    Desborough, Jane; Banfield, Michelle; Parker, Rhian

    2014-01-01

    Australian health policy initiatives have increasingly supported the employment of nurses in general practice. An understanding of the impact of nursing care on patients in this setting is integral to assuring quality, safety and a patient-centred focus. The aim was to develop a survey to evaluate the satisfaction and enablement of patients who receive nursing care in Australian general practices. The survey was to be simple to administer and analyse, ensuring practicality for use by general practice nurses, doctors and managers. Two validated instruments formed the basis of the Patient Enablement and Satisfaction Survey (PESS). This survey was refined and validated for the Australian setting using focus groups and in-depth interviews with patients, and feedback from general practice nurses. Test-retest and alternate form methods were used to establish the survey's reliability. Feedback resulted in 14 amendments to the original draft survey. Questions that demonstrated a strong positive correlation for the test-retest and alternate form measures were included in the final survey. The PESS is a useful, practical tool for the evaluation of nursing care in Australian general practice, its validity and reliability established through a patient-centred research approach, reflective of the needs of patients accessing nursing services in this setting.

  10. A survey of the role of the dietitian in preparing patients for home enteral feeding.

    PubMed

    Skipper, A; Rotman, N

    1990-07-01

    Teaching home enteral feeding is a complex process involving many activities not traditionally performed by dietitians. This survey was undertaken to investigate (a) tasks performed by the dietitian in preparing patients to receive home enteral feeding, (b) the effect of various demographic factors on the dietitian's role, (c) the amount of dietitian time spent preparing a patient for discharge on home enteral feeding, and (d) the types of home enteral feedings currently in use. A questionnaire was tested for reliability and validity, then mailed to 1,168 nutrition support dietitians. Results of the survey indicated that, more often than nurses or physicians, dietitians were responsible for calculating nutrient and fluid needs, selecting formula, determining the home feeding schedule, teaching the patient to prepare blenderized formulas, and teaching the patient to recognize formula intolerance. Dietitians were less often responsible than nurses for psychomotor skills such as teaching the patient to administer the formula, operate the pump, and flush the feeding tube. Dietitians seemed to have a larger role in hospitals with more than 499 beds, in teaching hospitals, and in hospitals with a nutrition support team. Dietitians reported a smaller role when they reported to a contract foodservice company and when their job duties were divided so that more time was spent in clinical dietetics than in nutrition support. However, dietitians in all demographic groups performed all tasks. The average amount of dietitian time spent preparing patients for discharge on home enteral feeding was 168 minutes (2.8 hours) per patient. More patients received gastric feedings (76%) than intestinal feedings (22%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Survey of Preferences in Patients Scheduled for Carpal Tunnel Release Using Conjoint Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wan Lim; Kim, Jin Sam; Lee, Jun Bum; Kim, Sun Hwa; Min, Dong-Uk

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the preferences of patients scheduled for carpal tunnel release using conjoint analysis and also introduce an example of how to apply a conjoint analysis to the medical field. The use of conjoint analysis in this study is new to the field of orthopedic surgery. Methods A total of 97 patients scheduled for carpal tunnel release completed the survey. The following four attributes were predefined: board certification status, distance from the patient's residency, medical costs, and waiting time for surgery. Two plausible levels for each attribute were assigned. Based on these attributes and levels, 16 scenarios were generated (2 × 2 × 2 × 2). We employed 8 scenarios using a fractional factorial design (orthogonal plan). Preferences for scenarios were then evaluated by ranking: patients were asked to list the 8 scenarios in their order of preference. Outcomes consisted of two results: the average importance of each attribute and the utility score. Results The most important attribute was the physician's board certificate, followed by distance from the patient's residency to the hospital, waiting time, and costs. Utility estimate findings revealed that patients had a greater preference for a hand specialist than a general orthopedic surgeon. Conclusions Patients considered the physician's expertise as the most important factor when choosing a hospital for carpal tunnel release. This suggests that patients are increasingly seeking safety without complications as interest in medical malpractice has increased. PMID:28261434

  12. Routine polysomnography in an epilepsy monitoring unit.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Matthew C L; Costello, Craig A; White, Elise J; Smit, Michelle; Carino, John; Strawhorn, Andrew; Jackson, Brianna; Kwan, Patrick; French, Christopher R; Yerra, S Raju; Tan, K Meng; O'Brien, Terence J; Goldin, Jeremy

    2013-08-01

    Up to 13% of patients with epilepsy have moderate or severe sleep-disordered breathing, in particular obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a disorder associated with reduced quality of life, worsened seizure control, and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Combining video-EEG monitoring with polysomnography (VPSG) provides the opportunity to diagnose clinically significant OSA as well as relate the occurrence of seizures and the epilepsy diagnosis to the presence and severity of sleep-disordered breathing. We have established routine VPSG in our inpatient video-EEG monitoring unit and present our findings in 87 patients. Clinically significant sleep-disordered breathing was diagnosed in 19 of 87 (22%) patients. Patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) had poorer sleep quality compared to patients with epilepsy and those with neither diagnosis, whereas the prevalence of clinically significant sleep-disordered breathing in patients with PNES (29%) did not differ significantly compared to patients with epilepsy (21%) and those with neither diagnosis (22%). The differences in sleep quality are not explained by differences in body mass index (BMI) or anti-epileptic drug (AED) effects.

  13. Oral care practices for patients in Intensive Care Units: A pilot survey

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Alexandre Franco; de Paula, Renata Monteiro; de Castro Piau, Cinthia Gonçalves Barbosa; Costa, Priscila Paganini; Bezerra, Ana Cristina Barreto

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the level of knowledge and difficulties concerning hospitalized patients regarding preventive oral health measures among professionals working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Study Population and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 71 health professionals working in the ICU. A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine the methods used, frequency, and attitude toward oral care provided to patients in Brazilian ICUs. The variables were analyzed using descriptive statistics (percentages). A one-sample t-test between proportions was used to assess significant differences between percentages. t-statistics were considered statistically significant for P < 0.05. Bonferroni correction was applied to account for multiple testing. Results: Most participants were nursing professionals (80.3%) working 12-h shifts in the ICU (70.4%); about 87.3% and 66.2% reported having knowledge about coated tongue and nosocomial pneumonia, respectively (P < 0.05). Most reported using spatulas, gauze, and toothbrushes (49.3%) or only toothbrushes (28.2%) with 0.12% chlorhexidine (49.3%) to sanitize the oral cavity of ICU patients (P < 0.01). Most professionals felt that adequate time was available to provide oral care to ICU patients and that oral care was a priority for mechanically ventilated patients (80.3% and 83.1%, respectively, P < 0.05). However, most professionals (56.4%) reported feeling that the oral cavity was difficult to clean (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The survey results suggest that additional education is necessary to increase awareness among ICU professionals of the association between dental plaque and systemic conditions of patients, to standardize oral care protocols, and to promote the oral health of patients in ICUs. PMID:27275074

  14. Benefits of Aldosterone Receptor Antagonism in Chronic Kidney Disease (BARACK D) trial–a multi-centre, prospective, randomised, open, blinded end-point, 36-month study of 2,616 patients within primary care with stage 3b chronic kidney disease to compare the efficacy of spironolactone 25 mg once daily in addition to routine care on mortality and cardiovascular outcomes versus routine care alone: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and increasing in prevalence. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and death in CKD, though of a different phenotype to the general CVD population. Few therapies have proved effective in modifying the increased CVD risk or rate of renal decline in CKD. There are accumulating data that aldosterone receptor antagonists (ARA) may offer cardio-protection and delay renal impairment in patients with the CV phenotype in CKD. The use of ARA in CKD has therefore been increasingly advocated. However, no large study of ARA with renal or CVD outcomes is underway. Methods The study is a prospective randomised open blinded endpoint (PROBE) trial set in primary care where patients will mainly be identified by their GPs or from existing CKD lists. They will be invited if they have been formally diagnosed with CKD stage 3b or there is evidence of stage 3b CKD from blood results (eGFR 30–44 mL/min/1.73 m2) and fulfil the other inclusion/exclusion criteria. Patients will be randomised to either spironolactone 25 mg once daily in addition to routine care or routine care alone and followed-up for 36 months. Discussion BARACK D is a PROBE trial to determine the effect of ARA on mortality and cardiovascular outcomes (onset or progression of CVD) in patients with stage 3b CKD. Trial registration EudraCT: 2012-002672-13 ISRTN: ISRCTN44522369 PMID:24886488

  15. Attitudes toward organ donation among waitlisted transplant patients: results of a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Merola, Jonathan; Pei, Kevin Y; Rodriguez-Davalos, Manuel I; Gan, Geliang; Deng, Yanhong; Mulligan, David C; Davis, Kimberly A

    2016-11-01

    Organ shortage remains a major barrier to transplantation. While many efforts have focused on educating the general population regarding donation, few studies have examined knowledge regarding donation and donor registration rates among waitlisted candidates. We aimed to determine waitlisted patients' willingness to donate, elucidate attitudes surrounding organ allocation, and identify barriers to donation. A cross-sectional survey was distributed to assess demographics, knowledge regarding organ donation, and attitudes regarding the allocation process. Responses from 225 of 579 (39%) waitlisted patients were collected. Seventy-one respondents (32%) were registered donors, while 64 patients (28%) noted no interest in participating in donation. A total of 19% of respondents felt their medical treatment would change by being a donor, while 86 patients (38%) felt their condition precluded them from donation. Forty patients (18%) felt they should be prioritized on the waitlist if they agreed to donate. A minority of patients (28%) reported discussion of organ donation with their physician. Waitlisted candidates constitute a population of willing, although often unregistered, organ donors. Moreover, many endorse misconceptions regarding the allocation process and their donation eligibility. In a population for which transplantation is not always possible, education is needed regarding organ donation among waitlisted patients, as this may enhance donation rates.

  16. A survey of nurses’ awareness of patient safety culture in neonatal intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Hemmat, Faezeh; Atashzadeh-Shoorideh, Foroozan; Mehrabi, Tayebeh; Zayeri, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient safety is considered as the most important quality for healthcare. One of the main factors that play an important role in the promotion of healthcare institutes is patient safety. This study describes the nurses’ awareness of patient safety culture in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 83 nurses working in neonatal intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, were selected using purposive sampling. Data collection tools consisted of the demographic characteristics questionnaire and the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Data were analyzed by using SPSS software. Results: The dimension that received the highest positive response rate was “expectations and actions of the supervisor/manager in promoting safety culture.” The dimension with the lowest percentage of positive responses was “frequency of error reporting.” 21.70% of the NICU nurses reported one or two incidents in their work units in the previous 12 months. Conclusions: In order to create and promote patient safety, appropriate management of resources and a correct understanding of patient safety culture are required. In this way, awareness of dimensions which are not acceptable provides the basic information necessary for improving patient safety. PMID:26257806

  17. Internet use by patients with bipolar disorder: Results from an international multisite survey.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Glenn, Tasha; Alda, Martin; Ardau, Raffaella; Baune, Bernhard T; Berk, Michael; Bersudsky, Yuly; Bilderbeck, Amy; Bocchetta, Alberto; Bossini, Letizia; Castro, Angela M Paredes; Cheung, Eric Yw; Chillotti, Caterina; Choppin, Sabine; Del Zompo, Maria; Dias, Rodrigo; Dodd, Seetal; Duffy, Anne; Etain, Bruno; Fagiolini, Andrea; Hernandez, Miryam Fernández; Garnham, Julie; Geddes, John; Gildebro, Jonas; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Goodwin, Guy M; Grof, Paul; Harima, Hirohiko; Hassel, Stefanie; Henry, Chantal; Hidalgo-Mazzei, Diego; Kapur, Vaisnvy; Kunigiri, Girish; Lafer, Beny; Larsen, Erik R; Lewitzka, Ute; Licht, Rasmus W; Lund, Anne Hvenegaard; Misiak, Blazej; Monteith, Scott; Munoz, Rodrigo; Nakanotani, Takako; Nielsen, René E; O'Donovan, Claire; Okamura, Yasushi; Osher, Yamima; Piotrowski, Patryk; Reif, Andreas; Ritter, Philipp; Rybakowski, Janusz K; Sagduyu, Kemal; Sawchuk, Brett; Schwartz, Elon; Scippa, Ângela M; Slaney, Claire; Sulaiman, Ahmad H; Suominen, Kirsi; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Tam, Peter; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Tondo, Leonardo; Vieta, Eduard; Vinberg, Maj; Viswanath, Biju; Volkert, Julia; Zetin, Mark; Whybrow, Peter C; Bauer, Michael

    2016-08-30

    There is considerable international interest in online education of patients with bipolar disorder, yet little understanding of how patients use the Internet and other sources to seek information. 1171 patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in 17 countries completed a paper-based, anonymous survey. 81% of the patients used the Internet, a percentage similar to the general public. Older age, less education, and challenges in country telecommunications infrastructure and demographics decreased the odds of using the Internet. About 78% of the Internet users looked online for information on bipolar disorder or 63% of the total sample. More years of education in relation to the country mean, and feeling very confident about managing life decreased the odds of seeking information on bipolar disorder online, while having attended support groups increased the odds. Patients who looked online for information on bipolar disorder consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 2.3 other information sources such as books, physician handouts, and others with bipolar disorder. Patients not using the Internet consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 1.6 other information sources. The percentage of patients with bipolar disorder who use the Internet is about the same as the general public. Other information sources remain important.

  18. Towards Patient-Oriented Diabetes Care: Results from Two KORA Surveys in Southern Germany

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Renée; Meisinger, Christa; Holle, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study aims to examine the relationship of diabetes care processes and patient outcomes with an expanded set of indicators regarding patient-oriented care delivery, such as treatment satisfaction, the quality of patient-physician relationship, and a wider range of patient outcomes such as self-management, health behaviour, disease-related burden, and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Methods. The study population consisted of 486 participants with type 2 diabetes in two population-based follow-up surveys, conducted in 2003 to 2005 and 2006 to 2008 in Southern Germany. Data were self-reported and questionnaire-based, including the SF-12 for HRQL. Multiple regression models were used to identify associations between care processes and outcomes with adjustment for confounders. Results. Frequent medical examinations increased the likelihood of self-monitoring activities, such as foot care. A positive patient experienced relationship with their physician is associated with higher adherence to medical recommendations, such as medication intake, and the score of the SF-12 mental component. Participants with diabetes-related complications reported higher levels of medical examinations and multiprofessional care. Conclusions. Indicators of patient-oriented care should become an indispensable part of diabetes clinical practice guidelines with the aim of striving for more effective support of patients. PMID:25859544

  19. Understanding and Predicting Social Media Use Among Community Health Center Patients: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of social media by health care organizations is growing and provides Web-based tools to connect patients, caregivers, and providers. Objective The aim was to determine the use and factors predicting the use of social media for health care–related purposes among medically underserved primary care patients. Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered to 444 patients of a federally qualified community health center. Results Community health center patients preferred that their providers use email, cell phones for texting, and Facebook and cell phone apps for sharing health information. Significantly more Hispanic than white patients believed their providers should use Facebook (P=.001), YouTube (P=.01), and Twitter (P=.04) for sharing health information. Use and intentions to use social media for health-related purposes were significantly higher for those patients with higher subjective norm scores. Conclusions Understanding use and factors predicting use can increase adoption and utilization of social media for health care–related purposes among underserved patients in community health centers. PMID:25427823

  20. A survey of patients with haemophilia to understand how they track product used at home.

    PubMed

    Sholapur, N S; Barty, R; Wang, G; Almonte, T; Heddle, N M

    2013-09-01

    Record keeping among individuals who manage haemophilia at home is an essential tool of communication between patient and Haemophilia Treatment Center (HTC). Complete records help HTCs monitor patients, their use of factor and ensure treatment is optimal. HTCs provide patients with a number of methods to track infusion practices. The study objectives were to: [1] determine the current methods of record keeping; [2] identify previous methods of record keeping; [3] understand the strengths and weaknesses associated with each method; and [4] gather suggestions for improvement. Survey methods were used to address the research objectives. Of the 83 patients in the Hamilton-Niagara region who received the survey distributed through the local HTC, 51 returned surveys were included into the analysis. Descriptive statistics were used. Results indicate individuals with haemophilia record infusion practices using: paper diaries, excel spreadsheets, hand-held PDAs and/or the online EZ-Log Web Client. The most popular method of record keeping was EZ-Log (45.1%) followed by paper diaries (35.2%). Advantages to using paper methods include the visual tracking of information and retaining hardcopies. The disadvantage was the inconvenience of physically submitting the records monthly. Advantages to using the online EZ-Log Web Client included ease of use and improved accuracy. The primary disadvantage was technical errors that were difficult to troubleshoot. Record keeping practices among individuals with haemophilia seem to vary according to personal preference and convenience. Respondents suggested that saving infusion history, incorporating barcode scanners or a copy and paste function could improve electronic methods.

  1. The Information and Consent Process in Patients undergoing Elective ENT surgery: A cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Georgalas, Christos; Ganesh, Kulandaivelu; Papesch, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Background To assess the importance of different information pathways for patients undergoing elective ENT surgery (General Practitioner, Specialist consultation, pre assessment clinic and consent process as well as printed information material and non medical sources) and to correlate their relative importance with patient and doctor factors Methods – Patients Cross – sectional questionnaire survey 226 consecutive patients undergoing elective non-oncological otolaryngology procedures at a District General Hospital between May and August 2004 Results Overall patients were moderately satisfied with the information they received prior to surgery (score 63/100). Although they were generally satisfied with the quality of information they received at their outpatient consultation and at the preadmission clinic, they were less satisfied with the quality of information provided by their GPs and by the quality of self – obtained information. Most importantly, linear regression modeling showed that the overall level of information could be predicted by three factors: The quality of written information received at the hospital, the quality of self-obtained information and the information provided by the specialist at the time of listing for surgery. While patient's education level was correlated with the information process, the age and gender of the patient as well as the grade of the doctor at the outpatients were not associated with his overall levels of satisfaction. Conclusion Although the impact of the initial outpatient consultation for patients undergoing elective surgery can not be over emphasized, written information provided at the hospital as well as patient – initiated, parallel information pathways are at least as important: It is our duty to recognize them and use them for the patient's advantage. PMID:18798994

  2. Survey on Smoking, Consuming Alcohol, and using Illicit Drugs in Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    YENİ, Naz; TUMAY, Feray; TONGUÇ, Özge; AZAROĞLU, Elvin; BOZOK, Naz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Addiction can be defined as the continuous consumption of addictive substances or repetition of certain behaviors despite adverse consequences. Epilepsy is associated with an increased risk of psychiatric disorders. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no published data regarding addictions in patients with epilepsy. Considering the high incidence of psychopathology, we planned a survey using a self-report questionnaire to study some of the addictive behaviors in patients with epilepsy and in control subjects. Methods Patients from our outpatient epilepsy clinic (n=106) and control subjects (n=96) aged between 18 and 65 years took the 20-question questionnaire that screened for smoking, consuming alcohol, or using other illicit drugs. Results Fifty-three percent of patients with epilepsy were male (n=57) and in the control group, 52% were male (n=50) (p=.062). The mean age was 32.66±2.23 years for patients with epilepsy and 35.70±0.59 years for the control group (p=.810). Mean duration of epilepsy was found to be 14.33±11.26 (1–46) years. Majority of patients with epilepsy (84%) had focal epilepsy. Alcohol intake was found to be significantly lower in patients with epilepsy (p=.0001). There was no difference regarding smoking (p=.530) or using illicit drugs between the groups (p=.262). Smoking cigarettes was lower in new onset epilepsies (<5 years) compared with epilepsies of longer duration (p=.031). Conclusion Recent studies connote to some common substrates in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and addiction. Therefore, we wanted to evaluate some addictive behaviors in patients with epilepsy. Although this study did not show significant differences other than low frequency of alcohol use in patients with epilepsy and low rate of smoking in patients with epilepsy duration of <5 year, further studies among homogeneous epilepsy subgroups with larger scale along with their neuropsychological profiles may still be required. PMID:28360739

  3. A nationwide population-based cross-sectional survey of health-related quality of life in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms in Denmark (MPNhealthSurvey): survey design and characteristics of respondents and nonrespondents

    PubMed Central

    Brochmann, Nana; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Christensen, Anne Illemann; Andersen, Christen Lykkegaard; Juel, Knud; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    Objective The Department of Hematology, Zealand University Hospital, Denmark, and the National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, created the first nationwide, population-based, and the most comprehensive cross-sectional health-related quality of life (HRQoL) survey of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). In Denmark, all MPN patients are treated in public hospitals and treatments received are free of charge for these patients. Therefore, MPN patients receive the best available treatment to the extent of its suitability for them and if they wish to receive the treatment. The aims of this article are to describe the survey design and the characteristics of respondents and nonrespondents. Material and methods Individuals with MPN diagnoses registered in the Danish National Patient Register (NPR) were invited to participate. The registers of the Danish Civil Registration System and Statistics Denmark provided information regarding demographics. The survey contained 120 questions: validated patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires and additional questions addressing lifestyle. Results A total of 4,704 individuals were registered with MPN diagnoses in the NPR of whom 4,236 were eligible for participation and 2,613 (62%) responded. Overall, the respondents covered the broad spectrum of MPN patients, but patients 70–79 years old, living with someone, of a Danish/Western ethnicity, and with a higher level of education exhibited the highest response rate. Conclusion A nationwide, population-based, and comprehensive HRQoL survey of MPN patients in Denmark was undertaken (MPNhealthSurvey). We believe that the respondents broadly represent the MPN population in Denmark. However, the differences between respondents and nonrespondents have to be taken into consideration when examining PROs from the respondents. The results of the investigation of the respondents’ HRQoL in this survey will follow in future articles. PMID:28280390

  4. Treatment outcome in patients with TMD--a survey of 123 patients referred to specialist care.

    PubMed

    Polso, Hanna-Leena; Näpänkangas, Ritva; Raustia, Aune M

    2010-07-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a group of functional disorders of the masticatory system. Signs and symptoms of TMD are very common in different age groups in both genders. Treatment need varies greatly, ranging from 5 to 27% of the population. The treatment of TMD patients is generally initiated using reversible conservative methods and if necessary, irreversible and surgical methods are used. Altogether 123 patients (93 females, 30 males, mean age 39 years, range 12 to 72 years) were referred to the Oral and Maxillofacial Department of Oulu University Hospital between the years 2005 and 2008. The treatment outcome was evaluated using the anamnestic and clinical dysfunction indices of Helkimo, before and after treatment. The results of the study showed that the outcome of the conservative treatment methods of TMD and of surgical treatment, if needed, was beneficial, with a subjectively and clinically statistically significant decrease in signs and symptoms.

  5. Is therapeutic judgement influenced by the patient's socio-economic status? A factorial vignette survey.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Esben Elholm; Morville, Anne-Le; Larsen, Anette Enemark; Hansen, Tina

    2016-07-01

    Background In Denmark patients are entitled to rehabilitation regardless of socio-economic status (SES). During this process therapists have to balance cost effectiveness with providing equal treatment. Aim To investigate whether occupational therapists and physiotherapists were influenced by the patient's SES. Material and method An experimental factorial vignette survey was used. Four different vignettes describing fictitious patient cases with different SES variables were randomly allocated to therapists working in somatic hospitals. Thereafter, the therapists judged specific clinical situations and general attitudes in relation to the patient's SES. Chi-square was used to test the statistical association between the variables. Results No statistically significant associations were found between the specific clinical situations and the patient's SES. A statistical significant association was found between general attitudes and the patient's SES. Subgroup analysis revealed a statistically significant association between the therapist's gender, age, and the therapeutic judgement in relation to SES. Conclusion In the specific clinical situations, Danish therapists seem to maintain their professional ethical principles, although they might face ethical dilemmas during their clinical decision-making. In order to prevent and resolve these dilemmas, they have to be made explicit. However, further research on how SES influences the health care professional's judgement is warranted.

  6. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in hospitalised medically ill patients. The ENDORSE Global Survey.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jean-Francois; Cohen, Alexander T; Tapson, Victor F; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Kakkar, Ajay K; Deslandes, Bruno; Huang, Wei; Anderson, Frederick A

    2010-04-01

    Limited data are available regarding the risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and VTE prophylaxis use in hospitalised medically ill patients. We analysed data from the global ENDORSE survey to evaluate VTE risk and prophylaxis use in this population according to diagnosis, baseline characteristics, and country. Data on patient characteristics, VTE risk, and prophylaxis use were abstracted from hospital charts. VTE risk and prophylaxis use were evaluated according to the 2004 American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify factors associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Data were evaluated for 37,356 hospitalised medical patients across 32 countries. VTE risk varied according to medical diagnosis, from 31.2% of patients with gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary diseases to 100% of patients with acute heart failure, active non-infectious respiratory disease, or pulmonary infection (global rate, 41.5%). Among those at risk for VTE, ACCP-recommended prophylaxis was used in 24.4% haemorrhagic stroke patients and 40-45% of cardiopulmonary disease patients (global rate, 39.5%). Large differences in prophylaxis use were observed among countries. Markers of disease severity, including central venous catheters, mechanical ventilation, and admission to intensive care units, were strongly associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. In conclusion, VTE risk varies according to medical diagnosis. Less than 40% of at-risk hospitalised medical patients receive ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Prophylaxis use appears to be associated with disease severity rather than medical diagnosis. These data support the necessity to improve implementation of available guidelines for evaluating VTE risk and providing prophylaxis to hospitalised medical patients.

  7. Routine Treatment of Cervical Cytological Cell Changes

    PubMed Central

    Huber, J.; Pötsch, B.; Gantschacher, M.; Templ, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diagnosis and treatment of vaginal and cervical cytological cell changes are described in European and national guidelines. The aim of this data collection was to evaluate the remission rates of PAP III and PAP III D cytological findings in patients over a period of 3–4 months. Method: The current state of affairs in managing suspicious and cytological findings (PAP III, and III D) in gynecological practice was assessed in the context of a data collection survey. An evaluation over a period of 24 months was conducted on preventative measures, the occurrence and changes to normal/suspect/pathological findings and therapy management (for suspicious or pathological findings). Results: 307 female patients were included in the analysis. At the time of the survey 186 patients (60.6 %) had PAP III and 119 (38.8 %) had PAP III D findings. The spontaneous remission rate of untreated PAP III patients was 6 % and that of untreated PAP III D patients was 11 %. The remission rates of patients treated with a vaginal gel were 77 % for PAP III and 71 % for PAP III D. Conclusion: A new treatment option was used in gynecological practice on patients with PAP III and PAP III D findings between confirmation and the next follow-up with excellent success. PMID:27761030

  8. Nutrition Screening and Assessment in Hospitalized Patients: A Survey of Current Practice in the United States.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vihas; Romano, Michelle; Corkins, Mark R; DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Earthman, Carrie; Malone, Ainsley; Miller, Sarah; Sabino, Kim; Wooley, Jennifer; Guenter, Peggi

    2014-08-01

    Background: The Joint Commission has mandated universal screening and assessment of hospitalized patients for malnutrition since 1995. Although various validated and nonvalidated tools are available, implementation of this mandate has not been well characterized. We report results of a survey of hospital-based professionals in the United States describing their perspective on the current range of nutrition screening and assessment practices as well as associated gaps in knowledge. Methods and Materials: Data from a 2012-2013 cross-sectional, web-based survey targeting members of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.), the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses, and the Society of Hospital Medicine were collected with non-hospital-based members excluded. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Survey data from 1777 unique email addresses are included in this report. A majority of respondents were dietitians, nearly half were A.S.P.E.N. members, and 69.4% reported caring for a mix of adult and pediatric patients. Most respondents answered affirmatively about nutrition screening being performed in alignment with The Joint Commission mandate, but only 50% were familiar with the 2012 Consensus Statement from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/A.S.P.E.N. on adult malnutrition. In most cases, nurses were primarily responsible for nutrition screening, while dietitians had primary responsibility for assessment. No one specific assessment tool or International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code was identified as being used a majority of the time in assessing or coding a patient for malnutrition. Conclusions: The survey findings affirmed compliance with accreditation standards in completing a nutrition screen within 24 hours of admission, and most hospitals appear to have a process to perform a nutrition assessment once a screen is completed. However, there is considerable heterogeneity in both use of tools and

  9. Should blood donors be routinely screened for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency? A systematic review of clinical studies focusing on patients transfused with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient red cells.

    PubMed

    Renzaho, Andre M N; Husser, Eliette; Polonsky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The risk factors associated with the use of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient blood in transfusion have not yet been well established. Therefore, the aim of this review was to evaluate whether whole blood from healthy G6PD-deficient donors is safe to use for transfusion. The study undertook a systematic review of English articles indexed in COCHRANE, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINHAL, with no date restriction up to March 2013, as well as those included in articles' reference lists and those included in Google Scholar. Inclusion criteria required that studies be randomized controlled trials, case controls, case reports, or prospective clinical series. Data were extracted following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews using a previously piloted form, which included fields for study design, population under study, sample size, study results, limitations, conclusions, and recommendations. The initial search identified 663 potentially relevant articles, of which only 13 studies met the inclusion criteria. The reported effects of G6PD-deficient transfused blood on neonates and children appear to be more deleterious than effects reported on adult patients. In most cases, the rise of total serum bilirubin was abnormal in infants transfused with G6PD-deficient blood from 6 hours up to 60 hours after transfusion. All studies on neonates and children, except one, recommended a routine screening for G6PD deficiency for this at-risk subpopulation because their immature hepatic function potentially makes them less able to handle any excess bilirubin load. It is difficult to make firm clinical conclusions and recommendations given the equivocal results, the lack of standardized evaluation methods to categorize red blood cell units as G6PD deficient (some of which are questionable), and the limited methodological quality and low quality of evidence. Notwithstanding these limitations, based on our review of the available literature, there is little to

  10. Routine outcome measures in Norway: Only partly implemented.

    PubMed

    Ruud, Torleif

    2015-01-01

    Norway has not had any strategy exclusively for the implementation of routine outcome measurement in the mental health services, but some efforts have been made as part of strategies for a national patient register and quality indicators. Fifteen years after the decision to make the rating of the Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF) mandatory at admission and discharge of each treatment episode in adult mental health services, this is still not fully implemented. An unknown and probably very low proportion of mental health services use GAF as a routine outcome measure in everyday clinical practice. Well-established electronic patient records in the mental health services and established procedures for reporting routine data to the National Patient Register should make it possible to collect and use routine outcome data. Implementation of routine outcome measurement in mental health services must be done with due emphasis on the critical steps in the various phases of the implementation process. The regional health authorities have a key role in establishing electronic systems that make relevant outcome measurements available in a seamless way for clinicians as well as for patients, and by contributing to a culture where quality and outcome are valued and given priority.

  11. Routine nasal packing follwoing nasal surgery-Is it necessary?

    PubMed

    Basha, S I; Gupta, D; Kaluskar, S K

    2005-01-01

    The practice of routine nasal packing after nasal surgery is usually customary and not evidence based. Post operative complications, while uncoumon, are sometimes pack related. A retrospective analysis of 110 patients who underwent a variety of nasal operations was performed to determine the incidence of complications when nasal packs were not routinely inserted 9 cases (8.2%) [6 out of these were revision surgeries] needed nasal packing for haemostasis at the end of surgery. 4 cases (3.6%) required to be packed in the immediate post operative period. One patient who required nasal packing developed a unilateral adhesion. No patient developed septal hematoma. The need for routine nasal packing is not supported. Packing should be indicated where there continuous bleeding at.

  12. Hospital-based pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD in Sweden--a national survey.

    PubMed

    Wadell, K; Janaudis Ferreira, T; Arne, M; Lisspers, K; Ställberg, B; Emtner, M

    2013-08-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary and cost-effective intervention that leads to improved health in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD. However, the availability of PR programs varies between and within different countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the availability and content of hospital-based PR programs in patients with COPD in Sweden. A cross-sectional descriptive design was applied using a web-based questionnaire which was sent out to all hospitals in Sweden. The questionnaire consisted of 32 questions that concerned availability and content of PR in patients with COPD during 2011. Seventy out of 71 hospitals responded the electronic survey. Forty-six (66%) hospitals offered PR for patients with COPD. Around 75% of the hospitals in southern and middle parts of Sweden and 33% of the hospitals in the northern part offered PR. Thirty-four percent of the patients declined participation. A total number of 1355 patients participated in PR which represents 0.2% of the COPD population in Sweden. All hospitals had exercise training as major component and 76% offered an educational program. Not even half a percent of the patients with COPD in Sweden took part in a hospital-based PR program during 2011. There was a considerable geographic discrepancy in availability over the country. To enable a greater part of the increasing number of patients with COPD to take part in this evidence-based treatment, there is a need of evaluating other settings of PR programs; in primary care, at home and/or over the internet.

  13. Use of home remedies: a cross-sectional survey of patients in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reliable information regarding patient knowledge of home remedies and the types of health problems patients use them for is scarce. Nevertheless, anecdotal evidence indicates that home remedies are used by patients for managing minor health problems and that this can be sufficient for symptom management while the body recovers from minor health problems. The aim of the presented study was to explore patient use of home remedies in Germany. Methods A questionnaire was developed and pretested in a pilot study phase. The revised questionnaire was comprised of questions about general knowledge and experienced efficiency of home remedies, the use of home remedies for common health problems and socio-demographic data. Patients were recruited via randomly selected addresses of general practitioners (GPs) in three regions of Germany (Heidelberg, Erfurt and Hanover and surrounding areas). The questionnaire was handed out in the waiting area of GP practices. The data was analyzed descriptively. Results 480 of 592 patients from 37 GP practices were included, according to a response rate of 81%. Based on the survey results, home remedies were widely known and used by about 80% of our respondents (on average 22 different home remedies were used per person). The most frequently used home remedies were steam-inhalation, hot lemon drink, honey, chamomile tea and chicken soup. 80% of respondents tried home remedies before pharmaceutical options. Information about home remedies was most commonly gained from family members, rather than from written guides, media or GPs. Conclusions These results provide an initial overview on the use of home remedies from the patient’s perspective in a German context. Bearing in mind the high use of home remedies that was reported by patients in the study, it is highly likely that GPs in Germany may need to advise patients on their use of home remedies during consultations. To this end, given the scarcity of reliable information on home

  14. Understanding patient perspectives on management of their chronic pain – online survey protocol

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Manasi; Vanlint, Simon; Moseley, G Lorimer; Mittinty, Murthy N; Stocks, Nigel

    2017-01-01

    Background It is widely recognized that both doctors and patients report discontent regarding pain management provided and received. The impact of chronic pain on an individual’s life resonates beyond physical and mental suffering; equal or at times even greater impact is observed on an individual’s personal relationships, ability to work, and social interactions. The degree of these effects in each individual varies, mainly because of differences in biological factors, social environment, past experiences, support, and belief systems. Therefore, it is equally possible that these individual patient characteristics could influence their treatment outcome. Research shows that meeting patient expectations is a major challenge for health care systems attempting to provide optimal treatment strategies. However, patient perspectives and expectations in chronic pain management have not been studied extensively. The aim of this study is to investigate the views, perceptions, beliefs, and expectations of individuals who experience chronic pain on a daily basis, and the strategies used by them in managing chronic pain. This paper describes the study protocol to be used in a cross sectional survey of chronic pain patients. Methods and analysis The study population will comprise of individuals aged ≥18 years, who have experienced pain for ≥3 months with no restrictions of sex, ethnicity, or region of residence. Ethics approval for our study was obtained from Humans research ethics committees, University of Adelaide and University of South Australia. Multinomial logistic regression will be used to estimate the effect of duration and character of pain, on patient’s perception of time to recovery and supplement intake. Logistic regression will also be used for estimating the effect of patient-provider relationship and pain education on patient-reported recovery and pain intensity. Discussion Knowledge about the perceptions and beliefs of patients with chronic pain could

  15. The importance of teaching communication in dental education. A survey amongst dentists, students and patients.

    PubMed

    Woelber, J P; Deimling, D; Langenbach, D; Ratka-Krüger, P

    2012-02-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the subjective importance of teaching communication in the dental curriculum by conducting a survey amongst dentists, students and patients. Three questionnaires about communication-related issues were developed in which different questions could be rated on a five-point Likert scale. These questions included the subjective importance of the dental team's friendliness, an elaborated consultation, modern office equipment or the dentist's technical skills. Seven hundred and twenty-nine questionnaires were completed [233 by dentists (32%), 310 by students (43%) and 185 by patients (25%)]. Eighty-seven percentage of the dentists, 84% of the students and 84% of the patients supported an integration of communicational issues in dental education; 94.7% of the dentists and 77.2% of the patients attached vital importance to the dentist-patient relationship regarding the therapeutic outcomes. Dentists with prior communicational training experience would spend significantly (P<0.001) more money for further courses. The results show the publicly perceived importance of integrating aspects of communication in dental education.

  16. Patient safety during radiological examinations: a nationwide survey of residency training hospitals in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang; Lee, San-Kan; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Wan, Yung-Liang; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Cheng, Amy; Chan, Wing P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Variations in radiological examination procedures and patient load lead to variations in standards of care related to patient safety and healthcare quality. To understand the status of safety measures to protect patients undergoing radiological examinations at residency training hospitals in Taiwan, a follow-up survey evaluating the full spectrum of diagnostic radiology procedures was conducted. Design Questionnaires covering 12 patient safety-related themes throughout the examination procedures were mailed to the departments of diagnostic radiology with residency training programmes in 19 medical centres (with >500 beds) and 17 smaller local institutions in Taiwan. After receiving the responses, all themes in 2014 were compared between medical centres and local institutions by using χ2 or 2-sample t-tests. Participants Radiology Directors or Technology Chiefs of medical centres and local institutions in Taiwan participated in this survey by completing and returning the questionnaires. Results The response rates of medical centres and local institutions were 95% and 100%, respectively. As indicated, large medical centres carried out more frequent clinically ordered, radiologist-guided patient education to prepare patients for specific examinations (CT, 28% vs 6%; special procedures, 78% vs 44%) and incident review and analysis (89% vs 47%); however, they required significantly longer access time for MRI examinations (7.00±29.50 vs 3.50±3.50 days), had more yearly incidents of large-volume contrast-medium extravasation (2.75±1.00 vs 1.00±0.75 cases) and blank radiographs (41% vs 8%), lower monthly rates of suboptimal (but interpretable) radiographs (0.00±0.01% vs 0.64±1.84%) and high-risk reminder reporting (0.01±0.16% vs 1.00±1.75%) than local institutions. Conclusions Our study elucidates the status of patient safety in diagnostic radiology in Taiwan, thereby providing helpful information to improve patient safety guidelines needed for

  17. Twitter Social Media is an Effective Tool for Breast Cancer Patient Education and Support: Patient-Reported Outcomes by Survey

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite reported benefits, many women do not attend breast cancer support groups. Abundant online resources for support exist, but information regarding the effectiveness of participation is lacking. We report the results of a Twitter breast cancer support community participant survey. Objective The aim was to determine the effectiveness of social media as a tool for breast cancer patient education and decreasing anxiety. Methods The Breast Cancer Social Media Twitter support community (#BCSM) began in July 2011. Institutional review board approval with a waiver of informed consent was obtained for a deidentified survey that was posted for 2 weeks on Twitter and on the #BCSM blog and Facebook page. Results There were 206 respondents to the survey. In all, 92.7% (191/206) were female. Respondents reported increased knowledge about breast cancer in the following domains: overall knowledge (80.9%, 153/189), survivorship (85.7%, 162/189), metastatic breast cancer (79.4%, 150/189), cancer types and biology (70.9%, 134/189), clinical trials and research (66.1%, 125/189), treatment options (55.6%, 105/189), breast imaging (56.6%, 107/189), genetic testing and risk assessment (53.9%, 102/189), and radiotherapy (43.4%, 82/189). Participation led 31.2% (59/189) to seek a second opinion or bring additional information to the attention of their treatment team and 71.9% (136/189) reported plans to increase their outreach and advocacy efforts as a result of participation. Levels of reported anxiety before and after participation were analyzed: 29 of 43 (67%) patients who initially reported “high or extreme” anxiety reported “low or no” anxiety after participation (P<.001). Also, no patients initially reporting low or no anxiety before participation reported an increase to high or extreme anxiety after participation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that breast cancer patients’ perceived knowledge increases and their anxiety decreases by participation in a

  18. Evaluation of quality-control data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey for routine water-quality activities at the Idaho National Laboratory and vicinity, southeastern Idaho, 2002-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattray, Gordon W.

    2014-01-01

    Quality-control (QC) samples were collected from 2002 through 2008 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, to ensure data robustness by documenting the variability and bias of water-quality data collected at surface-water and groundwater sites at and near the Idaho National Laboratory. QC samples consisted of 139 replicates and 22 blanks (approximately 11 percent of the number of environmental samples collected). Measurements from replicates were used to estimate variability (from field and laboratory procedures and sample heterogeneity), as reproducibility and reliability, of water-quality measurements of radiochemical, inorganic, and organic constituents. Measurements from blanks were used to estimate the potential contamination bias of selected radiochemical and inorganic constituents in water-quality samples, with an emphasis on identifying any cross contamination of samples collected with portable sampling equipment. The reproducibility of water-quality measurements was estimated with calculations of normalized absolute difference for radiochemical constituents and relative standard deviation (RSD) for inorganic and organic constituents. The reliability of water-quality measurements was estimated with pooled RSDs for all constituents. Reproducibility was acceptable for all constituents except dissolved aluminum and total organic carbon. Pooled RSDs were equal to or less than 14 percent for all constituents except for total organic carbon, which had pooled RSDs of 70 percent for the low concentration range and 4.4 percent for the high concentration range. Source-solution and equipment blanks were measured for concentrations of tritium, strontium-90, cesium-137, sodium, chloride, sulfate, and dissolved chromium. Field blanks were measured for the concentration of iodide. No detectable concentrations were measured from the blanks except for strontium-90 in one source solution and one equipment blank collected in September

  19. Internet Communities for Recruitment of Cancer Patients into an Internet Survey: A Discussion Paper

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chee, Wonshik; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Bender, Melinda; Lim, Hyun Ju

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide future directions for the usage of Internet communities (ICs) for recruitment of research participants based on issues raised in an Internet survey among 132 cancer patients. 317 general and 233 ethnic-specific Internet Cancer Support Groups and 1,588 ethnic-specific ICs were contacted to recruit cancer patients. Research staff recorded issues and wrote memos during the recruitment process. The written memos and records were later analyzed using content analysis. The issues included: (a) difficulty in identifying appropriate ICs and potential participants, (b) meta-tags, (c) dominant white and women groups, (d) dynamics inside ICs, (e) difficulty in trust building, and (f) potential selection bias. The findings suggest that researchers thoroughly review the ICs’ information, be recognizant of potential gender and ethnic issues and current trends in Internet interaction, and consider potential selection bias. PMID:16962122

  20. An Italian prospective multicenter survey on patients suspected of having non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is still an undefined syndrome with several unsettled issues despite the increasing awareness of its existence. We carried out a prospective survey on NCGS in Italian centers for the diagnosis of gluten-related disorders, with the aim of defining the clinical picture of this new syndrome and to establish roughly its prevalence compared with celiac disease. Methods From November 2012 to October 2013, 38 Italian centers (27 adult gastroenterology, 5 internal medicine, 4 pediatrics, and 2 allergy) participated in this prospective survey. A questionnaire was used in order to allow uniform and accurate collection of clinical, biochemical, and instrumental data. Results In total, 486 patients with suspected NCGS were identified in this 1-year period. The female/male ratio was 5.4 to 1, and the mean age was 38 years (range 3–81). The clinical picture was characterized by combined gastrointestinal (abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea and/or constipation, nausea, epigastric pain, gastroesophageal reflux, aphthous stomatitis) and systemic manifestations (tiredness, headache, fibromyalgia-like joint/muscle pain, leg or arm numbness, 'foggy mind,' dermatitis or skin rash, depression, anxiety, and anemia). In the large majority of patients, the time lapse between gluten ingestion and the appearance of symptoms varied from a few hours to 1 day. The most frequent associated disorders were irritable bowel syndrome (47%), food intolerance (35%) and IgE-mediated allergy (22%). An associated autoimmune disease was detected in 14% of cases. Regarding family history, 18% of our patients had a relative with celiac disease, but no correlation was found between NCGS and positivity for HLA-DQ2/-DQ8. IgG anti-gliadin antibodies were detected in 25% of the patients tested. Only a proportion of patients underwent duodenal biopsy; for those that did, the biopsies showed normal intestinal mucosa (69%) or mild increase in intraepithelial

  1. The Initiation of Chronic Opioids: A Survey of Chronic Pain Patients.

    PubMed

    Callinan, Catherine E; Neuman, Mark D; Lacy, Kim E; Gabison, Claudia; Ashburn, Michael A

    2016-12-03

    This study reports the results of a researcher-administered survey with 115 patients receiving chronic opioid therapy (>90 days) to obtain information regarding how chronic opioid therapy was started. Chronic opioids were started after surgery (27.0%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 18.5-35.5) or for the treatment of acute injury-related pain (27.0%, 95% CI, 18.5-35.5). Many who initiated opioid therapy after surgery reported postoperative complications (61.3%, 95% CI, 50.8-71.8) and many with injury-related pain reported follow-up corrective surgery (58.1%, 95% CI, 47.5-68.7), which led to the continuation of opioids. A large percentage of patients had concurrent depression (43.5%, 95% CI, 34.0-53.0) and anxiety (23.5%, 95% CI, 15.3-31.7). Many participants had a medical history of aberrant drug-related behavior (32.5%, 95% CI, 23.5-41.5) and self-reported history of addiction (21.7%, 95% CI, 13.7-29.7). Almost one-quarter reported taking opioids for a different indication than that for which opioids were started (95% CI, 26.6-45.0). Patients receiving long-term opioid therapy often transitioned to chronic use after starting opioids for the short-term treatment of postoperative or injury-related pain. It is not evident if a clear decision to continue opioids on a chronic basis was made. This survey provides insight as to how chronic opioid therapy is started, and may suggest opportunities for improved patient selection for opioid therapy.

  2. Questionnaire survey and serum phosphorus levels in maintenance hemodialysis patients switching lanthanum carbonate formulation from chewable tablets to granules.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Itsumi; Yoshizawa, Taku; Kumagai, Junko; Takahashi, Naoko; Tsuchiya, Shinichiro

    2014-06-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey of 79 maintenance hemodialysis patients switching lanthanum carbonate (LC) formulation from chewable tablets to granules, to investigate the compliance and patient preferences of these two formulations. For the number of times chewed when taking chewable tablets, the ratio of patients who responded 10 times or more was 54.4%, who responded four to nine times was 24.1% and who responded three times or less was 8.9%. Thirty-seven patients (46.8%) responded "Granules are easier to take", 22 patients (27.8%) responded "Chewable tablets are easier to take", and 20 patients (25.3%) responded "No difference between formulations." Changes in serum phosphorus (P) levels were also measured for 4 weeks after switching formulation, but no significant differences were observed before and after switching. We think that these questionnaire survey results show the compliance status and the patient needs for LC in the clinical practices.

  3. Radionuclide bone scan, radiographic bone survey, and alkaline phosphatase: studies of limited value in asymptomatic patients with ovarian carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Metler, F.A. Jr.; Christie, J.H.; Crow, N.E. Jr.; Garcia, J.F.; Wicks, J.D.; Bartow, S.A.

    1982-10-15

    Bone scans or skeletal surveys were obtained in 104 patients with ovarian carcinoma. No metastases were identified at staging in the 43 patients with Stage I or II disease. Four patients in the entire series had osseous metastases. Three of the 40 patients with Stage III epithelian ovarian carcinoma has osseous metastases at the time of staging. All of these were Grade III lesions. One Stage I, Grade III patient demonstrated osseous metastases two years after initial diagnosis. None of the four patients with osseous metastases had an elevated alkaline phosphatase; three of the four had bone pain. Based on these results, it is suggested that radiographic bone survey and radionuclide bone scans are not indicated as screening procedures in asymptomatic patients with ovarian carcinoma.

  4. Prevalence of dysfunctional breathing in patients treated for asthma in primary care: cross sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Mike; McKinley, R K; Freeman, Elaine; Foy, Chris

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of dysfunctional breathing in adults with asthma treated in the community. Design Postal questionnaire survey using Nijmegen questionnaire. Setting One general practice with 7033 patients. Participants All adult patients aged 17-65 with diagnosed asthma who were receiving treatment. Main outcome measure Score ⩾23 on Nijmegen questionnaire. Results 227/307 patients returned completed questionnaires; 219 (71.3%) questionnaires were suitable for analysis. 63 participants scored ⩾23. Those scoring ⩾23 were more likely to be female than male (46/132 (35%) v 17/87 (20%), P=0.016) and were younger (mean (SD) age 44.8 (14.7) v 49.0 (13.8, (P=0.05). Patients at different treatment steps of the British Thoracic Society asthma guidelines were affected equally. Conclusions About a third of women and a fifth of men had scores suggestive of dysfunctional breathing. Although further studies are needed to confirm the validity of this screening tool and these findings, these prevalences suggest scope for therapeutic intervention and may explain the anecdotal success of the Buteyko method of treating asthma. What is already known on this topicAbnormal breathing patterns may cause characteristic symptoms and impair quality of lifeEffective interventions exist for dysfunctional breathingDysfunctional breathing has been described in patients attending hospital respiratory clinicsWhat this study adds29% of adults treated for asthma in primary care had symptoms suggestive of dysfunctional breathingAffected patients were more likely to be female and younger, but no differences were found with severity of asthmaSome patients with asthma may benefit from breathing therapy PMID:11337441

  5. The international survey on the management of allergic rhinitis by physicians and patients (ISMAR).

    PubMed

    Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Canonica, Giorgio W; Zaky Helal, Mohamed; Gómez, René Maximiliano; Compalati, Enrico; Zernotti, Mario E; Sanchez-Borges, Mario; Morato Castro, Fabio F; Murrieta Aguttes, Margarita; López-Garcia, Aida; Tadros, Faheem A

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that the prevalence of allergic rhinitis (AR) is rising worldwide. Several reports, in fact, indicate increasing trends in the prevalence of AR especially in developing countries, likely related to the environment and climate changes and the adoption of an urbanized Western lifestyle. The primary objective of the present study was to collect information about management in real-life settings, including a characterization of typical patients' profile referring to physicians, the disease features, the common approaches to diagnostic assessments and therapeutic decisions. This was an international, multicenter, cross-sectional study conducted in adults or children (≥6 years) suffering from rhinitis confirmed by physician's diagnosis for at least one year. The 234 physicians who participated in the study included a total of 2778 patients in Egypt, Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, Iran, Venezuela, Argentina, Israel, Kuwait and United Arab Emirates. It was found that clinical history was the selected tool to diagnose and categorize AR patients (97.1%), with less than half of patients undergoing allergy testing, may be explaining the scarce use of immunotherapy on management of disease. Out of 2776 patients, 93.4% had somehow received a recommendation to avoid allergens and irritant agent exposure. Notably, 91.4% were receiving at least one treatment at the time of the survey, mostly oral antihistamines (79.7%) and intranasal corticosteroids (66.3%). Oral antihistamines, intranasal steroids and decongestants were considered both safe and effective by patients and physicians, preferring oral and nasal route of administration. The ISMAR registry was designed according to the most accepted epidemiological recommendations, and provides interesting information regarding the management of rhinitis from a patient and physician points of view, with many similarities between the participating countries. Further efforts are required to better

  6. Telemedicine and doctor-patient communication: an analytical survey of the literature.

    PubMed

    Miller, E A

    2001-01-01

    The literature about the effect of telemedicine on doctor-patient communication was reviewed. A total of 38 studies were identified: six were surveys of provider and community attitudes; 21 were post-encounter surveys of participants in a medical consultation; and 11 were qualitative analyses of behaviour in a medical encounter. Twenty-one of the 38 investigations originated in the USA, six in the UK, four in Australia, three in Norway, two in Canada, one in Finland and one in Sweden. All were relatively recent. The findings from each study were coded according to 23 categories developed from the literature and a positive or negative rating was assigned to each of the 213 communication results. Approximately 80% of abstracted findings favoured telemedicine, with all but two of the 23 categories analysed (non-verbal behaviour and lack of touch) reporting more positive than negative results. Verbal content analysis is important for the development of interventions aimed at facilitating doctor-patient telecommunication. However, further research is necessary if the nature and content of the communication process are to be fully understood.

  7. Exploring improvements in patient logistics in Dutch hospitals with a survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Research showed that promising approaches such as benchmarking, operations research, lean management and six sigma, could be adopted to improve patient logistics in healthcare. To our knowledge, little research has been conducted to obtain an overview on the use, combination and effects of approaches to improve patient logistics in hospitals. We therefore examined the approaches and tools used to improve patient logistics in Dutch hospitals, the reported effects of these approaches on performance, the applied support structure and the methods used to evaluate the effects. Methods A survey among experts on patient logistics in 94 Dutch hospitals. The survey data were analysed using cross tables. Results Forty-eight percent of all hospitals participated. Ninety-eight percent reported to have used multiple approaches, 39% of them used five or more approaches. Care pathways were the preferred approach by 43% of the hospitals, followed by business process re-engineering and lean six sigma (both 13%). Flowcharts were the most commonly used tool, they were used on a regular basis by 94% of the hospitals. Less than 10% of the hospitals used data envelopment analysis and critical path analysis on a regular basis. Most hospitals (68%) relied on external support for process analyses and education on patient logistics, only 24% had permanent internal training programs on patient logistics. Approximately 50% of the hospitals that evaluated the effects of approaches on efficiency, throughput times and financial results, reported that they had accomplished their goals. Goal accomplishment in general hospitals ranged from 63% to 67%, in academic teaching hospitals from 0% to 50%, and in teaching hospitals from 25% to 44%. More than 86% performed an evaluation, 53% performed a post-intervention measurement. Conclusions Patient logistics appeared to be a rather new subject as most hospitals had not selected a single approach, they relied on external support and they did

  8. Increased financial burden among patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia receiving imatinib in Japan: a retrospective survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The financial burden of medical expenses has been increasing for cancer patients. We investigated the relationship between household income and financial burden among patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) who have been treated with imatinib. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to 1200 patients between May and August 2009. We retrospectively surveyed their household incomes, out-of-pocket medical expenses, final co-payments after refunds, and the perceived financial burden of their medical expenses in 2000, 2005 and 2008. Results A total of 577 patients completed the questionnaire. Their median age was 61 years (range, 15–94). A financial burden was felt by 41.2 % (28 of 68) of the patients treated with imatinib in 2000, 70.8 % (201 of 284) in 2005, and 75.8 % (400 of 528) in 2008. Overall, 182 patients (31.7 %) considered its discontinuation because of the financial burden and 15 (2.6 %) temporarily stopped their imatinib prescription. In 2000, 2005 and 2008, the patients’ median annual household incomes were 49,615 US Dollars (USD), 38,510 USD and 36,731 USD, respectively, with an average currency exchange rate of 104 Yen/USD in 2008. Their median annual out-of-pocket expenses were 11,548, 12,067 and 11,538 USD and their median final annual co-payments were 4,375, 4,327 and 3,558 USD, respectively. Older patients (OR = 0.96, 95 % CI: 0.95–0.98, p ≪ 0.0001 for 1-year increments), and patients with higher household incomes (OR = 0.92, 95 % CI: 0.85–0.99, p = 0.03 for 10,000 USD-increments) were less likely to have considered discontinuing their imatinib treatment. Conversely, patients with higher annual final co-payments (OR = 2.21, 95 % CI: 1.28–4.28, p = 0.004 for 10,000 USD-increments) were more likely to have considered discontinuing their imatinib treatment. Conclusions The proportion of CML patients who sensed a financial burden increased between 2000 and 2008. During this period

  9. Program sustainability: focus on organizational routines.

    PubMed

    Pluye, P; Potvin, L; Denis, J L; Pelletier, J

    2004-12-01

    Program sustainability is an ongoing concern for most people in health promotion. However, the current notion of sustainability in organizations, namely routinization, needs refinement. This article examines organizational routines. In so doing, it refines the notion of sustainability and the assessment of routines. Drawing on the organizational literature, a routinized program is defined by the presence of routinized activities, meaning that these activities exhibit four characteristics of organizational routines: memory, adaptation, values and rules. To answer the question of how these characteristics are useful, we conducted an empirical study of the routinization of the Quebec Heart Health Demonstration Project in five community health centers. Our method consisted of a multiple-case study. We observed project activities in each center in 2000. The data came from documents and interviews with project actors. Our results show that, in one of the centers, no resources had been officially committed to project activities. Even so, the actors continued some activities on an informal basis. In another center, the activities satisfied three of the four routine characteristics. In the three others, activities satisfied all of the characteristics. These results suggest focusing the study of program sustainability on the routinization of activities resulting from it. They indicate four distinct degrees of sustainability: (1) the absence of sustainability; no program activity is continued; (2) precarious sustainability; some residual activities are pursued, at least unofficially; (3) weak sustainability; the program produces some official activities that are not routinized; and (4) sustainability through routinization; routinized activities result from the program.

  10. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...

  11. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...

  12. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...

  13. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...

  14. Evolutionary Dynamics of Digitized Organizational Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Peng

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation explores the effects of increased digitization on the evolutionary dynamics of organizational routines. Do routines become more flexible, or more rigid, as the mix of digital technologies and human actors changes? What are the mechanisms that govern the evolution of routines? The dissertation theorizes about the effects of…

  15. Adiponectin as a routine clinical biomarker.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Ken; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin is a protein synthesized and secreted predominantly by adipocytes into the peripheral blood. However, circulating adiponectin level is inversely related with body weight, especially visceral fat accumulation. The mechanism of this paradoxical relation remains obscure. Low circulating adiponectin concentrations (hypoadiponectinemia; <4 μg/mL) are associated with a variety of diseases, including dysmetabolism (type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, hyperuricemia), atherosclerosis (coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease), sleep apnea, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, gastritis and gastro-esophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel diseases, pancreatitis, osteoporosis, and cancer (endometrial cancer, postmenopausal breast cancer, leukemia, colon cancer, gastric cancer, prostate cancer). On the other hand, hyperadiponectinemia is associated with cardiac, renal and pulmonary diseases. This review article focuses on the significance of adiponectin as a clinical biomarker of obesity-related diseases. Routine measurement of adiponectin in patients with lifestyle-related diseases is highly recommended.

  16. A prospective, multicentre survey on antifungal therapy in neutropenic paediatric haematology patients.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Simone; Pagano, Livio; Caira, Morena; Carraro, Francesca; Luciani, Matteo; Russo, Delia; Colombini, Antonella; Morello, William; Viale, Pierluigi; Rossi, Giuseppe; Tridello, Gloria; Pegoraro, Anna; Nosari, Annamaria; Aversa, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a frequent complication after intensive chemotherapy. The aims of this prospective study were to describe the use of antifungal therapy and to report which strategy was routinely adopted to guide the introduction of antifungal therapy. A total of 321 febrile episodes in 160 paediatric patients affected by acute leukaemia or non-Hodgkin-lymphoma were investigated. Antifungal therapy was used in 100 of 321 febrile episodes (31%), and classified as empiric in 73 episodes, diagnostic-driven in 25 episodes and targeted in 2 episodes. Switching to a second-line antifungal therapy was needed in 28 of 100 episodes (28%) and was classified as empiric in 10 episodes (36%), diagnostic-driven in 17 episodes (61%) and targeted in 1 episode (4%). In 9 of 28 episodes (32%), switching to a third-line antifungal therapy was performed and was classified as empiric in 2 episodes (22%), diagnostic-driven in 6 episodes (67%) and targeted in 1 episode (11%). Invasive fungal infections was reported in 23 of 100 episodes: confirmed in 4 episodes, probable in 8 episodes, and possible in 11 episodes. Attributable mortality was 2.8%. Antifungal therapy was still used mostly empirically, whereas as fever persisted, its modification was guided by a diagnostic-driven approach.

  17. Are Cancer Survivors/Patients Knowledgeable about Osteoporosis? Results from a Survey of 285 Chemotherapy-Treated Cancer Patients and Their Companions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Heidi; Looker, Sherry; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Hayman, Suzanne R.; Kaur, Judith S.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Peethambaram, Prema P.; Stahl, Jean F.; Jatoi, Aminah

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed osteoporosis knowledge deficits among cancer patients and their spouses/partners. Design: Single-institution survey (modified version of the Osteoporosis Knowledge Assessment Tool). Setting: The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Participants: Consecutive chemotherapy-treated cancer patients (n = 285) with their…

  18. [Survey report on end-of-life care for ALS patients of ALS physicians in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Mieko

    2010-11-01

    In March 2009 we sent out the questionnaire to the 4,478 board certified neurologist to ask about the palliative care in ALS. 1,495 anonymous responses (33%) have been returned. 21% of the respondents prescribe morphine, which shows a drastic increase from the 14% in the 2007 survey. However, 77% of them had only less than 5 patients, 47% of them studied and trained themselves. It illustrates that most of the neurologists are not well experienced with morphine, and that they are isolated in practice. However, 47% of the respondents answer that they would prescribe morphine whether or not the national insurance pays. As for the withdrawal of the permanent ventilation, 21% of the respondents were asked by their patients to turn off the ventilation. While 24% of the respondents believe that the withdrawal right not should be promoted, 46% believe that such right should be granted if the decision made by the patient and/or his/her family members can explicitly be recognized. The result illustrates that the physicians are also divided. It may be the time to lay the foundation for the Japanese ALS physicians to discuss openly and candidly together to deal with the wants and wishes of their patients.

  19. Needs of family caregivers of advanced cancer patients: a survey in Shanghai of China.

    PubMed

    Cui, J; Song, L J; Zhou, L J; Meng, H; Zhao, J J

    2014-07-01

    It is important to understand the unmet needs of family caregivers of advanced cancer patients for developing and refining services to address the identified gaps in cancer care. To explore their needs in Chinese mainland and the possible factors associated with their needs, a self-developed questionnaire was used to survey a sample of 649 participants in 15 hospitals of Shanghai. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics, factor analysis, t-test, one-way ANOVA, and Fishers least significant difference t-test. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 13.0. Seven dimensions of needs (maintaining health, support from healthcare professionals, knowledge about the disease and treatment, support on funeral, information on hospice care, psychological support for patients and symptoms control for patients) were extracted from the results by factor analysis. The dimension with the highest score was 'knowledge about the disease and treatment' (4.37), and that with the lowest score named 'support on funeral' (2.85). The results showed that the factors including burden of payment for treatment, former caregiving experience of family caregivers and length of caregiving time were associated with their needs. Cancer services need to consider how to tailor resources and interventions to meet these needs of family caregivers of advanced cancer patients.

  20. Exploring Self-Efficacy in Australian General Practitioners Managing Patient Obesity: A Qualitative Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Ashman, Freya; Sturgiss, Elizabeth; Haesler, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Australian community, and general practitioners (GPs) are commonly approached by patients for assistance in losing weight. Previous studies have shown that GPs have low self-efficacy and low outcome expectation when it comes to managing overweight and obese patients, which affects their willingness to initiate and continue with weight counselling. This qualitative survey study aimed to explore the factors influencing confidence and behaviour in obesity management in GPs. Method. Twelve GPs recruited to deliver a pilot of an obesity management program participated in semistructured interviews, and interpretive analysis underpinned by social cognitive theory was performed on the transcripts. Results. Analysis identified five main themes: (1) perceived knowledge and skills, (2) structure to management approach, (3) the GP-patient relationship, (4) acknowledged barriers to weight loss and lifestyle change, and (5) prior experience and outcome expectation. Conclusions. GPs are likely to welcome tools which provide a more structured approach to obesity management. Shifting away from weight and BMI as sole yardsticks for success or failure and emphasising positive lifestyle changes for their own sake may improve GP self-efficacy and allow for a more authentic GP-patient interaction. PMID:27274872

  1. Practice patterns in the perioperative treatment of patients undergoing septorhinoplasty: a survey of facial plastic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Shadfar, Scott; Deal, Allison M; Jarchow, Andrea M; Yang, Hojin; Shockley, William W

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The common practices used in the perioperative care of patients undergoing septorhinoplasty are diverse and controversial. A consensus statement on the preferred clinical pathway in the perioperative treatment of patients undergoing septorhinoplasty has yet to be approached formally. OBJECTIVES To investigate the perioperative treatment of patients undergoing septorhinoplasty and to identify common practice patterns based on the preferences of leading facial plastic surgeons. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We distributed an online survey to members of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Specifically, fellowship directors and academic contact members were anonymously polled and stratified by the number of septorhinoplasties performed annually. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE A cohesive clinical guide to perioperative treatment after rhinoplasty. RESULTS Of the 92 members surveyed, 67 (73%) successfully completed the survey. The distribution of respondents included 43 academicians (64%) and 24 physicians in private practice (36%). Twenty-eight surgeons (42%) performed fewer than 50 rhinoplasties a year and 39 (58%), more than 50, representing 3510 to 4549 septorhinoplasties in total among respondents. Forty-four surgeons (66%) refrained from using any packing, and 41 (61%) used intranasal splints, with polymeric silicone splints the most popular of these (n = 24 [59%]). Sixty-six surgeons (99%) used external nasal splints, including 49 (74%) who used a thermoplastic splint and 49 (74%) who left the external nasal splint in place for 7 days or longer. The most common postoperative interventions to reduce edema and ecchymosis were elevation of the head of bed by 62 (93%), ice packs by 50 (75%), and Arnica montana by 33 (49%). Only 12 surgeons (18%) used postoperative corticosteroids to reduce edema. Fifty-six respondents (84%) prohibited participation in contact sports until at least 6 weeks after surgery. CONCLUSIONS AND

  2. Why is dental treatment of the gravid patient regarded with caution? When is the appropriate time for care--be it emergent or routine--in the gravid patient?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Baseemah J; Boyce, Ricardo A

    2014-01-01

    There are myths surrounding pregnancy and the oral cavity, such as, "having a baby causes your gums to swell and your teeth to weaken," or "I don't need to see a dentist, there's nothing wrong with my teeth" or "with each child say bye to a tooth or two." All these myths are just that, myths. During pregnancy, women may experience pregnancy gingivitis or may suffer from pre-existing periodontal disease. The myth of tooth loss during pregnancy, according to the ADA (American Dental Association), has "no histological, chemical or radiographic evidence to support [it]". The biggest myth or misconception is that dental care is unnecessary during pregnancy, and until problems arise, some gravid women draw back from seeking dental treatment. Also, professionals sometimes shy away from care of the gravid patient for reasons associated with teratogenicity and fetotoxicity. Teratogenic effects take place from three to eight weeks after conception, and fetotoxicity can occur at the latter end of the initial trimester on to delivery, according to Donaldson and Goodchild, authors of Pregnancy, breast-feeding and drugs used in dentistry in JADA's (The Journal of the American Dental Association) August, 2012 issue. This article includes reasons dental treatment is regarded with caution; therefore, appropriate timing of dental care and suggested clinical recommendations as they relate to the pregnant patient are reviewed.

  3. Carbapenem use in French hospitals: A nationwide survey at the patient level.

    PubMed

    Gauzit, Rémy; Pean, Yves; Alfandari, Serge; Bru, Jean-Pierre; Bedos, Jean-Pierre; Rabaud, Christian; Robert, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of carbapenem use in French healthcare settings in order to guide future actions. Healthcare facilities voluntarily participated in a nationwide cross-sectional survey in 2011. Medical data and reasons for carbapenem treatment (CPR) and discontinuation were recorded for all patients treated with carbapenems. A total of 2338 patients were recorded by 207 facilities. The median duration of CPR was 8 days, and 31.4% of patients received CPR for >10 days. An antibiotic consultant was involved in the initial choice of CPR in 36.8% of cases. CPR was chosen on an empirical (EP) basis for 1229 patients (52.6%), mainly because of severe sepsis (48.6%) or a perceived risk of bacterial resistance (33.7%). Among EP patients, de-escalation was more frequent in the case of intervention of an antibiotic consultant (35.1%) than without intervention (22.9%) (P<0.01). Among the 1109 patients receiving CPR initially based on bacteriological results, 607 (54.7%) had ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and 397 (35.8%) had Gram-negative bacilli susceptible to at least one β-lactam other than carbapenems or to fluoroquinolones. Among the latter, de-escalation was performed in 59 cases (14.9%). The intervention of an antibiotic consultant did not favour de-escalation in this group. In conclusion, carbapenems are frequently used for treating suspected or confirmed multidrug-resistant bacteria, and overall CPR duration is long. De-escalation is frequently not implemented despite isolates being susceptible to other drugs. More frequent antibiotic consultant intervention may help to decrease carbapenem use in the case of EP treatment.

  4. The view of pulmonologists on palliative care for patients with COPD: a survey study

    PubMed Central

    Duenk, RG; Verhagen, C; Dekhuijzen, PNR; Vissers, KCP; Engels, Y; Heijdra, Y

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Early palliative care is not a common practice for patients with COPD. Important barriers are the identification of patients for palliative care and the organization of such care in this patient group. Objective Pulmonologists have a central role in providing good quality palliative care for patients with COPD. To guide future research and develop services, their view on palliative care for these patients was explored. Methods A survey study was performed by the members of the Netherlands Association of Physicians for Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis. Results The 256 respondents (31.8%) covered 85.9% of the hospital organizations in the Netherlands. Most pulmonologists (92.2%) indicated to distinguish a palliative phase in the COPD trajectory, but there was no consensus about the different criteria used for its identification. Aspects of palliative care in COPD considered important were advance care planning conversation (82%), communication between pulmonologist and general practitioner (77%), and identification of the palliative phase (75.8%), while the latter was considered the most important aspect for improvement (67.6%). Pulmonologists indicated to prefer organizing palliative care for hospitalized patients with COPD themselves (55.5%), while 30.9% indicated to prefer cooperation with a specialized palliative care team (SPCT). In the ambulatory setting, a multidisciplinary cooperation between pulmonologist, general practitioner, and a respiratory nurse specialist was preferred (71.1%). Conclusion To encourage pulmonologists to timely initiate palliative care in COPD, we recommend to conduct further research into more specific identification criteria. Furthermore, pulmonologists should improve their skills of palliative care, and the members of the SPCT should be better informed about the management of COPD to improve care during hospitalization. Communication between pulmonologist and general practitioner should be emphasized in training to improve

  5. Global Routine Vaccination Coverage, 2015.

    PubMed

    Casey, Rebecca M; Dumolard, Laure; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Diallo, Mamadou S; Hampton, Lee M; Wallace, Aaron S

    2016-11-18

    In 1974, the World Health Organization (WHO) established the Expanded Program on Immunization* to provide protection against six vaccine-preventable diseases through routine infant immunization (1). Based on 2015 WHO and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) estimates, global coverage with the third dose of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine (DTP3), the first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) and the third dose of polio vaccine (Pol3) has remained stable (84%-86%) since 2010. From 2014 to 2015, estimated global coverage with the second MCV dose (MCV2) increased from 39% to 43% by the end of the second year of life and from 58% to 61% when older age groups were included. Global coverage was higher in 2015 than 2010 for newer or underused vaccines, including rotavirus vaccine, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), rubella vaccine, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine, and 3 doses of hepatitis B (HepB3) vaccine. Coverage estimates varied widely by WHO Region, country, and district; in addition, for the vaccines evaluated (MCV, DTP3, Pol3, HepB3, Hib3), wide disparities were found in coverage by country income classification. Improvements in equity of access are necessary to reach and sustain higher coverage and increase protection from vaccine-preventable diseases for all persons.

  6. Routine CMV screening during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Collinet, P; Subtil, D; Houfflin-Debarge, V; Kacet, N; Dewilde, A; Puech, F

    2004-05-10

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) screening during pregnancy has been widely discussed for several years, but still no consensus has been agreed. With a number of live births of 750,000 per year in France, we would expect 7500 infected infants at birth per year (rate of congenital infection of 1%). Among infected infants at birth, the number of severely infected foetuses would be approximately 75, the number of infants with severe sequelae would be 480, 675 approximately would present with hearing loss and the number of asymptomatic infants would be 6270. Five different preventive methods for congenital CMV infection are possible: (1) Routine CMV screening at the beginning of pregnancy for primary prevention. (2) Secondary prevention by antenatal diagnosis of congenital CMV infection complications. (3) Tertiary prevention by serological testing during pregnancy. (4) Tertiary prevention by serological screening at birth. (5) Tertiary prevention: Hearing loss screening at birth. The aims of this review are to define the advantages and disadvantages of these different methods of CMV screening during pregnancy and to determine if the current available information would make systematic testing acceptable.

  7. Taking a new biomarker into routine use – A perspective from the routine clinical biochemistry laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Sturgeon, Catharine; Hill, Robert; Hortin, Glen L; Thompson, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing pressure to provide cost-effective healthcare based on “best practice.” Consequently, new biomarkers are only likely to be introduced into routine clinical biochemistry departments if they are supported by a strong evidence base and if the results will improve patient management and outcome. This requires convincing evidence of the benefits of introducing the new test, ideally reflected in fewer hospital admissions, fewer additional investigations and/or fewer clinic visits. Carefully designed audit and cost-benefit studies in relevant patient groups must demonstrate that introducing the biomarker delivers an improved and more effective clinical pathway. From the laboratory perspective, pre-analytical requirements must be thoroughly investigated at an early stage. Good stability of the biomarker in relevant physiological matrices is essential to avoid the need for special processing. Absence of specific timing requirements for sampling and knowledge of the effect of medications that might be used to treat the patients in whom the biomarker will be measured is also highly desirable. Analytically, automation is essential in modern high-throughput clinical laboratories. Assays must therefore be robust, fulfilling standard requirements for linearity on dilution, precision and reproducibility, both within- and between-run. Provision of measurements by a limited number of specialized reference laboratories may be most appropriate, especially when a new biomarker is first introduced into routine practice. PMID:21137030

  8. Comparing hospital staff and patient perceptions of customer service: a pilot study utilizing survey and focus group data.

    PubMed

    Fottler, Myron D; Dickson, Duncan; Ford, Robert C; Bradley, Kenneth; Johnson, Lee

    2006-02-01

    The measurement of patient satisfaction is crucial to enhancing customer service and competitive advantage in the health-care industry. While there are numerous approaches to such measurement, this paper provides a case study which compares and contrasts patient and staff perceptions of customer service using both survey and focus group data. Results indicate that there is a high degree of correlation between staff and patient perceptions of customer service based on both survey and focus group data. However, the staff and patient subgroups also provided complementary information regarding patient perceptions of their service experience. Staff members tended to have more negative perceptions of service attributes than did the patients themselves. The focus group results provide complementary information to survey results in terms of greater detail and more managerially relevant information. While these results are derived from a pilot study, they suggest that diversification of data sources beyond patient surveys may enhance the utility of customer service information. If further research can affirm these findings, they create exciting possibilities for gathering valid, reliable and cost-effective customer service information.

  9. Survey of Sleep Status and its Related Factors among Hospitalized Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Javadi, Nazila; Darvishpour, Azar; Mehrdad, Neda; Lakeh, Nasrin Mokhtari

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Sleep disorders among heart failure (HF) patients negatively influence the quality of life. Awareness of sleep disturbances, as one of the disturbing factors of the quality of life among HF patients, and its related factors would help health care staff to provide more comprehensive care. Hence, this study was conducted to determine the quality of sleep and its related factors in hospitalized patients with HF. Methods: This cross-sectional survey study was conducted on 240 patients with HF hospitalized in one of the health centers of Guilan University of Medical Sciences between July and December 2013. Samples were selected by convenience sampling. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and a researcher-designed questionnaire on sleep disturbing factors were the instruments of this study. The correlation and relationship between sleep quality and variables related to personal, environmental, and disease factors were assessed. Results: The majority of the samples (91.2%) had a poor sleep quality. A significant positive correlation was found between sleep quality and age (r = 0.322; p value < 0.001), body mass index (r = 0.212; p value < 0.001), number of comorbidities (r = 0.205; p value = 0.001), number of hospitalizations (r = 0.202; p value < 0.001), number of drugs consumed (r = 0.178; p value = 0.003), and length of stay in hospital (r = 0.149; p value = 0.011). Also, significant differences were seen between sleep quality and sex (p value = 0.014), smoking (p value = 0.038), educational level (p value = 0. 047), and hospital noise (p value = 0. 004). Conclusion: Age, sex, educational level, smoking, and obesity were the most significant factors affecting the sleep quality in our HF patients. PMID:26157458

  10. [Report of a study concerning carry-over in epilepsy patients: questionnaire survey of neurologists].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masako; Watanabe, Yutaka; Murata, Yoshiko; Taniguchi, Go; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey on 7,500 members of the Societas Neurologica Japonica regarding the carry-over from pediatric to adult epilepsy care. The response rate was 16.9%. Analysis of the responses showed that 46% of the neurologists were aware of the term "carry-over" in epilepsy care, and 78% felt difficulties with epilepsy care in general. The most common reasons included "not familiar with interpreting EEG" and "not familiar with the laws, regulations and medical and welfare systems specific to epilepsy". Among the neurologists who felt difficulties when accepting epilepsy patients aged 20 years or older referred from the pediatric department, 68% had experienced accepting these patients. The two major reasons for feeling difficulties when accepting these patients were "difficult to have good understanding of the disease course from infancy" and "not familiar with the epilepsy syndrome specific to infancy". The above findings highlight the importance of recognizing the existence of the issue of carry-over in adult epilepsy care and its significance, and to resolve the factors that hinder the transition of care. To achieve this goal, joint activities of the Japanese Society of Child Neurology and the Japan Epilepsy Society in collaboration with the Societas Neurologica Japonica, the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology, and the Japan Neurosurgical Society are critical.

  11. Use of herbal remedies by multiple sclerosis patients: a nation-wide survey in Italy.

    PubMed

    Loraschi, A; Bellantonio, P; Bortolon, F; Capra, R; Cavalla, P; Costantino, G; Lugaresi, A; Martinelli, V; Marrosu, M G; Patti, F; Rottoli, M; Salvetti, M; Sola, P; Solaro, C; Klersy, C; Marino, F; Zaffaroni, M; Cosentino, M

    2016-04-01

    Though recent progress in multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment is remarkable, numerous unmet needs remain to be addressed often inducing patients to look for complementary and alternative medicines (CAM), especially herbal remedies (HR). HR use, scarcely investigated in MS, may cause adverse reactions (AR) and interfere with conventional treatment. We performed a survey aimed at evaluating use and attitudes towards HR and factor associated to HR use. Other CAM use and attitudes have been investigated as well. Multiple-choice questionnaires were distributed to MS out patients attending 14 Italian referral Centers. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify HR use determinants. Present/past HR use for either MS or other diseases was reported in 35.6 % of 2419 cases (95 % CI 36.0-40.0 %). CAM use was reported in 42.5 % of cases. Independent predictors of HR use were represented by higher education, geographic area, dissatisfaction with conventional treatment of diseases other than MS and benefit perception from CAM use. Both HR and CAM use were not always disclosed to the healthcare professional. In conclusion, HR and other CAM appear to be popular among MS patients. The involvement of the healthcare professionals appears to be scarce with potential risk of AR or interference with conventional treatments.

  12. Correlation of anxiety and depression symptoms in patients with restless legs syndrome: a population based survey

    PubMed Central

    Sevim, S; Dogu, O; Kaleagasi, H; Aral, M; Metin, O; Camdeviren, H

    2004-01-01

    Background and objectives: Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is an important and common cause of insomnia, and previous studies indicate that psychiatric wellbeing may be impaired among RLS patients. We aimed to investigate the interaction between anxiety/depression and RLS in a population based survey. Methods: Data were drawn from the Mersin University Neuro-Epidemiology Project, a representative community sample of adults aged over 17 years residing in Mersin (n = 3234). Subjects found to be positive for RLS (n = 103) were evaluated for symptoms of anxiety and depression using the Hamilton Anxiety and Depression Scales and compared with the same number of contemporaneous control subjects. Results: Significantly greater anxiety and depression symptoms were observed among patients with RLS than in the control subjects. Our data also seem to provide initial evidence of a correlation between the severity of RLS and of anxiety and depression symptoms (r = 0.21, p = 0.03 and r = 0.201, p = 0.04 respectively). Conclusions: Assessment of psychiatric status of RLS patients can be helpful and sometimes necessary to determine additional features and treatment strategies of this bothering condition. Further studies are needed to replicate our findings using longitudinal data. PMID:14742594

  13. Cyclophosphamide administration routine in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Teles, Kaian Amorim; Medeiros-Souza, Patrícia; Lima, Francisco Aires Correa; Araújo, Bruno Gedeon de; Lima, Rodrigo Aires Correa

    2016-09-17

    Cyclophosphamide (CPM) is an alkylating agent widely used for the treatment of malignant neoplasia and which can be used in the treatment of multiple rheumatic diseases. Medication administration errors may lead to its reduced efficacy or increased drug toxicity. Many errors occur in the administration of injectable drugs. The present study aimed at structuring a routine for cyclophosphamide use, as well as creating a document with pharmacotherapeutic guidelines for the patient. The routine is schematized in three phases: pre-chemotherapy (pre-ChT), administration of cyclophosphamide, and post-chemotherapy (post-ChT), taking into account the drugs to be administered before and after cyclophosphamide in order to prevent adverse effects, including nausea and hemorrhagic cystitis. Adverse reactions can alter laboratory tests; thus, this routine included clinical management for changes in white blood cells, platelets, neutrophils, and sodium, including cyclophosphamide dose adjustment in the case of kidney disease. Cyclophosphamide is responsible for other rare-but serious-side effects, for instance, hepatotoxicity, severe hyponatremia and heart failure. Other adverse reactions include hair loss, amenorrhea and menopause. In this routine, we also entered guidelines to post-chemotherapy patients. The compatibility of injectable drugs with the vehicle used has been described, as well as stability and infusion times. The routine aimed at the rational use of cyclophosphamide, with prevention of adverse events and relapse episodes, factors that may burden the health care system.

  14. Continuing to Confront COPD International Surveys: comparison of patient and physician perceptions about COPD risk and management

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Ana M; Landis, Sarah H; Han, MeiLan K; Muellerova, Hana; Aisanov, Zaurbek; van der Molen, Thys; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Ichinose, Masakazu; Mannino, David M; Davis, Kourtney J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Using data from the Continuing to Confront COPD International Physician and Patient Surveys, this paper describes physicians’ attitudes and beliefs regarding chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) prognosis, and compares physician and patient perceptions with respect to COPD. Methods In 12 countries worldwide, 4,343 patients with COPD were identified through systematic screening of population samples, and 1,307 physicians who regularly saw patients with COPD were sampled from in-country professional databases. Both patients and physicians completed surveys about their COPD knowledge, beliefs, and perceptions; physicians answered further questions about diagnostic methods and treatment choices for COPD. Results Most physicians (79%) responded that the long-term health outlook for patients with COPD has improved over the past decade, largely attributed to the introduction of better medications. However, patient access to medication remains an issue in many countries, and some physicians (39%) and patients (46%) agreed/strongly agreed with the statement “there are no truly effective treatments for COPD”. There was strong concordance between physicians and patients regarding COPD management practices, including the use of spirometry (86% of physicians and 76% of patients reporting they used/had undergone a spirometry test) and smoking cessation counseling (76% of physicians reported they counseled their smoking patients at every clinic visit, and 71% of smoking patients stated that they had received counseling in the past year). However, the groups differed in their perception about the role of smoking in COPD, with 78% of physicians versus 38% of patients strongly agreeing with the statement “smoking is the cause of most cases of COPD”. Conclusion The Continuing to Confront COPD International Surveys demonstrate that while physicians and patients largely agreed about COPD management practices and the need for more effective treatments for COPD

  15. Asymptomatic Gastric Band Erosion Detected during Routine Gastroduodenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Gee Young; Kim, Woo Sub; Kim, Hye Jin; Kang, Sun Hyung; Moon, Hee Seok; Sung, Jae Kyu; Jeong, Hyun Yong

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of gastric band erosion has decreased to 1%. Gastric band erosion can manifest with various clinical symptoms, although some patients remain asymptomatic. We present a case of a mostly asymptomatic patient who was diagnosed with gastric band erosion during a routine health check-up. A 32-year-old man without any underlying diseases except for non-alcoholic fatty liver underwent laparoscopic adjustable gastric band surgery in 2010. He had no significant complications postoperatively. He underwent routine health check-ups with near-normal gastroduodenoscopic findings through 2014. However, in 2015, routine gastroduodenoscopy showed that the gastric band had eroded into the stomach. His gastric band was removed laparoscopically, and the remaining gastric ulcer perforation was repaired using an omental patch. Due to the early diagnosis, the infection was not serious. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 3 with oral antibiotics. This patient was fortunately diagnosed early by virtue of a routine health check-up; thus, eliminating the possibility of serious complications. PMID:26867553

  16. Patterns of Technology Use in Patients Attending a Cardiopulmonary Outpatient Clinic: A Self-Report Survey

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-management education for cardiopulmonary diseases is primarily provided through time-limited, face-to-face programs, with access limited to a small percentage of patients. Telecommunication tools will increasingly be an important component of future health care delivery. Objective The purpose of this study was to describe the patterns of technology use in patients attending a cardiopulmonary clinic in an academic medical center. Methods A prevalence survey was developed to collect data on participant demographics (age in years, sex, and socioeconomic status); access to computers, Internet, and mobile phones; and use of current online health support sites or programs. Surveys were offered by reception staff to all patients attending the outpatient clinic. Results A total of 123 surveys were collected between March and April 2014. Technological devices were a pervasive part of everyday life with respondents engaged in regular computer (102/123, 82.9%), mobile telephone (115/117, 98.3%), and Internet (104/121, 86.0%) use. Emailing (101/121, 83.4%), researching and reading news articles (93/121, 76.9%), social media (71/121, 58.7%), and day-to-day activities (65/121, 53.7%) were the most common telecommunication activities. The majority of respondents reported that access to health support programs and assistance through the Internet (82/111, 73.9%) would be of use, with benefits reported as better understanding of health information (16/111, 22.5%), avoidance of difficult travel requirements and time-consuming face-to-face appointments (13/111, 18.3%), convenient and easily accessible help and information (12/111, 16.9%), and access to peer support and sharing (9/111, 12.7%). The majority of patients did not have concerns over participating in the online environment (87/111, 78.4%); the few concerns noted related to privacy and security (10/15), information accuracy (2/15), and computer literacy and access (2/15). Conclusions Chronic disease burden and

  17. A survey of celiac-sprue patients: effect of dietary restrictions on religious practices.

    PubMed

    Bentley, A C

    1988-01-01

    Celiac-Sprue Disease, also referred to as Non-Tropical Sprue, is a dietary disease. Celiac-Sprue patients were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding the effect of dietary restrictions on participation in the Passover meal and reception of Communion. A pilot study suggested that subjects made changes in their religious practices because of dietary restrictions. A second, more detailed survey, was performed in which 58 subjects participated and 14 religions were represented. The results indicated that many subjects made changes in their religious practices (p less than .01), made changes on their own initiative (p less than .01), or violated diet prescribed for the disease under the religious setting versus other settings (p less than .05).

  18. [Documentation of electronic patient records (EPRS) in German general practices: a telephone survey].

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Regine; Himmel, Wolfgang; Böckmann, Harro; Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Kochen, Michael M; Niebling, Wilhelm; Rogausch, Anja; Sigle, Jörg; Wetzel, Dirk; Scheidt-Nave, Christa

    2005-01-01

    In Germany, use and contents of EPRs are largely unknown and expected to be highly variable, due to missing standards. We conducted a telephone survey to describe and compare computer documentation habits in general practices. Specifically, we were interested in: (1) the type of medical data recorded; and (2) which factors influence the extent to which doctors used the EPR while seeing their patients. The sampling frame consisted of family physicians participating in a general practice research project: 32% (145/452) of family physicians in the district of Göttingen, Lower Saxony, and 63% (52/83) of physicians from a quality assurance network of family practices in the district of Freiburg, Baden-Württemberg. With the exception of two practices in Göttingen, all practices (n = 165 of 167) took part in this survey. Diagnoses, digital codes for service fees, and prescriptions were computerized in nearly all practices, although doctors were significantly more involved in Freiburg than in Göttingen. Clinical symptoms and findings were recorded in 80% of Freiburg and 52% of Göttingen practices (p = 0.008). Overall, in 74% of Freiburg and 51% of Göttingen practices, the physicians opened the EPR while seeing patients (p = 0.022). Nearly half of the Göttingen practices (49%) and 24% of the Freiburg practices (p < 0.05) entered digital codes for service fees and diagnoses on paper before entering them electronically. In multivariate models adjusting for sex, target group and training specialty, internet access in the office was independently predictive of 'EPR-activity' (OR: 2.23; 95%-confidence interval: 1.12-4.43). There seems to be room for improvement in terms of degree and intensity of recording of clinically-relevant data. Technical interest, i.e., internet access in the office, seems to enhance electronic documentation activities.

  19. Current attitudes to total hip replacement in the younger patient: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Tennent, T D; Goddard, N J

    2000-01-01

    A postal questionnaire was sent to all practicing consultant orthopaedic surgeons in the UK seeking information regarding their usual total hip replacement practice, the age at which they would define a patient as falling into the 'young hip group' and whether this might modify their practice. In particular, in the 'younger' age group, we were interested in the frequency of usage of uncemented implants, the choice of implant and the bearing surfaces. Of 1242 surgeons surveyed, we had a response from 935 who currently undertake total hip arthroplasty. Their responses confirm that approximately 60,645 total hip replacements are performed annually in the UK of which 9,376 are performed in the younger age group (mean age 57.5 years). As with our previous survey, the most popular prosthesis in the 'older' age group overall was the Charnley (51%) followed by the Exeter (15%). These implants also proved to be the most popular in the 'younger' age group (40% Charnley, 18% Exeter), with 75% of surgeons choosing a cemented stem, and 65% also opting to cement the socket. 23% of surgeons used hydroxy-apatite coated implants on both the femoral and acetabular sides of the joint. Stainless steel remained the most popular choice of femoral head bearing surface (42%) followed by chrome-cobalt (33%) and ceramic (25%). On the acetabular side, high density polyethylene predominated--accounting for 95%, with only 3% using chrome cobalt and 2% ceramic. There would appear to be a remarkably conservative attitude among British surgeons, the majority of whom prefer to stick with tried and tested cemented femoral implants when dealing with the younger patient. There are a small number of uncemented acetabulae and the hybrid configuration. Hydroxy-apatite coatings seem to be the most popular choice for the non-cemented prostheses. Ceramic femoral heads are used more frequently than the ceramic acetabular bearing, and equally metal/metal bearings remain infrequently used.

  20. Attributes of Non-Hispanic Blacks That Use Chiropractic Health Care: A Survey of Patients in Texas and Louisiana

    PubMed Central

    Ward, John; Humphries, Kelley; Coats, Jesse; Whitfield, Paige

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to describe non-Hispanic blacks that use chiropractic health care to better understand this underserved demographic. Methods E-mail and telephone calls were used to recruit doctors of chiropractic (DCs) in Texas and Louisiana to distribute anonymous surveys to their non-Hispanic black patients. Twenty doctors volunteered to participate. Each was sent 10 surveys and self-addressed envelopes to distribute. All doctors were given at least 3 months to distribute surveys to as many non-Hispanic black patients that they had. The survey contained 20 questions designed to develop a profile of non-Hispanic black patients that used chiropractic care. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize demographic and other patient attributes. Results Two-hundred surveys were distributed and 44 were completed, yielding a response rate of 22%. Non-Hispanic black patients were more likely to be female (54.5%), be older than 50 years (56.8%), be a college graduate (59.1%), be employed (61.9%), report not receiving public assistance in the past 5 years (81.4%), report a household income of $20 000 to $60 000 a year (48.8%), and born in the United States (83.7%). Participants reported that there was a DC within 30 minutes of their address (81.4%), their DC always explained things to them in an easy-to-understand manner (81.8%), their DC always showed respect for what they had to say (88.6%), and their DC always cared about them as a person (86.4%). Conclusions In the sample surveyed, non-Hispanic black patients tended to be female, be older, be college educated, be employed, and have a positive viewpoint on their interactions with their DC. PMID:26693213

  1. Screening for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy in patients with diabetes: a nationwide survey in Korea.

    PubMed

    Byun, Sang-Ho; Ma, Seung Hyun; Jun, Jae Kwan; Jung, Kyu-Won; Park, Boyoung

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to identify factors associated with screening for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy. Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2007 and 2009 were analyzed. Of 24,871 participants, 1,288 patients diagnosed with diabetes at ≥30 years of age were included. 36.3% received screening for diabetic retinopathy, and 40.5% received screening for diabetic nephropathy during the previous year. Patients living in rural areas, those with less education, those who had not received education about diabetes care, and those who did not receive medical care for diabetes were screened less often for retinopathy or nephropathy. Patients with poorer self-reported health status were screened more often. Occupation, smoking status, and diabetes duration were associated with retinopathy screening. Lower family income was associated with decreased nephropathy screening. Receiving education about diabetes care and receiving medical care for diabetes were significant factors in patients with a shorter duration of diabetes (the significant odds ratio [OR] of not receiving education varied between 0.27 and 0.51, and that of not receiving medical care varied between 0.34 and 0.42). Sociodemographic factors and health-related factors as well as education and medical care influenced screening for diabetic complications among those with a longer duration of diabetes (for retinopathy and nephropathy, the significant OR of living in a rural area varied between 0.56 and 0.61; for retinopathy, the significant OR of current smokers was 0.55, and the p-trend of subjective health status was <0.001; for nephropathy, the significant OR of a monthly household income of <3000 dollars was 0.61 and the p-trends of education and subjective health status were 0.030 and 0.007, respectively). Efforts to decrease sociodemographic disparities should be combined with education about diabetes care to increase the screening, especially for those with a

  2. Cost effectiveness of routine duodenal biopsies in iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Broide, Efrat; Matalon, Shay; Kriger-Sharabi, Ofra; Richter, Vered; Shirin, Haim; Leshno, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the cost effectiveness of routine small bowel biopsies (SBBs) in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) independent of their celiac disease (CD) serology test results. METHODS We used a state transition Markov model. Two strategies were compared: routine SBBs during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in all patients with IDA regardless their celiac serology status (strategy A) vs SBBs only in IDA patients with positive serology (strategy B). The main outcomes were quality adjusted life years (QALY), average cost and the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER). One way sensitivity analysis was performed on all variables and two way sensitivity analysis on selected variables were done. In order to validate the results, a Monte Carlo simulation of 100 sample trials with 10, and an acceptability curve were performed. RESULTS Strategy A of routine SBBs yielded 19.888 QALYs with a cost of $218.10 compared to 19.887 QALYs and $234.17 in strategy B. In terms of cost-effectiveness, strategy A was the dominant strategy, as long as the cost of SBBs stayed less than $67. In addition, the ICER of strategy A was preferable, providing the cost of biopsy stays under $77. Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that strategy A yielded the same QALY but with lower costs than strategy B. CONCLUSION Our model suggests that EGD with routine SBBs is a cost-effective approach with improved QALYs in patients with IDA when the prevalence of CD is 5% or greater. SBBs should be a routine screening tool for CD among patients with IDA, regardless of their celiac antibody status. PMID:27678365

  3. Survey of a community-based infusion program for Australian patients with rheumatoid arthritis requiring treatment with tocilizumab: patient characteristics and drivers of patient satisfaction and patient-perceived benefits and concerns

    PubMed Central

    Voight, Louisa

    2012-01-01

    Background Tocilizumab is an effective therapy for patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis that is administered by infusion over one hour every 4 weeks. The community-based infusion (ACTiv) program was introduced to Australia in August 2010 to provide accessible and convenient treatment for patients with rheumatoid arthritis who require tocilizumab. The primary objectives of this study were to determine the characteristics of patients in the ACTiv program, patient satisfaction, and patient-perceived benefits and concerns with the ACTiv program, and drivers of patient satisfaction and patient-perceived benefits and concerns. Methods A voluntary self-administered survey was given to all 608 patients in the ACTiv program between January 27, 2011 and March 31, 2011. Results A total of 351 surveys were returned completed, giving a response rate of 58% (351/608). Most patients in the ACTiv program were women aged 40–64 years, with a mean disease duration of 13.7 years and moderate disability, who had been in the ACTiv program for ≥5 months. Most patients (88%, 302/342) were either very satisfied or satisfied with the ACTiv program and believed that they were very unlikely or somewhat unlikely to switch from the ACTiv program (64%, 214/335). The most important benefit was the reassurance of receiving treatment from a trained nurse in a professional medical environment (33%, 102/309). The most important concern was the fear of side effects (48%, 134/280). The main drivers of patient satisfaction and patient-perceived benefits and concerns of patients were health profile, previous medication experience, and length of treatment time in the program. Conclusion The ACTiv program is used by patients of various ages, family life situations, and locations. Patient satisfaction with the program is high, which enables patients to benefit from long-term use of tocilizumab. PMID:22563239

  4. [Results of routine intraoperative cholangiography].

    PubMed

    Klima, S; Schyra, B

    1999-01-01

    Most bile duct injuries result from an incorrect interpretation of bile duct anatomy. In 500 laparoscopic cholecystectomies we used a modified technique of cholecystcholangiography. This method is very easy and needs only 5 minutes. We found variants of bile duct anatomy in 74 cases and occult bile duct stones in 20 patients. We recommend this method which decreases the risk of bile duct injuries and gives the opportunity to approximate the golden standard of conventional cholecystectomy.

  5. Review of the Literature on Survey Instruments Used to Collect Data on Hospital Patients' Perceptions of Care

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Nicholas G; Brown, Julie; Hepner, Kimberly A; Hays, Ron D

    2005-01-01

    Objective To review the existing literature (1980–2003) on survey instruments used to collect data on patients' perceptions of hospital care. Study Design Eight literature databases were searched (PubMED, MEDLINE Pro, MEDSCAPE, MEDLINEplus, MDX Health, CINAHL, ERIC, and JSTOR). We undertook 51 searches with each of the eight databases, for a total of 408 searches. The abstracts for each of the identified publications were examined to determine their applicability for review. Methods of Analysis For each instrument used to collect information on patient perceptions of hospital care we provide descriptive information, instrument content, implementation characteristics, and psychometric performance characteristics. Principal Findings The number of institutional settings and patients used in evaluating patient perceptions of hospital care varied greatly. The majority of survey instruments were administered by mail. Response rates varied widely from very low to relatively high. Most studies provided limited information on the psychometric properties of the instruments. Conclusions Our review reveals a diversity of survey instruments used in assessing patient perceptions of hospital care. We conclude that it would be beneficial to use a standardized survey instrument, along with standardization of the sampling, administration protocol, and mode of administration. PMID:16316435

  6. Patient-centered Communication survey of nursing homes and rehabilitation centers.

    PubMed

    Skinder-Meredith, Amy; Bye, Lynn; Bulthuis, Kari; Schueller, Angie

    2007-01-01

    A surge of research has recently been published on the importance ofpatient-centered communication (P-CC). However, patients with communication disorders are rarely considered in these discussions. Health care workers in long-term care facilities (L-TCFs) and rehabilitation centers were surveyed in order to: (1) assess the level of P-CC used with people with communication disorders versus those without communication disorders; (2) identify the tools and strategies currently used by health care providers in long-term care facilities and rehabilitation centers to enhance P-CC with people with communication disorders; (3) assess the perceived level of efectiveness of these tools and strategies; and (4) identify the tools desired by health care providers in these settings. The results regarding P-CC levels were fairly consistent across settings. Health care providers reported that they achieve slightly higher P-CC with patients without communication disorders than with those with communication disorders. Respondents in both settings used similar tools and strategies, but the reported level of effectiveness varied greatly between the two settings, with rehabilitation centers indicating better success than L-TCFs. Interestingly, rehabilitation center respondents were more interested in obtaining additional tools than were L-TCF respondents, but the types of tools desired were similar.

  7. [Treated patients in survey: High satisfaction with botulinum toxin in palmar hyperhidrosis].

    PubMed

    Deebaj, Richard; Emtestam, Lennart; Lundeberg, Lena; Brandin Samuelsson, Karin; Girnita, Ada

    2015-01-27

    When debilitating, hyperhidrosis can be seen as a disease and not just as a symptom. It is most often a primary condition but can be secondary to other diseases. Aluminum chloride products are the initial treatment modality for palmar hyperhidrosis followed by anticholinergics, iontophoresis and botulinum toxin. The Dermatology Department of the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden treated 151 patients at 289 visits with botulinum toxin for palmar hyperhidrosis during a two year period (2012-2013). It was found that botulinum toxin had good effect, which lasted between two and five months in 72% of cases. Muscle weakness (pincer grip) was reported at 41% of return visits and was present for less than one to four weeks in 62% of cases. At 56% of return visits, no side effects of botulinum toxin were reported. 90% of patients surveyed thought that botulinum toxin worked well or very well for their condition and 99% valued the treatment they received at the clinic as good to excellent.

  8. Iron overload patients with unknown etiology from national survey in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Katsuya; Hatayama, Mayumi; Addo, Lynda; Toki, Yasumichi; Sasaki, Katsunori; Tatsumi, Yasuaki; Hattori, Ai; Kato, Ayako; Kato, Koichi; Hayashi, Hisao; Suzuki, Takahiro; Kobune, Masayoshi; Tsutsui, Miyuki; Gotoh, Akihiko; Aota, Yasuo; Matsuura, Motoo; Hamada, Yuzuru; Tokuda, Takahiro; Komatsu, Norio; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2017-03-01

    Transfusion is believed to be the main cause of iron overload in Japan. A nationwide survey on post-transfusional iron overload subsequently led to the establishment of guidelines for iron chelation therapy in this country. To date, however, detailed clinical information on the entire iron overload population in Japan has not been fully investigated. In the present study, we obtained and studied detailed clinical information on the iron overload patient population in Japan. Of 1109 iron overload cases, 93.1% were considered to have occurred post-transfusion. There were, however, 76 cases of iron overload of unknown origin, which suggest that many clinicians in Japan may encounter some difficulty in correctly diagnosing and treating iron overload. Further clinical data were obtained for 32 cases of iron overload of unknown origin; median of serum ferritin was 1860.5 ng/mL. As occurs in post-transfusional iron overload, liver dysfunction was found to be as high as 95.7% when serum ferritin levels exceeded 1000 ng/mL in these patients. Gene mutation analysis of the iron metabolism-related genes in 27 cases of iron overload with unknown etiology revealed mutations in the gene coding hemojuvelin, transferrin receptor 2, and ferroportin; this indicates that although rare, hereditary hemochromatosis does occur in Japan.

  9. Longitudinal survey of T-lymphocytes and viral antibodies in MS patients.

    PubMed

    Caputo, D; Ferrante, P; Zaffaroni, M; Ghezzi, A; Cazzullo, C L

    1987-06-01

    Our study focused on the relationship between lymphocyte H/S ratios and antiviral antibodies. We have concluded a longitudinal survey of 29 clinically definite MS patients for 8 months seeking a possible correlation among clinical modifications, fluctuations of T-cell subsets and antiviral antibody titers. For this purpose in each patient the following parameters were recorded monthly:--clinical history and neurological examination;--blood T-cell subpopulation as defined by monoclonal antibodies of the OKT series;--serum antibody titers against measles, herpes simplex type 1 and 2, HTLV-1 viruses. All these data were compared with the different MS subgroups as defined by clinical course: stable, relapsing, progressive. We found that constantly normal OKT4+/OKT8+ ratios correlate with a stable clinical course; that highly fluctuating ratios parallel clinical exacerbation; that constantly high ratios are associated with a chronic-progressive course. These results are discussed with special reference to the correlation between OKT8+ lymphocyte percentages and anti-HTLV-1 antibodies, since this last virus has recently been claimed to be of pathogenetic importance in MS.

  10. Pediatric Mastocytosis: Routine Anesthetic Management for a Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Melody C.; Uzzaman, Ashraf; Scott, Linda M.; Metcalfe, Dean D.; Quezado, Zenaide

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pediatric mastocytosis consists of a spectrum of clinical variants characterized by increased numbers of resident mast cells in various organ systems. Mast cells are instrumental in mediating anaphylaxis and patients with mastocytosis are at risk to develop provoked and unprovoked episodes of anaphylaxis. METHODS The authors examined peri-anesthetic records of patients with pediatric mastocytosis who were anesthetized for diagnostic and surgical procedures from 1993 to 2006. In addition, the authors conducted a literature review of the experience of the use anesthetics in pediatric mastocytosis. RESULTS Twenty-two patients with pediatric mastocytosis, with a median age of 3.2 years (range 6 months to 20 years) at the time of the procedure, were anesthetized for 29 diagnostic and surgical procedures. All variants of the disease are represented in this series. Most patients had a history of flushing, pruritus, GERD and abdominal pain; one patient had history of spontaneous anaphylaxis. Routine anesthetic techniques were used and despite the complexity of the disease, the peri-operative courses were uncomplicated and without serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS We review the main features of pediatric mastocytosis, its anesthetic and perioperative implications, and describe a practical approach to the anesthetic management of pediatric patients with the disease. While many drugs used routinely in anesthesia reportedly cause mast cell degranulation, deviations from routine anesthesia techniques are not necessarily warranted. However, an understanding of the anesthetic implications of the disease and meticulous preparation to treat possible adverse events are advised. PMID:18633019

  11. An epilepsy information system to support routine and research.

    PubMed

    Griep, P; van den Berg, N; Doelman, J; Starrenburg, R

    1996-07-01

    An epilepsy information system is described that supports routine patient care, research, and medical management. The patient's clinical data is ordered in time by the date of the patient contact when the data was collected. The clinical data is also classified into six categories. An unrestricted text group has text subjects in each of these groups as well as in a general free text area. The system is integrated with other information subsystems (e.g. patient registration, clinical chemistry laboratory, EEG department and pharmacy) as well as with the routinely used text processor. Data inquiries for research and medical management purposes are programmed in a Structured Query Language (SQL). The data needed to answer these queries are taken from the data collected in daily routine. The integration of the system is very useful because data only have to be entered once and can be used when and where needed. Patient data stored in this system is more accessible in general as well as more usable for research purposes compared with the patient data previously stored only on paper.

  12. Inequalities in family practitioner use by sexual orientation: evidence from the English General Practice Patient Survey

    PubMed Central

    Urwin, Sean; Whittaker, William

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test for differences in primary care family practitioner usage by sexual orientation. Design Multivariate logistic analysis of pooled cross-sectional postal questionnaire responses to family practitioner usage. Setting Patient-reported use and experience of primary care in England, UK. Data from several waves of a postal questionnaire (General Practice Patient Survey) 2012–2014. Population 2 807 320 survey responses of adults aged 18 years and over, registered with a family practitioner. Main outcome measures Probability of a visit to a family practitioner within the past 3 months. Results Lesbian women were 0.803 times (95% CI 0.755 to 0.854) less likely to have seen a family practitioner in the past 3 months relative to heterosexual women (bisexual women OR=0.887, 95% CI 0.817 to 0.963). Gay men were 1.218 times (95% CI 1.163 to 1.276) more likely to have seen a family practitioner relative to heterosexual men (bisexual men OR=1.084, 95% CI 0.989 to 1.188). Our results are robust to the timing of the family practitioner visit (0–3, 0–6, 0–12 months). Gay men were more likely to have seen a family practitioner than heterosexual men where the proportion of women practitioners in the practice was higher (OR=1.238, 95% CI 1.041 to 1.472). Conclusions Inequalities in the use of primary care across sexual orientation in England exist having conditioned on several measures of health status, demographic and family practitioner characteristics. The findings suggest these differences may be reduced by policies targeting a reduction of differences in patient acceptability of primary care. In particular, further research is needed to understand whether lower use among heterosexual men represents unmet need or overutilisation among gay men, and the barriers to practitioner use seemingly occurring due to the gender distribution of practices. PMID:27173816

  13. Factors Associated with Health-Related Quality of Life among Saudi Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Asirvatham A.; Al Saeed, Abdulghani; Alzaid, Aus A.; Al Sabaan, Fahad S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with high mortality, morbidity, poor general health, and loss of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The objective of the study was to assess the factors associated with HRQOL among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods This was a cross sectional study conducted among 283 T2DM patients during June 2011 and September 2012 at a major tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The respondents were purposively and conveniently selected according to their availability during their routine visit to the outpatient clinics and they were interviewed using the Arabic version of the Short-Form 36-item survey (SF-36) to assess the HRQOL. Results The mean age of the participants was 56.4±13.2 years. Around 63% (178) were males and 37% (105) were females. Glycosylated hemoglobin level was found to be significantly higher among female and HRQOL was higher among male. Respondents who were more than 50 years old had poor HRQOL than less than 50 years age group. Poor economic status, reported diabetic complications and longer duration of diabetes were significantly associated with poor HRQOL. The respondents treated with combination of therapies (oral medication plus insulin) indicated better HRQOL than patients with insulin therapy alone. Multivariate analysis indicated that gender, economic status (except subscale energy), and complications of DM (except subscale energy) as independent risk factor for HRQOL. Conclusion Gender, economic status, and complication of DM were independent risk factors for majority of the subscales of HRQOL. PMID:25003076

  14. Microbial analysis and survey test of gamma-irradiated freeze-dried fruits for patient's food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae-Nam; Sung, Nak-Yun; Byun, Eui-Hong; Byun, Eui-Baek; Song, Beom-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Kyung-A.; Son, Eun-Joo; Lyu, Eun-Soon

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the microbiological and organoleptic qualities of gamma-irradiated freeze-dried apples, pears, strawberries, pineapples, and grapes, and evaluated the organoleptic acceptability of the sterilized freeze-dried fruits for hospitalized patients. The freeze-dried fruits were gamma-irradiated at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 12, and 15 kGy, and their quality was evaluated. Microorganisms were not detected in apples after 1 kGy, in strawberries and pears after 4 kGy, in pineapples after 5 kGy, and in grapes after 12 kGy of gamma irradiation. The overall acceptance score, of the irradiated freeze-dried fruits on a 7-point scale at the sterilization doses was 5.5, 4.2, 4.0, 4.1, and 5.1 points for apples, strawberries, pears, pineapples, and grapes, respectively. The sensory survey of the hospitalized cancer patients (N=102) resulted in scores of 3.8, 3.7, 3.9, 3.9, and 3.7 on a 5-point scale for the gamma-irradiated freeze-dried apples, strawberries, pears, pineapples, and grapes, respectively. The results suggest that freeze-dried fruits can be sterilized with a dose of 5 kGy, except for grapes, which require a dose of 12 kGy, and that the organoleptic quality of the fruits is acceptable to immuno-compromised patients. However, to clarify the microbiological quality and safety of freeze-dried fruits should be verified by plating for both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms.

  15. Physiotherapy Practice Patterns for Management of Patients Undergoing Thoracic Surgeries in India: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sultanpuram, Sagarika; Ottayil, Zulfeequer C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the current study is to determine the practice patterns of physiotherapists for patients undergoing thoracic surgeries in India. Materials and Methodology. A cross-sectional survey was conducted across India in which 600 questionnaires were sent in emails to physiotherapists. The questionnaire addressed assessment and treatment techniques of thoracic surgery. Results. A total of 234 completed questionnaires were returned with a response rate of 39%, with the majority of responses received from Telangana, Karnataka, and Andhra Pradesh. More than 90% of the responders practiced physical examination, chest expansion, chest X-ray, ABG analysis, pulmonary function test, and SpO2 (oxygen saturation) as the assessment measures in both the pre- and the postoperative phase. Breathing exercises, incentive spirometry, thoracic expansion exercises, coughing and huffing, positioning, and modified postural drainage are found to be commonly used physiotherapy interventions, both pre- and postoperatively, with a response rate of more than 90%. A response rate of more than 84.6% indicated that patients are made to dangle their lower limbs over the edge of the bed on the 1st postoperative day. Mobilization, such as walking up to a chair, sit to stand exercises, and perambulation within the patient's room, was started on the 2nd postoperative day, as stated by more than 65% of the physiotherapists. Staircase climbing was started on the 5th postoperative day. The most commonly used functional evaluation prior to discharge was 6-minute walk test. This was, in fact, practiced by 77.4% of the physiotherapists in their clinical settings. Conclusion. The most predominantly employed assessment measures included were physical examination, chest expansion, ABG analysis, pulmonary function test, chest X-ray, SpO2 (oxygen saturation), peripheral muscle strength, and cardiopulmonary exercise. The physiotherapy interventions most commonly used were breathing exercises, thoracic

  16. Clinician's Attitudes to the Introduction of Routine Weighing in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Michael M.; Wilkinson, Shelley A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Excessive gestational weight gain poses significant short- and long-term health risks to both mother and baby. Professional bodies and health services increasingly recommend greater attention be paid to weight gain in pregnancy. A large Australian tertiary maternity hospital plans to facilitate the (re)introduction of routine weighing of all women at every antenatal visit. Objective. To identify clinicians' perspectives of barriers and enablers to routinely weighing pregnant women and variations in current practice, knowledge, and attitudes between different staff groups. Method. Forty-four maternity staff from three professional groups were interviewed in four focus groups. Staff included midwives; medical staff; and dietitians. Transcripts underwent qualitative content analysis to identify and examine barriers and enablers to the routine weighing of women throughout pregnancy. Results. While most staff supported routine weighing, various concerns were raised. Issues included access to resources and staff; the ability to provide appropriate counselling and evidence-based interventions; and the impact of weighing on patients and the therapeutic relationship. Conclusion. Many clinicians supported the practice of routine weighing in pregnancy, but barriers were also identified. Implementation strategies will be tailored to the discrete professional groups and will address identified gaps in knowledge, resources, and clinician skills and confidence. PMID:27446614

  17. Requirements and access needs of patients with chronic disease to their hospital electronic health record: results of a cross-sectional questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    White, H; Gillgrass, L; Wood, A; Peckham, D G

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify patient's views on the functionality required for personalised access to the secondary care electronic health record (EHR) and their priorities for development. Design Quantitative analysis of a cross-sectional self-complete survey of patient views on required EHR functionality from a secondary care EHR, including a patient ranking of functionality. Setting Secondary care patients attending a regional cystic fibrosis unit in the north of England. Participants 201 adults (106 (52.7%) males), median age 29 years (range 17–58 years), entered and completed the study. Inclusion criteria are as follows: a confirmed diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, aged 16 years and over, at the time of clinical stability. Outcome measures Quantitative responses within 4 themes; (1) value placed on aspects of the EHR; (2) access requirements to functions of the EHR; (3) views on information sent to the EHR and (4) patient feedback entered into the EHR. A ranked score for 15 functions of the EHR was obtained. Results Highest ratings (% reporting item as very important/important) were reported for access to clinical measures (lung function (94%), C reactive protein (84%), sputum microbiology (81%) and blood results (80%)), medication changes (82%) and lists (83%) and sending repeat prescription (83%) and treatment requests (80%), while sending symptom diaries was less so (62%). Email contact with clinicians was the most valuable communication element of the EHR (84% very important/important). Of 15 features of the EHR (1=most desirable to 15=least desirable), patients identified ‘clinical measures’ (2.62 (CI 2.07 to 3.06)), and ‘access to medication lists’ (4.91 (CI 4.47 to 5.44)), as highest priority for development and the ability to comment on errors/omissions (11.0 (CI 10.6 to 11.5)) or experience of care (11.8 (CI 11.4 to 12.2)) as lowest. Conclusions Patients want extensive personal access to their hospital EHR, placing high importance on the

  18. Patient attitudes about financial incentives for diabetes self-management: A survey

    PubMed Central

    Blondon, Katherine S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the acceptability of incentives for behavior changes in individuals with diabetes, comparing financial incentives to self-rewards and non-financial incentives. METHODS: A national online survey of United States adults with diabetes was conducted in March 2013 (n = 153). This survey was designed for this study, with iterative testing and modifications in a pilot population. We measured the demographics of individuals, their interest in incentives, as well as the perceived challenge of diabetes self-management tasks, and expectations of incentives to improve diabetes self-management (financial, non-financial and self-rewards). Using an ordered logistic regression model, we assessed the association between a 32-point score of the perceived challenge of the self-management tasks and the three types of rewards. RESULTS: Ninety-six percent of individuals were interested in financial incentives, 60% in non-financial incentives and 72% in self-rewards. Patients were less likely to use financial incentives when they perceived the behavior to be more challenging (odds ratio of using financial incentives of 0.82 (95%CI: 0.72-0.93) for each point of the behavior score). While the effectiveness of incentives may vary according to the perceived level of challenge of each behavior, participants did not expect to need large amounts to motivate them to modify their behavior. The expected average amounts needed to motivate a 5 lb weight loss in our population and to maintain this weight change for a year was $258 (interquartile range of $10-100) and $713 (interquartile range of $25-250) for a 15 lb weight loss. The difference in mean amount estimates for 5 lb and 15 lb weight loss was significant (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Individuals with diabetes are willing to consider financial incentives to improve diabetes self-management. Future studies are needed to explore incentive programs and their effectiveness for diabetes. PMID:26069724

  19. Use of Neo-melubrina, a banned antipyretic drug, in San Diego, California: a survey of patients and providers

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Lori; Abarca, Sergio; Henry, Bonnie; Friedman, Lawrence

    2001-01-01

    Background Dipyrone is an antipyretic drug that has been associated with agranulocytosis. It is banned in the United States but is available in Mexico under the name Neo-melubrina. Objectives To define the use of Neo-melubrina in the Hispanic population of 2 San Diego, California, community clinics and to determine local physicians' and nurse practitioners' awareness of the drug and its risks. Design Patient survey and provider survey. Participants Patients: 200 parents of Hispanic pediatric patients. Providers: members of San Diego chapters of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the California Coalition of Nurse Practitioners. Main outcome measures Self-reported use of Neo-melubrina by patients, and provider awareness of Neo-melubrina and its most significant side effects. Results Of the 200 patients, 76 (38.0%) reported a lifetime use of Neo-melubrina. Most (56%) used it for both pain and fever. Most providers were unable to correctly identify why Neo-melubrina might be used or its adverse effects. Physicians answered correctly more often than nurse practitioners and pediatric providers more often than family medicine providers. Providers who trained within 75 miles of the US-Mexico border, who reported a patient population of more than 50% Hispanic, and who were resident physicians at the time of the survey were most likely to answer correctly. Conclusions Neo-melubrina has been used by a substantial percentage of Hispanic patients in the community clinics surveyed. Many San Diego health care providers are unaware of this medication and may, therefore, miss opportunities to educate patients about safer alternatives. PMID:11527837

  20. Identifying Adolescent Patients at Risk for Sexually Transmitted Infections: Development of a Brief Sexual Health Screening Survey.

    PubMed

    Victor, Elizabeth C; Chung, Richard; Thompson, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the association between survey responses to health behaviors, personality/psychosocial factors, and self-reported sexually transmitted infections (STIs) to create a brief survey to identify youth at risk for contracting STIs. Participants included 200 racially diverse 14- to 18-year-old patients from a pediatric primary care clinic. Two sexual behavior variables and one peer norm variable were used to differentiate subgroups of individuals at risk of contracting a STI based on reported history of STIs using probability (decision tree) analyses. These items, as well as sexual orientation and having ever had oral sex, were used to create a brief sexual health screening (BSHS) survey. Each point increase in total BSHS score was associated with exponential growth in the percentage of sexually active adolescents reporting STIs. Findings suggest that the BSHS could serve as a useful tool for clinicians to quickly and accurately detect sexual risk among adolescent patients.

  1. Views of Medical Doctors Regarding the 2013 WHO Adult HIV Treatment Guidelines Indicate Variable Applicability for Routine Patient Monitoring, for Their Family Members and for Themselves, in South-Africa.

    PubMed

    Venter, Willem Daniel Francois; Fairlie, Lee; Feldman, Charles; Cleaton-Jones, Peter; Chersich, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    South African doctors (n = 211) experienced in antiretroviral therapy use were asked via an online questionnaire about the WHO 2013 adult antiretroviral integrated guidelines, as well as clinical and personal issues, in three hypothetical scenarios: directing the Minister of Health, advising a family member requiring therapy amidst unstable antiretroviral supplies, and where doctors themselves were HIV-positive. Doctors (54%) favoured the 500 cells/μl WHO initiation threshold if advising the Minister; a third recommended retaining the 350 cells/μl threshold used at the time of the survey. However, they favoured a higher initiation threshold for their family member. Doctors were 4.9 fold more likely to initiate modern treatment, irrespective of their CD4 cell count, for themselves than for public-sector patients (95%CI odds ratio = 3.33-7.33; P<0.001, although lower if limited to stavudine-containing regimens. Doctors were equally concerned about stavudine-induced lactic acidosis and lipoatrophy. The majority (84%) would use WHO-recommended first-line therapy, with concerns split between tenofovir-induced nephrotoxicity (55%), and efavirenz central nervous system effects (29%). A majority (61%), if HIV-positive, would pay for a pre-initiation resistance test, use influenza-prophylaxis (85%), but not INH-prophylaxis (61%), and treat their cholesterol and blood pressure concerns conventionally (63% and 60%). Over 60% wanted viral loads and creatinine measured six monthly. A third felt CD4 monitoring only necessary if clinically indicated or if virological failure occurred. They would use barrier prevention (83%), but not recommend pre-exposure prophylaxis, if their sexual partner was HIV-negative (68%). A minority would be completely open about their HIV status, but the majority would disclose to their sexual partners, close family and friends. Respondents were overwhelmingly in favour of continued antiretrovirals after breastfeeding. In conclusion, doctors largely

  2. Active Movement Warm-Up Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Teri; Quint, Ashleigh; Fischer, Kim; Kiger, Joy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents warm-ups that are designed to physiologically and psychologically prepare students for vigorous physical activity. An active movement warm-up routine is made up of three parts: (1) active warm-up movement exercises, (2) general preparation, and (3) the energy system. These warm-up routines can be used with all grade levels…

  3. SVI: Super-VIOR interface routines

    SciTech Connect

    Alleva, D.

    1987-10-21

    This document describes a set of routines for a VME DMA module called the Super-VIOR. The Super-VIOR interface routines, also called the SVI routines, are written in PILS and run under a Valet-plus system. These routines enable a program to set up, execute, and monitor DMA operations. The Super-VIOR Interface Routines are written in PILS, a high level language similar to BASIC and Pascal which is powerful and fast enough for most applications. One of the most powerful features of the Valet/PILS system is the ability to set up exception vectors and exception handlers directly in a program. This feature is used to handle interrupts from the MC68450 (a 4 channel, 16 bit DMA controller) and the interface's front panel. This document is divided into ten sections, the first being the introduction. The remaining sections detail the interface registers, channel initiation, polling and interrupts, status reporting, front panel interrupts, the configuration routines, the operation control routines, the status reporting routines, and special comments on the MC68450.

  4. 10 CFR 1017.20 - Routine access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Routine access. 1017.20 Section 1017.20 Energy DEPARTMENT... INFORMATION Access to Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.20 Routine access. (a) Authorized... access to the UCNI, subject to limitations in paragraph (b) of this section, and who may...

  5. Making Routine Letters Have Positive Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, S. M.

    While few business people dispute the importance of carefully crafting persuasive, demanding, conciliatory, and bad-news letters, the regular flow of routine communications receives very little meaningful consideration or scrutiny. These routine communications (letters, inquiries, requests, collection letters, complaints, confirmations,…

  6. Daily Routines of Young Children. (Draft).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossbach, Hans-Guenther

    This pilot study of the structural characteristics of daily routines of young children also explored aspects of conceptual framework and research instruments. Four data collection instruments were developed. Two of the three retrospective measures used were questionnaires for mothers about their child's routine on the previous day. The other…

  7. Unlearning Established Organizational Routines--Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiol, Marlena; O'Connor, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this two-part paper is to develop a process model of unlearning established organizational routines. The model traces the interactions among three unlearning sub-processes: ostensive aspects of initial destabilization of an established routine; performative aspects of ongoing discarding-from-use of old behaviors and…

  8. New 2011 survey of patients with complex care needs in eleven countries finds that care is often poorly coordinated.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Cathy; Osborn, Robin; Squires, David; Doty, Michelle; Pierson, Roz; Applebaum, Sandra

    2011-12-01

    Around the world, adults with serious illnesses or chronic conditions account for a disproportionate share of national health care spending. We surveyed patients with complex care needs in eleven countries (Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States) and found that in all of them, care is often poorly coordinated. However, adults seen at primary practices with attributes of a patient-centered medical home--where clinicians are accessible, know patients' medical history, and help coordinate care--gave higher ratings to the care they received and were less likely to experience coordination gaps or report medical errors. Throughout the survey, patients in Switzerland and the United Kingdom reported significantly more positive experiences than did patients in the other countries surveyed. Reported improvements in the United Kingdom tracked with recent reforms there in health care delivery. Patients in the United States reported difficulty paying medical bills and forgoing care because of costs. Our study indicates a need for improvement in all countries through redesigning primary care, developing care teams accountable across sites of care, and managing transitions and medications well. The United States in particular has opportunities to learn from diverse payment innovations and care redesign efforts under way in the other study countries.

  9. 10 CFR 35.604 - Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote afterloader unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote afterloader unit. 35.604 Section 35.604 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and...

  10. Language spoken at home and the association between ethnicity and doctor–patient communication in primary care: analysis of survey data for South Asian and White British patients

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, Kara; Abel, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate if language spoken at home mediates the relationship between ethnicity and doctor–patient communication for South Asian and White British patients. Methods We conducted secondary analysis of patient experience survey data collected from 5870 patients across 25 English general practices. Mixed effect linear regression estimated the difference in composite general practitioner–patient communication scores between White British and South Asian patients, controlling for practice, patient demographics and patient language. Results There was strong evidence of an association between doctor–patient communication scores and ethnicity. South Asian patients reported scores averaging 3.0 percentage points lower (scale of 0–100) than White British patients (95% CI −4.9 to −1.1, p=0.002). This difference reduced to 1.4 points (95% CI −3.1 to 0.4) after accounting for speaking a non-English language at home; respondents who spoke a non-English language at home reported lower scores than English-speakers (adjusted difference 3.3 points, 95% CI −6.4 to −0.2). Conclusions South Asian patients rate communication lower than White British patients within the same practices and with similar demographics. Our analysis further shows that this disparity is largely mediated by language. PMID:26940108

  11. Comparing Telephone versus Mail Dissemination of the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and System Survey (HCAHPS) among Patients with Low Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fike, Geraldine C.

    2012-01-01

    The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Survey (HCAHPS) is a standardized survey instrument used by many hospitals for the purpose of measuring patient's perspectives regarding care received during their hospitalization. The survey provides national benchmark information enabling consumers to make comparisons of…

  12. Antinuclear antibody determination in a routine laboratory.

    PubMed Central

    Feltkamp, T E

    1996-01-01

    Pitfalls in the method for demonstrating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by the indirect immunofluorescence technique are described and the use of international standard preparations outlined. Determination of the optimal border dilution dividing positive from negative results is discussed. Each laboratory is a unique setting; it must define its own method, which should rarely be changed. One should not rely on copying methods from other laboratories or commercial firms, but the reproducibility of the nuclear substrate, the conjugate, and other variables should be controlled daily by the use of a control serum which has been related to the WHO standard preparation for ANA of the homogeneous type. Since many sera contain mixtures of different ANA, the results of routine tests are best expressed in titres or expressions of the intensity of fluorescence. The ANA test using the immunofluorescence technique should be used as a screening method for other tests allowing a more defined interpretation of the ANA. Each laboratory should individually determine the border between positive and negative results. Therefore about 200 sera from local healthy controls equally distributed over sex and age, and 100 sera from local patients with definite SLE should be tested. Since the local clinicians should become acquainted with this border it should rarely be changed. Finally each laboratory should participate regularly in national and international quality control rounds, where sera known to be difficult to interpret are tested. The judgment of the organisers of these rounds should stimulate improvements in the participating laboratories. PMID:8984936

  13. Antinuclear antibody determination in a routine laboratory.

    PubMed

    Feltkamp, T E

    1996-10-01

    Pitfalls in the method for demonstrating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by the indirect immunofluorescence technique are described and the use of international standard preparations outlined. Determination of the optimal border dilution dividing positive from negative results is discussed. Each laboratory is a unique setting; it must define its own method, which should rarely be changed. One should not rely on copying methods from other laboratories or commercial firms, but the reproducibility of the nuclear substrate, the conjugate, and other variables should be controlled daily by the use of a control serum which has been related to the WHO standard preparation for ANA of the homogeneous type. Since many sera contain mixtures of different ANA, the results of routine tests are best expressed in titres or expressions of the intensity of fluorescence. The ANA test using the immunofluorescence technique should be used as a screening method for other tests allowing a more defined interpretation of the ANA. Each laboratory should individually determine the border between positive and negative results. Therefore about 200 sera from local healthy controls equally distributed over sex and age, and 100 sera from local patients with definite SLE should be tested. Since the local clinicians should become acquainted with this border it should rarely be changed. Finally each laboratory should participate regularly in national and international quality control rounds, where sera known to be difficult to interpret are tested. The judgment of the organisers of these rounds should stimulate improvements in the participating laboratories.

  14. Attitudes towards treatment among patients suffering from sleep disorders. A Latin American survey

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Margarita; Kriguer, Norberto; Lloret, Santiago Pérez; Cardinali, Daniel P

    2003-01-01

    Background Although sleep disorders are common, they frequently remain unnoticed by the general practitioner. Few data are available about the willingness and reasons of patients with sleep disturbances to seek for medical assistance. Methods The results of a cross-sectional community-based multinational survey in three major Latin American urban areas, i.e. Buenos Aires, Mexico City and Sao Paulo, are reported. Two-hundred subjects suffering sleep disturbances and 100 non-sufferers were selected from the general population in each city (total number: 600 sufferers vs. 300 non-sufferers). A structured interview was conducted, sleep characteristics, feelings about sleep disturbances and strategies to cope with those problems being recorded. Data were analyzed by employing either t-test or analysis of variance (ANOVA) to the Z-transformed proportions. Results 22.7 ± 3.5 % (mean ± SEM) of subjects reported to suffer from sleep disturbances every night. About 3 out of 4 (74.2 ± 2.0 %) considered their disorder as mild and were not very concerned about it. Only 31 ± 2 % of sufferers reported to have sought for medical help. Although 45 ± 2 % of sufferers reported frequent daily sleepiness, trouble to remember things, irritability and headaches, they did not seek for medical assistance. Among those patients who saw a physician with complaints different from sleep difficulties only 1 out of 3 (33 ± 2 % of patients) were asked about quality of their sleep by the incumbent practitioner. Strategies of patients to cope with sleep problems included specific behaviors (taking a warm bath, reading or watching TV) (44 ± 1.6 %), taking herbal beverages (17 ± 1.2 %) or taking sleeping pills (10 ± 1.1 %). Benzodiazepines were consumed by 3 ± 0.6 % of sufferers. Conclusion Public educational campaigns on the consequences of sleep disorders and an adequate training of physicians in sleep medicine are needed to educate both the public and the general practitioners about sleep

  15. Patient information leaflets for Transrectal Ultrasound guided prostate biopsy: Results of North Thames deanery survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We evaluated the quality of patient information leaflets for Trans-Rectal Ultrasound guided prostate biopsies (TRUS-Bx) in North Thames region. TRUS-Bx information leaflets were requested from 24 hospitals in the region. All hospitals were contacted by telephone, and non-responders were followed-up by postal survey. Leaflets received were evaluated for a clear description of the procedure, directions to TRUS-Bx location, a clear description of the procedure, contact for queries/concerns, information about preparation prior to procedure, information about regular medication, information on how to obtain results, instructions for follow-up arrangements, analgesia used and risk of morbidity/mortality. Additionally, the leaflets were evaluated for diagrams to clarify the procedure and the anatomy, and sources of additional information, such as reference to published articles or prostate cancer patient support groups/internet websites. Findings In summary, a total of 17 leaflets (77%) were received. Of these, the majority (94%) had a clear description of the procedure, contact for queries/concerns (82%), information about preparation prior to TRUS-Bx (71%). Directions to TRUS-Bx location (29%), and analgesia used (35%), was very poorly described, and information on obtaining results and follow-up arrangements were described in only 12 (71%) leaflets. Complications such as risks of infection, haematuria, haematospermia and rectal bleeding, were generally explained (71%-76% of leaflets), urinary retention was mentioned in only 5 (29%) leaflets and mortality in only 1 case. Descriptive diagrams of the procedure and prostate anatomy were very rarely used, and sources of additional information were limited to 1 published article and reference to 1 prostate cancer support group. Conclusions This study demonstrates that there is large variation in the information supplied in TRUS-Bx patient information leaflets in the North Thames region, with some leaflets lacking

  16. Practice patterns when treating patients with low back pain: a survey of physical therapists.

    PubMed

    Davies, Claire; Nitz, Arthur J; Mattacola, Carl G; Kitzman, Patrick; Howell, Dana; Viele, Kert; Baxter, David; Brockopp, Dorothy

    2014-08-01

    Low back pain (LBP), is a common musculoskeletal problem, affecting 75-85% of adults in their lifetime. Direct costs of LBP in the USA were estimated over 85 billion dollars in 2005 resulting in a significant economic burden for the healthcare system. LBP classification systems and outcome measures are available to guide physical therapy assessments and intervention. However, little is known about which, if any, physical therapists use in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to identify the use of and barriers to LBP classification systems and outcome measures among physical therapists in one state. A mixed methods study using a cross-sectional cohort design with descriptive qualitative methods was performed. A survey collected both quantitative and qualitative data relevant to classification systems and outcome measures used by physical therapists working with patients with LBP. Physical therapists responded using classification systems designed to direct treatment predominantly. The McKenzie method was the most frequent approach to classify LBP. Barriers to use of classification systems and outcome measures were lack of knowledge, too limiting and time. Classification systems are being used for decision-making in physical therapy practice for patients with LBP. Lack of knowledge and training seems to be the main barrier to the use of classification systems in practice. The Oswestry Disability Index and Numerical Pain Scale were the most commonly used outcome measures. The main barrier to their use was lack of time. Continuing education and reading the literature were identified as important tools to teach evidence-based practice to physical therapists in practice.

  17. Mobile health and patient engagement in the safety net: a survey of community health centers and clinics.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Andrew; Haque, Farshid

    2015-05-01

    Patient-centered technologies have emerged as a way to actively engage patients in care. The reach and potential of cell phones to engage diverse patient populations is great. Evidence of their effectiveness in improving health-related outcomes is limited. Researchers conducted an online survey of community health centers and clinics to assess if and how health care providers in the safety net use cell phones to support patient engagement. The findings indicate that the use of cell phones in patient care is at an early stage of deployment across the safety net. Organizations identify chronic disease management as an area where cell phones offer considerable potential to effectively engage patients. To promote widespread adoption and use, technical assistance to support the implementation and management of interventions, evidence-based or best practice models that highlight successful implementation strategies in care delivery, and the introduction of new payment or reimbursement policies will be essential.

  18. Care of patients with Huntington's disease in South America: a survey.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Ricardo Oliveira Horta; Cardoso, Francisco Eduardo Costa; Chaná-Cuevas, Pedro; Cosentino, Carlos; Fernández, William; Rieder, Carlos R M; Serrano-Dueñas, Marcos; Weiser, Roberto

    2013-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a rare neurodegenerative disease with a multitude of symptoms, which requires access to specialized multidisciplinary care for adequate management. The aim of this study was to survey the characteristics of care in various HD centers in South America (SA). Methods A questionnaire was sent to 24 centers involved in the care for HD patients in SA. Results Of the total 24 centers, 19 (79.2%) are academic units. The majority of centers (62.5%) are general movement disorders clinics. Multidisciplinary care is available in 19 (79.2%) centers and in 20 (83.3%) care is provided free of charge. Genetic testing and counseling are available in 25 and 66.6% of centers, respectively. The majority of centers (83.3%) have no institutional support for end-stage care. Conclusions Although HD centers in SA are committed to providing multidisciplinary care, access to genetic counseling and end-stage care are lacking in most centers.

  19. A survey on the usage of supplements in canadian patients living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Aghdassi, Elaheh; Bondar, Helena; Salit, Irving E; Tinmouth, Jill; Allard, Johane P

    2009-09-01

    To assess the usage, knowledge and attitudes of Patients Living with HIV with respect to supplements. A questionnaire was mailed to people living with HIV via HIV/AIDS organizations in Ontario and distributed to those attending the HIV-clinic of the University Health Network. The survey was completed by 312 subjects (95 female, 207 male). Self-rated health status was considered fair/good in 77.5% and excellent in 15.4% of participants. Vitamin/mineral supplement was used by 75.6%. Main reasons to take supplements were to: prolong life (56.1%); treat HIV-related conditions (19.9%); increase energy level (42.6%) and to boost immunity (36.5%). Among participants, 54.2% were somewhat familiar with supplements, 44.7% trusted the information on the labels and 28.2% felt that if a supplement is available for sale, it is safe. Supplements were mostly purchased at pharmacies (45.5%) and health food stores (30.1%). Only 25.9% and 27.9% of participants discussed their use of supplements with their HIV or family doctor respectively. Supplements are frequently used by people living with HIV without consulting their doctors. Current research has not shown a clear benefit from micronutrient supplementation and with the possible potential drug interactions, people living with HIV will need nutrition education regarding supplement usage and should report their use to their physicians.

  20. Increased Exposure to Rigid Routines Can Lead to Increased Challenging Behavior Following Changes to Those Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Leah E.; Oliver, Chris; Callaghan, Eleanor; Woodcock, Kate A.

    2015-01-01

    Several neurodevelopmental disorders are associated with preference for routine and challenging behavior following changes to routines. We examine individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome, who show elevated levels of this behavior, to better understand how previous experience of a routine can affect challenging behavior elicited by disruption to…