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Sample records for routine pediatric immunizations

  1. Pediatric Mastocytosis: Routine Anesthetic Management for a Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Melody C.; Uzzaman, Ashraf; Scott, Linda M.; Metcalfe, Dean D.; Quezado, Zenaide

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pediatric mastocytosis consists of a spectrum of clinical variants characterized by increased numbers of resident mast cells in various organ systems. Mast cells are instrumental in mediating anaphylaxis and patients with mastocytosis are at risk to develop provoked and unprovoked episodes of anaphylaxis. METHODS The authors examined peri-anesthetic records of patients with pediatric mastocytosis who were anesthetized for diagnostic and surgical procedures from 1993 to 2006. In addition, the authors conducted a literature review of the experience of the use anesthetics in pediatric mastocytosis. RESULTS Twenty-two patients with pediatric mastocytosis, with a median age of 3.2 years (range 6 months to 20 years) at the time of the procedure, were anesthetized for 29 diagnostic and surgical procedures. All variants of the disease are represented in this series. Most patients had a history of flushing, pruritus, GERD and abdominal pain; one patient had history of spontaneous anaphylaxis. Routine anesthetic techniques were used and despite the complexity of the disease, the peri-operative courses were uncomplicated and without serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS We review the main features of pediatric mastocytosis, its anesthetic and perioperative implications, and describe a practical approach to the anesthetic management of pediatric patients with the disease. While many drugs used routinely in anesthesia reportedly cause mast cell degranulation, deviations from routine anesthesia techniques are not necessarily warranted. However, an understanding of the anesthetic implications of the disease and meticulous preparation to treat possible adverse events are advised. PMID:18633019

  2. Giving Pediatric Immunizations the Priority They Deserve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shalala, Donna E.

    1993-01-01

    Stresses the need for increased federal, state, and local support for child immunizations resulting from the alarming increases in the incidence of rubella and other infectious diseases, and endorses the Standards for Pediatric Immunization Practices recently published in the "Journal of the American Medical Association." (MDM)

  3. Polio inactivated vaccine costs into routine childhood immunization in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Ana Marli Christovam; Vicentine, Margarete Paganotti; Gryninger, Lígia Castelloni Figueiredo; de Soárez, Patricia Coelho; Novaes, Hillegonda Maria Dutilh

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the costs of vaccination regimens for introducing inactivated polio vaccine in routine immunization in Brazil. METHODS A cost analysis was conducted for vaccines in five vaccination regimens, including inactivated polio vaccine, compared with the oral polio vaccine-only regimen. The costs of the vaccines were estimated for routine use and for the “National Immunization Days”, during when the oral polio vaccine is administered to children aged less than five years, independent of their vaccine status, and the strategic stock of inactivated polio vaccine. The presented estimated costs are of 2011. RESULTS The annual costs of the oral vaccine-only program (routine and two National Immunization Days) were estimated at US$19,873,170. The incremental costs of inclusion of the inactivated vaccine depended on the number of vaccine doses, presentation of the vaccine (bottles with single dose or ten doses), and number of “National Immunization Days” carried out. The cost of the regimen adopted with two doses of inactivated vaccine followed by three doses of oral vaccine and one “National Immunization Day” was estimated at US$29,653,539. The concomitant replacement of the DTPw/Hib and HepB vaccines with the pentavalent vaccine enabled the introduction of the inactivated polio without increasing the number of injections or number of visits needed to complete the vaccination. CONCLUSIONS The introduction of the inactivated vaccine increased the annual costs of the polio vaccines by 49.2% compared with the oral vaccine-only regimen. This increase represented 1.13% of the expenditure of the National Immunization Program on the purchase of vaccines in 2011. PMID:25741645

  4. Routine Pediatric Enterovirus 71 Vaccination in China: a Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Kathy; Xing, Weijia; Yang, Juan; Liao, Qiaohong; Cowling, Benjamin J.; Yang, Bingyi; Lau, Eric H. Y.; Takahashi, Saki; Farrar, Jeremy J.; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Leung, Gabriel M.; Yu, Hongjie

    2016-01-01

    US$17.9 (95% CI US$16.9–US$18.8) in the base case, but these ceilings could be up to 66% higher if all the test-negative cases with missing laboratory data are EV71-HFMD. The EVC ceiling is (i) 10%–14% lower if productivity loss of parents/caregivers is excluded, (ii) 58%–84% higher if the willingness-to-pay threshold is increased to three times GDPpc, (iii) 14%–19% lower if the discount rate is increased to 6%, and (iv) 36% (95% CI 23%–50%) higher if the proportion of EV71-HFMD registered by national surveillance is the same as that observed in the three EV71 vaccine phase III trials. The validity of our results relies on the following assumptions: (i) self-reported hospital charges are a good proxy for the opportunity cost of care, (ii) the cost and health utility loss estimates based on laboratory-confirmed EV71-HFMD cases are representative of all EV71-HFMD cases, and (iii) the long-term average risk of EV71-HFMD in the future is similar to that registered by national surveillance during 2010–2013. Conclusions Compared to no vaccination, routine pediatric EV71 vaccination would be very cost-effective in China if the cost of immunization (including all logistical, procurement, and administration costs needed to confer 5 y of vaccine protection) is below US$12.0–US$18.3, depending on the choice of vaccine among the three candidates. Given that the annual number of births in China has been around 16 million in recent years, the annual costs for routine pediatric EV71 vaccination at this cost range should not exceed US$192–US$293 million. Our results can be used to determine the optimal vaccine when the prices of the three vaccines are known. PMID:26978565

  5. Assessing providers' vaccination behaviors during routine immunization in India.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Megan A; Gargano, Lisa M; Thacker, Naveen; Choudhury, Panna; Weiss, Paul S; Arora, Manisha; Orenstein, Walter A; Omer, Saad B; Hughes, James M

    2015-08-01

    Progress has been made toward improving routine immunization coverage in India, but universal coverage has not been achieved. Little is known about how providers' vaccination behaviors affect coverage rates. The purpose of this study was to identify provider behaviors that served as barriers to vaccination that could lead to missed opportunities to vaccinate. We conducted a study of health-care providers' vaccination behaviors during clinic visits for children <3 years of age. Information on provider behaviors was collected through parent report and direct observation. Compared with illness visits, parents were eight times more likely to report vaccination status was verified (p < 0.001) and three times more likely to report receiving counseling on immunization (p = 0.022) during vaccination visits. Training of all vaccination practitioners should focus on behaviors such as the necessity of verifying vaccination status regardless of visit type, stressing the importance of counseling parents on immunization and emphasizing what is a valid contraindication to vaccination.

  6. Safety and Efficacy Study of Romiplostim to Treat Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) in Pediatric Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombocytopenia; Thrombocytopenia in Pediatric Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenia in Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Immune Thrombocytopenia

  7. Incorporating immunizations into routine obstetric care to facilitate Health Care Practitioners in implementing maternal immunization recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Heather; Street, Jackie; Marshall, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Immunization against pertussis, influenza, and rubella reduces morbidity and mortality in pregnant women and their offspring. Health care professionals (HCPs) caring for women perinatally are uniquely placed to reduce maternal vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs). Despite guidelines recommending immunization during the perinatal period, maternal vaccine uptake remains low. This qualitative study explored the role of obstetricians, general practitioners, and midwives in maternal vaccine uptake. Semi-structured interviews (n = 15) were conducted with perinatal HCPs at a tertiary maternity hospital in South Australia. HCPs were asked to reflect on their knowledge, beliefs, and practice relating to immunization advice and vaccine provision. Interviews were transcribed and coded using thematic analysis. Data collection and analysis was an iterative process, with collection ceasing with theoretical saturation. Participants unanimously supported maternal vaccination as an effective way of reducing risk of disease in this vulnerable population, however only rubella immunity detection and immunization is embedded in routine care. Among these professionals, delegation of responsibility for maternal immunization was unclear and knowledge about maternal immunization was variable. Influenza and pertussis vaccine prevention measures were not included in standard pregnancy record documentation, information provision to patients was “ad hoc” and vaccinations not offered on-site. The key finding was that the incorporation of maternal vaccinations into standard care through a structured process is an important facilitator for immunization uptake. Incorporating vaccine preventable disease management measures into routine obstetric care including incorporation into the Pregnancy Record would facilitate HCPs in implementing recommendations. Rubella prevention provides a useful “template” for other vaccines. PMID:24509790

  8. Diagnostic Yield of Routine Enteropathogenic Stool Tests in Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ihekweazu, Faith D.; Ajjarapu, Avanthi; Kellermayer, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Goals It can be important to exclude infectious etiologies prior to adjusting immunosuppressive therapy in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) exacerbation. We sought to determine the diagnostic yield of routine infectious stool studies in pediatric UC patients. Procedures We conducted a retrospective review of 152 pediatric UC patients at Texas Children’s Hospital between January 2003 and December 2009. The patient records were followed through July 2014. The number and type of infectious stool studies performed and the results of those were collected. Results Three hundred fifty-four diagnostic stool tests were conducted for Clostridium difficile; 13.6% were positive. Two hundred twenty stool bacterial cultures were performed, and 1.8% were positive, all growing non-typhoid Salmonella. One of 13 (7.7%) Adenovirus PCR tests was positive. Two of 152 examinations (1.3%) for Ova and Parasites were positive. No stool tests for viral culture, viral particles, Yersinia or Rotavirus were positive. Conclusions Clostridium difficile infection is common in pediatric UC, and routine screening during flares is strongly recommended. Other bacterial and parasitic infections routinely tested for are uncommon, but Salmonella may be a potentially important attribute to disease exacerbations in select patients. In patients without co-morbid conditions, the utility of performing non-specific fecal viral tests is questionable. PMID:26663793

  9. Argument against the Routine Use of Steroids for Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Silvia M.; Hough, Catherine L.

    2016-01-01

    Steroids have a plausible mechanism of action of reducing severity of lung disease in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but have failed to show consistent benefits in patient-centered outcomes. Many studies have confounding from the likely presence of ventilator-induced lung injury and steroids may have shown benefit because administration minimized ongoing inflammation incited by injurious ventilator settings. If steroids have benefit, it is likely for specific populations that fall within the heterogeneous diagnosis of ARDS. Those pediatric patients with concurrent active asthma or reactive airway disease of prematurity, in addition to ARDS, are the most common group likely to derive benefit from steroids, but are poorly studied. With the information currently available, it does not appear that the typical adult or pediatric patient with ARDS derives benefit from steroids and steroids should not be given on a routine basis. PMID:27517035

  10. Effective immunization against influenza in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, V O; Flynn, J T; Deforest, A; Kaiser, B A; Schulman, S L; Bradley, A; Palmer, J; Polinsky, M S; Baluarte, H J

    1996-12-01

    Viral infections such as influenza are an important cause of morbidity following organ transplantation. We evaluated the immunogenicity of a commercially available influenza vaccine in pediatric renal transplant recipients in a two-phase, prospective study. In phase one, 47 transplant patients and seven control subjects with bronchopulmonary dysplasia received influenza vaccine. Sera were collected at the time of vaccination and 6 wk later. In phase two, sera from 18 transplant recipients and 47 healthy adults who had received the same vaccine were collected 6-12 months after vaccination. Antibody titers to the A/Taiwan/1/86 antigen were measured with hemagglutination inhibition assay in both phases of the study. Vaccine was well tolerated in all subjects. No vaccinated patient required hospitalization for complications of influenza infection. Vaccination did not increase the frequency of acute allograft rejection. In phase one, 43 patients (91%) and 5 controls (71%) either seroconverted (developed a fourfold or greater rise in titer), or developed post-vaccination titers > or = 1:160 (p = NS). Among the transplant recipients, non-seroconverters had a higher pre-vaccination geometric mean antibody titer (GMT) than those who seroconverted. Seroconversion developed independently of whether patients received double or triple immunosuppression. In phase two, post-vaccination GMT were similar for patients and control subjects at 11.5 and 8 months post-vaccination, respectively. In our study, influenza vaccination produced equivalent humoral immunity in transplant recipients and normal subjects. Routine influenza vaccination should be performed annually in this high-risk population.

  11. Supplementary polio immunization activities and prior use of routine immunization services in non-polio-endemic sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Frimpong, Jemima A; Abdelwahab, Jalaa; Asuming, Patrick; Touré, Hamadassalia; Awoonor-Williams, John Koku; Abachie, Thomas; Guidetti, Flavia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine participation in polio supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) in sub-Saharan Africa among users and non-users of routine immunization services and among users who were compliant or non-compliant with the routine oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) immunization schedule. Methods Data were obtained from household-based surveys in non-polio-endemic sub-Saharan African countries. Routine immunization service users were children (aged < 5 years) who had ever had a health card containing their vaccination history; non-users were children who had never had a health card. Users were considered compliant with the OPV routine immunization schedule if, by the SIA date, their health card reflected receipt of required OPV doses. Logistic regression measured associations between SIA participation and use of both routine immunization services and compliance with routine OPV among users. Findings Data from 21 SIAs conducted between 1999 and 2010 in 15 different countries met inclusion criteria. Overall SIA participation ranged from 70.2% to 96.1%. It was consistently lower among infants than among children aged 1–4 years. In adjusted analyses, participation among routine immunization services users was > 85% in 12 SIAs but non-user participation was > 85% in only 5 SIAs. In 18 SIAs, participation was greater among users (P < 0.01 in 16, 0.05 in 1 and < 0.10 in 1) than non-users. In 14 SIAs, adjusted analyses revealed lower participation among non-compliant users than among compliant users (P < 0.01 in 10, < 0.05 in 2 and < 0.10 in 2). Conclusion Large percentages of children participated in SIAs. Prior use of routine immunization services and compliance with the routine OPV schedule showed a strong positive association with SIA participation. PMID:22807595

  12. [Childhood immunization schedule of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics 2003].

    PubMed

    2003-03-01

    In this document the Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics provides recommendations for the immunization schedule for the 2003-2004 season. The use of inactivated poliovirus vaccine is again stressed for children of any age. Moreover, the introduction of the varicella vaccine and the pneumococcal conjugated vaccine, as well as the option of dTpa in adolescents, is highly recommended due to the availability of safe and effective products. Because of the increasing number of new vaccines in the immunization schedule, strategies with combined vaccines must be used.

  13. Routine immunization services in Pakistan: seeing beyond the numbers.

    PubMed

    Husain, S; Omer, S B

    2016-06-15

    Vaccine-preventable diseases continue to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children under 5 years of age in Pakistan, and the country remains one of the last reservoirs of polio, posing a threat of viral spread within the region and globally. This structured review describes challenges in the achievement of vaccination targets and identifies arenas for policy and programmatic interventions and future research. Burdened with limited demand and inefficient vaccination services, the recently devolved Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) faces multiple hurdles in increasing immunization volumes, improving the quality of services and ensuring timely vaccination. The EPI requires multi-pronged, multi-level, coordinated interventions to improve programme functioning and to enhance vaccination uptake at community level. Additionally, a lack of rigorous scientific enquiry on vaccination services limits the introduction of well-developed, responsive interventions. The paper describes systemic bottlenecks, proposes potential solutions and suggests lines of further enquiry to understand and reduce the languishing immunization rates in Pakistan.

  14. Live Music Therapy as an Active Focus of Attention for Pain and Behavioral Symptoms of Distress During Pediatric Immunization.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Sumathy; Ramesh, Bhuvaneswari; Dixit, Priyanka B; Venkatesh, Soma; Das, Prarthana; Gunasekaran, Dhandapany

    2016-07-01

    A total of 100 children coming for routine immunization to pediatric outpatient department were included and were divided into experiment (n = 50) and control (n = 50) groups. Experiment group received live music therapy during immunization procedure. Control group received no intervention. The Modified Behavior Pain Scale (MBPS), 10-point pain levels, and 10-point distress levels were documented by parents. Duration of crying was recorded by investigators. Pre- and postimmunization blood pressures and heart rates of parents holding the children were also measured and recorded by investigators. Independent and paired t tests were used for analysis. All 3 domains of the Modified Behavior Pain Scale and duration of crying showed significant improvement (P < .05) in the experiment group. Pain and distress levels also showed statistically nonsignificant improvement in experiment group. Blood pressure and heart rate of parents showed no difference. Music therapy could be helpful to children, parents, and health care providers by reducing discomfort of the child during pediatric immunization.

  15. Routine Use of Distal Arterial Perfusion in Pediatric Femoral Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Schad, Christine A; Fallon, Brian P; Monteagudo, Julie; Okochi, Shunpei; Cheung, Eva W; Morrissey, Nicholas J; Kadenhe-Chiweshe, Angela V; Aspelund, Gudrun; Stylianos, Steven; Middlesworth, William

    2017-01-01

    Lower-extremity ischemia is a significant complication in children on femoral venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO). Our institution currently routinely uses distal perfusion catheters (DPCs) in all femoral arterial cannulations in attempts to reduce ischemia. We performed a single-center, retrospective review of pediatric patients supported with femoral VA ECMO from January 2005 to November 2015. The outcomes of patients with prophylactic DPC placement at cannulation (prophylactic DPC) were compared to a historical group with DPCs placed in response only to clinically evident ischemic changes (reactive DPC). Ischemic complication requiring invasive intervention (fasciotomy or amputation) was the primary outcome. Twenty-nine patients underwent a total of 31 femoral arterial cannulations, 17 with prophylactic DPC and 14 with reactive DPC. Ischemic complications requiring invasive intervention developed in 2 of 17 (12%) prophylactic DPC patients versus 4 of 14 (29%) reactive DPC. In the reactive DPC group, 7 of 14 (50%) had ischemic changes postcannulation, six underwent DPC placement, and three out of six of these patients still required invasive intervention. One of the seven patients had ischemic changes, did not undergo DPC, and required amputation. While a greater percentage of patients in the prophylactic group was cannulated during extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR), statistical significance was not otherwise demonstrated. We demonstrate feasibility of superficial femoral artery (SFA) access in pediatric patients. We note fewer ischemic complications with prophylactic DPC placement, and observe that salvaging a limb with a reactive DPC was only successful 50% of the time. Although there was no statistical difference in the primary outcome between the two groups, limitations and confounding factors include small sample size and a greater percentage of patients in the prophylactic DPC group cannulated with ECPR in progress.

  16. The Vitamin D Connection to Pediatric Infections and Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Valencia P; Modlin, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, a resurgence in vitamin D deficiency and nutritional rickets has been reported throughout the world, including the United States. Inadequate serum vitamin D concentrations have also been associated with complications from other health problems, including tuberculosis, cancer (prostate, breast and colon), multiple sclerosis and diabetes. These findings support the concept of vitamin D possessing important pleiotropic actions outside of calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. In children, an association between nutritional rickets with respiratory compromise has long been recognized. Recent epidemiological studies clearly demonstrate the link between vitamin D deficiency and the increased incidence of respiratory infections. Further research has also elucidated the contribution of vitamin D in the host defense response to infection. However, the mechanism(s) by which vitamin D levels contribute to pediatric infections and immune function has yet to be determined. This knowledge is particularly relevant and timely, because infants and children appear more susceptible to viral rather than bacterial infections in the face of vitamin D deficiency. The connection between vitamin D, infections and immune function in the pediatric population indicates a possible role for vitamin D supplementation in potential interventions and adjuvant therapies. PMID:19190532

  17. The clinical impact of humoral immunity in pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Abanti; Ozawa, Mikki; Everly, Matthew J; Ettenger, Robert; Dharnidharka, Vikas; Benfield, Mark; Mathias, Robert; Portale, Anthony; McDonald, Ruth; Harmon, William; Kershaw, David; Vehaskari, V Matti; Kamil, Elaine; Baluarte, H Jorge; Warady, Bradley; Li, Li; Sigdel, Tara K; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Dai, Hong; Naesens, Maarten; Waskerwitz, Janie; Salvatierra, Oscar; Terasaki, Paul I; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2013-03-01

    The development of anti-donor humoral responses after transplantation associates with higher risks for acute rejection and 1-year graft survival in adults, but the influence of humoral immunity on transplant outcomes in children is not well understood. Here, we studied the evolution of humoral immunity in low-risk pediatric patients during the first 2 years after renal transplantation. Using data from 130 pediatric renal transplant patients randomized to steroid-free (SF) or steroid-based (SB) immunosuppression in the NIH-SNSO1 trial, we correlated the presence of serum anti-HLA antibodies to donor HLA antigens (donor-specific antibodies) and serum MHC class 1-related chain A (MICA) antibody with both clinical outcomes and histology identified on protocol biopsies at 0, 6, 12, and 24 months. We detected de novo antibodies after transplant in 24% (23% of SF group and 25% of SB group), most often after the first year. Overall, 22% developed anti-HLA antibodies, of which 6% were donor-specific antibodies, and 6% developed anti-MICA antibody. Presence of these antibodies de novo associated with significantly higher risks for acute rejection (P=0.02), chronic graft injury (P=0.02), and decline in graft function (P=0.02). In summary, antibodies to HLA and MICA antigens appear in approximately 25% of unsensitized pediatric patients, placing them at greater risk for acute and chronic rejection with accelerated loss of graft function. Avoiding steroids does not seem to modify this incidence. Whether serial assessments of these antibodies after transplant could guide individual tailoring of immunosuppression requires additional study.

  18. The Clinical Impact of Humoral Immunity in Pediatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Abanti; Ozawa, Mikki; Everly, Matthew J.; Ettenger, Robert; Dharnidharka, Vikas; Benfield, Mark; Mathias, Robert; Portale, Anthony; McDonald, Ruth; Harmon, William; Kershaw, David; Vehaskari, V. Matti; Kamil, Elaine; Baluarte, H. Jorge; Warady, Bradley; Li, Li; Sigdel, Tara K.; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Dai, Hong; Naesens, Maarten; Waskerwitz, Janie; Salvatierra, Oscar; Terasaki, Paul I.

    2013-01-01

    The development of anti-donor humoral responses after transplantation associates with higher risks for acute rejection and 1-year graft survival in adults, but the influence of humoral immunity on transplant outcomes in children is not well understood. Here, we studied the evolution of humoral immunity in low-risk pediatric patients during the first 2 years after renal transplantation. Using data from 130 pediatric renal transplant patients randomized to steroid-free (SF) or steroid-based (SB) immunosuppression in the NIH-SNSO1 trial, we correlated the presence of serum anti-HLA antibodies to donor HLA antigens (donor-specific antibodies) and serum MHC class 1-related chain A (MICA) antibody with both clinical outcomes and histology identified on protocol biopsies at 0, 6, 12, and 24 months. We detected de novo antibodies after transplant in 24% (23% of SF group and 25% of SB group), most often after the first year. Overall, 22% developed anti-HLA antibodies, of which 6% were donor-specific antibodies, and 6% developed anti-MICA antibody. Presence of these antibodies de novo associated with significantly higher risks for acute rejection (P=0.02), chronic graft injury (P=0.02), and decline in graft function (P=0.02). In summary, antibodies to HLA and MICA antigens appear in approximately 25% of unsensitized pediatric patients, placing them at greater risk for acute and chronic rejection with accelerated loss of graft function. Avoiding steroids does not seem to modify this incidence. Whether serial assessments of these antibodies after transplant could guide individual tailoring of immunosuppression requires additional study. PMID:23449533

  19. [Immunization schedule of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics: recommendations 2008].

    PubMed

    Bernaola Iturbe, E; Giménez Sánchez, F; Baca Cots, M; de Juan Martín, F; Díez Domingo, J; Garcés Sánchez, M; Gómez-Campderá, A; Martinón Torres, F; Picazo, J J; Pineda Solás, V

    2008-01-01

    The Vaccine Advisory Committee of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics provides information on the new developments in vaccines that have taken place in 2007, based on the available evidence, and discusses these developments. Certain modifications to the Immunization Schedule for 2008 are recommended. A second varicella vaccine booster dose, administered together with the booster dose of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine when children start school (3-4 years), is recommended to avoid vaccine failures against the varicella-zoster virus. Based on current scientific evidence, the importance of universal heptavalent conjugate pneumococcal vaccination, as carried out in most similar European countries and in the autonomous community of Madrid in Spain, is stressed. Human papilloma virus vaccine is included in the Immunization Schedule for girls from 11 years old, and initially, at least up to the age of 16 years. Vaccination against rotavirus in children starting at 6 weeks and completing the series before 6 months is recommended. Other recommendations included in this year's Immunization Schedule are vaccination against influenza and hepatitis A virus in risk groups and at the pediatrician's discretion, as a first step toward the future recommendation of universal immunization.

  20. Rationale and Design of the Pediatric Critical Illness Stress-Induced Immune Suppression (CRISIS) Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carcillo, Joseph; Holubkov, Richard; Dean, J. Michael; Berger, John; Meert, Kathleen L.; Anand, K. J. S.; Zimmerman, Jerry; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Harrison, Rick; Willson, Douglas F.; Nicholson, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Despite implementation of CDC recommendations and bundled interventions for preventing catheter-associated blood stream infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, or urinary catheter–associated infections, nosocomial infections and sepsis remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Recent studies suggest that acquired critical illness stress-induced immune suppression (CRISIS) plays a role in the development of nosocomial infection and sepsis. This condition can be related to inadequate zinc, selenium, and glutamine levels, as well as hypoprolactinemia, leading to stress-induced lymphopenia, a predominant TH2 monocyte/macrophage state, and subsequent immune suppression. Prolonged immune dysfunction increases the likelihood of nosocomial infections associated with invasive devices. Although strategies to prevent common complications of critical illness are routinely employed (eg, prophylaxis for gastrointestinal bleeding, thrombophlebitis), no prophylactic strategy is used to prevent stress-induced immune suppression. This is the authors’ rationale for the pediatric CRISIS prevention trial (NCT00395161), designed as a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical investigation to determine if daily enteral supplementation with zinc, selenium, and glutamine as well as parenteral metoclopramide (a dopamine 2 receptor antagonist that reverses hypoprolactinemia) prolongs the time until onset of nosocomial infection or sepsis in critically ill children compared to enteral supplementation with whey protein. If effective, this combined nutritional and pharmacologic approach may lessen the excess morbidity and mortality as well as resource utilization associated with nosocomial infections and sepsis in this population. The authors present the design and analytic plan for the CRISIS prevention trial. PMID:19380753

  1. Rationale and design of the pediatric critical illness stress-induced immune suppression (CRISIS) prevention trial.

    PubMed

    Carcillo, Joseph; Holubkov, Richard; Dean, J Michael; Berger, John; Meert, Kathleen L; Anand, K J S; Zimmerman, Jerry; Newth, Christopher J L; Harrison, Rick; Willson, Douglas F; Nicholson, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Despite implementation of CDC recommendations and bundled interventions for preventing catheter-associated blood stream infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, or urinary catheter-associated infections, nosocomial infections and sepsis remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Recent studies suggest that acquired critical illness stress-induced immune suppression (CRISIS) plays a role in the development of nosocomial infection and sepsis. This condition can be related to inadequate zinc, selenium, and glutamine levels, as well as hypoprolactinemia, leading to stress-induced lymphopenia, a predominant T(H)2 monocyte/macrophage state, and subsequent immune suppression. Prolonged immune dysfunction increases the likelihood of nosocomial infections associated with invasive devices. Although strategies to prevent common complications of critical illness are routinely employed (eg, prophylaxis for gastrointestinal bleeding, thrombophlebitis), no prophylactic strategy is used to prevent stress-induced immune suppression. This is the authors' rationale for the pediatric CRISIS prevention trial (NCT00395161), designed as a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical investigation to determine if daily enteral supplementation with zinc, selenium, and glutamine as well as parenteral metoclopramide (a dopamine 2 receptor antagonist that reverses hypoprolactinemia) prolongs the time until onset of nosocomial infection or sepsis in critically ill children compared to enteral supplementation with whey protein. If effective, this combined nutritional and pharmacologic approach may lessen the excess morbidity and mortality as well as resource utilization associated with nosocomial infections and sepsis in this population. The authors present the design and analytic plan for the CRISIS prevention trial.

  2. Hepatitis-B vaccine introduction into the routine immunization schedule--Andhra Pradesh experience.

    PubMed

    Kiran, V

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis B is a viral infection of the liver and is serious global public health problem with a high risk of death from cirrhosis of the liver and liver cancer, diseases that kill about one million persons each year globally. Globally, of the 2 billion people who have been infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV), more than 350 million have chronic (lifelong) infections. It is preventable with safe and effective vaccines that have been available since 1982. Although the vaccine will not cure chronic hepatitis, it is 95% effective in preventing chronic infections from developing, and is the first vaccine against a major human cancer. More than 160 countries have already added this vaccine to their routine immunization programmes. Available epidemiologic studies in India and AP indicate that India is in intermediate endemic status (with a prevalence of 2 to 7%) and the best way to reduce the prevalence as per the strategies outlined by WHO is to introduce Hep-B vaccine into routine immunization. AP is the first State in India to introduce Hep-B vaccine in the routine immunization in a phased manner. In-spite of the initial apprehensions and slow take up, the program is proven to be successful and Govt. of India has made budgetary provisions in the 10th plan for introduction in rest of India.

  3. Assessment of Routine Immunization Coverage in Nyala Locality, Reasons behind Incomplete Immunization in South Darfur State, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ismail Tibin Adam; El-Tayeb, Elsadeg Mahgoob; Omer, Mohammed Diaaeldin F A; Eltahir, Yassir Mohammed; El-Sayed, El-Tayeb Ahmed; Deribe, Kebede

    2014-02-25

    Little is known about the coverage of routine immunization service in South Darfur state, Sudan. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the vaccination rate and barriers for vaccination. A cross-sectional community-based study was undertaken in Nyala locality, south Darfur, Sudan, including urban, rural and Internal Displaced Peoples (IDPs) population in proportional representation. Survey data were collected by a questionnaire which was applied face to face to parents of 213 children 12-23 months. The collected data was then analyzed with SPSS software package. Results showed that vaccination coverage as revealed by showed vaccination card alone was 63.4% while it was increased to 82.2% when both history and cards were used. Some (5.6%) of children were completely non-vaccinated. The factors contributing to the low vaccination coverage were found to be knowledge problems of mothers (51%), access problems (15%) and attitude problems (34%). Children whose mother attended antenatal care and those from urban areas were more likely to complete their immunization schedule. In conclusion, the vaccination coverage in the studied area was low compared to the national coverage. Efforts to increase vaccination converge and completion of the scheduled plan should focus on addressing concerns of caregivers particularly side effects and strengthening the Expanded Programmer on Immunization services in rural areas.

  4. CLASSIFICATION AND TEAM RESPONSE TO NON-ROUTINE EVENTS OCCURRING DURING PEDIATRIC TRAUMA RESUSCITATION

    PubMed Central

    Webman, Rachel; Fritzeen, Jennifer; Yang, JaeWon; Ye, Grace F.; Mullan, Paul C.; Qureshi, Faisal G.; Parker, Sarah H.; Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Marsic, Ivan; Burd, Randall S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Errors directly causing serious harm are rare during pediatric trauma resuscitation, limiting the use of adverse outcome analysis for performance improvement in this setting. Errors not causing harm due to mitigation or chance may have similar causation and are more frequent than those causing adverse outcomes. Analyzing these error types is an alternative to adverse outcome analysis. The purpose of this study was to identify errors of any type during pediatric trauma resuscitation and evaluate team responses to their occurrence. Methods Errors identified using video analysis were classified as errors of omission or commission, and selection errors using input from trauma experts. The responses to error types and error frequency based on patient and event features were compared. Results Thirty-nine resuscitations were reviewed, identifying 337 errors (range 2–26 per resuscitation). The most common errors were related to cervical spine stabilization (n=93, 27.6%). Errors of omission (n=135) and commission (n=106) were more common than errors of selection (n=96). Although 35.9% of all errors were acknowledged and compensation occurred after 43.6%, no response (acknowledgement or compensation) was observed after 51.3% of errors. Errors of omission and commission were more often acknowledged (40.7% and 39.6% vs. 25.0%, p=0.03 and p=0.04, respectively) and compensated for (50.4% and 47.2% vs. 29.2%, p=0.004 and p=0.01, respectively) than selection errors. Response differences between errors of omission and commission were not observed. The number of errors and the number of high-risk errors that occurred did not differ based on patient or event features. Conclusions Errors are common during pediatric trauma resuscitation. Teams did not respond to most errors, although differences in team response were observed between error types. Determining causation of errors may be an approach for identifying latent safety threats contributing to adverse outcomes during

  5. Recommended immunization schedule for children and adolescents: Immunization Guideline (8th edition) released by the Korean Pediatric Society in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Choi, Eun Hwa; Park, Su Eun; Kim, Yae-Jean; Jo, Dae Sun; Kim, Yun-Kyung; Eun, Byung-Wook; Lee, Jina; Lee, Soo-Young; Lee, Hyunju; Kim, Ki Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This report includes the recommended immunization schedule table for children and adolescents based on the 8th (2015) and revised 7th (2012) Immunization Guidelines released by the Committee on Infectious Diseases of the Korean Pediatric Society (KPS). Notable revised recommendations include: reorganization of the immunization table with a list of vaccines on the vertical axis and the corresponding age on the horizontal axis; reflecting the inclusion of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, and hepatitis A vaccine into the National Immunization Program since 2012; addition of general recommendations for 2 new Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccines and their interchangeability with existing JE vaccines; addition of general recommendations for quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccines and scope of the recommended targets for vaccination; and emphasizing catch-up immunization of Tdap vaccine. Detailed recommendations for each vaccine may be obtained from the full KPS 8th Immunization Guidelines. PMID:28194210

  6. Variation in the costs of delivering routine immunization services in Peru.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D.; Mosqueira, N. R.; Penny, M. E.; Lanata, C. F.; Clark, A. D.; Sanderson, C. F. B.; Fox-Rushby, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Estimates of vaccination costs usually provide only point estimates at national level with no information on cost variation. In practice, however, such information is necessary for programme managers. This paper presents information on the variations in costs of delivering routine immunization services in three diverse districts of Peru: Ayacucho (a mountainous area), San Martin (a jungle area) and Lima (a coastal area). METHODS: We consider the impact of variability on predictions of cost and reflect on the likely impact on expected cost-effectiveness ratios, policy decisions and future research practice. All costs are in 2002 prices in US dollars and include the costs of providing vaccination services incurred by 19 government health facilities during the January-December 2002 financial year. Vaccine wastage rates have been estimated using stock records. FINDINGS: The cost per fully vaccinated child ranged from 16.63-24.52 U.S. Dollars in Ayacucho, 21.79-36.69 U.S. Dollars in San Martin and 9.58-20.31 U.S. Dollars in Lima. The volume of vaccines administered and wastage rates are determinants of the variation in costs of delivering routine immunization services. CONCLUSION: This study shows there is considerable variation in the costs of providing vaccines across geographical regions and different types of facilities. Information on how costs vary can be used as a basis from which to generalize to other settings and provide more accurate estimates for decision-makers who do not have disaggregated data on local costs. Future studies should include sufficiently large sample sizes and ensure that regions are carefully selected in order to maximize the interpretation of cost variation. PMID:15628205

  7. Influence of health providers on pediatrics' immunization rate.

    PubMed

    Al-lela, Omer Q B; Baidi Bahari, Mohd; Al-abbassi, Mustafa G; Salih, Muhannad R M; Basher, Amena Y

    2012-12-01

    To identify the immunization providers' characteristics associated with immunization rate in children younger than 2 years. A cohort and a cluster sampling design were implemented; 528 children between 18 and 70 months of age were sampled in five public health clinics in Mosul-Iraq. Providers' characterizations were obtained. Immunization rate for the children was assessed. Risk factors for partial immunization were explored using both bivariate analyses and multi-level logistic regression models. Less than half of the children had one or more than one missed dose, considered as partial immunization cases. The study found significant association of immunization rate with provider's type. Two factors were found that strongly impacted on immunization rate in the presence of other factors: birthplace and immunization providers' type.

  8. Assessing the effectiveness of house-to-house visits on routine oral polio immunization completion and tracking of defaulters.

    PubMed

    Curry, Dora Ward; Perry, Henry B; Tirmizi, Syed N; Goldstein, Allison L; Lynch, Meg C

    2014-06-01

    Strengthening routine immunization is one of the four prongs of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. Using data collected through 30-cluster sample household surveys of caretakers of children aged 12-23 months, this paper assessed the effectiveness of house-to-house visits on routine oral polio immunization completion, using simple frequency tables, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Logistic regression results demonstrated that children in households where the caregivers reported receiving a household visit by health workers were more likely to be fully immunized for polio through routine immunization than other children, although results were significant only after correcting for confounders. In Ethiopia and India, children of caregivers who remembered a house-to-house visit were significantly and positively associated with routine polio vaccination completion (OR = 2.2 and OR = 2.2 respectively). In Angola, the association was positive, though not significant (OR = 1.3). The evidence suggests that targeting high-risk areas for house-to-house visits played a role in increasing routine polio vaccination.

  9. [Childhood immunization schedule 2001-2002. Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics].

    PubMed

    2001-07-01

    In 1994 the Spanish Association of Pediatrics founded the Advisory Committee on Vaccines with the aim of providing advice on matters related to childhood immunizations and of implementing vaccination schedules. The latest recommendations concern the immunization schedule for 2001-2002, in which indications for the inactivated poliovirus vaccine instead of the attenuated poliovirus vaccine are of prime importance. The advisability of including the vaccine against chicken pox in healthy children is stressed.

  10. Assessment of nickel release from various dental appliances used routinely in pediatric dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Parimala; Agrawal, Suchi; Bansal, Arpana; Jain, Ankur; Tiwari, Utkarsh; Anand, Ayushi

    2016-01-01

    Context: The use of nickel-containing alloys in dentistry has been questioned because of the biological liabilities of nickel and the release of nickel ions from dental appliances into the oral cavity. The potential health hazards of nickel and chromium and their compounds have been the focus of attention for more than 100 years. It has established that these metals could cause hypersensitivity. Aims: To assess the nickel release from various dental appliances used in pediatric dentistry. Settings and Design: It is a in vitro study. Materials and Methods: The study was undertaken to analyze in vitro biodegradation of space maintainers and stainless steel crowns made out of stainless steel materials from different manufacturers. The leaching effect simulating the use of clinical practice was studied by keeping the respective number of Stainless Steel Crowns and space maintainers in the artificial saliva incubating at 37°C and analyzing for nickel release after 1,7,14,21 and 28 days using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Statistical Analysis: The results were statistically analyzed by using One way ANOVA and repeated measures of ANOVA was applied at different time intervals i.e. 1,7,14,21,28 days. The critical value for statistical significance was set at P = 0.05. Results: Results showed that there was measurable release of nickel which reached maximum level at the end of 7 days which was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The release of nickel and chromium very much below when compared with the average dietary intake of nickel (200-300 ppm/day) which were not capable of causing any toxic effects. PMID:27433051

  11. Access to Routine Immunization: A Comparative Analysis of Supply-Side Disparities between Northern and Southern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Eboreime, Ejemai; Abimbola, Seye; Bozzani, Fiammetta

    2015-01-01

    Background The available data on routine immunization in Nigeria show a disparity in coverage between Northern and Southern Nigeria, with the former performing worse. The effect of socio-cultural differences on health-seeking behaviour has been identified in the literature as the main cause of the disparity. Our study analyses the role of supply-side determinants, particularly access to services, in causing these disparities. Methods Using routine government data, we compared supply-side determinants of access in two Northern states with two Southern states. The states were identified using criteria-based purposive selection such that the comparisons were made between a low-coverage state in the South and a low-coverage state in the North as well as between a high-coverage state in the South and a high-coverage state in the North. Results Human resources and commodities at routine immunization service delivery points were generally insufficient for service delivery in both geographical regions. While disparities were evident between individual states irrespective of regional location, compared to the South, residents in Northern Nigeria were more likely to have vaccination service delivery points located within a 5km radius of their settlements. Conclusion Our findings suggest that regional supply-side disparities are not apparent, reinforcing the earlier reported socio-cultural explanations for disparities in routine immunization service uptake between Northern and Southern Nigeria. Nonetheless, improving routine immunisation coverage services require that there are available human resources and that health facilities are equitably distributed. PMID:26692215

  12. NCI, NHLBI/PBMTC First International Conference on Late Effects after Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Persistent Immune Deficiency in Pediatric Transplant Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Bunin, Nancy; Small, Trudy; Szabolcs, Paul; Baker, K. Scott; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Torgerson, Troy

    2011-01-01

    Defective immune reconstitution is a major barrier to successful hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and has important implications in the pediatric population. There are many factors which affect immune recovery, including stem cell source and GVHD. Complete assessment of immune recovery, including T and B lymphocyte evaluation, innate immunity and response to neoantigens, may provide insight as to infection risk and optimal time for immunizations. The increasing use of cord blood grafts requires additional study regarding early reconstitution and impact upon survival. Immunization schedules may require modification based upon stem cell source and immune reconstitution, and this is of particular importance as many children have been incompletely immunized, or not at all, prior to school entry. Additional studies are needed in children post HCT to evaluate the impact of differing stem cell sources upon immune reconstitution, infectious risks and immunization responses. PMID:22100979

  13. What experts think about integrating mobile health into routine immunization service delivery in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Okojie, Obehi Hilda

    2016-01-01

    Background Routine immunization (RI), like other essential health services, could benefit from mobile telephony and especially from the current trend of their increased use in health service delivery. SMS text messages have been recorded to be highly effective in many settings around the world and could be used for reminders and recalls to improve RI performance in Nigeria. This qualitative study assessed the state of RI services, obtained expert opinion on integration of mobile health (mHealth) into RI, and also identified potential threats to such an initiative. Methods In-depth Interviews were held with experts in RI and Primary Health Care from different arms of the health sector in Edo State Nigeria. Their responses were summarized and coded to allow for easy synthesis and interpretation of information. Results Among the experts, there was widespread support for the adoption of mHealth services into RI delivery but with a caution on threats to its success, including inconsistent supply of electricity, poor mobile telephone networks, and the possibility of a lack of political will and funding support from the government. Conclusions Although RI performance appears fairly satisfactory in the study setting, adoption of mHealth is highly encouraged to sustain the gains. User-friendliness, interoperability and adaptations to fit peculiar financial and health care models must be kept in view while customizing software solutions for this setting. Also, the store and forward system for handling health information appears more appropriate in this setting to maximize the effectiveness of mHealth despite the shortfall in infrastructure. PMID:28293579

  14. Integrated Delivery of Health Services During Outreach Visits: A Literature Review of Program Experience Through a Routine Immunization Lens

    PubMed Central

    Partapuri, Tasnim; Steinglass, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background. Outreach services are used systematically to deliver immunization and health services to individuals with insufficient access to health facilities in lower-income countries. Currently, the topic of integrated service delivery during immunization outreach lacks the attention paid to integration at fixed sites or during campaigns. This article explores integrated outreach and risks associated with service integration. Methods. Published and gray literature in public health databases and on organization websites were reviewed, yielding 33 articles and gray literature documents for a literature review of experience integrating other services with routine immunization at outreach sessions. Results. The current policy climate favors service integration as a strategy for increasing the equity and efficiency of important health interventions. However, integration may also present some risk to well-established and resourced interventions, such as immunization, which must be recognized as programs compete for limited resources. Experience reveals integration opportunities in planning and intersectoral coordination, training and supervision, community participation, pooled funding, and monitoring. Conclusions. The reviewed literature indicates that successful integration of health interventions with immunization at routine outreach sessions requires well-planned and implemented steps. It also highlights the need for additional studies or feedback on planning and implementing integrated outreach services in lower-income countries. PMID:22315382

  15. [Criteria for including vaccines in the immunization schedule of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Bernaola Iturbe, E; Giménez Sánchez, F; Baca Cots, M; de Juan Martín, F; Díez Domingo, J; Garcés Sánchez, M; Gómez-Campderá, A; Martinón Torres, F; Picazo, J J; Pineda Solás, V

    2008-01-01

    The Vaccine Advisory Committee of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics analyzes and discusses the criteria followed when preparing their yearly Recommended Immunization Schedule for children and adolescents. The relative importance of each criterion in the final recommendation is assessed. Following a review of the current state of affairs of childhood immunization in Spain and of the crucial role played by pediatricians, some reflections are presented on the problems derived from the vaccines recommended by this Committee but not covered by the national health system. Suggestions are made for individual pediatricians who may need to establish specific priorities in the recommendation of these vaccines.

  16. Pediatric recurrent respiratory tract infections: when and how to explore the immune system? (About 53 cases)

    PubMed Central

    El-Azami-El-Idrissi, Mohammed; Lakhdar-Idrissi, Mounia; Chaouki, Sanae; Atmani, Samir; Bouharrou, Abdelhak; Hida, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory tract infections are one of the most frequent reasons for pediatric visits and hospitalization. Causes of this pathology are multiple ranging from congenital to acquired and local to general. Immune deficiencies are considered as underlying conditions predisposing to this pathology. Our work is about to determine when and how to explore the immune system when facing recurrent respiratory infections. This was based on the records of 53 children hospitalized at the pediatrics unit of Hassan II University Hospital, Fez Morocco. Thirty boys and 23 girls with age ranging from 5 months to 12 years with an average age of 2 years were involved in this study. Bronchial foreign body was the main etiology in children of 3 to 6 year old. Gastro-esophageal reflux, which in some cases is a consequence of chronic cough, as well as asthma were most frequent in infants (17 and 15% respectively). Immune deficiency was described in 7.5% of patients and the only death we deplored in our series belongs to this group. Recurrent respiratory tract infections have multiple causes. In our series they are dominated by foreign body inhalation and gastroesophageal reflux, which in some cases is a consequence of a chronic cough. Immune deficiency is not frequent but could influence the prognosis. Therefore immune explorations should be well codified. PMID:27642394

  17. Pediatric recurrent respiratory tract infections: when and how to explore the immune system? (About 53 cases).

    PubMed

    El-Azami-El-Idrissi, Mohammed; Lakhdar-Idrissi, Mounia; Chaouki, Sanae; Atmani, Samir; Bouharrou, Abdelhak; Hida, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory tract infections are one of the most frequent reasons for pediatric visits and hospitalization. Causes of this pathology are multiple ranging from congenital to acquired and local to general. Immune deficiencies are considered as underlying conditions predisposing to this pathology. Our work is about to determine when and how to explore the immune system when facing recurrent respiratory infections. This was based on the records of 53 children hospitalized at the pediatrics unit of Hassan II University Hospital, Fez Morocco. Thirty boys and 23 girls with age ranging from 5 months to 12 years with an average age of 2 years were involved in this study. Bronchial foreign body was the main etiology in children of 3 to 6 year old. Gastro-esophageal reflux, which in some cases is a consequence of chronic cough, as well as asthma were most frequent in infants (17 and 15% respectively). Immune deficiency was described in 7.5% of patients and the only death we deplored in our series belongs to this group. Recurrent respiratory tract infections have multiple causes. In our series they are dominated by foreign body inhalation and gastroesophageal reflux, which in some cases is a consequence of a chronic cough. Immune deficiency is not frequent but could influence the prognosis. Therefore immune explorations should be well codified.

  18. Too little but not too late: Results of a literature review to improve routine immunization programs in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Ryman, Tove K; Dietz, Vance; Cairns, K Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Background Globally, immunization services have been the center of renewed interest with increased funding to improve services, acceleration of the introduction of new vaccines, and the development of a health systems approach to improve vaccine delivery. Much of the credit for the increased attention is due to the work of the GAVI Alliance and to new funding streams. If routine immunization programs are to take full advantage of the newly available resources, managers need to understand the range of proven strategies and approaches to deliver vaccines to reduce the incidence of diseases. In this paper, we present strategies that may be used at the sub-national level to improve routine immunization programs. Methods We conducted a systematic review of studies and projects reported in the published and gray literature. Each paper that met our inclusion criteria was rated based on methodological rigor and data were systematically abstracted. Routine-immunization – specific papers with a methodological rigor rating of greater than 60% and with conclusive results were reported. Results Greater than 11,000 papers were identified, of which 60 met our inclusion criteria and 25 papers were reported. Papers were grouped into four strategy approaches: bringing immunizations closer to communities (n = 11), using information dissemination to increase demand for vaccination (n = 3), changing practices in fixed sites (n = 4), and using innovative management practices (n = 7). Conclusion Immunization programs are at a historical crossroads in terms of developing new funding streams, introducing new vaccines, and responding to the global interest in the health systems approach to improving immunization delivery. However, to complement this, actual service delivery needs to be strengthened and program managers must be aware of proven strategies. Much was learned from the 25 papers, such as the use of non-health workers to provide numerous services at the community level. However

  19. Histopathologic features of the liver in pediatric acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jonas, M M; Roldan, E O; Lyons, H J; Fojaco, R M; Reddy, R K

    1989-07-01

    Autopsy and liver biopsy specimens from 30 pediatric patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS-related complex (ARC) were retrospectively reviewed. Of 28 cases with histologic abnormalities, the following findings were noted singly or in combination: giant-cell transformation, cytomegalovirus inclusions, Kaposi's sarcoma, diffuse lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate, granulomatous hepatitis, mild portal inflammation, necrosis around central veins, steatosis, and cholestasis. For the most part, abnormalities in the liver were not predictive of those in other organs, but the two children with the diffuse parenchymal lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate also had lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis (LIP). Liver histopathology in pediatric patients with AIDS shares some features with that in adults, but appreciable differences are noted. In particular, these differences include the higher frequency of giant-cell transformation and the lower frequency of granulomas in children and the observation of diffuse lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate associated with LIP.

  20. What is herd immunity, and how does it relate to pediatric vaccination uptake? US parent perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sobo, Elisa J

    2016-09-01

    In light of current concern over pediatric immunization rates, 53 US parents with at least one child kindergarten age or younger were surveyed and interviewed regarding vaccine decision making. Data were collected in 2014 in San Diego, California. Herd immunity was not a salient issue: only six (11.3%) referenced the term or concept spontaneously; others had to be prompted. Parents familiar with herd immunity (70%) variously saw it as not just unnecessary but unproven, illogical, unrealistic, and unreliable. For instance, parents questioned its attainability because many adults do not immunize themselves. Some understood the concept negatively, as an instance of "herd mentality." Further, having knowledge of herd immunity that public health experts would deem 'correct' did not lead to full vaccination. Implications of findings for understanding how the public makes use of scientific information, the potential role of public health messaging regarding altruism and 'free-riding,' and assumptions that vaccine-cautious parents would willfully take advantage of herd immunity are explored in relation to parent role expectations and American individualism.

  1. Auditing the Immunization Data Quality from Routine Reports in Shangyu District, East China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu; Zhang, Xinpei; Li, Qian; Chen, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the immunization data quality in Shangyu District, East China. Methods: An audit for immunization data for the year 2014 was conducted in 20 vaccination clinics of Shangyu District. The consistency of immunization data was estimated by verification factors (VFs), which was the proportion of vaccine doses reported as being administered that could be verified by written documentation at vaccination clinics. The quality of monitoring systems was evaluated using the quality index (QI). Results: The VFs of 20 vaccine doses ranged from 0.94 to 1.04 at the district level. The VFs for the 20 vaccination clinics ranged from 0.57 to 1.07. The VFs for Shangyu District was 0.98. The mean of total QI score of the 20 vaccination clinics was 80.32%. A significant correlation between the VFs of the 3rd dose of the diphtheria–tetanus–pertussis combined vaccine (DTP) and QI scores was observed at the vaccination clinic level. Conclusions: Deficiencies in data consistency and immunization reporting practice in Shangyu District were observed. Targeted measures are suggested to improve the quality of the immunization reporting system in vaccination clinics with poor data consistency. PMID:27869729

  2. Cost-effectiveness of routine immunization to control Japanese encephalitis in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ding; Kilgore, Paul E.; Clemens, John D.; Wei, Liu; Zhi-Yi, Xu

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the cost-effectiveness of inactivated and live attenuated Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccines given to infants and children in Shanghai. METHODS: A decision-analytical model was constructed in order to compare costs and outcomes for three hypothetical cohorts of 100,000 children followed from birth in 1997 to the age of 30 years who received either no JE vaccine, inactivated JE vaccine (P3), or live attenuated JE vaccine (SA 14-14-2). Cumulative incidences of JE from birth to 30 years of age in the pre-immunization era, i.e. before 1968, were used to estimate expected rates of JE in the absence of vaccination. The economic consequences were measured as cost per case, per death, and per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted for the two JE immunization programmes. FINDINGS: In comparison with no JE immunization, a programme using the P3 vaccine would prevent 420 JE cases and 105 JE deaths and would save 6456 DALYs per 100,000 persons; the use of the SA 14-14-2 vaccine would prevent 427 cases and 107 deaths and would save 6556 DALYs per 100,000 persons. Both kinds of immunization were cost saving but the SA 14-14-2 vaccine strategy resulted in a saving that was 47% greater (512,456 US dollars) than that obtained with the P3 vaccine strategy (348,246 US dollars). CONCLUSION: Both JE immunization strategies resulted in cost savings in comparison with no JE immunization. This provides a strong economic rationale for vaccinating against JE in Shanghai and suggests that vaccination against JE might be economically justifiable in other parts of China and in certain other developing countries of Asia where the disease is endemic. PMID:12856051

  3. Introduction of sequential inactivated polio vaccine-oral polio vaccine schedule for routine infant immunization in Brazil's National Immunization Program.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Carla Magda Allan S; de Fátima Pereira, Sirlene; Cunha Marreiros, Ana Carolina; Menezes, Nair; Flannery, Brendan

    2014-11-01

    In August 2012, the Brazilian Ministry of Health introduced inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) as part of sequential polio vaccination schedule for all infants beginning their primary vaccination series. The revised childhood immunization schedule included 2 doses of IPV at 2 and 4 months of age followed by 2 doses of oral polio vaccine (OPV) at 6 and 15 months of age. One annual national polio immunization day was maintained to provide OPV to all children aged 6 to 59 months. The decision to introduce IPV was based on preventing rare cases of vaccine-associated paralytic polio, financially sustaining IPV introduction, ensuring equitable access to IPV, and preparing for future OPV cessation following global eradication. Introducing IPV during a national multivaccination campaign led to rapid uptake, despite challenges with local vaccine supply due to high wastage rates. Continuous monitoring is required to achieve high coverage with the sequential polio vaccine schedule.

  4. Effects of fenbendazole on routine immune response parameters of BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Cray, Carolyn; Villar, David; Zaias, Julia; Altman, Norman H

    2008-11-01

    Fenbendazole (FBZ) is an anthelmintic drug widely used to treat and prevent pinworm outbreaks in laboratory rodents. Although data in nonrodent species indicate possible effects of fenbendazole on the bone marrow and lymphocyte proliferation and function, little has been reported regarding possible effects on the rodent immune system. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of a therapeutic regimen of FBZ on immune parameters in BALB/c mice. Both 9-wk on-off and 5-wk continuous medicated feed protocols were assessed. No significant differences between normal and FBZ diet treated mice were observed in the following parameters: complete blood count, blood chemistry, quantitation of major T and B cell markers in spleen, quantitation of T cell markers in the thymus, spleen cell proliferation to T and B cell mitogens, bone marrow colony-forming cell assays, skin graft rejection, and primary and secondary humoral immune responses. These data indicate that FBZ treatment does not affect many standard broad measures of immune function.

  5. Coverage and predictors of routine immunization among 12-23 months old children in disaster affected communities in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Shafiq Ur; Siddiqui, Amna Rehana; Ahmed, Jamil; Fatmi, Zafar; Shah, Sayed Masoom; Rahman, Aisha; Yousafzai, Mohammad Tahir

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed this study to determine the relationship of various factors related to poor immunization in children in an earthquake affected community. Materials and Methods: We conducted this cross-sectional study during 2007-2008 in Muzaffarabad district of Pakistani side of Kashmir. We selected 43 villages as clusters and in the second, 860 children between 12 and 24 months were selected from households through systematic sampling. Mothers of the eligible children were interviewed with a questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was run to measure the association of various factors with appropriate immunization status of the children. Results: We found that 74% of children had completed their required doses of routine immunization. There were greater odds of a child being unvaccinated if the family lived at a distance that was to be covered in more than 10 min by any transport (odds ratio [OR]: 1.12, confidence interval [CI]: 1.08-1.17), mother of the child was not educated (OR:2.4, 1.3-4.4), child belonged to a low socioeconomic status (OR:3.5, CI: 2.1-6.3), family had any challenge or situation that where they could not take the child to a health facility for vaccination (OR: 2.3, CI: 1.4-3.7) and for a female child that belonged to minority ethnic group (OR: 1.7, CI: 1.0-2.5). Conclusion: Improvement in access of communities, especially of minority and poor in disaster-stricken, to immunization services and female education and awareness about the need for immunization in children could play a role in improving immunization coverage in such settings. PMID:28293154

  6. The impact of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative on the financing of routine immunization: case studies in Bangladesh, C te d'Ivoire, and Morocco.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Ann; Ram, Sujata; Kaddar, Miloud

    2002-01-01

    To determine if the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (PEI) affected financing of routine immunization programmes, we compared sources and uses of funds for routine immunization programmes and PEI activities in Bangladesh, C te d'Ivoire, and Morocco for the years 1993-98. We also examined funding trends for these years in these countries and assessed the effect of the initiative on the availability of specific resources in national immunization programmes, such as cold-chain equipment and personnel time spent on activities related to national immunization days and surveillance of poliomyelitis and acute flaccid paralysis. We found that all three governments and the majority of donors and international organizations continued to fund routine immunization programmes at levels similar to those before the PEI. Trend analysis also indicated that financing for routine immunization in each of the countries continued to increase after the PEI was introduced. The results show that the PEI did not reduce funding for routine immunizations in these countries. PMID:12471404

  7. Pediatrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spackman, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The utilization of the Lixiscope in pediatrics was investigated. The types of images that can presently be obtained are discussed along with the problems encountered. Speculative applications for the Lixiscope are also presented.

  8. DNMT3B promoter polymorphism and risk of immune thrombocytopenic purpura in pediatric Egyptians.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Iman A; Abukhalil, Reham E; Ali, Dina K; Afifi, Rasha A

    2012-10-01

    Idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a heterogeneous clinical disorder characterized by immune-mediated platelet destruction. Epigenetic changes in gene expression, including DNA methylation and histone modifications, might contribute to autoimmunity. Polymorphisms of the DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) gene may influence DNMT3B activity on DNA methylation and increase the susceptibility to several diseases. The current study investigated the association between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the promoter of DNMT3B gene and the risk for ITP in pediatric Egyptians. DNMT3B SNP was genotyped by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism in 71 pediatric ITP patients and 82 healthy controls matched for age and sex. The C/C wild genotype was not detected in ITP patients or in the controls. The frequencies of the T/T and C/T genotypes were 93.9 and 6.1% in the controls and 91.5 and 6.1% in ITP patients, respectively. There was no significant difference in either genotypes or allelic distribution between ITP patients and the controls. In conclusion, this polymorphism was almost equally distributed between ITP patients and the controls. These results demonstrated that this SNP may not be used as a stratification marker to predict the susceptibility to childhood ITP in Egypt.

  9. Home intravenous antibiotic treatment for febrile episodes in immune-compromised pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, E; Yaniv, I; Drucker, M; Hadad, S; Goshen, Y; Stein, J; Ash, S; Fisher, S; Zaizov, R

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility of home intravenous antibiotic treatment (HIAT) for febrile episodes in immune-compromised (neutropenic, splenectomized), low-risk pediatric patients. Thirty hematology-oncology patients who presented to our emergency room from January 1993 to January 1995 and who suffered from a febrile episode and were considered at low risk for septic complications were immediately discharged on HIAT. Patients were followed for at least 3 weeks after recovery. Patients and parents were retrospectively questioned about adverse effects and about their degree of satisfaction with home treatment. Patients who required hospitalization during this period were considered unresponsive to HIAT and were analyzed for causes and adverse effects. Thirteen out of 60 (22%) febrile episodes, or eight out of 42 (19%) episodes of fever and neutropenia eventually led to hospitalization. Pseudomonas species infections were associated with the highest rate of unresponsiveness (88%). A central venous catheter infection developed in two cases following HIAT (two cases out of 640 days of therapy). No other complications were identified. No infection-related morbidity was observed. Patients and parents were highly satisfied with HIAT and wanted to use it again, if necessary. Immediate discharge on HIAT for low-risk pediatric immune-compromised patients suffering from a febrile episode is feasible, safe, and well accepted by patients and families. Patients who are found to have Pseudomonas infections should probably be hospitalized. Our results are preliminary and must be confirmed by a prospective, randomized trial before definite recommendations can be made.

  10. The role of routine polio immunization in the post-certification era.

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Roland W.; Cáceres, Victor M.; Mas Lago, Pedro

    2004-01-01

    The role of routine vaccination against poliomyelitis for the post-certification era remains an important area for policy decision-making. Two critical decisions need to be taken: first, to continue or discontinue vaccination with the live attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV); and second, if OPV is to be discontinued, whether vaccination with inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) is needed. Four potential vaccination scenarios can be constructed: stop all polio vaccination; continue with current vaccination policies (OPV, IPV, or sequential schedule); discontinue OPV, but continue IPV universally; or discontinue OPV, but continue IPV in selected countries. All possible scenarios require continued investments in a surveillance and response strategy, including a stockpile of polio vaccine. Continuing vaccination would limit the savings that could be applied to the control of other health priorities. This report reviews the key issues associated with each scenario, highlights the advantages and disadvantages of each scenario, and outlines the major challenges for policy decision-making. PMID:15106298

  11. Long-term anti-HBs antibody persistence and immune memory in children and adolescents who received routine childhood hepatitis B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Behre, Ulrich; Bleckmann, Gerhard; Crasta, Priya Diana; Leyssen, Maarten; Messier, Marc; Jacquet, Jeanne-Marie; Hardt, Karin

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents data from two studies that evaluated 5-y and 10-y persistence of antibodies against hepatitis B (HBV) surface antigen (anti-HBs) and immune response to an HBV vaccine challenge in children and adolescents who had received three doses of a HBV vaccine in infancy as part of routine clinical practice [NCT00519649/NCT00984139]. Anti-HBs antibody concentrations ≥ 10 mIU/ml persisted in 83.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 78.5–87.5) and 78.3% (95% CI: 73.1–83.0) of subjects aged 7–8 y and 12–13 y, respectively 5–10 y after infant vaccination. One month postchallenge dose, 98.2% (95% CI: 95.9–99.4) and 93.7% (95% CI: 90.2–96.2) of subjects in the two age groups, respectively had anti-HBs antibody concentrations ≥ 100 mIU/ml. Overall, 99.6% (95% CI: 98–100) and 97.2% (95% CI: 94.5–98.8) of subjects aged 7–8 y and 12–13 y mounted an anamnestic response to the HBV challenge dose, which was well-tolerated. Healthy children aged 7–8 y and adolescents aged 12–13 y received three doses of a monovalent pediatric HBV vaccine (10 μg of HBsAg) before 18 mo of age. Serum samples collected before and one month post-HBV vaccine challenge dose were tested for anti-HBs antibody concentrations. Safety assessments were made for the HBV vaccine challenge dose. A three-dose childhood HBV immunization regimen induced persistence of antibodies against HBV infection for 10 y, up to adolescence. This vaccination regimen also conferred long-term immune memory against HBV as evidenced by the strong anamnestic response to the HBV vaccine challenge, despite waning anti-HBs antibody levels.

  12. Genetic Polymorphisms in Inflammasome-Dependent Innate Immunity among Pediatric Patients with Severe Renal Parenchymal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Hui; Lee, Yun-Shien; Chang, Chee-Jen; Lin, Jui-Che; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammasome innate immune response activation has been demonstrated in various inflammatory diseases and microbial infections. However, to our knowledge, no study has examined the inflammasome-dependent pathways in patients with urinary tract infection. Defective or variant genes associated with innate immunity are believed to alter the host’s susceptibility to microbial infection. This study investigated genetic polymorphisms in genes encoding inflammasomes and the subsequent released cytokines in pediatric patients with severe renal parenchymal infections. Methodology This study included patients diagnosed with acute pyelonephritis (APN) and acute lobar nephronia (ALN) who had no underlying disease or structural anomalies other than vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping was performed in the genes associated with inflammasome formation and activation (NLRP3, CARD8) and subsequent IL–1β cytokine generation (IL–1β). Principal Findings A total of 40 SNPs were selected for initial genotyping. Analysis of samples from 48 patients each and 96 controls revealed that only nine SNPs (five SNPs in NLRP3; three SNPs in CARD8; one SNP in IL–1β) had heterozygosity rates >0.01. Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium was satisfied for the observed genotype frequencies of these SNPs. Analysis excluding patients with VUR, a well-known risk factor for severe UTIs, revealed a lower frequency of the CC genotype in NLRP3 (rs4612666) in patients with APN and ALN than in controls. Correction for multiple-SNP testing showed that the non-VUR subgroup of the APN+ALN combined patient groups remained significantly different from the control group (P < 0.0055). Conclusions This study is the first to suggest that the inflammasome-dependent innate immunity pathway is associated with the pathogenesis of pediatric severe renal parenchymal infections. Further investigation is warranted to clarify its pathogenic mechanism. PMID:26444566

  13. Evaluation of two yellow fever vaccines for routine immunization programs in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Carlos; Ponce, Amalia; Wilson, Mario M; Sharif, Norma; Vides, José B; Armoni, Judith; Teuwen, Dirk E

    2008-01-01

    Although highly effective vaccines have been available for almost 70 years, an estimated 200,000 cases of YF, including 30,000 deaths, still occur annually. This study evaluated the safety of two yellow fever (YF) vaccines [Stamaril and Vacina Contra Febre Amarela (VCFA)]. A total of 2,514 subjects were randomized equally to receive Stamaril or VCFA. Immediate reactions occurring within 30 minutes after vaccination, and solicited local and systemic reactions occurring within eight days, were monitored. Unsolicited local, systemic adverse events and serious adverse events (SAE) were recorded for 21 days after vaccination. Solicited local and systemic adverse reactions were reported by 15.3-17.6% and 30.4-31.6% of the Stamaril and VCFA groups, respectively. Only 56 of the 2,514 study subjects (2.2%) reported a severe solicited adverse reaction, 25 in the Stamaril group (1.99%) and 31 in the VFCA group (2.49%), (p=0.403). Ten subjects (0.8%) in each group reported at least one severe solicited local reaction (p = 0.988). A total of 18 Stamaril subjects (1.43%) and 21 VCFA subjects (1.68%) reported at least one severe solicited systemic reaction (p = 0.617) One SAE considered related to vaccination occurred, polymyalgia in the VCFA group. No immediate reactions to vaccination were seen. Vaccine-related unsolicited events were infrequent, 1.4% in the Stamaril group and 2.0% VCFA group, generally of mild or moderate intensity. We conclude that the safety profiles of Stamaril and VCFA support routine vaccination to prevent YF in residents of and travelers to endemic areas of South America and Africa.

  14. Forewarning of Poliovirus Outbreaks in the Horn of Africa: An Assessment of Acute Flaccid Paralysis Surveillance and Routine Immunization Systems in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Allison Taylor; Sodha, Samir; Warren, Wick C.; Sergon, Kibet; Kiptoon, Shem; Ogange, John; Ahmeda, Abdi Hassan; Eshetu, Messeret; Corkum, Melissa; Pillai, Satish; Scobie, Heather; Mdodo, Rennatus; Tack, Danielle M.; Halldin, Cara; Appelgren, Kristie; Kretsinger, Katrina; Bensyl, Diana M.; Njeru, Ian; Kolongei, Titus; Muigai, Juliet; Ismail, Amina; Okiror, Samuel O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the Horn of Africa region has successfully eliminated endemic poliovirus circulation, it remains at risk for reintroduction. International partners assisted Kenya in identifying gaps in the polio surveillance and routine immunization programs, and provided recommendations for improved surveillance and routine immunization during the health system decentralization process. Methods Structured questionnaires collected information about acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance resources, training, data monitoring, and supervision at provincial, district, and health facility levels. The routine immunization program information collected included questions about vaccine and resource availability, cold chain, logistics, health-care services and access, outreach coverage data, microplanning, and management and monitoring of AFP surveillance. Results Although AFP surveillance met national performance standards, widespread deficiencies and limited resources were observed and reported at all levels. Deficiencies were related to provider knowledge, funding, training, and supervision, and were particularly evident at the health facility level. Conclusions Gap analysis assists in maximizing resources and capacity building in countries where surveillance and routine immunization lag behind other health priorities. Limited resources for surveillance and routine immunization systems in the region indicate a risk for additional outbreaks of wild poliovirus and other vaccine-preventable illnesses. Monitoring and evaluation of program strengthening activities are needed. PMID:25316880

  15. A Clinical and Laboratory Approach to the Evaluation of Innate Immunity in Pediatric CVID Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kutukculer, Necil; Azarsiz, Elif; Karaca, Neslihan Edeer; Ulusoy, Ezgi; Koturoglu, Guldane; Aksu, Guzide

    2015-01-01

    Defective adaptive immune responses are well studied in common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) patients; however, more focus is needed on innate immune system defects to explain CVID’s clinical and laboratory heterogeneity. This is the first study comparing migratory function of granulocytes, oxidative burst activity of phagocytic cells, surface integrin expressions on neutrophils and lymphocytes, natural killer (NK) cell numbers and cytotoxic activity, natural killer T cells, lymphocyte subsets such as CD8+CD28+, CD4+CTLA-4+ cells in CVID patients (n: 20) and healthy controls (n: 26). The relationship between laboratory findings and some clinical was also investigated. CD3+CD8+ T cytotoxic cells were found to be elevated in CVID patients, but CD3+CD8+CD28+ or CD3+CD8+CD28− cells did not show any significant difference. CD4+CTLA-4+ cell percentages were significantly lower in CVID patients compared to healthy controls. Severe CVID patients had decreased percentages of NK cells with increased NK cell cytotoxicity suggesting possibly increased activation. Furthermore, CD3−CD16+CD56+CD28+ cells of CVID patients were elevated while percentage of CD28− NK cells was decreased. Neutrophil migration percentages were lower but and oxidative burst activity was not affected. CD11a expressions on these cells were depressed in contrast to increased expression of CD18. Innate immunity defects may affect the extent of recurrence and severity of infections in CVID. Our observations highlight some of these associations and indicate the need for further similar studies for improving better innate system evaluation batteries for these patients. Further phenotypic correlations of these analyses will help clinicians reach a more definitive target for the molecular genetic diagnostic of pediatric CVID patients. PMID:25964782

  16. Hospitalizations in pediatric patients with immune thrombocytopenia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Tarantino, Michael D.; Danese, Mark; Klaassen, Robert J.; Duryea, Jennifer; Eisen, Melissa; Bussel, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To examine utilization and outcomes in pediatric immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) hospitalizations, we used ICD-9 code 287.31 to identify hospitalizations in patients with ITP in the 2009 HCUP KID, an all-payer sample of pediatric hospitalizations from US community hospitals. Diagnosis and procedure codes were used to estimate rates of ITP-related procedures, comorbidity prevalence, costs, length of stay (LOS), and mortality. In 2009, there were an estimated 4499 hospitalizations in children aged 6 months–17 years with ITP; 43% in children aged 1–5 years; and 47% with emergency department encounters. The mean hospitalization cost was $5398, mean LOS 2.0 days, with 0.3% mortality (n = 13). With any bleeding (15.2%, including gastrointestinal 2.0%, hematuria 1.3%, intracranial hemorrhage [ICH] 0.6%), mean hospitalization cost was $7215, LOS 2.5 days, with 1.5% mortality. For ICH (0.6%, n = 27), mean cost was $40 209, LOS 8.5 days, with 21% mortality. With infections (14%, including upper respiratory 5.2%, viral 4.9%, bacterial 1.9%), the mean cost was $6928, LOS 2.9 days, with 0.9% mortality. Septic shock was reported in 0.3% of discharges. Utilization included immunoglobulin administration (37%) and splenectomies (2.3%). Factors associated with higher costs included age >6 years, ICH, hematuria, transfusion, splenectomy, and bone marrow diagnostics (p < 0.05). In conclusion, of the 4499 hospitalizations with ITP, mortality rates of 1.5%, 21%, and 0.9% were seen with any bleeding, ICH, and infection, respectively. Higher costs were associated with clinically significant bleeding and procedures. Future analyses may reveal effects of the implementation of more recent ITP guidelines and use of additional treatments. PMID:26941022

  17. Strengthening the partnership between routine immunization and the global polio eradication initiative to achieve eradication and assure sustainability.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Jalaa; Dietz, Vance; Eggers, Rudolf; Maher, Christopher; Olaniran, Marianne; Sandhu, Hardeep; Vandelaer, Jos

    2014-11-01

    Since the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) in 1988, the number of polio endemic countries has declined from 125 to 3 in 2013. Despite this remarkable achievement, ongoing circulation of wild poliovirus in polio-endemic countries and the increase in the number of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus cases, especially those caused by type 2, is a cause for concern. The Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018 (PEESP) was developed and includes 4 objectives: detection and interruption of poliovirus transmission, containment and certification, legacy planning, and a renewed emphasis on strengthening routine immunization (RI) programs. This is critical for the phased withdrawal of oral poliovirus vaccine, beginning with the type 2 component, and the introduction of a single dose of inactivated polio vaccine into RI programs. This objective has inspired renewed consideration of how the GPEI and RI programs can mutually benefit one another, how the infrastructure from the GPEI can be used to strengthen RI, and how a strengthened RI can facilitate polio eradication. The PEESP is the first GPEI strategic plan that places strong and clear emphasis on the necessity of improving RI to achieve and sustain global polio eradication.

  18. The Impact of Polio Eradication on Routine Immunization and Primary Health Care: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Closser, Svea; Cox, Kelly; Parris, Thomas M.; Landis, R. Matthew; Justice, Judith; Gopinath, Ranjani; Maes, Kenneth; Banteyerga Amaha, Hailom; Mohammed, Ismaila Zango; Dukku, Aminu Mohammed; Omidian, Patricia A.; Varley, Emma; Tedoff, Pauley; Koon, Adam D.; Nyirazinyoye, Laetitia; Luck, Matthew A.; Pont, W. Frank; Neergheen, Vanessa; Rosenthal, Anat; Nsubuga, Peter; Thacker, Naveen; Jooma, Rashid; Nuttall, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background. After 2 decades of focused efforts to eradicate polio, the impact of eradication activities on health systems continues to be controversial. This study evaluated the impact of polio eradication activities on routine immunization (RI) and primary healthcare (PHC). Methods. Quantitative analysis assessed the effects of polio eradication campaigns on RI and maternal healthcare coverage. A systematic qualitative analysis in 7 countries in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa assessed impacts of polio eradication activities on key health system functions, using data from interviews, participant observation, and document review. Results. Our quantitative analysis did not find compelling evidence of widespread and significant effects of polio eradication campaigns, either positive or negative, on measures of RI and maternal healthcare. Our qualitative analysis revealed context-specific positive impacts of polio eradication activities in many of our case studies, particularly disease surveillance and cold chain strengthening. These impacts were dependent on the initiative of policy makers. Negative impacts, including service interruption and public dissatisfaction, were observed primarily in districts with many campaigns per year. Conclusions. Polio eradication activities can provide support for RI and PHC, but many opportunities to do so remain missed. Increased commitment to scaling up best practices could lead to significant positive impacts. PMID:24690667

  19. Providing Information About Late Effects During Routine Follow-Up Consultations Between Pediatric Oncologists and Adolescent Survivors: A Video-Based, Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Korsvold, Live; Finset, Arnstein; Loge, Jon; Ruud, Ellen; Lie, Hanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Information about late effects is a prerequisite for survivors of childhood cancers to engage in self-management of their health. Yet, many lack such knowledge. This study investigated to what extent: (1) potential late effects were discussed with adolescent and young adult (AYA)-aged survivors (of pediatric cancer), and (2) information about late effects was provided by the pediatric oncologists (POs) during routine follow-up consultations. Methods: Consultations were recorded with 10 POs and 66 adolescents, aged 12–20 years, treated for leukemia (72.7%) or lymphoma (21.2%), or who had received hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for a benign disease (7.6%). Discussions of potential late effects were identified and coded, and then the amount of information about late effects provided was categorized into three levels: none, basic, and extended information. Results: Potential late effects were discussed in 85% of the consultations. Of these, 71% were PO initiated, and 60% concerned existing health problems. The POs provided none, basic, and extended information about late effects in 41%, 30%, and 29% of these discussions. Patients' age, time since treatment, and risk of late effects were not associated with amount of potential late effects discussed, but the type of potential late effect (physical vs. psychosocial and current vs. future risk) and PO were. Conclusion: Potential late effects were frequently discussed, thus providing ample opportunity to provide information about late effects to adolescent cancer survivors. The observed PO variability in providing such information indicates a need for standardization of information practices. PMID:26697269

  20. Detection of expression of IL-18 and its binding protein in Egyptian pediatric immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Iman A; Botros, Shahira K A; Morgan, Dalia S

    2014-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder, characterized by dysfunctional cellular immunity including the presence of activated platelet specific autoreactive T cells that recognize and respond to autologous platelet antigens. Autoreactive T cells drive the generation of platelet reactive autoantibodies by B cells as well as T-cytotoxic cell-mediated lysis of platelets. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a mediator of T helper type 1 cell responses synergistically with IL-12 that initiate and promote host defense and inflammation. IL-18 has a specific binding protein (IL-18BP) which belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. In the present study, serum level and messenger RNA( mRNA) expression of IL-18 as well as IL-18BP mRNA expression were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) of 100 Egyptian pediatric patients with ITP (70 acute and 30 chronic). In addition to this, we recruited 80 healthy volunteers in order to investigate the possible association between the imbalance of IL-18 and IL-18 BP expressions and the pathogenesis of ITP. IL-18 serum level and mRNA expression were not elevated in cases more than in the control group, but IL-18 mRNA was higher in chronic cases when compared to the acute ones (p=0.031) and there was a good negative correlation between the platelet count and serum IL-18. IL-18 BP m-RNA was slightly elevated in cases more than in the control group (95% Confidence interval=1.15-2.01). Our results were not supportive for previous findings of elevated IL18/BP mRNA ratio in ITP patients. This could be referred to the fact that autoimmune diseases are complex genetic disorders, therefore further studies on polymorphisms affecting IL-18 gene expression as well as kinetics of IL-18 expression are required to evaluate the role of interleukin 18 and its binding protein in the pathogenesis of ITP.

  1. Routine Immunization Consultant Program in Nigeria: A Qualitative Review of a Country-Driven Management Approach for Health Systems Strengthening

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Meghan; Wonodi, Chizoba

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Since 2002, the Nigerian government has deployed consultants to states to provide technical assistance for routine immunization (RI). RI consultants are expected to play a role in supportive supervision of health facility staff, capacity building, advocacy, and monitoring and evaluation. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of the RI consultant program’s strengths and weaknesses in 7 states and at the national level from June to September 2014 using semi-structured interviews and online surveys. Participants included RI consultants, RI program leaders, and implementers purposively drawn from national, state, and local government levels. Thematic analysis was used to analyze qualitative data from the interviews, which were triangulated with results from the quantitative surveys. Findings: At the time of data collection, 23 of 36 states and the federal capital territory had an RI consultant. Of the 7 states visited during the study, only 3 states had present and visibly working consultants. We conducted 84 interviews with 101 participants across the 7 states and conducted data analysis on 70 interviews (with 82 individuals) that had complete data. Among the full sample of interview respondents (N = 101), most (66%) were men with an average age of 49 years (±5.6), and the majority were technical officers (63%) but a range of other roles were also represented, including consultants (22%), directors (13%), and health workers (2%). Fifteen consultants and 44 program leaders completed the online surveys. Interview data from the 3 states with active RI consultants indicated that the consultants’ main contribution was supportive supervision at the local level, particularly for collecting and using RI data for decision making. They also acted as effective advocates for RI funding. In states without an RI consultant, gaps were highlighted in data management capacity and in monitoring of RI funds. Program design strengths: the broad terms

  2. Use of Recombinant Factor VIIa in a Pediatric Patient With Initial Presentation of Refractory Acute Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Severe Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gurion, Reut; Siu, Anita; Weiss, Aaron R.; Masterson, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Severe bleeding in acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is rare but can cause significant complications to the patient. Here we report the case of a pediatric patient with acute ITP and hematuria refractory to anti-D immune globulin, high dose intravenous immunoglobulin G, and high dose steroids. Her hematuria was successfully treated with recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa). While further investigation on the use of rFVIIa in ITP is warranted, this case report contributes to the pediatric literature for its use during the course of an initial presentation of ITP with hemorrhagic complications. PMID:23258971

  3. IgA1 immune complexes from pediatric patients with IgA nephropathy activate cultured human mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    Raskova Kafkova, Leona; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tomana, Milan; Matousovic, Karel; Brown, Rhubell; Hall, Stacy; Sanders, John T.; Eison, T. Matthew; Moldoveanu, Zina; Novak, Lea; Novak, Zdenek; Mayne, Richard; Julian, Bruce A.; Mestecky, Jiri; Wyatt, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Circulating immune complexes (CIC) containing galactose (Gal)-deficient IgA1 from adults with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) induce proliferation of cultured mesangial cells, but activities of CIC from pediatric patients with the disease have not been studied. Methods. CIC of different sizes were isolated from sera of pediatric and adult IgAN patients and their effects on cultured human mesangial cells (MC) were assessed by measuring cellular proliferation, expression of IL-6 and IL-8 and laminin and phosphotyrosine signaling. Results. Large CIC from pediatric IgAN patients (>800 kDa) containing Gal-deficient IgA1 stimulated cellular proliferation, whereas in some patients, smaller CIC were inhibitory. Addition of stimulatory and inhibitory CIC to MC differentially altered phosphorylation patterns of three major tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins of molecular mass 37, 60 and 115 kDa. The stimulatory CIC transiently increased tyrosine-phosphorylation of the 37-kDa protein and decreased phosphorylation of the other two proteins, whereas the inhibitory CIC increased phosphorylation of all three proteins. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of IgA1-containing CIC from sera of children with IgAN with clinically active disease (i.e., abnormal urinalysis and/or serum creatinine concentration) or inactive disease (i.e., normal urinalysis and serum creatinine concentration) on the expression of IL-6 and IL-8 genes by mesangial cells. Real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction results showed that the CIC from a patient with active disease stimulated MC to express the two cytokine genes at higher levels than did the CIC from a patient with inactive disease. Moreover, stimulatory CIC increased production of the extracellular matrix protein laminin. Conclusion. These data indicate that sera of pediatric IgAN patients contain biologically active CIC with Gal-deficient IgA1. PMID:21828345

  4. Application of PHEL (Public Health Epidemiological Logic) in devising a vaccination policy: a broad public health criteria-for routine Immunization.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rajan R

    2011-05-01

    There is a need to develop clear cut public health criteria for consideration of new vaccines for use in public health. Most of the vaccines which have become recently available or will soon be available are mostly recommended for use in clinical/office practice. A new vaccine that is highly recommended for use in clinical setting may not be effective at all for larger public health use or may even lack rationale to put it in use for public health. It is stressed that a new vaccine which is proven to be good clinical tool for preventing particular disease at individual level need not necessarily be good public health tool in combating the same disease at community level. The present paper takes a closer look at the logical basis for use of any vaccine in public health. Rabies vaccine is used as a case study to set the background to scrutinize the criteria for eligibility for considering any new vaccine to be included in routine immunization program A rough & ready algorithm is proposed as a check list for a new vaccine as a likely candidate for inclusion in Universal immunization programme.The suggested new algorithm is basically a public health criteria called as Public Health Epidemiological Logic (PHEL) Criteria. The public health debate and the arguments against inclusion of Rabies vaccine in routine national immunization programme in India is a argued in the frame work of PHEL criteria in this paper Rabies vaccine to drive home the point, that a vaccine which is a good clinical tool need not always be a good public health tool, where as a vaccine which is proven to be a good public health tool will always invariably be a good clinical tool as well.

  5. Introduction of Sequential Inactivated Polio Vaccine–Oral Polio Vaccine Schedule for Routine Infant Immunization in Brazil’s National Immunization Program

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Carla Magda Allan S.; de Fátima Pereira, Sirlene; Marreiros, Ana Carolina Cunha; Menezes, Nair; Flannery, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    In August 2012, the Brazilian Ministry of Health introduced inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) as part of sequential polio vaccination schedule for all infants beginning their primary vaccination series. The revised childhood immunization schedule included 2 doses of IPV at 2 and 4 months of age followed by 2 doses of oral polio vaccine (OPV) at 6 and 15 months of age. One annual national polio immunization day was maintained to provide OPV to all children aged 6 to 59 months. The decision to introduce IPV was based on preventing rare cases of vaccine-associated paralytic polio, financially sustaining IPV introduction, ensuring equitable access to IPV, and preparing for future OPV cessation following global eradication. Introducing IPV during a national multivaccination campaign led to rapid uptake, despite challenges with local vaccine supply due to high wastage rates. Continuous monitoring is required to achieve high coverage with the sequential polio vaccine schedule. PMID:25316829

  6. The impact of routine infant immunization with Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine in Malawi, a country with high human immunodeficiency virus prevalence.

    PubMed

    Daza, Paul; Banda, Richard; Misoya, Keystoxe; Katsulukuta, Agnes; Gessner, Bradford D; Katsande, Reggis; Mhlanga, Bekithemba R; Mueller, Judith E; Nelson, Christopher B; Phiri, Amos; Molyneux, Elizabeth M; Molyneux, Malcolm E

    2006-09-11

    Malawi has extreme poverty and a high-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence. Following Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine introduction during 2002, we evaluated vaccine impact by reviewing hospital surveillance data for acute bacterial meningitis in Blantyre district among children age 1-59 months admitted during 1997-2005. Documented annual Hib meningitis incidence rates decreased from 20-40/100,000 to near zero among both rural and urban residents despite no change in pneumococcal meningitis incidence rates. Before vaccine introduction, an average of 10 children/year had Hib meningitis and HIV infection compared to 2/year during 2003-2004 and none during 2005. Vaccine effectiveness was high following two or more doses of vaccine. The most urgent future need is for a sustainable routine infant immunization program, including a less expensive vaccine that preferably is delivered in a multivalent form.

  7. Chronic pediatric pulmonary disease and primary humoral antibody based immune disease.

    PubMed

    Dosanjh, A

    2011-04-01

    Chronic inflammation of the larger airways is a common occurrence in children. A number of factors such as younger age, premature birth, male gender, exposure to environmental smoke or pollution, and crowded housing can increase a child's susceptibility to chronic lung disease. Chronic bronchitis may be caused by an underlying humoral immunodeficiency if the clinical course is recurrent or prolonged. Primary humoral immunodeficiency accounts for approximately 70% of all immunodeficiencies. The differential of chronic bronchitis also includes Cystic Fibrosis, ciliary defects and immune cellular and phagocytic defects. This review will summarize the most common humoral antibody based immune based deficiencies associated with chronic pulmonary disease.

  8. The Randomized Comparative Pediatric Critical Illness Stress-Induced Immune Suppression (CRISIS) Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carcillo, Joseph A.; Dean, J. Michael; Holubkov, Richard; Berger, John; Meert, Kathleen L.; Anand, K. J. S.; Zimmerman, Jerry; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Harrison, Rick; Burr, Jeri; Willson, Douglas F.; Nicholson, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Objective Nosocomial infection / sepsis occurs in up to 40% of children requiring long stay intensive care. Zinc, selenium, glutamine, metoclopramide (a prolactin secretalogue), and or whey protein supplementation have been effective in reducing infection and sepsis in other populations. We evaluated whether daily nutriceutical supplementation with zinc, selenium, glutamine, and metoclopramide, compared to whey protein would reduce the occurrence of nosocomial infection / sepsis in this at-risk population. Design Randomized double blinded comparative effectiveness trial. Setting Eight pediatric intensive care units in the NICHD Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network. Patients Two hundred and ninety three long stay intensive care patients (age 1–17 years) expected to require more than 72 hours of invasive care. Interventions Patients were stratified according to immunocompromised status and center and then randomly assigned to receive daily enteral zinc, selenium, glutamine and IV metoclopramide (n = 149 ZSGM), or daily enteral whey protein (n = 144 WHEY) and IV saline, for up to 28 days of intensive care unit stay. The primary endpoint was time to development of nosocomial sepsis / infection. The analysis was intention to treat. Measurements and Main Results There were no differences by assigned treatment in the overall population with respect to time until the first episode of nosocomial infection / sepsis (median WHEY 13.2 days vs ZSGM 12.1 days, p=0.29 by log rank test) or the rate of nosocomial infection / sepsis (4.83/100 days WHEY vs. 4.99/100 days ZSGM, p = 0.81). Only 9% of the 293 subjects were immunocompromised and there was a reduction in rate of nosocomial infection / sepsis with ZSGM in this immunocompromised group (6.09/100 days WHEY vs 1.57/100 days ZSGM, p value = 0.011). Conclusions Compared with WHEY supplementation, ZSGM conferred no advantage in the immunecompetent population. Further evaluation of ZSGM supplementation is

  9. Hepatitis B immune status in adolescents vaccinated during infancy: A retrospective cohort study from a pediatric practice in Germany.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Carrie L; Remschmidt, Cornelius; Drobnitzky, Frank-Peter; Falkenhorst, Gerhard; Zimmermann, Ruth; Wichmann, Ole; Harder, Thomas

    2016-03-03

    In Germany, vaccination of infants against hepatitis B is recommended since 1995. However, data on long-term immunity is sparse and the necessity of a booster dose remains uncertain. Aims of this study were to assess the long-term persistence of antibodies to the hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) after immunization during infancy and the effect of a subsequent hepatitis B booster vaccination during adolescence on anti-HBs levels. Patients from a private pediatric practice who had received a full vaccination course of hepatitis B as infants and who were quantitatively tested for anti-HBs during adolescence (pre-booster levels) were included. In those participants who received a hepatitis B booster, post-booster anti-HBs levels were measured. Univariate analyses were conducted to determine factors associated with pre- and post-booster anti-HBs levels, respectively. 106 participants (53% male) were included in the study. At an average of 13.7 y after primary vaccination, 14% of participants had an anti-HBs level of ≥100 IU/l, while 46% were at 10-99 IU/l and 40% had anti-HBs levels of <10 IU/l. In total, 34 received a booster vaccination. Of those, 97% (33/34) had post-booster anti-HBs levels ≥ 100 IU/l, which were independent from pre-booster levels. No other patient characteristics were associated with pre-booster or post-booster anti-HBs≥ 100 IU/l. Although almost half of study participants showed low anti-HBs levels at follow-up, robust responses to booster vaccination suggest that adolescents who received the full vaccination course during infancy are still protected against hepatitis B infection.

  10. DNA methylation-associated colonic mucosal immune and defense responses in treatment-naïve pediatric ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Harris, R Alan; Nagy-Szakal, Dorottya; Mir, Sabina A V; Frank, Eibe; Szigeti, Reka; Kaplan, Jess L; Bronsky, Jiri; Opekun, Antone; Ferry, George D; Winter, Harland; Kellermayer, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are emerging globally, indicating that environmental factors may be important in their pathogenesis. Colonic mucosal epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, can occur in response to the environment and have been implicated in IBD pathology. However, mucosal DNA methylation has not been examined in treatment-naïve patients. We studied DNA methylation in untreated, left sided colonic biopsy specimens using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. We analyzed 22 control (C) patients, 15 untreated Crohn's disease (CD) patients, and 9 untreated ulcerative colitis (UC) patients from two cohorts. Samples obtained at the time of clinical remission from two of the treatment-naïve UC patients were also included into the analysis. UC-specific gene expression was interrogated in a subset of adjacent samples (5 C and 5 UC) using the Affymetrix GeneChip PrimeView Human Gene Expression Arrays. Only treatment-naïve UC separated from control. One-hundred-and-twenty genes with significant expression change in UC (> 2-fold, P<0.05) were associated with differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Epigenetically associated gene expression changes (including gene expression changes in the IFITM1, ITGB2, S100A9, SLPI, SAA1, and STAT3 genes) were linked to colonic mucosal immune and defense responses. These findings underscore the relationship between epigenetic changes and inflammation in pediatric treatment-naïve UC and may have potential etiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic relevance for IBD.

  11. Immunogenicity and Effectiveness of Routine Immunization With 1 or 2 Doses of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grassly, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The World Health Organization has recommended that all 124 countries currently using only oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) introduce at least 1 dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) before the global withdrawal of serotype 2 OPV in 2016. A 1- or 2-dose schedule, potentially administered intradermally with reduced antigen content, may make this affordable. Methods. A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies documenting seroconversion after 1 or 2, full or fractional (1/5) doses of enhanced-potency IPV was performed. Studies reporting the clinical efficacy of IPV were also reviewed. Results. Twenty study arms from 12 published articles were included in the analysis of seroconversion. One full dose of intramuscular IPV seroconverted 33%, 41%, and 47% of infants against serotypes 1, 2, and 3 on average, whereas 2 full doses seroconverted 79%, 80%, and 90%, respectively. Seroconversion increased with age at administration. Limited data from case-control studies indicate clinical efficacy equivalent to the proportion seroconverting. One fractional dose of intradermal IPV gave lower seroconversion (10%–40%), but after 2 doses seroconversion was comparable to that with full-dose IPV. Conclusions. Routine immunization with 2 full or fractional doses of IPV given after 10 weeks of age is likely to protect >80% of recipients against poliomyelitis if poliovirus reemerges after withdrawal of OPV serotypes. PMID:24634499

  12. Four is better than nine. a combined diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-hepatitis B-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine for routine immunization in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Swee-Lan; Soosai, Padma; Teoh, Yee-Leong; Han, Htay-Htay; Lefevre, Inge; Bock, Hans L

    2008-05-01

    Malaysian infants would have to receive nine injections during the first few months of life in order to be protected against disease caused by hepatitis B (HBV), diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) if single HBV and Hib vaccines were used. We evaluated a combined DTPw-HBV/Hib vaccine administered at 1.5, 3 and 5 months after a birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine (HBV). One month after completion of the primary vaccination, 99% of subjects had seroprotective anti-HBV antibody levels, and at least 98% had seroprotective antibodies against diphtheria, tetanus, and Hib, and were seropositive for pertussis antibodies. The immune response to the combined vaccine was comparable to that induced by separate injections with DTPw, HBV and Hib vaccines. Overall, the DTPw-HBV/Hib vaccine was as well tolerated as separate administration of DTPw, HBV and Hib vaccines. The combined DTPw-HBV/Hib vaccine induces protection against five diseases as recommended in the Malaysian routine vaccination schedule. Use of the combined DTPw-HBV/Hib vaccine can reduce the required number of injections from nine to four in the first few months of life.

  13. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Peripheral Immune Mediators: Results from Two Nationwide Danish Pediatric Cohorts.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Steffen U; Pipper, Christian B; Skogstrand, Kristin; Pociot, Flemming; Svensson, Jannet

    2017-04-06

    (1) Background: We aimed to examine if 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was related to the peripheral immunological and inflammatory signature both at birth, and in newly diagnosed patients with childhood type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their healthy controls; (2) Methods: The birth cohort consisted of 470 patients and 500 healthy controls. Dried blood samples were collected from the neonates in the period 1981-1999. The newly diagnosed cohort consisted of 460 patients and 453 siblings. Serum samples were collected in the period 1997-2005. A variety of peripheral immune mediators were measured and compared to total 25(OH)D levels (25(OH)D₂ + 25(OH)D₃). For each immune mediator, the relative change (RC) in the mean level was modeled by robust log-normal regression and correction for multiple testing was performed; (3) Results: Two associations were identified; there was a negative association between 25(OH)D (10 nmol/L increase) and leptin (RC (95% confidence interval (CI)), 0.98 (0.96; 1.00)), and a positive association between 25(OH)D (10 nmol/L increase) and the chemokine, chemokine (c-x-c motif) ligand (CXCL) 8 (RC (95% CI), 1.07 (1.01; 1.13)); (4) Conclusion: CXCL8 and leptin have significant associations with levels of 25(OH)D in the newly diagnosed cohort. These results do not indicate a strong influence of 25(OH)D on the peripheral immunological or inflammatory signature.

  14. Serotype distribution and susceptibility to penicillin and erythromycin among noninvasive or colonization isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae in northern Japan: a cross-sectional study in the pre-PCV7 routine immunization period.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Urushibara, Noriko; Ghosh, Souvik; Kuwahara, Osamu; Morimoto, Shigeo; Ito, Masahiko; Kudo, Kenji; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2014-10-01

    Distribution of serotypes, prevalence of resistance to penicillin and/or erythromycin (EM), and its genetic traits were analyzed for a total of 1,061 noninvasive or colonization isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae (998 and 61 isolates from children and adults, respectively) in Hokkaido, northern main island of Japan, in the year 2011, the pre-PCV7 routine immunization period. Serotype deduction was performed by sequential multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), employing mutagenic PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism for discrimination of 6A/C and 6B/D. Unaltered three PBP genes and macrolide resistance genes erm(B) and mef(A/E) were detected by multiplex PCR. Among isolates from children, 25 serotypes, including the prevalent types 6B (17.5%), 19F (15.6%), 23F (12.2%), and 6C (11.6%), were identified, revealing the PCV7 and PCV13 coverage rates as 48.2% and 60.3%, respectively, while serotype 3 was the most frequent (19.0%) among isolates from adults. Most of the pediatric isolates (96.8%) exhibited resistance to EM (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC], ≥1 μg/ml), with a higher prevalence of erm(B) (67.2%) than mef(A/E) (39.7%). erm(B) was associated with high-level EM resistance (MIC, ≥128 μg/ml) and distributed at high detection rates to major serotypes 23F (85.2%) and 6B (85.1%), as well as minor serotypes 3, 10A, 14, 15B, 15C, 19A, and 23A (>90%). While penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP) (penicillin G-MIC, 2-3 μg/ml) was detected in 7.8% of isolates from children, the most common PBP gene genotype was gPRSP (three altered genes pbp1a, 2x, and 2b; 38.3%), which was detected at higher rates (>60%) in the dominant serotypes 23F, 6B, and 19F, and minor serotypes 6D and 15A. Dominant serotypes in the S. pneumoniae isolates were generally similar to those reported for invasive strains, despite lower coverage rates by PCV7/13. The importance of further surveillance on incidence and drug resistance in the post-PCV7 period was

  15. Immune reconstitution complicated by CMV retinitis in a pediatric patient who underwent haploidentical CD34+-selected hematopoietic stem cell transplant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Simone; Boaro, Maria Paola; Pillon, Marta; Calore, Elisabetta; Cermakova, Ivete; Perruccio, Katia; Mengoli, Carlo; Messina, Chiara

    2008-09-01

    We describe two episodes of CMV retinitis in a pediatric patient who underwent a CD34+ selected graft from his haploidentical father. Both recipient and donor were cytomegalovirus (CMV) seropositive. Both episodes occurred late post-grafting during a phase of complete immunological recovery with sufficient numbers of circulating CMV-specific clones. Antiviral treatment with foscarnet and ganciclovir was successful but prolonged treatment was required to prevent relapses. We hypothesize that this complication was more related to an immune reconstitution process than to an immune-deficient state post-grafting. We conclude that CMV retinitis is a late complication of HSCT that can occur despite satisfactory immune reconstitution. Usually, it is responsive to antiviral therapy. Dilated fundoscopic examination is essential both for examining patients with reduced visual acuity and for screening asymptomatic patients.

  16. IL-33/ST2 immune responses to respiratory bacteria in pediatric asthma

    PubMed Central

    Hentschke, Isabell; Graser, Anna; Melichar, Volker O.; Kiefer, Alexander; Zimmermann, Theodor; Kroß, Bettina; Haag, Patricia; Xepapadaki, Paraskevi; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.; Bogdan, Christian; Finotto, Susetta

    2017-01-01

    Here we investigated the relationship between local bacterial colonization and anti-bacterial immune responses in pre-school asthmatic and control children within the EU-wide study PreDicta. In this cohort of pre-school asthmatic children, nasopharyngeal colonization with Gram-negative bacteria such as Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis was found to be associated with the highest interferon beta (IFNβ) and IL-33 levels in the nasal pharyngeal fluids (NPF). IL33R-ST2 was found induced in the blood of asthmatic children with additional Gram + bacteria in the nasopharynx (Gr+/−). Furthermore, asthmatic children had more episodes of infection that required antibiotic therapy than the control group. Treatment with antibiotics associated with reduced ST2 in blood cells of both asthmatic and control children and reduced IL-33 levels in the airways of asthmatic children. In the absence of Staphylococcus (S.) aureus in NPF, antibiotic therapy associated with decreased IL-33 levels in the NPF and lower ST2 values in the blood of control children but not of asthmatic children. These data suggest that, in asthmatic children, Gram- bacteria, which persist after antibiotic therapy, contributes to IL-33 locally and associated with Gr + bacteria colonization in the airways, inhibited IFN-β and in the absence of Staphylococcus (S.) aureus, induced ST2 bearing cells in their blood. PMID:28262704

  17. [Treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura in Pediatrics. Therapeutic efficacy of a regional intravenous immunoglobulin G].

    PubMed

    Buteler, C; Colombo, H; Gabosi, G; Manfredi, M J; Montero, S; Pasquali, M A; Rougier, C; Sisti, A M

    2001-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a bleeding disorder characterized by accelerated splenic removal of platelets opsonized with autoantibodies. Several different treatments have been tried in acute ITP patients, including intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. The aim of this paper was to assess the therapeutic efficacy, clinical tolerance and viral safety of Inmunoglobulina G Endovenosa-UNC, manufactured by Laboratorio de Hemoderivados, Cordoba National University, in the treatment of acute ITP patients. A prospective longitudinal study was carried out on 8 children, who were admitted to the Hospital de Niños de Córdoba, from July 1998 to June 1999. A dose of 1 g/Kg/day of Inmunoglobulina G Endovenosa-UNC was administered to those children whose platelet values remained < or = 20,000/mm3, 21 days after the first IVIG cycle. The observed results led us to conclude that Inmunoglobulina G Endovenosa-UNC is well tolerated and therapeutically effective in the treatment of acute ITP in children, with platelet values recovery, similar to those obtained with other IVIG. Moreover, it proved to be virally safe since the 8 patients were non reactive for viral markers of hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency, 12 months after ending the treatment.

  18. Pediatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Greco, Deborah S

    2014-03-01

    This article discusses pediatric nutrition in puppies and kittens. Supplementation of basic nutrients such as fat, protein, minerals, vitamins, and essential fatty acids of the bitch is essential for the proper growth and development of puppies during the lactation period. Milk replacers are compared for use in puppies and kittens. Supplements such as colostrum and probiotics for promotion of a healthy immune system and prevention or treatment of stress-induced and weaning diarrhea are also discussed.

  19. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get Weight Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A What's in this article? Why Are Vaccinations Important? Why Do I Need Shots? Which Vaccinations Do ...

  20. Factors underlying inadequate parents’ awareness regarding pediatrics immunization: findings of cross-sectional study in Mosul- Iraq

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since last 100 years, immunization rate is one of the best public health outcome and service indicators. However, the immunization system is still imperfect; there are many countries that still have unvaccinated children. Parental decisions regarding immunization are very important to improve immunization rate. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between parental knowledge-practice (KP) regarding immunization with family and immunization providers’ factors. Methods This is a prospective cross-sectional study design. Immunization knowledge and practices among 528 Iraqi parents were evaluated through validated questionnaire. Familial data and immunization provider’s characteristics were collected from parents through interview. Results More than half of respondents/study population (66.1%) have adequate knowledge- practice scores. Significant associations were noted for knowledge-practice groups with father’s education level, mother’s education level, mother’s age at delivery, number of preschool children, parents gender, family income, provider types, and birth place (p < 0.05). Conclusion Immunization campaigns and awareness are required to improve parents’ knowledge and practice regarding immunization. The study results reinforce recommendations for use of educational programmes to improve the immunization knowledge and practice. PMID:24485194

  1. Co-administration of a novel Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroups C and Y-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine does not interfere with the immune response to antigens contained in infant vaccines routinely used in the United States.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Gary S; Marchant, Colin D; Blatter, Mark; Friedland, Leonard R; Aris, Emmanuel; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2011-02-01

    An investigational combined Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Neisseria meningitidis serogroups C and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT) has been developed to protect infants from invasive disease caused by Hib and these meningococcal serogroups without adding injections to the immunization schedule. Incorporation of this novel vaccine into the US vaccination schedule will require demonstration of a lack of immunologic interference with other routine pediatric vaccines. This study assessed the immune response to 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and combined diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-hepatitis B-inactivated poliovirus vaccine (DTaP-HepB-IPV) when separately co-administered with HibMenCY-TT as compared to a US-licensed H. influenzae type b tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (Hib-TT) at 2, 4, 6 (N=606) and 12-15 months of age (N=366). HibMenCY-TT was non-inferior to Hib-TT in terms of antibody responses to all Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes contained in PCV7 and the diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B and poliovirus antigens contained in DTaP-HepB-IPV one month after the third vaccine dose, and the anti-tetanus geometric mean antibody concentration (GMC) was significantly higher in the HibMenCY-TT group than in the Hib-TT group. In an exploratory analysis, no significant differences in the proportion of subjects with anti-pneumococcal antibody concentrations ≥0.2 µg/ml or anti-pneumococcal GMC were seen between the two groups after the fourth vaccine dose. A schedule of HibMenCY-TT given concomitantly with PCV7 and DTaP-HepB-IPV would be expected to protect infants against all of the targeted diseases.

  2. Approaching a diagnostic point-of-care test for pediatric tuberculosis through evaluation of immune biomarkers across the clinical disease spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Jenum, Synne; Dhanasekaran, S.; Lodha, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Aparna; Kumar Saini, Deepak; Singh, Sarman; Singh, Varinder; Medigeshi, Guruprasad; Haks, Marielle C.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Doherty, Timothy Mark; Kabra, Sushil K.; Ritz, Christian; Grewal, Harleen M. S.

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) calls for an accurate, rapid, and simple point-of-care (POC) test for the diagnosis of pediatric tuberculosis (TB) in order to make progress “Towards Zero Deaths”. Whereas the sensitivity of a POC test based on detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is likely to have poor sensitivity (70–80% of children have culture-negative disease), host biomarkers reflecting the on-going pathological processes across the spectrum of MTB infection and disease may hold greater promise for this purpose. We analyzed transcriptional immune biomarkers direct ex-vivo and translational biomarkers in MTB-antigen stimulated whole blood in 88 Indian children with intra-thoracic TB aged 6 months to 15 years, and 39 asymptomatic siblings. We identified 12 biomarkers consistently associated with either clinical groups “upstream” towards culture-positive TB on the TB disease spectrum (CD14, FCGR1A, FPR1, MMP9, RAB24, SEC14L1, and TIMP2) or “downstream” towards a decreased likelihood of TB disease (BLR1, CD3E, CD8A, IL7R, and TGFBR2), suggesting a correlation with MTB-related pathology and high relevance to a future POC test for pediatric TB. A biomarker signature consisting of BPI, CD3E, CD14, FPR1, IL4, TGFBR2, TIMP2 and TNFRSF1B separated children with TB from asymptomatic siblings (AUC of 88%). PMID:26725873

  3. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... remembers" the germ and can fight it again. Vaccines contain germs that have been killed or weakened. When given to a healthy person, the vaccine triggers the immune system to respond and thus ...

  4. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  5. The costs, effects and cost-effectiveness of strategies to increase coverage of routine immunizations in low- and middle-income countries: systematic review of the grey literature.

    PubMed Central

    Batt, Katherine; Fox-Rushby, J. A.; Castillo-Riquelme, Marianela

    2004-01-01

    Evidence-based reviews of published literature can be subject to several biases. Grey literature, however, can be of poor quality and expensive to access. Effective search strategies also vary by topic and are rarely known in advance. This paper complements a systematic review of the published literature on the costs and effects of expanding immunization services in developing countries. The quality of data on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of strategies to increase immunization coverage is shown to be similar across literatures, but the quality of information on costing is much lower in the grey literature. After excluding poorer quality studies from this review we found the quantity of available evidence almost doubled, particularly for more complex health-system interventions and cost or cost-effectiveness analyses. Interventions in the grey literature are more up to date and cover a different geographical spread. Consequently the conclusions of the published and grey literatures differ, although the number of papers is still too low to account for differences across types of interventions. We recommend that in future researchers consider using non-English keywords in their searches. PMID:15628207

  6. The costs, effects and cost-effectiveness of strategies to increase coverage of routine immunizations in low- and middle-income countries: systematic review of the grey literature.

    PubMed

    Batt, Katherine; Fox-Rushby, J A; Castillo-Riquelme, Marianela

    2004-09-01

    Evidence-based reviews of published literature can be subject to several biases. Grey literature, however, can be of poor quality and expensive to access. Effective search strategies also vary by topic and are rarely known in advance. This paper complements a systematic review of the published literature on the costs and effects of expanding immunization services in developing countries. The quality of data on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of strategies to increase immunization coverage is shown to be similar across literatures, but the quality of information on costing is much lower in the grey literature. After excluding poorer quality studies from this review we found the quantity of available evidence almost doubled, particularly for more complex health-system interventions and cost or cost-effectiveness analyses. Interventions in the grey literature are more up to date and cover a different geographical spread. Consequently the conclusions of the published and grey literatures differ, although the number of papers is still too low to account for differences across types of interventions. We recommend that in future researchers consider using non-English keywords in their searches.

  7. Immune response to the mumps component of the MMR vaccine in the routine of immunisation services in the Brazilian National Immunisation Program.

    PubMed

    Santos, Eliane Matos dos; Silva e Sá, Gloria Regina da; Siqueira, Marilda Mendonça; Martins, Reinaldo de Menezes; Camacho, Luiz Antonio Bastos; von Doellinger, Vanessa dos Reis; Maia, Maria de Lourdes de Sousa

    2014-06-01

    A non-controlled longitudinal study was conducted to evaluate the combined vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) immunogenicity in 150 children vaccinated in the routine of three health units in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2008-2009, without other vaccines administered during the period from 30 days before to 30 days after vaccination. A previous study conducted in Brazil in 2007, in 1,769 children ranging from 12-15 months of age vaccinated against yellow fever and MMR simultaneously or at intervals of 30 days or more between doses, had shown low seroconversion for mumps regardless of the interval between administration of the two vaccines. The current study showed 89.5% (95% confidence interval: 83.3; 94.0) seroconversion rate for mumps. All children seroconverted for measles and rubella. After revaccination, high antibody titres and seroconversion rates were achieved against mumps. The results of this study and others suggest that two MMR doses confer optimal immunoresponses for all three antigens and the possible need for additional doses should be studied taking into account not only serological, but also epidemiological data, as there is no serological correlate of protection for mumps.

  8. Advances in pediatrics. Volume 32

    SciTech Connect

    Barness, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on pediatrics. Topics include: the biological role and clinical implications of taurine; human milk nonprotein nitrogen; monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis and treatment of childhood diseases; and human immune responses to polysaccharide antigens.

  9. Methods for evaluating the impact of vertical programs on health systems: protocol for a study on the impact of the global polio eradication initiative on strengthening routine immunization and primary health care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The impact of vertical programs on health systems is a much-debated topic, and more evidence on this complex relationship is needed. This article describes a research protocol developed to assess the relationship between the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, routine immunization, and primary health care in multiple settings. Methods/Design This protocol was designed as a combination of quantitative and qualitative research methods, making use of comparative ethnographies. The study evaluates the impact of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative on routine immunization and primary health care by: (a) combining quantitative and qualitative work into one coherent study design; (b) using purposively selected qualitative case studies to systematically evaluate the impact of key contextual variables; and (c) making extensive use of the method of participant observation to create comparative ethnographies of the impact of a single vertical program administered in varied contexts. Discussion The study design has four major benefits: (1) the careful selection of a range of qualitative case studies allowed for systematic comparison; (2) the use of participant observation yielded important insights on how policy is put into practice; (3) results from our quantitative analysis could be explained by results from qualitative work; and (4) this research protocol can inform the creation of actionable recommendations. Here, recommendations for how to overcome potential challenges in carrying out such research are presented. This study illustrates the utility of mixed-methods research designs in which qualitative data are not just used to embellish quantitative results, but are an integral component of the analysis. PMID:22938708

  10. Vitamin A supplements, routine immunization, and the subsequent risk of Plasmodium infection among children under 5 years in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hollm-Delgado, Maria-Graciela; Piel, Frédéric B; Weiss, Daniel J; Howes, Rosalind E; Stuart, Elizabeth A; Hay, Simon I; Black, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies, partly based on murine models, suggest childhood immunization and vitamin A supplements may confer protection against malaria infection, although strong evidence to support these theories in humans has so far been lacking. We analyzed national survey data from children aged 6–59 months in four sub-Saharan African countries over an 18-month time period, to determine the risk of Plasmodium spp. parasitemia (n=8390) and Plasmodium falciparum HRP-2 (PfHRP-2)-related antigenemia (n=6121) following vitamin A supplementation and standard vaccination. Bacille Calmette Guerin-vaccinated children were more likely to be PfHRP-2 positive (relative risk [RR]=4.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]=2.00–8.28). No association was identified with parasitemia. Measles and polio vaccination were not associated with malaria. Children receiving vitamin A were less likely to present with parasitemia (RR=0.46, 95% CI=0.39–0.54) and antigenemia (RR=0.23, 95% CI=0.17–0.29). Future studies focusing on climate seasonality, placental malaria and HIV are needed to characterize better the association between vitamin A and malaria infection in different settings. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03925.001 PMID:25647726

  11. Combination vaccines for childhood immunization. Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP)

    PubMed

    1999-05-01

    An increasing number of new and improved vaccines to prevent childhood diseases are being introduced. Combination vaccines represent one solution to the problem of increased numbers of injections during single clinic visits. This statement provides general guidance on the use of combination vaccines and related issues and questions. To minimize the number of injections children receive, parenteral combination vaccines should be used, if licensed and indicated for the patient's age, instead of their equivalent component vaccines. Hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines, in either monovalent or combination formulations from the same or different manufacturers, are interchangeable for sequential doses in the vaccination series. However, using acellular pertussis vaccine product(s) from the same manufacturer is preferable for at least the first three doses, until studies demonstrate the interchangeability of these vaccines. Immunization providers should stock sufficient types of combination and monovalent vaccines needed to vaccinate children against all diseases for which vaccines are recommended, but they need not stock all available types or brand-name products. When patients have already received the recommended vaccinations for some of the components in a combination vaccine, administering the extra antigen(s) in the combination is often permissible if doing so will reduce the number of injections required. To overcome recording errors and ambiguities in the names of vaccine combinations, improved systems are needed to enhance the convenience and accuracy of transferring vaccine-identifying information into medical records and immunization registries. Further scientific and programmatic research is needed on specific questions related to the use of combination vaccines.

  12. Time trends in pediatric hospitalizations for hepatitis A in Greece (1999-2013): Assessment of the impact of universal infant immunization in 2008.

    PubMed

    Papaevangelou, V; Alexopoulou, Z; Hadjichristodoulou, C; Kourlamba, G; Katsioulis, A; Theodoridou, K; Spoulou, V; Theodoridou, M

    2016-07-02

    Hepatitis A vaccine was introduced in the Greek National Immunization Program in 2008. To estimate possible impact of the universal vaccination implementation, time trends of hospitalizations for hepatitis A at the Infectious Diseases Unit of a Tertiary Pediatric Hospital in Athens during 1999-2013 were analyzed. Hepatitis A hospitalizations were recorded from the discharge database and were expressed as frequencies and rate of annual departmental hospitalizations. Time series analysis (ARIMA) was used to explore trends and the impact of the vaccination. Moreover, changes in patient age, population group distribution and the duration of hospitalization were also examined. Hepatitis A hospitalizations rate significantly decreased between pre-vaccination (1999-2008) and post-vaccination (2009-2013) era from 50.5 to 20.8/1000 hospitalizations (p = 0.005). A 3-year periodicity and a trend of reduction on hepatitis A hospitalizations rates across years were noted. Roma children had significant higher rates of hepatitis A hospitalization, followed by immigrant children. Importantly, possibly due to preceding vaccine availability with considerable uptake in private market and unvaccinated group/pockets of children (Roma), overall vaccination effect was less apparent when compared to data from other countries that implemented universal vaccination. No significant change in patient age, population group distribution, or duration of hospitalization was observed. High risk groups such as Roma children should be targeted for vaccination to reduce future outbreaks.

  13. Pediatric sedation.

    PubMed

    Daud, Yasmeen N; Carlson, Douglas W

    2014-08-01

    Pediatric sedation is an evolving field performed by an extensive list of specialties. Well-defined sedation systems within pediatric facilities are paramount to providing consistent, safe sedation. Pediatric sedation providers should be trained in the principles and practice of sedation, which include patient selection, pre-sedation assessment to determine risks during sedation, selection of optimal sedation medication, monitoring requirements, and post-sedation care. Training, credentialing, and continuing sedation education must be incorporated into sedation systems to verify and monitor the practice of safe sedation. Pediatric hospitalists represent a group of providers with extensive pediatric knowledge and skills who can safely provide pediatric sedation.

  14. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  15. Safety and Efficacy Study of Romiplostim (AMG 531) to Treat ITP in Pediatric Subjects

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-18

    Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombocytopenia in Pediatric Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenia in Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP)

  16. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ebisawa, Motohiro; Nishima, Sankei; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Kondo, Naomi

    2013-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology (JSPACI) was started in 1966 and currently has 3613 members as of August 1, 2012. The number of pediatricians specializing in allergies who have been certified by the Japanese Society of Allergology is 817. Among these, there are 125 training directors and training facilities for allergy and clinical immunology. The JSPACI first published an asthma guideline specific for children in 2000, and this has been revised every 3 yrs, contributing to better control of pediatric asthma. Food allergy management guidelines were first developed in 2005, which have helped to improve the care of food allergy patients. Among 514 pediatric training programs by the Japanese Society of Pediatrics, there are 312 facilities routinely performing oral food challenges. Among these, there were already 53 facilities performing oral immunotherapy at the end of 2011, treating 1400 cases of food allergy. The prevalence of pediatric allergic diseases has increased in Japan over the past 50 yrs. A number of International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood surveys have been conducted in the past at specific times. The prevalence of wheezing among children aged 13-14 yrs in 2002 was 13.0%. Multi-year surveys found a 1.5- to 2-fold increase every 10 yrs until 2002. However, according to the latest data in 2012, asthma prevalence seems to have slightly decreased in Japan. Food allergy mainly associated with infantile atopic eczema among infants younger than 1 yr of age is the most common form as with other developed countries. The estimated food allergy prevalence based on data from several surveys is 5-10% among infants (0-6 yrs) and 1-2% among schoolchildren (6-15 yrs). A variety of patients suffering from primary deficiency syndrome have been actively analyzed. Previously, antibody defects and well-defined syndromes with immunodeficiency were analyzed, but recent research is focusing on not only acquired immune

  17. Revisiting Routine Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Rebecca; Monaghan, John; Shingadia, Eisha; Vaughan, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    What is a routine question? The focus of this paper is routine questions and time (in years) since a hitherto routine question was last attempted by the solver. The data comes from undergraduate students' work on solving two calculus questions. The data was selected for reporting purposes because it is well documented and because it threw up…

  18. Pediatric MS

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Others on MSconnection.org Join a Local Support Group Ask an MS Navigator Edward M. Dowd Personal ... navigate the school system through the Pediatric MS Support Group . Treating pediatric MS Studies have shown that the ...

  19. Pediatric Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control and Prevention’s Safe Child website . What is pediatric critical care? Children who have severe or life-threatening injuries ... are staffed by physicians with specialized training in pediatric critical care medicine ("pediatric intensivists"). Because children can experience a ...

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of two doses of quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine or one dose of meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine, both administered concomitantly with routine immunization to 12- to 18-month-old children

    PubMed Central

    Noya, Francisco; McCormack, Deirdre; Reynolds, Donna L; Neame, Dion; Oster, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the immunogenicity and safety of a two-dose series of a quadrivalent meningococcal (serogroups A, C, Y and W) polysaccharide diphtheria toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACYW-D) administered to toddlers. METHODS: Children were randomly assigned (1:1) at study entry to receive MenACYW-D at 12 and 18 months of age (group 1; n=61) or meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine (MCC) at 12 months of age (group 2; n=62). All received routine childhood immunizations. A, C, Y and W antibody titres were measured in group 1 before and one month after the 18-month MenACYW-D vaccination and were measured in group 2 at one and seven months post-MCC vaccination. Antibodies elicited by diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, and acellular pertussis vaccine adsorbed combined with inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine and Haemophilus influenzae b conjugate (DTaP-IPV-Hib) vaccine coadministered at the 18-month vaccination were measured one month later. Safety data were collected. RESULTS: At 19 months of age, ≥96% in group 1 achieved protective titres for the four meningococcal serogroups after dose 2; 67% in group 2 exhibited protective titres against serogroup C 28 days after MCC vaccination at 12 months of age, declining to 27% seven months later. DTaP-IPV-Hib elicited high antibody concentrations/titres in groups 1 and 2, consistent with historical values. The safety profiles after each dose generated no unexpected safety signals; no serious adverse events were related to vaccination. DISCUSSION: A two-dose series of MenACYW-D given concomitantly with a DTaP-IPV-Hib booster dose at 18 months of age demonstrated a good immunogenicity and safety profile. A two-dose series of MenACYW-D can be used as an alternative to one dose of MCC and provides protection against additional serogroups (NCT ID: NCT01359449). PMID:25285126

  1. Effects of age, gender and holding on pain response during infant immunization.

    PubMed

    Ipp, Moshe; Taddio, Anna; Goldbach, Morton; Ben David, Shlomit; Stevens, Bonnie; Koren, Gideon

    2004-01-01

    Determinants of infant pain responses are important when assessing the efficacy of analgesics. In a randomized controlled trial, 106 infants aged 2 to 6 months were positioned either supine (SUP) on the examination table or held (HLD) by a parent during routine immunization in a community pediatric office. There was no difference between the SUP and HLD infants in duration of crying, facial grimacing or visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores. Similarly gender did not affect pain response. In contrast, 2-month-old infants displayed more pain during immunization than did 4 or 6-month-old infants.

  2. Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Prusakowski, Melanie K; Chen, Audrey P

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric sepsis is distinct from adult sepsis in its definitions, clinical presentations, and management. Recognition of pediatric sepsis is complicated by the various pediatric-specific comorbidities that contribute to its mortality and the age- and development-specific vital sign and clinical parameters that obscure its recognition. This article outlines the clinical presentation and management of sepsis in neonates, infants, and children, and highlights some key populations who require specialized care.

  3. Outdoor fitness routine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000891.htm Outdoor fitness routine To use the sharing features on this ... you and is right for your level of fitness. Here are some ideas: Warm up first. Get ...

  4. Modeling pediatric vaccination guidelines in a data warehouse.

    PubMed

    Housman, Daniel; Greim, Julie; Morgan, Stephen J; Nelson, Sarah M; Flanagan, Tara; Martin, Kerry; Eskin, Michael; Einbinder, Jonathan S

    2008-11-06

    Frequent updates and complexity of vaccination schedules can make it difficult for pediatric practices to ensure adherence to immunization guidelines. To address this problem, Partners HealthCare System (PHS) has created a quality reporting utility to manage pediatric immunizations and to support quality improvement initiatives. The rules-based solution uses reference database tables to model the logic for each vaccine.

  5. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thoracopaedia - An Imaging Encyclopedia of Pediatric Thoracic Disease Virtual Pediatric Hospital is the Apprentice's Assistant™ Last revised ... pediatric resources: GeneralPediatrics.com | PediatricEducation.org | SearchingPediatrics.com Virtual Pediatric Hospital is curated by Donna M. D' ...

  6. Global Routine Vaccination Coverage, 2015.

    PubMed

    Casey, Rebecca M; Dumolard, Laure; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Diallo, Mamadou S; Hampton, Lee M; Wallace, Aaron S

    2016-11-18

    In 1974, the World Health Organization (WHO) established the Expanded Program on Immunization* to provide protection against six vaccine-preventable diseases through routine infant immunization (1). Based on 2015 WHO and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) estimates, global coverage with the third dose of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine (DTP3), the first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) and the third dose of polio vaccine (Pol3) has remained stable (84%-86%) since 2010. From 2014 to 2015, estimated global coverage with the second MCV dose (MCV2) increased from 39% to 43% by the end of the second year of life and from 58% to 61% when older age groups were included. Global coverage was higher in 2015 than 2010 for newer or underused vaccines, including rotavirus vaccine, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), rubella vaccine, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine, and 3 doses of hepatitis B (HepB3) vaccine. Coverage estimates varied widely by WHO Region, country, and district; in addition, for the vaccines evaluated (MCV, DTP3, Pol3, HepB3, Hib3), wide disparities were found in coverage by country income classification. Improvements in equity of access are necessary to reach and sustain higher coverage and increase protection from vaccine-preventable diseases for all persons.

  7. Pediatric Terminology

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is working with NCI Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS) to provide standardized terminology for coding pediatric clinical trials and other resea

  8. Pediatric Specialists

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Family Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  9. Motivation through Routine Documentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koth, Laurie J.

    2016-01-01

    This informed commentary article offers a simple, effective classroom management strategy in which the teacher uses routine documentation to motivate students both to perform academically and to behave in a manner consistent with established classroom rules and procedures. The pragmatic strategy is grounded in literature, free to implement,…

  10. Learning from Homeschooling Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a rare opportunity to look inside the homeschool and to observe the routines of homeschooling families from across the United States. With more than 1000 survey participants, and nine parents selected for interviews, the compiled data were analyzed through open coding techniques. Meaningful aspects that arose from the routines…

  11. Routine DNA testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Routine DNA testing. It’s done once you’ve Marker-Assisted Breeding Pipelined promising Qantitative Trait Loci within your own breeding program and thereby established the performance-predictive power of each DNA test for your germplasm under your conditions. By then you are ready to screen your par...

  12. PROPER: Optical propagation routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krist, John E.

    2014-05-01

    PROPER simulates the propagation of light through an optical system using Fourier transform algorithms (Fresnel, angular spectrum methods). Distributed as IDL source code, it includes routines to create complex apertures, aberrated wavefronts, and deformable mirrors. It is especially useful for the simulation of high contrast imaging telescopes (extrasolar planet imagers like TPF).

  13. Pediatric Anthropometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinich, Kathleen D.; Reed, Matthew P.

    Anthropometry is the measurement of human size, shape, and physical capabilities. Most pediatric anthropometry data are gathered to describe child growth patterns, but data on body size, mass distribution, range of motion, and posture are used to develop crash test dummies and computational models of child occupants. Pediatric anthropometry data are also used to determine child restraint dimensions, so they will accommodate the applicable population of child occupants.

  14. Nutritional assessment in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, M R; Zemel, B; Stallings, V A

    1998-01-01

    Nutritional status affects every pediatric patient's response to illness. Good nutrition is important for achieving normal growth and development. Nutritional assessment therefore should be an integral part of the care for every pediatric patient. Routine screening measures for abnormalities of growth should be performed on all pediatric patients. Those patients with chronic illness and those at risk for malnutrition should have detailed nutritional assessments done. Components of a complete nutritional assessment include a medical history, nutritional history including dietary intake, physical examination, anthropometrics (weight, length or stature, head circumference, midarm circumference, and triceps skinfold thickness), pubertal staging, skeletal maturity staging, and biochemical tests of nutritional status. Alternative measures for linear growth assessment (e.g., lower leg and upper arm measures) can be performed on patients unable to stand or who have musculoskeletal deformities. Bone densitometry can be used to assess bone mineralization and the risk of fracture. Nutritionally at risk patients may benefit from determination of resting energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry. The use of age, gender, and disease-specific growth charts is essential in assessing nutritional status and monitoring nutrition interventions. The importance of accurate measurements using trained personnel and appropriate equipment cannot be overemphasized.

  15. Psychoneuroimmunology and the pediatric surgeon.

    PubMed

    Tagge, Edward P; Natali, Elizabeth Lee; Lima, Evan; Leek, Dustin; Neece, Cameron L; Randall, Kiti Freier

    2013-08-01

    The mind-body connection is receiving increasing scrutiny in a large number of clinical settings, although research has lagged in the pediatric specialties. Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) is a novel interdisciplinary scientific field that examines the relationship of the mind to the patient's neurologic, endocrine, and immune systems by examining critical parameters such as the effects of mental stress on wound healing and infection rates. Techniques that modify a patient's emotional and mental responses to illness and surgery have positive effects on their physiology resulting in improved recoveries and higher patient satisfaction rates. In the appropriate clinical settings, an awareness of PNI can enhance outcomes for pediatric surgical patients.

  16. Immunization against A/H1N1 pandemic flu (2009–2010) in pediatric patients at risk. What might be the most effective strategy? The experience of an health district of Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Vaccination coverage rates against pandemic flu were far below those required by Italian Public Health Authorities. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess how the management of vaccination against pandemic flu in the Health District of Piacenza (Northern Italy) had conditioned the adherence of patients at risk to the H1N1flu immunization program. Methods From a population of 27.018 children aged between 6 months and 16 years, 2361 pediatric patients considered at risk according to the guidelines of the Ministry of Health were enrolled to receive pandemic flu vaccination. Children enrolled in the immunization program were vaccinated with one of the following three options: A) by their pediatrician in his office after contacting him directly or by phone B) by their pediatrician in his office or in a public Health District office with the assistance of a nurse after an appointment had been booked by patient’s parents using a dedicated free of charge phone number C) by a doctor of the public Health District after an appointment had been booked as for option B Results The best outcomes of population vaccination coverage for pandemic flu were achieved when patients were vaccinated with option B (44.2%). For options A and C rates coverage results were 22.8% (OR 2,69) and 24.9% (OR 2, 39) respectively. Conclusion The results of this study may be taken into account by the public health Authorities when planning the management of future immunization campaigns out of the usual vaccination schedule or in an emergency event. PMID:22594575

  17. Providing Perinatal Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmi, Ayelet; Stafford, Brian; Buchholz, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    After birth, newborns and their caregivers are seen routinely and frequently in pediatric primary care settings. The close succession of visits in the first few months of life puts pediatric primary care professionals in a unique position to enhance infant mental health by developing strong relationships with caregivers, supporting babies and…

  18. Abnormal humoral immune response to influenza vaccination in pediatric type-1 human immunodeficiency virus infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Carlos J; Toro, Maria F; Aguirre, Carlos; Bustamante, Alberto; Hernandez, Mariluz; Arango, Liliana P; Echeverry, Marta; Arango, Ana E; Prada, Maria C; Alarcon, Herminia del P; Rojas, Mauricio

    2007-06-01

    Given that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been demonstrated useful to restore immune competence in type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected subjects, we evaluated the specific antibody response to influenza vaccine in a cohort of HIV-1-infected children on HAART so as to analyze the quality of this immune response in patients under antiretroviral therapy. Sixteen HIV-1-infected children and 10 HIV-1 seronegative controls were immunized with a commercially available trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine containing the strains A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B. Serum hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) antibody titers were determined for the three viral strains at the time of vaccination and 1 month later. Immunization induced a significantly increased humoral response against the three influenza virus strains in controls, and only against A/H3N2 in HIV-1-infected children. The comparison of post-vaccination HI titers between HIV-1+ patients and HIV-1 negative controls showed significantly higher HI titers against the three strains in controls. In addition, post vaccination protective HI titers (defined as equal to or higher than 1:40) against the strains A/H3N2 and B were observed in a lower proportion of HIV-1+ children than in controls, while a similar proportion of individuals from each group achieved protective HI titers against the A/H1N1 strain. The CD4+ T cell count, CD4/CD8 T cells ratio, and serum viral load were not affected by influenza virus vaccination when pre- vs post-vaccination values were compared. These findings suggest that despite the fact that HAART is efficient in controlling HIV-1 replication and in increasing CD4+ T cell count in HIV-1-infected children, restoration of immune competence and response to cognate antigens remain incomplete, indicating that additional therapeutic strategies are required to achieve a full reconstitution of immune functions.

  19. Expression of the 60 kDa and 71 kDa heat shock proteins and presence of antibodies against the 71 kDa heat shock protein in pediatric patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chengfeng; Chen, Sheng; Yuan, Mingchun; Ding, Fuyue; Yang, Dongliang; Wang, Ruibo; Li, Jianxin; Tanguay, Robert M; Wu, Tangchun

    2004-01-01

    Background Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by platelet destruction resulting from autoantibodies against platelet proteins, particularly platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) have been shown to be major antigenic determinants in some autoimmune diseases. Antibodies to Hsps have also been reported to be associated with a number of pathological states. Methods Using western blot, we measured the levels of the 60 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp60) and of the inducible 71 kDa member of the Hsp70 family (Hsp71) in lymphocytes and the presence of antibodies against these hsps in plasma of 29 pediatric patients with ITP before the treatment and in 6 other patients before and after treatment. Results Interestingly only one out of 29 patients showed detectable Hsp60 in lymphocytes while this heat shock protein was detected in the 30 control children. Hsp71 levels were slightly lower in lymphocytes of patients with ITP than in controls (1567.8 ± 753.2 via 1763.2 ± 641.8 integrated optical density (IOD) units). There was a small increase of Hsp71 after recovery from ITP. The titers of plasma antibodies against Hsp60 and Hsp71 were also examined. Antibodies against Hsp71 were more common in ITP patients (15/29) than in control children (5/30). The titer of anti-Hsp71 was also higher in children patients with ITP. The prevalence of ITP children with antibodies against Hsp71 (51.7%) was as high as those with antibodies against platelet membrane glycoproteins (58.3%). Conclusions In summary, pediatric patients with ITP showed no detectable expression of Hsp60 in lymphocytes and a high prevalence of antibody against Hsp71 in plasma. These changes add to our understanding of the pathogenesis of ITP and may be important for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of ITP. PMID:15070425

  20. Donor age matters in T-cell depleted haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in pediatric patients: Faster immune reconstitution using younger donors.

    PubMed

    González-Vicent, Marta; Molina, Blanca; Deltoro, Natalia; Sevilla, Julián; Vicario, José Luis; Castillo, Ana; Ramirez, Manuel; Díaz, Miguel Ángel

    2017-03-04

    T-cell depleted (TCD) haploidentical transplantation is increasingly used in paediatric patients with haematological malignancies and donor selection is a challenge. We conclude that a simple criterion such as donor age should be also considered in depleted haploidentical setting because faster immune reconstitution is achieved using younger donors decreasing non-relapse related mortality.

  1. CHR -- Character Handling Routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, A. C.; Rees, P. C. T.; Chipperfield, A. J.; Jenness, T.

    This document describes the Character Handling Routine library, CHR, and its use. The CHR library augments the limited character handling facilities provided by the Fortran 77 standard. It offers a range of character handling facilities: from formatting Fortran data types into text strings and the reverse, to higher level functions such as wild card matching, string sorting, paragraph reformatting and justification. The library may be used simply for building text strings for interactive applications or as a basis for more complex text processing applications.

  2. Pediatric Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Williams, Regan F; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Gosain, Ankush

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors accounting for approximately 10% of childhood solid tumors. Treatment is focused on multimodality therapy, which has improved the prognosis over the past two decades. Current regimens focus on decreasing treatment for low-risk patients to decrease the long-term side effects while maximizing therapy for patients with metastatic disease to improve survival. Pediatric sarcomas can be divided into soft tissue sarcomas and osseous tumors. Soft tissue sarcomas are further delineated into rhabdomyosarcomas, which affect young children and nonrhabdomyosarcomas, which are most common in adolescents. The most common bone sarcomas are osteosarcomas and Ewing's sarcoma.

  3. Contributions of pediatrics and pediatric pathology to the body of knowledge regarding human disease.

    PubMed

    Nezelof, Christian; Seemayer, Thomas A; Bridge, Julia A

    2010-03-01

    A century or so ago, pediatrics and pediatric pathology did not exist. Then, many fetuses/newborns died in utero or shortly after birth. With time, the issue of sepsis was addressed, and a greater number of newborns survived. Gradually, in this soil, the disciplines of pediatrics and pediatric nursing arose, as some recognized that infants were not merely small adults but were, in fact, quite different. Years later, pediatric pathology developed as a field of exploration. Today, pediatric pathology is a specialty, as witnessed by training programs, societies devoted to research and education, an expanding number of textbooks and innovative research. Pediatric pathology is distinct from adult pathology, as seen by the diversity of malformations and metabolic diseases stemming from mutations, the immaturity of the newborn's immune system, and the types of neoplasms germane to infants and children. Much of the progress in these areas was facilitated by the simultaneous emergence of cytogenetics and molecular biology and their powerful tools of investigation. The latter were applied in a synergistic fashion to a major extent in maternity clinics and children's hospitals by, among others, molecular biologists, clinical geneticists, cytogeneticists, pediatricians, and pediatric pathologists. This article describes a select but small number of the many contributions of pediatrics and pediatric pathology to the current body of medical knowledge.

  4. Exercise and immunity

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007165.htm Exercise and immunity To use the sharing features on ... take a daily walk or follow a simple exercise routine a few times a week. Exercise helps ...

  5. Myocarditis - pediatric

    MedlinePlus

    ... enable JavaScript. Pediatric myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle in an infant or young child. Causes Myocarditis is rare in ... the infection. This can lead to symptoms of heart failure. ... to detect. However, in newborns and infants, symptoms may sometimes appear suddenly. Symptoms may include: ...

  6. Pediatric ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, C.K. Jr.; Swischuk, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Two leading experts explore the benefits and limitations of pediatric ultrasonography, explaining the latest techniques for optimal imaging of specific body regions: the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, extremities, and soft tissues. Numerous illustrations emphasize significant points and combine with the text to show specifically what to look for when imaging children.

  7. Pediatric Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Skin changes are common in children. Common concerns are birthmarks (e.g., hemangiomas and port wine stains), atopic and contact dermatitis, acne, and alopecia areata. The authors review advances in common and not so common skin changes in pediatric patients. PMID:28360970

  8. Pediatric Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your child’s sinuses are not fully developed until late in the teen years. Although small, the maxillary (behind the cheek) and ethmoid (between the eyes) sinuses are present at birth. Unlike in adults, pediatric sinusitis is difficult to ...

  9. CALIPSO User-Provided Routines

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

    ... data files. These routines are written in Interactive Data Language (IDL). A README file demonstrating use of the routines is also available. Interactive Data Language (IDL) is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . ...

  10. Pediatric sleep apnea

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... During sleep, all of the muscles in the body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  12. Bedside ultrasound in pediatric emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jason A; Noble, Vicki E

    2008-05-01

    Bedside emergency ultrasound has been used by emergency physicians for >20 years for a variety of conditions. In adult centers, emergency ultrasound is routinely used in the management of victims of blunt abdominal trauma, in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and biliary disease, and in women with first-trimester pregnancy complications. Although its use has grown dramatically in the last decade in adult emergency departments, only recently has this tool been embraced by pediatric emergency physicians. As the modality advances and becomes more available, it will be important for primary care pediatricians to understand its uses and limitations and to ensure that pediatric emergency physicians have access to the proper training, equipment, and experience. This article is meant to review the current literature relating to emergency ultrasound in pediatric emergency medicine, as well as to describe potential pediatric applications.

  13. The Epidemiologic, Microbiologic and Clinical Picture of Bacteremia among Febrile Infants and Young Children Managed as Outpatients at the Emergency Room, before and after Initiation of the Routine Anti-Pneumococcal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Leibovitz, Eugene; David, Nuphar; Ribitzky-Eisner, Haya; Abo Madegam, Mouner; Abuabed, Said; Chodick, Gabriel; Maimon, Michal; Fruchtman, Yariv

    2016-01-01

    We described the occult bacteremia (OB) and bacteremia with diagnosed focus (BwF) picture among children managed as outpatients at the pediatric emergency room (PER) in southern Israel, before and after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) introduction in a retrospective study enrolling all three- to 36-month-old patients with fever >38.0 °C during 2005–2014. Of 511 (0.82% of all febrile patients) true bacteremias, 230 (45%) were managed as outpatients; 96 of 230 (41.7%) had OB and 134 (3.59%) had BwF. OB and BwF rates were 0.22% and 3.02%, respectively. A significant decrease was noted in OB and BwF rates (p = 0.0008 and p = 0.02, respectively). S. pneumoniae (SP, 37.5%), K. kingae (11.4%) and Brucella spp. (8.7%) were the most common OB pathogens and SP (29.8%), S. viridans (13.4%), and Brucella spp. (12.7%) were the most common in BwF patients. PCV13 serotypes were not found among the serotypes isolated post-PCV13 introduction. During 2010–2014 there was an increase in non-PCV13 serotype isolation (p = 0.005). SP was the main pathogen isolated among patients with pneumonia, acute otitis media (AOM) and periorbital cellulitis (62.5%, 33.3% and 60%, respectively). OB and BwF decreased following the introduction of PCVs and SP was the main pathogen in both conditions. Vaccine-SP serotypes were not isolated in OB after PCV13 introduction and non-vaccine serotypes increased significantly. PMID:27447651

  14. 78 FR 49272 - Pediatric Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... to discuss Cervarix (human papillomavirus Bivalent (Types 16 and 18) vaccine); Gammagard Liquid (Immune Globulin Infusion (human)); Hemacord (hematopoietic progenitor cells, cord blood); Copegus and... development of pediatric medical countermeasures. FDA intends to make background material available to...

  15. Pediatric tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Paolo; Forte, Vito

    2016-06-01

    Tracheotomy refers to a surgical incision made into a trachea. Tracheostomy, on the other hand, refers to a surgical procedure whereby the tracheal lumen is positioned in close proximity to the skin surface. Tracheostomy is an uncommon procedure in the pediatric population. When required tracheostomy is typically performed as an open surgical procedure under general anesthesia with the patient intubated. However, it may need to be performed under local anesthesia or over a rigid bronchoscope in the patient with a precarious airway. Over the past half century, the primary indication for pediatric tracheostomy has shifted from acute infectious airway compromise to the need for prolonged ventilatory support in neurologically compromised children. The surgical technique, choice of tracheostomy tube, and post-operative care requires a nuanced approach in infants and young children. This article will review these topics in a comprehensive fashion.

  16. Pediatric parasomnias.

    PubMed

    Mason, Thornton B A; Pack, Allan I

    2007-02-01

    Parasomnias in childhood are common, and often more frequent than in adults. The large number of parasomnias underscore that sleep is not simply a quiescent state, but can involve complex episodes of movement, ranging from subtle to dramatic and complex. Clinicians should be aware that many pediatric parasomnias are benign, self-limited, and may not persist into late childhood or adolescence. Importantly, parasomnias in childhood often differ in type from adults. Nevertheless, parasomnias across ages can be classified as: 1) disorders of arousal (from non-rapid eye movement, or NREM, sleep); 2) parasomnias usually associated with REM sleep; and 3) other parasomnias. We detail here issues in the clinical diagosis, evaluation, and management of multiple pediatric parasomnias. The further study of parasomnias in children may help elucidate the multi-factorial etiologies of these fascinating conditions, shedding light on the potential genetic bases as well as environmental contributions.

  17. Pediatric stridor.

    PubMed

    Ida, Jonathan B; Thompson, Dana Mara

    2014-10-01

    Pediatric stridor is an important symptom of upper airway obstruction, and must be recognized early by evaluating physicians. Proper evaluation and management, both acutely and chronically, can provide improved outcomes and better quality of life for patients. This article discusses the physiology of stridor and its intimate relation to airway anatomy, the work-up of the stridorous child, and recent advances in treatment, and provides illustrative examples of common lesions.

  18. Pediatric Virology

    PubMed Central

    Portnoy, Bernard

    1965-01-01

    Pediatric virology is not an isolàted discipline. Rather, the syndromes associated with viral infection are modified by the unique characteristics of infancy and childhood. Fortunately for the pediatrician, and certainly for children, viral infections in childhood are rarely fatal, and are almost never serious. Future efforts of the pediatrician and virologist should be directed toward increased fetal salvage as with rubella and the prevention of severe, viral lower respiratory tract disease. PMID:14298871

  19. Pediatric sialendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Bruch, Jean M; Setlur, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Sialendoscopy was introduced in the early 1990s as a minimally invasive alternative to standard methods for diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory and obstructive salivary gland disease. The technique was pioneered in adults; however, advances in instrumentation have allowed this to be adapted to the smaller salivary ductal anatomy found in the pediatric population. In this chapter, the technique of sialendoscopy for parotid and submandibular glands is described.

  20. Pulse oximetry in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Fouzas, Sotirios; Priftis, Kostas N; Anthracopoulos, Michael B

    2011-10-01

    The introduction of pulse oximetry in clinical practice has allowed for simple, noninvasive, and reasonably accurate estimation of arterial oxygen saturation. Pulse oximetry is routinely used in the emergency department, the pediatric ward, and in pediatric intensive and perioperative care. However, clinically relevant principles and inherent limitations of the method are not always well understood by health care professionals caring for children. The calculation of the percentage of arterial oxyhemoglobin is based on the distinct characteristics of light absorption in the red and infrared spectra by oxygenated versus deoxygenated hemoglobin and takes advantage of the variation in light absorption caused by the pulsatility of arterial blood. Computation of oxygen saturation is achieved with the use of calibration algorithms. Safe use of pulse oximetry requires knowledge of its limitations, which include motion artifacts, poor perfusion at the site of measurement, irregular rhythms, ambient light or electromagnetic interference, skin pigmentation, nail polish, calibration assumptions, probe positioning, time lag in detecting hypoxic events, venous pulsation, intravenous dyes, and presence of abnormal hemoglobin molecules. In this review we describe the physiologic principles and limitations of pulse oximetry, discuss normal values, and highlight its importance in common pediatric diseases, in which the principle mechanism of hypoxemia is ventilation/perfusion mismatch (eg, asthma exacerbation, acute bronchiolitis, pneumonia) versus hypoventilation (eg, laryngotracheitis, vocal cord dysfunction, foreign-body aspiration in the larynx or trachea). Additional technologic advancements in pulse oximetry and its incorporation into evidence-based clinical algorithms will improve the efficiency of the method in daily pediatric practice.

  1. Standard, routine and non-routine processes in health care.

    PubMed

    Lillrank, Paul; Liukko, Matti

    2004-01-01

    Quality management methods have been introduced into health care with variable success. Industrial approaches, such as standardization, are not always applicable professional services, because of fundamental differences in conceptions of aims and the predictability of the results of action. Processes in health care can be classified into standard, routine and non-routine depending on the level of repetition and amount of variation, variety and uncertainty. Quality problems are different in each type: standard processes may produce deviations from targets, routines errors in classification, and non-routines failures in interpretation. Different management approaches for each type are discussed. A metaphor to assist discussion, The Broom, is introduced.

  2. Pediatric vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-04-01

    Vitiligo is a disease of pigment loss. Most investigators currently consider vitiligo to be a disorder that occurs as a result of autoimmune destruction of melanocytes, supported by identification of antimelanocyte antibodies in many patients, and the presence of comorbid autoimmune disease in patients with and family members of individuals with vitiligo. One-half of vitiligo cases are of childhood onset. This article presents a current overview of pediatric vitiligo including comorbidities of general health, psychological factors, therapeutic options, and long-term health considerations.

  3. Pediatric Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Rentea, Rebecca M; St Peter, Shawn D

    2017-02-01

    Appendicitis is one of the most common surgical pathologies in children. It can present with right lower quadrant pain. Scoring systems in combination with selective imaging and surgical examination will diagnose most children with appendicitis. Clinical pathways should be used. Most surgical interventions for appendicitis are now almost exclusively laparoscopic, with trials demonstrating better outcomes for children who undergo index hospitalization appendectomies when perforated. Nonoperative management has a role in the treatment of both uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis. This article discusses the workup and management, modes of treatment, and continued areas of controversy in pediatric appendicitis.

  4. Pediatric urticaria.

    PubMed

    Tsakok, Teresa; Du Toit, George; Flohr, Carsten

    2014-02-01

    Although urticaria is not a life-threatening disease, its impact on quality of life in children should not be overlooked. A systematic search of online databases, including Medline, was performed to inform a review aiming to equip clinicians with an evidence-based approach to all aspects of pediatric urticaria. This review hinges on an illustrative case and includes a summary table of studies pertaining to disease management in children. The multiple issues faced by patients, their families, and treating clinicians are highlighted, and the current literature on the presentation, natural history, investigation, and management of this poorly understood condition is assessed.

  5. Pediatric vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Pamela F

    2012-04-01

    Childhood vasculitis is a challenging and complex group of conditions that are multisystem in nature and often require integrated care from multiple subspecialties, including rheumatology, dermatology, cardiology, nephrology, neurology, and gastroenterology. Vasculitis is defined as the presence of inflammation in the blood vessel wall. The site of vessel involvement, size of the affected vessels, extent of vascular injury, and underlying pathology determine the disease phenotype and severity. This article explores the classification and general features of pediatric vasculitis, as well as the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and therapeutic options for the most common vasculitides.

  6. Pediatric Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Badr, Dana T; Gaffin, Jonathan M; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2016-09-01

    Rhinosinusitis, is defined as an inflammation of the paranasal and nasal sinus mucosae. Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS)is a common problem in the pediatric age group and the diagnosis and treatment are challenging due to the chronicity and similarity of symptoms with allergic rhinitis and adenoid hypertrophy. Although it is less common than acute rhinosinusitis, CRS is becoming more frequent and significantly affects the quality of life in children and can substantially impair daily function. CRS is characterized by sinus symptoms lasting more than 3 months despite medical therapy. Many factors are involved in the pathogenesis of this disease and include a primary insult with a virus followed bybacterial infection and mucosal inflammation, along with predisposition to allergies. The standard treatment of pediatricacute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) is nasal irrigation and antibiotic use. Medical treatment of pediatric CRS includes avoidance of allergens in allergic patients (environmental or food) and therapy with nasal irrigation, nasal corticosteroids sprays, nasal decongestants, and antibiotics directed at the most common sinonasalorganisms (Haemophilusinfluenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Moraxella catarrhalis). Surgical therapy is rarely needed after appropriate medical therapy. Referral to an otolaryngologist and allergy specialist is recommended in case of failure of medical treatment.

  7. Development of Three Different NK Cell Subpopulations during Immune Reconstitution after Pediatric Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Prognostic Markers in GvHD and Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Huenecke, Sabine; Cappel, Claudia; Esser, Ruth; Pfirrmann, Verena; Salzmann-Manrique, Emilia; Betz, Sibille; Keitl, Eileen; Banisharif-Dehkordi, Julia; Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Königs, Christoph; Jarisch, Andrea; Soerensen, Jan; Ullrich, Evelyn; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Bremm, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) exerting graft-versus-leukemia/tumor effect and mediating pathogen-specific immunity. Although NK cells are the first donor-derived lymphocytes reconstituting post-HSCT, their distribution of CD56(++)CD16(-) (CD56(bright)), CD56(++)CD16(+) (CD56(intermediate=int)), and CD56(+)CD16(++) (CD56(dim)) NK cells is explicitly divergent from healthy adults, but to some extent comparable to the NK cell development in early childhood. The proportion of CD56(bright)/CD56(int)/CD56(dim) changed from 15/8/78% in early childhood to 6/4/90% in adults, respectively. Within this study, we first compared the NK cell reconstitution post-HSCT to reference values of NK cell subpopulations of healthy children. Afterward, we investigated the reconstitution of NK cell subpopulations post-HSCT in correlation to acute graft versus host disease (aGvHD) and chronic graft versus host disease (cGvHD) as well as to viral infections. Interestingly, after a HSCT follow-up phase of 12 months, the distribution of NK cell subpopulations largely matched the 50th percentile of the reference range for healthy individuals. Patients suffering from aGvHD and cGvHD showed a delayed reconstitution of NK cells. Remarkably, within the first 2 months post-HSCT, patients suffering from aGvHD had significantly lower levels of CD56(bright) NK cells compared to patients without viral infection or without graft versus host disease (GvHD). Therefore, the amount of CD56(bright) NK cells might serve as an early prognostic factor for GvHD development. Furthermore, a prolonged and elevated peak in CD56(int) NK cells seemed to be characteristic for the chronification of GvHD. In context of viral infection, a slightly lower CD56 and CD16 receptor expression followed by a considerable reduction in the absolute CD56(dim) NK cell numbers combined with reoccurrence of CD56(int) NK cells was observed. Our

  8. Development of Three Different NK Cell Subpopulations during Immune Reconstitution after Pediatric Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Prognostic Markers in GvHD and Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Huenecke, Sabine; Cappel, Claudia; Esser, Ruth; Pfirrmann, Verena; Salzmann-Manrique, Emilia; Betz, Sibille; Keitl, Eileen; Banisharif-Dehkordi, Julia; Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Königs, Christoph; Jarisch, Andrea; Soerensen, Jan; Ullrich, Evelyn; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Bremm, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) exerting graft-versus-leukemia/tumor effect and mediating pathogen-specific immunity. Although NK cells are the first donor-derived lymphocytes reconstituting post-HSCT, their distribution of CD56++CD16− (CD56bright), CD56++CD16+ (CD56intermediate=int), and CD56+CD16++ (CD56dim) NK cells is explicitly divergent from healthy adults, but to some extent comparable to the NK cell development in early childhood. The proportion of CD56bright/CD56int/CD56dim changed from 15/8/78% in early childhood to 6/4/90% in adults, respectively. Within this study, we first compared the NK cell reconstitution post-HSCT to reference values of NK cell subpopulations of healthy children. Afterward, we investigated the reconstitution of NK cell subpopulations post-HSCT in correlation to acute graft versus host disease (aGvHD) and chronic graft versus host disease (cGvHD) as well as to viral infections. Interestingly, after a HSCT follow-up phase of 12 months, the distribution of NK cell subpopulations largely matched the 50th percentile of the reference range for healthy individuals. Patients suffering from aGvHD and cGvHD showed a delayed reconstitution of NK cells. Remarkably, within the first 2 months post-HSCT, patients suffering from aGvHD had significantly lower levels of CD56bright NK cells compared to patients without viral infection or without graft versus host disease (GvHD). Therefore, the amount of CD56bright NK cells might serve as an early prognostic factor for GvHD development. Furthermore, a prolonged and elevated peak in CD56int NK cells seemed to be characteristic for the chronification of GvHD. In context of viral infection, a slightly lower CD56 and CD16 receptor expression followed by a considerable reduction in the absolute CD56dim NK cell numbers combined with reoccurrence of CD56int NK cells was observed. Our results suggest that a precise

  9. Lidar Altitude Data Read Routine

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-19

    ... Profile products. It is written in Interactive Data Language (IDL) and uses HDF routine calls to read the altitude data which are ... Data Read routine  (1.5 KB) Interactive Data Language (IDL) is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . ...

  10. Pediatric tracheomalacia.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Jose Carlos; Jennings, Russell W; Kim, Peter C W

    2016-06-01

    Tracheomalacia (TM) is defined as an increased collapsibility of the trachea due to structural anomalies of the tracheal cartilage and/or posterior membrane. Tracheomalacia has a wide range of etiologies but is most commonly present in children born with esophageal atresia and tracheal esophageal fistula. Clinical symptoms can range from minor expiratory stridor with typical barking cough to severe respiratory distress episodes to acute life-threatening events (ALTE). Although the majority of children have mild-to-moderate symptoms and will not need surgical intervention, some will need life-changing surgical treatment. This article examines the published pediatric literature on TM, discusses the details of clinical presentation, evaluation, diagnosis, and a variety of treatments.

  11. Systemic Treatment of Pediatric Psoriasis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Maddalena; Megna, Matteo; Balato, Anna; Ayala, Fabio; Lembo, Serena; Villani, Alessia; Balato, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated, inflammatory skin disease, affecting 1-3% of the white population. Although the existence of two psoriasis incidence peaks has been suggested (one in adolescence before 20 years of age and another in adulthood), its onset may occur at any age, including childhood and adolescence, in which the incidence is now estimated at 40.8 per 100,000. As for adult psoriasis, pediatric psoriasis has recently been associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, increased waist circumference percentiles and metabolic laboratory abnormalities, warranting early monitoring and lifestyle modifications. In addition, due to psoriasis' chronic nature and frequently occurring relapses, psoriatic patients tend to have an impaired quality of life, often requiring long-term treatment. Therefore, education of both pediatric patients and their parents is essential to successful and safe disease management. Given the lack of officially approved therapies, the very limited evidence-based data from randomized controlled trials, and the absence of standardized guidelines, to date, pediatric psoriasis treatment is primarily based on published case reports, case series, guidelines for adult psoriasis, expert opinions and experience with these drugs in other pediatric disorders coming from the disciplines of rheumatology, gastroenterology and oncology. This review focuses on the use of systemic treatments in pediatric psoriasis and their specific features, analyzing the few literature evidences available, expanding the treatment repertoire and guiding dermatologists in better managing of recalcitrant pediatric psoriasis.

  12. Routines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    Melser and Michie (1970), 135-151. Sacerdoti, Earl D, [1977], A structure for plans and behavior, Elsevier. * Sartre , Jean - Paul , [1976], Critique of...theorem proving to problem solving," Artificial Intelligence, 2 (3) 189-208. Fitts, Paul M and Michael I Posner, [1967], Human performance, Brooks/Cole...Laing, R D and A Esterson, [1964], Sanity, Madness, and the Family, Tavistock. Laird, John E, Paul Rosenbloom, and Allen Newell, [1984], Towards

  13. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation Board Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  14. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses Print Share Celiac Disease Many kids have sensitivities to certain foods, ... protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, consuming ...

  15. Find a Pediatric Dentist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Litch's Law Log HIPAA Forms Practice Management and Marketing Newsletter Webinar Materials Member Resources 2017 General Assembly ... Archives Access Pediatric Dentistry Today Practice Management and Marketing Newsletter Pediatric Dentistry Journal Open Access Articles Policies & ...

  16. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  17. Pediatric diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gyll, C.; Blake, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book treats the practical problems of pediatric radiography and radiological procedures. Written jointly by a radiographer and a radiologist, it covers pediatric positioning and procedures. An extended chapter covers neonatal radiography and radiology.

  18. Nuances in pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Kenefake, Mary Ella; Swarm, Matthew; Walthall, Jennifer

    2013-08-01

    Pediatric trauma evaluation mimics adult stabilization in that it is best accomplished with a focused and systematic approach. Attention to developmental differences, anatomic and physiologic nuances, and patterns of injury equip emergency physicians to stabilize and manage pediatric injury.

  19. Nuclear imaging in pediatrics

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The author's intent is to familiarize practicing radiologists with the technical aspects and interpretation of nuclear medicine procedures in children and to illustrate the indications for nuclear medicine procedures in pediatric problems. Pediatric doses, dosimetry, sedation, and injection techniques, organ systems, oncology and infection, testicular scanning and nuclear crystography, pediatric endocrine and skeletal systems, ventilation and perfusion imaging of both congenital and acquired pediatric disorders, cardiovascular problems, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, reticuloendothelial studies, and central nervous system are all topics which are included and discussed.

  20. Pediatric electrocardiographic imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jennifer N A

    2015-03-01

    Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) has been used in pediatric and congenital heart patients to better understand their electrophysiologic substrates. In this article we focus on the 4 subjects related to pediatric ECGI: (1) ECGI in patients with congenital heart disease and Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, (2) ECGI in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and preexcitation, (3) ECGI in pediatric patients with Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, and (4) ECGI for pediatric cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  1. Immunology of Pediatric HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Nicole H.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Most infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women escape HIV infection. Infants evade infection despite an immature immune system and, in the case of breastfeeding, prolonged repetitive, exposure. If infants become infected, the course of their infection and response to treatment differs dramatically depending upon the timing (in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding) and potentially the route of their infection. Perinatally acquired HIV infection occurs during a critical window of immune development. HIV’s perturbation of this dynamic process may account for the striking age-dependent differences in HIV disease progression. HIV infection also profoundly disrupts the maternal immune system upon which infants rely for protection and immune instruction. Therefore, it is not surprising that infants who escape HIV infection still suffer adverse effects. In this review, we highlight the unique aspects of pediatric HIV transmission and pathogenesis with a focus on mechanisms by which HIV infection during immune ontogeny may allow discovery of key elements for protection and control from HIV. PMID:23772619

  2. Immunizations: vaccinations in general.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Catherine C

    2015-06-01

    The childhood immunization schedule is complex and nuanced. Although serious adverse reactions to immunizations are uncommon, clinicians must be well-versed in these reactions as well as the contraindications and precautions to each vaccine. • Conjugate vaccine technology links polysaccharide antigens to carrier proteins, triggering T-cell-dependent immunity to polysaccharides, thereby strengthening immune memory. • On the basis of some research evidence and consensus, live vaccines are generally contraindicated in immunocompromised patients and in pregnancy. Most live vaccines can be administered to household contacts of immunocompromised patients. • On the basis of some research and consensus, modified administration of meningococcal, pneumococcal, and less commonly, other vaccines may be indicated to protect immunocompromised patients. • On the basis of disease epidemiology and consensus, international travelers should be up-to-date with all routine immunizations; depending on destination, additional vaccines or immune globulin may be required.

  3. Increasing nursing treatment for pediatric procedural pain.

    PubMed

    Bice, April A; Gunther, Mary; Wyatt, Tami

    2014-03-01

    Procedural pain management is an underused practice in children. Despite the availability of efficacious treatments, many nurses do not provide adequate analgesia for painful interventions. Complementary therapies and nonpharmacologic interventions are additionally essential to managing pain. Owing to the increasing awareness of inadequate nursing utilization of pharmacologic measures for procedural pain, this paper focuses only on analgesic treatments. The aim of this review was to examine how varying degrees of quality improvement affect nursing utilization of treatments for routine pediatric procedural pain. A comprehensive search of databases including Cinahl, Medline/Pubmed, Web of Science, Google Scholar, Psycinfo, and Cochrane Library was performed. Sixty-two peer-reviewed research articles were examined. Ten articles focusing on quality improvement in pediatric pain management published in English from 2001 to 2011 were included. Three themes emerged: 1) increasing nursing knowledge; 2) nursing empowerment; and 3) protocol implementation. Research critique was completed with the use of guidelines and recommendations from Creswell (2009) and Garrard (2011). The literature reveals that nurses still think that pediatric pain management is essential. Quality improvement increases nursing utilization of procedural pain treatments. Although increasing nursing knowledge improves pediatric pain management, it appears that nursing empowerment and protocol implementation increase nursing compliance more than just education alone. Nurses providing pain management can enhance their individual practice with quality improvement measures that may increase nursing adherence to institutional and nationally recommended pediatric procedural pain management guidelines.

  4. Learning Routines in Innovation Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoeve, Aimee; Nieuwenhuis, Loek F. M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to generate both a theoretical and an empirical basis for a research model that serves in further research as an analytical tool for understanding the complex phenomenon of learning at different levels in a work organisation. The key concept in this model is the routine concept of Nelson and Winter.…

  5. MISR Conversion to ASCII Routines

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

    ... These routines are written in Exelis Visual Information Solutions IDL programming language. They can be run either with a licensed ... with IDL and is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . The IDL VM software can be downloaded from this site or ordered ...

  6. Radiology of AIDS in the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Grattan-Smith, D; Harrison, L F; Singleton, E B

    1992-01-01

    The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has involved the pediatric age group and is especially prevalent in babies born of mothers who are intravenous drug abusers or prostitutes. Approximately 30% of children born to mothers who are seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) will develop HIV infection. There are several important differences in children and adults with AIDS. The incubation period of the disease is shorter, and initial clinical manifestations occur earlier in children. In addition, certain infections are more common in children, and the different types of malignancy, especially Kaposi's sarcoma, are unusual in the pediatric age group. The altered immune system involves both T cells and humoral immunity and increases susceptibility to a variety of infections, particularly opportunistic organisms. In this publication the complications of pediatric AIDS involving the lungs, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary system, and neurological system are described. The most common pulmonary complications in our experience are Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia. The spectrum of cardiovascular involvement in pediatric AIDS includes myocarditis, pericarditis, and infectious endocarditis. Gastrointestinal tract involvement is usually due to opportunistic organisms that produce esophagitis, gastritis, and colitis. Abdominal lymphadenopathy is a common finding either due to disseminating Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection or nonspecific lymphadenopathy. Although cholangitis is more commonly seen in adults, it may occur in children with AIDS and, in most cases, is due to related opportunistic infections. Genitourinary infections may be the first evidence of HIV disease. Cystitis, pyelonephritis, renal abscesses, and nephropathy with renal insufficiency are complications of pediatric AIDS. A variety of neurological abnormalities may occur in pediatric AIDS. The most common cause of

  7. Immunopathophysiology of pediatric CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Amit; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Dale, Russell C; Rostasy, Kevin; Brück, Wolfgang; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-08-30

    Elucidating pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the spectrum of pediatric-onset CNS demyelinating diseases, particularly those that may distinguish multiple sclerosis (MS) from other entities, promises to both improve diagnostics and guide more-informed therapeutic decisions. Observations that pediatric- and adult-onset MS share the same genetic and environmental risk factors support the view that these conditions represent essentially the same illness manifesting at different ages. Nonetheless, special consideration must be given when CNS inflammation manifests in early life, at a time when multiple organs (including immune and nervous systems) are actively maturing. CSF analysis in pediatric-onset MS points to chronic CNS inflammation, supported by observations from limited pathologic material available for study. Emerging results implicate abnormalities in both effector and regulatory T cell subsets, and potentially immune senescence, in children with MS. Although CNS-directed antibodies (including antibodies recognizing myelin antigens; Kir4.1) can be documented in pediatric-onset MS, their pathophysiologic significance (as in adults) remains unclear. This is in contrast to the presence of serum and/or CSF antibodies recognizing aquaporin-4, which, when measured using validated cell-based assays, supports the diagnosis of a neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, distinct from MS. Presence of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies documented with similar cell-based assays may also be associated with pathophysiologically distinct disease phenotypes in children. The substantial impact of pediatric-onset MS on normal brain development and function underscores the importance of elucidating both the immunobiology and neurobiology of disease. Ongoing efforts are aimed at developing and validating biological measures that define pathophysiologically distinct monophasic and chronic forms of pediatric CNS demyelination.

  8. Children's Intent Participation in a Pediatric Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rindstedt, Camilla; Aronsson, Karin

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes informal learning, drawing on video recordings of staff-child interaction in a pediatric unit. It is shown that even very young patients engage in intent community participation, carefully noting fine variations in examination and treatment practices. They orient to everyday routines in successively more complex ways, gradually…

  9. Memos trace routine radiation overexposures

    SciTech Connect

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-03-09

    Workers at the Energy Department's Fernald plant routinely received [open quotes]gross,[close quotes] [open quotes]unacceptable[close quotes] and [open quotes]undue[close quotes] radiation exposures during uranium processing operations from the 1950s through the early 1970s, according to internal Fernald memos. The documents come to light as DOE continues to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars every month to defend its former Fernald contractor, NLO Inc., from a workers' lawsuit seeking compensation for alleged injuries from poor safety practices at the Ohio facility. DOE officials have contended the NLO defense effort is justified because there is no evidence that any former Fernald workers have suffered injury as a result of radiation exposures at the plant. However, the internal Fernald memos document major concerns expressed by Fernald health officials about unsafe working conditions at the plant and what appear in some cases to be routine overexposures of workers.

  10. Increasing Vaccination Rates in a Pediatric Chronic Hemodialysis Unit.

    PubMed

    Geer, Jessica J

    2016-01-01

    Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at an increased risk for serious complications from vaccine-preventable childhood diseases. Despite this risk, vaccination rates remain low. The barriers to vaccination in the pediatric population on dialysis are multifactorial. The advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) is well poised to serve as a wellness champion for this chronic population. This article chronicles an APRN-led quality improvement project to increase vaccination rates to 100% in an outpatient pediatric population on hemodialysis. A quality improvement system was created to systematically review immunizations upon admission to the hemodialysis unit and annually thereafter. Over a two-year period, immunization rates improved significantly.

  11. Laser gingivectomy for pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Michelle M; Poiman, David J; Jacobson, Barry L

    2010-01-01

    Traditional gingivectomy procedures have been a challenge for pediatric dentists who confront issues of patient cooperation and discomfort. Treatment of pediatric patients must involve minimal operative and postoperative discomfort. Laser soft-tissue surgery has been shown to be well accepted by children. For the pediatric patient, the greatest advantage of the laser is the lack of local anesthesia injection and the associated pre- and postoperative discomfort. The following case report describes a gingivectomy procedure performed on a 14-year-old female.

  12. Sedation for Pediatric Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is more difficult to achieve cooperation when conducting endoscopy in pediatric patients than adults. As a result, the sedation for a comfortable procedure is more important in pediatric patients. The sedation, however, often involves risks and side effects, and their prediction and prevention should be sought in advance. Physicians should familiarize themselves to the relevant guidelines in order to make appropriate decisions and actions regarding the preparation of the sedation, patient monitoring during endoscopy, patient recovery, and hospital discharge. Furthermore, they have to understand the characteristics of the pediatric patients and different types of endoscopy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the details of sedation in pediatric endoscopy. PMID:24749082

  13. Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System A A A ... could put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  14. Measuring polio immunity to plan immunization activities.

    PubMed

    Voorman, Arend; Lyons, Hil M

    2016-11-21

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative is closer than ever to achieving a polio-free world. Immunization activities must still be carried out in non-endemic countries to maintain population immunity at levels which will stop poliovirus from spreading if it is re-introduced from still-infected areas. In areas where there is no active transmission of poliovirus, programs must rely on surrogate indicators of population immunity to determine the appropriate immunization activities, typically caregiver-reported vaccination history obtained from non-polio acute flaccid paralysis patients identified through polio surveillance. We used regression models to examine the relationship between polio vaccination campaigns and caregiver-reported polio vaccination history. We find that in many countries, vaccination campaigns have a surprisingly weak impact on these commonly used indicators. We conclude that alternative criteria and data, such as routine immunization indicators from vaccination records or household surveys, should be considered for planning polio vaccination campaigns, and that validation of such surrogate indicators is necessary if they are to be used as the basis for program planning and risk assessment. We recommend that the GPEI and similar organizations consider or continue devoting additional resources to rigorously study population immunity and campaign effectiveness in at-risk countries.

  15. Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, J P

    1983-04-01

    Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation refers to those measures used to restore ventilation and circulation in children. This article defines how cardiopulmonary resuscitation in infants, children, and adolescents differs from cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults and delineates the drugs and dosages to be used in the resuscitation of pediatric patients.

  16. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... get enough calories to heal and grow. After heart surgery, most babies and infants (younger than 12 to 15 months) can take ... valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... open heart surgery References Bernstein D. General principles ...

  17. [Research in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Márquez, Julia Rocío; González-Cabello, Héctor Jaime

    2015-01-01

    In the interest of encouraging the promotion of research done by physicians of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, in this supplement we publish articles written by residents of different specialties related to critical themes on pediatrics. These residents are guided by affiliated physicians from the Hospital de Pediatría del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI.

  18. Pediatric intensive care.

    PubMed

    Macintire, D K

    1999-07-01

    To provide optimal care, a veterinarian in a pediatric intensive care situation for a puppy or kitten should be familiar with normal and abnormal vital signs, nursing care and monitoring considerations, and probable diseases. This article is a brief discussion of the pediatric intensive care commonly required to treat puppies or kittens in emergency situations and for canine parvovirus type 2 enteritis.

  19. Teaching Prevention in Pediatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Tina L.; Greenberg, Larrie; Loeser, Helen; Keller, David

    2000-01-01

    Reviews methods of teaching preventive medicine in pediatrics and highlights innovative programs. Methods of teaching prevention in pediatrics include patient interactions, self-directed learning, case-based learning, small-group learning, standardized patients, computer-assisted instruction, the Internet, student-centered learning, and lectures.…

  20. Pediatric Care Online: A Pediatric Point-of-Care Tool.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric Care Online is the American Academy of Pediatrics' point-of-care tool designed for health care providers. Pediatric Care Online builds on content from Red Book Online and Pediatric Patient Education and features Quick Reference topic pages for more than 250 pediatric health care topics. The multitude of resources available within Pediatric Care Online will be reviewed in this column, and a sample search will be used to illustrate the type of information available within this point-of-care pediatric resource.

  1. The thymus. Pediatric surgical aspects.

    PubMed

    Midulla, P S; Dolgin, S E; Shlasko, E

    2001-05-01

    Since the original description of thymic death in an infant 400 years ago, the thymus has been recognized as an important structure to practitioners caring for infants and children. The source of many cysts, masses, and tumors in the neck and mediastinum, the thymus gland merits the pediatric surgeon's attention. The thymus is clearly an important lymphoid organ, the removal of which may be therapeutic in MG, but congenital absence leads to profound cell-mediated immunodeficiency. The immunologic sequelae of its neonatal extirpation remains obscure. It is apparent that further research is needed to clarify the functional role of the thymus gland in the developing immune system. Until better elucidated, a conservative approach to neonatal thymectomy may be justified.

  2. Routine Checkup Should Assess Fitness, Too

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_162856.html Routine Checkup Should Assess Fitness, Too Cardiorespiratory test would help gauge patients' heart ... checked regularly, but an exercise expert says cardiorespiratory fitness should also be part of a routine medical ...

  3. Program sustainability: focus on organizational routines.

    PubMed

    Pluye, P; Potvin, L; Denis, J L; Pelletier, J

    2004-12-01

    Program sustainability is an ongoing concern for most people in health promotion. However, the current notion of sustainability in organizations, namely routinization, needs refinement. This article examines organizational routines. In so doing, it refines the notion of sustainability and the assessment of routines. Drawing on the organizational literature, a routinized program is defined by the presence of routinized activities, meaning that these activities exhibit four characteristics of organizational routines: memory, adaptation, values and rules. To answer the question of how these characteristics are useful, we conducted an empirical study of the routinization of the Quebec Heart Health Demonstration Project in five community health centers. Our method consisted of a multiple-case study. We observed project activities in each center in 2000. The data came from documents and interviews with project actors. Our results show that, in one of the centers, no resources had been officially committed to project activities. Even so, the actors continued some activities on an informal basis. In another center, the activities satisfied three of the four routine characteristics. In the three others, activities satisfied all of the characteristics. These results suggest focusing the study of program sustainability on the routinization of activities resulting from it. They indicate four distinct degrees of sustainability: (1) the absence of sustainability; no program activity is continued; (2) precarious sustainability; some residual activities are pursued, at least unofficially; (3) weak sustainability; the program produces some official activities that are not routinized; and (4) sustainability through routinization; routinized activities result from the program.

  4. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...

  5. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...

  6. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...

  7. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...

  8. Evolutionary Dynamics of Digitized Organizational Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Peng

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation explores the effects of increased digitization on the evolutionary dynamics of organizational routines. Do routines become more flexible, or more rigid, as the mix of digital technologies and human actors changes? What are the mechanisms that govern the evolution of routines? The dissertation theorizes about the effects of…

  9. Optimizing pediatric clinical care and advocacy in an online era

    PubMed Central

    Dollin, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To help busy FPs find useful current information and keep up to date on pediatric infectious disease and immunization topics by highlighting the work of one excellent source of reliable information in this area, the Canadian Paediatric Society Infectious Diseases and Immunization Committee. Composition of the committee Committee members were appointed to represent the Canadian Paediatric Society, the College of Family Physicians of Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the National Advisory Committee on Immunization. Methods This article highlights important pediatric practice points generated by the Canadian Paediatric Society Infectious Diseases and Immunization Committee at a typical meeting in January 2013 from the perspective of an FP liaison. It also describes the committee’s work methods and its background thinking related to the most current and changing issues. Report Learn specific online links to updated pediatric infectious disease topics from the detailed content of this report. Topics include caring for kids new to Canada, vaccine-hesitant parents, influenza, human papillomavirus, pertussis, sexually transmitted infections, multidrug-resistant bacteria, and advocacy, among others. Conclusion Learn where to find this new and continuously changing information and how to stay evergreen in your knowledge. PMID:25022634

  10. Assessment and treatment of common pediatric sleep disorders

    PubMed Central

    Avis, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that chronically disrupted sleep in children and adolescents can lead to problems in cognitive functioning. Behavioral interventions for pediatric sleep problems (e.g., graduated extinction, parent education, positive bedtime routines), especially in young children, have been shown to produce clinically significant improvements. This review describes a few pertinent conditions of sleep disorders in children and adolescents as well as provides clinically useful approaches to sleep complaints and both pharmacologic and nonpharmacological treatments of some common pediatric sleep disorders. PMID:20622943

  11. Assessing Pediatric Nurses' Knowledge About Chemical Flame Retardants.

    PubMed

    Distelhorst, Laura; Bieda, Amy; DiMarco, Marguerite; Tullai-McGuinness, Susan

    Chemical flame retardants are routinely applied to children's products and are harmful to their health. Pediatric nurses are in a key position to provide education to caregivers on methods to decrease their children's exposure to these harmful chemicals. However, a critical barrier is the absence of any program to educate nurses about chemical flame retardants. In order to overcome this barrier, we must first assess their knowledge. This article provides key highlights every pediatric nurse should know about chemical flame retardants and reports the results of a knowledge assessment study.

  12. Brown-McLean Syndrome in a Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Tourkmani, Abdo Karim; Martinez, Jaime D; Berrones, David; Juárez-Domínguez, Brenda Y; Beltrán, Francisco; Galor, Anat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to report the case of a 12-year-old patient who presented for routine ophthalmic examination after congenital cataract surgery performed at 2 months of age. The patient was diagnosed with bilateral Brown-McLean syndrome by slit lamp examination. No treatment was required because the patient was asymptomatic and had a clear central cornea. This is the first described case of Brown-McLean syndrome in a pediatric patient, representing the importance of clinical examination in the pediatric age group after cataract surgery because of the risk for patients of developing peripheral edema.

  13. Brown-McLean Syndrome in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tourkmani, Abdo Karim; Martinez, Jaime D.; Berrones, David; Juárez-Domínguez, Brenda Y.; Beltrán, Francisco; Galor, Anat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to report the case of a 12-year-old patient who presented for routine ophthalmic examination after congenital cataract surgery performed at 2 months of age. The patient was diagnosed with bilateral Brown-McLean syndrome by slit lamp examination. No treatment was required because the patient was asymptomatic and had a clear central cornea. This is the first described case of Brown-McLean syndrome in a pediatric patient, representing the importance of clinical examination in the pediatric age group after cataract surgery because of the risk for patients of developing peripheral edema. PMID:26034485

  14. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Italy.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Alberto E; Armenio, Lucio; Bernardini, Roberto; Boner, Attilio; Calvani, Mauro; Cardinale, Fabio; Cavagni, Giovanni; Dondi, Arianna; Duse, Marzia; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Marseglia, Gian L; del Giudice, Michele Miraglia; Muraro, Antonella; Pajno, Giovanni B; Paravati, Francesco; Peroni, Diego; Tripodi, Salvatore; Ugazio, Alberto G; Indinnimeo, Luciana

    2011-05-01

    In Italy, according to the International Study on Asthma and Allergies in Childhood study, the prevalence of current asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic eczema in 2006 was 7.9%, 6.5%, and 10.1% among children aged 6-7 and 8.4%, 15.5%, and 7.75% among children aged 13-14 yr. University education in this field is provided by the Postgraduate Schools of Pediatrics and those of Allergology and Clinical Immunology, as well as several annual Master courses. The Italian Society of Pediatric Allergology and Immunology (SIAIP) was founded in 1996 and counts about 1000 members. SIAIP promotes evidence-based management of allergic children and disseminates information to patients and their families through a quite innovative website and the National Journal 'Rivista Italiana di Allergologia Pediatrica'. In the last decade, four major regional, inter-regional, and national web-based networks have been created to link pediatric allergy centers and to share their clinical protocols and epidemiologic data. In addition, National Registers of Primary Immune-deficiencies and on Pediatric HIV link all clinical excellence centers. Research projects in the field of pediatric allergy and immunology are founded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR) and by the National Research Council (CNR), but the overall investments in this research area are quite low. Only a handful Italian excellence centers participate in European Projects on Pediatric Allergy and Immunology within the 7th Framework Program. The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology currently hosts two Italians in its Executive Committee (EC) and one in the EC of the Pediatric Section; moreover, major European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology meetings and courses in the area of pediatrics (e.g., PAAM, Venice, 2009) have been held in Italy in the last 3 yr. Italian hallmarks in the management of allergic diseases in childhood are a quite alive and spread interest in

  15. Pediatric ventricular assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Burki, Sarah; Zafar, Farhan; Morales, David Luis Simon

    2015-01-01

    The domain of pediatric ventricular assist device (VAD) has recently gained considerable attention. Despite the fact that, historically, the practice of pediatric mechanical circulatory support (MCS) has lagged behind that of adult patients, this gap between the two groups is narrowing. Currently, the Berlin EXCOR VAD is the only pediatric-specific durable VAD approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The prospective Berlin Heart trial demonstrated a successful outcome, either bridge to transplantation (BTT), or in rare instances, bridge to recovery, in approximately 90% of children. Also noted during the trial was, however, a high incidence of adverse events such as embolic stroke, bleeding and infection. This has incentivized some pediatric centers to utilize adult implantable continuous-flow devices, for instance the HeartMate II and HeartWare HVAD, in children. As a result of this paradigm shift, the outlook of pediatric VAD support has dramatically changed: Treatment options previously unavailable to children, including outpatient management and even destination therapy, have now been becoming a reality. The sustained demand for continued device miniaturization and technological refinements is anticipated to extend the range of options available to children—HeartMate 3 and HeartWare MVAD are two examples of next generation VADs with potential pediatric application, both of which are presently undergoing clinical trials. A pediatric-specific continuous-flow device is also on the horizon: the redesigned Infant Jarvik VAD (Jarvik 2015) is undergoing pre-clinical testing, with a randomized clinical trial anticipated to follow thereafter. The era of pediatric VADs has begun. In this article, we discuss several important aspects of contemporary VAD therapy, with a particular focus on challenges unique to the pediatric population. PMID:26793341

  16. [Robotics in pediatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Camps, J I

    2011-10-01

    Despite the extensive use of robotics in the adult population, the use of robotics in pediatrics has not been well accepted. There is still a lack of awareness from pediatric surgeons on how to use the robotic equipment, its advantages and indications. Benefit is still controversial. Dexterity and better visualization of the surgical field are one of the strong values. Conversely, cost and a lack of small instruments prevent the use of robotics in the smaller patients. The aim of this manuscript is to present the controversies about the use of robotics in pediatric surgery.

  17. Pediatric Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Donna L.; Hentz, Tracy A.; Friedman, Debra L.

    2005-01-01

    Pediatric palliative care provides benefit to children living with life-threatening or terminal conditions. Palliative care should be available to all seriously ill children. Palliative care includes the treatment of symptoms such as pain, nausea, dyspnea, constipation, anorexia, and sialorrhea. This care can occur in a variety of settings, from home to hospice to hospital, and must include bereavement care and follow up after the death of a child. There are many challenges in pediatric palliative care, but continued research into this important area of pediatrics will lead to improvements in the care of children with life-threatening illnesses. PMID:23118638

  18. Immunizations for foreign travel.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of preparing travelers for destinations throughout the world is providing them with immunizations. Before administering any vaccines, however, a careful health and immunization history and travel itinerary should be obtained in order to determine vaccine indications and contraindications. There are three categories of immunizations for foreign travel. The first category includes immunizations which are routinely recommended whether or not the individual is traveling. Many travelers are due for primary vaccination or boosting against tetanus-diphtheria, measles-mumps-rubella, pneumococcal pneumonia, and influenza, for example, and the pre-travel visit is an ideal time to administer these. The second category are immunizations which might be required by a country as a condition for entry; these are yellow fever and cholera. The final category contains immunizations which are recommended because there is a risk of acquiring a particular disease during travel. Typhoid fever, meningococcal disease, rabies, and hepatitis are some examples. Travelers who are pregnant or who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus require special consideration. Provision of appropriate immunizations for foreign travel is an important aspect of preventing illness in travelers. PMID:1337807

  19. Routine outcome measures in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kisely, Steve; Adair, Carol E; Lin, Elizabeth; Marriott, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Canada is a federal country of 10 provinces and three territories. High level information on mental health conditions and service use has mostly been generated from administrative data collected by provinces and territories. These include four major types - hospital admissions and discharges, physician billings, ambulatory care services, and drug databases. At the national level, the Canadian Institute for Health Information brings together this information to produce indicators of outcome. Although these data provide information on patient and health system characteristics, they do not capture the full spectrum of formal and informal mental healthcare. These include changes in health status, functioning, community integration and quality of life. As a result, some jurisdictions have begun to implement more standardized measures of outcome such as the clinician-rated Health of the Nation Outcome Scales or the inpatient Resident Assessment Instrument - Mental Health. In this paper we provide an overview of mental-health-related data sources in Canada, highlight some of the more progressive practices beginning to emerge, and conclude with some thoughts about how the routine measurement and reporting of mental health outcomes in Canada might be advanced including efforts at engaging both clinicians and decision-makers.

  20. Routine CMV screening during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Collinet, P; Subtil, D; Houfflin-Debarge, V; Kacet, N; Dewilde, A; Puech, F

    2004-05-10

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) screening during pregnancy has been widely discussed for several years, but still no consensus has been agreed. With a number of live births of 750,000 per year in France, we would expect 7500 infected infants at birth per year (rate of congenital infection of 1%). Among infected infants at birth, the number of severely infected foetuses would be approximately 75, the number of infants with severe sequelae would be 480, 675 approximately would present with hearing loss and the number of asymptomatic infants would be 6270. Five different preventive methods for congenital CMV infection are possible: (1) Routine CMV screening at the beginning of pregnancy for primary prevention. (2) Secondary prevention by antenatal diagnosis of congenital CMV infection complications. (3) Tertiary prevention by serological testing during pregnancy. (4) Tertiary prevention by serological screening at birth. (5) Tertiary prevention: Hearing loss screening at birth. The aims of this review are to define the advantages and disadvantages of these different methods of CMV screening during pregnancy and to determine if the current available information would make systematic testing acceptable.

  1. Serum tumor markers in pediatric osteosarcoma: a summary review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary high-grade bone tumor in both adolescents and children. Early tumor detection is key to ensuring effective treatment. Serum marker discovery and validation for pediatric osteosarcoma has accelerated in recent years, coincident with an evolving understanding of molecules and their complex interactions, and the compelling need for improved pediatric osteosarcoma outcome measures in clinical trials. This review gives a short overview of serological markers for pediatric osteosarcoma, and highlights advances in pediatric osteosarcoma-related marker research within the past year. Studies in the past year involving serum markers in patients with pediatric osteosarcoma can be assigned to one of four categories, i.e., new approaches and new markers, exploratory studies in specialized disease subsets, large cross-sectional validation studies, and longitudinal studies, with and without an intervention. Most of the studies have examined the association of a serum marker with some aspect of the natural history of pediatric osteosarcoma. As illustrated by the many studies reviewed, several serum markers are emerging that show a credible association with disease modification. The expanding pool of informative osteosarcoma-related markers is expected to impact development of therapeutics for pediatric osteosarcoma positively and, it is hoped, ultimately clinical care. Combinations of serum markers of natural immunity, thyroid hormone homeostasis, and bone tumorigenesis may be undertaken together in patients with pediatric osteosarcoma. These serum markers in combination may do better. The potential effect of an intrinsic dynamic balance of tumor angiogenesis residing within a single hormone (tri-iodothyronine) is an attractive concept for regulation of vascularization in pediatric osteosarcoma. PMID:22587902

  2. Medical management of pediatric chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, L L; Brown, K R

    2000-10-01

    Pediatric sinusitis can be a challenging disease to treat, whether by a primary care physician or an otolaryngologist. When initial appropriate therapy fails to resolve the disorder, frustration may develop on the part of the patient, the family, and the physician. In addition to treatment with appropriate antibiotics for a sufficient length of time, other associated conditions that can exacerbate the condition must be considered and addressed as necessary. These may include viral upper respiratory infections, allergic rhinitis, immune deficiencies, asthma, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Unless all associated conditions have been optimized, treatment of chronic sinusitis will often be unsuccessful. Recognition that there may be another factor contributing to the patient's continuing illness should prompt appropriate evaluation and occasionally referral to appropriate specialists. Except for the unusual pediatric patient with a truly anatomic disorder or an underlying chronic illness such as cystic fibrosis, proper medical management will almost always resolve chronic sinusitis.

  3. Immune Thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Immune Thrombocytopenia? Immune thrombocytopenia (THROM-bo-si-toe-PE-ne- ... from one person to another. Types of Immune Thrombocytopenia The two types of ITP are acute (temporary ...

  4. Characterization of distinct immunophenotypes across pediatric brain tumor types.

    PubMed

    Griesinger, Andrea M; Birks, Diane K; Donson, Andrew M; Amani, Vladimir; Hoffman, Lindsey M; Waziri, Allen; Wang, Michael; Handler, Michael H; Foreman, Nicholas K

    2013-11-01

    Despite increasing evidence that antitumor immune control exists in the pediatric brain, these findings have yet to be exploited successfully in the clinic. A barrier to development of immunotherapeutic strategies in pediatric brain tumors is that the immunophenotype of these tumors' microenvironment has not been defined. To address this, the current study used multicolor FACS of disaggregated tumor to systematically characterize the frequency and phenotype of infiltrating immune cells in the most common pediatric brain tumor types. The initial study cohort consisted of 7 pilocytic astrocytoma (PA), 19 ependymoma (EPN), 5 glioblastoma (GBM), 6 medulloblastoma (MED), and 5 nontumor brain (NT) control samples obtained from epilepsy surgery. Immune cell types analyzed included both myeloid and T cell lineages and respective markers of activated or suppressed functional phenotypes. Immune parameters that distinguished each of the tumor types were identified. PA and EPN demonstrated significantly higher infiltrating myeloid and lymphoid cells compared with GBM, MED, or NT. Additionally, PA and EPN conveyed a comparatively activated/classically activated myeloid cell-skewed functional phenotype denoted in particular by HLA-DR and CD64 expression. In contrast, GBM and MED contained progressively fewer infiltrating leukocytes and more muted functional phenotypes similar to that of NT. These findings were recapitulated using whole tumor expression of corresponding immune marker genes in a large gene expression microarray cohort of pediatric brain tumors. The results of this cross-tumor comparative analysis demonstrate that different pediatric brain tumor types exhibit distinct immunophenotypes, implying that specific immunotherapeutic approaches may be most effective for each tumor type.

  5. Snapshot of Pediatric Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... and other central nervous system (CNS) tumors , and neuroblastoma , which are expected to account for more than ... in clinical trials in children with ALL and neuroblastoma. Selected Advances in Pediatric Cancers Research A comprehensive ...

  6. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, Karen A; Breuer, Christopher K

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an important cause of gastrointestinal pathology in children and adolescents. The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is increasing; therefore, it is important for the clinician to be aware of the presentation of this disease in the pediatric population. Laboratory tests, radiology studies, and endoscopic procedures are helpful in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and differentiating between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Once diagnosed, the goal of medical management is to induce remission of disease while minimizing the side effects of the medication. Specific attention needs to be paid to achieving normal growth in this susceptible population. Surgical management is usually indicated for failure of medical management, complication, or malignancy. Algorithms for diagnostic evaluation and treatment of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease are presented. The specific psychosocial issues facing these patients are also discussed in this review as are the future goals of research in the complex problem of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:16718840

  7. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  8. American Board of Pediatrics

    MedlinePlus

    ... QUICK LINKS Search form Search LOG OUT ABP PORTFOLIO LOG IN ABP PORTFOLIO THE AMERICAN BOARD of PEDIATRICS Certifying excellence in ... Overview MOCA-Peds Pilot MOC for Residents ABP Portfolio FAQs APPLY FOR EXAM How to Apply Certification ...

  9. Increasing immunization coverage.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Lawrence D; Curry, Edward S; Harlor, Allen D; Laughlin, James J; Leeds, Andrea J; Lessin, Herschel R; Rodgers, Chadwick T; Granado-Villar, Deise C; Brown, Jeffrey M; Cotton, William H; Gaines, Beverly Marie Madry; Gambon, Thresia B; Gitterman, Benjamin A; Gorski, Peter A; Kraft, Colleen A; Marino, Ronald Vincent; Paz-Soldan, Gonzalo J; Zind, Barbara

    2010-06-01

    In 1977, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a statement calling for universal immunization of all children for whom vaccines are not contraindicated. In 1995, the policy statement "Implementation of the Immunization Policy" was published by the American Academy of Pediatrics, followed in 2003 with publication of the first version of this statement, "Increasing Immunization Coverage." Since 2003, there have continued to be improvements in immunization coverage, with progress toward meeting the goals set forth in Healthy People 2010. Data from the 2007 National Immunization Survey showed that 90% of children 19 to 35 months of age have received recommended doses of each of the following vaccines: inactivated poliovirus (IPV), measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), varicella-zoster virus (VZB), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). For diphtheria and tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine, 84.5% have received the recommended 4 doses by 35 months of age. Nevertheless, the Healthy People 2010 goal of at least 80% coverage for the full series (at least 4 doses of DTaP, 3 doses of IPV, 1 dose of MMR, 3 doses of Hib, 3 doses of HBV, and 1 dose of varicella-zoster virus vaccine) has not yet been met, and immunization coverage of adolescents continues to lag behind the goals set forth in Healthy People 2010. Despite these encouraging data, a vast number of new challenges that threaten continued success toward the goal of universal immunization coverage have emerged. These challenges include an increase in new vaccines and new vaccine combinations as well as a significant number of vaccines currently under development; a dramatic increase in the acquisition cost of vaccines, coupled with a lack of adequate payment to practitioners to buy and administer vaccines; unanticipated manufacturing and delivery problems that have caused significant shortages of various vaccine products; and the rise of a public antivaccination movement that uses the

  10. Referral to pediatric surgical specialists.

    PubMed

    Klein, Michael D

    2014-02-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics, with the collaboration of the Surgical Sections of the American Academy of Pediatrics, has created referral recommendations intended to serve as voluntary practice parameters to assist general pediatricians in determining when and to whom to refer their patients for pediatric surgical specialty care. It is recognized that these recommendations may be difficult to implement, because communities vary in terms of access to major pediatric medical centers. Limited access does not negate the value of the recommendations, however, because the child who needs specialized surgical and anesthetic care is best served by the skills of the appropriate pediatric surgical team. Major congenital anomalies, malignancies, major trauma, and chronic illnesses (including those associated with preterm birth) in infants and children should be managed by pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical specialists at pediatric referral centers that can provide expertise in many areas, including the pediatric medical subspecialties and surgical specialties of pediatric radiology, pediatric anesthesiology, pediatric pathology, and pediatric intensive care. The optimal management of the child with complex problems, chronic illness, or disabilities requires coordination, communication, and cooperation of the pediatric surgical specialist with the child's primary care pediatrician or physician.

  11. Pediatric oncology in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kebudi, Rejin

    2012-03-01

    The survival of children with cancer has increased dramatically in the last decades, as a result of advances in diagnosis, treatment and supportive care. Each year in Turkey, 2500-3000 new childhood cancer cases are expected. According to the Turkish Pediatric Oncology Group and Turkish Pediatric Hematology Societies Registry, about 2000 new pediatric cancer cases are reported each year. The population in Turkey is relatively young. One fourth of the population is younger than 15 years of age. According to childhood mortality, cancer is the fourth cause of death (7.2%) after infections, cardiac deaths and accidents. The major cancers in children in Turkey are leukemia (31%), lymphoma (19%), central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms (13%), neuroblastomas (7%), bone tumors (6.1%), soft tissue sarcomas (6%), followed by renal tumors, germ cell tumors, retinoblastoma, carcinomas-epithelial neoplasms, hepatic tumors and others. Lymphomas rank second in frequency as in many developing countries in contrast to West Europe or USA, where CNS neoplasms rank second in frequency. The seven-year survival rate in children with malignancies in Turkey is 65.8%. The history of modern Pediatric Oncology in Turkey dates back to the 1970's. Pediatric Oncology has been accepted as a subspecialty in Turkey since 1983. Pediatric Oncologists are all well trained and dedicated. All costs for the diagnosis and treatment of children with cancer is covered by the government. Education and infrastructure for palliative care needs improvement.

  12. Pediatric enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, David; Kazmerski, Kimberly; Iyer, Kishore

    2006-01-01

    Common to all pediatric patients receiving enteral nutrition is the inability to consume calories orally. This is often secondary to issues of inadequate weight gain, inadequate growth, prolonged feeding times, weight loss, a decrease in weight/age or weight/height ratios, or a persistent triceps skinfold thickness <5% for age. Enteral nutrition requires enteral access. In the neonatal period the nasoenteric route is usually used. In pediatric patients requiring long-term enteral access, surgically, endoscopically, or radiologically placed percutaneous feeding tubes are common. Jejunal feeding tubes are used in pediatric patients with gastric feeding intolerance or persistent gastroesophageal reflux. Low-profile enteral access devices are preferred by most pediatric patients because of their cosmetic appearance. For most children, a standard pediatric polypeptide enteral formula is well tolerated. There are specialized pediatric enteral formulas available for patients with decreased intestinal length, altered intestinal absorptive capacity, or altered pancreatic function. Weaning patients from tube feeding to oral nutrition is the ultimate nutrition goal. A multidisciplinary approach to patients with short bowel syndrome will maximize the use of enteral nutrition while preserving parenteral nutrition for patients with true enteral nutrition therapy failure.

  13. Pediatric integrative medicine: pediatrics' newest subspecialty?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Integrative medicine is defined as relationship-centered care that focuses on the whole person, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches, healthcare professionals and disciplines to achieve optimal health and healing, including evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine. Pediatric integrative medicine (PIM) develops and promotes this approach within the field of pediatrics. We conducted a survey to identify and describe PIM programs within academic children’s hospitals across North America. Key barriers and opportunities were identified for the growth and development of academic PIM initiatives in the US and Canada. Methods Academic PIM programs were identified by email and eligible for inclusion if they had each of educational, clinical, and research activities. Program directors were interviewed by telephone regarding their clinical, research, educational, and operational aspects. Results Sixteen programs were included. Most (75%) programs provided both inpatient and outpatient services. Seven programs operated with less than 1 FTE clinical personnel. Credentialing of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers varied substantially across the programs and between inpatient and outpatient services. Almost all (94%) programs offered educational opportunities for residents in pediatrics and/or family medicine. One fifth (20%) of the educational programs were mandatory for medical students. Research was conducted in a range of topics, but half of the programs reported lack of research funding and/or time. Thirty-one percent of the programs relied on fee-for-service income. Conclusions Pediatric integrative medicine is emerging as a new subspecialty to better help address 21st century patient concerns. PMID:22894682

  14. Pediatric heart failure therapy with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Susan R; Canter, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Management of chronic heart failure in pediatrics has been altered by the adult literature showing improvements in mortality and hospitalization rates with the use of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists (beta-blockers) for routine therapy of all classes of ischemic and non-ischemic heart failure. Many pediatric heart failure specialists have incorporated these agents into their routine management of pediatric heart failure related to dilated cardiomyopathy or ventricular dysfunction in association with congenital heart disease. Retrospective and small prospective case series have shown encouraging improvements in cardiac function and symptoms, but interpretation has been complicated by the high rate of spontaneous recovery in pediatric patients. A recently completed pediatric double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial showed no difference between placebo and two doses of carvedilol over a 6-month period of follow-up, with significant improvement of all three groups over the course of evaluation. Experience with adults has suggested that only certain beta-blockers, including carvedilol, bisoprolol, nebivolol, and metoprolol succinate, should be used in the treatment of heart failure and that patients with high-grade heart failure may derive the most benefit. Other studies surmise that early or prophylactic use of these medications may alter the risk of disease progression in some high-risk subsets, such as patients receiving anthracyclines or those with muscular dystrophy. This article reviews these topics using experience as well as data from all the recent pediatric studies on the use of beta-blockers to treat congestive heart failure, especially when related to systolic ventricular dysfunction.

  15. Integrated Immune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarnece

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to replace several recent studies about astronaut immune systems with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling. The study will address lack of in-flight data to determine the inflight status of immune systems, physiological stress, viral immunity, to determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight, and to determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  16. American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

    MedlinePlus

    ... Litch's Law Log HIPAA Forms Practice Management and Marketing Newsletter Webinar Materials Member Resources 2017 General Assembly ... Archives Access Pediatric Dentistry Today Practice Management and Marketing Newsletter Pediatric Dentistry Journal Open Access Articles Policies & ...

  17. [History of pediatric anesthesiology].

    PubMed

    Simić, Dusica; Dragović, Simon; Budić, Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Among advances in medicine during the past 150 years, certainly the introduction of surgical anesthesia must be considered the greatest gifts of medical profession to mankind, especially to children. Pediatric anesthesia has progressed rapidly throughout the years. Since the first recorded case of pediatric anesthesia in 1842 to the latest advancement in training, technology, medicine and equipment in the last decades of this century, many historic moments have been following each other. Throughout the first decades of 20th century, most physicians treated children as miniature adults. It is believed that the development of modern pediatric anesthesia started in 1930. To offer a historic perspective, the evolution of new field through its rapid growth was divided into two chronologic categories: first (1930-1950) and second (1950-present). During the first period (1930-1950), the anesthesia techniques and equipment adjusted to different children's age were developed. In the second, together with further technique and equipment refinement, modern anesthetics and vital system surveillance (monitoring) were introduced into everyday practice. The keyto the advances in pediatric anesthesiology was difficulties leading to new inventions with consequent improvement of techniques and methods. This article reviews the origins and development of anesthesia for infants and children in the world and Serbia, emphasizing the contributions of many devoted physicians that represented the major force leading to inevitable evolution of pediatric anesthesia.

  18. Pediatric Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E.; Redline, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, the prevalence of overweight across all pediatric age groups and ethnicities has increased substantially, with the current prevalence of overweight among adolescents estimated to be approximately 30%. Current evidence suggests that overweight is modestly associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) among young children, but strongly associated with OSAS in older children and adolescents. The rising incidence of pediatric overweight likely will impact the prevalence, presentation, and treatment of childhood OSAS. The subgroup of children who may be especially susceptible include ethnic minorities and those from households with caregivers from low socioeconomic groups. OSAS, by exposing children to recurrent intermittent hypoxemia or oxidative stress, may amplify the adverse effects of adiposity on systemic inflammation and metabolic perturbations associated with vascular disease and diabetes. When these conditions manifest early in life, they have the potential to alter physiology at critical developmental stages, or, if persistent, provide cumulative exposures that may powerfully alter long-term health profiles. An increased prevalence of overweight also may impact the response to adenotonsillectomy as a primary treatment for childhood OSAS. The high and anticipated increased prevalence of pediatric OSAS mandates assessment of optimal approaches for preventing and treating both OSAS and overweight across the pediatric age range. In this Pulmonary Perspective, the interrelationships between pediatric OSAS and overweight are reviewed, and the implications of the overweight epidemic on childhood OSAS are discussed. PMID:17158283

  19. Pediatric Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Kristen; Stoffella, Sylvia; Meyers, Rachel; Girotto, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    The frequent use of antimicrobials in pediatric patients has led to a significant increase in multidrug-resistant bacterial infections among children. Antimicrobial stewardship programs have been created in many hospitals in an effort to curtail and optimize the use of antibiotics. Pediatric-focused programs are necessary because of the differences in antimicrobial need and use among this patient population, unique considerations and dosing, vulnerability for resistance due to a lifetime of antibiotic exposure, and the increased risk of adverse events. This paper serves as a position statement of the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) who supports the implementation of antimicrobial stewardship programs for all pediatric patients. PPAG also believes that a pediatric pharmacy specialist should be included as part of that program and that services be covered by managed care organizations and government insurance entities. PPAG also recommends that states create legislation similar to that in existence in California and Missouri and that a federal Task Force for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria be permanently established. PPAG also supports post-doctoral pharmacy training programs in antibiotic stewardship.

  20. Active Movement Warm-Up Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Teri; Quint, Ashleigh; Fischer, Kim; Kiger, Joy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents warm-ups that are designed to physiologically and psychologically prepare students for vigorous physical activity. An active movement warm-up routine is made up of three parts: (1) active warm-up movement exercises, (2) general preparation, and (3) the energy system. These warm-up routines can be used with all grade levels…

  1. SVI: Super-VIOR interface routines

    SciTech Connect

    Alleva, D.

    1987-10-21

    This document describes a set of routines for a VME DMA module called the Super-VIOR. The Super-VIOR interface routines, also called the SVI routines, are written in PILS and run under a Valet-plus system. These routines enable a program to set up, execute, and monitor DMA operations. The Super-VIOR Interface Routines are written in PILS, a high level language similar to BASIC and Pascal which is powerful and fast enough for most applications. One of the most powerful features of the Valet/PILS system is the ability to set up exception vectors and exception handlers directly in a program. This feature is used to handle interrupts from the MC68450 (a 4 channel, 16 bit DMA controller) and the interface's front panel. This document is divided into ten sections, the first being the introduction. The remaining sections detail the interface registers, channel initiation, polling and interrupts, status reporting, front panel interrupts, the configuration routines, the operation control routines, the status reporting routines, and special comments on the MC68450.

  2. 10 CFR 1017.20 - Routine access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Routine access. 1017.20 Section 1017.20 Energy DEPARTMENT... INFORMATION Access to Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.20 Routine access. (a) Authorized... access to the UCNI, subject to limitations in paragraph (b) of this section, and who may...

  3. Making Routine Letters Have Positive Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, S. M.

    While few business people dispute the importance of carefully crafting persuasive, demanding, conciliatory, and bad-news letters, the regular flow of routine communications receives very little meaningful consideration or scrutiny. These routine communications (letters, inquiries, requests, collection letters, complaints, confirmations,…

  4. Daily Routines of Young Children. (Draft).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossbach, Hans-Guenther

    This pilot study of the structural characteristics of daily routines of young children also explored aspects of conceptual framework and research instruments. Four data collection instruments were developed. Two of the three retrospective measures used were questionnaires for mothers about their child's routine on the previous day. The other…

  5. Unlearning Established Organizational Routines--Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiol, Marlena; O'Connor, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this two-part paper is to develop a process model of unlearning established organizational routines. The model traces the interactions among three unlearning sub-processes: ostensive aspects of initial destabilization of an established routine; performative aspects of ongoing discarding-from-use of old behaviors and…

  6. What's new in pediatric orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Sanders, James O; Otsuka, Norman Y; Martus, Jeffrey E

    2015-02-18

    This past year has seen an increase in the quality of studies in pediatric orthopaedics, and the completion of BrAIST demonstrated that high-level studies of important questions can be addressed in pediatric orthopaedics. The current commitment of improving quality of care for children promises a healthy future for pediatric orthopaedics.

  7. Metadata extraction routines for improving infobutton performance.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Nathan C; Haug, Peter J

    2010-11-13

    Infobuttons have been proven as an effective means for providing quick, context-specific links to pertinent information resources at the point of care. Current infobutton manager implementations, however, lack the ability to exchange metadata, are limited to a relatively small set of information providers, and are targeted primarily for a clinician audience. As part of a local effort to implement infobuttons for patient use via a tethered personal health record, we present a series of metadata extraction routines. These routines were constructed to extract key pieces of information from health information providers on the Internet, including content coverage, language availability, and readability scores. The extraction routines were tested using thirty different disease conditions against eight different providers. The routines yielded 183 potential infobutton targets and associated metadata for each. The capabilities of the extraction routines will be expanded to cover new types of metadata in the future.

  8. Sleeping beauties in pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Završnik, Jernej; Kokol, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping beauties (SBs) in science have been known for few decades; however, it seems that only recently have they become popular. An SB is a publication that “sleeps” for a long time and then almost suddenly awakes and becomes highly cited. SBs present interesting findings in science. Pediatrics research literature has not yet been analyzed for their presence, and 5 pediatrics SBs were discovered in this research. Their prevalence was approximately 0.011%. Some environments or periods are more “SB fertile” than others: 3 of 5 SBs were published in the journal Pediatrics, 4 originated from the United States, and 4 were published in the period from 1992 to 1993. No institutions or authors published more than 1 SB. PMID:27822155

  9. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  10. Integrative Pediatrics: Looking Forward

    PubMed Central

    McClafferty, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    Increase in the prevalence of disease and illness has dramatically altered the landscape of pediatrics. As a result, there is a demand for pediatricians with new skills and a sharper focus on preventative health. Patient demand and shifting pediatric illness patterns have accelerated research in the field of pediatric integrative medicine. This emerging field can be defined as healing-oriented medicine that considers the whole child, including all elements of lifestyle and family health. It is informed by evidence and carefully weighs all appropriate treatment options. This Special Issue of Children, containing a collection of articles written by expert clinicians, represents an important educational contribution to the field. The goal of the edition is to raise awareness about integrative topics with robust supporting evidence, and to identify areas where more research is needed. PMID:27417349

  11. Pediatric considerations in homecare.

    PubMed

    Petit de Mange, E A

    1998-09-01

    "If I had known beforehand how difficult, demanding, time consuming, and exhausting it would be--having my child home on a ventilator--I would never have agreed to bring her home" (personal communication with a parent, 1994). This mother's statement strikes at the heart of pediatric high-tech homecare. Parents assume caregiver roles that professional health providers have taken years to develop. Nurses, as strangers, intrude into intimate family relationships that have cultivated over years. Pioneering agencies attempt to fill a gap in pediatric care using guidelines that have been entrenched in the medical and economic models for years. The multiple dimensions of high-tech pediatric homecare require more than provision of technical nursing services. In homecare, nurses are challenged by cultural differences, language barriers, loss of control, family dynamics, practicing in unfamiliar environments, and new technology. To ensure quality nursing care, all professional dimensions need to be considered to be of equal importance.

  12. [Disease-modifying drugs in pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Bykova, O V; Nankina, I A; Drozdova, I M; Kvasova, O V; Batysheva, T T; Boiko, A N

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of therapies are being evaluated and introduced for the treatment of adult multiple sclerosis (MS). A role of these drugs in the management of pediatric MS has yet to be defined both in Russia and in the whole world. Despite the fact that today the study of new drugs in the pediatric population have included in routine practices of the big pharmaceutical agencies, such as FDA and EMA, recommendations for the treatment of pediatric patients with MS are based not so much on a long period of systematic clinical research, but on professional consensus of international expert associations, in particular, the International pediatric multiple sclerosis study group (IPMSSG). The clinical trials include the small number of patients which is not comparable to those conducted in adults. Therefore, there is a need for study designs for assessment of efficacy and safety of the drugs for MS treatment in children and adolescents. The authors present the IPMSSG concept on the treatment of pediatric MS taking into account peculiarities of the Russian legislation and experience of national experts.

  13. The Immune Response to Astrovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Shauna A.

    2016-01-01

    Astroviruses are one of the leading causes of pediatric gastroenteritis worldwide and are clinically importantly pathogens in the elderly and immunocompromised populations. Although the use of cell culture systems and small animal models have enhanced our understanding of astrovirus infection and pathogenesis, little is known about the immune response to astrovirus infection. Studies from humans and animals suggest that adaptive immunity is important in restricting classic and novel astrovirus infections, while studies from animal models and cell culture systems suggest that an innate immune system plays a role in limiting astrovirus replication. The relative contribution of each arm of the immune system in restricting astrovirus infection remains unknown. This review summarizes our current understanding of the immune response to astrovirus infection and highlights some of the key questions that stem from these studies. A full understanding of the immune response to astrovirus infection is required to be able to treat and control astrovirus-induced gastroenteritis. PMID:28042824

  14. Pediatric thoracoabdominal biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Kent, Richard; Salzar, Robert; Kerrigan, Jason; Parent, Daniel; Lessley, David; Sochor, Mark; Luck, Jason F; Loyd, Andre; Song, Yin; Nightingale, Roger; Bass, Cameron R; Maltese, Matthew R

    2009-11-01

    No experimental data exist quantifying the force-deformation behavior of the pediatric chest when subjected to non-impact, dynamic loading from a diagonal belt or a distributed loading surface. Kent et al. (2006) previously published juvenile abdominal response data collected using a porcine model. This paper reports on a series of experiments on a 7-year-old pediatric post-mortem human subject (PMHS) undertaken to guide the scaling of existing adult thoracic response data for application to the child and to assess the validity of the porcine abdominal model. The pediatric PMHS exhibited abdominal response similar to the swine, including the degree of rate sensitivity. The upper abdomen of the PMHS was slightly stiffer than the porcine behavior, while the lower abdomen of the PMHS fit within the porcine corridor. Scaling of adult thoracic response data using any of four published techniques did not successfully predict the pediatric behavior. All of the scaling techniques intrinsically reduce the stiffness of the adult response, when in reality the pediatric subject was as stiff as, or slightly more stiff than, published adult corridors. An assessment of age-related changes in thoracic stiffness indicated that for both a CPR patient population and dynamic diagonal belt loading on a PMHS population, the effective stiffness of the chest increases through the fourth decade of life and then decreases, resulting in stiffness values approximately the same for children and for elderly adults. Additional research is needed to elucidate the generality of this finding and to assess its significance for scaling adult data to represent pediatric responses.

  15. Pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Moody, Karen; Siegel, Linda; Scharbach, Kathryn; Cunningham, Leslie; Cantor, Rabbi Mollie

    2011-06-01

    Progress in pediatric palliative care has gained momentum, but there remain significant barriers to the appropriate provision of palliative care to ill and dying children, including the lack of properly trained health care professionals, resources to finance such care, and scientific research, as well as a continued cultural denial of death in children. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric palliative care, special communication concerns, decision making, ethical and legal considerations, symptom assessment and management, psychosocial issues, provision of care across settings, end-of-life care, and bereavement. Educational and supportive resources for health care practitioners and families, respectively, are included.

  16. Pediatric Gastric Teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela-Ramos, Marco Cesar; Mendizábal-Méndez, Ana Luisa; Ríos-Contreras, Carlos Alberto; Rodríguez-Montes, Claudia Esther

    2010-01-01

    Neoplasms from germ cell origin are a heterogeneous group of tumors rarely seen in the pediatric population, teratoma is the most frequent among them. They can occur in either gonadal or extragonadal locations. Extragonadal teratoma arising from abdominal viscera is very unusual. There are less than a hundred reported cases of gastric teratoma in the worldwide literature. Since the occurrence of this pathology in the pediatric age group is quite rare, we describe a case of a teratoma located in the lesser curvature of the stomach in an infant with an emphasis in radiologic-pathologic correlation. PMID:22470691

  17. Tracheostomy: pediatric considerations.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Ellen S

    2010-08-01

    Pediatric patients for whom tracheotomy is a consideration have different anatomy, medical conditions, and prognoses than adults; even the tracheotomy tubes are different. Indications for pediatric tracheotomy generally include bypassing airway obstruction, providing access for prolonged mechanical ventilation, and facilitating tracheobronchial toilet. Subglottic stenosis is an important indication for tracheotomy in children; its etiology, prevention, and alternative options for management are presented. Discussion includes the benefits, risks, impact on families, techniques for tracheotomy tube changes, and alternatives to tracheotomy, with illustrative photographs and diagrams.

  18. The Mobile Solutions for Immunization (M-SIMU) Trial: A Protocol for a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial That Assesses the Impact of Mobile Phone Delivered Reminders and Travel Subsidies to Improve Childhood Immunization Coverage Rates and Timeliness in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Kagucia, E. Wangeci; Ochieng, Benard; Hariharan, Nisha; Obor, David; Moulton, Lawrence H; Winch, Peter J; Levine, Orin S; Odhiambo, Frank; O'Brien, Katherine L; Feikin, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Background Text message (short message service, SMS) reminders and incentives are two demand-side interventions that have been shown to improve health care–seeking behaviors by targeting participant characteristics such as forgetfulness, lack of knowledge, and transport costs. Applying these interventions to routine pediatric immunizations may improve vaccination coverage and timeliness. Objective The Mobile Solutions for Immunization (M-SIMU) trial aims to determine if text message reminders, either with or without mobile phone–based incentives, sent to infant’s parents can improve immunization coverage and timeliness of routine pediatric vaccines in rural western Kenya. Methods This is a four-arm, cluster, randomized controlled trial. Villages are randomized to one of four study arms prior to enrollment of participants. The study arms are: (1) no intervention (a general health-related text message will be texted to this group at the time of enrollment), (2) text message reminders only, (3) text message reminders and a 75 Kenyan Shilling (KES) incentive, or (4) text message reminders and a KES200 incentive. Participants assigned to study arms 2-4 will receive two text message reminders; sent 3 days before and one day before the scheduled immunization visit at 6, 10, and 14 weeks for polio and pentavalent (containing diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, and Haemophilus influenza type b antigens) type b antigens) vaccines, and at 9 months for measles vaccine. Participants in incentive arms will, in addition to text message reminders as above, receive mobile phone–based incentives after each timely vaccination, where timely is defined as vaccination within 2 weeks of the scheduled date for each of the four routine expanded program immunization (EPI) vaccination visits. Mother-infant pairs will be followed to 12 months of age where the primary outcome, a fully immunized child, will be ascertained. A fully immunized child is defined as a child receiving

  19. Immunization of preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Gagneur, Arnaud; Pinquier, Didier; Quach, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinations of premature infants are often delayed despite being at an increased risk of contracting vaccine preventable diseases. This article reviews the current knowledge on the immune response to widely used vaccines, on the protection derived from routine immunization and on vaccine safety and tolerability in a population of preterm infants. Available data evaluating the immune response of preterm infants support early immunization without correction for gestational age. For a number of antigens, the antibody response to initial doses of vaccines may be lower than that of term infants, but protective concentrations are often achieved and memory successfully induced. Vaccines are immunogenic, safe and well tolerated in preterm infants. Preterm infants should be vaccinated using the same schedules as those usually recommended for full-term infants, with the exception of the hepatitis B vaccine, where additional doses should be administered in infants receiving the first dose during the first days of life if they weighed less than 2000 g because of a documented reduced immune response. PMID:26291883

  20. Increased Exposure to Rigid Routines Can Lead to Increased Challenging Behavior Following Changes to Those Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Leah E.; Oliver, Chris; Callaghan, Eleanor; Woodcock, Kate A.

    2015-01-01

    Several neurodevelopmental disorders are associated with preference for routine and challenging behavior following changes to routines. We examine individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome, who show elevated levels of this behavior, to better understand how previous experience of a routine can affect challenging behavior elicited by disruption to…

  1. Immunization Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... and afford to pay for them. World Immunization Week The last week of April each year is marked by WHO and partners as World Immunization Week. It aims to accelerate action to increase awareness ...

  2. Forecasting Epidemiological Consequences of Maternal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Ana I.; Rohani, Pejman

    2016-01-01

    Background. The increase in the incidence of whooping cough (pertussis) in many countries with high vaccination coverage is alarming. Maternal pertussis immunization has been proposed as an effective means of protecting newborns during the interval between birth and the first routine dose. However, there are concerns regarding potential interference between maternal antibodies and the immune response elicited by the routine schedule, with possible long-term population-level effects. Methods. We formulated a transmission model comprising both primary routine and maternal immunization. This model was examined to evaluate the long-term epidemiological effects of routine and maternal immunization, together with consequences of potential immune interference scenarios. Results. Overall, our model demonstrates that maternal immunization is an effective strategy in reducing the incidence of pertussis in neonates prior to the onset of the primary schedule. However, if maternal antibodies lead to blunting, incidence increases among older age groups. For instance, our model predicts that with 60% routine and maternal immunization coverage and 30% blunting, the incidence among neonates (0–2 months) is reduced by 43%. Under the same scenario, we observe a 20% increase in incidence among children aged 5–10 years. However, the downstream increase in the older age groups occurs with a delay of approximately a decade or more. Conclusions. Maternal immunization has clear positive effects on infant burden of disease, lowering mean infant incidence. However, if maternally derived antibodies adversely affect the immunogenicity of the routine schedule, we predict eventual population-level repercussions that may lead to an overall increase in incidence in older age groups. PMID:27838674

  3. The future of pediatric research.

    PubMed

    Boat, Thomas F

    2007-11-01

    The future of pediatric research will be enhanced by strengthening traditional biomedical approaches and embracing emerging opportunities. Biomedical discovery and translation of new knowledge, concepts, and devices into better diagnostic and therapeutic options will require more pediatric physician-scientists, rapid adoption of enabling technologies, increased funding for research and research training (including the creation of federally funded pediatric translational research centers), and a broader distribution of research activities across the academic pediatric community. Rapid improvement of child health outcomes also will be realized through robust health services research in pediatrics, including the application of rigorous quality improvement science that documents and disseminates successful interventions, leading to better access and effectiveness of care. Improving the value of pediatric care is a realistic goal. Achieving better outcomes through individually tailored (personalized) care for children should be tested experimentally. The future of pediatrics is bright, but will depend on the recognition of and response to a growing array of exciting opportunities.

  4. Cancer vaccines: emphasis on pediatric cancers.

    PubMed

    Guinipero, Terri; Finn, Olivera J

    2010-01-01

    The success that vaccines have had in the fight with infectious diseases has not been mirrored in their use in the fight against cancer. The major differences are that cancer vaccines have been tested in the therapeutic rather than the prophylactic setting, and in older adults rather than in the pediatric population. Cancers, as well as current standard treatments, are highly immunosuppressive, which further compromises the success of therapeutic vaccines. Cancer is considered to be primarily a disease of the older age and yet many children suffer from or succumb to cancers such as leukemias, glioblastomas, neuroblastomas and sarcomas. Standard therapy, even when curative, is accompanied by serious side effects, including secondary tumors later in life. Due to the greater capacity of a young immune system to recover after cancer treatment, therapeutic vaccines are expected to have a better chance to elicit protective immunity and prevent cancer recurrence in children. In this review, we discuss the current efforts at designing and testing cancer vaccines in children with the focus on specific tumor antigens expressed by pediatric cancers.

  5. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  6. Update on pediatric hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jennifer R S; Hill, Samantha E

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhidrosis is a common and under-recognized disease in the pediatric population that has a significant impact on quality of life. Focal and generalized forms of hyperhidrosis exist, which can be idiopathic or secondary to underlying medical conditions or medications. Treatment is tailored to the specific patient needs, characteristics and goals. These include topical preparations, iontophoresis, botulinum toxin and anticholinergic medications.

  7. Pediatric sleep pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Pelayo, Rafael; Yuen, Kin

    2012-10-01

    This article reviews common sleep disorders in children and pharmacologic options for them. Discussions of pediatric sleep pharmacology typically focus on treatment of insomnia. Although insomnia is a major concern in this population, other conditions of concern in children are presented, such as narcolepsy, parasomnias, restless legs syndrome, and sleep apnea.

  8. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  9. Pediatric primary gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harris, G J; Laszewski, M J

    1992-04-01

    Primary gastric lymphoma in the pediatric population is rare. We have described a case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Burkitt's type) manifested as a gastric mass. Despite its rarity in children, this tumor should be treated aggressively, since long-term survival has been reported.

  10. Pharmacotherapy of Pediatric Insomnia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    General guidelines for the use of medication to treat pediatric insomnia are presented. It should be noted that medication is not the first treatment choice and should be viewed within the context of a more comprehensive treatment plan. The pharmacological and clinical properties of over the counter medications and FDA-approved insomnia drugs are…

  11. Pediatric Glaucoma: Pharmacotherapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Samant, Monica; Medsinge, Anagha; Nischal, Ken K

    2016-06-01

    Childhood glaucoma is a major therapeutic challenge for pediatric ophthalmologists and glaucoma specialists worldwide. Management depends on the etiology and age at presentation. A variety of drugs are available for the control of intraocular pressure in children; however, none of these drugs have been licensed by the regulatory agencies for use in children. Furthermore, evidence gained from randomized controlled trials in the pediatric population is sparse, and little is known regarding the use of newer anti-glaucoma preparations. This evidence-based review aims to discuss the available pharmacotherapeutic options for glaucoma in children. Topical adrenoceptor blockers, topical and systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, prostaglandin (PG) analogs, adrenoceptor agonists, parasympathomimetics, and combined preparations are available for use in children, but usually as an off-label indication. Therefore, it is important to recognize that serious side effects have been reported, even with topical drops, and measures to reduce systemic absorption should be taken. Most drugs have been shown to have comparable ocular hypotensive effects, with the lowest occurrence of systemic side effects with PG analogs. Whereas a newly introduced prostaglandin analog, tafluprost, and some other preservative-free preparations have shown promising results in adult glaucoma patients, no pediatric reports are available as yet. Future studies may describe their role in treating pediatric glaucoma. This review also shares some suggested treatment pathways for primary congenital glaucoma (PCG), juvenile open angle glaucoma (JOAG), developmental glaucoma, aphakic/pseudophakic glaucoma, and uveitic glaucoma.

  12. Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100165.htm Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Intestinal Obstruction A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  13. Habitual routines in task-performing groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gersick, C. J.; Hackman, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Groups, like individuals, often develop habitual routines for dealing with frequently encountered stimuli. Although such routines are consequential for group life and work, little is known about them. This paper reconnoiters the territory of habitual behavior in groups that perform work within organizations. We offer a definition of group habits, identify their functions and dysfunctions, suggest how they develop and are maintained, and identify the circumstances when they are likely to be altered or abandoned. Throughout, we give special attention to the social nature of habitual routines in groups, to the interaction between habitual behavior and group life cycle phenomena, and to the role of the organizational context in prompting, shaping, and terminating habitual routines.

  14. Taking medicine at home - create a routine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000613.htm Taking medicine at home - create a routine To use the ... teeth. Find Ways to Help You Remember Your Medicines You can: Set the alarm on your clock, ...

  15. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Roma, Eleftheria; Miele, Erasmo

    2015-09-01

    This review includes the main pediatric studies published from April 2014 to March 2015. The host response of Treg cells with increases in FOXP3 and TGF-β1 combined with a reduction in IFN-γ by Teff cells may contribute to Helicobacter pylori susceptibility in children. Genotypic variability in H. pylori strains influences the clinical manifestation of the infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, while breast-feeding has a protective effect. Intrafamilial infection, especially from mother to children and from sibling to sibling, is the dominant transmission route. Studies showed conflicting results regarding the association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia. One study suggests that H. pylori eradication plays a role in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in H. pylori-infected children and adolescents. The prevalence of H. pylori was higher in chronic urticaria patients than in controls and, following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms disappeared. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and allergic disease was reported. Antibiotic resistance and insufficient compliance to treatment limit the efficacy of eradication therapy. Sequential therapy had no advantage over standard triple therapy. In countries where H. pylori infection is prevalent, studies focusing on virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility may provide anticipation of the prognosis and may be helpful to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  16. Pediatric Cervicofacial Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    King, Ericka; Chun, Robert; Sulman, Cecille

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present a case of a pediatric cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (NF), a rapidly progressive infection, and a review of a 10-year pediatric inpatient database. Design Case report and review. Setting Pediatric intensive care unit. Patients A healthy 5-year-old male who developed NF of the lower lip 36 hours following minor trauma. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code 728.86 (NF), was the inclusion criteria for the Kids’ Inpatient Database (KID) in 1997 and 2006. Results A pediatric case is presented with a thorough photographic record demonstrating the need for rapid diagnosis and treatment. In a review of the KID from 1997 and 2006, the relative risk of being discharged with NF in 2006 vs 1997 was 1.4 (95% CI, 9.95-2.28). Age at diagnosis of NF was older in 2006 compared with 1997 (11.5 years vs 8.05 years; P<.001). Deaths with a diagnosis of NF increased from 1997 compared with 2006: from 3.9% to 5.4%. In 2006, the odds of death were 15.1 times higher in pediatric discharges with a diagnosis of NF compared with discharges without a diagnosis of NF (P<.001; 95% CI, 9.3-23.1). Conclusions Even with the advent of new treatments and antibiotics, the incidence and death rates of NF have changed little over the past 10 years. While it is still a rare diagnosis, knowledge and awareness of necrotizing fasciitis with aggressive medical and surgical treatment are still the foundation in disease survival. PMID:22508620

  17. The role of postoperative chest radiography in pediatric tracheotomy.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J S; Sulek, M; de Jong, A; Friedman, E M

    2001-07-30

    A postoperative chest radiograph has traditionally been obtained after tracheotomies to evaluate for the presence of a pneumothorax and to assess tube position. Several recent studies in adults have questioned the usefulness of routine postoperative chest radiography in uncomplicated cases, but the role of post-operative chest radiography in pediatric patients has not been previously reviewed. We performed this study to examine the clinical utility of post-tracheotomy chest radiography in pediatric patients and determine if this routine practice impacts patient management enough to merit continued usage. A retrospective review was performed of 200 consecutive pediatric patients who underwent tracheotomies by the otolaryngology service in a tertiary care pediatric hospital from January 1994 to June 1999. All patients received postoperative chest radiographs. Five of 200 patients had a new postoperative radiographic finding, with three requiring interventions. Two patients required chest tube placement for pneumothorax, and one patient required tracheostomy tube change for repositioning. Fifty-one patients, including both pneumothoraces, exhibited clinical signs of pneumothorax (decreased breath sounds or oxygen saturation) in the immediate postoperative period. Chest X-ray ruled out a pneumothorax in the remaining 49 patients. The majority of these 51 patients were less than 2 years old (94%, P=0.002) or weighed less than 17 kg (89%, P=0.004). Postoperative chest X-rays yielded clinically relevant information in 168 patients that fell into one or more of four high risk categories: age less than 2, weight less than 17 kg, emergent procedures, or concomitant central line placement. Avoiding chest X-rays in the remaining 32 patients would have resulted in potential savings of $5000, which does not reflect the actuarial cost of a missed complication. Since the majority of our patients (84%) fell into a high-risk category, we feel it would be prudent to continue

  18. Neuroimaging in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: Current and Future Predictors of Functional Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suskauer, Stacy J.; Huisman, Thierry A. G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Although neuroimaging has long played a role in the acute management of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI), until recently, its use as a tool for understanding and predicting long-term brain-behavior relationships after TBI has been limited by the relatively poor sensitivity of routine clinical imaging for detecting diffuse axonal injury…

  19. Pediatric insomnia: new insights in clinical assessment and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Bruni, Oliviero; Angriman, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disorders in children can compromise quality of life of both children and families and chronic sleep deprivations is associated with poorer developmental outcome, overweight and behavioral disturbances. Clinicians should incorporate questions about sleep into their routine health assessment, and the assessment of insomnia should follow a medical approach primary and secondary contributing factors should be assessed, as well as maladaptive behaviors related to sleep. A careful examination of sleep/wake schedule, abnormal movements or behavior during sleep, and daytime consequences of sleep disruption or deprivation is mandatory. Sleeping environment, and bedtime routines should be examined to identify behavioral issues related to sleep. Polysomnography is not routinely indicated for children with insomnia, but actigraphy can give an objective estimation of sleep parameters. The Authors propose a new classification of pediatric insomnia, based on both genetic and clinical aspects, and suggest specific treatment options, including sleep hygiene, behavioral strategies and pharmacological treatment.

  20. What Is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... teens. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialists Have? Pediatric sports medicine specialists are medical ...

  1. What Is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... PICU. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Critical Care Specialists Have? Pediatric critical care specialists are medical ...

  2. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery-2014.

    PubMed

    Kearns, James T; Gundeti, Mohan S

    2014-07-01

    We seek to provide a background of the current state of pediatric urologic surgery including a brief history, procedural outcomes, cost considerations, future directions, and the state of robotic surgery in India. Pediatric robotic urology has been shown to be safe and effective in cases ranging from pyeloplasty to bladder augmentation with continent urinary diversion. Complication rates are in line with other methods of performing the same procedures. The cost of robotic surgery continues to decrease, but setting up pediatric robotic urology programs can be costly in terms of both monetary investment and the training of robotic surgeons. The future directions of robot surgery include instrument and system refinements, augmented reality and haptics, and telesurgery. Given the large number of children in India, there is huge potential for growth of pediatric robotic urology in India. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery has been established as safe and effective, and it will be an important tool in the future of pediatric urologic surgery worldwide.

  3. Pediatric Deceased Donation-A Report of the Transplantation Society Meeting in Geneva.

    PubMed

    Martin, Dominique E; Nakagawa, Thomas A; Siebelink, Marion J; Bramstedt, Katrina A; Brierley, Joe; Dobbels, Fabienne; Rodrigue, James R; Sarwal, Minnie; Shapiro, Ron; Dominguez-Gil, Beatriz; Danovitch, Gabriel; Sweet, Stuart C; Trompeter, Richard S; Moazam, Farhat; Bos, Michael A; Delmonico, Francis L

    2015-07-01

    The Ethics Committee of The Transplantation Society convened a meeting on pediatric deceased donation of organs in Geneva, Switzerland, on March 21 to 22, 2014. Thirty-four participants from Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Oceania, Europe, and North and South America explored the practical and ethical issues pertaining to pediatric deceased donation and developed recommendations for policy and practice. Their expertise was inclusive of pediatric intensive care, internal medicine, and surgery, nursing, ethics, organ donation and procurement, psychology, law, and sociology. The report of the meeting advocates the routine provision of opportunities for deceased donation by pediatric patients and conveys an international call for the development of evidence-based resources needed to inform provision of best practice care in deceased donation for neonates and children.

  4. Subjective refraction: the mechanism underlying the routine.

    PubMed

    Harris, W F

    2007-11-01

    The routine of subjective refraction is usually understood, explained and taught in terms of the relative positions of line or point foci and the retina. This paper argues that such an approach makes unnecessary and sometimes invalid assumptions about what is actually happening inside the eye. The only assumption necessary in fact is that the subject is able to guide the refractionist to (or close to) the optimum power for refractive compensation. The routine works even in eyes in which the interval of Sturm does not behave as supposed; it would work, in fact, regardless of the structure of the eye. The idealized subjective refraction routine consists of two steps: the first finds the best sphere (the stigmatic component) and the second finds the remaining Jackson cross-cylinder (the antistigmatic component). The model makes use of the concept of symmetric dioptric power space. The second part of the refraction routine can be performed with Jackson cross-cylinders alone. However, it is usually taught and practiced using spheres, cylinders and Jackson cross-cylinders in a procedure that is not easy to understand and learn. Recognizing that this part of the routine is equivalent to one involving Jackson cross-cylinders only allows one to teach and understand the procedure more naturally and easily.

  5. Routine surveillance for bloodstream infections in a pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant cohort: Do patients benefit?

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Heather; Fernandez, Conrad V; Langley, Joanne; Mailman, Tim; Crooks, Bruce; Higgins, Ann

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients are at a high risk for late bloodstream infection (BSI). Controversy exists regarding the benefit of surveillance blood cultures in this immunosuppressed population. Despite the common use of this practice, the practical value is not well established in non-neutropenic children following HSCT. METHODS: At the IWK Health Centre (Halifax, Nova Scotia), weekly surveillance blood cultures from central lines are drawn from children following HSCT until the line is removed. A retrospective chart review was performed to determine the utility and cost of this practice. Eligible participants were non-neutropenic HSCT recipients with central venous access lines. The cost of laboratory investigations, nursing time, hospital stay and interventions for positive surveillance cultures was calculated. RESULTS: Forty-three HSCTs were performed in 41 children. Donors were allogenic in 33 cases (77%) and autologous in 10 cases (23%). There were 316 patient contacts for surveillance cultures (mean seven per patient) and 577 central line lumens sampled. Three of 43 patients (7%) had clinically significant positive surveillance blood cultures. Bacteria isolated were Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=2) and Corynebacterium jeikeium (n=1). All follow-up cultures before initiation of antimicrobial therapy were sterile. All three patients were admitted for antimicrobial therapy if they were not already hospitalized and/or had an uncomplicated course. The estimated total cost of BSI surveillance and management of asymptomatic infection over six years was $27,989. CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that BSI surveillance in children following HSCT engraftment has a very low yield and significant cost. It is unclear whether it contributes to improved patient outcomes. PMID:18923737

  6. Complementary medicines in pediatric bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Bogarapu, S; Bishop, J R; Krueger, C D; Pavuluri, M N

    2008-02-01

    The increasing number and availability of various complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) has resulted in an exponentially growing utilization of these products for everything from minor aches and pains to the treatment of mental illness. Difficulties in treating mental illnesses in children, averseness to having children take psychiatric medications, and stigma all drive patients and their families to research alternative treatments. As a result, there has been an increased utilization of CAM in psychiatry, particularly for hard to treat conditions like pediatric BD. It is important for the health care providers to be aware of the alternative treatments by some of their patients. A review of studies investigating the utility of complementary and alternative medicines in bipolar patients was conducted and selected studies were included. Omega-3 fatty acids and lecithin/ choline have preliminary data indicating potential utility in the CAM treatment for bipolar disorder while S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-e) and inositol have some data supporting their efficacy in the treatment of depressive symptoms. Some data for CAM suggest they may be useful adjunctive treatments but only little data are available to support their use as stand-alone therapy. Thus, the conventional medicines remain the first choice in pediatric bipolar management. Healthcare providers need to routinely inquire about the utilization of these treatments by their patients and become familiar with the risks and benefits involved with their use in children.

  7. Biomarkers in Pediatric Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an infectious disease caused by bacteria, viruses, or a combination of these infectious agents. The severity of the clinical manifestations of CAP varies significantly. Consequently, both the differentiation of viral from bacterial CAP cases and the accurate assessment and prediction of disease severity are critical for effectively managing individuals with CAP. To solve questionable cases, several biomarkers indicating the etiology and severity of CAP have been studied. Unfortunately, only a few studies have examined the roles of these biomarkers in pediatric practice. The main aim of this paper is to detail current knowledge regarding the use of biomarkers to diagnose and treat CAP in children, analyzing the most recently published relevant studies. Despite several attempts, the etiologic diagnosis of pediatric CAP and the estimation of the potential outcome remain unsolved problems in most cases. Among traditional biomarkers, procalcitonin (PCT) appears to be the most effective for both selecting bacterial cases and evaluating the severity. However, a precise cut-off separating bacterial from viral and mild from severe cases has not been defined. The three-host protein assay based on C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), plasma interferon-γ protein-10 (IP-10), and micro-array-based whole genome expression arrays might offer more advantages in comparison with former biomarkers. However, further studies are needed before the routine use of those presently in development can be recommended. PMID:28218726

  8. Pediatric obesity. An introduction.

    PubMed

    Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children's health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric obesity prevalence suggests that changes to children's environments and/or to their learned behaviors may dramatically affect body weight regulation. This paper presents an overview of the epidemiology, consequences, and etiopathogenesis of pediatric obesity, serving as a general introduction to the subsequent papers in this Special Issue that address aspects of childhood obesity and cognition in detail.

  9. Pediatric Stroke: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tsze, Daniel S.; Valente, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is relatively rare in children, but can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Understanding that children with strokes present differently than adults and often present with unique risk factors will optimize outcomes in children. Despite an increased incidence of pediatric stroke, there is often a delay in diagnosis, and cases may still remain under- or misdiagnosed. Clinical presentation will vary based on the child's age, and children will have risk factors for stroke that are less common than in adults. Management strategies in children are extrapolated primarily from adult studies, but with different considerations regarding short-term anticoagulation and guarded recommendations regarding thrombolytics. Although most recommendations for management are extrapolated from adult populations, they still remain useful, in conjunction with pediatric-specific considerations. PMID:22254140

  10. Pediatric rhinitis risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yaofeng; Liu, Yin; Yang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Rhinitis is a common global disorder that impacts on the quality of life of the sufferer and caregivers. Treatment for pediatric rhinitis is empirical and does not include a detailed history of the allergy triggers or allergy testing. Thus, allergen avoidance advice is not tailored to the child's sensitivities, which may result in adenoid hypertrophy. However, infant onset rhinitis, especially its relationship with respiratory viruses, remains to be further clarified. Rhinitis basically involves inflammation of the upper nasal lining, presenting typically with symptoms of runny nose (rhinorrhea), nasal blockage, and/or sneezing. While not typically fatal, it does impose significant health, psychological, and monetary burden to its sufferers, and is thus considered a global health problem. Previous findings showed that immunotherapy had significant clinical efficacy in children with allergic rhinitis. The present review article aims to highlight recent perspectives pertaining to the rhinitis risk factors especially in pediatric patients. PMID:27698737

  11. Pediatric Palatal Fibroma

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tayyeb S; Ajaz, Tarannum; Agarwal, Mamta

    2017-01-01

    Fibroma is one of the most common soft tissue benign tumors of the oral cavity. These masses represent hyperplasias instead of true neoplasm, which develop due to irritation to the mucosal tissue resulting in proliferation of the cells. Although so common in the oral cavity, its occurrence on the palate is rare, mainly due to fewer chances of trauma. Here, we report a case of palatal fibroma in a child diagnosed on the basis of clinical, radiological, and histological features. The case represents an extremely rare occurrence as unusual trauma due to thumb sucking seemed to be the only apparent traumatic factor in the palatal region. How to cite this article Mishra R, Khan TS, Ajaz T, Agarwal M. Pediatric Palatal Fibroma. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017; 10(1):96-98. PMID:28377663

  12. Hippocrates on Pediatric Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Sgantzos, Markos; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Giatsiou, Styliani; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hippocrates of Kos is well known in medicine, but his contributions to pediatric dermatology have not previously been examined. A systematic study of Corpus Hippocraticum was undertaken to document references of clinical and historical importance of pediatric dermatology. In Corpus Hippocraticum, a variety of skin diseases are described, along with proposed treatments. Hippocrates rejected the theory of the punishment of the Greek gods and supported the concept that dermatologic diseases resulted from a loss of balance in the body humors. Many of the terms that Hippocrates and his pupils used are still being used today. Moreover, he probably provided one of the first descriptions of skin findings in smallpox, Henoch-Schönlein purpura (also known as anaphylactoid purpura, purpura rheumatica, allergic purpura), and meningococcal septicemia.

  13. Pediatric head injury.

    PubMed

    Tulipan, N

    1998-01-01

    Pediatric head injury is a public health problem that exacts a high price from patients, their families and society alike. While much of the brain damage in head-injured patients occurs at the moment of impact, secondary injuries can be prevented by aggressive medical and surgical intervention. Modern imaging devices have simplified the task of diagnosing intracranial injuries. Recent advances in monitoring technology have made it easier to assess the effectiveness of medical therapy. These include intracranial pressure monitoring devices that are accurate and safe, and jugular bulb monitoring which provides a continuous, qualitative measure of cerebral blood flow. The cornerstones of treatment remain hyperventilation and osmotherapy. Despite maximal treatment, however, the mortality and morbidity associated with pediatric head injury remains high. Reduction of this mortality and morbidity will likely depend upon prevention rather than treatment.

  14. [Pediatric adamantinoma. Case report].

    PubMed

    Cafferata, Constanza; Galluzzo, Laura; Cacciavillano, Walter; Innocenti, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Adamantinoma is a primary tumor of long bones, which affects mainly the shaft of the tibia, and is extremely rare in pediatrics. It frequently presents during the second decade of life, with a slight predominance in males. It is a low grade tumor, with local aggressiveness and low rate of metastasis and recurrence once it is completely removed. Its diagnosis is difficult, not only because it is a rare disease in children, but also because of the difficulty in the differential diagnosis with other benign lesions. We report the case of a 15-year-old patient with a painless swelling of the distal tibia, whose diagnosis was confirmed with the piece of amputation, as imaging features and both initial biopsies were not enough to achieve diagnosis. Though most of the literature consists of case reports, and very few in pediatric patients, they all agree on the difficulty in achieving the diagnosis of adamantinoma.

  15. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  16. Introduction to pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect

    McWhirter, W.R.; Masel, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the varied and complex aspects of management in pediatric oncology. Emphasis is placed on a team approach and on establishing and maintaining an individualized, humanistic relationships with the patient. Numerous illustrations show modern imaging techniques that are proving most valuable in the investigation of suspected or confirmed childhood cancer. Physical and psychological side effects of short-term and long-term treatment are also discussed.

  17. [Ultrasound in pediatric dermatology].

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, F J; Muñoz-Garza, F Z; Hernández-Martín, A

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous ultrasound is particularly useful in pediatric dermatology to diagnose numerous diseases without the need to use invasive tests. The present articles reviews some frequent dermatological entities in children whose study can be simplified through cutaneous ultrasound. This article also provides practical recommendations reported in the literature that may facilitate ultrasound examination, with special mention of benign tumoural disease, both congenital and acquired, and vascular anomalies.

  18. MR in pediatric neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wolpert, S.M. ); Barnes, P.; Strand, R. )

    1990-01-01

    The multitude of modern imaging techniques has made pediatric neuroradiology increasingly complex. The practitioner must have a thorough understanding of each possible diagnostic study in order to achieve the best results at the least expense and with minimal risk. In this book, MRI is emphasized; correlative CT, ultrasound, angiographic, and conventional x-ray studies assist in establishing effective diagnostic protocols and reaching accurate diagnoses.

  19. Levetiracetam Clinical Pharmacokinetic Monitoring in Pediatric Patients with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jason; Paquette, Vanessa; Levine, Marc; Ensom, Mary H H

    2017-03-28

    Levetiracetam is a broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug (AED) with a unique mechanism of action. Older AEDs can cause serious short- and long-term adverse drug reactions and complications, rendering them undesirable to use in pediatric patients. Characteristics that make levetiracetam a near-ideal AED include its broad spectrum of activity, good tolerability profile, and minimal drug-drug interactions. Clinical pharmacokinetic monitoring (CPM) is often recommended in pediatric patients for certain AEDs due to large interindividual pharmacokinetic differences and unpredictable drug disposition. Our objective was to determine whether monitoring levetiracetam concentrations is warranted for pediatric patients with epilepsy, using a previously published 9-step decision-making algorithm. A literature search of the MEDLINE (1946-August 2016), EMBASE (1974-August 2016), CENTRAL, and Google Scholar databases was performed to identify relevant English-language articles and answer the questions posed in the algorithm for levetiracetam CPM in pediatric epilepsies. Additional articles were identified from a manual bibliographic review of the relevant literature. We found that levetiracetam CPM met some criteria of the algorithm: levetiracetam is an appropriate adjunctive or monotherapy for pediatric patients with either focal or generalized seizures; it is readily measurable in plasma, with an appropriate degree of sensitivity, accuracy, and precision; it exhibits interindividual variation in pharmacokinetics; often, its pharmacologic effect cannot be easily measured; and the duration of therapy is expected to be long-term. However, important criteria not met include the following: there is no clear evidence for a concentration-response relationship for efficacy or toxicity; the proposed therapeutic range of 12-46 μg/mL is not well-defined and is generally considered as wide. Thus, clinical decision making is unlikely to be affected as a result of routine levetiracetam CPM. In

  20. Moral Dilemmas in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, John J; Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Otsuka, Norman Y

    2015-12-01

    All orthopedic surgeons face moral dilemmas on a regular basis; however, little has been written about the moral dilemmas that are encountered when providing orthopedic care to pediatric patients and their families. This article aims to provide surgeons with a better understanding of how bioethics and professionalism apply to the care of their pediatric patients. First, several foundational concepts of both bioethics and professionalism are summarized, and definitions are offered for 16 important terms within the disciplines. Next, some of the unique aspects of pediatric orthopedics as a subspecialty are reviewed before engaging in a discussion of 5 common moral dilemmas within the field. Those dilemmas include the following: (1) obtaining informed consent and assent for either surgery or research from pediatric patients and their families; (2) performing cosmetic surgery on pediatric patients; (3) caring for pediatric patients with cognitive or physical impairments; (4) caring for injured pediatric athletes; and (5) meeting the demand for pediatric orthopedic care in the United States. Pertinent considerations are reviewed for each of these 5 moral dilemmas, thereby better preparing surgeons for principled moral decision making in their own practices. Each of these dilemmas is inherently complex with few straightforward answers; however, orthopedic surgeons have an obligation to take the lead and better define these kinds of difficult issues within their field. The lives of pediatric patients and their families will be immeasurably improved as a result.

  1. Nutrition in Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Tracie L.; Neri, Daniela; Extein, Jason; Somarriba, Gabriel; Strickman-Stein, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are heterogeneous groups of serious disorders of the heart muscle and are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality among children who have the disease. While enormous improvements have been made in the treatment and survival of children with congenital heart disease, parallel strides have not been made in the outcomes for cardiomyopathies. Thus, ancillary therapies, such as nutrition and nutritional interventions, that may not cure but may potentially improve cardiac function and quality of life, are imperative to consider in children with all types of cardiomyopathy. Growth failure is one of the most significant clinical problems of children with cardiomyopathy with nearly one-third of children with this disorder manifesting some degree of growth failure during the course of their illness. Optimal intake of macronutrients can help improve cardiac function. In addition, several specific nutrients have been shown to correct myocardial abnormalities that often occur with cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In particular, antioxidants that can protect against free radical damage that often occurs in heart failure and nutrients that augment myocardial energy production are important therapies that have been explored more in adults with cardiomyopathy than in the pediatric population. Future research directions should pay particular attention to the effect of overall nutrition and specific nutritional therapies on clinical outcomes and quality of life in children with pediatric cardiomyopathy. PMID:18159216

  2. Functional foods in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Van den Driessche, M; Veereman-Wauters, G

    2002-01-01

    The philosophy that food can be health promoting beyond its nutritional value is gaining acceptance. Known disease preventive aspects of nutrition have led to a new science, the 'functional food science'. Functional foods, first introduced in Japan, have no universally accepted definition but can be described as foods or food ingredients that may provide health benefits and prevent diseases. Currently, there is a growing interest in these products. However, not all regulatory issues have been settled yet. Five categories of foods can be classified as functional foods: dietary fibers, vitamins and minerals, bioactive substances, fatty acids and pro-, pre- and symbiotics. The latter are currently the main focus of research. Functional foods can be applied in pediatrics: during pregnancy, nutrition is 'functional' since it has prenatal influences on the intra-uterine development of the baby, after birth, 'functional' human milk supports adequate growth of infants and pro- and prebiotics can modulate the flora composition and as such confer certain health advantages. Functional foods have also been studied in pediatric diseases. The severity of necrotising enterocolitis (NEC), diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, intestinal allergy and lactose intolerance may be reduced by using functional foods. Functional foods have proven to be valuable contributors to the improvement of health and the prevention of diseases in pediatric populations.

  3. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  4. Analysis of routine pilot-controller communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Daniel G.; Lee, Alfred; Rodvold, Michelle

    1990-01-01

    Although pilot-controller communication is central to aviation safety, this area of aviation human factors has not been extensively researched. Most research has focused on what kinds of communication problems occur. A more complete picture of communication problems requires understanding how communication usually works in routine operations. A sample of routine pilot-controller communication in the TRACON environment is described. After describing several dimensions of routine communication, three kinds of communication problems are treated: inaccuracies such as incorrect readbacks, procedural deviations such as missing callsigns and readbacks, and nonroutine transactions where pilot and controller must deal with misunderstandings or other communication problems. Preliminary results suggest these problems are not frequent events in daily operations. However, analysis of the problems that do occur suggest some factors that may cause them.

  5. Randomized controlled trials in pediatric complementary and alternative medicine: Where can they be found?

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Margaret; Campbell, Kaitryn; Ajiferuke, Isola; Moher, David

    2003-01-01

    Background The safety and effectiveness of CAM interventions are of great relevance to pediatric health care providers. The objective of this study is to identify sources of reported randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the field of pediatric complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Methods Reports of RCTs were identified by searching Medline and 12 additional bibliographic databases and by reviewing the reference lists of previously identified pediatric CAM systematic reviews. Results We identified 908 reports of RCTs that included children under 18 and investigated a CAM therapy. Since 1965, there has been a steady growth in the number of these trials that are being published. The four journals that published the most reported RCTs are The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Pediatrics, Journal of Pediatrics, and Lancet. Medline, CAB Health, and Embase were the best database sources for identifying these studies; they indexed 93.2%, 58.4% and 42.2 % respectively of the journals publishing reports of pediatric CAM RCTs. Conclusions Those working or interested in the field of pediatric CAM should routinely search Medline, CAB Health and Embase for literature in the field. The four core journals identified above should be included in their collection. PMID:12589711

  6. ANSYS duplicate finite-element checker routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, R.

    1995-01-01

    An ANSYS finite-element code routine to check for duplicated elements within the volume of a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element mesh was developed. The routine developed is used for checking floating elements within a mesh, identically duplicated elements, and intersecting elements with a common face. A space shuttle main engine alternate turbopump development high pressure oxidizer turbopump finite-element model check using the developed subroutine is discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided for duplicate element checking of 3D finite-element models.

  7. Examination of the Circle Spline Routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolin, R. M.; Jaeger, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Circle Spline routine is currently being used for generating both two and three dimensional spline curves. It was developed for use in ESCHER, a mesh generating routine written to provide a computationally simple and efficient method for building meshes along curved surfaces. Circle Spline is a parametric linear blending spline. Because many computerized machining operations involve circular shapes, the Circle Spline is well suited for both the design and manufacturing processes and shows promise as an alternative to the spline methods currently supported by the Initial Graphics Specification (IGES).

  8. Routine environmental monitoring schedule, calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, S.M.

    1997-11-24

    This document provides the Environmental Restorations Contractor (ERC) and the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC) a schedule in accordance with the HNF-PRO-454, Inactive Waste Sites` HNF-PRO-455, Solid Waste 3 Management4 and BHI-EE-02, Environmental Requirements, of monitoring and sampling, routines for the near-facility environmental monitoring program during calendar year (CY) 1998. Every attempt will be made to consistently follow this schedule; any deviation from this schedule will be documented by an internal memorandum (DSI) explaining the reason for the deviation. The DSI will be issued by the scheduled performing organization and directed to Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of Environmental Monitoring and investigations and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive wastes sites are scheduled to be surveyed at least annually. Any newly discovered wastes sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1999. The outside perimeter road surveys of 200 East and West Area and the rail survey from the 300 Area to Columbia Center will be performed in the year 2000 per agreement with Department of Energy, Richland Field Office. This schedule does not discuss staffing needs, nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines. Personnel performing routines to meet this schedule shall communicate any need for 1332 assistance in completing these routines to Radiological Control management and Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. After each routine survey is completed, a copy of the survey record, maps, and data sheets will be forwarded to Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. These routine surveys will not be considered complete until this

  9. Insomnia: the Sleeping Giant of Pediatric Public Health.

    PubMed

    Badin, Emily; Haddad, Cynthia; Shatkin, Jess Parker

    2016-05-01

    Insomnia among children and adolescents is ubiquitous and takes a great toll on youth and their families, impacting academic achievement, mood, social functioning, and a variety of developmental outcomes. Unfortunately, however, pediatric insomnia most often remains unidentified and untreated. When treatment is provided, it is most often in the form of medications, which are not FDA approved for that indication in children and adolescents. A comprehensive literature review was employed to establish the recommendations in this report. This article provides a review of sleep physiology and both current and recommended approaches to assessing and treating pediatric insomnia. Comprehensive assessment, accurate diagnosis, and evidence-based treatment of insomnia is imperative to the healthy development of children and adolescents. While clinicians often prescribe a variety of medications to treat pediatric insomnia, there is insufficient data to demonstrate efficacy and endorse their routine use. At this time, behavioral techniques, such as cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia and sleep hygiene education, should remain the first line of treatment. As a second-line consideration, melatonin, a dietary supplement, may be effective. Pediatric insomnia has an enormous impact on children, adolescents, and their families that requires adequate attention from clinicians and parents alike.

  10. General considerations and updates in pediatric gastrointestinal diagnostic endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal and colonic endoscopic examinations have been performed in pediatric patients in Korea for 3 decades. Endoscopic procedures are complex and may be unsafe if special concerns are not considered. Many things have to be kept in mind before, during, and after the procedure. Gastrointestinal endoscopy is one of the most frequently performed procedure in children nowadays, Since the dimension size of the endoscopy was modified for pediatric patients 15 years ago, endoscopic procedures are almost performed routinely in pediatric gastrointestinal patients. The smaller size of the scope let the physicians approach the diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic procedures. But this is an invasive procedure, so the procedure itself may provoke an emergence state. The procedure-related complications can more easily occur in pediatric patients. Sedation-related or procedure-related respiratory, cardiovascular complications are mostly important and critical in the care. The endoscopists are required to consider diverse aspects of the procedure - patient preparation, indications and contraindications, infection controls, sedation methods, sedative medicines and the side effects of each medicine, monitoring during and after the procedure, and complications related with the procedure and medicines - to perform the procedure successfully and safely. This article presents some important guidelines and recommendations for gastrointestinal endoscopy through literature review. PMID:21189965

  11. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program: Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret A.

    A description is provided of "Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice," a required course for pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in a California state university program. The course description presents information on the curricular placement of the course, prerequisites, in-class time allotments, and the focus of the course…

  12. Impact of parent-directed education on parental use of pain treatments during routine infant vaccinations: a cluster randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Taddio, Anna; Parikh, Chaitya; Yoon, Eugene W; Sgro, Michael; Singh, Harvinder; Habtom, Erita; Ilersich, Andrew F; Pillai Riddell, Rebecca; Shah, Vibhuti

    2015-01-01

    Educating parents about ways to minimize pain during routine infant vaccine injections at the point of care may positively impact on pain management practices. The objective of this cluster randomized trial was to determine the impact of educating parents about pain in outpatient pediatric clinics on their use of pain treatments during routine infant vaccinations. Four hospital-based pediatric clinics were randomized to intervention or control groups. Parents of 2- to 4-month-old infants attending the intervention clinics reviewed a pamphlet and a video about vaccination pain management on the day of vaccination, whereas those in the control clinics did not. Parent use of specific pain treatments (breastfeeding, sugar water, topical anesthetics, and/or holding of infants) on the education day and at subsequent routine vaccinations 2 months later was the primary outcome. Altogether, 160 parent-infant dyads (80 per group) participated between November 2012 and February 2014; follow-up data were available for 126 (79%). Demographics did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). On the education day and at follow-up vaccinations, use of pain interventions during vaccinations was higher in the intervention group (80% vs 26% and 68% vs 32%, respectively; P < 0.001 for both analyses). Educating parents about pain management in a hospital outpatient setting leads to higher use of pain interventions during routine infant vaccinations.

  13. Comparison between a pediatric health promotion center and a pediatric obesity clinic in detecting metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hye Ran; Yi, Dae Yong; Choi, Hyoung Soo

    2014-12-01

    This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of health check-ups in children in detecting metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by comparing the pediatric health promotion center with the pediatric obesity clinic. Children who visited a pediatric health promotion center (n=218) or a pediatric obesity clinic (n=178) were included. Anthropometric data, blood pressure, laboratory tests, and abdominal ultrasonography were evaluated. Two different criteria were applied to diagnose metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the 2 units was 3.2%-3.7% in a pediatric health promotion center and 23%-33.2% in a pediatric obesity clinic. Significant differences were observed in the prevalence of each component of metabolic syndrome between the 2 units including abdominal adiposity, blood pressure, serum triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose (P<0.05). The prevalence of NAFLD was 8.7% and 71.9% in the 2 units according to liver enzymes and 5.9% and 61.8% according to ultrasonography (P<0.05). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and NAFLD was higher among patients visiting the obesity clinic targeting obese children than that among patients visiting the health promotion center offering routine check-ups. An obesity-oriented approach is required to prevent obesity-related health problems in children.

  14. Immune System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  15. Drug repurposing in pediatrics and pediatric hematology oncology.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Julie; Corey, Seth J

    2013-01-01

    Drug 'repurposing', that is, using old drugs for new indications, has been proposed as a more efficient strategy for drug development than the current standard of beginning with novel agents. In this review, we explore the scope of drug repurposing in pediatric hematology oncology and in pediatrics in general. Drugs commonly used in children were identified using the Harriet Lane Handbook (HLH) and searched in PubMed for different uses. Additional drugs were identified by searching PubMed and Google.com for 'drug repurposing' or 'drug repositioning'. Almost 10% of drugs with primary uses in pediatrics have been repurposed in pediatric hematology oncology or pediatrics. The observant clinician, pharmacologist and translational bioinformatician, as well as structural targeting, will have a role in discovering new repurposing opportunities.

  16. An Examination of Latino Students' Homework Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Homework appears to be positively associated with better student outcomes. Although some researchers have explored the connection between time spent on homework and minority student achievement, few have examined the homework routines of Latino youth. Interviews with Latino high school students show that they have some difficulty completing daily…

  17. The Daily Routine of the Oldest Old.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barer, Barbara M.

    Individuals who are beyond the age of 85 have to confront the decrements of aging that are commonly recognized. This study examined the daily routine of the oldest old through interviews. Subjects were asked about the logistics of their daily lives, what they liked best to do, what they didn't like to do, what made a day good for them, and what…

  18. Modular thermal analyzer routine, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, J. A.; Phillips, M. A.; Williams, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The Modular Thermal Analyzer Routine (MOTAR) is a general thermal analysis routine with strong capabilities for performing thermal analysis of systems containing flowing fluids, fluid system controls (valves, heat exchangers, etc.), life support systems, and thermal radiation situations. Its modular organization permits the analysis of a very wide range of thermal problems for simple problems containing a few conduction nodes to those containing complicated flow and radiation analysis with each problem type being analyzed with peak computational efficiency and maximum ease of use. The organization and programming methods applied to MOTAR achieved a high degree of computer utilization efficiency in terms of computer execution time and storage space required for a given problem. The computer time required to perform a given problem on MOTAR is approximately 40 to 50 percent that required for the currently existing widely used routines. The computer storage requirement for MOTAR is approximately 25 percent more than the most commonly used routines for the most simple problems but the data storage techniques for the more complicated options should save a considerable amount of space.

  19. Action Selection in Complex Routinized Sequential Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruh, Nicolas; Cooper, Richard P.; Mareschal, Denis

    2010-01-01

    We report two experiments in which errors and interaction latencies were recorded during routinization of hierarchically structured computer-based tasks. Experiment 1 demonstrates that action selection is slowed at subtask transitions, especially when selecting lower frequency actions. This frequency effect is compounded by concurrent performance…

  20. 10 CFR 71.87 - Routine determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Operating Controls and Procedures § 71.87 Routine determinations. Before each shipment of licensed material, the licensee shall... accordance with written procedures; (g) For fissile material, any moderator or neutron absorber, if...

  1. Individual Values, Learning Routines and Academic Procrastination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Franziska; Hofer, Manfred; Fries, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Background: Academic procrastination, the tendency to postpone learning activities, is regarded as a consequence of postmodern values that are prominent in post-industrialized societies. When students strive for leisure goals and have no structured routines for academic tasks, delaying strenuous learning activities becomes probable. Aims: The…

  2. Routines. Infant/Toddler Caregiving: A Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    Intended for use in conjunction with videos illustrating key concepts and caregiving techniques, this guide focuses on how the daily routines of caring for infants and toddlers can become opportunities for promoting the child's learning and development and for deepening the relationship between child and caregiver. Special attention is given to…

  3. libvaxdata: VAX data format conversion routines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Lawrence M.

    2005-01-01

    libvaxdata provides a collection of routines for converting numeric data-integer and floating-point-to and from the formats used on a Digital Equipment Corporation1 (DEC) VAX 32-bit minicomputer (Brunner, 1991). Since the VAX numeric data formats are inherited from those used on a DEC PDP-11 16-bit minicomputer, these routines can be used to convert PDP-11 data as well. VAX numeric data formats are also the default data formats used on DEC Alpha 64-bit minicomputers running OpenVMS The libvaxdata routines are callable from Fortran or C. They require that the caller use two's-complement format for integer data and IEEE 754 format (ANSI/IEEE, 1985) for floating-point data. They also require that the 'natural' size of a C int type (integer) is 32 bits. That is the case for most modern 32-bit and 64-bit computer systems. Nevertheless, you may wish to consult the Fortran or C compiler documentation on your system to be sure. Some Fortran compilers support conversion of VAX numeric data on-the-fly when reading or writing unformatted files, either as a compiler option or a run-time I/O option. This feature may be easier to use than the libvaxdata routines. Consult the Fortran compiler documentation on your system to determine if this alternative is available to you. 1Later Compaq Computer Corporation, now Hewlett-Packard Company

  4. The first year of routine Herschel observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-06-01

    MEETING REPORT The successful completion of the first year of routine science operations of ESA's Herschel Space Observatory was marked by a Specialist Discussion Meeting of the RAS held in January 2011. A few of the early science highlights from the mission were presented. Derek Ward-Thompson and David Clements summarize.

  5. Practice guidelines for music interventions with hospitalized pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Janice W; Shirk, Beverly J; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2007-12-01

    Music therapy is an effective complementary approach that can achieve specific therapeutic outcomes in the clinical management of pediatric patients. Growing research on music interventions has generated scientific knowledge about how this modality benefits patients and has formed the basis for effective protocols that can be used in practice. Although it can be challenging to translate research-based protocols into routine clinical care at the bedside, it is essential that music therapy interventions be aligned with evidence-based information and that accepted standards be established by the music therapy discipline to achieve the greatest benefit. The importance of partnerships between nurses and music therapists is emphasized to enhance the success of music-based treatments. This discussion synthesizes research findings that can be used to design pediatric practice guidelines in the application of music therapy.

  6. Nutrition: A Primary Therapy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Bryan; Typpo, Katri

    2016-01-01

    , current recommendations for provision of nutrition to children with ARDS, and the current literature for immune-modulating diets for pediatric ARDS. We will examine emerging data regarding the role of the intestinal microbiome in modulating the response to critical illness. PMID:27790606

  7. Impaired physical function following pediatric LT.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Amy G; Neighbors, Katie; Mukherjee, Shubhra; Rak, Melanie; Varni, James W; Alonso, Estella M

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the spectrum of physical function of pediatric liver transplantation (LT) recipients 12-24 months after LT. Review data were collected through the functional outcomes group, an ancillary study of the Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation registry. Patients were eligible if they had survived LT by 12-24 months. Children ≥ 8 years and parents completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ 4.0 generic core scales, which includes 8 questions assessing physical function. Scores were compared to a matched healthy child population (n = 1658) and between survivors with optimal versus nonoptimal health. A total of 263 patients were included. Median age at transplant and survey was 4.8 years (interquartile range [IQR], 1.3-11.4 years) and 5.9 years (IQR, 2.6-13.1 years), respectively. The mean physical functioning score on child and parent reports were 81.2 ± 17.3 and 77.1 ± 23.7, respectively. Compared to a matched healthy population, transplant survivors and their parents reported lower physical function scores (P < 0.001); 32.9% of patients and 35.0% of parents reported a physical function score <75, which is > 1 standard deviation below the mean of a healthy population. Physical functioning scores were significantly higher in survivors with optimal health than those with nonoptimal health (P < 0.01). There was a significant relationship between emotional functioning and physical functioning scores for LT recipients (r = 0.69; P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, primary disease, height z score < -1.64 at longterm follow-up (LTF) visit,  > 4 days of hospitalization since LTF visit, and not being listed as status 1 were predictors of poor physical function. In conclusion, pediatric LT recipients 1-2 years after LT and their parents report lower physical function than a healthy population. Findings suggest practitioners need to routinely assess physical function, and

  8. Impaired Physical Function Following Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Amy G.; Neighbors, Katie; Mukherjee, Shubra; Rak, Melanie; Varni, James W.; Alonso, Estella M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Investigate the spectrum of physical function of pediatric liver transplant (LT) recipients 12–24 months post-LT. Study design Review data collected through the Functional Outcomes Group, an ancillary study of Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation registry. Patients were eligible if they had survived LT by 12–24 months. Children ≥ 8 years and parents completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales, which includes 8 questions assessing physical function. Scores were compared to a matched healthy child population (n=1658), and between survivors with optimal versus non-optimal health. Results A total of 263 patients were included. Median age at transplant and survey was 4.8 years (IQR 1.3–11.4) and 5.9 years (IQR 2.6–13.1), respectively. The mean Physical Functioning Score on child and parent reports were 81.2± 17.3 and 77.1± 23.7, respectively. Compared to a matched healthy population, transplant survivors and their parents reported lower physical function scores (p<0.01). 32.9% of patients and 35.0% of parents reported a physical function score <75, which is >1 SD below the mean of a healthy population. Physical Function Scores were significantly higher in survivors with optimal health than those with non-optimal health (p<0.01). There was a significant relationship between Emotional Functioning and Physical Functioning Scores for LT recipients (r=0.69, p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, primary disease, height Z score<−1.64 at long term follow-up (LTF) visit, ≥4 days of hospitalization since LTF visit, and not listed as Status 1 were predictors of poor physical function. Conclusions Pediatric LT recipients 1–2 years post-LT and their parents report lower physical function than a healthy population. Findings suggest practitioners need to routinely assess physical function, and development of rehabilitation programs may be important. PMID:26850789

  9. Group Intervention in Pediatric Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaForme Fiss, Alyssa

    2012-01-01

    Group intervention in pediatric physical and occupational therapy is an alternative to individual intervention allowing the therapist to meet the needs of multiple children at one time. Survey research indicates that approximately 40% to 60% of pediatric physical and occupational therapists use group intervention at least occasionally in practice,…

  10. Educational Preparation of Pediatric Audiologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roush, Jackson

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric audiologists play a vital role in detection, diagnosis, and intervention for young children with hearing loss and their families. Preparing the next generation of pediatric audiologists necessitates a creative approach that balances the requirements of a broad curriculum with the special skills needed to serve a unique and varied…

  11. Pediatric imaging for the technologist

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmot, D.M.; Sharko, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    This manual provides an accessible store of information on pediatric imaging procedures, with clearly described techniques and instructions. The aim is to simplify the pediatric examination. Extensively illustrated, this work describes in detail correct positioning, radiation protection, and methods of immobilization. The concluding chapters clarify what is required in the final image for accurate diagnosis.

  12. Pediatric brain tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingying; Margol, Ashley; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric brain tumors as a group, including medulloblastomas, gliomas, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT) are the most common solid tumors in children and the leading cause of death from childhood cancer. Brain tumor-derived cell lines are critical for studying the biology of pediatric brain tumors and can be useful for initial screening of new therapies. Use of appropriate brain tumor cell lines for experiments is important, as results may differ depending on tumor properties, and can thus affect the conclusions and applicability of the model. Despite reports in the literature of over 60 pediatric brain tumor cell lines, the majority of published papers utilize only a small number of these cell lines. Here we list the approximately 60 currently-published pediatric brain tumor cell lines and summarize some of their central features as a resource for scientists seeking pediatric brain tumor cell lines for their research.

  13. Pediatric lymphomas in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Klumb, Claudete E; Barber, Glen N; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study provides the clinical pathological characteristics of 1301 cases of pediatric/adolescent lymphomas in patients from different geographic regions of Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective analyses of diagnosed pediatric lymphoma cases in a 10‐year period was performed. We believe that it represents the largest series of pediatric lymphomas presented from Brazil. RESULTS: Non‐Hodgkin lymphomas represented 68% of the cases, including those of precursor (36%) and mature (64%) cell origin. Mature cell lymphomas comprised 81% of the B‐cell phenotype and 19% of the T‐cell phenotype. Hodgkin lymphomas represented 32% of all cases, including 87% of the classical type and 13% of nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The geographic distribution showed 38.4% of the cases in the Southeast region, 28.7% in the Northeast, 16.1% in the South, 8.8% in the North, and 8% in the Central‐west region. The distribution by age groups was 15–18 years old, 33%; 11–14 years old, 26%; 6–10 years old, 24%; and 6 years old or younger, 17%. Among mature B‐cell lymphomas, most of the cases were Burkitt lymphomas (65%), followed by diffuse large B‐cell lymphomas (24%). In the mature T‐cell group, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK‐positive was the most prevalent (57%), followed by peripheral T‐cell lymphoma, then not otherwise specified (25%). In the group of classic Hodgkin lymphomas, the main histological subtype was nodular sclerosis (76%). Nodular lymphocyte predominance occurred more frequently than in other series. CONCLUSION: Some of the results found in this study may reflect the heterogeneous socioeconomical status and environmental factors of the Brazilian population in different regions. PMID:21340214

  14. Innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Revillard, Jean-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    For more than half a century immunological research has been almost exclusively orientated towards the acquired immune response and the mechanisms of immune tolerance. Major discoveries have enabled us to better understand the functioning of the specific immune system: the structure of antibody molecules, the genetic mechanisms leading to the molecular diversity of B (BCR) and T (TCR) lymphocyte antigen receptors, the biological function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the presentation of peptides to alpha/beta receptor bearing T lymphocytes, the processes of positive and negative selection of lymphocytes during the course of their differentiation. The major role of specific or acquired immunity has been shown by the rapidly lethal character of severe combined immune deficiency diseases and various alterations in the mechanisms of tolerance have been proposed to explain the chronic inflammatory illnesses which are considered to be auto-immune. Natural or innate immunity has been known since the first description of an inflammatory reaction attributed to Cornelius Celsus. It entered into the scientific era at the end of the 19th century with the discovery of phagocytes by Metchnikoff and of the properties of the complement system by Bordet [1] but due to the vastness of the field and its lack of clear definition, it failed to excite the interest of researchers. The discovery of cytokines and progress in knowledge of the mechanisms of the inflammatory reaction have certainly helped to banish preconceived ideas about natural immunity, which was wrongly labelled as non-specific. This has led to the proposition of a wider role for immune functions beyond the level of the cell or the organism [2] and to a better understanding of the importance of the immediate defence mechanisms and their role in the later orientation of the acquired response.

  15. Pediatric environmental health.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Bailus

    2005-01-01

    The links between environmental agents, environmental conditions, and disease and disability among children are receiving increasing attention. Evidence abounds that children are more susceptible than adults to the damaging effects of environmental agents and conditions. This evidence is illuminated by the much-publicized and expanding research agenda on the prevention, recognition, diagnosis and treatment of environmentally related disease in the pediatric population. Encouragingly, advances in molecular biology and other sciences are providing important tools to aid pediatricians and other healthcare professionals in meeting the environmental health needs of children. PMID:15712790

  16. Procedural pediatric dermatology.

    PubMed

    Metz, Brandie J

    2013-04-01

    Due to many factors, including parental anxiety, a child's inability to understand the necessity of a procedure and a child's unwillingness to cooperate, it can be much more challenging to perform dermatologic procedures in children. This article reviews pre-procedural preparation of patients and parents, techniques for minimizing injection-related pain and optimal timing of surgical intervention. The risks and benefits of general anesthesia in the setting of pediatric dermatologic procedures are discussed. Additionally, the surgical approach to a few specific types of birthmarks is addressed.

  17. Pediatric Genitourinary Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Dénes, Francisco Tibor; Duarte, Ricardo Jordão; Cristófani, Lílian Maria; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias

    2013-01-01

    Tumors of the kidney, bladder, prostate, testis, and adrenal represent a large part of the adult urologic practice, but are relatively infrequent in children. The natural history and management of these tumors in the pediatric age is different from that of the adults. As result of the successful work of several clinical trial groups in recent decades, there has been a significant improvement in their cure rates. The aim of this article is to review their most significant clinical aspects, as well as to present an update in their management. PMID:24400293

  18. Pediatric Testicular Torsion.

    PubMed

    Bowlin, Paul R; Gatti, John M; Murphy, J Patrick

    2017-02-01

    The pediatric patient presenting with acute scrotal pain requires prompt evaluation and management given the likelihood of testicular torsion as the underlying cause. Although other diagnoses can present with acute testicular pain, it is important to recognize the possibility of testicular torsion because the best chance of testicular preservation occurs with expeditious management. When testicular torsion is suspected, prompt surgical exploration is warranted. A delay in surgical management should not occur in an effort to obtain confirmatory imaging. When torsion is discovered, the contralateral testicle should undergo fixation to reduce the risk of asynchronous torsion.

  19. Pediatric cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gemmete, Joseph J; Toma, Ahmed K; Davagnanam, Indran; Robertson, Fergus; Brew, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Childhood intracranial aneurysms differ from those in the adult population in incidence and gender prevalence, cause, location, and clinical presentation. Endovascular treatment of pediatric aneurysms is the suggested approach because it offers both reconstructive and deconstructive techniques and a better clinical outcome compared with surgery; however, the long-term durability of endovascular treatment is still questionable, therefore long-term clinical and imaging follow-up is necessary. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of intracranial aneurysms in children are discussed, and data from endovascular treatments are presented.

  20. Toddlers' Adjustment to the Stress of Immunization in Function of Mothers' General and Specific Coping Tendencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Favez, N.; Reicherts, M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research is to assess the relative influence of mothers' coping strategies in everyday life and mothers' specific coping acts on toddlers' adjustment behavior to pain and distress during a routine immunization. The population is 41 mothers with toddlers (23 girls, 18 boys; mean age, 22.7 months) undergoing a routine immunization in…

  1. Maternal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Helen Y.; Englund, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization has the potential to protect the pregnant woman, fetus, and infant from vaccine-preventable diseases. Maternal immunoglobulin G is actively transported across the placenta, providing passive immunity to the neonate and infant prior to the infant's ability to respond to vaccines. Currently inactivated influenza, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccines are recommended during pregnancy. Several other vaccines have been studied in pregnancy and found to be safe and immunogenic and to provide antibody to infants. These include pneumococcus, group B Streptococcus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and meningococcus vaccines. Other vaccines in development for potential maternal immunization include respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus vaccines. PMID:24799324

  2. The ImmProve Project: Leveraging electronic health record data to promote immunization delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bundy, David G.; Persing, Nichole M.; Solomon, Barry S.; King, Tracy M.; Murakami, Peter; Thompson, Richard E.; Engineer, Lilly D.; Lehmann, Christoph U.; Miller, Marlene R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Though an essential pediatric preventive service, immunizations are challenging to deliver reliably. Our objective was to measure the impact on pediatric immunization rates of providing clinicians with electronic health record-derived immunization prompting. Methods Operating in a large, urban, hospital-based pediatric primary care clinic, we evaluated 2 interventions to improve immunization delivery to children ages 2, 6, and 13 years: point-of-care, patient-specific electronic clinical decision support (CDS) when children overdue for immunizations presented for care and provider-specific bulletins listing children overdue for immunizations. Results Overall, the proportion of children up-to-date for a composite of recommended immunizations at ages 2, 6, and 13 years was not different in the intervention (CDS active) and historical control (CDS not active) periods; historical immunization rates were high. The proportion of children receiving 2 doses of hepatitis A immunization prior to their second birthday was significantly improved during the intervention period. Human papilloma virus (HPV) immunization delivery was low during both control and intervention periods and was unchanged for 13-year-olds. For 14-year-olds, however, 4 of the 5 highest quarterly rates of complete HPV immunization occurred in the final year of the intervention. Provider-specific bulletins listing children overdue for immunizations increased the likelihood of identified children receiving catch-up hepatitis A immunizations (hazard ratio: 1.32 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12–1.56]); results for HPV and the composite of recommended immunizations were of a similar magnitude but not statistically significant. Conclusions In our patient population, with high baseline uptake of recommended immunizations, electronic health record-derived immunization prompting had a limited effect on immunization delivery. Benefit was more clearly demonstrated for newer immunizations with lower

  3. Pediatric trauma BIG score: Predicting mortality in polytraumatized pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    El-Gamasy, Mohamed Abd El-Aziz; Elezz, Ahmed Abd El Basset Abo; Basuni, Ahmed Sobhy Mohamed; Elrazek, Mohamed El Sayed Ali Abd

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a worldwide health problem and the major cause of death and disability, particularly affecting the young population. It is important to remember that pediatric trauma care has made a significant improvement in the outcomes of these injured children. Aim of the Work: This study aimed at evaluation of pediatric trauma BIG score in comparison with New Injury Severity Score (NISS) and Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS) in Tanta University Emergency Hospital. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in Tanta University Emergency Hospital to all multiple trauma pediatric patients attended to the Emergency Department for 1 year. Pediatric trauma BIG score, PTS, and NISS scores were calculated and results compared to each other and to observed mortality. Results: BIG score ≥12.7 has sensitivity 86.7% and specificity 71.4%, whereas PTS at value ≤3.5 has sensitivity 63.3% and specificity 68.6% and NISS at value ≥39.5 has sensitivity 53.3% and specificity 54.3%. There was a significant positive correlation between BIG score value and mortality rate. Conclusion: The pediatric BIG score is a reliable mortality-prediction score for children with traumatic injuries; it uses international normalization ratio (INR), Base Excess (BE), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) values that can be measured within a few minutes of sampling, so it can be readily applied in the Pediatric Emergency Department, but it cannot be applied on patients with chronic diseases that affect INR, BE, or GCS. PMID:27994378

  4. Pediatric renal cryptococcosis: novel manifestations in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome era.

    PubMed

    Ramdial, Pratistadevi K; Sing, Yetish; Deonarain, Julian; Bhimma, Rajendra; Chotey, Nivesh; Sewram, Vikash

    2011-06-01

    Pediatric cryptococcosis has been documented in various organs, but pediatric renal cryptococcosis (RC) remains undocumented to date. The authors report RC in 2 children with AIDS, 7 and 9 years of age, with proteinuria. Both patients, on antiretroviral therapy (ARV) for 28 (patient 1) and 54 (patient 2) weeks each, had secured viral immunosuppression, but immune restoration was realized by patient 1 only. Cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) was diagnosed on the renal biopsy from patient 1 based on the clinicopathological profile and the presence of segmental glomerular and an interstitial lymphoplasmacytic and granulomatous reaction to Cryptococcus neoformans, with a predominance of capsule-deficient fungal forms. The renal biopsy from patient 2 demonstrated typical HIV-associated nephropathy with focal intratubular and interstitial C neoformans yeasts. Pediatric AIDS-associated renal disease must be expanded to include RC and cryptococcal IRIS, and the kidney must be included as a potential sentinel site of IRIS.

  5. Pediatric pyoderma gangrenosum: a systematic review and update.

    PubMed

    Kechichian, Elio; Haber, Roger; Mourad, Nadim; El Khoury, Rana; Jabbour, Samer; Tomb, Roland

    2017-02-23

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a sterile neutrophilic disorder that rarely affects children. Clinical, epidemiological, and therapeutic data on pediatric PG is poor as there are many newly reported associated diseases and drugs. This paper aims to review all recent available data on pediatric PG. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using Embase, Medline, and Cochrane databases. A total of 132 articles were included in the review. The most commonly reported underlying diseases in pediatric PG are inflammatory bowel diseases followed by hematologic disorders, vasculitis, immune deficiencies and Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum and Acne (PAPA) syndrome. More than half of the cases occur with no underlying disease. The most frequently reported clinical presentation is multiple disseminated ulcers. Treatment should be tailored according to the underlying etiology. It includes systemic steroids, corticosteroid sparing agents such as dapsone and cyclosporine, and TNF-alpha inhibitors such as adalimumab and infliximab. Response to treatment is high with cure rates reaching 90%. A high index of suspicion and a thorough workup are mandatory in the management of pediatric PG.

  6. Routine Operational Environmental Monitoring schedule, CY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This document provides Health Physics (HP) a schedule in accordance with the Environmental Compliance Manual, WHC-CM-7-5, of monitoring and sampling routines for the Operational Environmental Monitoring (OEM) Program during calendar year (CY) 1994. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of EES and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive waste sites are scheduled to be surveyed annually at a minimum. Any newly discovered waste sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1995. This schedule does not discuss the manpower needs nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines.

  7. Immune response

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The immune system includes specialized white blood cells, called lymphocytes that adapt themselves to fight specific foreign invaders. These cells develop into two groups in the bone marrow. From the bone ...

  8. ROUTINE CHOLANGIOGRAPHY DURING OPERATION FOR GALLSTONES

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C. C.; Faris, George A.

    1959-01-01

    Cholangiography done routinely during operation was found valuable for detection of stones in the bile ducts. Operation for stone not seen in the operative cholangiogram was seldom necessary. When no stone is demonstrated, it seems proper to spare the patient the additional trauma of common duct exploration. ImagesFigure 1 (Case 1).Figure 2 (Case 1).Figure 3 (Case 2).Figure 4 (Case 3).Figure 5 (Case 5).Figure 6 (Case 6). PMID:13651956

  9. The Role of Vitamin D in Pediatric Asthma.

    PubMed

    Bantz, Selene K; Zhu, Zhou; Zheng, Tao

    The detrimental effects of vitamin D deficiency in pediatrics have become increasingly apparent and extend beyond skeletal health. Unfortunately, vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in atopic pediatric patients, in whom it may disrupt the immune system and induce significant worsening of reactive airways. This review presents evidence that lung development and immune regulatory functions are vitamin D-dependent. We also review clinical studies that explore how vitamin D supplementation may prevent respiratory infections and help improve asthma control, and we elaborate how these effects may vary among populations. We reveal the strong need of screening measures for vitamin D deficiency in high risk pediatric populations, particularly African-Americans, Hispanic-Americans, and children with obesity. Finally, we emphasize that all children, especially those who are asthmatic, should be assessed to ensure adequate intake or supplementation with at least the minimum recommended doses of vitamin D. The simple intervention of vitamin D supplementation may provide significant clinical improvement in atopic disease, especially asthma.

  10. Pediatric Hand Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Nellans, Kate W.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Pediatric hand fractures are common childhood injuries. Identification of the fractures in the emergency room setting can be challenging owing to the physes and incomplete ossification of the carpus that are not revealed in the xrays. Most simple fractures can be treated with appropriate immobilization through buddy taping, finger splints, or casting. If correctly diagnosed, reduced and immobilized, these fractures usually result in excellent clinical outcomes. However, fractures may require operative stabilization if they have substantial angulation or rotation, extend into the joint, or cannot be held in a reduced position with splinting alone. Most fractures can be treated operatively with closed reduction and percutaneous pinning if addressed within the first week following the injury. In children, the thick, vascular-rich periosteum and bony remodeling potential make anatomic reductions and internal fixation rarely necessary. Most fractures complete bony healing in 3-4 weeks, with the scaphoid being a notable exception. Following immobilization, children rarely develop hand stiffness and formal occupational therapy is usually not necessary. Despite the high potential for excellent outcomes in pediatric hand fractures, some fractures remain difficult to diagnose and treat. PMID:24209954

  11. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition.

  12. [New horizons in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Grossman, Zachi

    2012-06-01

    The profession of pediatrics is constantLy changing. New morbidities are replacing old ones, as a reflection of the changes in society. Even today, old and rare morbidities, like scurvy or acute urinary retention, can be encountered in special settings and populations such as handicapped and developmentally delayed children. The availability of ever newer genetic tests highlights the duty of pediatricians to constantly update families for carrier detection, but also raises questions on the cLinical significance of asymptomatic mutations. Vaccination is one of the most effective pubLic health measures, but failure of medical staff to follow self vaccination recommendations might jeopardize protecting the children. Anti vaccination movement is rapidly growing due to the Internet. However, we must acknowledge the benefits inherent in Internet forums, for example, adolescents consulting anonymously regarding pubertal issues. A new and most needed aspect of care is treatment of pain in children. Increased staff awareness concerning anaLgesia is needed as well as promoting the use of medical clowns for anxiety and pain provoking procedures. Delivering appropriate healthcare to different societal demographic sectors is a challenge for pediatricians. The approach to fever phobia among ultra orthodox parents and advocacy for safety recommendations in the Arab population are two such exampLes. Finally, we shouLd always strive for innovative approaches in pediatric diseases affecting quality of life, and celiac disease is certainly promising in this direction.

  13. Pediatric Hypovitaminosis D

    PubMed Central

    Ariganjoye, Rafiu

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D, a secosteroid, is essential for the development and maintenance of healthy bone in both the adult and pediatric populations. Low level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-(OH)-D) is highly prevalent in children worldwide and has been linked to various adverse health outcomes including rickets, osteomalacia, osteomalacic myopathy, sarcopenia, and weakness, growth retardation, hypocalcemia, seizure and tetany, autism, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, cancers (prostate, colon, breast), infectious diseases (viral, tuberculosis), and autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Risk factors for hypovitaminosis D are people with darker skin pigmentation, use of sunscreen, insufficient ultraviolet B exposure, prematurity, living in northern latitudes, malnutrition, obesity, exclusive breastfeeding, low maternal vitamin D level, certain medications, drinking unfortified cow’s milk, liver failure, chronic renal insufficiency, cystic fibrosis, asthma, and sickle cell hemoglobinopathy. This review highlights and summarizes the molecular perspectives of vitamin D deficiency and its potential adverse health outcomes in pediatric age groups. The recommended treatment regimen is beyond the scope of this review. PMID:28229097

  14. Pediatric facial transplantation: Ethical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jennifer; Shaul, Randi Zlotnik; Hanson, Mark D; Borschel, Gregory H; Zuker, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Facial transplantation is becoming increasingly accepted as a method of reconstructing otherwise unreconstructable adult faces. As this modality is made more available, we must turn our attention to pediatric patients who may benefit from facial transplantation. In the current article, the authors present and briefly examine the most pressing ethical challenges posed by the possibility of performing facial transplantation on pediatric patients. Furthermore, they issue a call for a policy statement on pediatric facial transplantation. The present article may serve as a first step in that direction, highlighting ethical issues that would need to be considered in the creation of such a statement. PMID:25114614

  15. Pharmacologic Therapies for Pediatric Concussions

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Pediatric concussions are common, and emphasis on correct diagnosis and management is stressed in consensus guidelines. Medications may have a role in management of concussion, but no consensus exists regarding appropriate pharmacologic therapy. Evidence Acquisition: Nonsystematic review. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: There is limited evidence for hypertonic saline to improve posttraumatic headache in the emergency department setting. There is essentially no evidence for the use of any other medication in management of pediatric sport-related concussion. Conclusion: Further research is necessary to determine whether there is benefit to the use of any pharmacotherapy in the management of pediatric-aged athletes with concussions. PMID:26660460

  16. Adalimumab in pediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashish S; Suarez, Lisbet D; Rosh, Joel R

    2016-02-01

    Adalimumab, a human monoclonal antibody to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), was initially approved for the treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis in 2002. In the subsequent years, its anti-inflammatory properties were applied to the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, adult Crohn's disease (CD), plaque psoriasis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, adult ulcerative colitis and most recently in 2014, pediatric CD. The biologic era in pediatric CD has changed and redefined the therapeutic approach to this challenging lifelong disease. This article summarizes the clinical legacy of adalimumab with a focus on its most recent expanded indication, pediatric CD.

  17. Pediatric neuropsychology: toward subspecialty designation.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ida Sue; Wills, Karen; Rey-Casserly, Celiane; Armstrong, Kira; Westerveld, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Clinical neuropsychology is a rapidly expanding field of study in the psychological sciences whose practitioners are expert in the assessment, treatment, and research of individuals with known or suspected central nervous system disease or disorder. Pediatric neuropsychology has emerged as a distinct subspecialty area with related education, training, and clinical expertise for a growing number of neuropsychologists. This paper details the numerous steps taken by two affiliated organizations, the American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology and its membership organization, the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology, in the interest of the larger pediatric neuropsychology community and in pediatric neuropsychology subspecialty development.

  18. Radiation Safety in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Caird, Michelle S

    2015-01-01

    Patients, surgeons, and staff are exposed to ionizing radiation in pediatric orthopaedic surgery from diagnostic studies and imaging associated with procedures. Estimating radiation dose to pediatric patients is based on complex algorithms and dose to surgeons and staff is based on dosimeter monitoring. Surgeons can decrease radiation exposure to patients with careful and thoughtful ordering of diagnostic studies and by minimizing exposure intraoperatively. Surgeon and staff radiation exposure can be minimized with educational programs, proper shielding and positioning intraoperatively, and prudent use of intraoperative imaging. Overall, better awareness among pediatric orthopaedic surgeons of our role in radiation exposure can lead to improvements in radiation safety.

  19. Mentoring practices benefiting pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Weese, Meghan M; Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Huth, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies examining predictors of pediatric nurse protégé mentoring benefits demonstrated that protégé perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The ability to identify the mentoring practices that predict specific benefits for individual nurses provides a better understanding of how mentoring relationships can be leveraged within health care organizations promoting mutual mentoring benefits. This descriptive correlational, non-experimental study of nurses at a northeast Ohio, Magnet® recognized, free-standing pediatric hospital advances nursing science by demonstrating how mentoring practices benefit pediatric nurse protégés.

  20. Parent routines for managing cystic fibrosis in children

    PubMed Central

    Grossoehme, Daniel H.; Filigno, Stephanie Spear; Bishop, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Management of cystic fibrosis (CF) is burdensome and adherence is often suboptimal. Family routines are associated with adherence and health outcomes in other disease populations. Few studies have examined routines in CF. The study's aim was to describe parent experiences developing and utilizing CF care routines. Semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of 25 parents of children under 13 years of age with CF were analyzed using phenomenological analysis. Three domains emerged: parent experiences developing a routine, support systems facilitating maintenance of routines, and challenges with maintaining care routines. Parents found routines difficult to establish, used trial and error, encountered barriers, and found support helpful to manage care demands. Some parents chose to deviate from their routine. Providing anticipatory guidance to promote the use of care routines and strategies to manage potential challenges may facilitate use of routines and improve CF management. PMID:24838648

  1. Parental Vaccine Hesitancy: Clinical Implications for Pediatric Providers.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Meagan A; Coddington, Jennifer A; Richards, Elizabeth A; Aaltonen, Pamela M

    2015-01-01

    Despite being recognized as one of the greatest public health achievements, vaccines are increasingly under scrutiny for a multitude of reasons. "Parental vaccine hesitancy," an emerging term in today's literature, encompasses a wide range of concerns regarding vaccines and is believed to be responsible for decreasing coverage of many childhood vaccines. The threat to herd immunity posed by poor vaccine uptake increases the risk for resurgence of vaccine-preventable diseases. Pediatric primary health care providers have an obligation to respond to the increasing prevalence of vaccine hesitancy by providing education related to vaccines to ensure the safety and health of the population. The purpose of this article is to examine the most common concerns surrounding vaccine hesitancy and outline strategies for pediatric providers to address concerns with parents in the clinical setting.

  2. The relationship between pediatric combination vaccines and market effects.

    PubMed

    Behzad, Banafsheh; Jacobson, Sheldon H; Jokela, Janet A; Sewell, Edward C

    2014-06-01

    We explored market factors that affect pediatric combination vaccine uptake in the US public-sector pediatric vaccine market. We specifically examined how Pediarix and Pentacel earned a place in the 2009-2012 lowest overall cost formulary. Direct competition between Pediarix and Pentacel is driven by the indirect presence of the Merck Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine and the Recommended Childhood Immunization Schedule requirement for a hepatitis B birth dose. The resulting analysis suggests that Pentacel would never have earned a place in the lowest overall cost formulary for 2009-2012 federal contract prices for any cost of an injection unless the Merck H influenzae type b advantage was ignored and the hepatitis B birth dose administration cost was recognized by health care providers in designing the lowest overall cost formularies.

  3. The Relationship Between Pediatric Combination Vaccines and Market Effects

    PubMed Central

    Behzad, Banafsheh; Jokela, Janet A.; Sewell, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    We explored market factors that affect pediatric combination vaccine uptake in the US public-sector pediatric vaccine market. We specifically examined how Pediarix and Pentacel earned a place in the 2009–2012 lowest overall cost formulary. Direct competition between Pediarix and Pentacel is driven by the indirect presence of the Merck Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine and the Recommended Childhood Immunization Schedule requirement for a hepatitis B birth dose. The resulting analysis suggests that Pentacel would never have earned a place in the lowest overall cost formulary for 2009–2012 federal contract prices for any cost of an injection unless the Merck H influenzae type b advantage was ignored and the hepatitis B birth dose administration cost was recognized by health care providers in designing the lowest overall cost formularies. PMID:24825198

  4. Immune modulation following immunization with polyvalent vaccines in dogs.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Alois; May, Bettina; Teltscher, Andrea; Wistrela, Eva; Niedermüller, Hans

    2003-08-15

    A decline in T-cell-mediated immunity and transient state of immunosuppression after immunization has been reported in dogs. Nevertheless, dogs are still routinely vaccinated with polyvalent live vaccines and severe disease does not generally occur. In order to investigate these effects on the canine immune system and to elucidate possible mechanisms we determined the following immune parameters in the blood of 33 clinically sound German shepherd dogs before and after standard vaccination with a polyvalent vaccine against distemper, parvovirus, viral hepatitis, leptospirosis, kennel cough and rabies: white and differential blood cell count, the serum concentrations and/or activities of IL-1, IL-2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, neopterin and IgG, natural killer (NK) cell activity, bactericidal activity and complement hemolytic activity, lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) and nitroblue tetrazolium test (NBT). Our major findings were that significant postvaccinal decreases in T-cell mitogenic response to PHA and in neutrophil function and neopterin serum concentration were accompanied by simultaneous increase in plasma IgG and hemolytic complement activity. This suggests a transient shift in the balance between cell-mediated and humoral (T(H)1/T(H)2) immunity rather than immunosuppression. These results do not imply that dogs should not receive live vaccines, as the response to vaccines just seems to create a state of altered homeostasis when immunization elicits protection by humoral and cell-mediated immunity. However, these recognized compromises of immune function should be considered and vaccines still be applied only in healthy animals and strictly according to the rules and regulations given by the manufacturer.

  5. [Pediatric multiple trauma].

    PubMed

    Auner, B; Marzi, I

    2014-05-01

    Multiple trauma in children is rare so that even large trauma centers will only treat a small number of cases. Nevertheless, accidents are the most common cause of death in childhood whereby the causes are mostly traffic accidents and falls. Head trauma is the most common form of injury and the degree of severity is mostly decisive for the prognosis. Knowledge on possible causes of injury and injury patterns as well as consideration of anatomical and physiological characteristics are of great importance for treatment. The differences compared to adults are greater the younger the child is. Decompression and stopping bleeding are the main priorities before surgical fracture stabilization. The treatment of a severely injured child should be carried out by an interdisciplinary team in an approved trauma center with expertise in pediatrics. An inadequate primary assessment involves a high risk of early mortality. On the other hand children have a better prognosis than adults with comparable injuries.

  6. Introduction to Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Derek S

    2011-10-07

    Sepsis is a significant health problem in both critically ill children and adults. While the mortality rate from sepsis is much lower in children, sepsis is directly responsible for over 4,000 childhood deaths per year in the United States alone. At face value, this number suggests that more children die per year in the United States from sepsis as the primary cause than from cancer. Unfortunately, there are few studies on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of sepsis in children. Moreover, extrapolation of adult data to critically ill children is probably not appropriate due to several key developmental differences in the host response to infection and response to therapy. Therefore, additional studies targeting sepsis in the pediatric population are urgently required.

  7. Pediatric Suprasellar Tumors.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Heather J; George, Emilie; Settler, Allison; Schwartz, Theodore H; Greenfield, Jeffrey P

    2016-10-01

    The various childhood suprasellar tumors, while pathologically distinct, present similar clinical and surgical challenges as a result of their common anatomic location. These lesions are in close proximity to or may invade the optic nerve and chiasm, pituitary gland and infundibulum, hypothalamus, and third ventricle, leading to presenting features including visual field loss, impairment in visual acuity, endocrine dysfunction, and hydrocephalus. Though many suprasellar lesions are relatively benign in pathology, treatment may be complicated by high surgical morbidity resulting from damage to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Here we review the most frequent pediatric lesions occurring in the suprasellar region: craniopharyngioma, chiasmatic glioma, germ cell tumor, Rathke cleft and arachnoid cysts, pituitary adenoma, and histiocytosis. This review outlines both common presenting features and differentiating aspects of these lesions. It also includes classic radiographic presentations and treatment considerations for each lesion.

  8. Pediatric radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, E.C.; Kun, L.E.; Constine, L.S.; Tarbell, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    This text covers all aspects of radiation therapy for treatment of pediatric cancer. The book describes the proper use of irradiation in each of the malignancies of childhood, including tumors that are rarely encountered in adult practice. These include acute leukemia; supratentorial brain tumors; tumors of the posterior fossa of the brain and spinal canal; retinoblastoma and optic nerve glioma; neuroblastoma; Hodgkin's disease; malignant lymphoma; Ewing's sarcoma; osteosarcoma; rhabdomyosarcoma; Desmoid tumor; Wilms' tumor; liver and biliary tumors; germ cell and stromal cell tumors of the gonads; endocrine, aerodigestive tract, and breast tumors; Langerhans' cell histiocytosis; and skin cancer and hemangiomas. For each type of malignancy, the authors describe the epidemiology, common presenting signs and symptoms, staging, and proper diagnostic workup. Particular attention is given to the indications for radiation therapy and the planning of a course of radiotherapy, including the optimal radiation dose, field size, and technique.

  9. Childhood obesity for pediatric gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jeannie S; Barlow, Sarah E; Quiros-Tejeira, Ruben E; Scheimann, Ann; Skelton, Joseph; Suskind, David; Tsai, Patrika; Uko, Victor; Warolin, Joshua P; Xanthakos, Stavra A

    2013-01-01

    Obesity in childhood is one of the major health issues in pediatric health care today. As expected, the prevalence of obesity-related comorbidities has risen in parallel with that of obesity. Consultation regarding these concomitant diseases and subsequent management by subspecialists, including pediatric gastroenterologists, is now common and has resulted in obesity being recognized as a chronic disease requiring coordination of care. Although medications and even surgery may provide effective, though often temporary, treatments for obesity and its comorbidities, behavioral interventions addressing healthy dietary and physical activity habits remain a mainstay in the obesity treatment paradigm. Therefore, the issue of weight management must be addressed by both general practitioner and subspecialist alike. In this report, we review select aspects of pediatric obesity and obesity-related management issues because it relates in particular to the field of pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology.

  10. Childhood Obesity for Pediatric Gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jeannie S.; Barlow, Sarah E.; Quiros-Tejeira, Ruben E.; Scheimann, Ann; Skelton, Joseph; Suskind, David; Tsai, Patrika; Uko, Victor; Warolin, Joshua P.; Xanthakos, Stavra A.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity in childhood is one of the major health issues in pediatric health care today. As expected, the prevalence of obesity-related comorbidities has risen in parallel with that of obesity. Consultation regarding these concomitant diseases and subsequent management by subspecialists, including pediatric gastroenterologists, is now common and has resulted in obesity being recognized as a chronic disease requiring coordination of care. Although medications and even surgery may provide effective, though often temporary, treatments for obesity and its comorbidities, behavioral interventions addressing healthy dietary and physical activity habits remain a mainstay in the obesity treatment paradigm. Therefore, the issue of weight management must be addressed by both general practitioner and subspecialist alike. In this report, we review select aspects of pediatric obesity and obesity-related management issues because it relates in particular to the field of pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology. PMID:23282941

  11. What Is a Pediatric Rheumatologist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Family Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  12. What Is a Pediatric Gastroenterologist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Family Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  13. What Is a Pediatric Urologist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Family Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  14. What Is a Pediatric Endocrinologist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Family Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  15. [When life needs routine, imagination, listening].

    PubMed

    Tognoni, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    When life needs routine, imagination, listening. Barbara is a 44 years old oncologist, married and with two children, that tells through others but also with her own words of her cancer, until death. Giuseppe is a laboratory technician, researcher, mountaineer, promoter of humanitarian initiatives Bosnia and Croatia; his lateral amyotrophic sclerosis is told by his wife, in a booklet written after his death. Their two stories are the occasions for reflecting on the importance and role of closeness, listening, dreaming, narrating in improving the quality of life and care: none of these words are included in the guidelines.

  16. Genetics of pediatric obesity.

    PubMed

    Manco, Melania; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2012-07-01

    Onset of obesity has been anticipated at earlier ages, and prevalence has dramatically increased worldwide over the past decades. Epidemic obesity is mainly attributable to modern lifestyle, but family studies prove the significant role of genes in the individual's predisposition to obesity. Advances in genotyping technologies have raised great hope and expectations that genetic testing will pave the way to personalized medicine and that complex traits such as obesity will be prevented even before birth. In the presence of the pressing offer of direct-to-consumer genetic testing services from private companies to estimate the individual's risk for complex phenotypes including obesity, the present review offers pediatricians an update of the state of the art on genomics obesity in childhood. Discrepancies with respect to genomics of adult obesity are discussed. After an appraisal of findings from genome-wide association studies in pediatric populations, the rare variant-common disease hypothesis, the theoretical soil for next-generation sequencing techniques, is discussed as opposite to the common disease-common variant hypothesis. Next-generation sequencing techniques are expected to fill the gap of "missing heritability" of obesity, identifying rare variants associated with the trait and clarifying the role of epigenetics in its heritability. Pediatric obesity emerges as a complex phenotype, modulated by unique gene-environment interactions that occur in periods of life and are "permissive" for the programming of adult obesity. With the advent of next-generation sequencing techniques and advances in the field of exposomics, sensitive and specific tools to predict the obesity risk as early as possible are the challenge for the next decade.

  17. Immune reconstitution and vaccination outcome in HIV-1 infected children

    PubMed Central

    Cagigi, Alberto; Cotugno, Nicola; Giaquinto, Carlo; Nicolosi, Luciana; Bernardi, Stefania; Rossi, Paolo; Douagi, Iyadh; Palma, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Current evidence on routine immunization of HIV-1 infected children point out the need for a special vaccine schedule in this population. However, optimal strategies for identifying individuals susceptible to infections, and then offering them sustained protection through appropriate immunization schedule, both in terms of timing and number of vaccine doses, still remain to be elucidated. Understanding the degree of immune recovery after HAART initiation is important in guiding administration of routine vaccination in HIV-1 infected children. Although quantitative measures (e.g., CD4+ T-cell counts and immunoglobulin levels) are frequently performed to evaluate immune parameters, these measures do not fully mirror functional immune recovery. Here, we will review the status of single mandatory and recommended vaccines for HIV-1 infected children in relation to immune recovery after HAART initiation with the aim of identifying new means to help design personalized vaccine schedules for this population. PMID:22906931

  18. Innovation in pediatric surgical education.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Matthew S; Wulkan, Mark L

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric surgical training in the United States remained basically unchanged from the model developed by Ladd and Gross in the 1930s until recently. Standardized curriculum and novel evaluation methods are now being implemented. Pediatric Surgical education is currently undergoing a transition to competency-based evaluation and promotion. Unfortunately, there is little data on the efficacy of these changes. This presents an opportunity for further study of how we conduct training, and how we evaluate and promote our trainees.

  19. Applying molecular epidemiology in pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Molecular epidemiology is the study of genetic and environmental risk for disease, with much effort centered on cancer. Childhood leukemia occurs in nearly a third of all patients newly diagnosed with pediatric cancer. only a small percentage of these new cases of childhood leukemia are associated with high penetrant hereditary cancer syndromes. Childhood leukemia, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been associated with a dysregulated immune system due to delayed infectious exposure at a young age. Identical twins with childhood leukemia suggest that acute lymphoblastic leukemia begins in utero and that the concordant presentation is due to a shared preleukemia subclone via placental transfer. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphisms within candidate genes find that leukemia risk may be attributed to population-based polymorphisms affecting folate metabolism, xenobiotic metabolism, DNA repair, immunity, and B-cell development. More recently, genome-wide association studies for leukemia risk has led investigators to genes associated with B-cell development. When describing leukemia predisposition due to hereditary cancer syndromes, the following 6 categories become apparent on the basis of biology and clinical presentation: (1) genetic instability/DNA repair syndromes, (2) cell cycle/differentiation syndromes, (3) bone marrow failure syndromes, (4) telomere maintenance syndromes, (5) immunodeficiency syndromes, and (6) transcription factor syndromes and pure familial leukemia. understanding the molecular epidemiology of childhood leukemia can affect the treatment and tumor surveillance strategies for these high risk patients and their family members.

  20. Perspectives on optimal control of varicella and herpes zoster by mass routine varicella vaccination.

    PubMed

    Betta, Monica; Laurino, Marco; Pugliese, Andrea; Guzzetta, Giorgio; Landi, Alberto; Manfredi, Piero

    2016-03-16

    Herpes zoster arises from reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV), causing varicella in children. As reactivation occurs when cell-mediated immunity (CMI) declines, and there is evidence that re-exposure to VZV boosts CMI, mass varicella immunization might increase the zoster burden, at least for some decades. Fear of this natural zoster boom is the main reason for the paralysis of varicella immunization in Europe. We apply optimal control to a realistically parametrized age-structured model for VZV transmission and reactivation to investigate whether feasible varicella immunization paths that are optimal in controlling both varicella and zoster exist. We analyse the optimality system numerically focusing on the role of the cost functional, of the relative zoster-varicella cost and of the planning horizon length. We show that optimal programmes will mostly be unfeasible for public health owing to their complex temporal profiles. This complexity is the consequence of the intrinsically antagonistic nature of varicella immunization programmes when aiming to control both varicella and zoster. However, we show that gradually increasing-hence feasible-vaccination schedules can perform better than routine programmes with constant vaccine uptake. Finally, we show the optimal profiles of feasible programmes targeting mitigation of the post-immunization natural zoster boom with priority.

  1. Perspectives on optimal control of varicella and herpes zoster by mass routine varicella vaccination

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster arises from reactivation of the varicella–zoster virus (VZV), causing varicella in children. As reactivation occurs when cell-mediated immunity (CMI) declines, and there is evidence that re-exposure to VZV boosts CMI, mass varicella immunization might increase the zoster burden, at least for some decades. Fear of this natural zoster boom is the main reason for the paralysis of varicella immunization in Europe. We apply optimal control to a realistically parametrized age-structured model for VZV transmission and reactivation to investigate whether feasible varicella immunization paths that are optimal in controlling both varicella and zoster exist. We analyse the optimality system numerically focusing on the role of the cost functional, of the relative zoster–varicella cost and of the planning horizon length. We show that optimal programmes will mostly be unfeasible for public health owing to their complex temporal profiles. This complexity is the consequence of the intrinsically antagonistic nature of varicella immunization programmes when aiming to control both varicella and zoster. However, we show that gradually increasing—hence feasible—vaccination schedules can perform better than routine programmes with constant vaccine uptake. Finally, we show the optimal profiles of feasible programmes targeting mitigation of the post-immunization natural zoster boom with priority. PMID:26984627

  2. MATHEMATICAL ROUTINES FOR ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this package is to provide the scientific and engineering community with a library of programs useful for performing routine mathematical manipulations. This collection of programs will enable scientists to concentrate on their work without having to write their own routines for solving common problems, thus saving considerable amounts of time. This package contains sixteen subroutines. Each is separately documented with descriptions of the invoking subroutine call, its required parameters, and a sample test program. The functions available include: maxima, minima, and sort of vectors; factorials; random number generator (uniform or Gaussian distribution); complimentary error function; fast Fourier Transformation; Simpson's Rule integration; matrix determinate and inversion; Bessel function (J Bessel function for any order, and modified Bessel function for zero order); roots of a polynomial; roots of non-linear equation; and the solution of first order ordinary differential equations using Hamming's predictor-corrector method. There is also a subroutine for using a dot matrix printer to plot a given set of y values for a uniformly increasing x value. This package is written in FORTRAN 77 (Super Soft Small System FORTRAN compiler) for batch execution and has been implemented on the IBM PC computer series under MS-DOS with a central memory requirement of approximately 28K of 8 bit bytes for all subroutines. This program was developed in 1986.

  3. CPU timing routines for a CONVEX C220 computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bynum, Mary Ann

    1989-01-01

    The timing routines available on the CONVEX C220 computer system in the Structural Mechanics Division (SMD) at NASA Langley Research Center are examined. The function of the timing routines, the use of the timing routines in sequential, parallel, and vector code, and the interpretation of the results from the timing routines with respect to the CONVEX model of computing are described. The timing routines available on the SMD CONVEX fall into two groups. The first group includes standard timing routines generally available with UNIX 4.3 BSD operating systems, while the second group includes routines unique to the SMD CONVEX. The standard timing routines described in this report are /bin/csh time,/bin/time, etime, and ctime. The routines unique to the SMD CONVEX are getinfo, second, cputime, toc, and a parallel profiling package made up of palprof, palinit, and palsum.

  4. Pediatric Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors of the Central Nervous System Differentially Express Granzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Jeroen F.; van Hecke, Wim; Spliet, Wim G. M.; Villacorta Hidalgo, José; Fisch, Paul; Broekhuizen, Roel; Bovenschen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Background Central nervous system (CNS) primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) are malignant primary brain tumors that occur in young infants. Using current standard therapy, up to 80% of the children still dies from recurrent disease. Cellular immunotherapy might be key to improve overall survival. To achieve efficient killing of tumor cells, however, immunotherapy has to overcome cancer-associated strategies to evade the cytotoxic immune response. Whether CNS-PNETs can evade the immune response remains unknown. Methods We examined by immunohistochemistry the immune response and immune evasion strategies in pediatric CNS-PNETs. Results Here, we show that CD4+, CD8+, γδ-T-cells, and Tregs can infiltrate pediatric CNS-PNETs, although the activation status of cytotoxic cells is variable. Pediatric CNS-PNETs evade immune recognition by downregulating cell surface MHC-I and CD1d expression. Intriguingly, expression of SERPINB9, SERPINB1, and SERPINB4 is acquired during tumorigenesis in 29%, 29%, and 57% of the tumors, respectively. Conclusion We show for the first time that brain tumors express direct granzyme inhibitors (serpins) as a potential mechanism to overcome cellular cytotoxicity, which may have consequences for cellular immunotherapy. PMID:26963506

  5. Juvenile animal toxicity study designs to support pediatric drug development.

    PubMed

    Cappon, Gregg D; Bailey, Graham P; Buschmann, Jochen; Feuston, Maureen H; Fisher, J Edward; Hew, Kok Wah; Hoberman, Alan M; Ooshima, Yojiro; Stump, Donald G; Hurtt, Mark E

    2009-12-01

    The objective of juvenile animal toxicity studies of pharmaceuticals is to obtain safety data, including information on the potential for adverse effects on postnatal growth and development. Studies in juvenile animals may assist in identifying postnatal developmental toxicities or other adverse effects that are not adequately assessed in the routine toxicity evaluations and that cannot be safely or adequately measured in pediatric clinical trials. Unlike the traditional reproductive and developmental toxicology studies that have been discussed in the accompanying reports, the design requirements for toxicity studies in juvenile animals are not explicitly defined in regulatory guidance. However, studies in juvenile animals can be useful in providing safety information necessary to enable pediatric clinical trials in pediatric patients or when there are special concerns for toxicities that cannot be safely or adequately measured in clinical trials. These juvenile animal toxicity studies are designed on a case-by-case basis. General design considerations and examples of study designs for assessment of juvenile animal toxicity are discussed.

  6. Plant Immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants are faced with defending themselves against a multitude of pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, etc. Immunity is multi-layered and complex. Plants can induce defenses when they recognize small peptides, proteins or double-stranded RNA associated with pathogens. Recognitio...

  7. Antibody-mediated rejection in pediatric kidney transplantation: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yolanda W; Singh, Manpreet; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2015-04-01

    Kidney transplant is the preferred treatment of pediatric end-stage renal disease. One of the most challenging aspects of pediatric kidney transplant is the prevention and treatment of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR), which is one of the main causes of graft dysfunction and early graft loss. Most challenges are similar to those faced in adult kidney transplants; however, factors unique to the pediatric realm include naivety of the immune system and the small number of studies and randomized controlled trials available when considering pharmacological treatment options. Here, we present a case of ABMR in a pediatric patient and a review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of ABMR. ABMR in pediatric kidney transplant continues to be a frustrating condition to treat because (1) there still remain many unidentified potential antigens leading to ABMR, (2) children and adults are at different stages of their immune system development, and, thus, (3) the full pathophysiology of alloimmunity is still not completely understood, and (4) the efficacy and safety of treatment in adults may not be directly translated to children. As we continue to gain a better understanding towards the precise alloimmune mechanism that drives a particular ABMR, we can also improve pharmacotherapeutic choices. With continued research, they will become more precise in treating a particular mechanism versus using a broad scope of immunosuppression such as steroids. However, there is much more to be uncovered, such as identifying more non-human leukocyte antigens and their role in alloimmunity, determining the exact mechanism of adults achieving complete operational tolerance, and understanding the difference between pediatric and adult transplant recipients. Making strides towards a better understanding of these mechanisms will lead to continued efficacy and safety in treatment of pediatric ABMR.

  8. Genetic architecture differences between pediatric and adult-onset inflammatory bowel diseases in the Polish population

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Jerzy; Paziewska, Agnieszka; Lazowska, Izabella; Ambrozkiewicz, Filip; Goryca, Krzysztof; Kulecka, Maria; Rawa, Tomasz; Karczmarski, Jakub; Dabrowska, Michalina; Zeber-Lubecka, Natalia; Tomecki, Roman; Kluska, Anna; Balabas, Aneta; Piatkowska, Magdalena; Paczkowska, Katarzyna; Kierkus, Jaroslaw; Socha, Piotr; Lodyga, Michal; Rydzewska, Grazyna; Klopocka, Maria; Mierzwa, Grazyna; Iwanczak, Barbara; Krzesiek, Elzbieta; Bak-Drabik, Katarzyna; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Klincewicz, Beata; Radwan, Piotr; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Landowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Agnieszka; Korczowski, Bartosz; Starzynska, Teresa; Albrecht, Piotr; Mikula, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Most inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are classic complex disorders represented by common alleles. Here we aimed to define the genetic architecture of pediatric and adult-onset IBDs for the Polish population. A total of 1495 patients were recruited, including 761 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD; 424 pediatric), 734 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC; 390 pediatric), and 934 healthy controls. Allelotyping employed a pooled-DNA genome-wide association study (GWAS) and was validated by individual genotyping. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed on 44 IBD patients diagnosed before 6 years of age, 45 patients diagnosed after 40 years of age, and 18 healthy controls. Altogether, out of 88 selected SNPs, 31 SNPs were replicated for association with IBD. A novel BRD2 (rs1049526) association reached significance of P = 5.2 × 10−11 and odds ratio (OR) = 2.43. Twenty SNPs were shared between pediatric and adult patients; 1 and 7 were unique to adult-onset and pediatric-onset IBD, respectively. WES identified numerous rare and potentially deleterious variants in IBD-associated or innate immunity-associated genes. Deleterious alleles in both groups were over-represented among rare variants in affected children. Our GWAS revealed differences in the polygenic architecture of pediatric- and adult-onset IBD. A significant accumulation of rare and deleterious variants in affected children suggests a contribution by yet unexplained genetic components. PMID:28008999

  9. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part I: strategies for utilizing oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children.

    PubMed

    Cripe, Timothy P; Chen, Chun-Yu; Denton, Nicholas L; Haworth, Kellie B; Hutzen, Brian; Leddon, Jennifer L; Streby, Keri A; Wang, Pin-Yi; Markert, James M; Waters, Alicia M; Gillespie, George Yancey; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Friedman, Gregory K

    Progress for improving outcomes in pediatric patients with solid tumors remains slow. In addition, currently available therapies are fraught with numerous side effects, often causing significant life-long morbidity for long-term survivors. The use of viruses to kill tumor cells based on their increased vulnerability to infection is gaining traction, with several viruses moving through early and advanced phase clinical testing. The prospect of increased efficacy and decreased toxicity with these agents is thus attractive for pediatric cancer. In part I of this two-part review, we focus on strategies for utilizing oncolytic engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV) to target pediatric malignancies. We discuss mechanisms of action, routes of delivery, and the role of preexisting immunity on antitumor efficacy. Challenges to maximizing oncolytic HSV in children are examined, and we highlight how these may be overcome through various arming strategies. We review the preclinical and clinical evidence demonstrating safety of a variety of oncolytic HSVs. In Part II, we focus on the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic HSV in pediatric tumor types, pediatric clinical advances made to date, and future prospects for utilizing HSV in pediatric patients with solid tumors.

  10. Pediatric HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Espanol, Teresa; Caragol, Isabel; Soler, Pere; Hernandez, Manuel

    2004-12-01

    HIV infection by maternal transmission is increasing in the world due to the increase in infected women who are not receiving appropriate antiretroviral therapy. Prognosis of HIV infection in children is poor because the newborn has an immature immune system. Early diagnosis and therapy are needed to avoid the development of AIDS. New therapies are becoming available but prevention of infection, through maternal therapy during pregnancy, is the most effective measure in avoiding this infection through this transmission route.

  11. Adiponectin as a routine clinical biomarker.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Ken; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin is a protein synthesized and secreted predominantly by adipocytes into the peripheral blood. However, circulating adiponectin level is inversely related with body weight, especially visceral fat accumulation. The mechanism of this paradoxical relation remains obscure. Low circulating adiponectin concentrations (hypoadiponectinemia; <4 μg/mL) are associated with a variety of diseases, including dysmetabolism (type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, hyperuricemia), atherosclerosis (coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease), sleep apnea, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, gastritis and gastro-esophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel diseases, pancreatitis, osteoporosis, and cancer (endometrial cancer, postmenopausal breast cancer, leukemia, colon cancer, gastric cancer, prostate cancer). On the other hand, hyperadiponectinemia is associated with cardiac, renal and pulmonary diseases. This review article focuses on the significance of adiponectin as a clinical biomarker of obesity-related diseases. Routine measurement of adiponectin in patients with lifestyle-related diseases is highly recommended.

  12. [Management of aflibercept in routine clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Cabrera López, F

    2015-03-01

    Aflibercept is a new anti-vegf drug that, unlike ranibizumab and bevacizumab blocks both vegf-A and placental growth factor. Moreover, it binds with much greater strength and affinity to human VEGF-A165 than other endogenous vegf receptors, conferring it with a more extended effect and allowing a lower frequency of intravitreal injections. This facilitates the adoption of fixed treatment regimens other than monthly or individual regimens such as "treat and extend". Aflibercept is indicated for the treatment of neovascular (exudative) age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), visual alteration due to macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and visual alteration due to diabetic macular edema (DME). The present article reviews the management of aflibercept in routine clinical practice, based on the specifications of its new core data sheet, which includes all the therapeutic indications in which its use has been approved and evaluating the distinct alternatives and treatment regimens after the initial loading doses.

  13. Pediatric Allergic Contact Dermatitis: Lessons for Better Care.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Alina; Silverberg, Nanette; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Treat, James; Jacob, Sharon E

    2015-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is an immune-mediated condition that is likely underrecognized in children. ACD is the result of primary sensitization and secondary elicitation by allergy-provoking haptens. A detailed clinical history and physical examination may yield diagnosis. Patch testing is the criterion standard diagnostic tool for confirming the diagnosis of ACD in both children and adults. Herein, we present an overview of pediatric ACD, an analysis of relevant current literature on the topic, focused management recommendations, and a discussion of existing knowledge gaps that must be addressed by future research.

  14. [Vaccination schedule of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics: recommendations 2004].

    PubMed

    2004-05-01

    The Vaccine Assessment Committee of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics discusses vaccine developments in 2003 and recommends some modifications to the vaccination schedule. The recommendation of substituting the oral polio vaccine for the inactivated polio vaccine, suppressing the fifth dose, is maintained. The introduction of the conjugate pneumococcal vaccine and the varicella vaccine is stressed. Concerning the meningococcal C vaccine, the improvement introduced by being able to immunize with just two doses is discussed. In agreement with the information received from the European Medicines Agency, there appear to be no well-founded reasons to abandon hexavalent preparations.

  15. Intradermal naked plasmid DNA immunization: mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Elnekave, Mazal; Furmanov, Karina; Hovav, Avi-Hai

    2011-08-01

    Plasmid DNA is a promising vaccine modality that is regularly examined in prime-boost immunization regimens. Recent advances in skin immunity increased our understanding of the sophisticated cutaneous immune network, which revived scientific interest in delivering vaccines to the skin. Intradermal administration of plasmid DNA via needle injection is a simple and inexpensive procedure that exposes the plasmid and its encoded antigen to the dermal immune surveillance system. This triggers unique mechanisms for eliciting local and systemic immunity that can confer protection against pathogens and tumors. Understanding the mechanisms of intradermal plasmid DNA immunization is essential for enhancing and modulating its immunogenicity. With regard to vaccination, this is of greater importance as this routine injection technique is highly desirable for worldwide immunization. This article will focus on the current understanding of the mechanisms involved in antigen expression and presentation during primary and secondary syringe and needle intradermal plasmid DNA immunization.

  16. Translating microRNAs into biomarkers: What is new for pediatric cancer?

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Ivna Néria Silva Ribamar; de Freitas, Renata Mendes; Vargas, Fernando Regla

    2016-05-01

    Since their discovery in 2008, cell-free circulating microRNAs have been considered potential biomarkers for various conditions, including pediatric cancer. Diagnosis of pediatric cancer still relies on clinical signs, which sometimes may be non-specific or appear at later stages. Thus, there is a need for a better understanding of molecules that allow a less invasive, early and effective method of cancer diagnosis. Despite the efforts of many researches to set specific miRNAs to be routinely used as diagnostic molecules, no miR has been currently utilized so far. In this study, we review the recent discoveries on circulating miRNAs in blood of patients suffering from the following pediatric cancers: osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms tumor, acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphocytic leukemia, retinoblastoma and neuroblastoma. We also focus on the roles of circulating miRs in tumorigenesis pathways, the methodological approaches used to detect and quantify circulating miRs, and discuss the challenges in using them routinely as biomarkers for pediatric cancers.

  17. Challenges in pediatric chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Haliloğlu, Göknur; Yüksel, Deniz; Temoçin, Cağri Mesut; Topaloğlu, Haluk

    2016-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy, a treatable immune-mediated disease of the peripheral nervous system is less common in childhood compared to adults. Despite different sets of diagnostic criteria, lack of a reliable biologic marker leads to challenges in diagnosis, follow-up and treatment. Our first aim was to review clinical presentation, course, response to treatment, and prognosis in our childhood patients. We also aimed to document diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls and challenges at the bedside. Our original cohort consisted of 23 pediatric patients who were referred to us with a clinical diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy. Seven patients reaching to an alternative diagnosis were excluded. In the remaining patients, diagnostic, treatment and follow-up data were compared in typical patients who satisfied both clinical and electrodiagnostic criteria and atypical patients who failed to meet minimal research chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy electrodiagnostic requirements. Eight of 16 patients (50%) met the minimal chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy research diagnostic requirements. There was only a statistically significant difference (p = 0.010) in terms of European Neuromuscular Centre childhood chronic inflammatory diagnostic mandatory clinical criteria between the two groups. Misdiagnosis due to errors in electrophysiological interpretation (100%, n = 8), cerebrospinal fluid cytoalbuminologic dissociation (100%, n = 4 and/or subjective improvement on any immunotherapy modality (80 ± 19.27%)) was frequent. Pediatric CIDP is challenging in terms of diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls at the bedside. Diagnostic errors due to electrophysiological interpretation, cerebrospinal fluid cytoalbuminologic dissociation, and/or subjective improvement on immunotherapy should be considered.

  18. Comprehensive training for the future pediatric cardiologist

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    India faces a huge burden of pediatric and adult congenital heart diseases (CHDs). Many acquired valvar, myocardial, and vascular diseases also need treatment in childhood and adolescence. The emergence of pediatric cardiology as an independent specialty has been a relatively recent development. A few centers of excellence in pediatric cardiology have developed. However, the requirement of pediatric cardiac care and pediatric cardiologists is far in excess of what is available. There are no guidelines at present in India for uniform training in pediatric cardiology. Many training programs are nonstructured and do not focus on the regional needs. Both core training and advanced training programs are essential to provide adequate numbers of community-level pediatric cardiologists and academic leaders respectively. This article proposes a detailed plan and curriculum for comprehensive training of future pediatric cardiologists in India. PMID:27011684

  19. Rapidly growing pigmented tumor on a scalp nevus sebaceous of a pediatric patient: Observation or excision.

    PubMed

    Gaitan-Gaona, Francisco; Said, Mirra C; Galvan-Linares, Aldo; Palafox-Vigil, Gloria; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo

    2014-07-15

    A 14-year-old girl presented with a new, rapidly growing, pigmented tumor on a previously existing yellowish, verrucous plaque on the scalp. The patient received complete surgical excision. Routine histology ruled out basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and the histological diagnosis was pigmented trichoblastoma arising in nevus sebaceous (NS). It is important to define management for new lesions developing in pediatric patients with existing nevus sebaceus.

  20. When Routines Are Not so Routine: Exploring Coordination Work in Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haque, Saira Naim

    2010-01-01

    Many work processes take place through routines, or recurrent patterns of action. These activities involve individuals from several occupations working across spatial, temporal, and organizational boundaries. Crossing these professional, temporal and spatial boundaries has unique challenges which can lead to coordination failures. In these…

  1. Endocurietherapy in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Cherlow, J M; Syed, A M; Puthawala, A; Asch, M; Finklestein, J Z

    1990-01-01

    Endocurietherapy (brachytherapy) is the placing of radioactive sources directly into or near a solid tumor. This technique delivers a concentrated dose of radiation to a restricted volume while minimizing radiation effects on normal tissue. We have treated 11 patients (nine sarcomas, one carcinoma, and one Wilms') with endocurietherapy procedures as part of their multimodality treatment program. Six were treated as part of the primary management, and the other five were treated for recurrent or metastatic disease. Temporary afterloaded implants using ribbons embedded with radioactive iridium192 (Ir192) seeds delivered typical tumor doses of 4,000 cGy. Six patients, including four primary cases and two recurrent cases, are currently classified as no evidence of disease (NED) without further local regional treatment (follow-up of 11-62 months; median, 38 months), and one patient treated for metastasis also remains locally controlled. Two patients are classified as alive with disease (AWD), two died of disease (DOD), and one is now NED after surgical salvage. Special considerations were given to gonadal shielding, radioprotection techniques, and psychosocial issues in this pediatric population.

  2. Pediatric cranial computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.

    1984-01-01

    The introduction of CT in the investigation of intercranial pathology has revolutionized the approach to clinical neurological and neurosurgical practice. This book applies the advances of cranial CT to the pediatric patient. The test is divided into two sections. The first portion describes the practical methodology, anatomy and normal and abnormal CT scan appearance, including high or low density lesions, cystic lesions and ventricular or subarachnoid space dilation. The characteristic scans for various neurological diseases are presented and discussed. The author has given special attention to the CT diagnosis of congenital malformations and cerebral neoplasms. Partial Contents: Normal Computed Tomographic Anatomy/ High Density Lesions/Low Density Lesions/Cystic Lesions; Supratentorial/Cystic Lesions; Infratentorial/Increased Head Circumference/Increased Ventricular Size/Small Ventricular Size/Cranial Lesions/Spinal Lesions/CT Cisternography/Part II CT in Neonates/Congenital Craniocerebral Malformations/Hydrocephalus/Craniosynostosis/Head Trauma/Cerebrovascular Lesions/Intracranial Lesions/Seizure Disorders/Intracranial and Other Chronic Neurological Disorders.

  3. Update on Pediatric Overuse.

    PubMed

    Coon, Eric R; Young, Paul C; Quinonez, Ricardo A; Morgan, Daniel J; Dhruva, Sanket S; Schroeder, Alan R

    2017-02-01

    As concerns over health care-related harms and costs continue to mount, efforts to identify and combat medical overuse are needed. Although much of the recent attention has focused on health care for adults, children are also harmed by overuse. Using a structured PubMed search and manual tables of contents review, we identified important articles on pediatric overuse published in 2015. These articles were evaluated according to the quality of the methods, the magnitude of clinical effect, and the number of patients potentially affected and were categorized into overdiagnosis, overtreatment, and overutilization. Overdiagnosis: Findings included evidence for overdiagnosis of hypoxemia in children with bronchiolitis and skull fractures in children suffering minor head injuries. Overtreatment: Findings included evidence that up to 85% of hospitalized children with radiographic pneumonia may not have a bacterial etiology; many children are receiving prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy for osteomyelitis although oral therapy is equally effective; antidepressant medication for adolescents and nebulized hypertonic saline for bronchiolitis appear to be ineffective; and thresholds for treatment of hyperbilirubinemia may be too low. Overutilization: Findings suggested that the frequency of head circumference screening could be relaxed; large reductions in abdominal computed tomography testing for appendicitis appear to have been safe and effective; and overreliance on C-reactive protein levels in neonatal early onset sepsis appears to extend hospital length-of-stay.

  4. Magnetoencephalography in pediatric epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hunmin; Chung, Chun Kee

    2013-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) records the magnetic field generated by electrical activity of cortical neurons. The signal is not distorted or attenuated, and it is contactless recording that can be performed comfortably even for longer than an hour. It has excellent and decent temporal resolution, especially when it is combined with the patient's own brain magnetic resonance imaging (magnetic source imaging). Data of MEG and electroencephalography are not mutually exclusive and it is recorded simultaneously and interpreted together. MEG has been shown to be useful in detecting the irritative zone in both lesional and nonlesional epilepsy surgery. It has provided valuable and additive information regarding the lesion that should be resected in epilepsy surgery. Better outcomes in epilepsy surgery were related to the localization of the irritative zone with MEG. The value of MEG in epilepsy surgery is recruiting more patients to epilepsy surgery and providing critical information for surgical planning. MEG cortical mapping is helpful in younger pediatric patients, especially when the epileptogenic zone is close to the eloquent cortex. MEG is also used in both basic and clinical research of epilepsy other than surgery. MEG is a valuable diagnostic modality for diagnosis and treatment, as well as research in epilepsy. PMID:24244211

  5. Debriefing in pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Debriefing is a conversational session that revolves around the sharing and examining of information after a specific event has taken place. Debriefing may follow a simulated or actual experience and provides a forum for the learners to reflect on the experience and learn from their mistakes. Originating from the military and aviation industry, it is used on a daily basis to reflect and improve the performance in other high-risk industries. Expert debriefers may facilitate the reflection by asking open-ended questions to probe into the framework of the learners and apply lessons learned to future situations. Debriefing has been proven to improve clinical outcomes such as the return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest and the teaching of teamwork and communication in pediatrics. Incorporating debriefing into clinical practice would facilitate the cultural change necessary to talk more openly about team performance and learn from near misses, errors, and successes that will improve not only clinical outcome but also patient safety. PMID:25774195

  6. Pediatric guidelines for dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    Clinical guidelines are developed to assist clinicians in complex clinical decision making. Modern guideline development includes a systematic review and grading of relevant literature and then using the evidence review to construct recommendations for clinical care which are also graded regarding the level of evidence supporting them. Pediatric guidelines for dyslipidemia were first published in 1992. There was then a gap during which no formal guidelines were developed. In 2011, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction in Children were published. This included an evidence review and clinical recommendations regarding dyslipidemia. This review process began in 2006. The evidence review ended in 2008, and they were published in 2011 because of an extensive and prolonged review process. These guidelines recommend universal screening for dyslipidemia at age 9 to 11 y with a focus on identifying young individuals with genetic dyslipidemia such as familial hypercholesterolemia. The guidelines also include lifestyle recommendations and recommendations for pharmacologic treatment for children with markedly elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The guideline process should include review of the implementation of guidelines in practice and should also include ongoing review of the guidelines with respect to a growing evidence base with new research findings.

  7. Pediatric brain death determination.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Mudit; Ashwal, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Clinical guidelines for the determination of brain death in children were first published in 1987. These guidelines were revised in 2011 under the auspices of the Society of Critical Care Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Child Neurology Society, and provide the minimum standards that must be satisfied before brain death can be declared in infants and children. After achieving physiologic stability and exclusion of confounders, two examinations including apnea testing separated by an observation period (24 hours for term newborns up to 30 days of age, and 12 hours for infants and children from 31 days up to 18 years) are required to establish brain death. Apnea testing should demonstrate a final arterial PaCO2 20 mm Hg above the baseline and ≥ 60 mm Hg with no respiratory effort during the testing period. Ancillary studies (electroencephalogram and radionuclide cerebral blood flow) are not required to establish brain death and are not a substitute for the neurologic examination. The committee concluded that ancillary studies may be used (1) when components of the examination or apnea testing cannot be completed, (2) if uncertainty about components of the neurologic examination exists, (3) if a medication effect may be present, or (4) to reduce the interexamination observation period. When ancillary studies are used, a second clinical examination and apnea test should still be performed and components that can be completed must remain consistent with brain death.

  8. Pediatric neurosurgery: pride and prejudice.

    PubMed

    Winston, K R

    2000-02-01

    Pediatric neurosurgery now exists as a member of the family of neurosurgery with its own training programs, process of accreditation, national and international conferences and scientific journals. The relentless expansion of science relevant to the practice of neurosurgery and the changing patterns of neurosurgical practice have driven and continue to drive the juggernaut of evolutionary process which sometimes necessitates the birth of new specialties of practice. The history and the development of neurosurgery as they relate to children are presented. There is no more reason to think that the established specialty of pediatric neurosurgery or the patients under the care of pediatric neurosurgeons would benefit from the collapsing of pediatric neurosurgery back into the general neurosurgical fold than to think that all of neurosurgery, and hence all patients cared for by neurosurgeons, would benefit from the return of organized neurosurgery to its general surgical parent. Just as mankind benefits from the steady advancement of all aspects of neurosurgery, children benefit from the existence and steady advancement of pediatric neurosurgery.

  9. Pediatric Interventional Radiology: Vascular Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR) comprises a range of minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are performed using image guidance. PIR has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions. Over the years, technology has undergone dramatic and continuous evolution, making this speciality grow. In this review, the authors will discuss various vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients. It is challenging for the interventional radiologist to accomplish a successful interventional procedure. There are many vascular interventional radiology procedures which are being performed and have changed the way the diseases are managed. Some of the procedures are life saving and have become the treatment of choice in those patients. The future is indeed bright for the practice and practitioners of pediatric vascular and non-vascular interventions. As more and more of the procedures that are currently being performed in adults get gradually adapted for use in the pediatric population, it may be possible to perform safe and successful interventions in many of the pediatric vascular lesions that are otherwise being referred for surgery.

  10. Personalized assent for pediatric biobanks.

    PubMed

    Giesbertz, Noor A A; Melham, Karen; Kaye, Jane; van Delden, Johannes J M; Bredenoord, Annelien L

    2016-10-12

    Pediatric biobanking is considered important for generating biomedical knowledge and improving (pediatric) health care. However, the inclusion of children's samples in biobanks involves specific ethical issues. One of the main concerns is how to appropriately engage children in the consent procedure. We suggest that children should be involved through a personalized assent procedure, which means that both the content and the process of assent are adjusted to the individual child. In this paper we provide guidance on how to put personalized assent into pediatric biobanking practice and consider both the content and process of personalized assent. In the discussion we argue that the assent procedure itself is formative. Investing in the procedure should be a requirement for pediatric biobank research. Although personalized assent will require certain efforts, the pediatric (biobank) community must be aware of its importance. The investment and trust earned can result in ongoing engagement, important longitudinal information, and stability in/for the research infrastructure, as well as increased knowledge among its participants about research activity. Implementing personalized assent will both respect the child and support biobank research.

  11. Bortezomib in the treatment of antibody-mediated rejection in pediatric kidney transplant recipients: A multicenter Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Kizilbash, Sarah; Claes, Donna; Ashoor, Isa; Chen, Ashton; Jandeska, Sara; Matar, Raed Bou; Misurac, Jason; Sherbotie, Joseph; Twombley, Katherine; Verghese, Priya

    2017-05-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection leads to allograft loss after kidney transplantation. Bortezomib has been used in adults for the reversal of antibody-mediated rejection; however, pediatric data are limited. This retrospective study was conducted in collaboration with the Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium. Pediatric kidney transplant recipients who received bortezomib for biopsy-proven antibody-mediated rejection between 2008 and 2015 were included. The objective was to characterize the use of bortezomib in pediatric kidney transplant recipients. Thirty-three patients received bortezomib for antibody-mediated rejection at nine pediatric kidney transplant centers. Ninety percent of patients received intravenous immunoglobulin, 78% received plasmapheresis, and 78% received rituximab. After a median follow-up of 15 months, 65% of patients had a functioning graft. The estimated glomerular filtration rate improved or stabilized in 61% and 36% of patients at 3 and 12 months post-bortezomib, respectively. The estimated glomerular filtration rate at diagnosis significantly predicted estimated glomerular filtration rate at 12 months after adjusting for chronic histologic changes (P .001). Fifty-six percent of patients showed an at least 25% reduction in the mean fluorescence intensity of the immune-dominant donor-specific antibody, 1-3 months after the first dose of bortezomib. Non-life-threatening side effects were documented in 21 of 33 patients. Pediatric kidney transplant recipients tolerated bortezomib without life-threatening side effects. Bortezomib may stabilize estimated glomerular filtration rate for 3-6 months in pediatric kidney transplant recipients with antibody-mediated rejection.

  12. Family Routines and School Readiness during the Transition to Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferretti, Larissa K.; Bub, Kristen L.

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: Using data from 3,250 participants in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort, we used structural equation modeling to investigate whether family routines (e.g., bedtime routine, reading routine) established in preschool predict children's school readiness (i.e., academic skills, social-emotional skills, and…

  13. Rituals and Routines: Supporting Infants and Toddlers and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Linda; Petersen, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    The words "routine" and "ritual" are sometimes used interchangeably. Yet there are some important differences. Routines are repeated, predictable events that provide a foundation for the daily tasks in a child's life. Teachers can create a predictable routine in early childhood settings for infants and toddlers, and they can individualize those…

  14. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493....1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, §...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493....1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, §...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493....1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, §...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493....1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, §...

  18. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493....1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, §...

  19. [The controversy of routine articulator mounting in orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Han, Xianglong; Bai, Ding

    2013-06-01

    Articulators have been widely used by clinicians of dentistry. But routine articulator mounting is still controversial in orthodontics. Orthodontists oriented by gnathology approve routine articulator mounting while nongnathologic orthodontists disapprove it. This article reviews the thoughts of orthodontist that they agree or disagree with routine articulator mounting based on the considerations of biting, temporomandibular disorder (TMD), periodontitis, and so on.

  20. Routines and Transitions: A Guide for Early Childhood Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malenfont, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    In early childhood settings, children spend over 50 percent of their time on handwashing, dressing, napping, and other routines and transitions. "Routines and Transitions" is a guide to help turn these routine daily activities into learning experiences. By using transitions wisely, providers not only help children develop skills, but also run a…

  1. Correlates of Family Routines in Head Start Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Susan L.; Stoneman, Zolinda

    2004-01-01

    The popular parenting literature places great importance on the role of routines in children's lives. Empirical research on family routines, however, is limited. This study examined correlates of family routines in a Head Start population in order to better understand their significance in the lives of families. Weak correlations were found…

  2. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  3. Immune System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Immune System KidsHealth > For Parents > Immune System A A A ... can lead to illness and infection. About the Immune System The immune system is the body's defense against ...

  4. Japanese consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. Part 1: Pediatric radiopharmaceutical administered doses (JSNM pediatric dosage card). Part 2: Technical considerations for pediatric nuclear medicine imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Masaki, Hidekazu; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Okuno, Mitsuo; Oguma, Eiji; Onuma, Hiroshi; Kanegawa, Kimio; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Kensuke; Kitamura, Masayuki; Kida, Tetsuo; Kono, Tatsuo; Kondo, Chisato; Sasaki, Masayuki; Terada, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Teisuke; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Hirono, Keishi; Fujita, Yukihiko; Hoshino, Ken; Yano, Masayuki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2014-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine has recently published the consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. This article is the English version of the guidelines. Part 1 proposes the dose optimization in pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Part 2 comprehensively discusses imaging techniques for the appropriate conduct of pediatric nuclear medicine procedures, considering the characteristics of imaging in children.

  5. The place of premedication in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Abraham; Kain, Zeev N; Larsson, Peter; Lönnqvist, Per-Arne; Wolf, Andrew R

    2009-09-01

    Behind the multiple arguments for and against the use of premedication, sedative drugs in children is a noble principle that of minimizing psychological trauma related to anesthesia and surgery. However, several confounding factors make it very difficult to reach didactic evidence-based conclusions. One of the key confounding issues is that the nature of expectations and responses for both parent and child vary greatly in different environments around the world. Studies applicable to one culture and to one hospital system (albeit multicultural) may not apply elsewhere. Moreover, the study of hospital-related distress begins at the start of the patient's journey and ends long after hospital discharge; it cannot be focused completely on just the moment of anesthetic induction. Taking an example from actual practice experience, the trauma caused by the actual giving of a premedication to a child who absolutely does not want it and may struggle may not be recorded in a study but could form a significant component of overall effect and later psychological pathology. Clearly, attitudes by health professionals and parents to the practice of routine pediatric premedication, vary considerably, often provoking strong opinions. In this pro-con article we highlight two very different approaches to premedication. It is hoped that this helps the reader to critically re-evaluate a practice, which was universal historically and now in many centers is more selective.

  6. Pediatric obesity & type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dea, Tara L

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on (a) identifying obesity and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, (b) differentiating between pediatric type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, and (c) treating pediatric type 2 diabetes. Obesity has significant implications on a child's health, including an increased risk for insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes in children, characterized by insulin resistance and relative pancreatic b-cell failure due to the increased demand for insulin production, has now reached epidemic proportions. Longitudinal research on pediatric type 2 diabetes, however, is lacking because this epidemic is relatively new. Treatment of type 2 diabetes in children is focused on lifestyle modification with weight management/increased physical activity, and pharmacological management through oral medication or insulin therapy. Because children with type 2 diabetes are at risk for developing diabetes-related complications earlier in life, they need to be closely monitored for comorbidities.

  7. Tropical pediatrics: 2002 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Santos Ocampo, Perla D; Santos Ocampo-Padilla, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    It also presents the challenges that confront children in the tropics and their effects on the health of these children. These challenges include the technology divide, economic disparity, ecological changes, urbanization and industrialization, globalization, political instability, population explosion, and gender inequality. The paper paints a scenario of tropical pediatrics into the year 2015. Problems brought about by both underdevelopment and modernization, with urbanization and industrialization, will persist. Infectious diseases will continue to be the leading causes of deaths. The paper presents some significant achievements in the fight against tropical diseases and tries to predict what future progress will contribute to the alleviation of such diseases. The paper also outlines the commitment of the International Society of Tropical Pediatrics (ISTP) to improve the state of tropical pediatrics in the next 15 years.

  8. Simulation in Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bae, Donald S

    2015-01-01

    Surgical simulation has become an increasingly important means of improving skills acquisition, optimizing clinical outcomes, and promoting patient safety. While there have been great strides in other industries and other fields of medicine, simulation training is in its relative infancy within pediatric orthopaedics. Nonetheless, simulation has the potential to be an important component of Quality-Safety-Value Initiative of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA). The purpose of this article will be to review some definitions and concepts related to simulation, to discuss how simulation is beneficial both for trainee education as well as value-based health care, and to provide an update on current initiatives within pediatric orthopaedic surgery.

  9. Pediatric cardiac surgery in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Asou, T; Rachmat, J

    1998-10-01

    Pediatric cardiac surgery in Indonesia first developed thanks to the cooperation of various cardiac centers abroad. The establishment of the 'Harapan Kita' National Cardiac Center in 1985 was one of the most important initial steps. Thereafter, the discipline advanced remarkably in terms of the number of the operations performed and the variety of the diseases treated and, as a result, the surgical outcome also improved. Numerous problems remain to be solved. Only 1% of the children with congenital heart disease are today properly treated in Indonesia. Some of the underlying problems responsible for this situation include a shortage of pediatric cardiac professionals, the lack of the information and education on the part of the patients, and a shortage of funding, both privately and publicly. It would thus be welcome for pediatric cardiac surgeons, cardiologists and nurses in Indonesia to learn about congenital heart disease from doctors and nurses in advanced countries in order to improve the outlook at home.

  10. The Genetics of Pediatric Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Chesi, Alessandra; Grant, Struan F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity among children and adults has notably escalated over recent decades and represents a global major health problem. We now know that both genetics and environmental factors contribute to its complex etiology. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed compelling genetic signals influencing obesity risk in adults. Recent reports for childhood obesity revealed that many adult loci also play a role in the pediatric setting. Childhood GWAS have uncovered novel loci below the detection range in adult studies, suggesting that obesity genes may be more easily uncovered in the pediatric setting. Shedding light on the genetic architecture of childhood obesity will facilitate prevention and treatment of pediatric cases and will have fundamental implications for diseases that present later in life. PMID:26439977

  11. Implementing a Trauma-Informed Approach in Pediatric Health Care Networks.

    PubMed

    Marsac, Meghan L; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Hildenbrand, Aimee K; Nicholls, Elizabeth; Winston, Flaura K; Leff, Stephen S; Fein, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric health care networks serve millions of children each year. Pediatric illness and injury are among the most common potentially emotionally traumatic experiences for children and their families. In addition, millions of children who present for medical care (including well visits) have been exposed to prior traumatic events, such as violence or natural disasters. Given the daily challenges of working in pediatric health care networks, medical professionals and support staff can experience trauma symptoms related to their work. The application of a trauma-informed approach to medical care has the potential to mitigate these negative consequences. Trauma-informed care minimizes the potential for medical care to become traumatic or trigger trauma reactions, addresses distress, provides emotional support for the entire family, encourages positive coping, and provides anticipatory guidance regarding the recovery process. When used in conjunction with family-centered practices, trauma-informed approaches enhance the quality of care for patients and their families and the well-being of medical professionals and support staff. Barriers to routine integration of trauma-informed approaches into pediatric medicine include a lack of available training and unclear best-practice guidelines. This article highlights the importance of implementing a trauma-informed approach and offers a framework for training pediatric health care networks in trauma-informed care practices.

  12. [Vaccination schedule of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics: recommendations 2007].

    PubMed

    Bernaola Iturbe, E; Giménez Sánchez, F; Baca Cots, M; de Juan Martín, F; Díez Domingo, J; Garcés Sánchez, M; Gómez-Campderá, A; Martinón-Torres, F; Picazo, J J; Pineda Solás, V

    2007-01-01

    The Vaccine Advisory Committee of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics provides information on the new developments in vaccines that have taken place in 2006 and recommends certain modifications to the Immunization Schedule for 2007. To ensure early protection, the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine booster dose should be administered when children start school (3-4 years). Based on existing scientific evidence, the importance of universal heptavalent conjugate pneumococcal vaccination, as occurs in most similar European countries and in the autonomous community of Madrid in Spain, is confirmed. The safety and efficacy of rotavirus and human papilloma virus vaccines, as well as their use in our environment, is discussed and the role of pediatricians in their implementation is stressed. The recommended immunization schedule for children and adolescents starting vaccination late is also discussed.

  13. CULA: hybrid GPU accelerated linear algebra routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, John R.; Price, Daniel K.; Spagnoli, Kyle E.; Paolini, Aaron L.; Kelmelis, Eric J.

    2010-04-01

    The modern graphics processing unit (GPU) found in many standard personal computers is a highly parallel math processor capable of nearly 1 TFLOPS peak throughput at a cost similar to a high-end CPU and an excellent FLOPS/watt ratio. High-level linear algebra operations are computationally intense, often requiring O(N3) operations and would seem a natural fit for the processing power of the GPU. Our work is on CULA, a GPU accelerated implementation of linear algebra routines. We present results from factorizations such as LU decomposition, singular value decomposition and QR decomposition along with applications like system solution and least squares. The GPU execution model featured by NVIDIA GPUs based on CUDA demands very strong parallelism, requiring between hundreds and thousands of simultaneous operations to achieve high performance. Some constructs from linear algebra map extremely well to the GPU and others map poorly. CPUs, on the other hand, do well at smaller order parallelism and perform acceptably during low-parallelism code segments. Our work addresses this via hybrid a processing model, in which the CPU and GPU work simultaneously to produce results. In many cases, this is accomplished by allowing each platform to do the work it performs most naturally.

  14. Routine polysomnography in an epilepsy monitoring unit.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Matthew C L; Costello, Craig A; White, Elise J; Smit, Michelle; Carino, John; Strawhorn, Andrew; Jackson, Brianna; Kwan, Patrick; French, Christopher R; Yerra, S Raju; Tan, K Meng; O'Brien, Terence J; Goldin, Jeremy

    2013-08-01

    Up to 13% of patients with epilepsy have moderate or severe sleep-disordered breathing, in particular obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a disorder associated with reduced quality of life, worsened seizure control, and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Combining video-EEG monitoring with polysomnography (VPSG) provides the opportunity to diagnose clinically significant OSA as well as relate the occurrence of seizures and the epilepsy diagnosis to the presence and severity of sleep-disordered breathing. We have established routine VPSG in our inpatient video-EEG monitoring unit and present our findings in 87 patients. Clinically significant sleep-disordered breathing was diagnosed in 19 of 87 (22%) patients. Patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) had poorer sleep quality compared to patients with epilepsy and those with neither diagnosis, whereas the prevalence of clinically significant sleep-disordered breathing in patients with PNES (29%) did not differ significantly compared to patients with epilepsy (21%) and those with neither diagnosis (22%). The differences in sleep quality are not explained by differences in body mass index (BMI) or anti-epileptic drug (AED) effects.

  15. Antinuclear antibody determination in a routine laboratory.

    PubMed Central

    Feltkamp, T E

    1996-01-01

    Pitfalls in the method for demonstrating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by the indirect immunofluorescence technique are described and the use of international standard preparations outlined. Determination of the optimal border dilution dividing positive from negative results is discussed. Each laboratory is a unique setting; it must define its own method, which should rarely be changed. One should not rely on copying methods from other laboratories or commercial firms, but the reproducibility of the nuclear substrate, the conjugate, and other variables should be controlled daily by the use of a control serum which has been related to the WHO standard preparation for ANA of the homogeneous type. Since many sera contain mixtures of different ANA, the results of routine tests are best expressed in titres or expressions of the intensity of fluorescence. The ANA test using the immunofluorescence technique should be used as a screening method for other tests allowing a more defined interpretation of the ANA. Each laboratory should individually determine the border between positive and negative results. Therefore about 200 sera from local healthy controls equally distributed over sex and age, and 100 sera from local patients with definite SLE should be tested. Since the local clinicians should become acquainted with this border it should rarely be changed. Finally each laboratory should participate regularly in national and international quality control rounds, where sera known to be difficult to interpret are tested. The judgment of the organisers of these rounds should stimulate improvements in the participating laboratories. PMID:8984936

  16. Antinuclear antibody determination in a routine laboratory.

    PubMed

    Feltkamp, T E

    1996-10-01

    Pitfalls in the method for demonstrating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by the indirect immunofluorescence technique are described and the use of international standard preparations outlined. Determination of the optimal border dilution dividing positive from negative results is discussed. Each laboratory is a unique setting; it must define its own method, which should rarely be changed. One should not rely on copying methods from other laboratories or commercial firms, but the reproducibility of the nuclear substrate, the conjugate, and other variables should be controlled daily by the use of a control serum which has been related to the WHO standard preparation for ANA of the homogeneous type. Since many sera contain mixtures of different ANA, the results of routine tests are best expressed in titres or expressions of the intensity of fluorescence. The ANA test using the immunofluorescence technique should be used as a screening method for other tests allowing a more defined interpretation of the ANA. Each laboratory should individually determine the border between positive and negative results. Therefore about 200 sera from local healthy controls equally distributed over sex and age, and 100 sera from local patients with definite SLE should be tested. Since the local clinicians should become acquainted with this border it should rarely be changed. Finally each laboratory should participate regularly in national and international quality control rounds, where sera known to be difficult to interpret are tested. The judgment of the organisers of these rounds should stimulate improvements in the participating laboratories.

  17. Role of developmental immunotoxicity and immune dysfunction in chronic disease and cancer.

    PubMed

    Dietert, Rodney R

    2011-04-01

    The developing immune system is among the most sensitive targets for environmental insult and risk of chronic disease including cancer. Developmental immunotoxicity (DIT)-associated health risks include not only pediatric diseases like childhood asthma and type 1 diabetes, but also multi-disease "patterns" of conditions linked to the initial immune dysfunction. DIT contributes to ever-increasing health care costs, increasing reliance on drugs and reduced quality of life. Drug discovery efforts using cutting-edge immunology produce effective tools for management of allergic, autoimmune and inflammatory diseases; in stark contrast, required immunotoxicity testing clings to an outdated understanding of the immune system and its relationship to disease. As currently required, immune safety evaluation of drugs and chemicals lacks the capability of protecting against the most prevalent pediatric immune dysfunction-based diseases. For this reason, mandatory and relevant DIT testing is needed for all drugs and chemicals where pregnant women and children are at risk.

  18. Pediatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Talwalkar, Yeshawant B.; Harner, Marvin H.; Musgrave, James E.; Lawson, Russell K.; Campbell, Robert A.

    1975-01-01

    Thirty-one children received 38 kidney transplants from 22 live and 16 cadaver donors. Among the 31 patients, 25 received one transplant each, 5 received two transplants each and 1 received three transplants. Peritoneal or hemodialysis (or both) was carried out in 22 patients, with an average dialytic maintenance of 12 weeks before transplantation. Posttransplant immunosuppressive therapy included prednisone and azathioprine. Antilymphocyte globulin was administered to 33 recipients as adjunctive immunosuppressive therapy. At present, 23 patients have functioning allografts, 3 are on hemodialysis and 5 are dead. Of 22 live kidney transplants, 18 are presently functioning two months to 14 years after transplantation with an average of 36 months. Of 16 cadaver kidney transplants, 5 are presently functioning 9 to 57 months after transplantation with an average of 32 months. Actuarial live donor allograft survival for one year was 76 percent, for two years was 66 percent and for three years was 64 percent. Cadaver allograft survival was 50 percent, 40 percent and 40 percent, respectively. Complications were urologic and infection related. Of nine recipients with sustained hypertension, in six the condition was due to chronic rejection, while in one it was due to recurrence of the original disease in the allograft. Linear growth was measured in 15 children who were less than 14 years of age at the time of transplantation and in whom allografts survived more than one year. Maximum average linear growth velocity occurred during the first year after transplantation. Our experience indicates pediatric renal transplantation can be successfully used in the treatment of terminal renal failure. PMID:1098288

  19. Pediatrics: diagnosis of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Susan E; Gelfand, Michael J; Shulkin, Barry L

    2011-09-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common pediatric extracranial soft-tissue tumor, accounting for approximately 8% of childhood malignancies. Its prognosis is widely variable, ranging from spontaneous regression to fatal disease despite multimodality therapy. Multiple imaging and clinical tests are needed to accurately assess patient risk with risk groups based on disease stage, patient age, and biological tumor factors. Approximately 60% of patients with neuroblastoma have metastatic disease, most commonly involving bone marrow or cortical bone. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) scintigraphy plays an important role in the assessment of neuroblastoma, allowing whole-body disease assessment. mIBG is used to define extent of disease at diagnosis, assess disease response during therapy, and detect residual and recurrent disease during follow-up. mIBG is highly sensitive and specific for neuroblastoma, concentrating in >90% of tumors. mIBG was initially labeled with (131)I, but (123)I-mIBG yields higher quality images at a lower patient radiation dose. (123)I-mIBG (AdreView; GE Healthcare, Arlington Heights, IL) was approved for clinical use in children by the Food and Drug Administration in 2008 and is now commercially available throughout the United States. The use of single-photon emission computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in (123)I-mIBG imaging has improved certainty of lesion detection and localization. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography has recently been compared with mIBG and found to be most useful in neuroblastomas which fail to or weakly accumulate mIBG.

  20. Pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Klick, Jeffrey C; Hauer, Julie

    2010-07-01

    Palliative care has always been a part of the care of children. It includes any intervention that focuses on relieving suffering, slowing the progression of disease, and improving quality of life at any stage of disease. In addition, for even the child with the most unpredictable disease, there are predictable times in this child's life when the child, family, and care team will be suffering in ways that can be mitigated by specific interventions. Rather than defining pediatric palliative care in terms of a patient base, severity of disease, or even a general philosophy of care, palliative care can best be understood as a specific set of tasks directed at mitigating suffering. By understanding these tasks; learning to identify predictable times and settings of suffering; and learning to collaborate with multidisciplinary specialists, use communication skills, and identify clinical resources, the pediatrician can more effectively support children with life-threatening illnesses and their families. In this article, we define palliative care as a focus of care integrated in all phases of life and as a set of interventions aimed at easing suffering associated with life-threatening conditions. We detail an approach to these interventions and discuss how they can be implemented by the pediatrician with the support of specialists in hospice and palliative medicine. We discuss common and predictable times of suffering when these interventions become effective ways to treat suffering and improve quality of life. Finally, we discuss those situations that pediatricians most commonly and intensely interface with palliative care-the care of the child with complex, chronic conditions and severe neurologic impairment (SNI).

  1. The Future of Pediatric Obesity.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Jeff; Emerick, Jill; Saxena, Harshita

    2016-03-01

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports a steady increase in obesity over the last 30 years. The greatest increase was seen in 15 to 19 year olds, whose obesity prevalence almost doubled from 10.5% to 19.4%. The solution to pediatric obesity requires a multidisciplinary approach addressing cultural norms, technologic advances, and family engagement. Future treatment strategies to combat the obesity epidemic will have to extend beyond the health care provider's office. Behavior modification remains the key component to pediatric obesity prevention and treatment.

  2. Pharmacologic Treatment of Pediatric Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dhull, Rachita S; Baracco, Rossana; Jain, Amrish; Mattoo, Tej K

    2016-04-01

    Prevalence of hypertension is increasing in children and adolescents. Uncontrolled hypertension in children not only causes end organ damage but also increases the risk of adult hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Clinical trials have proven efficacy of antihypertensive medications in children. These medications are well tolerated by children with acceptable safety profile. The choice of agent is usually driven by underlying etiology of hypertension, profile of its side effects, and clinician's preference. This article will review currently available pediatric data on mechanism of action, common adverse effects, pediatric indication, recent clinical trial, and newer drugs in the common classes of antihypertensive medications.

  3. Treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Amy; Dodds, Alice; Walkup, John T; Rynn, Moira

    2013-11-01

    This article provides a brief review of the current available data concerning present treatment and potential new treatment advances for pediatric anxiety disorders, such as generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Disorder-specific treatment methods and innovations, particularly computer-assisted methods of delivery for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) will be reviewed. Additionally, the paper will discuss novel psychopharmacological compounds (e.g., D-cycloserine, riluzole, memantine, and anticonvulsant medications). Available evidence for the efficacy of novel medication strategies in adult studies and implications for their use in pediatrics will be discussed.

  4. Japan-Russia Pediatric Society.

    PubMed

    Nihei, K; Thunemathu, Y; Kobayashi, N

    1993-12-01

    In March 1990, medical interchange between Japan and the Soviet Union began with a letter from the local health bureau of Khabarovsk. We visited Khabarovsk three times and Kamchatka once, and saw many hospitals and patients. Russian doctors of pediatrics visited Japan. Medical information was exchanged and discussed. The Japan-Russia Pediatric Society was established to perform interchange of medical information, technology and staff such as doctors, nurses and technicians between Japan and Russia, especially the Far East district of Russia. The Society meeting has been held three times: Tokyo (1991), Khabarovsk (1992) and Niigata (1993). It is necessary to continue the interchange between the two countries.

  5. Measuring Quality in Pediatric Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lightdale, Jenifer R

    2016-01-01

    Measuring quality in endoscopy includes the assessment of appropriateness of a procedure and the skill with which it is performed. High-quality pediatric endoscopy is safe and efficient, used effectively to make proper diagnoses, is useful for excluding other diagnoses, minimizes adverse events, and is accompanied by appropriate documentation from beginning through end of the procedure. There are no standard quality metrics for pediatric endoscopy, but proposed candidates are both process and outcomes oriented. Both are likely to be used in the near future to increase transparency about patient outcomes, as well as to influence payments for the procedure.

  6. Diagnostic imaging in pediatric emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, R.M.; Coulam, C.M.; Allen, J.H.; Fleischer, A.; Lee, G.S.; Kirchner, S.G.; James A.E. Jr.

    1980-07-01

    Evaluation of pediatric emergencies by diagnostic imaging technics can involve both invasive and noninvasive procedures. Nuclear medicine, conventional radiography, ultrasound, computerized axial tomography, and xeroradiography are the major nonangiographic diagnostic technics available for patient evaluation. We will emphasize the use of computerized axial tomography, nuclear medicine, xeroradiography, and ultrasound in the evaluation of emergencies in the pediatric age group. Since the radiologist is the primary consultant with regard to diagnostic imaging, his knowledge of these modulities can greatly influence patient care and clinical results.

  7. Pediatric dermatology: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Prindaville, Brea; Antaya, Richard J; Siegfried, Elaine C

    2015-01-01

    Up to 30% percent of pediatric primary care visits include a skin-related problem, and referrals are hampered by appointment wait times among the longest of any pediatric subspecialty. Despite the clear demand for pediatric dermatologists, there has been a long-standing shortage of providers, leaving dermatology as one of the most underserved pediatric subspecialties. Another consequence of the workforce shortage is the limited opportunity for pediatric dermatology training for residents and postgraduate general pediatricians and dermatologists. This review includes the evolution of the subspecialty from conception through the present, along with obstacles to workforce expansion and potential solutions to improve access to care for children with skin diseases.

  8. Development of a pediatric palliative care team.

    PubMed

    Ward-Smith, Peggy; Linn, Jill Burris; Korphage, Rebecca M; Christenson, Kathy; Hutto, C J; Hubble, Christopher L

    2007-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics has provided clinical recommendations for palliative care needs of children. This article outlines the steps involved in implementing a pediatric palliative care program in a Midwest pediatric magnet health care facility. The development of a Pediatric Advanced Comfort Care Team was supported by hospital administration and funded through grants. Challenges included the development of collaborative relationships with health care professionals from specialty areas. Pediatric Advanced Comfort Care Team services, available from the time of diagnosis, are provided by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals and individualized on the basis of needs expressed by each child and his or her family.

  9. The pediatric surgeon and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Feudtner, Chris; Blinman, Thane A

    2013-08-01

    Palliative care is now a core component of pediatric care for children and families who are confronting serious illness with a low likelihood of survival. Pediatric surgeons, in partnership with pediatric palliative care teams, can play a pivotal role in assuring that these patients receive the highest possible quality of care. This article outlines a variety of definitions and conceptual frameworks, describes decision-making strategies and communication techniques, addresses issues of interdisciplinary collaboration and personal self-awareness, and illustrates these points through a series of case vignettes, all of which can help the pediatric surgeon perform the core tasks of pediatric palliative care.

  10. Utilizing peer academic detailing to improve childhood immunization coverage levels.

    PubMed

    Boom, Julie A; Nelson, Cynthia S; Kohrt, Alan E; Kozinetz, Claudia A

    2010-05-01

    Interventions that utilize academic detailing to improve childhood immunization have been implemented across the country. This study evaluates the effectiveness of an academic detailing intervention to increase childhood immunization rates in pediatric and family medicine practices in a major metropolitan area. Educational teams of one physician, nurse, and office manager delivered 83 peer education sessions at practices in the intervention group. Postintervention immunization rates for children 12-23 months of age increased 1% in the intervention group and decreased 3% in the control group. Postintervention coverage levels for children 12-23 months of age did not differ between the intervention and control groups. Results indicated this office-based intervention was not sufficient to effect measurable changes in immunization coverage levels after 1 year of participation. Future interventions need to provide initial feedback regarding practice immunization coverage levels prior to the educational interventions and include multiple encounters.

  11. QALY weights for neurosensory impairments in pediatric economic evaluations: case studies and a critique.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Scott D; Prosser, Lisa A; Asakawa, Keiko; Feeny, David

    2010-06-01

    The use of utility weights for the calculation of quality-adjusted life years is particularly problematic for pediatric health states. This article reviews variability in utility weights for intellectual disability and permanent hearing loss in economic evaluations of newborn screening and childhood immunizations. Utility weights for severe intellectual disability ranged from 0.06 to 0.74. Most studies either did not vary these utility weights in sensitivity analyses or assumed low variability; consequently, the robustness of cost-effectiveness estimates was not fully assessed. Two recently published catalogs of utility weights for pediatric health states also show wide divergences in estimates. More work is needed to establish measures of health utilities for childhood health states in order to allow for comparable assessments of pediatric interventions.

  12. Pediatric critical care--a new frontier.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chu-Chuan; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2009-10-01

    Pediatric intensive care is now a subspecialty of pediatric medicine. Different pathologic and physiologic processes occur in pediatric patients who require intensive care. Thus, the faculty and staffing requirement differ in many aspects from those of adult intensive care units (ICUs). In Taiwan, pediatric intensive care is relatively less developed than adult care. However, thanks to the implementation of national health insurance and increasing emphasis of children's health, the scope and quality of pediatric intensive care has widened and rapidly improved. Research has shown that full time in-ICU staffing and patient care will result in improved outcomes for critically ill pediatric patients. In this article, we review the literature and recent advances in pediatric intensive care; we also outline the challenges arising. Special emphasis was made to the clinical context of Taiwan.

  13. Wanted: pediatric nephrologists! - why trainees are not choosing pediatric nephrology.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Maria; Iglesia, Edward; Ko, Zion; Amamoo, Ahinee; Mahan, John; Desai, Tejas; Gibson, Keisha; Jhaveri, Kenar; Primack, William

    2014-09-01

    A workforce crisis for many pediatric specialties, particularly nephrology, is due to growing retirement rates, attrition during training, and retention difficulties. To obtain specific information regarding pediatric nephrology trainee shortages, we administered two cross-sectional surveys to non-renal pediatric subspecialty fellows and pediatric nephrology program directors. We characterized the fellows' experiences with nephrology and the program directors' experiences with their fellows as well as their outcomes in the last 10 years. We analyzed responses from 531 non-renal fellows (14.4% response rate). Overall, 317 (60%) fellows rated nephrology as difficult, particularly women (65.4% vs. 49.5%, p < 0.001), with American women medical graduates rating nephrology as more difficult compared to all others (p = 0.001). More men than women (24% vs. 8%, p < 0.001) considered the monetary benefit as not adequate. Program directors (25; 64% response rate) represented 57% of all USA fellows in training, and 15 (60%) found it difficult to recruit qualified applicants. Of the 183 graduates in the past 10 years, 35 (19%) were reported as not in the USA pediatric nephrology workforce. These findings support our belief that a strong effort needs to be made by the academic community to teach nephrology in more interesting and understandable formats. While these are national samples, we were unable to contact non-nephrology fellows directly and program directors from larger programs were underrepresented. Difficulties in attracting/retaining trainees (particularly women) to nephrology must be addressed systematically, identifying incentives to practice in this field. Bold concerted efforts are required and we propose seven steps to achieve this goal.

  14. Routine Processing and Evaluation of HST Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, S. B.; Wilson, I. R.; Crawford, J. R.; Dempsey, R. C.; Ewald, R. A.; Gillam, S. D.; Giovane, E. A.; Kochte, M. C.; Schultz, A. B.; Scott, J. F.; Swade, D. A.

    1993-05-01

    All WFPC, FOC, FOS, GHRS, HSP observations taken by the Hubble Space Telescope are automatically processed by the Routine Science Data Processing (RSDP) ``pipeline'' at STScI, under the Post Observation Data Processing System (PODPS) branch. Over 36,000 readouts have been processed since launch, 97% of these within two days of execution. Packetized science data enter the pipeline after telemetry bit-error correction at the Data Capture Facility, GSFC. Software sorts the data by observation, inserts fill packets as needed, and examines the data structure for errors. If none, the Edited Information Set is converted into a generic (waivered FITS) format. If repair is required (1-2% of observations), tested procedures are used to modify erroneous bits or keywords. The observation is then calibrated, and a film file or laser plot is generated. The HST instrument teams supply all information for calibration performed by RSDP. As calibration evolves, PODPS updates the flat fields and other files and tables for subsequent pipeline processing. Also, the observer may recalibrate the data with STSDAS tools. PODPS staff astronomers, using STSDAS IRAF tasks and SAOimage, evaluate the quality of each observation and provide keywords such as `OK' or `UNDEREXP' plus informative comments to the archive catalog. Comments often include information from the Observation Support Branch (OSS) regarding guide star acquisition success, centering slews, high jitter, etc. Observation data (in packetized, reformatted, and calibrated form) and their comments are placed in the HST science and ancillary optical disk archives (now by DMF, to be superseded by DADS). FITS tapes containing both uncalibrated and calibrated files are written for the GO by the Data Systems Operations Branch (DSOB), and prints or plots plus OSS and PODPS comments are mailed with the tapes. The authors are staff members of the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  15. Evaluation of macrocytosis in routine hemograms.

    PubMed

    Veda, P

    2013-03-01

    Macrocytosis, a condition in which erythrocytes are larger than normal manifests as an increase in mean corpuscular volume (MCV) more than 100 fl. The aim of this study was to identify the underlying causes of macrocytosis, detected in routine hemograms and to evaluate the hematological features in different etiologies. This study included 178 adult patients whose detailed medical history was recorded, and Vitamin B12 assay, folate assay, thyroid function tests, liver function tests, complete blood counts and peripheral smear evaluation was performed. Alcoholism was identified as the etiological factor in 65 cases (36.5%), Vitamin B12 deficiency in 43 cases (24.1%) and drug related in 23 cases (12.9%). These three conditions accounted for 73.6% of macrocytosis. Other causes identified were folate deficiency, liver disease, Myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic renal failure and Aplastic anemia. In 41 cases, the cause of macrocytosis could not be explained. Anemia was observed in 95 cases (53.3%) being most common in Vitamin B12 deficiency. 9 cases (20.9%) of Vitamin B12 deficiency presented with isolated macrocytosis without anemia. It was observed that mean hemoglobin was lower and red cell distribution width (RDW) higher in megaloblastic conditions. Peripheral smear revealed hypersegmented neutrophils in 86% and macro-ovalocytes in 72% of the megaloblastic cases. Complete medical history, red cell parameters and peripheral blood smear are simple, inexpensive tools which assist in identifying the underlying cause of macrocytosis, particularly in resource limited settings. Macrocytosis needs to be evaluated even in the absence of anemia, as it may be the first clue to an underlying pathology.

  16. THE HUMAN MICROBIOME AND PROBIOTICS: IMPLICATIONS FOR PEDIATRICS

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Michael H.; Versalovic, James

    2010-01-01

    The “human super-organism” refers to the human body and the massive numbers of microbes which dwell within us and on the skin surface. Despite the large numbers of microbes co-existing within the human body, humans including infants and children achieve a physiologic state of equilibrium known as health in the context of this microbial world. These key concepts suggest that many individual members of the human microbiome, including bacterial and fungal species, confer different benefits on the human host. Probiotics, or beneficial microbes, may modulate immune responses, provide key nutrients, or suppress the proliferation and virulence of infectious agents. The human microbiome is in fact dynamic and often in flux, which may be indicative of the continuous interplay among commensal microbes, pathogens, and the human host. In this article we review the state-of-the-art regarding probiotics applications to prevent or treat diseases of the pediatric gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems. Additionally, probiotics may regulate local and systemic immunity, thereby reducing allergic disease severity and susceptibilities of infants and children to allergies and atopic diseases. In summary, beneficial microbes offer promising alternatives for new strategies in therapeutic microbiology with implications for different subspecialties within pediatrics. Instead of simply trying to counteract microbes with vaccines and antibiotics, a new field of medical microbiology is emerging that strives to translate human microbiome research into new probiotics strategies for promotion of health and prevention of disease in children. PMID:18992706

  17. Indirect Effects of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines in National Immunization Programs for Children on Adult Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) was developed to overcome the limitations of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, which produces poor immunogenicity in infants younger than 2 years. As many countries have included PCVs in national immunization programs for children, the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by vaccine type Streptococcus pneumoniae has declined markedly, not only among the vaccinated pediatric population, but also among unvaccinated adults. In this review, we present a concise overview of the indirect effects of mass pediatric PCV immunization on unvaccinated adults. PMID:28032483

  18. Family Functioning in Pediatric Trichotillomania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Phoebe S.; Franklin, Martin E.; Keuthen, Nancy J.; Flessner, Christopher A.; Woods, Douglas W.; Piacentini, John A.; Stein, Dan J.; Loew, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about how pediatric trichotillomania (TTM), a clinically significant and functionally impairing disorder, is impacted by, and impacts, family functioning. We explored dimensions of family functioning and parental attitudes in a sample of children and adolescents who participated in an Internet-based survey and satisfied…

  19. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  20. Current concepts in pediatric endocrinology

    SciTech Connect

    Styne, D.M.; Brook, C.G.D.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains seven chapters. They are: Recombinant DNA Technology; The HLA System in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia; Neuroendocrinology; Circadian Rhythms; Basic Aspects and Pediatric Implications; New Treatment Methods in Diabetes Mellitus; The Insulin-Like Growth Factors; and Hypopituitarism: Review of Behavioral Data.

  1. Advances in pediatrics. Volume 31

    SciTech Connect

    Barness, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the advances made in pediatrics. The topics discussed are--Molecular biology of thalassemia; genetic mapping of humans; technology of recombinant-DNA; DNA-sequencing and human chromosomes and etiology of hereditary diseases; acne; and T-cell abnormalities.

  2. Update on pediatric bone health.

    PubMed

    Henwood, Maria J; Binkovitz, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Osteoporosis has long been considered a health problem unique to older adults. Children and adolescents with chronic illness, primary bone disease, or poor nutrition, however, are also predisposed to impaired skeletal health. The present review discusses normal skeletal development, risk factors for low bone mineral density, and prevention and treatment strategies that can help optimize bone health in the pediatric population.

  3. Pediatric imaging for the technologist

    SciTech Connect

    Sharko, G.; Wilmont, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the diagnostic techniques of radiology in pediatric patients. The topics discussed are: Computed tomography; radiography of skull, face, abdomen, skeleton; nuclear medicine; quality control of image processing and radiation doses of patients and standards of radiation protection of patients.

  4. Pediatric isolated bilateral iliac aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Chithra, R; Sundar, R Ajai; Velladuraichi, B; Sritharan, N; Amalorpavanathan, J; Vidyasagaran, T

    2013-07-01

    Aneurysms are rare in children. Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are very rare, especially bilateral aneurysms. Pediatric aneurysms are usually secondary to connective tissue disorders, arteritis, or mycotic causes. We present a case of a 3-year-old child with bilateral idiopathic common iliac aneurysms that were successfully repaired with autogenous vein grafts.

  5. Integrated Circuit Immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sketoe, J. G.; Clark, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a DOD E3 program overview on integrated circuit immunity. The topics include: 1) EMI Immunity Testing; 2) Threshold Definition; 3) Bias Tee Function; 4) Bias Tee Calibration Set-Up; 5) EDM Test Figure; 6) EMI Immunity Levels; 7) NAND vs. and Gate Immunity; 8) TTL vs. LS Immunity Levels; 9) TP vs. OC Immunity Levels; 10) 7805 Volt Reg Immunity; and 11) Seventies Chip Set. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  6. Health maintenance in school-aged children: Part I. History, physical examination, screening, and immunizations.

    PubMed

    Riley, Margaret; Locke, Amy B; Skye, Eric P

    2011-03-15

    The goals of the well-child examination in school-aged children (kindergarten through early adolescence) are promoting health, detecting disease, and counseling to prevent injury and future health problems. A complete history should address any concerns from the patient and family and screen for lifestyle habits, including diet, physical activity, daily screen time (e.g., television, computer, video games), hours of sleep per night, dental care, and safety habits. School performance can be used for developmental surveillance. A full physical examination should be performed; however, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends against routine scoliosis screening and testicular examination. Children should be screened for obesity, which is defined as a body mass index at or above the 95th percentile for age and sex, and resources for comprehensive, intensive behavioral interventions should be provided to children with obesity. Although the evidence is mixed regarding screening for hypertension before 18 years of age, many experts recommend checking blood pressure annually beginning at three years of age. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends vision and hearing screening annually or every two years in school-aged children. There is insufficient evidence to recommend screening for dyslipidemia in children of any age, or screening for depression before 12 years of age. All children should receive at least 400 IU of vitamin D daily, with higher doses indicated in children with vitamin D deficiency. Children who live in areas with inadequate fluoride in the water (less than 0.6 ppm) should receive a daily fluoride supplement. Age-appropriate immunizations should be given, as well as any missed immunizations.

  7. Educating residents in behavioral health care and collaboration: integrated clinical training of pediatric residents and psychology fellows.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Anthony R; leRoux, Pieter; Siegel, David M

    2011-02-01

    Pediatric residency practices face the challenge of providing both behavioral health (BH) training for pediatricians and psychosocial care for children. The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and Rochester General Hospital developed a joint training program and continuity clinic infrastructure in which pediatric residents and postdoctoral psychology fellows train and practice together. The integrated program provides children access to BH care in a primary care setting and gives trainees the opportunity to integrate collaborative BH care into their regular practice routines. During 1998-2008, 48 pediatric residents and 8 psychology fellows trained in this integrated clinical environment. The program's accomplishments include longevity, faculty and fiscal stability, sustained support from pediatric leadership and community payers, the development in residents and faculty of greater comfort in addressing BH problems and collaborating with BH specialists, and replication of the model in two other primary care settings. In addition to quantitative program outcomes data, the authors present a case example that illustrates how the integrated program works and achieves its goals. They propose that educating residents and psychology trainees side by side in collaborative BH care is clinically and educationally valuable and potentially applicable to other settings. A companion report published in this issue provides results from a study comparing the perceptions of pediatric residents whose primary care continuity clinic took place in this integrated setting with those of residents from the same pediatric residency who had their continuity clinic training in a nonintegrated setting.

  8. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity.

  9. Performance Analysis of Apollo Navigational Starter Routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, Stoyan I.; Holt, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this project is to recreate and analyze the effectiveness of the original Apollo Starter Routine (ASR) which was used to generate the state vector of the Apollo spacecraft based on a series of radiometric observations. The original Apollo navigation software is unavailable in a modern programming language and the original coding has not been preserved. This necessitates its recreation using the original software documentation. Space Shuttle navigation software does not typically use the ASR or an algorithm like it since the Shuttle s state vector is easily deduced from GPS information or other sources. However, this tactic will be ineffective when trying to determine the state vector of a craft approaching, departing or in orbit around the Moon since the GPS network faces the surface of the Earth, not outer space. The recreation of the ASR from the original documentation is therefore vital as a simulation baseline for the navigation software under development for the Constellation program. The algorithms that make up the ASR will be extracted from the original documentation and adapted for and then implemented in a modern programming language; the majority of it will be coded in Matlab. The ASR s effectiveness will then be tested using simulated tracking data. The ability of the ASR to handle realistically noisy data and the accuracy with which it generates state vectors were analyzed. The ASR proved to be robust enough to process data with range and angle noise as large as 10,000 meters and 10(exp -6) radians together and 300,000 meters and 5x10(exp -4) radians separately at Lunar distances. The ASR was able to handle marginally more noise at distances closer to the Earth where the angle noise was less significant. The ASR is capable of effectively processing 40-80 data points gathered at a rate of one per 20 seconds at close Earth orbit and up to 28-40 data points gathered at a rate of one per minute at distant Earth orbit and Lunar orbit.

  10. Procession to Pediatric Bacteremia and Sepsis: A Series of Covert Operations and Failures in Diplomacy

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Stacey L.; Seed, Patrick C.

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, bacterial sepsis remains a major cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality, particularly among neonates, the critically ill, and the growing immunocompromised patient population. Sepsis is the endpoint of a complex and dynamic series of events in which both host and microbial factors drive the high morbidity and potentially lethal physiological alterations. This article provides a succinct overview of the events that lead to pediatric bloodstream infections (BSI) and sepsis, with a focus on the molecular mechanisms employed by bacteria to subvert host barriers and local immunity to gain access to and persist within the systemic circulation. In the events preceding and during BSI and sepsis, gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens employ a battery of factors for translocation, inhibition of immunity, molecular mimicry, intracellular survival, and nutrient scavenging. Gaps in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of bacterial BSI and sepsis are highlighted as opportunities to identify and develop new therapeutics. PMID:20566606

  11. The environmental heat flux routine, version 4 (EHFR-4) and Multiple Reflections Routine (MRR), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    The environmental heat flux routine version 4, (EHFR-4) is a generalized computer program which calculates the steady state and/or transient thermal environments experienced by a space system during lunar surface, deep space, or thermal vacuum chamber operation. The specific environments possible for EHFR analysis include: lunar plain, lunar crater, combined lunar plain and crater, lunar plain in the region of spacecraft surfaces, intervehicular, deep space in the region of spacecraft surfaces, and thermal vacuum chamber generation. The EHFR was used for Extra Vehicular Mobility Unit environment analysis of the Apollo 11-17 missions, EMU manned and unmanned thermal vacuum qualification testing, and EMU-LRV interface environmental analyses.

  12. Simulation-based medical education in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Lopreiato, Joseph O; Sawyer, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    The use of simulation-based medical education (SBME) in pediatrics has grown rapidly over the past 2 decades and is expected to continue to grow. Similar to other instructional formats used in medical education, SBME is an instructional methodology that facilitates learning. Successful use of SBME in pediatrics requires attention to basic educational principles, including the incorporation of clear learning objectives. To facilitate learning during simulation the psychological safety of the participants must be ensured, and when done correctly, SBME is a powerful tool to enhance patient safety in pediatrics. Here we provide an overview of SBME in pediatrics and review key topics in the field. We first review the tools of the trade and examine various types of simulators used in pediatric SBME, including human patient simulators, task trainers, standardized patients, and virtual reality simulation. Then we explore several uses of simulation that have been shown to lead to effective learning, including curriculum integration, feedback and debriefing, deliberate practice, mastery learning, and range of difficulty and clinical variation. Examples of how these practices have been successfully used in pediatrics are provided. Finally, we discuss the future of pediatric SBME. As a community, pediatric simulation educators and researchers have been a leading force in the advancement of simulation in medicine. As the use of SBME in pediatrics expands, we hope this perspective will serve as a guide for those interested in improving the state of pediatric SBME.

  13. Ulcerated Giant Dermatofibroma following Routine Childhood Vaccination in a Young Boy

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Michelle S.Y.; Foong, Alice Y.W.; Koh, Mark J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The development of cutaneous neoplasms at immunization sites following vaccination is uncommon, and only few have been reported in the literature worldwide. We report an unusual case of an ulcerated giant dermatofibroma that developed as a chronic nonhealing plaque in the immunization scar of a young boy after vaccination. Case Report A 13-month-old Chinese boy presented with an unusual skin reaction on the vaccination site at the right anterolateral thigh following a routine intramuscular injection of ‘5-in-1’ (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Haemophilus influenzae B) vaccine at 4 months of age. The immunization site developed a slightly raised papule with a central punctum that progressively grew in size, ulcerated and showed occasional bleeding over a span of 9 months. On follow-up, the lesion showed a chronic granulomatous reaction with surrounding induration and a central scarring. The right inguinal lymph node was palpable. Ultrasound of the lesion showed only nonspecific focal skin thickening. An incisional skin biopsy with careful histopathological evaluation revealed microscopic features consistent with an ulcerated giant dermatofibroma. Conclusion Neoplastic development in immunization scars following vaccination is a rare occurrence and, hence, makes this case a diagnostic challenge. A high index of suspicion is crucial in atypical presentations of a common skin lesion, as typified by this case. Careful history taking and clinicopathological correlation of clinical findings with gross and microscopic findings along with targeted immunohistological staining is often essential to aid early diagnosis. PMID:27721753

  14. Pediatric hepatitis B treatment

    PubMed Central

    Inui, Ayano; Fujisawa, Tomoo

    2017-01-01

    Although the introduction of hepatitis B vaccine has been contributing to the reduction in the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers worldwide, the treatment of children with chronic HBV infection is a challenge to be addressed. HBeAg seroconversion, which induces low replication of HBV, is widely accepted as the first goal of antiviral treatment in children with chronic hepatitis B. However, spontaneous HBeAg seroconversion is highly expected in children with chronic HBV infection. Therefore, the identification of children who need antiviral treatment to induce HBeAg seroconversion is essential in the management of chronic HBV infection. Guidelines and experts’ opinion show how to identify children who should be treated and how to treat them. If decompensated cirrhosis is absent, interferon-alpha is the first-line antiviral treatment. Nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs), such as lamivudine, adefovir, entecavir and tenofovir, are also available for the treatment of children, although the approval age differs among them. If decompensated cirrhosis is present, NAs are the first-line antivirals. When the emergence of drug-resistant HBV variants is taken into consideration, entecavir (approved for age 2 years or older) and tenofovir (age 12 years or older), which have high genetic barriers, will play a central role in the treatment of HBV infection. However, the optimal duration of NA treatment and adverse events of long-term NA treatment remain unclear in children. In resource-constrained countries and regions, the financial burden of visiting hospitals, receiving routine blood examination and purchasing antiviral drugs is heavy. Moreover, there is no clear evidence that the induction of HBeAg seroconversion by antiviral treatment prevents the progression of liver disease to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in children with chronic HBV infection. It is thus imperative to clarify the clinical impact of antiviral treatment in children with HBV infection. PMID

  15. Pressure Ulcer Risk and Prevention Practices in Pediatric Patients: A Secondary Analysis of Data from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators®.

    PubMed

    Razmus, Ivy; Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about pressure ulcer prevention practice among pediatric patients. To describe the frequency of pressure ulcer risk assessment in pediatric patients and pressure ulcer prevention intervention use overall and by hospital unit type, a descriptive secondary analysis was performed of data submitted to the National Database for Nursing Quality Indicators® (NDNQI®) for at least 3 of the 4 quarters in 2012. Relevant data on pressure ulcer risk from 271 hospitals across the United States extracted from the NDNQI database included patient skin and pressure ulcer risk assessment on admission, time since the last pressure ulcer risk assessment, method used to assess pressure ulcer risk, and risk status. Extracted data on pressure ulcer prevention included skin assessment, pressure-redistribution surface use, routine repositioning, nutritional support, and moisture management. These data were organized by unit type and merged with data on hospital characteristics for the analysis. The sample included 39 984 patients ages 1 day to 18 years on 678 pediatric acute care units (general pediatrics, pediatric critical care units, neonatal intensive care units, pediatric step-down units, and pediatric rehabilitation units). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze study data. Most of the pediatric patients (33 644; 89.2%) were assessed for pressure ulcer risk within 24 hours of admission. The Braden Q Scale was frequently used to assess risk on general pediatrics units (75.4%), pediatric step-down units (85.5%), pediatric critical care units (81.3%), and pediatric rehabilitation units (56.1%). In the neonatal intensive care units, another scale or method was used more often (55% to 60%) to assess pressure ulcer risk. Of the 11 203 pediatric patients (39%) determined to be at risk for pressure ulcers, the majority (10 741, 95.8%) received some kind of pressure ulcer prevention intervention during the 24 hours preceding the NDNQI pressure ulcer survey. The frequency

  16. Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Cristina; Niccoli Asabella, Artor; Merenda, Nunzio; Altini, Corinna; Fanelli, Margherita; Muggeo, Paola; De Leonardis, Francesco; Perillo, Teresa; Santoro, Nicola; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the prognostic value of interim 18F-FDG PET/CT (PET-2) in pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (pHL), evaluating both visual and semiquantitative analysis. Thirty pHL patients (age ≤16) underwent serial 18F-FDG PET/CT: at baseline (PET-0), after 2 cycles of chemotherapy (PET-2) and at the end of first-line chemotherapy (PET-T). PET response assessment was carried out visually according to the Deauville Score (DS), as well as semiquantitatively by using the semiquantitative parameters reduction from PET-0 to PET-2 (ΔΣSUVmax0–2, ΔΣSUVmean0–2). Final clinical response assessment (outcome) at the end of first-line chemotherapy was the criterion standard, considering patients as responders (R) or nonresponders (NR). Disease status was followed identifying patients with absence or relapsed/progression disease (mean follow-up: 24 months, range 3–78). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of visual and semiquantitative assessment were calculated; furthermore, Fisher exact test was performed to evaluate the association between both visual and semiquantitative assessment and outcome at the end of the first-line chemotherapy. The prognostic capability of PET-2 semiquantitative parameters was calculated by ROC analysis and expressed as area under curve (AUC). Finally, progression-free survival (PFS) was analyzed according to PET-2 results based on the 5-point scale and semiquantitative criteria, using the Kaplan–Meier method. Based on the outcome at the end of first-line chemotherapy, 5 of 30 patients were NR, the remnant 25 of 30 were R. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of visual analysis were 60%,72%,30%,90%,70%; conversely, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of semiquantitative assessment were 80%, 92%, 66.7%, 95.8%, 90%. The highest AUC resulted for ΔΣSUVmax0–2 (0.836; cut-off <12.5; sensitivity 80%; specificity 91%). The association between

  17. Update From the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Jennifer E; O'Leary, Sean; Kimberlin, David W

    2016-12-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) consists of medical and public health experts who develop recommendations on vaccine use in the United States. The ACIP meets 3 times per year, and members and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) staff present findings and discuss vaccine research, vaccine effectiveness (VE) and safety, clinical trial results, and labeling/package insert information. Outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases and vaccine shortages are also discussed. Nonvoting representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society are present. The ACIP met on June 22-23, 2016 to discuss proposed recommendations for influenza vaccination, for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine dosing schedules, for the cholera vaccine (CVD 103-HgR), and for the use of MenACWY in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons, as well as an overview of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccines, safety of maternal tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis (Tdap) immunization, and laboratory containment of poliovirus type 2.

  18. One more shot for the road: a review and update of vaccinations for pediatric international travelers.

    PubMed

    Rebaza, Andre; Lee, Paul J

    2015-04-01

    Increasing numbers of children are traveling to developing countries where they are often at a higher risk than adults of acquiring vaccine-preventable diseases. Yet, they are less likely to receive pretravel medical advice and preventive care. This article reviews the current recommendations for pediatric travel immunizations, including specific travel vaccines such as typhoid, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis virus, and rabies as well as prospective vaccines for significant global diseases like malaria, dengue, chikungunya, and Ebola.

  19. Support Routines for In Situ Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Pariser, Oleg; Yeates, Matthew C.; Lee, Hyun H.; Lorre, Jean

    2013-01-01

    This software consists of a set of application programs that support ground-based image processing for in situ missions. These programs represent a collection of utility routines that perform miscellaneous functions in the context of the ground data system. Each one fulfills some specific need as determined via operational experience. The most unique aspect to these programs is that they are integrated into the large, in situ image processing system via the PIG (Planetary Image Geometry) library. They work directly with space in situ data, understanding the appropriate image meta-data fields and updating them properly. The programs themselves are completely multimission; all mission dependencies are handled by PIG. This suite of programs consists of: (1)marscahv: Generates a linearized, epi-polar aligned image given a stereo pair of images. These images are optimized for 1-D stereo correlations, (2) marscheckcm: Compares the camera model in an image label with one derived via kinematics modeling on the ground, (3) marschkovl: Checks the overlaps between a list of images in order to determine which might be stereo pairs. This is useful for non-traditional stereo images like long-baseline or those from an articulating arm camera, (4) marscoordtrans: Translates mosaic coordinates from one form into another, (5) marsdispcompare: Checks a Left Right stereo disparity image against a Right Left disparity image to ensure they are consistent with each other, (6) marsdispwarp: Takes one image of a stereo pair and warps it through a disparity map to create a synthetic opposite- eye image. For example, a right eye image could be transformed to look like it was taken from the left eye via this program, (7) marsfidfinder: Finds fiducial markers in an image by projecting their approximate location and then using correlation to locate the markers to subpixel accuracy. These fiducial markets are small targets attached to the spacecraft surface. This helps verify, or improve, the

  20. [Mumps--effect of immunizations on epidemiological situation].

    PubMed

    Gołabek, Violetta; Woźniakowska-Gesicka, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, 57% of States included mumps vaccine in their routine national immunization programmers. Nevertheless WHO reported then global increase of mumps cases--654 216 in 2004 compared to 334 064 cases in 2003. Cases registered in Europe accounted for 38% of general accidents. In Poland, since 2004 above 90% of population suffered from mumps since 19 years old. After 2006, after introduction second mumps vaccine dose for children at age 10 years in polish routine national immunization program, particularly will be exposure to risk of mumps infection and mumps complications unvaccinated and seronegatived aged in 1985-1995.

  1. Taking a new biomarker into routine use – A perspective from the routine clinical biochemistry laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Sturgeon, Catharine; Hill, Robert; Hortin, Glen L; Thompson, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing pressure to provide cost-effective healthcare based on “best practice.” Consequently, new biomarkers are only likely to be introduced into routine clinical biochemistry departments if they are supported by a strong evidence base and if the results will improve patient management and outcome. This requires convincing evidence of the benefits of introducing the new test, ideally reflected in fewer hospital admissions, fewer additional investigations and/or fewer clinic visits. Carefully designed audit and cost-benefit studies in relevant patient groups must demonstrate that introducing the biomarker delivers an improved and more effective clinical pathway. From the laboratory perspective, pre-analytical requirements must be thoroughly investigated at an early stage. Good stability of the biomarker in relevant physiological matrices is essential to avoid the need for special processing. Absence of specific timing requirements for sampling and knowledge of the effect of medications that might be used to treat the patients in whom the biomarker will be measured is also highly desirable. Analytically, automation is essential in modern high-throughput clinical laboratories. Assays must therefore be robust, fulfilling standard requirements for linearity on dilution, precision and reproducibility, both within- and between-run. Provision of measurements by a limited number of specialized reference laboratories may be most appropriate, especially when a new biomarker is first introduced into routine practice. PMID:21137030

  2. Correlates of Pediatric CPAP Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Stephen M.M.; Jensen, Emily L.; Simon, Stacey L.; Friedman, Norman R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common pediatric condition characterized by recurrent partial or complete cessation of airflow during sleep, typically due to inadequate upper airway patency. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a therapeutic option that reduces morbidity. Despite efforts to promote use, CPAP adherence is poor in both pediatric and adult populations. We sought to determine whether demographics, insurance status, OSA severity, therapeutic pressure, or comorbid conditions were associated with pediatric CPAP adherence. Methods: A retrospective review of adherence download data was performed on all pediatric patients with initiation or adjustment of CPAP treatment over a one-year period with documented in-laboratory CPAP titration. Patients were grouped as CPAP adherent or non-adherent, where adherence was defined as > 70% nightly use and average usage ≥ 4 hours per night. Differences between the groups were analyzed by χ2 test. Results: Overall, nearly half of participants were CPAP adherent (49%, 69/140). Of the demographic data collected (age, ethnicity, sex, insurance status), only female sex was associated with better adherence (60.9% vs 39.5% of males adherent; odds ratio [OR] = 2.41, 95%CI = 1.20–4.85; p = 0.01). Severity of OSA (diagnostic apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and degree of hypoxemia), therapeutic pressure, and residual AHI did not impact CPAP adherence (p > 0.05). Patients with developmental delay (DD) were more likely to be adherent with CPAP than those without a DD diagnosis (OR = 2.55, 95%CI = 1.27–5.13; p = 0.007). Female patients with trisomy 21 tended to be more adherent, but this did not reach significance or account for the overall increased adherence associated with female sex. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that adherence to CPAP therapy is poor but suggests that female sex and developmental delay are associated with better adherence. These findings support efforts to understand the

  3. 78 FR 20665 - Pediatric Device Consortia Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    .... This program is intended to further the development of multiple pediatric devices; thus, grants are not... The Pediatric Device Consortia Grant Program aims to fund networks of pediatric medical...

  4. Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Get ... date. See Disclaimer for additional details. Based on Immunization Schedule for Children 0 through 6 Years of ...

  5. Immune System Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  6. Biopharmaceutic planning in pediatric drug development.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Vivek S

    2012-09-01

    Pediatric drug development is a required consideration for all drug development programs. Age-appropriate formulations such as suspensions, chewable tablets, oral disintegrating tablets, etc., are typically developed and used in the pediatric clinical studies. However, it is not uncommon to use enabling formulations in the pivotal pediatric clinical study followed by bridging bioavailability and/or bioequivalence studies. Development of age-appropriate formulations is an essential part of pediatric drug development and adds additional biopharmaceutical considerations to an already complex problem. Careful planning of biopharmaceutic data collection during the adult and pediatric development program can contribute significantly to the biopharmaceutic risk assessment and planning of appropriate clinical studies leading to successful development of pediatric formulations.

  7. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric Dentistry, The journal of Pedodontics, and the International journal of Pediatric Dentistry. This study shows an average publication rate of trauma articles of approximately 3 percent of all articles published and with no improvement in later decennia. If only clinical studies are considered (leaving out case reports), the publication rate is less than 1 percent--completely out of proportion to the size of the problem dental trauma impose in children.

  8. Child Neurology Education for Pediatric Residents.

    PubMed

    Albert, Dara V F; Patel, Anup D; Behnam-Terneus, Maria; Sautu, Beatriz Cunill-De; Verbeck, Nicole; McQueen, Alisa; Fromme, H Barrett; Mahan, John D

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the current state of child neurology education during pediatric residency provides adequate preparation for pediatric practice. A survey was sent to recent graduates from 3 pediatric residency programs to assess graduate experience, perceived level of competence, and desire for further education in child neurology. Responses from generalists versus subspecialists were compared. The response rate was 32%, half in general pediatric practice. Only 22% feel very confident in approaching patients with neurologic problems. This may represent the best-case scenario as graduates from these programs had required neurology experiences, whereas review of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency curricula revealed that the majority of residencies do not. Pediatric neurologic problems are common, and pediatric residency graduates do encounter such problems in practice. The majority of pediatricians report some degree of confidence; however, some clear areas for improvement are apparent.

  9. Signs and symptoms of pediatric brain tumors and diagnostic value of preoperative EEG.

    PubMed

    Preuß, Matthias; Preiss, Sophia; Syrbe, Steffen; Nestler, Ulf; Fischer, Lars; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Bertsche, Astrid; Christiansen, Holger; Bernhard, Matthias K

    2015-11-01

    In pediatric patients, brain tumors have been estimated to be the cause for seizures in only 0.2-0.3% of cases, whereas seizures occurred in about 13% of pediatric brain tumor patients at presentation. This survey was conducted to analyze EEG findings in pediatric tumor patients over the past 14 years to evaluate the diagnostic value of preoperative EEG for diagnosis of brain tumors. Surface EEG was obtained in awake patients using the international 10- to 20-electrode placement in all pediatric patients with intracranial neoplasms between 2000 and 2013 at the University Hospital of Leipzig except for those who needed emergency operative treatment. One hundred forty-two pediatric patients with 80 infratentorial and 62 supratentorial tumors (WHO grades I-II: 91 patients; WHO grades III-IV: 46 patients). Symptomatic hydrocephalus was found in 37. Sensitivity and specificity of ophthalmologic examination for predicting hydrocephalus was 0.39 and 0.72. Preoperative EEG has been conducted in 116 patients, showing normal activity in 54 patients (47%). Out of 62 pathologic EEGs, 40 indicated correctly to the site of the lesion, 15 were pathologic despite of infratentorial location of the tumor. Nineteen patients had a history of seizures of which six had normal EEGs. Sensitivity for and specificity of EEG examination for symptomatic epilepsy was 0.68 and 0.7. Conclusion Preoperative routine EEG provides no additional value in the diagnostic algorithm of pediatric train tumors. The low specificity and sensitivity of EEG (even in patients with clinical seizures as primary symptom of a brain tumor) underline that EEG does not contribute to diagnosis and a normal EEG might even delay correct diagnosis.

  10. Malnutrition in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients: Assessment, Prevalence, and Association to Adverse Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Daskalou, Efstratia; Galli-Tsinopoulou, Assimina; Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi, Thomais; Augoustides-Savvopoulou, Persefone

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent finding in pediatric health care settings in the form of undernutrition or excess body weight. Its increasing prevalence and impact on overall health status, which is reflected in the adverse outcomes, renders imperative the application of commonly accepted and evidence-based practices and tools by health care providers. Nutrition risk screening on admission and nutrition status evaluation are key points during clinical management of hospitalized pediatric patients, in order to prevent health deterioration that can lead to serious complications and growth consequences. In addition, anthropometric data based on commonly accepted universal growth standards can give accurate results for nutrition status. Both nutrition risk screening and nutrition status assessment are techniques that should be routinely implemented, based on commonly accepted growth standards and methodology, and linked to clinical outcomes. The aim of the present review was to address the issue of hospital malnutrition in pediatric settings in terms of prevalence, outline nutrition status evaluation and nutrition screening process using different criteria and available tools, and present its relationship with outcome measures. Key teaching points • Malnutrition-underweight or excess body weight-is a frequent imbalance in pediatric settings that affects physical growth and results in undesirable clinical outcomes. • Anthropometry interpretation through growth charts and nutrition screening are cornerstones for the assessment of malnutrition.To date no commonly accepted anthropometric criteria or nutrition screening tools are used in hospitalized pediatric patients. • Commonly accepted nutrition status and screening processes based on the World Health Organization's growth standards can contribute to the overall hospital nutrition care of pediatric patients.

  11. On the frontline: pediatric obesity in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Heather M; Close, Matthew; Jones, Brett; Furtado, Nicholas; Bunney, E Bradshaw; Mackey, Mark; Marquez, Diego; Edison, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    Obesity among children is rising at an alarming rate. This study examines pediatric emergency department visits for children aged 2 to 17 years to determine the prevalence of normal, overweight, and obesity as well as to characterize discharge diagnosis and level of service among the different groups. The electronic emergency department medical record and billing service data were used in the review process. Body mass index (BMI) and percentiles were calculated using the Centers for Disease Control formulas with overweight being defined as BMI between 85th and 94th sex- and age-specific percentiles and obesity as greater than 95th sex- and age-specific percentile. The study was reviewed and approved by the institutional review board. Of the 596 patients meeting inclusion criteria, there was a predominance of African American and Hispanic patients. Approximately 53% (313) of patients were classified as normal weight, while 46% (272) of patients were either overweight or obese. The percentages of overweight and obesity were similar across racial/ethnic classifications, with a slight predominance of obesity among minority groups (30% and 35%, respectively, in minority groups vs 28% and 25%, respectively, in nonminority groups). There were no statistically significant differences between discharge diagnosis and level of service among the different weight categories. Rates of overweight and obesity in this predominately minority pediatric population were significantly greater than the published national rates. The impact of the epidemic of childhood obesity mandates the need for innovative strategies of weight control and reduction. Emergency departments routinely treat high-risk pediatric populations and can therefore serve as a resource for screening and early referral that has been previously untapped in combating childhood obesity.

  12. Complications in common general pediatric surgery procedures.

    PubMed

    Linnaus, Maria E; Ostlie, Daniel J

    2016-12-01

    Complications related to general pediatric surgery procedures are a major concern for pediatric surgeons and their patients. Although infrequent, when they occur the consequences can lead to significant morbidity and psychosocial stress. The purpose of this article is to discuss the common complications encountered during several common pediatric general surgery procedures including inguinal hernia repair (open and laparoscopic), umbilical hernia repair, laparoscopic pyloromyotomy, and laparoscopic appendectomy.

  13. Advances in pediatric pharmacology, therapeutics, and toxicology.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Paul, Ian M; Benjamin, Daniel K; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In the United States, passage of the FDASIA legislation made BPCA and PREA permanent, no longer requiring reauthorization every 5 years. This landmark legislation also stressed the importance of performing clinical trials in neonates when appropriate. In Europe the Pediatric Regulation, which went into effect in early 2007, also provides a framework for expanding pediatric clinical research. Although much work remains, as a result of greater regulatory guidance more pediatric data are reaching product labels.

  14. Laser gingivectomy for pediatrics. A case report.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Michelle M; Poiman, David J; Jacobson, Barry L

    2009-01-01

    Traditional gingivectomy procedures have been a challenge for pediatric dentists who confront issues of patient cooperation and discomfort. Treatment of pediatric patients must involve minimal operative and postoperative discomfort. Laser soft-tissue surgery has been shown to be well accepted by children. For the pediatric patient, the greatest advantage of the laser is the lack of local anesthesia injection and the associated pre- and postoperative discomfort. The following case report describes a gingivectomy procedure performed on a 14-year-old female.

  15. Learning From Errors in Ambulatory Pediatrics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    355 Learning from Errors in Ambulatory Pediatrics Julie J. Mohr, Carole M. Lannon, Kathleen A. Thoma, Donna Woods, Eric J. Slora, Richard C...Wasserman, Lynne Uhring Abstract Background: Approximately 70 percent of pediatric care occurs in ambulatory settings, yet there has been little...research on errors and harm in these settings. Given the importance of understanding harm in ambulatory pediatrics , this study was funded by the Agency

  16. Types of Lasers and Their Applications in Pediatric Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Nazemisalman, Bahareh; Farsadeghi, Mahya; Sokhansanj, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Laser technology has been recently introduced into the dental field with the idea to replace drilling. Having a less painful first dental experience by the use of modern instruments like laser can be an efficient preventive and therapeutic strategy in pediatric dentistry. Pedodontists need to learn the new less invasive technologies and adopt them in their routine practice. This study aimed to review the available types of lasers and their applications in pediatric dentistry. An electronic search was carried out in IranMedex, InterScience, Scopus, Science Direct, PubMed, ProQuest, Medline and Google Scholar databases to find relevant articles published from 2000 to 2014. Relevant textbooks were reviewed as well. Laser can be used as a suitable alternative to many conventional diagnostic and therapeutic dental procedures. It is especially efficient for caries detection and removal, pulp therapy, lowering the risk of infection, inflammation and swelling and reducing bleeding. On the other hand, due to minimal invasion, laser treatment is well tolerated by children. Improved patient cooperation leads to higher satisfaction of the parents, dentists and the children themselves.

  17. Types of Lasers and Their Applications in Pediatric Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Nazemisalman, Bahareh; Farsadeghi, Mahya; Sokhansanj, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Laser technology has been recently introduced into the dental field with the idea to replace drilling. Having a less painful first dental experience by the use of modern instruments like laser can be an efficient preventive and therapeutic strategy in pediatric dentistry. Pedodontists need to learn the new less invasive technologies and adopt them in their routine practice. This study aimed to review the available types of lasers and their applications in pediatric dentistry. An electronic search was carried out in IranMedex, InterScience, Scopus, Science Direct, PubMed, ProQuest, Medline and Google Scholar databases to find relevant articles published from 2000 to 2014. Relevant textbooks were reviewed as well. Laser can be used as a suitable alternative to many conventional diagnostic and therapeutic dental procedures. It is especially efficient for caries detection and removal, pulp therapy, lowering the risk of infection, inflammation and swelling and reducing bleeding. On the other hand, due to minimal invasion, laser treatment is well tolerated by children. Improved patient cooperation leads to higher satisfaction of the parents, dentists and the children themselves. PMID:26464775

  18. Radiation exposure and safety practices during pediatric central line placement

    PubMed Central

    Saeman, Melody R.; Burkhalter, Lorrie S.; Blackburn, Timothy J.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pediatric surgeons routinely use fluoroscopy for central venous line (CVL) placement. We examined radiation safety practices and patient/surgeon exposure during fluoroscopic CVL. Methods Fluoroscopic CVL procedures performed by 11 pediatric surgeons in 2012 were reviewed. Fluoroscopic time (FT), patient exposure (mGy), and procedural data were collected. Anthropomorphic phantom simulations were used to calculate scatter and dose (mSv). Surgeons were surveyed regarding safety practices. Results 386 procedures were reviewed. Median FT was 12.8 seconds. Median patient estimated effective dose was 0.13 mSv. Median annual FT per surgeon was 15.4 minutes. Simulations showed no significant difference (p = 0.14) between reported exposures (median 3.5 mGy/min) and the modeled regression exposures from the C-arm default mode (median 3.4 mGy/min). Median calculated surgeon exposure was 1.5 mGy/year. Eight of 11 surgeons responded to the survey. Only three reported 100% lead protection and frequent dosimeter use. Conclusion We found non-standard radiation training, safety practices, and dose monitoring for the 11 surgeons. Based on simulations, the C-arm default setting was typically used instead of low dose. While most CVL procedures have low patient/surgeon doses, every effort should be used to minimize patient and occupational exposure, suggesting the need for formal hands-on training for non-radiologist providers using fluoroscopy. PMID:25837269

  19. Influenza Immunization for All Health Care Personnel: Keep It Mandatory.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this statement is to reaffirm the American Academy of Pediatrics' support for a mandatory influenza immunization policy for all health care personnel. With an increasing number of organizations requiring influenza vaccination, coverage among health care personnel has risen to 75% in the 2013 to 2014 influenza season but still remains below the Healthy People 2020 objective of 90%. Mandatory influenza immunization for all health care personnel is ethical, just, and necessary to improve patient safety. It is a crucial step in efforts to reduce health care-associated influenza infections.

  20. American Academy of Pediatrics. Clinical report--gynecologic examination for adolescents in the pediatric office setting.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Paula K; Breech, Lesley

    2010-09-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics promotes the inclusion of the gynecologic examination in the primary care setting within the medical home. Gynecologic issues are commonly seen by clinicians who provide primary care to adolescents. Some of the most common concerns include questions related to pubertal development; menstrual disorders such as dysmenorrhea, amenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, and abnormal uterine bleeding; contraception; and sexually transmitted and non-sexually transmitted infections. The gynecologic examination is a key element in assessing pubertal status and documenting physical findings. Most adolescents do not need an internal examination involving a speculum or bimanual examination. However, for cases in which more extensive examination is needed, the primary care office with the primary care clinician who has established rapport and trust with the patient is often the best setting for pelvic examination. This report reviews the gynecologic examination, including indications for the pelvic examination in adolescents and the approach to this examination in the office setting. Indications for referral to a gynecologist are included. The pelvic examination may be successfully completed when conducted without pressure and approached as a normal part of routine young women's health care.

  1. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in pediatric rheumatology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) has emerged as an indispensible tool among physicians involved in musculoskeletal medicine in the last two decades, only recently has it become more attractive to pediatric rheumatologists. Thereafter, the use of MSUS in pediatric rheumatology has started to increase. Yet, an ever-growing body of literature shows parity and even superiority of MSUS when compared to physical examination and other imaging modalities. MSUS is suitable for examination of children of all ages and it has certain advantages over other imaging modalities; as it is cheaper, mobile, instantly accessible bedside, easy to combine with clinical assessment (interactivity) and non-invasive. It does not require sedation, which facilitates repetitive examinations. Assessment of multiple locations is possible during the same session. Agitation is rarely a problem and small children can be seated in their parents' lap or they can even play while being examined. PMID:21910870

  2. Pediatric obesity. An introduction ☆

    PubMed Central

    Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children’s health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric obesity prevalence suggests that changes to children’s environments and/or to their learned behaviors may dramatically affect body weight regulation. This paper presents an overview of the epidemiology, consequences, and etiopathogenesis of pediatric obesity, serving as a general introduction to the subsequent papers in this Special Issue that address aspects of childhood obesity and cognition in detail. PMID:25836737

  3. Lasers and pediatric dental care.

    PubMed

    Kotlow, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    There are several types of lasers that will allow pediatric dentists to remove soft tissue (such as diode or Neodynium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers) or remove both hard and soft tissue (such as the Erbium:YAG laser), in addition to photobiostimulation or therapeutic lasers that produce their healing benefits without producing heat. Lasers allow pediatric dentists to provide optimal care without many of the fear factors that result from conventional dental techniques. Lasers are extremely safe and effective when the user has a proper understanding of laser physics. Using lasers for caries removal, bone removal, and soft tissue treatment can reduce postoperative discomfort and infection and make it possible for dentists to provide safe, simple treatments.

  4. Physical rehabilitation of pediatric burns

    PubMed Central

    Atiyeh, B.; Janom, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Significant improvements have been made in the acute treatment of pediatric burn injuries over the past 3 decades which have significantly decreased mortality. Each year, more burned children are necessitating serious medical attention during their convalescence. For children with serious consequences resulting from burns that can persist from childhood through adolescence into adulthood, the value of long-term rehabilitation cannot be over stated. Burn injury management should not focus only on the immediate treatment. Long-term functional outcome and the required rehabilitation that burn victims must go through should be given equal if not more attention. The present is a review of the available modalities utilized for the physical rehabilitation of convalescent pediatric burns in order to overcome the catabolic state, improve muscle power and fitness, reduce disfiguring scars and prevent contractures. PMID:25249846

  5. Physical rehabilitation of pediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, B; Janom, H H

    2014-03-31

    Significant improvements have been made in the acute treatment of pediatric burn injuries over the past 3 decades which have significantly decreased mortality. Each year, more burned children are necessitating serious medical attention during their convalescence. For children with serious consequences resulting from burns that can persist from childhood through adolescence into adulthood, the value of long-term rehabilitation cannot be over stated. Burn injury management should not focus only on the immediate treatment. Long-term functional outcome and the required rehabilitation that burn victims must go through should be given equal if not more attention. The present is a review of the available modalities utilized for the physical rehabilitation of convalescent pediatric burns in order to overcome the catabolic state, improve muscle power and fitness, reduce disfiguring scars and prevent contractures.

  6. [What's new in pediatric cardiology?].

    PubMed

    Bonnet, D; Sidi, D

    1999-07-01

    In recent years, close collaborations have been established between pediatric cardiology, medical and molecular genetics, fetal cardiology and pediatric radiology. As a consequence, several congenital heart defects and syndromes including cardiovascular malformations have been related to microdeletions such as 22q11 in Di George syndrome and 7q in Williams syndrome. Prenatal detection of heart malformations has become a crucial part of the management of life-threatening malformations of the neonate such as the transposition of the great arteries or the coarctation of the aorta. We are at the dawn of a new era of the development of preventive cardiovascular medicine starting from childhood thanks to new techniques of echo-tracking. Finally, three-dimensional reconstruction of heart defects by using ultrasound, X-ray or MRI have dramatically improved the diagnosis and the therapeutic strategies of cardiac diseases.

  7. Pediatric Mixed Connective Tissue Disease.

    PubMed

    Berard, Roberta A; Laxer, Ronald M

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric-onset mixed connective tissue disease is among the rare disease entities in pediatric rheumatology and includes features of arthritis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis. Accurate recognition and diagnosis of the disease is paramount to prevent long-term morbidity. Advances in the genetic and immunologic understanding of the factors involved in the etiopathogenesis provide an opportunity for improvements in prognostication and targeted therapy. The development of a multinational cohort of patients with mixed connective tissue disease would be invaluable to provide more updated data regarding the clinical presentation, to develop a standardized treatment approach, disease activity and outcome tools, and to provide data on long-term outcomes and comorbidities.

  8. Gender and Sexuality in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Merens, Teri A

    2016-05-01

    The terms gender and sexuality, once rarely discussed in a public forum, are now dominant topics of conversation on social media, in all forms of entertainment, politics, law, and medicine. The pediatric primary care physician, like all people and institutions involved in the delivery of health care, must be diligent about providing compassionate and competent care to patients and families contending with gender issues. The complex variety of obstacles these patients may face require a well-informed, sensitive clinician who can offer sound medical advice and appropriate referral. This article guides pediatricians through some of the challenges related to gender identity so they can assist their patients in navigating through any difficulties. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(5):e158-e161.].

  9. Mechanical circulatory support in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Robert J; Miletic, Kyle G; Schraufnagel, Dean P; Vargo, Patrick R; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Stewart, Robert D; Moazami, Nader

    2016-05-01

    End-stage heart failure affects thousands of children yearly and mechanical circulatory support is used at many points in their care. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation supports both the failing heart and lungs, which has led to its use as an adjunct to cardiopulmonary resuscitation as well as in post-operative cardiogenic shock. Continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (VAD) have replaced pulsatile-flow devices in adults and early studies have shown promising results in children. The Berlin paracorporeal pulsatile VAD recently gained U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval and remains the only VAD approved in pediatrics. Failing univentricular hearts and other congenitally corrected lesions are new areas for mechanical support. Finding novel uses, improving durability, and minimizing complications are areas of growth in pediatric mechanical circulatory support.

  10. Quo vadis pediatric nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Conway, James J

    2007-07-01

    What has happened to the nuclear medicine subspecialty since those earlier issues of the Seminars in Nuclear Medicine? The earliest issues in 1972 presented topics in vogue at the time that included brain "scanning," cisternography, whole body counting, and abdominal imaging with (99m)Tc pertechnetate. The second pediatric subspecialty issues in 1993 reflected a 21-year evolution of the subspecialty and included the topics of renal scintigraphy, labeled cells for abdominal imaging, metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging, single photon emission computed tomography, and bone scintigraphy for benign disorders. The current issues will address diverse topics that cover the spectrum of the current practice of pediatric nuclear medicine. They include radiation exposure and absorbed dose reduction, positron emission tomography/computed tomography in children, neuroblastoma and other neuroendocrine tumors, thyroid cancer and therapy, bone density studies and, of course, the most prevalent studies in children, renal and bone. Brain, heart, and lung studies complete the spectrum.

  11. FIO/RIO -- FORTRAN file I/O routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, P. M.; Chipperfield, A. J.

    FIO/RIO is a subroutine package that allows a FORTRAN programmer to access sequential and direct access data files in a machine independent manner. The package consists of stand alone FIO and RIO routines, which can be used independently of the Starlink software environment, plus routines to interface to the Starlink parameter system.

  12. Recapturing Desired Family Routines: A Parent-Professional Behavioral Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buschbacher, Pamelazita; Fox, Lise; Clarke, Shelley

    2004-01-01

    Children with complex disabilities such as autism spectrum disorders and Landau Kleffner syndrome often lack means to participate in everyday family routines. Serious problem behaviors may result from their challenges in responding to and initiating communicative interactions. These behaviors can change routine family activities such that the…

  13. What Impact Does Developmental Coordination Disorder Have on Daily Routines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Janet; Larkin, Dawne; Dewey, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand how age and motor difficulties impact on daily routines, this qualitative investigation used focus groups and in-depth interviews with Australian and Canadian parents to examine the daily routines of younger (5 to 7 years of age) and older children (8 to 9 years of age) with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder…

  14. Computer routine adds plotting capabilities to existing programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. C.; Linnekin, J. S.

    1966-01-01

    PLOTAN, a generalized plot analysis routine written for the IBM 7094 computer, minimizes the difficulties in adding plot capabilities to large existing programs. PLOTAN is used in conjunction with a binary tape writing routine and has the ability to plot any variable on the intermediate binary tape as a function of any other.

  15. Changing Urban Bureaucracies: How New Practices Become Routinized.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.; And Others

    The goal of this report is to describe the process by which new service practices in urban bureaucracies become routinized. The routinization process is studied by examining the life histories of six types of innovations: computer-assisted instruction; police computer systems; mobile intensive care units; closed circuit television systems; breath…

  16. Factors for Radical Creativity, Incremental Creativity, and Routine, Noncreative Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madjar, Nora; Greenberg, Ellen; Chen, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    This study extends theory and research by differentiating between routine, noncreative performance and 2 distinct types of creativity: radical and incremental. We also use a sensemaking perspective to examine the interplay of social and personal factors that may influence a person's engagement in a certain level of creative action versus routine,…

  17. Thinking Routines: Replicating Classroom Practices within Museum Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolberg, Rochelle Ibanez; Goff, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This article describes thinking routines as tools to guide and support young children's thinking. These learning strategies, developed by Harvard University's Project Zero Classroom, actively engage students in constructing meaning while also understanding their own thinking process. The authors discuss how thinking routines can be used in both…

  18. Routine Activities and Victimization at School: The Significance of Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popp, Ann Marie; Peguero, Anthony A.

    2011-01-01

    Routine activities theory has not fully considered the role of gender in shaping victimization and yet, the research literature clearly demonstrates that gender is associated with an individual's risk of victimization. In addition to the pervasive effect of gender on victimization, gender shapes an individual's daily routines and thus may create a…

  19. Parental Involvement Routines and Former Head Start Children's Literacy Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dove, Meghan Kicklighter; Neuharth-Pritchett, Stacey; Wright, David W.; Wallinga, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between parental involvement routines and former Head Start children's literacy outcomes. Former Head Start children (n = 3, 808) from the National Head Start/Public School Transition Demonstration Research Project comprised the sample. Family routines and literacy outcomes in kindergarten were examined,…

  20. An Element of Practical Knowledge in Education: Professional Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacourse, France

    2011-01-01

    The question of practical knowledge and its teaching has arisen more perceptibly since the appearance of the aim to professionalize teachers. How can imperceptible knowledge such as professional routines be taught? To establish a social fabric and effective class management, it is essential to call on creative and adaptive professional routines.…