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Sample records for row ct comparison

  1. Comparison of cerebral blood flow data obtained by computed tomography (CT) perfusion with that obtained by xenon CT using 320-row CT.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Tanizaki, Yoshio; Kimura, Hiroaki; Akaji, Kazunori; Kano, Tadashige; Suzuki, Kentaro; Takayama, Youhei; Kanzawa, Takao; Shidoh, Satoka; Nakazawa, Masaki; Yoshida, Kazunari; Mihara, Ban

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) data obtained by computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging have been shown to be qualitative data rather than quantitative, in contrast with data obtained by other imaging methods, such as xenon CT (XeCT) imaging. Thus, interpatient comparisons of CBF values themselves obtained by CTP may be inaccurate. In this study, we have compared CBF ratios as well as CBF values obtained from CTP-CBF data to those obtained from XeCT-CBF data for the same patients to determine CTP-CBF parameters that can be used for interpatient comparisons. The data used in the present study were obtained as volume data using 320-row CT. The volume data were applied to an automated region of interest-determining software (3DSRT, version 3.5.2 ) and converted to 59 slices of 2 mm interval standardized images. In the present study, we reviewed 10 patients with occlusive cerebrovascular diseases (CVDs) undergoing both CTP and XeCT in the same period. Our study shows that ratios of CBF measurements, such as hemodynamic stress distribution (perforator-to-cortical flow ratio of middle cerebral artery [MCA] region) or the left/right ratio for the region of the MCA, calculated using CTP data have been shown to correlate well with the same ratios calculated using XeCT data. These results suggest that such CBF ratios could be useful for generating interpatient comparisons of CTP-CBF data obtained by 320-row CT among patients with occlusive CVD.

  2. Comparison of air kerma between C-arm CT and 64-multidetector-row CT using a phantom.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Seiki; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Murotani, Kazuhiro; Nishioku, Tadayoshi; Shirai, Shintaro; Sonomura, Tetsuo

    2014-05-01

    To compare air kerma after scanning a phantom with C-arm CT and with 64-multidetector row CT (64MDCT). A phantom was scanned using parameters based on data of ten patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who had C-arm CT during hepatic arteriography and 64MDCT during arterial portography. Radiation monitors were used to measure air kerma ten times at each of five points: the center (A), top (B), left side (C), bottom (D), and right side (E). For C-arm CT vs. 64MDCT, air kerma after scanning was 10.5 ± 0.2 vs. 6.4 ± 0.0 for A, 1.5 ± 0.0 vs. 11.6 ± 0.2 for B, 37.1 ± 0.2 vs. 11.1 ± 0.1 for C, 55.6 ± 1.0 vs. 10.6 ± 0.1 for D, and 40.5 ± 0.5 vs. 11.7 ± 0.1 for E, respectively. Air kerma for A, B, C, D, and E was 1.64, 0.13, 3.34, 5.24, and 3.46 times greater for C-arm CT than for 64MDCT, respectively. Using the same scanning parameters as for clinical cases, air kerma values were greater with C-arm CT than with 64MDCT; at the dorsal side of the phantom, they were 5.24 times greater with C-arm CT compared with 64MDCT.

  3. Evaluation of Deep Vein Thrombosis with Multidetector Row CT after Orthopedic Arthroplasty: a Prospective Study for Comparison with Doppler Sonography

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Sung Su; Kim, Youn Jeong; Chun, Yong Sun; Park, Chul Hi; Kim, Won-Hong

    2008-01-01

    Objective This prospective study evaluated the ability of indirect 16-row multidetector CT venography, in comparison with Doppler sonography, to detect deep vein thrombosis after total hip or knee replacement. Materials and Methods Sixty-two patients had undergone orthopedic replacement surgery on a total of 30 hip joints and 54 knee joints. The CT venography (scan delay time: 180 seconds; slice thickness/increment: 2/1.5 mm) and Doppler sonography were performed 8 to 40 days after surgery. We measured the z-axis length of the beam hardening artifact that degraded the image quality so that the presence of deep vein thrombosis couldn't be evaluated on the axial CT images. The incidence and location of deep vein thrombosis was analyzed. The diagnostic performance of the CT venograms was evaluated and compared with that of Doppler sonography as a standard of reference. Results The z-axis length (mean±standard deviation) of the beam hardening artifact was 4.5 ± 0.8 cm in the arthroplastic knees and 3.9 ± 2.9 cm in the arthroplastic hips. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was found in the popliteal or calf veins on Doppler sonography in 30 (48%) of the 62 patients. The CT venography has a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of 90%, 97%, 96%, 91% and 94%, respectively. Conclusion The ability of CT venography to detect DVT was comparable to that of Doppler sonography despite of beam hardening artifact. Therefore, CT venography is feasible to use as an alternative modality for evaluating postarthroplasty patients. PMID:18253077

  4. Superior CT coronary angiography image quality at lower radiation exposure with second generation 320-detector row CT in patients with elevated heart rate: a comparison with first generation 320-detector row CT

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Siang Y.; Ko, Brian S. H.; Cameron, James D.; Crossett, Marcus; Nasis, Arthur; Troupis, John; Meredith, Ian T.; Seneviratne, Sujith K.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aims to compare the image quality of second generation versus first generation 320-computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients with heart rate ≥65 bpm as it has not been specifically reported. Methods Consecutive patients who underwent CTCA using second-generation-320-detector-row-CT were prospectively enrolled. A total of 50 patients with elevated (≥65 bpm) heart rate and 50 patients with controlled (<65 bpm) heart rate were included. Age and gender matched patients who were scanned with the first-generation-320-detector-row-CT were retrospectively identified. Image quality in each coronary artery segment was assessed by two blinded CT angiographers using the five-point Likert scale. Results In the elevated heart rate cohorts, while there was no significant difference in heart rate during scan-acquisition (66 vs. 69 bpm, P=0.308), or body mass index (28.5 vs. 29.6, P=0.464), the second generation scanner was associated with better image quality (3.94±0.6 vs. 3.45±0.8, P=0.001), and with lower radiation (2.8 vs. 4.3 mSv, P=0.009). There was no difference in scan image quality for the controlled heart rate cohorts. Conclusions The second generation CT scanner provides better image quality at lower radiation dose in patients with elevated heart rate (≥65 bpm) compared to first generation CT scanner. PMID:25276615

  5. Acute appendicitis: comparison of low-dose and standard-dose unenhanced multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Keyzer, Caroline; Tack, Denis; de Maertelaer, Viviane; Bohy, Pascale; Gevenois, Pierre Alain; Van Gansbeke, Daniel

    2004-07-01

    To prospectively compare low- and standard-dose unenhanced multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) in patients suspected of having acute appendicitis. Ninety-five consecutive patients underwent two unenhanced multi-detector row CT examinations with 4 x 2.5-mm collimation, 120 kVp, and 30 and 100 effective mAs. Two radiologists independently read the images obtained at each dose during two sessions. Readers recorded visualization of the appendix and presence of gas in its lumen, appendicolith, periappendiceal fat stranding, cecal wall thickening, and abscess or phlegmon to measure the diameter of the appendix and to propose diagnosis (appendicitis or alternative). Data were compared according to dose and reader, with definite diagnosis established on basis of surgical findings (n = 37) or clinical follow-up. chi(2) tests and logistic regression were used. Measurement agreements were assessed with Cohen kappa statistics. Twenty-nine patients had a definite diagnosis of appendicitis. No difference was observed between the frequency of visualization of the appendix (P =.874) neither in its mean diameter (P =.101-.696, according to readers and sessions) nor in the readers' overall diagnosis (P =.788) at each dose. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of each sign were not different between doses. Fat stranding, appendicolith, and diameter were the most predictive signs, regardless of dose, yielding approximately 90% of correct diagnoses. The ability to propose a correct alternative diagnosis was not influenced by the dose. Low-dose unenhanced multi-detector row CT has similar diagnostic performance as standard-dose unenhanced multi-detector row CT for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Copyright RSNA, 2004

  6. [Comparison of a dental cone beam CT with a multi-detector row CT on effective doses and physical image quality].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Tokumori, Kenji; Okamura, Kazutoshi; Yoshiura, Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a dental cone beam computed tomography (dental CBCT) and a multi-detector row CT (MDCT) using effective doses and physical image quality. A dental mode (D-mode) and an implant mode (I-mode) were employed for calculating effective doses. Field of view (FOV) size of the MDCT was 150 mm. Three types of images were obtained using 3 different reconstruction functions: FC1 (for abdomen images), FC30 (for internal ear and bone images) and FC81 (for high resolution images). Effective doses obtained with the D-mode and with the I-mode were about 20% and 50% of those obtained with the MDCT, respectively. Resolution properties obtained with the D-mode and I-mode were superior to that of the MDCT in a high frequency range. Noise properties of the D-mode and the I-mode were better than those with FC81. It was found that the dental CBCT has better potential as compared with MDCT in both dental and implant modes.

  7. CT venography after knee replacement surgery: comparison of dual-energy CT-based monochromatic imaging and single-energy metal artifact reduction techniques on a 320-row CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Funama, Yoshinori; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirata, Kenichiro; Hatemura, Masahiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2017-02-01

    An optimal metal artifact reduction (MAR) technique is needed for a reliable and accurate image-based diagnosis. Using a 320-row scanner, we compared the dual-energy computed tomography (CT)-based monochromatic and the single-energy metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) techniques for CT venography (CTV) to identify the better imaging method for diagnosing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients who had undergone knee replacement surgery. Twenty-three consecutive patients with suspected DVT after unilateral knee replacement surgery underwent dual-energy CT (135/80 kVp). Monochromatic images of 35-135 keV were generated; the monochromatic image with the best signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the popliteal vein near the metal prosthesis were selected. The projection data of 80 kVp were reconstructed using MAR algorithm. The mean SNR ON MAR and the best SNR ON monochromatic images were compared. Two radiologists evaluated visualization of the metal artifacts on a four-point scale where 1 = extensive artifacts, 2 = strong artifacts, 3 = mild artifacts, and 4 = minimal artifacts. The mean SNR was significantly higher on the MAR than the monochromatic images (12.8 ± 4.7 versus 7.7 ± 5.1, P < 0.01) and the visual scores were significantly higher for MAR than monochromatic images (2.6 ± 0.8 versus 1.3 ± 0.4, P < 0.01). For CTV after knee replacement surgery, the MAR technique is superior to the monochromatic imaging technique.

  8. CT venography after knee replacement surgery: comparison of dual-energy CT-based monochromatic imaging and single-energy metal artifact reduction techniques on a 320-row CT scanner

    PubMed Central

    Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Funama, Yoshinori; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirata, Kenichiro; Hatemura, Masahiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Background An optimal metal artifact reduction (MAR) technique is needed for a reliable and accurate image-based diagnosis. Purpose Using a 320-row scanner, we compared the dual-energy computed tomography (CT)-based monochromatic and the single-energy metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) techniques for CT venography (CTV) to identify the better imaging method for diagnosing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients who had undergone knee replacement surgery. Material and Methods Twenty-three consecutive patients with suspected DVT after unilateral knee replacement surgery underwent dual-energy CT (135/80 kVp). Monochromatic images of 35–135 keV were generated; the monochromatic image with the best signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the popliteal vein near the metal prosthesis were selected. The projection data of 80 kVp were reconstructed using MAR algorithm. The mean SNR ON MAR and the best SNR ON monochromatic images were compared. Two radiologists evaluated visualization of the metal artifacts on a four-point scale where 1 = extensive artifacts, 2 = strong artifacts, 3 = mild artifacts, and 4 = minimal artifacts. Results The mean SNR was significantly higher on the MAR than the monochromatic images (12.8 ± 4.7 versus 7.7 ± 5.1, P < 0.01) and the visual scores were significantly higher for MAR than monochromatic images (2.6 ± 0.8 versus 1.3 ± 0.4, P < 0.01). Conclusion For CTV after knee replacement surgery, the MAR technique is superior to the monochromatic imaging technique. PMID:28321330

  9. Optimization of Z-axis automatic exposure control for multidetector row CT evaluation of neck and comparison with fixed tube current technique for image quality and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, S; Kalra, M K; Pottala, K M; Waldrop, S M; Hudgins, P A

    2006-01-01

    Z-axis automatic exposure control (AEC) technique automatically adjusts tube current based on size of body region scanned. The purpose of the current study was to compare diagnostic acceptability, noise, and radiation exposure of multidetector row CT (MDCT) of neck performed with z-axis AEC and with fixed current. Two study groups of 26 patients each underwent MDCT of neck using z-axis AEC with 8 noise index (NI), 150-440 mA, and 10 NI, 75-440 mA, respectively. A control group consisting of another 26 patients underwent MDCT of neck with fixed-current technique (300 mA). Objective noise and mean tube current-time products (mA . s) were recorded. Two radiologists evaluated images for diagnostic acceptability and subjective noise on a 5-point scale. All CT examinations of study and control groups were diagnostically acceptable, though objective noise was significantly more with z-axis AEC (shoulder: NI 8, 20.6 +/- 6.2 HU; NI 10, 22.2 +/- 4.6 HU) than with fixed current (16.2 +/- 6 HU) (P = .01). There was no significant difference between AEC and fixed current in diagnostic acceptability and subjective noise (P = .22-.42). AEC resulted in significant radiation dose reduction (NI 8, 186.3 +/- 20.5 mA . s; NI 10, 158.1 +/- 21.2 mA x s), compared with fixed current (235 +/- 21.8 mA x s). Z-axis AEC resulted in similar subjective noise and diagnostic acceptability, with radiation dose reduction of 21% for NI of 8 and 33% for NI of 10, respectively, for MDCT evaluation of neck, compared with those of fixed current technique.

  10. 64-Slice multidetector row CT angiography of the abdomen: comparison of low versus high concentration iodinated contrast media in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Holalkere, N-S; Matthes, K; Kalva, S P; Brugge, W R; Sahani, D V

    2011-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to assess the image quality and degree of vascular enhancement using low-concentration contrast media (LCCM) (300 mg I ml–1) and high-concentration contrast media (HCCM) (370 mg I ml–1) on 64-slice multidetector row CT (MDCT) abdominal CT angiography (CTA). In addition, we aimed to study the feasibility of using HCCM with a reduced total iodine dose. Methods CTA of the abdomen on a 64-slice MDCT was performed on 15 anaesthetised pigs. Study pigs were divided into three groups of five each based on the iodine concentration and dose received: Group A (LCCM; 300 mg I ml–1), Group B (HCCM; 370 mg I ml–1) and Group C HCCM with 20% less iodine dose. The total iodine injected was kept constant (600 mg kg–1) in Groups A and B. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed to study and compare each group for image quality, visibility of the branch order of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), artefacts, degree of enhancement in the aorta and main stem arteries and uniformity of enhancement in the aorta. Groups were compared using the analysis of variance test. Results The image quality of 64-slice MDCT angiography was excellent with a mean score of 4.63 and confident visualisation of the third to fifth order branches of the SMA in all groups. Group B demonstrated superior vascular enhancement, as compared with Groups A and C (p≤0.05). Uniform aortic enhancement was achieved with the use of LCCM and HCCM with 20% less iodine dose. Conclusion 64-slice MDCT angiography of the abdomen was of excellent quality. HCCM improves contrast enhancement and overall CTA image quality and allows the iodine dose to be reduced. PMID:21081582

  11. 64-Slice multidetector row CT angiography of the abdomen: comparison of low versus high concentration iodinated contrast media in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Holalkere, N-S; Matthes, K; Kalva, S P; Brugge, W R; Sahani, D V

    2011-03-01

    In this study we aimed to assess the image quality and degree of vascular enhancement using low-concentration contrast media (LCCM) (300 mg I ml(-1)) and high-concentration contrast media (HCCM) (370 mg I ml(-1)) on 64-slice multidetector row CT (MDCT) abdominal CT angiography (CTA). In addition, we aimed to study the feasibility of using HCCM with a reduced total iodine dose. CTA of the abdomen on a 64-slice MDCT was performed on 15 anaesthetised pigs. Study pigs were divided into three groups of five each based on the iodine concentration and dose received: Group A (LCCM; 300 mg I ml(-1)), Group B (HCCM; 370 mg I ml(-1)) and Group C HCCM with 20% less iodine dose. The total iodine injected was kept constant (600 mg kg(-1)) in Groups A and B. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed to study and compare each group for image quality, visibility of the branch order of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), artefacts, degree of enhancement in the aorta and main stem arteries and uniformity of enhancement in the aorta. Groups were compared using the analysis of variance test. The image quality of 64-slice MDCT angiography was excellent with a mean score of 4.63 and confident visualisation of the third to fifth order branches of the SMA in all groups. Group B demonstrated superior vascular enhancement, as compared with Groups A and C (p≤0.05). Uniform aortic enhancement was achieved with the use of LCCM and HCCM with 20% less iodine dose. 64-slice MDCT angiography of the abdomen was of excellent quality. HCCM improves contrast enhancement and overall CTA image quality and allows the iodine dose to be reduced.

  12. Role of multidetector-row CT in assessing the source of arterial haemorrhage in patients with pelvic vascular trauma. Comparison with angiography.

    PubMed

    Pinto, A; Niola, R; Tortora, G; Ponticiello, G; Russo, G; Di Nuzzo, L; Gagliardi, N; Scaglione, M; Merola, S; Stavolo, C; Maglione, F; Romano, L

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the role of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in identifying active bleeding and its source in polytrauma patients with pelvic vascular injuries with or without associated fractures of the pelvis. From January 2003 to December 2007, 28 patients (19 men and nine women, age range 16-80 years) with acute symptoms from blunt pelvic trauma and a drop in haematocrit underwent MDCT and angiography. Conventional radiography of the pelvis was performed in all patients at the time of admission to the emergency department. MDCT was performed with a four-row unit in 15 patients and a 16-row unit in the remaining 13 patients. The study included whole-body CT to identify craniocerebral, vertebral, thoracic, abdominal and pelvic injuries. CT was performed before and after rapid infusion (4-5 ml/s) of intravenous contrast material (120 ml) using a power injector. A triphasic contrast-enhanced study was performed in all patients. MDCT images were transferred to a workstation to assess pelvic fracture, site of haematoma and active extravasation of contrast material, visibility of possible vascular injuries and associated traumatic lesions. At angiography, an abdominal and pelvic aortogram was obtained in all cases before selective catheterisation of the internal iliac arteries and superselective catheterisation of their branches for embolisation purposes. Results related to identifying the source of bleeding at MDCT were compared with sites of bleeding or vascular injury identified by selective pelvic angiography. The sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of MDCT were determined. MDCT allowed us to identify pelvic bleeding in 21/28 patients (75%), with most cases being detected in the delayed contrast-enhanced phase (13/21 cases, 61.9%). Injured arteries were identified on MDCT in 12/21 cases (57%): the obturator artery (n=9), internal iliac artery (n=6), internal pudendal artery (n=6) and superior gluteal artery (n=5) were most frequently

  13. Clinical indications and utilization of 320-detector row CT in 2500 outpatients.

    PubMed

    Tabibian, Benjamin; Roach, Cayce J; Hanson, Eric H; Wynn, Brad L; Orrison, William W

    2011-06-01

    Clinical indications and utilization patterns for 3963 CT scans on 2500 consecutive patents on a 320-detector row CT in an outpatient setting were retrospectively analyzed and compared with previously reported CT studies. The impact of the latest generation CT technology, including whole organ perfusion, on indications and utilization patterns during the study period was also assessed. The top five requested CT scan types were abdomen/pelvis, chest, head, sinuses, and coronary CT angiography. Indication and utilization rates were similar to prior studies for abdomen/pelvis, non-cardiac chest, and head CT scans. Abdominal pain and headaches were the most frequent indications for abdomen/pelvis and head CTs, respectively. The 7.3% cardiac CT scan utilization rate was not comparable to rates of up to 72% in self-referral outpatient settings. Whole organ volume CT imaging was utilized in 100% of coronary CT angiography and 22.7% of head CTs. The 320-row CT had fewer negative head and body CT findings as compared to prior reports. The availability of new technology, such as whole organ dynamic scans, appears to have influenced CT indications, utilization and finding rates with a decrease in negative brain and body results. Comparisons with previous outpatient CT studies were similar for multiple categories with the exception of cardiac CT utilization, which is heavily influenced by self-referral. Further study of outpatient imaging indications and utilization rates from multiple centers may benefit from a standardized categorization to improve understanding of the disparate outpatient imaging environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. CT Coronary Angiography: 256-Slice and 320-Detector Row Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Edward M.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Steigner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has rapidly evolved from 4-detector row systems in 1998 to 256-slice and 320-detector row CT systems. With smaller detector element size and faster gantry rotation speed, spatial and temporal resolution of the 64-detector MDCT scanners have made coronary artery imaging a reliable clinical test. Wide-area coverage MDCT, such as the 256-slice and 320-detector row MDCT scanners, has enabled volumetric imaging of the entire heart free of stair-step artifacts at a single time point within one cardiac cycle. It is hoped that these improvements will be realized with greater diagnostic accuracy of CT coronary angiography. Such scanners hold promise in performing a rapid high quality “triple rule-out” test without high contrast load, improved myocardial perfusion imaging, and even four-dimensional CT subtraction angiography. These emerging technical advances and novel applications will continue to change the way we study coronary artery disease beyond detecting luminal stenosis. PMID:20425186

  15. Multi-detector row CT of pancreatic islet cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Horton, Karen M; Hruban, Ralph H; Yeo, Charles; Fishman, Elliot K

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic islet cell tumors (ICTs) are neuroendocrine neoplasms that produce and secrete hormones to a variable degree. These neoplasms can present a diagnostic challenge, both clinically and radiologically. ICTs can be classified as either syndromic or nonsyndromic on the basis of their clinical manifestations. Multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of both syndromic and nonsyndromic ICTs. In general, syndromic ICTs are less than 3 cm in size. They are typically hyperenhancing and are usually best seen on CT scans obtained during the arterial phase. Nonsyndromic ICTs tend to be larger than syndromic ICTs at presentation and are more likely to be cystic or necrotic. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with appropriate CT protocol for the evaluation of patients with suspected pancreatic ICT and to understand the variable CT appearances of these neoplasms. (c) RSNA, 2006.

  16. Multidetector-row CT with a 64-row amorphous silicon flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Edward G.; Colbeth, Richard E.; Daley, Earl T.; Job, Isaias D.; Mollov, Ivan P.; Mollov, Todor I.; Pavkovich, John M.; Roos, Pieter G.; Star-Lack, Josh M.; Tognina, Carlo A.

    2007-03-01

    A unique 64-row flat panel (FP) detector has been developed for sub-second multidetector-row CT (MDCT). The intent was to explore the image quality achievable with relatively inexpensive amorphous silicon (a-Si) compared to existing diagnostic scanners with discrete crystalline diode detectors. The FP MDCT system is a bench-top design that consists of three FP modules. Each module uses a 30 cm x 3.3 cm a-Si array with 576 x 64 photodiodes. The photodiodes are 0.52 mm x 0.52 mm, which allows for about twice the spatial resolution of most commercial MDCT scanners. The modules are arranged in an overlapping geometry, which is sufficient to provide a full-fan 48 cm diameter scan. Scans were obtained with various detachable scintillators, e.g. ceramic Gd IIO IIS, particle-in-binder Gd IIO IIS:Tb and columnar CsI:Tl. Scan quality was evaluated with a Catphan-500 performance phantom and anthropomorphic phantoms. The FP MDCT scans demonstrate nearly equivalent performance scans to a commercial 16-slice MDCT scanner at comparable 10 - 20 mGy/100mAs doses. Thus far, a high contrast resolution of 15 lp/cm and a low contrast resolution of 5 mm @ 0.3 % have been achieved on 1 second scans. Sub-second scans have been achieved with partial rotations. Since the future direction of MDCT appears to be in acquiring single organ coverage per scan, future efforts are planned for increasing the number of detector rows beyond the current 64- rows.

  17. Diagnostic Imaging of Pulmonary Thromboembolism by Multidetector-row CT

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    For diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism, multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) is a minimally invasive imaging technique that can be performed rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity, and has been increasingly employed as the imaging modality of first choice for this disease. Since deep vein thrombosis in the legs, which is important as a thrombus source, can be evaluated immediately after the diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism, this diagnostic method is considered to provide important information when deciding on a comprehensive therapeutic strategy for this disease. PMID:23555409

  18. Comparison of dynamic contrast-enhanced 3T MR and 64-row multidetector CT angiography for the localization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Oda, S; Utsunomiya, D; Hirai, T; Kai, Y; Ohmori, Y; Shigematsu, Y; Iryo, Y; Uetani, H; Azuma, M; Yamashita, Y

    2014-02-01

    For the localization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas, it is not determined whether dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA is more reliable than multidetector CTA. The aim of this study was to compare the agreement between intra-arterial DSA, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA at 3T, and 64-row multidetector CTA for the localization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas. We enrolled 12 consecutive patients (11 men, 1 woman; age range, 46-83 years; mean, 65 years) who underwent preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA at 3T and 64-row multidetector CTA. The spinal dural arteriovenous fistula location was confirmed by intra-arterial DSA as the reference standard. Two reviewers independently evaluated the level of the artery feeding the spinal dural arteriovenous fistula on the basis of continuity between the feeder and abnormal spinal vessels on 3T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA and 64-row multidetector CTA images. Interobserver and intermodality agreement was determined by calculation of the κ coefficient. On DSA, the vessel feeding the spinal dural arteriovenous fistula was the intercostal artery (7 cases), the lumbar artery (3 cases), and the internal iliac artery or the ascending pharyngeal artery (1 case each). For the fistula level, interobserver agreement was excellent for 3T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA (κ = 0.97; 95% CI, 0.92-1.00) and very good for 64-row multidetector CTA (κ = 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72-0.96). Intermodality agreement with DSA was good for 3T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA (κ = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.49-1.00) and moderate for 64-row multidetector CTA (κ = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.020-0.84). For the localization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas, 3T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA may be more reliable than 64-row multidetector CTA.

  19. Recent technologic advances in multi-detector row cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, Sandra Simon

    2009-11-01

    Recent technical advances in multi-detector row CT have resulted in lower radiation dose, improved temporal and spatial resolution, decreased scan time, and improved tissue differentiation. Lower radiation doses have resulted from the use of pre-patient z collimators, the availability of thin-slice axial data acquisition, the increased efficiency of ECG-based tube current modulation, and the implementation of iterative reconstruction algorithms. Faster gantry rotation and the simultaneous use of two x-ray sources have led to improvements in temporal resolution, and gains in spatial resolution have been achieved through application of the flying x-ray focal-spot technique in the z-direction. Shorter scan times have resulted from the design of detector arrays with increasing numbers of detector rows and through the simultaneous use of two x-ray sources to allow higher helical pitch. Some improvement in tissue differentiation has been achieved with dual energy CT. This article discusses these recent technical advances in detail.

  20. Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma by Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI: comparison with triple phase 64 detector row helical CT.

    PubMed

    Akai, Hiroyuki; Kiryu, Shigeru; Matsuda, Izuru; Satou, Jirou; Takao, Hidemasa; Tajima, Taku; Watanabe, Yasushi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Akahane, Masaaki; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2011-11-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI with that of triple phase 64-MDCT in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Thirty-four patients with 52 surgically proven lesions underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and triple phase 64-MDCT. Two observers independently evaluated MR and CT imaging on a lesion-by-lesion basis. Sensitivity, positive and negative predictive values and reproducibility were evaluated. The diagnostic accuracy of each modality was assessed with alternative-free response receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Both observers showed higher sensitivity in detecting lesions with MRI compared to CT, however, only the difference between the two imaging techniques for observer 2 was significant (P=0.034). For lesions 1cm or smaller, MRI and CT showed equal sensitivity (both 62.5%) with one observer, and MRI proved superior to CT with the other observer (MRI 75% vs. CT 56.3%), but the latter difference was not significant (P=0.083). The difference in positive and negative predictive value between the two imaging techniques for each observer was not significant (P>0.05). The areas under the ROC curve for each observer were 0.843 and 0.861 for MRI vs. 0.800 and 0.833 for CT and the differences were not significant. Reproducibility was higher using MRI for both observers, but the result was not significant (MRI 32/33 vs. CT 29/33, P=0.083). Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI tended to show higher diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and reproducibility compared to triple phase 64-MDCT in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma, however statistical significance was not achieved. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Classification of lung area using multidetector-row CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukaibo, Tsutomu; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2002-05-01

    Recently, we can get high quality images in the short time for the progress of X-ray CT scanner. And the three dimensional (3-D) analysis of pulmonary organs using multidetector-row CT (MDCT) images, is expected. This paper presents a method for classifying lung area into each lobe using pulmonary MDCT images of the whole lung area. It is possible to recognize the position of nodule by classifying lung area into these lobes. The structure of lungs differs on the right one and left one. The right lung is divided into three domains by major fissure and minor fissure. And, the left lung is divided into two domains by major fissure. Watching MDCT images carefully, we find that the surroundings of fissures have few blood vessels. Therefore, lung area is classified by extraction of the domain that the distance from pulmonary blood vessels is large and connective search of these extracted domains. These extraction and search are realized by 3-D weighted Hough transform.

  2. Minimizing the acquisition phase in coronary CT angiography using the second generation 320-row CT.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Nobuo; Kanno, Shigeaki; Maeda, Eriko; Akahane, Masaaki; Torigoe, Rumiko; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2014-07-01

    We aimed to compare the radiation dose and image quality of a minimal phase window centered at 77 % compared with a wide phase window in coronary CT angiography using the second-generation 320-row CT. Eighty patients with heart rate ≤75 bpm were retrospectively included. The first 40 patients underwent scanning with a wide phase window (65-85 %), while the last 40 patients underwent scanning with a minimal phase window centered at 77 %. Subjective image quality was graded using a 4-point scale (4 = excellent). Image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio at the proximal segments were also analyzed. The mean effective dose was derived from the dose length product multiplied by a chest conversion coefficient (κ = 0.014 mSv mGy(-1) cm(-1)). Minimal phase window scanning centered at 77 % reduced the radiation dose by 30 % compared with wide phase window scanning (1.7 vs 2.4 mSv, p = 0.0009). The subjective image quality showed no significant difference (3.75 vs 3.76, p = 0.77). No significant difference was observed in the image noise, CT number, and contrast-to-noise ratio. Radiation dose could be reduced while maintaining image quality by use of a minimal phase window centered at 77 % compared with a wide phase window in coronary CT angiography using the second generation 320-row CT.

  3. Coronary CT angiography using 64 detector rows: methods and design of the multi-centre trial CORE-64

    PubMed Central

    Vavere, Andrea L.; Rochitte, Carlos E.; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; de Roos, Albert; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Lemos, Pedro A.; Bush, David E.; Lardo, Albert C.; Texter, John; Brinker, Jeffery; Cox, Christopher; Clouse, Melvin E.; Lima, João A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) for the noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenoses is a promising candidate for widespread clinical application because of its noninvasive nature and high sensitivity and negative predictive value as found in several previous studies using 16 to 64 simultaneous detector rows. A multi-centre study of CT coronary angiography using 16 simultaneous detector rows has shown that 16-slice CT is limited by a high number of nondiagnostic cases and a high false-positive rate. A recent meta-analysis indicated a significant interaction between the size of the study sample and the diagnostic odds ratios suggestive of small study bias, highlighting the importance of evaluating MSCT using 64 simultaneous detector rows in a multi-centre approach with a larger sample size. In this manuscript we detail the objectives and methods of the prospective “CORE-64” trial (“Coronary Evaluation Using Multidetector Spiral Computed Tomography Angiography using 64 Detectors”). This multi-centre trialwas unique in that it assessed the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in nine centres worldwide in comparison to conventional coronary angiography. In conclusion, the multi-centre, multi-institutional and multi-continental trial CORE-64 has great potential to ultimately assess the per-patient diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography using 64 simultaneous detector rows. PMID:18998142

  4. Coronary CT angiography using 64 detector rows: methods and design of the multi-centre trial CORE-64.

    PubMed

    Miller, Julie M; Dewey, Marc; Vavere, Andrea L; Rochitte, Carlos E; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; de Roos, Albert; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Lemos, Pedro A; Bush, David E; Lardo, Albert C; Texter, John; Brinker, Jeffery; Cox, Christopher; Clouse, Melvin E; Lima, João A C

    2009-04-01

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) for the noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenoses is a promising candidate for widespread clinical application because of its non-invasive nature and high sensitivity and negative predictive value as found in several previous studies using 16 to 64 simultaneous detector rows. A multi-centre study of CT coronary angiography using 16 simultaneous detector rows has shown that 16-slice CT is limited by a high number of nondiagnostic cases and a high false-positive rate. A recent meta-analysis indicated a significant interaction between the size of the study sample and the diagnostic odds ratios suggestive of small study bias, highlighting the importance of evaluating MSCT using 64 simultaneous detector rows in a multi-centre approach with a larger sample size. In this manuscript we detail the objectives and methods of the prospective "CORE-64" trial ("Coronary Evaluation Using Multidetector Spiral Computed Tomography Angiography using 64 Detectors"). This multi-centre trial was unique in that it assessed the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in nine centres worldwide in comparison to conventional coronary angiography. In conclusion, the multi-centre, multi-institutional and multi-continental trial CORE-64 has great potential to ultimately assess the per-patient diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography using 64 simultaneous detector rows.

  5. Relationship between noise, dose, and pitch in cardiac multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Primak, Andrew N; McCollough, Cynthia H; Bruesewitz, Michael R; Zhang, Jie; Fletcher, Joel G

    2006-01-01

    In spiral computed tomography (CT), dose is always inversely proportional to pitch. However, the relationship between noise and pitch (and hence noise and dose) depends on the scanner type (single vs multi-detector row) and reconstruction mode (cardiac vs noncardiac). In single detector row spiral CT, noise is independent of pitch. Conversely, in noncardiac multi-detector row CT, noise depends on pitch because the spiral interpolation algorithm makes use of redundant data from different detector rows to decrease noise for pitch values less than 1 (and increase noise for pitch values > 1). However, in cardiac spiral CT, redundant data cannot be used because such data averaging would degrade the temporal resolution. Therefore, the behavior of noise versus pitch returns to the single detector row paradigm, with noise being independent of pitch. Consequently, since faster rotation times require lower pitch values in cardiac multi-detector row CT, dose is increased without a commensurate decrease in noise. Thus, the use of faster rotation times will improve temporal resolution, not alter noise, and increase dose. For a particular application, the higher dose resulting from faster rotation speeds should be justified by the clinical benefits of the improved temporal resolution.

  6. Intercostal Artery Supplying Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Demonstration of a Tumor Feeder by C-arm CT and Multidetector Row CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo-Cheol Chung, Jin Wook; Lee, In Joon; An, Sangbu; Seong, Nak Jong; Son, Kyu Ri; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2011-02-15

    This study was designed to describe tumor feeders from the intercostal artery supplying hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on C-arm CT and multidetector row CT. From March 2008 to May 2009, C-arm CT of the intercostal artery was prospectively performed in 24 HCC patients. Two interventional radiologists, who performed C-arm CT, evaluated tumor feeders on C-arm CT and multidetector row CT scans by consensus. In total, 35 intercostal arteries were examined by C-arm CT. All tumor feeders except one showed a sharp upward turn at or near the costochondral junction. On axial C-arm CT images, all tumor feeders were observed as an enhancing dot in the upper intercostal space along the diaphragm. On multidetector CT scans, 17 tumor feeders were observed and 18 were not. Tumor feeders from the intercostal artery are observed as an enhancing dot along the diaphragm on C-arm CT and can be seen on multidetector row CT in approximately half of patients.

  7. Optimization of multiplanar reformations from isotropic data sets acquired with 16-detector row helical CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Tracy A; Nelson, Rendon C; Johnson, G Allan; Lee, Ellie R; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Lowry, Carolyn R; Bullard, Anthony B; DeLong, David M; Paulson, Erik K

    2006-01-01

    Institutional review board approval and waiver of consent were obtained for the patient component of this retrospective HIPAA-compliant study. By using an anthropomorphic phantom and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors, radiation dose was determined for one eight-detector row and two 16-detector row computed tomographic (CT) protocols. A custom phantom was scanned by using the three protocols to identify isotropy. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were determined for the same protocols by using a third phantom. Seven patients had undergone isotropic 16-detector row CT of the abdomen and pelvis. Anonymized coronal reformations at various thicknesses were ranked qualitatively by three radiologists. Effective dose equivalents were similar for the eight- and 16-detector row protocols. When transverse and coronal reformations of data acquired in the custom phantom were compared, coronal reformations obtained with the 16-detector row and 0.625-mm section thickness protocol were found to be nearly identical to the transverse image for all sets of line pairs. CNRs were consistently highest on 5-mm-thick coronal reformations (CNR range, 1.2-3.3). For qualitative assessment, 2- and 3-mm-thick coronal reformations were consistently preferred.

  8. SimDoseCT: dose reporting software based on Monte Carlo simulation for a 320 detector-row cone-beam CT scanner and ICRP computational adult phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cros, Maria; Joemai, Raoul M. S.; Geleijns, Jacob; Molina, Diego; Salvadó, Marçal

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to develop and test software for assessing and reporting doses for standard patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations in a 320 detector-row cone-beam scanner. The software, called SimDoseCT, is based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code, which was developed to calculate organ doses and effective doses in ICRP anthropomorphic adult reference computational phantoms for acquisitions with the Aquilion ONE CT scanner (Toshiba). MC simulation was validated by comparing CTDI measurements within standard CT dose phantoms with results from simulation under the same conditions. SimDoseCT consists of a graphical user interface connected to a MySQL database, which contains the look-up-tables that were generated with MC simulations for volumetric acquisitions at different scan positions along the phantom using any tube voltage, bow tie filter, focal spot and nine different beam widths. Two different methods were developed to estimate organ doses and effective doses from acquisitions using other available beam widths in the scanner. A correction factor was used to estimate doses in helical acquisitions. Hence, the user can select any available protocol in the Aquilion ONE scanner for a standard adult male or female and obtain the dose results through the software interface. Agreement within 9% between CTDI measurements and simulations allowed the validation of the MC program. Additionally, the algorithm for dose reporting in SimDoseCT was validated by comparing dose results from this tool with those obtained from MC simulations for three volumetric acquisitions (head, thorax and abdomen). The comparison was repeated using eight different collimations and also for another collimation in a helical abdomen examination. The results showed differences of 0.1 mSv or less for absolute dose in most organs and also in the effective dose calculation. The software provides a suitable tool for dose assessment in standard adult patients undergoing CT

  9. SimDoseCT: dose reporting software based on Monte Carlo simulation for a 320 detector-row cone-beam CT scanner and ICRP computational adult phantoms.

    PubMed

    Cros, Maria; Joemai, Raoul M S; Geleijns, Jacob; Molina, Diego; Salvadó, Marçal

    2017-07-17

    This study aims to develop and test software for assessing and reporting doses for standard patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations in a 320 detector-row cone-beam scanner. The software, called SimDoseCT, is based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code, which was developed to calculate organ doses and effective doses in ICRP anthropomorphic adult reference computational phantoms for acquisitions with the Aquilion ONE CT scanner (Toshiba). MC simulation was validated by comparing CTDI measurements within standard CT dose phantoms with results from simulation under the same conditions. SimDoseCT consists of a graphical user interface connected to a MySQL database, which contains the look-up-tables that were generated with MC simulations for volumetric acquisitions at different scan positions along the phantom using any tube voltage, bow tie filter, focal spot and nine different beam widths. Two different methods were developed to estimate organ doses and effective doses from acquisitions using other available beam widths in the scanner. A correction factor was used to estimate doses in helical acquisitions. Hence, the user can select any available protocol in the Aquilion ONE scanner for a standard adult male or female and obtain the dose results through the software interface. Agreement within 9% between CTDI measurements and simulations allowed the validation of the MC program. Additionally, the algorithm for dose reporting in SimDoseCT was validated by comparing dose results from this tool with those obtained from MC simulations for three volumetric acquisitions (head, thorax and abdomen). The comparison was repeated using eight different collimations and also for another collimation in a helical abdomen examination. The results showed differences of 0.1 mSv or less for absolute dose in most organs and also in the effective dose calculation. The software provides a suitable tool for dose assessment in standard adult patients undergoing CT

  10. [Multidetector row CT in assessment of coronary artery calcification on hemodialisis].

    PubMed

    Caro, P; Delgado, R; Dapena, F; Núñez, A

    2007-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a strong predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Coronary artery calcification is more frequent, more extensive and progresses more rapidly in CKD than in general population. They are also considered a marker of coronary heart disease, with high prevalence and functional significance. It suggests that detection and surveillance may be worthwhile in general clinical practice. New non-invasive image techniques, like Multi-detector row CT, a type of spiral scanner, assess density and volume of calcification at multiple sites and allow quantitative scoring of vascular calcification using calcium scores analogous to those from electron-beam CT. We have assessed and quantified coronary artery calcification with 16 multidetector row CT in 44 patients on hemodialysis and their relationship with several cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary artery calcification prevalence was of 84 % with mean calcium score of 1580 +/- 2010 ( r 0-9844) with calcium score > 400 in 66% of patients. It was usually multiple, affecting more than two vessels in more than 50%. In all but one patient, left anterior descending artery was involved with higher calcium score level at right coronary artery. Advanced age, male, diabetes, smoking, more morbidity, cerebrovascular disease previous, and calcium-binders phosphate and analogous vitamin D treatment would seem to be associated with coronary artery calcification. Coronary artery calcification is very frequent and extensive, usually multiple and associated to modifiable risk factors in hemodialysis patients. Multi-detector-row CT seems an effective, suitable, readily applicable method to assess and quantify coronary artery calcification.

  11. Computed tomography dose assessment for a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Geleijns, J; Salvadó Artells, M; de Bruin, P W; Matter, R; Muramatsu, Y; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2009-05-21

    Computed tomography (CT) dosimetry should be adapted to the rapid developments in CT technology. Recently a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner that challenges the existing Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) dosimetry paradigm was introduced. The purpose of this study was to assess dosimetric characteristics of this cone beam scanner, to study the appropriateness of existing CT dose metrics and to suggest a pragmatic approach for CT dosimetry for cone beam scanners. Dose measurements with a small Farmer-type ionization chamber and with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers were performed free in air to characterize the cone beam. According to the most common dose metric in CT, namely CTDI, measurements were also performed in 150 mm and 350 mm long CT head and CT body dose phantoms with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers, respectively. To explore effects that cannot be measured with ionization chambers, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the dose distribution in 150 mm, 350 mm and 700 mm long CT head and CT body phantoms were performed. To overcome inconsistencies in the definition of CTDI100 for the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner, doses were also expressed as the average absorbed dose within the pencil chamber (D100). Measurements free in air revealed excellent correspondence between CTDI300air and D100air, while CTDI100air substantially underestimates CTDI300air. Results of measurements in CT dose phantoms and corresponding MC simulations at centre and peripheral positions were weighted and revealed good agreement between CTDI300w, D100w and CTDI600w, while CTDI100w substantially underestimates CTDI300w. D100w provides a pragmatic metric for characterizing the dose of the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner. This quantity can be measured with the widely available 100 mm pencil ionization chamber within 150 mm long CT dose phantoms. CTDI300w measured in 350 mm long CT dose phantoms serves as an appropriate standard of

  12. Comparison of Single Row, Twin Row, and Diamond Planting Patterns in Valencia Peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most Valencia peanuts are grown in single rows on 36 to 40 inch beds. Because of their bunch-type and erect growth habit, Valencia peanuts do not spread over the whole bed and have the opportunity to benefit from multiple row planting arrangements. This study was conducted at locations near Portal...

  13. Comparisons of single-row and twin-row soybean production in the Mid South

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A Maturity Group (MG) IV and MG V soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] cultivar were planted in single-rows and twin-rows on 102 cm beds at 20, 30, 40, and 50 seeds m-2 in a Beulah fine sandy loam (coarse-loamy, mixed thermic Typic Dystrochrepts) in 2008, 2009, 2010 and Sharkey clay (Vertic Haplaquept) i...

  14. Noninvasive imaging of coronary arteries: current and future role of multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Halliburton, Sandra S; Stillman, Arthur E; Kuzmiak, Stacie A; Nissen, Steven E; Tuzcu, E Murat; White, Richard D

    2004-07-01

    While invasive imaging techniques, especially selective conventional coronary angiography, will remain vital to planning and guiding catheter-based and surgical treatment of significantly stenotic coronary lesions, the comprehensive and serial assessment of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic stages of coronary artery disease (CAD) for preventive purposes will eventually need to rely on noninvasive imaging techniques. Cardiovascular imaging with tomographic modalities, including computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, has great potential for providing valuable information. This review article will describe the current and future role of cardiac CT, and in particular that of multi-detector row CT, for imaging of atherosclerotic and other pathologic changes of the coronary arteries. It will describe how tomographic coronary imaging may eventually supplement traditional angiographic techniques in understanding the patterns of atherosclerotic CAD development.

  15. Image quality and radiation reduction of 320-row area detector CT coronary angiography with optimal tube voltage selection and an automatic exposure control system: comparison with body mass index-adapted protocol.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jiyeon; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal; Shim, Hackjoon; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-06-01

    To assess the image quality and radiation exposure of 320-row area detector computed tomography (320-ADCT) coronary angiography with optimal tube voltage selection with the guidance of an automatic exposure control system in comparison with a body mass index (BMI)-adapted protocol. Twenty-two patients (study group) underwent 320-ADCT coronary angiography using an automatic exposure control system with the target standard deviation value of 33 as the image quality index and the lowest possible tube voltage. For comparison, a sex- and BMI-matched group (control group, n = 22) using a BMI-adapted protocol was established. Images of both groups were reconstructed by an iterative reconstruction algorithm. For objective evaluation of the image quality, image noise, vessel density, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) were measured. Two blinded readers then subjectively graded the image quality using a four-point scale (1: nondiagnostic to 4: excellent). Radiation exposure was also measured. Although the study group tended to show higher image noise (14.1 ± 3.6 vs. 9.3 ± 2.2 HU, P = 0.111) and higher vessel density (665.5 ± 161 vs. 498 ± 143 HU, P = 0.430) than the control group, the differences were not significant. There was no significant difference between the two groups for SNR (52.5 ± 19.2 vs. 60.6 ± 21.8, P = 0.729), CNR (57.0 ± 19.8 vs. 67.8 ± 23.3, P = 0.531), or subjective image quality scores (3.47 ± 0.55 vs. 3.59 ± 0.56, P = 0.960). However, radiation exposure was significantly reduced by 42 % in the study group (1.9 ± 0.8 vs. 3.6 ± 0.4 mSv, P = 0.003). Optimal tube voltage selection with the guidance of an automatic exposure control system in 320-ADCT coronary angiography allows substantial radiation reduction without significant impairment of image quality, compared to the results obtained using a BMI-based protocol.

  16. The radiological diagnosis of fenestral otosclerosis: the utility of histogram analysis using multidetector row CT.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Togao, Osamu; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Inoguchi, Takashi; Kumazawa, Seiji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Bone density measurements using high-resolution CT have been reported to be useful to diagnose fenestral otosclerosis. However, small region of interest (ROI) chosen by less-experienced radiologists may result in false-negative findings. Semi-automatic analysis such as CT histogram analysis may offer improved assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of CT histogram analysis in diagnosing fenestral otosclerosis. Temporal bone CT of consecutive patients with otosclerosis and normal controls was retrospectively analyzed. The control group consisted of the normal-hearing contralateral ears of patients with otitis media, cholesteatoma, trauma, facial nerve palsy, or tinnitus. All CT images were obtained using a 64-detector-row CT scanner with 0.5-mm collimation. AROI encompassing 10 × 10 pixels was placed in the bony labyrinth located anterior to the oval window. The mean CT value, variance and entropy were compared between otosclerosis patients and normal controls using Student's t test. The number of pixels below mean minus SD in the control (%Lowcont) and total subjects (%Lowtotal) were also compared. In addition, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) value for the discrimination between otosclerosis patients and normal controls was calculated. 51 temporal bones of 38 patients with otosclerosis and 30 temporal bones of 30 control subjects were included. The mean CT value was significantly lower in otosclerosis cases than in normal controls (p < 0.01). In addition, variance, entropy, %Lowcont and %Lowtotal were significantly higher in otosclerosis cases than in normal controls (p < 0.01, respectively). The AUC values for the mean CT value, %Lowcont and %Lowtotal were 0.751, 0.760 and 0.765, respectively. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that histogram analysis of CT image may be of clinical value in diagnosing otosclerosis.

  17. 320-row CT renal perfusion imaging in patients with aortic dissection: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongting; Liu, Jiayi; Wen, Zhaoying; Li, Yu; Sun, Zhonghua; Xu, Qin; Fan, Zhanming

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical value of renal perfusion imaging in patients with aortic dissection (AD) using 320-row computed tomography (CT), and to determine the relationship between renal CT perfusion imaging and various factors of aortic dissection. Methods Forty-three patients with AD who underwent 320-row CT renal perfusion before operation were prospectively enrolled in this study. Diagnosis of AD was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. Blood flow (BF) of bilateral renal perfusion was measured and analyzed. CT perfusion imaging signs of AD in relation to the type of AD, number of entry tears and the false lumen thrombus were observed and compared. Results The BF values of patients with type A AD were significantly lower than those of patients with type B AD (P = 0.004). No significant difference was found in the BF between different numbers of intimal tears (P = 0.288), but BF values were significantly higher in cases with a false lumen without thrombus and renal arteries arising from the true lumen than in those with thrombus (P = 0.036). The BF values measured between the true lumen, false lumen and overriding groups were different (P = 0.02), with the true lumen group having the highest. Also, the difference in BF values between true lumen and false lumen groups was statistically significant (P = 0.016), while no statistical significance was found in the other two groups (P > 0.05). The larger the size of intimal entry tears, the greater the BF values (P = 0.044). Conclusions This study shows a direct correlation between renal CT perfusion changes and AD, with the size, number of intimal tears, different types of AD, different renal artery origins and false lumen thrombosis, significantly affecting the perfusion values. PMID:28182709

  18. Bronchial anatomy of left lung: a study of multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinya; Ju, Yuanrong; Liu, Cheng; Li, Jianfeng; Huang, Min; Sun, Jian; Wang, Tao

    2009-02-01

    Familiarity with prevailing pattern and variations in the bronchial tree is not only essential for the anatomist to explain bronchial variation in bronchial specimens, but also useful for guiding bronchoscopy and instructing pulmonary segmental resection. The purpose of this study was designed to demonstrate various branching patterns of left lung with 3D images, with special attention given to identify the major types at transverse thin-section CT. Two hundred and sixteen patients with routine thorax scans were enrolled. The images of bronchial tree, virtual bronchoscopy were reconstructed using post-processing technique of multi-detector row CT. We attempted to classify the segmental bronchi by interpreting the post-processing images, and identified them in transverse thin-section CT. Our results showed that the segmental bronchial ramifications of the left superior lobe were classified into three types mainly, i.e., common stem of apical and posterior segmental bronchi (64%, 138/216); trifurcation (23%, 50/216); common stem of apical and anterior segmental bronchi (10%, 22/216), and they could be identified at two typical sections of transverse thin-section CT. There were two major types in left basal segmental bronchi, i.e., bifurcation (75%, 163/216), trifurcation (18%, 39/216), and they could also be identified at two typical sections of transverse thin-section CT. In conclusion, our study have offered simplified branching patterns of bronchi and demonstrated various unusual bronchial branching patterns perfectly with 3D images, and have also revealed how to identify the main branching patterns in transverse thin-section CT.

  19. Evaluation of different small bowel contrast agents by multi - detector row CT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Ren; Yu, Xiao-Li; Peng, Zhi-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate the effects of different oral small bowel contrast agents towards the intestinal dilatation and intestinal wall structure exhibition by the abdominal multi - detector row CT (MDCT) examination. Methods: 80 patients were performed the whole abdominal CT examination, then randomly divided into four groups, with 20 patients in each group. 45 minutes before the CT examination, the patients were served with a total of 1800 ml pure water, pure milk, dilute lactulose solution and isotonic mannitol solution, respectively. Results: The images were blinded read by two experienced abdominal radiologists in the workstation, the cross-sectional diameters of duodenum, jejunum, proximal and terminal ends of ileum of each patient were measured, then the analysis of variance was performed to analyze the differences in the intestinal dilatation among the experimental groups. The scoring method was used to score the intestinal dilatation and intestinal structure exhibition. The diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the best intestinal dilation degrees. Similarly, the diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the highest scores in the entire small bowel dilatation degree and intestinal structure exhibition. Conclusions: 2.5% osmotic mannitol and the diluted lactulose solution enabled the full dilatation of small bowel, and could clearly exhibit the wall structure. PMID:26629131

  20. Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT

    SciTech Connect

    Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H.

    2007-05-15

    We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

  1. Overbeaming and overlapping of volume-scan CT with tube current modulation in a 320-detector row CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Lan; Chen, Yan-Shi; Lai, Nan-Ku; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of volume scan tube current modulation (VS-ATCM) with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR3D) technique in abdomen CT examinations. We scanned an elliptical cone-shaped phantom utilizing AIDR3D technique combined with VS-ATCM mode in a 320-detector row CT scanner. The image noise distributions with conventional filtered back-projction (FBP) technique and those with AIDR3D technique were compared. The radiation dose profile and tube current time product (mAs) in three noise levels of VS-ATCM modes were compared. The radiation beam profiles of five preset scan lengths were measured using Gafchromic film strips to assess the effects of overbeaming and everlapping. The results indicated that the image noises with AIDR3D technique was 13-74% lower than those in FBP technique. The mAs distributions can be a prediction for various abdominal sizes when undergoing a VS-ATCM mode scan. Patients can receive the radiation dose of overbeaming and overlapping during the VS-ATCM mode scans.

  2. Quantitative Features of Liver Lesions, Lung Nodules, and Renal Stones at Multi-Detector Row CT Examinations: Dependency on Radiation Dose and Reconstruction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Justin; Mileto, Achille; Nelson, Rendon C; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    To determine if radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm affect the computer-based extraction and analysis of quantitative imaging features in lung nodules, liver lesions, and renal stones at multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Retrospective analysis of data from a prospective, multicenter, HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved clinical trial was performed by extracting 23 quantitative imaging features (size, shape, attenuation, edge sharpness, pixel value distribution, and texture) of lesions on multi-detector row CT images of 20 adult patients (14 men, six women; mean age, 63 years; range, 38-72 years) referred for known or suspected focal liver lesions, lung nodules, or kidney stones. Data were acquired between September 2011 and April 2012. All multi-detector row CT scans were performed at two different radiation dose levels; images were reconstructed with filtered back projection, adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction, and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithms. A linear mixed-effects model was used to assess the effect of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm on extracted features. Among the 23 imaging features assessed, radiation dose had a significant effect on five, three, and four of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction had a significant effect on three, one, and one of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). MBIR reconstruction had a significant effect on nine, 11, and 15 of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Of note, the measured size of lung nodules and renal stones with MBIR was significantly different than those for the other two algorithms (P < .002 for all comparisons). Although lesion texture was significantly affected by the

  3. Automated multidetector row CT dataset segmentation with an interactive watershed transform (IWT) algorithm: Part 2. Body CT angiographic and orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pamela T; Hahn, Horst K; Heath, David G; Fishman, Elliot K

    2008-12-01

    The preceding manuscript describes the principles behind the Interactive Watershed Transform (IWT) segmentation tool. The purpose of this manuscript is to illustrate the clinical utility of this editing technique for body multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) imaging. A series of cases demonstrates clinical applications where automated segmentation of skeletal structures with IWT is most useful. Both CT angiography and orthopedic applications are presented.

  4. Multi-detector row CT scanning in Paleoanthropology at various tube current settings and scanning mode.

    PubMed

    Badawi-Fayad, J; Yazbeck, C; Balzeau, A; Nguyen, T H; Istoc, A; Grimaud-Hervé, D; Cabanis, E- A

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal tube current setting and scanning mode for hominid fossil skull scanning, using multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Four fossil skulls (La Ferrassie 1, Abri Pataud 1, CroMagnon 2 and Cro-Magnon 3) were examined by using the CT scanner LightSpeed 16 (General Electric Medical Systems) with varying dose per section (160, 250, and 300 mAs) and scanning mode (helical and conventional). Image quality of two-dimensional (2D) multiplanar reconstructions, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and native images was assessed by four reviewers using a four-point grading scale. An ANOVA (analysis of variance) model was used to compare the mean score for each sequence and the overall mean score according to the levels of the scanning parameters. Compared with helical CT (mean score=12.03), the conventional technique showed sustained poor image quality (mean score=4.17). With the helical mode, we observed a better image quality at 300 mAs than at 160 in the 3D sequences (P=0.03). Whereas in native images, a reduction in the effective tube current induced no degradation in image quality (P=0.05). Our study suggests a standardized protocol for fossil scanning with a 16 x 0.625 detector configuration, a 10 mm beam collimation, a 0.562:1 acquisition mode, a 0.625/0.4 mm slice thickness/reconstruction interval, a pitch of 5.62, 120 kV and 300 mAs especially when a 3D study is required.

  5. A new 3-D diagnosis strategy for duodenal malignant lesions using multidetector row CT, CT virtual duodenoscopy, duodenography, and 3-D multicholangiography.

    PubMed

    Sata, N; Endo, K; Shimura, K; Koizumi, M; Nagai, H

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in multidetector row computed tomography (MD-CT) technology provide new opportunities for clinical diagnoses of various diseases. Here we assessed CT virtual duodenoscopy, duodenography, and three-dimensional (3D) multicholangiography created by MD-CT for clinical diagnosis of duodenal malignant lesions. The study involved seven cases of periduodenal carcinoma (four ampullary carcinomas, two duodenal carcinomas, one pancreatic carcinoma). Biliary contrast medium was administered intravenously, followed by intravenous administration of an anticholinergic agent and oral administration of effervescent granules for expanding the upper gastrointestinal tract. Following intravenous administration of a nonionic contrast medium, an upper abdominal MD-CT scan was performed in the left lateral position. Scan data were processed on a workstation to create CT virtual duodenoscopy, duodenography, 3D multicholangiography, and various postprocessing images, which were then evaluated for their effectiveness as preoperative diagnostic tools. Carcinoma location and extent were clearly demonstrated as defects or colored low-density areas in 3-D multicholangiography images and as protruding lesions in virtual duodenography and duodenoscopy images. These findings were confirmed using multiplanar or curved planar reformation images. In conclusion, CT virtual duodenoscopy, doudenography, 3-D multicholangiography, and various images created by MD-CT alone provided necessary and adequate preoperative diagnostic information.

  6. Coronary artery calcium score: influence of reconstruction interval at 16-detector row CT with retrospective electrocardiographic gating.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Thomas; Hunold, Peter; Schmermund, Axel; Kühl, Hilmar; Waltering, Kai-Uwe; Debatin, Jörg F; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2004-11-01

    In 30 patients, Agatston and volumetric scores were assessed by using retrospectively gated multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). For each patient, 10 data sets were created at different times and were evenly spaced throughout the cardiac cycle. For each reconstruction, patients were assigned a percentile that described the level of cardiovascular risk. Nineteen (63%) of 30 patients could be assigned to more than one risk group depending on the reconstruction interval used. Agatston and volumetric scores both proved highly dependent on the reconstruction interval used (coefficient of variation, < or =63.1%) even with the most advanced CT scanners. Accurate and reproducible quantification of coronary calcium seems to require analysis of multiple reconstructions.

  7. Suspected aortic dissection and other aortic disorders: multi-detector row CT in 373 cases in the emergency setting.

    PubMed

    Hayter, Robert G; Rhea, James T; Small, Andrew; Tafazoli, Faranak S; Novelline, Robert A

    2006-03-01

    To retrospectively review the authors' experience with multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) for detection of aortic dissection in the emergency setting. The investigation was institutional review board approved, did not require informed patient consent, and was HIPAA compliant. In 373 clinical evaluations in the emergency setting, 365 patients suspected of having aortic dissection and/or other aortic disorders underwent multidetector CT. Criteria for acute aortic disorder were confirmed by using surgical and pathologic diagnoses or findings at clinical follow-up and any subsequent imaging as the reference standard. Positive cases were characterized according to type of disorder interpreted. Resulting sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy were calculated by using two-way contingency tables. All cases found to be negative for acute aortic disorders were grouped according to alternative CT findings. Sixty-seven (18.0%) of the 373 cases were interpreted as positive for acute aortic disorder. One hundred twelve acute aortic disorders were identified in these 67 cases: 23 acute aortic dissections, 14 acute aortic intramural hematomas, 20 acute penetrating aortic ulcers, 44 new or enlarging aortic aneurysms, and 11 acute aortic ruptures. Three hundred five (81.8%) cases were interpreted as negative for acute aortic disorder. In 48 negative cases, multidetector CT depicted alternative findings that accounted for the clinical presentation. Of these, three included both acute aortic disorders and alternative findings, and 45 included only alternative findings. One (0.3%) case was indeterminate for acute aortic disorder. Overall, 112 findings were interpreted as positive for acute aortic disorder, an alternative finding, or both at CT. No interpretations were false-positive, one was false-negative, 67 were true-positive, and 304 were true-negative. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy were

  8. Multi-detector row CT colonography: effect of collimation, pitch, and orientation on polyp detection in a human colectomy specimen.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stuart A; Halligan, Steve; Bartram, Clive I; Morgan, Paul R; Talbot, Ian C; Fry, Nicola; Saunders, Brian P; Khosraviani, Kirosh; Atkin, Wendy

    2003-10-01

    To investigate the effects of orientation, collimation, pitch, and tube current setting on polyp detection at multi-detector row computed tomographic (CT) colonography and to determine the optimal combination of scanning parameters for screening. A colectomy specimen containing 117 polyps of different sizes was insufflated and imaged with a multi-detector row CT scanner at various collimation (1.25 and 2.5 mm), pitch (3 and 6), and tube current (50, 100, and 150 mA) settings. Two-dimensional multiplanar reformatted images and three-dimensional endoluminal surface renderings from the 12 resultant data sets were examined by one observer for the presence and conspicuity of polyps. The results were analyzed with Poisson regression and logistic regression to determine the effects of scanning parameters and of specimen orientation on polyp detection. The percentage of polyps that were detected significantly increased when collimation (P =.008) and table feed (P =.03) were decreased. Increased tube current resulted in improved detection only of polyps with a diameter of less than 5 mm. Polyps of less than 5 mm were optimally depicted with a collimation of 1.25 mm, a pitch of 3, and a tube current setting of 150 mA; polyps with a diameter greater than 5 mm were adequately depicted with 1.25-mm collimation and with either pitch setting and any of the three tube current settings. Small polyps in the transverse segment (positioned at a 90 degrees angle to the z axis of scanning) were significantly less visible than those in parallel or oblique orientations (P <.001). The effective radiation dose, calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation, was 1.4-10.0 mSv. Detection of small polyps (<5 mm) with multi-detector row CT is highly dependent on collimation, pitch, and, to a lesser extent, tube current. Collimation of 1.25 mm, combined with pitch of 6 and tube current of 50 mA, provides for reliable detection of polyps 5 mm or larger while limiting the effective radiation dose

  9. The role of multidetector-row CT in the diagnosis, classification and management of acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, I W; Peebles, C R; Harden, S P; Shambrook, J S

    2014-01-01

    The term “acute aortic syndrome” (AAS) encompasses several non-traumatic life-threatening pathologies of the thoracic aorta presenting in patients with a similar clinical profile. These include aortic dissection, intramural haematoma and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcers. These different pathological entities can be indistinguishable on clinical grounds alone and may be confused with other causes of chest pain, including myocardial infarction. Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) is the current modality of choice for imaging AAS with a sensitivity and specificity approaching 100%. Early diagnosis and accurate radiological classification is associated with improved clinical outcomes in AAS. We review the characteristic radiological features of the different pathologies that encompass AAS and highlight the vital role of MDCT in determining the management of these life-threatening conditions. PMID:25083552

  10. Whole brain CT perfusion deficits using 320-detector-row CT scanner in TIA patients are associated with ABCD2 score.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Bijal K; Mustafa, Ghulam; McMurtray, Aaron; Masud, Mohammed W; Gunukula, Sameer K; Kamal, Haris; Kandel, Amit; Beltagy, Abdelrahman; Li, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Transient ischemic attacks (TIA) are cerebral ischemic events without infarction. The uses of CT perfusion (CTP) techniques such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), time to peak (TTP), mean transit time (MTT) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) provide real time data about ischemia. It has been shown that CTP changes occur in less sensitive CTP scanners in patients with TIA. Larger detector row CTP (whole brain perfusion studies) may show that CTP abnormalities are more prevalent than previously noted. It is also unclear if these changes are associated with TIA severity. To demonstrate that TIA patients are associated with perfusion deficits using whole brain 320-detector-row CT perfusion, and to determine an association between ABCD2 score and perfusion deficit using whole brain perfusion. We retrospectively reviewed all TIA patients for CTP deficits from 2008-2010. Perfusion imaging was reviewed at admission; and it was determined if a perfusion deficit was present along with vascular territory involved. Of 364 TIA patients, 62 patients had CTP deficits. The largest group of patients had MCA territory involved with 48 of 62 patients (77.42%). The most common perfusion abnormality was increased TTP with 46 patients (74.19%). The ABCD2 score was reviewed in association with perfusion deficit. Increased age >60, severe hypertension (>180/100 mmHg), patients with speech abnormalities, and duration of symptoms >10 min were associated with a perfusion deficit but history of diabetes or minimal/moderate hypertension (140/90-179/99 mmHg) was not. There was no association between motor deficit and perfusion abnormality. Perfusion deficits are found in TIA patients using whole brain CTP and associated with components of the ABCD2 score.

  11. Value of Virtual Colonoscopy with 64 Row CT in Evaluation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Łasecki, Mateusz; Nienartowicz, Ewa; Pelak, Joanna; Słonina, Joanna; Olchowy, Cyprian; Ścieżka, Marek; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Virtual colonoscopy (VC) enables three-dimensional view of walls and internal lumen of the colon as a result of reconstruction of multislice CT images. The role of VC in diagnosis of the colon abnormalities systematically increases, and in many medical centers all over the world is carried out as a screening test of patients with high risk of colorectal cancer. Material/Methods We analyzed results of virtual colonoscopy of 360 patients with clinical suspicion of colorectal cancer. Sensitivity and specificity of CT colonoscopy for detection of colon cancers and polyps were assessed. Results Results of our research have shown high diagnostic efficiency of CT colonoscopy in detection of focal lesions in large intestine of 10 mm or more diameter. Sensitivity was 85.7%, specificity 89.2%. Conclusions Virtual colonoscopy is noninvasive and well tolerated by patients imaging method, which permits for early detection of the large intestine lesions with specificity and sensitivity similar to classical colonoscopy in screening exams in patients suspected for colorectal cancer. Good preparation of the patients for the examination is very important for proper diagnosis and interpretation of this imaginge procedure. PMID:25302086

  12. Prevalence of Temporal Bone Fractures in Patients with Mandibular Fractures Using Multidetector-Row CT.

    PubMed

    Ogura, I; Kaneda, T; Sasaki, Y; Buch, K; Sakai, O

    2015-06-01

    Temporal bone fracture after mandibular trauma is thought to be rare, and its prevalence has not been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of temporal bone fractures in patients with mandibular fractures and the relationship between temporal bone fractures and the mandibular fracture location using multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). A prospective study was performed in 201 patients with mandibular fractures who underwent 64-MDCT scans. The mandibular fracture locations were classified as median, paramedian, angle, and condylar types. Statistical analysis for the relationship between prevalence of temporal bone fractures and mandibular fracture locations was performed using χ(2) test with Fisher's exact test. A P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The percentage of cases with temporal bone fracture was 3.0 % of all patients with mandibular fractures and 19.0 % of those with multiple mandibular fractures of paramedian and condylar type. There was a significant relationship between the incidence of temporal bone fracture and the paramedian- and condylar-type mandibular fracture (P = 0.001). Multiple mandibular fractures of paramedian and condylar type may be a stronger indicator for temporal bone fractures. This study suggests that patients with mandibular fracture, especially the paramedian and condylar type, should be examined for coexisting temporal bone fracture using MDCT.

  13. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In the present era of cone-beam CT scanners, the use of the standardized CTDI{sub 100} as a surrogate of the idealized CTDI is strongly discouraged and, consequently, so should be the use of the dose-length product (DLP) as an estimate of the total energy imparted to the patient. However, the DLP is still widely used as a reference quantity to normalize the effective dose for a given scan protocol mainly because the CTDI{sub 100} is an easy-to-measure quantity. The aim of this article is therefore to describe a method for radiation dose assessment in large cone-beam single axial scans, which leads to a straightforward estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient. The authors developed a method accessible to all medical physicists and easy to implement in clinical practice in an attempt to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose. Methods: The authors used commercially available material and a simple mathematical model. The method described herein is based on the dosimetry paradigm introduced by the AAPM Task Group 111. It consists of measuring the dose profiles at the center and the periphery of a long body phantom with a commercial solid-state detector. A weighted dose profile is then calculated from these measurements. To calculate the CT dosimetric quantities analytically, a Gaussian function was fitted to the dose profile data. Furthermore, the Gaussian model has the power to condense the z-axis information of the dose profile in two parameters: The single-scan central dose, f(0), and the width of the profile, {sigma}. To check the energy dependence of the solid-state detector, the authors compared the dose profiles to measurements made with a small volume ion chamber. To validate the overall method, the authors compared the CTDI{sub 100} calculated analytically to the measurement made with a 100 mm pencil ion chamber. Results: For the central and weighted dose profiles, the authors found a good

  14. Automatic vs semi-automatic global cardiac function assessment using 64-row CT

    PubMed Central

    Greupner, J; Zimmermann, E; Hamm, B; Dewey, M

    2012-01-01

    Objective Global cardiac function assessment using multidetector CT (MDCT) is time-consuming. Therefore we sought to compare an automatic software tool with an established semi-automatic method. Methods A total of 36 patients underwent CT with 64×0.5 mm detector collimation, and global left ventricular function was subsequently assessed by two independent blinded readers using both an automatic region-growing-based software tool (with and without manual adjustment) and an established semi-automatic software tool. We also analysed automatic motion mapping to identify end-systole. Results The time needed for assessment using the semi-automatic approach (12:12±6:19 min) was reduced by 75–85% with the automatic software tool (unadjusted, 01:34±0:29 min, adjusted, 02:53±1:19 min; both p<0.001). There was good correlation (r=0.89; p<0.001) for the ejection fraction (EF) between the adjusted automatic (58.6±14.9%) and the semi-automatic (58.0±15.3%) approaches. Also the manually adjusted automatic approach led to significantly smaller limits of agreement than the unadjusted automatic approach for end-diastolic volume (±36.4 ml vs ±58.5 ml, p>0.05). Using motion mapping to automatically identify end-systole reduced analysis time by 95% compared with the semi-automatic approach, but showed inferior precision for EF and end-systolic volume. Conclusion Automatic function assessment using MDCT with manual adjustment shows good agreement with an established semi-automatic approach, while reducing the analysis by 75% to less than 3 min. This suggests that automatic CT function assessment with manual correction may be used for fast, comfortable and reliable evaluation of global left ventricular function. PMID:22045953

  15. Comparison of the Diagnostic Image Quality of the Canine Maxillary Dentoalveolar Structures Obtained by Cone Beam Computed Tomography and 64-Multidetector Row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Soukup, Jason W.; Drees, Randi; Koenig, Lisa J.; Snyder, Christopher J.; Hetzel, Scott; Miles, Chanda R.; Schwarz, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Summary The objective of this blinded study was to validate the use of cone beam computed tomography (CT) for imaging of the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures by comparing its diagnostic image quality with that of 64-multidetector row CT. Sagittal slices of a tooth-bearing segment of the maxilla of a commercially purchased dog skull embedded in methyl methacrylate were obtained along a line parallel with the dental arch using a commercial histology diamond saw. The slice of tooth-bearing bone that best depicted the dentoalveolar structures was chosen and photographed. The maxilla segment was imaged with cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT. Four blinded evaluators compared the cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT images and image quality was scored as it related to the anatomy of dentoalveolar structures. Trabecular bone, enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, and lamina dura were scored. In addition, a score depicting the evaluators overall impression of the image was recorded. Images acquired with cone beam CT were found to be significantly superior in image quality to images acquired with 64-multidetector row CT overall, and in all scored categories. In our study setting, cone beam CT was found to be a valid and clinically superior imaging modality for the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures when compared to 64-multidetector row CT. PMID:26415384

  16. Use of an automatic exposure control mechanism for dose optimization in multi-detector row CT examinations: clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mulkens, Tom H; Bellinck, Patrick; Baeyaert, Michel; Ghysen, Dirk; Van Dijck, Xavier; Mussen, Elvier; Venstermans, Caroline; Termote, Jean-Luc

    2005-10-01

    To prospectively compare dose reduction and image quality achieved with an automatic exposure control system that is based on both angular (x-y axis) and z-axis tube current modulation with dose reduction and image quality achieved with an angular modulation system for multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). The study protocol was approved by the institutional review board, and oral informed consent was obtained. In two groups of 200 patients, five anatomic regions (ie, the thorax, abdomen-pelvis, abdomen-liver, lumbar spine, and cervical spine) were examined with this modulation system and a six-section multi-detector row CT scanner. Data from these patients were compared with data from 200 patients who were examined with an angular modulation system. Dose reduction by means of reduction of the mean effective tube current in 600 examinations, image noise in 200 examinations performed with each modulation system, and subjective image quality scores in 100 examinations per-formed with each modulation system were compared with Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Mean dose reduction for the angular and z-axis tube current modulation system and for the angular modulation system was as follows: thorax, 20% and 14%, respectively; abdomen-liver, 38% and 18%, respectively; abdomen-pelvis, 32% and 26%, respectively; lumbar spine, 37% and 10%, respectively; and cervical spine, 68% and 16%, respectively. These differences were statistically significant (P < .05). There was no significant difference in image noise and mean image quality scores between modulation systems, with the exception of cervical spinal examinations (P < .001 for both), where the examinations with angular modulation resulted in better scores. There is good correlation between the mean effective tube current level and the body mass index of patients with the new modulation system. Correlation was as follows: thorax, 0.77; abdomen-pelvis, 0.83; abdomen-liver, 0.84; lumbar spine, 0.8; and cervical spine, 0

  17. Comparison of the Diagnostic Image Quality of the Canine Maxillary Dentoalveolar Structures Obtained by Cone Beam Computed Tomography and 64-Multidetector Row Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Jason W; Drees, Randi; Koenig, Lisa J; Snyder, Christopher J; Hetzel, Scott; Miles, Chanda R; Schwarz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this blinded study was to validate the use of cone beam computed tomography (C) for imaging of the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures by comparing its diagnostic image quality with that of 64-multidetector row CT Sagittal slices of a tooth-bearing segment of the maxilla of a commercially purchased dog skull embedded in methylmethacrylate were obtained along a line parallel with the dental arch using a commercial histology diamond saw. The slice of tooth-bearing bone that best depicted the dentoalveolar structures was chosen and photographed. The maxillary segment was imaged with cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT. Four blinded evaluators compared the cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT images and image quality was scored as it related to the anatomy of dentoalveolar structures. Trabecular bone, enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, and lamina dura were scored In addition, a score depicting the evaluators overall impression of the image was recorded. Images acquired with cone beam CT were found to be significantly superior in image quality to images acquired with 64-multidetector row CT overall, and in all scored categories. In our study setting cone beam CT was found to be a valid and clinically superior imaging modality for the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures when compared to 64-multidetector row CT.

  18. Scan time and patient dose for thoracic imaging in neonates and small children using axial volumetric 320-detector row CT compared to helical 64-, 32-, and 16- detector row CT acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Kroft, Lucia J M; Roelofs, Joost J H; Geleijns, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    Recently a 320-detector-row CT (MDCT) scanner has become available that allows axial volumetric scanning of a 16-cm-long range (50 cm field of view) in a single 0.35-s rotation. For imaging neonates and small children, volume scanning is potentially of great advantage as the entire scan range can be acquired in 0.35 s, which can reduce motion artefacts and may reduce the need for sedation in clinical CT imaging. Also, because there is no over-ranging associated with axial volumetric scanning, this may reduce patient radiation dose. To evaluate, by means of a phantom study, scan time and patient dose for thoracic imaging in neonates and small children by using axial cone-beam and helical fan-beam MDCT acquisitions. Paediatric imaging protocols were assessed for a 320-MDCT volumetric scanner (Aquilion ONE, Toshiba, Otawara, Japan). The 320-MDCT scanner allows for cone-beam acquisitions with coverage up to 160 mm, but it also allows for helical fan-beam acquisitions in 64-, 32-, or 16-MDCT modes. The acquisition configurations that were evaluated were 320 x 0.5 mm, 240 x 0.5 mm, and 160 x 0.5 mm for axial volumetric scanning, and 64 x 0.5 mm, 32 x 0.5 mm, and 16 x 0.5 mm for helical scanning. Dose assessment was performed for clinically relevant paediatric angiographic or chest/mediastinum acquisition protocols with tube voltages of 80 or 100 kVp and tube currents between 40 and 80 mA. Scan time was 0.35 s for 320-MDCT acquisitions, scan times varied between 1.9 s and 8.3 s for helical acquisitions. Dose savings varying between 18% and 40% were achieved with axial volumetric scanning as compared to helical scanning (for 320- versus 64-MDCT at 160 mm and 80 kVp, and for 320- versus 16-MDCT at 80 mm and 100 kVp, respectively). Statistically significant reduction in radiation dose was found for axial 320-MDCT volumetric scanning compared to helical 64-, 32-, and 16-MDCT scanning. Axial thoracic CT of neonates and small children with volumetric 320-MDCT can be performed

  19. Technical note: Electrocardiogram electrode repositioning for 320-row coronary CT angiography in patients with regular and recurrent premature ventricular contractions.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takeshi; Matsutani, Hideyuki; Groarke, John; Takamura, Kazuhisa; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Rybicki, Frank J; Kumamaru, Kanako K

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmias can compromise image quality and increase radiation exposure during coronary CT angiography (CTA). However, premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) can occur in a predictable recurrent and regular pattern (ie, bigeminy, trigeminy, quadrigeminy) with post-PVC compensatory pauses. Electrocardiographic (ECG) electrode repositioning can achieve relative amplification of the R waves of PVCs compared with R waves of sinus beats. This technical note describes how simple ECG electrode repositioning, combined with an absolute-delay strategy, facilitated selective R waves of PVC ECG triggering of image acquisition in 6 patients with PVC bigeminy or quadrigeminy at the time of 320-row coronary CTA. All 6 studies were single heartbeat acquisition scans with excellent image quality and a median effective radiation dose of 2.9 mSv (interquartile range, 2.1-3.8 mSv). Standard ECG electrode positions used for 2 patients with PVC bigeminy undergoing coronary CTA were associated with an acquisition over 2 heartbeats and effective radiation doses of 6.8 and 10.3 mSv, respectively. In conclusion, ECG electrode repositioning combined with an absolute-delay strategy for regularly recurring PVCs, such as ventricular bigeminy, facilitates high image quality and lower radiation dose during coronary CTA. This simple and straightforward technique can be considered for all patients with regular and recurrent PVCs undergoing coronary CTA. Copyright © 2014 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Imaging of cochlear implant electrode array with flat-detector CT and conventional multislice CT: comparison of image quality and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Struffert, Tobias; Hertel, Victoria; Kyriakou, Yannis; Krause, Jens; Engelhorn, Tobias; Schick, Bernhard; Iro, Heinrich; Hornung, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2010-04-01

    Cochlear implantation assessment is possible using commercially available standard flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT) protocols. Image quality is superior to multislice CT (MSCT). The radiation dose of FD-CT is lower in comparison with MSCT standard protocols and may therefore overcome the limitations of MSCT in the evaluation of cochlear implants. FD-CT offers higher spatial resolution than MSCT. Our objective was to compare the image quality of FD-CT to conventional MSCT in the visualization of a cochlear implant electrode array with respect to radiation exposure. An isolated temporal bone specimen was scanned using a commercially available FD-CT system and a 4 and 64 row MSCT scanner. Different scanning protocols were used. Image quality was assessed by four independent readers using a scoring system with different criteria describing delineation of the cochlea and the electrode array, image noise and spatial resolution. Radiation dose was measured using the CT dose index (CTDI) and a 16 cm acrylic phantom. Image quality was rated superior for FD-CT for all criteria by all readers. Single electrode contacts were only visible in FD-CT and assessment of implant position was improved by FD-CT. The radiation dose of FD-CT was half that of MSCT standard protocols.

  1. Technical Note: Evaluation of a 160-mm/256-row CT scanner for whole-heart quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    So, Aaron; Imai, Yasuhiro; Nett, Brian; Jackson, John; Nett, Liz; Hsieh, Jiang; Wisenberg, Gerald; Teefy, Patrick; Yadegari, Andrew; Islam, Ali; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-08-01

    The authors investigated the performance of a recently introduced 160-mm/256-row CT system for low dose quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) imaging of the whole heart. This platform is equipped with a gantry capable of rotating at 280 ms per full cycle, a second generation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR-V) to correct for image noise arising from low tube voltage potential/tube current dynamic scanning, and image reconstruction algorithms to tackle beam-hardening, cone-beam, and partial-scan effects. Phantom studies were performed to investigate the effectiveness of image noise and artifact reduction with a GE Healthcare Revolution CT system for three acquisition protocols used in quantitative CT MP imaging: 100, 120, and 140 kVp/25 mAs. The heart chambers of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were filled with iodinated contrast solution at different concentrations (contrast levels) to simulate the circulation of contrast through the heart in quantitative CT MP imaging. To evaluate beam-hardening correction, the phantom was scanned at each contrast level to measure the changes in CT number (in Hounsfield unit or HU) in the water-filled region surrounding the heart chambers with respect to baseline. To evaluate cone-beam artifact correction, differences in mean water HU between the central and peripheral slices were compared. Partial-scan artifact correction was evaluated from the fluctuation of mean water HU in successive partial scans. To evaluate image noise reduction, a small hollow region adjacent to the heart chambers was filled with diluted contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio in the region before and after noise correction with ASiR-V was compared. The quality of MP maps acquired with the CT system was also evaluated in porcine CT MP studies. Myocardial infarct was induced in a farm pig from a transient occlusion of the distal left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a catheter-based interventional procedure. MP maps were generated

  2. Comparison of transplenic multidetector CT portography to multidetector CT-angiography in normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Echandi, Rita L; Morandi, Federica; Daniel, William T; Paquette, Janet L; Daniel, Gregory B

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated transplenic injection of iodinated contrast medium for computed tomography (CT) assessment of the portal vasculature. Specific aims were to: (1) establish a protocol for transplenic transplenic CT portography using a 40-row multidetector scanner; (2) compare transplenic CT portography to dual-phase CT angiography in terms of image quality, opacification of the portal system, and contrast enhancement of the portal vasculature and liver; (3) compare personnel exposure during transplenic CT portography and transplenic portal scintigraphy. Seven juvenile dogs underwent transplenic portal scintigraphy, CT angiography, and transplenic CT portography. Transplenic portal scintigraphy and CT angiography were performed using previously established protocols. For transplenic CT portography, a 20- or 22 gauge needle attached to an extension set was placed into the splenic parenchyma using CT guidance. Iodinated contrast medium (175 mg I/ml) was administered, and CT acquisition was started at the time of the injection. Transplenic CT portography was simple, rapid and provided more intense enhancement of the splenic and portal veins, with a lower contrast medium dose (median dose: 525 mg I for transplenic CT portography, 7700 mg I for CT angiography), but caused inconsistent intrahepatic portal branches and parenchymal opacification due to streamlining and streak artifacts. Despite significantly lower attenuation values in the portal vein, CT angiography provided sufficient enhancement for vessel identification and more consistent parenchymal hepatic enhancement. Personnel radiation exposure rate was higher during transplenic CT portography (0.0725 mSv/min) compared with transplenic portal scintigraphy (0.000125 mSv/min). As transplenic CT portography requires an average injection time of 1 min per study; over 650 [corrected] studies must be performed before reaching the maximum permissible whole body dose of 0.05 [corrected] Sv.

  3. Split-Bolus Single-Pass Multidetector-Row CT Protocol for Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Scialpi, Michele; Rebonato, Alberto; Cagini, Lucio; Brunese, Luca; Piscioli, Irene; Pierotti, Luisa; Bellantonio, Lucio; D’Andrea, Alfredo; Rotondo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Currently computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has become a widely accepted clinical tool in the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Objectives: To report split-bolus single-pass 64-multidetector-row CT (MDCT) protocol for diagnosis of PE. Patients and Methods: MDCT split-bolus results in 40 patients suspicious of PE were analyzed in terms of image quality of target pulmonary vessels (TPVs) and occurrence and severity of flow-related artifact, flow-related artifact, false filling defect of the pulmonary veins and beam hardening streak artifacts. Dose radiation to patients was calculated. Results: MDCT split-bolus protocol allowed diagnostic images of high quality in all cases. Diagnosis of PE was obtained in 22 of 40 patients. Mean attenuation for target vessels was higher than 250 HU all cases: 361 ± 98 HU in pulmonary artery trunk (PAT); 339 ± 93 HU in right pulmonary artery (RPA); 334 ± 100 HU in left pulmonary artery (LPA). Adequate enhancement was obtained in the right atrium (RA):292 ± 83 HU; right pulmonary vein (RPV): 302 ± 91 HU, and left pulmonary vein (LPV): 291 ± 83 HU. The flow related artifacts and the beam hardening streak artifacts have been detected respectively in 4 and 25 patients. No false filling defect of the pulmonary veins was revealed. Conclusion: MDCT split-bolus technique by simultaneous opacification of pulmonary arteries and veins represents an accurate technique for diagnosis of acute PE, removes the false filling defects of the pulmonary veins, and reduces flow related artifacts. PMID:27110334

  4. Coronary CT angiography using the second-generation 320-detector row CT: assessment of image quality and radiation dose in various heart rates compared with the first-generation scanner.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Nobuo; Maeda, Eriko; Akahane, Masaaki; Torigoe, Rumiko; Kiryu, Shigeru; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2013-10-01

    To assess the image quality and radiation dose reduction in various heart rates in coronary CT angiography using the second-generation 320-detector row CT compared with the first-generation CT. Ninety-six patients were retrospectively included. The first 48 patients underwent coronary CT angiography with the first-generation 320-detector row CT, while the last 48 patients underwent with the second-generation CT. Subjective image quality was graded using a 4-point scale (4, excellent; 1, unable to evaluate). Image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio were also analyzed. Subgroup analysis was performed based on the heart rate. The mean effective dose was derived from the dose length product multiplied by a conversion coefficient for the chest (κ = 0.014 mSv × mGy(-1) × cm(-1)). The overall subjective image quality score showed no significant difference (3.66 vs 3.69, respectively, p = 0.25). The image quality score of the second-generation group tended to be higher than that of the first-generation group in the 66- to 75-bpm subgroup (3.36 vs 3.53, respectively, p = 0.07). No significant difference was observed in image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio. The overall radiation dose reduced by 24 % (3.3 vs 2.5 mSv, respectively, p = 0.03), and the reduction was substantial in patients with higher heart rate (66- to 75-bpm, 4.3 vs 2.2 mSv, respectively, p = 0.009; >75 bpm, 8.2 vs 3.7 mSv, respectively, p = 0.005). The second-generation 320-detector row CT could maintain the image quality while reducing the radiation dose in coronary CT angiography. The dose reduction was larger in patients with higher heart rate.

  5. Multi-detector row CT as a "one-stop" examination in the preoperative evaluation of the morphology and function of living renal donors: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Su, Chen; Yan, Chaogui; Guo, Yan; Zhou, Xuhui; Chen, Yaqing; Liu, Mingjuan; Wang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2011-02-01

    We designed to investigate the feasibility of multi-detector row computerized tomography (CT) as a "one-stop" examination for the simultaneous preoperative evaluation of the morphology and function of living renal donors. 21 living renal donors were examined by 64-slice spiral CT with a three-phase enhancement CT scan and two inserted dynamic scans. The maximum intensity projection (MIP), multi-planar reformation (MPR), and volume reconstruction (VR) procedures were performed to compare the renal parenchyma, renal vessels, and collecting system with operational findings. The known Patlak equation was used to calculate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR); exact GFR information was acquired by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Our results as following, there were 3 cases of artery variation and 3 cases of vein variation. CT findings all corresponded with the operation, and the sensitivity, positive predictive value, specialty, and negative predictive value of CT were all 100%. The r of the GFR values estimated from CT is 0.894 (left) (P < 0.001) and 0.881 (right) (P < 0.001). In conclusions, our findings demonstrate that 64-slice spiral CT may offer a "one-stop" examination to replace SPECT in the preoperative evaluation of living renal donors to simultaneously provide information regarding both anatomy and the GFR of living renal donors.

  6. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  7. Thin-section CT of lung without ECG gating: 64-detector row CT can markedly reduce cardiac motion artifact which can simulate lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Masahiro; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Sumikawa, Hiromitsu; Inoue, Atsuo; Daimon, Tadahisa; Honda, Osamu; Mihara, Naoki; Johkoh, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hironobu

    2009-01-01

    Motion artifacts, which can mimic thickened bronchial wall and the cystic appearance of bronchiectasis, constitute a potential pitfall in the diagnosis of interstitial or bronchial disease. Therefore, purpose of our study was to evaluate whether 64-detector row CT (64-MDCT) enables a reduction in respiratory or cardiac motion artifacts in the lung area on thin-section CT without ECG gating, and to examine the correlation between cardiac motion artifact and heart rate. Thirty-two patients with suspected diffuse lung disease, who underwent both 8- and 64-MDCT (gantry rotation time, 0.5 and 0.4s, respectively), were included. The heart rates of an additional 155 patients were measured (range, 48-126 beats per minute; mean, 76 beats per minute) immediately prior to 64-MDCT, and compared to the degree of cardiac motion artifact. Two independent observers evaluated the following artifacts on a monitor without the knowledge of relevant clinical information: (1) artifacts on 8- and 64-MDCT images with 1.25-mm thickness and those on 64-MDCT images with 0.625-mm thickness in 32 patients; and (2) artifacts on 64-MDCT images with 0.625-mm thickness in 155 patients. Interobserver agreement was good in evaluating artifacts on 8-MDCT images with 1.25-mm thickness (weighted Kappa test, kappa=0.61-0.71), and fair or poor in the other evaluations (kappa<0.31). Two observers stated that cardiac motion artifacts were more significant on 8-MDCT than on 64-MDCT in all 32 patients. Statistically significant differences were found at various checkpoints only in comparing artifacts between 8- and 64-MDCT for 1.25-mm thickness (Wilcoxon's signed-rank test, p<0.0017). Cardiac motion artifacts on 64-MDCT had no significant correlation with heart rate (Spearman's correlation coefficient by rank test). The high temporal resolution of 64-MDCT appears to reduce cardiac motion artifact that can affect thin-section scans of the lung parenchyma.

  8. [Added diagnostic benefit of 16-row whole-body spiral CT in patients with multiple trauma differentiated by region and injury severity according to the ATLS concept].

    PubMed

    Maurer, M H; Knopke, S; Schröder, R J

    2008-12-01

    To determine the added diagnostic benefit of using MS-CT in multiple trauma patients differentiated by severity of injury and affected body region. A retrospective analysis was performed of the 16-row whole-body spiral CT findings in 275 multiple trauma patients (73 % men, 27 % women; age 39.6 +/- 18.9 years) with regard to additional findings and new findings obtained with CT compared to the findings obtained by conventional projection radiography and abdominal ultrasound in the emergency room. The additional and new findings were differentiated by body region (head, face, chest, pelvis, abdomen, spine) and the degree of severity according to the three classes of injuries distinguished by the ATLS concept (class 1: simple injury, class 2: potentially life threatening, class 3: immediately life threatening). A total of 921 additional findings (= findings potentially relevant for further diagnosis and therapy in addition to the findings obtained by conventional radiography or ultrasound) were obtained by MS-CT in all patients. The distribution by number of patients and body region was as follows: 22 neck, 76 face, 125 chest, 112 abdomen, 50 pelvis, and 91 spine. Most additional findings were categorized as potentially life threatening (ATLS class 2). In addition, there were 439 completely new findings, involving the head in 128 patients (mostly ATLS class 3), the face in 18, the chest in 47, the abdomen in 26, and the spine in 9 patients. Most new findings involving the face, abdomen, and spine were ATLS class 2 injuries. Compared with conventional radiography and ultrasound in the emergency room, 16-row whole-body spiral CT yields numerous additional and new findings in different body regions in patients with multiple traumas. New findings primarily involved the head, and the additional findings involved the chest, pelvis, and spine. Most findings obtained with CT were potentially life threatening (ATLS class 2).

  9. Influence of 320-detector-row volume scanning and AAPM report 111 CT dosimetry metrics on size-specific dose estimate: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Kinomura, Yutaka; Ida, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Masanao

    2016-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) task group 204 has recommended the use of size-dependent conversion factors to calculate size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) values from volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) values. However, these conversion factors do not consider the effects of 320-detector-row volume computed tomography (CT) examinations or the new CT dosimetry metrics proposed by AAPM task group 111. This study aims to investigate the influence of these examinations and metrics on the conversion factors reported by AAPM task group 204, using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations were performed modelling a Toshiba Aquilion ONE CT scanner, in order to compute dose values in water for cylindrical phantoms with 8-40-cm diameters at 2-cm intervals for each scanning parameter (tube voltage, bow-tie filter, longitudinal beam width). Then, the conversion factors were obtained by applying exponential regression analysis between the dose values for a given phantom diameter and the phantom diameter combined with various scanning parameters. The conversion factors for each scanning method (helical, axial, or volume scanning) and CT dosimetry method (i.e., the CTDI100 method or the AAPM task group 111 method) were in agreement with those reported by AAPM task group 204, within a percentage error of 14.2 % for phantom diameters ≥11.2 cm. The results obtained in this study indicate that the conversion factors previously presented by AAPM task group 204 can be used to provide appropriate SSDE values for 320-detector-row volume CT examinations and the CT dosimetry metrics proposed by the AAPM task group 111.

  10. Multi-detector row CT of the left atrium and pulmonary veins before radio-frequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lacomis, Joan M; Wigginton, William; Fuhrman, Carl; Schwartzman, David; Armfield, Derek R; Pealer, Karen M

    2003-10-01

    Radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of the distal pulmonary veins and posterior left atrium is increasingly being used to treat recurrent or refractory atrial fibrillation that resists pharmacologic therapy or cardioversion. Successful RFCA of atrial fibrillation requires resolution of abnormal rhythms while minimizing complications and can be achieved with precise, preprocedural, three-dimensional (3D) anatomic delineation of the target, the atriopulmonary venous junction. Three-dimensional multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) of the pulmonary veins and left atrium provides the necessary anatomic information for successful RFCA, including (a) the number, location, and angulation of pulmonary veins and their ostial branches unobscured by adjacent cardiac and vascular anatomy, and (b) left atrial volume. The 3D multi-detector row CT scanning and postprocessing techniques used for pre-RFCA planning are straightforward. Radiologists must not only understand these techniques but must also be familiar with atrial fibrillation and the technical considerations and complications associated with RFCA of this condition. In addition, radiologists must be familiar with anatomic variants of the left atrium and distal pulmonary veins and understand the importance of these variants to the referring cardiac interventional electrophysiologist. Copyright RSNA, 2003

  11. Biomechanical Comparison of Arthroscopic Single- and Double-Row Repair Techniques for Acute Bony Bankart Lesions.

    PubMed

    Spiegl, Ulrich J; Smith, Sean D; Todd, Jocelyn N; Coatney, Garrett A; Wijdicks, Coen A; Millett, Peter J

    2014-08-01

    Single- and double-row arthroscopic reconstruction techniques for acute bony Bankart lesions have been described in the literature. The double-row fixation technique would provide superior reduction and stability of a simulated bony Bankart lesion at time zero in a cadaveric model compared with the single-row technique. Controlled laboratory study. Testing was performed on 14 matched pairs of glenoids with simulated bony Bankart fractures with a defect width of 25% of the glenoid diameter. Half of the fractures were repaired with a double-row technique, while the contralateral glenoids were repaired with a single-row technique. The quality of fracture reduction was measured with a coordinate measuring machine. To determine the biomechanical stability of the repairs, specimens were preconditioned with 10 sinusoidal cycles between 5 and 25 N at 0.1 Hz and then pulled to failure in the anteromedial direction at a rate of 5 mm/min. Loads at 1 mm and 2 mm of fracture displacement were determined. The double-row technique required significantly higher forces to achieve fracture displacements of 1 mm (mean, 60.6 N; range, 39.0-93.3 N; P = .001) and 2 mm (mean, 94.4 N; range, 43.4-151.2 N; P = .004) than the single-row technique (1 mm: mean, 30.2 N; range, 14.0-54.1 N and 2 mm: mean, 63.7 N; range, 26.6-118.8 N). Significantly reduced fracture displacement was seen after double-row repair for both the unloaded condition (mean, 1.1 mm; range, 0.3-2.4 mm; P = .005) and in response to a 10-N anterior force applied to the defect (mean, 1.6 mm; range, 0.5-2.7 mm; P = .001) compared with single-row repair (unloaded: mean, 2.1 mm; range, 1.3-3.4 mm and loaded: mean, 3.4 mm; range, 1.9-4.7 mm). The double-row fixation technique resulted in improved fracture reduction and superior stability at time zero in this cadaveric model. This information may influence the surgical technique used to treat large osseous Bankart fractures and the postoperative rehabilitation protocols

  12. Noninvasive coronary angiography by 320-row computed tomography with lower radiation exposure and maintained diagnostic accuracy: comparison of results with cardiac catheterization in a head-to-head pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Marc; Zimmermann, Elke; Deissenrieder, Florian; Laule, Michael; Dübel, Hans-Peter; Schlattmann, Peter; Knebel, Fabian; Rutsch, Wolfgang; Hamm, Bernd

    2009-09-08

    Noninvasive coronary angiography with the use of multislice computed tomography (CT) scanners is feasible with high sensitivity and negative predictive value; however, the radiation exposure associated with this technique is rather high. We evaluated coronary angiography using whole-heart 320-row CT, which avoids exposure-intensive overscanning and overranging. A total of 30 consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease referred for clinically indicated conventional coronary angiography (CCA) were included in this prospective intention-to-diagnose study. CT was performed with the use of up to 320 simultaneous detector rows before same-day CCA, which, together with quantitative analysis, served as the reference standard. The per-patient sensitivity and specificity for CT compared with CCA were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 72 to 100) and 94% (95% CI, 73 to 100), respectively. Per-vessel versus per-segment sensitivity and specificity were 89% (95% CI, 62 to 98) and 96% (95% CI, 90 to 99) versus 78% (95% CI, 56 to 91) and 98% (95% CI, 96 to 99), respectively. Interobserver agreement between the 2 readers was significantly better for CCA (97% of 121 coronary arteries) than for CT (90%; P=0.04). Percent diameter stenosis determined with the use of CT showed good correlation with CCA (P<0.001, R=0.81) without significant underestimation or overestimation (-3.1+/-24.4%; P=0.08). Intraindividual comparison of CT with CCA revealed a significantly smaller effective radiation dose (median, 4.2 versus 8.5 mSv; P<0.05) and amount of contrast agent required (median, 80 versus 111 mL; P<0.001) for 320-row CT. The majority of patients (87%) indicated that they would prefer CT over CCA for future diagnostic imaging (P<0.001). CT with the use of emerging technology has the potential to significantly reduce the radiation dose and amount of contrast agent required compared with CCA while maintaining high diagnostic accuracy.

  13. Comparison of the Clinical and Radiological Oucomes of Conventional Double row and Double row Suture Bridge Repairs in Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Muiño, José María Silberberg; Gimenez, Martín Alejandro; Salvucci, Mauro Gabriel Maroa; Ferro, Diego; Rullan, Ramón Muiña; Blanchero, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To compare clinical and radiological results of two types of rotator cuff (RC) repairs: the double row and double row-suture bridge. Methods: Forty-two patients with a complete tear (medium and large size) of the RC were repaired by a double row arthroscopic technique. Minimum follow-up was 19 months (range, 19-28 months). Clinical outcomes were assessed by the Modified Constant Scale and satisfaction rate by an independent observer; VAS, UCLA and ASES. Radiological results were assed by a postoperative MRI by a musculoskeletal radiologist. Results: Series of 22 patients in the double row technique (Group A) and 20 patients in the double-row suture bridge (Gruop B). Statistically there was a significant improvement in the Constant Scale, satisfaction rate, muscle assessment, VAS, UCLA and ASES in both groups after the surgical procedure. There were no significant clinical differences between both groups at any time after the surgical procedure. According to MRI postop, 19/22 shoulders in Group A and 18/20 in Group B remained intact, with no significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion: RC repairs with double row and double-row-suture bridge techniques provide clinical and radiological good and excelent results. In our retrospective, mid-size study, we have found no differences between these two repair techniques.

  14. Optimal scan timing for artery-vein separation at whole-brain CT angiography using a 320-row MDCT volume scanner.

    PubMed

    Shirasaka, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Yamashita, Koji; Kondo, Masatoshi; Hamasaki, Hiroshi; Shimomiya, Yamato; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Funama, Yoshinori; Honda, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    A 320-row multidetector CT (MDCT) is expected for a good artery-vein separation in terms of temporal resolution. However, a shortened scan duration may lead to insufficient vascular enhancement. We assessed the optimal scan timing for the artery-vein separation at whole-brain CT angiography (CTA) when bolus tracking was used at 320-row MDCT. We analyzed 60 patients, who underwent whole-brain four-dimensional CTA. Difference in CT attenuation between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the superior sagittal sinus (Datt) was calculated in each phase. Using a visual evaluation score for the depiction of arteries and veins, we calculated the difference between the mean score for the intracranial arteries and the mean score for the veins (Dscore). We assessed the time at which the maximum Datt and Dscore were simultaneously observed. The maximum Datt was observed at 6.0 s and 8.0 s in the arterial-dominant phase and at 16.0 s and 18.0 s in the venous-dominant phase after the contrast media arrival time at the ICA (Taa). The maximum Dscore was observed at 6.0 s and 8.0 s in the arterial-dominant phase and at 16.0 s in the venous-dominant phase after the Taa. There were no statistically significant differences in Datt (p = 0.375) or Dscore (p = 0.139) between these scan timings. The optimal scan timing for artery-vein separation at whole-brain CTA was 6.0 s or 8.0 s for the arteries and 16.0 s for the veins after the Taa. Advances in knowledge: Optimal scan timing allowed us to visualize intracranial arteries or veins with minimal superimposition.

  15. Comparison of Rowing on a Concept 2 Stationary and Dynamic Ergometer

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Aaron; Abendroth, Julianne; King, Deborah; Swensen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Biomechanical and physiological responses to rowing 1000 m at a power output equivalent to a 2000 m race were compared in 34 collegiate rowers (17 women, 17 men) rowing on a stationary and dynamic Concept 2 ergometer. Stroke ratio, peak handle force, rate of force development, impulse, and respiratory exchange ratio decreased by 15.7, 14.8, 10.9, 10.2 and 1.9%, respectively, on the dynamic ergometer. In contrast, percent time to peak force and stroke rate increased by 10.5 and 12.6%, respectively, during dynamic ergometry; the changes in stroke rate and impulse were greater for men than women. Last, VO2 was 5.1% higher and efficiency 5. 3% lower on the dynamic ergometer for men. Collegiate rowers used higher stoke rates and lower peak stroke forces to achieve a similar power output while rowing at race pace on the dynamic ergometer, which may have increased the cardiopulmonary demand and possibly reduced force production in the primary movers. Differences were more pronounced in males than females; this dichotomy may be more due to dynamic ergometer familiarity than sex. Key points When rowing at a constant power output, all rowers used higher stroke rates and lower stroke forces on the Concept 2 Dynamic ergometer as compared to the Concept 2 Stationary ergometer. When rowing at a constant power output, cardiopulmonary demand was higher for all rowers, as measured by heart rate, on the Concept 2 Dynamic ergometer as compared to the Concept 2 Stationary ergometer. When rowing at a constant power output, efficiency was lower for male rowers on the Concept 2 Dynamic ergometer as compared to the Concept 2 Stationary ergometer. PMID:24149871

  16. Correlative Imaging in a Patient with Cystic Thymoma: CT, MR and PET/CT Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Valeria; Esposito, Alfredo; Maurea, Simone; Camera, Luigi; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Palmieri, Giovannella; Buonerba, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cystic thymoma is a rare variant of thymic neoplasm characterized by almost complete cystic degeneration with mixed internal structure. We describe a case of a 60 year-old woman with a cystic thymoma studied with advanced tomographic imaging stydies. CT, MRI and PET/CT with 18F-FDG were performed; volumetric CT and MRI images provided better anatomic evaluation for pre-operative assessment, while PET/CT was helpful for lesion characterization based on 18F-FDG uptake. Although imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative evaluation of cystic thymoma, final diagnosis still remains surgical. Case Report A 60-year-old woman with recent chest pain and no history of previous disease was admitted to our departement to investigate the result of a previous chest X-ray that showed bilateral mediastinal enlargement; for this purpose, enhanced chest CT scan was performed using a 64-rows scanner (Toshiba, Aquilion 64, Japan) before and after intravenous bolus administration of iodinated non ionic contrast agent; CT images demonstrated the presence of a large mediastinal mass (11×8 cm) located in the anterior mediastinum who extended from the anonymous vein to the cardio-phrenic space, compressing the left atrium and causing medium lobe atelectasis; bilateral pleural effusion was also present. Conclusions In conclusion, correlative imaging plays a foundamental role for the diagnostic evaluation of patient with cystic thymoma. In particular, volumetric CT and MRI studies can provide better anatomic informations regarding internal structure and local tumor spread for pre-operative assessment. Conversely, metabolic imaging using 18F-FDG PET/CT is helpful for lesion characterization differentiating benign from malignant lesion on the basis of intense tracer uptake. The role of PET/MRI is still under investigation. However, final diagnosis still remains surgical even though imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative patient management. PMID:25593635

  17. Inter-algorithm lesion volumetry comparison of real and 3D simulated lung lesions in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, Marthony; Solomon, Justin; Hoye, Jocelyn; Smith, Taylor; Ebner, Lukas; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish volumetric exchangeability between real and computational lung lesions in CT. We compared the overall relative volume estimation performance of segmentation tools when used to measure real lesions in actual patient CT images and computational lesions virtually inserted into the same patient images (i.e., hybrid datasets). Pathologically confirmed malignancies from 30 thoracic patient cases from Reference Image Database to Evaluate Therapy Response (RIDER) were modeled and used as the basis for the comparison. Lesions included isolated nodules as well as those attached to the pleura or other lung structures. Patient images were acquired using a 16 detector row or 64 detector row CT scanner (Lightspeed 16 or VCT; GE Healthcare). Scans were acquired using standard chest protocols during a single breath-hold. Virtual 3D lesion models based on real lesions were developed in Duke Lesion Tool (Duke University), and inserted using a validated image-domain insertion program. Nodule volumes were estimated using multiple commercial segmentation tools (iNtuition, TeraRecon, Inc., Syngo.via, Siemens Healthcare, and IntelliSpace, Philips Healthcare). Consensus based volume comparison showed consistent trends in volume measurement between real and virtual lesions across all software. The average percent bias (+/- standard error) shows -9.2+/-3.2% for real lesions versus -6.7+/-1.2% for virtual lesions with tool A, 3.9+/-2.5% and 5.0+/-0.9% for tool B, and 5.3+/-2.3% and 1.8+/-0.8% for tool C, respectively. Virtual lesion volumes were statistically similar to those of real lesions (< 4% difference) with p >.05 in most cases. Results suggest that hybrid datasets had similar inter-algorithm variability compared to real datasets.

  18. Automated multidetector row CT dataset segmentation with an interactive watershed transform (IWT) algorithm: Part 1. Understanding the IWT technique.

    PubMed

    Heath, David G; Hahn, Horst K; Johnson, Pamela T; Fishman, Elliot K

    2008-12-01

    Segmentation of volumetric computed tomography (CT) datasets facilitates evaluation of 3D CT angiography renderings, particularly with maximum intensity projection displays. This manuscript describes a novel automated bone editing program that uses an interactive watershed transform (IWT) technique to rapidly extract the skeletal structures from the volume. Advantages of this tool include efficient segmentation of large datasets with minimal need for correction. In the first of this two-part series, the principles of the IWT technique are reviewed, followed by a discussion of clinical utility based on our experience.

  19. Rowing Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinks, W. L.

    This review of the literature discusses and examines the methods used in physiological assessment of rowers, results of such assessments, and future directions emanating from research in the physiology of rowing. The first section discusses the energy demands of rowing, including the contribution of the energy system, anaerobic metabolism, and the…

  20. Coronary artery calcium measurement with multi-detector row CT: in vitro assessment of effect of radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Hong, Cheng; Bae, Kyongtae T; Pilgram, Thomas K; Suh, Jongdae; Bradley, David

    2002-12-01

    The authors assessed in vitro the effect of radiation dose on coronary artery calcium quantification with multi-detector row computed tomography. A cardiac phantom with calcified cylinders was scanned at various milliampere second settings (20-160 mAs). A clear tendency was found for image noise to decrease as tube current increased (P <.001). No tendency was found for the Agatson score or calcium volume and mass errors to vary with tube current. Calcium measurements were not significantly affected by the choice of tube current. Calcium mass error was strongly correlated with calcium volume error (P <.001). The calcium mass measurement was more accurate and less variable than the calcium volume measurement.

  1. Second-generation dual-energy computed tomography of the abdomen: radiation dose comparison with 64- and 128-row single-energy acquisition.

    PubMed

    De Cecco, Carlo Nicola; Darnell, Anna; Macías, Napoleón; Ayuso, Juan Ramón; Rodríguez, Sonia; Rimola, Jordi; Pagés, Mario; García-Criado, Ángeles; Rengo, Marco; Muscogiuri, Giuseppe; Laghi, Andrea; Ayuso, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the radiation dose in abdominal dual-energy (DE) and single-energy (SE) acquisitions obtained in clinical practice with a second-generation DE computed tomography (DECT) and to analyze the dose variation in comparison with an SE acquisition performed with a 64-row SECT (SECT). A total of 130 patients divided into 2 groups underwent precontrast and portal abdominal 128-row CT examination. In group A, DE portal acquisition was performed using a detector configuration of 2 × 40 × 0.6 mm, tube A at 80 kVp and a reference value of 559 mAs, tube B at 140 kVp and a reference value of 216 mAs, pitch 0.6, and online dose modulation; group B underwent SE portal acquisition using a detector configuration of 64 × 0.6 mm, 120 kVp and a reference value of 180 mAs, pitch 0.75, and online dose modulation. Group C consisted of 32 subjects from group A previously studied with 64-row SECT using the following parameters: detector configuration 64 × 0.6 mm, 120 kVp and a reference value of 180 mAs, pitch 0.75, and online dose modulation. In each group, the portal phase dose-length product and radiation dose (mSv) were calculated and normalized for a typical abdominal acquisition of 40 cm. After normalization to standard 40-cm acquisition, a dose-length product of 599.0 ± 133.5 mGy · cm (range, 367.5 ± 1231.2 mGy · cm) in group A, 525.9 ± 139.2 mGy · cm (range, 215.7-882.8 mGy · cm) in group B, and 515.9 ± 111.3 mGy · cm (range, 305.5-687.2 mGy · cm) in group C was calculated for portal phase acquisition.A significant radiation dose increase (P < 0.05) was observed in group A (10.2 ± 2.3 mSv) compared with group B (8.9 ± 2.4) and group C (8.8 ± 1.9 mSv). No significant difference (P > 0.05) was reported between SE 64- and 128-row acquisitions. A significant positive correlation between radiation dose and body mass index was observed in each group (group A, r = 0.59, P < 0.0001; group B, r = 0.35, P < 0.0001; group C, r = 0.20, P = 0

  2. Radiation dose is reduced with a single-pass whole-body multi-detector row CT trauma protocol compared with a conventional segmented method: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Ptak, Thomas; Rhea, James T; Novelline, Robert A

    2003-12-01

    Radiation dose data were collected from a calibrated multi-detector row computed tomographic (CT) scanner during trauma CT. One protocol (used with 10 case subjects) involved a single-pass continuous whole-body acquisition from cranial vertex to symphysis pubis, while the other, conventional protocol (used with 10 control subjects) involved scouting and scanning body segments (head, cervical spine, chest, abdomen, and pelvis) individually. Technical factors were kept constant within each body segment for the single-pass and the segmented protocols. Statistics included univariate analysis, two-tailed t testing to evaluate statistical significance of the summary statistic, and power and subject population contingency tables. The mean dose length product (DLP) with the single-pass protocol was 17% lower than the sum of the DLPs of each of the individual body segment scans (P <.001). Analysis of power and subject population by using a difference in mean of 500 mGy. cm and an alpha of.05 revealed a (1-beta) of higher than 0.90 for a sample of 10 patients. Thus, a whole-body single-pass trauma protocol, compared with a typical segmented acquisition protocol matched for imaging technique, resulted in reduced total radiation dose. The reduction in radiation dose is thought to represent a reduction in redundant imaging at overlap zones between body segments scanned in the segmental protocol but not in the continuous acquisition.

  3. Submillisievert Median Radiation Dose for Coronary Angiography with a Second-Generation 320–Detector Row CT Scanner in 107 Consecutive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shanbhag, Sujata M.; Arai, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To (a) use a new second-generation wide-volume 320–detector row computed tomographic (CT) scanner to explore optimization of radiation exposure in coronary CT angiography in an unselected and consecutive cohort of patients referred for clinical purposes and (b) compare estimated radiation exposure and image quality with that from a cohort of similar patients who underwent imaging with a previous first-generation CT system. Materials and Methods: The study was approved by the institutional review board, and all subjects provided written consent. Coronary CT angiography was performed in 107 consecutive patients with a new second-generation 320–detector row unit. Estimated radiation exposure and image quality were compared with those from 100 consecutive patients who underwent imaging with a previous first-generation scanner. Effective radiation dose was estimated by multiplying the dose-length product by an effective dose conversion factor of 0.014 mSv/mGy ⋅ cm and reported with size-specific dose estimates (SSDEs). Image quality was evaluated by two independent readers. Results: The mean age of the 107 patients was 55.4 years ± 12.0 (standard deviation); 57 patients (53.3%) were men. The median body mass index was 27.3 kg/m2 (range, 18.1–47.2 kg/m2); however, 71 patients (66.4%) were overweight, obese, or morbidly obese. A tube potential of 100 kV was used in 97 patients (90.6%), single-volume acquisition was used in 104 (97.2%), and prospective electrocardiographic gating was used in 106 (99.1%). The mean heart rate was 57.1 beats per minute ± 11.2 (range, 34–96 beats per minute), which enabled single-heartbeat scans in 100 patients (93.4%). The median radiation dose was 0.93 mSv (interquartile range [IQR], 0.58–1.74 mSv) with the second-generation unit and 2.67 mSv (IQR, 1.68–4.00 mSv) with the first-generation unit (P < .0001). The median SSDE was 6.0 mGy (IQR, 4.1–10.0 mGy) with the second-generation unit and 13.2 mGy (IQR, 10.2–18

  4. Comparison between CT Net enhancement and PET/CT SUV for N staging of gastric cancer: A case series.

    PubMed

    Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Telegrafo, Michele; Lucarelli, Nicola Maria; Lorusso, Valentina; Scardapane, Arnaldo; Niccoli Asabella, Artor; Moschetta, Marco

    2017-09-01

    The therapeutic approach of gastric cancer strictly depends on TNM staging mainly provided by CT and PET/CT. However, the lymph node size criterion as detected by MDCT causes a poor differential diagnosis between reactive and metastatic enlarged lymph nodes with low specificity values. Our study aims to compare 320-row CT Net enhancement and fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-FDG PET/CT) SUV for N staging of gastric cancer. 45 patients with histologically proven gastric cancer underwent CT and F-FDG PET/CT. Two radiologists in consensus evaluated all images and calculated the CT Net enhancement and F-FDG PET/CT SUV for N staging, having the histological findings as the reference standard. CT and F-FDG PET/CT sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were evaluated and compared by using the Mc Nemar test. The histological examination revealed nodal metastases in 29/45 cases (64%). CT Net enhancement obtained sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV of 90%, 81%, 87%, 90% and 81%, respectively. F-FDG PET/CT SUV obtained sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV of 66%, 88%, 73%, 90% and 58%, respectively. No statistically significant difference between the two imaging modalities was found (p = 0.1). CT Net enhancement represents an accurate tool for N staging of gastric cancer and could be considered as the CT corresponding quantitative parameter of F-FDG PET/CT SUV. It could be applied in the clinical practice for differentiating reactive lymph nodes from metastatic ones improving accuracy and specificity of CT.

  5. The effect of bolus viscosity on laryngeal closure in swallowing: kinematic analysis using 320-row area detector CT.

    PubMed

    Inamoto, Yoko; Saitoh, Eiichi; Okada, Sumiko; Kagaya, Hitoshi; Shibata, Seiko; Ota, Kikuo; Baba, Mikoto; Fujii, Naoko; Katada, Kazuhiro; Wattanapan, Pattra; Palmer, Jeffrey B

    2013-03-01

    The present study examined the effect of bolus viscosity on the onset of laryngeal closure (relative to hyoid elevation), the duration of laryngeal closure, and other key events of swallowing in ten healthy volunteers. All volunteers underwent 320-row area detector computed tomography swallow studies while swallowing 10 ml of honey-thick barium (5 % v/w) and thin barium (5 % v/w) in a 45° reclining position. Three-dimensional images of both consistencies were created in 29 phases at an interval of 0.10 s (100 ms) over a 2.90-s duration. The timing of the motions of the hyoid bone, soft palate, and epiglottis; the opening and closing of the laryngeal vestibule, true vocal cords (TVC), and pharyngoesophageal segment; and the bolus movement were measured and compared between the two consistencies. The result showed differing patterns of bolus movement for thin and thick liquids. With thin liquids, the bolus reached the hypopharynx earlier and stayed in the hypopharynx longer than with thick liquids. Among events of laryngeal closure, only the timing of TVC closure differed significantly between the two consistencies. With thin liquids, TVC closure started earlier and lasted longer than with thick liquids. This TVC movement could reflect a response to the faster flow of thin liquids. The results suggest that bolus viscosity alters the temporal characteristics of swallowing, especially closure of the TVC.

  6. Prospective evaluation of the influence of iterative reconstruction on the reproducibility of coronary calcium quantification in reduced radiation dose 320 detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Choi, Andrew D; Leifer, Eric S; Yu, Jeannie; Shanbhag, Sujata M; Bronson, Kathie; Arai, Andrew E; Chen, Marcus Y

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC) predicts coronary heart disease events and is important for individualized cardiac risk assessment. This report assesses the interscan variability of CT for coronary calcium quantification using image acquisition with standard and reduced radiation dose protocols and whether the use of reduced radiation dose acquisition with iterative reconstruction (IR; "reduced-dose/IR ") allows for similar image quality and reproducibility when compared to standard radiation dose acquisition with filtered back projection (FBP; "standard-dose/FBP") on 320-detector row computed tomography (320-CT). 200 consecutive patients (60 ± 9 years, 59% male) prospectively underwent two standard- and two reduced-dose acquisitions (800 total scans, 1600 reconstructions) using 320 slice CT and 120 kV tube voltage. Automated tube current modulation was used and for reduced-dose scans, prescribed tube current was lowered by 70%. Image noise and Agatston scores were determined and compared. Regarding stratification by Agatston score categories (0, 1-10, 11-100, 101-400, >400), reduced-dose/IR versus standard-dose/FBP had excellent agreement at 89% (95% CI: 86-92%) with kappa 0.86 (95% CI: 0.81-0.90). Standard-dose/FBP rescan agreement was 93% (95% CI: 89-96%) with kappa = 0.91 (95% CI: 0.86-0.95) while reduced-dose/IR rescan agreement was similar at 91% (95% CI: 87-94%) with kappa 0.88 (95% CI: 0.83-0.93). Image noise was significantly higher but clinically acceptable for reduced-dose/IR (18 Hounsfield Unit [HU] mean) compared to standard-dose/FBP (16 HU; p < 0.0001). Median radiation exposure was 74% lower for reduced- (0.37 mSv) versus standard-dose (1.4 mSv) acquisitions. Rescan agreement was excellent for reduced-dose image acquisition with iterative reconstruction and standard-dose acquisition with filtered back projection for the quantification of coronary calcium by CT. These methods make it possible to reduce radiation exposure by 74%. URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct

  7. Impaired left ventricular function has a detrimental effect on image quality in multi-detector row CT coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Manghat, N E; Morgan-Hughes, G J; Shaw, S R; Marshall, A J; Roobottom, C A

    2008-04-01

    To determine whether there is a relationship between left ventricular (LV) haemodynamic parameters, circulation times, and arterial contrast opacification that might affect the image quality of computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography. Thirty-six patients were included in the study: 18 with cardiomyopathy (CM) and LV dilatation of suspected ischaemic aetiology [age 57.9+/-13.7 years, range 30-77 years; 14 male, four female; body mass index (BMI)=27.7+/-4.5, range 25.5-31.8] and 18 controls (age 62.3+/-9.4 years, range 47-89 years; 10 male, eight female; BMI 27.8+/-6.6; range 19.2-33.6). Coronary artery image quality was assessed using a three-point visual scale; contrast medium circulation times, aortic root contrast attenuation, and LV functional parameters were studied. Visually reduced contrast opacification impaired image quality more often in the CM group than the control group (27.4 versus 5.1%). A total of 55.6% CM patients had a contrast transit time ranging from 30-75 s; the number of "unassessable" segments increased with increasing transit time conforming to a fitted quadratic model (R2=0.74). The relationship between LV ejection fraction and contrast attenuation may also conform to a quadratic model (R2=0.71). LV haemodynamics influence coronary artery opacification using cardiac CT, and users imaging this subgroup must do so with the knowledge of this potential pitfall. The results indicate the need for further studies examining CT protocols in this clinical subgroup.

  8. Whole body 16-row multislice CT in emergency room: effects of different protocols on scanning time, image quality and radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Fanucci, Ezio; Fiaschetti, Valeria; Rotili, Anna; Floris, Roberto; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare two different scanning protocols in patients suspected to have multiple trauma using multidetector 16-row computed tomography (CT) to better define scanning time, imaging quality and radiation exposure. Forty-six patients, between March 2004 and March 2005, with suspected multiple trauma (cerebral, spine, chest, abdominal and pelvis) were evaluated with two different protocols: Protocol "A" 26 patients; Protocol "B" 20 patients. Protocol A consists of a single-pass continuous whole-body acquisition (from vertex to pubic symphysis), whereas Protocol B of conventional segmented acquisition with scanning of body segments individually. Both protocols were performed using a multidetector 16-rows CT (Light-Speed 16, General Electric Medical System, Milwaukee, WI, USA) with the same technical factors. Radiation dose was evaluated in two ways: computer tomography dose index (CTDI) = dose measured in central and peripheral region of the subjects as a direct result of a CT section acquisition of T millimeters thick (independent from the two protocols) and dose length product (DLP) = total dose deposited over the length of the acquisition (dependent from the two protocols). Image quality was rated according to the following scores: 1, excellent; 2, good; 3, satisfactory; 4, moderate and 5, poor. The results were compared using Wilcoxon's test to identify significant difference in terms of image quality, scanning time, radiation exposure and presence of artifacts, assuming significance at a p value of <0.05. In the single-pass scanning, DLP was 2.671 mGy x cm and a total scan time of 35 s. In whole-body protocols, we have seen artifacts due to arm adduction in thorax and less image quality in brain. In the conventional segmented study, DLP was 3.217 mGy x cm and a total scan time of 65 s; this protocol offered less extraction capabilities of off-axial on focused images of the entire spine, aorta, facial bones or hip without rescanning

  9. Time Efficiency and Diagnostic Accuracy of New Automated Myocardial Perfusion Analysis Software in 320-Row CT Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rief, Matthias; Stenzel, Fabian; Kranz, Anisha; Schlattmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the time efficiency and diagnostic accuracy of automated myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) image analysis software. Materials and Methods 320-row CTP was performed in 30 patients, and analyses were conducted independently by three different blinded readers by the use of two recent software releases (version 4.6 and novel version 4.71GR001, Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan). Analysis times were compared, and automated epi- and endocardial contour detection was subjectively rated in five categories (excellent, good, fair, poor and very poor). As semi-quantitative perfusion parameters, myocardial attenuation and transmural perfusion ratio (TPR) were calculated for each myocardial segment and agreement was tested by using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Conventional coronary angiography served as reference standard. Results The analysis time was significantly reduced with the novel automated software version as compared with the former release (Reader 1: 43:08 ± 11:39 min vs. 09:47 ± 04:51 min, Reader 2: 42:07 ± 06:44 min vs. 09:42 ± 02:50 min and Reader 3: 21:38 ± 3:44 min vs. 07:34 ± 02:12 min; p < 0.001 for all). Epi- and endocardial contour detection for the novel software was rated to be significantly better (p < 0.001) than with the former software. ICCs demonstrated strong agreement (≥ 0.75) for myocardial attenuation in 93% and for TPR in 82%. Diagnostic accuracy for the two software versions was not significantly different (p = 0.169) as compared with conventional coronary angiography. Conclusion The novel automated CTP analysis software offers enhanced time efficiency with an improvement by a factor of about four, while maintaining diagnostic accuracy. PMID:23323027

  10. Assessment of organ absorbed doses and estimation of effective doses from pediatric anthropomorphic phantom measurements for multi-detector row CT with and without automatic exposure control.

    PubMed

    Brisse, Hervé J; Robilliard, Magalie; Savignoni, Alexia; Pierrat, Noelle; Gaboriaud, Geneviève; De Rycke, Yann; Neuenschwander, Sylvia; Aubert, Bernard; Rosenwald, Jean-Claude

    2009-10-01

    This study was designed to measure organ absorbed doses from multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) on pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms, calculate the corresponding effective doses, and assess the influence of automatic exposure control (AEC) in terms of organ dose variations. Four anthropomorphic phantoms (phantoms represent the equivalent of a newborn, 1-, 5-, and 10-y-old child) were scanned with a four-channel MDCT coupled with a z-axis-based AEC system. Two CT torso protocols were compared: a first protocol without AEC and constant tube current-time product and a second protocol with AEC using age-adjusted noise indices. Organ absorbed doses were monitored by thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Cu, P). Effective doses were calculated according to the tissue weighting factors of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (). For fixed mA acquisitions, organ doses normalized to the volume CT dose index in a 16-cm head phantom (CTDIvol16) ranged from 0.6 to 1.5 and effective doses ranged from 8.4 to 13.5 mSv. For the newborn-equivalent phantom, the AEC-modulated scan showed almost no significant dose variation compared to the fixed mA scan. For the 1-, 5- and 10-y equivalent phantoms, the use of AEC induced a significant dose decrease on chest organs (ranging from 61 to 31% for thyroid, 37 to 21% for lung, 34 to 17% for esophagus, and 39 to 10% for breast). However, AEC also induced a significant dose increase (ranging from 28 to 48% for salivary glands, 22 to 51% for bladder, and 24 to 70% for ovaries) related to the high density of skull base and pelvic bones. These dose increases should be considered before using AEC as a dose optimization tool in children.

  11. Optimum CT reconstruction parameters for vascular and hepatocellular carcinoma models in a liver phantom with multi-level dynamic computed tomography with 64 detector rows: a basic study.

    PubMed

    Murotani, Kazuhiro; Kazuhiro, Murotani; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Hosokawa, Seiki; Nishioku, Tadayoshi

    2013-07-01

    We quantified to clarify the optimum factors for CT image reconstruction of an enhanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model in a liver phantom obtained by multi-level dynamic computed tomography (M-LDCT) with 64 detector rows. After M-LDCT scanning of a water phantom and an enhanced HCC model, we compared the standard deviation (SD, 1 ± SD), noise power spectrum (NPS) values, contrast-noise ratios (CNR), and the M-LDCT image among the reconstruction parameters, including the convolution kernel (FC11, FC13, and FC15), post-processing quantum filters (2D-Q00, 2D-Q01, and 2D-Q02) and slice thicknesses/slice intervals. The SD and NPS values were lowest with FC11 and 2D-Q02. The CNR values were highest with 2D-Q02. The M-LDCT image quality was highest with FC11 and 2D-Q02, and with slice thicknesses/slice intervals of 0.5 mm/0.5 mm and 0.5 mm/0.25 mm. The optimum factors were the FC11 convolution kernel, 2D-Q02 quantum filter, and 0.5 mm slice thickness/0.5 mm slice interval or less.

  12. Rowing injuries.

    PubMed

    Rumball, Jane S; Lebrun, Constance M; Di Ciacca, Stephen R; Orlando, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Participation in the sport of rowing has been steadily increasing in recent decades, yet few studies address the specific injuries incurred. This article reviews the most common injuries described in the literature, including musculoskeletal problems in the lower back, ribs, shoulder, wrist and knee. A review of basic rowing physiology and equipment is included, along with a description of the mechanics of the rowing stroke. This information is necessary in order to make an accurate diagnosis and treatment protocol for these injuries, which are mainly chronic in nature. The most frequently injured region is the low back, mainly due to excessive hyperflexion and twisting, and can include specific injuries such as spondylolysis, sacroiliac joint dysfunction and disc herniation. Rib stress fractures account for the most time lost from on-water training and competition. Although theories abound for the mechanism of injury, the exact aetiology of rib stress fractures remains unknown. Other injuries discussed within, which are specific to ribs, include costochondritis, costovertebral joint subluxation and intercostal muscle strains. Shoulder pain is quite common in rowers and can be the result of overuse, poor technique, or tension in the upper body. Injuries concerning the forearm and wrist are also common, and can include exertional compartment syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, deQuervain's and intersection syndrome, and tenosynovitis of the wrist extensors. In the lower body, the major injuries reported include generalised patellofemoral pain due to abnormal patellar tracking, and iliotibial band friction syndrome. Lastly, dermatological issues, such as blisters and abrasions, and miscellaneous issues, such as environmental concerns and the female athlete triad, are also included in this article.Pathophysiology, mechanism of injury, assessment and management strategies are outlined in the text for each injury, with special attention given to ways to correct

  13. Comparison of coronary plaque subtypes in male and female patients using 320-row MDCTA.

    PubMed

    Khosa, Faisal; Khan, Atif N; Nasir, Khurram; Bedayat, Arash; Malik, Zehra; Jon, Ali F; Cheema, Ahmad R; Clouse, Melvin E; Welty, Francine K

    2013-02-01

    Determine plaque subtype and volume difference in male and female patients with obstructive and non-obstructive CAD using 320-row MDCTA. 128 patients with suspected CAD underwent MDCTA. All studies were divided into two groups based on disease severity. 0-70% stenosis (non-obstructive CAD) & >70% (obstructive). All were compared for plaque quantity and subtypes by gender. Main arteries, RCA, LM, LAD and LCX were analyzed using Vitrea 5.2 software to quantify fatty, fibrous and calcified plaque. Thresholds for coronary plaque quantification (volume in mm(3)) were preset at 35 ± 12 HU for fatty, 90 ± 24 HU for fibrous and >130 HU for calcified/mixed plaque and analyzed using STATA software. Total plaque burden in 118 patients [65M: 53F] was significantly higher in all arteries in males compared to females with non-obstructive disease. Total plaque volume for males vs. females was: RCA: 10.10 ± 5.02 mm(3) vs. 6.89 ± 2.75 mm(3), respectively, p = 0.001; LAD: 7.21 ± 3.38 mm(3) vs. 5.89 ± 1.93 mm(3), respectively, p = 0.04; LCX: 9.13 ± 3.27 mm(3) vs. 7.16 ± 1.73 mm(3), respectively, p = 0.002; LM 15.13 ± 4.51 mm(3) vs. 11.85 ± 4.03 mm(3), respectively, p = 0.001. In sub-analyses, males had significantly more fibrous and fatty plaque in LM, LAD & LCX than females. However in the RCA, only fibrous plaque was significantly greater in males. Calcified plaque volume was not significantly different in both genders. Only 8% of patients had obstructive CAD (>70% stenosis); there was no significant difference in plaque volume or subtypes. In patients with non-obstructive CAD, males were found to have significantly higher total coronary plaque volume with predominance of fibrous and fatty subtypes compared to females of the same age and BMI. There was no significant difference in plaque subtype or volume in patients with obstructive disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Is aortic atherothrombotic disease detected using multidetector-row CT associated with an increased risk of early ischemic lesion recurrence after acute ischemic stroke?

    PubMed

    Ko, Youngchai; Kim, Wook-Joo; Jang, Myung Suk; Yang, Mi Hwa; Park, Jung Hyun; Choi, Sang Il; Chun, Eun Ju; Lee, Soo Joo; Han, Moon-Ku; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2012-03-01

    Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) is emerging as a new tool for diagnosing aortic atherothrombotic disease (AAD). We elucidated whether MDCT-detected AAD is associated with an increased risk of early ischemic lesion recurrence on diffusion-weighted MRI after ischemic stroke. A consecutive series of patients with acute ischemic stroke confirmed using diffusion-weighted MRI who were hospitalized within 48 hours after symptom onset and underwent MDCT were identified in a prospective stroke registry database. AAD on MDCT was defined as the presence of plaque formation that was noncalcified and ≥4 mm thick, ulcerative, or soft and thrombosed (vulnerable) in the proximal aortic arch. Ischemic lesion recurrence on diffusion-weighted MRI was defined as the occurrence of any new lesion separate from the index lesion on follow-up diffusion-weighted MRI performed within 14 days after symptom onset. A total of 138 patients was selected. MDCT detected AAD in 24 of 138 (17.4%); ≥4 mm thickness in 17 of 138 (12.3%); ulcerated plaque in 20 of 138 (14.5%); and vulnerable plaque in 16 of 138 (11.6%). With respect to diffusion-weighted MRI lesion recurrence, the crude ORs (95% CIs) were as follows: AAD, 3.56 (1.43-8.89); vulnerable plaque, 3.21 (1.11-9.30); ulcerated plaque, 3.37 (1.27-8.95); and ≥4 mm thickness of the noncalcified plaque, 4.23 (1.11-16.19). These results remained significant after adjustments for potential confounders were made. This study shows that AAD detected by MDCT increases the risk of early ischemic lesion recurrence after acute ischemic stroke, thus supporting the role of MDCT in diagnosing AAD and assessing its contribution to recurrence.

  15. CT enterography.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Giulia A; Raptopoulos, Vassilios

    2010-04-01

    Conventional radiologic and endoscopic evaluations of the small bowel are often limited by the length, caliber, and motility of the small bowel loops. The development of new multidetector-row CT scanners, with faster scan times and isotropic spatial resolution, allows high-resolution multiphasic and multiplanar assessment of the bowel, bowel wall, and lumen. CT Enterography (CTE) is a variant of routine abdominal scanning, geared toward more sustained bowel filling with oral contrast material, and the use of multiplanar images, that can enhance gastrointestinal (GI) tract imaging. This article examines the techniques and clinical applications of CTE in comparison with CT enteroclysis, focusing on Crohn disease, obscure GI bleeding, GI tumors, acute abdominal pain, and bowel obstruction. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of CT and MR imaging in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Vymazal, Josef; Rulseh, Aaron M; Keller, Jiří; Janouskova, Ladislava

    2012-12-01

    Cerebrovascular disease represents a major source of global mortality and morbidity. Imaging examinations play a critical role in the management of stroke patients, from establishing the initial diagnosis to determining and guiding further treatment. In this article, current CT and MRI methods employed in the management of stroke patients are reviewed, with an emphasis on ischemic stroke. The advantages and disadvantages of these techniques are discussed, a number of cases emphasizing key points are presented, and a comparison between modern CT and MRI techniques is outlined. The major drawback of CT is the high radiation dose, while in MRI it is the more complicated and time-consuming aspect of the examination. • Cerebrovascular disease represents a major source of global mortality and morbidity • Imaging examinations play a critical role in the management of stroke patients • The penumbra may be seen with both CT and MRI; however, this concept may be overly simplistic • The major drawback of CT is the high radiation dose, while MRI is a more complicated examination.

  17. Detection of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma: Comparison of multi-detector CT with digital subtraction angiography and Lipiodol CT

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao-Hua; Guan, Yong-Song; Zhou, Xiang-Ping; Huang, Juan; Sun, Long; Li, Xiao; Liu, Yuan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of biphasic multi-detector row helical computed tomography (MDCT), digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and Lipiodol computed tomography (CT) in detection of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with nodular HCC underwent biphasic MDCT examination: hepatic arterial phase (HAP) 25 s and portal venous phase (PVP) 70 s after injection of the contrast medium (1.5 mL/kg). They also underwent hepatic angiography and intra-arterial infusion of iodized oil. Lipiodol CT was performed 3-4 wk after infusion. MDCT images were compared with DSA and Lipiodol CT images for detection of hepatic nodules. RESULTS: The three imaging techniques had the same sensitivity in detecting nodules >20 mm in diameter. There was no significant difference in the sensitivity among HAP-MDCT, Lipiodol CT and DSA for nodules of 10-20 mm in diameter. For the nodules <10 mm in diameter, HAP-MDCT identified 47, Lipiodol CT detected 27 (χ2 = 11.3, P = 0.005<0.01, HAP-MDCT vs Lipiodol CT) and DSA detected 16 (χ2 = 9.09, P = 0.005<0.01 vs Lipiodol CT and χ2 = 29.03, P = 0.005<0.01vs HAP-MDCT). However, six nodules <10 mm in diameter were detected only by Lipiodol CT. CONCLUSION: MDCT and Lipiodol CT are two complementary modalities. At present, MDCT does not obviate the need for DSA and subsequent Lipiodol CT as a preoperative examination for HCC. PMID:15633215

  18. The added diagnostic value of 64-row multidetector CT combined with contrast-enhanced US in the evaluation of hepatocellular nodule vascularity: implications in the diagnosis of malignancy in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio; Alaimo, Valerio; Baratella, Elisa; Medeot, Alessandro; Midiri, Massimo; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the added diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) combined with 64-row multidetector CT (CT) in the assessment of hepatocellular nodule vascularity in patients with liver cirrhosis. One hundred and six cirrhotic patients (68 male, 38 female; mean age +/- SD, 70 +/- 7 years) with 121 biopsy-proven hepatocellular nodules (72 hepatocellular carcinomas, 10 dysplastic and 15 regenerative nodules, 12 hemangiomas, and 12 other benignancies) detected during US surveillance were prospectively recruited. Each nodule was scanned by CEUS during the arterial (10-40 s), portal venous (45-90 s), and delayed sinusoidal phase (from 100 s after microbubble injection to microbubble disappearance). Nodule vascularity at CEUS, CT, and combined CEUS/CT was evaluated side-by-side by two independent blinded readers who classified nodules as benign or malignant according to reference diagnostic criteria. The combined assessment of CEUS/CT provided higher sensitivity (97%, both readers) than did separate assessment of CEUS (88% reader 1; 87% reader 2) and CT (74% reader 1; 71% reader 2; P < 0.05), while no change in specificity was provided by combined analysis. The combined assessment of hepatocellular nodule vascularity at CT and CEUS improved sensitivity in the diagnosis of malignancy in patients with liver cirrhosis.

  19. A comparison of cylindrical and row trenched cooling holes with alignment angle of 0 degree near the combustor endwall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianpour, E.; Nor Azwadi, C. S.; Golshokouh, I.

    2013-12-01

    We studied the effects of cylindrical and row trenched cooling holes with alignment angle of 0° at BR=3.18 on the film cooling performance near the endwall surface of a combustor simulator. In this research, a three-dimensional presentation of gas turbine engine was simulated and analyzed with a commercial finite volume package FLUENT 6.2.26 to gain fundamental data. The current study has been performed with Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence model (RANS) on internal cooling passages. This combustor simulator combined the interaction of two rows of dilution jets, which were staggered in the stream wise direction and aligned in the span wise direction. The entire findings of the study declared that with using the row trenched holes near the enwall surface; film cooling effectiveness is doubled compared to the cooling performance of baseline case.

  20. The Impact of Different Levels of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D on Image Quality of 320-Row Coronary CT Angiography: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Sarah; Rief, Matthias; Zimmermann, Elke; Martus, Peter; Schuijf, Joanne Désirée; Blobel, Jörg; Richter, Felicitas; Dewey, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was the systematic image quality evaluation of coronary CT angiography (CTA), reconstructed with the 3 different levels of adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR 3D) and compared to filtered back projection (FBP) with quantum denoising software (QDS). Methods Standard-dose CTA raw data of 30 patients with mean radiation dose of 3.2 ± 2.6 mSv were reconstructed using AIDR 3D mild, standard, strong and compared to FBP/QDS. Objective image quality comparison (signal, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), contour sharpness) was performed using 21 measurement points per patient, including measurements in each coronary artery from proximal to distal. Results Objective image quality parameters improved with increasing levels of AIDR 3D. Noise was lowest in AIDR 3D strong (p≤0.001 at 20/21 measurement points; compared with FBP/QDS). Signal and contour sharpness analysis showed no significant difference between the reconstruction algorithms for most measurement points. Best coronary SNR and CNR were achieved with AIDR 3D strong. No loss of SNR or CNR in distal segments was seen with AIDR 3D as compared to FBP. Conclusions On standard-dose coronary CTA images, AIDR 3D strong showed higher objective image quality than FBP/QDS without reducing contour sharpness. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00967876 PMID:25945924

  1. Imaging of Orthotopic Glioblastoma Xenografts in Mice Using a Clinical CT Scanner: Comparison with Micro-CT and Histology

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Stefanie; Mürle, Bettina; Felix, Manuela; Arns, Anna; Groden, Christoph; Wenz, Frederik; Hug, Andreas; Glatting, Gerhard; Kramer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is an increasing need for small animal in vivo imaging in murine orthotopic glioma models. Because dedicated small animal scanners are not available ubiquitously, the applicability of a clinical CT scanner for visualization and measurement of intracerebrally growing glioma xenografts in living mice was validated. Materials and Methods 2.5x106 U87MG cells were orthotopically implanted in NOD/SCID/ᵞc-/- mice (n = 9). Mice underwent contrast-enhanced (300 μl Iomeprol i.v.) imaging using a micro-CT (80 kV, 75 μAs, 360° rotation, 1,000 projections, scan time 33 s, resolution 40 x 40 x 53 μm) and a clinical CT scanner (4-row multislice detector; 120 kV, 150 mAs, slice thickness 0.5 mm, feed rotation 0.5 mm, resolution 98 x 98 x 500 μm). Mice were sacrificed and the brain was worked up histologically. In all modalities tumor volume was measured by two independent readers. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured from reconstructed CT-scans (0.5 mm slice thickness; n = 18). Results Tumor volumes (mean±SD mm3) were similar between both CT-modalities (micro-CT: 19.8±19.0, clinical CT: 19.8±18.8; Wilcoxon signed-rank test p = 0.813). Moreover, between reader analyses for each modality showed excellent agreement as demonstrated by correlation analysis (Spearman-Rho >0.9; p<0.01 for all correlations). Histologically measured tumor volumes (11.0±11.2) were significantly smaller due to shrinkage artifacts (p<0.05). CNR and SNR were 2.1±1.0 and 1.1±0.04 for micro-CT and 23.1±24.0 and 1.9±0.7 for the clinical CTscanner, respectively. Conclusion Clinical CT scanners may reliably be used for in vivo imaging and volumetric analysis of brain tumor growth in mice. PMID:27829015

  2. Advances and perspectives in lung cancer imaging using multidetector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel

    2012-10-01

    The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (CT) into clinical practice has revolutionized many aspects of the clinical work-up. Lung cancer imaging has benefited from various breakthroughs in computing technology, with advances in the field of lung cancer detection, tissue characterization, lung cancer staging and response to therapy. Our paper discusses the problems of radiation, image visualization and CT examination comparison. It also reviews the most significant advances in lung cancer imaging and highlights the emerging clinical applications that use state of the art CT technology in the field of lung cancer diagnosis and follow-up.

  3. A comparison of lactate concentration in plasma collected from the toe, ear, and fingertip after a simulated rowing exercise

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, J; Farrally, M

    2000-01-01

    Objective—To examine the validity of using blood taken from the toe for the assessment of plasma lactate concentration in rowers. To achieve this, values were compared with those taken from the fingertip and earlobe. Methods—Nine subjects exercised at two separate submaximum workloads on the Concept II rowing ergometer. The loads, each lasting four minutes, elicited mean (SD) heart rate responses of 160.1 (8.5) and 180.1 (5.7) beats/min, which corresponded to 76.4 (6.1)% and 91.9 (4.7)% of the estimated heart rate maximum of the subjects. Blood was simultaneously removed after the cessation of exercise by three experimenters and was analysed for plasma lactate concentration. Results—At 76.4% of estimated heart rate maximum, the mean (SD) plasma lactate concentrations sampled from the fingertip, toe, and earlobe were 6.36 (1.58), 5.81 (1.11), and 5.29 (1.24) mmol/l respectively. At 91.9% of estimated heart rate maximum, respective values were 8.81 (2.30), 8.53 (1.37), and 8.41 (2.35) mmol/l. No significant differences (p>0.05) were found between any of the sites at either work intensity. Conclusions—The toe may offer a practical alternative for assessing the concentration of lactate during rowing, having the advantage that repeated blood samples can be removed without interruption of the rowing action. Key Words: blood sampling; lactate; ergometer; rowing PMID:10690448

  4. Comparison of BR3 surveillance and vessel plates to the surrogate plates representative of the Yankee Rowe PWR vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Fabry, A.; Chaouadi, R.; Puzzolante, J.L.; Van de Velde, J.; Biemiller, E.C.; Rosinski, S.T.; Carter, R.G.

    1999-10-01

    The sister pressure vessels at the BR3 and Yankee Rowe PWR plants were operated at lower-than-usual temperature ({approx}260 C) and their plates were austenitized at higher-than-usual temperature ({approx}970 C) -- a heat treatment leading to a coarser microstructure than is typical for the fine grain plates considered in development of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.99. The surveillance programs provided by Westinghouse for the two plants were limited to the same A302-B plate representative of the Rowe vessel upper shell plate; this material displayed outlier behavior characterized by a 41J. Charpy-V Notch shift significantly larger than predicted by Regulatory Guide 1.99. Because lower irradiation temperature and nickel alloying are generally considered detrimental to irradiation sensitivity, there was a major concern that the nickel-modified lower Rowe plate and the nickel-modified BR3 plate may become too embrittled to satisfy the toughness requirements embodied in the PTS screening criterion. This paper compares three complementary studies undertaken to clarify these uncertainties: (1) The accelerated irradiation and test program launched in 1990 by Yankee Atomic Electric Company using typical vessel plate materials containing 0.24% copper at two nickel levels: YA1, 0.63% (A533-B) and YA9, 0.19% (A302-B). These were heat-treated to produce the coarse and fine grain microstructures representative of the Yankee/BR3 and the Regulatory Guide plates, respectively; (2) The BR3 surveillance and vessel testing program; this vessel was wet-annealed in 1984, relicensed for operation till the plant shutdown in 1987, and was trepanned in early 1995; (3) The accelerated irradiations in the Belgian test reactor BR2 of the Yankee coarse grain plates YA1 and YA9 together with BR3 vessel specimens extracted at nozzle elevation, a location with negligible radiation exposure. It is contended that the PTS screening criterion was never attained by the BR3 and Rowe plates, and that the

  5. Follow-up of multicentric HCC according to the mRECIST criteria: role of 320-Row CT with semi-automatic 3D analysis software for evaluating the response to systemic therapy

    PubMed Central

    TELEGRAFO, M.; DILORENZO, G.; DI GIOVANNI, G.; CORNACCHIA, I.; STABILE IANORA, A.A.; ANGELELLI, G.; MOSCHETTA, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the role of 320-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) with 3D analysis software in follow up of patients affected by multicentric hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with systemic therapy by using modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). Patients and methods 38 patients affected by multicentric HCC underwent MDCT. All exams were performed before and after iodinate contrast material intravenous injection by using a 320-detection row CT device. CT images were analyzed by two radiologists using multi-planar reconstructions (MPR) in order to assess the response to systemic therapy according to mRECIST criteria: complete response (CR), partial response (PR), progressive disease (PD), stable disease (SD). 30 days later, the same two radiologists evaluated target lesion response to systemic therapy according to mRECIST criteria by using 3D analysis software. The difference between the two systems in assessing HCC response to therapy was assessed by the analysis of the variance (Anova Test). Interobserver agreement between the two radiologists by using MPR images and 3D analysis software was calculated by using Cohen’s Kappa test. Results PR occurred in 10/38 cases (26%), PD in 6/38 (16%), SD in 22/38 (58%). Anova Test showed no statistically significant difference between the two systems for assessing target lesion response to therapy (p >0.05). Inter-observer agreement (k) was respectively of 0.62 for MPR images measurements and 0.86 for 3D analysis ones. Conclusions 3D Analysis software provides a semiautomatic system for assessing target lesion response to therapy according to mRE-CIST criteria in patient affected by multifocal HCC treated with systemic therapy. The reliability of 3D analysis software makes it useful in the clinical practice. PMID:28098056

  6. Traumatic brain injury: Comparison between autopsy and ante-mortem CT.

    PubMed

    Panzer, Stephanie; Covaliov, Lidia; Augat, Peter; Peschel, Oliver

    2017-08-26

    The aim of this study was to compare pathological findings after traumatic brain injury between autopsy and ante-mortem computed tomography (CT). A second aim was to identify changes in these findings between the primary posttraumatic CT and the last follow-up CT before death. Through the collaboration between clinical radiology and forensic medicine, 45 patients with traumatic brain injury were investigated. These patients had undergone ante-mortem CT as well as autopsy. During autopsy, the brain was cut in fronto-parallel slices directly after removal without additional fixation or subsequent histology. Typical findings of traumatic brain injury were compared between autopsy and radiology. Additionally, these findings were compared between the primary CT and the last follow-up CT before death. The comparison between autopsy and radiology revealed a high specificity (≥80%) in most of the findings. Sensitivity and positive predictive value were high (≥80%) in almost half of the findings. Sixteen patients had undergone craniotomy with subsequent follow-up CT. Thirteen conservatively treated patients had undergone a follow-up CT. Comparison between the primary CT and the last ante-mortem CT revealed marked changes in the presence and absence of findings, especially in patients with severe traumatic brain injury requiring decompression craniotomy. The main pathological findings of traumatic brain injury were comparable between clinical ante-mortem CT examinations and autopsy. Comparison between the primary CT after trauma and the last ante-mortem CT revealed marked changes in the findings, especially in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Hence, clinically routine ante-mortem CT should be included in the process of autopsy interpretation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of CT and PET/CT for biopsy guidance in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Cerci, Juliano J; Tabacchi, Elena; Bogoni, Mateos; Delbeke, Dominique; Pereira, Carlos Cunha; Cerci, Rodrigo J; Krauzer, Cassiano; Sakamoto, Danielle Giacometti; Fanti, Stefano; Vitola, João Vicente

    2017-08-01

    To compare FDG PET/CT and CT for the guidance of percutaneous biopsies with histological confirmation of lesions. We prospectively evaluated 323 patients of whom 181 underwent FDG PET/CT-guided biopsy (total 188 biopsies) and 142 underwent CT-guided biopsy (total 146 biopsies). Biopsies were performed using the same PET/CT scanner with a fluoroscopic imaging system. Technical feasibility, clinical success and complication rates in the two groups were evaluated. Of the 188 biopsies with PET/CT guidance, 182 (96.8%) were successful with conclusive tissue samples obtained and of the 146 biopsies with CT guidance, 137 (93.8%) were successful. Therefore, 6 of 188 biopsies (3.1%) with PET/CT guidance and 9 of 146 (6.1%) with CT guidance were inconclusive (p = 0.19). Due to inconclusive histological results, 4 of the 188 lesions (2.1%) were rebiopsied with PET/CT guidance and 3 of 146 lesions (2.0%) were rebiopsied with CT guidance. Histology demonstrated that 142 of 188 lesions (75.5%) were malignant, and 40 (21.2%) were benign in the PET/CT-guided group, while 89 of 146 lesions (60.9%) were malignant and 48 (32.8%) were benign in the CT-guided group (p = 0.004 and 0.01, respectively). Patients with a histological diagnosis of benign lesion had no recurrence of disease with a minimum of 6 months follow-up. Of the 188 PET/CT-guided biopsies, 6 (3.1%) were repeat biopsies due to a previous nondiagnostic CT-guided biopsy performed in a different diagnostic centre. The interval between the two biopsies was less than a month in all cases. Histology revealed five malignant lesions and one benign lesion among these. The complication rate in the PET/CT-guided biopsy group was 12.7% (24 of 188), while in the CT-guided group, was 9.5% (14 of 146, p = 0.26). Therefore, there was no significant difference in complication rates between PET/CT and CT guidance. PET/CT-guided biopsy is already known to be a feasible and accurate method in the diagnostic work-up of suspected

  8. Comparison of micro-CT and cone beam CT on the feasibility of assessing trabecular structures in mandibular condyle.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xin; Zhang, Zuyan; Gu, Jianping; Wang, Zhihui; Vandenberghe, Bart; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Yang, Jie; Ma, Guowu; Ling, Haibin; Ma, Xuchen

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of CBCT in assessing trabecular structures. Two human mandibles were scanned by micro-CT (Skyscan 1173 high-energy spiral scan micro-CT; Skyscan NV, Kontich, Belgium) and CBCT (3D Accuitomo 170; Morita, Japan). The CBCT images were reconstructed with 0.5 and 1 mm thicknesses. The condylar images were selected for registration. A parallel algorithm for histogram computation was introduced to perform the registration. A mutual information (MI) value was used to evaluate the match between the images obtained from micro-CT and CBCT. In comparison with the micro-CT image for the two samples, the CBCT image with 0.5 mm thickness has a MI value of 0.873 and 0.903 while that with 1.0 mm thickness has a MI value of 0.741 and 0.752. The CBCT images with 0.5 mm thickness were better matched with micro-CT images. CBCT shows comparable accuracy with high-resolution micro-CT in assessing trabecular structures. CBCT can be a feasible tool to evaluate osseous changes of jaw bones.

  9. A laboratory comparison of a new arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair to a double row transosseous equivalent rotator cuff repair using suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Frederick J; Hahn, Michael; Day, Michael; Meislin, Robert J; Jazrawi, Laith M

    2013-01-01

    Because current instrumentation makes it possible to perform an arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair, we performed a biomechanical comparison of a double-row transosseous equivalent rotator cuff repair using suture anchors to an arthroscopic, transosseous rotator cuff repair to determine if they provided similar fixation stability. Six pairs of shoulders were used. One of each pair had a standard double row, transosseous equivalent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using a suture-bridge technique with suture anchors, and the other had an arthroscopic transosseous repair using an Xbox technique. The repairs were cycled at 150 N for 10,000 cycles with movement of the lateral cuff edge recorded and then tested to failure. The total cuff edge displacement at 10,000 cycles in the anchor group (transosseous equivalent repair) was 7.9 mm and 6.3 mm for the bone tunnel group (transosseous repair); these were not significantly different (p=0.19). The anchor group failed at an average of 309 N and the bone tunnel group at an average of 339 N (p=0.22). Biomechanical testing suggests that arthroscopic, transosseous rotator cuff repair using a Xbox suture configuration is similar in strength and stability to an arthroscopic transosseous equivalent suture-bridge repair. Both techniques demonstrated difficulty in maintaining the lateral position of the tendon.

  10. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-02-23

    An apparatus and program product check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  11. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2008-10-14

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  12. Designing ROW Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1996-01-01

    There are many aspects to consider when designing a Rosenbrock-Wanner-Wolfbrandt (ROW) method for the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) solving initial value problems (IVP's). The process can be simplified by constructing ROW methods around good Runge-Kutta (RK) methods. The formulation of a new, simple, embedded, third-order, ROW method demonstrates this design approach.

  13. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens [Rochester, MN; Pinnow, Kurt Walter [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian Edward [Rochester, MN

    2012-02-07

    An apparatus, program product and method check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  14. Primary hyperaldosteronism: comparison of CT, adrenal venography, and venous sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Geisinger, M.A.; Zelch, M.G.; Bravo, E.L.; Risius, B.F.; O'Donovan, P.B.; Borkowski, G.P.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-nine patients with primary hyperaldosteronism were evaluated with computed tomography (CT), adrenal venous sampling, and adrenal venography. Twenty-three patients had aldosteronomas and six had bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia. Sixteen (70%) of the adenomas were accurately located by CT. All nodules of 1.5 cm or larger diameter and 50% of nodules 1.0 to 1.4 cm in diameter were demonstrated. Nodules of less than 1.0 cm in diameter generally were not detected. High-resolution CT appeared more sensitive than standard CT (75% vs 58%). Adrenal venous sampling for aldosterone assay was the most sensitive of the three methods, localizing 22 (96%) of the 23 adenomas. Eighteen (78%) of the adenomas were identified by adrenal venography, although two patients with bilateral cortical hyperplasia were mistakenly diagnosed as having a small adenoma. No such false-positive studies were encountered with CT or adrenal venous sampling.

  15. Comparison of CT and MR-CT Fusion for Prostate Post-Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Maletz, Kristina L.; Ennis, Ronald D.; Ostenson, Jason; Pevsner, Alexander; Kagen, Alexander; Wernick, Iddo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The use of T2 MR for postimplant dosimetry (PID) after prostate brachytherapy allows more anatomically accurate and precise contouring but does not readily permit seed identification. We developed a reproducible technique for performing MR-CT fusion and compared the resulting dosimetry to standard CT-based PID. Methods and Materials: CT and T1-weighted MR images for 45 patients were fused and aligned based on seed distribution. The T2-weighted MR image was then fused to the aligned T1. Reproducibility of the fusion technique was tested by inter- and intraobserver variability for 13 patients. Dosimetry was computed for the prostate as a whole and for the prostate divided into anterior and posterior sectors of the base, mid-prostate, and apex. Results: Inter- and intraobserver variability for the fusion technique showed less than 1% variation in D90. MR-CT fusion D90 and CT D90 were nearly equivalent for the whole prostate, but differed depending on the identification of superior extent of the base (p = 0.007) and on MR/CT prostate volume ratio (p = 0.03). Sector analysis showed a decrease in MR-CT fusion D90 in the anterior base (ratio 0.93 {+-}0.25, p < 0.05) and an increase in MR-CT fusion D90 in the apex (p < 0.05). The volume of extraprostatic tissue encompassed by the V100 is greater on MR than CT. Factors associated with this difference are the MR/CT volume ratio (p < 0.001) and the difference in identification of the inferior extent of the apex (p = 0.03). Conclusions: We developed a reproducible MR-CT fusion technique that allows MR-based dosimetry. Comparing the resulting postimplant dosimetry with standard CT dosimetry shows several differences, including adequacy of coverage of the base and conformity of the dosimetry around the apex. Given the advantage of MR-based tissue definition, further study of MR-based dosimetry is warranted.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice multidetector-row CT for detection of in-stent restenosis vs detection of stenosis in nonstented coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Kefer, Joelle M; Coche, Emmanuel; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) for detecting in-stent restenosis. Fifty patients with 69 previously implanted coronary stents underwent 16-slice MDCT before quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Diagnostic accuracy of MDCT for detection of in-stent restenosis defined as >50% lumen diameter stenosis (DS) in stented and nonstented coronary segments >1.5-mm diameter was computed using QCA as reference. According to QCA, 18/69 (25%) stented segments had restenosis. In addition, 33/518 (6.4%) nonstented segments had >50% DS. In-stent restenosis was correctly identified on MDCT images in 12/18 stents, and absence of restenosis was correctly identified in 50/51 stents. Stenosis in native coronary arteries was correctly identified in 22/33 segments and correctly excluded in 482/485 segments. Thus, sensitivity (67% vs 67% p=1.0), specificity (98% vs 99%, p=0.96) and overall diagnostic accuracy (90% vs 97%, p=0.68) was similarly high for detecting in-stent restenosis as for detecting stenosis in nonstented coronary segments. MDCT has similarly high diagnostic accuracy for detecting in-stent restenosis as for detecting coronary artery disease in nonstented segments. This suggests that MDCT could be clinically useful for identification of restenosis in patients after coronary stenting.

  17. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Weidlich, Georg A.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities—fan beam and cone beam—was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient. PMID:27752404

  18. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities.

    PubMed

    Lechuga, Lawrence; Weidlich, Georg A

    2016-09-12

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities-fan beam and cone beam-was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient.

  19. Comparison of CT scanning and radionuclide imaging in liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.L.; Esposito, F.S.

    1980-01-01

    Early experience with body CT suggested its usefulness in many diagnostic problems; jaundice, renal and pancreatic masses, and in the evaluation of relatively inaccessible parts of the body, such as the retroperitineum, mediastinum, and pelvis. Investigation of hepatic disease by CT was not unexpectedly compared to radionuclide liver scanning, the major preexisting modality for imaging the liver. In the evaluation of the jaundiced patient, CT rapidly assumed a major role, providing more specific information about the liver than the RN liver scan, as well as demonstrating adjacent organs. CT differentiate obstructive from non-obstructive jaundice. With respect to mass lesions of the liver, the RN liver scan is more sensitive than CT but less specific. The abnormalities on an isotope image of the liver consist of normal variants in configuration, extrinsic compression by adjacent structures, cysts, hemangiomata, abscesses, and neoplasms. These suspected lesions may then be better delineated by the CT image, and a more precise diagnosis made. The physiologic information provided by the RN liver scan is an added facet which is helpful in the patient with diffuse hepatic disease. The CT image will be normal in many of these patients, however, hemochromatosis and fatty infiltration lend themselves especially to density evaluation by CT. The evaluation of lymphoma is more thorough with CT. Structures other than the liver, such as lymph nodes, are visualized. Gallium, however, provides additional isotopic information in patients with lymphoma, and in addition, is known to be useful in the investigation of a febrile patient with an abscess. Newer isotopic agents expand hepatic imaging in other directions, visualizing the biliary tree and evaluating the jaundiced patient.

  20. Comparison of 4- and 64-slice CT scanning in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Douma, Renée A; Hofstee, Herman M A; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; van Waesberghe, Jan Hein T M; Lely, Rutger J; Kamphuisen, Pieter W; Gerdes, Victor E A; Kramer, Mark H H; Büller, Harry R

    2010-01-01

    With the introduction of multi-detector row CT (MDCT), sensitivity to diagnose pulmonary embolism (PE) has greatly improved. The use of newer generation CT-scans may lead to a higher prevalence and a different distribution of PE. We compared 64-slice with 4-slice MDCT regarding prevalence and distribution of PE, the number of inconclusive test results and inter-reader variability. CT-scans from a random sample of 110 consecutive patients who underwent 4-slice CT-scanning were compared with 64-slice CT-scans from 107 patients from a second cohort. Three radiologists independently reassessed all CT-scans. Consensus was reached in case of disagreement between the readers. Final diagnosis of PE was categorised as central, segmental or subsegmental by the thrombus' most proximal end. The prevalence of PE was 24% (26/110, 95% confidence interval [CI] 17-32%) and 22% (24/107, 16-31%) for the 4-slice and 64-slice cohort, respectively. The prevalence of isolated subsegmental emboli was 2/26 (7.7%; 2.1-24%) and 5/24 (21%; 9.2-41%), respectively (p=0.424). The number of inconclusive scans was 10% in both cohorts, mostly due to movement artefacts and suboptimal intravascular contrast, respectively. The inter-reader agreement between the three readers was 0.70 for the 4-slice scans and 0.68 for the 64-slice scans. Although absolute prevalence of PE was equal in both cohorts, there was a trend towards more subsegmental PE with 64-slice CT. In a multi-reader setting, the number of inconclusive examinations was higher than quoted for clinical management studies, indicating that the diagnosis of PE with MDCT could be less straightforward than assumed.

  1. Role of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer; comparison with multidetector row computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Ergul, N; Gundogan, C; Tozlu, M; Toprak, H; Kadıoglu, H; Aydin, M; Cermik, T F

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to analyze the contribution of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) imaging to the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer compared with multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). We retrospectively scanned the data of 52 patients who were referred for FDG PET/CT imaging for evaluation of pancreatic lesions greater than 10mm. The diagnostic performances of 4 imaging methods and the impact of PET/CT on the management of pancreatic cancer were defined. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in 33 of 52 patients (63%), 15 patients had benign diseases of pancreas (29%), and 4 patients were normal (8%). Sensitivity and NPV of EUS and PET/CT were equal (100%) and higher than MDCT and MRI. Specificity, PPV and NPV of PET/CT were significantly higher than MDCT. However, sensitivities of two imaging methods were not significantly different. There was no significant difference between PET/CT and MRI and EUS for these values. When the cut-off value of SUVmax was 3.2, the most effective sensitivity and specificity values were obtained. PET/CT contributed to the management of pancreatic cancer in 30% of patients. FDG PET/CT is a valuable imaging method for the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer, especially when applied along with EUS as first line diagnostic tools. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of Reconstruction Intervals in Routine ECG-Pulsed 64-Row-MSCT Coronary Angiography in Frequency Controlled Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Frydrychowicz, Alex Pache, Gregor; Saueressig, Ulrich; Foell, Daniela; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Bley, Thorsten A.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. In light of the increasing use and acceptance of multislice computed tomography (MSCT) coronary angiography it was the purpose of this study to compare reconstruction intervals used in a routine ECG-pulsed MSCT coronary artery angiography setting with frequency controlled patients. Methods. Examinations were performed on a Siemens Somatom Sensation 64 scanner with a total of 110 ml of contrast agent and ECG pulsing (interval from 40% to 70%) after oral application of a {beta}-blocker if the heart rate was higher than 65 bpm. All human subjects were referred for the evaluation of suspected coronary artery disease. Coronary artery segments were evaluated by two experienced radiologists in a consensus reading. A ranking of diagnostic image quality (from 1 (no evaluation possible) to 5 (excellent image quality)) was statistically evaluated by Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. Results. In 45 patients (30 male, 15 female, age 63.8 {+-} 12.1 years) we detected a significant advantage of the 60% reconstruction interval over 40%, 50%, and 70% (for each p < 0.05). In cases of sudden arrhythmia or movement during the scan, additional reconstruction intervals within the ECG-pulsed reconstruction intervals remained necessary for diagnosis. Conclusion. In a routine diagnostic setting with frequency controlled patients and ECG pulsing the 60% reconstruction interval can be considered superior for the initial diagnosis in 64-row multislice computed tomography coronary angiography. However, further information can be derived from various reconstruction intervals such as 40% and 70%.

  3. A Comparison of Density Functional Theory with Ab initio Approaches for Systems Involving First Transition Row Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricca, Alessandra; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is found to give a better description of the geometries and vibrational frequencies of FeL and FeL(sup +) systems than second order Moller Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). Namely, the DFT correctly predicts the shift in the CO vibrational frequency between free CO and the Sigma(sup -) state of FeCO and yields a good result for the Fe-C distance in the quartet states of FeCH4(+) 4 These are properties where the MP2 results are unsatisfactory. Thus DFT appears to be an excellent approach for optimizing the geometries and computing the zero-point energies of systems containing first transition row atoms. Because the DFT approach is biased in favor of the 3d(exp 7) occupation, whereas the more traditional approaches are biased in favor of the 3d(exp 6) occupation, differences are found in the relative ordering of states. It is shown that if the dissociation is computed to the most appropriate atomic asymptote and corrected to the ground state asymptote using the experimental separations, the DFT results are in good agreement with high levels of theory. The energetics at the DFT level are much superior to the MP2 and in most cases in good agreement with high levels of theory.

  4. Consideration of the Pathological Features of Pediatric Congenital Heart Diseases Which Are Ideally Suitable for Diagnosing With Multidetector-row CT

    PubMed Central

    Hayabuchi, Yasunobu; Inoue, Miki; Watanabe, Noriko; Sakata, Miho; Ohnishi, Tatsuya; Kagami, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Background A lots of articles published regarding the usefulness of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) mostly describe that it can be an alternative to the invasive catheterization and angiography. The unique diagnostic features of this imaging modality have been largely ignored or disregarded. We described the pathological conditions that cannot be diagnosed by conventional angiography with cardiac catheterization but can be accurately diagnosed by MDCT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed non-ECG-gated MDCT images acquired from 452 children and young adults with CHD between 2005 and 2010 in our institute. In this article, we focused on the diagnostic advantages of MDCT, and indicated five pathological conditions. (1) When Blalock-Taussig shunt total occlusion prevents catheter insertion into the artificial vessel and angiography is ruled out, the peripheral pulmonary artery during the peripheral pulmonary artery can be imaged and diagnosed using MDCT based on blood flow supplied from many small collateral vessels originating from the aorta. (2) The location and protrusion of the device in the vessel after coil embolization to treat patent ductus arteriosus can be accurately visualized by virtual endoscopy using MDCT. (3) Calcification of patches, synthetic blood vessels, and other prostheses that is indistinct on conventional angiograms is clear on MDCT. (4) Simultaneous MDCT observations of the anatomical relationships between arterial and venous systems on the same image can clarify the detail diagnosis for surgical treatment. (5) Compression of the airways by the great vessels and pulmonary segmental emphysematous change can be diagnosed by MDCT. Results and Conclusions Among patients with CHD, MDCT is useful not only as a non-invasive alternative to conventional angiography, but also as a tool for specific morphological diagnoses. In the future, it will be necessary to accumulate experience in the

  5. INTERIOR SECOND FLOOR EAST END LOOKING WEST AT NORTH ROW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR SECOND FLOOR- EAST END LOOKING WEST AT NORTH ROW OF MUSHROOM COLUMNS. - Colt Fire Arms Company, South Armory Building, 36-150 Huyshope Avenue, 17-170 Van Dyke Avenue, 49 Vredendale Avenue, Hartford, Hartford County, CT

  6. INTERIOR, SOUTH PART, CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. DOUBLE ROW OF CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR, SOUTH PART, CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. DOUBLE ROW OF CENTER COLUMNS REFLECTS SOUTH PART'S RE-USE OF ANOTHER BUILDING'S STRUCTURAL FRAME. - New Haven Rail Yard, Work Equipment Shop, Vicinity of Cedar & Lamberton Streets, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  7. 4. VIEW NORTHWEST, INTERIOR OF GATEHOUSE, SHOWING ROW OF GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHWEST, INTERIOR OF GATEHOUSE, SHOWING ROW OF GATE OPERATING MECHANISMS; HEIGHT OF STEMS INDICATES FOREGROUND GATE IS OPEN - Norwich Water Power Company, Headgates, West bank of Shetucket River opposite Fourteenth Street, Greenville section, Norwich, New London County, CT

  8. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms.

    PubMed

    Brisse, H J; Brenot, J; Pierrat, N; Gaboriaud, G; Savignoni, A; De Rycke, Y; Neuenschwander, S; Aubert, B; Rosenwald, J-C

    2009-04-07

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD(1%) assessed in a Catphan phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol(16) with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR(2.8%)), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1(%), adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy(-1). Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD(1%) for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol(16) values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  9. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisse, H. J.; Brenot, J.; Pierrat, N.; Gaboriaud, G.; Savignoni, A.; DeRycke, Y.; Neuenschwander, S.; Aubert, B.; Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2009-04-01

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD1% assessed in a Catphan® phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol16 with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR2.8%), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1%, adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy-1. Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD1% for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol16 values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  10. A biomechanical comparison of tendon-bone interface motion and cyclic loading between single-row, triple-loaded cuff repairs and double-row, suture-tape cuff repairs using biocomposite anchors.

    PubMed

    Barber, F Alan; Drew, Otis R

    2012-09-01

    To compare tendon-bone interface motion and cyclic loading in a single-row, triple-loaded anchor repair with a suture-tape, rip-stop, double-row rotator cuff repair. Using 18 human shoulders from 9 matched cadaveric pairs, we created 2 groups of rotator cuff repairs. Group 1 was a double-row, rip-stop, suture-tape construct. Group 2 was a single-row, triple-loaded construct. Before mechanical testing, the supraspinatus footprint was measured with calipers. A superiorly positioned digital camera optically measured the tendon footprint motion during 60° of humeral internal and external rotation. Specimens were secured at a fixed angle not exceeding 45° in reference to the load. After preloading, each sample was cycled between 10 N and 100 N for 200 cycles at 1 Hz, followed by destructive testing at 33 mm/s. A digital camera with tracking software measured the repair displacement at 100 and 200 cycles. Ultimate load and failure mode for each sample were recorded. The exposed anterior footprint border (6.5% ± 6%) and posterior footprint border (0.9% ± 1.7%) in group 1 were statistically less than the exposed anterior footprint border (30.3% ± 17%) and posterior footprint border (29.8% ± 14%) in group 2 (P = .003 and P < .001, respectively). The maximal internal rotation and external rotation tendon footprint displacements in group 1 (1.6 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively) were less than those in group 2 (both 3.6 mm) (P = .007 and P = .004, respectively). Mean displacement after 100 cycles for group 1 and group 2 was 2.0 mm and 3.2 mm, respectively, and at 200 cycles, mean displacement was 2.5 mm and 4.2 mm, respectively (P = .02). The mean ultimate failure load in group 1 (586 N) was greater than that in group 2 (393 N) (P = .02). The suture-tendon interface was the site of most construct failures. The suture-tape, rip-stop, double-row rotator cuff repair had greater footprint coverage, less rotational footprint displacement, and a greater mean ultimate failure load

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Modified Mason-Allen Single-Row Repair for Bursal-Sided Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Comparison With the Double-Row Suture-Bridge Technique.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Kook, Seung-Hwan; Rao, Nandan; Seo, Myeong-Jae

    2015-08-01

    Various repair techniques have been reported for the operative treatment of bursal-sided partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. Recently, arthroscopic single-row repair using a modified Mason-Allen technique has been introduced. The arthroscopic, modified Mason-Allen single-row technique with preservation of the articular-sided tendon provides satisfactory clinical outcomes and similar results to the double-row suture-bridge technique after conversion of a partial-thickness tear to a full-thickness tear. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A retrospective study was conducted on 84 consecutive patients with symptomatic, bursal-sided partial-thickness rotator cuff tears involving more than 50% thickness of the tendon. A total of 47 patients were treated by the modified Mason-Allen single-row repair technique, preserving the articular-sided tendon, and 37 patients were treated by the double-row suture-bridge repair technique after conversion to a full-thickness tear. The clinical and functional outcomes were evaluated using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Constant scores and a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and satisfaction of patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to analyze the integrity of tendons at 6-month follow-up. Patients were followed up for a mean of 32.5 months. In the 47 patients treated with the modified Mason-Allen suture technique, the VAS score decreased from a preoperative mean of 5.3 ± 0.3 to 0.9 ± 0.5 at the time of final follow-up. There was a statistically significant increase in the mean ASES score (from 45.4 ± 2.9 to 88.6 ± 4.5) and mean Constant score (from 66.9 ± 2.6 to 88.1 ± 2.4) (P < .001). Four of 47 patients (8.5%) demonstrated retears at 6-month postoperative MRI. There was no statistical difference in terms of functional outcomes and the retear rate compared with those of patients with the suture-bridge repair technique (3 patients, 8.1%). However, the mean number of suture anchors used in the

  12. ASSESSMENT OF EFFECTIVE DOSE FROM CONE BEAM CT IMAGING IN SPECT/CT EXAMINATION IN COMPARISON WITH OTHER MODALITIES.

    PubMed

    Tonkopi, Elena; Ross, Andrew A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiation dose from the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) component of single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) examinations and to compare it with the radiopharmaceutical related dose as well as dose from multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Effective dose (ED) from computed tomography (CT) was estimated using dose-length product values and anatomy-specific conversion factors. The contribution from the SPECT component was evaluated using ED per unit administered activity for the radiopharmaceuticals listed in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publications 80 and 106. With the exception of cardiac studies (0.11 mSv), the CBCT dose (3.96-6.04 mSv) was similar to that from the radiopharmaceutical accounting for 29-56 % of the total ED from the examination. In comparison with MDCT examinations, the CBCT dose was 48 and 42 % lower for abdomen/pelvis and chest/abdomen/pelvis scans, respectively, while in the chest the CBCT scan resulted in higher dose (23 %). Radiation dose from the CT component should be taken into consideration when evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Follow-up of Wilms tumor: comparison of CT with other imaging procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Brasch, R.C.; Randel, S.B.; Gould, R.G.

    1981-11-01

    In a retrospective review, computed tomography (CT) was compared to a ''routine'' combination of other diagnostic imaging procedures used for follow-up evaluations of 13 children being treated for Wilms tumor. The examined variables were diagnostic accuracy, expense, and duration of examination. Results from 13 patients indicated that CT most accurately answers diagnostic queries pertinent to follow-up evaluation of Wilms tumors: the presence and extent of bilateral renal tumors, local recurrence, contralateral renal hypertrophy, and metastasis to liver or lungs. For diagnosing pulmonary metastases, CT was superior to conventional chest radiography both in sensitivity (4/4 vs. 2/4) and specificity (9/9 vs. 6/9). In depiction of liver metastases, CT (3/3) was superior to liver scintigraphy (2/3). The extent of bilateral Wilms tumors was better defined by CT than by urography. In no instances were the alternative diagnostic imaging studies found to be more accurate than CT for the detection of recurrent tumor. Average cost for a CT examination ($344) is considerably less than the cost for a routine combination of the other imaging studies ($594). Examination time and diagnostic radiation doses are also reduced using CT. Pending larger comparison studies, CT is recommended as the primary diagnostic method for follow-up evaluation of patients with Wilms tumor.

  14. Quantification of coronary flow using dynamic angiography with 320-detector row CT and motion coherence image processing: Detection of ischemia for intermediate coronary stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Michinobu; Yamasaki, Yuzo; Kamitani, Takeshi; Kawanami, Satoshi; Sagiyama, Koji; Yamanouchi, Torahiko; Shimomiya, Yamato; Matoba, Tetsuya; Mukai, Yasushi; Odashiro, Keita; Baba, Shingo; Maruoka, Yasuhiro; Kitamura, Yoshiyuki; Nishie, Akihiro; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Anatomical coronary stenosis is not always indicative of functional stenosis, particularly for intermediate coronary lesions. The purpose of this study is to propose a new method for quantifying coronary flow using dynamic CT angiography for the whole heart (heart-DCT) and investigate its ability for detecting ischemia from intermediate coronary stenosis. Participants comprised 36 patients with coronary artery disease who underwent heart-DCT using 320-detector CT with tube voltage of 80kV and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). Heart-DCT was continuously performed at mid-diastole throughout 15-25 cardiac cycles with prospective ECG-gating after bolus injection of contrast media (12-24ml). Dynamic datasets were computed into 90-100 data sets by motion coherence image processing (MCIP). Next, time-density curves (TDCs) for coronary arteries with a diameter >3mm were automatically calculated for all phases using MCIP. On the basis of the maximum slope method, coronary flow index (CFI) was defined as the ratio of the maximum upslope of coronary artery attenuation to the upslope of ascending aorta attenuation on the TDC, and was used to quantify coronary flow. CFIs for the proximal and distal sites of coronary arteries with mild-to-moderate stenosis were calculated. Coronary territories were categorized as non-ischemic or ischemic by MPS. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the optimal cutoff for CFI to detect ischemia. Distal CFI was significantly lower for ischemia (0.26±0.08) than for non-ischemia (0.50±0.17, p<0.0001). No significant difference in proximal CFI was seen between ischemia (0.55±0.23) and non-ischemia (0.62±0.24). ROC analysis revealed 0.39 as the optimal cutoff for distal CFI to detect ischemia, with C-statistics of 0.91, 100% sensitivity, and 75% specificity. This novel imaging technique allows coronary flow quantification using heart-DCT. Distal CFI can detect myocardial ischemia derived from

  15. Preoperative Lymph Node Staging by FDG PET/CT With Contrast Enhancement for Thyroid Cancer: A Multicenter Study and Comparison With Neck CT

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Ari; Ha, Jung-Min; Han, Yeon-Hee; Kong, Eunjung; Choi, Yunjung; Hong, Ki Hwan; Park, Jun-Hee; Kim, Sung Hoon; Park, Jung Mi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare lymph node (LN) staging using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with contrast-enhancement (CE) PET/CT and contrast-enhanced neck CT (neck CT) in patients with thyroid cancer with level-by-level comparison with various factors. Methods This was a retrospective multicenter study. A total of 85 patients were enrolled. Patients who underwent a preoperative evaluation by CE PET/CT and neck CT for thyroid cancer were enrolled. The gold standard for LN was the combination of surgical pathology and clinical follow-up. We compared CE PET/CT with neck CT using a level-by-level method. Factors, including age, sex, camera, arm position, tumor size, extra-thyroidal extension, tumor location, number of primary tumors, primary tumor maximum standardized uptake value, and the interval from scan to operation were also analyzed. Results Overall accuracy was 81.2% for CE PET/CT and 68.2% for neck CT. CE PET/CT was more sensitive than neck CT (65.8% vs. 44.7%). Also, CE PET/CT showed higher negative predictive value (77.2% vs. 66.1%). CE PET/CT showed good agreement with the gold standard (weighted kappa [κ], 0.7) for differentiating N0, N1a, and N1b, whereas neck CT showed moderate agreement (weighted κ, 0.5). CE PET/CT showed better agreement for the number of levels involved with the gold standard (weighted κ, 0.7) than that of neck CT with the gold standard (weighted κ, 0.5). The accuracies for differentiating N0, N1a, and N1b were 81.2% for CE PET/CT and 68.2% for neck CT. Level-by-level analysis showed that CE PET/CT was more sensitive and has higher negative predictive value for detecting ipsilateral level IV and level VI LNs than neck CT. Other analyzed factors were not related to accuracies of both modalities. Conclusion CE PET/CT was more sensitive and reliable than neck CT for preoperative LN staging in patients with thyroid cancer. PMID:27334517

  16. Accurate estimation of global and regional cardiac function by retrospectively gated multidetector row computed tomography: comparison with cine magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Belge, Bénédicte; Coche, Emmanuel; Pasquet, Agnès; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2006-07-01

    Retrospective reconstruction of ECG-gated images at different parts of the cardiac cycle allows the assessment of cardiac function by multi-detector row CT (MDCT) at the time of non-invasive coronary imaging. We compared the accuracy of such measurements by MDCT to cine magnetic resonance (MR). Forty patients underwent the assessment of global and regional cardiac function by 16-slice MDCT and cine MR. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes estimated by MDCT (134+/-51 and 67+/-56 ml) were similar to those by MR (137+/-57 and 70+/-60 ml, respectively; both P=NS) and strongly correlated (r=0.92 and r=0.95, respectively; both P<0.001). Consequently, LV ejection fractions by MDCT and MR were also similar (55+/-21 vs. 56+/-21%; P=NS) and highly correlated (r=0.95; P<0.001). Regional end-diastolic and end-systolic wall thicknesses by MDCT were highly correlated (r=0.84 and r=0.92, respectively; both P<0.001), but significantly lower than by MR (8.3+/-1.8 vs. 8.8+/-1.9 mm and 12.7+/-3.4 vs. 13.3+/-3.5 mm, respectively; both P<0.001). Values of regional wall thickening by MDCT and MR were similar (54+/-30 vs. 51+/-31%; P=NS) and also correlated well (r=0.91; P<0.001). Retrospectively gated MDCT can accurately estimate LV volumes, EF and regional LV wall thickening compared to cine MR.

  17. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization Therapy for a Hypoplastic Pelvic Kidney with a Single Vaginal Ectopic Ureter to Control Incontinence: The Usefulness of Three-Dimensional CT Angiography Using Multidetector-Row Helical CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kudoh, Kouichi Kadota, Masataka; Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Imuta, Masanori; Yasuda, Tsuyoshi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Inadome, Akito; Yoshida, Masaki; Ueda, Shouichi

    2003-09-15

    A girl with continuous urinary incontinence was successfully treated by angiographic embolization of a hypoplastic pelvic kidney with a single unilateral vaginal ectopic opening of the ureter. For this intervention, CT angiography was useful for detecting the corresponding renal artery of the hypoplastic kidney.

  18. Biomechanics of Rowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Kazunori; Kaya, Motoshi; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi; Andrews, Brian J.; Zavatsky, Amy B.; Halliday, Suzanne E.

    Compared with the other exercise, such as walking and cycling, rowing was expected to have some fitness advantage, while there were some misgivings about the risk of injury. The objectives of this study were to quantify biomechanical characteristics of rowing for fitness and rehabilitation and to offer normative data for the prevention of injury and for determining effective exercise. An experiment was performed to collect the kinematic and kinetic data during rowing by experienced and non-experienced subjects. A three-dimensional whole-body musculo-skeletal model was used to calculate the biomechanical loads, such as the joint moments, the muscular tensions, the joint contact forces and the energy consumption. The results of this study indicate that rowing is an effective exercise for rehabilitation and fitness. However, the non-experienced rower should acquire considerable skill to obtain sufficient exercise. The rowing cadence should be decided according to the purpose of the exercise.

  19. 32. TYPICAL BRYANT ITEMS FROM THE 1930S; TOP ROW LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. TYPICAL BRYANT ITEMS FROM THE 1930S; TOP ROW LEFT TO RIGHT: PORCELAIN CASED SWITCH, ROTARY SWITCH, SHORTING PLUG TO BYPASS FUSE; SECOND ROW: BRASS INCANDESCENT LAMP SURFACE RECEPTACLE, INCANDESCENT LAMPHOLDER WITH ADAPTER FOR GLASS GLOBE; THIRD ROW: PORCELAIN BASE ROTARY SWITCH, APPLIANCE BREAKER WITH COVER REMOVED, APPLIANCE BREAKER - Bryant Electric Company, 1421 State Street, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  20. Suicide on Death Row.

    PubMed

    Tartaro, Christine; Lester, David

    2016-11-01

    Despite the level of supervision of inmates on death row, their suicide rate is higher than both the male prison population in the United States and the population of males over the age of 14 in free society. This study presents suicide data for death row inmates from 1978 through 2010. For the years 1978 through 2010, suicide rates on death row were higher than that for the general population of males over the age of 15 and for state prisons for all but 2 years.

  1. Comparison of X-ray film and photographic paper in recording CT images.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, T F; Lincoln, A J; Mehnert, P J; Paul, G J

    1984-12-01

    Because of a potential film cost savings of approximately 35% using photographic print paper instead of X-ray film in recording CT images, a comparison was undertaken of these hard copy recording methods. One hundred consecutive CT examinations were reviewed on the scanner display console and recorded on X-ray film and photographic print paper using a multi-imager camera. Hard copy images were compared for diagnostic adequacy. X-ray film adequately recorded the pathology in all cases. Photographic paper adequately recorded the pathology in 97% of cases. In 26% of cases X-ray film was felt to better display the CT diagnosis whereas in 2% of cases photographic paper better displayed the CT diagnosis. Test phantom scans recorded on both media showed no observable difference in spatial or contrast resolution.

  2. Comparison of stroke infarction between CT perfusion and diffusion weighted imaging: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd. Rahni, Ashrani Aizzuddin; Arka, Israna Hossain; Chellappan, Kalaivani; Mukari, Shahizon Azura; Law, Zhe Kang; Sahathevan, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results of comparison of automatic segmentations of the infarct core, between that obtained from CT perfusion (based on time to peak parameter) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). For each patient, the two imaging volumes were automatically co-registered to a common frame of reference based on an acquired CT angiography image. The accuracy of image registration is measured by the overlap of the segmented brain from both images (CT perfusion and DWI), measured within their common field of view. Due to the limitations of the study, DWI was acquired as a follow up scan up to a week after initial CT based imaging. However, we found significant overlap of the segmented brain (Jaccard indices of approximately 0.8) and the percentage of infarcted brain tissue from the two modalities were still fairly highly correlated (correlation coefficient of approximately 0.9). The results are promising with more data needed in future for clinical inference.

  3. Comparison of CT imaging artifacts from craniomaxillofacial internal fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Fiala, T G; Novelline, R A; Yaremchuk, M J

    1993-12-01

    This study compares the artifacts caused by craniomaxillofacial internal fixation devices in CT images. Mandibular reconstruction and "mini" titanium, Vitallium, and stainless steel systems, "micro" titanium and Vitallium systems, and stainless steel wires were evaluated. The hardware was placed on a nylon grid and submerged in water. CT images were obtained with both bone and soft-tissue window settings. All artifacts were compared and graded after a minimum of five observations each. The severity of "starburst" artifact was found to be related to the physical size of the fixation hardware and its composition. Titanium hardware caused the least amount of artifact. Vitallium and stainless steel fixation devices, with the exception of interfragmentary wiring, produced significantly more artifact. These results agree with theoretical predictions. The data indicate that when postoperative imaging is an important clinical consideration, (1) the least amount of implant material necessary to achieve stable fixation should be used, (2) the proximity of implant material to the area of interest should be considered, and (3) titanium implants produce less artifact than Vitallium or stainless steel implants.

  4. Screening and comparison of polychromatic and monochromatic image reconstruction of abdominal arterial energy spectrum CT.

    PubMed

    Wang, X P; Wang, B; Hou, P; Li, R; Gao, J B

    2017-01-01

    We screened the suitable image reconstruction to observe the abdominal artery and compare the quality between the polychromatic and the monochromatic reconstruction images of the abdominal artery spectrum CT. Eighty patients underwent Gemstone CT energy spectrum imaging to obtain an abdominal artery polychromatic image (140 kVp) and a monochromatic image from 40 ~ 140 keV. The CT value of region of interest (ROI) was measured on the polychromatic image and the single energy image. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the abdominal aorta and hepatic artery were determined. The images in each group underwent image quality subjective scoring by three experienced radiologists using a blinded method. Finally, comprehensive comparisons and image quality subjective scorings were performed on the CT, SNR, and CNR values of the abdominal aorta. The obtained data were statistically analyzed by SPSS 19.0 software. When the keV value was reduced, the CT value of the abdominal artery gradually increased, and the image noise also changed. The comprehensive comparisons and subjective scorings were finalized for each single energy image based on the abdominal artery image quality objective indicators (CT value, SNR, and CNR). Results revealed that the abdominal artery image quality in the 50 ~ 60 keV monochromatic group was better compared to the polychromatic group. Furthermore, onochromatic imaging had different impacts on the abdominal aorta and hepatic artery image qualities. In different types of abdominal arterial reconstruction images obtained using abdominal energy spectrum CT conventional enhanced scanning, the image quality of the 50 ~ 60keV monochromatic reconstruction was higher when compared with the polychromatic reconstruction. Thus, it is recommended to apply the conventional reconstruction for abdominal artery energy spectrum CT scanning.

  5. Physics of rowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Jean-Philippe; Labbe, Romain; Mouterde, Timothee; Clanet, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    Synchronization in rowing seems like a crucial condition for those who aim at winning top-level rowing races. However, in nature, one can observe animals with many legs, such as krill, swimming in a desynchronized manner which is nearly metachronal. From a physicist point of view, rowing by following a metachronal wave also seems like a great idea because, at high Reynolds number, the metachronal gait has one big advantage over the synchronized gait: it reduces the fluctuations of speed and thus the drag on the body. In this experimental study, we have built a scale model of a rowing boat to deal with the question of the effect of synchronization on the boat performance.

  6. Quantitative comparison of PET performance-Siemens Biograph mCT and mMR.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, Anna M; Sæther, Oddbjørn; Eikenes, Live; Goa, Pål Erik

    2016-12-01

    Integrated clinical whole-body PET/MR systems were introduced in 2010. In order to bring this technology into clinical usage, it is of great importance to compare the performance with the well-established PET/CT. The aim of this study was to evaluate PET performance, with focus on image quality, on Siemens Biograph mMR (PET/MR) and Siemens Biograph mCT (PET/CT). A direct quantitative comparison of the performance characteristics between the mMR and mCT system was performed according to National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2007 protocol. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate and image quality were evaluated. The evaluation was supplemented with additional standardized uptake value (SUV) measurements. The spatial resolution was similar for the two systems. Average sensitivity was higher for the mMR (13.3 kcps/MBq) compared to the mCT system (10.0 kcps/MBq). Peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) was slightly higher for the mMR (196 kcps @ 24.4 kBq/mL) compared to the mCT (186 kcps @ 30.1 kBq/mL). Scatter fractions in the clinical activity concentration range yielded lower values for the mCT (34.9 %) compared to those for the mMR (37.0 %). Best image quality of the systems resulted in approximately the same mean hot sphere contrast and a difference of 19 percentage points (pp) in mean cold contrast, in favour of the mCT. In general, point spread function (PSF) increased hot contrast and time of flight (TOF) increased both hot and cold contrast. Highest hot contrast for the smallest sphere (10 mm) was achieved with the combination of TOF and PSF on the mCT. Lung residual error was higher for the mMR (22 %) than that for the mCT (17 %), with no effect of PSF. With TOF, lung residual error was reduced to 8 % (mCT). SUV was accurate for both systems, but PSF caused overestimations for the 13-, 17- and 22-mm spheres. Both systems proved good performance characteristics, and the PET image quality of the mMR was close to that of the mCT

  7. Mechanical efficiency in rowing.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, T; Matsuo, A; Yamamoto, K; Asami, T

    1986-01-01

    Five university oarsmen participated in a determination of mechanical efficiency when rowing in a tank. In the tank, water was circulated at 3 m X s-1 by a motor driven pump. The subjects rowed with the stepwise incremental loading, in which the intensity increased by 10% of the maximum force of rowing (maxFc) every 2 min. Power (WO) was calculated from the force applied to the oarlock pin (FC) and its angular displacement (theta H). Oxygen uptake and heart rate were measured every 30 s during rowing. Anaerobic threshold (AT) was determined from expired gas variables by Wasserman's method. AT of oarsmen was 74.6 +/- 6.01% as a percentage of VO2max. As the displacement of the handgrip in the stroke was independent of WO, the increment of WO was caused by the increase of both FC and stroke frequency. Gross efficiency without base-line correction (GE) increased with FC with low intensities of rowing. In the region of 124-182 W of WO GE was almost constant at 17.5%. Efficiency was 19.8 +/- 1.4%, with resting metabolism as base-line correction (net efficiency), and 27.5 +/- 2.9% when using the unloaded rowing as the base-line correction (work efficiency), and 22.8 +/- 2.2% when calculating the work rate as the base-line correction (delta efficiency).

  8. Scottish Short Stone Rows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Short stone rows received a good deal of attention during the 1980s and 1990s, at a time when archaeoastronomy in prehistoric Britain and Ireland was moving beyond reassessments of Alexander Thom's "megalithic observatories" by identifying coherent groups of similar monuments with clear orientation trends. Many such rows are found in western Scotland, with the main concentration in Argyll and the island of Mull. Systematic analyses of their orientations produced credible evidence of an awareness of the 18.6-year lunar node cycle, within a "primary-secondary" pattern whereby isolated rows were oriented close to moonrise or moonset at the southern major standstill limit, while others oriented in this way were accompanied by a second row oriented in a declination range that could be interpreted either as lunar or solar. A detailed investigation of the landscape situation of the sites in northern Mull, accompanied by excavations at two of the sites, suggested that they were deliberately placed in locations where critical moonsets would be seen against prominent distant landscape features, but where the distant horizon in most or all other directions was hidden from view. A lack of independent archaeological evidence may help to explain why archaeoastronomical investigations at short stone rows have never progressed beyond "data-driven" studies of orientations and landscape situation. Nonetheless, the work that was done at these sites raised important general methodological issues, and pioneered techniques, that remain relevant across archaeoastronomy today.

  9. Comparison of SPECT/CT, MRI and CT in diagnosis of skull base bone invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-xu; Han, Peng-hui; Zhang, Guo-qian; Wang, Rui-hao; Ge, Yong-bin; Ren, Zhi-gang; Li, Jian-sheng; Fu, Wen-hai

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is crucial for correct staging, assessing treatment response and contouring the tumor target in radiotherapy planning, as well as improving the patient's prognosis. To compare the diagnostic efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for the detection of skull base invasion in NPC. Sixty untreated patients with histologically proven NPC underwent SPECT/CT imaging, contrast-enhanced MRI and CT. Of the 60 patients, 30 had skull base invasion confirmed by the final results of contrast-enhanced MRI, CT and six-month follow-up imaging (MRI and CT). The diagnostic efficacy of the three imaging modalities in detecting skull base invasion was evaluated. The rates of positive findings of skull base invasion for SPECT/CT, MRI and CT were 53.3%, 48.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 93.3%, 86.7% and 90.0% for SPECT/CT fusion imaging, 96.7%, 100.0% and 98.3% for contrast-enhanced MRI, and 66.7%, 100.0% and 83.3% for contrast-enhanced CT. MRI showed the best performance for the diagnosis of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, followed closely by SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT had poorer specificity than that of both MRI and CT, while CT had the lowest sensitivity.

  10. Biomechanics of Rowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Kazunori; Andrews, Brian J.; Zavatsky, Amy B.; Halliday, Suzanne E.

    A new control model for the study of biomechanical simulation of human movement was investigated using rowing as an example. The objectives were to explore biological and mechanical alternatives to optimal control methods. The simulation methods included simple control mechanisms based on proportional and derivative (PD) control, consideration of a simple neural model, introduction of an inverse dynamics system for feedback, and computational adjustment of control parameters by using an evaluative criterion and optimization method. By using simulation, appropriate rowing motions were synthesized. The generated rowing motion was periodic, continuous, and adaptable so that the pattern was stable against the mechanical force and independent of the initial condition. We believe that the simulation model is not only practical as a computational research tool from a biomechanical-engineering viewpoint but also significant from the point of view of fundamental biological theories of movement.

  11. Comparison of CT-derived Ventilation Maps with Deposition Patterns of Inhaled Microspheres in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Lamm, W. J.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Krueger, Melissa; Glenny, Robb W.; Corley, Richard A.

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Computer models for inhalation toxicology and drug-aerosol delivery studies rely on ventilation pattern inputs for predictions of particle deposition and vapor uptake. However, changes in lung mechanics due to disease can impact airflow dynamics and model results. It has been demonstrated that non-invasive, in vivo, 4DCT imaging (3D imaging at multiple time points in the breathing cycle) can be used to map heterogeneities in ventilation patterns under healthy and disease conditions. The purpose of this study was to validate ventilation patterns measured from CT imaging by exposing the same rats to an aerosol of fluorescent microspheres (FMS) and examining particle deposition patterns using cryomicrotome imaging. Materials and Methods: Six male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with elastase to a single lobe to induce a heterogeneous disease. After four weeks, rats were imaged over the breathing cycle by CT then immediately exposed to an aerosol of ~1µm FMS for ~5 minutes. After the exposure, the lungs were excised and prepared for cryomicrotome imaging, where a 3D image of FMS deposition was acquired using serial sectioning. Cryomicrotome images were spatially registered to match the live CT images to facilitate direct quantitative comparisons of FMS signal intensity with the CT-based ventilation maps. Results: Comparisons of fractional ventilation in contiguous, non-overlapping, 3D regions between CT-based ventilation maps and FMS images showed strong correlations in fractional ventilation (r=0.888, p<0.0001). Conclusion: We conclude that ventilation maps derived from CT imaging are predictive of the 1µm aerosol deposition used in ventilation-perfusion heterogeneity inhalation studies.

  12. Comparison of CT-derived ventilation maps with deposition patterns of inhaled microspheres in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Richard E.; Lamm, Wayne J.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Krueger, Melissa A.; Glenny, Robb W.; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Computer models for inhalation toxicology and drug-aerosol delivery studies rely on ventilation pattern inputs for predictions of particle deposition and vapor uptake. However, changes in lung mechanics due to disease can impact airflow dynamics and model results. It has been demonstrated that non-invasive, in vivo, 4DCT imaging (3D imaging at multiple time points in the breathing cycle) can be used to map heterogeneities in ventilation patterns under healthy and disease conditions. The purpose of this study was to validate ventilation patterns measured from CT imaging by exposing the same rats to an aerosol of fluorescent microspheres (FMS) and examining particle deposition patterns using cryomicrotome imaging. Materials and Methods Six male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with elastase to a single lobe to induce a heterogeneous disease. After four weeks, rats were imaged over the breathing cycle by CT then immediately exposed to an aerosol of ~1μm FMS for ~5 minutes. After the exposure, the lungs were excised and prepared for cryomicrotome imaging, where a 3D image of FMS deposition was acquired using serial sectioning. Cryomicrotome images were spatially registered to match the live CT images to facilitate direct quantitative comparisons of FMS signal intensity with the CT-based ventilation maps. Results Comparisons of fractional ventilation in contiguous, non-overlapping, 3D regions between CT-based ventilation maps and FMS images showed strong correlations in fractional ventilation (r=0.888, p<0.0001). Conclusion We conclude that ventilation maps derived from CT imaging are predictive of the 1μm aerosol deposition used in ventilation-perfusion heterogeneity inhalation studies. PMID:25513951

  13. Applied physiology of rowing.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, F C

    1984-01-01

    Elite oarsmen and oarswomen possess large body dimensions and show outstanding aerobic and anaerobic qualities. Oarsmen have VO2max values of 6.1 +/- 0.6 L/min and have incurred O2 debts of between 10 and 20 litres. The caloric expenditure of rowing estimated from the O2 cost of a 6-minute rowing ergometer exercise was calculated at 36 kcal/min, one of the highest energy costs so far reported for any predominantly aerobic-type sport. Aerobic and anaerobic calculations show that 70 to 75% of the energy necessary to row the standard 2000m distance for men is derived from aerobiosis while the remaining 25 to 30% is anaerobic. Women achieve VO2max values of 4.1 +/- 0.4 L/min and slightly lower anaerobic values than men. The relative 60 to 65% energy contribution of aerobic metabolism and 35 to 40% for anaerobiosis is not surprising since women compete at 1000m. Rowers also exhibit excellent isokinetic leg strength and power when compared with other elite athletes and oarswomen produced higher relative leg strength values than men when lean body mass is considered. Muscle fibre type distributions in oarsmen resemble those of distance runners while women tend to have a slightly higher proportion of fast-twitch fibres. An average power output of 390 +/- 13.6W was produced by oarsmen for 6 minutes of simulated rowing while women were able to develop 300 +/- 18.4 for 3 minutes of the same activity. Mechanical efficiency for rowing was calculated at 20 +/- 0.9%. Oarsmen also achieve very high ventilation volumes being able to average above 200 L/min BTPS for 6 minutes of simulated rowing; women ventilate 170 L/min BTPS for 3 minutes of this exercise. Excellent VO2/VE and O2 pulse values demonstrate outstanding cardiorespiratory efficiency. Both oarsmen and oarswomen utilise a unique physiological pattern of race pacing; they begin exertion with a vigorous sprint which places excessive demands on anaerobic metabolism followed by a severely high aerobic steady-state and then

  14. Special computer-aided computed tomography (CT) volume measurement and comparison method for pulmonary tuberculosis (TB).

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingming; Sun, Zhaogang; Xie, Ruming; Gao, Mengqiu; Li, Chuanyou

    2015-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) manifestations in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients are complex and could not be quantitatively evaluated. We aimed to establish a new method to objectively measure the lung injury level in PTB by thoracic CT and make quantitative comparisons. In the retrospective study, a total of 360 adults were selected and divided into four groups according to their CT manifestations and medical history: Normal group, PTB group, PTB with diabetes mellitus (DM) group and Death caused by PTB group. Five additional patients who had continuous CT scans were chosen for preliminary longitudinal analysis. We established a new computer-aided CT volume measurement and comparison method for PTB patients (CACTV-PTB) which measured lung volume (LV) and thoracic volume (TV). RLT was calculated as the ratio of LV to TV and comparisons were performed among different groups. Standardized RLT (SRLT) was used in the longitudinal analysis among different patients. In the Normal group, LV and TV were positively correlated in linear regression (Ŷ=-0.5+0.46X, R(2)=0.796, P<0.01). RLT values were significantly different among four groups (Normal: 0.40±0.05, PTB: 0.37±0.08, PTB+DM: 0.34±0.06, Death: 0.23±0.04). The curves of SRLT value from different patients shared a same start point and could be compared directly. Utilizing the novel objective method CACTV-PTB makes it possible to compare the severity and dynamic change among different PTB patients. Our early experience also suggested that the lung injury is severer in the PTB+DM group than in the PTB group.

  15. Photon counting spectral CT versus conventional CT: comparative evaluation for breast imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Fritz, Shannon G.

    2011-04-01

    Spectral CT systems with photon counting detectors have more advantages compared to conventional CT systems. However, clinical applications have been hampered for a long time due to the high demands of clinical systems and limitations of spectroscopic x-ray detectors. Photon counting detector technology has gained considerable improvements in the past decade, and spectral CT has become a hot topic. Several experimental spectral CT systems are under investigation. The purpose of this work was to perform the first direct, side-by-side comparison of existing spectral CT technology with a mature clinical CT system based on a conventional energy integrating detector. We have built an experimental spectral CT system whose main parameters are similar to the parameters of a clinical CT system. The system uses a spectroscopic cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector. The detector includes two rows of CZT pixels with 256 pixels in each row. The pixel size is 1 × 1 mm2, and the maximum count rate is 2 Mcounts/pixel/s. The spectral CT system has a magnification factor of 1.62 and the source to detector and source to image distances of 85 and 53 cm, respectively. The above parameters are similar to those of the clinical CT system, Siemens Sensation 16, used for comparison. The two systems were compared by imaging spatial resolution and contrast resolution phantoms made from acrylic cylinders with 14 cm diameters. The resolution phantom included Al wires with 0.3, 0.6, and 1 mm diameters, and 0.25 g cc-1 CaCO3 contrast. The contrast phantom included contrast elements with 1.7, 5, and 15 mg cc-1 iodine, and 1.1, 3.3, and 10 mg cc-1 gadolinium. The phantoms were imaged with the two systems using 120 kVp tube voltage and 470 mR total skin exposure. The spectral CT showed CT numbers, image noise, and spatial and contrast resolutions to be similar within 10% compared to the Siemens 16 system, and provided an average of 10% higher CNR. However, the spectral CT system had a major

  16. Photon counting spectral CT versus conventional CT: comparative evaluation for breast imaging application.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M; Fritz, Shannon G

    2011-04-07

    Spectral CT systems with photon counting detectors have more advantages compared to conventional CT systems. However, clinical applications have been hampered for a long time due to the high demands of clinical systems and limitations of spectroscopic x-ray detectors. Photon counting detector technology has gained considerable improvements in the past decade, and spectral CT has become a hot topic. Several experimental spectral CT systems are under investigation. The purpose of this work was to perform the first direct, side-by-side comparison of existing spectral CT technology with a mature clinical CT system based on a conventional energy integrating detector. We have built an experimental spectral CT system whose main parameters are similar to the parameters of a clinical CT system. The system uses a spectroscopic cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector. The detector includes two rows of CZT pixels with 256 pixels in each row. The pixel size is 1 × 1 mm(2), and the maximum count rate is 2 Mcounts/pixel/s. The spectral CT system has a magnification factor of 1.62 and the source to detector and source to image distances of 85 and 53 cm, respectively. The above parameters are similar to those of the clinical CT system, Siemens Sensation 16, used for comparison. The two systems were compared by imaging spatial resolution and contrast resolution phantoms made from acrylic cylinders with 14 cm diameters. The resolution phantom included Al wires with 0.3, 0.6, and 1 mm diameters, and 0.25 g cc(-1) CaCO(3) contrast. The contrast phantom included contrast elements with 1.7, 5, and 15 mg cc(-1) iodine, and 1.1, 3.3, and 10 mg cc(-1) gadolinium. The phantoms were imaged with the two systems using 120 kVp tube voltage and 470 mR total skin exposure. The spectral CT showed CT numbers, image noise, and spatial and contrast resolutions to be similar within 10% compared to the Siemens 16 system, and provided an average of 10% higher CNR. However, the spectral CT system had a

  17. Evaluation of the ΔV 4D CT ventilation calculation method using in vivo xenon CT ventilation data and comparison to other methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Geoffrey G; Latifi, Kujtim; Du, Kaifang; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Christensen, Gary E; Ding, Kai; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G

    2016-03-08

    Ventilation distribution calculation using 4D CT has shown promising potential in several clinical applications. This study evaluated the direct geometric ventilation calculation method, namely the ΔV method, with xenon-enhanced CT (XeCT) ventilation data from four sheep, and compared it with two other published meth-ods, the Jacobian and the Hounsfield unit (HU) methods. Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were used for the evaluation and comparison. The average SCC with one standard deviation was 0.44 ± 0.13 with a range between 0.29 and 0.61 between the XeCT and ΔV ventilation distributions. The average DSC value for lower 30% ventilation volumes between the XeCT and ΔV ventilation distributions was 0.55 ± 0.07 with a range between 0.48 and 0.63. Ventilation difference introduced by deformable image registration errors improved with smoothing. In conclusion, ventilation distributions generated using ΔV-4D CT and deformable image registration are in reasonably agreement with the in vivo XeCT measured ventilation distribution.

  18. A retrospective comparison of smart prep and test bolus multi-detector CT pulmonary angiography protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Suckling, Tara; Smith, Tony; Reed, Warren

    2013-06-15

    Optimal arterial opacification is crucial in imaging the pulmonary arteries using computed tomography (CT). This poses the challenge of precisely timing data acquisition to coincide with the transit of the contrast bolus through the pulmonary vasculature. The aim of this quality assurance exercise was to investigate if a change in CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) scanning protocol resulted in improved opacification of the pulmonary arteries. Comparison was made between the smart prep protocol (SPP) and the test bolus protocol (TBP) for opacification in the pulmonary trunk. A total of 160 CTPA examinations (80 using each protocol) performed between January 2010 and February 2011 were assessed retrospectively. CT attenuation coefficients were measured in Hounsfield Units (HU) using regions of interest at the level of the pulmonary trunk. The average pixel value, standard deviation (SD), maximum, and minimum were recorded. For each of these variables a mean value was then calculated and compared for these two CTPA protocols. Minimum opacification of 200 HU was achieved in 98% of the TBP sample but only 90% of the SPP sample. The average CT attenuation over the pulmonary trunk for the SPP was 329 (SD = ±21) HU, whereas for the TBP it was 396 (SD = ±22) HU (P = 0.0017). The TBP also recorded higher maximum (P = 0.0024) and minimum (P = 0.0039) levels of opacification. This study has found that a TBP resulted in significantly better opacification of the pulmonary trunk than the SPP.

  19. Localization of islet cell tumors by dynamic CT: comparison with plain CT, arteriography, sonography, and venous sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Krudy, A.G.; Doppman, J.L.; Jensen, R.T.; Norton, J.A.; Collen, M.J.; Shawker, T.H.; Gardner, J.D.; McArthur, K.; Gorden, P.

    1984-09-01

    Ten patients with suspected islet cell tumors (seven with possible gastrinomas, three with insulinomas) underwent diagnostic evaluation with dynamic CT scanning, routine CT scanning, angiography, and sonography. Venous sampling was also performed in selected instances. Nine sites of gastrinoma and three insulinomas were confirmed surgically in eight patients. Two patients had negative surgical explorations. Routine CT demonstrated five of the nine gastrinomas and one of two insulinomas. Angiography was positive in six of nine gastrinomas and all three insulinomas. Sonography showed only two of the nine gastrinomas and two of the three insulinomas. Dynamic CT scanning demonstrated three additional lesions (two gastrinomas, on insulinoma) not visible on routine CT scanning. Although most of these lesions were visible arteriographically, dynamic CT scans at the appropriate level localized the pathology in the transverse plane and greatly aided in surgical resection of these lesions.

  20. Image quality and dose comparison among screen-film, computed, and CT scanned projection radiography: applications to CT urography.

    PubMed

    McCollough, C H; Bruesewitz, M R; Vrtiska, T J; King, B F; LeRoy, A J; Quam, J P; Hattery, R R

    2001-11-01

    To evaluate image quality and dose for abdominal imaging techniques that could be used as part of a computed tomographic (CT) urographic examination: screen-film (S-F) radiography or computed radiography (CR), performed with moving and stationary grids, and CT scanned projection radiography (CT SPR). An image quality phantom underwent imaging with moving and stationary grids with both a clinical S-F combination and CR plate. CT SPR was performed with six CT scanners at various milliampere second and kilovolt peak settings. Entrance skin exposure (ESE); spatial, contrast, and temporal resolutions; geometric accuracy; and artifacts were assessed. S-F or CR images, with either grid, provided image quality equivalent to that with the clinical standard, S-F with a moving grid. ESE values for both S-F and CR were 435 mR (112.2 microC/kg [1 mR = 0.258 microC/kg]) with a moving grid and 226 mR (58.3 microC/kg) with a stationary grid. All CT SPR images provided inferior spatial resolution compared with S-F or CR images. High-contrast objects generated substantial artifacts on CT SPR images. Compared with S-F, CR and CT SPR provided improved resolution of small low-contrast objects. The contrast between iodine and soft-tissue-mimicking structures on CT SPR images acquired at 80 kVp was twice that at 120 kVp. CT SPR images with acceptable noise levels required a midline ESE value of approximately 300 mR (77.4 microC/kg) at 80 kVp. S-F and CR provided better spatial resolution than did CT SPR. However, CT SPR provided improved low-contrast resolution compared with S-F, at exposures comparable to those used for S-F or CR.

  1. Accuracy of low dose CT in the diagnosis of appendicitis in childhood and comparison with USG and standard dose CT.

    PubMed

    Yi, Dae Yong; Lee, Kyung Hoon; Park, Sung Bin; Kim, Jee Taek; Lee, Na Mi; Kim, Hyery; Yun, Sin Weon; Chae, Soo Ahn; Lim, In Seok

    2017-04-23

    Computed tomography should be performed after careful consideration due to radiation hazard, which is why interest in low dose CT has increased recently in acute appendicitis. Previous studies have been performed in adult and adolescents populations, but no studies have reported on the efficacy of using low-dose CT in children younger than 10 years. Patients (n=475) younger than 10 years who were examined for acute appendicitis were recruited. Subjects were divided into three groups according to the examinations performed: low-dose CT, ultrasonography, and standard-dose CT. Subjects were categorized according to age and body mass index (BMI). Low-dose CT was a contributive tool in diagnosing appendicitis, and it was an adequate method, when compared with ultrasonography and standard-dose CT in terms of sensitivity (95.5% vs. 95.0% and 94.5%, p=0.794), specificity (94.9% vs. 80.0% and 98.8%, p=0.024), positive-predictive value (96.4% vs. 92.7% and 97.2%, p=0.019), and negative-predictive value (93.7% vs. 85.7% and 91.3%, p=0.890). Low-dose CT accurately diagnosed patients with a perforated appendix. Acute appendicitis was effectively diagnosed using low-dose CT in both early and middle childhood. BMI did not influence the accuracy of detecting acute appendicitis on low-dose CT. Low-dose CT is effective and accurate for diagnosing acute appendicitis in childhood, as well as in adolescents and young adults. Additionally, low-dose CT was relatively accurate, irrespective of age or BMI, for detecting acute appendicitis. Therefore, low-dose CT is recommended for assessing children with suspected acute appendicitis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  2. Comparison of volumetric breast density estimations from mammography and thorax CT.

    PubMed

    Geeraert, N; Klausz, R; Cockmartin, L; Muller, S; Bosmans, H; Bloch, I

    2014-08-07

    Breast density has become an important issue in current breast cancer screening, both as a recognized risk factor for breast cancer and by decreasing screening efficiency by the masking effect. Different qualitative and quantitative methods have been proposed to evaluate area-based breast density and volumetric breast density (VBD). We propose a validation method comparing the computation of VBD obtained from digital mammographic images (VBDMX) with the computation of VBD from thorax CT images (VBDCT). We computed VBDMX by applying a conversion function to the pixel values in the mammographic images, based on models determined from images of breast equivalent material. VBDCT is computed from the average Hounsfield Unit (HU) over the manually delineated breast volume in the CT images. This average HU is then compared to the HU of adipose and fibroglandular tissues from patient images. The VBDMX method was applied to 663 mammographic patient images taken on two Siemens Inspiration (hospL) and one GE Senographe Essential (hospJ). For the comparison study, we collected images from patients who had a thorax CT and a mammography screening exam within the same year. In total, thorax CT images corresponding to 40 breasts (hospL) and 47 breasts (hospJ) were retrieved. Averaged over the 663 mammographic images the median VBDMX was 14.7% . The density distribution and the inverse correlation between VBDMX and breast thickness were found as expected. The average difference between VBDMX and VBDCT is smaller for hospJ (4%) than for hospL (10%). This study shows the possibility to compare VBDMX with the VBD from thorax CT exams, without additional examinations. In spite of the limitations caused by poorly defined breast limits, the calibration of mammographic images to local VBD provides opportunities for further quantitative evaluations.

  3. Comparison of volumetric breast density estimations from mammography and thorax CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geeraert, N.; Klausz, R.; Cockmartin, L.; Muller, S.; Bosmans, H.; Bloch, I.

    2014-08-01

    Breast density has become an important issue in current breast cancer screening, both as a recognized risk factor for breast cancer and by decreasing screening efficiency by the masking effect. Different qualitative and quantitative methods have been proposed to evaluate area-based breast density and volumetric breast density (VBD). We propose a validation method comparing the computation of VBD obtained from digital mammographic images (VBDMX) with the computation of VBD from thorax CT images (VBDCT). We computed VBDMX by applying a conversion function to the pixel values in the mammographic images, based on models determined from images of breast equivalent material. VBDCT is computed from the average Hounsfield Unit (HU) over the manually delineated breast volume in the CT images. This average HU is then compared to the HU of adipose and fibroglandular tissues from patient images. The VBDMX method was applied to 663 mammographic patient images taken on two Siemens Inspiration (hospL) and one GE Senographe Essential (hospJ). For the comparison study, we collected images from patients who had a thorax CT and a mammography screening exam within the same year. In total, thorax CT images corresponding to 40 breasts (hospL) and 47 breasts (hospJ) were retrieved. Averaged over the 663 mammographic images the median VBDMX was 14.7% . The density distribution and the inverse correlation between VBDMX and breast thickness were found as expected. The average difference between VBDMX and VBDCT is smaller for hospJ (4%) than for hospL (10%). This study shows the possibility to compare VBDMX with the VBD from thorax CT exams, without additional examinations. In spite of the limitations caused by poorly defined breast limits, the calibration of mammographic images to local VBD provides opportunities for further quantitative evaluations.

  4. CT image quality over time: comparison of image quality for six different CT scanners over a six-year period.

    PubMed

    Roa, Ana Maria A; Andersen, Hilde K; Martinsen, Anne Catrine T

    2015-03-08

    UNSCEAR concluded that increased use of CT scanning caused dramatic changes in population dose. Therefore, international radiation protection authorities demand: 1) periodical quality assurance tests with respect to image quality and radiation dose, and 2) optimization of all examination protocols with respect to image quality and radiation dose. This study aimed to evaluate and analyze multiple image quality parameters and variability measured throughout time for six different CT scanners from four different vendors, in order to evaluate the current methodology for QA controls of CT systems. The results from this study indicate that there is minor drifting in the image noise and uniformity and in the spatial resolution over time for CT scanners, independent of vendors. The HU for different object densities vary between different CT scanner models from different vendors, and over time for one specific CT scanner. Future tests of interphantom and intraphantom variations, along with inclusion of more CT scanners, are necessary to establish robust baselines and recommendations of methodology for QA controls of CT systems, independent of model and vendor.

  5. Serial automated quantitative CT analysis in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: functional correlations and comparison with changes in visual CT scores.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Joseph; Bartholmai, Brian J; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Kokosi, Maria; Egashira, Ryoko; Brun, Anne Laure; Nair, Arjun; Walsh, Simon L F; Karwoski, Ronald; Wells, Athol U

    2017-09-29

    To determine whether computer-based CT quantitation of change can improve on visual change quantification of parenchymal features in IPF. Sixty-six IPF patients with serial CT imaging (6-24 months apart) had CT features scored visually and with a computer software tool: ground glass opacity, reticulation and honeycombing (all three variables summed as interstitial lung disease extent [ILD]) and emphysema. Pulmonary vessel volume (PVV) was estimated by computer only. Relationships between changes in CT features and forced vital capacity (FVC) were examined using univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses. On univariate analysis, changes in computer variables demonstrated stronger linkages to FVC change than changes in visual scores (CALIPER ILD:R(2)=0.53, p<0.0001; Visual ILD:R(2)=0.16, p=0.001). PVV increase correlated most strongly with relative FVC change (R(2)=0.57). When PVV constituents (vessel size and location) were examined, an increase in middle zone vessels linked most strongly to FVC decline (R(2)=0.57) and was independent of baseline disease severity (characterised by CT fibrosis extent, FVC, or DLco). An increase in PVV, specifically an increase in middle zone lung vessels, was the strongest CT determinant of FVC decline in IPF and was independent of baseline disease severity. • Computer analysis improves on visual CT scoring in evaluating deterioration on CT • Increasing pulmonary vessel volume is the strongest CT predictor of functional deterioration • Increasing pulmonary vessel volume predicts functional decline independent of baseline disease severity.

  6. Monoenergetic reconstructions for imaging of coronary artery stents using spectral detector CT: In-vitro experience and comparison to conventional images.

    PubMed

    Hickethier, Tilman; Baeßler, Bettina; Kroeger, Jan Robert; Doerner, Jonas; Pahn, Gregor; Maintz, David; Michels, Guido; Bunck, Alexander C

    Accurate assessment of coronary stents using non-invasive CT imaging remains challenging despite new stent materials and improvements in CT technology. Virtual monoenergetic (monoE) images reconstructed from dual energy CT acquisitions potentially decrease artifacts caused by coronary stents. A novel spectral detector technology provides monoE and conventional images simultaneously for all conducted scans. The purpose of our study was to systematically investigate the influence of different monoE reconstructions on the visualization of coronary stent lumen in comparison to conventional images. Ten different coronary stents (diameter 3.0 mm) embedded in plastic tubes filled with contrast agent (500 HU) were scanned with a 128-row spectral detector CT (IQon, Philips, 120 kV, 125 mAs). Images were reconstructed (0.67 mm slice thickness, 0.35 mm increment) with a stent-specific conventional reconstruction kernel and 6 different monoE settings (60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 150 keV). Image quality for each stent and reconstruction was quantified using established parameters: image noise (standard deviation (SD) within a standardized ROI), in-stent attenuation difference (mean attenuation difference between stented and non-stented lumen) and visible lumen diameter (mean visible diameter of the stented tube). Image noise was significantly lower in all monoE data dets compared to conventional images (conventional: 13.41, 60 keV: 11.62, 70 keV: 11.67, 80 keV: 11.69, 90 keV: 11.71, 100 keV: 11.75, 150 keV: 11.80 HU SD; p < 0.01). The in-stent attenuation difference was significantly smaller in monoE data with higher keV levels than in conventional images (conventional: 148.18, 60 keV: 154.13 p = 0.036, 70 keV: 143.43 p = 0.109, 80 keV: 137.25 p = 0.052, 90 keV: 133.02 p = 0.043, 100 keV: 130.12 p = 0.039, 150 keV: 123.99 HU p = 0.035). The visible lumen diameter was significantly greater in monoE data with higher keV levels than in conventional images

  7. Rowing competitions and perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Alfinio; Bernhardt, Stephen A.; Shipman, Henry L.

    2015-02-01

    This paper is about integrating the use of graphing technology (specifically, GeoGebra) with principles of motion, principles of perspective, and the concept of vanishing points to model a dynamic event. Students were asked to analyse video images of a rowing competition filmed with a single camera positioned perpendicular to the race. The fixed position of the camera in such races makes it difficult to determine whether a scull closer to the camera is actually overtaking another, more distant scull. The paper illustrates how students in their first year at the university can integrate the use of technology, science, mathematics, and writing to solve a real world problem involving motion.

  8. Comparison of FDG-PET/CT and CT for Delineation of Lumpectomy Cavity for Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C. Lavely, William C.; Frassica, Deborah A.; Myers, Lee T.; Asrari, Fariba; Wahl, Richard L.; Zellars, Richard C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The success of partial breast irradiation critically depends on proper target localization. We examined the use of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) for improved lumpectomy cavity (LC) delineation and treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Twelve breast cancer patients underwent FDG-PET/CT on a GE Discovery scanner with a median time from surgery to PET/CT of 49 days. The LC was contoured on the CT scan by a radiation oncologist and, together with a nuclear medicine physician, on the PET/CT scan. The volumes were calculated and compared in each patient. Treatment planning target volumes (PTVs) were calculated by expanding the margin 2 cm beyond the LC, maintaining a 5-mm margin from the skin and chest wall, and the treatment plans were evaluated. In addition, a study with a patient-like phantom was conducted to evaluate the effect that the window/level settings might have on contouring. Results: The margin of the LC was well visualized on all FDG-PET images. The phantom results indicated that the difference between the known volume and the FDG-PET-delineated volume was <10%, regardless of the window/level settings. The PET/CT volumes were larger than the CT volumes in all cases (median volume ratio, 1.68; range, 1.24-2.45; p = 0.004). The PET/CT-based PTVs were also larger than the CT-based PTV (median volume ratio, 1.16; range, 1.08-1.64; p = 0.006). In 9 of 12 patients, a CT-based treatment plan did not provide adequate coverage of the PET/CT-based PTV (99% of the PTV received <95% of the prescribed dose), resulting in substantial cold spots in some plans. In these cases, treatment plans were generated which were specifically designed to cover the larger PET/CT-based PTV. Although these plans showed an increased dose to the normal tissues, the increases were modest: the non-target breast volume receiving {>=}50 Gy, lung volume receiving {>=}30 Gy, and heart volume receiving {>=}5 Gy increased by 5

  9. The role of ultrasonography in the imaging of body packers comparison with CT: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Cengel, Ferhat; Bulakci, Mesut; Selcuk, Tuba; Savas, Yildiray; Ceyhan, Muhammet; Kocak, Ayhan; Bilgili, Cigdem Ozkara

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the sonographic properties of drug packets containing narcotic drugs and the diagnostic role of ultrasonography in detecting body packing in comparison with CT. Forty-five suspects admitted to our hospital for diagnosis and management were routinely evaluated by non-contrast CT for the presence of drug packets. A single radiologist blind to CT data independently performed the abdominal ultrasonographic scans. Thirty-five of 45 suspects were carrying packets. In positive cases, two types of packets with different properties were noted. Twenty-eight cases had type 1 packets (solid form drug) and 7 had type 2 packets (liquid form cocaine). The sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values of ultrasonography for detecting drug packets were 91%, 70%, 91%, and 70%, respectively. Ultrasonography accurately determined the presence or absence of packs in 39 of 45 suspects. Ultrasonography was found to have a high sensitivity but a low specificity in suspected cases. A negative ultrasonography cannot rule out the diagnosis of body packing. However, it may be preferred as the initial imaging method or for follow-up of suspected cases as a radiation-free, easy-to-use, and inexpensive technique.

  10. Comparison of full-scan and half-scan for cone beam breast CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lingyun; Shaw, Chris C.; Lai, Chao-jen; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Tu, Shu-ju; Liu, Xinming

    2006-03-01

    The half-scan cone beam technique, requiring a scan for 180° plus detector width only, can help achieve both shorter scan time as well as higher exposure in each individual projection image. This purpose of this paper is to investigate whether half-scan cone beam CT technique can provide acceptable images for clinical application. The half-scan cone beam reconstruction algorithm uses modified Parker's weighting function and reconstructs from slightly more than half of the projection views for full-scan, giving out promising results. A rotation phantom, stationary gantry bench top system was built to conduct experiments to evaluate half-scan cone beam breast CT technique. A post-mastectomy breast specimen, a stack of lunch meat slices embedded with various sizes of calcifications and a polycarbonate phantom inserted with glandular and adipose tissue equivalents are imaged and reconstructed for comparison study. A subset of full-scan projection images of a mastectomy specimen were extracted and used as the half-scan projection data for reconstruction. The results show half-scan reconstruction algorithm for cone beam breast CT images does not significantly degrade image quality when compared with the images of same or even half the radiation dose level. Our results are encouraging, emphasizing the potential advantages in the use of half-scan technique for cone beam breast imaging.

  11. Comparison of manual and automatic MR-CT registration for radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Korsager, Anne Sofie; Carl, Jesper; Østergaard, Lasse Riis

    2016-05-01

    In image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer, delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV) often relies on magnetic resonance (MR) because of its good soft-tissue visualization. Registration of MR and computed tomography (CT) is required in order to add this accurate delineation to the dose planning CT. An automatic approach for local MR-CT registration of the prostate has previously been developed using a voxel property-based registration as an alternative to a manual landmark-based registration. The aim of this study is to compare the two registration approaches and to investigate the clinical potential for replacing the manual registration with the automatic registration. Registrations and analysis were performed for 30 prostate cancer patients treated with IGRT using a Ni-Ti prostate stent as a fiducial marker. The comparison included computing translational and rotational differences between the approaches, visual inspection, and computing the overlap of the CTV. The computed mean translational difference was 1.65, 1.60, and 1.80 mm and the computed mean rotational difference was 1.51°, 3.93°, and 2.09° in the superior/inferior, anterior/posterior, and medial/lateral direction, respectively. The sensitivity of overlap was 87%. The results demonstrate that the automatic registration approach performs registrations comparable to the manual registration. PACS number(s): 87.57.nj, 87.61.-c, 87.57.Q-, 87.56.J.

  12. Coronary calcium screening with dual-source CT: reliability of ungated, high-pitch chest CT in comparison with dedicated calcium-scoring CT.

    PubMed

    Hutt, Antoine; Duhamel, Alain; Deken, Valérie; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Molinari, Francesco; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the reliability of ungated, high-pitch dual-source CT for coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening. One hundred and eighty-five smokers underwent a dual-source CT examination with acquisition of two sets of images during the same session: (a) ungated, high-pitch and high-temporal resolution acquisition over the entire thorax (i.e., chest CT); (b) prospectively ECG-triggered acquisition over the cardiac cavities (i.e., cardiac CT). Sensitivity and specificity of chest CT for detecting positive CAC scores were 96.4 % and 100 %, respectively. There was excellent inter-technique agreement for determining the quantitative CAC score (ICC = 0.986). The mean difference between the two techniques was 11.27, representing 1.81 % of the average of the two techniques. The inter-technique agreement for categorizing patients into the four ranks of severity was excellent (weighted kappa = 0.95; 95 % CI 0.93-0.98). The inter-technique differences for quantitative CAC scores did not correlate with BMI (r = 0.05, p = 0.575) or heart rate (r = -0.06, p = 0.95); 87.2 % of them were explained by differences at the level of the right coronary artery (RCA: 0.8718; LAD: 0.1008; LCx: 0.0139; LM: 0.0136). Ungated, high-pitch dual-source CT is a reliable imaging mode for CAC screening in the conditions of routine chest CT examinations. • CAC is an independent risk factor for major cardiac events. • ECG-gated techniques are the reference standard for calcium scoring. • Great interest is directed toward calcium scoring on non-gated chest CT examinations. • Reliable calcium scoring can be obtained with dual-source CT in a high-pitch mode.

  13. Imaging lobular breast carcinoma: comparison of synchrotron radiation DEI-CT technique with clinical CT, mammography and histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, S.; Bravin, A.; Keyriläinen, J.; Fernández, M.; Suortti, P.; Thomlinson, W.; Tenhunen, M.; Virkkunen, P.; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M.-L.

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities for imaging cancer-bearing breast tissue samples are described and compared. The images include clinical mammograms and computed tomography (CT) images, CT images with partly coherent synchrotron radiation (SR), and CT and radiography images taken with SR using the diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The images are evaluated by a radiologist and compared with histopathological examination of the samples. Two cases of lobular carcinoma are studied in detail. The indications of cancer are very weak or invisible in the conventional images, but the morphological changes due to invasion of cancer become pronounced in the images taken by the DEI method. The strands penetrating adipose tissue are seen clearly in the DEI-CT images, and the histopathology confirms that some strands contain the so-called 'Indian file' formations of cancer cells. The radiation dose is carefully measured for each of the imaging modalities. The mean glandular dose (MGD) for 50% glandular breast tissue is about 1 mGy in conventional mammography and less than 0.25 mGy in projection DEI, while in the clinical CT imaging the MGD is very high, about 45 mGy. The entrance dose of 95 mGy in DEI-CT imaging gives rise to an MGD of 40 mGy, but the dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude, because the contrast is very large in most images.

  14. Measures of rowing performance.

    PubMed

    Smith, T Brett; Hopkins, Will G

    2012-04-01

    Accurate measures of performance are important for assessing competitive athletes in practi~al and research settings. We present here a review of rowing performance measures, focusing on the errors in these measures and the implications for testing rowers. The yardstick for assessing error in a performance measure is the random variation (typical or standard error of measurement) in an elite athlete's competitive performance from race to race: ∼1.0% for time in 2000 m rowing events. There has been little research interest in on-water time trials for assessing rowing performance, owing to logistic difficulties and environmental perturbations in performance time with such tests. Mobile ergometry via instrumented oars or rowlocks should reduce these problems, but the associated errors have not yet been reported. Measurement of boat speed to monitor on-water training performance is common; one device based on global positioning system (GPS) technology contributes negligible extra random error (0.2%) in speed measured over 2000 m, but extra error is substantial (1-10%) with other GPS devices or with an impeller, especially over shorter distances. The problems with on-water testing have led to widespread use of the Concept II rowing ergometer. The standard error of the estimate of on-water 2000 m time predicted by 2000 m ergometer performance was 2.6% and 7.2% in two studies, reflecting different effects of skill, body mass and environment in on-water versus ergometer performance. However, well trained rowers have a typical error in performance time of only ∼0.5% between repeated 2000 m time trials on this ergometer, so such trials are suitable for tracking changes in physiological performance and factors affecting it. Many researchers have used the 2000 m ergometer performance time as a criterion to identify other predictors of rowing performance. Standard errors of the estimate vary widely between studies even for the same predictor, but the lowest

  15. Comparison of cone-beam CT-guided and CT fluoroscopy-guided transthoracic needle biopsy of lung nodules.

    PubMed

    Rotolo, Nicola; Floridi, Chiara; Imperatori, Andrea; Fontana, Federico; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mangini, Monica; Arlant, Veronica; De Marchi, Giuseppe; Novario, Raffaele; Dominioni, Lorenzo; Fugazzola, Carlo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2016-02-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided and CT fluoroscopy (fluoro-CT)-guided technique for transthoracic needle biopsy (TNB) of lung nodules. The hospital records of 319 consecutive patients undergoing 324 TNBs of lung nodules in a single radiology unit in 2009-2013 were retrospectively evaluated. The newly introduced CBCT technology was used to biopsy 123 nodules; 201 nodules were biopsied by conventional fluoro-CT-guided technique. We assessed the performance of the two biopsy systems for diagnosis of malignancy and the radiation exposure. Nodules biopsied by CBCT-guided and by fluoro-CT-guided technique had similar characteristics: size, 20 ± 6.5 mm (mean ± standard deviation) vs. 20 ± 6.8 mm (p = 0.845); depth from pleura, 15 ± 15 mm vs. 15 ± 16 mm (p = 0.595); malignant, 60% vs. 66% (p = 0.378). After a learning period, the newly introduced CBCT-guided biopsy system and the conventional fluoro-CT-guided system showed similar sensitivity (95% and 92%), specificity (100% and 100%), accuracy for diagnosis of malignancy (96% and 94%), and delivered non-significantly different median effective doses [11.1 mSv (95 % CI 8.9-16.0) vs. 14.5 mSv (95% CI 9.5-18.1); p = 0.330]. The CBCT-guided and fluoro-CT-guided systems for lung nodule biopsy are similar in terms of diagnostic performance and effective dose, and may be alternatively used to optimize the available technological resources. • CBCT-guided and fluoro-CT-guided lung nodule biopsy provided high and similar diagnostic accuracy. • Effective dose from CBCT-guided and fluoro-CT-guided lung nodule biopsy was similar. • To optimize resources, CBCT-guided lung nodule biopsy may be an alternative to fluoro-CT-guided.

  16. Comparison of Low- and Standard-Dose CT for the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seong Jong; Ryu, Chang-Woo; Choi, Na Young; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Oh, Ji Young; Yang, Dal Mo

    2017-06-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to compare low-dose CT and standard-dose CT in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis with an emphasis on diagnostic value. A systematic literature search for articles published through June 2016 was performed to identify studies that compared low-dose CT with standard-dose CT for the evaluation of patients suspected of having acute appendicitis. Summary estimates of sensitivity and specificity with 95% CIs were calculated using a bivariate random-effects model. Meta-regression was used to perform statistical comparisons of low-dose CT and standard-dose CT. Of 154 studies, nine studies investigating a total of 2957 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of low-dose CT were 96.25% (95% CI, 91.88-98.31%) and 93.22% (95% CI, 88.75-96.00%), respectively. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of standard-dose CT were 96.40% (95% CI, 93.55-98.02%) and 92.17% (95% CI, 88.24-94.86%), respectively. In a joint model estimation of meta-regression, lowand standard-dose CT did not show a statistically significant difference (p = 0.71). Both lowand standard-dose CT seem to be characterized by high positive and negative predictive values across a broad spectrum of pretest probabilities for acute appendicitis. Low-dose CT is highly effective for the diagnosis of suspected appendicitis and can be considered a valid alternative first-line imaging test that reduces the potential risk of exposure to ionizing radiation.

  17. Model-based iterative reconstruction in ultra-low-dose pediatric chest CT: comparison with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Jin; Yoo, So-Young; Jeon, Tae Yeon; Kim, Ji Hye

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate image quality and dose reduction of ultra-low-dose pediatric chest CT reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), as compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Fifty-seven patients (mean age 14 years, M:F=31:26) who underwent ultra-low-dose chest CT reconstructed with both MBIR and ASIR were enrolled in the study. The subjective and objective image qualities of both reconstruction techniques were assessed by 3 radiologists, and compared using statistical analysis. We also evaluated radiation dose of ultra-low-dose chest CT as well as degree of dose reduction in comparison to the prior CT (either standard dose or reduced dose protocol) available in 36 patients. The image quality of MBIR was superior to ASIR both subjectively and objectively. While MBIR showed preserved diagnostic acceptability in 100%, ASIR showed 92% at mean 0.31 mSv (range, 0.13-0.57 mSv) ultra-low-dose CT. In the 36 patients who underwent the prior CT, mean decrease in size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) and dose length product (DLP) at ultra-low-dose CT was 88% (range, 34% - 98%) and 86% (range,42% - 99%), respectively. MBIR significantly improves image quality, as compared to ASIR. Furthermore, MBIR facilitates diagnostically acceptable ultra-low-dose chest CT with nearly 90% less radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. CT imaging of bone and bone marrow infiltration in malignant melanoma--Challenges and limitations for clinical staging in comparison to 18FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Bier, Georg; Hoffmann, Vera; Kloth, Christopher; Othman, Ahmed E; Eigentler, Thomas; Garbe, Claus; La Fougère, Christian; Pfannenberg, Christina; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Klumpp, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Rationale of this study was the evaluation of the diagnostic value of computed tomography (CT) in the detection of bone marrow infiltration in comparison to PET/CT. Fifty patients (age 61 ± 15.12 years) with metastatic malignant melanoma underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT, including contrast-enhanced CT. 2 readers evaluated the CT images in consensus for bone and bone marrow lesions focusing on lesion location, type and size. PET/CT was used as reference standard to estimate sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive value. Moreover, the bone marrow density was estimated in the long bones and the sacral bone. Serum hamoglobin, thrombocyte level and S100 protein were correlated with the presence or absence of bone and bone marrow lesions. According to PET/CT as standard of reference, of 594 bone and medullary lesions 495 were considered malignant. Of these 77.8% were medullary, 20.4% lytic, 1% sclerotic and 0.8% mixed lytic/sclerotic. Contrast-enhanced CT yielded a lesion-based sensitivity of 36.8% and a specificity of 87.9% (PPV 93.8%; NPV 21.8%). Patient-based sensitivity and specificity were 78.8% and 82.4%, respectively. Of the missed lesions, most were medullary (95.8%). A disseminated bone marrow involvement (defined as >10 bone marrow lesions or diffuse infiltration of a whole body segment) was described in 11 cases, in 6 cases the disseminated involvement was underestimated or missed on CT. In cases with disseminated bone marrow involvement the bone marrow density was significantly higher in the humerus (p=0.04), but not in the femur or sacral bone (p=0.06). Multivariate analysis revealed no isolated effect of bone metastases on S100 serum and hemoglobin level, but both were significantly altered in patients with disseminated bone marrow involvement (p<0.05). In conclusion, the diagnostic value of computed tomography for the detection of bone marrow metastases in patients with melanoma, is limited. Especially in cases with disseminated bone marrow

  19. Dual energy with dual source CT and kVp switching with single source CT: a comparison of dual energy performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Kappler, S.; Reinwand, M.; Stierstorfer, K.

    2009-02-01

    Stimulated by the introduction of clinical dual source CT, the interest in dual energy methods has been increasing in the past years. Whereas the potential of material decomposition by dual energy methods is known since the early 1980ies, the realization of dual energy methods is a wide field of today's research. Energy separation can be achieved with energy selective detectors or by varying X-ray source spectra. This paper focuses on dual energy techniques with varying X-ray spectra. These can be provided by dual source CT devices, operated with different kVp settings on each tube. Excellent spectral separation is the key property for use in clinical routine. The drawback of higher cost for two tubes and two detectors leads to an alternative realization, where a single source CT yields different spectra by fast kVp switching from reading to reading. This provides access to dual-energy methods in single source CT. However, this technique comes with some intrinsic limitations. The maximum X-ray flux is reduced in comparison to the dual source system. The kVp rise and fall time between each reading reduces the spectral separation. In comparison to dual source CT, for a constant number of projections per energy spectrum the temporal resolution is reduced; a reasonable trade of between reduced numbers of projection and limited temporal resolution has to be found. The overall dual energy performance is the guiding line for our investigations. We present simulations and measurements which benchmark both solutions in terms of spectral behavior, especially of spectral separation.

  20. Comparison of virtual unenhanced CT images of the abdomen under different iodine flow rates.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongrui; Li, Ye; Jackson, Alan; Li, Xiaodong; Huang, Ning; Guo, Chunjie; Zhang, Huimao

    2017-01-01

    To assess the effect of varying iodine flow rate (IFR) and iodine concentration on the quality of virtual unenhanced (VUE) images of the abdomen obtained with dual-energy CT. 94 subjects underwent unenhanced and triphasic contrast-enhanced CT scan of the abdomen, including arterial phase, portal venous phase, and delayed phase using dual-energy CT. Patients were randomized into 4 groups with different IFRs or iodine concentrations. VUE images were generated at 70 keV. The CT values, image noise, SNR and CNR of aorta, portal vein, liver, liver lesion, pancreatic parenchyma, spleen, erector spinae, and retroperitoneal fat were recorded. Dose-length product and effective dose for an examination with and without plain phase scan were calculated to assess the potential dose savings. Two radiologists independently assessed subjective image quality using a five-point scale. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used first to test for normal distribution. Where data conformed to a normal distribution, analysis of variance was used to compare mean HU values, image noise, SNRs and CNRs for the 4 image sets. Where data distribution was not normal, a nonparametric test (Kruskal-Wallis test followed by stepwise step-down comparisons) was used. The significance level for all tests was 0.01 (two-sided) to allow for type 2 errors due to multiple testing. The CT numbers (HU) of VUE images showed no significant differences between the 4 groups (p > 0.05) or between different phases within the same group (p > 0.05). VUE images had equal or higher SNR and CNR than true unenhanced images. VUE images received equal or lower subjective image quality scores than unenhanced images but were of acceptable quality for diagnostic use. Calculated dose-length product and estimated dose showed that the use of VUE images in place of unenhanced images would be associated with a dose saving of 25%. VUE images can replace conventional unenhanced images. VUE images are not affected by varying iodine

  1. Assessment of non-invasive chronic fungal rhinosinusitis by cone beam CT: comparison with multidetector CT findings.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Tomohiko; Tani, Akiko; Yokoyama, Shuji; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2017-08-09

    To investigate the accuracy of cone beam CT (CBCT) to diagnose non-invasive chronic fungal rhinosinusitis. Preoperative CT evaluation of non-invasive chronic fungal rhinosinusitis was performed by CBCT (3D Accuitomo 170(®)) and traditional multidetector CT (MDCT) (Aquilion 32(®)) in 13 and 38 patients with non-invasive chronic fungal maxillary sinusitis, respectively, in different facilities. Detection of intrasinus calcification was compared between these two groups. Detection of intrasinus calcification in patients with non-invasive chronic fungal maxillary sinusitis was higher in the MDCT group (84.2%) than the CBCT group (46.2%). CBCT is inferior to MDCT in detection of intrasinus calcification in patients with non-invasive chronic fungal maxillary sinusitis. CBCT is frequently used in the screening of the paranasal lesion, but it is not enough to evaluate non-invasive chronic fungal maxillary sinusitis alone. Retrospective study.

  2. Comparison of four software packages for CT lung volumetry in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Stefan F; Molinari, Francesco; Dufresne, Valerie; Gosset, Natacha; Silva, Mario; Bankier, Alexander A

    2015-06-01

    To compare CT lung volumetry (CTLV) measurements provided by different software packages, and to provide normative data for lung densitometric measurements in healthy individuals. This retrospective study included 51 chest CTs of 17 volunteers (eight men and nine women; mean age, 30 ± 6 years), who underwent spirometrically monitored CT at total lung capacity (TLC), functional residual capacity (FRC), and mean inspiratory capacity (MIC). Volumetric differences assessed by four commercial software packages were compared with analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measurements and benchmarked against the threshold for acceptable variability between spirometric measurements. Mean lung density (MLD) and parenchymal heterogeneity (MLD-SD) were also compared with ANOVA. Volumetric differences ranged from 12 to 213 ml (0.20 % to 6.45 %). Although 16/18 comparisons (among four software packages at TLC, MIC, and FRC) were statistically significant (P < 0.001 to P = 0.004), only 3/18 comparisons, one at MIC and two at FRC, exceeded the spirometry variability threshold. MLD and MLD-SD significantly increased with decreasing volumes, and were significantly larger in lower compared to upper lobes (P < 0.001). Lung volumetric differences provided by different software packages are small. These differences should not be interpreted based on statistical significance alone, but together with absolute volumetric differences. • Volumetric differences, assessed by different CTLV software, are small but statistically significant. • Volumetric differences are smaller at TLC than at MIC and FRC. • Volumetric differences rarely exceed spirometric repeatability thresholds at MIC and FRC. • Differences between CTLV measurements should be interpreted based on comparison of absolute differences. • MLD increases with decreasing volumes, and is larger in lower compared to upper lobes.

  3. Percutaneous Bone Biopsies: Comparison between Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT and CT-Scan Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Tselikas, Lambros Joskin, Julien; Roquet, Florian; Farouil, Geoffroy; Dreuil, Serge; Hakimé, Antoine Teriitehau, Christophe; Auperin, Anne; Baere, Thierry de Deschamps, Frederic

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to compare the accuracy of targeting and the radiation dose of bone biopsies performed either under fluoroscopic guidance using a cone-beam CT with real-time 3D image fusion software (FP-CBCT-guidance) or under conventional computed tomography guidance (CT-guidance).MethodsSixty-eight consecutive patients with a bone lesion were prospectively included. The bone biopsies were scheduled under FP-CBCT-guidance or under CT-guidance according to operating room availability. Thirty-four patients underwent a bone biopsy under FP-CBCT and 34 under CT-guidance. We prospectively compared the two guidance modalities for their technical success, accuracy, puncture time, and pathological success rate. Patient and physician radiation doses also were compared.ResultsAll biopsies were technically successful, with both guidance modalities. Accuracy was significantly better using FP-CBCT-guidance (3 and 5 mm respectively: p = 0.003). There was no significant difference in puncture time (32 and 31 min respectively, p = 0.51) nor in pathological results (88 and 88 % of pathological success respectively, p = 1). Patient radiation doses were significantly lower with FP-CBCT (45 vs. 136 mSv, p < 0.0001). The percentage of operators who received a dose higher than 0.001 mSv (dosimeter detection dose threshold) was lower with FP-CBCT than CT-guidance (27 vs. 59 %, p = 0.01).ConclusionsFP-CBCT-guidance for bone biopsy is accurate and reduces patient and operator radiation doses compared with CT-guidance.

  4. The Demise of Skid Row.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Inciardi, James A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the history and evolution of the American skid row; analyzes the changes it has undergone, particularly in the face of urban renewal; and speculates on its future. Includes opinions of the inhabitants of skid row which were obtained from interviews. (MJL)

  5. The Demise of Skid Row.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Inciardi, James A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the history and evolution of the American skid row; analyzes the changes it has undergone, particularly in the face of urban renewal; and speculates on its future. Includes opinions of the inhabitants of skid row which were obtained from interviews. (MJL)

  6. Local variations in bone mineral density: a comparison of OCT versus x-ray micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Stevens-Smith, Jenna; Scutt, Andrew; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2008-02-01

    We describe variations in the degree of mineralisation within the subchondral bone plate of the equine metacarpophalangeal joint. A comparison of Optical Coherence Tomography, Micro CT, and SEM techniques was performed. These data are compared between sites on a healthy sample and at points on an osteoarthritically degenerated sample. No significant correlation was found between the optical scattering coefficient and the micro-CT derived BMD for comparisons between different sites on the bone surface. Also OCT demonstrated a larger regional variation in scattering coefficient than did micro CT for bone mineral density. This suggests that the optical scattering coefficient of bone is not related solely to the volume-density of calcium-phosphate. Patches of lower optical scattering coefficient were found in the bone structure that was related to the osteoarthritic lesion area on the overlying cartilage. Areas of microcracking, as revealed by both SEM and micro CT produced distinctive granularity in the OCT images. In further experiments, OCT was compared with micro CT and mechanical strength testing (3-point bending) in a small animal model of cardiovascular disease (cholesterol overload in mice). In the cardiovascular diseased mice, micro-CT of the trabecular bone did not demonstrate a significant change in trabecular bone mineral density before and after administration of the high cholesterol diet. However mechanical testing demonstrated a decrease in mechanical strength and OCT demonstrated a corresponding statistically significant decrease in optical scattering of the bone.

  7. Volumetric analysis of lung nodules in computed tomography (CT): comparison of two different segmentation algorithm softwares and two different reconstruction filters on automated volume calculation.

    PubMed

    Christe, Andreas; Brönnimann, Alain; Vock, Peter

    2014-02-01

    A precise detection of volume change allows for better estimating the biological behavior of the lung nodules. Postprocessing tools with automated detection, segmentation, and volumetric analysis of lung nodules may expedite radiological processes and give additional confidence to the radiologists. To compare two different postprocessing software algorithms (LMS Lung, Median Technologies; LungCARE®, Siemens) in CT volumetric measurement and to analyze the effect of soft (B30) and hard reconstruction filter (B70) on automated volume measurement. Between January 2010 and April 2010, 45 patients with a total of 113 pulmonary nodules were included. The CT exam was performed on a 64-row multidetector CT scanner (Somatom Sensation, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) with the following parameters: collimation, 24x1.2 mm; pitch, 1.15; voltage, 120 kVp; reference tube current-time, 100 mAs. Automated volumetric measurement of each lung nodule was performed with the two different postprocessing algorithms based on two reconstruction filters (B30 and B70). The average relative volume measurement difference (VME%) and the limits of agreement between two methods were used for comparison. At soft reconstruction filters the LMS system produced mean nodule volumes that were 34.1% (P < 0.0001) larger than those by LungCARE® system. The VME% was 42.2% with a limit of agreement between -53.9% and 138.4%.The volume measurement with soft filters (B30) was significantly larger than with hard filters (B70); 11.2% for LMS and 1.6% for LungCARE®, respectively (both with P < 0.05). LMS measured greater volumes with both filters, 13.6% for soft and 3.8% for hard filters, respectively (P < 0.01 and P > 0.05). There is a substantial inter-software (LMS/LungCARE®) as well as intra-software variability (B30/B70) in lung nodule volume measurement; therefore, it is mandatory to use the same equipment with the same reconstruction filter for the follow-up of lung nodule volume.

  8. Comparison of CT-Number and Gray Scale Value of Different Dental Materials and Hard Tissues in CT and CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Emadi, Naghmeh; Safi, Yaser; Akbarzadeh Bagheban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) are valuable diagnostic aids for many clinical applications. This study was designed to compare the gray scale value (GSV) and Hounsfield unit (HU) of selected dental materials and various hard tissues using CT or CBCT. Methods and Materials: Three samples of all test materials including amalgam (AM), composite resin (CR), glass ionomer (GI), zinc-oxide eugenol (ZOE), calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement, AH-26 root canal sealer (AH-26), gutta-percha (GP), Coltosol (Col), Dycal (DL), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), zinc phosphate (ZP), and polycarbonate cement (PC) were prepared and scanned together with samples of bone, dentin and enamel using two CBCT devices, Scanora 3D (S3D) and NewTom VGi (NTV) and a spiral CT (SCT) scanner (Somatom Emotion 16 multislice spiral CT);. Subsequently, the HU and GSV values were determined and evaluated. The data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The level of significance was determined at 0.05. Results: There were significant differences among the three different scanners (P<0.05). The differences between HU/GSV values of 12 selected dental materials using NTV was significant (P<0.05) and for S3D and SCT was insignificant (P>0.05). All tested materials showed maximum values in S3D and SCT (3094 and 3071, respectively); however, bone and dentin showed low/medium values (P<0.05). In contrast, the tested materials and tissues showed a range of values in NTV (366 to15383; P<0.05). Conclusion: Scanner system can influence the obtained HU/GSV of dental materials. NTV can discriminate various dental materials, in contrast to S3D/SCT scanners. NTV may be a more useful diagnostic aid for clinical practice. PMID:25386210

  9. Comparison of near-infrared spectroscopy with CT cerebral blood flow measurements in newborn piglets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Derek W.; Picot, Paul A.; Springett, Roger; Delpy, David T.; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2001-05-01

    Severely premature infants are often at high risk of cerebral hemorrhage or ischemic injury due to their inability to properly regulate blood flow to the brain. If blood flow is too high, the infant is at risk of cerebral hemorrhage, while too little blood flow can result in ischemic injury. The purpose of this research is to design and develop a means of non-invasively measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Such a device would greatly aid the diagnosis and monitoring of afflicted infants. Previous attempts to measure CBF with NIRS have achieved limited success. In this study we acquired high signal-to-noise NIR spectrum from 600 to 980 nm with a cooled CCD spectrometer. This spectrometer enables the differential path length factor (DPF) to be estimated with accuracy using a second derivative technique described by Matcher et al. The validity of our new approach is determined via direct comparison with a previously validated computed tomography (CT) method. Three newborn piglets were studied. CBF measurements were performed at various partial arterial CO2 tensions (PaCO2) using both the NIRS and CT methods. The results of the two methods correlate well with a relationship of CBFCT equals -4.30 + 1.05 CBFNIRS (r2 equals 0.96).

  10. Serial changes of (18)F-FDG PET/CT findings in ischiopubic synchondrosis: comparison with contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kazunobu; Tsuchida, Tatsuro; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Tanizawa, Akihiko; Kimura, Hirohiko

    2015-01-01

    A 3 years old female patient underwent resection and chemotherapy for a yolk sac tumor of the retroperitoneum. Two years later, fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) showed high uptake in the right ischiopubic synchondrosis (IPS), which had a radiolucent structure on CT. The structure showed contrast enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which was a non-specific finding. Six weeks later, a follow-up (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan was performed which showed no abnormal uptake in the IPS. The disappearance of (18)F-FDG uptake preceded that of contrast enhancement on MRI, which was seen 7 months after the initial (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan. This is the first report showing serial changes of (18)F-FDG uptake in IPS, in comparison to MRI findings.

  11. Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm{sup 2} (0.002 mm{sup -1}) to 0.29 mm{sup 2} (0.74 mm{sup -1}). The GE kernels 'Soft,''Standard,''Chest,' and 'Lung' closely matched the Siemens kernels 'B35f,''B43f,''B41f,' and 'B80f' (RMSD < 0.05 mm{sup 2}, |PFD| < 0.02 mm{sup -1}, respectively). The GE 'Bone,''Bone+,' and 'Edge' kernels all matched most closely with Siemens 'B75f' kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm{sup 2} and 0.41 mm{sup -1}, respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is

  12. Comparison of image registration based measures of regional lung ventilation from dynamic spiral CT with Xe-CT

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Fuld, Matthew K.; Du, Kaifang; Christensen, Gary E.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Regional lung volume change as a function of lung inflation serves as an index of parenchymal and airway status as well as an index of regional ventilation and can be used to detect pathologic changes over time. In this paper, the authors propose a new regional measure of lung mechanics—the specific air volume change by corrected Jacobian. The authors compare this new measure, along with two existing registration based measures of lung ventilation, to a regional ventilation measurement derived from xenon-CT (Xe-CT) imaging. Methods: 4DCT and Xe-CT datasets from four adult sheep are used in this study. Nonlinear, 3D image registration is applied to register an image acquired near end inspiration to an image acquired near end expiration. Approximately 200 annotated anatomical points are used as landmarks to evaluate registration accuracy. Three different registration based measures of regional lung mechanics are derived and compared: the specific air volume change calculated from the Jacobian (SAJ); the specific air volume change calculated by the corrected Jacobian (SACJ); and the specific air volume change by intensity change (SAI). The authors show that the commonly used SAI measure can be derived from the direct SAJ measure by using the air-tissue mixture model and assuming there is no tissue volume change between the end inspiration and end expiration datasets. All three ventilation measures are evaluated by comparing to Xe-CT estimates of regional ventilation. Results: After registration, the mean registration error is on the order of 1 mm. For cubical regions of interest (ROIs) in cubes with size 20 mm × 20 mm × 20 mm, the SAJ and SACJ measures show significantly higher correlation (linear regression, average r2 = 0.75 and r2 = 0.82) with the Xe-CT based measure of specific ventilation (sV) than the SAI measure. For ROIs in slabs along the ventral-dorsal vertical direction with size of 150 mm × 8 mm × 40 mm, the SAJ, SACJ, and SAI all show high

  13. Unusual Presentation of Bladder Paraganglioma: Comparison of (131)I MIBG SPECT/CT and (68)Ga DOTANOC PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tarun Kumar; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Gupta, Nitin; Shukla, Jaya; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Extraadrenal chromaffin cell-related tumors or paragangliomas are rare, especially in the bladder, accounting for less than 1% of cases. We report a 16-year-old boy who presented with hematuria and paroxysmal headache and was found to have a prostatic growth infiltrating the urinary bladder on anatomical imaging. Iodine-131 ((131)I) metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) whole-body scanning and subsequently gallium-68 ((68)Ga) DOTANOC positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were performed. The MIBG scan revealed a non-tracer-avid soft-tissue mass, while DOTANOC PET/CT revealed a tracer-avid primary soft-tissue mass involving the urinary bladder and prostate with metastasis to the iliac lymph nodes. He underwent surgical management; histopathology of the surgical specimen revealed a bladder paraganglioma, whereas the prostate was found to be free of tumor.

  14. Unusual Presentation of Bladder Paraganglioma: Comparison of 131I MIBG SPECT/CT and 68Ga DOTANOC PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tarun Kumar; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Gupta, Nitin; Shukla, Jaya; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Extraadrenal chromaffin cell-related tumors or paragangliomas are rare, especially in the bladder, accounting for less than 1% of cases. We report a 16-year-old boy who presented with hematuria and paroxysmal headache and was found to have a prostatic growth infiltrating the urinary bladder on anatomical imaging. Iodine-131 (131I) metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) whole-body scanning and subsequently gallium-68 (68Ga) DOTANOC positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were performed. The MIBG scan revealed a non-tracer-avid soft-tissue mass, while DOTANOC PET/CT revealed a tracer-avid primary soft-tissue mass involving the urinary bladder and prostate with metastasis to the iliac lymph nodes. He underwent surgical management; histopathology of the surgical specimen revealed a bladder paraganglioma, whereas the prostate was found to be free of tumor. PMID:26912984

  15. Comparison of ring artifact removal methods using flat panel detector based CT images

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ring artifacts are the concentric rings superimposed on the tomographic images often caused by the defective and insufficient calibrated detector elements as well as by the damaged scintillator crystals of the flat panel detector. It may be also generated by objects attenuating X-rays very differently in different projection direction. Ring artifact reduction techniques so far reported in the literature can be broadly classified into two groups. One category of the approaches is based on the sinogram processing also known as the pre-processing techniques and the other category of techniques perform processing on the 2-D reconstructed images, recognized as the post-processing techniques in the literature. The strength and weakness of these categories of approaches are yet to be explored from a common platform. Method In this paper, a comparative study of the two categories of ring artifact reduction techniques basically designed for the multi-slice CT instruments is presented from a common platform. For comparison, two representative algorithms from each of the two categories are selected from the published literature. A very recently reported state-of-the-art sinogram domain ring artifact correction method that classifies the ring artifacts according to their strength and then corrects the artifacts using class adaptive correction schemes is also included in this comparative study. The first sinogram domain correction method uses a wavelet based technique to detect the corrupted pixels and then using a simple linear interpolation technique estimates the responses of the bad pixels. The second sinogram based correction method performs all the filtering operations in the transform domain, i.e., in the wavelet and Fourier domain. On the other hand, the two post-processing based correction techniques actually operate on the polar transform domain of the reconstructed CT images. The first method extracts the ring artifact template vector using a homogeneity

  16. CT of the chest with model-based, fully iterative reconstruction: comparison with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Yasutaka; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Nagasawa, Naoki; Murashima, Shuichi; Sakuma, Hajime

    2013-08-09

    The recently developed model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) enables significant reduction of image noise and artifacts, compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and filtered back projection (FBP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate lesion detectability of low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) with MBIR in comparison with ASIR and FBP. Chest CT was acquired with 64-slice CT (Discovery CT750HD) with standard-dose (5.7 ± 2.3 mSv) and low-dose (1.6 ± 0.8 mSv) conditions in 55 patients (aged 72 ± 7 years) who were suspected of lung disease on chest radiograms. Low-dose CT images were reconstructed with MBIR, ASIR 50% and FBP, and standard-dose CT images were reconstructed with FBP, using a reconstructed slice thickness of 0.625 mm. Two observers evaluated the image quality of abnormal lung and mediastinal structures on a 5-point scale (Score 5 = excellent and score 1 = non-diagnostic). The objective image noise was also measured as the standard deviation of CT intensity in the descending aorta. The image quality score of enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes on low-dose MBIR CT (4.7 ± 0.5) was significantly improved in comparison with low-dose FBP and ASIR CT (3.0 ± 0.5, p = 0.004; 4.0 ± 0.5, p = 0.02, respectively), and was nearly identical to the score of standard-dose FBP image (4.8 ± 0.4, p = 0.66). Concerning decreased lung attenuation (bulla, emphysema, or cyst), the image quality score on low-dose MBIR CT (4.9 ± 0.2) was slightly better compared to low-dose FBP and ASIR CT (4.5 ± 0.6, p = 0.01; 4.6 ± 0.5, p = 0.01, respectively). There were no significant differences in image quality scores of visualization of consolidation or mass, ground-glass attenuation, or reticular opacity among low- and standard-dose CT series. Image noise with low-dose MBIR CT (11.6 ± 1.0 Hounsfield units (HU)) were significantly lower than with low-dose ASIR (21.1 ± 2.6 HU, p < 0.0005), low-dose FBP CT (30.9 ± 3.9 HU, p < 0.0005), and

  17. Hydrodynamic performance of multiple-row slotted breakwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbisy, Moussa S.; Mlybari, Ehab M.; Helal, Medhat M.

    2016-06-01

    This study examines the hydrodynamic performance of multiple-row vertical slotted breakwaters. We developed a mathematical model based on an eigenfunction expansion method and a least squares technique for Stokes second-order waves. The numerical results obtained for limiting cases of double-row and triple-row walls are in good agreement with results of previous studies and experimental results. Comparisons with experimental measurements of the reflection, transmission, and dissipation coefficients ( C R , C T , and C E ) for double-row walls show that the proposed mathematical model adequately reproduces most of the important features. We found that for double-row walls, the C R increases with increasing wave number, kd, and with a decreasing permeable wall part, dm. The C T follows the opposite trend. The C E slowly increases with an increasing kd for lower kd values, reaches a maximum, and then decreases again. In addition, an increasing porosity of dm would significantly decrease the C R , while increasing the C T . At lower values of kd, a decreasing porosity increases the C E , but for high values of kd, a decreasing porosity reduces the C E . The numerical results indicate that, for triple-row walls, the effect of the arrangement of the chamber widths on hydrodynamic characteristics is not significant, except when kd<0.5. Double-row slotted breakwaters may exhibit a good wave-absorbing performance at kd>0.5, where by the horizontal wave force may be smaller than that of a single wall. On the other hand, the difference between double-row and triple-row vertical slotted breakwaters is marginal.

  18. Simultaneous whole-body PET/MR imaging in comparison to PET/CT in pediatric oncology: initial results.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Jürgen F; Gatidis, Sergios; Schmidt, Holger; Gückel, Brigitte; Bezrukov, Ilja; Pfannenberg, Christina A; Reimold, Matthias; Ebinger, Martin; Fuchs, Jörg; Claussen, Claus D; Schwenzer, Nina F

    2014-10-01

    To compare positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and PET/computed tomography (CT) for lesion detection and interpretation, quantification of fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake, and accuracy of MR-based PET attenuation correction in pediatric patients with solid tumors. Materials and Methods This prospective study had local ethics committee and German Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices approval. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients and legal guardians. Twenty whole-body (18)F-FDG PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/MR examinations were performed in 18 pediatric patients (median age, 14 years; range, 11-17 years). (18)F-FDG PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/MR data were acquired sequentially on the same day for all patients. PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) were quantified with volume of interest measurements in lesions and healthy tissues. MR-based PET attenuation correction was compared with CT-derived attenuation maps (µ-maps). Lesion detection was assessed with separate reading of PET/CT and PET/MR data. Estimates of radiation dose were derived from the applied doses of (18)F-FDG and CT protocol parameters. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed to report correlation coefficients and relative deviations for comparison of SUVs, rates of lesion detection, and percentage reductions in radiation dose. PET SUVs showed strong correlations between PET of PET/CT (PETCT) and PET of PET/MR (PETMR) (r > 0.85 for most tissues). Apart from drawbacks of MR-based PET attenuation correction in osseous structures and lungs, similar SUVs were found on PET images corrected with CT-based µ-maps (13.1% deviation of SUVs for bone marrow and <5% deviation for other tissues). Lesion detection rate with PET/MR imaging was equivalent to that with PET/CT (61 areas of focal uptake on PETMR images vs 62 areas on PETCT images). Advantages of PET/MR were observed especially in soft-tissue regions. Furthermore, PET

  19. Comparison of Intraoperative Portable CT Scanners in Skull Base and Endoscopic Sinus Surgery: Single Center Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Conley, David B.; Tan, Bruce; Bendok, Bernard R.; Batjer, H. Hunt; Chandra, Rakesh; Sidle, Douglas; Rahme, Rudy J.; Adel, Joseph G.; Fishman, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Precise and safe management of complex skull base lesions can be enhanced by intraoperative computed tomography (CT) scanning. Surgery in these areas requires real-time feedback of anatomic landmarks. Several portable CT scanners are currently available. We present a comparison of our clinical experience with three portable scanners in skull base and craniofacial surgery. We present clinical case series and the participants were from the Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Three scanners are studied: one conventional multidetector CT (MDCT), two digital flat panel cone-beam CT (CBCT) devices. Technical considerations, ease of use, image characteristics, and integration with image guidance are presented for each device. All three scanners provide good quality images. Intraoperative scanning can be used to update the image guidance system in real time. The conventional MDCT is unique in its ability to resolve soft tissue. The flat panel CBCT scanners generally emit lower levels of radiation and have less metal artifact effect. In this series, intraoperative CT scanning was technically feasible and deemed useful in surgical decision-making in 75% of patients. Intraoperative portable CT scanning has significant utility in complex skull base surgery. This technology informs the surgeon of the precise extent of dissection and updates intraoperative stereotactic navigation. PMID:22470270

  20. [The comparison of volume of ischemia zone in CT examination with neurological and functional status of patients after cerebral ischemia].

    PubMed

    Bartynowska, Karolina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish the correlation between volume of ischemic zone in CT examination and neurological and functional (Barthel index) disorders after cerebral ischemia. The retrospective study was performed. The 30 patients (the median age was 73 years; 14 woman and 16 man) were examined. The medial cerebral artery stroke was recognised in CT. CT examinations without contrast media injection, neurological and functional (Barthel index) diagnostic tests were performed directly and 18 months after ischemia. The evolution of ischemic zone in CT and neurological and functional disorders were estimated. The correlation between volume of ischemic zone in CT, neurological parameters and Barthel index results was examined. The statistical correlation between ischemic zone volumetry and physiological reactions was ascertained. In acute phase the greater volume of ischemic zone responds to neurological dysfunctions. The same tendency, without statistical significance, was observed between volume of ischemic zone and Barthel index result (inversely proportional). 18 months after cerebral stroke the statistical correlation was significant only for comparison of volume of the ischemic zone and Barthel index result. The greater volume of ischemic zone responded to lower Barthel index. Ischemic stroke volumetry in CT examination can facilitate neurological (physiological reactions disorders) and functional (Barthel index) status assessment.

  1. Accuracy of the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score during the first 3 hours of middle cerebral artery stroke: comparison of noncontrast CT, CT angiography source images, and CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lin, K; Rapalino, O; Law, M; Babb, J S; Siller, K A; Pramanik, B K

    2008-05-01

    The Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) is a reliable method of delineating the extent of middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke. Our aim was to retrospectively compare the accuracy of ASPECTS on noncontrast CT, CT angiography (CTA) source images, and CT perfusion maps of cerebral blood volume (CBV) during the first 3 hours of middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke. First-time patients with MCA stroke who presented <3 hours from symptom onset and were evaluated by noncontrast CT/CTA/CT perfusion, had confirmed acute nonlacunar MCA infarct on diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) within 7 days, and had follow-up angiography were included. Patients were excluded for persistent MCA occlusion or stenosis. Two raters through consensus assigned an ASPECTS on the noncontrast CT, CTA source images, and the section-selective (2 x 12 mm coverage) CT perfusion CBV maps. ASPECTS on follow-up DWI served as the reference standard. For each CT technique, the detection rates of regional infarction, the mean ASPECTS, and the linear correlation to final ASPECTS were determined and compared. P values <.05 were considered significant. Twenty-eight patients satisfied the criteria with DWI performed at a mean of 50.3 hours (range, 22-125 hours) post-CT imaging. Of 280 ASPECTS regions, 100 were infarcted on DWI. The accuracy of noncontrast CT, CTA source images, and CT perfusion CBV for detecting regional infarct was 80.0%, 84.3%, and 96.8%, respectively (P < .0001). The mean ASPECTSs of noncontrast CT, CTA source images, CT perfusion CBV, and DWI were 8.4 +/- 1.8, 8.0 +/- 1.8, 6.8 +/- 1.9, and 6.5 +/- 1.8, respectively. The mean noncontrast CT and CTA source image ASPECTS was different from that of DWI (P < .05). Correlation of noncontrast CT, CTA source images, and CT perfusion CBV ASPECTS with final ASPECTS was r(2) = 0.34, r(2) = 0.42, and r(2) = 0.91, respectively. In a retrospective cohort of MCA infarcts imaged <3 hours from stroke onset, ASPECTS was most accurately determined

  2. Personalized estimates of radiation dose from dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population and comparison with diagnostic mammography.

    PubMed

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M; Conover, David L

    2013-11-21

    This study retrospectively analyzed the mean glandular dose (MGD) to 133 breasts from 132 subjects, all women, who participated in a clinical trial evaluating dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population. The clinical trial was conducted in adherence to a protocol approved by institutional review boards and the study participants provided written informed consent. Individual estimates of MGD to each breast from dedicated breast CT was obtained by combining x-ray beam characteristics with estimates of breast dimensions and fibroglandular fraction from volumetric breast CT images, and using normalized glandular dose coefficients. For each study participant and for the breast corresponding to that imaged with breast CT, an estimate of the MGD from diagnostic mammography (including supplemental views) was obtained from the DICOM image headers for comparison. This estimate uses normalized glandular dose coefficients corresponding to a breast with 50% fibroglandular weight fraction. The median fibroglandular weight fraction for the study cohort determined from volumetric breast CT images was 15%. Hence, the MGD from diagnostic mammography was corrected to be representative of the study cohort. Individualized estimates of MGD from breast CT ranged from 5.7 to 27.8 mGy. Corresponding to the breasts imaged with breast CT, the MGD from diagnostic mammography ranged from 2.6 to 31.6 mGy. The mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from dedicated breast CT exam were 13.9 ± 4.6 and 12.6, respectively. For the corresponding breasts, the mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from diagnostic mammography were 12.4 ± 6.3 and 11.1, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that at the 0.05 level, the distributions of MGD from dedicated breast CT and diagnostic mammography were significantly different (Wilcoxon signed ranks test, p = 0.007). While the interquartile range and the range (maximum-minimum) of MGD from dedicated breast CT was lower than

  3. Personalized estimates of radiation dose from dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population and comparison with diagnostic mammography

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O’Connell, Avice M.; Conover, David L.

    2013-01-01

    This study retrospectively analyzed the mean glandular dose (MGD) to 133 breasts from 132 subjects, all women, who participated in a clinical trial evaluating dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population. The clinical trial was conducted in adherence to a protocol approved by institutional review boards and the study participants provided written informed consent. Individual estimates of mean glandular dose to each breast from dedicated breast CT was obtained by combining x-ray beam characteristics with estimates of breast dimensions and fibroglandular fraction from volumetric breast CT images, and using normalized glandular dose coefficients. For each study participant and for the breast corresponding to that imaged with breast CT, an estimate of the MGD from diagnostic mammography (including supplemental views) was obtained from the DICOM image headers for comparison. This estimate uses normalized glandular dose coefficients corresponding to a breast with 50% fibroglandular weight fraction. The median fibroglandular weight fraction for the study cohort determined from volumetric breast CT images was 15%. Hence, the MGD from diagnostic mammography was corrected to be representative of the study cohort. Individualized estimates of MGD from breast CT ranged from 5.7 mGy to 27.8 mGy. Corresponding to the breasts imaged with breast CT, the MGD from diagnostic mammography ranged from 2.6 to 31.6 mGy. The mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from dedicated breast CT exam were 13.9±4.6 and 12.6, respectively. For the corresponding breasts, the mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from diagnostic mammography were 12.4±6.3 and 11.1, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that at the 0.05 level, the distributions of MGD from dedicated breast CT and diagnostic mammography were significantly different (Wilcoxon signed ranks test, p = 0.007). While the interquartile range and the range (maximum-minimum) of MGD from dedicated breast CT was

  4. Personalized estimates of radiation dose from dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population and comparison with diagnostic mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M.; Conover, David L.

    2013-11-01

    This study retrospectively analyzed the mean glandular dose (MGD) to 133 breasts from 132 subjects, all women, who participated in a clinical trial evaluating dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population. The clinical trial was conducted in adherence to a protocol approved by institutional review boards and the study participants provided written informed consent. Individual estimates of MGD to each breast from dedicated breast CT was obtained by combining x-ray beam characteristics with estimates of breast dimensions and fibroglandular fraction from volumetric breast CT images, and using normalized glandular dose coefficients. For each study participant and for the breast corresponding to that imaged with breast CT, an estimate of the MGD from diagnostic mammography (including supplemental views) was obtained from the DICOM image headers for comparison. This estimate uses normalized glandular dose coefficients corresponding to a breast with 50% fibroglandular weight fraction. The median fibroglandular weight fraction for the study cohort determined from volumetric breast CT images was 15%. Hence, the MGD from diagnostic mammography was corrected to be representative of the study cohort. Individualized estimates of MGD from breast CT ranged from 5.7 to 27.8 mGy. Corresponding to the breasts imaged with breast CT, the MGD from diagnostic mammography ranged from 2.6 to 31.6 mGy. The mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from dedicated breast CT exam were 13.9 ± 4.6 and 12.6, respectively. For the corresponding breasts, the mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from diagnostic mammography were 12.4 ± 6.3 and 11.1, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that at the 0.05 level, the distributions of MGD from dedicated breast CT and diagnostic mammography were significantly different (Wilcoxon signed ranks test, p = 0.007). While the interquartile range and the range (maximum-minimum) of MGD from dedicated breast CT was lower than

  5. Accuracy and reliability of different cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) devices for structural analysis of alveolar bone in comparison with multislice CT and micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Van Dessel, Jeroen; Nicolielo, Laura Ferreira Pinheiro; Huang, Yan; Coudyzer, Walter; Salmon, Benjamin; Lambrichts, Ivo; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    The aim of this study was to assess whether cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) may be used for clinically reliable alveolar bone quality assessment in comparison to its clinical alternatives, multislice computed tomography and the gold standard (micro-CT). Six dentate mandibular bone samples were scanned with seven CBCT devices (ProMax 3D Max, NewTom GiANO, Cranex 3D, 3D Accuitomo 170, Carestream 9300, Scanora 3D, I-CAT Next generation), one micro-CT scanner (SkyScan 1174) and one MSCT machine (Somatom Definition Flash) using two protocols (standard and high-resolution). MSCT and CBCT images were automatically spatially aligned on the micro-CT scan of the corresponding sample. A volume of interest was manually delineated on the micro-CT image and overlaid on the other scanning devices. Alveolar bone structures were automatically extracted using the adaptive thresholding algorithm. Based on the resulting binary images, an automatic 3D morphometric quantification was performed in a CT-Analyser (Bruker, Kontich, Belgium). The reliability and measurement errors were calculated for each modality compared to the gold standard micro-CT. Both MSCT and CBCT were associated with a clinically and statistically (P <0.05) significant measurement error. Bone quantity-related morphometric indices (bone volume fraction 8.41% min to 17.90% max, bone surface density -0.47 mm-1 min to 0.16 mm-1 max and trabecular thickness 0.15 mm min to 0.31 mm max) were significantly (P <0.05) overestimated, resulting in significantly (P <0.05) closer trabecular pores (total porosity percentage -8.41% min to -17.90% max and fractal dimension 0.08 min to 0.17 max) in all scanners compared to micro-CT. However, the structural pattern of the alveolar bone remained similar compared to that of the micro-CT for the ProMax 3D Max, NewTom GiANO, Cranex 3D, 3D Accuitomo 170 and Carestream 9300. On the other hand, the Scanora 3D, i-CAT Next Generation, standard and high

  6. Louisiana farm discussion: 8 foot row spacing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This year several tests in growers’ fields were used to compare traditional 6-foot row spacing to 8-foot row spacing. Cane is double-drilled in the wider row spacing. The wider row spacing would accommodate John Deere 3522 harvester. Field data indicate the sugarcane yields are very comparable in 8-...

  7. Comparison of dosimetry between PET/CT and PET alone using (11)C-ITMM.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiteru; Sakata, Muneyuki; Oda, Keiichi; Wagatsuma, Kei; Toyohara, Jun; Ishibashi, Kenji; Ishii, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2016-03-01

    We used a new tracer, N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino) pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-4-(11)C-methoxy-N-methylbenzamide ((11)C-ITMM), to compare radiation doses from positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with previously published doses from PET alone. Twelve healthy volunteers [six males (mean age ± SD, 27.7 ± 6.7 years) and six females (31.8 ± 14.5 years)] in 12 examinations were recruited. Dose estimations from PET/CT were compared with those from PET alone. Regions of interest (ROIs) in PET/CT were delineated on the basis of low-dose CT (LD-CT) images acquired during PET/CT. Internal and external radiation doses were estimated using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 and CT-Expo software. The effective dose (ED) for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT was estimated to be 4.7 ± 0.5 μSv/MBq for the male subjects and 4.1 ± 0.7 μSv/MBq for the female subjects. The mean ED for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET alone in a previous report was estimated to be 4.6 ± 0.3 μSv/MBq (males, n = 3). The ED values for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT in the male subjects were almost identical to those from PET alone. The absorbed doses (ADs) of the gallbladder, stomach, red bone marrow, and spleen calculated from PET/CT were significantly different from those calculated from PET alone. The EDs of (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT were almost identical to those calculated from PET alone. The ADs in several organs calculated from PET/CT differed from those from PET alone. LD-CT images acquired during PET/CT may facilitate organ identification.

  8. Assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability from routine contrast-enhanced 16-detector-row computed tomography of the heart: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Konstantin; Sanz, Javier; Poon, Michael; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Ohnesorge, Bernd; Rius, Teresa; Fayad, Zahi A; Reiser, Maximilian F; Becker, Christoph R

    2005-05-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of 16-detector-row computed tomography (16DCT) of the heart in the assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability in comparison to stress perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (SP-MRI) and delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI). A number of 30 patients underwent both 16DCT and MRI of the heart. Contrast-enhanced 16DCT data sets were reviewed for areas of myocardium with reduced attenuation. Both CT and MRI data were examined by independent reviewers for the presence of myocardial perfusion defects or myocardial infarctions (MI). Volumetric analysis of the hypoperfusion areas in CT and the infarct sizes in DE-MRI were performed. According to MRI, myocardial infarctions were detected in 11 of 30 cases, and perfusion defects not corresponding to an MI were detected in six of 30 patients. CTA was able to detect ten of 11 MI correctly (sensitivity 91%, specificity 79%, accuracy 83%), and detected three of six hypoperfusions correctly (sensitivity 50%, specificity 92%, accuracy 79%). Assessing the volume of perfusion defects correlating to history of MI on the CT images, a systematic underestimation of the true infarct size as compared to the results of DE-MRI was found (P<0.01). Routine, contrast-enhanced 16-detector row CT of the heart can detect chronic myocardial infarctions in the majority of cases, but ischemic perfusion defects are not reliably detected under resting conditions.

  9. Somatostatin receptor based PET/CT in patients with the suspicion of cardiac sarcoidosis: an initial comparison to cardiac MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Malte; Schirbel, Andreas; Werner, Rudolf A.; Pelzer, Theo; Pizarro, Carmen; Skowasch, Dirk; Thomas, Lena; Schlesinger-Irsch, Ulrike; Thomas, Daniel; Bundschuh, Ralph A.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis is often challenging. Whereas cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) are most commonly used to evaluate patients, PET/CT using radiolabeled somatostatin receptor (SSTR) ligands for visualization of inflammation might represent a more specific alternative. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of SSTR–PET/CT for detecting cardiac sarcoidosis in comparison to CMR. 15 patients (6 males, 9 females) with sarcoidosis and suspicion on cardiac involvement underwent SSTR-PET/CT imaging and CMR. Images were visually scored. The AHA 17-segment model of the left myocardium was used for localization and comparison of inflamed myocardium for both imaging modalities. In semi-quantitative analysis, mean (SUVmean) and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of affected myocardium were calculated and compared with both remote myocardium and left ventricular (LV) cavity. SSTR-PET was positive in 7/15, CMR in 10/15 patients. Of the 3 CMR+/PET− subjects, one patient with minor involvement (<25% of wall thickness in CMR) was missed by PET. The remaining two CMR+/PET− patients displayed no adverse cardiac events during follow-up. In the 17-segment model, PET/CT yielded 27 and CMR 29 positive segments. Overall concordance of the 2 modalities was 96.1% (245/255 segments analyzed). SUVmean and SUVmax in inflamed areas were 2.0±1.2 and 2.6±1.2, respectively. The lesion-to-remote myocardium and lesion-to-LV cavity ratios were 1.8±0.2 and 1.9±0.2 for SUVmean and 2.0±0.3 and 1.7±0.3 for SUVmax, respectively. Detection of cardiac sarcoidosis by SSTR-PET/CT is feasible. Our data warrant further analysis in larger prospective series. PMID:27780922

  10. Somatostatin receptor based PET/CT in patients with the suspicion of cardiac sarcoidosis: an initial comparison to cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Lapa, Constantin; Reiter, Theresa; Kircher, Malte; Schirbel, Andreas; Werner, Rudolf A; Pelzer, Theo; Pizarro, Carmen; Skowasch, Dirk; Thomas, Lena; Schlesinger-Irsch, Ulrike; Thomas, Daniel; Bundschuh, Ralph A; Bauer, Wolfgang R; Gärtner, Florian C

    2016-11-22

    Diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis is often challenging. Whereas cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) are most commonly used to evaluate patients, PET/CT using radiolabeled somatostatin receptor (SSTR) ligands for visualization of inflammation might represent a more specific alternative. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of SSTR-PET/CT for detecting cardiac sarcoidosis in comparison to CMR.15 patients (6 males, 9 females) with sarcoidosis and suspicion on cardiac involvement underwent SSTR-PET/CT imaging and CMR. Images were visually scored. The AHA 17-segment model of the left myocardium was used for localization and comparison of inflamed myocardium for both imaging modalities. In semi-quantitative analysis, mean (SUVmean) and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of affected myocardium were calculated and compared with both remote myocardium and left ventricular (LV) cavity.SSTR-PET was positive in 7/15, CMR in 10/15 patients. Of the 3 CMR+/PET- subjects, one patient with minor involvement (<25% of wall thickness in CMR) was missed by PET. The remaining two CMR+/PET- patients displayed no adverse cardiac events during follow-up.In the 17-segment model, PET/CT yielded 27 and CMR 29 positive segments. Overall concordance of the 2 modalities was 96.1% (245/255 segments analyzed). SUVmean and SUVmax in inflamed areas were 2.0±1.2 and 2.6±1.2, respectively. The lesion-to-remote myocardium and lesion-to-LV cavity ratios were 1.8±0.2 and 1.9±0.2 for SUVmean and 2.0±0.3 and 1.7±0.3 for SUVmax, respectively.Detection of cardiac sarcoidosis by SSTR-PET/CT is feasible. Our data warrant further analysis in larger prospective series.

  11. Image quality comparison between single energy and dual energy CT protocols for hepatic imaging.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Ng, Joshua M; Megibow, Alec J; Pelc, Norbert J

    2016-08-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) enables volumetric scans in a single breath hold and is clinically useful for hepatic imaging. For simple tasks, conventional single energy (SE) computed tomography (CT) images acquired at the optimal tube potential are known to have better quality than dual energy (DE) blended images. However, liver imaging is complex and often requires imaging of both structures containing iodinated contrast media, where atomic number differences are the primary contrast mechanism, and other structures, where density differences are the primary contrast mechanism. Hence it is conceivable that the broad spectrum used in a dual energy acquisition may be an advantage. In this work we are interested in comparing these two imaging strategies at equal-dose and more complex settings. We developed numerical anthropomorphic phantoms to mimic realistic clinical CT scans for medium size and large size patients. MDCT images based on the defined phantoms were simulated using various SE and DE protocols at pre- and post-contrast stages. For SE CT, images from 60 kVp through 140 with 10 kVp steps were considered; for DE CT, both 80/140 and 100/140 kVp scans were simulated and linearly blended at the optimal weights. To make a fair comparison, the mAs of each scan was adjusted to match the reference radiation dose (120 kVp, 200 mAs for medium size patients and 140 kVp, 400 mAs for large size patients). Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of liver against other soft tissues was used to evaluate and compare the SE and DE protocols, and multiple pre- and post-contrasted liver-tissue pairs were used to define a composite CNR. To help validate the simulation results, we conducted a small clinical study. Eighty-five 120 kVp images and 81 blended 80/140 kVp images were collected and compared through both quantitative image quality analysis and an observer study. In the simulation study, we found that the CNR of pre-contrast SE image mostly increased with increasing k

  12. In Vivo Comparison of Radiation Exposure of Dual-Energy CT Versus Low-Dose CT Versus Standard CT for Imaging Urinary Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Jepperson, Maria A.; Cernigliaro, Joseph G.; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H.; Morin, Richard L.; Haley, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is an emerging imaging modality with the unique capability of determining urinary stone composition. This study compares radiation exposure of DECT, standard single-energy CT (SECT), and low-dose renal stone protocol single-energy CT (LDSECT) for the evaluation of nephrolithiasis in a single in vivo patient cohort. Materials and Methods: Following institutional review board (IRB) approval, we retrospectively reviewed 200 consecutive DECT examinations performed on patients with suspected urolithiasis over a 6-month period. Of these, 35 patients had undergone examination with our LDSECT protocol, and 30 patients had undergone examination of the abdomen and pelvis with our SECT imaging protocol within 2 years of the DECT examination. The CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) was used to compare radiation exposure between scans. Image quality was objectively evaluated by comparing image noise. Statistical evaluation was performed using a Student's t-test. Results: DECT performed at 80/140 kVp and 100/140 kVp did not produce a significant difference in radiation exposure compared with LDSECT (p=0.09 and 0.18, respectively). DECT performed at 80/140 kVp and 100/140 kVp produced an average 40% and 31%, respectively, reduction in radiation exposure compared with SECT (p<0.001). For patients imaged with the 100/140 kVp protocol, average values for images noise were higher in the LDSECT images compared with DECT images (p<0.001) and there was no significant difference in image noise between DECT and SECT images in the same patient (p=0.88). Patients imaged with the 80/140 kVp protocol had equivocal image noise compared with LDSECT images (p=0.44), however, DECT images had greater noise compared with SECT images in the same patient (p<0.001). Of the 75 patients included in the study, stone material was available for 16; DECT analysis correctly predicted stone composition in 15/16 patients (93%). Conclusion: DECT

  13. Comparison of bone histomorphometry and μCT for evaluating bone quality in tail-suspended rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lian-Wen; Huang, Yun-Fei; Wang, Ying; Luan, Hui-Qin; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2014-10-01

    Astronauts often suffer from microgravity-induced osteoporosis due to their time in space. Bone histomorphometry, the 'gold standard' technique for detecting bone quality, is widely used in the evaluation of osteoporosis. This study investigates whether μCT has the same application value as histomorphometry in the evaluation of weightlessness-induced bone loss. A total of 24 SD rats were distributed into three groups (n = 8, each): tail-suspension (TS), TS plus active exercise (TSA), and control (CON). After 21 days, bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and μCT, and microstructure was measured by μCT and histomorphometry. BMD was found to have decreased significantly in TS and TSA compared with the CON group. The results of the μCT measurements showed that a change in BMD mainly occurred in the trabecular bone, and the trabecular BMD increased significantly in the TSA compared with the TS group. The comparison of μCT and histomorphometry showed that TS led to a significant decrease in bone volume (BV/TV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and trabecular number (Tb.N), and it led to an increase in trabecular separation (Tb.Sp). However, active exercise can prevent these changes. Significant differences in most parameters between TSA and CON were found by μCT but not by histomorphometry. Additionally, the parameters of these two methods are highly correlated. Therefore, the application value of μCT is as good as histomorphometry and DXA in the diagnosis of weightlessness-induced osteoporosis and is even better in evaluating the efficacy of exercise.

  14. Comparison of computational to human observer detection for evaluation of CT low dose iterative reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Brendan; Fahmi, Rachid; Brown, Kevin M.; Raihani, Nilgoun; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Model observers were created and compared to human observers for the detection of low contrast targets in computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with an advanced, knowledge-based, iterative image reconstruction method for low x-ray dose imaging. A 5-channel Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling Observer (CHO) was used with internal noise added to the decision variable (DV) and/or channel outputs (CO). Models were defined by parameters: (k1) DV-noise with standard deviation (std) proportional to DV std; (k2) DV-noise with constant std; (k3) CO-noise with constant std across channels; and (k4) CO-noise in each channel with std proportional to CO variance. Four-alternative forced choice (4AFC) human observer studies were performed on sub-images extracted from phantom images with and without a "pin" target. Model parameters were estimated using maximum likelihood comparison to human probability correct (PC) data. PC in human and all model observers increased with dose, contrast, and size, and was much higher for advanced iterative reconstruction (IMR) as compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Detection in IMR was better than FPB at 1/3 dose, suggesting significant dose savings. Model(k1,k2,k3,k4) gave the best overall fit to humans across independent variables (dose, size, contrast, and reconstruction) at fixed display window. However Model(k1) performed better when considering model complexity using the Akaike information criterion. Model(k1) fit the extraordinary detectability difference between IMR and FBP, despite the different noise quality. It is anticipated that the model observer will predict results from iterative reconstruction methods having similar noise characteristics, enabling rapid comparison of methods.

  15. Objective and Subjective Intrapatient Comparison of Iohexol Versus Diatrizoate for Bowel Preparation Quality at CT Colonography.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brandon; Hinshaw, J Louis; Robbins, Jessica B; Pickhardt, Perry J

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to objectively and subjectively compare nonionic iohexol and ionic diatrizoate iodinated oral contrast agents as part of a cathartic bowel regimen within the same CT colonography (CTC) cohort, with otherwise identical preparations. In this retrospective study, 46 adults with no symptoms (mean age, 59.4 years; 26 men and 20 women) returning for follow-up CTC over a 9-month interval underwent the same bowel preparation with the exception of 75 mL of iohexol 350 in place of 60 mL of diatrizoate. All other preparation components (bisacodyl, magnesium citrate, and 2% barium) remained constant. Objective volumetric analysis of residual colonic fluid volume and fluid attenuation was performed. Additionally, two radiologists experienced with CTC who were blinded to the specific bowel preparation scored each of six colonic segments for adherent residual solid stool using a previously validated 4-point scale (0 for no stool; 1-3 for increasing residual stool). A paired t test was used for comparison of the cohorts. No clear clinically meaningful difference was found between the two preparations on overall objective or subjective evaluation. The mean (± SD) residual fluid volume was 173 ± 126 mL with the iohexol preparation and 130 ± 79 mL with the diatrizoate preparation (p = 0.02). The mean total colonic stool score was 2.5 (0.42/segment) with iohexol and 2.3 (0.38/segment) with diatrizoate (p = 0.69). The mean fluid attenuation was higher with iohexol (849 ± 270 HU) compared with diatrizoate (732 ± 168 HU) (p = 0.03). On the basis of this direct intrapatient comparison, we found that oral iohexol is a suitable alternative to diatrizoate for fluid tagging as part of a cathartic bowel preparation at CTC. Because this nonionic tagging agent is more palatable, less expensive, and likely safer than ionic diatrizoate, our CTC program now uses iohexol as the standard recommended regimen.

  16. Vertebral rotation measurement: a summary and comparison of common radiographic and CT methods

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Gabrielle C; Hill, Doug L; Le, Lawrence H; Raso, Jim V; Lou, Edmond H

    2008-01-01

    Current research has provided a more comprehensive understanding of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) as a three-dimensional spinal deformity, encompassing both lateral and rotational components. Apart from quantifying curve severity using the Cobb angle, vertebral rotation has become increasingly prominent in the study of scoliosis. It demonstrates significance in both preoperative and postoperative assessment, providing better appreciation of the impact of bracing or surgical interventions. In the past, the need for computer resources, digitizers and custom software limited studies of rotation to research performed after a patient left the scoliosis clinic. With advanced technology, however, rotation measurements are now more feasible. While numerous vertebral rotation measurement methods have been developed and tested, thorough comparisons of these are still relatively unexplored. This review discusses the advantages and disadvantages of six common measurement techniques based on technology most pertinent in clinical settings: radiography (Cobb, Nash-Moe, Perdriolle and Stokes' method) and computer tomography (CT) imaging (Aaro-Dahlborn and Ho's method). Better insight into the clinical suitability of rotation measurement methods currently available is presented, along with a discussion of critical concerns that should be addressed in future studies and development of new methods. PMID:18976498

  17. Oral contrast media for body CT: Comparison of diatrizoate sodium and iohexol for patient acceptance and bowel opacification.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Michelle M; Lockhart, Mark E; Fineberg, Naomi S; Berland, Lincoln L

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether a difference in patient preference exists between iohexol (Omnipaque) and diatrizoate sodium (Gastroview) as oral contrast medium for abdominal-pelvic CT. A secondary objective was to evaluate whether there are significant differences in bowel opacification and adverse effect profile for the two agents. From August 2007 through March 2009, 300 patients were enrolled in this prospective study after informed consent was obtained. Eligible patients were identified from those scheduled for outpatient abdominal-pelvic CT. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive one of two oral contrast agents in a double-blinded fashion. Subjects graded the taste using a 5-point scale, and data regarding demographics, total volume, and adverse effects were collected. A direct comparison of 30 mL of each of the two diluted agents in randomized order was then performed. CT images were graded for bowel opacification by two blinded abdominal radiologists. Of 287 subjects who expressed a preference, 233 patients (81%) preferred dilute iohexol compared with 54 patients (19%) who preferred dilute diatrizoate sodium (p < 0.001). Ten patients had no preference, and three patients did not complete the taste comparison study. No difference in bowel opacification was identified between the oral contrast agents (p = 0.27), nor was there a significant difference in adverse effects (p = 0.352). Patents preferred dilute iohexol over dilute diatrizoate sodium for oral contrast for abdominal-pelvic CT. There was no significant difference in bowel opacification or adverse effect profile.

  18. Determining contrast medium dose and rate on basis of lean body weight: does this strategy improve patient-to-patient uniformity of hepatic enhancement during multi-detector row CT?

    PubMed

    Ho, Lisa M; Nelson, Rendon C; Delong, David M

    2007-05-01

    To prospectively evaluate the use of lean body weight (LBW) as the main determinant of the volume and rate of contrast material administration during multi-detector row computed tomography of the liver. This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval. All patients gave written informed consent. Four protocols were compared. Standard protocol involved 125 mL of iopamidol injected at 4 mL/sec. Total body weight (TBW) protocol involved 0.7 g iodine per kilogram of TBW. Calculated LBW and measured LBW protocols involved 0.86 g of iodine per kilogram and 0.92 g of iodine per kilogram calculated or measured LBW for men and women, respectively. Injection rate used for the three experimental protocols was determined proportionally on the basis of the calculated volume of contrast material. Postcontrast attenuation measurements during portal venous phase were obtained in liver, portal vein, and aorta for each group and were summed for each patient. Patient-to-patient enhancement variability in same group was measured with Levene test. Two-tailed t test was used to compare the three experimental protocols with the standard protocol. Data analysis was performed in 101 patients (25 or 26 patients per group), including 56 men and 45 women (mean age, 53 years). Average summed attenuation values for standard, TBW, calculated LBW, and measured LBW protocols were 419 HU +/- 50 (standard deviation), 443 HU +/- 51, 433 HU +/- 50, and 426 HU +/- 33, respectively (P = not significant for all). Levene test results for summed attenuation data for standard, TBW, calculated LBW, and measured LBW protocols were 40 +/- 29, 38 +/- 33 (P = .83), 35 +/- 35 (P = .56), and 26 +/- 19 (P = .05), respectively. By excluding highly variable but poorly perfused adipose tissue from calculation of contrast medium dose, the measured LBW protocol may lessen patient-to-patient enhancement variability while maintaining satisfactory hepatic and vascular enhancement.

  19. Diagnostic performance of combined noninvasive coronary angiography and myocardial perfusion imaging using 320 row detector computed tomography: design and implementation of the CORE320 multicenter, multinational diagnostic study.

    PubMed

    Vavere, Andrea L; Simon, Gregory G; George, Richard T; Rochitte, Carlos E; Arai, Andrew E; Miller, Julie M; Di Carli, Marcello; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Zadeh, Armin A; Dewey, Marc; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Laham, Roger; Rybicki, Frank J; Schuijf, Joanne D; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; Kuribyashi, Sachio; Sakuma, Hajime; Nomura, Cesar; Yaw, Tan Swee; Kofoed, Klaus F; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Clouse, Melvin E; Brinker, Jeffrey; Cox, Christopher; Lima, Joao A C

    2011-01-01

    Multidetector coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) is a promising modality for widespread clinical application because of its noninvasive nature and high diagnostic accuracy as found in previous studies using 64 to 320 simultaneous detector rows. It is, however, limited in its ability to detect myocardial ischemia. In this article, we describe the design of the CORE320 study ("Combined coronary atherosclerosis and myocardial perfusion evaluation using 320 detector row computed tomography"). This prospective, multicenter, multinational study is unique in that it is designed to assess the diagnostic performance of combined 320-row CTA and myocardial CT perfusion imaging (CTP) in comparison with the combination of invasive coronary angiography and single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI). The trial is being performed at 16 medical centers located in 8 countries worldwide. CT has the potential to assess both anatomy and physiology in a single imaging session. The co-primary aim of the CORE320 study is to define the per-patient diagnostic accuracy of the combination of coronary CTA and myocardial CTP to detect physiologically significant coronary artery disease compared with (1) the combination of conventional coronary angiography and SPECT-MPI and (2) conventional coronary angiography alone. If successful, the technology could revolutionize the management of patients with symptomatic CAD.

  20. The accuracy of solid model and rapid prototype of prostheses in comparison to the digital CT image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwandi, Agri; Kiswanto, Gandjar; Kusumaningsih, Widjajalaksmi; Soemardi, Tresna P.

    2017-02-01

    Prostheses are a derivative of biomedical products that have important things, which are: a design, size and bio compatible material. To produce optimum prostheses, safe and comfortable use, it would require design a model that fits the size of the patient's anatomy. In this paper describes the accuracy of solid model and rapid prototype of prostheses in comparison to the digital CT image data. Where the main parameters used as the reference measurement is digital CT image data. The data were analyzed using a statistical method to get the standard deviation of the comparison parameters of the data obtained, so that it can be known how the accuracy of the measurement results of each data.

  1. Evaluation of bone substitute materials: comparison of flat-panel based volume CT to conventional multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, Sebastian; Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Sachlos, Elefterios; Haberstroh, Jörg; Scheifele, Christian; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Voss, Pit Jacob; Veigel, Egle; Smedek, Jörg; Ganter, Philip; Tuna, Taskin; Gutwald, Ralf; Palmowski, Moritz

    2013-10-01

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a key factor in bone regeneration within the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Despite this in vivo analysis of tissue-engineered-constructs to monitor bone rehabilitation are difficult to conduct. Novel high-resolving flat-panel based volume CTs (fp-VCT) are increasingly used for imaging bone structures. This study compares the potential value of novel fp-VCT with conventional multidetector CT (MDCT) based on a sheep sinus floor elevation model. Calcium-hydroxyapatite reinforced collagen scaffolds were populated with autologous osteoblasts and implanted into sheep maxillary sinus. After 8, 16 and 24 weeks MDCT and fp-VCT scans were performed to investigate the volume of the augmented area; densities of cancellous and compact bone were assessed as comparative values. fp-VCT imaging resulted in higher spatial resolution, which was advantageous when separating closely related anatomical structures (i.e. trabecular and compact bone, biomaterials). Fp-VCT facilitated imaging of alterations occurring in test specimens over time. fp-VCTs therefore displayed high volume coverage, dynamic imaging potential and superior performance when investigating superfine bone structures and bone remodelling of biomaterials. Thus, fp-VCTs may be a suitable instrument for intraoperative imaging and future in vivo tissue-engineering studies.

  2. Comparison of CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Manual and CT-Guided Robotic Positioning System for In Vivo Needle Placements in Swine Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis, F.; Takaki, H.; Laskhmanan, M.; Durack, J. C.; Erinjeri, J. P.; Getrajdman, G. I.; Maybody, M.; Sofocleous, C. T.; Solomon, S. B.; Srimathveeravalli, G.

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo compare CT fluoroscopy-guided manual and CT-guided robotic positioning system (RPS)-assisted needle placement by experienced IR physicians to targets in swine liver.Materials and MethodsManual and RPS-assisted needle placement was performed by six experienced IR physicians to four 5 mm fiducial seeds placed in swine liver (n = 6). Placement performance was assessed for placement accuracy, procedure time, number of confirmatory scans, needle manipulations, and procedure radiation dose. Intra-modality difference in performance for each physician was assessed using paired t test. Inter-physician performance variation for each modality was analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis test.ResultsPaired comparison of manual and RPS-assisted placements to a target by the same physician indicated accuracy outcomes was not statistically different (manual: 4.53 mm; RPS: 4.66 mm; p = 0.41), but manual placement resulted in higher total radiation dose (manual: 1075.77 mGy/cm; RPS: 636.4 mGy/cm; p = 0.03), required more confirmation scans (manual: 6.6; RPS: 1.6; p < 0.0001) and needle manipulations (manual: 4.6; RPS: 0.4; p < 0.0001). Procedure time for RPS was longer than manual placement (manual: 6.12 min; RPS: 9.7 min; p = 0.0003). Comparison of inter-physician performance during manual placement indicated significant differences in the time taken to complete placements (p = 0.008) and number of repositions (p = 0.04) but not in other study measures (p > 0.05). Comparison of inter-physician performance during RPS-assisted placement suggested statistically significant differences in procedure time (p = 0.02) and not in other study measures (p > 0.05).ConclusionsCT-guided RPS-assisted needle placement reduced radiation dose, number of confirmatory scans, and needle manipulations when compared to manual needle placement by experienced IR physicians, with equivalent accuracy.

  3. Intra-individual comparison of magnesium citrate and sodium phosphate for bowel preparation at CT colonography

    PubMed Central

    Bannas, Peter; Bakke, Joshua; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Pickhardt, Perry J.

    2014-01-01

    AIM To perform an objective, intra-individual comparison of residual colonic fluid volume and attenuation associated with the current front-line laxative magnesium citrate (MgC) versus the former front-line laxative sodium phosphate (NaP) at CT colonography (CTC). MATERIALS AND METHODS This retrospective Health Insurance and Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. The study cohort included 250 asymptomatic adults (mean age at index 56.1 years; 124 male/126 female) who underwent CTC screening twice over a 5 year interval. Colon catharsis at initial and follow-up screening employed single-dose NaP and double-dose MgC, respectively, allowing for intra-patient comparison. Automated volumetric analysis of residual colonic fluid volume and attenuation was performed on all 500 CTC studies. Colonic fluid volume <200 ml and mean attenuation between 300–900 HU were considered optimal. Paired t-test and McNemar’s test were used to compare differences. RESULTS Residual fluid volumes <200 ml were recorded in 192 examinations (76.8%) following MgC and in 204 examinations (81.6%) following NaP (p=0.23). The mean total residual fluid volume was 155±114 ml for MgC and 143±100 ml for NaP (p=0.01). The attenuation range of 300–900 HU was significantly more frequent for MgC (n=220, 88%) than for NaP (n=127, 50.8%; p<0.001). Mean fluid attenuation was significantly lower for MgC (700±165 HU) than for NaP (878±155 HU; p<0.001). Concomitant presence of both optimal fluid volume and attenuation was significantly more frequent for MgC 65.2% than for NaP (38%; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Objective intra-individual comparison using automated volumetric analysis suggests that the replacement of NaP by MgC as the front-line laxative for CTC has not compromised overall examination quality. PMID:25239789

  4. Dynamic multidetector CT and non-contrast-enhanced MR for right adrenal vein imaging: comparison with catheter venography in adrenal venous sampling.

    PubMed

    Ota, Hideki; Seiji, Kazumasa; Kawabata, Masahiro; Satani, Nozomi; Omata, Kei; Ono, Yoshikiyo; Iwakura, Yoshitsugu; Morimoto, Ryo; Matsuura, Tomonori; Kudo, Masataka; Tominaga, Junya; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Ito, Sadayoshi; Takase, Kei

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate visualization of the right adrenal vein (RAV) with multidetector CT and non-contrast-enhanced MR imaging in patients with primary aldosteronism. A total of 125 patients (67 men) scheduled for adrenal venous sampling (AVS) were included. Dynamic 64-detector-row CT and balanced steady-state free precession-based non-contrast-enhanced 3-T MR imaging were performed. RAV visualization based on a four-point score was documented. Both anatomical location and variation on cross-sectional imaging were evaluated, and the findings were compared with catheter venography as the gold standard. The RAV was visualized in 93.2% by CT and 84.8% by MR imaging (p = 0.02). Positive predictive values of RAV visualization were 100% for CT and 95.2% for MR imaging. Imaging score was significantly higher in CT than MR imaging (p < 0.01). The RAV formed a common trunk with an accessory hepatic vein in 16% of patients. The RAV orifice level on cross-sectional imaging was concordant with catheter venography within the range of 1/3 vertebral height in >70% of subjects. Success rate of AVS was 99.2%. Dynamic CT is a reliable way to map the RAV prior to AVS. Non-contrast-enhanced MR imaging is an alternative when there is a risk of complication from contrast media or radiation exposure. Dynamic CT and non-contrast-enhanced MR imaging detect the right adrenal vein (RAV). Dynamic CT can visualize the RAV more than non-contrast-enhanced MR imaging. Mapping the RAV helps to achieve successful adrenal venous sampling. Sixteen per cent of RAVs share the common trunk with accessory hepatic veins.

  5. Size-based emphysema cluster analysis on low attenuation area in 3D volumetric CT: comparison with pulmonary functional test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minho; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Sang Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Oh, Sang Young

    2015-03-01

    To quantify low attenuation area (LAA) of emphysematous regions according to cluster size in 3D volumetric CT data of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and to compare these indices with their pulmonary functional test (PFT). Sixty patients with COPD were scanned by a more than 16-multi detector row CT scanner (Siemens Sensation 16 and 64) within 0.75mm collimation. Based on these LAA masks, a length scale analysis to estimate each emphysema LAA's size was performed as follows. At first, Gaussian low pass filter from 30mm to 1mm kernel size with 1mm interval on the mask was performed from large to small size, iteratively. Centroid voxels resistant to the each filter were selected and dilated by the size of the kernel, which was regarded as the specific size emphysema mask. The slopes of area and number of size based LAA (slope of semi-log plot) were analyzed and compared with PFT. PFT parameters including DLco, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC were significantly (all p-value< 0.002) correlated with the slopes (r-values; -0.73, 0.54, 0.69, respectively) and EI (r-values; -0.84, -0.60, -0.68, respectively). In addition, the D independently contributed regression for FEV1 and FEV1/FVC (adjust R sq. of regression study: EI only, 0.70, 0.45; EI and D, 0.71, 0.51, respectively). By the size based LAA segmentation and analysis, we evaluated the Ds of area, number, and distribution of size based LAA, which would be independent factors for predictor of PFT parameters.

  6. Multimodal imaging of the human temporal bone: A comparison of CT and optical scanning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voie, Arne H.; Whiting, Bruce; Skinner, Margaret; Neely, J. Gail; Lee, Kenneth; Holden, Tim; Brunsden, Barry

    2003-10-01

    A collaborative effort between Washington University in St. Louis and Spencer Technologies in Seattle, WA has been undertaken to create a multimodal 3D reconstruction of the human cochlea and vestibular system. The goal of this project is to improve the accuracy of in vivo CT reconstructions of implanted cochleae, and to expand the knowledge of high-resolution anatomical detail provided by orthogonal-plane optical sectioning (OPFOS). At WUSL, computed tomography (CT) images of the cochlea are used to determine the position of cochlear implant electrodes relative to target auditory neurons. The cochlear implant position is determined using pre- and post-operative CT scans. The CT volumes are cross-registered to align the semicircular canals and internal auditory canal, which have a unique configuration in 3-D space. The head of a human body donor was scanned with a clinical CT device, after which the temporal bones were removed, fixed in formalin and trimmed prior to scanning with a laboratory Micro CT scanner. Following CT, the temporal bones were sent to the OPFOS Imaging Lab at Spencer Technologies for a further analysis. 3-D reconstructions of CT and OPFOS imaging modalities were compared, and results are presented. [Work supported by NIDCD Grants R44-03623-5 and R01-00581-13.

  7. Low grade coal worker's pneumoconiosis. Comparison of CT and chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Gevenois, P A; Pichot, E; Dargent, F; Dedeire, S; Vande Weyer, R; De Vuyst, P

    1994-07-01

    We compared CT with chest radiography (CR) in the assessment of low grade coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) in a population of 83 subjects. All subjects had a high-voltage p.a. CR, graded according to the ILO classification between 0/0 and 1/1, a conventional CT (CCT) using contiguous 1-cm-thick sections on the entire thorax and a set of 10 high-resolution CT (HRCT) images. CR and CT were separately read by consensus by 2 teams of 2 trained readers. CR was coded 0/0 in 9 subjects; 0/1 in 31; 1/0 in 28; 1/1 in 15. Among these groups of patients, micronodules were detected by CT in respectively 2 (22%), 14 (45%), 17 (61%) and 10 (67%) patients. In all groups, micronodules were more often detected by CT when the opacities detected on CR were scored as rounded (p, q) than irregular (s, t). Among the patients graded 0/0 or 0/1, CT showed micronodules in 40%. By contrast, among the patients graded 1/0 or 1/1, CT did not show micronodules in 37%, but revealed in numerous patients that opacities detected on CR were related to bronchiectasis and/or emphysema only. Comparative analysis of HRCT and CCT showed that both techniques are complementary and proved the usefulness of CCT in the detection or confirmation of low profusion of micronodules.

  8. A comparison of micro-CT and thin section analysis of Lateglacial glaciolacustrine varves from Glen Roy, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendle, Jacob M.; Palmer, Adrian P.; Carr, Simon J.

    2015-04-01

    Despite the prevalence of thin section analysis in studies of Quaternary sediments, there are limitations associated with the production of thin sections (sediment modification) and the inherently 2D view that a thin section affords. Non-destructive and rapid scanning technologies such as X-ray computed microtomography (μCT) enable material samples to be visualised and analysed in 3D. In a Quaternary context, however, such techniques are in their infancy. This paper assesses the optimum approach to μCT analysis of Quaternary sediments, applying the method on Lateglacial glaciolacustrine varves from Glen Roy, Scotland. Scan datasets are examined at each stage of the thin section process and comparisons are made between 2D μCT images and thin sections for the recognition of 2D sediment features, with further appraisal of 3D models to identify 3D sediment structures. Comparable sediment features are observed in 2D μCT images and thin sections, however, the μCT imaging resolution determines the precision of microfacies descriptions. Additional 3D structures are distinguished from volumetric models that are otherwise impossible to identify in thin section slides. These 3D structures can locally alter sediment properties (e.g. layer thickness) as seen in 2D thin sections and/or digital images, although such variation cannot be detected with these media. It has been demonstrated that clear benefits exist in understanding the 3D structure of Quaternary sediments, both prior to thin-sectioning to avoid complicating (e.g. deformation) structures, and after thin-sectioning to establish the complex 3D context of 2D datasets. It is recommended that μCT and thin section techniques are applied in parallel in future studies, which will profit from the integration of 'true' 3D data. It is also advised that samples are scanned soon after field sampling, due to the significant modification of in situ sediment structures that can occur during thin section processing.

  9. Hyaline cartilage thickness in radiographically normal cadaveric hips: comparison of spiral CT arthrographic and macroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Wyler, Annabelle; Bousson, Valérie; Bergot, Catherine; Polivka, Marc; Leveque, Eric; Vicaut, Eric; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2007-02-01

    To assess spiral multidetector computed tomographic (CT) arthrography for the depiction of cartilage thickness in hips without cartilage loss, with evaluation of anatomic slices as the reference standard. Permission to perform imaging studies in cadaveric specimens of individuals who had willed their bodies to science was obtained from the institutional review board. Two independent observers measured the femoral and acetabular hyaline cartilage thickness of 12 radiographically normal cadaveric hips (from six women and five men; age range at death, 52-98 years; mean, 76.5 years) on spiral multidetector CT arthrographic reformations and on coronal anatomic slices. Regions of cartilage loss at gross or histologic examination were excluded. CT arthrographic and anatomic measurements in the coronal plane were compared by using Bland-Altman representation and a paired t test. Differences between mean cartilage thicknesses at the points of measurement were tested by means of analysis of variance. Interobserver and intraobserver reproducibilities were determined. At CT arthrography, mean cartilage thickness ranged from 0.32 to 2.53 mm on the femoral head and from 0.95 to 3.13 mm on the acetabulum. Observers underestimated cartilage thickness in the coronal plane by 0.30 mm +/- 0.52 (mean +/- standard error) at CT arthrography (P < .001) compared with the anatomic reference standard. Ninety-five percent of the differences between CT arthrography and anatomic values ranged from -1.34 to 0.74 mm. The difference between mean cartilage thicknesses at the different measurement points was significant for coronal spiral multidetector CT arthrography and anatomic measurement of the femoral head and acetabulum and for sagittal and transverse CT arthrography of the femoral head (P < .001). Changes in cartilage thickness from the periphery to the center of the joint ("gradients") were found by means of spiral multidetector CT arthrography and anatomic measurement. Spiral

  10. Assessment of CF lung disease using motion corrected PROPELLER MRI: a comparison with CT.

    PubMed

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Serra, Goffredo; Bertolo, Silvia; Spronk, Sandra; Ros, Mirco; Fraioli, Francesco; Quattrucci, Serena; Assael, M Baroukh; Catalano, Carlo; Pomerri, Fabio; Tiddens, Harm A W M; Morana, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    To date, PROPELLER MRI, a breathing-motion-insensitive technique, has not been assessed for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We compared this technique to CT for assessing CF lung disease in children and adults. Thirty-eight stable CF patients (median 21 years, range 6-51 years, 22 female) underwent MRI and CT on the same day. Study protocol included respiratory-triggered PROPELLER MRI and volumetric CT end-inspiratory and -expiratory acquisitions. Two observers scored the images using the CF-MRI and CF-CT systems. Scores were compared with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI versus CT were calculated. MRI sensitivity for detecting severe CF bronchiectasis was 0.33 (CI 0.09-0.57), while specificity was 100% (CI 0.88-1). ICCs for bronchiectasis and trapped air were as follows: MRI-bronchiectasis (0.79); CT-bronchiectasis (0.85); MRI-trapped air (0.51); CT-trapped air (0.87). Bland-Altman plots showed an MRI tendency to overestimate the severity of bronchiectasis in mild CF disease and underestimate bronchiectasis in severe disease. Motion correction in PROPELLER MRI does not improve assessment of CF lung disease compared to CT. However, the good inter- and intra-observer agreement and the high specificity suggest that MRI might play a role in the short-term follow-up of CF lung disease (i.e. pulmonary exacerbations). PROPELLER MRI does not match CT sensitivity to assess CF lung disease. PROPELLER MRI has lower sensitivity than CT to detect severe bronchiectasis. PROPELLER MRI has good to very good intra- and inter-observer variability. PROPELLER MRI can be used for short-term follow-up studies in CF.

  11. [A comparison of ventilation/perfusion single photon emission CT and CT pulmonary angiography for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Meng, Jing-jing; Zhang, Li-jun; Wang, Qian; Fang, Wei; Dai, Hao-jie; Yan, Jue; Wang, Tie; Yao, Zhi-ming; He, Jia; Li, Mei; Mi, Hong-zhi; Jiao, Jian; Zheng, Yu-min

    2013-03-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) single photon emission CT (SPECT) as compared to computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) for pulmonary embolism (PE). In this prospective multicenter study, 111 patients in whom acute or sub-acute PE was clinically confirmed or suspected were enrolled. The patients underwent one-day method V/Q lung scan (including SPECT and planar imaging) within 3 days before and after completion of CTPA. The European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) guidelines for ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy (2009) reference was used as the evaluation criteria of V/Q SPECT imaging. The refined modified prospective investigation of pulmonary embolism diagnosis (RM-PIOPED) criteria was used for evaluation of planar imaging. According to the direct and indirect signs of PE, the imaging of CTPA was evaluated. All patients were followed for at least 6 months. A diagnosis was finally made by consensus of respiratory physicians, radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians based on the clinical data, laboratory tests, imaging features and follow-up results. The difference among diagnostic methods was evaluated for significance using chi-square test. The receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn according to the results of the 3 diagnostic tests. The area under ROC curve (AUC) was calculated and compared. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Among the 111 patients, PE was confirmed in 80, and excluded in 31. The diagnostic sensitivity/specificity/accuracy of V/Q SPECT, planar imaging, and CTPA were 85.9%/93.5%/88.1%, 75.7%/92.9%/81.4%, and 85.5%/90.0%/86.8%, respectively. By ROC curve analysis, the AUC values of V/Q SPECT, planar imaging and CTPA were 0.898, 0.838, and 0.877, respectively; with 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.831 to 0.966, 0.759 to 0.917, and 0.801 to 0.954, respectively. The area of the fitted smooth ROC curve was statistically significant (P < 0.05) as compared with the

  12. Sixteen-row multislice computed tomography: basic concepts, protocols, and enhanced clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Cademartiri, Filippo; Luccichenti, Giacomo; van Der Lugt, Aad; Pavone, Paolo; Pattynama, Peter M; de Feyter, Pim J; Krestin, Gabriel P

    2004-02-01

    Since its introduction, spiral computed tomography (CT) technology underwent a continuous and fast technical and clinical development. In particular, spatial and temporal resolutions were constantly increased during the last decade. The main breakthrough for clinical application was the introduction of multislice technology, first with 2-row and 4-row equipment and more recently with 16-row scanners. A high-resolution sub-millimeter CT dataset can be acquired easily, although with an increased x-ray exposure for the patient. The high speed of the scan requires up-to-date and careful protocol optimization. Scanner technology and geometry affect image formation procedure and imaging protocols should be adapted accordingly. The technical foundations of spiral CT imaging and the main scan and reconstruction parameters are described in this article. Updated protocols and clinical examples of the latest applications are also discussed.

  13. Evaluation of dose reduction and image quality in CT colonography: comparison of low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction and routine-dose CT with filtered back projection.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Koichi; Fujiwara, Masanori; Kanazawa, Hidenori; Mogi, Tomohiro; Iida, Nao; Mitsushima, Toru; Lefor, Alan T; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2015-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the radiation dose and image quality comparing low-dose CT colonography (CTC) reconstructed using different levels of iterative reconstruction techniques with routine-dose CTC reconstructed with filtered back projection. Following institutional ethics clearance and informed consent procedures, 210 patients underwent screening CTC using automatic tube current modulation for dual positions. Examinations were performed in the supine position with a routine-dose protocol and in the prone position, randomly applying four different low-dose protocols. Supine images were reconstructed with filtered back projection and prone images with iterative reconstruction. Two blinded observers assessed the image quality of endoluminal images. Image noise was quantitatively assessed by region-of-interest measurements. The mean effective dose in the supine series was 1.88 mSv using routine-dose CTC, compared to 0.92, 0.69, 0.57, and 0.46 mSv at four different low doses in the prone series (p < 0.01). Overall image quality and noise of low-dose CTC with iterative reconstruction were significantly improved compared to routine-dose CTC using filtered back projection. The lowest dose group had image quality comparable to routine-dose images. Low-dose CTC with iterative reconstruction reduces the radiation dose by 48.5 to 75.1% without image quality degradation compared to routine-dose CTC with filtered back projection. • Low-dose CTC reduces radiation dose ≥ 48.5% compared to routine-dose CTC. • Iterative reconstruction improves overall CTC image quality compared with FBP. • Iterative reconstruction reduces overall CTC image noise compared with FBP. • Automated exposure control with iterative reconstruction is useful for low-dose CTC.

  14. Alcoholic Women on Skid Row.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sandra C.

    1987-01-01

    Examined women (N=20) who were receiving alcoholism treatment in the skid-row area of Portland, Oregon. Women had histories of problem drinking and extensive treatment for alcoholism. Most had been married and had children. Despite transiency, the majority maintained contact with friends and relatives. Compared these women to New York City's…

  15. Comparison of CT and dual-energy DEXA using a modified trunk compartment in the measurement of abdominal fat.

    PubMed

    Lane, James T; Mack-Shipman, Lynn R; Anderson, Joseph C; Moore, Timothy E; Erickson, Judi M; Ford, Timothy C; Stoner, Julie A; Larsen, Jennifer L

    2005-08-01

    The quantification of abdominal fat is a marker of health risk. While dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) is easily applied, it measures overall fat, although abdominal fat may be a better indicator of health risk from obesity. We have evaluated whether a subcomponent of DEXA measurements correlates better with computed tomography (CT) for body fat than those traditionally used. Forty-seven healthy adults (22 M/25 F), aged 54.5+/-15.8 yr (mean+/-SD), with BMI of 27.1+/-4.6 kg/m2 participated in a cross-sectional study. Body fat was measured using abdominal CT and DEXA for total fat, trunk fat, and a modified trunk measurement that excludes the chest, termed "lower trunk," and compared. The coefficient of variation for DEXA measurements for trunk, lower trunk, and total body were 1.98, 3.12, and 0.85%, respectively. Mean DEXA for percentage fat ranged from 31.7% to 34.1% for trunk, lower trunk, and total body, compared to 54.2% for abdominal CT (p<0.003 for each pairwise comparison). Lower trunk, whole trunk, and total body DEXA measurements were not different. Measurement of subcomponents of fat content by DEXA is not superior to whole body measurements and remains consistently lower than measurements by CT.

  16. Comparison of two respiration monitoring systems for 4D imaging with a Siemens CT using a new dynamic breathing phantom.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, A C; Runz, A; Echner, G; Sroka-Perez, G; Karger, C P

    2012-05-07

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) requires breathing information from the patient, and for this, several systems are available. Testing of these systems, under realistic conditions, requires a phantom with a moving target and an expandable outer contour. An anthropomorphic phantom was developed to simulate patient breathing as well as lung tumor motion. Using the phantom, an optical camera system (GateCT) and a pressure sensor (AZ-733V) were simultaneously operated, and 4D-CTs were reconstructed with a Siemens CT using the provided local-amplitude-based sorting algorithm. The comparison of the tumor trajectories of both systems revealed discrepancies up to 9.7 mm. Breathing signal differences, such as baseline drift, temporal resolution and noise level were shown not to be the reason for this. Instead, the variability of the sampling interval and the accuracy of the sampling rate value written on the header of the GateCT-signal file were identified as the cause. Interpolation to regular sampling intervals and correction of the sampling rate to the actual value removed the observed discrepancies. Consistently, the introduction of sampling interval variability and inaccurate sampling rate values into the header of the AZ-733V file distorted the tumor trajectory for this system. These results underline the importance of testing new equipment thoroughly, especially if components of different manufacturers are combined.

  17. A single institution study of radiation dose received from CT imaging: A comparison to Malaysian NDRL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, N. D.; Shamsuri, S. B. M.; Tan, Y. W.; Razali, M. A. S. M.; Isa, S. M.

    2017-05-01

    Advancement of CT technology has led to an increase in CT scanning as it improves the diagnosis. However, it is important to assess health risk of patients associated with ionising radiation received from CT. This study evaluated current dose distributions at Advanced Medical and Dental Institute (AMDI), Malaysia and was used to establish Local Diagnostic Reference Level (LDRL). Dose indicators such as CT Dose Index (CTDIvol and CTDIw) and Dose-Length Product (DLP) were gathered for all routine CT examinations performed at the Imaging Unit, AMDI from January 2015 to June 2016. The first and third quartile values for each dose indicator were determined. A total of 364 CT studies were performed during that period with the highest number of cases being Thorax-Abdomen-Pelvis (TAP) study (57% of total study). The CTDIw ranged between 2.0 mGy to 23.4 mGy per procedure. DLP values were ranged between 94 mGy.cm to 1687 mGy.cm. The local dose data was compared with the national DRL to monitor the current CT practice at AMDI and LDRL will be established from the calculated third quartile values of dose distribution. From the results, some of the local dose values exceeded the Malaysian and further evaluation is important to ensure the dose optimisation for patients.

  18. Comparison of CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography in the diagnosis of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Miabi, Zinat; Pourfathi, Hojjat; Midia, Mehran; Midia, Ramin; Parvizi, Rezayat

    2011-01-01

    There are several methods for the diagnosis and evaluation of coarctation of the aorta. Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) is the standard detection method, though it entails complications and side-effects. The aim of the present study was to compare Computed Tomography (CT) angiography with DSA for diagnosing aortic coarctation. We performed a cross-sectional study of 15 patients (11 males and four females aged between two and 30 years) referred to Tabriz Shahid Madani Hospital and Imaging Center between August 2005 and February 2006 with suspected aortic coarctation. All patients were subjected to DSA and CT angiography for diagnosis of aortic coarctation. The mean age of the patients was 14.6 years; 11 were male (74.4%) and four (26.6%) were female. The DSA and CT angiography results were comparable in all patients in terms of diagnosis and the detection of complications, particularly cardiovascular complications. However, CT angiography was less time-consuming to perform than DSA (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, CT angiography, comparableto DSA, diagnosed coarctation of aorta in all the patients. However, CT angiography is a non-invasive, cost effective procedure that takes significantly less time to carry out than DSA. Therefore, CT angiography is recommended as an appropriate method for diagnosing the coarctation of aorta.

  19. Improved detection of bone metastases from lung cancer in the thoracic cage using 5- and 1-mm axial images versus a new CT software generating rib unfolding images: comparison with standard ¹⁸F-FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Homann, Georg; Mustafa, Deedar F; Ditt, Hendrik; Spengler, Werner; Kopp, Hans-Georg; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Horger, Marius

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the performance of a dedicated computed tomography (CT) software called "bone reading" generating rib unfolded images for improved detection of rib metastases in patients with lung cancer in comparison to readings of 5- and 1-mm axial CT images and (18)F-Fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT). Ninety consecutive patients who underwent (18)F-FDG-PET/CT and chest CT scanning between 2012 and 2014 at our institution were analyzed retrospectively. Chest CT scans with 5- and 1-mm slice thickness were interpreted blindly and separately focused on the detection of rib metastases (location, number, cortical vs. medullary, and osteoblastic vs. sclerotic). Subsequent image analysis of unfolded 1 mm-based CT rib images was performed. For all three data sets the reading time was registered. Finally, results were compared to those of FDG-PET. Validation was based on FDG-PET positivity for osteolytic and mixed osteolytic/osteoblastic focal rib lesions and follow-up for sclerotic PET-negative lesions. A total of 47 metastatic rib lesions were found on FDG-PET/CT plus another 30 detected by CT bone reading and confirmed by follow-up CT. Twenty-nine lesions were osteolytic, 14 were mixed osteolytic/osteoblastic, and 34 were sclerotic. On a patient-based analysis, CT (5 mm), CT (1 mm), and CT (1-mm bone reading) yielded a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 76.5/97.3/93, 81.3/97.3/94, and 88.2/95.9/92, respectively. On segment-based (unfolded rib) analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the three evaluations were 47.7/95.7/67, 59.5/95.8/77, and 94.8/88.2/92, respectively. Reading time for 5 mm/1 mm axial images and unfolded images was 40.5/50.7/21.56 seconds, respectively. The use of unfolded rib images in patients with lung cancer improves sensitivity and specificity of rib metastasis detection in comparison to 5- and 1-mm CT slice reading. Moreover, it may reduce the reading time. Copyright © 2015 AUR

  20. Mechanical performance of aquatic rowing and flying.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J A; Westneat, M W

    2000-01-01

    Aquatic flight, performed by rowing or flapping fins, wings or limbs, is a primary locomotor mechanism for many animals. We used a computer simulation to compare the mechanical performance of rowing and flapping appendages across a range of speeds. Flapping appendages proved to be more mechanically efficient than rowing appendages at all swimming speeds, suggesting that animals that frequently engage in locomotor behaviours that require energy conservation should employ a flapping stroke. The lower efficiency of rowing appendages across all speeds begs the question of why rowing occurs at all. One answer lies in the ability of rowing fins to generate more thrust than flapping fins during the power stroke. Large forces are necessary for manoeuvring behaviours such as accelerations, turning and braking, which suggests that rowing should be found in slow-swimming animals that frequently manoeuvre. The predictions of the model are supported by observed patterns of behavioural variation among rowing and flapping vertebrates. PMID:11052539

  1. Hydrodynamic characteristics of three rows of vertical slotted wall breakwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaydalani, Majed O.; Saif, Mohammed A. N.; Helal, Medhat M.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we examine the hydrodynamic characteristics of three rows of vertical slotted wall breakwaters in which the front and middle walls are permeable and partially immersed in a water channel of constant depth, whereas the third wall is impermeable. The wave-structure interaction and flow behavior of this type of breakwater arrangement are complicated and must be analyzed before breakwaters can be appropriately designed. To study the hydrodynamic breakwater performance, we developed a mathematical model based on the eigenfunction expansion method and a least squares technique for predicting wave interaction with three rows of vertical slotted wall breakwaters. We theoretically examined the wave transmission, reflection, energy loss, wave runup, and wave force under normal regular waves. Comparisons with experimental measurements show that the mathematical model results adequately reproduce most of the important features. The results of this investigation provide a better understanding of the hydrodynamic performance of triple-row vertical slotted wall breakwaters.

  2. Percutaneous Transthoracic Lung Biopsy: Comparison Between C-Arm Cone-Beam CT and Conventional CT Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yun-Chung; Tsai, Sheng-Heng; Cheng, Yuchi; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chai, Jyh-Wen; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a comparatively novel modality for guiding percutaneous transthoracic lung biopsies (PTLBs), and despite its potential advantages over conventional computed tomography (CCT), a head-to-head comparison of the two techniques has yet to be reported in the literature. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic value and safety of CBCT-guided PTLB compared to CCT-guided biopsy, with cases performed in a single hospital. METHODS: A total of 104 PTLB patients were retrospectively analyzed in this study. 35 PTLBs were performed under CBCT guidance, and 69 PTLBs were performed under CCT guidance. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for malignancy as well as procedure time, radiation dose of patients, and complication rate in the two groups were compared. RESULTS: Total procedure time was significantly lower in the CBCT group (32 ± 11 minutes) compared to the CCT group (38 ± 9.7 minutes; P = .009), especially among patients ≥ 70 years of age (CBCT: 33 ± 12 minutes, CCT: 42 ± 13, P = .022). For lesions in the lower lobes, the CBCT-guided group received significantly reduced effective radiation dose (2.9 ± 1.6 mSv) than CCT-guided patients (3.7 ± 0.80; P = .042). Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for malignancy were comparable between the two groups, as were post-biopsy complication rates. CONCLUSION: CBCT guidance significantly reduces the procedure time and radiation exposure for PTLBs compared with CCT, and should be considered in clinical settings that may be difficult or time-consuming to perform under CCT. PMID:26310371

  3. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of PET/CT and PET/MR imaging in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Al-Nabhani, Khalsa Z; Syed, Rizwan; Michopoulou, Sofia; Alkalbani, Jokha; Afaq, Asim; Panagiotidis, Emmanouil; O'Meara, Celia; Groves, Ashley; Ell, Peter; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare whole-body PET/MR imaging and PET/CT, qualitatively and quantitatively, in oncologic patients and assess the confidence and degree of inter- and intraobserver agreement in anatomic lesion localization. Fifty patients referred for staging with known cancers underwent PET/CT with low-dose CT for attenuation correction immediately followed by PET/MR imaging with 2-point Dixon attenuation correction. PET/CT scans were obtained according to standard protocols (56 ± 20 min after injection of an average 367 MBq of (18)F-FDG, 150 MBq of (68)Ga-DOTATATE, or 333.8 MBq of (18)F-fluoro-ethyl-choline; 2.5 min/bed position). PET/MR was performed with 5 min/bed position. Three dual-accredited nuclear medicine physicians/radiologists identified the lesions and assigned each to an exact anatomic location. The image quality, alignment, and confidence in anatomic localization of lesions were scored on a scale of 1-3 for PET/CT and PET/MR imaging. Quantitative analysis was performed by comparing the standardized uptake values. Intraclass correlation coefficients and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to assess intra- and interobserver agreement in image quality, alignment, and confidence in lesion localization for the 2 modalities. Two hundred twenty-seven tracer-avid lesions were identified in 50 patients. Of these, 225 were correctly identified on PET/CT and 227 on PET/MR imaging by all 3 observers. The confidence in anatomic localization improved by 5.1% when using PET/MR imaging, compared with PET/CT. The mean percentage interobserver agreement was 96% for PET/CT and 99% for PET/MR imaging, and intraobserver agreement in lesion localization across the 2 modalities was 93%. There was 10% (5/50 patients) improvement in local staging with PET/MR imaging, compared with PET/CT. In this first study, we show the effectiveness of whole-body PET/MR imaging in oncology. There is no statistically significant difference between PET

  4. MRI-guided and CT-guided cervical nerve root infiltration therapy: a cost comparison.

    PubMed

    Maurer, M H; Froeling, V; Röttgen, R; Bretschneider, T; Hartwig, T; Disch, A C; de Bucourt, M; Hamm, B; Streitparth, F

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate and compare the costs of MRI-guided and CT-guided cervical nerve root infiltration for the minimally invasive treatment of radicular neck pain. Between September 2009 and April 2012, 22 patients (9 men, 13 women; mean age: 48.2 years) underwent MRI-guided (1.0 Tesla, Panorama HFO, Philips) single-site periradicular cervical nerve root infiltration with 40 mg triamcinolone acetonide. A further 64 patients (34 men, 30 women; mean age: 50.3 years) were treated under CT fluoroscopic guidance (Somatom Definition 64, Siemens). The mean overall costs were calculated as the sum of the prorated costs of equipment use (purchase, depreciation, maintenance, and energy costs), personnel costs and expenditure for disposables that were identified for MRI- and CT-guided procedures. Additionally, the cost of ultrasound guidance was calculated. The mean intervention time was 24.9 min. (range: 12 - 36 min.) for MRI-guided infiltration and 19.7 min. (range: 5 - 54 min.) for CT-guided infiltration. The average total costs per patient were EUR 240 for MRI-guided interventions and EUR 124 for CT-guided interventions. These were (MRI/CT guidance) EUR 150/60 for equipment use, EUR 46/40 for personnel, and EUR 44/25 for disposables. The mean overall cost of ultrasound guidance was EUR 76. Cervical nerve root infiltration using MRI guidance is still about twice as expensive as infiltration using CT guidance. However, since it does not involve radiation exposure for patients and personnel, MRI-guided nerve root infiltration may become a promising alternative to the CT-guided procedure, especially since a further price decrease is expected for MRI devices and MR-compatible disposables. In contrast, ultrasound remains the less expensive method for nerve root infiltration guidance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Determining the cause of pulmonary atelectasis: a comparison of plain radiography and CT.

    PubMed

    Woodring, J H

    1988-04-01

    In a retrospective analysis of 50 patients with segmental or lobar atelectasis of the lung, chest radiographs and CT studies were compared for their abilities to distinguish whether a centrally obstructing tumor was the cause. This was done to help define the role of CT in evaluating patients with atelectasis. Atelectasis was caused by an obstructing tumor in 27 cases and a variety of other conditions in 23. The chest radiograph correctly identified an obstructing tumor as the cause of atelectasis in 24 of 27 patients on the basis of the presence of a central hilar mass or obvious bronchial abnormality; there was 89% sensitivity and 96% specificity with a 12% false-negative rate and a 4% false-positive rate. CT correctly identified all 27 obstructing carcinomas on the basis of the presence of either a central bronchial abnormality or a central hilar mass; there was 100% sensitivity and 87% specificity with a 0% false-negative rate and a 10% false-positive rate. Absence of air bronchograms or the presence of mucus-filled bronchi within the atelectatic lung were secondary CT findings that also favored the presence of an obstructing tumor. Although the chest radiograph was more specific than CT for tumor as the cause of atelectasis (96% vs 87%, respectively), it was less sensitive than CT for tumor (89% vs 100%, respectively) resulting in missed tumor diagnoses. CT identified all cases caused by obstructing tumor and successfully excluded obstructing tumor in most of the remaining cases, with an acceptable number of false-positive tumor diagnoses (10%). CT should be performed when the cause of segmental or lobar atelectasis cannot be established with certainty on the basis of the chest radiograph.

  6. Use of CT to reduce understaging in prostatic cancer: comparison with conventional staging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Emory, T.H.; Reinke, D.B.; Hill, A.L.; Lange, P.H.

    1983-08-01

    Thirty prostatic cancer patients were evaluated for staging purposes with both CT (18-sec scan speed) and certain commonly used conventional diagnostic tests, namely: radionuclide bone scan with correlative plain films, the prostatic fraction of the serum acid phosphatase, excretory urogram, and chest radiograph. All patients included in the study had histopathologic proof of diagnosis. CT correctly identified extracapsular prostatic cancer spread locally or in pelvic lymph nodes in 14% of patients with completely negative conventional studies. Sensitivity of extracapsular tumor spread detection increased from 41% to 59% by adding CT to the conventional studies. CT confirmed the presence of tumor spread and localized it in 43% of patients with positive conventional studies. Conventional studies were positive when tumor spread was present in 32% of patients with negative CT. CT reduces understaging when conventional tests are negative, localizes and conforms tumor spread when conventional tests are positive, but cannot demonstrate tumor spread in some patients whose conventional tests are positive and who are subsequently shown to have tumor spread histopathologically.

  7. Comparison of CT and MRI in Diagnosis of Laryngeal Carcinoma with Anterior Vocal Commissure Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-hui; Zhao, Jing; Li, Zeng-hong; Yang, Wei-qiang; Liu, Qi-hong; Yang, Zhi-yun; Liao, Bing; Li, Xiao-ling; Wang, Bin; Qin, Hao; Luo, Jie; Lv, Ke-xing; Wen, Wei-ping; Lei, Wen-bin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the accuracy of CT and MRI in determining the invasion of thyroid cartilage by and the T staging of laryngeal carcinoma with anterior vocal commissure (AVC) involvement. A total of 26 cases of laryngeal carcinomas with AVC involvement from May 2012 to January 2014 underwent enhanced CT and MRI scan, out of whom 6 patients also underwent diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging(DWI). T staging and thyroid cartilage involvement were evaluated. All the surgical specimens underwent serial section and were reviewed by two senior pathologists independently. When compared with pathologic staging, the accuracy was 88.46% (23/26) of MRI scan (with a 95% confidence interval 37~77%) and 57.69% (15/26) of CT scan (with a 95% confidence interval 70~98%), respectively (P < 0.01). We also reported three cases who were misdiagnosed on CT or MRI about either the thyroid cartilage was involved or not, and one case of preliminary study of DWI. Compared to CT, MRI exhibited a higher accuracy rate on T staging of laryngeal carcinomas with AVC involvement. Combined utility of CT and MRI could help improve the accuracy of assessment of thyroid cartilage involvement and T staging of laryngeal carcinomas with AVC involvement. PMID:27480073

  8. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: preliminary comparison of 64-section CT enteroclysis with video capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Khalife, Samer; Soyer, Philippe; Alatawi, Abdullah; Vahedi, Kouroche; Hamzi, Lounis; Dray, Xavier; Placé, Vinciane; Marteau, Philippe; Boudiaf, Mourad

    2011-01-01

    To retrospectively compare the diagnostic capabilities of 64-section CT enteroclysis with those of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) to elucidate the cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Thirty-two patients who had 64-section CT enteroclysis and VCE because of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding were included. Imaging findings were compared with those obtained at double balloon endoscopy, surgery and histopathological analysis, which were used as a standard of reference. Concordant findings were found in 22 patients (22/32; 69%), including normal findings (n=13), tumours (n=7), lymphangiectasia (n=1) and inflammation (n=1), and discrepancies in 10 patients (10/32; 31%), including ulcers (n=3), angioectasias (n=2), tumours (n=2) and normal findings (n=3). No statistical difference in the proportions of abnormal findings between 64-section CT enteroclysis (11/32; 34%) and VCE (17/32, 53%) (P=0.207) was found. However, 64-section CT enteroclysis helped identify tumours not detected at VCE (n=2) and definitely excluded suspected tumours (n=3) because of bulges at VCE. Conversely, VCE showed ulcers (n=3) and angioectasias (n=2) which were not visible at 64-section CT enteroclysis. Our results suggest that 64-section CT enteroclysis and VCE have similar overall diagnostic yields in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the two techniques are complementary in this specific population.

  9. [CT and MR virtual colonscopy: indications, limits and comparison with conventional colonscopy].

    PubMed

    Bertini, L; Campagnano, S; Lanciotti, S; Fiorello, S; Fabiani, B; Graziani, M G; Gualdi, G F

    2006-01-01

    Virtual endoscopy is a new method for studying the colon; it consists in acquisition of CT and MR images and to elaborate them with a workstation, to create endoluminal vision as like as traditional colonscopy, permitting the complete exploration of colonic lumen, also with stenotic tumors. The analysis of the differences between CT and MR colography shows like these two techniques present both advantages and disadvantages, such as the impossibility to perform MR in patients with pace-maker or in claustrophobic patients and the impossibility to perform CT with iodated agents in patients with renal failure or with a story of adverse reactions. The increased use of these techniques is due to the high sensitivity of last-generation CT and MR machine, to the increased spatial resolution, to specific softwares for digital cleaning of colon, to the introduction of high-end workstations and to the possibility of computed assisted diagnosis (CAD). So, it is desiderable that the increasing spread of multidetector CT devices and the future technical innovations, should have the effect to increase culture and experience in various diagnostic centers about CT-colography, making possible the spreading of virtual endoscopy as a screening tool.

  10. Billet planting, 8-foot rows, residue updates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cultural practices are continually tested and upgraded to maximize sugarcane yield in Louisiana. Over the past 3 years extensive research went in to comparing the industry standard 6-foot row spacing to a wider, 8 foot row. Each 8 foot row was double drilled with seed canes that were 2-3 feet apart....

  11. Feasibility of simultaneous PET/MR of the carotid artery: first clinical experience and comparison to PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Ripa, Rasmus S; Knudsen, Andreas; Hag, Anne Mette F; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Loft, Annika; Keller, Sune H; Hansen, Adam E; von Benzon, Eric; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjær, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed at comparing PET/MR to PET/CT for imaging the carotid arteries in patients with known increased risk of atherosclerosis. Six HIV-positive men underwent sequential PET/MR and PET/CT of the carotid arteries after injection of 400 MBq of 18F-FDG. PET/MR was performed a median of 131 min after injection. Subsequently,PET/CT was performed. Regions of interest (ROI) were drawn slice by slice to include the carotid arteries and standardized uptake values (SUV) were calculated from both datasets independently. Quantitative comparison of 18F-FDG uptake revealed a high congruence between PET data acquired using the PET/MR system compared to the PET/CT system. The mean difference for SUVmean was -0.18 (p < 0.001) and -0.14 for SUVmax (p < 0.001) indicating a small but significant bias towards lower values using the PET/MR system. The 95% limits of agreement were -0.55 to 0.20 for SUVmean and -0.93 to 0.65 for SUVmax. The image quality of the PET/MR allowed for delineation of the carotid vessel wall. The correlations between 18F-FDG uptake from ROI including both vessel wall and vessel lumen to ROI including only the wall were strong (r = 0.98 for SUVmean and r = 1.00 for SUVmax) indicating that the luminal 18F-FDG content had minimal influence on the values. The study shows for the first time that simultaneous PET/MR of the carotid arteries is feasible in patients with increased risk of atherosclerosis. Quantification of 18F-FDG uptake correlated well between PET/MR and PET/CT despite difference in method of PET attenuation correction, reconstruction algorithm, and detector technology. PMID:23900769

  12. Quantitative Image Quality Comparison of Reduced- and Standard-Dose Dual-Energy Multiphase Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis CT.

    PubMed

    Buty, Mario; Xu, Ziyue; Wu, Aaron; Gao, Mingchen; Nelson, Chelyse; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Teomete, Uygar; Celik, Haydar; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter; Mollura, Daniel J; Bagci, Ulas; Folio, Les R

    2017-06-01

    We present a new image quality assessment method for determining whether reducing radiation dose impairs the image quality of computed tomography (CT) in qualitative and quantitative clinical analyses tasks. In this Institutional Review Board-exempt study, we conducted a review of 50 patients (male, 22; female, 28) who underwent reduced-dose CT scanning on the first follow-up after standard-dose multiphase CT scanning. Scans were for surveillance of von Hippel-Lindau disease (N = 26) and renal cell carcinoma (N = 10). We investigated density, morphometric, and structural differences between scans both at tissue (fat, bone) and organ levels (liver, heart, spleen, lung). To quantify structural variations caused by image quality differences, we propose using the following metrics: dice similarity coefficient, structural similarity index, Hausdorff distance, gradient magnitude similarity deviation, and weighted spectral distance. Pearson correlation coefficient and Welch 2-sample t test were used for quantitative comparisons of organ morphometry and to compare density distribution of tissue, respectively. For qualitative evaluation, 2-sided Kendall Tau test was used to assess agreement among readers. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations were designed to examine significance of image differences for clinical tasks. Qualitative judgment served as an overall assessment, whereas detailed quantifications on structural consistency, intensity homogeneity, and texture similarity revealed more accurate and global difference estimations. Qualitative and quantitative results indicated no significant image quality degradation. Our study concludes that low(er)-dose CT scans can be routinely used because of no significant loss in quantitative image information compared with standard-dose CT scans.

  13. Localization of medullary thyroid carcinoma after surgery using (11)C-methionine PET/CT: comparison with (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hye Won; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Ji In; Kim, Hee Kyung; Shin, Hyun Won; Shin, Jung Hee; Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, Jae Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Tumor localization is difficult in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) that have persistent hypercalcitoninemia after thyroidectomy. In this study, the (11)C-methionine positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was compared with the (18)F-FDG PET/CT for diagnostic sensitivity in detecting residual or metastatic disease. (11)C-methionine PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT were performed on 16 consecutive patients with MTC that had persistent hypercalcitoninemia after surgery in this prospective, single-center study. Patient- and lesion-based analyses were performed using a composite reference standard which was the sum of the lesions confirmed by all combined modalities, including neck ultrasonography (US) with or without fine needle aspiration cytology, CT, bone scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and surgery. By patient-based analysis, the sensitivities of (11)C-methionine PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT were both 63%. By lesion-based analysis, the sensitivity of (11)C-methionine PET/CT was similar to (18)F-FDG PET/CT (73% vs. 80%). Excluding hepatic lesions, which could not be detected because of physiological uptake of methionine by the liver, the sensitivity of (11)C-methionine PET/CT was better than (18)F-FDG PET/CT especially for detecting cervical lymph node lesions; however, it was not superior to US. All patients with serum calcitonin levels ≥370 pg/mL showed uptake by (11)C-methionine PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT. This preliminary data showed that despite its similar sensitivity to (18)F-FDG PET/CT for detecting residual or metastatic MTC, (11)C-methionine PET/CT provided minimal additional information compared to combined (18)F-FDG PET/CT and neck US.

  14. Localized Prostate Cancer Detection with 18F FACBC PET/CT: Comparison with MR Imaging and Histopathologic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Esther; Shih, Joanna; Pinto, Peter A.; Merino, Maria J.; Lindenberg, Maria L.; Bernardo, Marcelino; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Adler, Stephen; Owenius, Rikard; Choyke, Peter L.; Kurdziel, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize uptake of 1-amino-3-fluorine 18-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (18F FACBC) in patients with localized prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and normal prostate tissue and to evaluate its potential utility in delineation of intraprostatic cancers in histopathologically confirmed localized prostate cancer in comparison with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study. Twenty-one men underwent dynamic and static abdominopelvic 18F FACBC combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) and multiparametric (MP) 3-T endorectal MR imaging before robotic-assisted prostatectomy. PET/CT and MR images were coregistered by using pelvic bones as fiducial markers; this was followed by manual adjustments. Whole-mount histopathologic specimens were sliced with an MR-based patient-specific mold. 18F FACBC PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) were compared with those at MR imaging and histopathologic analysis for lesion- and sector-based (20 sectors per patient) analysis. Positive and negative predictive values for each modality were estimated by using generalized estimating equations with logit link function and working independence correlation structure. Results 18F FACBC tumor uptake was rapid but reversible. It peaked 3.6 minutes after injection and reached a relative plateau at 15–20 minutes (SUVmax[15–20min]). Mean prostate tumor SUVmax(15–20min) was significantly higher than that of the normal prostate (4.5 ± 0.5 vs 2.7 ± 0.5) (P < .001); however, it was not significantly different from that of BPH (4.3 ± 0.6) (P = .27). Sector-based comparison with histopathologic analysis, including all tumors, revealed sensitivity and specificity of 67% and 66%, respectively, for 18F FACBC PET/CT and 73% and 79%, respectively, for T2-weighted MR imaging. 18F FACBC PET/CT and MP MR

  15. Clinical evaluation of dual-energy bone removal in CT angiography of the head and neck: comparison with conventional bone-subtraction CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Deng, K; Liu, C; Ma, R; Sun, C; Wang, X-m; Ma, Z-T; Sun, X-l

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate the bone-subtraction effect of dual-energy bone removal in computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the head and neck in comparison with conventional bone-subtraction CTA. The study comprised 52 patients who were divided into two groups at random, and examined using dual-source CT for head and neck CTA. Dual-energy bone removal CTA and conventional bone-subtraction CTA were applied to each of the two groups, respectively. The bone subtraction was performed automatically in both methods. Vascular structures, as well as brain tissue remained visible. The subtracted images were further processed with maximum intensity projection (MIP) and volume-rendering technique (VRT) for image evaluation. Two experienced radiologists reviewed the resulting subtracted and non-subtracted volume data with respect to the delineation and detection of image quality and vascular pathology. The means of the weighted CT dose index (CTDIvol) for bone-removal dual-energy CTA and conventional bone-subtraction CTA were 20.56+/-0.01 mGy and 25.57+/-0.56 mGy, respectively. There was a significant difference between them. The percentage of carotid and vertebral arteries and all other vessels that could be successfully assessed with these two methods were 87.8, 68, and 83%, and 93.5, 91.8, and 92.6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the visualization of the carotid arteries; however, there were significant differences in the visualization of the vertebral arteries. Compared with conventional bone-subtraction CTA, dual-energy bone-removal CTA had a lower radiation dose. It eliminated most bones in the head and neck successfully; however, the bone subtraction effect around the vertebral artery was unsatisfactory. Dual-energy bone-removal CTA provides a new method for detecting vascular diseases in routine clinical work.

  16. A Comparison of daily megavoltage CT and ultrasound image guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Cheng; Kainz, Kristofer; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen

    2008-12-15

    In order to quantify the differences between ultrasound-imaging and megavoltage-CT (MVCT) daily prostate localization in prostate-cancer radiotherapy and their dosimetric impacts, daily shifts were analyzed for a total of 140 prostate cancer patients; 106 positioned using ultrasound-based imaging [B-mode Acquisition and Targeting (BAT)], and 34 using the MVCT from a TomoTherapy Hi-Art unit. The shifts indicated by the two systems were compared statistically along the right/left (R/L), superior/inferior (S/I), and anterior/posterior (A/P) directions. The systematic and random variations among the daily alignments were calculated. Margins to account for these shifts were estimated. The mean shifts and standard deviations along the R/L, S/I, and A/P directions were -0.11{+-}3.80, 0.67{+-}4.67, and 2.71{+-}6.31 mm for BAT localizations and -0.98{+-}5.13, 0.27{+-}3.35, and 1.00{+-}4.22 mm for MVCT localizations, respectively. The systematic and random variations in daily shifts based on MVCT were generally smaller than those based on BAT, especially along the A/P direction. A t-test showed this difference to be statistically significant. The planning target volume margins in the A/P direction estimated to account for daily variations were 8.81 and 14.66 mm based on MVCT and BAT data, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the daily prostate movement pattern between the first few fractions and the remaining fractions. Dosimetric comparison of MVCT and BAT prostate alignments was performed for seven fractions from a patient. The degradation from the plan caused by the MVCT alignment is trivial, while that by BAT is substantial. The MVCT technique results in smaller variations in daily shifts than ultrasound imaging, indicating that MVCT is more reliable and precise for prostate localization. Ultrasound-based localization may overestimate the daily prostate motion, particularly in the A/P direction, negatively impacting prostate dose coverage

  17. Bilateral Second Carpal Row Duplication Associated with Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cladiere-Nassif, Victoire; Delaroche, Caroline; Pottier, Edwige; Feron, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 75-year-old woman presenting a hitherto undescribed condition of bilateral second carpal row duplication. She was diagnosed in childhood with both Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, with no clear evidence and no further medical follow-up. She presented throughout her life with various articular symptoms, which appeared to be compatible with a diagnosis of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, and underwent several surgical procedures on her knees and hips. Most recently, she was reporting pain at the base of the fifth metacarpal bone of the left hand. X-ray images and computed tomography (CT) were obtained for exploration and showed a total second row duplication in both carpi, with a total number of 18 carpal bones in each wrist. PMID:26649258

  18. Intrahepatic peripheral cholangiocarcinoma (IPCC): comparison between perfusion ultrasound and CT imaging.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, M; Vecchiato, F; Cantisani, V; Barbi, E; Passamonti, M; Ricci, P; Malagò, R; Faccioli, N; Zamboni, G; Pozzi Mucelli, R

    2008-02-01

    This study was done to compare the perfusion patterns of intrahepatic peripheral cholangiocarcinoma (IPCC) on contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and dynamic computed tomography (CT). We retrospectively reviewed 23 histologically proven cases of IPCC. All lesions were studied by CEUS with sulfur hexafluoride-filled microbubbles coated with a phospholipid capsule, and by dynamic CT. Contrast-enhancement patterns were evaluated in the arterial phase (CEUS 10-20 s after the injection; CT 25-30 s after the injection) and in the delayed phase (CEUS 120 s after the injection; CT>2-3 min after the injection). Lesions were single in 18/23 cases (78%), single with nearby satellite lesions in 1/23 (4%) cases and multifocal with distant secondary lesions in 4/23 (17%) cases. Lesion diameter was 2-5 cm in 7/23 cases (30%), 5-7 cm in 13/23 cases (57%) and >7 cm in 3/23 (13%) cases. On CEUS, lesions were hypervascular in 16/23 cases (70%). On delayed-phase CEUS, 22/23 lesions (96%) were markedly hypoechoic. CT showed that the lesions were hypovascular in the arterial phase in 15/23 cases (66%) and hypervascular in 7/23 (30%) cases; one lesion (1/23; 4%) was isovascular. On delayed-phase CT, lesions were hyperdense in 17/23 cases (74%), hypodense in 5/23 (22%) cases and isodense in 1/23 (43%) cases. Enhancement discrepancy between delayed-phase CEUS (hypoechogenicity) and CT (hyperdensity) is common semiological findings in the study of IPCC.

  19. Imaging and Right Ventricular Pacing Lead Position: A Comparison of CT, MRI, and Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Moore, Peter; Coucher, John; Ngai, Stanley; Stanton, Tony; Wahi, Sudhir; Gould, Paul; Booth, Cameron; Pratap, Jit; Kaye, Gerald

    2016-04-01

    Right ventricular nonapical (RVNA) pacing may reduce the risk of heart failure. Fluoroscopy is the standard approach to determine lead tip position, but is inaccurate. We compared cardiac computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), two-dimensional and three-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and chest x-ray (CXR) to assess which provides the optimal assessment of right ventricular (RV) lead tip position. Eighteen patients with MRI-conditional pacemakers (10 RVNA and eight apical [RVA] leads) underwent contrast CT, MRI, TTE, and a standard postimplant posteroanterior and lateral CXR. To compare images, the RV was arbitrarily partitioned into three long-axis segments (right ventricular outflow tract, middle, and apex), and two short-axis segments (septal and nonseptal). Agreement between modalities was assessed. RV lead tip position was identified in all patients on CT, TTE, and CXR, but was not identified in seven (39%) patients on MRI due to device-related artifact. Of 10 leads deemed to be nonapical/septal during implant, 70% were identified as nonapical on CXR, 60% on CT, 60% on MRI, and 80% on TTE. On CT imaging only 10% were truly septal, 20% on MRI, 30% on CXR, and 80% on TTE. Agreement was better between modalities when assessing position of the designated RVA leads. During implant leads intended for the septum are not confirmed as such on subsequent imaging, and marked heterogeneity is apparent between modalities. MRI is limited by artifact, and discrepancy exists between TTE and CT in identifying septal lead position. CT gave the clearest definition of lead tip position. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Quantification of interstitial fluid on whole body CT: comparison with whole body autopsy.

    PubMed

    Lo Gullo, Roberto; Mishra, Shelly; Lira, Diego A; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Singh, Sarabjeet; Shepard, Jo-Anne O; Digumarthy, Subba R; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Stone, James R

    2015-12-01

    Interstitial fluid accumulation can occur in pleural, pericardial, and peritoneal spaces, and subcutaneous tissue planes. The purpose of the study was to assess if whole body CT examination in a postmortem setting could help determine the presence and severity of third space fluid accumulation in the body. Our study included 41 human cadavers (mean age 61 years, 25 males and 16 females) who had whole-body postmortem CT prior to autopsy. All bodies were maintained in the morgue in the time interval between death and autopsy. Two radiologists reviewed the whole-body CT examinations independently to grade third space fluid in the pleura, pericardium, peritoneum, and subcutaneous space using a 5-point grading system. Qualitative CT grading for third space fluid was correlated with the amount of fluid found on autopsy and the quantitative CT fluid volume, estimated using a dedicated software program (Volume, Syngo Explorer, Siemens Healthcare). Moderate and severe peripheral edema was seen in 16/41 and 7/41 cadavers respectively. It is not possible to quantify anasarca at autopsy. Correlation between imaging data for third space fluid and the quantity of fluid found during autopsy was 0.83 for pleural effusion, 0.4 for pericardial effusion and 0.9 for ascites. The degree of anasarca was significantly correlated with the severity of ascites (p < 0.0001) but not with pleural or pericardial effusion. There was strong correlation between volumetric estimation and qualitative grading for anasarca (p < 0.0001) and pleural effusion (p < 0.0001). Postmortem CT can help in accurate detection and quantification of third space fluid accumulation. The quantity of ascitic fluid on postmortem CT can predict the extent of anasarca.

  1. Performance comparison between static and dynamic cardiac CT on perfusion quantitation and patient classification tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac CT acquisitions for perfusion assessment can be performed in a dynamic or static mode. In this simulation study, we evaluate the relative classification and quantification performance of these modes for assessing myocardial blood flow (MBF). In the dynamic method, a series of low dose cardiac CT acquisitions yields data on contrast bolus dynamics over time; these data are fit with a model to give a quantitative MBF estimate. In the static method, a single CT acquisition is obtained, and the relative CT numbers in the myocardium are used to infer perfusion states. The static method does not directly yield a quantitative estimate of MBF, but these estimates can be roughly approximated by introducing assumed linear relationships between CT number and MBF, consistent with the ways such images are typically visually interpreted. Data obtained by either method may be used for a variety of clinical tasks, including 1) stratifying patients into differing categories of ischemia and 2) using the quantitative MBF estimate directly to evaluate ischemic disease severity. Through simulations, we evaluate the performance on each of these tasks. The dynamic method has very low bias in MBF estimates, making it particularly suitable for quantitative estimation. At matched radiation dose levels, ROC analysis demonstrated that the static method, with its high bias but generally lower variance, has superior performance in stratifying patients, especially for larger patients.

  2. Bone marrow trephine biopsy in Hodgkin's lymphoma. Comparison with PET-CT scan in 65 patients.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, Sunil; Cabello-García, Dolores; Allende-Riera, Ana; Cárdenas-Negro, Carlos; Raya, José María; Hernández-Garcia, Miguel T

    2017-08-29

    To compare bone marrow biopsy (BMB) and PET/CT in detecting bone marrow involvement in Hodgkin's lymphoma MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 65 patients with both tests in the initial staging or in relapse with special attention to the PET/CT uptake pattern. In 3 patients (4.6%), the BMB showed bone marrow involvement with the PET/CT being positive in them all: 2 with diffuse+multifocal pattern and one diffuse only. In 11 additional patients (total 14/65, 21%), bone marrow involvement was diagnosed by PET/CT because bone marrow uptake was above hepatic one. The pattern was focal only in 2 cases, multifocal in 5, diffuse in 3 and diffuse+multifocal in one. In these last 4 cases the BMB showed an unspecific myelopathy. PET/CT detects all cases with BMB affected and many that escape to biopsy, however when the uptake pattern is diffuse it could be by involvement or reactive hyperplasia and in those cases the BMB should be done. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. A quantitative comparison of micro-CT preparations in Dipteran flies

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Peter; Wicklein, Martina; Sykes, Dan; Ahmed, Farah; Krapp, Holger G.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray-based 3D-imaging techniques have gained fundamental significance in research areas ranging from taxonomy to bioengineering. There is demand for the characterisation of species-specific morphological adaptations, micro-CTCT) being the method of choice in small-scale animals. This has driven the development of suitable staining techniques to improve absorption-based tissue contrast. A quantitative account on the limits of current staining protocols for preparing μCT specimen, however, is still missing. Here we present a study that quantifies results obtained by combining a variety of different contrast agents and fixative treatments that provides general guidance for μCT applications, particularly suitable for insect species. Using a blowfly model system (Calliphora), we enhanced effective spatial resolution and, in particular, optimised tissue contrast enabling semi-automated segmentation of soft and hard tissue from μCT data. We introduce a novel probabilistic measure of the contrast between tissues: PTC. Our results show that a strong iodine solution provides the greatest overall increase in tissue contrast, however phosphotungstic acid offers better inter-tissue discriminability. We further show that using paraformaldehyde as a fixative as opposed to ethanol, slows down the uptake of a staining solution by approximately a factor of two. PMID:28000717

  4. Comparison of SNOMED CT versus Medcin terminology concept coverage for mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Montella, Diane; Brown, Steven H; Elkin, Peter L; Jackson, James C; Rosenbloom, S Trent; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind; Welsh, Gail; Cotton, Bryan; Guillamondegui, Oscar D; Lew, Henry; Taber, Katherine H; Tupler, Larry A; Vanderploeg, Rodney; Speroff, Theodore

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a "signature" injury of the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Structured electronic data regarding TBI findings is important for research, population health and other secondary uses but requires appropriate underlying standard terminologies to ensure interoperability and reuse. Currently the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) uses the terminology SNOMED CT and the Department of Defense (DOD) uses Medcin. We developed a comprehensive case definition of mild TBI composed of 68 clinical terms. Using automated and manual techniques, we evaluated how well the mild TBI case definition terms could be represented by SNOMED CT and Medcin, and compared the results. We performed additional analysis stratified by whether the concepts were rated by a TBI expert panel as having High, Medium, or Low importance to the definition of mild TBI. SNOMED CT sensitivity (recall) was 90% overall for coverage of mild TBI concepts, and Medcin sensitivity was 49%, p < 0.001 (using McNemar's chi square). Positive predictive value (precision) for each was 100%. SNOMED CT outperformed Medcin for concept coverage independent of import rating by our TBI experts. SNOMED CT was significantly better able to represent mild TBI concepts than Medcin. This finding may inform data gathering, management and sharing, and data exchange strategies between the VA and DOD for active duty soldiers and veterans with mild TBI. Since mild TBI is an important condition in the civilian population as well, the current study results may be useful also for the general medical setting.

  5. A quantitative comparison of micro-CT preparations in Dipteran flies.

    PubMed

    Swart, Peter; Wicklein, Martina; Sykes, Dan; Ahmed, Farah; Krapp, Holger G

    2016-12-21

    X-ray-based 3D-imaging techniques have gained fundamental significance in research areas ranging from taxonomy to bioengineering. There is demand for the characterisation of species-specific morphological adaptations, micro-CTCT) being the method of choice in small-scale animals. This has driven the development of suitable staining techniques to improve absorption-based tissue contrast. A quantitative account on the limits of current staining protocols for preparing μCT specimen, however, is still missing. Here we present a study that quantifies results obtained by combining a variety of different contrast agents and fixative treatments that provides general guidance for μCT applications, particularly suitable for insect species. Using a blowfly model system (Calliphora), we enhanced effective spatial resolution and, in particular, optimised tissue contrast enabling semi-automated segmentation of soft and hard tissue from μCT data. We introduce a novel probabilistic measure of the contrast between tissues: PTC. Our results show that a strong iodine solution provides the greatest overall increase in tissue contrast, however phosphotungstic acid offers better inter-tissue discriminability. We further show that using paraformaldehyde as a fixative as opposed to ethanol, slows down the uptake of a staining solution by approximately a factor of two.

  6. Iofetamine HCI I-123 brain scanning in stroke: a comparison with transmission CT

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.H.; Madsen, M.T.; McLellan, T.; Schwartzman, R.J.

    1988-03-01

    Although IMP scans fail to show fine anatomical details of the brain, because of poor resolution of a single head rotational system, adequate information is offered by the scans to localize most perfusion defects caused by stroke. The following conclusions can be drawn from our study: 1. The planar IMP brain scans processed through the computer are sensitive in the early diagnosis of acute stroke except for small and deeply localized lesions. 2. The SPECT IMP imaging is more sensitive than the planar or transmission CT scans in the early diagnosis of stroke. Semiquantitative evaluations are feasible with IMP SPECT. 3. Neither transmission CT nor IMP SPECT are sensitive in the detection of acute lacunar infarcts. 4. In acute infarction, the transmission CT is usually negative or minimally positive in the early stages, while impaired uptake of IMP occurs immediately after the onset of the stroke. In acute stroke, the extent of the perfusion defect on IMP is usually greater than the abnormality seen on the transmission CT. 5. On followup studies, IMP scans show improved perfusion reflecting physiologic changes, while transmission CT scans show further dense anatomical changes when compared to the initial studies. 6. Hyperemic changes are likely due to collateral circulation or luxury perfusion. This finding suggests that the IMP reflects local cerebral blood flow in strokes.

  7. Comparison of CT and MRI brain tumor imaging using a canine glioma model.

    PubMed

    Whelan, H T; Clanton, J A; Wilson, R E; Tulipan, N B

    1988-01-01

    A canine gliosarcoma model was used to study the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast enhancement in defining the histologic margins of brain tumors. The effectiveness of this technique was compared to conventional computed tomography (CT) using iodinated contrast enhancement. Cultured canine gliosarcoma cells were injected into the left hemisphere of adult mongrel dogs. The dogs developed brain tumors and progressive clinical signs. Serial MRI with and without gadolinium diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid was compared to serial CT with and without sodium iothalamate obtained on the same days. After the final scans, animals were sacrificed; the brains were removed and processed for routine histopathologic study. All tumors were visualized with contrast-enhanced MRI which proved most sensitive. Gadolinium di-ethylene triamine penta-acetic acid caused bright enhancement of tumors in a distribution that consistently corresponded to areas of pathologically proved tumor infiltration. Gross and microscopic autopsy findings correlated better with MRI than with CT which tended to produce poorer resolution and underrepresent the size of viable tumor. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is more accurate than unenhanced MRI, unenhanced CT, or enhanced CT in defining the histologic margins of tumors.

  8. A biomechanical and histological comparison of the suture bridge and conventional double-row techniques of the repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Fei, Wenyong; Guo, Weichun

    2015-06-16

    The suture bridge (SB) technique and conventional double-row (DR) are both effective in repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears . However, increasing numbers of scholars believe that the SB technique produces better results than conventional DR because of the higher bone-tendon contact area and pressure. However, The clinical outcomes have been mixed and little direct evidence has been supplied in vivo. This study was designed using the SB and DR techniques to determine which is the better technique. Sixty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into 2 groups, the SB group and DR group. SB and DR were then used to repair their rotator cuff tears. Rabbits were then sacrificed at the 2(nd), 4(th), or 8(th) week after surgery and a histological comparison was made. The biomechanical comparison was made at the 8(th) week. The load to failure of the SB group was 134.59 ± 17.69 N at the 8(th) postoperative week, and that was significantly higher than in the DR group (103.83 ± 6.62, P = 0.001), but both repair groups remained lower than in the control group (199.25 ± 14.81). Histological evaluation showed that both the SB and DR groups healed at the bone-tendon interface. But there were subtle differences between the two groups in the structure and morphology of collagen fibers and cartilage cells at bone-tendon interface. In general, the collagen fibers of the SB group were more compact than those of the DR group at all times tested. At the 4(th) and 8(th) weeks, the collagen fibers and cartilage cells in the SB group were arranged in a column modality, but those in the DR group were distributed horizontally. The SB technique facilitated healing more effectively than the conventional DR technique. The difference in morphology of collagen fibers and cartilage cells may be related to the difference in bone-tendon contact pressure.

  9. A comparison of the use of contrast media with different iodine concentrations for multidetector CT of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seung Chai; Kim, Seung Hyup; Cho, Jeong Yeon

    2011-01-01

    To determine the optimal iodine concentration of contrast media for kidney multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) by comparing the degree of renal parenchymal enhancement and the severity of the renal streak artifact with contrast media of different iodine concentrations. A 16-row MDCT was performed in 15 sedated rabbits by injection of 2 mL contrast media/kg body weight at a rate of 0.3 mL/sec. Monomeric nonionic contrast media of 250, 300, and 370 mg iodine/mL were injected at 1-week intervals. Mean attenuation values were measured in each renal structure with attenuation differences among the structures. The artifact was evaluated by CT window width/level and three grading methods. The values were compared with iodine concentrations. The 370 mg iodine/mL concentration showed significantly higher cortical enhancement than 250 mg iodine/mL in all phases (p < 0.05). There was however no significant difference in the degree of enhancement between the 300 mg iodine/mL and 370 mg iodine/mL concentrations in all phases. There is a significant difference in attenuation for the cortex-outer medulla between 250 mg iodine/mL and 300 mg iodine/mL (p < 0.05). The artifact was more severe with a medium of 370 mg iodine/mL than with 250 mg iodine/mL by all grading methods (p < 0.05). The 300 mg iodine/mL is considered to be the most appropriate iodine concentration in an aspect of the enhancement and artifact on a kidney MDCT scan.

  10. A Comparison of the Use of Contrast Media with Different Iodine Concentrations for Multidetector CT of the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seung Chai; Cho, Jeong Yeon

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the optimal iodine concentration of contrast media for kidney multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) by comparing the degree of renal parenchymal enhancement and the severity of the renal streak artifact with contrast media of different iodine concentrations. Materials and Methods A 16-row MDCT was performed in 15 sedated rabbits by injection of 2 mL contrast media/kg body weight at a rate of 0.3 mL/sec. Monomeric nonionic contrast media of 250, 300, and 370 mg iodine/mL were injected at 1-week intervals. Mean attenuation values were measured in each renal structure with attenuation differences among the structures. The artifact was evaluated by CT window width/level and three grading methods. The values were compared with iodine concentrations. Results The 370 mg iodine/mL concentration showed significantly higher cortical enhancement than 250 mg iodine/mL in all phases (p < 0.05). There was however no significant difference in the degree of enhancement between the 300 mg iodine/mL and 370 mg iodine/mL concentrations in all phases. There is a significant difference in attenuation for the cortex-outer medulla between 250 mg iodine/mL and 300 mg iodine/mL (p < 0.05). The artifact was more severe with a medium of 370 mg iodine/mL than with 250 mg iodine/mL by all grading methods (p < 0.05). Conclusion The 300 mg iodine/mL is considered to be the most appropriate iodine concentration in an aspect of the enhancement and artifact on a kidney MDCT scan. PMID:22043154

  11. Comparison of CT and angiography in assessing resectability of pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jafri, S.Z.H.; Aisen, A.M.; Glazer, G.M.; Weiss, C.A.

    1984-03-01

    A retrospective study of 27 patients with pancreatic carcinoma compared computed tomography (CT) and angiography in their ability to predict resectability of the neoplasm, using encasement of the splanchnic vessels as the criterion for nonresectability. Five patients had resectable tumor at surgery; the other 22 had unresectable disease. Tumor involvement of the splanchnic vessels was determined in 18 patients by CT examination and in 19 patients by angiography. Several other patients were found to have liver metastases, resulting in a radiologic diagnosis of nonresectability in 20 patients overall. All patients considered to have unresectable disease on the basis of either radiologic method proved to have unresectable tumor at surgery. CT is about as accurate as angiography in assessing resectability of pancreatic carcinoma.

  12. Comparison between CT tumor size and pathological tumor size in frozen section examinations of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Isaka, Tetsuya; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Ito, Hiroyuki; Imamura, Naoko; Watanabe, Masato; Imai, Kentaro; Nishii, Teppei; Woo, Tetsukan; Yamada, Kouzo; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Masuda, Munetaka

    2014-07-01

    We examined the appropriate measurement for pathological tumor size by comparing radiological and pathological tumor size of resected lung adenocarcinoma in FSE. We reviewed records of 59 resected specimens of lung adenocarcinoma for FSE from January to December 2008. Specimens were well-inflated with saline by using an injector before cutting into segments. After selecting the tumor segment of maximal diameter, we compared three ways of measuring pathological tumor size by using paired t-test: (I) macroscopic tumor size (MTS), measured with a metal straight ruler, (II) microscopic frozen section tumor size (FSTS), and (III) microscopic paraffin section tumor size (PSTS). We compared each discrepancy rate (DR) [DR=(CT tumor size-pathological tumor size)/CT tumor size×100] (%) between tumors that were air-containing type and solid-density type on CT scans, and also compared the tumors with lepidic component rates (LCR) ≥50% and LCR <50%, by using Mann-Whitney U-tests. FSE could diagnose malignancy with 100% accuracy. The mean CT tumor size was 18.36mm, and the mean pathological tumor sizes (MTS, FSTS, and PSTS) were 17.81, 14.29, and 14.23mm, respectively. FSTS and PSTS were significantly smaller than CT tumor size (p<0.001). The DR calculated with PSTS was significantly larger in air-containing than in solid-density tumors, and also larger in LCR ≥50% than in LCR <50% tumors. FSE with the inflation method diagnosed malignancy with 100% accuracy. The lung specimen must be sufficiently inflated to prevent tissue shrinking, and we propose MTS as the definition for pathological tumor size in FSE. The greater discordance observed between CT tumor size and microscopic tumor size was assumed to be due to shrinkage of the lepidic component in the tumor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Single-Row or Double-Row Fixation Technique for Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiaojiao; Yuan, Chaoqun; Chen, Kai; Cheng, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Background The single-row and double-row fixation techniques have been widely used for rotator cuff tears. However, whether the double-row technique produces superior clinical or anatomic outcomes is still considered controversial. This study aims to use meta-analysis to compare the clinical and anatomical outcomes between the two techniques. Methods The Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane library databases were searched for relevant studies published before November 1, 2012. Studies clearly reporting a comparison of the single-row and double-row techniques were selected. The Constant, ASES, and UCLA scale systems and the rotator cuff integrity rate were evaluated. The weighted mean differences and relative risks were calculated using a fixed-effects or random-effects model. Results Eight studies were included in this meta-analysis. The weighted mean differences of the ASES (−0.84; P = 0.04; I2 = 0%) and UCLA (−0.75; P = 0.007; I2 = 0%) scales were significantly low in the single-row group for full-thickness rotator cuff tears. For tear sizes smaller than 3 cm, no significant difference was found between the groups no matter in Constant (P = 0.95; I2 = 0%), ASES (P = 0.77; I2 = 0%), or UCLA (P = 0.24; I2 = 13%) scales. For tear sizes larger than 3 cm, the ASES (−1.95; P = 0.001; I2 = 49%) and UCLA (−1.17; P = 0.006; I2 = 0%) scales were markedly lower in the single-row group. The integrity of the rotator cuff (0.81; P = 0.0004; I2 = 10%) was greater and the partial thickness retear rate (1.93; P = 0.007; I2 = 10%) was less in the double-row group. Full-thickness retears showed no difference between the groups (P = 0.15; I2 = 0%). Conclusion The meta-analysis suggests that the double-row fixation technique increases post-operative rotator cuff integrity and improves the clinical outcomes, especially for full-thickness rotator cuff tears larger than 3 cm. For tear sizes smaller than 3 cm

  14. Fluid collections in the intraperitoneal and extraperitoneal spaces: comparison of MR and CT

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.M.; Weinreb, J.C.; Maravilla, K.R.

    1985-06-01

    Fourteen patients with abnormal subdiaphragmatic fluid collections were examined with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. MR and CT provided equivalent information concerning the presence and extent of fluid collections in 13 of the 14 cases. Image acquisitions with two different repetition times (TRs) and two echo times (TEs) were necessary, in most cases, to detect and discriminate between different types of pathologic fluids. Transudative ascites demonstrated long T1 and T2 relaxation times, whereas abscesses, phlegmon, pancreatic pseudocyst, exudative pancreatitis, and chronic hematoma demonstrated an intermediate or short T1 and a long T2.

  15. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT for Systemic Staging of Newly Diagnosed Invasive Lobular Carcinoma Versus Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Molly P.; Goldman, Debra A.; Dashevsky, Brittany; Riedl, Christopher C.; Gönen, Mithat; Osborne, Joseph R.; Jochelson, Maxine; Hudis, Clifford; Morrow, Monica; Ulaner, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    Although guidelines such as those of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network consider 18F-FDG PET/CT for systemic staging of newly diagnosed stage III breast cancer patients, factors in addition to stage may influence the utility of PET/CT. Because invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is less conspicuous than invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) on 18F-FDG PET, we hypothesized that tumor histology may be one such factor. We evaluated PET/CT systemic staging of patients newly diagnosed with ILC compared with IDC. Methods In this Institutional Review Board–approved retrospective study, our Hospital Information System was screened for ILC patients who underwent PET/CT in 2006–2013 before systemic or radiation therapy. Initial stage was determined from examination, mammography, ultrasound, MR, or surgery. PET/CT was performed to identify unsuspected distant metastases. A sequential cohort of stage III IDC patients was evaluated for comparison. Upstaging rates were compared using the Pearson χ2 test. Results The study criteria were fulfilled by 146 ILC patients. PET/CT revealed unsuspected distant metastases in 12 (8%): 0 of 8 with initial stage I, 2 of 50 (4%) stage II, and 10 of 88 (11%) stage III. Upstaging to IV by PET/CT was confirmed by biopsy in all cases. Three of 12 upstaged patients were upstaged only by the CT component of the PET/CT, as the metastases were not 18F-FDG–avid. In the comparison stage III IDC cohort, 22% (20/89) of patients were upstaged to IV by PET/CT. All 20 demonstrated 18F-FDG–avid metastases. The relative risk of PET/CT revealing unsuspected distant metastases in stage III IDC patients was 1.98 times (95% confidence interval, 0.98–3.98) that of stage III ILC patients (P = 0.049). For 18F-FDG–avid metastases, the relative risk of PET/CT revealing unsuspected 18F-FDG–avid distant metastases in stage III IDC patients was 2.82 times (95% confidence interval, 1.26–6.34) that of stage III ILC patients (P = 0.007). Conclusion 18F

  16. Acceptance of Combined Coronary CT Angiography and Myocardial CT Perfusion versus Conventional Coronary Angiography in Patients with Coronary Stents—Intraindividual Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Martus, Peter; Laule, Michael; Dewey, Marc; Schönenberger, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate how well patients with coronary stents accept combined coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) compared with conventional coronary angiography (CCA). Background While combined CTA and CTP may improve diagnostic accuracy compared with CTA alone, patient acceptance of CTA/CTP remains to be defined. Methods A total of 90 patients with coronary stents prospectively underwent CTA/CTP (both with contrast agent, CTP with adenosine) and CCA as part of the CARS-320 study. In this group, an intraindividual comparison of patient acceptance of CTA, CTP, and CCA was performed. Results CTP was experienced to be significantly more painful than CTA (p<0.001) and was associated with a higher frequency of dyspnea (p<0.001). Comparison of CTA/CTP with CCA revealed no significant differences in terms of pain (p = 0.141) and comfort (p = 0.377). Concern before CTA/CTP and CCA and overall satisfaction were likewise not significantly different (p = 0.097 and p = 0.123, respectively). Nevertheless, about two thirds (n = 60, 68%) preferred CTA/CTP to CCA (p<0.001). Moreover, patients felt less helpless during CTA/CTP than during CCA (p = 0.026). Lack of invasiveness and absence of pain were the most frequently mentioned advantages of CTA/CTP over CCA in our patient population. Conclusions CCA and combined CTA/CTP are equally well accepted by patients; however, more patients prefer CTA/CTP. CTP was associated with more intense pain than CTA and more frequently caused dyspnea than CTA alone. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00967876 PMID:26327127

  17. SU-D-207B-03: A PET-CT Radiomics Comparison to Predict Distant Metastasis in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Coroller, T; Yip, S; Lee, S; Mak, R; Aerts, H; Kim, J

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Early prediction of distant metastasis may provide crucial information for adaptive therapy, subsequently improving patient survival. Radiomic features that extracted from PET and CT images have been used for assessing tumor phenotype and predicting clinical outcomes. This study investigates the values of radiomic features in predicting distant metastasis (DM) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: A total of 108 patients with stage II–III lung adenocarcinoma were included in this retrospective study. Twenty radiomic features were selected (10 from CT and 10 from PET). Conventional features (metabolic tumor volume, SUV, volume and diameter) were included for comparison. Concordance index (CI) was used to evaluate features prognostic value. Noether test was used to compute p-value to consider CI significance from random (CI = 0.5) and were adjusted for multiple testing using false rate discovery (FDR). Results: A total of 70 patients had DM (64.8%) with a median time to event of 8.8 months. The median delivered dose was 60 Gy (range 33–68 Gy). None of the conventional features from PET (CI ranged from 0.51 to 0.56) or CT (CI ranged from 0.57 to 0.58) were significant from random. Five radiomics features were significantly prognostic from random for DM (p-values < 0.05). Four were extracted from CT (CI = 0.61 to 0.63, p-value <0.01) and one from PET which was also the most prognostic (CI = 0.64, p-value <0.001). Conclusion: This study demonstrated significant association between radiomic features and DM for patients with locally advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Moreover, conventional (clinically utilized) metrics were not significantly associated with DM. Radiomics can potentially help classify patients at higher risk of DM, allowing clinicians to individualize treatment, such as intensification of chemotherapy) to reduce the risk of DM and improve survival. R.M. has consulting interests with Amgen.

  18. Chest CT Features of Cystic Fibrosis in Korea: Comparison with Non-Cystic Fibrosis Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, So Yeon; Cha, Min Jae; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Tae Sung; Yoon, Hyun Jung

    2017-01-01

    Objective Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a rare congenital disease in Korea, and its clinical and imaging findings are unclear. The objective of our study was to describe the clinical and CT features of CF in Korea and compare its features with those of other diseases mimicking CF. Materials and Methods From November 1994 to December 2014, a presumptive diagnosis of CF was made in 23 patients based on clinical or radiological examination. After the exclusion of 10 patients without diagnostic confirmation, 13 patients were included in the study. A diagnosis of CF was made with the CF gene study. CT findings were evaluated for the presence and distribution of parenchymal abnormalities including bronchiectasis, tree-in-bud (TIB) pattern, mucus plugging, consolidation, and mosaic attenuation. Results Of the 13 patients, 7 (median age, 15 years) were confirmed as CF, 4 (median age, 19 years) had primary ciliary dyskinesia, 1 had bronchiectasis of unknown cause, and 1 had chronic asthma. CT of patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging in all patients, with upper lung predominance (57%). In CT of the non-CF patients, bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging were also predominant features, with lower lung predominance (50%). Conclusion Korean patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, cellular bronchiolitis, mucus plugging, and mosaic attenuation, which overlapped with those of non-CF patients. CF gene study is recommended for the definitive diagnosis of CF in patients with these clinical and imaging features. PMID:28096734

  19. A Comparison of Several Artificial Neural Network Classifiers for CT Images of Hardwood Logs

    Treesearch

    Daniel L. Schmoldt; Jing He; A. Lynn Abbott

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of internal log defects, obtained by scanning, is critical to efficiency improvements for future hardwood sawmills. Nevertheless, before computed tomography (CT) scanning can be applied in industrial operations, we need to automatically interpret scan information so that it can provide the saw operator with the information necessary to make proper sawing...

  20. CT pulmonary densitovolumetry in patients with acromegaly: a comparison between active disease and controlled disease.

    PubMed

    Camilo, Gustavo B; Carvalho, Alysson R S; Machado, Dequitier C; Mogami, Roberto; Melo, Pedro L; Lopes, Agnaldo J

    2015-10-01

    Our purpose was to compare the findings of CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function in patients with active acromegaly and controlled acromegaly and, secondarily, to correlate these findings. 11 patients with active acromegaly, 18 patients with controlled acromegaly and 17 control subjects, all non-smokers, underwent quantification of lung volume using multidetector CT (Q-MDCT) and pulmonary function tests. Patients with active acromegaly had larger total lung mass (TLM) values than the controls and larger amounts of non-aerated compartments than the other two groups. Patients with active acromegaly also had larger amounts of poorly aerated compartments than the other two groups, a difference that was observed in both total lung volume (TLV) and TLM. TLV as measured by inspiratory Q-MDCT correlated significantly with total lung capacity, whereas TLV measured using expiratory Q-MDCT correlated significantly with functional residual capacity. Patients with active acromegaly have more lung mass and larger amounts of non-aerated and poorly aerated compartments. There is a relationship between the findings of CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function test parameters. Although the nature of our results demands further investigation, our data suggest that both CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function tests can be used as useful tools for patients with acromegaly by assisting in the prediction of disease activity.

  1. CT pulmonary densitovolumetry in patients with acromegaly: a comparison between active disease and controlled disease

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, Gustavo B; Carvalho, Alysson R S; Machado, Dequitier C; Mogami, Roberto; Melo, Pedro L

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our purpose was to compare the findings of CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function in patients with active acromegaly and controlled acromegaly and, secondarily, to correlate these findings. Methods: 11 patients with active acromegaly, 18 patients with controlled acromegaly and 17 control subjects, all non-smokers, underwent quantification of lung volume using multidetector CT (Q-MDCT) and pulmonary function tests. Results: Patients with active acromegaly had larger total lung mass (TLM) values than the controls and larger amounts of non-aerated compartments than the other two groups. Patients with active acromegaly also had larger amounts of poorly aerated compartments than the other two groups, a difference that was observed in both total lung volume (TLV) and TLM. TLV as measured by inspiratory Q-MDCT correlated significantly with total lung capacity, whereas TLV measured using expiratory Q-MDCT correlated significantly with functional residual capacity. Conclusion: Patients with active acromegaly have more lung mass and larger amounts of non-aerated and poorly aerated compartments. There is a relationship between the findings of CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function test parameters. Advances in knowledge: Although the nature of our results demands further investigation, our data suggest that both CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function tests can be used as useful tools for patients with acromegaly by assisting in the prediction of disease activity. PMID:26246281

  2. Mucinous versus nonmucinous solitary pulmonary nodular bronchioloalveolar carcinoma: CT and FDG PET findings and pathologic comparisons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Yun; Lee, Kyung Soo; Han, Joungho; Kim, Byung-Tae; Cho, Young-Seok; Shim, Young Mog; Kim, Jhingook

    2009-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate the CT, PET, and pathologic findings of solitary pulmonary nodular mucinous and nonmucinous bronchioloalveolar carcinomas (BACs). From August 2003 to March 2008, we saw 24 patients with solitary pulmonary nodular mucinous (n=6) or nonmucinous (n=18) BACs that were resected. CT and PET findings of the lesions were assessed in terms of size, solidity, morphologic characteristics, attenuation and maximum standardized uptake value (mSUV). All nonmucinous BACs appeared as a pure ground-glass opacity (GGO) nodule, whereas mucinous BACs appeared as solid (n=4) or part-solid (n=2) nodules. CT attenuation values were significantly higher for mucinous BACs (-21.0 HU+/-4.9) than for nonmucinous BACs (-491.8 HU+/-172.5) (P<.001). Mean mSUVs were 2.3+/-1.9 for mucinous BACs and 0.5+/-0.8 for nonmucinous BACs (P=.007), but mSUVs were not statistically different after size adjustment (r=0.371, P=.081). Mucinous BACs appear as solid or part-solid nodules at CT, whereas nonmucinous BACs present as pure GGO nodules. Both subtypes of tumors show scant FDG uptake at PET.

  3. Comparison of pulmonary CT findings and serum KL-6 levels in patients with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Okada, F; Ando, Y; Honda, K; Tanoue, S; Matsumoto, S; Mori, H

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively compare high-resolution CT findings among cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) patients with normal and elevated serum KL-6 levels. Chest CT scans performed between April 1999 and April 2007 in 20 COP patients with a normal KL-6 level and 17 COP patients with an elevated KL-6 level were evaluated retrospectively by two chest radiologists. The CT findings in the COP patients with either a normal or an elevated KL-6 level mainly consisted of consolidation (n = 17 and n = 13, respectively) followed by ground-glass opacity (n = 11 and n = 13, respectively). Traction bronchiectasis and architectural distortion were significantly more frequent in patients with an elevated KL-6 level than in those with normal levels (n = 7 and n = 1, and n = 13 and n = 3, respectively) (p = 0.0077 and p = 0.00017, respectively). In follow-up CT scans, a relapse within 1 year after initial treatment with steroids, performed in 16 patients with a normal KL-6 level and 16 with an elevated KL-6 level, occurred in 2 (12.5%) patients with a normal KL-6 level and in 6 (37.5%) with an elevated KL-6 level. The frequency of relapse in patients with an elevated KL-6 level was higher than in those with a normal KL-6 level; however, no significant difference between the two groups was observed (p = 0.103). In conclusion, CT findings of traction bronchiectasis and architectural distortion in COP patients are associated with increased serum KL-6 levels, which might be related to a relapse after treatment.

  4. Comparison of SNOMED CT versus Medcin Terminology Concept Coverage for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Montella, Diane; Brown, Steven H.; Elkin, Peter L.; Jackson, James C.; Rosenbloom, S. Trent; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind; Welsh, Gail; Cotton, Bryan; Guillamondegui, Oscar D.; Lew, Henry; Taber, Katherine H.; Tupler, Larry A.; Vanderploeg, Rodney; Speroff, Theodore

    2011-01-01

    Background: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a “signature” injury of the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Structured electronic data regarding TBI findings is important for research, population health and other secondary uses but requires appropriate underlying standard terminologies to ensure interoperability and reuse. Currently the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) uses the terminology SNOMED CT and the Department of Defense (DOD) uses Medcin. Methods: We developed a comprehensive case definition of mild TBI composed of 68 clinical terms. Using automated and manual techniques, we evaluated how well the mild TBI case definition terms could be represented by SNOMED CT and Medcin, and compared the results. We performed additional analysis stratified by whether the concepts were rated by a TBI expert panel as having High, Medium, or Low importance to the definition of mild TBI. Results: SNOMED CT sensitivity (recall) was 90% overall for coverage of mild TBI concepts, and Medcin sensitivity was 49%, p < 0.001 (using McNemar’s chi square). Positive predictive value (precision) for each was 100%. SNOMED CT outperformed Medcin for concept coverage independent of import rating by our TBI experts. Discussion: SNOMED CT was significantly better able to represent mild TBI concepts than Medcin. This finding may inform data gathering, management and sharing, and data exchange strategies between the VA and DOD for active duty soldiers and veterans with mild TBI. Since mild TBI is an important condition in the civilian population as well, the current study results may be useful also for the general medical setting. PMID:22195156

  5. Digital Tomosynthesis to Evaluate Fracture Healing: Prospective Comparison With Radiography and CT.

    PubMed

    Ha, Alice S; Lee, Amie Y; Hippe, Daniel S; Chou, Shinn-Huey S; Chew, Felix S

    2015-07-01

    Radiography, currently the standard for postoperative fracture imaging, is limited by overlapping bone and hardware. Tomosynthesis has the benefit of level-by-level imaging without the disadvantages of metal artifacts, increased radiation, and higher costs of CT, the current problem-solving tool. The purpose of this study was to compare tomosynthesis with radiography for evaluating fracture healing. In a prospective study, patients within 1 year of wrist hardware fixation underwent radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT, and the images were interpreted by three readers. The diagnostic accuracy of radiology and tomosynthesis was assessed with ROC curves, and interreader agreement was assessed with Cohen kappa. Fracture scores were correlated with Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) and pain scores. The study participants were 49 patients with 51 fractures. The most common fracture sites were distal radius (43%), scaphoid (18%), and metacarpals (18%). Rates of cortex obscuration by hardware were 2% for CT, 8% for tomosynthesis, and 15% for radiography (p < 0.01 between one modality and another). Detection of cortical fracture lines was significantly better with tomosynthesis than with radiography (AUC, 0.84 vs 0.76, p = 0.01). Inter-reader agreement was moderate for both radiography and tomosynthesis (κ = 0.44 vs 0.55, p = 0.051). There was no significant correlation between fracture scores and DASH scores. There was significant correlation between reported pain levels and both tomosynthesis (r = 0.28, p = 0.03) and CT (r = 0.29, p = 0.04) fracture scores. Tomosynthesis provides diagnostic information superior to that of ra diography in postoperative evaluation of wrist fractures with lower cost and radiation than CT and should be considered in fracture follow-up imaging of other bones.

  6. CT interpretations in multiply injured patients: comparison of emergency physicians and on-call radiologists.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Zeynep Aslı; Kozacı, Nalan; Çekiç, Bülent; Beydilli, İnan; Akçimen, Mehmet; Güven, Dilek Soydam; Toslak, İclal Erdem

    2016-12-01

    In this study, emergency physicians and on-call radiologists were compared regarding identification of fatal injuries on computed tomographic (CT) scans in patients with trauma. Multiply injured patients who were older than 18 years and underwent CT scanning were included in the study. The CT scans were interpreted by the responsible emergency physician. At the same time, these images were also evaluated by the on-call radiologist. Final evaluation was done 1 week later by a radiology instructor who knew the clinical follow-up of the patient. The study included 156 patients. The mean age of the patients included in the study was found to be 41.6 years. Less than half (33.5%) of the patients were female and 86.5% were male. A total of 482 CT scans were performed in the patients. Regarding brain CTs, the concordance rate for emergency physicians was 98%, whereas it was 94% for on-call radiologists. Regarding thoracic CTs, the concordance rate for emergency physicians was 91%, whereas was 93% for on-call radiologists. There was a perfect concordance (κ value > 0.75) for on-call radiologists and emergency physicians in terms of brain and thoracic CTs. Regarding abdominal-pelvic CTs, the concordance rate for emergency physicians was 97%, whereas it was 98% for on-call radiologists. Moderate concordance (κ range = 0.40-0.75) was detected for emergency physicians in terms of identification of liver, spleen, kidney, and intra-abdominal/retroperitoneal hemorrhages. There was a perfect concordance (κ value > 0.75) for pelvic fractures. In this study, it was shown that emergency physicians were successful in identifying fatal injuries on trauma CT images after a short-term training on interpretation of trauma CTs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Flat-detector computed tomography with intravenous contrast material application in experimental aneurysms: comparison with multislice CT and conventional angiography.

    PubMed

    Struffert, Tobias; Doelken, Marc; Adamek, Edyta; Schwarz, Marc; Engelhorn, Tobias; Kloska, Stephan; Ott, Sabine; Doerfler, Arnd

    2010-05-01

    Despite limited soft tissue resolution flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT) provides substantial superior spatial resolution in comparison with multislice computed tomography (MS-CT). This may add value in the visualization of small vascular structures if intravenous contrast application leads to substantial opacification and visibility of intracranial vessels or aneurysms. To evaluate the feasibility of visualization of vascular structures by FD-CT angiography (FD-CTA) after intravenous contrast injection compared with MS-CTA and intra-arterial digital subtracted angiography (IADSA) in an animal model. Aneurysms were created in the right common carotid artery in six New Zealand White Rabbits using the elastase technique. Imaging was performed using FD-CTA, MS-CTA (injection of 1 ml/kg body weight) and IADSA. Anonymized volume rendering reconstruction (VRT), maximum intensity projection (MIP), and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images were reconstructed and evaluated by two experienced reviewers for aneurysm geometry and vascular structure anatomy using standard tools of a dedicated workstation. Aneurysms could be successfully created in all animals. Measurements of aneurysm geometry (aneurysm height, width, neck width) and vascular structures (brachiocephalic trunk, carotid artery diameter and plane) were nearly identical in all three modalities. Intra- and inter-observer correlations of the different parameters showed high r values between 0.83 and 0.99. Our results show the feasibility of FD-CTA in comparison with MS-CTA and IADSA in an animal model. Despite limited soft tissue resolution, opacification of vascular structures with sufficient contrast to the surrounding structures was possible in all animals. Vascular structures appeared better delineated in FD-CTA than in MS-CTA, probably due to the superior spatial resolution.

  8. Feasibility of epicardial adipose tissue quantification in non-ECG-gated low-radiation-dose CT: comparison with prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Simon-Yarza, Isabel; Viteri-Ramírez, Guillermo; Saiz-Mendiguren, Ramón; Slon-Roblero, Pedro J; Paramo, María; Bastarrika, Gorka

    2012-06-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is an important indicator of cardiovascular risk. This parameter is generally assessed on ECG-gated computed tomography (CT) images. To evaluate feasibility and reliability of EAT quantification on non-gated thoracic low-radiation-dose CT examinations with respect to prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisition. Sixty consecutive asymptomatic smokers (47 men; mean age 64 ± 9.8 years) underwent low-dose CT of the chest and prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisitions (64-slice dual-source CT). The two examinations were reconstructed with the same range, field of view, slice thickness, and convolution algorithm. Two independent observers blindly quantified EAT volume using commercially available software. Data were compared with paired sample Student t-test, concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), and Bland-Altman plots. No statistically significant difference was observed for EAT volume quantification with low-dose-CT (141.7 ± 58.3 mL) with respect to ECG-gated CT (142.7 ± 57.9 mL). Estimation of CCC showed almost perfect concordance between the two techniques for EAT-volume assessment (CCC, 0.99; mean difference, 0.98 ± 5.1 mL). Inter-observer agreement for EAT volume estimation was CCC: 0.96 for low-dose-CT examinations and 0.95 for ECG-gated CT. Non-gated low-dose CT allows quantifying EAT with almost the same concordance and reliability as using dedicated prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisition protocols.

  9. Evaluation of the degree of pancreatic fatty infiltration by area-based assessment of CT images: comparison with histopathology-based and CT attenuation index-based assessments.

    PubMed

    Hori, Mika; Onaya, Hiroaki; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Yamaji, Taiki; Kobayashi, Hideaki; Takahashi, Mami; Mutoh, Michihiro; Shimada, Kazuaki; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of fatty infiltration (FI) of the pancreas using area-based assessment on computed tomography (CT) (CT area-based assessment) in its correlation and agreement/concordance with histopathology-based assessment. Furthermore, we examined whether CT area-based assessment was better than CT attenuation index-based assessment. We retrospectively evaluated the degree of FI of the pancreas in 37 pancreatic cancer patients who had undergone preoperative CT and pancreaticoduodenectomy. The degree of FI of the pancreas was examined by histopathology-based assessment using surgical resection samples, and CT area-based and CT attenuation index-based assessments. Mean values of pancreatic FI measured by area-based assessment on unenhanced CT and by histopathology-based assessments were 14.4 ± 23.2 % (range 0-77.7 %) and 16.2 ± 17.4 % (range 0.2-60.2 %), respectively. Area-based assessment on unenhanced CT showed higher correlation and concordance with histopathology-based assessment, demonstrating a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.78 (P < 0.0001) and a Kendall's tau-b coefficient of 0.69 (P < 0.0001). For CT attenuation index-based assessment, the corresponding values were -0.66 (P < 0.0001) and -0.39 (P = 0.008), respectively. To order/categorize subjects according to the degree of FI of the pancreas, CT area-based assessment is suggested to be better than CT attenuation index-based assessment.

  10. Calcified plaque: measurement of area at thin-section flat-panel CT and 64-section multidetector CT and comparison with histopathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Ammar; Rieber, Johannes; Mooyaart, Eline A Q; Seneviratne, Sujith K; Houser, Stuart L; Bamberg, Fabian; Raffel, O Christopher; Gupta, Rajiv; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Pien, Homer; Lee, Hang; Brady, Thomas J; Hoffmann, Udo

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the blooming artifacts in ex vivo coronary arteries at multidetector computed tomography (CT) and flat-panel-volume CT by comparing measured areas of calcified plaque with respect to the reference standard of histopathologic findings. Three ex vivo hearts were scanned with multidetector CT and flat-panel-volume CT after institutional review board approval. The area of calcified plaque was measured at histopathologic examination, multidetector CT, and flat-panel-volume CT. The plaque area was overestimated at multidetector CT by 400% (4.61/1.15) on average, and the predicted difference between the measurements was significant (3.46 mm(2), P = .018). The average overestimation of plaque area at flat-panel-volume CT was twofold (214% [2.18/1.02]), and the predicted difference was smaller (1.16 mm(2), P = .08). The extent of the blooming artifact in visualizing calcified coronary plaque is reduced by using flat-panel-volume CT. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  11. Improved CT Detection of Acute Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Encephalitis Based on a Frequency-Selective Nonlinear Blending: Comparison With MRI.

    PubMed

    Bongers, Malte Niklas; Bier, Georg; Ditt, Hendrik; Beck, Robert; Ernemann, Ulrike; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Horger, Marius

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the diagnostic efficacy of a new CT postprocessing tool based on frequency-selective nonlinear blending (best-contrast CT) with that of standard linear blending of unenhanced head CT in patients with herpes simplex virus type 1 and herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE), using FLAIR MRI sequences as the standard of reference. Fifteen consecutive patients (six women and nine men; mean [± SD] age, 60 ± 19 years) with proven HSE (positive polymerase chain reaction results from CSF analysis and the presence of neurologic deficits) were retrospectively enrolled. All patients had undergone head CT and MRI (mean time interval, 2 ± 2 days). After standardized unenhanced head CT scans were read, presets of the best-contrast algorithm were determined (center, 30 HU; delta, 5 HU; slope, 5 nondimensional), and resulting images were analyzed. Contrast enhancement was objectively measured by ROI analysis, comparing contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of unenhanced CT and best-contrast CT. FLAIR and DWI MRI sequences were analyzed, and FLAIR was considered as the standard of reference. For assessment of disease extent, a previously reported 50-point score (HSE score) was used. CNR values for unenhanced head CT (CNR, 5.42 ± 2.77) could be statistically significantly increased using best-contrast CT (CNR, 9.62 ± 4.28) (p = 0.003). FLAIR sequences yielded a median HSE score of 9.0 (range, 6-17) and DWI sequences yielded HSE scores of 6.0 (range, 5-17). By comparison, unenhanced head CT resulted in a median HSE score of 3.5 (range, 1-6). The median best-contrast CT HSE score was 7.5 (range, 6-10). Agreement between FLAIR and unenhanced CT was 54.44%, that between DWI and best-contrast CT was 95.36%, and that between FLAIR and best-contrast CT was 85.21%. The most frequently overseen findings were located at the level of the upper part of the mesencephalon and at the subthalamic or insular level. Frequency-selective nonlinear blending

  12. Multi-institutional MicroCT image comparison of image-guided small animal irradiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Chris D.; Lindsay, Patricia; E Graves, Edward; Wong, Eugene; Perez, Jessica R.; Poirier, Yannick; Ben-Bouchta, Youssef; Kanesalingam, Thilakshan; Chen, Haijian; E Rubinstein, Ashley; Sheng, Ke; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    To recommend imaging protocols and establish tolerance levels for microCT image quality assurance (QA) performed on conformal image-guided small animal irradiators. A fully automated QA software SAPA (small animal phantom analyzer) for image analysis of the commercial Shelley micro-CT MCTP 610 phantom was developed, in which quantitative analyses of CT number linearity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity and noise, geometric accuracy, spatial resolution by means of modulation transfer function (MTF), and CT contrast were performed. Phantom microCT scans from eleven institutions acquired with four image-guided small animal irradiator units (including the commercial PXi X-RAD SmART and Xstrahl SARRP systems) with varying parameters used for routine small animal imaging were analyzed. Multi-institutional data sets were compared using SAPA, based on which tolerance levels for each QA test were established and imaging protocols for QA were recommended. By analyzing microCT data from 11 institutions, we established image QA tolerance levels for all image quality tests. CT number linearity set to R 2  >  0.990 was acceptable in microCT data acquired at all but three institutions. Acceptable SNR  >  36 and noise levels  <55 HU were obtained at five of the eleven institutions, where failing scans were acquired with current-exposure time of less than 120 mAs. Acceptable spatial resolution (>1.5 lp mm-1 for MTF  =  0.2) was obtained at all but four institutions due to their large image voxel size used (>0.275 mm). Ten of the eleven institutions passed the set QA tolerance for geometric accuracy (<1.5%) and nine of the eleven institutions passed the QA tolerance for contrast (>2000 HU for 30 mgI ml-1). We recommend performing imaging QA with 70 kVp, 1.5 mA, 120 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and a frame rate of 5 fps for the PXi X-RAD SmART. For the Xstrahl SARRP, we recommend using 60 kVp, 1.0 mA, 240 s imaging time, 0.20

  13. Multi-institutional MicroCT image comparison of image-guided small animal irradiators.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Chris D; Lindsay, Patricia; Graves, Edward E; Wong, Eugene; Perez, Jessica R; Poirier, Yannick; Ben-Bouchta, Youssef; Kanesalingam, Thilakshan; Chen, Haijian; Rubinstein, Ashley E; Sheng, Ke; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2017-06-26

    To recommend imaging protocols and establish tolerance levels for microCT image quality assurance (QA) performed on conformal image-guided small animal irradiators. A fully automated QA software SAPA (small animal phantom analyzer) for image analysis of the commercial Shelley micro-CT MCTP 610 phantom was developed, in which quantitative analyses of CT number linearity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity and noise, geometric accuracy, spatial resolution by means of modulation transfer function (MTF), and CT contrast were performed. Phantom microCT scans from eleven institutions acquired with four image-guided small animal irradiator units (including the commercial PXi X-RAD SmART and Xstrahl SARRP systems) with varying parameters used for routine small animal imaging were analyzed. Multi-institutional data sets were compared using SAPA, based on which tolerance levels for each QA test were established and imaging protocols for QA were recommended. By analyzing microCT data from 11 institutions, we established image QA tolerance levels for all image quality tests. CT number linearity set to R (2)  >  0.990 was acceptable in microCT data acquired at all but three institutions. Acceptable SNR  >  36 and noise levels  <55 HU were obtained at five of the eleven institutions, where failing scans were acquired with current-exposure time of less than 120 mAs. Acceptable spatial resolution (>1.5 lp mm(-1) for MTF  =  0.2) was obtained at all but four institutions due to their large image voxel size used (>0.275 mm). Ten of the eleven institutions passed the set QA tolerance for geometric accuracy (<1.5%) and nine of the eleven institutions passed the QA tolerance for contrast (>2000 HU for 30 mgI ml(-1)). We recommend performing imaging QA with 70 kVp, 1.5 mA, 120 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and a frame rate of 5 fps for the PXi X-RAD SmART. For the Xstrahl SARRP, we recommend using 60 kVp, 1.0 mA, 240 s imaging time, 0.20

  14. Hepatocellular carcinoma: prediction of blood supply from an intercostal artery with multidetector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Uk; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; An, Sangbu; Seong, Nak Jong; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the ability of multidetector row computed tomography (CT) to detect blood supply from the intercostal artery in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Between January 2003 and December 2007, angiography of the intercostal artery was performed in 93 patients (76 men and 17 women, mean age 58 years) with HCC who had also undergone multidetector row CT. CT scans and digital subtraction angiograms of these patients were retrospectively reviewed by two investigators in consensus to evaluate tumor feeding vessels. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors that predict the presence of an HCC blood supply from an intercostal artery. Tumor staining fed by an intercostal artery was noted in 65 patients (70%; 112 tumor feeding vessels) by intercostal angiography. Readers interpreted that tumor feeding vessels were evident by CT in 35 (54%) of these 65 patients with tumor staining supplied by an intercostal artery by angiography. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a visible tumor feeding vessel by CT (P = .003) and hepatic artery attenuation by angiography (P = .014) were significantly related to the presence of a blood supply from an intercostal artery. Visualization of a tumor feeding vessel from the intercostal artery by multidetector row CT is an important sign of parasitic supply to an HCC. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of two types of adult phantoms in terms of organ doses from diagnostic CT procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haikuan; Gu, Jianwei; Caracappa, Peter F.; Xu, X. George

    2010-03-01

    The rapidly increasing number of diagnostic computed tomography (CT) procedures in the recent decades has spurred heightened concern over the potential risk to patients. Although an accurate organ dose assessment tool has now become highly desirable, existing software packages depend on stylized computational phantoms that were originally developed more than 40 years ago, exhibiting very large discrepancies when compared with phantoms that are anatomically realistic. However, past comparative studies did not focus on CT protocols for adult patients. This study was designed to quantitatively compare two types of phantoms, the stylized phantoms and a pair of recently developed RPI-adult male and adult female (RPI-AM and RPI-AF) phantoms, for various CT scanning protocols involving the chest, abdomen-pelvis and chest-abdomen-pelvis. Organ doses were based on Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNPX code and a detailed CT scanner model for the GE LightSpeed 16. Results are presented as ratios of organ doses from the stylized phantoms to those from the RPI phantoms. It is found that, for most organs contained in the scan volume, the ratios were within the range of 0.75-1.16. However, the stomach doses are significantly different and the ratio is found to be up to 1.86 in male phantoms and 2.29 in the female phantoms due to the anatomical differences between the two types of phantoms. Organs that lie near a scan boundary also exhibit a significant relative difference in organ doses between the two types of phantoms. This study concludes that, due to relatively low x-ray energies, CT doses are very sensitive to organ shape, size and position, and thus anatomically realistic phantoms should be used to avoid the dose uncertainties caused by the lack of anatomical realism. The new phantoms, such as the RPI-AM and AF phantoms that are designed using advanced surface meshes, are deformable and will make it possible to match the anatomy of a specific patient leading to further

  16. Pulmonary cryptococcosis: comparison of CT findings in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-xuan; Chen, You-san; Liu, Shi-yuan; Shi, Yu-xin

    2015-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with pulmonary cryptococcosis have been reported, however, many reports were limited by the small number of patients, and not taken into account the distinction between immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. To retrospectively evaluate thoracic CT findings in patients with pulmonary cryptococcosis whose immune status ranged from normal to severely compromised, and determine characteristic imaging features of pulmonary cryptococcosis between patients with different immune status. CT scan findings of 29 immunocompetent and 43 immunocompromised patients with clinically proven pulmonary cryptococcosis were reviewed retrospectively. Different patterns of CT scan abnormalities between immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients, AIDS and non-AIDS immunocompromised patients were compared by Fisher's exact test. Pulmonary nodules/masses, either solitary or multiple, were the most common CT finding, present in 65 (90.3%) of the 72 patients; associated findings included CT halo sign (n = 24), cavitation (n = 23), and air bronchogram (n = 17). Areas of consolidation (n = 14), areas of GGO (n = 13), linear opacities (n = 11), lymphadenopathy (n = 5), and pleural effusion (n = 8) were uncommon. The parenchymal abnormalities were peripherally located in 47 (65.2%) of the cases. Cavitations within nodules/masses were more frequently present in immunocompromised patients than in immunocompetent patients (P = 0.009), and in AIDS patients than in non-AIDS immunocompromised patients (P = 0.002). Air bronchograms within nodules/masses were more frequent present in immunocompetent patients than in immunocompromised patients (P = 0.005). Nodules/masses with halo sign were less frequent in AIDS patients than those in non-AIDS immunocompromised patients (P = 0.027). Pulmonary cryptococcosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of solitary or multiple pulmonary nodules

  17. Low kilovoltage CT of the neck with 70 kVp: comparison with a standard protocol.

    PubMed

    Gnannt, R; Winklehner, A; Goetti, R; Schmidt, B; Kollias, S; Alkadhi, H

    2012-06-01

    CT protocols should aim for radiation doses being as low as reasonably achievable. The purpose of our study was to assess the image quality and radiation dose of neck CT at a tube potential of 70 kVp. Twenty patients (7 female, mean age 51.4 years, age range 19-81 years) underwent contrast-enhanced 64-section CT of the neck at 70 kVp (ATCM, effective tube current-time product 614 eff.mAs, range 467-713 eff.mAs). All 20 patients had a previous neck CT at 120 kVp on the same scanner. Two radiologists assessed image quality and artifacts in the upper, middle, and lower neck. Image noise and attenuation were measured, and the CNR was calculated. Effective radiation dose was calculated. Interobserver agreement regarding image quality of soft tissue for 70-kVp and 120-kVp scans was good to excellent. At 70 kVp, soft tissues were of diagnostic image quality in all scans, whereas the lower cervical spine was not of diagnostic quality in 3 and 4 scans per both readers. No difference was found among 70-kVp and 120-kVp scans for soft tissue image quality in the upper neck, while image quality was significantly better in the middle at 70 kVp (P < .05) and better in the lower third at 120 kVp (P < .05). CNR was significantly higher at 70 kVp in all levels for both readers (P < .001). Effective radiation dose at 70 kVp was significantly lower (0.88 ± 0.2 mSv) than at 120 kVp (1.33 ± 0.2 mSv, P < .001). CT of the cervical soft tissues at 70 kVp is feasible, provides diagnostic image quality with improved CNR, and reduces radiation dose by approximately 34% compared with a standard protocol at 120 kVp. In contrast, low kVp CT of the lower cervical spine suffers from compromised image quality.

  18. The relevance of MRI for patient modeling in head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: A comparison of CT and CT-MRI based tissue segmentation on simulated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaart, René F. Paulides, Margarethus M.; Fortunati, Valerio; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F.; Lugt, Aad van der

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, head and neck (H and N) hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is solely based on computed tomography (CT) images. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior soft-tissue contrast over CT. The purpose of the authors’ study is to investigate the relevance of using MRI in addition to CT for patient modeling in H and N HTP. Methods: CT and MRI scans were acquired for 11 patients in an immobilization mask. Three observers manually segmented on CT, MRI T1 weighted (MRI-T1w), and MRI T2 weighted (MRI-T2w) images the following thermo-sensitive tissues: cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, myelum, sclera, lens, vitreous humor, and the optical nerve. For these tissues that are used for patient modeling in H and N HTP, the interobserver variation of manual tissue segmentation in CT and MRI was quantified with the mean surface distance (MSD). Next, the authors compared the impact of CT and CT and MRI based patient models on the predicted temperatures. For each tissue, the modality was selected that led to the lowest observer variation and inserted this in the combined CT and MRI based patient model (CT and MRI), after a deformable image registration. In addition, a patient model with a detailed segmentation of brain tissues (including white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) was created (CT and MRI{sub db}). To quantify the relevance of MRI based segmentation for H and N HTP, the authors compared the predicted maximum temperatures in the segmented tissues (T{sub max}) and the corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR) of the patient models based on (1) CT, (2) CT and MRI, and (3) CT and MRI{sub db}. Results: In MRI, a similar or reduced interobserver variation was found compared to CT (maximum of median MSD in CT: 0.93 mm, MRI-T1w: 0.72 mm, MRI-T2w: 0.66 mm). Only for the optical nerve the interobserver variation is significantly lower in CT compared to MRI (median MSD in CT: 0.58 mm, MRI-T1w: 1.27 mm, MRI-T2w: 1.40 mm

  19. Comparison of calibrated and uncalibrated bone mineral density by CT to DEXA in menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Miyabara, Y; Holmes, D; Camp, J; Miller, V M; Kearns, A E

    2012-08-01

    Coronary artery disease and osteoporosis increase in women after menopause. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the heart used to evaluate coronary arterial calcification include images of the thoracic vertebrae. The utility of using these images to assess bone health in women remains to be defined. Analyses of thoracic spine volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) from CT scans of the heart were performed to determine how specific calibration affects the ability to assess vBMD in recently menopausal women and to evaluate how vBMD relates to areal bone mineral density (aBMD) using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Women (n = 111) enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) at Mayo Clinic underwent a CT scan of the heart that included calibration phantoms and a DEXA of the lumbar spine. The Spine Cancer Assessment program was used to determine vBMD of thoracic vertebrae with and without the calibration correction. Trabecular bone vBMD at T8 averaged 163.57±28.58 and 157.94±27.55 mg/cc (mean±standard deviation, SD) for calibrated and uncalibrated values, respectively. The relationship between calibrated and uncalibrated measures approached unity (R = 0.98). Lumbar spine (L2-4) aBMD was 1.19±0.16 g/cm(2) (mean±SD). Both calibrated and uncalibrated thoracic vBMD correlated positively and significantly with lumbar aBMD, but the relationship was less than unity (R = 0.63). Uncalibrated measures of thoracic spine vBMD obtained from CT scans of the heart may provide clinically relevant information about bone health and osteoporosis/osteopenia risk in recently menopausal women.

  20. Comparison of homocysteinemia and MTHFR 677CT polymorphism with Framingham Coronary Heart Risk Score.

    PubMed

    Gariglio, Luis; Riviere, Stephanie; Morales, Analía; Porcile, Rafael; Potenzoni, Miguel; Fridman, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    The Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Score is an important clinical tool. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare plasma homocysteine levels and polymorphism 677CT MTHFR with this score to determine the utility of these new biomarkers in clinical practice. Plasma homocysteine levels determined by chemiluminescence and polymorphism 677CT MTHFR, detected by PCR-RFLP, were compared with Framingham coronary risk score in a cross-sectional survey on 68 men and 165 women. Coronary heart disease risk augmented with an increase in the quartile of plasma homocysteine. In the 2nd, 3rd and 4th quartile of plasma homocysteine, men showed significantly (P<0.001) higher risk than women. For the highest quartile of plasma homocysteine, OR of high-risk (10-year risk≥20%) compared with the lowest quartile was 17.45 (95% CI: 5.79-52.01). Frequencies of CT and TT genotype and T allele were not over-represented in the individuals with score≥10%. The higher plasma homocysteine concentrations in individuals with score≥10% with respect to those with low risk (P<0.005 and P<0.001) were not due to the presence of T allele. The T allele (CT+TT genotypes) of the MTHFR C677T polymorphism was not significantly associated with an increased risk of coronary disease (OR=1.09, 95% CI=0.50-2.39, P=0.844). The present study demonstrated an association between plasma homocysteine levels and the severity of coronary heart disease estimated with the Framingham coronary risk score, and this association appeared to be independent on the genotype of MTHFR. We postulate that plasma homocysteine is effective enough, considered even in isolation. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of DCE-CT models for quantitative evaluation of K(trans) in larynx tumors.

    PubMed

    Oosterbroek, J; Bennink, E; Philippens, M E P; Raaijmakers, C P J; Viergever, M A; de Jong, H W A M

    2015-05-07

    Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) can be used to estimate blood perfusion and vessel permeability in tumors. Tumor induced angiogenesis is generally associated with disorganized microvasculature with increased permeability or leakage. Estimated vascular leakage (K(trans)) values and their reliability greatly depend on the perfusion model used. To identify the preferred model for larynx tumor analysis, several perfusion models frequently used for estimating permeability were compared in this study. DCE-CT scans were acquired for 16 larynx cancer patients. Larynx tumors were delineated based on whole-mount histopathology after laryngectomy. DCE-CT data within these delineated volumes were analyzed using the Patlak and Logan plots, the Extended Tofts Model (ETM), the Adiabatic Approximation to the Tissue Homogeneity model (AATH) and a variant of AATH with fixed transit time (AATHFT). Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) was used to identify the best fitting model. K(trans) values from all models were compared with this best fitting model. Correlation strength was tested with two-tailed Spearman's rank correlation and further examined using Bland-Altman plots. AATHFT was found to be the best fitting model. The overall median of individual patient medians K(trans) estimates were 14.3, 15.1, 16.1, 2.6 and 22.5 mL/100 g min(  -  1) for AATH, AATHFT, ETM, Patlak and Logan, respectively. K(trans) estimates for all models except Patlak were strongly correlated (P  <  0.001). Bland-Altman plots show large biases but no significant deviating trend for any model other than Patlak. AATHFT was found to be the preferred model among those tested for estimation of K(trans) in larynx tumors.

  2. Comparison of DCE-CT models for quantitative evaluation of Ktrans in larynx tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterbroek, J.; Bennink, E.; Philippens, M. E. P.; Raaijmakers, C. P. J.; Viergever, M. A.; de Jong, H. W. A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) can be used to estimate blood perfusion and vessel permeability in tumors. Tumor induced angiogenesis is generally associated with disorganized microvasculature with increased permeability or leakage. Estimated vascular leakage (Ktrans) values and their reliability greatly depend on the perfusion model used. To identify the preferred model for larynx tumor analysis, several perfusion models frequently used for estimating permeability were compared in this study. DCE-CT scans were acquired for 16 larynx cancer patients. Larynx tumors were delineated based on whole-mount histopathology after laryngectomy. DCE-CT data within these delineated volumes were analyzed using the Patlak and Logan plots, the Extended Tofts Model (ETM), the Adiabatic Approximation to the Tissue Homogeneity model (AATH) and a variant of AATH with fixed transit time (AATHFT). Akaike’s Information Criterion (AIC) was used to identify the best fitting model. Ktrans values from all models were compared with this best fitting model. Correlation strength was tested with two-tailed Spearman’s rank correlation and further examined using Bland-Altman plots. AATHFT was found to be the best fitting model. The overall median of individual patient medians Ktrans estimates were 14.3, 15.1, 16.1, 2.6 and 22.5 mL/100 g min  -  1 for AATH, AATHFT, ETM, Patlak and Logan, respectively. Ktrans estimates for all models except Patlak were strongly correlated (P  <  0.001). Bland-Altman plots show large biases but no significant deviating trend for any model other than Patlak. AATHFT was found to be the preferred model among those tested for estimation of Ktrans in larynx tumors.

  3. CT and MR findings of Krukenberg tumors: Comparison with primary ovarian tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seung Hyup; Kim, Won Hong; Park, Kyung Joo

    1996-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the CT and MR findings of Krukenberg tumors and to compare them with those of primary ovarian tumors. This study included 20 patients with Krukenberg tumors and 65 patients with various primary ovarian tumors. CT/MR/both imaging studies were available in 15/1/4 patients with Krukenberg tumor and 31/10/24 patients with primary ovarian tumors, respectively. Imaging findings of the tumors were categorized into three subgroups: a solid mass with intratumoral cysts, a solid mass without intratumoral cysts, and a predominantly cystic mass. Among 32 Krukenberg tumors (bilateral in 12 patients), 22 were solid masses with intratumoral cysts, in 14 of which the wall of the intratumoral cysts showed apparently strong contrast enhancement on CT and/or MRI. Six Krukenberg tumors were solid masses without intratumoral cysts, and four were predominantly cystic masses. Imaging findings of 88 primary ovarian tumors (bilateral in 23 patients) were 5 solid masses with intratumoral cysts, 27 solid masses without intratumoral cysts, and 56 predominantly cystic masses. None of the five primary ovarian tumors with solid mass with intratumoral cysts demonstrated apparently strong contrast enhancement of the cyst wall. Krukenberg tumor should be suspected when one sees solid ovarian tumors containing well demarcated intratumoral cystic lesions, especially if the walls of those cysts demonstrate apparently strong contrast enhancement. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Comparison between clinical, ultrasound, CT, MRI, and pathology findings in dogs presented for suspected thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Taeymans, Olivier; Penninck, Dominique G; Peters, Rachel M

    2013-01-01

    This study compares clinical, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and pathology findings in 16 prospectively, and seven retrospectively recruited dogs presented for suspected thyroid carcinoma. Of these, 17 were confirmed thyroid carcinoma, while six were initially misdiagnosed. These included four carotid body tumors, one para-esophageal abscess, and one undifferentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Thyroid carcinomas occurred in older dogs without evidence of sex predilection, and were more often unilateral. All were large, heterogeneous, moderately to strongly vascularized, and most commonly contained areas of dystrophic mineralization and/or fluid accumulations. On MRI, thyroid carcinomas appeared hyperintense compared to surrounding musculature in all imaging sequences used, while on CT they had a lower attenuation value than normal thyroid gland tissue. Histologically confirmed tumor capsule disruption with invasion of the surrounding structures was most commonly detected with MRI. Palpation was not an accurate predictor of locally invasive vs. well-encapsulated masses. Computed tomography had the highest specificity (100%) and MRI had the highest sensitivity (93%) in diagnosing thyroid carcinoma, while ultrasound had considerably lower results. We conclude that ultrasound is adequate for use as a screening tool for dogs with suspected thyroid carcinoma, but recommend either CT or MRI for preoperative diagnosis and staging.

  5. Cerebral blood volume imaging by flat detector computed tomography in comparison to conventional multislice perfusion CT.

    PubMed

    Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kloska, Stephan; Engelhorn, Tobias; Boese, Jan; Zellerhoff, Michael; Schwab, Stefan; Doerfler, Arnd

    2011-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that Flat Detector computed tomography (FD-CT) with intravenous contrast medium would allow the calculation of whole brain cerebral blood volume (CBV) mapping (FD-CBV) and would correlate with multislice Perfusion CT (PCT). Twenty five patients were investigated with FD-CBV and PCT. Correlation of the CBV maps of both techniques was carried out with measurements from six anatomical regions from both sides of the brain. Mean values of each region and the correlation coefficient were calculated. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to compare the two different imaging techniques. The image and data quality of both PCT and FD-CBV were suitable for evaluation in all patients. The mean CBV values of FD-CBV and PCT showed only minimal differences with overlapping standard deviation. The correlation coefficient was 0.79 (p < 0.01). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -0.077 ± 0.48 ml/100 g between FD-CBV and PCT CBV measurements, indicating that FD-CBV values were only slightly lower than those of PCT. CBV mapping with intravenous contrast medium using Flat Detector CT compared favourably with multislice PCT. The ability to assess cerebral perfusion within the angiographic suite may improve the management of ischaemic stroke and evaluation of the efficacy of dedicated therapies.

  6. A Comparison between 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging and Biological and Radiological Findings in Restaging of Hepatoblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Treglia, Giorgio; Pagano, Manuela; Fania, Piercarlo; Basso, Maria Eleonora; Fagioli, Franca; Ficola, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Background. In this study we retrospectively evaluated if 18F-FDG-PET/CT provided incremental diagnostic information over CI in a group of hepatoblastoma patients performing restaging. Procedure. Nine patients (mean age: 5.9 years; range: 3.1–12 years) surgically treated for hepatoblastoma were followed up by clinical examination, serum α-FP monitoring, and US. CI (CT or MRI) and PET/CT were performed in case of suspicion of relapse. Fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) were carried out for final confirmation if the results of CI, PET/CT, and/or α-FP levels were suggestive of relapse. PET/CT and CI findings were analyzed for comparison purposes, using FNAB as reference standard. Results. α-FP level was suggestive of disease recurrence in 8/9 patients. Biopsy was performed in 8/9 cases. CI and PET/CT resulted to be concordant in 5/9 patients (CI identified recurrence of disease, but 18F-FDG-PET/CT provided a better definition of disease extent); in 4/9 cases, CI diagnostic information resulted in negative findings, whereas PET/CT correctly detected recurrence of disease. 18F-FDG-PET/CT showed an agreement of 100% (8/8) with FNAB results. Conclusions. 18F-FDG-PET/CT scan seems to better assess HB patients with respect to CI and may provide incremental diagnostic value in the restaging of this group of patients. PMID:24063012

  7. A Comparison of Techniques for (90)Y PET/CT Image-Based Dosimetry Following Radioembolization with Resin Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Pasciak, Alexander S; Bourgeois, Austin C; Bradley, Yong C

    2014-01-01

    (90)Y PET/CT following radioembolization has recently been established as a viable diagnostic tool, capable of producing images that are both quantitative and have superior image quality than alternative (90)Y imaging modalities. Because radioembolization is assumed to be a permanent implant, it is possible to convert quantitative (90)Y PET image sets into data representative of spatial committed absorbed-dose. Multiple authors have performed this transformation using dose-point kernel (DPK) convolution to account for the transport of the high-energy (90)Y β-particles. This article explores a technique called the Local Deposition Method (LDM), an alternative to DPK convolution for (90)Y image-based dosimetry. The LDM assumes that the kinetic energy from each (90)Y β-particle is deposited locally, within the voxel where the decay occurred. Using the combined analysis of phantoms scanned using (90)Y PET/CT and ideal mathematical phantoms, an accuracy comparison of DPK convolution and the LDM has been performed. Based on the presented analysis, DPK convolution provides no detectible accuracy benefit over the LDM for (90)Y PET-based dosimetry. For PET systems with (90)Y resolution poorer than 3.25 mm at full-width and half-max using a small voxel size, the LDM may produce a dosimetric solution that is more accurate than DPK convolution under ideal conditions; however, image noise can obscure some of the perceived benefit. As voxel size increases and resolution decreases, differences between the LDM and DPK convolution are reduced. The LDM method of post-radioembolization dosimetry has the advantage of not requiring additional post-processing. The provided conversion factors can be used to determine committed absorbed-dose using conventional PET image analysis tools. The LDM is a recommended option for routine post-radioembolization (90)Y dosimetry based on PET/CT imaging.

  8. A Comparison of Techniques for 90Y PET/CT Image-Based Dosimetry Following Radioembolization with Resin Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Pasciak, Alexander S.; Bourgeois, Austin C.; Bradley, Yong C.

    2014-01-01

    90Y PET/CT following radioembolization has recently been established as a viable diagnostic tool, capable of producing images that are both quantitative and have superior image quality than alternative 90Y imaging modalities. Because radioembolization is assumed to be a permanent implant, it is possible to convert quantitative 90Y PET image sets into data representative of spatial committed absorbed-dose. Multiple authors have performed this transformation using dose-point kernel (DPK) convolution to account for the transport of the high-energy 90Y β-particles. This article explores a technique called the Local Deposition Method (LDM), an alternative to DPK convolution for 90Y image-based dosimetry. The LDM assumes that the kinetic energy from each 90Y β-particle is deposited locally, within the voxel where the decay occurred. Using the combined analysis of phantoms scanned using 90Y PET/CT and ideal mathematical phantoms, an accuracy comparison of DPK convolution and the LDM has been performed. Based on the presented analysis, DPK convolution provides no detectible accuracy benefit over the LDM for 90Y PET-based dosimetry. For PET systems with 90Y resolution poorer than 3.25 mm at full-width and half-max using a small voxel size, the LDM may produce a dosimetric solution that is more accurate than DPK convolution under ideal conditions; however, image noise can obscure some of the perceived benefit. As voxel size increases and resolution decreases, differences between the LDM and DPK convolution are reduced. The LDM method of post-radioembolization dosimetry has the advantage of not requiring additional post-processing. The provided conversion factors can be used to determine committed absorbed-dose using conventional PET image analysis tools. The LDM is a recommended option for routine post-radioembolization 90Y dosimetry based on PET/CT imaging. PMID:24904832

  9. [Comparison of CT manifestations of primary colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma and signet ring cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhui; Zhang, Zhiping; Dong, Xingxiang; Gao, Depei; Zhang, Dafu

    2017-03-25

    To compare the difference in CT manifestations between primary colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma and signet ring cell carcinoma in order to improve radiologic diagnosis. Clinicopathological data and CT findings of 109 patients with colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma and 46 patients with primary colorectal signet-ring cell carcinoma confirmed by surgery and pathology from March 2008 to February 2015 in the Tumor Hospital of Yunnan Province were retrospectively collected. Differences in age, gender, tumor location, length and thickness of the involved intestinal wall, thickening pattern of the intestinal wall, lesion density, calcification, contrast-enhanced form, peri-intestinal invasion, occurrence of intestinal obstruction and metastasis of other organs were compared between the two groups. Among 109 patients with colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma, 68 were men and 41 were women with a mean age of (56.8±15.4) years. Among 46 patients with primary colorectal signet-ring cell carcinoma, 26 were men and 20 were women with a mean age of (42.9±15.6) years. Compared with mucinous adenocarcinoma group, signet-ring cell carcinoma group showed more concentric bowel-wall thickening[93.5%(43/46) vs. 81.6%(89/109), χ(2)=9.19, P=0.030], higher lesion density [(42.0±3.0) Hu vs. (28.5±1.5) Hu, t=37.30, P=0.000], more marked enhancement [54.3%(25/46) vs. 12.8%(14/109), χ(2)=35.21, P=0.000], less vast-low-density region in enhanced CT imaging[2.2%(1/46) vs. 45.0%(49/109), χ(2)=73.31, P=0.000] and more severe peri-intestinal invasion [41.3% (19/46) vs. 17.4%(19/109), χ(2)=10.25, P=0.006]. Calcification was found in 18.3%(20/109) of mucinous adenocarcinoma cases, but was not found in signet-ring cell carcinoma cases (χ(2)=9.69, P=0.002). Target ring sign in contrast-enhanced scan was observed in 15.2%(7/46) of signet-ring cell carcinoma cases, while in none of mucinous adenocarcinoma cases (χ(2)=17.37, P=0.000). There were no statistically significant differences in

  10. Comment on "Dosimetric comparison of stopping power calibration with dual-energy CT and single-energy CT in proton therapy treatment planning" [Med. Phys. 43(6), 2845-2854 (2016)].

    PubMed

    Wohlfahrt, Patrick; Möhler, Christian; Greilich, Steffen; Richter, Christian

    2017-06-21

    A dosimetric comparison of proton treatment planning based on single-energy CT (SECT) and dual-energy CT (DECT) was recently published by Zhu and Penfold(1) in Medical Physics. In this study, the polymer phantom Catphan Module 404 (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY, USA) of known material composition was used to demonstrate an improved accuracy of dose calculation using DECT instead of SECT. To confirm this result in a more realistic human case, the authors show for a single axial CT slice the dose difference of a SECT- and DECT-based treatment plan using the anthropomorphic phantom Rando (Radiological Support Devices, Inc., CA, USA) of unknown composition. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative assessment of emphysema from whole lung CT scans: comparison with visual grading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Apanosovich, Tatiyana V.; Wang, Jianwei; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2009-02-01

    Emphysema is a disease of the lungs that destroys the alveolar air sacs and induces long-term respiratory dysfunction. CT scans allow for imaging of the anatomical basis of emphysema and for visual assessment by radiologists of the extent present in the lungs. Several measures have been introduced for the quantification of the extent of disease directly from CT data in order to add to the qualitative assessments made by radiologists. In this paper we compare emphysema index, mean lung density, histogram percentiles, and the fractal dimension to visual grade in order to evaluate the predictability of radiologist visual scoring of emphysema from low-dose CT scans through quantitative scores, in order to determine which measures can be useful as surrogates for visual assessment. All measures were computed over nine divisions of the lung field (whole lung, individual lungs, and upper/middle/lower thirds of each lung) for each of 148 low-dose, whole lung scans. In addition, a visual grade of each section was also given by an expert radiologist. One-way ANOVA and multinomial logistic regression were used to determine the ability of the measures to predict visual grade from quantitative score. We found that all measures were able to distinguish between normal and severe grades (p<0.01), and between mild/moderate and all other grades (p<0.05). However, no measure was able to distinguish between mild and moderate cases. Approximately 65% prediction accuracy was achieved from using quantitative score to predict visual grade, with 73% if mild and moderate cases are considered as a single class.

  12. Bowel preparation for CT colonography: blinded comparison of magnesium citrate and sodium phosphate for catharsis.

    PubMed

    Borden, Zachary S; Pickhardt, Perry J; Kim, David H; Lubner, Meghan G; Agriantonis, Demetrios J; Hinshaw, J Louis

    2010-01-01

    To compare colonic cleansing and fluid retention of double-dose magnesium citrate with those of single-dose sodium phosphate in patients undergoing computed tomographic (CT) colonography. This retrospective HIPAA-compliant clinical study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. The study included 118 consecutive patients given single-dose sodium phosphate for bowel catharsis and 115 consecutive patients at risk for phosphate nephropathy, who were instead given double-dose magnesium citrate. The bowel preparation regimen was otherwise identical. Four-point scales were used to assess residual stool and fluid in the six colonic segments, and attenuation of residual fluid was measured. An a priori power analysis was performed, and unpaired t tests with Welch correction were used to compare the two groups on stool and fluid scores and fluid attenuation. Both cathartic regimens offered excellent colon cleansing, with no significant difference for residual stool in any of the six segments. Stool scores of 1 or 2 (ie, no residual stool or residual stool <5 mm) were recorded in 88.6% (627 of 708) of colonic segments in the sodium phosphate group and in 88.1% (608 of 690) in the magnesium citrate group. No clinically important differences were seen in residual fluid scores in any of the six segments, with the only significant difference seen in the sigmoid colon (2.17 for sodium phosphate vs 2.44 for magnesium citrate; P< 0.01). Fluid attenuation was significantly different between magnesium citrate and sodium phosphate groups (790 HU +/- 216 vs 978 HU +/- 160; P <.001). Both sodium phosphate and magnesium citrate provided excellent colon cleansing for CT colonography. Residual stool and fluid were similar in both groups, and fluid attenuation values were closer to optimal in the magnesium citrate group. Since bowel preparation provided by both cathartics was comparable, magnesium citrate should be considered for CT colonography, particularly in

  13. Cost comparison of nephron-sparing treatments for cT1a renal masses.

    PubMed

    Castle, Scott M; Gorbatiy, Vladislav; Avallone, Michael A; Eldefrawy, Ahmed; Caulton, Darryl E; Leveillee, Raymond J

    2013-10-01

    Treatment options for small renal tumors have evolved from radical nephrectomy (RN) to partial nephrectomy (PN), thermal ablation, or active surveillance. With the advancement of techniques, costs differences are unclear. The objective of this study is to compare the 6-month costs associated with nephron-sparing procedures for cT1a renal tumors. We performed a review of patients diagnosed with a solitary cT1a renal mass who underwent surgical treatment from June 2008 to May 2011. Open partial nephrectomy (OPN), robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RLPN), laparoscopic radio-frequency ablation (LRFA), or computed tomography guided radio frequency ablation (CTRFA) was performed on 173 patients. Cost data were collected for surgical costs, associated hospital stay, and the 6-month postoperative period. Patients underwent surgery, including 52 OPN, 48 RLPN, 44 LRFA, and 29 CTRFA. Median total costs associated were $17,018, $20,314, $13,965, and $6,475, for OPN, RLPN, LRFA, and CTRFA, respectively. When stratified by approach differences were noted for total cost (P < 0.001), operating room (OR) time (P < 0.001), surgical supply (P < 0.001), and room and board (P < 0.001) in univariable analysis. Multivariable linear regression (R(2) = 0.966) showed surgical approach (P = 0.007), length of stay (P < 0.001), and OR time (P < 0.001) to be significant predictors of total cost. However, tumor size (P = 0.175), and Charlson comorbidity index (P = 0.078) were not statistically significant. Six-month cost of nephron-sparing surgery is lowest with radio frequency ablation (RFA) by either laparoscopic or computed tomography (CT)-guided approach compared to RLPN and OPN. As oncologic and safety outcomes improve and become comparable in all nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) approaches, cost of each procedure will start to play a stronger role in the clinical and healthcare policy setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Zanca, F.; Jacobs, A.; Crijns, W.; De Wever, W.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure.

  15. A comparison of simulation tools for photon-counting spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasirudin, Radin A.; Penchev, Petar; Mei, Kai; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Fiebich, Martin; Noël, Peter B.

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting detectors (PCD) not only have the advantage of providing spectral information but also offer high quantum efficiencies, producing high image quality in combination with a minimal amount of radiation dose. Due to the clinical unavailability of photon-counting CT, the need to evaluate different CT simulation tools for researching different applications for photon-counting systems is essential. In this work, we investigate two different methods to simulate PCD data: Monte-Carlo based simulation (MCS) and analytical based simulation (AS). The MCS is a general-purpose photon transport simulation based on EGSnrc C++ class library. The AS uses analytical forward-projection in combination with additional acquisition parameters. MCS takes into account all physical effects, but is computationally expensive (several days per CT acquisition). AS is fast (several minutes), but lacks the accurateness of MCS with regard to physical interactions. To evaluate both techniques an entrance spectra of 100kvp, a modified CTP515 module of the CatPhan 600 phantom, and a detector system with six thresholds was simulated. For evaluation the simulated projection data are decomposed via a maximum likelihood technique, and reconstructed via standard filtered-back projection (FBP). Image quality from both methods is subjectively and objectively assessed. Visually, the difference in the image quality was not significant. When further evaluated, the relative difference was below 4%. As a conclusion, both techniques offer different advantages, while at different stages of development the accelerated calculations via AS can make a significant difference. For the future one could foresee a combined method to join accuracy and speed.

  16. MRI experience with multiple sclerosis - Comparison to CT and clinical status

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, L.; Carr, T.; Nicholson, R.L.

    1985-05-01

    A Multiple Sclerosis (M.S.) Protocol was set--SEB (1000/60) volume acquisition and selected single slices SEC (1000/120) and IR (1500/450). Single slices SE 500/30, 1500/30 and 1530/60 were obtained for T1 and T2 calculation. New software and coils permitted multi-slice multi-echo acquisition so the Protocol was changed to multi-slice multi-echo transaxial SE 2120/60-120, and the T1 and T2 sets. The study consisted of 62 known M.S. patients and 35 controls. Of the 62 M.S. patients, 58 (94%) were positive on NMR. Thirty-two of these patients had CT scans of which 17 (53%) were positive. Of the 35 controls, 2 were positive on NMR for a false positive rate of 6%. The relative sensitivity of NMR, Double Dose Delayed CT(DDD) and contrast CT in the clinically early progressive group is 87%, 60% and 45% respectively. In the chronic stable group, the sensitivity is 100% for NMR and 55% for DDD. The NMR lesions were graded on a scale of 1 - 4 and the authors found poor correlation with either duration of disease or Kurtzke Functional Scale. The T1, T2 values showed good differentiation between white matter and lesions, although differentiation between lesions and grey matter was poor. White matter has T1 of 328 +- 28 and T2 of 85 +- 22, grey matter T1 of 515 +- 37 and T2 of 96 +- 32 and lesions T1 of 530 +- 76 and T2 of 106 +- 27. They conclude that multi-slice SE 2120/60-120 NMR imaging has proven to be a valuable tool in the clinical diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis. Most of the lesions seen are asymptomatic and the number, size and distribution of lesions have little correlation with severity or acuity of the disease.

  17. A comparison of x-ray detectors for mouse CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goertzen, Andrew L.; Nagarkar, Vivek; Street, Robert A.; Paulus, Michael J.; Boone, John M.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2004-12-01

    There is significant interest in using computed tomography (CT) for in vivo imaging applications in mouse models of disease. Most commercially available mouse x-ray CT scanners utilize a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector coupled via fibre optic taper to a phosphor screen. However, there has been little research to determine if this is the optimum detector for the specific task of in vivo mouse imaging. To investigate this issue, we have evaluated four detectors, including an amorphous selenium (a-Se) detector, an amorphous silicon (a-Si) detector with a gadolinium oxysulphide (GOS) screen, a CCD with a 3:1 fibre taper and a GOS screen, and a CCD with a 2:1 fibre taper and both GOS and thallium-doped caesium iodide (CsI:Tl) screens. The detectors were evaluated by measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE), stability over multiple exposures, and noise in reconstructed CT images. The a-Se detector had the best MTF and the highest DQE (0.6 at 0 lp mm-1) but had the worst stability (45% reduction after 2000 exposure frames). The a-Si detector and the CCD with the 3:1 fibre, both of which used the GOS screen, had very similar performance with a DQE of approximately 0.30 at 0 lp mm-1. For the CCD with the 2:1 fibre, the CsI:Tl screen resulted in a nearly two-fold improvement in DQE over the GOS screen (0.4 versus 0.24 at 0 lp mm-1). The CCDs both had the best stability, with less than a 1% change in pixel values over multiple exposures. The pixel values of the a-Si detector increased 5% over multiple exposures due to the effects of image lag. Despite the higher DQE of the a-Se detector, the reconstructed CT images acquired with the a-Si detector had lower noise levels, likely due to the blurring effects from the phosphor screen.

  18. A comparison of x-ray detectors for mouse CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Goertzen, Andrew L; Nagarkar, Vivek; Street, Robert A; Paulus, Michael J; Boone, John M; Cherry, Simon R

    2004-12-07

    There is significant interest in using computed tomography (CT) for in vivo imaging applications in mouse models of disease. Most commercially available mouse x-ray CT scanners utilize a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector coupled via fibre optic taper to a phosphor screen. However, there has been little research to determine if this is the optimum detector for the specific task of in vivo mouse imaging. To investigate this issue, we have evaluated four detectors, including an amorphous selenium (a-Se) detector, an amorphous silicon (a-Si) detector with a gadolinium oxysulphide (GOS) screen, a CCD with a 3:1 fibre taper and a GOS screen, and a CCD with a 2:1 fibre taper and both GOS and thallium-doped caesium iodide (CsI:Tl) screens. The detectors were evaluated by measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE), stability over multiple exposures, and noise in reconstructed CT images. The a-Se detector had the best MTF and the highest DQE (0.6 at 0 lp mm(-1)) but had the worst stability (45% reduction after 2000 exposure frames). The a-Si detector and the CCD with the 3:1 fibre, both of which used the GOS screen, had very similar performance with a DQE of approximately 0.30 at 0 lp mm(-1). For the CCD with the 2:1 fibre, the CsI:Tl screen resulted in a nearly two-fold improvement in DQE over the GOS screen (0.4 versus 0.24 at 0 lp mm(-1)). The CCDs both had the best stability, with less than a 1% change in pixel values over multiple exposures. The pixel values of the a-Si detector increased 5% over multiple exposures due to the effects of image lag. Despite the higher DQE of the a-Se detector, the reconstructed CT images acquired with the a-Si detector had lower noise levels, likely due to the blurring effects from the phosphor screen.

  19. Quantitative and qualitative comparison of continuous bed motion and traditional step and shoot PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Dustin R; Acuff, Shelley; Cruise, Sarah; Syed, Mumtaz; Neveu, Melissa; Stuckey, Alan; Bradley, Yong

    2015-01-01

    New developments in PET/CT technology have enabled the commercial availability of continuous bed motion (CBM) acquisition methods. This technology has some potential performance benefits compared to standard step and shoot (SS) imaging, however, this technology has not been assessed with regard to quantitative and image quality parameters compared to traditional SS techniques. This study seeks to compare clinically relevant quantitative and image quality parameters using CBM and SS data collection methods with the intent of providing assistance in making educated decisions regarding imaging protocol development when using CBM technology versus SS imaging.

  20. Quantitative and qualitative comparison of continuous bed motion and traditional step and shoot PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Dustin R; Acuff, Shelley; Cruise, Sarah; Syed, Mumtaz; Neveu, Melissa; Stuckey, Alan; Bradley, Yong

    2015-01-01

    New developments in PET/CT technology have enabled the commercial availability of continuous bed motion (CBM) acquisition methods. This technology has some potential performance benefits compared to standard step and shoot (SS) imaging, however, this technology has not been assessed with regard to quantitative and image quality parameters compared to traditional SS techniques. This study seeks to compare clinically relevant quantitative and image quality parameters using CBM and SS data collection methods with the intent of providing assistance in making educated decisions regarding imaging protocol development when using CBM technology versus SS imaging. PMID:25625027

  1. Skeletal dosimetry based on µCT images of trabecular bone: update and comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, R.; Cassola, V. F.; Vieira, J. W.; Khoury, H. J.; de Oliveira Lira, C. A. B.; Robson Brown, K.

    2012-06-01

    Two skeletal dosimetry methods using µCT images of human bone have recently been developed: the paired-image radiation transport (PIRT) model introduced by researchers at the University of Florida (UF) in the US and the systematic-periodic cluster (SPC) method developed by researchers at the Federal University of Pernambuco in Brazil. Both methods use µCT images of trabecular bone (TB) to model spongiosa regions of human bones containing marrow cavities segmented into soft tissue volumes of active marrow (AM), trabecular inactive marrow and the bone endosteum (BE), which is a 50 µm thick layer of marrow on all TB surfaces and on cortical bone surfaces next to TB as well as inside the medullary cavities. With respect to the radiation absorbed dose, the AM and the BE are sensitive soft tissues for the induction of leukaemia and bone cancer, respectively. The two methods differ mainly with respect to the number of bone sites and the size of the µCT images used in Monte Carlo calculations and they apply different methods to simulate exposure from radiation sources located outside the skeleton. The PIRT method calculates dosimetric quantities in isolated human bones while the SPC method uses human bones embedded in the body of a phantom which contains all relevant organs and soft tissues. Consequently, the SPC method calculates absorbed dose to the AM and to the BE from particles emitted by radionuclides concentrated in organs or from radiation sources located outside the human body in one calculation step. In order to allow for similar calculations of AM and BE absorbed doses using the PIRT method, the so-called dose response functions (DRFs) have been developed based on absorbed fractions (AFs) of energy for electrons isotropically emitted in skeletal tissues. The DRFs can be used to transform the photon fluence in homogeneous spongiosa regions into absorbed dose to AM and BE. This paper will compare AM and BE AFs of energy from electrons emitted in skeletal

  2. YIELD AND GRADE OF VALENCIA PEANUT IN SINGLE ROW, TWIN ROW, AND DIAMOND PLANTING PATTERNS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted at Wayne Baker’s farm South of Clovis in 2006 to compare single row, twin row, and diamond planting patterns in Valencia peanut on 36 inch beds. The twin row and diamond pattern treatments were planted with an experimental planter developed at the USDA-ARS National Peanut Rese...

  3. : Light Interception in Single Row, Twin Row, and Diamond Planting Patterns of Valencia Peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A field study was conducted on a growers farm South of Clovis, NM in 2006 to compare light interception and radiation use efficiency in single row, twin row, and diamond planted Valencia peanuts with line quantum sensors (Apogee instruments, Logan) installed across the crop row. Data were recorded ...

  4. TU-G-204-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): Dynamic CT Myocardial Perfusion Measurement and Its Comparison to Fractional Flow Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Hubbard, L; Groves, E; Sadeghi, B; Javan, H; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a first pass analysis (FPA) technique for CT perfusion measurement in a swine animal and its validation using fractional flow reserve (FFR) as a reference standard. Methods: Swine were placed under anesthesia and relevant physiologic parameters were continuously recorded. Intra-coronary adenosine was administered to induce maximum hyperemia. A pressure wire was advanced distal to the first diagonal branch of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery for FFR measurements and a balloon dilation catheter was inserted over the pressure wire into the proximal LAD to create varying levels of stenosis. Images were acquired with a 320-row wide volume CT scanner. Three main coronary perfusion beds were delineated in the myocardium using arteries extracted from CT angiography images using a minimum energy hypothesis. The integrated density in the perfusion bed was used to calculate perfusion using the FPA technique. The perfusion in the LAD bed over a range of stenosis severity was measured. The measured fractional perfusion was compared to FFR and linear regression was performed. Results: The measured fractional perfusion using the FPA technique (P-FPA) and FFR were related as P-FPA = 1.06FFR – 0.06 (r{sup 2} = 0.86). The perfusion measurements were calculated with only three to five total CT volume scans, which drastically reduces the radiation dose as compared with the existing techniques requiring 15–20 volume scans. Conclusion: The measured perfusion using the first pass analysis technique showed good correlation with FFR measurements as a reference standard. The technique for perfusion measurement can potentially make a substantial reduction in radiation dose as compared with the existing techniques.

  5. Comparison between human and model observer performance in low-contrast detection tasks in CT images: application to images reconstructed with filtered back projection and iterative algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Calzado, A; Geleijns, J; Joemai, R M S; Veldkamp, W J H

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare low-contrast detectability (LCDet) performance between a model [non–pre-whitening matched filter with an eye filter (NPWE)] and human observers in CT images reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative [adaptive iterative dose reduction three-dimensional (AIDR 3D; Toshiba Medical Systems, Zoetermeer, Netherlands)] algorithms. Methods: Images of the Catphan® phantom (Phantom Laboratories, New York, NY) were acquired with Aquilion ONE™ 320-detector row CT (Toshiba Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) at five tube current levels (20–500 mA range) and reconstructed with FBP and AIDR 3D. Samples containing either low-contrast objects (diameters, 2–15 mm) or background were extracted and analysed by the NPWE model and four human observers in a two-alternative forced choice detection task study. Proportion correct (PC) values were obtained for each analysed object and used to compare human and model observer performances. An efficiency factor (η) was calculated to normalize NPWE to human results. Results: Human and NPWE model PC values (normalized by the efficiency, η = 0.44) were highly correlated for the whole dose range. The Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients (95% confidence interval) between human and NPWE were 0.984 (0.972–0.991) for AIDR 3D and 0.984 (0.971–0.991) for FBP, respectively. Bland–Altman plots based on PC results showed excellent agreement between human and NPWE [mean absolute difference 0.5 ± 0.4%; range of differences (−4.7%, 5.6%)]. Conclusion: The NPWE model observer can predict human performance in LCDet tasks in phantom CT images reconstructed with FBP and AIDR 3D algorithms at different dose levels. Advances in knowledge: Quantitative assessment of LCDet in CT can accurately be performed using software based on a model observer. PMID:24837275

  6. Performance comparison of two commercial BGO-based PET/CT scanners using NEMA NU 2-2001

    SciTech Connect

    Bolard, Gregory; Prior, John O.; Modolo, Luca; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Kosinski, Marek; Wastiel, Claude; Malterre, Jerome; Bulling, Shelley; Bochud, Francois; Verdun, Francis R.

    2007-07-15

    Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners play a major role in medicine for in vivo imaging in an increasing number of diseases in oncology, cardiology, neurology, and psychiatry. With the advent of short-lived radioisotopes other than {sup 18}F and newer scanners, there is a need to optimize radioisotope activity and acquisition protocols, as well as to compare scanner performances on an objective basis. The Discovery-LS (D-LS) was among the first clinical PET/CT scanners to be developed and has been extensively characterized with older National Electrical Manufacturer Association (NEMA) NU 2-1994 standards. At the time of publication of the latest version of the standards (NU 2-2001) that have been adapted for whole-body imaging under clinical conditions, more recent models from the same manufacturer, i.e., Discovery-ST (D-ST) and Discovery-STE (D-STE), were commercially available. We report on the full characterization both in the two- and three-dimensional acquisition mode of the D-LS according to latest NEMA NU 2-2001 standards (spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate performance, accuracy of count losses, and random coincidence correction and image quality), as well as a detailed comparison with the newer D-ST widely used and whose characteristics are already published.

  7. Performance comparison of two commercial BGO-based PET/CT scanners using NEMA NU 2-2001.

    PubMed

    Bolard, Grégory; Prior, John O; Modolo, Luca; Delaloye, Angelika Bischof; Kosinski, Marek; Wastiel, Claude; Malterre, Jérôme; Bulling, Shelley; Bochud, François; Verdun, Francis R

    2007-07-01

    Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners play a major role in medicine for in vivo imaging in an increasing number of diseases in oncology, cardiology, neurology, and psychiatry. With the advent of short-lived radioisotopes other than 18F and newer scanners, there is a need to optimize radioisotope activity and acquisition protocols, as well as to compare scanner performances on an objective basis. The Discovery-LS (D-LS) was among the first clinical PET/CT scanners to be developed and has been extensively characterized with older National Electrical Manufacturer Association (NEMA) NU 2-1994 standards. At the time of publication of the latest version of the standards (NU 2-2001) that have been adapted for whole-body imaging under clinical conditions, more recent models from the same manufacturer, i.e., Discovery-ST (D-ST) and Discovery-STE (D-STE), were commercially available. We report on the full characterization both in the two- and three-dimensional acquisition mode of the D-LS according to latest NEMA NU 2-2001 standards (spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate performance, accuracy of count losses, and random coincidence correction and image quality), as well as a detailed comparison with the newer D-ST widely used and whose characteristics are already published.

  8. Performance comparison of two commercial BGO-based PET/CT scanners using NEMA NU 2-2001.

    PubMed

    Bolard, Grégory; Prior, John O; Modolo, Luca; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Kosinski, Marek; Wastiel, Claude; Malterre, Jérôme; Bulling, Shelley; Bochud, François; Verdun, Francis R

    2007-07-01

    Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners play a major role in medicine for in vivo imaging in an increasing number of diseases in oncology, cardiology, neurology, and psychiatry. With the advent of short-lived radioisotopes other than F18 and newer scanners, there is a need to optimize radioisotope activity and acquisition protocols, as well as to compare scanner performances on an objective basis. The Discovery-LS (D-LS) was among the first clinical PET/CT scanners to be developed and has been extensively characterized with older National Electrical Manufacturer Association (NEMA) NU 2-1994 standards. At the time of publication of the latest version of the standards (NU 2-2001) that have been adapted for whole-body imaging under clinical conditions, more recent models from the same manufacturer, i.e., Discovery-ST (D-ST) and Discovery-STE (D-STE), were commercially available. We report on the full characterization both in the two- and three-dimensional acquisition mode of the D-LS according to latest NEMA NU 2-2001 standards (spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate performance, accuracy of count losses, and random coincidence correction and image quality), as well as a detailed comparison with the newer D-ST widely used and whose characteristics are already published. © 2007 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Hierarchical CT to Ultrasound Registration of the Lumbar Spine: A Comparison with Other Registration Methods.

    PubMed

    Koo, Terry K; Kwok, Wingchi Edmund

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) measurement of the spine can provide important information for functional, developmental, diagnostic, and treatment-effect evaluations. However, existing measurement techniques are either 2-dimensional, highly invasive, or involve a high radiation dose, prohibiting their widespread and repeated use in both research and clinical settings. Non-invasive, non-ionizing, 3D measurement of the spine is still beyond the current state-of-the-art. Towards this goal, we developed an intensity-based hierarchical CT-ultrasound registration approach to quantify the 3D positions and orientations of lumbar vertebrae from 3D freehand ultrasound and one-time computed tomography. The method was validated using a human dry bone specimen (T12-L5) and a porcine cadaver (L2-L6) by comparing the registration results with a gold standard fiducial-based registration. Mean (SD) target registration error and percentage of successful registration were 1.2 (0.6) mm and 100% for the human dry bone specimen, and 2.18 (0.82) mm and 92% for the porcine cadaver, indicating that the method is accurate and robust under clinically realistic conditions. Given that the use of ultrasound eliminates ionizing radiation during pose measurements, we believe that the hierarchical CT-ultrasound registration method is an attractive option for quantifying 3D poses of individual vertebra and motion segment, and thus warrants further investigations.

  10. Comparison of dose measurements in CT using a novel semiconductor detector and a small ion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Paschoal, Cinthia M. M.; Ferreira, Fernanda Carla L.; Santos, Luiz A. P.; Souza, Divanizia N.

    2015-07-01

    The advance of multislice computed tomography (CT) has become inadequate the currently dosimetric protocol used in CT. Instead of dosimetry based on the measurement of CTDI using a pencil ion chamber of 100 m of length, it was proposed the use of a small ion chamber (IC) and the calculating the dose equilibrium (Deq) at the location of the chamber. The objective of this work was to compare the performance of a short IC and a commercial photodiode to measure the accumulated dose at the center of the scan length L, DL(0), and to obtain the equilibrium dose Deq using the two detectors. The result for L=100 mm was compared with the result of a pencil chamber. The results indicate that the commercial photodiode is suitable to measure the accumulated dose at the center of the scan length L as compared with the ion chambers. This methodology allows measurements of the accumulated dose for any desired scan length, allowing measuring the equilibrium dose Deq if the phantom is long enough to allow it. (authors)

  11. Comparison of models and acquisition techniques for estimation of myocardial blood flow from CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, Adam M.; Branch, Kelley R.; Caldwell, James H.; Bassingthwaighte, James B.

    2011-03-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced CT has been successfully applied in cardiac imaging for the estimation of myocardial blood flow (MBF). In general, these acquisitions impart a relatively high radiation dose because they require continuous or gated imaging of the heart for 15-40 seconds. At present, there is no consensus on the appropriate estimation method to derive MBF and on the appropriate acquisition technique to minimize dose while maintaining MBF estimation accuracy and precision. This work explores the tradeoff of accuracy and precision of MBF estimates with several estimation methods and acquisition techniques in support of the fundamental goal of optimizing dynamic cardiac CT in terms of radiation dose and MBF estimation fidelity. We simulated time attenuation curves (TACs) for a range of flow states (Flow = [0.8, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2] ml/g/min) and several acquisition techniques. We estimated MBF with 5 different methods for each simulated TAC. From multiple independent realizations, we assessed the accuracy and precision of each method. Results show that acquisition techniques with 1/3 tube current or 1/3 temporal sampling permits accurate MBF estimates with most methods with reduction in MBF estimate precision by on average 30%. Furthermore, reduction in model complexity can be beneficial for improving the precision of MBF estimates.

  12. Head-to-head comparison between (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and MR/CT angiography in clinically recurrent head and neck paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Heimburger, Céline; Veillon, Francis; Taïeb, David; Goichot, Bernard; Riehm, Sophie; Petit-Thomas, Julie; Averous, Gerlinde; Cavalcanti, Marcela; Hubelé, Fabrice; Chabrier, Gerard; Namer, Izzie Jacques; Charpiot, Anne; Imperiale, Alessio

    2017-06-01

    Head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs) can relapse after primary treatment. Optimal imaging protocols have not yet been established for posttreatment evaluation. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic value of (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and MR/CT angiography (MRA/CTA) in HNPGL patients with clinical relapse during their follow-up. Sixteen consecutive patients presenting with local pain, tinnitus, dysphagia, hoarse voice, cranial nerve involvement, deafness, or retrotympanic mass appearing during follow-up after the initial treatment of HNPGLs were retrospectively evaluated. Patients underwent both (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA (15 patents) or CTA (1 patent). Both methods were first assessed under blinded conditions and afterwards correlated. Head and neck imaging abnormalities without histological confirmation were considered true-positive results based on a consensus between radiologists and nuclear physicians and on further (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and/or MRA. (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA/CTA were concordant in 14 patients and in disagreement in 2 patients. (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA/CTA identified, respectively, 12 and 10 presumed recurrent HNPGLs in 12 patients. The two lesions diagnosed by PET/CT only were confirmed during follow-up by otoscopic examination and MRA performed 29 and 17 months later. (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT images were only slightly influenced by the posttreatment sequelae, showing a better interobserver reproducibility than MRA/CTA. Finally, in 2 of the 16 studied patients, (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT detected two additional synchronous primary HNPGLs. (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT is highly sensitive in posttreatment evaluation of patients with HNPGLs, and also offers better interobserver reproducibility than MRA/CTA and whole-body examination. We therefore suggest that (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT is performed as the first diagnostic imaging modality in symptomatic patients with suspicion of HNPGL relapse after primary treatment when (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues are

  13. Comparison of effective radiation doses from X-ray, CT, and PET/CT in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma using a dose monitoring program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeun Yoon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the use of a dose monitoring program for calculating and comparing the diagnostic radiation doses in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed diagnostic and therapeutic imaging studies performed on pediatric patients with neuroblastoma from 2003 to 2014. We calculated the mean effective dose per exam for X-ray, conventional computed tomography (CT), and CT of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) from the data collected using a dose monitoring program (DoseTrack group) since October 2012. Using the data, we estimated the cumulative dose per person and the relative dose from each modality in all patients (Total group). The effective dose from PET was manually calculated for all patients. RESULTS We included 63 patients with a mean age of 3.2±3.5 years; 28 had a history of radiation therapy, with a mean irradiated dose of 31.9±23.2 Gy. The mean effective dose per exam was 0.04±0.19 mSv for X-ray, 1.09±1.11 mSv for CT, and 8.35±7.45 mSv for CT of PET/CT in 31 patients of the Dose-Track group. The mean estimated cumulative dose per patient in the Total group was 3.43±2.86 mSv from X-ray (8.5%), 7.66±6.09 mSv from CT (19.1%), 18.35±13.52 mSv from CT of PET/CT (45.7%), and 10.71±10.05 mSv from PET (26.7%). CONCLUSION CT of PET/CT contributed nearly half of the total cumulative dose in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. The radiation dose from X-ray was not negligible because of the large number of X-ray images. A dose monitoring program can be useful for calculating radiation doses in patients with cancer. PMID:27306659

  14. Comparison of effective radiation doses from X-ray, CT, and PET/CT in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma using a dose monitoring program.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeun Yoon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myung Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the use of a dose monitoring program for calculating and comparing the diagnostic radiation doses in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. We retrospectively reviewed diagnostic and therapeutic imaging studies performed on pediatric patients with neuroblastoma from 2003 to 2014. We calculated the mean effective dose per exam for X-ray, conventional computed tomography (CT), and CT of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) from the data collected using a dose monitoring program (DoseTrack group) since October 2012. Using the data, we estimated the cumulative dose per person and the relative dose from each modality in all patients (Total group). The effective dose from PET was manually calculated for all patients. We included 63 patients with a mean age of 3.2±3.5 years; 28 had a history of radiation therapy, with a mean irradiated dose of 31.9±23.2 Gy. The mean effective dose per exam was 0.04±0.19 mSv for X-ray, 1.09±1.11 mSv for CT, and 8.35±7.45 mSv for CT of PET/CT in 31 patients of the DoseTrack group. The mean estimated cumulative dose per patient in the Total group was 3.43±2.86 mSv from X-ray (8.5%), 7.66±6.09 mSv from CT (19.1%), 18.35±13.52 mSv from CT of PET/CT (45.7%), and 10.71±10.05 mSv from PET (26.7%). CT of PET/CT contributed nearly half of the total cumulative dose in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. The radiation dose from X-ray was not negligible because of the large number of X-ray images. A dose monitoring program can be useful for calculating radiation doses in patients with cancer.

  15. A comparison of radiation doses between state-of-the-art multislice CT coronary angiography with iterative reconstruction, multislice CT coronary angiography with standard filtered back-projection and invasive diagnostic coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Gosling, O; Loader, R; Venables, P; Roobottom, C; Rowles, N; Bellenger, N; Morgan-Hughes, G

    2010-06-01

    To accurately compare the radiation dose between prospectively gated cardiac multidetector CT (with and without iterative reconstruction) and diagnostic invasive coronary angiography using the latest International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 (ICRP) tissue weightings. A retrospective analysis of consecutive patients presenting to a university teaching hospital for investigation of coronary artery disease. Radiation doses for each technique were calculated using computational Monte Carlo modelling of a standard Cristy phantom rather than the application of previously published conversion factors. While these have frequently been used in other studies, they are based on out-dated ICRP tissue weightings (ICRP 60) and are for the whole chest rather than for structures irradiated in cardiac imaging. In order to allow a comparison, doses were calculated and expressed in terms of effective dose in millisieverts (mSv). From a population presenting for angiography within a clinical service, the median radiation dose from cardiac CT with standard filtered back-projection (84 patients, 5.4 mSv) was comparable with the dose from invasive diagnostic coronary angiography (94 patients, 6.3 mSv). The dose for cardiac CT using iterative reconstruction was significantly lower (39 patients, 2.5 mSv). The median effective dose from cardiac CT with standard filtered back-projection was comparable with the effective dose from invasive coronary angiography, even with application of the most contemporary ICRP tissue weightings and use of cardiac specific volumes. Cardiac CT scanning incorporating iterative reconstruction resulted in a significant reduction in the effective dose.

  16. Comparison of FDG-PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT for monitoring therapy response in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Christopher C; Pinker, Katja; Ulaner, Gary A; Ong, Leonard T; Baltzer, Pascal; Jochelson, Maxine S; McArthur, Heather L; Gönen, Mithat; Dickler, Maura; Weber, Wolfgang A

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) for the prediction of progression-free survival (PFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) in patients with stage IV breast cancer undergoing systemic therapy. Sixty-five patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with first- or second-line systemic therapy in prospective clinical trials were included. Response to treatment was evaluated by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 for CE-CT and by PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST), respectively. All responders by RECIST (n = 22) were also responders by PERCIST, but 40% (17/43) of non-responders by RECIST were responders by PERCIST. Responses according to RECIST and PERCIST both correlated with PFS, but PERCIST showed a significantly higher predictive accuracy (concordance index for PFS: 0.70 vs. 0.60). One-year PFS for responders vs. non-responders by RECIST was 59% vs. 27%, compared to 63% vs. 0% by PERCIST. Four-year DSS of responders and non-responders by RECIST was 50% and 38%, respectively (p = 0.2, concordance index: 0.55) as compared to 58% vs. 18% for PERCIST (p < 0.001, concordance index: 0.65). Response on PET/CT was also a significantly better predictor for DSS than disease control on CE-CT. In patients with metastatic breast cancer, tumor response on PET/CT appears to be a superior predictor of PFS and DSS than response on CE-CT. Monitoring tumor response by PET/CT may increase the power of clinical trials using tumor response as an endpoint, and may improve patient management in clinical routine.

  17. Mary Budd Rowe: A Storyteller of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchini, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines Mary Budd Rowe's groundbreaking and far-reaching contributions to science education. Rowe is best known for her research on wait-time: the idea that teachers can improve the quality and length of classroom discussions by waiting at least 3 s before and after student responses. Her wait-time research grew from and helped…

  18. On Row Rank Equal Column Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalili, Parviz

    2009-01-01

    We will prove a well-known theorem in Linear Algebra, that is, for any "m x n" matrix the dimension of row space and column space are the same. The proof is based on the subject of "elementary matrices" and "reduced row-echelon" form of a matrix.

  19. Rows=Wildlife Corridors: An Urban Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Darrell D.

    1983-01-01

    Linear strips of land associated with highways, electrical transmission lines, gas/oil pipelines (called right-of-way or ROWs) are inhibited by a variety of wildlife and offer a unique opportunity to study the wildlife in the urban setting. Types of wildlife found in and importance of ROWs are discussed. (JN)

  20. On Row Rank Equal Column Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalili, Parviz

    2009-01-01

    We will prove a well-known theorem in Linear Algebra, that is, for any "m x n" matrix the dimension of row space and column space are the same. The proof is based on the subject of "elementary matrices" and "reduced row-echelon" form of a matrix.

  1. Attenuation-based characterization of coronary atherosclerotic plaque: comparison of dual source and dual energy CT with single-source CT and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Thomas; Porubsky, Stefan; Kayed, Hany; Harder, Nils; Krissak, U Radko; Meyer, Mathias; Sueselbeck, Tim; Marx, Alexander; Michaely, Henrik; Schoepf, U Joseph; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Fink, Christian

    2011-10-01

    To compare different CT acquisition techniques regarding for attenuation-based characterization of coronary atherosclerotic plaques using histopathology as the standard of reference. In a post mortem study 17 human hearts were studied with dual-source CT (DSCT) and dual energy CT (DECT) mode on a DSCT as well as with 16-slice single-source CT (SSCT). At autopsy, atherosclerotic lesions were cut at 5 μm sections. Histopathologic classification of the plaques according to the American Heart Association (AHA) criteria was performed by two pathologists. Attenuation values of all plaques were measured in DSCT, DECT and SSCT studies, respectively and classified based on attenuation according to modified AHA criteria. 58 coronary plaques were identified at autopsy. Regardless of the CT technique only 52/58 plaques were found at CT (sensitivity=89.6%). There was no significant difference between the mean attenuation values of different plaque types between DSCT, DECT, and SSCT: type IV: 11HU/8HU/19HU; type Va: 44HU/45HU/52HU; type Vb: 1088HU/966HU/1079HU). The sensitivity for correct classification varied depending on the plaque type (type II=0%, type III=0%, type IV=43%, type Va=58%, Vb=97%). Independent of the used acquisition technique, SSCT, DSCT and DECT show similar results for attenuation-based characterization of atherosclerotic coronary plaques. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. X-ray CT analyses, models and numerical simulations: a comparison with petrophysical analyses in an experimental CO2 study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Steven; Pudlo, Dieter; Enzmann, Frieder; Reitenbach, Viktor; Albrecht, Daniel; Ganzer, Leonhard; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    An essential part of the collaborative research project H2STORE (hydrogen to store), which is funded by the German government, was a comparison of various analytical methods for characterizing reservoir sandstones from different stratigraphic units. In this context Permian, Triassic and Tertiary reservoir sandstones were analysed. Rock core materials, provided by RWE Gasspeicher GmbH (Dortmund, Germany), GDF Suez E&P Deutschland GmbH (Lingen, Germany), E.ON Gas Storage GmbH (Essen, Germany) and RAG Rohöl-Aufsuchungs Aktiengesellschaft (Vienna, Austria), were processed by different laboratory techniques; thin sections were prepared, rock fragments were crushed and cubes of 1 cm edge length and plugs 3 to 5 cm in length with a diameter of about 2.5 cm were sawn from macroscopic homogeneous cores. With this prepared sample material, polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, coupled with image analyses, specific surface area measurements (after Brunauer, Emmet and Teller, 1938; BET), He-porosity and N2-permeability measurements and high-resolution microcomputer tomography (μ-CT), which were used for numerical simulations, were applied. All these methods were practised on most of the same sample material, before and on selected Permian sandstones also after static CO2 experiments under reservoir conditions. A major concern in comparing the results of these methods is an appraisal of the reliability of the given porosity, permeability and mineral-specific reactive (inner) surface area data. The CO2 experiments modified the petrophysical as well as the mineralogical/geochemical rock properties. These changes are detectable by all applied analytical methods. Nevertheless, a major outcome of the high-resolution μ-CT analyses and following numerical data simulations was that quite similar data sets and data interpretations were maintained by the different petrophysical standard methods. Moreover, the μ-CT analyses are not only time saving, but also

  3. Analysis of death in major trauma: value of prompt post mortem computed tomography (pmCT) in comparison to office hour autopsy.

    PubMed

    Schmitt-Sody, Markus; Kurz, Stefanie; Reiser, Maximilian; Kanz, Karl Georg; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Peschel, Oliver; Kirchhoff, Sonja

    2016-03-29

    To analyze diagnostic accuracy of prompt post mortem Computed Tomography (pmCT) in determining causes of death in patients who died during trauma room management and to compare the results to gold standard autopsy during office hours. Multiple injured patients who died during trauma room care were enrolled. PmCT was performed immediately followed by autopsy during office hours. PmCT and autopsy were analyzed primarily regarding pmCT ability to find causes of death and secondarily to define exact causes of death including accurate anatomic localizations. For the secondary analysis data was divided in group-I with equal results of pmCT and autopsy, group-II with autopsy providing superior results and group-III with pmCT providing superior information contributing to but not majorly causing death. Seventeen multiple trauma patients were enrolled. Since multiple trauma patients were enrolled more injuries than patients are provided. Eight patients sustained deadly head injuries (47.1%), 11 chest (64.7%), 4 skeletal system (23.5%) injuries and one patient drowned (5.8%). Primary analysis revealed in 16/17 patients (94.1%) causes of death in accordance with autopsy. Secondary analysis revealed in 9/17 cases (group-I) good agreement of autopsy and pmCT. In seven cases autopsy provided superior results (group-II) whereas in 1 case pmCT found more information (group-III). The presented work studied the diagnostic value of pmCT in defining causes of death in comparison to standard autopsy. Primary analysis revealed that in 94.1% of cases pmCT was able to define causes of death even if only indirect signs were present. Secondary analysis showed that pmCT and autopsy showed equal results regarding causes of death in 52.9%. PmCT is useful in traumatic death allowing for an immediate identification of causes of death and providing detailed information on bony lesions, brain injuries and gas formations. It is advisable to conduct pmCT especially in cases without consent to

  4. Vascular enhancement and image quality of CT venography: comparison of standard and low kilovoltage settings.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Atsuko; Matsuoka, Shin; Kuramochi, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Tatsuo; Yagihashi, Kunihiro; Kurihara, Yasuyuki; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2011-10-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate the vascular enhancement and image quality of CT venography (CTV) with a lower peak kilovoltage (kVp) setting than the standard setting. In this retrospective study, the clinical records of 100 consecutive patients with suspected pulmonary embolism were analyzed. All patients underwent pulmonary CT angiography and CTV of the abdomen, pelvis, and lower extremities using 64-MDCT with automatic tube current modulation: 50 patients underwent CT at 120 kVp, the standard kVp setting, and 50 patients were scanned at 100 kVp; we refer to these groups as the "standard-kVp group" and the "low-kVp group," respectively. Vessel enhancement and image noise were assessed in the inferior vena cava (IVC), femoral vein, and popliteal vein. Two radiologists who were blinded to the kVp setting placed the regions of interest on vessels by consensus and assessed image quality using a 5-point visual scale. Effective dose was estimated using the dose-length product. The Wilcoxon rank test was used to evaluate differences between the two groups using statistics software (JMP, version 5.1). A p value of less than 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. Mean vascular enhancement was significantly higher in the low-kVp group than in the standard-kVp group: IVC, 138.4 ± 12.2 (SD) HU versus 164.5 ± 17.4 HU, respectively; femoral vein, 130.2 ± 18.0 HU versus 152.0 ± 24.5 HU; and popliteal vein, 136.7 ± 17.5 HU versus 158.3 ± 26.0 HU. Although the images of the low-kVp group had significantly higher image noise, there were no significant differences in image quality in the IVC and popliteal vein. The mean effective dose for the low-kVp protocol was significantly lower than that for the standard-kVp protocol. Lowering the kVp setting for CTV examinations improved vascular enhancement while providing sufficient image quality.

  5. Three dimensional dose distribution comparison of simple and complex acquisition trajectories in dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Jainil P.; Mann, Steve D.; McKinley, Randolph L.; Tornai, Martin P.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: A novel breast CT system capable of arbitrary 3D trajectories has been developed to address cone beam sampling insufficiency as well as to image further into the patient’s chest wall. The purpose of this study was to characterize any trajectory-related differences in 3D x-ray dose distribution in a pendant target when imaged with different orbits. Methods: Two acquisition trajectories were evaluated: circular azimuthal (no-tilt) and sinusoidal (saddle) orbit with ±15° tilts around a pendant breast, using Monte Carlo simulations as well as physical measurements. Simulations were performed with tungsten (W) filtration of a W-anode source; the simulated source flux was normalized to the measured exposure of a W-anode source. A water-filled cylindrical phantom was divided into 1 cm{sup 3} voxels, and the cumulative energy deposited was tracked in each voxel. Energy deposited per voxel was converted to dose, yielding the 3D distributed dose volumes. Additionally, three cylindrical phantoms of different diameters (10, 12.5, and 15 cm) and an anthropomorphic breast phantom, initially filled with water (mimicking pure fibroglandular tissue) and then with a 75% methanol-25% water mixture (mimicking 50–50 fibroglandular-adipose tissues), were used to simulate the pendant breast geometry and scanned on the physical system. Ionization chamber calibrated radiochromic film was used to determine the dose delivered in a 2D plane through the center of the volume for a fully 3D CT scan using the different orbits. Results: Measured experimental results for the same exposure indicated that the mean dose measured throughout the central slice for different diameters ranged from 3.93 to 5.28 mGy, with the lowest average dose measured on the largest cylinder with water mimicking a homogeneously fibroglandular breast. These results align well with the cylinder phantom Monte Carlo studies which also showed a marginal difference in dose delivered by a saddle trajectory in the

  6. BrachyView: multiple seed position reconstruction and comparison with CT post-implant dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnaghy, S.; Loo, K. J.; Cutajar, D. L.; Jalayer, M.; Tenconi, C.; Favoino, M.; Rietti, R.; Tartaglia, M.; Carriero, F.; Safavi-Naeini, M.; Bucci, J.; Jakubek, J.; Pospisil, S.; Zaider, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Petasecca, M.

    2016-05-01

    BrachyView is a novel in-body imaging system utilising high-resolution pixelated silicon detectors (Timepix) and a pinhole collimator for brachytherapy source localisation. Recent studies have investigated various options for real-time intraoperative dynamic dose treatment planning to increase the quality of implants. In a previous proof-of-concept study, the justification of the pinhole concept was shown, allowing for the next step whereby multiple active seeds are implanted into a PMMA phantom to simulate a more realistic clinical scenario. In this study, 20 seeds were implanted and imaged using a lead pinhole of 400 μ m diameter. BrachyView was able to resolve the seed positions within 1-2 mm of expected positions, which was verified by co-registering with a full clinical post-implant CT scan.

  7. Feasibility of low-concentration iodinated contrast medium with lower-tube-voltage dual-source CT aortography using iterative reconstruction: comparison with automatic exposure control CT aortography.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Jeong; Kim, Song Soo; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Jeong, Jin-Ok; Jin, Seon Ah; Shin, Byung Seok; Shin, Kyung-Sook; Ahn, Moonsang

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of low-concentration contrast medium (CM) for vascular enhancement, image quality, and radiation dose on computed tomography aortography (CTA) using a combined low-tube-voltage and iterative reconstruction (IR) technique. Ninety subjects underwent dual-source CT (DSCT) operating in dual-source, high-pitch mode. DSCT scans were performed using both high-concentration CM (Group A, n = 50; Iomeprol 400) and low-concentration CM (Group B, n = 40; Iodixanol 270). Group A was scanned using a reference tube potential of 120 kVp and 120 reference mAs under automatic exposure control with IR. Group B was scanned using low-tube-voltage (80 or 100 kVp if body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2)) at a fixed current of 150 mAs, along with IR. Images of the two groups were compared regarding attenuation, image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), iodine load, and radiation dose in various locations of the CTA. In comparison between Group A and Group B, the average mean attenuation (454.73 ± 86.66 vs. 515.96 ± 101.55 HU), SNR (25.28 ± 4.34 vs. 31.29 ± 4.58), and CNR (21.83 ± 4.20 vs. 27.55 ± 4.81) on CTA in Group B showed significantly greater values and significantly lower image noise values (18.76 ± 2.19 vs. 17.48 ± 3.34) than those in Group A (all Ps < 0.05). Homogeneous contrast enhancement from the ascending thoracic aorta to the infrarenal abdominal aorta was significantly superior in Group B (P < 0.05). Low-concentration CM and a low-tube-voltage combination technique using IR is a feasible method, showing sufficient contrast enhancement and image quality.

  8. Comparison of manual vs. automated multimodality (CT-MRI) image registration for brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Abhirup; Santiago, Roberto J.; Smith, Ryan; Kassaee, Alireza . E-mail: Kassaee@xrt.upenn.edu

    2005-03-31

    Computed tomgoraphy-magnetic resonance imaging (CT-MRI) registrations are routinely used for target-volume delineation of brain tumors. We clinically use 2 software packages based on manual operation and 1 automated package with 2 different algorithms: chamfer matching using bony structures, and mutual information using intensity patterns. In all registration algorithms, a minimum of 3 pairs of identical anatomical and preferably noncoplanar landmarks is used on each of the 2 image sets. In manual registration, the program registers these points and links the image sets using a 3-dimensional (3D) transformation. In automated registration, the 3 landmarks are used as an initial starting point and further processing is done to complete the registration. Using our registration packages, registration of CT and MRI was performed on 10 patients. We scored the results of each registration set based on the amount of time spent, the accuracy reported by the software, and a final evaluation. We evaluated each software program by measuring the residual error between 'matched' points on the right and left globes and the posterior fossa for fused image slices. In general, manual registration showed higher misalignment between corresponding points compared to automated registration using intensity matching. This error had no directional dependence and was, most of the time, larger for a larger structure in both registration techniques. Automated algorithm based on intensity matching also gave the best results in terms of registration accuracy, irrespective of whether or not the initial landmarks were chosen carefully, when compared to that done using bone matching algorithm. Intensity-matching algorithm required the least amount of user-time and provided better accuracy.

  9. Comparisons of obesity assessments in over-weight elementary students using anthropometry, BIA, CT and DEXA.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ok-Kyeong; Rhee, Yang-Keun; Park, Tae-Sun; Cha, Youn-Soo

    2010-04-01

    Obesity was characterized in Korean elementary students using different obesity assessment tests on 103 overweight elementary students from three schools of Jeonbuk Province. The body mass index (BMI) and obesity index (OI) were compared, and the data using DEXA and CT were compared with the data using BIA and a tape measure. The results of this study are as follows: first, 27 students who were classified as obese by OI were classified as overweight by BMI, and 3 students who were classified as standard weight by BMI were classified as overweight by OI. Secondly, by DEXA and BIA measurements, there was 1.51% difference in body fat percentage (boys 1.66%, girls 1.17%) and the difference in body fat mass between boys and girls was 0.77 kg (boys 0.85 kg, girls 0.59 kg), but those differences in body fat percentage and mass were not statistically significant. Thirdly, the average total abdominal fat (TAF) measured by CT scans of obese children was more significantly related with subcutaneous fat (r = 0.983, P < 0.01) than visceral fat (r = 0.640, P < 0.01). Also, TAF were highest significant with waist circumference by a tape measure (r = 0.744, P < 0.01). In summary, as there are some differences of assessment results between two obesity test methods (BMI, OI), we need more definite standards to determine the degree of obesity. The BIA seems to be the most simple and effective way to measure body fat mass, whereas waist/hip ratio (WHR) using a tape measurer is considered to be the most effective method for assessing abdominal fat in elementary students.

  10. Comparison of CT duodeno-cholangiopancreatography to ERCP for assessing biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kielar, Ania; Toa, Hardy; Sekar, Arni; Mimeault, Richard; Jaffey, James

    2005-01-01

    The authors have developed a CT protocol, CT duodeno-cholangiopancreatography (CDCP), which is performed during a single contrast-enhanced phase, proceeding cranially, allowing enhancement of the pancreas during its parenchymal phase followed by enhancement of the liver during its portal-venous phase. This retrospective pilot study evaluates CDCP compared with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) as a diagnostic tool for assessing the cause and level of biliary obstruction. Forty-one patients with jaundice underwent CDCP and ERCP between October 2002 and May 2004. Pathologic confirmation was obtained in 31 of the 41 (76%) patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and kappa values of CDCP and ERCP compared with pathology were calculated for tumors and stones. Pathology-proven cases included 7 cases of stones, 23 tumors, and 1 other cause of obstruction. The overall level of agreement of diagnoses between CDCP and pathology was 29 of 31 (93.5%); that between CDCP and ERCP was 36 of 41 (88%). Comparing CDCP to pathology for tumors, the sensitivity was 100%, the specificity was 89%, and the kappa was 0.92 (95% CI 0.76-1.0). For stone detection, CDCP had a sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 100%, and a kappa value of 0.90 (95% CI 0.72-1.0). For level of obstruction of the common bile duct, comparing CDCP to ERCP, observations agreed in 31 of the 36 (86%) cases; for the pancreatic duct, observations agreed in 24 of the 25 (96%) cases. CDCP is a noninvasive diagnostic tool that can be used to assess the cause and level of obstruction. A blinded prospective study would be valuable to further assess the merits of CDCP.

  11. CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous drainage: comparison of the one step and the Seldinger techniques.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Kenji; Yamagami, Takuji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Baba, Yasutaka; Nakamura, Yuko; Fukumoto, Wataru; Awai, Kazuo

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the one step technique compared with the Seldinger technique in computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous drainage of abdominal and pelvic abscess. Seventy-six consecutive patients (49 men, 27 women; mean age 63.5 years, range 19-87 years) with abdominal and pelvic abscess were included in this study. Drainages were performed with the one step (n = 46) and with the Seldinger (n = 48) technique between September 2012 and June 2014. The technical success and clinical success rates were 95.8% and 93.5%, respectively, for the one step group, and 97.8% and 95.7%, respectively, for the Seldinger group. The mean procedure time was significantly shorter with the one step than with the Seldinger method (15.0 ± 4.3 min, range 10-29 min vs. 21.0 ± 9.5 min, range 13-54 min, p < .01). The mean abscess size and depth were 73.4 ± 44.0 mm and 42.5 ± 19.3 mm, respectively, in the one step group, and 61.0 ± 22.8 mm and 35.0 ± 20.7 mm in the Seldinger group. The one step technique was easier and faster than the Seldinger technique. The effectiveness of both techniques was similar for the CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous drainage of abdominal and pelvic abscess.

  12. Diagnostic Performance of Dual-Energy CT Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: Direct Comparison With Cardiovascular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sung Min; Song, Meong Gun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion dual-energy CT (DECT) and its incremental value when used with coronary CT angiography (CTA) for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS One hundred patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease without chronic myocardial infarction detected with coronary CTA underwent stress perfusion DECT, stress cardiovascular perfusion MRI, and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stress perfusion DECT and cardiovascular stress perfusion MR images were used for detecting perfusion defects. Coronary CTA and ICA were evaluated in the detection of ≥ 50% coronary stenosis. The diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detecting hemodynamically significant stenosis was assessed before and after stress perfusion DECT on a pervessel basis with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI as the reference standard. RESULTS The performance of stress perfusion DECT compared with cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI on a per-vessel basis in the detection of perfusion defects was sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 74%; positive predictive value, 73%; negative predictive value, 90%. Per segment, these values were sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 80%; positive predictive value, 63%; and negative predictive value, 88%. Compared with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI per vessel territory the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary CTA were 95%, 61%, 61%, and 95%. The values for stress perfusion DECT were 92%, 72%, 68%, and 94%. The values for coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT were 88%, 79%, 73%, and 91%. The ROC AUC increased from 0.78 to 0.84 (p = 0.02) with the use of coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT compared with coronary CTA alone. CONCLUSION Stress perfusion DECT plays a complementary role in enhancing the accuracy of coronary CTA for identifying hemodynamically

  13. Dynamic volume CT: the next revolution in clinical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boedeker, Kirsten; Mather, Rich

    2008-08-01

    The need for table motion in multi-detector CT causes image volumes acquired for whole organ motion and perfusion studies to lack temporal uniformity. The next revolution in clinical CT, dynamic volume CT, mitigates this limitation by providing the ability to acquire an entire organ with isotropic resolution in a single gantry rotation with no table movement. The first dynamic volume CT scanner has recently been introduced and comprises 320 detector rows of 0.5mm channel thickness, covering 16cm of anatomy in one rotation of 0.35sec. This scanner offers many advancements in terms of temporal uniformity, reconstruction, and radiation dose. This system significantly reduces motion artifact and eliminates contrast phase differences within the volume. Because this scanner does not require helical acquisition for volumetric imaging, it delivers significantly less dose for applications such as CT coronary angiography exams as well as reduced dose in most other applications. Furthermore, by eliminating table motion, the need for complex interpolation methods that can distort cardiac images is removed. Image quality is not sacrificed compared with standard 64-row CT scanners, as demonstrated via low contrast, resolution, and accuracy measurements presented in this work. By capturing the entire brain in one rotation, brain perfusion, bone subtraction, and quantitative perfusion analysis are now possible with a single low dose exam. Dynamic volume CT offers to change the way medicine approaches stroke patients, myocardial perfusion studies, and imaging of other moving body parts such as the lung and joints.

  14. Galaxies with "rows": A new catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butenko, M. A.; Khoperskov, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    Galaxies with "rows" in Vorontsov-Velyaminov's terminology stand out among the variety of spiral galactic patterns. A characteristic feature of such objects is the sequence of straight-line segments that forms the spiral arm. In 2001 A. Chernin and co-authors published a catalog of such galaxies which includes 204 objects from the Palomar Atlas. In this paper, we supplement the catalog with 276 objects based on an analysis of all the galaxies from the New General Catalogue and Index Catalogue. The total number of NGC and IC galaxies with rows is 406, including the objects of Chernin et al. (2001). The use of more recent galaxy images allowed us to detect more "rows" on average, compared with the catalog of Chernin et al. When comparing the principal galaxy properties we found no significant differences between galaxies with rows and all S-typeNGC/IC galaxies.We discuss twomechanisms for the formation of polygonal structures based on numerical gas-dynamic and collisionless N-body calculations, which demonstrate that a spiral pattern with rows is a transient stage in the evolution of galaxies and a system with a powerful spiral structure can pass through this stage. The hypothesis of A. Chernin et al. (2001) that the occurrence frequency of interacting galaxies is twice higher among galaxies with rows is not confirmed for the combined set of 480 galaxies. The presence of a central stellar bar appears to be a favorable factor for the formation of a system of "rows".

  15. Comparison of CT and MR in 400 patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Waluch, V.; Yadley, R.A.; Wycoff, R.R.

    1984-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) (0.35T) and computed tomography (CT) were compared in 400 consecutive patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord. Of 325 positive diagnoses, MR detected abnormality while CT was normal in 93; MR was more specific in 68; MR and CT gave equivalent information in 129; CT was more specific in 32; and CT was positive while MR was normal in 3. MR was superior to CT in detection of multiple sclerosis, subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy, posterior fossa infarcts and tumors, small extra-axial fluid collections, and cervical syringomyelia. CT was preferable in evaluation of meningiomas and separation of tumor from edema. CT takes less time and may be preferable in patients with acute trauma as well as very young or elderly individuals. Thus the two studies should be considered complementary.

  16. Comparison of 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT in localisation of tumours in ectopic ACTH syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Swati S; Lila, Anurag R; Kasaliwal, Rajeev; Khare, Shruti; Yerawar, Chaitanya G; Hira, Priya; Phadke, Uday; Shah, Hina; Lele, Vikram R; Malhotra, Gaurav; Bandgar, Tushar; Shah, Nalini S

    2016-01-01

    Background Localising ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) syndrome (EAS) tumour source is challenging. Somatostatin receptor-based PET imaging has shown promising results, but the data is limited to case reports and small case series. We reviewed here the performance of 68Ga-DOTANOC positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) in our cohort of 12 consecutive EAS patients. Materials and methods Retrospective data analysis of 12 consecutive patients of EAS presenting to a single tertiary care centre in a period between January 2013 and December 2014 was done. CECT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT were reported (blinded) by an experienced radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician, respectively. The performance of CECT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was compared. Results Tumours could be localised in 11 out of 12 patients at initial presentation (overt cases), whereas in one patient, tumour remained occult. Thirteen lesions were identified in 11 patients as EAS source (true positives). CECT localised 12 out of these 13 lesions (sensitivity 92.3%) and identified five false-positive lesions (positive predictive value (PPV) 70.5%). Compared with false-positive lesions, true-positive lesions had greater mean contrast enhancement at 60s (33.2 vs 5.6 Hounsfield units (HU)). 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was able to identify 9 out of 13 lesions (sensitivity 69.2%) and reported no false-positive lesions (PPV 100%). Conclusion CECT remains the first-line investigation in localisation of EAS. The contrast enhancement pattern on CECT can further aid in characterisation of the lesions. 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT can be added to CECT, to enhance positive prediction of the suggestive lesions. PMID:27006371

  17. Inter-observer agreement of CT measurement of the glenoid bone surface by the CT Pico method: Comparison with laser in a cadaveric model.

    PubMed

    De Filippo, Massimo; Saba, Luca; Negrini, Giulio; Silva, Mario; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe; Pogliacomi, Francesco; Castagna, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to test reproducibility of the CT Pico method in a cadaveric model and to compare CT Pico measurements with a high-precision laser probe for optical scanning. The glenoid surface of ten dried cadaveric scapulae (with intact surface) was measured by and high-precision laser probe for optical scanning, the latter being assumed as a reference standard. Measurements were done according to the Pico technique, using a circle-shaped region of interest (ROI) that was placed on the inferior glenoid rim. Measurements obtained using the CT Pico method (three readers) and with laser were compared to assess differences between radiological assessment and the reference standard. Each observer performed two repeated measurements from each scapulae (20 for each observer). Mean differences between laser measurements and each CT reader were 18.4% (range, -4 to 61%) for reader 1, 12.4% (range, -15 to 64%) for reader 2, and 11% (range, -14 to 58%) for reader 3. Considering all the 60 measurements made by the three readers, 39 measurements out of 60 (65%) were outside the range [-5%; +5%] while 26 measurements (43%) are outside the range [-10%; +10%]. The largest differences (positive and negative) were +64 and -14 %, respectively. Intra-operator reproducibility was high in most cases (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) =0.93, ICC = 0.91, ICC = 0.93 and Lin's Concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) = 0.92, CCC = 0.90, CCC = 0.92 for reader 1 to 3, respectively. However, in five cases the CT Pico measurements showed absolute differences between the first and second measurements that exceeded 10%. The inter-observer variability for CT measurement of the glenoid surface using the CT Pico method was high when compared with laser, in the assessment of glenoid surface in cadaveric specimens, thus the CT Pico method is not reliable and could cause errors in the clinical management of the patient. Level of evidence Level II, Development of

  18. Comparison of PET/CT and whole-mount histopathology sections of the human prostate: a new strategy for voxel-wise evaluation.

    PubMed

    Schiller, F; Fechter, T; Zamboglou, C; Chirindel, A; Salman, N; Jilg, C A; Drendel, V; Werner, M; Meyer, P T; Grosu, A-L; Mix, M

    2017-08-17

    Implementation of PET/CT in diagnosis of primary prostate cancer (PCa) requires a profound knowledge about the tracer, preferably from a quantitative evaluation. Direct visual comparison of PET/CT slices to whole prostate sections is hampered by considerable uncertainties from imperfect coregistration and fundamentally different image modalities. In the current study, we present a novel method for advanced voxel-wise comparison of histopathology from excised prostates to pre-surgical PET. Resected prostates from eight patients who underwent PSMA-PET/CT were scanned (ex vivo CT) and thoroughly pathologically prepared. In vivo and ex vivo CT including histopathology were coregistered with three different methods (manual, semi-/automatic). Spatial overlap after CT-based registration was evaluated with dice similarity (DSC). Furthermore, we constructed 3D cancer distribution models from histopathologic information in various slices. Subsequent smoothing reflected the intrinsically limited spatial resolution of PSMA-PET. The resulting histoPET models were used for quantitative analysis of spatial histopathology-PET pattern agreement focusing on p values and coefficients of determination (R (2)). We examined additional rigid mutual information (MI) coregistration directly based on PSMA-PET and histoPET. Mean DSC for the three different methods (ManReg, ScalFactReg, and DefReg) were 0.79 ± 0.06, 0.82 ± 0.04, and 0.90 ± 0.02, respectively, while quantification of PET-histopathology pattern agreement after CT-based registration revealed R (2) 45.7, 43.2, and 41.3% on average with p < 10(-5). Subsequent PET-based MI coregistration yielded R (2) 61.3, 55.9, and 55.6%, respectively, while implying anatomically plausible transformations. Creating 3D histoPET models based on thorough histopathological preparation allowed sophisticated quantitative analyses showing highly significant correlations between histopathology and (PSMA-)PET. We recommend manual CT

  19. Closing in on the K edge: coronary CT angiography at 100, 80, and 70 kV-initial comparison of a second- versus a third-generation dual-source CT system.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Mathias; Haubenreisser, Holger; Schoepf, U Joseph; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Leidecker, Christianne; Allmendinger, Thomas; Lehmann, Ralf; Sudarski, Sonja; Borggrefe, Martin; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Henzler, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    To prospectively evaluate radiation and contrast medium requirements for performing high-pitch coronary computed tomographic (CT) angiography at 70 kV using a third-generation dual-source CT system in comparison to a second-generation dual-source CT system. All patients gave informed consent for this institutional review board-approved study. Forty-five patients (median age, 52 years; 27 men) were imaged in high-pitch mode with a third-generation dual-source CT system at 70 kV (n = 15) or with a second-generation dual-source CT system at 80 or 100 kV (n = 15 for each). Tube voltage was based on body mass index: 80 or 70 kV for less than 26 kg/m(2) versus 100 kV for 26-30 kg/m(2). For the 80- and 100-kV protocols, 80 mL of contrast material was injected, versus 45 mL for the 70-kV protocol. Data were reconstructed by using a second-generation iterative reconstruction algorithm for second-generation dual-source CT and a recently introduced third-generation iterative reconstruction algorithm for third-generation dual-source CT. Objective image quality was measured for various regions of interest, and subjective image quality was evaluated with a five-point Likert scale. The signal-to-noise ratio of the coronary CT angiography studies acquired with 70 kV was significantly higher (70 kV: 14.3-17.6 vs 80 kV: 7.1-12.9 vs 100 kV: 9.8-12.9; P < .0497) than those acquired with the other two protocols for all coronary arteries. Qualitative image quality analyses revealed no significant differences between the three CT angiography protocols (median score, 5; P > .05). The mean effective dose was 75% and 108% higher (0.92 mSv ± 0.3 [standard deviation] and 0.78 mSv ± 0.2 vs 0.44 mSv ± 0.1; P < .0001), respectively, for the 80- and 100-kV CT angiography protocols than for the 70-kV CT angiography protocol. In nonobese patients, third-generation high-pitch coronary dual-source CT angiography at 70 kV results in robust image quality for studying the coronary arteries, at

  20. Forming Simulation of Thick AFP Laminates and Comparison with Live CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutz, Daniel; Vermilyea, Mark; Bel, Sylvain; Hinterhölzl, Roland

    2016-08-01

    Automated fiber placement (AFP) process can be used to manufacture laminates by laying up unidirectional slit tapes along a desired path and placing multiple layers on top of each other. Usually, the slit tapes are placed direct onto the tooling to attain the final part geometry. Alternatively, the laminate can be built up on a planar substrate and can be subsequently formed into the final shape. This kind of processing allows manufacturing highly curved parts, which may not be possible with the direct placement. In the present work a forming simulation of thick AFP laminates is developed to predict the tapes' orientations and delamination as well as transverse tape spread-ups and separations during the forming process. The simulation model is built up through the material characterization experiments. Validation is performed comparing the results of the simulation vs. the experimental forming on two generic geometries. An optical inspection is made on the external layers of the laminates. In a second step, live computer tomography (CT) scans are used to inspect the tapes within an AFP laminate during forming of an L- and a Z-flange. Tapes re-orientation, gaps and tapes widening are observed experimentally and compared to the simulation results. The simulation is capable to predict the tows orientation and provides indicators concerning the tows spread-up and separation.

  1. [Evaluation of an adaptive filter for CT under low-CNR condition: comparison with linear filter].

    PubMed

    Mori, Issei; Uchida, Miho; Sato, Ami; Sato, Shingo; Tamura, Hajime; Takai, Yoshihiro; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Saito, Haruo; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Ogura, Takahide; Chida, Koichi; Machida, Yoshio

    2009-01-20

    The use of an adaptive filter for CT images is becoming a common procedure and is said to reduce image noise while preserving sharpness and helping to reduce the required X-ray dose. Although many reports support this view, the validity of such evaluations is arguable. When the linearity of a system is in question, physical performance indexes should be measured under conditions similar to those of clinical use. Evaluations of diagnosis using clinical images may be fallible because the non-filtered image used as the reference might not have been optimally reconstructed. We have chosen simple, but commonly used, adaptive filters for our evaluation. As a reference for comparing performance, we designed linear filters that best approximate the noise characteristics of the adaptive filters. MTF is measured through observation of the edge-spread function. Clinical abdominal images are used to compare the performance of adaptive filters and linear filters. We conclude that the performance of the type of adaptive filter we have chosen is virtually the same as that of the linear filter, as long as the image quality of soft tissues is our interest. Both the noise SD and MTF are virtually the same if the contrast of the object is not substantially higher than 150 HU. Images of soft tissues obtained with the use of adaptive filters are also virtually the same as those obtained by linear filters. The edge-preservation characteristic of this adaptive filter is not observable for soft tissues.

  2. Characteristics of false positive findings in CT colonography CAD: a comparison of two fecal tagging regimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morra, Lia; Delsanto, Silvia; Agliozzo, Silvano; Baggio, Riccardo; Belluccio, Erika; Correale, Loredana; Genova, Dario; Bert, Alberto; Regge, Daniele

    2009-02-01

    The successful application of Computer Aided Detection schemes to CT Colonography depends not only on their performances in terms of sensitivity and specificity, but also on the interaction with the radiologist, and thus ultimately on factors such as the nature of CAD prompts and the reading paradigm. Fecal tagging is emerging as a widely accepted technique for patient preparation, and patient-friendlier schemes are being proposed in an effort to increase compliance to screening programs; the interaction between CAD and FT regimens should likewise be taken into account. In this scenario, an analysis of the characteristics of CAD prompts is of paramount importance in order to guide further research, both from clinical and technical viewpoints. The CAD scheme analyzed in this paper is essentially composed of five steps: electronic cleansing, colon surface extraction, polyp candidate segmentation, pre-filtering of residual tagged stool and classification of the generated candidates in true polyps vs. false alarms. False positives were divided into six categories: untagged and tagged solid stool, haustral folds, extra-colonic candidates, ileocecal valve and cleansing artifacts. A full cathartic preparation was compared with a semi-cathartic regimen with sameday fecal tagging, which is characterized by higher patient acceptance but also higher inhomogeneity. The distribution of false positives at segmentation reflects the quality of preparation, as more inhomogeneous tagging results in a higher number of untagged solid stool and cleansing artifacts.

  3. Comparison of multidetector CT and endoscopic ultrasonography in malignant pancreatic mass lesions.

    PubMed

    Arabul, Mahmut; Karakus, Funda; Alper, Emrah; Kandemir, Altay; Celik, Mustafa; Karakus, Volkan; Yucel, Kamil; Unsal, Belkis

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has been shown to be superior to conventional CT in detecting and staging pancreatic cancer. We conducted a prospective trial to compare EUS and MDCT, in discriminating benign/malignant, in determining local and vascular invasion of a suspected pancreatic cancer and deciding its resectability. The study was performed at the Gastroenterology Department of Izmir Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, from June 2009 to June 2010, all patients with suspected pancreatic and periampullary tumors referred to our department were enrolled. A total of 56 patients were evaluated at the beginning. Five patients having distal CBD tumor (n=2), gallbladder tumor (n=1) and papillary tumor (n=2) were excluded from the study. Analysis was done for the remaining 51 patients. For the diagnosis of resectability/unresectability, EUS alone demonstrated a definite role in 4 (9%) of the 43 patients in confirming surgical and pathologic results and MDCT alone demonstrated a definite role in 6 (14%) of the 43 patients in confirming their results. An accurate diagnostic decision regarding resectability/unresectability was accomplished in 27 (63%) patients with EUS and MDCT. While MDCT is clinically quite effective, in terms of a correct resectability/unresectability decision, EUS should also be used.

  4. Mary Budd Rowe: a storyteller of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Julie A.

    2008-12-01

    This article examines Mary Budd Rowe's groundbreaking and far-reaching contributions to science education. Rowe is best known for her research on wait-time: the idea that teachers can improve the quality and length of classroom discussions by waiting at least 3 s before and after student responses. Her wait-time research grew from and helped inform her staunch advocacy of science education as inquiry; Rowe saw wonder and excitement as central to the teaching and learning of science. She spent much of her professional life designing professional development experiences and innovative curriculum materials to help teachers, particularly elementary school teachers, enact inquiry in their classrooms.

  5. Memory hierarchy using row-based compression

    DOEpatents

    Loh, Gabriel H.; O'Connor, James M.

    2016-10-25

    A system includes a first memory and a device coupleable to the first memory. The device includes a second memory to cache data from the first memory. The second memory includes a plurality of rows, each row including a corresponding set of compressed data blocks of non-uniform sizes and a corresponding set of tag blocks. Each tag block represents a corresponding compressed data block of the row. The device further includes decompression logic to decompress data blocks accessed from the second memory. The device further includes compression logic to compress data blocks to be stored in the second memory.

  6. A comparison between a SNOMED CT problem list and the ICD-10-CM/PCS HIPAA code sets.

    PubMed

    Steindel, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    In 2013 the United States will convert from the use of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) to the use of the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification/Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-CM/PCS). This study compares the approximately 5,000 terms in the July 2009 Clinical Observations Recording and Encoding (CORE) Problem List subset of the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) terminology produced by the National Library of Medicine with terms found in the January 2009 versions of ICD-10-CM/PCS. The comparison was done by a single individual and used the internally defined concepts of "Exact," "Inexact," "Model" (one SNOMED CT term to many ICD-10-CM/PCS terms), "Not Elsewhere Classified," "Not Otherwise Specified," "Synonym," and "Not Found" to classify the CORE Problem List terms according to the quality of the match. Among the CORE Problem List terms, 6.0 percent were not found in ICD-10-CM/PCS, and 69.1 percent had equivalent ICD-10-CM/PCS terms. The 13.0 percent of terms classified as "Inexact" could also be used directly assuming some acceptable loss of clinical precision. The 11.9 percent of terms classified as "Model" represent differences that require rule-based mapping. The results of this study suggest that ICD-10-CM/PCS meets the intended design goal of increased clinical precision but studies are needed to precisely define the depth of coverage.

  7. Differentiation of central lung cancer from atelectasis: comparison of diffusion-weighted MRI with PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui-Meng; Li, Long; Wei, Xin-Hua; Guo, Yong-Mei; Huang, Yun-Hai; Lai, Li-Sha; Chen, A-Mei; Liu, Guo-Shun; Xiong, Wei-Feng; Luo, Liang-Ping; Jiang, Xin-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Prospectively assess the performance of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) for differentiation of central lung cancer from atelectasis. 38 consecutive lung cancer patients (26 males, 12 females; age range: 28-71 years; mean age: 49 years) who were referred for thoracic MR imaging examinations were enrolled. MR examinations were performed using a 1.5-T clinical scanner and scanning sequences of T1WI, T2WI, and DWI. Cancers and atelectasis were measured by mapping of the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) obtained with a b-value of 500 s/mm(2). PET/CT and DW-MR allowed differentiation of tumor and atelectasis in all 38 cases, but T2WI did not allow differentiation in 9 cases. Comparison of conventional T2WI and DW-MRI indicated a higher contrast noise ratio of the central lung carcinoma than the atelectasis by DW-MRI. ADC maps indicated significantly lower mean ADC in the central lung carcinoma than in the atelectasis (1.83±0.58 vs. 2.90±0.26 mm(2)/s, p<0.0001). ADC values of small cell lung carcinoma were significantly greater than those from squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma (p<0.0001 for both). DW-MR imaging provides valuable information not obtained by conventional MR and may be useful for differentiation of central lung carcinoma from atelectasis. Future developments may allow DW-MR imaging to be used as an alternative to PET-CT in imaging of patients with lung cancer.

  8. Differentiation of Central Lung Cancer from Atelectasis: Comparison of Diffusion-Weighted MRI with PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui-Meng; Li, Long; Wei, Xin-Hua; Guo, Yong-Mei; Huang, Yun-Hai; Lai, Li-Sha; Chen, A-Mei; Liu, Guo-Shun; Xiong, Wei-Feng; Luo, Liang-Ping; Jiang, Xin-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Objective Prospectively assess the performance of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) for differentiation of central lung cancer from atelectasis. Materials and Methods 38 consecutive lung cancer patients (26 males, 12 females; age range: 28–71 years; mean age: 49 years) who were referred for thoracic MR imaging examinations were enrolled. MR examinations were performed using a 1.5-T clinical scanner and scanning sequences of T1WI, T2WI, and DWI. Cancers and atelectasis were measured by mapping of the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) obtained with a b-value of 500 s/mm2. Results PET/CT and DW-MR allowed differentiation of tumor and atelectasis in all 38 cases, but T2WI did not allow differentiation in 9 cases. Comparison of conventional T2WI and DW-MRI indicated a higher contrast noise ratio of the central lung carcinoma than the atelectasis by DW-MRI. ADC maps indicated significantly lower mean ADC in the central lung carcinoma than in the atelectasis (1.83±0.58 vs. 2.90±0.26 mm2/s, p<0.0001). ADC values of small cell lung carcinoma were significantly greater than those from squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma (p<0.0001 for both). Conclusions DW-MR imaging provides valuable information not obtained by conventional MR and may be useful for differentiation of central lung carcinoma from atelectasis. Future developments may allow DW-MR imaging to be used as an alternative to PET-CT in imaging of patients with lung cancer. PMID:23593186

  9. Comparisons of Derived Metrics from Computed Tomography (CT) Scanned Images of Fluvial Sediment from Gravel-Bed Flume Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voepel, Hal; Ahmed, Sharif; Hodge, Rebecca; Leyland, Julian; Sear, David

    2016-04-01

    Uncertainty in bedload estimates for gravel bed rivers is largely driven by our inability to characterize arrangement, orientation and resultant forces of fluvial sediment in river beds. Water working of grains leads to structural differences between areas of the bed through particle sorting, packing, imbrication, mortaring and degree of bed armoring. In this study, non-destructive, micro-focus X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging in 3D is used to visualize, quantify and assess the internal geometry of sections of a flume bed that have been extracted keeping their fabric intact. Flume experiments were conducted at 1:1 scaling of our prototype river. From the volume, center of mass, points of contact, and protrusion of individual grains derived from 3D scan data we estimate 3D static force properties at the grain-scale such as pivoting angles, buoyancy and gravity forces, and local grain exposure. Here metrics are derived for images from two flume experiments: one with a bed of coarse grains (>4mm) and the other where sand and clay were incorporated into the coarse flume bed. In addition to deriving force networks, comparison of metrics such as critical shear stress, pivot angles, grain distributions, principle axis orientation, and pore space over depth are made. This is the first time bed stability has been studied in 3D using CT scanned images of sediment from the bed surface to depths well into the subsurface. The derived metrics, inter-granular relationships and characterization of bed structures will lead to improved bedload estimates with reduced uncertainty, as well as improved understanding of relationships between sediment structure, grain size distribution and channel topography.

  10. Low dose chest CT protocol (50 mAs) as a routine protocol for comprehensive assessment of intrathoracic abnormality.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Nishino, Mizuki; Lin, Pei-Jan; Gautam, Shiva; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic capability of low-dose CT (50 mAs) in comparison to standard-dose CT (150 mAs). Fifty-nine consecutive patients underwent two non-contrast chest CT scans with different current-time products (50 and 150 mAs at 120 kVp) on a 64-detector row CT scanner. Three board certified chest radiologists independently reviewed 118 series of 2 mm-thick images (2 series for each of 59 patients) in a random order. The readers assessed abnormal findings including emphysema, ground-glass opacity, reticular opacity, micronodules, bronchiectasis, honeycomb, nodules (>5 mm), aortic aneurysm, coronary artery calcification, pericardial and pleural effusion, pleural thickening, mediastinal tumor and lymph node enlargement. Five-point scale from 1 (definitely absent) to 5 (definitely present) was used to record the results. The rates of score agreement between two images were calculated. Deviation of one observer's score from other two observers was compared between low dose CT and standard dose CT. Mean agreement rate of the lung parenchymal findings between low dose CT and standard dose CT images was 0.836 (range, 0.746-0.926). Mean agreement rates for mediastinal and pleural findings were 0.920 (range, 0.735-1.000). There was no statistically significant difference in the deviation of the observers' scores between low-dose CT and standard-dose CT. Low dose CT protocol at 50 mAs can produce the screening results consistent with standard dose CT protocol (150 mAs), supporting routine use of low dose chest CT protocol.

  11. Pulmonary Thermal Ablation: Comparison of Radiofrequency and Microwave Devices by Using Gross Pathologic and CT Findings in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Brace, Christopher L.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Laeseke, Paul F.; Sampson, Lisa A.; Lee, Fred T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of equivalently sized radiofrequency and microwave ablation applicators in a normal porcine lung model. Materials and Methods: All experiments were approved by an institutional animal care and use committee. A total of 18 ablations were performed in vivo in normal porcine lungs. By using computed tomographic (CT) fluoroscopic guidance, a 17-gauge cooled triaxial microwave antenna (n = 9) and a 17-gauge cooled radiofrequency (RF) electrode (n = 9) were placed percutaneously. Ablations were performed for 10 minutes by using either 125 W of microwave power or 200 W of RF power delivered with an impedance-based pulsing algorithm. CT images were acquired every minute during ablation to monitor growth. Animals were sacrificed after the procedure. Ablation zones were then excised and sectioned transverse to the applicator in 5-mm increments. Minimum and maximum diameter, cross-sectional area, length, and circularity were measured from gross specimens and CT images. Comparisons of each measurement were performed by using a mixed-effects model; P < .05 was considered to indicate a significant difference. Results: Mean diameter (3.32 cm ± 0.19 [standard deviation] vs 2.70 cm ± 0.23, P < .001) was 25% larger with microwave ablation and mean cross-sectional area (8.25 cm2 ± 0.92 vs 5.45 cm2 ± 1.14, P < .001) was 50% larger with microwave ablation, compared with RF ablation. With microwave ablation, the zones of ablation were also significantly more circular in cross section (mean circularity, 0.90 ± 0.06 vs 0.82 ± 0.09; P < .05). One small pneumothorax was noted during RF ablation but stabilized without intervention. Conclusion: Microwave ablation with a 17-gauge high-power triaxial antenna creates larger and more circular zones of ablation than does a similarly sized RF applicator in a preclinical animal model. Microwave ablation may be a more effective treatment of lung tumors. © RSNA, 2009 PMID:19336667

  12. Effect of row-to-row shading on the output of flat-plate south-facing photovoltaic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, D.Y.; Hassan, A.Y.; Collis, J. ); Stefanakos, E.K. )

    1989-08-01

    When solar arrays (photovoltaic, thermal, etc.) are arranged in multiple rows of modules, all but the first row suffer reduction in (power) output, even when sufficient spacing between rows is provided. The reduction in output power occurs because the first row prevents some of the diffuse and reflected radiation from reaching the row directly behind it. This work presents estimates of the effect of shading on the amounts of solar radiation received by consecutive rows of flat-plate arrays.

  13. Does management intensity in inter rows effect soil physical properties in Austrian and Romanian vineyards?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Thomas; Strauss, Peter; Stiper, Katrin; Klipa, Vladimir; Popescu, Daniela; Winter, Silvia; Zaller, Johann G.

    2016-04-01

    Successful viticulture is mainly influenced by soil and climate. The availability of water during the growing season highly influences wine quality and quantity. To protect soil from being eroded most of the winegrowers keep the inter row zones of the vineyards green. Greening also helps to provide water-stress to the grapes for harvesting high quality wines. However, these greening strategies concerning the intensity of inter row management differ from farm to farm and are mainly based on personal experience of the winegrowers. However to what extent different inter row management practices affect soil physical properties are not clearly understood yet. To measure possible effects of inter row management in vineyards on soil physical parameters we selected paired vineyards with different inter row management in Austria and Romania. In total more than 7000 soil analysis were conducted for saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, soil water retention, water stable aggregates, total organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, potassium, phosphorous, soil texture, bulk density and water infiltration. The comparison between high intensity management with at least one soil disturbance per year, medium intensity with one soil disturbance every second inter row per year and low intensity management with no soil disturbance since at least 5 years indicates that investigated soil physical properties did not improve for the upper soil layer (3-8cm). This is in contrast to general perceptions of improved soil physical properties due to low intensity of inter row management, i.e. permanent vegetated inter rows. This may be attributed to long term and high frequency mechanical stress by agricultural machinery in inter rows.

  14. Noise performance of low-dose CT: comparison between an energy integrating detector and a photon counting detector using a whole-body research photon counting CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Kappler, Steffen; Hahn, Katharina; Li, Zhoubo; Halaweish, Ahmed F; Henning, Andre; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-10-01

    Photon counting detector (PCD)-based computed tomography (CT) is an emerging imaging technique. Compared to conventional energy integrating detector (EID)-based CT, PCD-CT is able to exclude electronic noise that may severely impair image quality at low photon counts. This work focused on comparing the noise performance at low doses between the PCD and EID subsystems of a whole-body research PCD-CT scanner, both qualitatively and quantitatively. An anthropomorphic thorax phantom was scanned, and images of the shoulder portion were reconstructed. The images were visually and quantitatively compared between the two subsystems in terms of streak artifacts, an indicator of the impact of electronic noise. Furthermore, a torso-shaped water phantom was scanned using a range of tube currents. The product of the noise and the square root of the tube current was calculated, normalized, and compared between the EID and PCD subsystems. Visual assessment of the thorax phantom showed that electronic noise had a noticeably stronger degrading impact in the EID images than in the PCD images. The quantitative results indicated that in low-dose situations, electronic noise had a noticeable impact (up to a 5.8% increase in magnitude relative to quantum noise) on the EID images, but negligible impact on the PCD images.

  15. Comparison of human and Hotelling observer performance for a fan-beam CT signal detection task

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Adrian A.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Reiser, Ingrid; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A human observer study was performed for a signal detection task for the case of fan-beam x-ray computed tomography. Hotelling observer (HO) performance was calculated for the same detection task without the use of efficient channels. By considering the full image covariance produced by the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm and avoiding the use of channels in the computation of HO performance, the authors establish an absolute upper bound on signal detectability. Therefore, this study serves as a baseline for relating human and ideal observer performance in the case of fan-beam CT. Methods: Eight human observers participated in a two-alternative forced choice experiment where the signal of interest was a small simulated ellipsoid in the presence of independent, identically distributed Gaussian detector noise. Theoretical performance of the HO, which is equivalent to the ideal observer in this case (see Sec. 13.2.12 in Barrett and Myers [Foundations of Image Science (Wiley, Hoboken, NJ, 2004)], was also computed and compared to the performance of the human observers. In addition to a reference FBP implementation, two FBP implementations with inherent loss of HO signal detectability (e.g., by apodizing the ramp filter) were also investigated. Each of these latter two implementations takes the form of a discrete-to-discrete linear operator (i.e., a matrix), which has a nontrivial null-space resulting in the loss of detectability. Results: Estimated observer detectability index (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal}\\begin{document}$\\hat{d}_A$\\end{document}d^A) values for the human observers and SNR values for the HO were obtained. While Hanning filtering in the FBP implementation with a cutoff frequency of 1/4 of the Nyquist frequency reduces HO SNR (due to the reconstruction matrix's nontrivial null-space), this filtering was shown to consistently improve human observer performance. By contrast, increasing the image pixel size was seen to have a comparable

  16. Efficacy and safety of CT-P13 (biosimilar infliximab) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: comparison between switching from reference infliximab to CT-P13 and continuing CT-P13 in the PLANETRA extension study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Dae Hyun; Prodanovic, Nenad; Jaworski, Janusz; Miranda, Pedro; Ramiterre, Edgar; Lanzon, Allan; Baranauskaite, Asta; Wiland, Piotr; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Oparanov, Boycho; Smiyan, Svitlana; Kim, HoUng; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, SuYeon; Park, Won

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of switching from the infliximab reference product (RP; Remicade) to its biosimilar CT-P13 (Remsima, Inflectra) or continuing CT-P13 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for an additional six infusions. Methods This open-label extension study recruited patients with RA who had completed the 54-week, randomised, parallel-group study comparing CT-P13 with RP (PLANETRA; NCT01217086). CT-P13 (3 mg/kg) was administered intravenously every 8 weeks from weeks 62 to 102. All patients received concomitant methotrexate. Endpoints included American College of Rheumatology 20% (ACR20) response, ACR50, ACR70, immunogenicity and safety. Data were analysed for patients who received CT-P13 for 102 weeks (maintenance group) and for those who received RP for 54 weeks and then switched to CT-P13 (switch group). Results Overall, 302 of 455 patients who completed the PLANETRA study enrolled into the extension. Of these, 158 had received CT-P13 (maintenance group) and 144 RP (switch group). Response rates at week 102 for maintenance versus switch groups, respectively, were 71.7% vs 71.8% for ACR20, 48.0% vs 51.4% for ACR50 and 24.3% vs 26.1% for ACR70. The proportion of patients with antidrug antibodies was comparable between groups (week 102: 40.3% vs 44.8%, respectively). Treatment-emergent adverse events occurred in similar proportions of patients in the two groups during the extension study (53.5% and 53.8%, respectively). Conclusions Comparable efficacy and tolerability were observed in patients who switched from RP to its biosimilar CT-P13 for an additional year and in those who had long-term CT-P13 treatment for 2 years. Trial registration number NCT01571219; Results. PMID:27130908

  17. Comparison of Perfusion CT Software to Predict the Final Infarct Volume After Thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Austein, Friederike; Riedel, Christian; Kerby, Tina; Meyne, Johannes; Binder, Andreas; Lindner, Thomas; Huhndorf, Monika; Wodarg, Fritz; Jansen, Olav

    2016-09-01

    Computed tomographic perfusion represents an interesting physiological imaging modality to select patients for reperfusion therapy in acute ischemic stroke. The purpose of our study was to determine the accuracy of different commercial perfusion CT software packages (Philips (A), Siemens (B), and RAPID (C)) to predict the final infarct volume (FIV) after mechanical thrombectomy. Single-institutional computed tomographic perfusion data from 147 mechanically recanalized acute ischemic stroke patients were postprocessed. Ischemic core and FIV were compared about thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (TICI) score and time interval to reperfusion. FIV was measured at follow-up imaging between days 1 and 8 after stroke. In 118 successfully recanalized patients (TICI 2b/3), a moderately to strongly positive correlation was observed between ischemic core and FIV. The highest accuracy and best correlation are shown in early and fully recanalized patients (Pearson r for A=0.42, B=0.64, and C=0.83; P<0.001). Bland-Altman plots and boxplots demonstrate smaller ranges in package C than in A and B. Significant differences were found between the packages about over- and underestimation of the ischemic core. Package A, compared with B and C, estimated more than twice as many patients with a malignant stroke profile (P<0.001). Package C best predicted hypoperfusion volume in nonsuccessfully recanalized patients. Our study demonstrates best accuracy and approximation between the results of a fully automated software (RAPID) and FIV, especially in early and fully recanalized patients. Furthermore, this software package overestimated the FIV to a significantly lower degree and estimated a malignant mismatch profile less often than other software. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Comparison of tibiofemoral joint space width measurements from standing CT and fixed flexion radiography.

    PubMed

    Segal, Neil A; Frick, Eric; Duryea, Jeffrey; Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Torner, James C; Felson, David T; Anderson, Donald D

    2016-08-09

    The objective of this project was to determine the relationship between medial tibiofemoral joint space width measured on fixed-flexion radiographs and the three-dimensional joint space width distribution on low-dose, standing CT (SCT) imaging. At the 84-month visit of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, 20 participants were recruited. A commercial SCT scanner for the foot and ankle was modified to image knees while standing. Medial tibiofemoral joint space width was assessed on radiographs at fixed locations from 15-30% of compartment width using validated software and on SCT by mapping the distances between three-dimensional subchondral bone surfaces. Individual joint space width values from radiographs were compared with three-dimensional joint space width values from corresponding sagittal plane locations using paired t-tests and correlation coefficients. For the 4 medial-most tibiofemoral locations, radiographic joint space width values exceeded the minimal joint space width on SCT by a mean of 2.0mm and were approximately equal to the 61st percentile value of the joint space width distribution at each respective sagittal-plane location. Correlation coefficients at these locations were 0.91-0.97 and the offsets between joint space width values from radiographs and SCT measurements were consistent. There were greater offsets and variability in the offsets between modalities closer to the tibial spine. Joint space width measurements on fixed-flexion radiographs are highly correlated with three-dimensional joint space width from SCT. In addition to avoiding bony overlap obscuring the joint, a limitation of radiographs, the current study supports a role for SCT in the evaluation of tibiofemoral OA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Ex vivo comparison of Galileos cone beam CT and intraoral radiographs in detecting occlusal caries

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, S; Tyndall, D; Wright, JT; Everett, E

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of cone beam CT (CBCT) with intraoral radiographs for detection of occlusal caries. Methods A set of 60 extracted teeth were imaged using a Sirona Galileos CBCT system (Sirona Dental Systems, Bensheim, Germany) and an intraoral Planmeca® system (Planmeca OY, Helsinki, Finland). Six observers looked at both modalities and used a five-point confidence scale to evaluate presence or absence of occlusal caries. Histology was used as the gold standard. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and weighted kappa statistics were used for statistical analysis. Differences in the area under the curve (AUC) values between observers and modalities were analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Differences in sensitivity and specificity were analysed using the Wilcoxon test. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability was assessed by weighted kappa scores. Results The mean value and standard deviation of AUC was 0.719 ± 0.038 for CBCT and 0.649 ± 0.062 for the intraoral radiographs. The ANOVA results demonstrated that there was no significant difference between the modalities and the observers. The interobserver kappa for pairs of observers ranged from fair to substantial for bitewings (0.244–0.543) and CBCT (0.152–0.401). Four out of six observers reported higher sensitivity but lower specificity with CBCT. The Wilcoxon exact p-value showed no difference in sensitivity (0.175) or specificity (0.573) between the two modalities. Conclusion Based on the results we conclude that the Sirona CBCT unit cannot be used for the sole purpose of looking at occlusal caries. PMID:22184471

  20. Spectral material characterization with dual-energy CT: comparison of commercial and investigative technologies in phantoms.

    PubMed

    Gabbai, Michal; Leichter, Isaac; Mahgerefteh, Samuel; Sosna, Jacob

    2015-08-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) enables tissue discrimination based on the X-ray attenuations at different photon energies emitted by the tube. The spectral dependencies of net X-ray attenuation can be analyzed and used to characterize specific materials. To evaluate the capability of DECT to characterize and differentiate high-density materials, using spectral analysis. Images of phantoms containing iodine, barium, gadolinium, and calcium solutions in five concentrations were obtained from three DECT scanners and with sequential scanning at different kV values from three conventional MDCT devices. DECT studies were performed with commercial dual-source and rapid kV-switching systems, and a spectral-detector CT (SDCT) prototype based on dual-layer detector technology. Spectral maps describing Hounsfield Units (HU) in low- versus high-energy images were calculated and characterizing curves for all materials were compared. Spectral low- to- high energy maps yielded linear curves (R(2) = 0.98-0.999) with increasing slopes for calcium, gadolinium, barium, and iodine, respectively. Slope differences between all material pairs were highest (reaching 45%) for DECT with dual-source (140/80 kV) and rapid kV-switching (60/80 keV), reaching statistical significance (P < 0.05) with most techniques. Slope differences between all material pairs for sequential scanning were lower (reaching 32%). Slope differences lacked statistical significance for iodine-barium with two sequential-acquisition techniques and the dual-source DECT scanner, and the calcium-gadolium pair with the dual-source scanner. All designated techniques for dual-energy scanning provide robust and material-specific spectral characterization and differentiation of barium, iodine, calcium, and gadolinium, though to varying degrees. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014.

  1. Comparison of liver volumetry on contrast-enhanced CT images: one semiautomatic and two automatic approaches.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei; He, Baochun; Fan, Yingfang; Fang, Chihua; Jia, Fucang

    2016-11-08

    This study was to evaluate the accuracy, consistency, and efficiency of three liver volumetry methods- one interactive method, an in-house-developed 3D medical Image Analysis (3DMIA) system, one automatic active shape model (ASM)-based segmentation, and one automatic probabilistic atlas (PA)-guided segmentation method on clinical contrast-enhanced CT images. Forty-two datasets, including 27 normal liver and 15 space-occupying liver lesion patients, were retrospectively included in this study. The three methods - one semiautomatic 3DMIA, one automatic ASM-based, and one automatic PA-based liver volumetry - achieved an accuracy with VD (volume difference) of -1.69%, -2.75%, and 3.06% in the normal group, respectively, and with VD of -3.20%, -3.35%, and 4.14% in the space-occupying lesion group, respectively. However, the three methods achieved an efficiency of 27.63 mins, 1.26 mins, 1.18 mins on average, respectively, compared with the manual volumetry, which took 43.98 mins. The high intraclass correlation coefficient between the three methods and the manual method indicated an excel-lent agreement on liver volumetry. Significant differences in segmentation time were observed between the three methods (3DMIA, ASM, and PA) and the manual volumetry (p < 0.001), as well as between the automatic volumetries (ASM and PA) and the semiautomatic volumetry (3DMIA) (p < 0.001). The semiautomatic interactive 3DMIA, automatic ASM-based, and automatic PA-based liver volum-etry agreed well with manual gold standard in both the normal liver group and the space-occupying lesion group. The ASM- and PA-based automatic segmentation have better efficiency in clinical use.

  2. Comparison of liver volumetry on contrast-enhanced CT images: one semiautomatic and two automatic approaches.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei; He, Baochun; Fan, Yingfang; Fang, Chihua; Jia, Fucang

    2016-11-01

    This study was to evaluate the accuracy, consistency, and efficiency of three liver volumetry methods- one interactive method, an in-house-developed 3D medical Image Analysis (3DMIA) system, one automatic active shape model (ASM)-based segmentation, and one automatic probabilistic atlas (PA)-guided segmentation method on clinical contrast-enhanced CT images. Forty-two datasets, including 27 normal liver and 15 space-occupying liver lesion patients, were retrospectively included in this study. The three methods - one semiautomatic 3DMIA, one automatic ASM-based, and one automatic PA-based liver volumetry - achieved an accuracy with VD (volume difference) of -1.69%,-2.75%, and 3.06% in the normal group, respectively, and with VD of -3.20%,-3.35%, and 4.14% in the space-occupying lesion group, respectively. However, the three methods achieved an efficiency of 27.63 mins, 1.26 mins, 1.18 mins on average, respectively, compared with the manual volumetry, which took 43.98 mins. The high intraclass correlation coefficient between the three methods and the manual method indicated an excellent agreement on liver volumetry. Significant differences in segmentation time were observed between the three methods (3DMIA, ASM, and PA) and the manual volumetry (p<0.001), as well as between the automatic volumetries (ASM and PA) and the semiautomatic volumetry (3DMIA) (p<0.001). The semiautomatic interactive 3DMIA, automatic ASM-based, and automatic PA-based liver volumetry agreed well with manual gold standard in both the normal liver group and the space-occupying lesion group. The ASM- and PA-based automatic segmentation have better efficiency in clinical use. PACS number(s): 87.55.-x. © 2016 The Authors.

  3. Duplex ultrasonography for the detection of vertebral artery stenosis: A comparison with CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Rozeman, Anouk D; Hund, Hajo; Westein, Michel; Wermer, Marieke J H; Lycklama À Nijeholt, Geert J; Boiten, Jelis; Schimsheimer, Robert-Jan; Algra, Ale

    2017-08-01

    Vertebrobasilar stenosis is frequent in patients with posterior circulation stroke and it increases risk of recurrence. We investigated feasibility of duplex ultrasonography (DUS) for screening for extracranial vertebral artery stenosis and compared it with CT angiography (CTA). We gathered data on 337 consecutive patients who had DUS because of posterior circulation stroke or TIA. Matching CTA studies were retrieved and used as reference. Stenosis on CTA was considered "significant" if >50%, at DUS if Peak Systolic Velocity (PSV) > 140 cm/s for the V1 segment and PSV > 125 cm/s for the V2 segment. We determined the area under the ROC curve (AUROC). In addition, we calculated which PSV cut-off value resulted in highest sensitivity with acceptable specificity. DUS was able to make an adequate measurement in 378 of 674 V1 segments and 673 of 674 V2 segments. DUS detected a significant stenosis in 52 of 378 V1 segments; 12 were confirmed by CTA (AUROC 0.73, 95% Confidence Interval 0.63-0.83). The optimal DUS PSV cut-off value for this segment was 90 cm/s. For the V2 segment there were too few stenoses to allow reliable assessment of diagnostic characteristics of DUS. Although DUS has a fair AUROC for detecting significant stenosis, adequate assessment of the V1 segment is often not possible due to anatomic difficulties. Assessment of the V2 segment is feasible but yielded few stenoses. Hence, we consider usefulness of DUS for screening of extracranial vertebral artery stenosis limited.

  4. Comparison measurements of DQE for two flat panel detectors: fluoroscopic detector vs. cone beam CT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt Benítez, Ricardo; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David

    2006-03-01

    The physical performance of two flat panel detectors (FPD) has been evaluated using a standard x-ray beam quality set by IEC, namely RQA5. The FPDs evaluated in this study are based on an amorphous silicon photodiode array that is coupled to a thallium-doped Cesium Iodide scintillator and to a thin film transistor (TFT) array. One detector is the PaxScan 2520 that is designed for fluoro imaging, and has a small dynamic range and a large image lag. The other detector is the PaxScan 4030CB that is designed for cone beam CT, and has a large dynamic range (>16-bit), a reduced image lag and many imaging modes. Varian Medical Systems manufactured both detectors. The linearity of the FPDs was investigated by using an ionization chamber and aluminum filtration in order to obtain the beam quality. Since the FPDs are used in fluoroscopic mode, image lag of the FPD was measured in order to investigate its effect on this study, especially its effect on DQE. The spatial resolution of the FPDs was determined by obtaining the pre-sampling modulation transfer function for each detector. A sharp edge was used in accordance to IEC 62220-1. Next, the Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) was calculated for various exposures levels at RQA5 radiation quality. Finally, the DQE of each FPD was obtained with a modified version of the international standard set by IEC 62220-1. The results show that the physical performance in DQE and MTF of the PaxScan 4030CB is superior to that of PaxScan2520.

  5. Comparison of Partial Volume Effects in Arterial and Venous Contrast Curves in CT Brain Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Alan J.; Bennink, Edwin; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Viergever, Max A.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Smit, Ewoud J.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In brain CT perfusion (CTP), the arterial contrast bolus is scaled to have the same area under the curve (AUC) as the venous outflow to correct for partial volume effects (PVE). This scaling is based on the assumption that large veins are unaffected by PVE. Measurement of the internal carotid artery (ICA), usually unaffected by PVE due to its large diameter, may avoid the need for partial volume correction. The aims of this work are to examine i) the assumptions behind PVE correction and ii) the potential of selecting the ICA obviating correction for PVE. Methods The AUC of the ICA and sagittal sinus were measured in CTP datasets from 52 patients. The AUCs were determined by i) using commercial CTP software based on a Gaussian curve-fitting to the time attenuation curve, and ii) by simple integration of the time attenuation curve over a time interval. In addition, frames acquired up to 3 minutes after first bolus passage were used to examine the ratio of arterial and venous enhancement. The impact of selecting the ICA without PVE correction was illustrated by reporting cerebral blood volume (CBV) measurements. Results In 49 of 52 patients, the AUC of the ICA was significantly larger than that of the sagittal sinus (p = 0.017). Measured after the first pass bolus, contrast enhancement remained 50% higher in the ICA just after the first pass bolus, and 30% higher 3 minutes later. CBV measurements were significantly lowered when the ICA was used without PVE correction. Conclusions Contradicting the assumptions underlying PVE correction, contrast in the ICA was significantly higher than in the sagittal sinus, even 3 minutes after the first pass of the contrast bolus. PVE correction might lead to overestimation of CBV if the CBV is calculated using the AUC of the time attenuation curves. PMID:24858308

  6. Pulmonary embolism in pregnancy: comparison of pulmonary CT angiography and lung scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Carole A; McDermott, Shaunagh; Freyne, Bridget J; Brennan, Donal J; Collins, Conor D; Skehan, Stephen J

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively compare the diagnostic adequacy of lung scintigraphy with that of pulmonary CT angiography (CTA) in the care of pregnant patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. Patient characteristics, radiology report content, additional imaging performed, final diagnosis, and diagnostic adequacy were recorded for pregnant patients consecutively referred for lung scintigraphy or pulmonary CTA according to physician preference. Measurements of pulmonary arterial enhancement were performed on all pulmonary CTA images of pregnant patients. Lung scintigraphy and pulmonary CTA studies deemed inadequate for diagnosis at the time of image acquisition were further assessed, and the cause of diagnostic inadequacy was determined. The relative contribution of the inferior vena cava to the right side of the heart was measured on nondiagnostic CTA images and compared with that on CTA images of age-matched nonpregnant women, who were the controls. Twenty-eight pulmonary CTA examinations were performed on 25 pregnant patients, and 25 lung scintigraphic studies were performed on 25 pregnant patients. Lung scintigraphy was more frequently adequate for diagnosis than was pulmonary CTA (4% vs 35.7%) (p = 0.0058). Pulmonary CTA had a higher diagnostic inadequacy rate among pregnant than nonpregnant women (35.7% vs 2.1%) (p < 0.001). Transient interruption of contrast material by unopacified blood from the inferior vena cava was identified in eight of 10 nondiagnostic pulmonary CTA studies. We found that lung scintigraphy was more reliable than pulmonary CTA in pregnant patients. Transient interruption of contrast material by unopacified blood from the inferior vena cava is a common finding at pulmonary CTA of pregnant patients.

  7. Regadenoson-stress myocardial CT perfusion and single-photon emission CT: rationale, design, and acquisition methods of a prospective, multicenter, multivendor comparison.

    PubMed

    Cury, Ricardo C; Kitt, Therese M; Feaheny, Kathleen; Akin, Jamie; George, Richard T

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacologic stress myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) has been reported to be a viable imaging modality for detection of myocardial ischemia compared with single-photon emission CT (SPECT) in several single-center studies. However, regadenoson-stress CTP has not previously been compared with SPECT in a multicenter, multivendor study. The rationale and design of a phase 2, randomized, cross-over study of regadenoson-stress myocardial perfusion imaging by CTP compared with SPECT are described herein. The study will be conducted at approximately 25 sites by using 6 different CT scanner models, including 64-, 128-, 256-, and 320-slice systems. Subjects with known/suspected coronary artery disease will be randomly assigned to 1 of 2 imaging procedure sequences; rest and regadenoson-stress SPECT on day 1, then regadenoson-stress CTP and rest CTP/coronary CT angiography (same acquisition) on day 2; or regadenoson-stress CTP and rest CTP/CT angiography on day 1, then rest and regadenoson-stress SPECT on day 2. The prespecified primary analysis examines the agreement rate between CTP and SPECT for detecting or excluding ischemia (≥2 or 0-1 reversible defects, respectively), as assessed by 3 independent blinded readers for each modality. Non-inferiority will be indicated if the lower boundary of the 95% CI for the agreement rate is within 0.15 of 0.78 (the observed agreement rate in the regadenoson pivotal trials). The protocol described herein will support the first evaluation of regadenoson-stress CTP by using multiple scanner types compared with SPECT.

  8. Imaging the Parasinus Region with a Third-Generation Dual-Source CT and the Effect of Tin Filtration on Image Quality and Radiation Dose.

    PubMed

    Lell, M M; May, M S; Brand, M; Eller, A; Buder, T; Hofmann, E; Uder, M; Wuest, W

    2015-07-01

    CT is the imaging technique of choice in the evaluation of midface trauma or inflammatory disease. We performed a systematic evaluation of scan protocols to optimize image quality and radiation exposure on third-generation dual-source CT. CT protocols with different tube voltage (70-150 kV), current (25-300 reference mAs), prefiltration, pitch value, and rotation time were systematically evaluated. All images were reconstructed with iterative reconstruction (Advanced Modeled Iterative Reconstruction, level 2). To individually compare results with otherwise identical factors, we obtained all scans on a frozen human head. Conebeam CT was performed for image quality and dose comparison with multidetector row CT. Delineation of important anatomic structures and incidental pathologic conditions in the cadaver head was evaluated. One hundred kilovolts with tin prefiltration demonstrated the best compromise between dose and image quality. The most dose-effective combination for trauma imaging was Sn100 kV/250 mAs (volume CT dose index, 2.02 mGy), and for preoperative sinus surgery planning, Sn100 kV/150 mAs (volume CT dose index, 1.22 mGy). "Sn" indicates an additional prefiltration of the x-ray beam with a tin filter to constrict the energy spectrum. Exclusion of sinonasal disease was possible with even a lower dose by using Sn100 kV/25 mAs (volume CT dose index, 0.2 mGy). High image quality at very low dose levels can be achieved by using a Sn100-kV protocol with iterative reconstruction. The effective dose is comparable with that of conventional radiography, and the high image quality at even lower radiation exposure favors multidetector row CT over conebeam CT. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Single center comparison of laparoscopic cryoablation and CT-guided percutaneous cryoablation for renal tumors.

    PubMed

    Derweesh, Ithaar H; Malcolm, John B; Diblasio, Christopher J; Giem, Andrew; Rewcastle, John C; Wake, Robert W; Patterson, Anthony L; Gold, Robert

    2008-11-01

    Cryoablation has demonstrated therapeutic effectiveness for selected renal tumors. We compared our perioperative and short-term outcomes of laparoscopic (LAP) v percutaneous (PERC) renal cryoablation. Thirty-four patients (18 men/16 women) underwent a LAP and 26 patients (19 men/7 women) underwent a PERC procedure between September1998 and January 2007. LAP cryoablation was performed transperitoneally with ultrasonographic monitoring. PERC cryoablation was performed with CT guidance. Follow-up imaging was obtained at regular intervals. Mean follow-up was 25 months. Average age (years) was 67.0 for the LAP and 69.7 for the PERC procedure (P = 0.307). Mean body mass index (kg/m(2)) was 29.8 for those undergoing LAP and 28.7 for those undergoing PERC procedures (P = 0.543). Mean tumor size (cm) was 2.9 for LAP patients and 3.1 for PERC patients (P = 0.432). Anterior tumors comprised 61.7% of LAP and 15.4% of PERC procedures (P < 0.001). Posterior tumors comprised 32.4% of LAP and 65.4% of PERC procedures (P = 0.01). Mean procedure time (minutes) was 165.7 for LAP and 106.6 for PERC procedures (P < 0.001). Hospital stay (days) was 2.6 for those undergoing LAP and 1.8 for those undergoing PERC procedures (P < 0.001). Both LAP patients (82.4%) and PERC patients (19.2%) needed postoperative narcotics (P < 0.001). Atelectasis developed in 70.6% of LAP patients and 34.6% of PERC patients (P = 0.005). Residual enhancement was seen in 11.5% of PERC patients and 2.9% of LAP patients (P = 0.192). Complications developed in 14.7% of LAP patients and 26.9% of PERC patients (P = 0.248). 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year disease-specific survival for the two groups was 100%. Tumor size > 4 cm and endophytic location were significantly associated with residual enhancement. LAP and PERC renal cryoablation have similar short-term outcomes. Significantly more anterior tumors were approached laparoscopically and significantly more posterior tumors were approached percutaneously. The PERC

  10. Objective volumetric comparison of room air versus carbon dioxide for colonic distention at screening CT colonography.

    PubMed

    Patrick, James L; Bakke, Joshua R; Bannas, Peter; Kim, David H; Lubner, Meghan G; Pickhardt, Perry J

    2015-02-01

    To objectively compare colonic distention at CT colonography (CTC) achieved with manual room air vs. automated low-pressure carbon dioxide (CO2) using a novel automated volumetric quality assessment tool. Volumetric analysis was retrospectively performed on CTC studies in 300 asymptomatic adults using an automated quality assessment tool (V3D Colon [beta version], Viatronix). Colonic distention was achieved with room air self-administered to tolerance via hand-held pump (mean number of pumps, 39 ± 32) in 150 individuals (mean age, 59 years; 98 men, 51 women) and via continuous low-pressure automated infusion of CO2 in 150 individuals (mean age, 57 years; 89 men, 61 women). CTC studies in supine and prone position were assessed to determine total colonic volume (luminal gas and fluid). The colonic length along the automated centerline was also recorded to enable calculation of length-adjusted colonic volumes. The mean total colonic volume (±SD) for individuals receiving room air and CO2 distention was 1809 ± 514 and 2223 ± 686 mL, respectively (p < 0.01). The prone position was better distended in 78.7% (118/150) of cases using room air; whereas, the supine was better in 66.0% (99/150) of CO2 cases (p < 0.01). Using a volume threshold of 2000 mL, 49 (32.7%) of room air cases and 92 (61.3%) of CO2 cases were above this cut-off. The mean length-adjusted colonic volume (mL/cm) for the room air and CO2 techniques was 9.9 ± 2.4 and 11.6 ± 2.6 mL/cm (p < 0.01). Using automated volumetry allowed quantitative analyses of colonic volumes and objectively confirmed that continuous low-pressure CO2 provides greater overall colonic distention than the manual room air technique at CTC. The supine position demonstrated better distention with CO2, whereas the prone position was better distended with the room air technique.

  11. Dose measurements for dental cone-beam CT: a comparison with MSCT and panoramic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deman, P.; Atwal, P.; Duzenli, C.; Thakur, Y.; Ford, N. L.

    2014-06-01

    To date there is a lack of published information on appropriate methods to determine patient doses from dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) equipment. The goal of this study is to apply and extend the methods recommended in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report 111 for CBCT equipment to characterize dose and effective dose for a range of dental imaging equipment. A protocol derived from the one proposed by Dixon et al (2010 Technical Report 111, American Association of Physicist in Medicine, MD, USA), was applied to dose measurements of multi-slice CT, dental CBCT (small and large fields of view (FOV)) and a dental panoramic system. The computed tomography dose index protocol was also performed on the MSCT to compare both methods. The dose distributions in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom were characterized using a thimble ionization chamber and Gafchromic™ film (beam profiles). Gafchromic™ films were used to measure the dose distribution in an anthropomorphic phantom. A method was proposed to extend dose estimates to planes superior and inferior to the central plane. The dose normalized to 100 mAs measured in the center of the phantom for the large FOV dental CBCT (11.4 mGy/100 mAs) is two times lower than that of MSCT (20.7 mGy/100 mAs) for the same FOV, but approximately 15 times higher than for a panoramic system (0.6 mGy/100 mAs). The effective dose per scan (in clinical conditions) found for the dental CBCT are 167.60 ± 3.62, 61.30 ± 3.88 and 92.86 ± 7.76 mSv for the Kodak 9000 (fixed scan length of 3.7 cm), and the iCAT Next Generation for 6 cm and 13 cm scan lengths respectively. The method to extend the dose estimates from the central slice to superior and inferior slices indicates a good agreement between theory and measurement. The Gafchromic™ films provided useful beam profile data and 2D distributions of dose in phantom.

  12. Preliminary clinical experience with a dedicated interventional robotic system for CT-guided biopsies of lung lesions: a comparison with the conventional manual technique.

    PubMed

    Anzidei, Michele; Argirò, Renato; Porfiri, Andrea; Boni, Fabrizio; Anile, Marco; Zaccagna, Fulvio; Vitolo, Domenico; Saba, Luca; Napoli, Alessandro; Leonardi, Andrea; Longo, Flavia; Venuta, Federico; Bezzi, Mario; Catalano, Carlo

    2015-05-01

    Evaluate the performance of a robotic system for CT-guided lung biopsy in comparison to the conventional manual technique. One hundred patients referred for CT-guided lung biopsy were randomly assigned to group A (robot-assisted procedure) or group B (conventional procedure). Size, distance from entry point and position in lung of target lesions were evaluated to assess homogeneity differences between the two groups. Procedure duration, dose length product (DLP), precision of needle positioning, diagnostic performance of the biopsy and rate of complications were evaluated to assess the clinical performance of the robotic system as compared to the conventional technique. All biopsies were successfully performed. The size (p = 0.41), distance from entry point (p = 0.86) and position in lung (p = 0.32) of target lesions were similar in both groups (p = 0.05). Procedure duration and radiation dose were significantly reduced in group A as compared to group B (p = 0.001). Precision of needle positioning, diagnostic performance of the biopsy and rate of complications were similar in both groups (p = 0.05). Robot-assisted CT-guided lung biopsy can be performed safely and with high diagnostic accuracy, reducing procedure duration and radiation dose in comparison to the conventional manual technique. • CT-guided biopsy is the main procedure to obtain diagnosis in lung tumours. • The robotic device facilitates percutaneous needle placement under CT guidance. • Robot-assisted CT-guided lung biopsy reduces procedure duration and radiation dose.

  13. Estimation of lung motion fields in 4D CT data by variational non-linear intensity-based registration: A comparison and evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Werner, René; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz; Ehrhardt, Jan

    2014-08-07

    Accurate and robust estimation of motion fields in respiration-correlated CT (4D CT) images, usually performed by non-linear registration of the temporal CT frames, is a precondition for the analysis of patient-specific breathing dynamics and subsequent image-supported diagnostics and treatment planning. In this work, we present a comprehensive comparison and evaluation study of non-linear registration variants applied to the task of lung motion estimation in thoracic 4D CT data. In contrast to existing multi-institutional comparison studies (e.g. MIDRAS and EMPIRE10), we focus on the specific but common class of variational intensity-based non-parametric registration and analyze the impact of the different main building blocks of the underlying optimization problem: the distance measure to be minimized, the regularization approach and the transformation space considered during optimization. In total, 90 different combinations of building block instances are compared. Evaluated on proprietary and publicly accessible 4D CT images, landmark-based registration errors (TRE) between 1.14 and 1.20 mm for the most accurate registration variants demonstrate competitive performance of the applied general registration framework compared to other state-of-the-art approaches for lung CT registration. Although some specific trends can be observed, effects of interchanging individual instances of the building blocks on the TRE are in general rather small (no single outstanding registration variant existing); the same level of accuracy is, however, associated with significantly different degrees of motion field smoothness and computational demands. Consequently, the building block combination of choice will depend on application-specific requirements on motion field characteristics.

  14. State-of-the-art in CT hardware and scan modes for cardiovascular CT

    PubMed Central

    Halliburton, Sandra; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dey, Damini; Einstein, Andrew J.; Gentry, Ralph; George, Richard T.; Gerber, Thomas; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Weigold, Wm. Guy

    2013-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (CT) allows noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging of the heart, great vessels, and the coronary arteries. In recent years, there have been several advances in CT hardware, which have expanded the clinical utility of CT for cardiovascular imaging; such advances are ongoing. This review article from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) Basic and Emerging Sciences and Technology (BEST) Working Group summarizes the technical aspects of current state-of-the-art CT hardware and describes the scan modes this hardware supports for cardiovascular CT imaging. PMID:22551595

  15. State-of-the-art in CT hardware and scan modes for cardiovascular CT.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, Sandra; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dey, Damini; Einstein, Andrew J; Gentry, Ralph; George, Richard T; Gerber, Thomas; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Weigold, Wm Guy

    2012-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (CT) allows noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging of the heart, great vessels, and coronary arteries. In recent years, there have been several advances in CT hardware, which have expanded the clinical utility of CT for cardiovascular imaging; such advances are ongoing. This review article from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Basic and Emerging Sciences and Technology Working Group summarizes the technical aspects of current state-of-the-art CT hardware and describes the scan modes this hardware supports for cardiovascular CT imaging.

  16. Bone micro-architectural analysis of mandible and tibia in ovariectomised rats: A quantitative structural comparison between undecalcified histological sections and micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Li, W; Liu, Y S; Zhou, Y S

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate if micro-CT can work as a method for the 3D assessment and analysis of cancellous bone by comparing micro-CT with undecalcified histological sections in OVX rats. The mandible and tibia of sham, ovariectomised (OVX) and zoledronate-injected ovariectomised (OVX-ZOL) rats were assessed morphometrically. Specimens were scanned by micro-CT. Undecalcified histological sections were manufactured from the specimen scanned by micro-CT and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. Bivariate linear regressions and one-way analysis of variance were undertaken for statistics using SPSS 16.0.1 software. There were highly significant correlations between undecalcified histological sections and micro-CT for all parameters (bone volume density (BV/TV), bone surface density (BS/BV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), trabecular number (Tb.N), and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp))in the mandible and tibia. Bone histomorphometric parameters analysed by both methods exhibited significant differences among sham, OVX, and OVX-ZOL groups. There were significant correlations between mandible and tibia in BV/TV, BS/BV, and Tb.Sp. Micro-CT is a complementary tool to histological sections in basic research that could improve our understanding of bone histomorphometry. The mandible can be used as an effective site to assess bone morphometry of OVX or metabolic bone disease rat models.Cite this article: H. Liu, W. Li, Y. S. Liu, Y. S. Zhou. Bone micro-architectural analysis of mandible and tibia in ovariectomised rats: A quantitative structural comparison between undecalcified histological sections and micro-CT. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:253-262. © 2016 Liu et al.

  17. Coronary CT angiography characteristics of OCT-defined thin-cap fibroatheroma: a section-to-section comparison study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong Hyun; Kang, Soo-Jin; Koo, Hyun Jung; Chang, Mineok; Kang, Joon-Won; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Baek, Seunghee; Han, Seungbong; Lee, Pil Hyung; Roh, Jae-Hyung; Ahn, Jung-Min; Park, Duk-Woo; Lee, Seung-Whan; Lee, Cheol Whan; Park, Seong-Wook; Park, Seung-Jung; Mintz, Gary S; Kim, Young-Hak

    2017-08-23

    To evaluate whether plaque characteristics as assessed by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) were associated with the presence of a thin-cap fibroatheroma (TCFA)-a precursor of plaque rupture-defined by optical coherence tomography (OCT) in a section-to-section-level comparison. From 28 symptomatic patients, 31 coronary lesions were evaluated on 727 cross-sections co-registered by both CCTA and OCT. CCTA plaque characteristics included low attenuation plaque (LAP, <30 HU), napkin ring sign (NRS), positive remodelling (PR, remodelling index ≥1.10), and spotty calcification and plaque area and plaque burden. By OCT, presence of TCFA, lumen area and arc of lipid were determined. OCT revealed a TCFA in 69 (9.4%) sections from 19 (61.2 %) lesions. In per-section analysis, OCT-TCFA showed higher frequency of CCTA-detected LAP (58.0% vs. 18.5%), NRS (31.9% vs. 8.8%) and PR (68.1% vs. 48.0%) and greater plaque burden (70.6% vs. 61.9%) as compared to sections without OCT-TCFA (all p < 0.05). In multivariable analysis, LAP (odds ratio [OR] 4.05, p < 0.001) and NRS (OR 2.47, p = 0.005) were associated with OCT-TCFA. CCTA-measured lumen area correlated well with OCT-measured lumen area (R = 0.859, limits of agreement -0.5 ± 3.7 mm(2)). LAP and NRS in CCTA were associated with the presence of OCT-defined TCFA in a section-to-section comparison. • CT-defined LAP and NRS were associated with OCT-defined TCFA • OCT-TCFA showed higher frequency of LAP, NRS, PR and greater plaque burden • Non-calcified plaque area was correlated with OCT-measured lipid arc.

  18. Objective and Subjective Intra-patient Comparison of Iohexol versus Diatrizoate for Bowel Preparation Quality at CT Colonography

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brandon; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Robbins, Jessica B.; Pickhardt, Perry J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To objectively and subjectively compare nonionic iohexol and ionic diatrizoate iodinated oral contrast as part of a cathartic bowel regimen within the same CT colonography (CTC) cohort, with otherwise identical preparations. Materials and Methods In our IRB-approved retrospective study, 46 asymptomatic adults (mean age, 59.4 years; 26M/20F) returning for follow-up CTC over a 9-month interval underwent the same bowel preparation with the exception of 75 ml iohexol 350 (Omnipaque) in place of 60 ml diatrizoate (Gastrografin). All other preparation components (bisacodyl, magnesium citrate, and 2% barium) remained constant. Objective volumetric analysis of residual colonic fluid volume and fluid attenuation was performed. Additionally, two radiologists experienced with CTC, blinded to the specific bowel preparation, scored each of 6 colonic segments for adherent residual solid stool using a previously validated 4-point scale (0 for no stool; 1–3 for increasing residual stool). Paired t-test was used for comparison of the cohorts. Results No clear clinically-meaningful difference was found between the two preparations on overall objective or subjective evaluation. Mean (±SD) residual fluid volume was 173±126 ml with the iohexol preparation and 130±79 ml with the diatrizoate prep (p=0.02). Mean total colonic stool score was 2.5 (0.42/segment) with iohexol and 2.3 (0.38/segment) with diatrizoate (p=0.69). Mean (±SD) fluid attenuation was higher with iohexol (849±270HU) compared with diatrizoate (732±168HU) (p=0.03). Conclusions Based on this direct intra-patient comparison, we found that oral iohexol is a suitable alternative to diatrizoate for fluid tagging as part of a cathartic bowel preparation at CTC. Because this nonionic tagging agent is more palatable, less expensive, and likely safer than ionic diatrizoate, our CTC program now utilizes iohexol as the standard recommended regimen. PMID:27010251

  19. Tracer kinetic analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and CT bladder cancer data: A preliminary comparison to assess the magnitude of water exchange effects.

    PubMed

    Bains, Lauren J; McGrath, Deirdre M; Naish, Josephine H; Cheung, Susan; Watson, Yvonne; Taylor, M Ben; Logue, John P; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Waterton, John C; Buckley, David L

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of water exchange on tracer kinetic parameter estimates derived from T(1)-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data using a direct quantitative comparison with DCE-CT. Data were acquired from 12 patients with bladder cancer who underwent DCE-CT followed by DCE-MRI within a week. A two-compartment tracer kinetic model was fitted to the CT data, and two versions of the same model with modifications to account for the fast exchange and no exchange limits of water exchange were fitted to the MR data. The two-compartment tracer kinetic model provided estimates of the fractional plasma volume (v(p)), the extravascular extracellular space fraction (v(e)), plasma perfusion (F(p)), and the microvascular permeability surface area product. Our findings suggest that DCE-CT is an appropriate reference for DCE-MRI in bladder cancers as the only significant difference found between CT and MR parameter estimates were the no exchange limit estimates of v(p) (P = 0.002). These results suggest that although water exchange between the intracellular and extravascular-extracellular space has a negligible effect on DCE-MRI, vascular-extravascular-extracellular space water exchange may be more important.

  20. Comparison between manual and semi-automatic segmentation of nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses from CT images.

    PubMed

    Tingelhoff, K; Moral, A I; Kunkel, M E; Rilk, M; Wagner, I; Eichhorn, K G; Wahl, F M; Bootz, F

    2007-01-01

    Segmentation of medical image data is getting more and more important over the last years. The results are used for diagnosis, surgical planning or workspace definition of robot-assisted systems. The purpose of this paper is to find out whether manual or semi-automatic segmentation is adequate for ENT surgical workflow or whether fully automatic segmentation of paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity is needed. We present a comparison of manual and semi-automatic segmentation of paranasal sinuses and the nasal cavity. Manual segmentation is performed by custom software whereas semi-automatic segmentation is realized by a commercial product (Amira). For this study we used a CT dataset of the paranasal sinuses which consists of 98 transversal slices, each 1.0 mm thick, with a resolution of 512 x 512 pixels. For the analysis of both segmentation procedures we used volume, extension (width, length and height), segmentation time and 3D-reconstruction. The segmentation time was reduced from 960 minutes with manual to 215 minutes with semi-automatic segmentation. We found highest variances segmenting nasal cavity. For the paranasal sinuses manual and semi-automatic volume differences are not significant. Dependent on the segmentation accuracy both approaches deliver useful results and could be used for e.g. robot-assisted systems. Nevertheless both procedures are not useful for everyday surgical workflow, because they take too much time. Fully automatic and reproducible segmentation algorithms are needed for segmentation of paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity.

  1. Comparison of pre/post-operative CT image volumes to preoperative digitization of partial hepatectomies: a feasibility study in surgical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumpuri, Prashanth; Clements, Logan W.; Li, Rui; Waite, Jonathan M.; Stefansic, James D.; Geller, David A.; Miga, Michael I.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2009-02-01

    Preoperative planning combined with image-guidance has shown promise towards increasing the accuracy of liver resection procedures. The purpose of this study was to validate one such preoperative planning tool for four patients undergoing hepatic resection. Preoperative computed tomography (CT) images acquired before surgery were used to identify tumor margins and to plan the surgical approach for resection of these tumors. Surgery was then performed with intraoperative digitization data acquire by an FDA approved image-guided liver surgery system (Pathfinder Therapeutics, Inc., Nashville, TN). Within 5-7 days after surgery, post-operative CT image volumes were acquired. Registration of data within a common coordinate reference was achieved and preoperative plans were compared to the postoperative volumes. Semi-quantitative comparisons are presented in this work and preliminary results indicate that significant liver regeneration/hypertrophy in the postoperative CT images may be present post-operatively. This could challenge pre/post operative CT volume change comparisons as a means to evaluate the accuracy of preoperative surgical plans.

  2. TU-C-12A-11: Comparisons Between Cu-ATSM PET and DCE-CT Kinetic Parameters in Canine Sinonasal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    La Fontaine, M; Bradshaw, T; Kubicek, L; Forrest, L; Jeraj, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Regions of poor perfusion within tumors may be associated with higher hypoxic levels. This study aimed to test this hypothesis by comparing measurements of hypoxia from Cu-ATSM PET to vasculature kinetic parameters from DCE-CT kinetic analysis. Methods: Ten canine patients with sinonasal tumors received one Cu-ATSM PET/CT scan and three DCE-CT scans prior to treatment. Cu-ATSM PET/CT and DCE-CT scans were registered and resampled to matching voxel dimensions. Kinetic analysis was performed on DCE-CT scans and for each patient, the resulting kinetic parameter values from the three DCE-CT scans were averaged together. Cu-ATSM SUVs were spatially correlated (r{sub spatial}) on a voxel-to-voxel basis against the following DCE-CT kinetic parameters: transit time (t{sub 1}), blood flow (F), vasculature fraction (v{sub 1}), and permeability (PS). In addition, whole-tumor comparisons were performed by correlating (r{sub ROI}) the mean Cu-ATSM SUV (SUV{sub mean}) with median kinetic parameter values. Results: The spatial correlations (r{sub spatial}) were poor and ranged from -0.04 to 0.21 for all kinetic parameters. These low spatial correlations may be due to high variability in the DCE-CT kinetic parameter voxel values between scans. In our hypothesis, t{sub 1} was expected to have a positive correlation, while F was expected to have a negative correlation to hypoxia. However, in wholetumor analysis the opposite was found for both t{sub 1} (r{sub ROI} = -0.25) and F (r{sub ROI} = 0.56). PS and v{sub 1} may depict angiogenic responses to hypoxia and found positive correlations to Cu-ATSM SUV for PS (r{sub ROI} = 0.41), and v{sub 1} (r{sub ROI} = 0.57). Conclusion: Low spatial correlations were found between Cu-ATSM uptake and DCE-CT vasculature parameters, implying that poor perfusion is not associated with higher hypoxic regions. Across patients, the most hypoxic tumors tended to have higher blood flow values, which is contrary to our initial hypothesis. Funding

  3. Comparison of the diagnostic value of FDG-PET/CT and axillary ultrasound for the detection of lymph node metastases in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Riegger, Carolin; Koeninger, Angela; Hartung, Verena; Otterbach, Friedrich; Kimmig, Rainer; Forsting, Michael; Bockisch, Andreas; Antoch, Gerald; Heusner, Till A

    2012-12-01

    FDG-PET/CT is increasingly being used for breast cancer staging. Its diagnostic accuracy in comparison to ultrasound as the standard non-invasive imaging modality for the evaluation of axillary lymph nodes has yet not been evaluated. To retrospectively compare the diagnostic value of full-dose, intravenously contrast-enhanced FDG-PET/CT and ultrasound for the detection of lymph node metastases in breast cancer patients. Ninety patients (one patient with a bilateral carcinoma) (89 women, one man; mean age, 55.5 +/- 16.6 years) suffering from primary breast cancer underwent whole-body FDG-PET/CT and axillary ultrasound. The ipsilateral axillary fossa (n = 91) was evaluated for metastatic spread. The sensitivity, specificity, the positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of both methods were calculated. The sensitivity and accuracy were statistically compared using the McNemar Test (P <0.05). Analyses were made on a patient basis. The number of patients with extra-axillary locoregional lymph node metastases exclusively detected by FDG-PET/CT was evaluated. For axillary lymph node metastases histopathology served as the reference standard. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of FDG-PET/CT for the detection of axillary lymph node metastases were 54%, 89%, 77%, 74%, and 75%, respectively. For ultrasound it was 38%, 78%, 54%, 65%, and 62%, respectively. FDG-PET/CT was significantly more accurate than ultrasound for the detection of axillary lymph node metastases (P = 0.019). There was no statistically significant difference between the sensitivity of both modalities (P = 0.0578). FDG-PET/CT detected extra-axillary locoregional lymph node metastases in seven patients (8%) that had not been detected by another imaging modality. Though more accurate compared to ultrasound for evaluating the axillary lymph node status FDG-PET/CT is only as sensitive as ultrasound when it comes to the detection of axillary lymph node

  4. Comparison of xenon enhanced CT (XeCT) and I-123 iodoamphetamine (SPECT/IMP) techniques for measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF)

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, R.S.; Collier, B.D.; Kilgor, D.P.; Walsh, P.R.; Daniels, D.L.; Haughton, V.M.; Williams, A.L.; Pojunas, K.W.; Tikofsky, R.S.; Isitman, A.T.

    1985-05-01

    An ongoing prospective study measuring rCBF by XeCT(20 patients) and SPECT/IMP (84 patients) to date includes 9 patients examined by both techniques. XeCT was done as 3 contiguous transaxial tomograms using a scanner (GE 9800) equipped with dynamic imaging capability and a gas delivery system for inspiring 30% Xenon. SPECT/IMP was done 20 minutes after injection of 3-5 mCi of IMP, obtaining 64 views over 360 degrees, 40 sec./view, with either a GE 400T or 400ACT. SPECT/IMP images obtained with the 400ACT camera (specially designed for head work) were superior to those obtained with the older camera. For all 9 cases, both techniques demonstrated flow abnormalities at all sites of infarction identified by conventional CT (TCT): 1 patient with normal TCT also had normal rCBF examinations. Furthermore, 8 of 9 cases showed evidence of ischemia (regions with normal TCT and abnormal rCBF measurements) by both techniques.

  5. Developing Formulas by Skipping Rows in Pascal's Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buonpastore, Robert J.; Osler, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    A table showing the first thirteen rows of Pascal's triangle, where the rows are, as usual numbered from 0 to 12 is presented. The entries in the table are called binomial coefficients. In this note, the authors systematically delete rows from Pascal's triangle and, by trial and error, try to find a formula that allows them to add new rows to the…

  6. Developing Formulas by Skipping Rows in Pascal's Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buonpastore, Robert J.; Osler, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    A table showing the first thirteen rows of Pascal's triangle, where the rows are, as usual numbered from 0 to 12 is presented. The entries in the table are called binomial coefficients. In this note, the authors systematically delete rows from Pascal's triangle and, by trial and error, try to find a formula that allows them to add new rows to the…

  7. MO-E-17A-03: Monte Carlo CT Dose Calculation: A Comparison Between Experiment and Simulation Using ARCHER-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T; Du, X; Su, L; Gao, Y; Ji, W; Xu, X; Zhang, D; Shi, J; Liu, B; Kalra, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the CT doses derived from the experiments and GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, using a human cadaver and ATOM phantom. Methods: The cadaver of an 88-year old male and the ATOM phantom were scanned by a GE LightSpeed Pro 16 MDCT. For the cadaver study, the Thimble chambers (Model 10×5−0.6CT and 10×6−0.6CT) were used to measure the absorbed dose in different deep and superficial organs. Whole-body scans were first performed to construct a complete image database for MC simulations. Abdomen/pelvis helical scans were then conducted using 120/100 kVps, 300 mAs and a pitch factor of 1.375:1. For the ATOM phantom study, the OSL dosimeters were used and helical scans were performed using 120 kVp and x, y, z tube current modulation (TCM). For the MC simulations, sufficient particles were run in both cases such that the statistical errors of the results by ARCHER-CT were limited to 1%. Results: For the human cadaver scan, the doses to the stomach, liver, colon, left kidney, pancreas and urinary bladder were compared. The difference between experiments and simulations was within 19% for the 120 kVp and 25% for the 100 kVp. For the ATOM phantom scan, the doses to the lung, thyroid, esophagus, heart, stomach, liver, spleen, kidneys and thymus were compared. The difference was 39.2% for the esophagus, and within 16% for all other organs. Conclusion: In this study the experimental and simulated CT doses were compared. Their difference is primarily attributed to the systematic errors of the MC simulations, including the accuracy of the bowtie filter modeling, and the algorithm to generate voxelized phantom from DICOM images. The experimental error is considered small and may arise from the dosimeters. R01 grant (R01EB015478) from National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

  8. A head-to-head comparison between CT- and IVUS-derived coronary blood flow models.

    PubMed

    Bulant, C A; Blanco, P J; Maso Talou, G D; Bezerra, C Guedes; Lemos, P A; Feijóo, R A

    2017-01-25

    The goal of this work is to compare coronary hemodynamics as predicted by computational blood flow models derived from two imaging modalities: coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and intravascular ultrasound integrated with angiography (IVUS). Criteria to define boundary conditions are proposed to overcome the dissimilar anatomical definition delivered by both modalities. The strategy to define boundary conditions is novel in the present context, and naturally accounts for the flow redistribution induced by the resistance of coronary vessels. Hyperemic conditions are assumed to assess model predictions under stressed hemodynamic environments similar to those encountered in Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) calculations. As results, it was found that CCTA models predict larger pressure drops, higher average blood velocity and smaller FFR. Concerning the flow rate at distal locations in the major vessels of interest, it was found that CCTA predicted smaller flow than IVUS, which is a consequence of a larger sensitivity of CCTA models to coronary steal phenomena. Comparisons to in-vivo measurements of FFR are shown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Does a bout of strength training affect 2,000 m rowing ergometer performance and rowing-specific maximal power 24 h later?

    PubMed

    Gee, Thomas I; French, Duncan N; Howatson, Glyn; Payton, Stephen J; Berger, Nicolas J; Thompson, Kevin G

    2011-11-01

    Rowers regularly undertake rowing training within 24 h of performing bouts of strength training; however, the effect of this practice has not been investigated. This study evaluated the impact of a bout of high-intensity strength training on 2,000 m rowing ergometer performance and rowing-specific maximal power. Eight highly trained male club rowers performed baseline measures of five separate, static squat jumps (SSJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ), maximal rowing ergometer power strokes (PS) and a single 2,000 m rowing ergometer test (2,000 m). Subsequently, participants performed a high-intensity strength training session consisting of various multi-joint barbell exercises. The 2,000 m test was repeated at 24 and 48 h post-ST, in addition SSJ, CMJ and PS tests were performed at these time points and also at 2 h post-ST. Muscle soreness, serum creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were assessed pre-ST and 2, 24 and 48 h post-ST. Following the ST, there were significant elevations in muscle soreness (2 and 24 h, P < 0.01), CK (2, 24 and 48 h, P < 0.01), and LDH (2 h, P < 0.05) in comparison to baseline values. There were significant decrements across all time points for SSJ, CMJ and PS, which ranged between 3 and 10% (P < 0.05). However, 2,000 m performance and related measurements of heart rate and blood lactate were not significantly affected by ST. In summary, a bout of high-intensity strength training resulted in symptoms of muscle damage and decrements in rowing-specific maximal power, but this did not affect 2,000 m rowing ergometer performance in highly trained rowers.

  10. Characterization of Genome-Wide Variation in Four-Row Wax, a Waxy Maize Landrace with a Reduced Kernel Row Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanmei; Wang, Xuewen; Wei, Bin; Wang, Yongbin; Liu, Yinghong; Zhang, Junjie; Hu, Yufeng; Yu, Guowu; Li, Jian; Xu, Zhanbin; Huang, Yubi

    2016-01-01

    In southwest China, some maize landraces have long been isolated geographically, and have phenotypes that differ from those of widely grown cultivars. These landraces may harbor rich genetic variation responsible for those phenotypes. Four-row Wax is one such landrace, with four rows of kernels on the cob. We resequenced the genome of Four-row Wax, obtaining 50.46 Gb sequence at 21.87× coverage, then identified and characterized 3,252,194 SNPs, 213,181 short InDels (1-5 bp) and 39,631 structural variations (greater than 5 bp). Of those, 312,511 (9.6%) SNPs were novel compared to the most detailed haplotype map (HapMap) SNP database of maize. Characterization of variations in reported kernel row number (KRN) related genes and KRN QTL regions revealed potential causal mutations in fea2, td1, kn1, and te1. Genome-wide comparisons revealed abundant genetic variations in Four-row Wax, which may be associated with environmental adaptation. The sequence and SNP variations described here enrich genetic resources of maize, and provide guidance into study of seed numbers for crop yield improvement.

  11. Comparison of CT on Rails With Electronic Portal Imaging for Positioning of Prostate Cancer Patients With Implanted Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Rebecca Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Milner, Alvin; Cox, Jennifer; Duchesne, Gillian; Cleeve, Laurence; Zhu Li; Cramb, Jim; Sparks, Laura; Laferlita, Marcus

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this investigation was to measure the agreement between in-room computed tomography (CT) on rails and electronic portal image (EPI) radiography. Methods and Materials: Agreement between the location of the center of gravity (COG) of fiducial markers (FMs) on CT and EPI images was determined in phantom studies and a patient cohort. A secondary analysis between the center of volume (COV) of the prostate on CT and the COG of FMs on CT and EPI was performed. Agreement was defined as the 95% probability of a difference of {<=}3.0 mm between images. Systematic and random errors from CT and EPI are reported. Results: From 8 patients, 254 CT and EPI pairs were analyzed. FMs were localized to within 3 mm on CT and EPI images 96.9% of the time in the left-right (LR) plane, 85.8% superior-inferior (SI), and 89% anterior-posterior (AP). The differences between the COV on CT and the COG on EPI were not within 3 mm in any plane: 87.8% (LR), 64.2% (SI), and 70.9% (AP). The systematic error varied from 1.2 to 2.9 mm (SI) and 1.8-2.9 mm (AP) between the COG on EPI and COV on CT. Conclusions: Considerable differences between in-room CT and EPI exist. The phantom measurements showed slice thickness affected the accuracy of localization in the SI plane, and couch sag that occurs at the CT on rails gantry could not be totally corrected for in the AP plane. Other confounding factors are the action of rotating the couch and associated time lag between image acquisitions (prostate motion), EPI image quality, and outlining uncertainties.

  12. Single- and dual-energy CT of the abdomen: comparison of radiation dose and image quality of 2nd and 3rd generation dual-source CT.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Julian L; Hardie, Andrew D; Schoepf, U Joseph; Felmly, Lloyd M; Perry, Jonathan D; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Mangold, Stefanie; Caruso, Damiano; Canstein, Christian; Vogl, Thomas J; De Cecco, Carlo N

    2017-02-01

    To compare single-energy (SECT) and dual-energy (DECT) abdominal CT examinations in matched patient cohorts regarding differences in radiation dose and image quality performed with second- and third-generation dual-source CT (DSCT). We retrospectively analysed 200 patients (100 male, 100 female; mean age 61.2 ± 13.5 years, mean body mass index 27.5 ± 3.8 kg/m(2)) equally divided into four groups matched by gender and body mass index, who had undergone portal venous phase abdominal CT with second-generation (group A, 120-kV-SECT; group B, 80/140-kV-DECT) and third-generation DSCT (group C, 100-kV-SECT; group D, 90/150-kV-DECT). The radiation dose was normalised for 40-cm scan length. Dose-independent figure-of-merit (FOM) contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated for various organs and vessels. Subjective overall image quality and reader confidence were assessed. The effective normalised radiation dose was significantly lower (P < 0.001) in groups C (6.2 ± 2.0 mSv) and D (5.3 ± 1.9 mSv, P = 0.103) compared to groups A (8.8 ± 2.3 mSv) and B (9.7 ± 2.4 mSv, P = 0.102). Dose-independent FOM-CNR peaked for liver, kidney, and portal vein measurements (all P ≤ 0.0285) in group D. Subjective image quality and reader confidence were consistently rated as excellent in all groups (all ≥1.53 out of 5). With both DSCT generations, abdominal DECT can be routinely performed without radiation dose penalty compared to SECT, while third-generation DSCT shows improved dose efficiency. • Dual-source CT (DSCT) allows for single- and dual-energy image acquisition. • Dual-energy acquisition does not increase the radiation dose in abdominal DSCT. • Third-generation DSCT shows improved dose efficiency compared to second-generation DSCT. • Dose-independent figure-of-merit image contrast was highest with third-generation dual-energy DSCT. • Third-generation DSCT shows improved dose efficiency for SECT and DECT.

  13. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Gaffney, David K.; Beriwal, Sushil; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Lee Burnett, Omer; D'Souza, David P.; Patil, Nikhilesh; Haddock, Michael G.; Jhingran, Anuja; Jones, Ellen L.; Kunos, Charles A.; Lee, Larissa J.; Mayr, Nina A.; Petersen, Ivy; Petric, Primoz; Portelance, Lorraine; Small, William; Strauss, Jonathan B.; and others

    2014-10-01

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  14. Initial experience with lung-MRI at 3.0T: Comparison with CT and clinical data in the evaluation of interstitial lung disease activity.

    PubMed

    Lutterbey, G; Grohé, C; Gieseke, J; von Falkenhausen, M; Morakkabati, N; Wattjes, M P; Manka, R; Trog, D; Schild, H H

    2007-02-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of highfield lung-MRI at 3.0T. A comparison with Computed Tomography (CT) and clinical data regarding the assessment of inflammatory activity in patients with diffuse lung disease was performed. Prospective evaluation of 21 patients (15 males, 6 females, 43-80 y) with diffuse lung diseases who underwent clinical work-up inclusive laboratory tests, lung-function tests and transbronchial biopsy. After routine helical CT (additional 12 HRCT) a lung-MRI (3.0 Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands) using a T2-weighted, cardiac and respiratory triggered Fast-Spinecho-Sequence (TE/TR=80/1500-2500 ms, 22 transverse slices, 7/2mm slice-thickness/-gap) was performed. A pneumologist classified the cases into two groups: A=temporary acute interstitial disease or chronic interstitial lung disease with acute episode or superimposed infection/B=burned out interstitial lung disease without activity. Two blinded CT-radiologists graded the cases in active/inactive disease on the basis of nine morphological criteria each. A third radiologist rated the MRI-cases as active/inactive, depending on the signal-intensities of lung tissues. The pneumologist classified 14 patients into group A and 7 patients into group B. Using CT, 6 cases were classified as active, 15 cases as inactive disease. With MRI 12 cases were classified as active and 9 cases as inactive. In the complete group of 21 patients MRI decisions and CT decisions respectively were false positive/false negative/correct in 2/4/15 respectively 0/8/13 cases. Correct diagnoses were obtained in 72% (MRI) respectively 62% (CT). In the subgroup of 12 cases including HRCT, MRI respectively CT were false positive/false negative/correct in 2/1/9 respectively 0/5/7 cases. Correct diagnoses were obtained in 75% (MRI) respectively 58% (CT). Highfield MRI of the lung is feasible and performed slightly better compared to CT in the determination of activity in patients with interstitial lung

  15. Optical RAM row access using WDM-enabled all-passive row/column decoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Sotirios; Alexoudi, Theoni; Kanellos, George T.; Miliou, Amalia; Pleros, Nikos

    2014-03-01

    Towards achieving a functional RAM organization that reaps the advantages offered by optical technology, a complete set of optical peripheral modules, namely the Row (RD) and Column Decoder (CD) units, is required. In this perspective, we demonstrate an all-passive 2×4 optical RAM RD with row access operation and subsequent all-passive column decoding to control the access of WDM-formatted words in optical RAM rows. The 2×4 RD exploits a WDM-formatted 2-bit-long memory WordLine address along with its complementary value, all of them encoded on four different wavelengths and broadcasted to all RAM rows. The RD relies on an all-passive wavelength-selective filtering matrix (λ-matrix) that ensures a logical `0' output only at the selected RAM row. Subsequently, the RD output of each row drives the respective SOA-MZI-based Row Access Gate (AG) to grant/block the entry of the incoming data words to the whole memory row. In case of a selected row, the data word exits the row AG and enters the respective CD that relies on an allpassive wavelength-selective Arrayed Waveguide Grating (AWG) for decoding the word bits into their individual columns. Both RD and CD procedures are carried out without requiring any active devices, assuming that the memory address and data word bits as well as their inverted values will be available in their optical form by the CPU interface. Proof-of-concept experimental verification exploiting cascaded pairs of AWGs as the λ-matrix is demonstrated at 10Gb/s, providing error-free operation with a peak power penalty lower than 0.2dB for all optical word channels.

  16. (68)Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT Versus Histopathology in Primary Localized Prostate Cancer: A Voxel-Wise Comparison.

    PubMed

    Zamboglou, Constantinos; Schiller, Florian; Fechter, Tobias; Wieser, Gesche; Jilg, Cordula Annette; Chirindel, Alin; Salman, Nasr; Drendel, Vanessa; Werner, Martin; Mix, Michael; Meyer, Philipp Tobias; Grosu, Anca Ligia

    2016-01-01

    We performed a voxel-wise comparison of (68)Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT with prostate histopathology to evaluate the performance of (68)Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA for the detection and delineation of primary prostate cancer (PCa). Nine patients with histopathological proven primary PCa underwent (68)Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT followed by radical prostatectomy. Resected prostates were scanned by ex-vivo CT in a special localizer and histopathologically prepared. Histopathological information was matched to ex-vivo CT. PCa volume (PCa-histo) and non-PCa tissue in the prostate (NPCa-histo) were processed to obtain a PCa-model, which was adjusted to PET-resolution (histo-PET). Each histo-PET was coregistered to in-vivo PSMA-PET/CT data. Analysis of spatial overlap between histo-PET and PSMA PET revealed highly significant correlations (p < 10(-5)) in nine patients and moderate to high coefficients of determination (R²) from 42 to 82 % with an average of 60 ± 14 % in eight patients (in one patient R(2) = 7 %). Mean SUVmean in PCa-histo and NPCa-histo was 5.6 ± 6.1 and 3.3 ± 2.5 (p = 0.012). Voxel-wise receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses comparing the prediction by PSMA-PET with the non-smoothed tumor distribution from histopathology yielded an average area under the curve of 0.83 ± 0.12. Absolute and relative SUV (normalized to SUVmax) thresholds for achieving at least 90 % sensitivity were 3.19 ± 3.35 and 0.28 ± 0.09, respectively. Voxel-wise analyses revealed good correlations of (68)Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT and histopathology in eight out of nine patients. Thus, PSMA-PET allows a reliable detection and delineation of PCa as basis for PET-guided focal therapies.

  17. NPS comparison of anatomical noise characteristics in mammography, tomosynthesis, and breast CT images using power law metrics