Science.gov

Sample records for row ct comparison

  1. Comparison of cerebral blood flow data obtained by computed tomography (CT) perfusion with that obtained by xenon CT using 320-row CT.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Tanizaki, Yoshio; Kimura, Hiroaki; Akaji, Kazunori; Kano, Tadashige; Suzuki, Kentaro; Takayama, Youhei; Kanzawa, Takao; Shidoh, Satoka; Nakazawa, Masaki; Yoshida, Kazunari; Mihara, Ban

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) data obtained by computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging have been shown to be qualitative data rather than quantitative, in contrast with data obtained by other imaging methods, such as xenon CT (XeCT) imaging. Thus, interpatient comparisons of CBF values themselves obtained by CTP may be inaccurate. In this study, we have compared CBF ratios as well as CBF values obtained from CTP-CBF data to those obtained from XeCT-CBF data for the same patients to determine CTP-CBF parameters that can be used for interpatient comparisons. The data used in the present study were obtained as volume data using 320-row CT. The volume data were applied to an automated region of interest-determining software (3DSRT, version 3.5.2 ) and converted to 59 slices of 2 mm interval standardized images. In the present study, we reviewed 10 patients with occlusive cerebrovascular diseases (CVDs) undergoing both CTP and XeCT in the same period. Our study shows that ratios of CBF measurements, such as hemodynamic stress distribution (perforator-to-cortical flow ratio of middle cerebral artery [MCA] region) or the left/right ratio for the region of the MCA, calculated using CTP data have been shown to correlate well with the same ratios calculated using XeCT data. These results suggest that such CBF ratios could be useful for generating interpatient comparisons of CTP-CBF data obtained by 320-row CT among patients with occlusive CVD.

  2. Superior CT coronary angiography image quality at lower radiation exposure with second generation 320-detector row CT in patients with elevated heart rate: a comparison with first generation 320-detector row CT

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Siang Y.; Ko, Brian S. H.; Cameron, James D.; Crossett, Marcus; Nasis, Arthur; Troupis, John; Meredith, Ian T.; Seneviratne, Sujith K.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aims to compare the image quality of second generation versus first generation 320-computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients with heart rate ≥65 bpm as it has not been specifically reported. Methods Consecutive patients who underwent CTCA using second-generation-320-detector-row-CT were prospectively enrolled. A total of 50 patients with elevated (≥65 bpm) heart rate and 50 patients with controlled (<65 bpm) heart rate were included. Age and gender matched patients who were scanned with the first-generation-320-detector-row-CT were retrospectively identified. Image quality in each coronary artery segment was assessed by two blinded CT angiographers using the five-point Likert scale. Results In the elevated heart rate cohorts, while there was no significant difference in heart rate during scan-acquisition (66 vs. 69 bpm, P=0.308), or body mass index (28.5 vs. 29.6, P=0.464), the second generation scanner was associated with better image quality (3.94±0.6 vs. 3.45±0.8, P=0.001), and with lower radiation (2.8 vs. 4.3 mSv, P=0.009). There was no difference in scan image quality for the controlled heart rate cohorts. Conclusions The second generation CT scanner provides better image quality at lower radiation dose in patients with elevated heart rate (≥65 bpm) compared to first generation CT scanner. PMID:25276615

  3. [Comparison of a dental cone beam CT with a multi-detector row CT on effective doses and physical image quality].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Tokumori, Kenji; Okamura, Kazutoshi; Yoshiura, Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a dental cone beam computed tomography (dental CBCT) and a multi-detector row CT (MDCT) using effective doses and physical image quality. A dental mode (D-mode) and an implant mode (I-mode) were employed for calculating effective doses. Field of view (FOV) size of the MDCT was 150 mm. Three types of images were obtained using 3 different reconstruction functions: FC1 (for abdomen images), FC30 (for internal ear and bone images) and FC81 (for high resolution images). Effective doses obtained with the D-mode and with the I-mode were about 20% and 50% of those obtained with the MDCT, respectively. Resolution properties obtained with the D-mode and I-mode were superior to that of the MDCT in a high frequency range. Noise properties of the D-mode and the I-mode were better than those with FC81. It was found that the dental CBCT has better potential as compared with MDCT in both dental and implant modes.

  4. CT venography after knee replacement surgery: comparison of dual-energy CT-based monochromatic imaging and single-energy metal artifact reduction techniques on a 320-row CT scanner

    PubMed Central

    Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Funama, Yoshinori; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirata, Kenichiro; Hatemura, Masahiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Background An optimal metal artifact reduction (MAR) technique is needed for a reliable and accurate image-based diagnosis. Purpose Using a 320-row scanner, we compared the dual-energy computed tomography (CT)-based monochromatic and the single-energy metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) techniques for CT venography (CTV) to identify the better imaging method for diagnosing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients who had undergone knee replacement surgery. Material and Methods Twenty-three consecutive patients with suspected DVT after unilateral knee replacement surgery underwent dual-energy CT (135/80 kVp). Monochromatic images of 35–135 keV were generated; the monochromatic image with the best signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the popliteal vein near the metal prosthesis were selected. The projection data of 80 kVp were reconstructed using MAR algorithm. The mean SNR ON MAR and the best SNR ON monochromatic images were compared. Two radiologists evaluated visualization of the metal artifacts on a four-point scale where 1 = extensive artifacts, 2 = strong artifacts, 3 = mild artifacts, and 4 = minimal artifacts. Results The mean SNR was significantly higher on the MAR than the monochromatic images (12.8 ± 4.7 versus 7.7 ± 5.1, P < 0.01) and the visual scores were significantly higher for MAR than monochromatic images (2.6 ± 0.8 versus 1.3 ± 0.4, P < 0.01). Conclusion For CTV after knee replacement surgery, the MAR technique is superior to the monochromatic imaging technique. PMID:28321330

  5. Multidetector-row CT with a 64-row amorphous silicon flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Edward G.; Colbeth, Richard E.; Daley, Earl T.; Job, Isaias D.; Mollov, Ivan P.; Mollov, Todor I.; Pavkovich, John M.; Roos, Pieter G.; Star-Lack, Josh M.; Tognina, Carlo A.

    2007-03-01

    A unique 64-row flat panel (FP) detector has been developed for sub-second multidetector-row CT (MDCT). The intent was to explore the image quality achievable with relatively inexpensive amorphous silicon (a-Si) compared to existing diagnostic scanners with discrete crystalline diode detectors. The FP MDCT system is a bench-top design that consists of three FP modules. Each module uses a 30 cm x 3.3 cm a-Si array with 576 x 64 photodiodes. The photodiodes are 0.52 mm x 0.52 mm, which allows for about twice the spatial resolution of most commercial MDCT scanners. The modules are arranged in an overlapping geometry, which is sufficient to provide a full-fan 48 cm diameter scan. Scans were obtained with various detachable scintillators, e.g. ceramic Gd IIO IIS, particle-in-binder Gd IIO IIS:Tb and columnar CsI:Tl. Scan quality was evaluated with a Catphan-500 performance phantom and anthropomorphic phantoms. The FP MDCT scans demonstrate nearly equivalent performance scans to a commercial 16-slice MDCT scanner at comparable 10 - 20 mGy/100mAs doses. Thus far, a high contrast resolution of 15 lp/cm and a low contrast resolution of 5 mm @ 0.3 % have been achieved on 1 second scans. Sub-second scans have been achieved with partial rotations. Since the future direction of MDCT appears to be in acquiring single organ coverage per scan, future efforts are planned for increasing the number of detector rows beyond the current 64- rows.

  6. Recent technologic advances in multi-detector row cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, Sandra Simon

    2009-11-01

    Recent technical advances in multi-detector row CT have resulted in lower radiation dose, improved temporal and spatial resolution, decreased scan time, and improved tissue differentiation. Lower radiation doses have resulted from the use of pre-patient z collimators, the availability of thin-slice axial data acquisition, the increased efficiency of ECG-based tube current modulation, and the implementation of iterative reconstruction algorithms. Faster gantry rotation and the simultaneous use of two x-ray sources have led to improvements in temporal resolution, and gains in spatial resolution have been achieved through application of the flying x-ray focal-spot technique in the z-direction. Shorter scan times have resulted from the design of detector arrays with increasing numbers of detector rows and through the simultaneous use of two x-ray sources to allow higher helical pitch. Some improvement in tissue differentiation has been achieved with dual energy CT. This article discusses these recent technical advances in detail.

  7. Classification of lung area using multidetector-row CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukaibo, Tsutomu; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2002-05-01

    Recently, we can get high quality images in the short time for the progress of X-ray CT scanner. And the three dimensional (3-D) analysis of pulmonary organs using multidetector-row CT (MDCT) images, is expected. This paper presents a method for classifying lung area into each lobe using pulmonary MDCT images of the whole lung area. It is possible to recognize the position of nodule by classifying lung area into these lobes. The structure of lungs differs on the right one and left one. The right lung is divided into three domains by major fissure and minor fissure. And, the left lung is divided into two domains by major fissure. Watching MDCT images carefully, we find that the surroundings of fissures have few blood vessels. Therefore, lung area is classified by extraction of the domain that the distance from pulmonary blood vessels is large and connective search of these extracted domains. These extraction and search are realized by 3-D weighted Hough transform.

  8. Coronary CT angiography using 64 detector rows: methods and design of the multi-centre trial CORE-64

    PubMed Central

    Vavere, Andrea L.; Rochitte, Carlos E.; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; de Roos, Albert; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Lemos, Pedro A.; Bush, David E.; Lardo, Albert C.; Texter, John; Brinker, Jeffery; Cox, Christopher; Clouse, Melvin E.; Lima, João A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) for the noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenoses is a promising candidate for widespread clinical application because of its noninvasive nature and high sensitivity and negative predictive value as found in several previous studies using 16 to 64 simultaneous detector rows. A multi-centre study of CT coronary angiography using 16 simultaneous detector rows has shown that 16-slice CT is limited by a high number of nondiagnostic cases and a high false-positive rate. A recent meta-analysis indicated a significant interaction between the size of the study sample and the diagnostic odds ratios suggestive of small study bias, highlighting the importance of evaluating MSCT using 64 simultaneous detector rows in a multi-centre approach with a larger sample size. In this manuscript we detail the objectives and methods of the prospective “CORE-64” trial (“Coronary Evaluation Using Multidetector Spiral Computed Tomography Angiography using 64 Detectors”). This multi-centre trialwas unique in that it assessed the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in nine centres worldwide in comparison to conventional coronary angiography. In conclusion, the multi-centre, multi-institutional and multi-continental trial CORE-64 has great potential to ultimately assess the per-patient diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography using 64 simultaneous detector rows. PMID:18998142

  9. Relationship between noise, dose, and pitch in cardiac multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Primak, Andrew N; McCollough, Cynthia H; Bruesewitz, Michael R; Zhang, Jie; Fletcher, Joel G

    2006-01-01

    In spiral computed tomography (CT), dose is always inversely proportional to pitch. However, the relationship between noise and pitch (and hence noise and dose) depends on the scanner type (single vs multi-detector row) and reconstruction mode (cardiac vs noncardiac). In single detector row spiral CT, noise is independent of pitch. Conversely, in noncardiac multi-detector row CT, noise depends on pitch because the spiral interpolation algorithm makes use of redundant data from different detector rows to decrease noise for pitch values less than 1 (and increase noise for pitch values > 1). However, in cardiac spiral CT, redundant data cannot be used because such data averaging would degrade the temporal resolution. Therefore, the behavior of noise versus pitch returns to the single detector row paradigm, with noise being independent of pitch. Consequently, since faster rotation times require lower pitch values in cardiac multi-detector row CT, dose is increased without a commensurate decrease in noise. Thus, the use of faster rotation times will improve temporal resolution, not alter noise, and increase dose. For a particular application, the higher dose resulting from faster rotation speeds should be justified by the clinical benefits of the improved temporal resolution.

  10. Optimization of multiplanar reformations from isotropic data sets acquired with 16-detector row helical CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Tracy A; Nelson, Rendon C; Johnson, G Allan; Lee, Ellie R; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Lowry, Carolyn R; Bullard, Anthony B; DeLong, David M; Paulson, Erik K

    2006-01-01

    Institutional review board approval and waiver of consent were obtained for the patient component of this retrospective HIPAA-compliant study. By using an anthropomorphic phantom and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors, radiation dose was determined for one eight-detector row and two 16-detector row computed tomographic (CT) protocols. A custom phantom was scanned by using the three protocols to identify isotropy. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were determined for the same protocols by using a third phantom. Seven patients had undergone isotropic 16-detector row CT of the abdomen and pelvis. Anonymized coronal reformations at various thicknesses were ranked qualitatively by three radiologists. Effective dose equivalents were similar for the eight- and 16-detector row protocols. When transverse and coronal reformations of data acquired in the custom phantom were compared, coronal reformations obtained with the 16-detector row and 0.625-mm section thickness protocol were found to be nearly identical to the transverse image for all sets of line pairs. CNRs were consistently highest on 5-mm-thick coronal reformations (CNR range, 1.2-3.3). For qualitative assessment, 2- and 3-mm-thick coronal reformations were consistently preferred.

  11. [Multidetector row CT in assessment of coronary artery calcification on hemodialisis].

    PubMed

    Caro, P; Delgado, R; Dapena, F; Núñez, A

    2007-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a strong predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Coronary artery calcification is more frequent, more extensive and progresses more rapidly in CKD than in general population. They are also considered a marker of coronary heart disease, with high prevalence and functional significance. It suggests that detection and surveillance may be worthwhile in general clinical practice. New non-invasive image techniques, like Multi-detector row CT, a type of spiral scanner, assess density and volume of calcification at multiple sites and allow quantitative scoring of vascular calcification using calcium scores analogous to those from electron-beam CT. We have assessed and quantified coronary artery calcification with 16 multidetector row CT in 44 patients on hemodialysis and their relationship with several cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary artery calcification prevalence was of 84 % with mean calcium score of 1580 +/- 2010 ( r 0-9844) with calcium score > 400 in 66% of patients. It was usually multiple, affecting more than two vessels in more than 50%. In all but one patient, left anterior descending artery was involved with higher calcium score level at right coronary artery. Advanced age, male, diabetes, smoking, more morbidity, cerebrovascular disease previous, and calcium-binders phosphate and analogous vitamin D treatment would seem to be associated with coronary artery calcification. Coronary artery calcification is very frequent and extensive, usually multiple and associated to modifiable risk factors in hemodialysis patients. Multi-detector-row CT seems an effective, suitable, readily applicable method to assess and quantify coronary artery calcification.

  12. Computed tomography dose assessment for a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Geleijns, J; Salvadó Artells, M; de Bruin, P W; Matter, R; Muramatsu, Y; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2009-05-21

    Computed tomography (CT) dosimetry should be adapted to the rapid developments in CT technology. Recently a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner that challenges the existing Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) dosimetry paradigm was introduced. The purpose of this study was to assess dosimetric characteristics of this cone beam scanner, to study the appropriateness of existing CT dose metrics and to suggest a pragmatic approach for CT dosimetry for cone beam scanners. Dose measurements with a small Farmer-type ionization chamber and with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers were performed free in air to characterize the cone beam. According to the most common dose metric in CT, namely CTDI, measurements were also performed in 150 mm and 350 mm long CT head and CT body dose phantoms with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers, respectively. To explore effects that cannot be measured with ionization chambers, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the dose distribution in 150 mm, 350 mm and 700 mm long CT head and CT body phantoms were performed. To overcome inconsistencies in the definition of CTDI100 for the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner, doses were also expressed as the average absorbed dose within the pencil chamber (D100). Measurements free in air revealed excellent correspondence between CTDI300air and D100air, while CTDI100air substantially underestimates CTDI300air. Results of measurements in CT dose phantoms and corresponding MC simulations at centre and peripheral positions were weighted and revealed good agreement between CTDI300w, D100w and CTDI600w, while CTDI100w substantially underestimates CTDI300w. D100w provides a pragmatic metric for characterizing the dose of the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner. This quantity can be measured with the widely available 100 mm pencil ionization chamber within 150 mm long CT dose phantoms. CTDI300w measured in 350 mm long CT dose phantoms serves as an appropriate standard of

  13. Comparisons of single-row and twin-row soybean production in the Mid South

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Maturity Group (MG) IV and MG V soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] cultivar were planted in single-rows and twin-rows on 102 cm beds at 20, 30, 40, and 50 seeds m-2 in a Beulah fine sandy loam (coarse-loamy, mixed thermic Typic Dystrochrepts) in 2008, 2009, 2010 and Sharkey clay (Vertic Haplaquept) i...

  14. Comparison of Single Row, Twin Row, and Diamond Planting Patterns in Valencia Peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most Valencia peanuts are grown in single rows on 36 to 40 inch beds. Because of their bunch-type and erect growth habit, Valencia peanuts do not spread over the whole bed and have the opportunity to benefit from multiple row planting arrangements. This study was conducted at locations near Portal...

  15. Noninvasive imaging of coronary arteries: current and future role of multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Halliburton, Sandra S; Stillman, Arthur E; Kuzmiak, Stacie A; Nissen, Steven E; Tuzcu, E Murat; White, Richard D

    2004-07-01

    While invasive imaging techniques, especially selective conventional coronary angiography, will remain vital to planning and guiding catheter-based and surgical treatment of significantly stenotic coronary lesions, the comprehensive and serial assessment of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic stages of coronary artery disease (CAD) for preventive purposes will eventually need to rely on noninvasive imaging techniques. Cardiovascular imaging with tomographic modalities, including computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, has great potential for providing valuable information. This review article will describe the current and future role of cardiac CT, and in particular that of multi-detector row CT, for imaging of atherosclerotic and other pathologic changes of the coronary arteries. It will describe how tomographic coronary imaging may eventually supplement traditional angiographic techniques in understanding the patterns of atherosclerotic CAD development.

  16. The radiological diagnosis of fenestral otosclerosis: the utility of histogram analysis using multidetector row CT.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Togao, Osamu; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Inoguchi, Takashi; Kumazawa, Seiji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Bone density measurements using high-resolution CT have been reported to be useful to diagnose fenestral otosclerosis. However, small region of interest (ROI) chosen by less-experienced radiologists may result in false-negative findings. Semi-automatic analysis such as CT histogram analysis may offer improved assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of CT histogram analysis in diagnosing fenestral otosclerosis. Temporal bone CT of consecutive patients with otosclerosis and normal controls was retrospectively analyzed. The control group consisted of the normal-hearing contralateral ears of patients with otitis media, cholesteatoma, trauma, facial nerve palsy, or tinnitus. All CT images were obtained using a 64-detector-row CT scanner with 0.5-mm collimation. AROI encompassing 10 × 10 pixels was placed in the bony labyrinth located anterior to the oval window. The mean CT value, variance and entropy were compared between otosclerosis patients and normal controls using Student's t test. The number of pixels below mean minus SD in the control (%Lowcont) and total subjects (%Lowtotal) were also compared. In addition, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) value for the discrimination between otosclerosis patients and normal controls was calculated. 51 temporal bones of 38 patients with otosclerosis and 30 temporal bones of 30 control subjects were included. The mean CT value was significantly lower in otosclerosis cases than in normal controls (p < 0.01). In addition, variance, entropy, %Lowcont and %Lowtotal were significantly higher in otosclerosis cases than in normal controls (p < 0.01, respectively). The AUC values for the mean CT value, %Lowcont and %Lowtotal were 0.751, 0.760 and 0.765, respectively. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that histogram analysis of CT image may be of clinical value in diagnosing otosclerosis.

  17. 320-row CT renal perfusion imaging in patients with aortic dissection: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongting; Liu, Jiayi; Wen, Zhaoying; Li, Yu; Sun, Zhonghua; Xu, Qin; Fan, Zhanming

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical value of renal perfusion imaging in patients with aortic dissection (AD) using 320-row computed tomography (CT), and to determine the relationship between renal CT perfusion imaging and various factors of aortic dissection. Methods Forty-three patients with AD who underwent 320-row CT renal perfusion before operation were prospectively enrolled in this study. Diagnosis of AD was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. Blood flow (BF) of bilateral renal perfusion was measured and analyzed. CT perfusion imaging signs of AD in relation to the type of AD, number of entry tears and the false lumen thrombus were observed and compared. Results The BF values of patients with type A AD were significantly lower than those of patients with type B AD (P = 0.004). No significant difference was found in the BF between different numbers of intimal tears (P = 0.288), but BF values were significantly higher in cases with a false lumen without thrombus and renal arteries arising from the true lumen than in those with thrombus (P = 0.036). The BF values measured between the true lumen, false lumen and overriding groups were different (P = 0.02), with the true lumen group having the highest. Also, the difference in BF values between true lumen and false lumen groups was statistically significant (P = 0.016), while no statistical significance was found in the other two groups (P > 0.05). The larger the size of intimal entry tears, the greater the BF values (P = 0.044). Conclusions This study shows a direct correlation between renal CT perfusion changes and AD, with the size, number of intimal tears, different types of AD, different renal artery origins and false lumen thrombosis, significantly affecting the perfusion values. PMID:28182709

  18. Bronchial anatomy of left lung: a study of multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinya; Ju, Yuanrong; Liu, Cheng; Li, Jianfeng; Huang, Min; Sun, Jian; Wang, Tao

    2009-02-01

    Familiarity with prevailing pattern and variations in the bronchial tree is not only essential for the anatomist to explain bronchial variation in bronchial specimens, but also useful for guiding bronchoscopy and instructing pulmonary segmental resection. The purpose of this study was designed to demonstrate various branching patterns of left lung with 3D images, with special attention given to identify the major types at transverse thin-section CT. Two hundred and sixteen patients with routine thorax scans were enrolled. The images of bronchial tree, virtual bronchoscopy were reconstructed using post-processing technique of multi-detector row CT. We attempted to classify the segmental bronchi by interpreting the post-processing images, and identified them in transverse thin-section CT. Our results showed that the segmental bronchial ramifications of the left superior lobe were classified into three types mainly, i.e., common stem of apical and posterior segmental bronchi (64%, 138/216); trifurcation (23%, 50/216); common stem of apical and anterior segmental bronchi (10%, 22/216), and they could be identified at two typical sections of transverse thin-section CT. There were two major types in left basal segmental bronchi, i.e., bifurcation (75%, 163/216), trifurcation (18%, 39/216), and they could also be identified at two typical sections of transverse thin-section CT. In conclusion, our study have offered simplified branching patterns of bronchi and demonstrated various unusual bronchial branching patterns perfectly with 3D images, and have also revealed how to identify the main branching patterns in transverse thin-section CT.

  19. Evaluation of different small bowel contrast agents by multi - detector row CT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Ren; Yu, Xiao-Li; Peng, Zhi-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate the effects of different oral small bowel contrast agents towards the intestinal dilatation and intestinal wall structure exhibition by the abdominal multi - detector row CT (MDCT) examination. Methods: 80 patients were performed the whole abdominal CT examination, then randomly divided into four groups, with 20 patients in each group. 45 minutes before the CT examination, the patients were served with a total of 1800 ml pure water, pure milk, dilute lactulose solution and isotonic mannitol solution, respectively. Results: The images were blinded read by two experienced abdominal radiologists in the workstation, the cross-sectional diameters of duodenum, jejunum, proximal and terminal ends of ileum of each patient were measured, then the analysis of variance was performed to analyze the differences in the intestinal dilatation among the experimental groups. The scoring method was used to score the intestinal dilatation and intestinal structure exhibition. The diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the best intestinal dilation degrees. Similarly, the diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the highest scores in the entire small bowel dilatation degree and intestinal structure exhibition. Conclusions: 2.5% osmotic mannitol and the diluted lactulose solution enabled the full dilatation of small bowel, and could clearly exhibit the wall structure. PMID:26629131

  20. Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT

    SciTech Connect

    Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H.

    2007-05-15

    We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

  1. Overbeaming and overlapping of volume-scan CT with tube current modulation in a 320-detector row CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Lan; Chen, Yan-Shi; Lai, Nan-Ku; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of volume scan tube current modulation (VS-ATCM) with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR3D) technique in abdomen CT examinations. We scanned an elliptical cone-shaped phantom utilizing AIDR3D technique combined with VS-ATCM mode in a 320-detector row CT scanner. The image noise distributions with conventional filtered back-projction (FBP) technique and those with AIDR3D technique were compared. The radiation dose profile and tube current time product (mAs) in three noise levels of VS-ATCM modes were compared. The radiation beam profiles of five preset scan lengths were measured using Gafchromic film strips to assess the effects of overbeaming and everlapping. The results indicated that the image noises with AIDR3D technique was 13-74% lower than those in FBP technique. The mAs distributions can be a prediction for various abdominal sizes when undergoing a VS-ATCM mode scan. Patients can receive the radiation dose of overbeaming and overlapping during the VS-ATCM mode scans.

  2. Multi-detector row CT scanning in Paleoanthropology at various tube current settings and scanning mode.

    PubMed

    Badawi-Fayad, J; Yazbeck, C; Balzeau, A; Nguyen, T H; Istoc, A; Grimaud-Hervé, D; Cabanis, E- A

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal tube current setting and scanning mode for hominid fossil skull scanning, using multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Four fossil skulls (La Ferrassie 1, Abri Pataud 1, CroMagnon 2 and Cro-Magnon 3) were examined by using the CT scanner LightSpeed 16 (General Electric Medical Systems) with varying dose per section (160, 250, and 300 mAs) and scanning mode (helical and conventional). Image quality of two-dimensional (2D) multiplanar reconstructions, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and native images was assessed by four reviewers using a four-point grading scale. An ANOVA (analysis of variance) model was used to compare the mean score for each sequence and the overall mean score according to the levels of the scanning parameters. Compared with helical CT (mean score=12.03), the conventional technique showed sustained poor image quality (mean score=4.17). With the helical mode, we observed a better image quality at 300 mAs than at 160 in the 3D sequences (P=0.03). Whereas in native images, a reduction in the effective tube current induced no degradation in image quality (P=0.05). Our study suggests a standardized protocol for fossil scanning with a 16 x 0.625 detector configuration, a 10 mm beam collimation, a 0.562:1 acquisition mode, a 0.625/0.4 mm slice thickness/reconstruction interval, a pitch of 5.62, 120 kV and 300 mAs especially when a 3D study is required.

  3. A new 3-D diagnosis strategy for duodenal malignant lesions using multidetector row CT, CT virtual duodenoscopy, duodenography, and 3-D multicholangiography.

    PubMed

    Sata, N; Endo, K; Shimura, K; Koizumi, M; Nagai, H

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in multidetector row computed tomography (MD-CT) technology provide new opportunities for clinical diagnoses of various diseases. Here we assessed CT virtual duodenoscopy, duodenography, and three-dimensional (3D) multicholangiography created by MD-CT for clinical diagnosis of duodenal malignant lesions. The study involved seven cases of periduodenal carcinoma (four ampullary carcinomas, two duodenal carcinomas, one pancreatic carcinoma). Biliary contrast medium was administered intravenously, followed by intravenous administration of an anticholinergic agent and oral administration of effervescent granules for expanding the upper gastrointestinal tract. Following intravenous administration of a nonionic contrast medium, an upper abdominal MD-CT scan was performed in the left lateral position. Scan data were processed on a workstation to create CT virtual duodenoscopy, duodenography, 3D multicholangiography, and various postprocessing images, which were then evaluated for their effectiveness as preoperative diagnostic tools. Carcinoma location and extent were clearly demonstrated as defects or colored low-density areas in 3-D multicholangiography images and as protruding lesions in virtual duodenography and duodenoscopy images. These findings were confirmed using multiplanar or curved planar reformation images. In conclusion, CT virtual duodenoscopy, doudenography, 3-D multicholangiography, and various images created by MD-CT alone provided necessary and adequate preoperative diagnostic information.

  4. Coronary artery calcium score: influence of reconstruction interval at 16-detector row CT with retrospective electrocardiographic gating.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Thomas; Hunold, Peter; Schmermund, Axel; Kühl, Hilmar; Waltering, Kai-Uwe; Debatin, Jörg F; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2004-11-01

    In 30 patients, Agatston and volumetric scores were assessed by using retrospectively gated multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). For each patient, 10 data sets were created at different times and were evenly spaced throughout the cardiac cycle. For each reconstruction, patients were assigned a percentile that described the level of cardiovascular risk. Nineteen (63%) of 30 patients could be assigned to more than one risk group depending on the reconstruction interval used. Agatston and volumetric scores both proved highly dependent on the reconstruction interval used (coefficient of variation, < or =63.1%) even with the most advanced CT scanners. Accurate and reproducible quantification of coronary calcium seems to require analysis of multiple reconstructions.

  5. The role of multidetector-row CT in the diagnosis, classification and management of acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, I W; Peebles, C R; Harden, S P; Shambrook, J S

    2014-01-01

    The term “acute aortic syndrome” (AAS) encompasses several non-traumatic life-threatening pathologies of the thoracic aorta presenting in patients with a similar clinical profile. These include aortic dissection, intramural haematoma and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcers. These different pathological entities can be indistinguishable on clinical grounds alone and may be confused with other causes of chest pain, including myocardial infarction. Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) is the current modality of choice for imaging AAS with a sensitivity and specificity approaching 100%. Early diagnosis and accurate radiological classification is associated with improved clinical outcomes in AAS. We review the characteristic radiological features of the different pathologies that encompass AAS and highlight the vital role of MDCT in determining the management of these life-threatening conditions. PMID:25083552

  6. Value of Virtual Colonoscopy with 64 Row CT in Evaluation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Łasecki, Mateusz; Nienartowicz, Ewa; Pelak, Joanna; Słonina, Joanna; Olchowy, Cyprian; Ścieżka, Marek; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Virtual colonoscopy (VC) enables three-dimensional view of walls and internal lumen of the colon as a result of reconstruction of multislice CT images. The role of VC in diagnosis of the colon abnormalities systematically increases, and in many medical centers all over the world is carried out as a screening test of patients with high risk of colorectal cancer. Material/Methods We analyzed results of virtual colonoscopy of 360 patients with clinical suspicion of colorectal cancer. Sensitivity and specificity of CT colonoscopy for detection of colon cancers and polyps were assessed. Results Results of our research have shown high diagnostic efficiency of CT colonoscopy in detection of focal lesions in large intestine of 10 mm or more diameter. Sensitivity was 85.7%, specificity 89.2%. Conclusions Virtual colonoscopy is noninvasive and well tolerated by patients imaging method, which permits for early detection of the large intestine lesions with specificity and sensitivity similar to classical colonoscopy in screening exams in patients suspected for colorectal cancer. Good preparation of the patients for the examination is very important for proper diagnosis and interpretation of this imaginge procedure. PMID:25302086

  7. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In the present era of cone-beam CT scanners, the use of the standardized CTDI{sub 100} as a surrogate of the idealized CTDI is strongly discouraged and, consequently, so should be the use of the dose-length product (DLP) as an estimate of the total energy imparted to the patient. However, the DLP is still widely used as a reference quantity to normalize the effective dose for a given scan protocol mainly because the CTDI{sub 100} is an easy-to-measure quantity. The aim of this article is therefore to describe a method for radiation dose assessment in large cone-beam single axial scans, which leads to a straightforward estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient. The authors developed a method accessible to all medical physicists and easy to implement in clinical practice in an attempt to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose. Methods: The authors used commercially available material and a simple mathematical model. The method described herein is based on the dosimetry paradigm introduced by the AAPM Task Group 111. It consists of measuring the dose profiles at the center and the periphery of a long body phantom with a commercial solid-state detector. A weighted dose profile is then calculated from these measurements. To calculate the CT dosimetric quantities analytically, a Gaussian function was fitted to the dose profile data. Furthermore, the Gaussian model has the power to condense the z-axis information of the dose profile in two parameters: The single-scan central dose, f(0), and the width of the profile, {sigma}. To check the energy dependence of the solid-state detector, the authors compared the dose profiles to measurements made with a small volume ion chamber. To validate the overall method, the authors compared the CTDI{sub 100} calculated analytically to the measurement made with a 100 mm pencil ion chamber. Results: For the central and weighted dose profiles, the authors found a good

  8. Comparison of the Diagnostic Image Quality of the Canine Maxillary Dentoalveolar Structures Obtained by Cone Beam Computed Tomography and 64-Multidetector Row Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Jason W; Drees, Randi; Koenig, Lisa J; Snyder, Christopher J; Hetzel, Scott; Miles, Chanda R; Schwarz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this blinded study was to validate the use of cone beam computed tomography (C) for imaging of the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures by comparing its diagnostic image quality with that of 64-multidetector row CT Sagittal slices of a tooth-bearing segment of the maxilla of a commercially purchased dog skull embedded in methylmethacrylate were obtained along a line parallel with the dental arch using a commercial histology diamond saw. The slice of tooth-bearing bone that best depicted the dentoalveolar structures was chosen and photographed. The maxillary segment was imaged with cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT. Four blinded evaluators compared the cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT images and image quality was scored as it related to the anatomy of dentoalveolar structures. Trabecular bone, enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, and lamina dura were scored In addition, a score depicting the evaluators overall impression of the image was recorded. Images acquired with cone beam CT were found to be significantly superior in image quality to images acquired with 64-multidetector row CT overall, and in all scored categories. In our study setting cone beam CT was found to be a valid and clinically superior imaging modality for the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures when compared to 64-multidetector row CT.

  9. Coronary CT angiography using the second-generation 320-detector row CT: assessment of image quality and radiation dose in various heart rates compared with the first-generation scanner.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Nobuo; Maeda, Eriko; Akahane, Masaaki; Torigoe, Rumiko; Kiryu, Shigeru; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2013-10-01

    To assess the image quality and radiation dose reduction in various heart rates in coronary CT angiography using the second-generation 320-detector row CT compared with the first-generation CT. Ninety-six patients were retrospectively included. The first 48 patients underwent coronary CT angiography with the first-generation 320-detector row CT, while the last 48 patients underwent with the second-generation CT. Subjective image quality was graded using a 4-point scale (4, excellent; 1, unable to evaluate). Image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio were also analyzed. Subgroup analysis was performed based on the heart rate. The mean effective dose was derived from the dose length product multiplied by a conversion coefficient for the chest (κ = 0.014 mSv × mGy(-1) × cm(-1)). The overall subjective image quality score showed no significant difference (3.66 vs 3.69, respectively, p = 0.25). The image quality score of the second-generation group tended to be higher than that of the first-generation group in the 66- to 75-bpm subgroup (3.36 vs 3.53, respectively, p = 0.07). No significant difference was observed in image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio. The overall radiation dose reduced by 24 % (3.3 vs 2.5 mSv, respectively, p = 0.03), and the reduction was substantial in patients with higher heart rate (66- to 75-bpm, 4.3 vs 2.2 mSv, respectively, p = 0.009; >75 bpm, 8.2 vs 3.7 mSv, respectively, p = 0.005). The second-generation 320-detector row CT could maintain the image quality while reducing the radiation dose in coronary CT angiography. The dose reduction was larger in patients with higher heart rate.

  10. Split-Bolus Single-Pass Multidetector-Row CT Protocol for Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Scialpi, Michele; Rebonato, Alberto; Cagini, Lucio; Brunese, Luca; Piscioli, Irene; Pierotti, Luisa; Bellantonio, Lucio; D’Andrea, Alfredo; Rotondo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Currently computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has become a widely accepted clinical tool in the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Objectives: To report split-bolus single-pass 64-multidetector-row CT (MDCT) protocol for diagnosis of PE. Patients and Methods: MDCT split-bolus results in 40 patients suspicious of PE were analyzed in terms of image quality of target pulmonary vessels (TPVs) and occurrence and severity of flow-related artifact, flow-related artifact, false filling defect of the pulmonary veins and beam hardening streak artifacts. Dose radiation to patients was calculated. Results: MDCT split-bolus protocol allowed diagnostic images of high quality in all cases. Diagnosis of PE was obtained in 22 of 40 patients. Mean attenuation for target vessels was higher than 250 HU all cases: 361 ± 98 HU in pulmonary artery trunk (PAT); 339 ± 93 HU in right pulmonary artery (RPA); 334 ± 100 HU in left pulmonary artery (LPA). Adequate enhancement was obtained in the right atrium (RA):292 ± 83 HU; right pulmonary vein (RPV): 302 ± 91 HU, and left pulmonary vein (LPV): 291 ± 83 HU. The flow related artifacts and the beam hardening streak artifacts have been detected respectively in 4 and 25 patients. No false filling defect of the pulmonary veins was revealed. Conclusion: MDCT split-bolus technique by simultaneous opacification of pulmonary arteries and veins represents an accurate technique for diagnosis of acute PE, removes the false filling defects of the pulmonary veins, and reduces flow related artifacts. PMID:27110334

  11. Multi-detector row CT as a "one-stop" examination in the preoperative evaluation of the morphology and function of living renal donors: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Su, Chen; Yan, Chaogui; Guo, Yan; Zhou, Xuhui; Chen, Yaqing; Liu, Mingjuan; Wang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2011-02-01

    We designed to investigate the feasibility of multi-detector row computerized tomography (CT) as a "one-stop" examination for the simultaneous preoperative evaluation of the morphology and function of living renal donors. 21 living renal donors were examined by 64-slice spiral CT with a three-phase enhancement CT scan and two inserted dynamic scans. The maximum intensity projection (MIP), multi-planar reformation (MPR), and volume reconstruction (VR) procedures were performed to compare the renal parenchyma, renal vessels, and collecting system with operational findings. The known Patlak equation was used to calculate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR); exact GFR information was acquired by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Our results as following, there were 3 cases of artery variation and 3 cases of vein variation. CT findings all corresponded with the operation, and the sensitivity, positive predictive value, specialty, and negative predictive value of CT were all 100%. The r of the GFR values estimated from CT is 0.894 (left) (P < 0.001) and 0.881 (right) (P < 0.001). In conclusions, our findings demonstrate that 64-slice spiral CT may offer a "one-stop" examination to replace SPECT in the preoperative evaluation of living renal donors to simultaneously provide information regarding both anatomy and the GFR of living renal donors.

  12. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  13. Influence of 320-detector-row volume scanning and AAPM report 111 CT dosimetry metrics on size-specific dose estimate: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Kinomura, Yutaka; Ida, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Masanao

    2016-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) task group 204 has recommended the use of size-dependent conversion factors to calculate size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) values from volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) values. However, these conversion factors do not consider the effects of 320-detector-row volume computed tomography (CT) examinations or the new CT dosimetry metrics proposed by AAPM task group 111. This study aims to investigate the influence of these examinations and metrics on the conversion factors reported by AAPM task group 204, using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations were performed modelling a Toshiba Aquilion ONE CT scanner, in order to compute dose values in water for cylindrical phantoms with 8-40-cm diameters at 2-cm intervals for each scanning parameter (tube voltage, bow-tie filter, longitudinal beam width). Then, the conversion factors were obtained by applying exponential regression analysis between the dose values for a given phantom diameter and the phantom diameter combined with various scanning parameters. The conversion factors for each scanning method (helical, axial, or volume scanning) and CT dosimetry method (i.e., the CTDI100 method or the AAPM task group 111 method) were in agreement with those reported by AAPM task group 204, within a percentage error of 14.2 % for phantom diameters ≥11.2 cm. The results obtained in this study indicate that the conversion factors previously presented by AAPM task group 204 can be used to provide appropriate SSDE values for 320-detector-row volume CT examinations and the CT dosimetry metrics proposed by the AAPM task group 111.

  14. Comparison of the Clinical and Radiological Oucomes of Conventional Double row and Double row Suture Bridge Repairs in Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Muiño, José María Silberberg; Gimenez, Martín Alejandro; Salvucci, Mauro Gabriel Maroa; Ferro, Diego; Rullan, Ramón Muiña; Blanchero, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To compare clinical and radiological results of two types of rotator cuff (RC) repairs: the double row and double row-suture bridge. Methods: Forty-two patients with a complete tear (medium and large size) of the RC were repaired by a double row arthroscopic technique. Minimum follow-up was 19 months (range, 19-28 months). Clinical outcomes were assessed by the Modified Constant Scale and satisfaction rate by an independent observer; VAS, UCLA and ASES. Radiological results were assed by a postoperative MRI by a musculoskeletal radiologist. Results: Series of 22 patients in the double row technique (Group A) and 20 patients in the double-row suture bridge (Gruop B). Statistically there was a significant improvement in the Constant Scale, satisfaction rate, muscle assessment, VAS, UCLA and ASES in both groups after the surgical procedure. There were no significant clinical differences between both groups at any time after the surgical procedure. According to MRI postop, 19/22 shoulders in Group A and 18/20 in Group B remained intact, with no significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion: RC repairs with double row and double-row-suture bridge techniques provide clinical and radiological good and excelent results. In our retrospective, mid-size study, we have found no differences between these two repair techniques.

  15. Comparison of Rowing on a Concept 2 Stationary and Dynamic Ergometer

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Aaron; Abendroth, Julianne; King, Deborah; Swensen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Biomechanical and physiological responses to rowing 1000 m at a power output equivalent to a 2000 m race were compared in 34 collegiate rowers (17 women, 17 men) rowing on a stationary and dynamic Concept 2 ergometer. Stroke ratio, peak handle force, rate of force development, impulse, and respiratory exchange ratio decreased by 15.7, 14.8, 10.9, 10.2 and 1.9%, respectively, on the dynamic ergometer. In contrast, percent time to peak force and stroke rate increased by 10.5 and 12.6%, respectively, during dynamic ergometry; the changes in stroke rate and impulse were greater for men than women. Last, VO2 was 5.1% higher and efficiency 5. 3% lower on the dynamic ergometer for men. Collegiate rowers used higher stoke rates and lower peak stroke forces to achieve a similar power output while rowing at race pace on the dynamic ergometer, which may have increased the cardiopulmonary demand and possibly reduced force production in the primary movers. Differences were more pronounced in males than females; this dichotomy may be more due to dynamic ergometer familiarity than sex. Key points When rowing at a constant power output, all rowers used higher stroke rates and lower stroke forces on the Concept 2 Dynamic ergometer as compared to the Concept 2 Stationary ergometer. When rowing at a constant power output, cardiopulmonary demand was higher for all rowers, as measured by heart rate, on the Concept 2 Dynamic ergometer as compared to the Concept 2 Stationary ergometer. When rowing at a constant power output, efficiency was lower for male rowers on the Concept 2 Dynamic ergometer as compared to the Concept 2 Stationary ergometer. PMID:24149871

  16. Coronary artery calcium measurement with multi-detector row CT: in vitro assessment of effect of radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Hong, Cheng; Bae, Kyongtae T; Pilgram, Thomas K; Suh, Jongdae; Bradley, David

    2002-12-01

    The authors assessed in vitro the effect of radiation dose on coronary artery calcium quantification with multi-detector row computed tomography. A cardiac phantom with calcified cylinders was scanned at various milliampere second settings (20-160 mAs). A clear tendency was found for image noise to decrease as tube current increased (P <.001). No tendency was found for the Agatson score or calcium volume and mass errors to vary with tube current. Calcium measurements were not significantly affected by the choice of tube current. Calcium mass error was strongly correlated with calcium volume error (P <.001). The calcium mass measurement was more accurate and less variable than the calcium volume measurement.

  17. Rowing Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinks, W. L.

    This review of the literature discusses and examines the methods used in physiological assessment of rowers, results of such assessments, and future directions emanating from research in the physiology of rowing. The first section discusses the energy demands of rowing, including the contribution of the energy system, anaerobic metabolism, and the…

  18. Time Efficiency and Diagnostic Accuracy of New Automated Myocardial Perfusion Analysis Software in 320-Row CT Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rief, Matthias; Stenzel, Fabian; Kranz, Anisha; Schlattmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the time efficiency and diagnostic accuracy of automated myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) image analysis software. Materials and Methods 320-row CTP was performed in 30 patients, and analyses were conducted independently by three different blinded readers by the use of two recent software releases (version 4.6 and novel version 4.71GR001, Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan). Analysis times were compared, and automated epi- and endocardial contour detection was subjectively rated in five categories (excellent, good, fair, poor and very poor). As semi-quantitative perfusion parameters, myocardial attenuation and transmural perfusion ratio (TPR) were calculated for each myocardial segment and agreement was tested by using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Conventional coronary angiography served as reference standard. Results The analysis time was significantly reduced with the novel automated software version as compared with the former release (Reader 1: 43:08 ± 11:39 min vs. 09:47 ± 04:51 min, Reader 2: 42:07 ± 06:44 min vs. 09:42 ± 02:50 min and Reader 3: 21:38 ± 3:44 min vs. 07:34 ± 02:12 min; p < 0.001 for all). Epi- and endocardial contour detection for the novel software was rated to be significantly better (p < 0.001) than with the former software. ICCs demonstrated strong agreement (≥ 0.75) for myocardial attenuation in 93% and for TPR in 82%. Diagnostic accuracy for the two software versions was not significantly different (p = 0.169) as compared with conventional coronary angiography. Conclusion The novel automated CTP analysis software offers enhanced time efficiency with an improvement by a factor of about four, while maintaining diagnostic accuracy. PMID:23323027

  19. Assessment of organ absorbed doses and estimation of effective doses from pediatric anthropomorphic phantom measurements for multi-detector row CT with and without automatic exposure control.

    PubMed

    Brisse, Hervé J; Robilliard, Magalie; Savignoni, Alexia; Pierrat, Noelle; Gaboriaud, Geneviève; De Rycke, Yann; Neuenschwander, Sylvia; Aubert, Bernard; Rosenwald, Jean-Claude

    2009-10-01

    This study was designed to measure organ absorbed doses from multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) on pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms, calculate the corresponding effective doses, and assess the influence of automatic exposure control (AEC) in terms of organ dose variations. Four anthropomorphic phantoms (phantoms represent the equivalent of a newborn, 1-, 5-, and 10-y-old child) were scanned with a four-channel MDCT coupled with a z-axis-based AEC system. Two CT torso protocols were compared: a first protocol without AEC and constant tube current-time product and a second protocol with AEC using age-adjusted noise indices. Organ absorbed doses were monitored by thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Cu, P). Effective doses were calculated according to the tissue weighting factors of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (). For fixed mA acquisitions, organ doses normalized to the volume CT dose index in a 16-cm head phantom (CTDIvol16) ranged from 0.6 to 1.5 and effective doses ranged from 8.4 to 13.5 mSv. For the newborn-equivalent phantom, the AEC-modulated scan showed almost no significant dose variation compared to the fixed mA scan. For the 1-, 5- and 10-y equivalent phantoms, the use of AEC induced a significant dose decrease on chest organs (ranging from 61 to 31% for thyroid, 37 to 21% for lung, 34 to 17% for esophagus, and 39 to 10% for breast). However, AEC also induced a significant dose increase (ranging from 28 to 48% for salivary glands, 22 to 51% for bladder, and 24 to 70% for ovaries) related to the high density of skull base and pelvic bones. These dose increases should be considered before using AEC as a dose optimization tool in children.

  20. Imaging of Orthotopic Glioblastoma Xenografts in Mice Using a Clinical CT Scanner: Comparison with Micro-CT and Histology

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Stefanie; Mürle, Bettina; Felix, Manuela; Arns, Anna; Groden, Christoph; Wenz, Frederik; Hug, Andreas; Glatting, Gerhard; Kramer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is an increasing need for small animal in vivo imaging in murine orthotopic glioma models. Because dedicated small animal scanners are not available ubiquitously, the applicability of a clinical CT scanner for visualization and measurement of intracerebrally growing glioma xenografts in living mice was validated. Materials and Methods 2.5x106 U87MG cells were orthotopically implanted in NOD/SCID/ᵞc-/- mice (n = 9). Mice underwent contrast-enhanced (300 μl Iomeprol i.v.) imaging using a micro-CT (80 kV, 75 μAs, 360° rotation, 1,000 projections, scan time 33 s, resolution 40 x 40 x 53 μm) and a clinical CT scanner (4-row multislice detector; 120 kV, 150 mAs, slice thickness 0.5 mm, feed rotation 0.5 mm, resolution 98 x 98 x 500 μm). Mice were sacrificed and the brain was worked up histologically. In all modalities tumor volume was measured by two independent readers. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured from reconstructed CT-scans (0.5 mm slice thickness; n = 18). Results Tumor volumes (mean±SD mm3) were similar between both CT-modalities (micro-CT: 19.8±19.0, clinical CT: 19.8±18.8; Wilcoxon signed-rank test p = 0.813). Moreover, between reader analyses for each modality showed excellent agreement as demonstrated by correlation analysis (Spearman-Rho >0.9; p<0.01 for all correlations). Histologically measured tumor volumes (11.0±11.2) were significantly smaller due to shrinkage artifacts (p<0.05). CNR and SNR were 2.1±1.0 and 1.1±0.04 for micro-CT and 23.1±24.0 and 1.9±0.7 for the clinical CTscanner, respectively. Conclusion Clinical CT scanners may reliably be used for in vivo imaging and volumetric analysis of brain tumor growth in mice. PMID:27829015

  1. A comparison of cylindrical and row trenched cooling holes with alignment angle of 0 degree near the combustor endwall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianpour, E.; Nor Azwadi, C. S.; Golshokouh, I.

    2013-12-01

    We studied the effects of cylindrical and row trenched cooling holes with alignment angle of 0° at BR=3.18 on the film cooling performance near the endwall surface of a combustor simulator. In this research, a three-dimensional presentation of gas turbine engine was simulated and analyzed with a commercial finite volume package FLUENT 6.2.26 to gain fundamental data. The current study has been performed with Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence model (RANS) on internal cooling passages. This combustor simulator combined the interaction of two rows of dilution jets, which were staggered in the stream wise direction and aligned in the span wise direction. The entire findings of the study declared that with using the row trenched holes near the enwall surface; film cooling effectiveness is doubled compared to the cooling performance of baseline case.

  2. Advances and perspectives in lung cancer imaging using multidetector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel

    2012-10-01

    The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (CT) into clinical practice has revolutionized many aspects of the clinical work-up. Lung cancer imaging has benefited from various breakthroughs in computing technology, with advances in the field of lung cancer detection, tissue characterization, lung cancer staging and response to therapy. Our paper discusses the problems of radiation, image visualization and CT examination comparison. It also reviews the most significant advances in lung cancer imaging and highlights the emerging clinical applications that use state of the art CT technology in the field of lung cancer diagnosis and follow-up.

  3. A comparison of lactate concentration in plasma collected from the toe, ear, and fingertip after a simulated rowing exercise

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, J; Farrally, M

    2000-01-01

    Objective—To examine the validity of using blood taken from the toe for the assessment of plasma lactate concentration in rowers. To achieve this, values were compared with those taken from the fingertip and earlobe. Methods—Nine subjects exercised at two separate submaximum workloads on the Concept II rowing ergometer. The loads, each lasting four minutes, elicited mean (SD) heart rate responses of 160.1 (8.5) and 180.1 (5.7) beats/min, which corresponded to 76.4 (6.1)% and 91.9 (4.7)% of the estimated heart rate maximum of the subjects. Blood was simultaneously removed after the cessation of exercise by three experimenters and was analysed for plasma lactate concentration. Results—At 76.4% of estimated heart rate maximum, the mean (SD) plasma lactate concentrations sampled from the fingertip, toe, and earlobe were 6.36 (1.58), 5.81 (1.11), and 5.29 (1.24) mmol/l respectively. At 91.9% of estimated heart rate maximum, respective values were 8.81 (2.30), 8.53 (1.37), and 8.41 (2.35) mmol/l. No significant differences (p>0.05) were found between any of the sites at either work intensity. Conclusions—The toe may offer a practical alternative for assessing the concentration of lactate during rowing, having the advantage that repeated blood samples can be removed without interruption of the rowing action. Key Words: blood sampling; lactate; ergometer; rowing PMID:10690448

  4. Primary hyperaldosteronism: comparison of CT, adrenal venography, and venous sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Geisinger, M.A.; Zelch, M.G.; Bravo, E.L.; Risius, B.F.; O'Donovan, P.B.; Borkowski, G.P.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-nine patients with primary hyperaldosteronism were evaluated with computed tomography (CT), adrenal venous sampling, and adrenal venography. Twenty-three patients had aldosteronomas and six had bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia. Sixteen (70%) of the adenomas were accurately located by CT. All nodules of 1.5 cm or larger diameter and 50% of nodules 1.0 to 1.4 cm in diameter were demonstrated. Nodules of less than 1.0 cm in diameter generally were not detected. High-resolution CT appeared more sensitive than standard CT (75% vs 58%). Adrenal venous sampling for aldosterone assay was the most sensitive of the three methods, localizing 22 (96%) of the 23 adenomas. Eighteen (78%) of the adenomas were identified by adrenal venography, although two patients with bilateral cortical hyperplasia were mistakenly diagnosed as having a small adenoma. No such false-positive studies were encountered with CT or adrenal venous sampling.

  5. Comparison of BR3 surveillance and vessel plates to the surrogate plates representative of the Yankee Rowe PWR vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Fabry, A.; Chaouadi, R.; Puzzolante, J.L.; Van de Velde, J.; Biemiller, E.C.; Rosinski, S.T.; Carter, R.G.

    1999-10-01

    The sister pressure vessels at the BR3 and Yankee Rowe PWR plants were operated at lower-than-usual temperature ({approx}260 C) and their plates were austenitized at higher-than-usual temperature ({approx}970 C) -- a heat treatment leading to a coarser microstructure than is typical for the fine grain plates considered in development of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.99. The surveillance programs provided by Westinghouse for the two plants were limited to the same A302-B plate representative of the Rowe vessel upper shell plate; this material displayed outlier behavior characterized by a 41J. Charpy-V Notch shift significantly larger than predicted by Regulatory Guide 1.99. Because lower irradiation temperature and nickel alloying are generally considered detrimental to irradiation sensitivity, there was a major concern that the nickel-modified lower Rowe plate and the nickel-modified BR3 plate may become too embrittled to satisfy the toughness requirements embodied in the PTS screening criterion. This paper compares three complementary studies undertaken to clarify these uncertainties: (1) The accelerated irradiation and test program launched in 1990 by Yankee Atomic Electric Company using typical vessel plate materials containing 0.24% copper at two nickel levels: YA1, 0.63% (A533-B) and YA9, 0.19% (A302-B). These were heat-treated to produce the coarse and fine grain microstructures representative of the Yankee/BR3 and the Regulatory Guide plates, respectively; (2) The BR3 surveillance and vessel testing program; this vessel was wet-annealed in 1984, relicensed for operation till the plant shutdown in 1987, and was trepanned in early 1995; (3) The accelerated irradiations in the Belgian test reactor BR2 of the Yankee coarse grain plates YA1 and YA9 together with BR3 vessel specimens extracted at nozzle elevation, a location with negligible radiation exposure. It is contended that the PTS screening criterion was never attained by the BR3 and Rowe plates, and that the

  6. Comparison of CT and MR-CT Fusion for Prostate Post-Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Maletz, Kristina L.; Ennis, Ronald D.; Ostenson, Jason; Pevsner, Alexander; Kagen, Alexander; Wernick, Iddo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The use of T2 MR for postimplant dosimetry (PID) after prostate brachytherapy allows more anatomically accurate and precise contouring but does not readily permit seed identification. We developed a reproducible technique for performing MR-CT fusion and compared the resulting dosimetry to standard CT-based PID. Methods and Materials: CT and T1-weighted MR images for 45 patients were fused and aligned based on seed distribution. The T2-weighted MR image was then fused to the aligned T1. Reproducibility of the fusion technique was tested by inter- and intraobserver variability for 13 patients. Dosimetry was computed for the prostate as a whole and for the prostate divided into anterior and posterior sectors of the base, mid-prostate, and apex. Results: Inter- and intraobserver variability for the fusion technique showed less than 1% variation in D90. MR-CT fusion D90 and CT D90 were nearly equivalent for the whole prostate, but differed depending on the identification of superior extent of the base (p = 0.007) and on MR/CT prostate volume ratio (p = 0.03). Sector analysis showed a decrease in MR-CT fusion D90 in the anterior base (ratio 0.93 {+-}0.25, p < 0.05) and an increase in MR-CT fusion D90 in the apex (p < 0.05). The volume of extraprostatic tissue encompassed by the V100 is greater on MR than CT. Factors associated with this difference are the MR/CT volume ratio (p < 0.001) and the difference in identification of the inferior extent of the apex (p = 0.03). Conclusions: We developed a reproducible MR-CT fusion technique that allows MR-based dosimetry. Comparing the resulting postimplant dosimetry with standard CT dosimetry shows several differences, including adequacy of coverage of the base and conformity of the dosimetry around the apex. Given the advantage of MR-based tissue definition, further study of MR-based dosimetry is warranted.

  7. Follow-up of multicentric HCC according to the mRECIST criteria: role of 320-Row CT with semi-automatic 3D analysis software for evaluating the response to systemic therapy

    PubMed Central

    TELEGRAFO, M.; DILORENZO, G.; DI GIOVANNI, G.; CORNACCHIA, I.; STABILE IANORA, A.A.; ANGELELLI, G.; MOSCHETTA, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the role of 320-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) with 3D analysis software in follow up of patients affected by multicentric hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with systemic therapy by using modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). Patients and methods 38 patients affected by multicentric HCC underwent MDCT. All exams were performed before and after iodinate contrast material intravenous injection by using a 320-detection row CT device. CT images were analyzed by two radiologists using multi-planar reconstructions (MPR) in order to assess the response to systemic therapy according to mRECIST criteria: complete response (CR), partial response (PR), progressive disease (PD), stable disease (SD). 30 days later, the same two radiologists evaluated target lesion response to systemic therapy according to mRECIST criteria by using 3D analysis software. The difference between the two systems in assessing HCC response to therapy was assessed by the analysis of the variance (Anova Test). Interobserver agreement between the two radiologists by using MPR images and 3D analysis software was calculated by using Cohen’s Kappa test. Results PR occurred in 10/38 cases (26%), PD in 6/38 (16%), SD in 22/38 (58%). Anova Test showed no statistically significant difference between the two systems for assessing target lesion response to therapy (p >0.05). Inter-observer agreement (k) was respectively of 0.62 for MPR images measurements and 0.86 for 3D analysis ones. Conclusions 3D Analysis software provides a semiautomatic system for assessing target lesion response to therapy according to mRE-CIST criteria in patient affected by multifocal HCC treated with systemic therapy. The reliability of 3D analysis software makes it useful in the clinical practice. PMID:28098056

  8. Comparison of CT scanning and radionuclide imaging in liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.L.; Esposito, F.S.

    1980-01-01

    Early experience with body CT suggested its usefulness in many diagnostic problems; jaundice, renal and pancreatic masses, and in the evaluation of relatively inaccessible parts of the body, such as the retroperitineum, mediastinum, and pelvis. Investigation of hepatic disease by CT was not unexpectedly compared to radionuclide liver scanning, the major preexisting modality for imaging the liver. In the evaluation of the jaundiced patient, CT rapidly assumed a major role, providing more specific information about the liver than the RN liver scan, as well as demonstrating adjacent organs. CT differentiate obstructive from non-obstructive jaundice. With respect to mass lesions of the liver, the RN liver scan is more sensitive than CT but less specific. The abnormalities on an isotope image of the liver consist of normal variants in configuration, extrinsic compression by adjacent structures, cysts, hemangiomata, abscesses, and neoplasms. These suspected lesions may then be better delineated by the CT image, and a more precise diagnosis made. The physiologic information provided by the RN liver scan is an added facet which is helpful in the patient with diffuse hepatic disease. The CT image will be normal in many of these patients, however, hemochromatosis and fatty infiltration lend themselves especially to density evaluation by CT. The evaluation of lymphoma is more thorough with CT. Structures other than the liver, such as lymph nodes, are visualized. Gallium, however, provides additional isotopic information in patients with lymphoma, and in addition, is known to be useful in the investigation of a febrile patient with an abscess. Newer isotopic agents expand hepatic imaging in other directions, visualizing the biliary tree and evaluating the jaundiced patient.

  9. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities.

    PubMed

    Lechuga, Lawrence; Weidlich, Georg A

    2016-09-12

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities-fan beam and cone beam-was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient.

  10. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Weidlich, Georg A.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities—fan beam and cone beam—was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient. PMID:27752404

  11. Follow-up of Wilms tumor: comparison of CT with other imaging procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Brasch, R.C.; Randel, S.B.; Gould, R.G.

    1981-11-01

    In a retrospective review, computed tomography (CT) was compared to a ''routine'' combination of other diagnostic imaging procedures used for follow-up evaluations of 13 children being treated for Wilms tumor. The examined variables were diagnostic accuracy, expense, and duration of examination. Results from 13 patients indicated that CT most accurately answers diagnostic queries pertinent to follow-up evaluation of Wilms tumors: the presence and extent of bilateral renal tumors, local recurrence, contralateral renal hypertrophy, and metastasis to liver or lungs. For diagnosing pulmonary metastases, CT was superior to conventional chest radiography both in sensitivity (4/4 vs. 2/4) and specificity (9/9 vs. 6/9). In depiction of liver metastases, CT (3/3) was superior to liver scintigraphy (2/3). The extent of bilateral Wilms tumors was better defined by CT than by urography. In no instances were the alternative diagnostic imaging studies found to be more accurate than CT for the detection of recurrent tumor. Average cost for a CT examination ($344) is considerably less than the cost for a routine combination of the other imaging studies ($594). Examination time and diagnostic radiation doses are also reduced using CT. Pending larger comparison studies, CT is recommended as the primary diagnostic method for follow-up evaluation of patients with Wilms tumor.

  12. ASSESSMENT OF EFFECTIVE DOSE FROM CONE BEAM CT IMAGING IN SPECT/CT EXAMINATION IN COMPARISON WITH OTHER MODALITIES.

    PubMed

    Tonkopi, Elena; Ross, Andrew A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiation dose from the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) component of single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) examinations and to compare it with the radiopharmaceutical related dose as well as dose from multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Effective dose (ED) from computed tomography (CT) was estimated using dose-length product values and anatomy-specific conversion factors. The contribution from the SPECT component was evaluated using ED per unit administered activity for the radiopharmaceuticals listed in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publications 80 and 106. With the exception of cardiac studies (0.11 mSv), the CBCT dose (3.96-6.04 mSv) was similar to that from the radiopharmaceutical accounting for 29-56 % of the total ED from the examination. In comparison with MDCT examinations, the CBCT dose was 48 and 42 % lower for abdomen/pelvis and chest/abdomen/pelvis scans, respectively, while in the chest the CBCT scan resulted in higher dose (23 %). Radiation dose from the CT component should be taken into consideration when evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose.

  13. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-02-23

    An apparatus and program product check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  14. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2008-10-14

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  15. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens [Rochester, MN; Pinnow, Kurt Walter [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian Edward [Rochester, MN

    2012-02-07

    An apparatus, program product and method check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice multidetector-row CT for detection of in-stent restenosis vs detection of stenosis in nonstented coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Kefer, Joelle M; Coche, Emmanuel; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) for detecting in-stent restenosis. Fifty patients with 69 previously implanted coronary stents underwent 16-slice MDCT before quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Diagnostic accuracy of MDCT for detection of in-stent restenosis defined as >50% lumen diameter stenosis (DS) in stented and nonstented coronary segments >1.5-mm diameter was computed using QCA as reference. According to QCA, 18/69 (25%) stented segments had restenosis. In addition, 33/518 (6.4%) nonstented segments had >50% DS. In-stent restenosis was correctly identified on MDCT images in 12/18 stents, and absence of restenosis was correctly identified in 50/51 stents. Stenosis in native coronary arteries was correctly identified in 22/33 segments and correctly excluded in 482/485 segments. Thus, sensitivity (67% vs 67% p=1.0), specificity (98% vs 99%, p=0.96) and overall diagnostic accuracy (90% vs 97%, p=0.68) was similarly high for detecting in-stent restenosis as for detecting stenosis in nonstented coronary segments. MDCT has similarly high diagnostic accuracy for detecting in-stent restenosis as for detecting coronary artery disease in nonstented segments. This suggests that MDCT could be clinically useful for identification of restenosis in patients after coronary stenting.

  17. Comparison of Reconstruction Intervals in Routine ECG-Pulsed 64-Row-MSCT Coronary Angiography in Frequency Controlled Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Frydrychowicz, Alex Pache, Gregor; Saueressig, Ulrich; Foell, Daniela; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Bley, Thorsten A.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. In light of the increasing use and acceptance of multislice computed tomography (MSCT) coronary angiography it was the purpose of this study to compare reconstruction intervals used in a routine ECG-pulsed MSCT coronary artery angiography setting with frequency controlled patients. Methods. Examinations were performed on a Siemens Somatom Sensation 64 scanner with a total of 110 ml of contrast agent and ECG pulsing (interval from 40% to 70%) after oral application of a {beta}-blocker if the heart rate was higher than 65 bpm. All human subjects were referred for the evaluation of suspected coronary artery disease. Coronary artery segments were evaluated by two experienced radiologists in a consensus reading. A ranking of diagnostic image quality (from 1 (no evaluation possible) to 5 (excellent image quality)) was statistically evaluated by Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. Results. In 45 patients (30 male, 15 female, age 63.8 {+-} 12.1 years) we detected a significant advantage of the 60% reconstruction interval over 40%, 50%, and 70% (for each p < 0.05). In cases of sudden arrhythmia or movement during the scan, additional reconstruction intervals within the ECG-pulsed reconstruction intervals remained necessary for diagnosis. Conclusion. In a routine diagnostic setting with frequency controlled patients and ECG pulsing the 60% reconstruction interval can be considered superior for the initial diagnosis in 64-row multislice computed tomography coronary angiography. However, further information can be derived from various reconstruction intervals such as 40% and 70%.

  18. A Comparison of Density Functional Theory with Ab initio Approaches for Systems Involving First Transition Row Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricca, Alessandra; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is found to give a better description of the geometries and vibrational frequencies of FeL and FeL(sup +) systems than second order Moller Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). Namely, the DFT correctly predicts the shift in the CO vibrational frequency between free CO and the Sigma(sup -) state of FeCO and yields a good result for the Fe-C distance in the quartet states of FeCH4(+) 4 These are properties where the MP2 results are unsatisfactory. Thus DFT appears to be an excellent approach for optimizing the geometries and computing the zero-point energies of systems containing first transition row atoms. Because the DFT approach is biased in favor of the 3d(exp 7) occupation, whereas the more traditional approaches are biased in favor of the 3d(exp 6) occupation, differences are found in the relative ordering of states. It is shown that if the dissociation is computed to the most appropriate atomic asymptote and corrected to the ground state asymptote using the experimental separations, the DFT results are in good agreement with high levels of theory. The energetics at the DFT level are much superior to the MP2 and in most cases in good agreement with high levels of theory.

  19. Consideration of the Pathological Features of Pediatric Congenital Heart Diseases Which Are Ideally Suitable for Diagnosing With Multidetector-row CT

    PubMed Central

    Hayabuchi, Yasunobu; Inoue, Miki; Watanabe, Noriko; Sakata, Miho; Ohnishi, Tatsuya; Kagami, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Background A lots of articles published regarding the usefulness of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) mostly describe that it can be an alternative to the invasive catheterization and angiography. The unique diagnostic features of this imaging modality have been largely ignored or disregarded. We described the pathological conditions that cannot be diagnosed by conventional angiography with cardiac catheterization but can be accurately diagnosed by MDCT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed non-ECG-gated MDCT images acquired from 452 children and young adults with CHD between 2005 and 2010 in our institute. In this article, we focused on the diagnostic advantages of MDCT, and indicated five pathological conditions. (1) When Blalock-Taussig shunt total occlusion prevents catheter insertion into the artificial vessel and angiography is ruled out, the peripheral pulmonary artery during the peripheral pulmonary artery can be imaged and diagnosed using MDCT based on blood flow supplied from many small collateral vessels originating from the aorta. (2) The location and protrusion of the device in the vessel after coil embolization to treat patent ductus arteriosus can be accurately visualized by virtual endoscopy using MDCT. (3) Calcification of patches, synthetic blood vessels, and other prostheses that is indistinct on conventional angiograms is clear on MDCT. (4) Simultaneous MDCT observations of the anatomical relationships between arterial and venous systems on the same image can clarify the detail diagnosis for surgical treatment. (5) Compression of the airways by the great vessels and pulmonary segmental emphysematous change can be diagnosed by MDCT. Results and Conclusions Among patients with CHD, MDCT is useful not only as a non-invasive alternative to conventional angiography, but also as a tool for specific morphological diagnoses. In the future, it will be necessary to accumulate experience in the

  20. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisse, H. J.; Brenot, J.; Pierrat, N.; Gaboriaud, G.; Savignoni, A.; DeRycke, Y.; Neuenschwander, S.; Aubert, B.; Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2009-04-01

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD1% assessed in a Catphan® phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol16 with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR2.8%), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1%, adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy-1. Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD1% for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol16 values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  1. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms.

    PubMed

    Brisse, H J; Brenot, J; Pierrat, N; Gaboriaud, G; Savignoni, A; De Rycke, Y; Neuenschwander, S; Aubert, B; Rosenwald, J-C

    2009-04-07

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD(1%) assessed in a Catphan phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol(16) with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR(2.8%)), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1(%), adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy(-1). Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD(1%) for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol(16) values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  2. INTERIOR, SOUTH PART, CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. DOUBLE ROW OF CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR, SOUTH PART, CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. DOUBLE ROW OF CENTER COLUMNS REFLECTS SOUTH PART'S RE-USE OF ANOTHER BUILDING'S STRUCTURAL FRAME. - New Haven Rail Yard, Work Equipment Shop, Vicinity of Cedar & Lamberton Streets, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  3. INTERIOR SECOND FLOOR EAST END LOOKING WEST AT NORTH ROW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR SECOND FLOOR- EAST END LOOKING WEST AT NORTH ROW OF MUSHROOM COLUMNS. - Colt Fire Arms Company, South Armory Building, 36-150 Huyshope Avenue, 17-170 Van Dyke Avenue, 49 Vredendale Avenue, Hartford, Hartford County, CT

  4. 4. VIEW NORTHWEST, INTERIOR OF GATEHOUSE, SHOWING ROW OF GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHWEST, INTERIOR OF GATEHOUSE, SHOWING ROW OF GATE OPERATING MECHANISMS; HEIGHT OF STEMS INDICATES FOREGROUND GATE IS OPEN - Norwich Water Power Company, Headgates, West bank of Shetucket River opposite Fourteenth Street, Greenville section, Norwich, New London County, CT

  5. Comparison of X-ray film and photographic paper in recording CT images.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, T F; Lincoln, A J; Mehnert, P J; Paul, G J

    1984-12-01

    Because of a potential film cost savings of approximately 35% using photographic print paper instead of X-ray film in recording CT images, a comparison was undertaken of these hard copy recording methods. One hundred consecutive CT examinations were reviewed on the scanner display console and recorded on X-ray film and photographic print paper using a multi-imager camera. Hard copy images were compared for diagnostic adequacy. X-ray film adequately recorded the pathology in all cases. Photographic paper adequately recorded the pathology in 97% of cases. In 26% of cases X-ray film was felt to better display the CT diagnosis whereas in 2% of cases photographic paper better displayed the CT diagnosis. Test phantom scans recorded on both media showed no observable difference in spatial or contrast resolution.

  6. Comparison of stroke infarction between CT perfusion and diffusion weighted imaging: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd. Rahni, Ashrani Aizzuddin; Arka, Israna Hossain; Chellappan, Kalaivani; Mukari, Shahizon Azura; Law, Zhe Kang; Sahathevan, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results of comparison of automatic segmentations of the infarct core, between that obtained from CT perfusion (based on time to peak parameter) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). For each patient, the two imaging volumes were automatically co-registered to a common frame of reference based on an acquired CT angiography image. The accuracy of image registration is measured by the overlap of the segmented brain from both images (CT perfusion and DWI), measured within their common field of view. Due to the limitations of the study, DWI was acquired as a follow up scan up to a week after initial CT based imaging. However, we found significant overlap of the segmented brain (Jaccard indices of approximately 0.8) and the percentage of infarcted brain tissue from the two modalities were still fairly highly correlated (correlation coefficient of approximately 0.9). The results are promising with more data needed in future for clinical inference.

  7. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization Therapy for a Hypoplastic Pelvic Kidney with a Single Vaginal Ectopic Ureter to Control Incontinence: The Usefulness of Three-Dimensional CT Angiography Using Multidetector-Row Helical CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kudoh, Kouichi Kadota, Masataka; Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Imuta, Masanori; Yasuda, Tsuyoshi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Inadome, Akito; Yoshida, Masaki; Ueda, Shouichi

    2003-09-15

    A girl with continuous urinary incontinence was successfully treated by angiographic embolization of a hypoplastic pelvic kidney with a single unilateral vaginal ectopic opening of the ureter. For this intervention, CT angiography was useful for detecting the corresponding renal artery of the hypoplastic kidney.

  8. Accurate estimation of global and regional cardiac function by retrospectively gated multidetector row computed tomography: comparison with cine magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Belge, Bénédicte; Coche, Emmanuel; Pasquet, Agnès; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2006-07-01

    Retrospective reconstruction of ECG-gated images at different parts of the cardiac cycle allows the assessment of cardiac function by multi-detector row CT (MDCT) at the time of non-invasive coronary imaging. We compared the accuracy of such measurements by MDCT to cine magnetic resonance (MR). Forty patients underwent the assessment of global and regional cardiac function by 16-slice MDCT and cine MR. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes estimated by MDCT (134+/-51 and 67+/-56 ml) were similar to those by MR (137+/-57 and 70+/-60 ml, respectively; both P=NS) and strongly correlated (r=0.92 and r=0.95, respectively; both P<0.001). Consequently, LV ejection fractions by MDCT and MR were also similar (55+/-21 vs. 56+/-21%; P=NS) and highly correlated (r=0.95; P<0.001). Regional end-diastolic and end-systolic wall thicknesses by MDCT were highly correlated (r=0.84 and r=0.92, respectively; both P<0.001), but significantly lower than by MR (8.3+/-1.8 vs. 8.8+/-1.9 mm and 12.7+/-3.4 vs. 13.3+/-3.5 mm, respectively; both P<0.001). Values of regional wall thickening by MDCT and MR were similar (54+/-30 vs. 51+/-31%; P=NS) and also correlated well (r=0.91; P<0.001). Retrospectively gated MDCT can accurately estimate LV volumes, EF and regional LV wall thickening compared to cine MR.

  9. 32. TYPICAL BRYANT ITEMS FROM THE 1930S; TOP ROW LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. TYPICAL BRYANT ITEMS FROM THE 1930S; TOP ROW LEFT TO RIGHT: PORCELAIN CASED SWITCH, ROTARY SWITCH, SHORTING PLUG TO BYPASS FUSE; SECOND ROW: BRASS INCANDESCENT LAMP SURFACE RECEPTACLE, INCANDESCENT LAMPHOLDER WITH ADAPTER FOR GLASS GLOBE; THIRD ROW: PORCELAIN BASE ROTARY SWITCH, APPLIANCE BREAKER WITH COVER REMOVED, APPLIANCE BREAKER - Bryant Electric Company, 1421 State Street, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  10. Biomechanics of Rowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Kazunori; Kaya, Motoshi; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi; Andrews, Brian J.; Zavatsky, Amy B.; Halliday, Suzanne E.

    Compared with the other exercise, such as walking and cycling, rowing was expected to have some fitness advantage, while there were some misgivings about the risk of injury. The objectives of this study were to quantify biomechanical characteristics of rowing for fitness and rehabilitation and to offer normative data for the prevention of injury and for determining effective exercise. An experiment was performed to collect the kinematic and kinetic data during rowing by experienced and non-experienced subjects. A three-dimensional whole-body musculo-skeletal model was used to calculate the biomechanical loads, such as the joint moments, the muscular tensions, the joint contact forces and the energy consumption. The results of this study indicate that rowing is an effective exercise for rehabilitation and fitness. However, the non-experienced rower should acquire considerable skill to obtain sufficient exercise. The rowing cadence should be decided according to the purpose of the exercise.

  11. Comparison of SPECT/CT, MRI and CT in diagnosis of skull base bone invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-xu; Han, Peng-hui; Zhang, Guo-qian; Wang, Rui-hao; Ge, Yong-bin; Ren, Zhi-gang; Li, Jian-sheng; Fu, Wen-hai

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is crucial for correct staging, assessing treatment response and contouring the tumor target in radiotherapy planning, as well as improving the patient's prognosis. To compare the diagnostic efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for the detection of skull base invasion in NPC. Sixty untreated patients with histologically proven NPC underwent SPECT/CT imaging, contrast-enhanced MRI and CT. Of the 60 patients, 30 had skull base invasion confirmed by the final results of contrast-enhanced MRI, CT and six-month follow-up imaging (MRI and CT). The diagnostic efficacy of the three imaging modalities in detecting skull base invasion was evaluated. The rates of positive findings of skull base invasion for SPECT/CT, MRI and CT were 53.3%, 48.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 93.3%, 86.7% and 90.0% for SPECT/CT fusion imaging, 96.7%, 100.0% and 98.3% for contrast-enhanced MRI, and 66.7%, 100.0% and 83.3% for contrast-enhanced CT. MRI showed the best performance for the diagnosis of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, followed closely by SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT had poorer specificity than that of both MRI and CT, while CT had the lowest sensitivity.

  12. Comparison of CT-derived Ventilation Maps with Deposition Patterns of Inhaled Microspheres in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Lamm, W. J.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Krueger, Melissa; Glenny, Robb W.; Corley, Richard A.

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Computer models for inhalation toxicology and drug-aerosol delivery studies rely on ventilation pattern inputs for predictions of particle deposition and vapor uptake. However, changes in lung mechanics due to disease can impact airflow dynamics and model results. It has been demonstrated that non-invasive, in vivo, 4DCT imaging (3D imaging at multiple time points in the breathing cycle) can be used to map heterogeneities in ventilation patterns under healthy and disease conditions. The purpose of this study was to validate ventilation patterns measured from CT imaging by exposing the same rats to an aerosol of fluorescent microspheres (FMS) and examining particle deposition patterns using cryomicrotome imaging. Materials and Methods: Six male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with elastase to a single lobe to induce a heterogeneous disease. After four weeks, rats were imaged over the breathing cycle by CT then immediately exposed to an aerosol of ~1µm FMS for ~5 minutes. After the exposure, the lungs were excised and prepared for cryomicrotome imaging, where a 3D image of FMS deposition was acquired using serial sectioning. Cryomicrotome images were spatially registered to match the live CT images to facilitate direct quantitative comparisons of FMS signal intensity with the CT-based ventilation maps. Results: Comparisons of fractional ventilation in contiguous, non-overlapping, 3D regions between CT-based ventilation maps and FMS images showed strong correlations in fractional ventilation (r=0.888, p<0.0001). Conclusion: We conclude that ventilation maps derived from CT imaging are predictive of the 1µm aerosol deposition used in ventilation-perfusion heterogeneity inhalation studies.

  13. Physics of rowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Jean-Philippe; Labbe, Romain; Mouterde, Timothee; Clanet, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    Synchronization in rowing seems like a crucial condition for those who aim at winning top-level rowing races. However, in nature, one can observe animals with many legs, such as krill, swimming in a desynchronized manner which is nearly metachronal. From a physicist point of view, rowing by following a metachronal wave also seems like a great idea because, at high Reynolds number, the metachronal gait has one big advantage over the synchronized gait: it reduces the fluctuations of speed and thus the drag on the body. In this experimental study, we have built a scale model of a rowing boat to deal with the question of the effect of synchronization on the boat performance.

  14. Mechanical efficiency in rowing.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, T; Matsuo, A; Yamamoto, K; Asami, T

    1986-01-01

    Five university oarsmen participated in a determination of mechanical efficiency when rowing in a tank. In the tank, water was circulated at 3 m X s-1 by a motor driven pump. The subjects rowed with the stepwise incremental loading, in which the intensity increased by 10% of the maximum force of rowing (maxFc) every 2 min. Power (WO) was calculated from the force applied to the oarlock pin (FC) and its angular displacement (theta H). Oxygen uptake and heart rate were measured every 30 s during rowing. Anaerobic threshold (AT) was determined from expired gas variables by Wasserman's method. AT of oarsmen was 74.6 +/- 6.01% as a percentage of VO2max. As the displacement of the handgrip in the stroke was independent of WO, the increment of WO was caused by the increase of both FC and stroke frequency. Gross efficiency without base-line correction (GE) increased with FC with low intensities of rowing. In the region of 124-182 W of WO GE was almost constant at 17.5%. Efficiency was 19.8 +/- 1.4%, with resting metabolism as base-line correction (net efficiency), and 27.5 +/- 2.9% when using the unloaded rowing as the base-line correction (work efficiency), and 22.8 +/- 2.2% when calculating the work rate as the base-line correction (delta efficiency).

  15. Evaluation of the ΔV 4D CT ventilation calculation method using in vivo xenon CT ventilation data and comparison to other methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Geoffrey G; Latifi, Kujtim; Du, Kaifang; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Christensen, Gary E; Ding, Kai; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G

    2016-03-08

    Ventilation distribution calculation using 4D CT has shown promising potential in several clinical applications. This study evaluated the direct geometric ventilation calculation method, namely the ΔV method, with xenon-enhanced CT (XeCT) ventilation data from four sheep, and compared it with two other published meth-ods, the Jacobian and the Hounsfield unit (HU) methods. Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were used for the evaluation and comparison. The average SCC with one standard deviation was 0.44 ± 0.13 with a range between 0.29 and 0.61 between the XeCT and ΔV ventilation distributions. The average DSC value for lower 30% ventilation volumes between the XeCT and ΔV ventilation distributions was 0.55 ± 0.07 with a range between 0.48 and 0.63. Ventilation difference introduced by deformable image registration errors improved with smoothing. In conclusion, ventilation distributions generated using ΔV-4D CT and deformable image registration are in reasonably agreement with the in vivo XeCT measured ventilation distribution.

  16. A retrospective comparison of smart prep and test bolus multi-detector CT pulmonary angiography protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Suckling, Tara; Smith, Tony; Reed, Warren

    2013-06-15

    Optimal arterial opacification is crucial in imaging the pulmonary arteries using computed tomography (CT). This poses the challenge of precisely timing data acquisition to coincide with the transit of the contrast bolus through the pulmonary vasculature. The aim of this quality assurance exercise was to investigate if a change in CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) scanning protocol resulted in improved opacification of the pulmonary arteries. Comparison was made between the smart prep protocol (SPP) and the test bolus protocol (TBP) for opacification in the pulmonary trunk. A total of 160 CTPA examinations (80 using each protocol) performed between January 2010 and February 2011 were assessed retrospectively. CT attenuation coefficients were measured in Hounsfield Units (HU) using regions of interest at the level of the pulmonary trunk. The average pixel value, standard deviation (SD), maximum, and minimum were recorded. For each of these variables a mean value was then calculated and compared for these two CTPA protocols. Minimum opacification of 200 HU was achieved in 98% of the TBP sample but only 90% of the SPP sample. The average CT attenuation over the pulmonary trunk for the SPP was 329 (SD = ±21) HU, whereas for the TBP it was 396 (SD = ±22) HU (P = 0.0017). The TBP also recorded higher maximum (P = 0.0024) and minimum (P = 0.0039) levels of opacification. This study has found that a TBP resulted in significantly better opacification of the pulmonary trunk than the SPP.

  17. Localization of islet cell tumors by dynamic CT: comparison with plain CT, arteriography, sonography, and venous sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Krudy, A.G.; Doppman, J.L.; Jensen, R.T.; Norton, J.A.; Collen, M.J.; Shawker, T.H.; Gardner, J.D.; McArthur, K.; Gorden, P.

    1984-09-01

    Ten patients with suspected islet cell tumors (seven with possible gastrinomas, three with insulinomas) underwent diagnostic evaluation with dynamic CT scanning, routine CT scanning, angiography, and sonography. Venous sampling was also performed in selected instances. Nine sites of gastrinoma and three insulinomas were confirmed surgically in eight patients. Two patients had negative surgical explorations. Routine CT demonstrated five of the nine gastrinomas and one of two insulinomas. Angiography was positive in six of nine gastrinomas and all three insulinomas. Sonography showed only two of the nine gastrinomas and two of the three insulinomas. Dynamic CT scanning demonstrated three additional lesions (two gastrinomas, on insulinoma) not visible on routine CT scanning. Although most of these lesions were visible arteriographically, dynamic CT scans at the appropriate level localized the pathology in the transverse plane and greatly aided in surgical resection of these lesions.

  18. Scottish Short Stone Rows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Short stone rows received a good deal of attention during the 1980s and 1990s, at a time when archaeoastronomy in prehistoric Britain and Ireland was moving beyond reassessments of Alexander Thom's "megalithic observatories" by identifying coherent groups of similar monuments with clear orientation trends. Many such rows are found in western Scotland, with the main concentration in Argyll and the island of Mull. Systematic analyses of their orientations produced credible evidence of an awareness of the 18.6-year lunar node cycle, within a "primary-secondary" pattern whereby isolated rows were oriented close to moonrise or moonset at the southern major standstill limit, while others oriented in this way were accompanied by a second row oriented in a declination range that could be interpreted either as lunar or solar. A detailed investigation of the landscape situation of the sites in northern Mull, accompanied by excavations at two of the sites, suggested that they were deliberately placed in locations where critical moonsets would be seen against prominent distant landscape features, but where the distant horizon in most or all other directions was hidden from view. A lack of independent archaeological evidence may help to explain why archaeoastronomical investigations at short stone rows have never progressed beyond "data-driven" studies of orientations and landscape situation. Nonetheless, the work that was done at these sites raised important general methodological issues, and pioneered techniques, that remain relevant across archaeoastronomy today.

  19. Biomechanics of Rowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Kazunori; Andrews, Brian J.; Zavatsky, Amy B.; Halliday, Suzanne E.

    A new control model for the study of biomechanical simulation of human movement was investigated using rowing as an example. The objectives were to explore biological and mechanical alternatives to optimal control methods. The simulation methods included simple control mechanisms based on proportional and derivative (PD) control, consideration of a simple neural model, introduction of an inverse dynamics system for feedback, and computational adjustment of control parameters by using an evaluative criterion and optimization method. By using simulation, appropriate rowing motions were synthesized. The generated rowing motion was periodic, continuous, and adaptable so that the pattern was stable against the mechanical force and independent of the initial condition. We believe that the simulation model is not only practical as a computational research tool from a biomechanical-engineering viewpoint but also significant from the point of view of fundamental biological theories of movement.

  20. Comparison of volumetric breast density estimations from mammography and thorax CT.

    PubMed

    Geeraert, N; Klausz, R; Cockmartin, L; Muller, S; Bosmans, H; Bloch, I

    2014-08-07

    Breast density has become an important issue in current breast cancer screening, both as a recognized risk factor for breast cancer and by decreasing screening efficiency by the masking effect. Different qualitative and quantitative methods have been proposed to evaluate area-based breast density and volumetric breast density (VBD). We propose a validation method comparing the computation of VBD obtained from digital mammographic images (VBDMX) with the computation of VBD from thorax CT images (VBDCT). We computed VBDMX by applying a conversion function to the pixel values in the mammographic images, based on models determined from images of breast equivalent material. VBDCT is computed from the average Hounsfield Unit (HU) over the manually delineated breast volume in the CT images. This average HU is then compared to the HU of adipose and fibroglandular tissues from patient images. The VBDMX method was applied to 663 mammographic patient images taken on two Siemens Inspiration (hospL) and one GE Senographe Essential (hospJ). For the comparison study, we collected images from patients who had a thorax CT and a mammography screening exam within the same year. In total, thorax CT images corresponding to 40 breasts (hospL) and 47 breasts (hospJ) were retrieved. Averaged over the 663 mammographic images the median VBDMX was 14.7% . The density distribution and the inverse correlation between VBDMX and breast thickness were found as expected. The average difference between VBDMX and VBDCT is smaller for hospJ (4%) than for hospL (10%). This study shows the possibility to compare VBDMX with the VBD from thorax CT exams, without additional examinations. In spite of the limitations caused by poorly defined breast limits, the calibration of mammographic images to local VBD provides opportunities for further quantitative evaluations.

  1. Comparison of volumetric breast density estimations from mammography and thorax CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geeraert, N.; Klausz, R.; Cockmartin, L.; Muller, S.; Bosmans, H.; Bloch, I.

    2014-08-01

    Breast density has become an important issue in current breast cancer screening, both as a recognized risk factor for breast cancer and by decreasing screening efficiency by the masking effect. Different qualitative and quantitative methods have been proposed to evaluate area-based breast density and volumetric breast density (VBD). We propose a validation method comparing the computation of VBD obtained from digital mammographic images (VBDMX) with the computation of VBD from thorax CT images (VBDCT). We computed VBDMX by applying a conversion function to the pixel values in the mammographic images, based on models determined from images of breast equivalent material. VBDCT is computed from the average Hounsfield Unit (HU) over the manually delineated breast volume in the CT images. This average HU is then compared to the HU of adipose and fibroglandular tissues from patient images. The VBDMX method was applied to 663 mammographic patient images taken on two Siemens Inspiration (hospL) and one GE Senographe Essential (hospJ). For the comparison study, we collected images from patients who had a thorax CT and a mammography screening exam within the same year. In total, thorax CT images corresponding to 40 breasts (hospL) and 47 breasts (hospJ) were retrieved. Averaged over the 663 mammographic images the median VBDMX was 14.7% . The density distribution and the inverse correlation between VBDMX and breast thickness were found as expected. The average difference between VBDMX and VBDCT is smaller for hospJ (4%) than for hospL (10%). This study shows the possibility to compare VBDMX with the VBD from thorax CT exams, without additional examinations. In spite of the limitations caused by poorly defined breast limits, the calibration of mammographic images to local VBD provides opportunities for further quantitative evaluations.

  2. Applied physiology of rowing.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, F C

    1984-01-01

    Elite oarsmen and oarswomen possess large body dimensions and show outstanding aerobic and anaerobic qualities. Oarsmen have VO2max values of 6.1 +/- 0.6 L/min and have incurred O2 debts of between 10 and 20 litres. The caloric expenditure of rowing estimated from the O2 cost of a 6-minute rowing ergometer exercise was calculated at 36 kcal/min, one of the highest energy costs so far reported for any predominantly aerobic-type sport. Aerobic and anaerobic calculations show that 70 to 75% of the energy necessary to row the standard 2000m distance for men is derived from aerobiosis while the remaining 25 to 30% is anaerobic. Women achieve VO2max values of 4.1 +/- 0.4 L/min and slightly lower anaerobic values than men. The relative 60 to 65% energy contribution of aerobic metabolism and 35 to 40% for anaerobiosis is not surprising since women compete at 1000m. Rowers also exhibit excellent isokinetic leg strength and power when compared with other elite athletes and oarswomen produced higher relative leg strength values than men when lean body mass is considered. Muscle fibre type distributions in oarsmen resemble those of distance runners while women tend to have a slightly higher proportion of fast-twitch fibres. An average power output of 390 +/- 13.6W was produced by oarsmen for 6 minutes of simulated rowing while women were able to develop 300 +/- 18.4 for 3 minutes of the same activity. Mechanical efficiency for rowing was calculated at 20 +/- 0.9%. Oarsmen also achieve very high ventilation volumes being able to average above 200 L/min BTPS for 6 minutes of simulated rowing; women ventilate 170 L/min BTPS for 3 minutes of this exercise. Excellent VO2/VE and O2 pulse values demonstrate outstanding cardiorespiratory efficiency. Both oarsmen and oarswomen utilise a unique physiological pattern of race pacing; they begin exertion with a vigorous sprint which places excessive demands on anaerobic metabolism followed by a severely high aerobic steady-state and then

  3. CT image quality over time: comparison of image quality for six different CT scanners over a six-year period.

    PubMed

    Roa, Ana Maria A; Andersen, Hilde K; Martinsen, Anne Catrine T

    2015-03-08

    UNSCEAR concluded that increased use of CT scanning caused dramatic changes in population dose. Therefore, international radiation protection authorities demand: 1) periodical quality assurance tests with respect to image quality and radiation dose, and 2) optimization of all examination protocols with respect to image quality and radiation dose. This study aimed to evaluate and analyze multiple image quality parameters and variability measured throughout time for six different CT scanners from four different vendors, in order to evaluate the current methodology for QA controls of CT systems. The results from this study indicate that there is minor drifting in the image noise and uniformity and in the spatial resolution over time for CT scanners, independent of vendors. The HU for different object densities vary between different CT scanner models from different vendors, and over time for one specific CT scanner. Future tests of interphantom and intraphantom variations, along with inclusion of more CT scanners, are necessary to establish robust baselines and recommendations of methodology for QA controls of CT systems, independent of model and vendor.

  4. Comparison of full-scan and half-scan for cone beam breast CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lingyun; Shaw, Chris C.; Lai, Chao-jen; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Tu, Shu-ju; Liu, Xinming

    2006-03-01

    The half-scan cone beam technique, requiring a scan for 180° plus detector width only, can help achieve both shorter scan time as well as higher exposure in each individual projection image. This purpose of this paper is to investigate whether half-scan cone beam CT technique can provide acceptable images for clinical application. The half-scan cone beam reconstruction algorithm uses modified Parker's weighting function and reconstructs from slightly more than half of the projection views for full-scan, giving out promising results. A rotation phantom, stationary gantry bench top system was built to conduct experiments to evaluate half-scan cone beam breast CT technique. A post-mastectomy breast specimen, a stack of lunch meat slices embedded with various sizes of calcifications and a polycarbonate phantom inserted with glandular and adipose tissue equivalents are imaged and reconstructed for comparison study. A subset of full-scan projection images of a mastectomy specimen were extracted and used as the half-scan projection data for reconstruction. The results show half-scan reconstruction algorithm for cone beam breast CT images does not significantly degrade image quality when compared with the images of same or even half the radiation dose level. Our results are encouraging, emphasizing the potential advantages in the use of half-scan technique for cone beam breast imaging.

  5. Comparison of manual and automatic MR-CT registration for radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Korsager, Anne Sofie; Carl, Jesper; Østergaard, Lasse Riis

    2016-05-01

    In image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer, delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV) often relies on magnetic resonance (MR) because of its good soft-tissue visualization. Registration of MR and computed tomography (CT) is required in order to add this accurate delineation to the dose planning CT. An automatic approach for local MR-CT registration of the prostate has previously been developed using a voxel property-based registration as an alternative to a manual landmark-based registration. The aim of this study is to compare the two registration approaches and to investigate the clinical potential for replacing the manual registration with the automatic registration. Registrations and analysis were performed for 30 prostate cancer patients treated with IGRT using a Ni-Ti prostate stent as a fiducial marker. The comparison included computing translational and rotational differences between the approaches, visual inspection, and computing the overlap of the CTV. The computed mean translational difference was 1.65, 1.60, and 1.80 mm and the computed mean rotational difference was 1.51°, 3.93°, and 2.09° in the superior/inferior, anterior/posterior, and medial/lateral direction, respectively. The sensitivity of overlap was 87%. The results demonstrate that the automatic registration approach performs registrations comparable to the manual registration. PACS number(s): 87.57.nj, 87.61.-c, 87.57.Q-, 87.56.J.

  6. Comparison of FDG-PET/CT and CT for Delineation of Lumpectomy Cavity for Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C. Lavely, William C.; Frassica, Deborah A.; Myers, Lee T.; Asrari, Fariba; Wahl, Richard L.; Zellars, Richard C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The success of partial breast irradiation critically depends on proper target localization. We examined the use of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) for improved lumpectomy cavity (LC) delineation and treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Twelve breast cancer patients underwent FDG-PET/CT on a GE Discovery scanner with a median time from surgery to PET/CT of 49 days. The LC was contoured on the CT scan by a radiation oncologist and, together with a nuclear medicine physician, on the PET/CT scan. The volumes were calculated and compared in each patient. Treatment planning target volumes (PTVs) were calculated by expanding the margin 2 cm beyond the LC, maintaining a 5-mm margin from the skin and chest wall, and the treatment plans were evaluated. In addition, a study with a patient-like phantom was conducted to evaluate the effect that the window/level settings might have on contouring. Results: The margin of the LC was well visualized on all FDG-PET images. The phantom results indicated that the difference between the known volume and the FDG-PET-delineated volume was <10%, regardless of the window/level settings. The PET/CT volumes were larger than the CT volumes in all cases (median volume ratio, 1.68; range, 1.24-2.45; p = 0.004). The PET/CT-based PTVs were also larger than the CT-based PTV (median volume ratio, 1.16; range, 1.08-1.64; p = 0.006). In 9 of 12 patients, a CT-based treatment plan did not provide adequate coverage of the PET/CT-based PTV (99% of the PTV received <95% of the prescribed dose), resulting in substantial cold spots in some plans. In these cases, treatment plans were generated which were specifically designed to cover the larger PET/CT-based PTV. Although these plans showed an increased dose to the normal tissues, the increases were modest: the non-target breast volume receiving {>=}50 Gy, lung volume receiving {>=}30 Gy, and heart volume receiving {>=}5 Gy increased by 5

  7. Imaging lobular breast carcinoma: comparison of synchrotron radiation DEI-CT technique with clinical CT, mammography and histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, S.; Bravin, A.; Keyriläinen, J.; Fernández, M.; Suortti, P.; Thomlinson, W.; Tenhunen, M.; Virkkunen, P.; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M.-L.

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities for imaging cancer-bearing breast tissue samples are described and compared. The images include clinical mammograms and computed tomography (CT) images, CT images with partly coherent synchrotron radiation (SR), and CT and radiography images taken with SR using the diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The images are evaluated by a radiologist and compared with histopathological examination of the samples. Two cases of lobular carcinoma are studied in detail. The indications of cancer are very weak or invisible in the conventional images, but the morphological changes due to invasion of cancer become pronounced in the images taken by the DEI method. The strands penetrating adipose tissue are seen clearly in the DEI-CT images, and the histopathology confirms that some strands contain the so-called 'Indian file' formations of cancer cells. The radiation dose is carefully measured for each of the imaging modalities. The mean glandular dose (MGD) for 50% glandular breast tissue is about 1 mGy in conventional mammography and less than 0.25 mGy in projection DEI, while in the clinical CT imaging the MGD is very high, about 45 mGy. The entrance dose of 95 mGy in DEI-CT imaging gives rise to an MGD of 40 mGy, but the dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude, because the contrast is very large in most images.

  8. CT imaging of bone and bone marrow infiltration in malignant melanoma--Challenges and limitations for clinical staging in comparison to 18FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Bier, Georg; Hoffmann, Vera; Kloth, Christopher; Othman, Ahmed E; Eigentler, Thomas; Garbe, Claus; La Fougère, Christian; Pfannenberg, Christina; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Klumpp, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Rationale of this study was the evaluation of the diagnostic value of computed tomography (CT) in the detection of bone marrow infiltration in comparison to PET/CT. Fifty patients (age 61 ± 15.12 years) with metastatic malignant melanoma underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT, including contrast-enhanced CT. 2 readers evaluated the CT images in consensus for bone and bone marrow lesions focusing on lesion location, type and size. PET/CT was used as reference standard to estimate sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive value. Moreover, the bone marrow density was estimated in the long bones and the sacral bone. Serum hamoglobin, thrombocyte level and S100 protein were correlated with the presence or absence of bone and bone marrow lesions. According to PET/CT as standard of reference, of 594 bone and medullary lesions 495 were considered malignant. Of these 77.8% were medullary, 20.4% lytic, 1% sclerotic and 0.8% mixed lytic/sclerotic. Contrast-enhanced CT yielded a lesion-based sensitivity of 36.8% and a specificity of 87.9% (PPV 93.8%; NPV 21.8%). Patient-based sensitivity and specificity were 78.8% and 82.4%, respectively. Of the missed lesions, most were medullary (95.8%). A disseminated bone marrow involvement (defined as >10 bone marrow lesions or diffuse infiltration of a whole body segment) was described in 11 cases, in 6 cases the disseminated involvement was underestimated or missed on CT. In cases with disseminated bone marrow involvement the bone marrow density was significantly higher in the humerus (p=0.04), but not in the femur or sacral bone (p=0.06). Multivariate analysis revealed no isolated effect of bone metastases on S100 serum and hemoglobin level, but both were significantly altered in patients with disseminated bone marrow involvement (p<0.05). In conclusion, the diagnostic value of computed tomography for the detection of bone marrow metastases in patients with melanoma, is limited. Especially in cases with disseminated bone marrow

  9. Dual energy with dual source CT and kVp switching with single source CT: a comparison of dual energy performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Kappler, S.; Reinwand, M.; Stierstorfer, K.

    2009-02-01

    Stimulated by the introduction of clinical dual source CT, the interest in dual energy methods has been increasing in the past years. Whereas the potential of material decomposition by dual energy methods is known since the early 1980ies, the realization of dual energy methods is a wide field of today's research. Energy separation can be achieved with energy selective detectors or by varying X-ray source spectra. This paper focuses on dual energy techniques with varying X-ray spectra. These can be provided by dual source CT devices, operated with different kVp settings on each tube. Excellent spectral separation is the key property for use in clinical routine. The drawback of higher cost for two tubes and two detectors leads to an alternative realization, where a single source CT yields different spectra by fast kVp switching from reading to reading. This provides access to dual-energy methods in single source CT. However, this technique comes with some intrinsic limitations. The maximum X-ray flux is reduced in comparison to the dual source system. The kVp rise and fall time between each reading reduces the spectral separation. In comparison to dual source CT, for a constant number of projections per energy spectrum the temporal resolution is reduced; a reasonable trade of between reduced numbers of projection and limited temporal resolution has to be found. The overall dual energy performance is the guiding line for our investigations. We present simulations and measurements which benchmark both solutions in terms of spectral behavior, especially of spectral separation.

  10. Percutaneous Bone Biopsies: Comparison between Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT and CT-Scan Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Tselikas, Lambros Joskin, Julien; Roquet, Florian; Farouil, Geoffroy; Dreuil, Serge; Hakimé, Antoine Teriitehau, Christophe; Auperin, Anne; Baere, Thierry de Deschamps, Frederic

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to compare the accuracy of targeting and the radiation dose of bone biopsies performed either under fluoroscopic guidance using a cone-beam CT with real-time 3D image fusion software (FP-CBCT-guidance) or under conventional computed tomography guidance (CT-guidance).MethodsSixty-eight consecutive patients with a bone lesion were prospectively included. The bone biopsies were scheduled under FP-CBCT-guidance or under CT-guidance according to operating room availability. Thirty-four patients underwent a bone biopsy under FP-CBCT and 34 under CT-guidance. We prospectively compared the two guidance modalities for their technical success, accuracy, puncture time, and pathological success rate. Patient and physician radiation doses also were compared.ResultsAll biopsies were technically successful, with both guidance modalities. Accuracy was significantly better using FP-CBCT-guidance (3 and 5 mm respectively: p = 0.003). There was no significant difference in puncture time (32 and 31 min respectively, p = 0.51) nor in pathological results (88 and 88 % of pathological success respectively, p = 1). Patient radiation doses were significantly lower with FP-CBCT (45 vs. 136 mSv, p < 0.0001). The percentage of operators who received a dose higher than 0.001 mSv (dosimeter detection dose threshold) was lower with FP-CBCT than CT-guidance (27 vs. 59 %, p = 0.01).ConclusionsFP-CBCT-guidance for bone biopsy is accurate and reduces patient and operator radiation doses compared with CT-guidance.

  11. Local variations in bone mineral density: a comparison of OCT versus x-ray micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Stevens-Smith, Jenna; Scutt, Andrew; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2008-02-01

    We describe variations in the degree of mineralisation within the subchondral bone plate of the equine metacarpophalangeal joint. A comparison of Optical Coherence Tomography, Micro CT, and SEM techniques was performed. These data are compared between sites on a healthy sample and at points on an osteoarthritically degenerated sample. No significant correlation was found between the optical scattering coefficient and the micro-CT derived BMD for comparisons between different sites on the bone surface. Also OCT demonstrated a larger regional variation in scattering coefficient than did micro CT for bone mineral density. This suggests that the optical scattering coefficient of bone is not related solely to the volume-density of calcium-phosphate. Patches of lower optical scattering coefficient were found in the bone structure that was related to the osteoarthritic lesion area on the overlying cartilage. Areas of microcracking, as revealed by both SEM and micro CT produced distinctive granularity in the OCT images. In further experiments, OCT was compared with micro CT and mechanical strength testing (3-point bending) in a small animal model of cardiovascular disease (cholesterol overload in mice). In the cardiovascular diseased mice, micro-CT of the trabecular bone did not demonstrate a significant change in trabecular bone mineral density before and after administration of the high cholesterol diet. However mechanical testing demonstrated a decrease in mechanical strength and OCT demonstrated a corresponding statistically significant decrease in optical scattering of the bone.

  12. Comparison of CT-Number and Gray Scale Value of Different Dental Materials and Hard Tissues in CT and CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Emadi, Naghmeh; Safi, Yaser; Akbarzadeh Bagheban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) are valuable diagnostic aids for many clinical applications. This study was designed to compare the gray scale value (GSV) and Hounsfield unit (HU) of selected dental materials and various hard tissues using CT or CBCT. Methods and Materials: Three samples of all test materials including amalgam (AM), composite resin (CR), glass ionomer (GI), zinc-oxide eugenol (ZOE), calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement, AH-26 root canal sealer (AH-26), gutta-percha (GP), Coltosol (Col), Dycal (DL), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), zinc phosphate (ZP), and polycarbonate cement (PC) were prepared and scanned together with samples of bone, dentin and enamel using two CBCT devices, Scanora 3D (S3D) and NewTom VGi (NTV) and a spiral CT (SCT) scanner (Somatom Emotion 16 multislice spiral CT);. Subsequently, the HU and GSV values were determined and evaluated. The data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The level of significance was determined at 0.05. Results: There were significant differences among the three different scanners (P<0.05). The differences between HU/GSV values of 12 selected dental materials using NTV was significant (P<0.05) and for S3D and SCT was insignificant (P>0.05). All tested materials showed maximum values in S3D and SCT (3094 and 3071, respectively); however, bone and dentin showed low/medium values (P<0.05). In contrast, the tested materials and tissues showed a range of values in NTV (366 to15383; P<0.05). Conclusion: Scanner system can influence the obtained HU/GSV of dental materials. NTV can discriminate various dental materials, in contrast to S3D/SCT scanners. NTV may be a more useful diagnostic aid for clinical practice. PMID:25386210

  13. Comparison of near-infrared spectroscopy with CT cerebral blood flow measurements in newborn piglets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Derek W.; Picot, Paul A.; Springett, Roger; Delpy, David T.; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2001-05-01

    Severely premature infants are often at high risk of cerebral hemorrhage or ischemic injury due to their inability to properly regulate blood flow to the brain. If blood flow is too high, the infant is at risk of cerebral hemorrhage, while too little blood flow can result in ischemic injury. The purpose of this research is to design and develop a means of non-invasively measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Such a device would greatly aid the diagnosis and monitoring of afflicted infants. Previous attempts to measure CBF with NIRS have achieved limited success. In this study we acquired high signal-to-noise NIR spectrum from 600 to 980 nm with a cooled CCD spectrometer. This spectrometer enables the differential path length factor (DPF) to be estimated with accuracy using a second derivative technique described by Matcher et al. The validity of our new approach is determined via direct comparison with a previously validated computed tomography (CT) method. Three newborn piglets were studied. CBF measurements were performed at various partial arterial CO2 tensions (PaCO2) using both the NIRS and CT methods. The results of the two methods correlate well with a relationship of CBFCT equals -4.30 + 1.05 CBFNIRS (r2 equals 0.96).

  14. Rowing competitions and perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Alfinio; Bernhardt, Stephen A.; Shipman, Henry L.

    2015-02-01

    This paper is about integrating the use of graphing technology (specifically, GeoGebra) with principles of motion, principles of perspective, and the concept of vanishing points to model a dynamic event. Students were asked to analyse video images of a rowing competition filmed with a single camera positioned perpendicular to the race. The fixed position of the camera in such races makes it difficult to determine whether a scull closer to the camera is actually overtaking another, more distant scull. The paper illustrates how students in their first year at the university can integrate the use of technology, science, mathematics, and writing to solve a real world problem involving motion.

  15. Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm{sup 2} (0.002 mm{sup -1}) to 0.29 mm{sup 2} (0.74 mm{sup -1}). The GE kernels 'Soft,''Standard,''Chest,' and 'Lung' closely matched the Siemens kernels 'B35f,''B43f,''B41f,' and 'B80f' (RMSD < 0.05 mm{sup 2}, |PFD| < 0.02 mm{sup -1}, respectively). The GE 'Bone,''Bone+,' and 'Edge' kernels all matched most closely with Siemens 'B75f' kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm{sup 2} and 0.41 mm{sup -1}, respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is

  16. Unusual Presentation of Bladder Paraganglioma: Comparison of (131)I MIBG SPECT/CT and (68)Ga DOTANOC PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tarun Kumar; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Gupta, Nitin; Shukla, Jaya; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Extraadrenal chromaffin cell-related tumors or paragangliomas are rare, especially in the bladder, accounting for less than 1% of cases. We report a 16-year-old boy who presented with hematuria and paroxysmal headache and was found to have a prostatic growth infiltrating the urinary bladder on anatomical imaging. Iodine-131 ((131)I) metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) whole-body scanning and subsequently gallium-68 ((68)Ga) DOTANOC positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were performed. The MIBG scan revealed a non-tracer-avid soft-tissue mass, while DOTANOC PET/CT revealed a tracer-avid primary soft-tissue mass involving the urinary bladder and prostate with metastasis to the iliac lymph nodes. He underwent surgical management; histopathology of the surgical specimen revealed a bladder paraganglioma, whereas the prostate was found to be free of tumor.

  17. Unusual Presentation of Bladder Paraganglioma: Comparison of 131I MIBG SPECT/CT and 68Ga DOTANOC PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tarun Kumar; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Gupta, Nitin; Shukla, Jaya; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Extraadrenal chromaffin cell-related tumors or paragangliomas are rare, especially in the bladder, accounting for less than 1% of cases. We report a 16-year-old boy who presented with hematuria and paroxysmal headache and was found to have a prostatic growth infiltrating the urinary bladder on anatomical imaging. Iodine-131 (131I) metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) whole-body scanning and subsequently gallium-68 (68Ga) DOTANOC positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were performed. The MIBG scan revealed a non-tracer-avid soft-tissue mass, while DOTANOC PET/CT revealed a tracer-avid primary soft-tissue mass involving the urinary bladder and prostate with metastasis to the iliac lymph nodes. He underwent surgical management; histopathology of the surgical specimen revealed a bladder paraganglioma, whereas the prostate was found to be free of tumor. PMID:26912984

  18. Comparison of ring artifact removal methods using flat panel detector based CT images

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ring artifacts are the concentric rings superimposed on the tomographic images often caused by the defective and insufficient calibrated detector elements as well as by the damaged scintillator crystals of the flat panel detector. It may be also generated by objects attenuating X-rays very differently in different projection direction. Ring artifact reduction techniques so far reported in the literature can be broadly classified into two groups. One category of the approaches is based on the sinogram processing also known as the pre-processing techniques and the other category of techniques perform processing on the 2-D reconstructed images, recognized as the post-processing techniques in the literature. The strength and weakness of these categories of approaches are yet to be explored from a common platform. Method In this paper, a comparative study of the two categories of ring artifact reduction techniques basically designed for the multi-slice CT instruments is presented from a common platform. For comparison, two representative algorithms from each of the two categories are selected from the published literature. A very recently reported state-of-the-art sinogram domain ring artifact correction method that classifies the ring artifacts according to their strength and then corrects the artifacts using class adaptive correction schemes is also included in this comparative study. The first sinogram domain correction method uses a wavelet based technique to detect the corrupted pixels and then using a simple linear interpolation technique estimates the responses of the bad pixels. The second sinogram based correction method performs all the filtering operations in the transform domain, i.e., in the wavelet and Fourier domain. On the other hand, the two post-processing based correction techniques actually operate on the polar transform domain of the reconstructed CT images. The first method extracts the ring artifact template vector using a homogeneity

  19. Measures of rowing performance.

    PubMed

    Smith, T Brett; Hopkins, Will G

    2012-04-01

    Accurate measures of performance are important for assessing competitive athletes in practi~al and research settings. We present here a review of rowing performance measures, focusing on the errors in these measures and the implications for testing rowers. The yardstick for assessing error in a performance measure is the random variation (typical or standard error of measurement) in an elite athlete's competitive performance from race to race: ∼1.0% for time in 2000 m rowing events. There has been little research interest in on-water time trials for assessing rowing performance, owing to logistic difficulties and environmental perturbations in performance time with such tests. Mobile ergometry via instrumented oars or rowlocks should reduce these problems, but the associated errors have not yet been reported. Measurement of boat speed to monitor on-water training performance is common; one device based on global positioning system (GPS) technology contributes negligible extra random error (0.2%) in speed measured over 2000 m, but extra error is substantial (1-10%) with other GPS devices or with an impeller, especially over shorter distances. The problems with on-water testing have led to widespread use of the Concept II rowing ergometer. The standard error of the estimate of on-water 2000 m time predicted by 2000 m ergometer performance was 2.6% and 7.2% in two studies, reflecting different effects of skill, body mass and environment in on-water versus ergometer performance. However, well trained rowers have a typical error in performance time of only ∼0.5% between repeated 2000 m time trials on this ergometer, so such trials are suitable for tracking changes in physiological performance and factors affecting it. Many researchers have used the 2000 m ergometer performance time as a criterion to identify other predictors of rowing performance. Standard errors of the estimate vary widely between studies even for the same predictor, but the lowest

  20. Comparison of Intraoperative Portable CT Scanners in Skull Base and Endoscopic Sinus Surgery: Single Center Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Conley, David B.; Tan, Bruce; Bendok, Bernard R.; Batjer, H. Hunt; Chandra, Rakesh; Sidle, Douglas; Rahme, Rudy J.; Adel, Joseph G.; Fishman, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Precise and safe management of complex skull base lesions can be enhanced by intraoperative computed tomography (CT) scanning. Surgery in these areas requires real-time feedback of anatomic landmarks. Several portable CT scanners are currently available. We present a comparison of our clinical experience with three portable scanners in skull base and craniofacial surgery. We present clinical case series and the participants were from the Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Three scanners are studied: one conventional multidetector CT (MDCT), two digital flat panel cone-beam CT (CBCT) devices. Technical considerations, ease of use, image characteristics, and integration with image guidance are presented for each device. All three scanners provide good quality images. Intraoperative scanning can be used to update the image guidance system in real time. The conventional MDCT is unique in its ability to resolve soft tissue. The flat panel CBCT scanners generally emit lower levels of radiation and have less metal artifact effect. In this series, intraoperative CT scanning was technically feasible and deemed useful in surgical decision-making in 75% of patients. Intraoperative portable CT scanning has significant utility in complex skull base surgery. This technology informs the surgeon of the precise extent of dissection and updates intraoperative stereotactic navigation. PMID:22470270

  1. The Demise of Skid Row.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Inciardi, James A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the history and evolution of the American skid row; analyzes the changes it has undergone, particularly in the face of urban renewal; and speculates on its future. Includes opinions of the inhabitants of skid row which were obtained from interviews. (MJL)

  2. Personalized estimates of radiation dose from dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population and comparison with diagnostic mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M.; Conover, David L.

    2013-11-01

    This study retrospectively analyzed the mean glandular dose (MGD) to 133 breasts from 132 subjects, all women, who participated in a clinical trial evaluating dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population. The clinical trial was conducted in adherence to a protocol approved by institutional review boards and the study participants provided written informed consent. Individual estimates of MGD to each breast from dedicated breast CT was obtained by combining x-ray beam characteristics with estimates of breast dimensions and fibroglandular fraction from volumetric breast CT images, and using normalized glandular dose coefficients. For each study participant and for the breast corresponding to that imaged with breast CT, an estimate of the MGD from diagnostic mammography (including supplemental views) was obtained from the DICOM image headers for comparison. This estimate uses normalized glandular dose coefficients corresponding to a breast with 50% fibroglandular weight fraction. The median fibroglandular weight fraction for the study cohort determined from volumetric breast CT images was 15%. Hence, the MGD from diagnostic mammography was corrected to be representative of the study cohort. Individualized estimates of MGD from breast CT ranged from 5.7 to 27.8 mGy. Corresponding to the breasts imaged with breast CT, the MGD from diagnostic mammography ranged from 2.6 to 31.6 mGy. The mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from dedicated breast CT exam were 13.9 ± 4.6 and 12.6, respectively. For the corresponding breasts, the mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from diagnostic mammography were 12.4 ± 6.3 and 11.1, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that at the 0.05 level, the distributions of MGD from dedicated breast CT and diagnostic mammography were significantly different (Wilcoxon signed ranks test, p = 0.007). While the interquartile range and the range (maximum-minimum) of MGD from dedicated breast CT was lower than

  3. Comparison of dosimetry between PET/CT and PET alone using (11)C-ITMM.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiteru; Sakata, Muneyuki; Oda, Keiichi; Wagatsuma, Kei; Toyohara, Jun; Ishibashi, Kenji; Ishii, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2016-03-01

    We used a new tracer, N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino) pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-4-(11)C-methoxy-N-methylbenzamide ((11)C-ITMM), to compare radiation doses from positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with previously published doses from PET alone. Twelve healthy volunteers [six males (mean age ± SD, 27.7 ± 6.7 years) and six females (31.8 ± 14.5 years)] in 12 examinations were recruited. Dose estimations from PET/CT were compared with those from PET alone. Regions of interest (ROIs) in PET/CT were delineated on the basis of low-dose CT (LD-CT) images acquired during PET/CT. Internal and external radiation doses were estimated using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 and CT-Expo software. The effective dose (ED) for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT was estimated to be 4.7 ± 0.5 μSv/MBq for the male subjects and 4.1 ± 0.7 μSv/MBq for the female subjects. The mean ED for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET alone in a previous report was estimated to be 4.6 ± 0.3 μSv/MBq (males, n = 3). The ED values for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT in the male subjects were almost identical to those from PET alone. The absorbed doses (ADs) of the gallbladder, stomach, red bone marrow, and spleen calculated from PET/CT were significantly different from those calculated from PET alone. The EDs of (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT were almost identical to those calculated from PET alone. The ADs in several organs calculated from PET/CT differed from those from PET alone. LD-CT images acquired during PET/CT may facilitate organ identification.

  4. Somatostatin receptor based PET/CT in patients with the suspicion of cardiac sarcoidosis: an initial comparison to cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Lapa, Constantin; Reiter, Theresa; Kircher, Malte; Schirbel, Andreas; Werner, Rudolf A; Pelzer, Theo; Pizarro, Carmen; Skowasch, Dirk; Thomas, Lena; Schlesinger-Irsch, Ulrike; Thomas, Daniel; Bundschuh, Ralph A; Bauer, Wolfgang R; Gärtner, Florian C

    2016-11-22

    Diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis is often challenging. Whereas cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) are most commonly used to evaluate patients, PET/CT using radiolabeled somatostatin receptor (SSTR) ligands for visualization of inflammation might represent a more specific alternative. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of SSTR-PET/CT for detecting cardiac sarcoidosis in comparison to CMR.15 patients (6 males, 9 females) with sarcoidosis and suspicion on cardiac involvement underwent SSTR-PET/CT imaging and CMR. Images were visually scored. The AHA 17-segment model of the left myocardium was used for localization and comparison of inflamed myocardium for both imaging modalities. In semi-quantitative analysis, mean (SUVmean) and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of affected myocardium were calculated and compared with both remote myocardium and left ventricular (LV) cavity.SSTR-PET was positive in 7/15, CMR in 10/15 patients. Of the 3 CMR+/PET- subjects, one patient with minor involvement (<25% of wall thickness in CMR) was missed by PET. The remaining two CMR+/PET- patients displayed no adverse cardiac events during follow-up.In the 17-segment model, PET/CT yielded 27 and CMR 29 positive segments. Overall concordance of the 2 modalities was 96.1% (245/255 segments analyzed). SUVmean and SUVmax in inflamed areas were 2.0±1.2 and 2.6±1.2, respectively. The lesion-to-remote myocardium and lesion-to-LV cavity ratios were 1.8±0.2 and 1.9±0.2 for SUVmean and 2.0±0.3 and 1.7±0.3 for SUVmax, respectively.Detection of cardiac sarcoidosis by SSTR-PET/CT is feasible. Our data warrant further analysis in larger prospective series.

  5. Somatostatin receptor based PET/CT in patients with the suspicion of cardiac sarcoidosis: an initial comparison to cardiac MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Malte; Schirbel, Andreas; Werner, Rudolf A.; Pelzer, Theo; Pizarro, Carmen; Skowasch, Dirk; Thomas, Lena; Schlesinger-Irsch, Ulrike; Thomas, Daniel; Bundschuh, Ralph A.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis is often challenging. Whereas cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) are most commonly used to evaluate patients, PET/CT using radiolabeled somatostatin receptor (SSTR) ligands for visualization of inflammation might represent a more specific alternative. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of SSTR–PET/CT for detecting cardiac sarcoidosis in comparison to CMR. 15 patients (6 males, 9 females) with sarcoidosis and suspicion on cardiac involvement underwent SSTR-PET/CT imaging and CMR. Images were visually scored. The AHA 17-segment model of the left myocardium was used for localization and comparison of inflamed myocardium for both imaging modalities. In semi-quantitative analysis, mean (SUVmean) and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of affected myocardium were calculated and compared with both remote myocardium and left ventricular (LV) cavity. SSTR-PET was positive in 7/15, CMR in 10/15 patients. Of the 3 CMR+/PET− subjects, one patient with minor involvement (<25% of wall thickness in CMR) was missed by PET. The remaining two CMR+/PET− patients displayed no adverse cardiac events during follow-up. In the 17-segment model, PET/CT yielded 27 and CMR 29 positive segments. Overall concordance of the 2 modalities was 96.1% (245/255 segments analyzed). SUVmean and SUVmax in inflamed areas were 2.0±1.2 and 2.6±1.2, respectively. The lesion-to-remote myocardium and lesion-to-LV cavity ratios were 1.8±0.2 and 1.9±0.2 for SUVmean and 2.0±0.3 and 1.7±0.3 for SUVmax, respectively. Detection of cardiac sarcoidosis by SSTR-PET/CT is feasible. Our data warrant further analysis in larger prospective series. PMID:27780922

  6. Comparison of bone histomorphometry and μCT for evaluating bone quality in tail-suspended rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lian-Wen; Huang, Yun-Fei; Wang, Ying; Luan, Hui-Qin; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2014-10-01

    Astronauts often suffer from microgravity-induced osteoporosis due to their time in space. Bone histomorphometry, the 'gold standard' technique for detecting bone quality, is widely used in the evaluation of osteoporosis. This study investigates whether μCT has the same application value as histomorphometry in the evaluation of weightlessness-induced bone loss. A total of 24 SD rats were distributed into three groups (n = 8, each): tail-suspension (TS), TS plus active exercise (TSA), and control (CON). After 21 days, bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and μCT, and microstructure was measured by μCT and histomorphometry. BMD was found to have decreased significantly in TS and TSA compared with the CON group. The results of the μCT measurements showed that a change in BMD mainly occurred in the trabecular bone, and the trabecular BMD increased significantly in the TSA compared with the TS group. The comparison of μCT and histomorphometry showed that TS led to a significant decrease in bone volume (BV/TV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and trabecular number (Tb.N), and it led to an increase in trabecular separation (Tb.Sp). However, active exercise can prevent these changes. Significant differences in most parameters between TSA and CON were found by μCT but not by histomorphometry. Additionally, the parameters of these two methods are highly correlated. Therefore, the application value of μCT is as good as histomorphometry and DXA in the diagnosis of weightlessness-induced osteoporosis and is even better in evaluating the efficacy of exercise.

  7. Comparison of computational to human observer detection for evaluation of CT low dose iterative reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Brendan; Fahmi, Rachid; Brown, Kevin M.; Raihani, Nilgoun; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Model observers were created and compared to human observers for the detection of low contrast targets in computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with an advanced, knowledge-based, iterative image reconstruction method for low x-ray dose imaging. A 5-channel Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling Observer (CHO) was used with internal noise added to the decision variable (DV) and/or channel outputs (CO). Models were defined by parameters: (k1) DV-noise with standard deviation (std) proportional to DV std; (k2) DV-noise with constant std; (k3) CO-noise with constant std across channels; and (k4) CO-noise in each channel with std proportional to CO variance. Four-alternative forced choice (4AFC) human observer studies were performed on sub-images extracted from phantom images with and without a "pin" target. Model parameters were estimated using maximum likelihood comparison to human probability correct (PC) data. PC in human and all model observers increased with dose, contrast, and size, and was much higher for advanced iterative reconstruction (IMR) as compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Detection in IMR was better than FPB at 1/3 dose, suggesting significant dose savings. Model(k1,k2,k3,k4) gave the best overall fit to humans across independent variables (dose, size, contrast, and reconstruction) at fixed display window. However Model(k1) performed better when considering model complexity using the Akaike information criterion. Model(k1) fit the extraordinary detectability difference between IMR and FBP, despite the different noise quality. It is anticipated that the model observer will predict results from iterative reconstruction methods having similar noise characteristics, enabling rapid comparison of methods.

  8. The accuracy of solid model and rapid prototype of prostheses in comparison to the digital CT image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwandi, Agri; Kiswanto, Gandjar; Kusumaningsih, Widjajalaksmi; Soemardi, Tresna P.

    2017-02-01

    Prostheses are a derivative of biomedical products that have important things, which are: a design, size and bio compatible material. To produce optimum prostheses, safe and comfortable use, it would require design a model that fits the size of the patient's anatomy. In this paper describes the accuracy of solid model and rapid prototype of prostheses in comparison to the digital CT image data. Where the main parameters used as the reference measurement is digital CT image data. The data were analyzed using a statistical method to get the standard deviation of the comparison parameters of the data obtained, so that it can be known how the accuracy of the measurement results of each data.

  9. Evaluation of bone substitute materials: comparison of flat-panel based volume CT to conventional multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, Sebastian; Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Sachlos, Elefterios; Haberstroh, Jörg; Scheifele, Christian; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Voss, Pit Jacob; Veigel, Egle; Smedek, Jörg; Ganter, Philip; Tuna, Taskin; Gutwald, Ralf; Palmowski, Moritz

    2013-10-01

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a key factor in bone regeneration within the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Despite this in vivo analysis of tissue-engineered-constructs to monitor bone rehabilitation are difficult to conduct. Novel high-resolving flat-panel based volume CTs (fp-VCT) are increasingly used for imaging bone structures. This study compares the potential value of novel fp-VCT with conventional multidetector CT (MDCT) based on a sheep sinus floor elevation model. Calcium-hydroxyapatite reinforced collagen scaffolds were populated with autologous osteoblasts and implanted into sheep maxillary sinus. After 8, 16 and 24 weeks MDCT and fp-VCT scans were performed to investigate the volume of the augmented area; densities of cancellous and compact bone were assessed as comparative values. fp-VCT imaging resulted in higher spatial resolution, which was advantageous when separating closely related anatomical structures (i.e. trabecular and compact bone, biomaterials). Fp-VCT facilitated imaging of alterations occurring in test specimens over time. fp-VCTs therefore displayed high volume coverage, dynamic imaging potential and superior performance when investigating superfine bone structures and bone remodelling of biomaterials. Thus, fp-VCTs may be a suitable instrument for intraoperative imaging and future in vivo tissue-engineering studies.

  10. Hydrodynamic performance of multiple-row slotted breakwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbisy, Moussa S.; Mlybari, Ehab M.; Helal, Medhat M.

    2016-06-01

    This study examines the hydrodynamic performance of multiple-row vertical slotted breakwaters. We developed a mathematical model based on an eigenfunction expansion method and a least squares technique for Stokes second-order waves. The numerical results obtained for limiting cases of double-row and triple-row walls are in good agreement with results of previous studies and experimental results. Comparisons with experimental measurements of the reflection, transmission, and dissipation coefficients ( C R , C T , and C E ) for double-row walls show that the proposed mathematical model adequately reproduces most of the important features. We found that for double-row walls, the C R increases with increasing wave number, kd, and with a decreasing permeable wall part, dm. The C T follows the opposite trend. The C E slowly increases with an increasing kd for lower kd values, reaches a maximum, and then decreases again. In addition, an increasing porosity of dm would significantly decrease the C R , while increasing the C T . At lower values of kd, a decreasing porosity increases the C E , but for high values of kd, a decreasing porosity reduces the C E . The numerical results indicate that, for triple-row walls, the effect of the arrangement of the chamber widths on hydrodynamic characteristics is not significant, except when kd<0.5. Double-row slotted breakwaters may exhibit a good wave-absorbing performance at kd>0.5, where by the horizontal wave force may be smaller than that of a single wall. On the other hand, the difference between double-row and triple-row vertical slotted breakwaters is marginal.

  11. Comparison of CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Manual and CT-Guided Robotic Positioning System for In Vivo Needle Placements in Swine Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis, F.; Takaki, H.; Laskhmanan, M.; Durack, J. C.; Erinjeri, J. P.; Getrajdman, G. I.; Maybody, M.; Sofocleous, C. T.; Solomon, S. B.; Srimathveeravalli, G.

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo compare CT fluoroscopy-guided manual and CT-guided robotic positioning system (RPS)-assisted needle placement by experienced IR physicians to targets in swine liver.Materials and MethodsManual and RPS-assisted needle placement was performed by six experienced IR physicians to four 5 mm fiducial seeds placed in swine liver (n = 6). Placement performance was assessed for placement accuracy, procedure time, number of confirmatory scans, needle manipulations, and procedure radiation dose. Intra-modality difference in performance for each physician was assessed using paired t test. Inter-physician performance variation for each modality was analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis test.ResultsPaired comparison of manual and RPS-assisted placements to a target by the same physician indicated accuracy outcomes was not statistically different (manual: 4.53 mm; RPS: 4.66 mm; p = 0.41), but manual placement resulted in higher total radiation dose (manual: 1075.77 mGy/cm; RPS: 636.4 mGy/cm; p = 0.03), required more confirmation scans (manual: 6.6; RPS: 1.6; p < 0.0001) and needle manipulations (manual: 4.6; RPS: 0.4; p < 0.0001). Procedure time for RPS was longer than manual placement (manual: 6.12 min; RPS: 9.7 min; p = 0.0003). Comparison of inter-physician performance during manual placement indicated significant differences in the time taken to complete placements (p = 0.008) and number of repositions (p = 0.04) but not in other study measures (p > 0.05). Comparison of inter-physician performance during RPS-assisted placement suggested statistically significant differences in procedure time (p = 0.02) and not in other study measures (p > 0.05).ConclusionsCT-guided RPS-assisted needle placement reduced radiation dose, number of confirmatory scans, and needle manipulations when compared to manual needle placement by experienced IR physicians, with equivalent accuracy.

  12. Size-based emphysema cluster analysis on low attenuation area in 3D volumetric CT: comparison with pulmonary functional test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minho; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Sang Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Oh, Sang Young

    2015-03-01

    To quantify low attenuation area (LAA) of emphysematous regions according to cluster size in 3D volumetric CT data of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and to compare these indices with their pulmonary functional test (PFT). Sixty patients with COPD were scanned by a more than 16-multi detector row CT scanner (Siemens Sensation 16 and 64) within 0.75mm collimation. Based on these LAA masks, a length scale analysis to estimate each emphysema LAA's size was performed as follows. At first, Gaussian low pass filter from 30mm to 1mm kernel size with 1mm interval on the mask was performed from large to small size, iteratively. Centroid voxels resistant to the each filter were selected and dilated by the size of the kernel, which was regarded as the specific size emphysema mask. The slopes of area and number of size based LAA (slope of semi-log plot) were analyzed and compared with PFT. PFT parameters including DLco, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC were significantly (all p-value< 0.002) correlated with the slopes (r-values; -0.73, 0.54, 0.69, respectively) and EI (r-values; -0.84, -0.60, -0.68, respectively). In addition, the D independently contributed regression for FEV1 and FEV1/FVC (adjust R sq. of regression study: EI only, 0.70, 0.45; EI and D, 0.71, 0.51, respectively). By the size based LAA segmentation and analysis, we evaluated the Ds of area, number, and distribution of size based LAA, which would be independent factors for predictor of PFT parameters.

  13. Low grade coal worker's pneumoconiosis. Comparison of CT and chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Gevenois, P A; Pichot, E; Dargent, F; Dedeire, S; Vande Weyer, R; De Vuyst, P

    1994-07-01

    We compared CT with chest radiography (CR) in the assessment of low grade coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) in a population of 83 subjects. All subjects had a high-voltage p.a. CR, graded according to the ILO classification between 0/0 and 1/1, a conventional CT (CCT) using contiguous 1-cm-thick sections on the entire thorax and a set of 10 high-resolution CT (HRCT) images. CR and CT were separately read by consensus by 2 teams of 2 trained readers. CR was coded 0/0 in 9 subjects; 0/1 in 31; 1/0 in 28; 1/1 in 15. Among these groups of patients, micronodules were detected by CT in respectively 2 (22%), 14 (45%), 17 (61%) and 10 (67%) patients. In all groups, micronodules were more often detected by CT when the opacities detected on CR were scored as rounded (p, q) than irregular (s, t). Among the patients graded 0/0 or 0/1, CT showed micronodules in 40%. By contrast, among the patients graded 1/0 or 1/1, CT did not show micronodules in 37%, but revealed in numerous patients that opacities detected on CR were related to bronchiectasis and/or emphysema only. Comparative analysis of HRCT and CCT showed that both techniques are complementary and proved the usefulness of CCT in the detection or confirmation of low profusion of micronodules.

  14. Multimodal imaging of the human temporal bone: A comparison of CT and optical scanning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voie, Arne H.; Whiting, Bruce; Skinner, Margaret; Neely, J. Gail; Lee, Kenneth; Holden, Tim; Brunsden, Barry

    2003-10-01

    A collaborative effort between Washington University in St. Louis and Spencer Technologies in Seattle, WA has been undertaken to create a multimodal 3D reconstruction of the human cochlea and vestibular system. The goal of this project is to improve the accuracy of in vivo CT reconstructions of implanted cochleae, and to expand the knowledge of high-resolution anatomical detail provided by orthogonal-plane optical sectioning (OPFOS). At WUSL, computed tomography (CT) images of the cochlea are used to determine the position of cochlear implant electrodes relative to target auditory neurons. The cochlear implant position is determined using pre- and post-operative CT scans. The CT volumes are cross-registered to align the semicircular canals and internal auditory canal, which have a unique configuration in 3-D space. The head of a human body donor was scanned with a clinical CT device, after which the temporal bones were removed, fixed in formalin and trimmed prior to scanning with a laboratory Micro CT scanner. Following CT, the temporal bones were sent to the OPFOS Imaging Lab at Spencer Technologies for a further analysis. 3-D reconstructions of CT and OPFOS imaging modalities were compared, and results are presented. [Work supported by NIDCD Grants R44-03623-5 and R01-00581-13.

  15. A comparison of micro-CT and thin section analysis of Lateglacial glaciolacustrine varves from Glen Roy, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendle, Jacob M.; Palmer, Adrian P.; Carr, Simon J.

    2015-04-01

    Despite the prevalence of thin section analysis in studies of Quaternary sediments, there are limitations associated with the production of thin sections (sediment modification) and the inherently 2D view that a thin section affords. Non-destructive and rapid scanning technologies such as X-ray computed microtomography (μCT) enable material samples to be visualised and analysed in 3D. In a Quaternary context, however, such techniques are in their infancy. This paper assesses the optimum approach to μCT analysis of Quaternary sediments, applying the method on Lateglacial glaciolacustrine varves from Glen Roy, Scotland. Scan datasets are examined at each stage of the thin section process and comparisons are made between 2D μCT images and thin sections for the recognition of 2D sediment features, with further appraisal of 3D models to identify 3D sediment structures. Comparable sediment features are observed in 2D μCT images and thin sections, however, the μCT imaging resolution determines the precision of microfacies descriptions. Additional 3D structures are distinguished from volumetric models that are otherwise impossible to identify in thin section slides. These 3D structures can locally alter sediment properties (e.g. layer thickness) as seen in 2D thin sections and/or digital images, although such variation cannot be detected with these media. It has been demonstrated that clear benefits exist in understanding the 3D structure of Quaternary sediments, both prior to thin-sectioning to avoid complicating (e.g. deformation) structures, and after thin-sectioning to establish the complex 3D context of 2D datasets. It is recommended that μCT and thin section techniques are applied in parallel in future studies, which will profit from the integration of 'true' 3D data. It is also advised that samples are scanned soon after field sampling, due to the significant modification of in situ sediment structures that can occur during thin section processing.

  16. Comparison of CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography in the diagnosis of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Miabi, Zinat; Pourfathi, Hojjat; Midia, Mehran; Midia, Ramin; Parvizi, Rezayat

    2011-01-01

    There are several methods for the diagnosis and evaluation of coarctation of the aorta. Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) is the standard detection method, though it entails complications and side-effects. The aim of the present study was to compare Computed Tomography (CT) angiography with DSA for diagnosing aortic coarctation. We performed a cross-sectional study of 15 patients (11 males and four females aged between two and 30 years) referred to Tabriz Shahid Madani Hospital and Imaging Center between August 2005 and February 2006 with suspected aortic coarctation. All patients were subjected to DSA and CT angiography for diagnosis of aortic coarctation. The mean age of the patients was 14.6 years; 11 were male (74.4%) and four (26.6%) were female. The DSA and CT angiography results were comparable in all patients in terms of diagnosis and the detection of complications, particularly cardiovascular complications. However, CT angiography was less time-consuming to perform than DSA (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, CT angiography, comparableto DSA, diagnosed coarctation of aorta in all the patients. However, CT angiography is a non-invasive, cost effective procedure that takes significantly less time to carry out than DSA. Therefore, CT angiography is recommended as an appropriate method for diagnosing the coarctation of aorta.

  17. Comparison of two respiration monitoring systems for 4D imaging with a Siemens CT using a new dynamic breathing phantom.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, A C; Runz, A; Echner, G; Sroka-Perez, G; Karger, C P

    2012-05-07

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) requires breathing information from the patient, and for this, several systems are available. Testing of these systems, under realistic conditions, requires a phantom with a moving target and an expandable outer contour. An anthropomorphic phantom was developed to simulate patient breathing as well as lung tumor motion. Using the phantom, an optical camera system (GateCT) and a pressure sensor (AZ-733V) were simultaneously operated, and 4D-CTs were reconstructed with a Siemens CT using the provided local-amplitude-based sorting algorithm. The comparison of the tumor trajectories of both systems revealed discrepancies up to 9.7 mm. Breathing signal differences, such as baseline drift, temporal resolution and noise level were shown not to be the reason for this. Instead, the variability of the sampling interval and the accuracy of the sampling rate value written on the header of the GateCT-signal file were identified as the cause. Interpolation to regular sampling intervals and correction of the sampling rate to the actual value removed the observed discrepancies. Consistently, the introduction of sampling interval variability and inaccurate sampling rate values into the header of the AZ-733V file distorted the tumor trajectory for this system. These results underline the importance of testing new equipment thoroughly, especially if components of different manufacturers are combined.

  18. Comparison of CT and dual-energy DEXA using a modified trunk compartment in the measurement of abdominal fat.

    PubMed

    Lane, James T; Mack-Shipman, Lynn R; Anderson, Joseph C; Moore, Timothy E; Erickson, Judi M; Ford, Timothy C; Stoner, Julie A; Larsen, Jennifer L

    2005-08-01

    The quantification of abdominal fat is a marker of health risk. While dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) is easily applied, it measures overall fat, although abdominal fat may be a better indicator of health risk from obesity. We have evaluated whether a subcomponent of DEXA measurements correlates better with computed tomography (CT) for body fat than those traditionally used. Forty-seven healthy adults (22 M/25 F), aged 54.5+/-15.8 yr (mean+/-SD), with BMI of 27.1+/-4.6 kg/m2 participated in a cross-sectional study. Body fat was measured using abdominal CT and DEXA for total fat, trunk fat, and a modified trunk measurement that excludes the chest, termed "lower trunk," and compared. The coefficient of variation for DEXA measurements for trunk, lower trunk, and total body were 1.98, 3.12, and 0.85%, respectively. Mean DEXA for percentage fat ranged from 31.7% to 34.1% for trunk, lower trunk, and total body, compared to 54.2% for abdominal CT (p<0.003 for each pairwise comparison). Lower trunk, whole trunk, and total body DEXA measurements were not different. Measurement of subcomponents of fat content by DEXA is not superior to whole body measurements and remains consistently lower than measurements by CT.

  19. Louisiana farm discussion: 8 foot row spacing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This year several tests in growers’ fields were used to compare traditional 6-foot row spacing to 8-foot row spacing. Cane is double-drilled in the wider row spacing. The wider row spacing would accommodate John Deere 3522 harvester. Field data indicate the sugarcane yields are very comparable in 8-...

  20. Diagnostic performance of combined noninvasive coronary angiography and myocardial perfusion imaging using 320 row detector computed tomography: design and implementation of the CORE320 multicenter, multinational diagnostic study.

    PubMed

    Vavere, Andrea L; Simon, Gregory G; George, Richard T; Rochitte, Carlos E; Arai, Andrew E; Miller, Julie M; Di Carli, Marcello; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Zadeh, Armin A; Dewey, Marc; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Laham, Roger; Rybicki, Frank J; Schuijf, Joanne D; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; Kuribyashi, Sachio; Sakuma, Hajime; Nomura, Cesar; Yaw, Tan Swee; Kofoed, Klaus F; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Clouse, Melvin E; Brinker, Jeffrey; Cox, Christopher; Lima, Joao A C

    2011-01-01

    Multidetector coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) is a promising modality for widespread clinical application because of its noninvasive nature and high diagnostic accuracy as found in previous studies using 64 to 320 simultaneous detector rows. It is, however, limited in its ability to detect myocardial ischemia. In this article, we describe the design of the CORE320 study ("Combined coronary atherosclerosis and myocardial perfusion evaluation using 320 detector row computed tomography"). This prospective, multicenter, multinational study is unique in that it is designed to assess the diagnostic performance of combined 320-row CTA and myocardial CT perfusion imaging (CTP) in comparison with the combination of invasive coronary angiography and single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI). The trial is being performed at 16 medical centers located in 8 countries worldwide. CT has the potential to assess both anatomy and physiology in a single imaging session. The co-primary aim of the CORE320 study is to define the per-patient diagnostic accuracy of the combination of coronary CTA and myocardial CTP to detect physiologically significant coronary artery disease compared with (1) the combination of conventional coronary angiography and SPECT-MPI and (2) conventional coronary angiography alone. If successful, the technology could revolutionize the management of patients with symptomatic CAD.

  1. Percutaneous Transthoracic Lung Biopsy: Comparison Between C-Arm Cone-Beam CT and Conventional CT Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yun-Chung; Tsai, Sheng-Heng; Cheng, Yuchi; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chai, Jyh-Wen; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a comparatively novel modality for guiding percutaneous transthoracic lung biopsies (PTLBs), and despite its potential advantages over conventional computed tomography (CCT), a head-to-head comparison of the two techniques has yet to be reported in the literature. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic value and safety of CBCT-guided PTLB compared to CCT-guided biopsy, with cases performed in a single hospital. METHODS: A total of 104 PTLB patients were retrospectively analyzed in this study. 35 PTLBs were performed under CBCT guidance, and 69 PTLBs were performed under CCT guidance. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for malignancy as well as procedure time, radiation dose of patients, and complication rate in the two groups were compared. RESULTS: Total procedure time was significantly lower in the CBCT group (32 ± 11 minutes) compared to the CCT group (38 ± 9.7 minutes; P = .009), especially among patients ≥ 70 years of age (CBCT: 33 ± 12 minutes, CCT: 42 ± 13, P = .022). For lesions in the lower lobes, the CBCT-guided group received significantly reduced effective radiation dose (2.9 ± 1.6 mSv) than CCT-guided patients (3.7 ± 0.80; P = .042). Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for malignancy were comparable between the two groups, as were post-biopsy complication rates. CONCLUSION: CBCT guidance significantly reduces the procedure time and radiation exposure for PTLBs compared with CCT, and should be considered in clinical settings that may be difficult or time-consuming to perform under CCT. PMID:26310371

  2. Comparison of CT and MRI in Diagnosis of Laryngeal Carcinoma with Anterior Vocal Commissure Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-hui; Zhao, Jing; Li, Zeng-hong; Yang, Wei-qiang; Liu, Qi-hong; Yang, Zhi-yun; Liao, Bing; Li, Xiao-ling; Wang, Bin; Qin, Hao; Luo, Jie; Lv, Ke-xing; Wen, Wei-ping; Lei, Wen-bin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the accuracy of CT and MRI in determining the invasion of thyroid cartilage by and the T staging of laryngeal carcinoma with anterior vocal commissure (AVC) involvement. A total of 26 cases of laryngeal carcinomas with AVC involvement from May 2012 to January 2014 underwent enhanced CT and MRI scan, out of whom 6 patients also underwent diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging(DWI). T staging and thyroid cartilage involvement were evaluated. All the surgical specimens underwent serial section and were reviewed by two senior pathologists independently. When compared with pathologic staging, the accuracy was 88.46% (23/26) of MRI scan (with a 95% confidence interval 37~77%) and 57.69% (15/26) of CT scan (with a 95% confidence interval 70~98%), respectively (P < 0.01). We also reported three cases who were misdiagnosed on CT or MRI about either the thyroid cartilage was involved or not, and one case of preliminary study of DWI. Compared to CT, MRI exhibited a higher accuracy rate on T staging of laryngeal carcinomas with AVC involvement. Combined utility of CT and MRI could help improve the accuracy of assessment of thyroid cartilage involvement and T staging of laryngeal carcinomas with AVC involvement. PMID:27480073

  3. Use of CT to reduce understaging in prostatic cancer: comparison with conventional staging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Emory, T.H.; Reinke, D.B.; Hill, A.L.; Lange, P.H.

    1983-08-01

    Thirty prostatic cancer patients were evaluated for staging purposes with both CT (18-sec scan speed) and certain commonly used conventional diagnostic tests, namely: radionuclide bone scan with correlative plain films, the prostatic fraction of the serum acid phosphatase, excretory urogram, and chest radiograph. All patients included in the study had histopathologic proof of diagnosis. CT correctly identified extracapsular prostatic cancer spread locally or in pelvic lymph nodes in 14% of patients with completely negative conventional studies. Sensitivity of extracapsular tumor spread detection increased from 41% to 59% by adding CT to the conventional studies. CT confirmed the presence of tumor spread and localized it in 43% of patients with positive conventional studies. Conventional studies were positive when tumor spread was present in 32% of patients with negative CT. CT reduces understaging when conventional tests are negative, localizes and conforms tumor spread when conventional tests are positive, but cannot demonstrate tumor spread in some patients whose conventional tests are positive and who are subsequently shown to have tumor spread histopathologically.

  4. Localized Prostate Cancer Detection with 18F FACBC PET/CT: Comparison with MR Imaging and Histopathologic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Esther; Shih, Joanna; Pinto, Peter A.; Merino, Maria J.; Lindenberg, Maria L.; Bernardo, Marcelino; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Adler, Stephen; Owenius, Rikard; Choyke, Peter L.; Kurdziel, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize uptake of 1-amino-3-fluorine 18-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (18F FACBC) in patients with localized prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and normal prostate tissue and to evaluate its potential utility in delineation of intraprostatic cancers in histopathologically confirmed localized prostate cancer in comparison with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study. Twenty-one men underwent dynamic and static abdominopelvic 18F FACBC combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) and multiparametric (MP) 3-T endorectal MR imaging before robotic-assisted prostatectomy. PET/CT and MR images were coregistered by using pelvic bones as fiducial markers; this was followed by manual adjustments. Whole-mount histopathologic specimens were sliced with an MR-based patient-specific mold. 18F FACBC PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) were compared with those at MR imaging and histopathologic analysis for lesion- and sector-based (20 sectors per patient) analysis. Positive and negative predictive values for each modality were estimated by using generalized estimating equations with logit link function and working independence correlation structure. Results 18F FACBC tumor uptake was rapid but reversible. It peaked 3.6 minutes after injection and reached a relative plateau at 15–20 minutes (SUVmax[15–20min]). Mean prostate tumor SUVmax(15–20min) was significantly higher than that of the normal prostate (4.5 ± 0.5 vs 2.7 ± 0.5) (P < .001); however, it was not significantly different from that of BPH (4.3 ± 0.6) (P = .27). Sector-based comparison with histopathologic analysis, including all tumors, revealed sensitivity and specificity of 67% and 66%, respectively, for 18F FACBC PET/CT and 73% and 79%, respectively, for T2-weighted MR imaging. 18F FACBC PET/CT and MP MR

  5. A Comparison of daily megavoltage CT and ultrasound image guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Cheng; Kainz, Kristofer; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen

    2008-12-15

    In order to quantify the differences between ultrasound-imaging and megavoltage-CT (MVCT) daily prostate localization in prostate-cancer radiotherapy and their dosimetric impacts, daily shifts were analyzed for a total of 140 prostate cancer patients; 106 positioned using ultrasound-based imaging [B-mode Acquisition and Targeting (BAT)], and 34 using the MVCT from a TomoTherapy Hi-Art unit. The shifts indicated by the two systems were compared statistically along the right/left (R/L), superior/inferior (S/I), and anterior/posterior (A/P) directions. The systematic and random variations among the daily alignments were calculated. Margins to account for these shifts were estimated. The mean shifts and standard deviations along the R/L, S/I, and A/P directions were -0.11{+-}3.80, 0.67{+-}4.67, and 2.71{+-}6.31 mm for BAT localizations and -0.98{+-}5.13, 0.27{+-}3.35, and 1.00{+-}4.22 mm for MVCT localizations, respectively. The systematic and random variations in daily shifts based on MVCT were generally smaller than those based on BAT, especially along the A/P direction. A t-test showed this difference to be statistically significant. The planning target volume margins in the A/P direction estimated to account for daily variations were 8.81 and 14.66 mm based on MVCT and BAT data, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the daily prostate movement pattern between the first few fractions and the remaining fractions. Dosimetric comparison of MVCT and BAT prostate alignments was performed for seven fractions from a patient. The degradation from the plan caused by the MVCT alignment is trivial, while that by BAT is substantial. The MVCT technique results in smaller variations in daily shifts than ultrasound imaging, indicating that MVCT is more reliable and precise for prostate localization. Ultrasound-based localization may overestimate the daily prostate motion, particularly in the A/P direction, negatively impacting prostate dose coverage

  6. Iofetamine HCI I-123 brain scanning in stroke: a comparison with transmission CT

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.H.; Madsen, M.T.; McLellan, T.; Schwartzman, R.J.

    1988-03-01

    Although IMP scans fail to show fine anatomical details of the brain, because of poor resolution of a single head rotational system, adequate information is offered by the scans to localize most perfusion defects caused by stroke. The following conclusions can be drawn from our study: 1. The planar IMP brain scans processed through the computer are sensitive in the early diagnosis of acute stroke except for small and deeply localized lesions. 2. The SPECT IMP imaging is more sensitive than the planar or transmission CT scans in the early diagnosis of stroke. Semiquantitative evaluations are feasible with IMP SPECT. 3. Neither transmission CT nor IMP SPECT are sensitive in the detection of acute lacunar infarcts. 4. In acute infarction, the transmission CT is usually negative or minimally positive in the early stages, while impaired uptake of IMP occurs immediately after the onset of the stroke. In acute stroke, the extent of the perfusion defect on IMP is usually greater than the abnormality seen on the transmission CT. 5. On followup studies, IMP scans show improved perfusion reflecting physiologic changes, while transmission CT scans show further dense anatomical changes when compared to the initial studies. 6. Hyperemic changes are likely due to collateral circulation or luxury perfusion. This finding suggests that the IMP reflects local cerebral blood flow in strokes.

  7. A quantitative comparison of micro-CT preparations in Dipteran flies

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Peter; Wicklein, Martina; Sykes, Dan; Ahmed, Farah; Krapp, Holger G.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray-based 3D-imaging techniques have gained fundamental significance in research areas ranging from taxonomy to bioengineering. There is demand for the characterisation of species-specific morphological adaptations, micro-CTCT) being the method of choice in small-scale animals. This has driven the development of suitable staining techniques to improve absorption-based tissue contrast. A quantitative account on the limits of current staining protocols for preparing μCT specimen, however, is still missing. Here we present a study that quantifies results obtained by combining a variety of different contrast agents and fixative treatments that provides general guidance for μCT applications, particularly suitable for insect species. Using a blowfly model system (Calliphora), we enhanced effective spatial resolution and, in particular, optimised tissue contrast enabling semi-automated segmentation of soft and hard tissue from μCT data. We introduce a novel probabilistic measure of the contrast between tissues: PTC. Our results show that a strong iodine solution provides the greatest overall increase in tissue contrast, however phosphotungstic acid offers better inter-tissue discriminability. We further show that using paraformaldehyde as a fixative as opposed to ethanol, slows down the uptake of a staining solution by approximately a factor of two. PMID:28000717

  8. Comparison of CT and MRI brain tumor imaging using a canine glioma model.

    PubMed

    Whelan, H T; Clanton, J A; Wilson, R E; Tulipan, N B

    1988-01-01

    A canine gliosarcoma model was used to study the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast enhancement in defining the histologic margins of brain tumors. The effectiveness of this technique was compared to conventional computed tomography (CT) using iodinated contrast enhancement. Cultured canine gliosarcoma cells were injected into the left hemisphere of adult mongrel dogs. The dogs developed brain tumors and progressive clinical signs. Serial MRI with and without gadolinium diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid was compared to serial CT with and without sodium iothalamate obtained on the same days. After the final scans, animals were sacrificed; the brains were removed and processed for routine histopathologic study. All tumors were visualized with contrast-enhanced MRI which proved most sensitive. Gadolinium di-ethylene triamine penta-acetic acid caused bright enhancement of tumors in a distribution that consistently corresponded to areas of pathologically proved tumor infiltration. Gross and microscopic autopsy findings correlated better with MRI than with CT which tended to produce poorer resolution and underrepresent the size of viable tumor. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is more accurate than unenhanced MRI, unenhanced CT, or enhanced CT in defining the histologic margins of tumors.

  9. Performance comparison between static and dynamic cardiac CT on perfusion quantitation and patient classification tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac CT acquisitions for perfusion assessment can be performed in a dynamic or static mode. In this simulation study, we evaluate the relative classification and quantification performance of these modes for assessing myocardial blood flow (MBF). In the dynamic method, a series of low dose cardiac CT acquisitions yields data on contrast bolus dynamics over time; these data are fit with a model to give a quantitative MBF estimate. In the static method, a single CT acquisition is obtained, and the relative CT numbers in the myocardium are used to infer perfusion states. The static method does not directly yield a quantitative estimate of MBF, but these estimates can be roughly approximated by introducing assumed linear relationships between CT number and MBF, consistent with the ways such images are typically visually interpreted. Data obtained by either method may be used for a variety of clinical tasks, including 1) stratifying patients into differing categories of ischemia and 2) using the quantitative MBF estimate directly to evaluate ischemic disease severity. Through simulations, we evaluate the performance on each of these tasks. The dynamic method has very low bias in MBF estimates, making it particularly suitable for quantitative estimation. At matched radiation dose levels, ROC analysis demonstrated that the static method, with its high bias but generally lower variance, has superior performance in stratifying patients, especially for larger patients.

  10. Comparison of CT and angiography in assessing resectability of pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jafri, S.Z.H.; Aisen, A.M.; Glazer, G.M.; Weiss, C.A.

    1984-03-01

    A retrospective study of 27 patients with pancreatic carcinoma compared computed tomography (CT) and angiography in their ability to predict resectability of the neoplasm, using encasement of the splanchnic vessels as the criterion for nonresectability. Five patients had resectable tumor at surgery; the other 22 had unresectable disease. Tumor involvement of the splanchnic vessels was determined in 18 patients by CT examination and in 19 patients by angiography. Several other patients were found to have liver metastases, resulting in a radiologic diagnosis of nonresectability in 20 patients overall. All patients considered to have unresectable disease on the basis of either radiologic method proved to have unresectable tumor at surgery. CT is about as accurate as angiography in assessing resectability of pancreatic carcinoma.

  11. Sixteen-row multislice computed tomography: basic concepts, protocols, and enhanced clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Cademartiri, Filippo; Luccichenti, Giacomo; van Der Lugt, Aad; Pavone, Paolo; Pattynama, Peter M; de Feyter, Pim J; Krestin, Gabriel P

    2004-02-01

    Since its introduction, spiral computed tomography (CT) technology underwent a continuous and fast technical and clinical development. In particular, spatial and temporal resolutions were constantly increased during the last decade. The main breakthrough for clinical application was the introduction of multislice technology, first with 2-row and 4-row equipment and more recently with 16-row scanners. A high-resolution sub-millimeter CT dataset can be acquired easily, although with an increased x-ray exposure for the patient. The high speed of the scan requires up-to-date and careful protocol optimization. Scanner technology and geometry affect image formation procedure and imaging protocols should be adapted accordingly. The technical foundations of spiral CT imaging and the main scan and reconstruction parameters are described in this article. Updated protocols and clinical examples of the latest applications are also discussed.

  12. Alcoholic Women on Skid Row.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sandra C.

    1987-01-01

    Examined women (N=20) who were receiving alcoholism treatment in the skid-row area of Portland, Oregon. Women had histories of problem drinking and extensive treatment for alcoholism. Most had been married and had children. Despite transiency, the majority maintained contact with friends and relatives. Compared these women to New York City's…

  13. Acceptance of Combined Coronary CT Angiography and Myocardial CT Perfusion versus Conventional Coronary Angiography in Patients with Coronary Stents—Intraindividual Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Martus, Peter; Laule, Michael; Dewey, Marc; Schönenberger, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate how well patients with coronary stents accept combined coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) compared with conventional coronary angiography (CCA). Background While combined CTA and CTP may improve diagnostic accuracy compared with CTA alone, patient acceptance of CTA/CTP remains to be defined. Methods A total of 90 patients with coronary stents prospectively underwent CTA/CTP (both with contrast agent, CTP with adenosine) and CCA as part of the CARS-320 study. In this group, an intraindividual comparison of patient acceptance of CTA, CTP, and CCA was performed. Results CTP was experienced to be significantly more painful than CTA (p<0.001) and was associated with a higher frequency of dyspnea (p<0.001). Comparison of CTA/CTP with CCA revealed no significant differences in terms of pain (p = 0.141) and comfort (p = 0.377). Concern before CTA/CTP and CCA and overall satisfaction were likewise not significantly different (p = 0.097 and p = 0.123, respectively). Nevertheless, about two thirds (n = 60, 68%) preferred CTA/CTP to CCA (p<0.001). Moreover, patients felt less helpless during CTA/CTP than during CCA (p = 0.026). Lack of invasiveness and absence of pain were the most frequently mentioned advantages of CTA/CTP over CCA in our patient population. Conclusions CCA and combined CTA/CTP are equally well accepted by patients; however, more patients prefer CTA/CTP. CTP was associated with more intense pain than CTA and more frequently caused dyspnea than CTA alone. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00967876 PMID:26327127

  14. Chest CT Features of Cystic Fibrosis in Korea: Comparison with Non-Cystic Fibrosis Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, So Yeon; Cha, Min Jae; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Tae Sung; Yoon, Hyun Jung

    2017-01-01

    Objective Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a rare congenital disease in Korea, and its clinical and imaging findings are unclear. The objective of our study was to describe the clinical and CT features of CF in Korea and compare its features with those of other diseases mimicking CF. Materials and Methods From November 1994 to December 2014, a presumptive diagnosis of CF was made in 23 patients based on clinical or radiological examination. After the exclusion of 10 patients without diagnostic confirmation, 13 patients were included in the study. A diagnosis of CF was made with the CF gene study. CT findings were evaluated for the presence and distribution of parenchymal abnormalities including bronchiectasis, tree-in-bud (TIB) pattern, mucus plugging, consolidation, and mosaic attenuation. Results Of the 13 patients, 7 (median age, 15 years) were confirmed as CF, 4 (median age, 19 years) had primary ciliary dyskinesia, 1 had bronchiectasis of unknown cause, and 1 had chronic asthma. CT of patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging in all patients, with upper lung predominance (57%). In CT of the non-CF patients, bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging were also predominant features, with lower lung predominance (50%). Conclusion Korean patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, cellular bronchiolitis, mucus plugging, and mosaic attenuation, which overlapped with those of non-CF patients. CF gene study is recommended for the definitive diagnosis of CF in patients with these clinical and imaging features. PMID:28096734

  15. Mucinous versus nonmucinous solitary pulmonary nodular bronchioloalveolar carcinoma: CT and FDG PET findings and pathologic comparisons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Yun; Lee, Kyung Soo; Han, Joungho; Kim, Byung-Tae; Cho, Young-Seok; Shim, Young Mog; Kim, Jhingook

    2009-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate the CT, PET, and pathologic findings of solitary pulmonary nodular mucinous and nonmucinous bronchioloalveolar carcinomas (BACs). From August 2003 to March 2008, we saw 24 patients with solitary pulmonary nodular mucinous (n=6) or nonmucinous (n=18) BACs that were resected. CT and PET findings of the lesions were assessed in terms of size, solidity, morphologic characteristics, attenuation and maximum standardized uptake value (mSUV). All nonmucinous BACs appeared as a pure ground-glass opacity (GGO) nodule, whereas mucinous BACs appeared as solid (n=4) or part-solid (n=2) nodules. CT attenuation values were significantly higher for mucinous BACs (-21.0 HU+/-4.9) than for nonmucinous BACs (-491.8 HU+/-172.5) (P<.001). Mean mSUVs were 2.3+/-1.9 for mucinous BACs and 0.5+/-0.8 for nonmucinous BACs (P=.007), but mSUVs were not statistically different after size adjustment (r=0.371, P=.081). Mucinous BACs appear as solid or part-solid nodules at CT, whereas nonmucinous BACs present as pure GGO nodules. Both subtypes of tumors show scant FDG uptake at PET.

  16. Comparison of SNOMED CT versus Medcin Terminology Concept Coverage for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Montella, Diane; Brown, Steven H.; Elkin, Peter L.; Jackson, James C.; Rosenbloom, S. Trent; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind; Welsh, Gail; Cotton, Bryan; Guillamondegui, Oscar D.; Lew, Henry; Taber, Katherine H.; Tupler, Larry A.; Vanderploeg, Rodney; Speroff, Theodore

    2011-01-01

    Background: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a “signature” injury of the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Structured electronic data regarding TBI findings is important for research, population health and other secondary uses but requires appropriate underlying standard terminologies to ensure interoperability and reuse. Currently the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) uses the terminology SNOMED CT and the Department of Defense (DOD) uses Medcin. Methods: We developed a comprehensive case definition of mild TBI composed of 68 clinical terms. Using automated and manual techniques, we evaluated how well the mild TBI case definition terms could be represented by SNOMED CT and Medcin, and compared the results. We performed additional analysis stratified by whether the concepts were rated by a TBI expert panel as having High, Medium, or Low importance to the definition of mild TBI. Results: SNOMED CT sensitivity (recall) was 90% overall for coverage of mild TBI concepts, and Medcin sensitivity was 49%, p < 0.001 (using McNemar’s chi square). Positive predictive value (precision) for each was 100%. SNOMED CT outperformed Medcin for concept coverage independent of import rating by our TBI experts. Discussion: SNOMED CT was significantly better able to represent mild TBI concepts than Medcin. This finding may inform data gathering, management and sharing, and data exchange strategies between the VA and DOD for active duty soldiers and veterans with mild TBI. Since mild TBI is an important condition in the civilian population as well, the current study results may be useful also for the general medical setting. PMID:22195156

  17. Mechanical performance of aquatic rowing and flying.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J A; Westneat, M W

    2000-01-01

    Aquatic flight, performed by rowing or flapping fins, wings or limbs, is a primary locomotor mechanism for many animals. We used a computer simulation to compare the mechanical performance of rowing and flapping appendages across a range of speeds. Flapping appendages proved to be more mechanically efficient than rowing appendages at all swimming speeds, suggesting that animals that frequently engage in locomotor behaviours that require energy conservation should employ a flapping stroke. The lower efficiency of rowing appendages across all speeds begs the question of why rowing occurs at all. One answer lies in the ability of rowing fins to generate more thrust than flapping fins during the power stroke. Large forces are necessary for manoeuvring behaviours such as accelerations, turning and braking, which suggests that rowing should be found in slow-swimming animals that frequently manoeuvre. The predictions of the model are supported by observed patterns of behavioural variation among rowing and flapping vertebrates. PMID:11052539

  18. Comparison of two types of adult phantoms in terms of organ doses from diagnostic CT procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haikuan; Gu, Jianwei; Caracappa, Peter F.; Xu, X. George

    2010-03-01

    The rapidly increasing number of diagnostic computed tomography (CT) procedures in the recent decades has spurred heightened concern over the potential risk to patients. Although an accurate organ dose assessment tool has now become highly desirable, existing software packages depend on stylized computational phantoms that were originally developed more than 40 years ago, exhibiting very large discrepancies when compared with phantoms that are anatomically realistic. However, past comparative studies did not focus on CT protocols for adult patients. This study was designed to quantitatively compare two types of phantoms, the stylized phantoms and a pair of recently developed RPI-adult male and adult female (RPI-AM and RPI-AF) phantoms, for various CT scanning protocols involving the chest, abdomen-pelvis and chest-abdomen-pelvis. Organ doses were based on Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNPX code and a detailed CT scanner model for the GE LightSpeed 16. Results are presented as ratios of organ doses from the stylized phantoms to those from the RPI phantoms. It is found that, for most organs contained in the scan volume, the ratios were within the range of 0.75-1.16. However, the stomach doses are significantly different and the ratio is found to be up to 1.86 in male phantoms and 2.29 in the female phantoms due to the anatomical differences between the two types of phantoms. Organs that lie near a scan boundary also exhibit a significant relative difference in organ doses between the two types of phantoms. This study concludes that, due to relatively low x-ray energies, CT doses are very sensitive to organ shape, size and position, and thus anatomically realistic phantoms should be used to avoid the dose uncertainties caused by the lack of anatomical realism. The new phantoms, such as the RPI-AM and AF phantoms that are designed using advanced surface meshes, are deformable and will make it possible to match the anatomy of a specific patient leading to further

  19. Comparison of DCE-CT models for quantitative evaluation of Ktrans in larynx tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterbroek, J.; Bennink, E.; Philippens, M. E. P.; Raaijmakers, C. P. J.; Viergever, M. A.; de Jong, H. W. A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) can be used to estimate blood perfusion and vessel permeability in tumors. Tumor induced angiogenesis is generally associated with disorganized microvasculature with increased permeability or leakage. Estimated vascular leakage (Ktrans) values and their reliability greatly depend on the perfusion model used. To identify the preferred model for larynx tumor analysis, several perfusion models frequently used for estimating permeability were compared in this study. DCE-CT scans were acquired for 16 larynx cancer patients. Larynx tumors were delineated based on whole-mount histopathology after laryngectomy. DCE-CT data within these delineated volumes were analyzed using the Patlak and Logan plots, the Extended Tofts Model (ETM), the Adiabatic Approximation to the Tissue Homogeneity model (AATH) and a variant of AATH with fixed transit time (AATHFT). Akaike’s Information Criterion (AIC) was used to identify the best fitting model. Ktrans values from all models were compared with this best fitting model. Correlation strength was tested with two-tailed Spearman’s rank correlation and further examined using Bland-Altman plots. AATHFT was found to be the best fitting model. The overall median of individual patient medians Ktrans estimates were 14.3, 15.1, 16.1, 2.6 and 22.5 mL/100 g min  -  1 for AATH, AATHFT, ETM, Patlak and Logan, respectively. Ktrans estimates for all models except Patlak were strongly correlated (P  <  0.001). Bland-Altman plots show large biases but no significant deviating trend for any model other than Patlak. AATHFT was found to be the preferred model among those tested for estimation of Ktrans in larynx tumors.

  20. The relevance of MRI for patient modeling in head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: A comparison of CT and CT-MRI based tissue segmentation on simulated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaart, René F. Paulides, Margarethus M.; Fortunati, Valerio; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F.; Lugt, Aad van der

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, head and neck (H and N) hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is solely based on computed tomography (CT) images. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior soft-tissue contrast over CT. The purpose of the authors’ study is to investigate the relevance of using MRI in addition to CT for patient modeling in H and N HTP. Methods: CT and MRI scans were acquired for 11 patients in an immobilization mask. Three observers manually segmented on CT, MRI T1 weighted (MRI-T1w), and MRI T2 weighted (MRI-T2w) images the following thermo-sensitive tissues: cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, myelum, sclera, lens, vitreous humor, and the optical nerve. For these tissues that are used for patient modeling in H and N HTP, the interobserver variation of manual tissue segmentation in CT and MRI was quantified with the mean surface distance (MSD). Next, the authors compared the impact of CT and CT and MRI based patient models on the predicted temperatures. For each tissue, the modality was selected that led to the lowest observer variation and inserted this in the combined CT and MRI based patient model (CT and MRI), after a deformable image registration. In addition, a patient model with a detailed segmentation of brain tissues (including white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) was created (CT and MRI{sub db}). To quantify the relevance of MRI based segmentation for H and N HTP, the authors compared the predicted maximum temperatures in the segmented tissues (T{sub max}) and the corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR) of the patient models based on (1) CT, (2) CT and MRI, and (3) CT and MRI{sub db}. Results: In MRI, a similar or reduced interobserver variation was found compared to CT (maximum of median MSD in CT: 0.93 mm, MRI-T1w: 0.72 mm, MRI-T2w: 0.66 mm). Only for the optical nerve the interobserver variation is significantly lower in CT compared to MRI (median MSD in CT: 0.58 mm, MRI-T1w: 1.27 mm, MRI-T2w: 1.40 mm

  1. Billet planting, 8-foot rows, residue updates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultural practices are continually tested and upgraded to maximize sugarcane yield in Louisiana. Over the past 3 years extensive research went in to comparing the industry standard 6-foot row spacing to a wider, 8 foot row. Each 8 foot row was double drilled with seed canes that were 2-3 feet apart....

  2. CT and MR findings of Krukenberg tumors: Comparison with primary ovarian tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seung Hyup; Kim, Won Hong; Park, Kyung Joo

    1996-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the CT and MR findings of Krukenberg tumors and to compare them with those of primary ovarian tumors. This study included 20 patients with Krukenberg tumors and 65 patients with various primary ovarian tumors. CT/MR/both imaging studies were available in 15/1/4 patients with Krukenberg tumor and 31/10/24 patients with primary ovarian tumors, respectively. Imaging findings of the tumors were categorized into three subgroups: a solid mass with intratumoral cysts, a solid mass without intratumoral cysts, and a predominantly cystic mass. Among 32 Krukenberg tumors (bilateral in 12 patients), 22 were solid masses with intratumoral cysts, in 14 of which the wall of the intratumoral cysts showed apparently strong contrast enhancement on CT and/or MRI. Six Krukenberg tumors were solid masses without intratumoral cysts, and four were predominantly cystic masses. Imaging findings of 88 primary ovarian tumors (bilateral in 23 patients) were 5 solid masses with intratumoral cysts, 27 solid masses without intratumoral cysts, and 56 predominantly cystic masses. None of the five primary ovarian tumors with solid mass with intratumoral cysts demonstrated apparently strong contrast enhancement of the cyst wall. Krukenberg tumor should be suspected when one sees solid ovarian tumors containing well demarcated intratumoral cystic lesions, especially if the walls of those cysts demonstrate apparently strong contrast enhancement. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Comparison between clinical, ultrasound, CT, MRI, and pathology findings in dogs presented for suspected thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Taeymans, Olivier; Penninck, Dominique G; Peters, Rachel M

    2013-01-01

    This study compares clinical, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and pathology findings in 16 prospectively, and seven retrospectively recruited dogs presented for suspected thyroid carcinoma. Of these, 17 were confirmed thyroid carcinoma, while six were initially misdiagnosed. These included four carotid body tumors, one para-esophageal abscess, and one undifferentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Thyroid carcinomas occurred in older dogs without evidence of sex predilection, and were more often unilateral. All were large, heterogeneous, moderately to strongly vascularized, and most commonly contained areas of dystrophic mineralization and/or fluid accumulations. On MRI, thyroid carcinomas appeared hyperintense compared to surrounding musculature in all imaging sequences used, while on CT they had a lower attenuation value than normal thyroid gland tissue. Histologically confirmed tumor capsule disruption with invasion of the surrounding structures was most commonly detected with MRI. Palpation was not an accurate predictor of locally invasive vs. well-encapsulated masses. Computed tomography had the highest specificity (100%) and MRI had the highest sensitivity (93%) in diagnosing thyroid carcinoma, while ultrasound had considerably lower results. We conclude that ultrasound is adequate for use as a screening tool for dogs with suspected thyroid carcinoma, but recommend either CT or MRI for preoperative diagnosis and staging.

  4. Bilateral Second Carpal Row Duplication Associated with Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cladiere-Nassif, Victoire; Delaroche, Caroline; Pottier, Edwige; Feron, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 75-year-old woman presenting a hitherto undescribed condition of bilateral second carpal row duplication. She was diagnosed in childhood with both Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, with no clear evidence and no further medical follow-up. She presented throughout her life with various articular symptoms, which appeared to be compatible with a diagnosis of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, and underwent several surgical procedures on her knees and hips. Most recently, she was reporting pain at the base of the fifth metacarpal bone of the left hand. X-ray images and computed tomography (CT) were obtained for exploration and showed a total second row duplication in both carpi, with a total number of 18 carpal bones in each wrist. PMID:26649258

  5. A Comparison between 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging and Biological and Radiological Findings in Restaging of Hepatoblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Treglia, Giorgio; Pagano, Manuela; Fania, Piercarlo; Basso, Maria Eleonora; Fagioli, Franca; Ficola, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Background. In this study we retrospectively evaluated if 18F-FDG-PET/CT provided incremental diagnostic information over CI in a group of hepatoblastoma patients performing restaging. Procedure. Nine patients (mean age: 5.9 years; range: 3.1–12 years) surgically treated for hepatoblastoma were followed up by clinical examination, serum α-FP monitoring, and US. CI (CT or MRI) and PET/CT were performed in case of suspicion of relapse. Fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) were carried out for final confirmation if the results of CI, PET/CT, and/or α-FP levels were suggestive of relapse. PET/CT and CI findings were analyzed for comparison purposes, using FNAB as reference standard. Results. α-FP level was suggestive of disease recurrence in 8/9 patients. Biopsy was performed in 8/9 cases. CI and PET/CT resulted to be concordant in 5/9 patients (CI identified recurrence of disease, but 18F-FDG-PET/CT provided a better definition of disease extent); in 4/9 cases, CI diagnostic information resulted in negative findings, whereas PET/CT correctly detected recurrence of disease. 18F-FDG-PET/CT showed an agreement of 100% (8/8) with FNAB results. Conclusions. 18F-FDG-PET/CT scan seems to better assess HB patients with respect to CI and may provide incremental diagnostic value in the restaging of this group of patients. PMID:24063012

  6. MRI experience with multiple sclerosis - Comparison to CT and clinical status

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, L.; Carr, T.; Nicholson, R.L.

    1985-05-01

    A Multiple Sclerosis (M.S.) Protocol was set--SEB (1000/60) volume acquisition and selected single slices SEC (1000/120) and IR (1500/450). Single slices SE 500/30, 1500/30 and 1530/60 were obtained for T1 and T2 calculation. New software and coils permitted multi-slice multi-echo acquisition so the Protocol was changed to multi-slice multi-echo transaxial SE 2120/60-120, and the T1 and T2 sets. The study consisted of 62 known M.S. patients and 35 controls. Of the 62 M.S. patients, 58 (94%) were positive on NMR. Thirty-two of these patients had CT scans of which 17 (53%) were positive. Of the 35 controls, 2 were positive on NMR for a false positive rate of 6%. The relative sensitivity of NMR, Double Dose Delayed CT(DDD) and contrast CT in the clinically early progressive group is 87%, 60% and 45% respectively. In the chronic stable group, the sensitivity is 100% for NMR and 55% for DDD. The NMR lesions were graded on a scale of 1 - 4 and the authors found poor correlation with either duration of disease or Kurtzke Functional Scale. The T1, T2 values showed good differentiation between white matter and lesions, although differentiation between lesions and grey matter was poor. White matter has T1 of 328 +- 28 and T2 of 85 +- 22, grey matter T1 of 515 +- 37 and T2 of 96 +- 32 and lesions T1 of 530 +- 76 and T2 of 106 +- 27. They conclude that multi-slice SE 2120/60-120 NMR imaging has proven to be a valuable tool in the clinical diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis. Most of the lesions seen are asymptomatic and the number, size and distribution of lesions have little correlation with severity or acuity of the disease.

  7. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Zanca, F.; Jacobs, A.; Crijns, W.; De Wever, W.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure.

  8. Quantitative assessment of emphysema from whole lung CT scans: comparison with visual grading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Apanosovich, Tatiyana V.; Wang, Jianwei; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2009-02-01

    Emphysema is a disease of the lungs that destroys the alveolar air sacs and induces long-term respiratory dysfunction. CT scans allow for imaging of the anatomical basis of emphysema and for visual assessment by radiologists of the extent present in the lungs. Several measures have been introduced for the quantification of the extent of disease directly from CT data in order to add to the qualitative assessments made by radiologists. In this paper we compare emphysema index, mean lung density, histogram percentiles, and the fractal dimension to visual grade in order to evaluate the predictability of radiologist visual scoring of emphysema from low-dose CT scans through quantitative scores, in order to determine which measures can be useful as surrogates for visual assessment. All measures were computed over nine divisions of the lung field (whole lung, individual lungs, and upper/middle/lower thirds of each lung) for each of 148 low-dose, whole lung scans. In addition, a visual grade of each section was also given by an expert radiologist. One-way ANOVA and multinomial logistic regression were used to determine the ability of the measures to predict visual grade from quantitative score. We found that all measures were able to distinguish between normal and severe grades (p<0.01), and between mild/moderate and all other grades (p<0.05). However, no measure was able to distinguish between mild and moderate cases. Approximately 65% prediction accuracy was achieved from using quantitative score to predict visual grade, with 73% if mild and moderate cases are considered as a single class.

  9. A comparison of simulation tools for photon-counting spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasirudin, Radin A.; Penchev, Petar; Mei, Kai; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Fiebich, Martin; Noël, Peter B.

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting detectors (PCD) not only have the advantage of providing spectral information but also offer high quantum efficiencies, producing high image quality in combination with a minimal amount of radiation dose. Due to the clinical unavailability of photon-counting CT, the need to evaluate different CT simulation tools for researching different applications for photon-counting systems is essential. In this work, we investigate two different methods to simulate PCD data: Monte-Carlo based simulation (MCS) and analytical based simulation (AS). The MCS is a general-purpose photon transport simulation based on EGSnrc C++ class library. The AS uses analytical forward-projection in combination with additional acquisition parameters. MCS takes into account all physical effects, but is computationally expensive (several days per CT acquisition). AS is fast (several minutes), but lacks the accurateness of MCS with regard to physical interactions. To evaluate both techniques an entrance spectra of 100kvp, a modified CTP515 module of the CatPhan 600 phantom, and a detector system with six thresholds was simulated. For evaluation the simulated projection data are decomposed via a maximum likelihood technique, and reconstructed via standard filtered-back projection (FBP). Image quality from both methods is subjectively and objectively assessed. Visually, the difference in the image quality was not significant. When further evaluated, the relative difference was below 4%. As a conclusion, both techniques offer different advantages, while at different stages of development the accelerated calculations via AS can make a significant difference. For the future one could foresee a combined method to join accuracy and speed.

  10. Skeletal dosimetry based on µCT images of trabecular bone: update and comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, R.; Cassola, V. F.; Vieira, J. W.; Khoury, H. J.; de Oliveira Lira, C. A. B.; Robson Brown, K.

    2012-06-01

    Two skeletal dosimetry methods using µCT images of human bone have recently been developed: the paired-image radiation transport (PIRT) model introduced by researchers at the University of Florida (UF) in the US and the systematic-periodic cluster (SPC) method developed by researchers at the Federal University of Pernambuco in Brazil. Both methods use µCT images of trabecular bone (TB) to model spongiosa regions of human bones containing marrow cavities segmented into soft tissue volumes of active marrow (AM), trabecular inactive marrow and the bone endosteum (BE), which is a 50 µm thick layer of marrow on all TB surfaces and on cortical bone surfaces next to TB as well as inside the medullary cavities. With respect to the radiation absorbed dose, the AM and the BE are sensitive soft tissues for the induction of leukaemia and bone cancer, respectively. The two methods differ mainly with respect to the number of bone sites and the size of the µCT images used in Monte Carlo calculations and they apply different methods to simulate exposure from radiation sources located outside the skeleton. The PIRT method calculates dosimetric quantities in isolated human bones while the SPC method uses human bones embedded in the body of a phantom which contains all relevant organs and soft tissues. Consequently, the SPC method calculates absorbed dose to the AM and to the BE from particles emitted by radionuclides concentrated in organs or from radiation sources located outside the human body in one calculation step. In order to allow for similar calculations of AM and BE absorbed doses using the PIRT method, the so-called dose response functions (DRFs) have been developed based on absorbed fractions (AFs) of energy for electrons isotropically emitted in skeletal tissues. The DRFs can be used to transform the photon fluence in homogeneous spongiosa regions into absorbed dose to AM and BE. This paper will compare AM and BE AFs of energy from electrons emitted in skeletal

  11. A comparison of x-ray detectors for mouse CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goertzen, Andrew L.; Nagarkar, Vivek; Street, Robert A.; Paulus, Michael J.; Boone, John M.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2004-12-01

    There is significant interest in using computed tomography (CT) for in vivo imaging applications in mouse models of disease. Most commercially available mouse x-ray CT scanners utilize a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector coupled via fibre optic taper to a phosphor screen. However, there has been little research to determine if this is the optimum detector for the specific task of in vivo mouse imaging. To investigate this issue, we have evaluated four detectors, including an amorphous selenium (a-Se) detector, an amorphous silicon (a-Si) detector with a gadolinium oxysulphide (GOS) screen, a CCD with a 3:1 fibre taper and a GOS screen, and a CCD with a 2:1 fibre taper and both GOS and thallium-doped caesium iodide (CsI:Tl) screens. The detectors were evaluated by measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE), stability over multiple exposures, and noise in reconstructed CT images. The a-Se detector had the best MTF and the highest DQE (0.6 at 0 lp mm-1) but had the worst stability (45% reduction after 2000 exposure frames). The a-Si detector and the CCD with the 3:1 fibre, both of which used the GOS screen, had very similar performance with a DQE of approximately 0.30 at 0 lp mm-1. For the CCD with the 2:1 fibre, the CsI:Tl screen resulted in a nearly two-fold improvement in DQE over the GOS screen (0.4 versus 0.24 at 0 lp mm-1). The CCDs both had the best stability, with less than a 1% change in pixel values over multiple exposures. The pixel values of the a-Si detector increased 5% over multiple exposures due to the effects of image lag. Despite the higher DQE of the a-Se detector, the reconstructed CT images acquired with the a-Si detector had lower noise levels, likely due to the blurring effects from the phosphor screen.

  12. A comparison of x-ray detectors for mouse CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Goertzen, Andrew L; Nagarkar, Vivek; Street, Robert A; Paulus, Michael J; Boone, John M; Cherry, Simon R

    2004-12-07

    There is significant interest in using computed tomography (CT) for in vivo imaging applications in mouse models of disease. Most commercially available mouse x-ray CT scanners utilize a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector coupled via fibre optic taper to a phosphor screen. However, there has been little research to determine if this is the optimum detector for the specific task of in vivo mouse imaging. To investigate this issue, we have evaluated four detectors, including an amorphous selenium (a-Se) detector, an amorphous silicon (a-Si) detector with a gadolinium oxysulphide (GOS) screen, a CCD with a 3:1 fibre taper and a GOS screen, and a CCD with a 2:1 fibre taper and both GOS and thallium-doped caesium iodide (CsI:Tl) screens. The detectors were evaluated by measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE), stability over multiple exposures, and noise in reconstructed CT images. The a-Se detector had the best MTF and the highest DQE (0.6 at 0 lp mm(-1)) but had the worst stability (45% reduction after 2000 exposure frames). The a-Si detector and the CCD with the 3:1 fibre, both of which used the GOS screen, had very similar performance with a DQE of approximately 0.30 at 0 lp mm(-1). For the CCD with the 2:1 fibre, the CsI:Tl screen resulted in a nearly two-fold improvement in DQE over the GOS screen (0.4 versus 0.24 at 0 lp mm(-1)). The CCDs both had the best stability, with less than a 1% change in pixel values over multiple exposures. The pixel values of the a-Si detector increased 5% over multiple exposures due to the effects of image lag. Despite the higher DQE of the a-Se detector, the reconstructed CT images acquired with the a-Si detector had lower noise levels, likely due to the blurring effects from the phosphor screen.

  13. Performance comparison of two commercial BGO-based PET/CT scanners using NEMA NU 2-2001

    SciTech Connect

    Bolard, Gregory; Prior, John O.; Modolo, Luca; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Kosinski, Marek; Wastiel, Claude; Malterre, Jerome; Bulling, Shelley; Bochud, Francois; Verdun, Francis R.

    2007-07-15

    Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners play a major role in medicine for in vivo imaging in an increasing number of diseases in oncology, cardiology, neurology, and psychiatry. With the advent of short-lived radioisotopes other than {sup 18}F and newer scanners, there is a need to optimize radioisotope activity and acquisition protocols, as well as to compare scanner performances on an objective basis. The Discovery-LS (D-LS) was among the first clinical PET/CT scanners to be developed and has been extensively characterized with older National Electrical Manufacturer Association (NEMA) NU 2-1994 standards. At the time of publication of the latest version of the standards (NU 2-2001) that have been adapted for whole-body imaging under clinical conditions, more recent models from the same manufacturer, i.e., Discovery-ST (D-ST) and Discovery-STE (D-STE), were commercially available. We report on the full characterization both in the two- and three-dimensional acquisition mode of the D-LS according to latest NEMA NU 2-2001 standards (spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate performance, accuracy of count losses, and random coincidence correction and image quality), as well as a detailed comparison with the newer D-ST widely used and whose characteristics are already published.

  14. Performance comparison of two commercial BGO-based PET/CT scanners using NEMA NU 2-2001.

    PubMed

    Bolard, Grégory; Prior, John O; Modolo, Luca; Delaloye, Angelika Bischof; Kosinski, Marek; Wastiel, Claude; Malterre, Jérôme; Bulling, Shelley; Bochud, François; Verdun, Francis R

    2007-07-01

    Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners play a major role in medicine for in vivo imaging in an increasing number of diseases in oncology, cardiology, neurology, and psychiatry. With the advent of short-lived radioisotopes other than 18F and newer scanners, there is a need to optimize radioisotope activity and acquisition protocols, as well as to compare scanner performances on an objective basis. The Discovery-LS (D-LS) was among the first clinical PET/CT scanners to be developed and has been extensively characterized with older National Electrical Manufacturer Association (NEMA) NU 2-1994 standards. At the time of publication of the latest version of the standards (NU 2-2001) that have been adapted for whole-body imaging under clinical conditions, more recent models from the same manufacturer, i.e., Discovery-ST (D-ST) and Discovery-STE (D-STE), were commercially available. We report on the full characterization both in the two- and three-dimensional acquisition mode of the D-LS according to latest NEMA NU 2-2001 standards (spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate performance, accuracy of count losses, and random coincidence correction and image quality), as well as a detailed comparison with the newer D-ST widely used and whose characteristics are already published.

  15. Single-Row or Double-Row Fixation Technique for Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiaojiao; Yuan, Chaoqun; Chen, Kai; Cheng, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Background The single-row and double-row fixation techniques have been widely used for rotator cuff tears. However, whether the double-row technique produces superior clinical or anatomic outcomes is still considered controversial. This study aims to use meta-analysis to compare the clinical and anatomical outcomes between the two techniques. Methods The Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane library databases were searched for relevant studies published before November 1, 2012. Studies clearly reporting a comparison of the single-row and double-row techniques were selected. The Constant, ASES, and UCLA scale systems and the rotator cuff integrity rate were evaluated. The weighted mean differences and relative risks were calculated using a fixed-effects or random-effects model. Results Eight studies were included in this meta-analysis. The weighted mean differences of the ASES (−0.84; P = 0.04; I2 = 0%) and UCLA (−0.75; P = 0.007; I2 = 0%) scales were significantly low in the single-row group for full-thickness rotator cuff tears. For tear sizes smaller than 3 cm, no significant difference was found between the groups no matter in Constant (P = 0.95; I2 = 0%), ASES (P = 0.77; I2 = 0%), or UCLA (P = 0.24; I2 = 13%) scales. For tear sizes larger than 3 cm, the ASES (−1.95; P = 0.001; I2 = 49%) and UCLA (−1.17; P = 0.006; I2 = 0%) scales were markedly lower in the single-row group. The integrity of the rotator cuff (0.81; P = 0.0004; I2 = 10%) was greater and the partial thickness retear rate (1.93; P = 0.007; I2 = 10%) was less in the double-row group. Full-thickness retears showed no difference between the groups (P = 0.15; I2 = 0%). Conclusion The meta-analysis suggests that the double-row fixation technique increases post-operative rotator cuff integrity and improves the clinical outcomes, especially for full-thickness rotator cuff tears larger than 3 cm. For tear sizes smaller than 3 cm

  16. Hierarchical CT to Ultrasound Registration of the Lumbar Spine: A Comparison with Other Registration Methods.

    PubMed

    Koo, Terry K; Kwok, Wingchi Edmund

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) measurement of the spine can provide important information for functional, developmental, diagnostic, and treatment-effect evaluations. However, existing measurement techniques are either 2-dimensional, highly invasive, or involve a high radiation dose, prohibiting their widespread and repeated use in both research and clinical settings. Non-invasive, non-ionizing, 3D measurement of the spine is still beyond the current state-of-the-art. Towards this goal, we developed an intensity-based hierarchical CT-ultrasound registration approach to quantify the 3D positions and orientations of lumbar vertebrae from 3D freehand ultrasound and one-time computed tomography. The method was validated using a human dry bone specimen (T12-L5) and a porcine cadaver (L2-L6) by comparing the registration results with a gold standard fiducial-based registration. Mean (SD) target registration error and percentage of successful registration were 1.2 (0.6) mm and 100% for the human dry bone specimen, and 2.18 (0.82) mm and 92% for the porcine cadaver, indicating that the method is accurate and robust under clinically realistic conditions. Given that the use of ultrasound eliminates ionizing radiation during pose measurements, we believe that the hierarchical CT-ultrasound registration method is an attractive option for quantifying 3D poses of individual vertebra and motion segment, and thus warrants further investigations.

  17. Comparison of dose measurements in CT using a novel semiconductor detector and a small ion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Paschoal, Cinthia M. M.; Ferreira, Fernanda Carla L.; Santos, Luiz A. P.; Souza, Divanizia N.

    2015-07-01

    The advance of multislice computed tomography (CT) has become inadequate the currently dosimetric protocol used in CT. Instead of dosimetry based on the measurement of CTDI using a pencil ion chamber of 100 m of length, it was proposed the use of a small ion chamber (IC) and the calculating the dose equilibrium (Deq) at the location of the chamber. The objective of this work was to compare the performance of a short IC and a commercial photodiode to measure the accumulated dose at the center of the scan length L, DL(0), and to obtain the equilibrium dose Deq using the two detectors. The result for L=100 mm was compared with the result of a pencil chamber. The results indicate that the commercial photodiode is suitable to measure the accumulated dose at the center of the scan length L as compared with the ion chambers. This methodology allows measurements of the accumulated dose for any desired scan length, allowing measuring the equilibrium dose Deq if the phantom is long enough to allow it. (authors)

  18. Comparison of models and acquisition techniques for estimation of myocardial blood flow from CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, Adam M.; Branch, Kelley R.; Caldwell, James H.; Bassingthwaighte, James B.

    2011-03-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced CT has been successfully applied in cardiac imaging for the estimation of myocardial blood flow (MBF). In general, these acquisitions impart a relatively high radiation dose because they require continuous or gated imaging of the heart for 15-40 seconds. At present, there is no consensus on the appropriate estimation method to derive MBF and on the appropriate acquisition technique to minimize dose while maintaining MBF estimation accuracy and precision. This work explores the tradeoff of accuracy and precision of MBF estimates with several estimation methods and acquisition techniques in support of the fundamental goal of optimizing dynamic cardiac CT in terms of radiation dose and MBF estimation fidelity. We simulated time attenuation curves (TACs) for a range of flow states (Flow = [0.8, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2] ml/g/min) and several acquisition techniques. We estimated MBF with 5 different methods for each simulated TAC. From multiple independent realizations, we assessed the accuracy and precision of each method. Results show that acquisition techniques with 1/3 tube current or 1/3 temporal sampling permits accurate MBF estimates with most methods with reduction in MBF estimate precision by on average 30%. Furthermore, reduction in model complexity can be beneficial for improving the precision of MBF estimates.

  19. TU-G-204-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): Dynamic CT Myocardial Perfusion Measurement and Its Comparison to Fractional Flow Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Hubbard, L; Groves, E; Sadeghi, B; Javan, H; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a first pass analysis (FPA) technique for CT perfusion measurement in a swine animal and its validation using fractional flow reserve (FFR) as a reference standard. Methods: Swine were placed under anesthesia and relevant physiologic parameters were continuously recorded. Intra-coronary adenosine was administered to induce maximum hyperemia. A pressure wire was advanced distal to the first diagonal branch of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery for FFR measurements and a balloon dilation catheter was inserted over the pressure wire into the proximal LAD to create varying levels of stenosis. Images were acquired with a 320-row wide volume CT scanner. Three main coronary perfusion beds were delineated in the myocardium using arteries extracted from CT angiography images using a minimum energy hypothesis. The integrated density in the perfusion bed was used to calculate perfusion using the FPA technique. The perfusion in the LAD bed over a range of stenosis severity was measured. The measured fractional perfusion was compared to FFR and linear regression was performed. Results: The measured fractional perfusion using the FPA technique (P-FPA) and FFR were related as P-FPA = 1.06FFR – 0.06 (r{sup 2} = 0.86). The perfusion measurements were calculated with only three to five total CT volume scans, which drastically reduces the radiation dose as compared with the existing techniques requiring 15–20 volume scans. Conclusion: The measured perfusion using the first pass analysis technique showed good correlation with FFR measurements as a reference standard. The technique for perfusion measurement can potentially make a substantial reduction in radiation dose as compared with the existing techniques.

  20. Comparison between human and model observer performance in low-contrast detection tasks in CT images: application to images reconstructed with filtered back projection and iterative algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Calzado, A; Geleijns, J; Joemai, R M S; Veldkamp, W J H

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare low-contrast detectability (LCDet) performance between a model [non–pre-whitening matched filter with an eye filter (NPWE)] and human observers in CT images reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative [adaptive iterative dose reduction three-dimensional (AIDR 3D; Toshiba Medical Systems, Zoetermeer, Netherlands)] algorithms. Methods: Images of the Catphan® phantom (Phantom Laboratories, New York, NY) were acquired with Aquilion ONE™ 320-detector row CT (Toshiba Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) at five tube current levels (20–500 mA range) and reconstructed with FBP and AIDR 3D. Samples containing either low-contrast objects (diameters, 2–15 mm) or background were extracted and analysed by the NPWE model and four human observers in a two-alternative forced choice detection task study. Proportion correct (PC) values were obtained for each analysed object and used to compare human and model observer performances. An efficiency factor (η) was calculated to normalize NPWE to human results. Results: Human and NPWE model PC values (normalized by the efficiency, η = 0.44) were highly correlated for the whole dose range. The Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients (95% confidence interval) between human and NPWE were 0.984 (0.972–0.991) for AIDR 3D and 0.984 (0.971–0.991) for FBP, respectively. Bland–Altman plots based on PC results showed excellent agreement between human and NPWE [mean absolute difference 0.5 ± 0.4%; range of differences (−4.7%, 5.6%)]. Conclusion: The NPWE model observer can predict human performance in LCDet tasks in phantom CT images reconstructed with FBP and AIDR 3D algorithms at different dose levels. Advances in knowledge: Quantitative assessment of LCDet in CT can accurately be performed using software based on a model observer. PMID:24837275

  1. Comparison of effective radiation doses from X-ray, CT, and PET/CT in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma using a dose monitoring program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeun Yoon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the use of a dose monitoring program for calculating and comparing the diagnostic radiation doses in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed diagnostic and therapeutic imaging studies performed on pediatric patients with neuroblastoma from 2003 to 2014. We calculated the mean effective dose per exam for X-ray, conventional computed tomography (CT), and CT of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) from the data collected using a dose monitoring program (DoseTrack group) since October 2012. Using the data, we estimated the cumulative dose per person and the relative dose from each modality in all patients (Total group). The effective dose from PET was manually calculated for all patients. RESULTS We included 63 patients with a mean age of 3.2±3.5 years; 28 had a history of radiation therapy, with a mean irradiated dose of 31.9±23.2 Gy. The mean effective dose per exam was 0.04±0.19 mSv for X-ray, 1.09±1.11 mSv for CT, and 8.35±7.45 mSv for CT of PET/CT in 31 patients of the Dose-Track group. The mean estimated cumulative dose per patient in the Total group was 3.43±2.86 mSv from X-ray (8.5%), 7.66±6.09 mSv from CT (19.1%), 18.35±13.52 mSv from CT of PET/CT (45.7%), and 10.71±10.05 mSv from PET (26.7%). CONCLUSION CT of PET/CT contributed nearly half of the total cumulative dose in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. The radiation dose from X-ray was not negligible because of the large number of X-ray images. A dose monitoring program can be useful for calculating radiation doses in patients with cancer. PMID:27306659

  2. X-ray CT analyses, models and numerical simulations: a comparison with petrophysical analyses in an experimental CO2 study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Steven; Pudlo, Dieter; Enzmann, Frieder; Reitenbach, Viktor; Albrecht, Daniel; Ganzer, Leonhard; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    An essential part of the collaborative research project H2STORE (hydrogen to store), which is funded by the German government, was a comparison of various analytical methods for characterizing reservoir sandstones from different stratigraphic units. In this context Permian, Triassic and Tertiary reservoir sandstones were analysed. Rock core materials, provided by RWE Gasspeicher GmbH (Dortmund, Germany), GDF Suez E&P Deutschland GmbH (Lingen, Germany), E.ON Gas Storage GmbH (Essen, Germany) and RAG Rohöl-Aufsuchungs Aktiengesellschaft (Vienna, Austria), were processed by different laboratory techniques; thin sections were prepared, rock fragments were crushed and cubes of 1 cm edge length and plugs 3 to 5 cm in length with a diameter of about 2.5 cm were sawn from macroscopic homogeneous cores. With this prepared sample material, polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, coupled with image analyses, specific surface area measurements (after Brunauer, Emmet and Teller, 1938; BET), He-porosity and N2-permeability measurements and high-resolution microcomputer tomography (μ-CT), which were used for numerical simulations, were applied. All these methods were practised on most of the same sample material, before and on selected Permian sandstones also after static CO2 experiments under reservoir conditions. A major concern in comparing the results of these methods is an appraisal of the reliability of the given porosity, permeability and mineral-specific reactive (inner) surface area data. The CO2 experiments modified the petrophysical as well as the mineralogical/geochemical rock properties. These changes are detectable by all applied analytical methods. Nevertheless, a major outcome of the high-resolution μ-CT analyses and following numerical data simulations was that quite similar data sets and data interpretations were maintained by the different petrophysical standard methods. Moreover, the μ-CT analyses are not only time saving, but also

  3. Comparisons of obesity assessments in over-weight elementary students using anthropometry, BIA, CT and DEXA.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ok-Kyeong; Rhee, Yang-Keun; Park, Tae-Sun; Cha, Youn-Soo

    2010-04-01

    Obesity was characterized in Korean elementary students using different obesity assessment tests on 103 overweight elementary students from three schools of Jeonbuk Province. The body mass index (BMI) and obesity index (OI) were compared, and the data using DEXA and CT were compared with the data using BIA and a tape measure. The results of this study are as follows: first, 27 students who were classified as obese by OI were classified as overweight by BMI, and 3 students who were classified as standard weight by BMI were classified as overweight by OI. Secondly, by DEXA and BIA measurements, there was 1.51% difference in body fat percentage (boys 1.66%, girls 1.17%) and the difference in body fat mass between boys and girls was 0.77 kg (boys 0.85 kg, girls 0.59 kg), but those differences in body fat percentage and mass were not statistically significant. Thirdly, the average total abdominal fat (TAF) measured by CT scans of obese children was more significantly related with subcutaneous fat (r = 0.983, P < 0.01) than visceral fat (r = 0.640, P < 0.01). Also, TAF were highest significant with waist circumference by a tape measure (r = 0.744, P < 0.01). In summary, as there are some differences of assessment results between two obesity test methods (BMI, OI), we need more definite standards to determine the degree of obesity. The BIA seems to be the most simple and effective way to measure body fat mass, whereas waist/hip ratio (WHR) using a tape measurer is considered to be the most effective method for assessing abdominal fat in elementary students.

  4. Comparison of manual vs. automated multimodality (CT-MRI) image registration for brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Abhirup; Santiago, Roberto J.; Smith, Ryan; Kassaee, Alireza . E-mail: Kassaee@xrt.upenn.edu

    2005-03-31

    Computed tomgoraphy-magnetic resonance imaging (CT-MRI) registrations are routinely used for target-volume delineation of brain tumors. We clinically use 2 software packages based on manual operation and 1 automated package with 2 different algorithms: chamfer matching using bony structures, and mutual information using intensity patterns. In all registration algorithms, a minimum of 3 pairs of identical anatomical and preferably noncoplanar landmarks is used on each of the 2 image sets. In manual registration, the program registers these points and links the image sets using a 3-dimensional (3D) transformation. In automated registration, the 3 landmarks are used as an initial starting point and further processing is done to complete the registration. Using our registration packages, registration of CT and MRI was performed on 10 patients. We scored the results of each registration set based on the amount of time spent, the accuracy reported by the software, and a final evaluation. We evaluated each software program by measuring the residual error between 'matched' points on the right and left globes and the posterior fossa for fused image slices. In general, manual registration showed higher misalignment between corresponding points compared to automated registration using intensity matching. This error had no directional dependence and was, most of the time, larger for a larger structure in both registration techniques. Automated algorithm based on intensity matching also gave the best results in terms of registration accuracy, irrespective of whether or not the initial landmarks were chosen carefully, when compared to that done using bone matching algorithm. Intensity-matching algorithm required the least amount of user-time and provided better accuracy.

  5. Comparison of CT duodeno-cholangiopancreatography to ERCP for assessing biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kielar, Ania; Toa, Hardy; Sekar, Arni; Mimeault, Richard; Jaffey, James

    2005-01-01

    The authors have developed a CT protocol, CT duodeno-cholangiopancreatography (CDCP), which is performed during a single contrast-enhanced phase, proceeding cranially, allowing enhancement of the pancreas during its parenchymal phase followed by enhancement of the liver during its portal-venous phase. This retrospective pilot study evaluates CDCP compared with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) as a diagnostic tool for assessing the cause and level of biliary obstruction. Forty-one patients with jaundice underwent CDCP and ERCP between October 2002 and May 2004. Pathologic confirmation was obtained in 31 of the 41 (76%) patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and kappa values of CDCP and ERCP compared with pathology were calculated for tumors and stones. Pathology-proven cases included 7 cases of stones, 23 tumors, and 1 other cause of obstruction. The overall level of agreement of diagnoses between CDCP and pathology was 29 of 31 (93.5%); that between CDCP and ERCP was 36 of 41 (88%). Comparing CDCP to pathology for tumors, the sensitivity was 100%, the specificity was 89%, and the kappa was 0.92 (95% CI 0.76-1.0). For stone detection, CDCP had a sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 100%, and a kappa value of 0.90 (95% CI 0.72-1.0). For level of obstruction of the common bile duct, comparing CDCP to ERCP, observations agreed in 31 of the 36 (86%) cases; for the pancreatic duct, observations agreed in 24 of the 25 (96%) cases. CDCP is a noninvasive diagnostic tool that can be used to assess the cause and level of obstruction. A blinded prospective study would be valuable to further assess the merits of CDCP.

  6. Diagnostic Performance of Dual-Energy CT Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: Direct Comparison With Cardiovascular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sung Min; Song, Meong Gun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion dual-energy CT (DECT) and its incremental value when used with coronary CT angiography (CTA) for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS One hundred patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease without chronic myocardial infarction detected with coronary CTA underwent stress perfusion DECT, stress cardiovascular perfusion MRI, and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stress perfusion DECT and cardiovascular stress perfusion MR images were used for detecting perfusion defects. Coronary CTA and ICA were evaluated in the detection of ≥ 50% coronary stenosis. The diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detecting hemodynamically significant stenosis was assessed before and after stress perfusion DECT on a pervessel basis with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI as the reference standard. RESULTS The performance of stress perfusion DECT compared with cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI on a per-vessel basis in the detection of perfusion defects was sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 74%; positive predictive value, 73%; negative predictive value, 90%. Per segment, these values were sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 80%; positive predictive value, 63%; and negative predictive value, 88%. Compared with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI per vessel territory the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary CTA were 95%, 61%, 61%, and 95%. The values for stress perfusion DECT were 92%, 72%, 68%, and 94%. The values for coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT were 88%, 79%, 73%, and 91%. The ROC AUC increased from 0.78 to 0.84 (p = 0.02) with the use of coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT compared with coronary CTA alone. CONCLUSION Stress perfusion DECT plays a complementary role in enhancing the accuracy of coronary CTA for identifying hemodynamically

  7. Comparison of CT and MR in 400 patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Waluch, V.; Yadley, R.A.; Wycoff, R.R.

    1984-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) (0.35T) and computed tomography (CT) were compared in 400 consecutive patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord. Of 325 positive diagnoses, MR detected abnormality while CT was normal in 93; MR was more specific in 68; MR and CT gave equivalent information in 129; CT was more specific in 32; and CT was positive while MR was normal in 3. MR was superior to CT in detection of multiple sclerosis, subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy, posterior fossa infarcts and tumors, small extra-axial fluid collections, and cervical syringomyelia. CT was preferable in evaluation of meningiomas and separation of tumor from edema. CT takes less time and may be preferable in patients with acute trauma as well as very young or elderly individuals. Thus the two studies should be considered complementary.

  8. Comparison of 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT in localisation of tumours in ectopic ACTH syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Swati S; Lila, Anurag R; Kasaliwal, Rajeev; Khare, Shruti; Yerawar, Chaitanya G; Hira, Priya; Phadke, Uday; Shah, Hina; Lele, Vikram R; Malhotra, Gaurav; Bandgar, Tushar; Shah, Nalini S

    2016-01-01

    Background Localising ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) syndrome (EAS) tumour source is challenging. Somatostatin receptor-based PET imaging has shown promising results, but the data is limited to case reports and small case series. We reviewed here the performance of 68Ga-DOTANOC positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) in our cohort of 12 consecutive EAS patients. Materials and methods Retrospective data analysis of 12 consecutive patients of EAS presenting to a single tertiary care centre in a period between January 2013 and December 2014 was done. CECT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT were reported (blinded) by an experienced radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician, respectively. The performance of CECT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was compared. Results Tumours could be localised in 11 out of 12 patients at initial presentation (overt cases), whereas in one patient, tumour remained occult. Thirteen lesions were identified in 11 patients as EAS source (true positives). CECT localised 12 out of these 13 lesions (sensitivity 92.3%) and identified five false-positive lesions (positive predictive value (PPV) 70.5%). Compared with false-positive lesions, true-positive lesions had greater mean contrast enhancement at 60s (33.2 vs 5.6 Hounsfield units (HU)). 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was able to identify 9 out of 13 lesions (sensitivity 69.2%) and reported no false-positive lesions (PPV 100%). Conclusion CECT remains the first-line investigation in localisation of EAS. The contrast enhancement pattern on CECT can further aid in characterisation of the lesions. 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT can be added to CECT, to enhance positive prediction of the suggestive lesions. PMID:27006371

  9. Comparison of FDG-PET/CT images between chronic renal failure patients on hemodialysis and controls.

    PubMed

    Toriihara, Akira; Kitazume, Yoshio; Nishida, Hidenori; Kubota, Kazunori; Nakadate, Masashi; Tateishi, Ukihide

    2015-01-01

    The whole-body 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) distribution in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients on hemodialysis would be different from that in subjects with normal renal function, because they lack urinary FDG excretion and remain in a constant volume overload. We evaluated the difference in the physiological uptake pattern of FDG between chronic renal failure patients on hemodialysis and control subjects. The subjects for this retrospective study consisted of 24 chronic renal failure patients on hemodialysis (HD group) and 24 age- and sex-matched control subjects (NC group). Standardized uptake values normalized by the body weight (SUVbw), ideal body weight (SUVibw), lean body mass (SUVlbm), and body surface area (SUVbsa) in the cerebellum, lungs, liver, gluteal muscles and subcutaneous fat, spleen, thoracolumbar spine, thoracic and abdominal aorta, and right atrium were calculated in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images. SUVbw in the gluteal muscles, subcutaneous fat, spleen and right atrium was significantly higher in the HD group as compared to that in the NC group (p < 0.05; unpaired t test). In addition, SUVibm, SUVlbm, as well as SUVbsa in the abdominal aorta were significantly higher in the HD group as compared to those in the NC group (p < 0.05; unpaired t test). In conclusion, as compared to normal subjects, chronic renal failure patients on hemodialysis show significantly higher physiological FDG uptake in the soft tissues, spleen and blood pool.

  10. [Evaluation of an adaptive filter for CT under low-CNR condition: comparison with linear filter].

    PubMed

    Mori, Issei; Uchida, Miho; Sato, Ami; Sato, Shingo; Tamura, Hajime; Takai, Yoshihiro; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Saito, Haruo; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Ogura, Takahide; Chida, Koichi; Machida, Yoshio

    2009-01-20

    The use of an adaptive filter for CT images is becoming a common procedure and is said to reduce image noise while preserving sharpness and helping to reduce the required X-ray dose. Although many reports support this view, the validity of such evaluations is arguable. When the linearity of a system is in question, physical performance indexes should be measured under conditions similar to those of clinical use. Evaluations of diagnosis using clinical images may be fallible because the non-filtered image used as the reference might not have been optimally reconstructed. We have chosen simple, but commonly used, adaptive filters for our evaluation. As a reference for comparing performance, we designed linear filters that best approximate the noise characteristics of the adaptive filters. MTF is measured through observation of the edge-spread function. Clinical abdominal images are used to compare the performance of adaptive filters and linear filters. We conclude that the performance of the type of adaptive filter we have chosen is virtually the same as that of the linear filter, as long as the image quality of soft tissues is our interest. Both the noise SD and MTF are virtually the same if the contrast of the object is not substantially higher than 150 HU. Images of soft tissues obtained with the use of adaptive filters are also virtually the same as those obtained by linear filters. The edge-preservation characteristic of this adaptive filter is not observable for soft tissues.

  11. Forming Simulation of Thick AFP Laminates and Comparison with Live CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutz, Daniel; Vermilyea, Mark; Bel, Sylvain; Hinterhölzl, Roland

    2016-08-01

    Automated fiber placement (AFP) process can be used to manufacture laminates by laying up unidirectional slit tapes along a desired path and placing multiple layers on top of each other. Usually, the slit tapes are placed direct onto the tooling to attain the final part geometry. Alternatively, the laminate can be built up on a planar substrate and can be subsequently formed into the final shape. This kind of processing allows manufacturing highly curved parts, which may not be possible with the direct placement. In the present work a forming simulation of thick AFP laminates is developed to predict the tapes' orientations and delamination as well as transverse tape spread-ups and separations during the forming process. The simulation model is built up through the material characterization experiments. Validation is performed comparing the results of the simulation vs. the experimental forming on two generic geometries. An optical inspection is made on the external layers of the laminates. In a second step, live computer tomography (CT) scans are used to inspect the tapes within an AFP laminate during forming of an L- and a Z-flange. Tapes re-orientation, gaps and tapes widening are observed experimentally and compared to the simulation results. The simulation is capable to predict the tows orientation and provides indicators concerning the tows spread-up and separation.

  12. Comparisons of Derived Metrics from Computed Tomography (CT) Scanned Images of Fluvial Sediment from Gravel-Bed Flume Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voepel, Hal; Ahmed, Sharif; Hodge, Rebecca; Leyland, Julian; Sear, David

    2016-04-01

    Uncertainty in bedload estimates for gravel bed rivers is largely driven by our inability to characterize arrangement, orientation and resultant forces of fluvial sediment in river beds. Water working of grains leads to structural differences between areas of the bed through particle sorting, packing, imbrication, mortaring and degree of bed armoring. In this study, non-destructive, micro-focus X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging in 3D is used to visualize, quantify and assess the internal geometry of sections of a flume bed that have been extracted keeping their fabric intact. Flume experiments were conducted at 1:1 scaling of our prototype river. From the volume, center of mass, points of contact, and protrusion of individual grains derived from 3D scan data we estimate 3D static force properties at the grain-scale such as pivoting angles, buoyancy and gravity forces, and local grain exposure. Here metrics are derived for images from two flume experiments: one with a bed of coarse grains (>4mm) and the other where sand and clay were incorporated into the coarse flume bed. In addition to deriving force networks, comparison of metrics such as critical shear stress, pivot angles, grain distributions, principle axis orientation, and pore space over depth are made. This is the first time bed stability has been studied in 3D using CT scanned images of sediment from the bed surface to depths well into the subsurface. The derived metrics, inter-granular relationships and characterization of bed structures will lead to improved bedload estimates with reduced uncertainty, as well as improved understanding of relationships between sediment structure, grain size distribution and channel topography.

  13. Comparison of human and Hotelling observer performance for a fan-beam CT signal detection task

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Adrian A.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Reiser, Ingrid; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A human observer study was performed for a signal detection task for the case of fan-beam x-ray computed tomography. Hotelling observer (HO) performance was calculated for the same detection task without the use of efficient channels. By considering the full image covariance produced by the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm and avoiding the use of channels in the computation of HO performance, the authors establish an absolute upper bound on signal detectability. Therefore, this study serves as a baseline for relating human and ideal observer performance in the case of fan-beam CT. Methods: Eight human observers participated in a two-alternative forced choice experiment where the signal of interest was a small simulated ellipsoid in the presence of independent, identically distributed Gaussian detector noise. Theoretical performance of the HO, which is equivalent to the ideal observer in this case (see Sec. 13.2.12 in Barrett and Myers [Foundations of Image Science (Wiley, Hoboken, NJ, 2004)], was also computed and compared to the performance of the human observers. In addition to a reference FBP implementation, two FBP implementations with inherent loss of HO signal detectability (e.g., by apodizing the ramp filter) were also investigated. Each of these latter two implementations takes the form of a discrete-to-discrete linear operator (i.e., a matrix), which has a nontrivial null-space resulting in the loss of detectability. Results: Estimated observer detectability index (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal}\\begin{document}$\\hat{d}_A$\\end{document}d^A) values for the human observers and SNR values for the HO were obtained. While Hanning filtering in the FBP implementation with a cutoff frequency of 1/4 of the Nyquist frequency reduces HO SNR (due to the reconstruction matrix's nontrivial null-space), this filtering was shown to consistently improve human observer performance. By contrast, increasing the image pixel size was seen to have a comparable

  14. Comparison of tibiofemoral joint space width measurements from standing CT and fixed flexion radiography.

    PubMed

    Segal, Neil A; Frick, Eric; Duryea, Jeffrey; Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Torner, James C; Felson, David T; Anderson, Donald D

    2016-08-09

    The objective of this project was to determine the relationship between medial tibiofemoral joint space width measured on fixed-flexion radiographs and the three-dimensional joint space width distribution on low-dose, standing CT (SCT) imaging. At the 84-month visit of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, 20 participants were recruited. A commercial SCT scanner for the foot and ankle was modified to image knees while standing. Medial tibiofemoral joint space width was assessed on radiographs at fixed locations from 15-30% of compartment width using validated software and on SCT by mapping the distances between three-dimensional subchondral bone surfaces. Individual joint space width values from radiographs were compared with three-dimensional joint space width values from corresponding sagittal plane locations using paired t-tests and correlation coefficients. For the 4 medial-most tibiofemoral locations, radiographic joint space width values exceeded the minimal joint space width on SCT by a mean of 2.0mm and were approximately equal to the 61st percentile value of the joint space width distribution at each respective sagittal-plane location. Correlation coefficients at these locations were 0.91-0.97 and the offsets between joint space width values from radiographs and SCT measurements were consistent. There were greater offsets and variability in the offsets between modalities closer to the tibial spine. Joint space width measurements on fixed-flexion radiographs are highly correlated with three-dimensional joint space width from SCT. In addition to avoiding bony overlap obscuring the joint, a limitation of radiographs, the current study supports a role for SCT in the evaluation of tibiofemoral OA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison measurements of DQE for two flat panel detectors: fluoroscopic detector vs. cone beam CT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt Benítez, Ricardo; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David

    2006-03-01

    The physical performance of two flat panel detectors (FPD) has been evaluated using a standard x-ray beam quality set by IEC, namely RQA5. The FPDs evaluated in this study are based on an amorphous silicon photodiode array that is coupled to a thallium-doped Cesium Iodide scintillator and to a thin film transistor (TFT) array. One detector is the PaxScan 2520 that is designed for fluoro imaging, and has a small dynamic range and a large image lag. The other detector is the PaxScan 4030CB that is designed for cone beam CT, and has a large dynamic range (>16-bit), a reduced image lag and many imaging modes. Varian Medical Systems manufactured both detectors. The linearity of the FPDs was investigated by using an ionization chamber and aluminum filtration in order to obtain the beam quality. Since the FPDs are used in fluoroscopic mode, image lag of the FPD was measured in order to investigate its effect on this study, especially its effect on DQE. The spatial resolution of the FPDs was determined by obtaining the pre-sampling modulation transfer function for each detector. A sharp edge was used in accordance to IEC 62220-1. Next, the Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) was calculated for various exposures levels at RQA5 radiation quality. Finally, the DQE of each FPD was obtained with a modified version of the international standard set by IEC 62220-1. The results show that the physical performance in DQE and MTF of the PaxScan 4030CB is superior to that of PaxScan2520.

  16. Efficacy and safety of CT-P13 (biosimilar infliximab) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: comparison between switching from reference infliximab to CT-P13 and continuing CT-P13 in the PLANETRA extension study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Dae Hyun; Prodanovic, Nenad; Jaworski, Janusz; Miranda, Pedro; Ramiterre, Edgar; Lanzon, Allan; Baranauskaite, Asta; Wiland, Piotr; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Oparanov, Boycho; Smiyan, Svitlana; Kim, HoUng; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, SuYeon; Park, Won

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of switching from the infliximab reference product (RP; Remicade) to its biosimilar CT-P13 (Remsima, Inflectra) or continuing CT-P13 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for an additional six infusions. Methods This open-label extension study recruited patients with RA who had completed the 54-week, randomised, parallel-group study comparing CT-P13 with RP (PLANETRA; NCT01217086). CT-P13 (3 mg/kg) was administered intravenously every 8 weeks from weeks 62 to 102. All patients received concomitant methotrexate. Endpoints included American College of Rheumatology 20% (ACR20) response, ACR50, ACR70, immunogenicity and safety. Data were analysed for patients who received CT-P13 for 102 weeks (maintenance group) and for those who received RP for 54 weeks and then switched to CT-P13 (switch group). Results Overall, 302 of 455 patients who completed the PLANETRA study enrolled into the extension. Of these, 158 had received CT-P13 (maintenance group) and 144 RP (switch group). Response rates at week 102 for maintenance versus switch groups, respectively, were 71.7% vs 71.8% for ACR20, 48.0% vs 51.4% for ACR50 and 24.3% vs 26.1% for ACR70. The proportion of patients with antidrug antibodies was comparable between groups (week 102: 40.3% vs 44.8%, respectively). Treatment-emergent adverse events occurred in similar proportions of patients in the two groups during the extension study (53.5% and 53.8%, respectively). Conclusions Comparable efficacy and tolerability were observed in patients who switched from RP to its biosimilar CT-P13 for an additional year and in those who had long-term CT-P13 treatment for 2 years. Trial registration number NCT01571219; Results. PMID:27130908

  17. Regadenoson-stress myocardial CT perfusion and single-photon emission CT: rationale, design, and acquisition methods of a prospective, multicenter, multivendor comparison.

    PubMed

    Cury, Ricardo C; Kitt, Therese M; Feaheny, Kathleen; Akin, Jamie; George, Richard T

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacologic stress myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) has been reported to be a viable imaging modality for detection of myocardial ischemia compared with single-photon emission CT (SPECT) in several single-center studies. However, regadenoson-stress CTP has not previously been compared with SPECT in a multicenter, multivendor study. The rationale and design of a phase 2, randomized, cross-over study of regadenoson-stress myocardial perfusion imaging by CTP compared with SPECT are described herein. The study will be conducted at approximately 25 sites by using 6 different CT scanner models, including 64-, 128-, 256-, and 320-slice systems. Subjects with known/suspected coronary artery disease will be randomly assigned to 1 of 2 imaging procedure sequences; rest and regadenoson-stress SPECT on day 1, then regadenoson-stress CTP and rest CTP/coronary CT angiography (same acquisition) on day 2; or regadenoson-stress CTP and rest CTP/CT angiography on day 1, then rest and regadenoson-stress SPECT on day 2. The prespecified primary analysis examines the agreement rate between CTP and SPECT for detecting or excluding ischemia (≥2 or 0-1 reversible defects, respectively), as assessed by 3 independent blinded readers for each modality. Non-inferiority will be indicated if the lower boundary of the 95% CI for the agreement rate is within 0.15 of 0.78 (the observed agreement rate in the regadenoson pivotal trials). The protocol described herein will support the first evaluation of regadenoson-stress CTP by using multiple scanner types compared with SPECT.

  18. YIELD AND GRADE OF VALENCIA PEANUT IN SINGLE ROW, TWIN ROW, AND DIAMOND PLANTING PATTERNS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted at Wayne Baker’s farm South of Clovis in 2006 to compare single row, twin row, and diamond planting patterns in Valencia peanut on 36 inch beds. The twin row and diamond pattern treatments were planted with an experimental planter developed at the USDA-ARS National Peanut Rese...

  19. : Light Interception in Single Row, Twin Row, and Diamond Planting Patterns of Valencia Peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field study was conducted on a growers farm South of Clovis, NM in 2006 to compare light interception and radiation use efficiency in single row, twin row, and diamond planted Valencia peanuts with line quantum sensors (Apogee instruments, Logan) installed across the crop row. Data were recorded ...

  20. Dose measurements for dental cone-beam CT: a comparison with MSCT and panoramic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deman, P.; Atwal, P.; Duzenli, C.; Thakur, Y.; Ford, N. L.

    2014-06-01

    To date there is a lack of published information on appropriate methods to determine patient doses from dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) equipment. The goal of this study is to apply and extend the methods recommended in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report 111 for CBCT equipment to characterize dose and effective dose for a range of dental imaging equipment. A protocol derived from the one proposed by Dixon et al (2010 Technical Report 111, American Association of Physicist in Medicine, MD, USA), was applied to dose measurements of multi-slice CT, dental CBCT (small and large fields of view (FOV)) and a dental panoramic system. The computed tomography dose index protocol was also performed on the MSCT to compare both methods. The dose distributions in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom were characterized using a thimble ionization chamber and Gafchromic™ film (beam profiles). Gafchromic™ films were used to measure the dose distribution in an anthropomorphic phantom. A method was proposed to extend dose estimates to planes superior and inferior to the central plane. The dose normalized to 100 mAs measured in the center of the phantom for the large FOV dental CBCT (11.4 mGy/100 mAs) is two times lower than that of MSCT (20.7 mGy/100 mAs) for the same FOV, but approximately 15 times higher than for a panoramic system (0.6 mGy/100 mAs). The effective dose per scan (in clinical conditions) found for the dental CBCT are 167.60 ± 3.62, 61.30 ± 3.88 and 92.86 ± 7.76 mSv for the Kodak 9000 (fixed scan length of 3.7 cm), and the iCAT Next Generation for 6 cm and 13 cm scan lengths respectively. The method to extend the dose estimates from the central slice to superior and inferior slices indicates a good agreement between theory and measurement. The Gafchromic™ films provided useful beam profile data and 2D distributions of dose in phantom.

  1. On Row Rank Equal Column Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalili, Parviz

    2009-01-01

    We will prove a well-known theorem in Linear Algebra, that is, for any "m x n" matrix the dimension of row space and column space are the same. The proof is based on the subject of "elementary matrices" and "reduced row-echelon" form of a matrix.

  2. Mary Budd Rowe: A Storyteller of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchini, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines Mary Budd Rowe's groundbreaking and far-reaching contributions to science education. Rowe is best known for her research on wait-time: the idea that teachers can improve the quality and length of classroom discussions by waiting at least 3 s before and after student responses. Her wait-time research grew from and helped…

  3. Comparison between manual and semi-automatic segmentation of nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses from CT images.

    PubMed

    Tingelhoff, K; Moral, A I; Kunkel, M E; Rilk, M; Wagner, I; Eichhorn, K G; Wahl, F M; Bootz, F

    2007-01-01

    Segmentation of medical image data is getting more and more important over the last years. The results are used for diagnosis, surgical planning or workspace definition of robot-assisted systems. The purpose of this paper is to find out whether manual or semi-automatic segmentation is adequate for ENT surgical workflow or whether fully automatic segmentation of paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity is needed. We present a comparison of manual and semi-automatic segmentation of paranasal sinuses and the nasal cavity. Manual segmentation is performed by custom software whereas semi-automatic segmentation is realized by a commercial product (Amira). For this study we used a CT dataset of the paranasal sinuses which consists of 98 transversal slices, each 1.0 mm thick, with a resolution of 512 x 512 pixels. For the analysis of both segmentation procedures we used volume, extension (width, length and height), segmentation time and 3D-reconstruction. The segmentation time was reduced from 960 minutes with manual to 215 minutes with semi-automatic segmentation. We found highest variances segmenting nasal cavity. For the paranasal sinuses manual and semi-automatic volume differences are not significant. Dependent on the segmentation accuracy both approaches deliver useful results and could be used for e.g. robot-assisted systems. Nevertheless both procedures are not useful for everyday surgical workflow, because they take too much time. Fully automatic and reproducible segmentation algorithms are needed for segmentation of paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity.

  4. Tracer kinetic analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and CT bladder cancer data: A preliminary comparison to assess the magnitude of water exchange effects.

    PubMed

    Bains, Lauren J; McGrath, Deirdre M; Naish, Josephine H; Cheung, Susan; Watson, Yvonne; Taylor, M Ben; Logue, John P; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Waterton, John C; Buckley, David L

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of water exchange on tracer kinetic parameter estimates derived from T(1)-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data using a direct quantitative comparison with DCE-CT. Data were acquired from 12 patients with bladder cancer who underwent DCE-CT followed by DCE-MRI within a week. A two-compartment tracer kinetic model was fitted to the CT data, and two versions of the same model with modifications to account for the fast exchange and no exchange limits of water exchange were fitted to the MR data. The two-compartment tracer kinetic model provided estimates of the fractional plasma volume (v(p)), the extravascular extracellular space fraction (v(e)), plasma perfusion (F(p)), and the microvascular permeability surface area product. Our findings suggest that DCE-CT is an appropriate reference for DCE-MRI in bladder cancers as the only significant difference found between CT and MR parameter estimates were the no exchange limit estimates of v(p) (P = 0.002). These results suggest that although water exchange between the intracellular and extravascular-extracellular space has a negligible effect on DCE-MRI, vascular-extravascular-extracellular space water exchange may be more important.

  5. TU-C-12A-11: Comparisons Between Cu-ATSM PET and DCE-CT Kinetic Parameters in Canine Sinonasal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    La Fontaine, M; Bradshaw, T; Kubicek, L; Forrest, L; Jeraj, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Regions of poor perfusion within tumors may be associated with higher hypoxic levels. This study aimed to test this hypothesis by comparing measurements of hypoxia from Cu-ATSM PET to vasculature kinetic parameters from DCE-CT kinetic analysis. Methods: Ten canine patients with sinonasal tumors received one Cu-ATSM PET/CT scan and three DCE-CT scans prior to treatment. Cu-ATSM PET/CT and DCE-CT scans were registered and resampled to matching voxel dimensions. Kinetic analysis was performed on DCE-CT scans and for each patient, the resulting kinetic parameter values from the three DCE-CT scans were averaged together. Cu-ATSM SUVs were spatially correlated (r{sub spatial}) on a voxel-to-voxel basis against the following DCE-CT kinetic parameters: transit time (t{sub 1}), blood flow (F), vasculature fraction (v{sub 1}), and permeability (PS). In addition, whole-tumor comparisons were performed by correlating (r{sub ROI}) the mean Cu-ATSM SUV (SUV{sub mean}) with median kinetic parameter values. Results: The spatial correlations (r{sub spatial}) were poor and ranged from -0.04 to 0.21 for all kinetic parameters. These low spatial correlations may be due to high variability in the DCE-CT kinetic parameter voxel values between scans. In our hypothesis, t{sub 1} was expected to have a positive correlation, while F was expected to have a negative correlation to hypoxia. However, in wholetumor analysis the opposite was found for both t{sub 1} (r{sub ROI} = -0.25) and F (r{sub ROI} = 0.56). PS and v{sub 1} may depict angiogenic responses to hypoxia and found positive correlations to Cu-ATSM SUV for PS (r{sub ROI} = 0.41), and v{sub 1} (r{sub ROI} = 0.57). Conclusion: Low spatial correlations were found between Cu-ATSM uptake and DCE-CT vasculature parameters, implying that poor perfusion is not associated with higher hypoxic regions. Across patients, the most hypoxic tumors tended to have higher blood flow values, which is contrary to our initial hypothesis. Funding

  6. Comparison of pre/post-operative CT image volumes to preoperative digitization of partial hepatectomies: a feasibility study in surgical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumpuri, Prashanth; Clements, Logan W.; Li, Rui; Waite, Jonathan M.; Stefansic, James D.; Geller, David A.; Miga, Michael I.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2009-02-01

    Preoperative planning combined with image-guidance has shown promise towards increasing the accuracy of liver resection procedures. The purpose of this study was to validate one such preoperative planning tool for four patients undergoing hepatic resection. Preoperative computed tomography (CT) images acquired before surgery were used to identify tumor margins and to plan the surgical approach for resection of these tumors. Surgery was then performed with intraoperative digitization data acquire by an FDA approved image-guided liver surgery system (Pathfinder Therapeutics, Inc., Nashville, TN). Within 5-7 days after surgery, post-operative CT image volumes were acquired. Registration of data within a common coordinate reference was achieved and preoperative plans were compared to the postoperative volumes. Semi-quantitative comparisons are presented in this work and preliminary results indicate that significant liver regeneration/hypertrophy in the postoperative CT images may be present post-operatively. This could challenge pre/post operative CT volume change comparisons as a means to evaluate the accuracy of preoperative surgical plans.

  7. CT Enterography

    MedlinePlus

    ... obstructions and Crohn’s disease. CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. CT enterography is better able ... the benefits vs. risks? Benefits CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A major advantage of CT ...

  8. MO-E-17A-03: Monte Carlo CT Dose Calculation: A Comparison Between Experiment and Simulation Using ARCHER-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T; Du, X; Su, L; Gao, Y; Ji, W; Xu, X; Zhang, D; Shi, J; Liu, B; Kalra, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the CT doses derived from the experiments and GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, using a human cadaver and ATOM phantom. Methods: The cadaver of an 88-year old male and the ATOM phantom were scanned by a GE LightSpeed Pro 16 MDCT. For the cadaver study, the Thimble chambers (Model 10×5−0.6CT and 10×6−0.6CT) were used to measure the absorbed dose in different deep and superficial organs. Whole-body scans were first performed to construct a complete image database for MC simulations. Abdomen/pelvis helical scans were then conducted using 120/100 kVps, 300 mAs and a pitch factor of 1.375:1. For the ATOM phantom study, the OSL dosimeters were used and helical scans were performed using 120 kVp and x, y, z tube current modulation (TCM). For the MC simulations, sufficient particles were run in both cases such that the statistical errors of the results by ARCHER-CT were limited to 1%. Results: For the human cadaver scan, the doses to the stomach, liver, colon, left kidney, pancreas and urinary bladder were compared. The difference between experiments and simulations was within 19% for the 120 kVp and 25% for the 100 kVp. For the ATOM phantom scan, the doses to the lung, thyroid, esophagus, heart, stomach, liver, spleen, kidneys and thymus were compared. The difference was 39.2% for the esophagus, and within 16% for all other organs. Conclusion: In this study the experimental and simulated CT doses were compared. Their difference is primarily attributed to the systematic errors of the MC simulations, including the accuracy of the bowtie filter modeling, and the algorithm to generate voxelized phantom from DICOM images. The experimental error is considered small and may arise from the dosimeters. R01 grant (R01EB015478) from National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

  9. State-of-the-art in CT hardware and scan modes for cardiovascular CT

    PubMed Central

    Halliburton, Sandra; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dey, Damini; Einstein, Andrew J.; Gentry, Ralph; George, Richard T.; Gerber, Thomas; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Weigold, Wm. Guy

    2013-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (CT) allows noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging of the heart, great vessels, and the coronary arteries. In recent years, there have been several advances in CT hardware, which have expanded the clinical utility of CT for cardiovascular imaging; such advances are ongoing. This review article from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) Basic and Emerging Sciences and Technology (BEST) Working Group summarizes the technical aspects of current state-of-the-art CT hardware and describes the scan modes this hardware supports for cardiovascular CT imaging. PMID:22551595

  10. State-of-the-art in CT hardware and scan modes for cardiovascular CT.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, Sandra; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dey, Damini; Einstein, Andrew J; Gentry, Ralph; George, Richard T; Gerber, Thomas; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Weigold, Wm Guy

    2012-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (CT) allows noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging of the heart, great vessels, and coronary arteries. In recent years, there have been several advances in CT hardware, which have expanded the clinical utility of CT for cardiovascular imaging; such advances are ongoing. This review article from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Basic and Emerging Sciences and Technology Working Group summarizes the technical aspects of current state-of-the-art CT hardware and describes the scan modes this hardware supports for cardiovascular CT imaging.

  11. Comparison of CT on Rails With Electronic Portal Imaging for Positioning of Prostate Cancer Patients With Implanted Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Rebecca Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Milner, Alvin; Cox, Jennifer; Duchesne, Gillian; Cleeve, Laurence; Zhu Li; Cramb, Jim; Sparks, Laura; Laferlita, Marcus

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this investigation was to measure the agreement between in-room computed tomography (CT) on rails and electronic portal image (EPI) radiography. Methods and Materials: Agreement between the location of the center of gravity (COG) of fiducial markers (FMs) on CT and EPI images was determined in phantom studies and a patient cohort. A secondary analysis between the center of volume (COV) of the prostate on CT and the COG of FMs on CT and EPI was performed. Agreement was defined as the 95% probability of a difference of {<=}3.0 mm between images. Systematic and random errors from CT and EPI are reported. Results: From 8 patients, 254 CT and EPI pairs were analyzed. FMs were localized to within 3 mm on CT and EPI images 96.9% of the time in the left-right (LR) plane, 85.8% superior-inferior (SI), and 89% anterior-posterior (AP). The differences between the COV on CT and the COG on EPI were not within 3 mm in any plane: 87.8% (LR), 64.2% (SI), and 70.9% (AP). The systematic error varied from 1.2 to 2.9 mm (SI) and 1.8-2.9 mm (AP) between the COG on EPI and COV on CT. Conclusions: Considerable differences between in-room CT and EPI exist. The phantom measurements showed slice thickness affected the accuracy of localization in the SI plane, and couch sag that occurs at the CT on rails gantry could not be totally corrected for in the AP plane. Other confounding factors are the action of rotating the couch and associated time lag between image acquisitions (prostate motion), EPI image quality, and outlining uncertainties.

  12. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Gaffney, David K.; Beriwal, Sushil; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Lee Burnett, Omer; D'Souza, David P.; Patil, Nikhilesh; Haddock, Michael G.; Jhingran, Anuja; Jones, Ellen L.; Kunos, Charles A.; Lee, Larissa J.; Mayr, Nina A.; Petersen, Ivy; Petric, Primoz; Portelance, Lorraine; Small, William; Strauss, Jonathan B.; and others

    2014-10-01

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  13. Memory hierarchy using row-based compression

    DOEpatents

    Loh, Gabriel H.; O'Connor, James M.

    2016-10-25

    A system includes a first memory and a device coupleable to the first memory. The device includes a second memory to cache data from the first memory. The second memory includes a plurality of rows, each row including a corresponding set of compressed data blocks of non-uniform sizes and a corresponding set of tag blocks. Each tag block represents a corresponding compressed data block of the row. The device further includes decompression logic to decompress data blocks accessed from the second memory. The device further includes compression logic to compress data blocks to be stored in the second memory.

  14. Mary Budd Rowe: a storyteller of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Julie A.

    2008-12-01

    This article examines Mary Budd Rowe's groundbreaking and far-reaching contributions to science education. Rowe is best known for her research on wait-time: the idea that teachers can improve the quality and length of classroom discussions by waiting at least 3 s before and after student responses. Her wait-time research grew from and helped inform her staunch advocacy of science education as inquiry; Rowe saw wonder and excitement as central to the teaching and learning of science. She spent much of her professional life designing professional development experiences and innovative curriculum materials to help teachers, particularly elementary school teachers, enact inquiry in their classrooms.

  15. Does management intensity in inter rows effect soil physical properties in Austrian and Romanian vineyards?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Thomas; Strauss, Peter; Stiper, Katrin; Klipa, Vladimir; Popescu, Daniela; Winter, Silvia; Zaller, Johann G.

    2016-04-01

    Successful viticulture is mainly influenced by soil and climate. The availability of water during the growing season highly influences wine quality and quantity. To protect soil from being eroded most of the winegrowers keep the inter row zones of the vineyards green. Greening also helps to provide water-stress to the grapes for harvesting high quality wines. However, these greening strategies concerning the intensity of inter row management differ from farm to farm and are mainly based on personal experience of the winegrowers. However to what extent different inter row management practices affect soil physical properties are not clearly understood yet. To measure possible effects of inter row management in vineyards on soil physical parameters we selected paired vineyards with different inter row management in Austria and Romania. In total more than 7000 soil analysis were conducted for saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, soil water retention, water stable aggregates, total organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, potassium, phosphorous, soil texture, bulk density and water infiltration. The comparison between high intensity management with at least one soil disturbance per year, medium intensity with one soil disturbance every second inter row per year and low intensity management with no soil disturbance since at least 5 years indicates that investigated soil physical properties did not improve for the upper soil layer (3-8cm). This is in contrast to general perceptions of improved soil physical properties due to low intensity of inter row management, i.e. permanent vegetated inter rows. This may be attributed to long term and high frequency mechanical stress by agricultural machinery in inter rows.

  16. Effect of row-to-row shading on the output of flat-plate south-facing photovoltaic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, D.Y.; Hassan, A.Y.; Collis, J. ); Stefanakos, E.K. )

    1989-08-01

    When solar arrays (photovoltaic, thermal, etc.) are arranged in multiple rows of modules, all but the first row suffer reduction in (power) output, even when sufficient spacing between rows is provided. The reduction in output power occurs because the first row prevents some of the diffuse and reflected radiation from reaching the row directly behind it. This work presents estimates of the effect of shading on the amounts of solar radiation received by consecutive rows of flat-plate arrays.

  17. Comparison of the effectiveness of different immobilization systems in different body regions using daily megavoltage CT in helical tomotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, K-F

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Effective immobilization is crucial for the accurate delivery of radiotherapy. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of the commonly used immobilization systems for different body regions using megavoltage CT (MVCT). Methods: Daily treatment set-up data from 212 patients treated by helical tomotherapy (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) in 6 body regions (52 head and neck, 41 chest, 38 abdomen, 36 pelvis, 18 breast and 27 cranium) were obtained. Based on a verification tool using the pre-treatment MVCT, set-up corrections for each patient were recorded. Mean systematic and random errors of lateral, longitudinal, vertical and roll directions and three-dimensional vectors were compared between immobilization systems of each region. Results: Smaller set-up deviations were observed in the Orfit system (Orfit Industries NV, Wijnegem, Belgium) of the head and neck region, while the performance of immobilization systems for the chest, abdomen and pelvis regions was similar. Larger differences were noted in the breast group, where the prone BodyFIX® system (Medical Intelligence, Medizintechnik GmbH, Schwabmünchen, Germany) was less stable than the supine VacLok® system (CIVCO Medical Solutions, Orange City, IA). Conclusion: Differences were found between the immobilization systems in the head and neck region, in which the Orfit system was relatively more effective, whereas the VacLok and BodyFIX systems performed similarly in the chest, abdomen and pelvis regions. For the breast case, the supine position with VacLok was much more stable than the prone breast technique. The results provided references for the estimation of clinical target volume–planning target volume margins. Advances in knowledge: This is the first article on comprehensive comparisons performed in immobilization systems for main body regions that provides some practical recommendations. PMID:24398111

  18. A respiratory-gated micro-CT comparison of respiratory patterns in free-breathing and mechanically ventilated rats.

    PubMed

    Ford, Nancy L; McCaig, Lynda; Jeklin, Andrew; Lewis, James F; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W; Holdsworth, David W; Drangova, Maria

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aim to quantify the differences in lung metrics measured in free-breathing and mechanically ventilated rodents using respiratory-gated micro-computed tomography. Healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine and scanned with a retrospective respiratory gating protocol on a GE Locus Ultra micro-CT scanner. Each animal was scanned while free-breathing, then intubated and mechanically ventilated (MV) and rescanned with a standard ventilation protocol (56 bpm, 8 mL/kg and PEEP of 5 cm H2O) and again with a ventilation protocol that approximates the free-breathing parameters (88 bpm, 2.14 mL/kg and PEEP of 2.5 cm H2O). Images were reconstructed representing inspiration and end expiration with 0.15 mm voxel spacing. Image-based measurements of the lung lengths, airway diameters, lung volume, and air content were compared and used to calculate the functional residual capacity (FRC) and tidal volume. Images acquired during MV appeared darker in the airspaces and the airways appeared larger. Image-based measurements showed an increase in lung volume and air content during standard MV, for both respiratory phases, compared with matched MV and free-breathing. Comparisons of the functional metrics showed an increase in FRC for mechanically ventilated rats, but only the standard MV exhibited a significantly higher tidal volume than free-breathing or matched MV Although standard mechanical ventilation protocols may be useful in promoting consistent respiratory patterns, the amount of air in the lungs is higher than in free-breathing animals. Matching the respiratory patterns with the free-breathing case allowed similar lung morphology and physiology measurements while reducing the variability in the measurements.

  19. Can MRI accurately detect pilon articular malreduction? A quantitative comparison between CT and 3T MRI bone models

    PubMed Central

    Radzi, Shairah; Dlaska, Constantin Edmond; Cowin, Gary; Robinson, Mark; Pratap, Jit; Schuetz, Michael Andreas; Mishra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Background Pilon fracture reduction is a challenging surgery. Radiographs are commonly used to assess the quality of reduction, but are limited in revealing the remaining bone incongruities. The study aimed to develop a method in quantifying articular malreductions using 3D computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) models. Methods CT and MRI data were acquired using three pairs of human cadaveric ankle specimens. Common tibial pilon fractures were simulated by performing osteotomies to the ankle specimens. Five of the created fractures [three AO type-B (43-B1), and two AO type-C (43-C1) fractures] were then reduced and stabilised using titanium implants, then rescanned. All datasets were reconstructed into CT and MRI models, and were analysed in regards to intra-articular steps and gaps, surface deviations, malrotations and maltranslations of the bone fragments. Results Initial results reveal that type B fracture CT and MRI models differed by ~0.2 (step), ~0.18 (surface deviations), ~0.56° (rotation) and ~0.4 mm (translation). Type C fracture MRI models showed metal artefacts extending to the articular surface, thus unsuitable for analysis. Type C fracture CT models differed from their CT and MRI contralateral models by ~0.15 (surface deviation), ~1.63° (rotation) and ~0.4 mm (translation). Conclusions Type B fracture MRI models were comparable to CT and may potentially be used for the postoperative assessment of articular reduction on a case-to-case basis. PMID:28090442

  20. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle.

  1. Three-dimensional visual truth of the normal airway tree for use as a quantitative comparison to micro-CT reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiesse, Jacqueline; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; de Ryk, Jessica; Namati, Eman; Leinen, Jessica; Recheis, Wolfgang A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    Mouse models are important for pulmonary research to gain insight into structure and function in normal and diseased states, thereby extending knowledge of human disease conditions. The flexibility of human disease induction into mice, due to their similar genome, along with their short gestation cycle makes mouse models highly suitable as investigative tools. Advancements in non-invasive imaging technology, with the development of micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), have aided representation of disease states in these small pulmonary system models. The generation ofμCT 3D airway reconstructions has to date provided a means to examine structural changes associated with disease. The degree of accuracy ofμCT is uncertain. Consequently, the reliability of quantitative measurements is questionable. We have developed a method of sectioning and imaging the whole mouse lung using the Large Image Microscope Array (LIMA) as the gold standard for comparison. Fixed normal mouse lungs were embedded in agarose and 250μm sections of tissue were removed while the remaining tissue block was imaged with a stereomicroscope. A complete dataset of the mouse lung was acquired in this fashion. Following planar image registration, the airways were manually segmented using an in-house built software program PASS. Amira was then used render the 3D isosurface from the segmentations. The resulting 3D model of the normal mouse airway tree developed from pathology images was then quantitatively assessed and used as the standard to compare the accuracy of structural measurements obtained from μ-CT.

  2. Emphysema quantification from CT scans using novel application of diaphragm curvature estimation: comparison with standard quantification methods and pulmonary function data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Barr, R. Graham

    2009-02-01

    Emphysema is a disease of the lungs that destroys the alveolar air sacs and induces long-term respiratory dysfunction. CT scans allow for the imaging of the anatomical basis of emphysema and quantification of the underlying disease state. Several measures have been introduced for the quantification emphysema directly from CT data; most,however, are based on the analysis of density information provided by the CT scans, which vary by scanner and can be hard to standardize across sites and time. Given that one of the anatomical variations associated with the progression of emphysema is the flatting of the diaphragm due to the loss of elasticity in the lung parenchyma, curvature analysis of the diaphragm would provide information about emphysema from CT. Therefore, we propose a new, non-density based measure of the curvature of the diaphragm that would allow for further quantification methods in a robust manner. To evaluate the new method, 24 whole-lung scans were analyzed using the ratios of the lung height and diaphragm width to diaphragm height as curvature estimates as well as using the emphysema index as comparison. Pearson correlation coefficients showed a strong trend of several of the proposed diaphragm curvature measures to have higher correlations, of up to r=0.57, with DLCO% and VA than did the emphysema index. Furthermore, we found emphysema index to have only a 0.27 correlation to the proposed measures, indicating that the proposed measures evaluate different aspects of the disease.

  3. Region of interest (ROI) computed tomography (CT): Comparison with full field of view (FFOV) and truncated CT for a human head phantom.

    PubMed

    Chityala, R; Hoffmann, K R; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D R

    2005-01-01

    Cone-beam CT reconstruction can be performed at lower integral dose, by using a non-uniform beam filter between the x-ray source and the patient to obtain good image quality within an ROI with minimal artifacts. To evaluate the method, a human head phantom was placed on a rotary stage. Cone-beam projection images of the phantom were obtained with and without an ROI filter (dose reduction factor ~7). A mapping function was established to equalize the intensity outside the ROI (to compensate for the attenuation by the filter) to the intensity inside by assuming that those features lying both inside and outside very close to the edge of the ROI are the same. Reconstructed images were obtained using equalized projection images for 2 cases: one in which the outside region was smoothed using an averaging filter and the other with no smoothing outside. In addition, a third case was simulated by calculating the average pixel value inside the ROI for each image and assigning this value to all pixels outside the ROI for that image. The images were then back projected using a Feldkamp algorithm. We found that the three cases yield results inside the ROI comparable to those obtained using FFOV projections. In addition, the ROI filter reconstruction with smoothing provides image information outside the ROI comparable to the FFOV reconstruction. CT using an ROI filter provides a means to reconstruct reliable 3D for a volume of interest with greatly reduced integral dose compared to FFOV projections and with minimal artifacts.

  4. Voxel-Based Sensitivity of Flat-Panel CT for the Detection of Intracranial Hemorrhage: Comparison to Multi-Detector CT

    PubMed Central

    Frölich, Andreas M.; Buhk, Jan-Hendrik; Fiehler, Jens; Kemmling, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Flat-panel CT (FPCT) allows cross-sectional parenchymal, vascular and perfusion imaging within the angiography suite, which could greatly facilitate acute stroke management. We hypothesized that FPCT offers equal diagnostic accuracy compared to multi-detector CT (MDCT) as a primary tool to exclude intracranial hemorrhage. Methods 22 patients with intracranial hematomas who had both MDCT and FPCT performed within 24 hours were retrospectively identified. Patients with visible change in hematoma size or configuration were excluded. Two raters independently segmented hemorrhagic lesions. Data sets and corresponding binary lesion maps were co-registered to compare hematoma volume. Diagnostic accuracy of FPCT to detect hemorrhage was calculated from voxel-wise analysis of lesion overlap compared to reference MDCT. Results Mean hematoma size was similar between MDCT (16.2±8.9 ml) and FPCT (16.1±8.6 ml), with near perfect correlation of hematoma sizes between modalities (ρ = 0.95, p<0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of FPCT to detect hemorrhagic voxels was 61.6% and 99.8% for intraventricular hematomas and 67.7% and 99.5% for all other intracranial hematomas. Conclusions In this small sample containing predominantly cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage, FPCT based assessment of hemorrhagic volume in brain yields acceptable accuracy compared to reference MDCT, albeit with a limited sensitivity on a voxel level. Further assessment and improvement of FPCT is necessary before it can be applied as a primary imaging modality to exclude intracranial hemorrhage in acute stroke patients. PMID:27806106

  5. Ct shift: A novel and accurate real-time PCR quantification model for direct comparison of different nucleic acid sequences and its application for transposon quantifications.

    PubMed

    Kolacsek, Orsolya; Pergel, Enikő; Varga, Nóra; Apáti, Ágota; Orbán, Tamás I

    2017-01-20

    There are numerous applications of quantitative PCR for both diagnostic and basic research. As in many other techniques the basis of quantification is that comparisons are made between different (unknown and known or reference) specimens of the same entity. When the aim is to compare real quantities of different species in samples, one cannot escape their separate precise absolute quantification. We have established a simple and reliable method for this purpose (Ct shift method) which combines the absolute and the relative approach. It requires a plasmid standard containing both sequences of amplicons to be compared (e.g. the target of interest and the endogenous control). It can serve as a reference sample with equal copies of templates for both targets. Using the ΔΔCt formula we can quantify the exact ratio of the two templates in each unknown sample. The Ct shift method has been successfully applied for transposon gene copy measurements, as well as for comparison of different mRNAs in cDNA samples. This study provides the proof of concept and introduces some potential applications of the method; the absolute nature of results even without the need for real reference samples can contribute to the universality of the method and comparability of different studies.

  6. Comparison of Scientific Calipers and Computer-Enabled CT Review for the Measurement of Skull Base and Craniomaxillofacial Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Citardi, Martin J.; Herrmann, Brian; Hollenbeak, Chris S.; Stack, Brendan C.; Cooper, Margaret; Bucholz, Richard D.

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, cadaveric studies and plain-film cephalometrics provided information about craniomaxillofacial proportions and measurements; however, advances in computer technology now permit software-based review of computed tomography (CT)-based models. Distances between standardized anatomic points were measured on five dried human skulls with standard scientific calipers (Geneva Gauge, Albany, NY) and through computer workstation (StealthStation 2.6.4, Medtronic Surgical Navigation Technology, Louisville, CO) review of corresponding CT scans. Differences in measurements between the caliper and CT model were not statistically significant for each parameter. Measurements obtained by computer workstation CT review of the cranial skull base are an accurate representation of actual bony anatomy. Such information has important implications for surgical planning and clinical research. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:17167599

  7. Computerized lung nodule detection: comparison of performance for low-dose and standard-dose helical CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armato, Samuel G., III; Giger, Maryellen L.; Doi, Kunio; Bick, Ulrich; MacMahon, Heber

    2001-07-01

    The vast amount of image data acquired during a computed tomography (CT) scan makes lung nodule detection a burdensome task. Moreover, the growing acceptance of low-dose CT for lung cancer screening promises to further impact radiologists' workloads. Therefore, we have developed a computerized method to automatically analyze structures within a CT scan and identify those structures that represent lung nodules. Gray-level thresholding is performed to segment the lungs in each section to produce a segmented lung volume, which is then iteratively thresholded. At each iteration, remaining voxels are grouped into contiguous three-dimensional structures. Structures that satisfy a volume criterion then become nodule candidates. The set of nodule candidates is subjected to feature analysis. To distinguish candidates representing nodule and non-nodule structures, a rule-based approach is combined with an automated classifier. This method was applied to 43 standard-dose (diagnostic) CT scans and 13 low-dose CT scans. The method achieved an overall detection sensitivity of 71% with 1.5 false-positive detections per section on the standard-dose database and 71% sensitivity with 1.2 false-positive detections per section on the low-dose database. This automated method demonstrates promising performance in its ability to accurately detect lung nodules in standard-dose and low-dose CT images.

  8. Developing Formulas by Skipping Rows in Pascal's Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buonpastore, Robert J.; Osler, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    A table showing the first thirteen rows of Pascal's triangle, where the rows are, as usual numbered from 0 to 12 is presented. The entries in the table are called binomial coefficients. In this note, the authors systematically delete rows from Pascal's triangle and, by trial and error, try to find a formula that allows them to add new rows to the…

  9. Does a bout of strength training affect 2,000 m rowing ergometer performance and rowing-specific maximal power 24 h later?

    PubMed

    Gee, Thomas I; French, Duncan N; Howatson, Glyn; Payton, Stephen J; Berger, Nicolas J; Thompson, Kevin G

    2011-11-01

    Rowers regularly undertake rowing training within 24 h of performing bouts of strength training; however, the effect of this practice has not been investigated. This study evaluated the impact of a bout of high-intensity strength training on 2,000 m rowing ergometer performance and rowing-specific maximal power. Eight highly trained male club rowers performed baseline measures of five separate, static squat jumps (SSJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ), maximal rowing ergometer power strokes (PS) and a single 2,000 m rowing ergometer test (2,000 m). Subsequently, participants performed a high-intensity strength training session consisting of various multi-joint barbell exercises. The 2,000 m test was repeated at 24 and 48 h post-ST, in addition SSJ, CMJ and PS tests were performed at these time points and also at 2 h post-ST. Muscle soreness, serum creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were assessed pre-ST and 2, 24 and 48 h post-ST. Following the ST, there were significant elevations in muscle soreness (2 and 24 h, P < 0.01), CK (2, 24 and 48 h, P < 0.01), and LDH (2 h, P < 0.05) in comparison to baseline values. There were significant decrements across all time points for SSJ, CMJ and PS, which ranged between 3 and 10% (P < 0.05). However, 2,000 m performance and related measurements of heart rate and blood lactate were not significantly affected by ST. In summary, a bout of high-intensity strength training resulted in symptoms of muscle damage and decrements in rowing-specific maximal power, but this did not affect 2,000 m rowing ergometer performance in highly trained rowers.

  10. Comparison of an alternative and existing binning methods to reduce the acquisition duration of 4D PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Didierlaurent, David Ribes, Sophie; Caselles, Olivier; Jaudet, Cyril; Dierickx, Lawrence O.; Zerdoud, Slimane; Brillouet, Severine; Weits, Kathleen; Batatia, Hadj; Courbon, Frédéric

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion is a source of artifacts that reduce image quality in PET. Four dimensional (4D) PET/CT is one approach to overcome this problem. Existing techniques to limiting the effects of respiratory motions are based on prospective phase binning which requires a long acquisition duration (15–25 min). This time is uncomfortable for the patients and limits the clinical exploitation of 4D PET/CT. In this work, the authors evaluated an existing method and an alternative retrospective binning method to reduce the acquisition duration of 4D PET/CT. Methods: The authors studied an existing mixed-amplitude binning (MAB) method and an alternative binning method by mixed-phases (MPhB). Before implementing MPhB, they analyzed the regularity of the breathing patterns in patients. They studied the breathing signal drift and missing CT slices that could be challenging for implementing MAB. They compared the performance of MAB and MPhB with current binning methods to measure the maximum uptake, internal volume, and maximal range of tumor motion. Results: MPhB can be implemented depending on an optimal phase (in average, the exhalation peak phase −4.1% of the entire breathing cycle duration). Signal drift of patients was in average 35% relative to the breathing amplitude. Even after correcting this drift, MAB was feasible in 4D CT for only 64% of patients. No significant differences appeared between the different binning methods to measure the maximum uptake, internal volume, and maximal range of tumor motion. The authors also determined the inaccuracies of MAB and MPhB to measure the maximum amplitude of tumor motion with three bins (less than 3 mm for movement inferior to 12 mm, up to 6.4 mm for a 21 mm movement). Conclusions: The authors proposed an alternative binning method by mixed-phase binning that halves the acquisition duration of 4D PET/CT. Mixed-amplitude binning was challenging because of signal drift and missing CT slices. They showed that more

  11. Automated segmentation and tracking of coronary arteries in cardiac CT scans: comparison of performance with a clinically used commercial software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Chughtai, Aamer; Patel, Smita; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Sahiner, Berkman; Wei, Jun; Kazerooni, Ella A.

    2010-03-01

    Coronary CT angiography (cCTA) has been reported to be an effective means for diagnosis of coronary artery disease. We are investigating the feasibility of developing a computer-aided detection (CADe) system to assist radiologists in detection of non-calcified plaques in coronary arteries in ECG-gated cCTA scans. In this study, we developed a prototype vessel segmentation and tracking method to extract the coronary arterial trees which will define the search space for plaque detection. Vascular structures are first enhanced by 3D multi-scale filtering and analysis of the eigenvalues of Hessian matrices using a vessel enhancement response function specifically designed for coronary arteries. The enhanced vascular structures are then segmented by an EM estimation method. The segmented coronary arteries are tracked using a 3D dynamic balloon tracking (DBT) method. For this preliminary study, two starting seed points were manually identified at the origins of the left and right coronary artery (LCA and RCA). The DBT method automatically moves a sphere along the vessel whose diameter is adjusted dynamically based on the local vessel size, tracks the vessels, and identifies its branches to generate the left and right coronary arterial trees. The algorithm was applied to 20 cCTA scans that contained various degrees of coronary artery diseases. To evaluate the performance of vessel segmentation and tracking, the rendered volume of coronary arteries tracked by our algorithm was displayed on a PC, placed next to a GE Advantage workstation on which the coronary arterial trees tracked by the GE software and the original cCTA scan were displayed. Two experienced thoracic radiologists visually examined the coronary arteries on the cCTA scan and the segmented vessels to count untracked false-negative (FN) segments and false positives (FPs). The comparison was made by radiologists' visual judgment because the digital files for the segmented vessels were not accessible on the

  12. SU-E-I-84: Accuracy Comparison of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using In-Air Micro-CT Image Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y; Fullerton, G; Goins, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor volume is considered as a better predictor for therapy response monitoring and tumor staging over Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. In this study, the accuracy of subcutaneous rodent tumor volumes using preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and ultrasound (US) equipment and with an external caliper was compared using in-air micro-CT image volume of excised tumors determined as reference tumor volume in our prior study. Methods: MR, US and micro-CT images of subcutaneous SCC4 head and neck tumor xenografts were acquired 4, 6, 9, 11 and 13 days after tumor cell inoculation. Before MR and US scans, caliper measurements were made. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging and ex vivo caliper measurements were performed. Tumor volumes were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three image modalities and caliper, and compared with reference tumor volume by linear regression analysis as well as Bland-Altman plots. A one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) test was also performed to compare volumes among caliper measurements. Results: The correlation coefficients (R2) of the regression lines for tumor volumes measured by the three imaging modalities and caliper were 0.9939, 0.9669, 0.9806, 0.9274, 0.9619 and 0.9819 for MRI, US and micro-CT, caliperbeforeMRI, caliperbeforeUS and ex vivo caliper respectively. In Bland-Altman plots, the average of tumor volume difference from reference tumor volume (bias) was significant for caliper and micro- CT, but not for MRI and US. Comparison of caliper measurements showed a significant difference (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Using the in-air micro-CT image volume, tumor volume measured by MRI was the most accurate among the three imaging modalities. In vivo caliper volume measurements showed unreliability while ex

  13. Characterization of Genome-Wide Variation in Four-Row Wax, a Waxy Maize Landrace with a Reduced Kernel Row Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanmei; Wang, Xuewen; Wei, Bin; Wang, Yongbin; Liu, Yinghong; Zhang, Junjie; Hu, Yufeng; Yu, Guowu; Li, Jian; Xu, Zhanbin; Huang, Yubi

    2016-01-01

    In southwest China, some maize landraces have long been isolated geographically, and have phenotypes that differ from those of widely grown cultivars. These landraces may harbor rich genetic variation responsible for those phenotypes. Four-row Wax is one such landrace, with four rows of kernels on the cob. We resequenced the genome of Four-row Wax, obtaining 50.46 Gb sequence at 21.87× coverage, then identified and characterized 3,252,194 SNPs, 213,181 short InDels (1-5 bp) and 39,631 structural variations (greater than 5 bp). Of those, 312,511 (9.6%) SNPs were novel compared to the most detailed haplotype map (HapMap) SNP database of maize. Characterization of variations in reported kernel row number (KRN) related genes and KRN QTL regions revealed potential causal mutations in fea2, td1, kn1, and te1. Genome-wide comparisons revealed abundant genetic variations in Four-row Wax, which may be associated with environmental adaptation. The sequence and SNP variations described here enrich genetic resources of maize, and provide guidance into study of seed numbers for crop yield improvement.

  14. Comparison between Pre-log and Post-log Statistical Models in Ultra-Low-Dose CT Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lin; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Kim, Soo Mee; Alessio, Adam; Kinahan, Paul; Chang, Zhiqian; Sauer, Ken; Kalra, Mannudeep; De Man, Bruno

    2016-11-09

    X-ray detectors in clinical computed tomography (CT) usually operate in current-integrating mode. Their complicated signal statistics often lead to intractable likelihood functions for practical use in model-based image reconstruction (MBIR). It is therefore desirable to design simplified statistical models without losing the essential factors. Depending on whether the CT transmission data are logarithmically transformed, pre-log and post-log models are two major categories of choices in CT MBIR. Both being approximations, it remains an open question whether one model can notably improve image quality over the other on real scanners. In this study, we develop and compare several pre-log and post-log MBIR algorithms under a unified framework. Their reconstruction accuracy based on simulation and clinical datasets are evaluated. The results show that pre-log MBIR can achieve notably better quantitative accuracy than post-log MBIR in ultra-low-dose CT, although in less extreme cases, post-log MBIR with handcrafted pre-processing remains a competitive alternative. Pre-log MBIR could play a growing role in emerging ultra-low-dose CT applications.

  15. Optical RAM row access using WDM-enabled all-passive row/column decoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Sotirios; Alexoudi, Theoni; Kanellos, George T.; Miliou, Amalia; Pleros, Nikos

    2014-03-01

    Towards achieving a functional RAM organization that reaps the advantages offered by optical technology, a complete set of optical peripheral modules, namely the Row (RD) and Column Decoder (CD) units, is required. In this perspective, we demonstrate an all-passive 2×4 optical RAM RD with row access operation and subsequent all-passive column decoding to control the access of WDM-formatted words in optical RAM rows. The 2×4 RD exploits a WDM-formatted 2-bit-long memory WordLine address along with its complementary value, all of them encoded on four different wavelengths and broadcasted to all RAM rows. The RD relies on an all-passive wavelength-selective filtering matrix (λ-matrix) that ensures a logical `0' output only at the selected RAM row. Subsequently, the RD output of each row drives the respective SOA-MZI-based Row Access Gate (AG) to grant/block the entry of the incoming data words to the whole memory row. In case of a selected row, the data word exits the row AG and enters the respective CD that relies on an allpassive wavelength-selective Arrayed Waveguide Grating (AWG) for decoding the word bits into their individual columns. Both RD and CD procedures are carried out without requiring any active devices, assuming that the memory address and data word bits as well as their inverted values will be available in their optical form by the CPU interface. Proof-of-concept experimental verification exploiting cascaded pairs of AWGs as the λ-matrix is demonstrated at 10Gb/s, providing error-free operation with a peak power penalty lower than 0.2dB for all optical word channels.

  16. The evaluation and comparison of kidney length obtained from axial cuts in spiral CT scan with its true length

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Mehdi; Rahimi, Farshad; Tajadini, Mohammadhasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increased size of kidney is the main symptom of pyelonephritis and renal ischemia in children. Ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) scan methods are the imaging methods for evaluating the urogenital system. The aim of this study is to compare the kidney length obtained from spiral CT scan with the true length obtained from multi-slice CT. Materials and Methods: From 100 patients 200 kidneys were examined in Alzahra Hospital in 2012. Multi-slice CT was used to obtain coronal and sagittal cuts to find the length of kidneys. Results: The mean values of true size of axial sections of the right and left kidneys were 108.37 ± 12.3 mm and 109.74 ± 13.6 mm, respectively. The mean difference of axial sections’ lengths in the right and left kidneys was 1.37 ± 1.22 mm. The mean values of length in the spiral CT scan of the right and left kidneys were 98.61 ± 15.8 mm and 103.11 ± 15.9 mm, respectively. The difference in the estimated size by multi-slice CT scan in oblique and axial images was significant (9.77 ± 1.19 mm and 6.63 ± 0.8 mm for the right and left kidneys, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The average size of both kidneys determined in axial images was smaller than the actual size. The estimation of kidney size in axial images is not reliable, and to obtain the actual size, it is required to have the coronal and sagittal cuts with proper quality, which could be achieved by multi-slice method. PMID:25709984

  17. Radiation absorbed from dental implant radiography: a comparison of linear tomography, CT scan, and panoramic and intra-oral techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Danforth, R.A.; Barnes, R.W.; Burtch, M.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Absorbed radiation dose in bone marrow, thyroid, salivary gland, eye, and skin entrance was determined by placement of lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's) at selected anatomical sites within and on a human-like x-ray phantom. The phantom was exposed to radiation from linear tomographic and computer-assisted tomographic (CT) simulated dental implant radiographic examinations. The mean dose was determined for each anatomical site. Resulting dose measurements from linear tomography and computer-assisted tomography are compared with reported panoramic and intra-oral doses. CT examination delivered the greatest dose, while linear tomography was generally lowest. Panoramic and intra-oral doses were similar to those of linear tomography.

  18. Comparison of quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging CT to fluorescent microsphere-based flow from high-resolution cryo-images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Li, Yuemeng; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) has the potential to provide quantitative measures of myocardial blood flow (MBF) which can aid the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. We evaluated the quantitative accuracy of MPI-CT in a porcine model of balloon-induced LAD coronary artery ischemia guided by fractional flow reserve (FFR). We quantified MBF at baseline (FFR=1.0) and under moderate ischemia (FFR=0.7) using MPI-CT and compared to fluorescent microsphere-based MBF from high-resolution cryo-images. Dynamic, contrast-enhanced CT images were obtained using a spectral detector CT (Philips Healthcare). Projection-based mono-energetic images were reconstructed and processed to obtain MBF. Three MBF quantification approaches were evaluated: singular value decomposition (SVD) with fixed Tikhonov regularization (ThSVD), SVD with regularization determined by the L-Curve criterion (LSVD), and Johnson-Wilson parameter estimation (JW). The three approaches over-estimated MBF compared to cryo-images. JW produced the most accurate MBF, with average error 33.3+/-19.2mL/min/100g, whereas LSVD and ThSVD had greater over-estimation, 59.5+/-28.3mL/min/100g and 78.3+/-25.6 mL/min/100g, respectively. Relative blood flow as assessed by a flow ratio of LAD-to-remote myocardium was strongly correlated between JW and cryo-imaging, with R2=0.97, compared to R2=0.88 and 0.78 for LSVD and ThSVD, respectively. We assessed tissue impulse response functions (IRFs) from each approach for sources of error. While JW was constrained to physiologic solutions, both LSVD and ThSVD produced IRFs with non-physiologic properties due to noise. The L-curve provided noise-adaptive regularization but did not eliminate non-physiologic IRF properties or optimize for MBF accuracy. These findings suggest that model-based MPI-CT approaches may be more appropriate for quantitative MBF estimation and that cryo-imaging can support the development of MPI-CT by providing spatial distributions of MBF.

  19. Yankee Rowe simulator core model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitano, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the validation of the Yankee Rowe simulator core model. Link-Miles Simulation Corporation is developing the Yankee Rowe simulator and Yankee Atomic Electric Company is involved in input and benchmark data generation, as well as simulator validation. Core model validation by Yankee comprises three tasks: (1) careful generation of fuel reactivity characteristics (B constants); (2) nonintegrated core model testing; and (3) fully integrated core model testing. Simulator core model validation and verification is a multistage process involving input and benchmark data generation as well as interactive debugging. Core characteristics were brought within acceptable criteria by this process. This process was achieved through constant communication between Link-Miles and Yankee engineers. Based on this validation, the Yankee Rowe simulator core model is found to be acceptable for training purposes.

  20. Neutron camera employing row and column summations

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G.; Diawara, Yacouba; Donahue, Jr, Cornelius; Montcalm, Christopher A.; Riedel, Richard A.; Visscher, Theodore

    2016-06-14

    For each photomultiplier tube in an Anger camera, an R.times.S array of preamplifiers is provided to detect electrons generated within the photomultiplier tube. The outputs of the preamplifiers are digitized to measure the magnitude of the signals from each preamplifier. For each photomultiplier tube, a corresponding summation circuitry including R row summation circuits and S column summation circuits numerically add the magnitudes of the signals from preamplifiers for each row and for each column to generate histograms. For a P.times.Q array of photomultiplier tubes, P.times.Q summation circuitries generate P.times.Q row histograms including R entries and P.times.Q column histograms including S entries. The total set of histograms include P.times.Q.times.(R+S) entries, which can be analyzed by a position calculation circuit to determine the locations of events (detection of a neutron).

  1. Yankee Rowe isotopics benchmark using MCNP-XT

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Whitmer, C.

    2013-07-01

    The Yankee Rowe spent fuel isotopic data provides a valuable source to benchmark the burnup calculations as part of verification and validation (V and V) efforts for the TerraPower's Monte Carlo depletion code, MCNP-XT. A total of 71 fuel rods were selected in the Yankee Rowe isotopic measurements covering a burnup range up to 44 MWd/kg ({approx}4.4%) under both the asymptotic spectrum and the non-asymptotic spectrum. The MCNP-XT pin cell depletion provides a comparison against the asymptotic spectrum measurement; and full assembly depletion with 322 depletion materials provides comparisons against various non-asymptotic depletion conditions. All calculations are performed based on the recent ENDF/B-VII.O data. Furthermore, the Monte Carlo depletion uncertainties and biases were examined showing their effect as insignificant. The set of burnup calculations cover the scattered experimental measurements demonstrating excellent agreement with the measured values. This benchmark exercise demonstrates the depletion analysis capability of the MCNP-XT code and validates the low burnup range. (authors)

  2. Factors affecting uncertainty in lung nodule volume estimation with CT: comparisons of findings from two estimation methods in a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Zeng, Rongping; Myers, Kyle J.; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    This work aimed to compare two different types of volume estimation methods (a model-based and a segmentationbased method) in terms of identifying factors affecting measurement uncertainty. Twenty-nine synthetic nodules with varying size, radiodensity, and shape were placed in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom and scanned with a 16- detector row CT scanner. Ten repeat scans were acquired using three exposures and two slice collimations, and were reconstructed with varying slice thicknesses. Nodule volumes were estimated from the reconstructed data using a matched-filter and a segmentation approach. Log transformed volumes were used to obtain measurement error with truth obtained through micro-CT. ANOVA and multiple linear regression were applied to measurement error to identify significant factors affecting volume estimation for each method. Root mean square of measurement errors (RMSE) for meaningful subgroups, repeatability coefficients (RC) for different imaging protocols, and reproducibility coefficients (RDC) for thin and thick collimation conditions were evaluated. Results showed that for both methods, nodule size, shape and slice thickness were significant factors. Collimation was significant for the matched-filter method. RMSEs for matched-filter measurements were in general smaller than segmentation. To achieve RMSE on the order of 15% or less for {5, 8, 9, 10mm} nodules, the corresponding maximum allowable slice thicknesses were {3, 5, 5, 5mm} for the matched-filter and {0.8, 3, 3, 3mm} for the segmentation method. RCs showed similar patterns for both methods, increasing with slice thickness. For 8-10mm nodules, the measurements were highly repeatable provided the slice thickness was ≤3mm, regardless of method and across varying acquisition conditions. RDCs were lower for thin collimation than thick collimation protocols. While RDC of matched filter volume estimation results was always lower than segmentation results, for 8-10mm nodules with thin

  3. Optimal Lateral Row Anchor Positioning in Posterior-Superior Transosseous Equivalent Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zumstein, Matthias A.; Raniga, Sumit; Labrinidis, Agatha; Eng, Kevin; Bain, Gregory I.; Moor, Beat K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The optimal placement of suture anchors in transosseous-equivalent (TOE) double-row rotator cuff repair remains controversial. Purpose: A 3-dimensional (3D) high-resolution micro–computed tomography (micro-CT) histomorphometric analysis of cadaveric proximal humeral greater tuberosities (GTs) was performed to guide optimal positioning of lateral row anchors in posterior-superior (infraspinatus and supraspinatus) TOE rotator cuff repair. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Thirteen fresh-frozen human cadaveric proximal humeri underwent micro-CT analysis. The histomorphometric parameters analyzed in the standardized volumes of interest included cortical thickness, bone volume, and trabecular properties. Results: Analysis of the cortical thickness of the lateral rows demonstrated that the entire inferior-most lateral row, 15 to 21 mm from the summit of the GT, had the thickest cortical bone (mean, 0.79 mm; P = .0001), with the anterior-most part of the GT, 15 to 21 mm below its summit, having the greatest cortical thickness of 1.02 mm (P = .008). There was a significantly greater bone volume (BV; posterior, 74.5 ± 27.4 mm3; middle, 55.8 ± 24.9 mm3; anterior, 56.9 ± 20.7 mm3; P = .001) and BV as a percentage of total tissue volume (BV/TV; posterior, 7.3% ± 2.7%, middle, 5.5% ± 2.4%; anterior, 5.6% ± 2.0%; P = .001) in the posterior third of the GT than in intermediate or anterior thirds. In terms of both BV and BV/TV, the juxta-articular medial row had the greatest value (BV, 87.3 ± 25.1 mm3; BV/TV, 8.6% ± 2.5%; P = .0001 for both) followed by the inferior-most lateral row 15 to 21 mm from the summit of the GT (BV, 62.0 ± 22.7 mm3; BV/TV, 6.1% ± 2.2%; P = .0001 for both). The juxta-articular medial row had the greatest value for both trabecular number (0.3 ± 0.06 mm–1; P = .0001) and thickness (0.3 ± 0.08 μm; P = .0001) with the lowest degree of trabecular separation (1.3 ± 0.4 μm; P = .0001). The structure model index

  4. 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT Versus Histopathology in Primary Localized Prostate Cancer: A Voxel-Wise Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Zamboglou, Constantinos; Schiller, Florian; Fechter, Tobias; Wieser, Gesche; Jilg, Cordula Annette; Chirindel, Alin; Salman, Nasr; Drendel, Vanessa; Werner, Martin; Mix, Michael; Meyer, Philipp Tobias; Grosu, Anca Ligia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We performed a voxel-wise comparison of 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT with prostate histopathology to evaluate the performance of 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA for the detection and delineation of primary prostate cancer (PCa). Methodology: Nine patients with histopathological proven primary PCa underwent 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT followed by radical prostatectomy. Resected prostates were scanned by ex-vivo CT in a special localizer and histopathologically prepared. Histopathological information was matched to ex-vivo CT. PCa volume (PCa-histo) and non-PCa tissue in the prostate (NPCa-histo) were processed to obtain a PCa-model, which was adjusted to PET-resolution (histo-PET). Each histo-PET was coregistered to in-vivo PSMA-PET/CT data. Results: Analysis of spatial overlap between histo-PET and PSMA PET revealed highly significant correlations (p < 10-5) in nine patients and moderate to high coefficients of determination (R²) from 42 to 82 % with an average of 60 ± 14 % in eight patients (in one patient R2 = 7 %). Mean SUVmean in PCa-histo and NPCa-histo was 5.6 ± 6.1 and 3.3 ± 2.5 (p = 0.012). Voxel-wise receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses comparing the prediction by PSMA-PET with the non-smoothed tumor distribution from histopathology yielded an average area under the curve of 0.83 ± 0.12. Absolute and relative SUV (normalized to SUVmax) thresholds for achieving at least 90 % sensitivity were 3.19 ± 3.35 and 0.28 ± 0.09, respectively. Conclusions: Voxel-wise analyses revealed good correlations of 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT and histopathology in eight out of nine patients. Thus, PSMA-PET allows a reliable detection and delineation of PCa as basis for PET-guided focal therapies. PMID:27446496

  5. Evaluation of biventricular ejection fraction with ECG-gated 16-slice CT: preliminary findings in acute pulmonary embolism in comparison with radionuclide ventriculography.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel; Vlassenbroek, Alain; Roelants, Véronique; D'Hoore, William; Verschuren, Franck; Goncette, Louis; Maldague, Baudouin

    2005-07-01

    This study aimed to assess the feasibility of cardiac global function evaluation during a whole-chest multi-slice CT (MSCT) acquisition in patients referred for suspicion of pulmonary embolism (PE), and to compare the results with planar equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography (ERNA). Ten consecutive haemodynamically stable patients (six female, four male; mean age 69.7 years; heart rate 65-99 bpm) with suspicion of PE underwent an MSCT and ERNA within a 6 h period. CT acquisition was performed after contrast medium injection by using 16x1.5 mm collimation and retrospective ECG gating. Left ventricular (LVEF) and right ventricular (RVEF) ejection fractions were calculated using dedicated three-dimensional software. Relationships between measurements obtained with MSCT and ERNA were assessed using linear regression analysis and reliability of MSCT was assessed with intra-class correlation coefficient. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to calculate limits of agreement between MSCT and ERNA. MSCT was performed successfully in ten patients with a mean acquisition time of 16.5+/-2.8 s. Functional cardiac evaluation was possible on CT for all patients except for one due to poor opacification of right ventricle. Linear regression analysis showed a good correlation between MSCT and ERNA for the LVEF (R=0.91) and the RVEF (R=0.89) measurements. Intra-class correlation was superior for LVEF (0.92) than for the RVEF (0.68). Bland-Altman plots demonstrated that MSCT substantially overestimated the ERNA RVEF. Morphological CT data demonstrated PE in four of ten of patients and alternative diagnoses in five of ten patients. Our study reveals that MSCT with retrospective ECG gating may provide in one modality a morphological and a functional cardiopulmonary evaluation. Comparison with ERNA demonstrated a good correlation for both ventricular ejection fractions.

  6. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yakun; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Methods: A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDI{sub vol} and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. Results: The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose

  7. In-vivo Comparison of 18F-FLT uptake, CT Number, Tumor Volume in Evaluation of Repopulation during Radiotherapy for Lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Jinming; Li, Chengming; Sun, Xindong; Meng, Xue

    2017-01-01

    Accelerated repopulation has been observed in various tumors. This study was aimed to evaluate the potential of 3′-deoxy-3′-18F-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT) uptake and Computed Tomography Number (CTN) in monitoring tumor responses to radiotherapy compared with tumor volume (TV) changes. Tumor bearing nude mice were assigned to either irradiated daily or every second day group and then randomized to 6 sub-groups to receive 0Gy, 6Gy, 12Gy, 18Gy, 24Gy, 36Gy irradiation, respectively. TV was measured every 3 days. 18F-FLT micro-PET/CT scans were performed after irradiation being completed. Tumor sections were stained to calculate the immunohistochemical (Ki-67) labeling index (LI). Comparison analysis between FLT uptake parameters, CTNs, VTs and Ki-67 LI results were conducted to determine the correlation. Ki-67 LI increased significantly after 6 times of irradiation at irradiated daily group and after 3 times at irradiated every second day group, suggesting accelerated repopulation. No shrinkage of TV was noticed at two groups during irradiation delivery. Both 18F-FLT uptake and CTN increased significantly after irradiation of 12Gy/6f/6d and 6Gy/3f/6d. Comparison analysis found a significant relationship between Ki-67 LI and 18F-FLT uptake parameters as well as CTN. Both 18F-FLT PET and CT have the potential to reflect the tumor proliferative response during radiation delivery. PMID:28387306

  8. Comparison of analytical and numerical approaches for CT-based aberration correction in transcranial passive acoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ryan M.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections are employed in transcranial ultrasound both for therapy and imaging. In this study, analytical and numerical approaches for calculating aberration corrections based on CT data were compared, with a particular focus on their application to transcranial passive imaging. Two models were investigated: a three-dimensional full-wave numerical model (Connor and Hynynen 2004 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 51 1693-706) based on the Westervelt equation, and an analytical method (Clement and Hynynen 2002 Ultrasound Med. Biol. 28 617-24) similar to that currently employed by commercial brain therapy systems. Trans-skull time delay corrections calculated from each model were applied to data acquired by a sparse hemispherical (30 cm diameter) receiver array (128 piezoceramic discs: 2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) passively listening through ex vivo human skullcaps (n  =  4) to emissions from a narrow-band, fixed source emitter (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency). Measurements were taken at various locations within the cranial cavity by moving the source around the field using a three-axis positioning system. Images generated through passive beamforming using CT-based skull corrections were compared with those obtained through an invasive source-based approach, as well as images formed without skull corrections, using the main lobe volume, positional shift, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio as metrics for image quality. For each CT-based model, corrections achieved by allowing for heterogeneous skull acoustical parameters in simulation outperformed the corresponding case where homogeneous parameters were assumed. Of the CT-based methods investigated, the full-wave model provided the best imaging results at the cost of computational complexity. These results highlight the importance of accurately modeling trans-skull propagation when calculating CT-based aberration corrections

  9. Testing functional and morphological interpretations of enamel thickness along the deciduous tooth row in human children.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    The significance of a gradient in enamel thickness along the human permanent molar row has been debated in the literature. Some attribute increased enamel thickness from first to third molars to greater bite force during chewing. Others argue that thicker third molar enamel relates to a smaller crown size facilitated by a reduced dentin component. Thus, differences in morphology, not function, explains enamel thickness. This study draws on these different interpretive models to assess enamel thickness along the entire human deciduous tooth row. Average enamel thickness (AET), the area and proportion of crown enamel and dentin, and a crown size proxy are calculated for incisors, canines, and molars. Allometric scaling relationships are assessed within each tooth class, and then comparisons are undertaken along the row. Generally, AET was correlated with crown size and scaled with isometry, except for second molars which scaled with positive allometry. Mean AET increased along the row and was greater on molars, where bite forces are reported to be higher. Second molars combined the largest crown size with the thickest enamel and the smallest proportion of dentin, which is consistent with a reduction in the potential for cusp fracture under high bite forces. Resistance to wear may also account for some enamel thickness variation between tooth classes. Dental reduction did not explain the trend in AET from central to lateral incisors, or from first to second molars. The gradient in AET along the deciduous tooth row is partly consistent with a functional interpretation of enamel thickness.

  10. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  11. TU-EF-304-06: A Comparison of CT Number to Relative Linear Stopping Power Conversion Curves Used by Proton Therapy Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P; Lowenstein, J; Kry, S; Ibbott, G; Followill, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the CT Number (CTN) to Relative Linear Stopping Power (RLSP) conversion curves used by 14 proton institutions in their dose calculations. Methods: The proton institution’s CTN to RLSP conversion curves were collected by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center during its on-site dosimetry review audits. The CTN values were converted to scaled CT Numbers. The scaling assigns a CTN of 0 to air and 1000 to water to allow intercomparison. The conversion curves were compared and the mean curve was calculated based on institutions’ predicted RLSP values for air (CTN 0), lung (CTN 250), fat (CTN 950), water (1000), liver (CTN 1050), and bone (CTN 2000) points. Results: One institution’s curve was found to have a unique curve shape between the scaled CTN of 1025 to 1225. This institution modified its curve based on the findings. Another institution had higher RLSP values than expected for both low and high CTNs. This institution recalibrated their two CT scanners and the new data placed their curve closer to the mean of all institutions. After corrections were made to several conversion curves, four institutions still fall outside 2 standard deviations at very low CTNs (100–200), and two institutions fall outside between CTN 850–900. The largest percent difference in RLSP values between institutions for the specific tissues reviewed was 22% for the lung point. Conclusion: The review and comparison of CTN to RLSP conversion curves allows IROC Houston to identify any outliers and make recommendations for improvement. Several institutions improved their clinical dose calculation accuracy as a Result of this review. There is still area for improvement, particularly in the lung area of the curve. The IROC Houston QA Center is supported by NCI grant CA180803.

  12. Three-dimensional spiral CT angiography in pancreatic surgical planning using non-tailored protocols: comparison with conventional angiography.

    PubMed

    Blomley, M J; Albrecht, T; Williamson, R C; Allison, D J

    1998-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate three-dimensional spiral computed tomography (3DCT) as an adjunct to routine pancreatic CT scanning, with particular regard to the identification of surgically important hepatic arterial anomalies, correlated with conventional visceral angiography. 32 patients underwent spiral CT scans prior to pancreatic surgery using established protocols. Oral contrast medium was used throughout. 150 ml of intravenous contrast medium was given at 3 ml s-1 with a 24 s spiral CT sequence starting 35 s after the start of infusion. Two protocols were employed, both with a pitch of 1:3 mm table feed/collimation (n = 17) and 5 mm table feed/collimation (n = 15). Overlapping (1 mm minimum) axial reformats were reconstructed. 3DCT shaded-surface displays of the visceral arteries were assessed for visceral arterial anomalies. Visceral angiography (n = 23) was independently correlated. Satisfactory 3D angiograms were performed in all but one patient, in whom the coeliac axis was missed. (i) 3 mm protocol: 3DCT (n = 17) showed three anomalous right hepatic arteries (ARHA), one trifurcation anomaly and one splenic artery with an aortic origin. Angiography (n = 11) confirmed these findings, although one patient with an ARHA did not have angiography. A left gastric arterial supply to the left liver was not detected. (ii) 5 mm protocol: 3DCT (n = 15) showed two cases of ARHA. While confirming these findings, angiography (n = 12) showed a third case of ARHA, in which the coeliac and superior mesenteric artery had very close origins. A left gastric supply to the left liver was also missed. It is concluded that satisfactory 3DCT is possible without changing existing scanning protocols, although narrow sections are required for the confident assessment of right hepatic arterial anomalies, and any left hepatic supply via the left gastric artery was poorly assessed in this series.

  13. An in vitro CT Comparison of Gutta-Percha Removal with Two Rotary Systems and Hedstrom Files

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pankaj; Bharath, Makonahalli Jaganath; Sahadev, Chickmagravalli Krishnegowda; Makonahalli Ramachandra, Praveen Kumar; Rao, Yogesh; Ali, Ambereen; Mohamed, Shahnawaz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the efficacy of NiTi mechanical rotary instrumentation and Hedstrom file for gutta-percha/sealer removal computed tomography (CT) was utilized in vitro. Materials and Methods Thirty extracted human single rooted teeth, each with a single canal were selected. The samples were decoronated with a double faced diamond disk to have 17-mm root; teeth roots were instrumented with K-files up to master apical file #30 using step back technique. Samples were obturated using cold lateral condensation of gutta-percha and AH Plus root canal sealer. The teeth were then randomly divided into three groups of 10 specimens each. After 2 weeks 3-dimensional images of the roots were obtained by CT and the volume of root filling mass was measured. All the canals were then retreated by either the ProTaper retreatment files, Mtwo retreatment files or Hedstrom files. The canals were irrigated with 2 mL of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite irrigating solution during each change of instrument. The volume of remaining filling materials after the retreatment procedures was assessed by CT. Statistical analysis was performed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test. Results Neither of studied systems completely removed the root filling material. No significant difference was observed between the rotary systems. The volume of remaining filling materials was significantly less in rotary instrumentation than hand files. There was no significant difference for debris extruded from the apical foramen between the groups. Conclusion Under the experimental conditions, Mtwo and ProTaper retreatment files left less gutta-percha and sealer than H files; however, complete removal of filling materials was not achieved by the three systems investigated. PMID:23717331

  14. Simultaneous measurements of cerebral blood flow by the xenon/CT method and the microsphere method. A comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, D.; Yonas, H.; Jackson, D.L.; Wolfson, S.K. Jr.; Rockette, H.; Good, W.F.; Cook, E.E.; Arena, V.C.; Willy, J.A.; Maitz, G.S.

    1985-10-01

    Simultaneous measurements of cerebral blood flow have been performed in baboons to assess the correlation between the acute and invasive nondiffusible microsphere technique and the noninvasive xenon-enhanced CT method. Blood flows in small tissue volumes (approximately 1 cm3) were directly compared. The results of these studies demonstrate a statistically significant association between the two methods (P less than .001). Similar correlations were obtained by both the Kendall tau (tau) and the Spearman (r) methods. The problems and limitations of such correlations are discussed.

  15. A comparison between amplitude sorting and phase-angle sorting using external respiratory measurement for 4D CT

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Wei; Parikh, Parag J.; Hubenschmidt, James P.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Low, Daniel A.

    2006-08-15

    Respiratory motion can cause significant dose delivery errors in conformal radiation therapy for thoracic and upper abdominal tumors. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) has been proposed to provide the image data necessary to model tumor motion and consequently reduce these errors. The purpose of this work was to compare 4D CT reconstruction methods using amplitude sorting and phase angle sorting. A 16-slice CT scanner was operated in cine mode to acquire 25 scans consecutively at each couch position through the thorax. The patient underwent synchronized external respiratory measurements. The scans were sorted into 12 phases based, respectively, on the amplitude and direction (inhalation or exhalation) or on the phase angle (0-360 deg.) of the external respiratory signal. With the assumption that lung motion is largely proportional to the measured respiratory amplitude, the variation in amplitude corresponds to the variation in motion for each phase. A smaller variation in amplitude would associate with an improved reconstructed image. Air content, defined as the amount of air within the lungs, bronchi, and trachea in a 16-slice CT segment and used by our group as a surrogate for internal motion, was correlated to the respiratory amplitude and phase angle throughout the lungs. For the 35 patients who underwent quiet breathing, images (similar to those used for treatment planning) and animations (used to display respiratory motion) generated using amplitude sorting displayed fewer reconstruction artifacts than those generated using phase angle sorting. The variations in respiratory amplitude were significantly smaller (P<0.001) with amplitude sorting than those with phase angle sorting. The subdivision of the breathing cycle into more (finer) phases improved the consistency in respiratory amplitude for amplitude sorting, but not for phase angle sorting. For 33 of the 35 patients, the air content showed significantly improved (P<0.001) correlation with the

  16. Development and Evaluation of a Combined Cultivator and Band Sprayer with a Row-Centering RTK-GPS Guidance System

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Ruiz, Manuel; Carballido, Jacob; Agüera, Juan; Rodríguez-Lizana, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Typically, low-pressure sprayers are used to uniformly apply pre- and post-emergent herbicides to control weeds in crop rows. An innovative machine for weed control in inter-row and intra-row areas, with a unique combination of inter-row cultivation tooling and intra-row band spraying for six rows and an electro-hydraulic side-shift frame controlled by a GPS system, was developed and evaluated. Two weed management strategies were tested in the field trials: broadcast spraying (the conventional method) and band spraying with mechanical weed control using RTK-GPS (the experimental method). This approach enabled the comparison between treatments from the perspective of cost savings and efficacy in weed control for a sugar beet crop. During the 2010–2011 season, the herbicide application rate (112 L ha−1) of the experimental method was approximately 50% of the conventional method, and thus a significant reduction in the operating costs of weed management was achieved. A comparison of the 0.2-trimmed means of weed population post-treatment showed that the treatments achieved similar weed control rates at each weed survey date. Sugar beet yields were similar with both methods (p = 0.92). The use of the experimental equipment is cost-effective on ≥20 ha of crops. These initial results show good potential for reducing herbicide application in the Spanish beet industry. PMID:23478600

  17. Development and evaluation of a combined cultivator and band sprayer with a row-centering RTK-GPS guidance system.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ruiz, Manuel; Carballido, Jacob; Agüera, Juan; Rodríguez-Lizana, Antonio

    2013-03-11

    Typically, low-pressure sprayers are used to uniformly apply pre- and post-emergent herbicides to control weeds in crop rows. An innovative machine for weed control in inter-row and intra-row areas, with a unique combination of inter-row cultivation tooling and intra-row band spraying for six rows and an electro-hydraulic side-shift frame controlled by a GPS system, was developed and evaluated. Two weed management strategies were tested in the field trials: broadcast spraying (the conventional method) and band spraying with mechanical weed control using RTK-GPS (the experimental method). This approach enabled the comparison between treatments from the perspective of cost savings and efficacy in weed control for a sugar beet crop. During the 2010-2011 season, the herbicide application rate (112 L ha(-1)) of the experimental method was approximately 50% of the conventional method, and thus a significant reduction in the operating costs of weed management was achieved. A comparison of the 0.2-trimmed means of weed population post-treatment showed that the treatments achieved similar weed control rates at each weed survey date. Sugar beet yields were similar with both methods (p = 0.92). The use of the experimental equipment is cost-effective on ≥20 ha of crops. These initial results show good potential for reducing herbicide application in the Spanish beet industry.

  18. Comparison of 68Ga-HBED-CC PSMA-PET/CT and multiparametric MRI for gross tumour volume detection in patients with primary prostate cancer based on slice by slice comparison with histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Zamboglou, Constantinos; Drendel, Vanessa; Jilg, Cordula A.; Rischke, Hans C.; Beck, Teresa I.; Schultze-Seemann, Wolfgang; Krauss, Tobias; Mix, Michael; Schiller, Florian; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Werner, Martin; Langer, Mathias; Bock, Michael; Meyer, Philipp T.; Grosu, Anca L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The exact detection and delineation of the intraprostatic tumour burden is crucial for treatment planning in primary prostate cancer (PCa). We compared 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT with multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) for diagnosis and tumour delineation in patients with primary PCa based on slice by slice correlation with histopathological reference material. Methodology: Seven patients with histopathologically proven primary PCa underwent 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT and MRI followed by radical prostatectomy. Resected prostates were scanned by ex-vivo CT in a special localizer and prepared for histopathology. Invasive PCa was delineated on a HE stained histologic tissue slide and matched to ex-vivo CT to obtain gross tumor volume (GTV-)histo. Ex-vivo CT including GTV-histo and MRI data were matched to in-vivo CT(PET). Consensus contours based on MRI (GTV-MRI), PSMA PET (GTV-PET) or the combination of both (GTV-union/-intersection) were created. In each in-vivo CT slice the prostate was separated into 4 equal segments and sensitivity and specificity for PSMA PET and mpMRI were assessed by comparison with histological reference material. Furthermore, the spatial overlap between GTV-histo and GTV-PET/-MRI and the Sørensen-Dice coefficient (DSC) were calculated. In the case of multifocal PCa (4/7 patients), SUV values (PSMA PET) and ADC-values (diffusion weighted MRI) were obtained for each lesion. Results: PSMA PET and mpMRI detected PCa in all patients. GTV-histo was detected in 225 of 340 segments (66.2%). Sensitivity and specificity for GTV-PET, GTV-MRI, GTV-union and GTV-intersection were 75% and 87%, 70% and 82%, 82% and 67%, 55% and 99%, respectively. GTV-histo had on average the highest overlap with GTV-union (57±22%), which was significantly higher than overlap with GTV-MRI (p=0.016) and GTV-PET (p=0.016), respectively. The mean DSC for GTV-union, GTV-PET and GTV-MRI was 0.51 (±0.18), 0.45 (±0.17) and 0.48 (±0.19), respectively. In every patient with

  19. Diagnostic capability of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced liver MRI for diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison with multi-detector CT.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Yuko; Hieda, Masashi; Akiyama, Naoko; Terada, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Noriaki; Nishiki, Masayo; Kono, Hirotaka; Kohno, Hiroshi; Irei, Toshimitsu; Yoshikawa, Yukinobu; Kuraoka, Kazuya; Taniyama, Kiyomi; Awai, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic capability of gadoxetate disodium (Gd-EOB)-MRI for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared with multidetector CT (MDCT). Fifty patients with 57 surgically proven HCCs who underwent Gd-EOB-MRI and MDCT from March 2008 to June 2011 were evaluated. Two observers evaluated MR and CT on a lesion-by-lesion basis. We analyzed sensitivity by grading on a 5-point scale, the degree of arterial enhancement and the differences in histological grades in the diffusion-weighted images (DWI). The results showed that the sensitivity of Gd-EOB-MRI was higher than that of MDCT especially for HCCs that were 1 cm in diameter or smaller. The hepatobiliary phase was useful for the detecting of small HCC. We had few cases in which it was difficult to judge HCC in the arterial enhancement between MRI and MDCT. In the diffusion-weighted image, well differentiated HCC tended to show a low signal intensity, and poorly differentiated HCC tended to show a high signal intensity. In moderately differentiated HCC's, the mean diameter of the high signal intensity group was larger than that of the low signal intensity group (24.5 mm vs. 15.8 mm). In conclusion, Gd-EOB-MRI tended to show higher sensitivity compared to MDCT in the detection of HCC.

  20. Patient-specific models of wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm: a comparison between MR and CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Putter, Sander; Breeuwer, Marcel; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Kose, Ursula; Gerritsen, Frans A.

    2006-03-01

    Finite element method based patient-specific wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) may provide a more accurate rupture risk predictor than the currently used maximum transverse diameter. In this study, we have investigated the sensitivity of the wall stress in AAA with respect to geometrical variations. We have acquired MR and CT images for four patients with AAA. Three individual users have delineated the AAA vessel wall contours on the image slices. These contours were used to generate synthetic feature images for a deformable model based segmentation method. We investigated the reproducibility and the influence of the user variability on the wall stress. For sufficiently smooth models of the AAA wall, the peak wall stress is reproducible for three out of the four AAA geometries. The 0.99 percentiles of the wall stress show excellent reproducibility for all four AAAs. The variations induced by user variability are larger than the errors caused by the segmentation variability. The influence of the user variability appears to be similar for MR and CT. We conclude that the peak wall stress in AAA is sensitive to small geometrical variations. To increase reproducibility it appears to be best not to allow too much geometrical detail in the simulations. This could be achieved either by using a sufficiently smooth geometry representation or by using a more robust statistical parameter derived from the wall stress distribution.

  1. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 02: A comparison of dose reduction methods on image quality for cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R; Buckley, LA

    2014-08-15

    Modern radiotherapy uses highly conformai dose distributions and therefore relies on daily image guidance for accurate patient positioning. Kilovoltage cone beam CT is one technique that is routinely used for patient set-up and results in a high dose to the patient relative to planar imaging techniques. This study uses an Elekta Synergy linac equipped with XVI cone beam CT to investigate the impact of various imaging parameters on dose and image quality. Dose and image quality are assessed as functions of x-ray tube voltage, tube current and the number of projections in the scan. In each case, the dose measurements confirm that as each parameter increases the dose increases. The assessment of high contrast resolution shows little dependence on changes to the image technique. However, low contrast visibility suggests a trade off between dose and image quality. Particularly for changes in tube potential, the dose increases much faster as a function of voltage than the corresponding increase in low contrast image quality. This suggests using moderate values of the peak tube voltage (100 – 120 kVp) since higher values result in significant dose increases with little gain in image quality. Measurements also indicate that increasing tube current achieves the greatest degree of improvement in the low contrast visibility. The results of this study highlight the need to establish careful imaging protocols to limit dose to the patient and to limit changes to the imaging parameters to those cases where there is a clear clinical requirement for improved image quality.

  2. Extended abstract: Partial row projection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bramley, R.; Lee, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Accelerated row projection (RP) algorithms for solving linear systems Ax = b are a class of iterative methods which in theory converge for any nonsingular matrix. RP methods are by definition ones that require finding the orthogonal projection of vectors onto the null space of block rows of the matrix. The Kaczmarz form, considered here because it has a better spectrum for iterative methods, has an iteration matrix that is the product of such projectors. Because straightforward Kaczmarz method converges slowly for practical problems, typically an outer CG acceleration is applied. Definiteness, symmetry, or localization of the eigenvalues, of the coefficient matrix is not required. In spite of this robustness, work has generally been limited to structured systems such as block tridiagonal matrices because unlike many iterative solvers, RP methods cannot be implemented by simply supplying a matrix-vector multiplication routine. Finding the orthogonal projection of vectors onto the null space of block rows of the matrix in practice requires accessing the actual entries in the matrix. This report introduces a new partial RP algorithm which retains advantages of the RP methods.

  3. Accuracy and Feasibility of Optoelectronic Sensors for Weed Mapping in Wide Row Crops

    PubMed Central

    Andújar, Dionisio; Ribeiro, Ángela; Fernández-Quintanilla, César; Dorado, José

    2011-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to assess the accuracy of a ground-based weed mapping system that included optoelectronic sensors for weed detection, and to determine the sampling resolution required for accurate weed maps in maize crops. The optoelectronic sensors were located in the inter-row area of maize to distinguish weeds against soil background. The system was evaluated in three maize fields in the early spring. System verification was performed with highly reliable data from digital images obtained in a regular 12 m × 12 m grid throughout the three fields. The comparison in all these sample points showed a good relationship (83% agreement on average) between the data of weed presence/absence obtained from the optoelectronic mapping system and the values derived from image processing software (“ground truth”). Regarding the optimization of sampling resolution, the comparison between the detailed maps (all crop rows with sensors separated 0.75 m) with maps obtained with various simulated distances between sensors (from 1.5 m to 6.0 m) indicated that a 4.5 m distance (equivalent to one in six crop rows) would be acceptable to construct accurate weed maps. This spatial resolution makes the system cheap and robust enough to generate maps of inter-row weeds. PMID:22163740

  4. Accuracy and feasibility of optoelectronic sensors for weed mapping in wide row crops.

    PubMed

    Andújar, Dionisio; Ribeiro, Ángela; Fernández-Quintanilla, César; Dorado, José

    2011-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to assess the accuracy of a ground-based weed mapping system that included optoelectronic sensors for weed detection, and to determine the sampling resolution required for accurate weed maps in maize crops. The optoelectronic sensors were located in the inter-row area of maize to distinguish weeds against soil background. The system was evaluated in three maize fields in the early spring. System verification was performed with highly reliable data from digital images obtained in a regular 12 m × 12 m grid throughout the three fields. The comparison in all these sample points showed a good relationship (83% agreement on average) between the data of weed presence/absence obtained from the optoelectronic mapping system and the values derived from image processing software ("ground truth"). Regarding the optimization of sampling resolution, the comparison between the detailed maps (all crop rows with sensors separated 0.75 m) with maps obtained with various simulated distances between sensors (from 1.5 m to 6.0 m) indicated that a 4.5 m distance (equivalent to one in six crop rows) would be acceptable to construct accurate weed maps. This spatial resolution makes the system cheap and robust enough to generate maps of inter-row weeds.

  5. Epigenetic regulation of L1CAM in endometrial carcinoma: comparison to cancer–testis (CT-X) antigens

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background L1CAM was originally identified as an adhesion molecule involved in neural development. In many human carcinomas L1CAM is over-expressed and is associated with a bad prognosis. We previously reported that L1CAM was absent in the vast majority of endometrioid endometrial carcinomas (ECs) (type 1) but was strongly expressed in the more aggressive serous and clear-cell ECs (termed type 2). The differential regulation of L1CAM in ECs is not well understood. Recent evidence suggests that it can be regulated by epigenetic mechanisms. Here we investigated the role of DNA-methylation of the L1CAM promoter for expression. We also studied the relationship to cancer testis (CT-X) antigens that co-localize with L1CAM on chromosome Xq28, a region that is often activated in human tumors. Methods We used EC cell lines and primary tumor tissues for our analysis. For expression analysis we employed RT-PCR and Western blotting. DNA-Methylation of the L1CAM promoter was determined after bisulfite conversation and DNA sequencing. Tumor tissues were examined by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Results We demonstrate that the treatment of L1CAM low/negative expressing EC cell lines with 5′-Azacytidine (5-AzaC) or knock-down of DNMT1 (DNA methyltransferase 1) as well as the HDAC (histone deacetylase) inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) up-regulated L1CAM at the mRNA and protein level. The L1CAM gene has two promoter regions with two distinct CpG islands. We observed that the expression of L1CAM correlated with hypermethylation in promoter 1 and 5-AzaC treatment affected the DNA-methylation pattern in this region. The CT-X antigens NY-ESO-1, MAGE-A3 and MAGE-A4 were also strongly up-regulated by 5-AzaC or knock-down of DNMT1 but did not respond to treatment with TSA. Primary EC tumor tissues showed a variable methylation pattern of the L1CAM promoter. No striking differences in promoter methylation were observed between tumor areas with L1CAM expression and those without

  6. Partition Model-Based 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT Predictive Dosimetry Compared with 90Y TOF PET/CT Posttreatment Dosimetry in Radioembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Quantitative Agreement Comparison.

    PubMed

    Gnesin, Silvano; Canetti, Laurent; Adib, Salim; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Silva Monteiro, Marina; Bize, Pierre; Denys, Alban; Prior, John O; Baechler, Sebastien; Boubaker, Ariane

    2016-11-01

    (90)Y-microsphere selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is a valuable treatment in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Partition-model predictive dosimetry relies on differential tumor-to-nontumor perfusion evaluated on pretreatment (99m)Tc-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) SPECT/CT. The aim of this study was to evaluate agreement between the predictive dosimetry of (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT and posttreatment dosimetry based on (90)Y time-of-flight (TOF) PET/CT.

  7. Comparison between traditional laboratory tests, permeability measurements and CT-based fluid flow modelling for cultural heritage applications.

    PubMed

    De Boever, Wesley; Bultreys, Tom; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we examine the possibility to use on-site permeability measurements for cultural heritage applications as an alternative for traditional laboratory tests such as determination of the capillary absorption coefficient. These on-site measurements, performed with a portable air permeameter, were correlated with the pore network properties of eight sandstones and one granular limestone that are discussed in this paper. The network properties of the 9 materials tested in this study were obtained from micro-computed tomography (μCT) and compared to measurements and calculations of permeability and the capillary absorption rate of the stones under investigation, in order to find the correlation between pore network characteristics and fluid management characteristics of these sandstones. Results show a good correlation between capillary absorption, permeability and network properties, opening the possibility of using on-site permeability measurements as a standard method in cultural heritage applications.

  8. Comparison of Two Deformable Registration Algorithms in the Presence of Radiologic Change Between Serial Lung CT Scans.

    PubMed

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R; White, Bradley; Justusson, Julia; Straus, Christopher; Malik, Renuka; Al-Hallaq, Hania A; Armato, Samuel G

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the image registration accuracy achieved using two deformable registration algorithms when radiation-induced normal tissue changes were present between serial computed tomography (CT) scans. Two thoracic CT scans were collected for each of 24 patients who underwent radiation therapy (RT) treatment for lung cancer, eight of whom experienced radiologically evident normal tissue damage between pre- and post-RT scan acquisition. For each patient, 100 landmark point pairs were manually placed in anatomically corresponding locations between each pre- and post-RT scan. Each post-RT scan was then registered to the pre-RT scan using (1) the Plastimatch demons algorithm and (2) the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm. The registration accuracy for each scan pair was evaluated by comparing the distance between landmark points that were manually placed in the post-RT scans and points that were automatically mapped from pre- to post-RT scans using the displacement vector fields output by the two registration algorithms. For both algorithms, the registration accuracy was significantly decreased when normal tissue damage was present in the post-RT scan. Using the Plastimatch algorithm, registration accuracy was 2.4 mm, on average, in the absence of radiation-induced damage and 4.6 mm, on average, in the presence of damage. When the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm was instead used, registration errors decreased to 1.3 mm, on average, in the absence of damage and 2.5 mm, on average, when damage was present. This work demonstrated that the presence of lung tissue changes introduced following RT treatment for lung cancer can significantly decrease the registration accuracy achieved using deformable registration.

  9. Comparison of Radiological Parameters between Normal and Patellar Dislocation Groups in Korean Population: A Rotational Profile CT-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Jatin; Seon, Jong-Keun; Woo, Seong-Hwan; Jin, Cheng; Song, Eun-Kyoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patellofemoral instability is a common cause of anterior knee pain in adolescents and young adults. Most normal and pathological values for diagnosing patellofemoral instability are based on Western literature. We conducted this radiological study to determine normal values for different patellofemoral parameters in a Korean population and to evaluate their usefulness in diagnosis. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the rotational profile computerized tomography (CT) scans of the patellar dislocation and control groups. Trochlear, patellar, rotational profile, and trochleo-patellar alignment parameters were compared between the groups. Receiver operating characteristic curves were drawn for significant parameters, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated for the cut-off values. Results There were 48 patients in the patellar dislocation group and 87 patients in the control group. In the control group and patellar dislocation group, the mean sulcus angle was 132.5° and 143.3°, respectively, trochlear depth was 6.04 mm and 3.6 mm, bisect offset was 56.4% and 99.9%, lateral patellar tilting was 9.8° and 19.2°, patellar facet asymmetry was 63.5% and 45.16%, and the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance was 10.91 mm and 27.16 mm, respectively. Conclusions The trochlear depth, bisect offset, patella tilting, and TT-TG distance were parameters that significantly contributed to patellar instability. Rotational profile CT can be considered a good diagnostic tool to assess all these parameters that help to identify anatomical aberration resulting in patellofemoral instability, thereby helping in formulating the most effective treatment plan. PMID:27894178

  10. SU-E-I-98: Dose Comparison for Pulmonary Embolism CT Studies: Single Energy Vs. Dual Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the size specific dose estimate (SSDE), dose length product (DLP) and noise relationship for pulmonary embolism studies evaluated by single source dual energy computed tomography (DECT) against conventional CT (CCT) studies in a busy cancer center and to determine the dose savings provided by DECT. Methods: An IRB-approved retrospective study was performed to determine the CTDIvol and DLP from a subset of patients scanned with both DECT and CCT over the past five years. We were able to identify 30 breast cancer patients (6 male, 24 female, age range 24 to 81) who had both DECT and CCT studies performed. DECT scans were performed with a GE HD 750 scanner (140/80 kVp, 480 mAs and 40 mm) and CCT scans were performed with a GE Lightspeed 16 slice scanner (120 kVp, 352 mAs, 20 mm). Image noise was measured by placing an ROI and recording the standard deviation of the mean HU along the descending aorta. Results: The average DECT patient size specific dose estimate was to be 14.2 ± 1.7 mGy as compared to 22.4 ± 2.7 mGy from CCT PE studies, which is a 37% reduction in the SSDE. The average DECT DLP was 721.8 ± 84.6 mGy-cm as compared to 981.8 ± 106.1 mGy-cm for CCT, which is a 26% decrease. Compared to CCT the image noise was found to decrease by 19% when using DECT for PE studies. Conclusion: DECT SSDE and DLP measurements indicate dose savings and image noise reduction when compared to CCT. In an environment that heavily debates CT patient doses, this study confirms the effectiveness of DECT in PE imaging.

  11. Comparison of physical quality assurance between Scanora 3D and 3D Accuitomo 80 dental CT scanners

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ahmed S.; Fteita, Dareen; Kulmala, Jarmo

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in dentistry has proven to be useful in the diagnosis and treatment planning of several oral and maxillofacial diseases. The quality of the resulting image is dictated by many factors related to the patient, unit, and operator. Materials and methods In this work, two dental CBCT units, namely Scanora 3D and 3D Accuitomo 80, were assessed and compared in terms of quantitative effective dose delivered to specific locations in a dosimetry phantom. Resolution and contrast were evaluated in only 3D Accuitomo 80 using special quality assurance phantoms. Results Scanora 3D, with less radiation time, showed less dosing values compared to 3D Accuitomo 80 (mean 0.33 mSv, SD±0.16 vs. 0.18 mSv, SD±0.1). Using paired t-test, no significant difference was found in Accuitomo two scan sessions (p>0.05), while it was highly significant in Scanora (p>0.05). The modulation transfer function value (at 2 lp/mm), in both measurements, was found to be 4.4%. The contrast assessment of 3D Accuitomo 80 in the two measurements showed few differences, for example, the grayscale values were the same (SD=0) while the noise level was slightly different (SD=0 and 0.67, respectively). Conclusions The radiation dose values in these two CBCT units are significantly less than those encountered in systemic CT scans. However, the dose seems to be affected more by changing the field of view rather than the voltage or amperage. The low doses were at the expense of the image quality produced, which was still acceptable. Although the spatial resolution and contrast were inferior to the medical images produced in systemic CT units, the present results recommend adopting CBCTs in maxillofacial imaging because of low radiation dose and adequate image quality. PMID:26091832

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of noninvasive coronary angiography with 320-detector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Nasis, Arthur; Leung, Michael C; Antonis, Paul R; Cameron, James D; Lehman, Sam J; Hope, Sarah A; Crossett, Marcus P; Troupis, John M; Meredith, Ian T; Seneviratne, Sujith K

    2010-11-15

    We sought to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of noninvasive coronary angiography using 320-detector row computed tomography, which provides 16-cm craniocaudal coverage in 350 ms and can image the entire coronary tree in a single heartbeat, representing a significant advance from previous-generation scanners. We evaluated 63 consecutive patients who underwent 320-detector row computed tomography and invasive coronary angiography for the investigation of suspected coronary artery disease. Patients with known coronary artery disease were excluded. Computed tomographic (CT) studies were assessed by 2 independent observers blinded to results of invasive coronary angiography. A single observer unaware of CT results assessed invasive coronary angiographic images quantitatively. All available coronary segments were included in the analysis, regardless of size or image quality. Lesions with >50% diameter stenoses were considered significant. Mean heart rate was 63 ± 7 beats/min, with 6 patients (10%) in atrial fibrillation during image acquisition. Thirty-three patients (52%) and 70 of 973 segments (7%) had significant coronary stenoses on invasive coronary angiogram. Seventeen segments (2%) were nondiagnostic on computed tomogram and were assumed to contain significant stenoses on an "intention-to-diagnose" analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of computed tomography for detecting significant stenoses were 94%, 87%, 88%, and 93%, respectively, by patient (n = 63), 89%, 95%, 82%, and 97%, respectively, by artery (n = 260), and 87%, 97%, 73%, and 99%, respectively, by segment (n = 973). In conclusion, noninvasive 320-detector row CT coronary angiography provides high diagnostic accuracy across all coronary segments, regardless of size, cardiac rhythm, or image quality.

  13. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Prospective Multicenter Comparison of Early Interim FLT PET/CT versus FDG PET/CT with IHP, EORTC, Deauville, and PERCIST Criteria for Early Therapeutic Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Fayad, Luis; Advani, Ranjana; Vose, Julie; Macapinlac, Homer; Meza, Jane; Hankins, Jordan; Mottaghy, Felix; Juweid, Malik; Quon, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To compare the performance characteristics of interim fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (after two cycles of chemotherapy) by using the most prominent standardized interpretive criteria (including International Harmonization Project [IHP] criteria, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC] criteria, and PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) versus those of interim (18)F fluorothymidine (FLT) PET/CT and simple visual interpretation. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant prospective study was approved by the institutional review boards, and written informed consent was obtained. Patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) underwent both FLT and FDG PET/CT 18-24 days after two cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone or rituximab, etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin. For FDG PET/CT interpretation, IHP criteria, EORTC criteria, PERCIST, Deauville criteria, standardized uptake value, total lesion glycolysis, and metabolic tumor volume were used. FLT PET/CT images were interpreted with visual assessment by two reviewers in consensus. The interim (after cycle 2) FDG and FLT PET/CT studies were then compared with the end-of-treatment FDG PET/CT studies to determine which interim examination and/or criteria best predicted the result after six cycles of chemotherapy. Results From November 2011 to May 2014, there were 60 potential patients for inclusion, of whom 46 patients (24 men [mean age, 60.9 years ± 13.7; range, 28-78 years] and 22 women [mean age, 57.2 years ± 13.4; range, 25-76 years]) fulfilled the criteria. Thirty-four patients had complete response, and 12 had residual disease at the end of treatment. FLT PET/CT had a significantly higher positive predictive value (PPV) (91%) in predicting residual disease than did any FDG PET/CT interpretation method

  14. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  15. Comparison between blinded and partially blinded detection of gastric cancer with multidetector CT using surgery and endoscopic submucosal dissection as reference standards.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Lee, D H; Ko, Y T

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare blinded with partially blinded detection of gastric cancer with multidetector (MD) CT by using surgery and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) as reference standards. 44 patients with gastric cancer underwent MDCT with air as an oral contrast agent. Surgery was performed on 37 patients, ESD on six and surgery after ESD on one. To provide comparison cases of blinded evaluation, 38 MDCT examinations were added for cases where no focal gastric lesion was seen on endoscopy. Two radiologists, blinded to the presence, number and location of the tumours, evaluated axial and axial plus multiplanar reformation (MPR) images of 82 MDCT examinations with or without gastric cancer. For partially blinded evaluation, the same radiologists, blinded to the location and number of tumours, evaluated axial and axial plus MPR images of 44 MDCT examinations of gastric cancer. Differences in assessment were resolved by consensus. 45 gastric cancers were found in surgical and ESD specimens. Detection rates of gastric cancer from axial and axial plus MPR images during blinded evaluation and from axial and axial plus MPR images during partially blinded evaluation were 62% (28/45), 64% (29/45), 64% (29/45) and 71% (32/45), respectively. There was no statistical significance for the comparison between blinded and partially blinded detection rates of gastric cancer. The detection rate of gastric cancer with MDCT during blinded evaluation showed no specific difference compared with the detection rate of gastric cancer with MDCT during partially blinded evaluation.

  16. CT Pulmonary Angiography at Reduced Radiation Exposure and Contrast Material Volume Using Iterative Model Reconstruction and iDose4 Technique in Comparison to FBP

    PubMed Central

    Laqmani, Azien; Kurfürst, Maximillian; Butscheidt, Sebastian; Sehner, Susanne; Schmidt-Holtz, Jakob; Behzadi, Cyrus; Nagel, Hans Dieter; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess image quality of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) at reduced radiation exposure (RD-CTPA) and contrast medium (CM) volume using two different iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms (iDose4 and iterative model reconstruction (IMR)) in comparison to filtered back projection (FBP). Materials and Methods 52 patients (body weight < 100 kg, mean BMI: 23.9) with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) underwent RD-CTPA (tube voltage: 80 kV; mean CTDIvol: 1.9 mGy) using 40 ml CM. Data were reconstructed using FBP and two different IR algorithms (iDose4 and IMR). Subjective and objective image quality and conspicuity of PE were assessed in central, segmental, and subsegmental arteries. Results Noise reduction of 55% was achieved with iDose4 and of 85% with IMR compared to FBP. Contrast-to-noise ratio significantly increased with iDose4 and IMR compared to FBP (p<0.05). Subjective image quality was rated significantly higher at IMR reconstructions in comparison to iDose4 and FBP. Conspicuity of central and segmental PE significantly improved with the use of IMR. In subsegmental arteries, iDose4 was superior to IMR. Conclusions CTPA at reduced radiation exposure and contrast medium volume is feasible with the use of IMR, which provides improved image quality and conspicuity of pulmonary embolism in central and segmental arteries. PMID:27611448

  17. Automated bone removal in CT angiography: Comparison of methods based on single energy and dual energy scans

    SciTech Connect

    Straten, Marcel van; Schaap, Michiel; Dijkshoorn, Marcel L.; Greuter, Marcel J.; Lugt, Aad van der; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dual energy based methods for bone removal in computed tomography angiography (CTA) images and compare these with single energy based methods that use an additional, nonenhanced, CT scan. Methods: Four different bone removal methods were applied to CT scans of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom, acquired with a second generation dual source CT scanner. The methods differed by the way information on the presence of bone was obtained (either by using an additional, nonenhanced scan or by scanning with two tube voltages at the same time) and by the way the bone was removed from the CTA images (either by masking or subtracting the bone). The phantom contained parts which mimic vessels of various diameters in direct contact with bone. Both a quantitative and qualitative analysis of image quality after bone removal was performed. Image quality was quantified by the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) normalized to the square root of the dose (CNRD). At locations where vessels touch bone, the quality of the bone removal and the vessel preservation were visually assessed. The dual energy based methods were assessed with and without the addition of a 0.4 mm tin filter to the high voltage x-ray tube filtration. For each bone removal method, the dose required to obtain a certain CNR after bone removal was compared with the dose of a reference scan with the same CNR but without automated bone removal. The CNRD value of the reference scan was maximized by choosing the lowest tube voltage available. Results: All methods removed the bone completely. CNRD values were higher for the masking based methods than for the subtraction based methods. Single energy based methods had a higher CNRD value than the corresponding dual energy based methods. For the subtraction based dual energy method, tin filtration improved the CNRD value with approximately 50%. For the masking based dual energy method, it was easier to differentiate between iodine and bone when tin filtration

  18. Blade row interaction effects on flutter and forced response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, Daniel H.

    1993-01-01

    In the flutter or forced response analysis of a turbomachine blade row, the blade row in question is commonly treated as if it is isolated from the neigboring blade rows. Disturbances created by vibrating blades are then free to propagate away from this blade row without being disturbed. In reality, neighboring blade rows will reflect some portion of this wave energy back toward the vibrating blades, causing additional unsteady forces on them. It is of fundamental importance to determine whether or not these reflected waves can have a significant effect on the aeroelastic stability or forced response of a blade row. Therefore, a procedure to calculate intra-blade-row unsteady aerodynamic interactions was developed which relies upon results available from isolated blade row unsteady aerodynamic analyses. In addition, an unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique is used to obtain a model for the vibratory response in which the neighboring blade rows are also flexible. The flutter analysis shows that interaction effects can be destabilizing, and the forced response analysis shows that interaction effects can result in a significant increase in the resonant response of a blade row.

  19. Comparison between X-rays spectra and their effective energies in small animal CT tomographic imaging and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Mahdjoub; Mimi, Malika; Bentourkia, M'hamed

    2017-03-01

    Small animal CT imaging and dosimetry usually rely on X-ray radiation produced by X-ray tubes. These X-rays typically cover a large energy range. In this study, we compared poly-energetic X-ray spectra against estimated equivalent (effective) mono-energetic beams with the same number of simulated photons for small animal CT imaging and dosimetry applications. Two poly-energetic X-ray spectra were generated from a tungsten anode at 50 and 120 kVp. The corresponding effective mono-energetic beams were established as 36 keV for the 50 kVp spectrum and 49.5 keV for the 120 kVp spectrum. To assess imaging applications, we investigated the spatial resolution by a tungsten wire, and the contrast-to-noise ratio in a reference phantom and in a realistic mouse phantom. For dosimetry investigation, we calculated the absorbed dose in a segmented digital mouse atlas in the skin, fat, heart and bone tissues. Differences of 2.1 and 2.6% in spatial resolution were respectively obtained between the 50 and 120 kVp poly-energetic spectra and their respective 36 and 49.5 keV mono-energetic beams. The differences in contrast-to-noise ratio between the poly-energetic 50 kVp spectrum and its corresponding mono-energetic 36 keV beam for air, fat, brain and bone were respectively -2.9, -0.2, 11.2 and -4.8%, and similarly between the 120 kVp and its effective energy 49.5 keV: -11.3, -20.2, -4.2 and -13.5%. Concerning the absorbed dose, for the lower X-ray beam energies, 50 kVp against 36 keV, the poly-energetic radiation doses were higher than the mono-energetic doses. Instead, for the higher X-ray beam energies, 120 kVp and 49.5 keV, the absorbed dose to the bones and lungs were higher for the mono-energetic 49.5 keV. The intensity and energy of the X-ray beam spectrum have an impact on both imaging and dosimetry in small animal studies. Simulations with mono-energetic beams should take into account these differences in order to study biological effects or to be compared to

  20. Comparison of femoral neck BMD evaluation obtained using Lunar DXA and QCT with asynchronous calibration from CT colonography.

    PubMed

    Pickhardt, Perry J; Bodeen, Gabriel; Brett, Alan; Brown, J Keenan; Binkley, Neil

    2015-01-01

    For patients undergoing screening computed tomography colonography (CTC), an opportunity exists for bone mineral density (BMD) screening without additional radiation exposure using quantitative computed tomography (QCT). This study investigated the use of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-equivalent QCT Computed Tomography X-Ray Absorptiometry (CTXA) analysis at the hip obtained using CTC examinations using a retrospective asynchronous calibration of patient scans. A cohort of 33 women, age 61.3 (10.6) yr (mean [standard deviation]), had routine CTC using various GE LightSpeed CT scanner models followed after 0-9 mo by a DXA hip BMD examination using a GE Lunar Prodigy machine. Areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and T-scores of the proximal femur were measured from either prone or supine CTC examinations using Mindways QCT Pro software following standard workflow except that the CT scanners were asynchronously calibrated by phantoms scanned retrospectively of the CTC examination without the subject present. CTXA and DXA aBMD were highly correlated (R2=0.907) with a linear relationship of DXA_BMD=1.297*CTXA_BMD+0.048. The standard error of estimate (SEE) on the linear fit was 0.053 g/cm2. CTXA and DXA T-scores showed a linear relationship of DXA_T-score=1.034*CTXA_T-score+0.3 and an SEE of 0.379 T-scores. CTXA and DXA aBMD and T-score measurements showed good correlation despite asynchronous scan acquisition and retrospective QCT calibration. The SEE of 0.053 g/cm2 is on par with the literature comparing Hologic and Lunar DXA devices. The observed relationship between CTXA and Lunar DXA aBMD matches predictions from published cross-calibrations relating CTXA to DXA aBMD measurement. Thus, opportunistic use of CTXA T-scores obtained at the time of CTC could enhance osteoporosis screening.

  1. Hand Replantation with Proximal Row Carpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Keun; Lee, Hang-Ho; Park, Ji-Kang; Kim, Joo-Yong; Dhawan, Vikas

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present our operative technique and postoperative results of the hand replantation with proximal row carpectomy in cases of complete amputation at the level of wrist joint. From May 2003 to April 2005, five patients suffered from complete amputation of the hand due to industrial trauma. Amputation level was radiocarpal joint in three cases and midcarpal joint in two cases. Three cases represented guillotine type and two cases with local crush type injuries. All were men and the mean age was 26.6 years. The mean follow-up period was 26.8 months. At the time of replantation, the wrist joint was stabilized with transarticular fixation using three to four Kirschner’s wires after performing proximal row carpectomy. Postoperatively, functional results such as muscle strength, range of motion of the wrist and fingers, and sensory recovery were assessed according to Chen’s criteria. Joint width and arthritic changes of the radio-capitate joint were evaluated with radiologic tools. According to Chen’s criteria, the overall results in five cases were classified as grade II. Intrinsic muscle power of hands was found to be grade 4. The mean grip and pinch powers were 41% and 45%, respectively, compared to contralateral hand. The mean arc of flexion–extension of wrist was 53°. Total mean active motion of fingers was 215 degrees. Static two-point discrimination of fingertip ranged from 8 to 13 mm. On the follow-up, computerized tomography showed well-preserved radio-capitate joint space without any arthritic changes. While performing hand replantation after amputation at the radiocarpal or midcarpal level, proximal row carpectomy is a useful procedure to preserve joint motion of the wrist in selected cases. PMID:18855073

  2. CT enterography with polyethylene glycol solution vs CT enteroclysis in small bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Minordi, L M; Vecchioli, A; Mirk, P; Bonomo, L

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study is to compare CT enterography with polyethylene glycol solution (PEG-CT) with CT enteroclysis (CT-E) in patients with suspected small bowel disease. Methods 145 patients underwent abdominal contrast-enhanced 16-row multidetector CT after administration of 2000 ml of PEG by mouth (n = 75) or after administration of 2000 ml of methylcellulose by nasojejunal tube (n = 70). Small bowel distension, luminal and extraluminal findings were evaluated and compared with small bowel follow-through examination in 60 patients, double contrast enema in 50, surgery in 25 and endoscopy in 35. Statistical evaluation was carried out by χ2 testing. For both techniques we have also calculated the effective dose and the equivalent dose in a standard patient. Results Crohn's disease was diagnosed in 64 patients, neoplasms in 16, adhesions in 6. Distension of the jejunum was better with CT-E than PEG-CT (p<0.05: statistically significant difference). No significant difference was present for others sites (p>0.05). Evaluation of pathological ileal loops was good with both techniques. The values of sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were respectively 94%, 100% and 96% with CT-E, and 93%, 94% and 93% with PEG-CT. The effective dose for PEG-CT was less than the dose for the CT-E (34.7 mSv vs 39.91 mSv). Conclusion PEG-CT shows findings of Crohn's disease as well as CT-E does, although CT-E gives better bowel distension, especially in the jejunum, and has higher specificity than PEG-CT. PMID:20959377

  3. [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT for imaging of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression in multiple myeloma - Comparison to [18F]FDG and laboratory values

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Schreder, Martin; Schirbel, Andreas; Samnick, Samuel; Kortüm, Klaus Martin; Herrmann, Ken; Kropf, Saskia; Einsele, Herrmann; Buck, Andreas K.; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Knop, Stefan; Lückerath, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    Chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) is a key factor for tumor growth and metastasis in several types of human cancer including multiple myeloma (MM). Proof-of-concept of CXCR4-directed radionuclide therapy in MM has recently been reported. This study assessed the diagnostic performance of the CXCR4-directed radiotracer [68Ga]Pentixafor in MM and a potential role for stratifying patients to CXCR4-directed therapies. Thirty-five patients with MM underwent [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT for evaluation of eligibility for endoradiotherapy. In 19/35 cases, [18F]FDG-PET/CT for correlation was available. Scans were compared on a patient and on a lesion basis. Tracer uptake was correlated with standard clinical parameters of disease activity. [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET detected CXCR4-positive disease in 23/35 subjects (66%). CXCR4-positivity at PET was independent from myeloma subtypes, cytogenetics or any serological parameters and turned out as a negative prognostic factor. In the 19 patients in whom a comparison to [18F]FDG was available, [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET detected more lesions in 4/19 (21%) subjects, [18F]FDG proved superior in 7/19 (37%). In the remaining 8/19 (42%) patients, both tracers detected an equal number of lesions. [18F]FDG-PET positivity correlated with [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET positivity (p=0.018). [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET provides further evidence that CXCR4 expression frequently occurs in advanced multiple myeloma, representing a negative prognostic factor and a potential target for myeloma specific treatment. However, selecting patients for CXCR4 directed therapies and prognostic stratification seem to be more relevant clinical applications for this novel imaging modality, rather than diagnostic imaging of myeloma. PMID:28042328

  4. Comparison of NaF and FDG PET/CT for assessment of treatment response in castrate-resistant prostate cancers with osseous metastases

    PubMed Central

    Simoncic, Urban; Perlman, Scott; Liu, Glenn; Staab, Mary Jane; Straus, Jane; Jeraj, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Assessment of skeletal metastases response to therapy is highly relevant, but unresolved clinical problem. The main goal of this work was to compare pharmacodynamic responses to therapy assessed with NaF and FDG PET/CT. Materials and Methods Prostate cancer patients with known osseous metastases were treated with Zibotentan (ZD4054) and imaged with combined dynamic NaF/FDG PET/CT prior to therapy (Baseline), after 4 weeks of therapy (Week 4) and after 2 weeks of treatment break (Week 6). Kinetic analysis allowed comparison of voxel-based tracer uptake rate parameter Ki, vasculature parameters K1 (measuring perfusion/permeability) and Vb (measuring vasculature fraction in the tissue) together with standardized uptake values (SUVs). Results Correlations were high for the NaF and FDG peak uptake parameters (Ki and SUV correlations ranged from 0.57 to 0.88) and for vasculature parameters (K1 and Vb correlations ranged from 0.61 to 0.81). Correlation between the NaF and FDG Week 4 Ki responses was low (ρ=0.35, p=0.084), but higher for NaF and FDG Week 6 Ki responses (ρ=0.72, p<0.0001). Correlations for vasculature responses were always low (ρ<0.35). NaF and FDG uptakes in the osseous metastases were spatially dislocated, with overlap in the range from 0% to 80%. Conclusions These results showed that late NaF and FDG uptake responses are consistently correlated, but earlier uptake responses and all vasculature responses can be unrelated. This study also proved that FDG and NaF uptakes are spatially dislocated. Although treatment responses assessed with NaF and FDG may be correlated, using both tracers provides additional information. PMID:25128349

  5. Are CT Scans a Satisfactory Substitute for the Follow-Up of RSA Migration Studies of Uncemented Cups? A Comparison of RSA Double Examinations and CT Datasets of 46 Total Hip Arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Zeleznik, Michael P.; Nilsson, Kjell G.; Olivecrona, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    As part of the 14-year follow-up of a prospectively randomized radiostereometry (RSA) study on uncemented cup fixation, two pairs of stereo radiographs and a CT scan of 46 hips were compared. Tantalum beads, inserted during the primary operation, were detected in the CT volume and the stereo radiographs and used to produce datasets of 3D coordinates. The limit of agreement between the combined CT and RSA datasets was calculated in the same way as the precision of the double RSA examination. The precision of RSA corresponding to the 99% confidence interval was 1.36°, 1.36°, and 0.60° for X-, Y-, and Z-rotation and 0.40, 0.17, and 0.37 mm for X-, Y-, and Z-translation. The limit of agreement between CT and RSA was 1.51°, 2.17°, and 1.05° for rotation and 0.59, 0.56, and 0.74 mm for translation. The differences between CT and RSA are close to the described normal 99% confidence interval for precision in RSA: 0.3° to 2° for rotation and 0.15 to 0.6 mm for translation. We conclude that measurements using CT and RSA are comparable and that CT can be used for migration studies for longitudinal evaluations of patients with RSA markers. PMID:28243598

  6. Comparison of Fusion Imaging Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Intra-arterial CT: Assessment of Drug Distribution by an Implantable Port System in Patients Undergoing Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Kusunoki, Shinichiroh; Nakaura, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takamori, Hiroshi; Chikamoto, Akira; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro

    2006-06-15

    Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is effective for treating primary and metastatic carcinoma of the liver. We compared the perfusion patterns of HAI chemotherapy on intra-arterial port-catheter computed tomography (iapc-CT) and fused images obtained with a combined single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) system. We studied 28 patients with primary or metastatic carcinoma of the liver who bore an implantable HAI port system. All underwent abdominal SPECT using Tc-99m-MAA (185 Mbq); the injection rate was 1 mL/min, identical to the chemotherapy infusion rate, and 0.5 mL/sec for iapc-CT. Delivery was through an implantable port. We compared the intrahepatic perfusion (IHP) and extrahepatic perfusion (EHP) patterns of HAI chemotherapy on iapc-CT images and fused images obtained with a combined SPECT/CT system. In 23 of 28 patients (82%), IHP patterns on iapc-CT images and fused images were identical. In 5 of the 28 patients (18%), IHP on fusion images was different from IHP on iapc-CT images. EHP was seen on fused images in 12 of the 28 patients (43%) and on iapc-CT images in 8 patients (29%). In 17 patients (61%), upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastroduodenal mucosal lesions. EHP was revealed on fused images in 10 of these patients; 9 of them manifested gastroduodenal toxicity at the time of subsequent HAI chemotherapy. Fusion imaging using the combined SPECT/CT system reflects the actual distribution of the infused anticancer agent. This information is valuable not only for monitoring adequate drug distribution but also for avoiding potential extrahepatic complications.

  7. [CT - diagnosis and differential diagnosis of inflammatory acute intestinal conditions].

    PubMed

    Wiesner, W

    2011-08-24

    Multidetector-row CT has shown over the past years that it is able to provide reliable diagnoses in various acute intestinal conditions. The presented article provides an overview of primary and secondary inflammatory acute intestinal pathologies and their differential diagnoses.

  8. 97. VIEW OF CENTER OF INTERIOR ROW OF EQUIPMENT CABINETS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. VIEW OF CENTER OF INTERIOR ROW OF EQUIPMENT CABINETS ON SOUTH SIDE OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM. THREE ADDITIONAL GOULD BRUSH CHART RECORDERS ARE IN THIS ROW (NOT VISIBLE IN PHOTOGRAPH) LOCATED IMMEDIATELY EAST (LEFT) OF THESE CABINETS. Another row of cabinets south of (behind) this one is not accessible for photography. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  9. Compact Spare-Row Decoder For Computer Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard B.; Rakow, Glenn P.; Bickler, Thomas C.; Barto, Rod

    1992-01-01

    Spare-row memory-address-decoder circuit commanded to address ninth row in computer memory instead of addressing one of eight others it would address normally. Variants used to construct small, highly reliable computers. Spare-row decoder offers advantages of compactness, efficiency, and performance. Requires only 12.5 percent memory overhead. System equipped with spare-row decoder requires less glue logic and exhibits greater through-put. Applications include computers in Hitchhiker Central Unit embedded computer on Cassini spacecraft. Concept of circuit applicable to most flight computer systems.

  10. Three-dimensional image reconstruction of an anorectal malformation with multidetector-row helical computed tomography technology.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yoshio; Ando, Hisami; Seo, Takahiko; Kaneko, Kentaro; Katsuno, Shinsuke; Shinohara, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Kensaku; Toriwaki, Junichiro

    2003-05-01

    The presentation of the surgical anatomy of anorectal malformation by standard anatomical figures is not suitable for individual anorectoplasty. It is essential to understand the anatomy of the pelvic muscle (striated muscle complex: SMC) including the external anal sphincter and their three-dimensional (3D) configuration in each patient. Thus, we studied the SMC three-dimensionally with multidetector-row helical computed tomography (MRH-CT) preoperatively, and evaluated its usefulness. Fourteen patients with anorectal malformations before anorectoplasty (types: high n=6, intermediate n=2, low n=6) and two patients without anorectal malformations as controls (total: male n=8, female n=8) were investigated. An image of pelvic region was prepared with a slice thickness of 0.5 mm and a reconstruction pitch of 0.5 mm. A 3D reconstruction on a conventional personal computer (PC) was made with a volume rendering method, and assisted by our own software. The SMC was analyzed with three modified modes of 3D reconstruction corresponding to the surrounding tissues. A length of the parasagittal muscle, and both the sagittal and transverse width of the vertical fibers in the SMC at the connection to the parasagittal muscle were measured on a 3D image and then compared among three different types and controls. To eliminate variations in age, a length index was used to allow comparison. The 3D configuration of the SMC was different in every case. The arranged image mode, which displayed the SMC and the pelvic bones simultaneously, enabled to use conventional knowledge in cysto-urethrography. The length of the parasagittal muscle was longest in the high type but the width of the vertical fibers was smallest. Anatomical figures of the SMC including the external anal sphincter were clearly demonstrated on a PC in every anorectal malformation by our program. A 3D reconstruction image provides positional information on the SMC for the body surface and pelvic bone at the same time

  11. Accuracy of Liver Fat Quantification With Advanced CT, MRI, and Ultrasound Techniques: Prospective Comparison With MR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Harald; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Kliewer, Mark A.; Hernando, Diego; Chen, Guang-Hong; Zagzebski, James A.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the accuracy of proton-density fat-fraction, single- and dual-energy CT (SECT and DECT), gray-scale ultrasound (US), and US shear-wave elastography (US-SWE) in the quantification of hepatic steatosis with MR spectroscopy (MRS) as the reference standard. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Fifty adults who did not have symptoms (23 men, 27 women; mean age, 57 ± 5 years; body mass index, 27 ± 5) underwent liver imaging with unenhanced SECT, DECT, gray-scale US, US-SWE, proton-density fat-fraction MRI, and MRS for this prospective trial. MRS voxels for the reference standard were colocalized with all other modalities under investigation. For SECT (120 kVp), attenuation values were recorded. For rapid-switching DECT (80/140 kVp), monochromatic images (70–140 keV) and fat density–derived material decomposition images were reconstructed. For proton-density fat fraction MRI, a quantitative chemical shift–encoded method was used. For US, echogenicity was evaluated on a qualitative 0–3 scale. Quantitative US shear-wave velocities were also recorded. Data were analyzed by linear regression for each technique compared with MRS. RESULTS There was excellent correlation between MRS and both proton-density fat-fraction MRI (r2 = 0.992; slope, 0.974; intercept, −0.943) and SECT (r2 = 0.856; slope, −0.559; intercept, 35.418). DECT fat attenuation had moderate correlation with MRS measurements (r2 = 0.423; slope, 0.034; intercept, 8.459). There was good correlation between qualitative US echogenicity and MRS measurements with a weighted kappa value of 0.82. US-SWE velocity did not have reliable correlation with MRS measurements (r2 = 0.004; slope, 0.069; intercept, 6.168). CONCLUSION Quantitative MRI proton-density fat fraction and SECT fat attenuation have excellent linear correlation with MRS measurements and can serve as accurate noninvasive biomarkers for quantifying steatosis. Material decomposition with DECT does

  12. Configuring bonds between first-row transition metals.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Reed J; Clouston, Laura J; Lu, Connie C

    2015-11-17

    Alfred Werner, who pioneered the field of coordination chemistry, envisioned coordination complexes as a single, transition metal atom at the epicenter of a vast ligand space. The idea that the locus of a coordination complex could be shared by multiple metals held together with covalent bonds would eventually lead to the discovery of the quadruple and quintuple bond, which have no analogues outside of the transition metal block. Metal-metal bonding can be classified into homometallic and heterometallic groups. Although the former is dominant, the latter is arguably more intriguing because of the inherently larger chemical space in which metal-metal bonding can be explored. In 2013, Lu and Thomas independently reported the isolation of heterometallic multiple bonds with exclusively first-row transition metals. Structural and theoretical data supported triply bonded Fe-Cr and Fe-V cores. This Account describes our continued efforts to configure bonds between first-row transition metals from titanium to copper. Double-decker ligands, or binucleating platforms that brace two transition metals in proximity, have enabled the modular synthesis of diverse metal-metal complexes. The resulting complexes are also ideal for investigating the effects of an "ancillary" metal on the properties and reactivities of an "active" metal center. A total of 38 bimetallic complexes have been compiled comprising 18 unique metal-metal pairings. Twenty-one of these bimetallics are strictly isostructural, allowing for a systematic comparison of metal-metal bonding. The nature of the chemical bond between first-row metals is remarkably variable and depends on two primary factors: the total d-electron count, and the metals' relative d-orbital energies. Showcasing the range of covalent bonding are a quintuply bonded (d-d)(10) Mn-Cr heterobimetallic and the singly bonded late-late pairings, e.g., Fe-Co, which adopt unusually high spin states. A long-term goal is to rationally tailor the

  13. CT-Based Evaluation of Tumor Volume After Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy of Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity: Comparison with Clinical Remission Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Stefan Turowski, Bernd; Berkefeld, Joachim; Kovacs, Adorjan F.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To assess the volume of locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity and the oropharynx before and after intra-arterial (i.a.) chemotherapy by means of computed tomography and to compare these data with clinically determined treatment response of the same patient population. Methods. Eighty-eight patients with histologically proven, advanced carcinoma of the oral cavity and/or the oropharynx (local tumor stages T3/4) received neoadjuvant i.a. chemotherapy with cisplatin as part of a multimodal therapeutic regimen, comprising (1) local chemotherapy, (2) surgery, and (3) combined radio-chemotherapy. Three weeks after the intervention, residual disease was evaluated radiologically by measurement of the tumor volume and clinically by inspection and palpation of the primary tumor according to WHO criteria. Results. Comparison of treatment response according to radiological and clinical criteria respectively revealed complete remission in 5% vs. 8% (p < 0.05), partial remission in 30% vs. 31%, stable disease in 61% vs. 58%, and tumor progression in 5% vs. 2%. Conclusion. Radiological volumetry and clinical evaluation found comparable response rates after local chemotherapy. However, in patients with good response after local treatment, volumetric measurement with CT may help to distinguish between partial and complete remission. Thus, radiological tumor volumetry provides precise and differentiated information about tumor response and should be used as an additional tool in treatment monitoring after local chemotherapy.

  14. Low-dose interpolated average CT for attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Zhang, Geoffrey; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2010-07-01

    Because of the advantages in the use of high photon flux and thus the short scan times of CT imaging, the traditional 68Ge scans for positron emission tomography (PET) image attenuation correction have been replaced by CT scans in the modern PET/CT technology. The combination of fast CT scan and slow PET scan often causes image misalignment between the PET and CT images due to respiration motion. Use of the average CT derived from cine CT images is reported to reduce such misalignment. However, the radiation dose to patients is higher with cine CT scans. This study introduces a method that uses breath-hold CT images and their interpolations to generate the average CT for PET image attenuation correction. Breath-hold CT sets are taken at end-inspiration and end-expiration. Deformable image registration is applied to generate a voxel-to-voxel motion matrix between the two CT sets. The motion is equally divided into 5 steps from inspiration to expiration and 5 steps from expiration to inspiration, generating a total of 8 phases of interpolated CT sets. An average CT image is generated from all the 10 phase CT images, including original inhale/exhale CT and 8 interpolated CT sets. Quantitative comparison shows that the reduction of image misalignment artifacts using the average CT from the interpolation technique for PET attenuation correction is at a similar level as that using cine average CT, while the dose to the patient from the CT scans is reduced significantly. The interpolated average CT method hence provides a low dose alternative to cine CT scans for PET attenuation correction.

  15. Improving Spectral Results Using Row-by-Row Fourier Transform of Spatial Heterodyne Raman Spectrometer Interferogram.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Patrick D; Strange, K Alicia; Angel, S Michael

    2016-12-12

    This work describes a method of applying the Fourier transform to the two-dimensional Fizeau fringe patterns generated by the spatial heterodyne Raman spectrometer (SHRS), a dispersive interferometer, to correct the effects of certain types of optical alignment errors. In the SHRS, certain types of optical misalignments result in wavelength-dependent and wavelength-independent rotations of the fringe pattern on the detector. We describe here a simple correction technique that can be used in post-processing, by applying the Fourier transform in a row-by-row manner. This allows the user to be more forgiving of fringe alignment and allows for a reduction in the mechanical complexity of the SHRS.

  16. System manual for the University of Pennsylvania retrofitted solar heated Philadelphia row home (SolaRow)

    SciTech Connect

    Zinnes, I.; Lior, N.

    1980-05-01

    The University of Pennsylvania SolaRow house, an urban row home retrofitted for comfort and domestic hot water heating, was extensively instrumented for performance monitoring and acquisition of weather and solar radiation data. This report describes the heating and instrumentation systems, provides the details for instrumentation, piping and valve identification, and specifies the operation and maintenance of the heating and data acquisition systems. The following are included: (1) system flow diagrams; (2) valve and cable identification tables; (3) wiring diagrams; and (4) start-up, normal operation, shut-down, maintenance and trouble-shooting procedures. It thus provides the necessary technical information to permit system operation and monitoring, overall system performance analysis and optimization, and acquisition of climatological data.

  17. Comparison of thoracic radiographs and single breath-hold helical CT for detection of pulmonary nodules in dogs with metastatic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Nemanic, Sarah; London, Cheryl A; Wisner, Erik R

    2006-01-01

    Imaging studies in people indicate that x-ray computed tomography (CT) is a more sensitive technique than thoracic radiography for the detection of pulmonary metastasic neoplasia. Systematic studies comparing CT and thoracic radiographic techniques in veterinary patients have not been performed. The present retrospective study was designed to directly compare the efficacy of these 2 techniques in detecting pulmonary nodules in dogs. Eighteen dogs with histologically confirmed pulmonary metastatic neoplasia had contemporaneous thoracic radiographs and pulmonary CT scans compared. Quantitative analyses included estimation of pulmonary nodule size, number, and lobar distribution on thoracic radiographs and CT images. Only 9% of CT-detected pulmonary nodules were identified on thoracic radiographs (P < .003). The lower size threshold was approximately 1 mm to detect pulmonary nodules on CT images and 7-9 mm to reliably detect nodules on radiographs (P < .0001). Additionally, pulmonary nodules were detected in a significantly greater number of lung lobes using CT as compared with thoracic radiographs (P < .0001). These data indicate that CT is significantly more sensitive than thoracic radiography for detecting soft-tissue nodules in dogs. As such, thoracic CT should be considered in any patient with neoplasia that has potential for pulmonary metastasis to more reliably stage the disease, particularly when accurate characterization of the extent and distribution of pulmonary metastatic disease affects therapeutic planning.

  18. Three-dimensional texture analysis of contrast enhanced CT images for treatment response assessment in Hodgkin lymphoma: Comparison with F-18-FDG PET

    SciTech Connect

    Knogler, Thomas; El-Rabadi, Karem; Weber, Michael; Karanikas, Georgios; Mayerhoefer, Marius E.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional (3D) texture analysis (TA) of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) images for treatment response assessment in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), compared with F-18-fludeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT. Methods: 3D TA of 48 lymph nodes in 29 patients was performed on venous-phase CE-CT images before and after chemotherapy. All lymph nodes showed pathologically elevated FDG uptake at baseline. A stepwise logistic regression with forward selection was performed to identify classic CT parameters and texture features (TF) that enable the separation of complete response (CR) and persistent disease. Results: The TF fraction of image in runs, calculated for the 45° direction, was able to correctly identify CR with an accuracy of 75%, a sensitivity of 79.3%, and a specificity of 68.4%. Classical CT features achieved an accuracy of 75%, a sensitivity of 86.2%, and a specificity of 57.9%, whereas the combination of TF and CT imaging achieved an accuracy of 83.3%, a sensitivity of 86.2%, and a specificity of 78.9%. Conclusions: 3D TA of CE-CT images is potentially useful to identify nodal residual disease in HL, with a performance comparable to that of classical CT parameters. Best results are achieved when TA and classical CT features are combined.

  19. Comparison of the effects of salmon calcitonin (sCT) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in a number of in vivo and in vitro tests

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, S.P.; Brase, D.; Cooper, C.; Dewey, W.L.

    1986-03-05

    sCT and CGRP have been shown previously to have multiple activities in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent work has shown that CGRP (15 ..mu..g) intraventricularly (IVT) produces a naloxone reversible 37% inhibition in the p-phenylquinone test (PPQ) accompanied by severe diarrhea. The ED50 of sCT in the PPQ test is 362 ng and this effect is not reversed totally by naloxone. The onset of CGRP is more rapid than that of sCT. sCT and CGRP (10/sup -6/M) both produce naloxone reversible inhibition of the electrically stimulated guinea pig ileum (GPI) (25% and 50% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP (10/sup -6/ M) produce contracture (15% and 40% respectively) of the non-stimulated GPI that is not blocked by atropine. Both sCT and CGRP block the naloxone-induced contracture of the morphine (MS04) dependent ilea (29% and 68% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP produce biphasic shifts in the MS04 acetylcholine dose-effect curves in the stimulated and nonstimulated GPI, respectively. Neither sCT nor CGRP (10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -4/ M) displaces /sup 3/H-naloxone binding to mouse brain membranes. Both sCT and CGRP may produce their effects by modulation of CA/sup +2/ fluxes in the CNS and GPI.

  20. 19. VIEW OF THE TWO ROWS OF COKE OVENS, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF THE TWO ROWS OF COKE OVENS, LOOKING EAST. THE OVENS LIE TO THE EAST OF THE MINE BUILDINGS. BEEHIVE OVENS FORM THE ROW ON THE LEFT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THE RECTANGULAR OVENS ARE ON THE RIGHT. - Tower Hill No. 2 Mine, Approximately 0.47 mile Southwest of intersection of Stone Church Road & Township Route 561, Hibbs, Fayette County, PA

  1. Effect of corn or soybean row position on soil water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop plants can funnel water to the soil and increase water content more in the row relative to the interrow. Because the row intercepts more soil water after rains and higher root density, the soil may also dry out more between rains than does soil in the interrow. The purpose of this study was to ...

  2. Theoretical studies of the first- and second-row transition-metal mono- and dicarbonyl positive ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Leslie A.; Rosi, Marzio; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Ab initio calculations have been carried out on the first- and second-row transition-metal mono- and dicarbonyl positive ions. The bonding in these systems is discussed in detail. Trends in the series of mono- and dicarbonyl ions and between the first- and second-row transition metals are explained in terms of a dominantly electrostatic bonding interaction and differences in metal ion state separations, ionization potentials, and s and d orbital sizes. Dissociation energies are presented and a detailed comparison is made with experimental data. Where reliable experimental data exists, agreement with the theoretical results is generally good.

  3. Kilovoltage cone-beam CT imaging dose during breast radiotherapy: A dose comparison between a left and right breast setup

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Alexandra; Holloway, Lois; Begg, Jarrad; Nelson, Vinod; Metcalfe, Peter

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the delivered dose from a kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) acquired in breast treatment position for a left and right breast setup. The dose was measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters positioned within a female anthropomorphic phantom at organ locations. Imaging was performed on an Elekta Synergy XVI system with the phantom setup on a breast board. The image protocol involved 120 kVp, 140 mAs, and a 270° arc rotation clockwise 0° to 270° for the left breast setup and 270° to 180° for the right breast setup (maximum arc rotations possible). The dose delivered to the left breast, right breast, and heart was 5.1 mGy, 3.9 mGy, and 4.0 mGy for the left breast setup kV-CBCT, and 6.4 mGy, 6.0 mGy, and 4.8 mGy for the right breast setup kV-CBCT, respectively. The rotation arc of the kV-CBCT influenced the dose delivered, with the right breast setup kV-CBCT found to deliver a dose of up to 4 mGy or 105% higher to the treated breast′s surface in comparison with the left breast setup. This is attributed to the kV-CBCT source being more proximal to the anterior of the phantom for a right breast setup, whereas the source is more proximal to the posterior of the patient for a left-side scan.

  4. CT scanning of the breast using a conventional CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Doust, B D; Milbrath, J R; Doust, V L

    1981-09-01

    Using a conventional body CT scanner, computed tomography of the breast was performed on 32 patients known to have or suspected of having breast masses. Xeromammograms were available for comparison in all cases. All mass lesions were histologically proved. Seven patients were examined prone, 25 supine. The prone position yielded pictures that resembled craniocaudal mammograms. Breast asymmetry, skin thickening, stranding from a mass to the chest wall, calcification, and axillary lymphadenopathy could be demonstrated by means of CT. The portion of the breast adjacent to the chest wall was more readily examined by means of CT than by conventional mammography. Internal mammary nodes could not be demonstrated.

  5. Comparison of SPECT/CT and MRI in Diagnosing Symptomatic Lesions in Ankle and Foot Pain Patients: Diagnostic Performance and Relation to Lesion Type

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Seunggyun; Hong, Sung Hwan; Paeng, Jin Chul; Lee, Dong Yeon; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Arya, Amitabh; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Keon Wook

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of SPECT/CT and MRI in patients with ankle and foot pain, with regard to the lesion types. Materials and Methods Fifty consecutive patients with ankle and foot pain, who underwent 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT and MRI, were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Symptomatic lesions were determined based on clinical examination and response to treatment. On MRI and SPECT/CT, detected lesions were classified as bone, ligament/tendon, and joint lesions. Uptake on SPECT/CT was assessed using a 4-grade system. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of SPECT/CT and MRI were evaluated in all detected lesions and each lesion type. Diagnostic value of uptake grade was analyzed using receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis, and diagnostic performance was compared using Chi-square or McNemar tests. Results In overall lesions, the sensitivity, PPV and NPV of SPECT/CT for symptomatic lesions were 93%, 56%, 91%, and they were 98%, 48%, 95% for MRI. There was no significant difference between SPECT/CT and MRI. However, the specificity of SPECT/CT was significantly higher than that of MRI (48% versus 24%, P = 0.016). Uptake grade on SPECT/CT was significantly higher in symptomatic lesions (P < 0.001), and its area under curve on ROC analysis was 0.787. In the analysis of each lesion type, the specificity of SPECT/CT was poor in joint lesions compared with other lesion types and MRI (P < 0.001, respectively). MRI exhibited lower specificity than SPECT/CT in bone lesions (P = 0.004) and ligament/tendon lesions (P < 0.001). Conclusions SPECT/CT has MRI-comparable diagnostic performance for symptomatic lesions in ankle and foot pain patients. SPECT/CT and MRI exhibit different diagnostic specificity in different lesion types. SPECT/CT may be used as a complementary imaging method to MRI for enhancing diagnostic specificity. PMID:25668182

  6. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Erickson, Beth; Gaffney, David K.; Bosch, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3 Tesla (3T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy Materials/Methods Twenty-three gynecologic radiation oncology experts contoured the same 3 cervical-cancer brachytherapy cases: one Stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, one Stage IIB partial response (PR) case with ovoid with needles and one Stage IB2 CR case with a ring applicator. CT contours were completed before MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with kappa statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index (CI) was calculated for each of the six data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare CT and MR contours of the same case. Results For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (p<0.001). Kappa and CI estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. DICE coefficients were 89% for the Stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the Stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the Stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion When comparing MR- to CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. The largest difference at the time of brachytherapy was in the case with parametrial extension at diagnosis that had a near-complete response, due to the appearance of the parametria on CT but not on MR. Based on these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases.aspx. PMID:25304792

  7. Comparison of cone beam CT scans with enhanced photostimulated phosphor plate images in the detection of root fracture of endodontically treated teeth

    PubMed Central

    Bechara, B; McMahan, C A; Noujeim, M; Faddoul, T; Moore, W S; Teixeira, F B; Geha, H

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Two-dimensional intraoral radiography is the most common tool for diagnosing root fractures (RFs). Cone beam CT (CBCT) is widely used to depict RFs in endodontically treated teeth. Beam hardening and other artefacts caused by gutta percha may result in an incorrect diagnosis when using CBCT only. A comparison of two CBCT machines with photostimulated phosphor (PSP) plate images enhanced with the equalization tool was carried out to detect RFs in endodontically treated teeth. Methods: 66 roots were collected, decoronated and treated endodontically using the same technique with gutta percha. 33 of these roots were randomly selected and fractured; the 2 root fragments were glued together with 1 layer of methyl methacrylate and placed randomly in 8 prepared beef rib fragments. Large fields of view (FOVs) were acquired with one CBCT unit and small FOVs with the second CBCT unit. Periapical radiographs (using intraoral PSP plates) were also acquired. A contrast enhancement tool was used when evaluating the PSP plate images. Results: Small FOV images had significantly higher accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) and sensitivity in detecting RFs than PSP plates and large FOV images. The specificity of the enhanced PSP images was higher than, although not significantly higher than, the small FOV images and was significantly higher than the large FOV images. Conclusions: CBCT small FOVs should be acquired for depicting RFs of endodontically treated teeth. Images obtained using PSP plates had the lowest rate of false-positive results and their use can save the patient a radiation dose. PMID:23625067

  8. Comparison of CT- and FDG-PET-defined gross tumor volume in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Paulino, Arnold C. . E-mail: apaulino@tmh.tmc.edu; Koshy, Mary; Howell, Rebecca; Schuster, David; Davis, Lawrence W.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the gross tumor volume (GTV) identified on CT to that obtained from fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and determine the differences in volume and dose coverage of the PET-GTV when the CT-GTV is used for radiotherapy planning. Methods and Materials: A total of 40 patients with intact squamous cell carcinoma arising in the head-and-neck region underwent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at one department. All patients underwent CT simulation for treatment planning followed by PET-CT in the treatment position. CT simulation images were fused to the CT component of the PET-CT images. The GTV using the CT simulation images was contoured (CT-GTV), as was the GTV based on the PET scan (PET-GTV). The IMRT plans were obtained using the CT-GTV. Results: The PET-GTV was smaller, the same size, and larger than the CT-GTV in 30 (75%), 3 (8%), and 7 (18%) cases respectively. The median PET-GTV and CT-GTV volume was 20.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.2-294) and 37.2 cm{sup 3} (range, 2-456), respectively. The volume of PET-GTV receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose was 100% in 20 (50%), 95-99% in 10 (25%), 90-94% in 3 (8%), 85-89% in 1 (3%), 80-84% in 2 (5%), 75-79% in 1 (3%), and <75% in 3 (8%) cases. The minimal dose received by 95% of the PET-GTV was {>=}100% in 19 (48%), 95-99% in 11 (28%), 90-94% in 5 (13%), 85-89% in 2 (5%), and <75% in 3 (8%) cases. Conclusion: The PET-GTV was larger than the CT-GTV in 18% of cases. In approximately 25% of patients with intact head-and-neck cancer treated using IMRT, the volume of PET-GTV receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose and minimal dose received by 95% of the PET-GTV were less than optimal.

  9. SU-E-E-12: Validation of the Implementation of Different CT Scanners in Proton Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes, C Llina; Geismer, D; Christiaens, M; Vermeren, X; Ding, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of the relationship of CT number and Relative Stopping Power (RSP) among different CT-scanners in the evaluation of dose distribution, for different tumor sites and proton therapy modalities like Pencil Beam and Uniform Scanning. Methods: The same tissue characterization phantom was used to analyze the difference in the X-rays energy spectra of 2 CT scanners of the same vendor. One CT is for planning and the other for treatment verification. The Hounsfield unit (HU) variations and associated dosimetric uncertainty were investigated in uniform scanning and pencil beam treatment plans of different sites. At the same time comparisons of the CT calibration curve were done using the same acquisition protocols. The phantom was imaged on a 16 multi-row CT scanner, with energies of 120 and 140 kVp,currents of 263 and 245 mA and slice thickness of 2 and 3mm respectively. The dosimetric uncertainty of the plans was evaluated in a homogeneus phantom comparing DVHs, gamma index criteria 3% 3mm, and range between them. Results: The variation of HU was within the standard deviation of the average for each tissue substitute. The curves fitted with a bilinear interpolation show a maximum deviation in high density materials like cortical bone and solid water, where the HU values deviated more than 0,6% for the 120kVp protocol. For the others curves the deviation was more than 2% for low densities materials. The gamma index uncertainty criteria passed in all the cases. Conclusion: The HU variations for the different scanners were ≤3%. Lower than the 3,5% uncertainties considered in our treatment planning system. The dosimetric analysis shows that the X-ray spectrum has a small effect on the HU-RSP curve, allowing the use of a single tissue characterization curve in our proton treatment planning system for plans verifications.

  10. Fuel metabolism during severe rowing exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, R.W.; Lubowitz, J.; Asakura, T.; Stein, T.P.

    1986-03-01

    Eight elite oarsmen were studied during and after six min of severe ergometer exercise. Power output averaged 380 +/- 28 watts. Serial venous blood samples and gas exchange measurements were obtained during exercise. In 4 of the 8 subjects, a primed periodic oral dose of the tracer (6,6-/sup 2/H/sub 2/)glucose was used to determine the effects of severe exercise on glucose metabolism. During exercise, the levels of lactate progressively increased to 12.2 +/- 1.3 mM (SE). There was little change in isotopic glucose enrichment during exercise (from 2.95 +/- 0.30 to 2.55 +/- 0.23 atom percent excess, APE). During recovery, isotopic glucose enrichment decreased significantly to 1.40 +/- 0.14 APE, indicating a substantial post-exercise plasma glucose flux. There were significant post-exercise increases in plasma glucose accumulation (from 84 +/- 5 to 131 +/- 3 mg/dl) and insulin concentration (0.57 +/- 0.08 to 1.34 +/- 0.15 ng/ml). These results suggest that muscle glycogen is the primary source of fuel during six minutes of maximal rowing exercise.

  11. Proximal Row Carpectomy Combined with Wrist Hemiarthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Culp, Randall W.; Bachoura, Abdo; Gelman, Scott E.; Jacoby, Sidney M.

    2012-01-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) combined with distal radius hemiarthroplasty is a relatively novel procedure that rivals total wrist arthrodesis and offers a new surgical treatment option for select patients with painful, end-stage wrist disease. We present our early experience with this procedure. A retrospective chart review was conducted for nonrheumatoid patients diagnosed with wrist arthritis and subsequently treated with wrist hemiarthroplasty combined with PRC. The minimum follow-up duration was 12 months. Preoperative and postoperative flexion, extension, and grip strength were recorded. Postoperative radiographic findings were assessed. The Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) questionnaire was administered to gauge postoperative pain and function. The records of 10 patients were reviewed. The mean age was 64 years and the mean postoperative follow-up duration was 19 months. Postoperative flexion, extension, and grip strength were all found to be less than the preoperative levels. The mean postoperative PRWE score for pain and function were 26 and 23, respectively. The complications were diverse and occurred at a relatively high rate. PRC combined with distal radius hemiarthroplasty is a novel procedure that offers a potential surgical option for the treatment of wrist arthritis in select patients. Our early experience has lead us to modify our technique with regard to the implant material, and at this stage, the surgical technique and the most appropriate implant may require further optimization. The level of evidence for this study is IV (therapeutic). PMID:23904978

  12. Distal radius fracture after proximal row carpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Igeta, Yuka; Naito, Kiyohito; Sugiyama, Yoichi; Obata, Hiroyuki; Aritomi, Kentaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We encountered a patient with distal radius fracture (DRF) after proximal row carpectomy (PRC). The mechanism of the DRF after PRC is discussed in this report. Presentation of case The patient was a 73-year-old female who had undergone PRC due to Kienböck disease before. The wrist range of motion was: 45° on dorsiflexion and 20° on flexion. DRF has occurred at 3 years after PRC. The fracture type was extra-articular fracture. Osteosynthesis was performed using a volar locking plate. No postoperative complication developed, the Mayo score was excellent at 6 months after surgery, and the daily living activity level recovered to that before injury. Discussion Since the wrist range of motion decreased and the lunate fitted into the joint surface after PRC, making the forearm join with the hand like a single structure, pressure may have been loaded on the weak distal end of the radius from the dorsal side, causing volar displacement and fracture. Conclusion The pressure distribution and range of motion of the radiocarpal joint after PRC are different from those of a normal joint, and the mechanism of fracture also changes due to PRC. PMID:25623755

  13. Prognostic Value of Combined CT Angiography and Myocardial Perfusion Imaging versus Invasive Coronary Angiography and Nuclear Stress Perfusion Imaging in the Prediction of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events: The CORE320 Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Marcus Y; Rochitte, Carlos E; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dewey, Marc; George, Richard T; Miller, Julie M; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Sakuma, Hajime; Laham, Roger; Vavere, Andrea L; Cerci, Rodrigo J; Mehra, Vishal C; Nomura, Cesar; Kofoed, Klaus F; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Scholte, Arthur J; Laule, Michael; Tan, Swee Yaw; Hoe, John; Paul, Narinder; Rybicki, Frank J; Brinker, Jeffrey A; Arai, Andrew E; Matheson, Matthew B; Cox, Christopher; Clouse, Melvin E; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Lima, João A C

    2017-03-14

    Purpose To compare the prognostic importance (time to major adverse cardiovascular event [MACE]) of combined computed tomography (CT) angiography and CT myocardial stress perfusion imaging with that of combined invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and stress single photon emission CT myocardial perfusion imaging. Materials and Methods This study was approved by all institutional review boards, and written informed consent was obtained. Between November 2009 and July 2011, 381 participants clinically referred for ICA and aged 45-85 years were enrolled in the Combined Noninvasive Coronary Angiography and Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Using 320-Detector Row Computed Tomography (CORE320) prospective multicenter diagnostic study. All images were analyzed in blinded independent core laboratories, and a panel of physicians adjudicated all adverse events. MACE was defined as revascularization (>30 days after index ICA), myocardial infarction, or cardiac death; hospitalization for chest pain or congestive heart failure; or arrhythmia. Late MACE was defined similarly, except for patients who underwent revascularization within the first 182 days after ICA, who were excluded. Comparisons of 2-year survival (time to MACE) used standard Kaplan-Meier curves and restricted mean survival times bootstrapped with 2000 replicates. Results An MACE (49 revascularizations, five myocardial infarctions, one cardiac death, nine hospitalizations for chest pain or congestive heart failure, and one arrhythmia) occurred in 51 of 379 patients (13.5%). The 2-year MACE-free rates for combined CT angiography and CT perfusion findings were 94% negative for coronary artery disease (CAD) versus 82% positive for CAD and were similar to combined ICA and single photon emission CT findings (93% negative for CAD vs 77% positive for CAD, P < .001 for both). Event-free rates for CT angiography and CT perfusion versus ICA and single photon emission CT for either positive or negative results were not

  14. SU-E-J-141: Comparison of Dose Calculation On Automatically Generated MRBased ED Maps and Corresponding Patient CT for Clinical Prostate EBRT Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Schadewaldt, N; Schulz, H; Helle, M; Renisch, S; Frantzen-Steneker, M; Heide, U

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of computing radiation dose on automatically generated MR-based simulated CT images compared to true patient CTs. Methods: Six prostate cancer patients received a regular planning CT for RT planning as well as a conventional 3D fast-field dual-echo scan on a Philips 3.0T Achieva, adding approximately 2 min of scan time to the clinical protocol. Simulated CTs (simCT) where synthesized by assigning known average CT values to the tissue classes air, water, fat, cortical and cancellous bone. For this, Dixon reconstruction of the nearly out-of-phase (echo 1) and in-phase images (echo 2) allowed for water and fat classification. Model based bone segmentation was performed on a combination of the DIXON images. A subsequent automatic threshold divides into cortical and cancellous bone. For validation, the simCT was registered to the true CT and clinical treatment plans were re-computed on the simCT in pinnacle{sup 3}. To differentiate effects related to the 5 tissue classes and changes in the patient anatomy not compensated by rigid registration, we also calculate the dose on a stratified CT, where HU values are sorted in to the same 5 tissue classes as the simCT. Results: Dose and volume parameters on PTV and risk organs as used for the clinical approval were compared. All deviations are below 1.1%, except the anal sphincter mean dose, which is at most 2.2%, but well below clinical acceptance threshold. Average deviations are below 0.4% for PTV and risk organs and 1.3% for the anal sphincter. The deviations of the stratifiedCT are in the same range as for the simCT. All plans would have passed clinical acceptance thresholds on the simulated CT images. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the clinical usability of MR based dose calculation with the presented Dixon acquisition and subsequent fully automatic image processing. N. Schadewaldt, H. Schulz, M. Helle and S. Renisch are employed by Phlips Technologie Innovative Techonologies, a

  15. [Potentialities of computed tomography and ultrasound in diagnosis of hormonally active adrenal diseases: results of comparison CT and US with operative adn histological data].

    PubMed

    Denisova, L B; Vorontsova, S V; Emel'ianova, L N

    2000-01-01

    The data given in the paper suggest that X-ray computed tomography (CT) is highly effective in detecting all types of hormonally active adrenal abnormalities. CT used in hormonally active adrenal diseases yielded data on major quantitative and qualitative (primarily densitometric) criteria that could be used in assessing the images of the adrenal area in these patients. Ultrasound study (USS) made at the first stage of topical diagnostic searches was of informative value in detecting adrenal tumor lesions, the technique being highly sensitive in the diagnosis of adrenal pheochromocytomas and adenocarcinomas, but less informative in the detection of hormonally active adrenocortical adenomas (aldesterone-producing ones in particular) than CT. The diagnosis of various adrenocortical hyperplasies and the differentiation of hyperplastic and tumor forms of hypercorticoidism are a prerogative of CT that substantially supplements USS findings in such cases.

  16. 18F-FDG PET/CT in suspected recurrences of epithelial malignant pleural mesothelioma in asbestos-fibers-exposed patients (comparison to standard diagnostic follow-up).

    PubMed

    Niccoli-Asabella, Artor; Notaristefano, Antonio; Rubini, Domenico; Altini, Corinna; Ferrari, Cristina; Merenda, Nunzio; Fanelli, Margherita; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the role of 18-fluorine-labeled 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in patients with previous occupational or environmental exposure to asbestos, with histopathological diagnosis of epithelial malignant pleural mesothelioma and suspected recurrences, comparing the data from 18F-FDG PET/CT and computed tomography with contrast enhancement (CECT). 18F-FDG PET/CT has greater sensitivity than CECT in identifying local extent, lymph nodes, and metastasis. 18F-FDG PET/CT whole-body explorations are useful to monitor the follow-up and evaluate the metabolic response to chemo- and radiotherapy, modifying the scheduled treatment plan.

  17. A Spreadsheet for the Mixing of a Row of Jets with a Confined Crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holderman, J. D.; Smith, T. D.; Clisset, J. R.; Lear, W. E.

    2005-01-01

    An interactive computer code, written with a readily available software program, Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA) is presented which displays 3 D oblique plots of a conserved scalar distribution downstream of jets mixing with a confined crossflow, for a single row, double rows, or opposed rows of jets with or without flow area convergence and/or a non-uniform crossflow scalar distribution. This project used a previously developed empirical model of jets mixing in a confined crossflow to create an Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that can output the profiles of a conserved scalar for jets injected into a confined crossflow given several input variables. The program uses multiple spreadsheets in a single Microsoft Excel notebook to carry out the modeling. The first sheet contains the main program, controls for the type of problem to be solved, and convergence criteria. The first sheet also provides for input of the specific geometry and flow conditions. The second sheet presents the results calculated with this routine to show the effects on the mixing of varying flow and geometric parameters. Comparisons are also made between results from the version of the empirical correlations implemented in the spreadsheet and the versions originally written in Applesoft BASIC (Apple Computer, Cupertino, CA) in the 1980's.

  18. A Spreadsheet for the Mixing of a Row of Jets with a Confined Crossflow. Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holderman, J. D.; Smith, T. D.; Clisset, J. R.; Lear, W. E.

    2005-01-01

    An interactive computer code, written with a readily available software program, Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA) is presented which displays 3 D oblique plots of a conserved scalar distribution downstream of jets mixing with a confined crossflow, for a single row, double rows, or opposed rows of jets with or without flow area convergence and/or a non-uniform crossflow scalar distribution. This project used a previously developed empirical model of jets mixing in a confined crossflow to create an Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that can output the profiles of a conserved scalar for jets injected into a confined crossflow given several input variables. The program uses multiple spreadsheets in a single Microsoft Excel notebook to carry out the modeling. The first sheet contains the main program, controls for the type of problem to be solved, and convergence criteria. The first sheet also provides for input of the specific geometry and flow conditions. The second sheet presents the results calculated with this routine to show the effects on the mixing of varying flow and geometric parameters. Comparisons are also made between results from the version of the empirical correlations implemented in the spreadsheet and the versions originally written in Applesoft BASIC (Apple Computer, Cupertino, CA) in the 1980's.

  19. Maximal strength on different resistance training rowing exercises predicts start phase performance in elite kayakers.

    PubMed

    Ualí, Ismael; Herrero, Azael J; Garatachea, Nuria; Marín, Pedro J; Alvear-Ordenes, Ildefonso; García-López, David

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship existing between maximum strength values in 2 common resistance training row exercises (bilateral bench pull [BBP] and one-arm cable row [OACR]) and short sprint performance in elite kayakers. Ten junior kayakers (5 women and 5 men) were tested on different days for 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and maximal voluntary isometric contraction in both exercises. Moreover, a 12-m sprint kayak was performed in a dew pond to record split times (2, 5, and 10 m), peak velocity, distance completed considering the first 8 strokes, and mean acceleration induced by right blade and left blade strokes. No differences (p > 0.05) were observed when right and left arms were compared in sprint testing or strength testing variables. Maximal strength values in BBP and OACR were significantly correlated with short sprint performance variables, showing the bilateral exercise with slightly stronger correlation coefficients than the unilateral seated row. Moreover, the relationship between strength testing and sprint testing variables is stronger when maximal force is measured through a dynamic approach (1RM) in comparison with an isometric approach. In conclusion, maximal strength in BBP and OACR is a good predictor of the start phase performance in elite sprint kayakers, mainly the 1RM value in BBP.

  20. In vivo micro-CT imaging of untreated and irradiated orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts in mice: capabilities, limitations and a comparison with bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Stefanie; Felix, Manuela C; Hartmann, Linda; Bierbaum, Miriam; Maros, Máté E; Kerl, Hans U; Wenz, Frederik; Glatting, Gerhard; Kramer, Martin; Giordano, Frank A; Brockmann, Marc A

    2015-04-01

    Small animal imaging is of increasing relevance in biomedical research. Studies systematically assessing the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced in vivo micro-CT of orthotopic glioma xenografts in mice do not exist. NOD/SCID/γc(-/-) mice (n = 27) underwent intracerebral implantation of 2.5 × 10(6) GFP-Luciferase-transduced U87MG cells. Mice underwent bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to detect tumor growth and afterwards repeated contrast-enhanced (300 µl Iomeprol i.v.) micro-CT imaging (80 kV, 75 µAs, 360° rotation, 1,000 projections, 33 s scan time, resolution 40 × 40 × 53 µm, 0.5 Gy/scan). Presence of tumors, tumor diameter and tumor volume in micro-CT were rated by two independent readers. Results were compared with histological analyses. Six mice with tumors confirmed by micro-CT received fractionated irradiation (3 × 5 Gy every other day) using the micro-CT (5 mm pencil beam geometry). Repeated micro-CT scans were tolerated well. Tumor engraftment rate was 74 % (n = 20). In micro-CT, mean tumor volume was 30 ± 33 mm(3), and the smallest detectable tumor measured 360 × 620 µm. The inter-rater agreement (n = 51 micro-CT scans) for the item tumor yes/no was excellent (Spearman-Rho = 0.862, p < 0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of micro-CT were 0.95 and 0.71, respectively (PPV = 0.91, NPV = 0.83). BLI on day 21 after tumor implantation had a sensitivity and specificity of 0.90 and 1.0, respectively (PPV = 1.0, NPV = 0.5). Maximum tumor diameter and volume in micro-CT and histology correlated excellently (tumor diameter: 0.929, p < 0.001; tumor volume: 0.969, p < 0.001, n = 17). Irradiated animals showed a large central tumor necrosis. Longitudinal contrast enhanced micro-CT imaging of brain tumor growth in live mice is feasible at high sensitivity levels and with excellent inter-rater agreement and allows visualization of radiation effects.

  1. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z CT Colonography Computed tomography (CT) colonography or virtual colonoscopy uses special x-ray equipment to examine ... and blood vessels. CT colonography, also known as virtual colonoscopy, uses low dose radiation CT scanning to ...

  2. TU-A-12A-02: Novel Lung Ventilation Imaging with Single Energy CT After Single Inhalation of Xenon: Comparison with SPECT Ventilation Images

    SciTech Connect

    Negahdar, M; Yamamoto, T; Shultz, D; Gable, L; Shan, X; Mittra, E; Loo, B; Maxim, P; Diehn, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a novel lung functional imaging method to determine the spatial distribution of xenon (Xe) gas in a single inhalation as a measure of regional ventilation. We compare Xe-CT ventilation to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation, which is the current clinical reference. Regional lung ventilation information may be useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of pulmonary diseases such as COPD, radiotherapy planning, and assessing the progression of toxicity after radiation therapy. Methods: In an IRB-approved clinical study, Xe-CT and SPECT ventilation scans were acquired for three patients including one patient with severe emphysema and two lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. For Xe- CT, we acquired two breath-hold single energy CT images of the entire lung with inspiration of 100% O2 and a mixture of 70% Xe and 30% O2, respectively. A video biofeedback system was used to achieve reproducible breath-holds. We used deformable image registration to align the breathhold images with each other to accurately subtract them, producing a map of the distribution of Xe as a surrogate of lung ventilation. We divided each lung into twelve parts and correlated the Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement at each part with the SPECT ventilation count of the corresponding part of the lung. Results: The mean of the Pearson linear correlation coefficient values between the Xe-CT and ventilation SPECT count for all three patients were 0.62 (p<0.01). The Xe-CT image had a higher resolution than SPECT, and did not show central airway deposition artifacts that were present in the SPECT image. Conclusion: We developed a rapid, safe, clinically practical, and potentially widely accessible method for regional lung functional imaging. We demonstrated strong correlations between the Xe-CT ventilation image and SPECT ventilation image as the clinical reference. This ongoing study will investigate more patients to confirm this finding.

  3. Cell block eleven, looking from the "Death Row" exercise yard, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block eleven, looking from the "Death Row" exercise yard, facing north (note cell block fifteen to the right and cell block fourteen in the distance_ - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. 7. Row of pumps against first floor interior west wall. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Row of pumps against first floor interior west wall. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, Scranton Yards, Oil House, 650 feet Southeast of Cliff & Mechanic Streets, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  5. Detail, starpattern balustrade of north span, from northwest, showing row ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, star-pattern balustrade of north span, from northwest, showing row of four star-pattern railing slabs bracketed by simple molded concrete balusters - Horner Street Bridge, Horner Street over Stonycreek River, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  6. 1. View looking southeast down senior officer row. Building 6 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View looking southeast down senior officer row. Building 6 on left and senior officer housing on right. Galaxy Street in foreground. - Chanute Air Force Base, East of Route 45 & south of Rantoul, Rantoul, Champaign County, IL

  7. 26. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING ROW OF TIMBER SUPPORT TOWERS BUILT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING ROW OF TIMBER SUPPORT TOWERS BUILT AS TEMPORARY TRUSS REINFORCEMENT (NOTE STEEL STRUCTURES ATOP TIMBER BRACING) - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  8. Effect of BMI on knee joint torques in ergometer rowing.

    PubMed

    Roemer, Karen; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Richter, Chris; Munoz-Maldonado, Yolanda; Hamilton, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    Although an authoritative panel recommended the use of ergometer rowing as a non-weight-bearing form of exercise for obese adults, the biomechanical characterization of ergometer rowing is strikingly absent. We examined the interaction between body mass index (BMI) relative to the lower extremity biomechanics during rowing in 10 normal weight (BMI 18-25), 10 overweight (BMI 25-30 kg·m⁻²), and 10 obese (BMI > 30 kg·m⁻²) participants. The results showed that BMI affects joint kinematics and primarily knee joint kinetics. The data revealed that high BMI leads to unfavorable knee joint torques, implying increased loads of the medial compartment in the knee joint that could be avoided by allowing more variable foot positioning on future designs of rowing ergometers.

  9. Rows of barrack, Building No. 909 (left) and Building No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rows of barrack, Building No. 909 (left) and Building No. 910 (right), looking 82 degrees east - Presidio of San Francisco, Enlisted Men's Barracks Type, West end of Crissy Field, between Pearce & Maudlin Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  10. Row of barracks, Building No. 902 (right) and Building No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Row of barracks, Building No. 902 (right) and Building No. 903 (left), looking 277 degrees west - Presidio of San Francisco, Enlisted Men's Barracks Type, West end of Crissy Field, between Pearce & Maudlin Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  11. THERMALWATER FLOW METER. Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    THERMAL-WATER FLOW METER. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Superior Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  12. Row effect for R-11 condensation on enhanced tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.L.; Murawski, C.G. )

    1990-08-01

    Experimental results of a condensation row effect study on enhanced tubes are presented. A test cell was constructed to condense Refrigerant-11 on the shell side of a vertical bank of five horizontal tubes. Four distinctly different commercially available tubes were tested. The tubes are a 1024-fpm integral fin, the Wolverine Tube-C, Wieland GEWA-SC, and the Tred-D. A modified Turbo-C tube was also tested. Experimental and visual observations are used to understand the row effect due to condensate loading. By plotting the data in the form of the local condensation coefficient versus condensate Reynolds number, the results may be interpreted for any number of tube rows, up to the maximum Reynolds numbers tested. Bundle average condensation coefficients may be established by integrating the h versus Re values over the number of tube rows.

  13. Detection of ischaemic myocardial lesions with coronary CT angiography and adenosine-stress dynamic perfusion imaging using a 128-slice dual-source CT: diagnostic performance in comparison with cardiac MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S M; Choi, J-H; Chang, S-A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the diagnostic performance of adenosine-stress dynamic CT perfusion (ASDCTP) imaging and coronary CT angiography (CCTA) for the detection of ischaemic myocardial lesions using 128-slice dual-source CT compared with that of 1.5 T cardiac MRI. Methods: This prospective study included 33 patients (61±8 years, 82% male) with suspected coronary artery diseases who underwent ASDCTP imaging and adenosine-stress cardiac MRI. Two investigators independently evaluated ASDCTP images in correlation with significant coronary stenosis on CCTA using two different thresholds of 50% and 70% diameter stenosis. Hypoattenuated myocardial lesions on ASDCTP associated with significant coronary stenoses on CCTA were regarded as true perfusion defects. All estimates of diagnostic performance were calculated and compared with those of cardiac MRI. Results: With use of a threshold of 50% diameter stenosis on CCTA, the diagnostic estimates per-myocardial segment were as follows: sensitivity, 81% [95% confidence interval (CI): 70–92%]; specificity, 94% (95% CI: 92–96%); and accuracy 93% (95% CI: 91–95%). With use of a threshold of 70%, the diagnostic estimates were as follows: sensitivity, 48% (95% CI: 34–62%); specificity, 99% (95% CI: 98–100%); and accuracy, 94% (95% CI: 92–96%). Conclusion: Dynamic CTP using 128-slice dual-source CT enables the assessment of the physiological significance of coronary artery lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in patients with clinically suspected coronary artery disease. Advances in knowledge: Combined CCTA and ASDCTP yielded high accuracy in the detection of perfusion defects regardless of the threshold of significant coronary stenosis. PMID:24096592

  14. Reliability analysis of visual ranking of coronary artery calcification on low-dose CT of the thorax for lung cancer screening: comparison with ECG-gated calcium scoring CT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Kyung; Sung, Yon Mi; Cho, So Hyun; Park, Young Nam; Choi, Hye-Young

    2014-12-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is frequently detected on low-dose CT (LDCT) of the thorax. Concurrent assessment of CAC and lung cancer screening using LDCT is beneficial in terms of cost and radiation dose reduction. The aim of our study was to evaluate the reliability of visual ranking of positive CAC on LDCT compared to Agatston score (AS) on electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated calcium scoring CT. We studied 576 patients who were consecutively registered for health screening and undergoing both LDCT and ECG-gated calcium scoring CT. We excluded subjects with an AS of zero. The final study cohort included 117 patients with CAC (97 men; mean age, 53.4 ± 8.5). AS was used as the gold standard (mean score 166.0; range 0.4-3,719.3). Two board-certified radiologists and two radiology residents participated in an observer performance study. Visual ranking of CAC was performed according to four categories (1-10, 11-100, 101-400, and 401 or higher) for coronary artery disease risk stratification. Weighted kappa statistics were used to measure the degree of reliability on visual ranking of CAC on LDCT. The degree of reliability on visual ranking of CAC on LDCT compared to ECG-gated calcium scoring CT was excellent for board-certified radiologists and good for radiology residents. A high degree of association was observed with 71.6% of visual rankings in the same category as the Agatston category and 98.9% varying by no more than one category. Visual ranking of positive CAC on LDCT is reliable for predicting AS rank categorization.

  15. Airway Segmentation and Centerline Extraction from Thoracic CTComparison of a New Method to State of the Art Commercialized Methods

    PubMed Central

    Reynisson, Pall Jens; Scali, Marta; Smistad, Erik; Hofstad, Erlend Fagertun; Leira, Håkon Olav; Lindseth, Frank; Nagelhus Hernes, Toril Anita; Amundsen, Tore; Sorger, Hanne; Langø, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    airways and the centerlines. Reference segmentation comparison averages and standard deviations for MPM and TSF correspond to literature. Conclusion The TSF is able to segment the airways and extract the centerlines in one single step. The number of branches found is lower for the TSF method than in Mimics. OsiriX demands the highest number of clicks to process the data, the segmentation is often sparse and extracting the centerline requires the use of another software system. Two of the software systems performed satisfactory with respect to be used in preprocessing CT images for navigated bronchoscopy, i.e. the TSF method and the MPM. According to reference segmentation both TSF and MPM are comparable with other segmentation methods. The level of automaticity and the resulting high number of branches plus the fact that both centerline and the surface of the airways were extracted, are requirements we considered particularly important. The in house method has the advantage of being an integrated part of a navigation platform for bronchoscopy, whilst the other methods can be considered preprocessing tools to a navigation system. PMID:26657513

  16. Color duplex ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound in comparison to MS-CT in the detection of endoleak following endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Clevert, D-A; Minaifar, N; Weckbach, S; Kopp, R; Meimarakis, G; Clevert, D-A; Reiser, M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare Color Duplex Ultrasound (CDU), Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) and Multislice Computed Tomography (MS-CT) angiography in the routine follow up of patients following Endovascular Repair (EVAR) of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA).43 consecutive patients with AAA underwent endovascular aneurysm repair and were imaged with CDU, CEUS and MS-CT angiography at regular intervals after the procedure. Each imaging modality was evaluated for the detection of endoleaks. The presence of endoleaks was analyzed and the conspicuity of findings was assessed.CTA was used as gold standard in determining the presence of endoleaks. CDU was true positive for endoleaks in 5/43 patients (11.6%) and false positive for endoleaks in 2/43 patients (4.6%). The sensitivity of CDU was therefore 33.3% and its specificity 92.8%; the positive and negative predictive values were 0.71 and 0.72, respectively. CEUS was true positive for the detection of endoleaks in 15/43 patients (34.9%) and false positive in 2/43 patients (4.6%). The sensitivity of CEUS was therefore 100% and its specificity 93%; the positive and negative predictive values were 0.88 and 1. In the follow up the two false positive endoleaks in CEUS were confirmed as true positive endoleaks by CEUS and MS-CT. In our small patient group, contrast-enhanced ultrasound seemed to be more accurately in demonstrating endoleaks after EVAR than MS-CT angiography and may be considered as a primary surveillance modality whereas duplex ultrasound scanning alone is not as sensitive as CEUS and MS-CT angiography in detection of endoleaks. Especially in patients with contraindications for CT contrast agents (e.g. due to renal failure or severe allergy) CEUS provides a good alternative to MS-CT.

  17. Anxiety in Cancer Patients during 18F-FDG PET/CT Low Dose: A Comparison of Anxiety Levels before and after Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Lina; Carolino, Elisabete; Oliveira, Cátia; Pacheco, Carolina; Castro, Maria; Alonso, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Assessing the level of anxiety in oncology patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan and identifying the main reasons that generate anxiety. Material and Method. The study included 81 cancer patients submitted to the 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan. Patients filled in the Scan Experience Questionnaire and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) before and after 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan. Results. Substantial levels of anxiety were detected both before and after 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan (STAI mean > 30), with a significant increase in the state of anxiety after scan performance (p < 0.0001, Medianpre = 31.1, and Medianpos = 33.0). 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose results are the main cause of anxiety both before (79.1%) and after (86.9%) the scan. The information provided by staff both before and on the 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose day was classified mostly as completely understandable (70.5% and 75.3%, resp.) and as very useful (70.5% and 72.6%, resp.) and correlated positively with patients' overall satisfaction with NM Department (rS = 0.372, p = 0.004 and rS = 0.528, p = 0.000, resp.), but not with anxiety levels. Conclusions. Patients perceive high levels of anxiety during the 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan and the concern with scan results was pointed out as the main factor for that emotional reaction. PMID:28392942

  18. SU-F-207-13: Comparison of Four Dimensional Computed Tomography (4D CT) Versus Breath Hold Images to Determine Pulmonary Nodule Elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Negahdar, M; Loo, B; Maxim, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Elasticity may distinguish malignant from benign pulmonary nodules. To compare determining of malignant pulmonary nodule (MPN) elasticity from four dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images versus inhale/exhale breath-hold CT images. Methods: We analyzed phase 00 and 50 of 4D CT and deep inhale and natural exhale of breath-hold CT images of 30 MPN treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). The radius of the smallest MPN was 0.3 cm while the biggest one was 2.1 cm. An intensity based deformable image registration (DIR) workflow was applied to the 4D CT and breath-hold images to determine the volumes of the MPNs and a 1 cm ring of surrounding lung tissue (ring) in each state. Next, an elasticity parameter was derived by calculating the ratio of the volume changes of MPN (exhale:inhale or phase50:phase00) to that of a 1 cm ring of lung tissue surrounding the MPN. The proposed formulation of elasticity enables us to compare volume changes of two different MPN in two different locations of lung. Results: The calculated volume ratio of MPNs from 4D CT (phase50:phase00) and breath-hold images (exhale:inhale) was 1.00±0.23 and 0.95±0.11, respectively. It shows the stiffness of MPN and comparably bigger volume changes of MPN in breath-hold images because of the deeper degree of inhalation. The calculated elasticity of MPNs from 4D CT and breath-hold images was 1.12±0.22 and 1.23±0.26, respectively. For five patients who have had two MPN in their lung, calculated elasticity of tumor A and tumor B follows same trend in both 4D CT and breath-hold images. Conclusion: We showed that 4D CT and breath-hold images are comparable in the ability to calculate the elasticity of MPN. This study has been supported by Department of Defense LCRP 2011 #W81XWH-12-1-0286.

  19. The extension of a uniform canopy reflectance model to include row effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The effect of row structure is assumed to be caused by the variation in density of vegetation across rows rather than to a profile in canopy height. The calculation of crop reflectance using vegetation density modulation across rows follows a parallel procedure to that for a uniform canopy. Predictions using the row model for wheat show that the effect of changes in sun to row azimuth are greatest in Landsat Band 5 (red band) and can result in underestimation of crop vigor.

  20. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of FBP, ASiR, and MBIR reconstruction during CT angiography in the evaluation of a vessel phantom with calcified stenosis in a distal superficial femoral artery in a cadaver extremity

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, Jitsuro; Yamada, Minoru; Yamada, Yoshitake; Yamazaki, Shun; Imanishi, Nobuaki; Tamura, Kentaro; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Nakatsuka, Seishi; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To investigate whether adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) or model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) improves the diagnostic performance of computed tomography angiography (CTA) for small-vessel calcified lesions relative to filtered back projection (FBP) using cadaver extremities and a calcified stenosis phantom. Methods: A cadaver was used in accordance with our institutional regulations, and a calcified stenosis phantom simulating 4 grades of stenosis was prepared. The phantom was inserted within the distal superficial femoral artery of the cadaver leg. Ten CT images per reconstruction type and stenosis grade were acquired using a 64-slice multidetector-row CTA. As an objective measurement, the first and second derivatives of the CT value function profiles were calculated. As a subjective measurement, 2 blinded reviewers measured the stenosis ratio using a quantitative scale. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to evaluate the data. Results: Objective measurements of both 25% and 50% stenosis differed significantly (P < 0.01) between MBIR (25/50%: 25.80/50.30 ± 3.88/3.86%) and FBP (25/50%: 35.60/83.80 ± 3.44/26.10%), whereas significant differences were not observed between ASiR and FBP. Reviewer 2's subjective measurements of 25% stenosis differed significantly (P < 0.01) between MBIR (35.13 ± 3.25%) and ASiR (40.89 ± 3.14%), and the measurements of 50% stenosis differed significantly (P < 0.01) between MBIR (reviewers 1/2, 62.36/54.78 ± 2.78/4.96%) and FBP (reviewers 1/2, 62.36/74.84 ± 2.78/18.10%). Significant differences in the subjective measurements were not observed between ASiR and FBP. Conclusion: MBIR improves the diagnostic performance of CTA for small-vessel calcified lesions relative to FBP. PMID:27399123

  1. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) for Echographic Detection of Hepato Cellular Carcinoma in Cirrhotic Patients Previously Treated with Multiple Techniques: Comparison of Conventional US, Spiral CT and 3-Dimensional CEUS with Navigator Technique (3DNav CEUS)

    PubMed Central

    Giangregorio, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    A commercially available technique named “NAVIGATOR” (Esaote, Italy) easily enables a 3-D reconstruction of a single 2-D acquisition of Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) imaging of the whole liver (with a volumetric correction thanks to the electromagnetic device of NAVIGATOR). Aim of the study was to evaluate this “panoramic” technique in comparison with conventional US and spiral CT in the detection of new hepatic lesions. 144 cirrhotic patients (previously treated for hepato cellular carcinoma (HCC)) in follow-up with detection of 98 new nodules (N), 28 multinodular (Nmulti), 14 loco-regional regrowth (LR) 94 efficaciously treated without new nodules (neg) and four multinodular without new nodules, were submitted to 200 examinations with this new technique from November 2008 to November 2009. 3DNavCEUS was performed using SonoVue (Bracco), as contrast agent, and a machine (Technos MPX, Esaote). Spiral CT and 3DNav CEUS were performed in the same month during follow up. Sens.,Spec.,diagn.-Acc.,PPV and NPV were evaluated; comparison and differences between the techniques were obtained with chi-square (SPSS release-15). Final diagnosis was: 98 new lesions (N) (one to three), 28 multinodular HCC (Nmulti) and 14 loco-regional regrowth (LR); in 94 no more lesions were observed during follow-up; conventional US obtained: 58 N (+18 multinodularN and 8 LR), 40 false negative (+10 Nmulti and 6 LR) (sens:59.2, spec:100%, Diagn Accur:73.6, PPV:100; NPV:70.1); spiral CT obtained: 84N (+26-multinodularN and 14-LR), 14 false-negative (+2-Nmulti), and one false-positive (sens:85.7, spec:97.9%, Diagn Accur:90.9, PPV:97.7; NPV:86.8); 3DNAV obtained: 92N (+28 multinodularN and 14LR), 6 false-negative, and two false-positives (sens:93.9, spec:97.9%, Diagn Accur:95.6, PPV:97.9; NPV:93.9). 3-DNav CEUS is significantly better than US and almost similar to spiral CT for detection of new HCC. This technique, in particular, showed the presence of lesions even in the cases not

  2. 7 CFR 810.204 - Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. 810.204 Section 810.204 Agriculture Regulations of the... Standards for Barley Principles Governing the Application of Standards § 810.204 Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. Grade Minimum limits of—...

  3. 7 CFR 810.204 - Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. 810.204 Section 810.204 Agriculture Regulations of the... Standards for Barley Principles Governing the Application of Standards § 810.204 Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. Grade Minimum limits of—...

  4. 7 CFR 810.204 - Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. 810.204 Section 810.204 Agriculture Regulations of the... Standards for Barley Principles Governing the Application of Standards § 810.204 Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. Grade Minimum limits of—...

  5. 7 CFR 810.204 - Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. 810.204 Section 810.204 Agriculture Regulations of the... Standards for Barley Principles Governing the Application of Standards § 810.204 Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. Grade Minimum limits of—...

  6. 7 CFR 810.204 - Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. 810.204 Section 810.204 Agriculture Regulations of the... Standards for Barley Principles Governing the Application of Standards § 810.204 Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. Grade Minimum limits of—...

  7. PET/CT: underlying physics, instrumentation, and advances.

    PubMed

    Torres Espallardo, I

    2017-01-12

    Since it was first introduced, the main goal of PET/CT has been to provide both PET and CT images with high clinical quality and to present them to radiologists and specialists in nuclear medicine as a fused, perfectly aligned image. The use of fused PET and CT images quickly became routine in clinical practice, showing the great potential of these hybrid scanners. Thanks to this success, manufacturers have gone beyond considering CT as a mere attenuation corrector for PET, concentrating instead on design high performance PET and CT scanners with more interesting features. Since the first commercial PET/CT scanner became available in 2001, both the PET component and the CT component have improved immensely. In the case of PET, faster scintillation crystals with high stopping power such as LYSO crystals have enabled more sensitive devices to be built, making it possible to reduce the number of undesired coincidence events and to use time of flight (TOF) techniques. All these advances have improved lesion detection, especially in situations with very noisy backgrounds. Iterative reconstruction methods, together with the corrections carried out during the reconstruction and the use of the point-spread function, have improved image quality. In parallel, CT instrumentation has also improved significantly, and 64- and 128-row detectors have been incorporated into the most modern PET/CT scanners. This makes it possible to obtain high quality diagnostic anatomic images in a few seconds that both enable the correction of PET attenuation and provide information for diagnosis. Furthermore, nowadays nearly all PET/CT scanners have a system that modulates the dose of radiation that the patient is exposed to in the CT study in function of the region scanned. This article reviews the underlying physics of PET and CT imaging separately, describes the changes in the instrumentation and standard protocols in a combined PET/CT system, and finally points out the most important

  8. Staging of Primary Abdominal Lymphomas: Comparison of Whole-Body MRI with Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Stecco, Alessandro; Buemi, Francesco; Quagliozzi, Martina; Lombardi, Mariangela; Santagostino, Alberto; Sacchetti, Gian Mauro; Carriero, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of whole-body MRI with diffusion-weighted sequences (WB-DW-MRI) with that of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the staging of patients with primary gastrointestinal lymphoma. Methods. This retrospective study involved 17 untreated patients with primary abdominal gastrointestinal lymphoma. All patients underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT and WB-DW-MRI. Histopathology findings or at least 6 months of clinical and radiological follow-up was the gold standard. The Musshoff-modified Ann Arbor system was used for staging, and diagnostic accuracy was evaluated on a per-node basis. Results. WB-DW-MRI exhibited 100% sensitivity, 96.3% specificity, and 96.1% and 100% positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and PPV and NPV of PET/CT were 95.9%, 100%, and 100% and 96.4%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the two techniques (p = 0.05). The weighted kappa agreement statistics with a 95% confidence interval were 0.97 (0.95–0.99) between the two MRI readers and 0.87 (0.82–0.92) between the two methods. Conclusions. WB-DW-MRI appears to have a comparable diagnostic value to 18F-FDG-PET/CT in staging patients with gastrointestinal lymphoma. PMID:26798331

  9. Screening for coronary artery disease in respiratory patients: comparison of single- and dual-source CT in patients with a heart rate above 70 bpm.

    PubMed

    Pansini, Vittorio; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Tacelli, Nunzia; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Flohr, Thomas; Deken, Valérie; Duhamel, Alain; Remy, Jacques

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate the assessibility of coronary arteries in respiratory patients with high heart rates. This study was based on the comparative analysis of two paired populations of 54 patients with a heart rate >70 bpm evaluated with dual-source (group 1) and single-source (group 2) CT. The mean heart rate was 89.1 bpm in group 1 and 86.7 bpm in group 2 (P=0.26). The mean number of assessable segments per patient was significantly higher in group 1 compared to group 2 (P CT angiograms of the chest. The improvement in coronary imaging with dual-source CT suggests that high heart rates should no longer be considered as contraindications for ECG-gated CT angiograms of the chest whenever clinically relevant.

  10. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Boone, J M; Abbey, C K; Hargreaves, J; Bateni, C; Lindfors, K K; Yang, K; Nosratieh, A; Hernandez, A; Gazi, P

    2015-04-21

    The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33, 0.71, 1.5 and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast.The percent correct of the human observer's responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p < 0.05) better in the case of thin-section images, compared to thick section images similar to mammography, for all but the 1 mm lesion diameter lesions. For example, the average of three radiologist's performance for 3 mm diameter lesions was 92% correct for thin section breast CT images while it was 67% for the simulated projection images. A gradual reduction in observer performance was observed as the section thickness increased beyond about 1 mm. While a performance difference based on breast density was seen in both breast CT and the projection image results, the average radiologist performance using breast CT images in dense breasts outperformed the performance using simulated projection images in fatty breasts for all lesion diameters except 11 mm. The average radiologist performance outperformed that of the average physicist observer, however trends

  11. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Boone, J. M.; Abbey, C. K.; Hargreaves, J.; Bateni, C.; Lindfors, K. K.; Yang, K.; Nosratieh, A.; Hernandez, A.; Gazi, P.

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33, 0.71, 1.5 and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast. The percent correct of the human observer’s responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p < 0.05) better in the case of thin-section images, compared to thick section images similar to mammography, for all but the 1 mm lesion diameter lesions. For example, the average of three radiologist’s performance for 3 mm diameter lesions was 92% correct for thin section breast CT images while it was 67% for the simulated projection images. A gradual reduction in observer performance was observed as the section thickness increased beyond about 1 mm. While a performance difference based on breast density was seen in both breast CT and the projection image results, the average radiologist performance using breast CT images in dense breasts outperformed the performance using simulated projection images in fatty breasts for all lesion diameters except 11 mm. The average radiologist performance outperformed that of the average physicist

  12. New insights on COPD imaging via CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sverzellati, N; Molinari, F; Pirronti, T; Bonomo, L; Spagnolo, P; Zompatori, M

    2007-01-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to quantify morphological features and investigate structure/function relationship in COPD. This approach allows a phenotypical definition of COPD patients, and might improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis and suggest new therapeutical options. In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has also become potentially suitable for the assessment of ventilation, perfusion and respiratory mechanics. This review focuses on the established clinical applications of CT, and novel CT and MRI techniques, which may prove valuable in evaluating the structural and functional damage in COPD. PMID:18229568

  13. A comparison of six software packages for evaluation of solid lung nodules using semi-automated volumetry: what is the minimum increase in size to detect growth in repeated CT examinations.

    PubMed

    de Hoop, Bartjan; Gietema, Hester; van Ginneken, Bram; Zanen, Pieter; Groenewegen, Gerard; Prokop, Mathias

    2009-04-01

    We compared interexamination variability of CT lung nodule volumetry with six currently available semi-automated software packages to determine the minimum change needed to detect the growth of solid lung nodules. We had ethics committee approval. To simulate a follow-up examination with zero growth, we performed two low-dose unenhanced CT scans in 20 patients referred for pulmonary metastases. Between examinations, patients got off and on the table. Volumes of all pulmonary nodules were determined on both examinations using six nodule evaluation software packages. Variability (upper limit of the 95% confidence interval of the Bland-Altman plot) was calculated for nodules for which segmentation was visually rated as adequate. We evaluated 214 nodules (mean diameter 10.9 mm, range 3.3 mm-30.0 mm). Software packages provided adequate segmentation in 71% to 86% of nodules (p < 0.001). In case of adequate segmentation, variability in volumetry between scans ranged from 16.4% to 22.3% for the various software packages. Variability with five to six software packages was significantly less for nodules >or=8 mm in diameter (range 12.9%-17.1%) than for nodules <8 mm (range 18.5%-25.6%). Segmented volumes of each package were compared to each of the other packages. Systematic volume differences were detected in 11/15 comparisons. This hampers comparison of nodule volumes between software packages.

  14. Nutrition and Supplements for Elite Open-Weight Rowing.

    PubMed

    Boegman, Susan; Dziedzic, Christine E

    2016-01-01

    Competitive rowing events are raced over 2,000 m requiring athletes to have highly developed aerobic and anaerobic systems. Elite rowers therefore undertake training sessions focused on lactate tolerance, strength and power as well as aerobic and anaerobic capacity development, that can amount to a 24-h training week. The training stimuli and consequent metabolic demands of each session in a rowing training program differ depending on type, length, and intensity. Nutrition guidelines for endurance- and power-based sports should be drawn upon; however, individualized and flexible nutrition plans are critical to successfully meet the daily, weekly, and cyclic nutrient requirements of a rower. This review will provide an overview of key nutritional strategies to optimize training and enhance adaptation, and briefly discuss supplement strategies that may support health and enhance performance in elite rowing.

  15. A parallelization of the row-searching algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaici, Malika; Khaled, Hayet; Khaled, Zakia; Bentahar, Athmane

    2012-11-01

    The problem dealt in this paper concerns the parallelization of the row-searching algorithm which allows the search for linearly dependant rows on a given matrix and its implementation on MPI (Message Passing Interface) environment. This algorithm is largely used in control theory and more specifically in solving the famous diophantine equation. An introduction to the diophantine equation is presented, then two parallelization approaches of the algorithm are detailed. The first distributes a set of rows on processes (processors) and the second makes a distribution per blocks. The sequential algorithm and its two parallel forms are implemented using MPI routines, then modelled using UML (Unified Modelling Language) and finally evaluated using algorithmic complexity.

  16. Aging performance for masters records in athletics, swimming, rowing, cycling, triathlon, and weightlifting.

    PubMed

    Baker, A Barry; Tang, Yong Q

    2010-10-01

    Record performances for Masters sporting events for swimming, cycling, triathlon, rowing, and weightlifting were analyzed and then compared with the authors' previously published results for Masters running, walking, and jumping sports events. Records were normalized using the 30s age records as a baseline, and studied through the various age ranges to the 90s. A curvilinear mathematical model [y = 1 - exp((T - T(0))/τ)] was again used for the major comparisons, along with slope changes using a linear model [y = α(T -T'0)] across the age groupings. All sports declined with increasing age, with rowing showing the least deterioration. Performances in running, swimming, and walking were reasonably well maintained, followed by greater decline with age for cycling, triathlon, and jumping events. Weightlifting showed the fastest and greatest decline with increasing age. The relative performances for women, when compared with men's performances for these Masters events, was approximately 80% to 85%, with jumping at 73% and weightlifting at 52%. These relative performances compared with World Record comparisons of approximately 90% (with weightlifting at approximately 75%). All these results show no greater decline with age for endurance events over the sprint events, though there was a greater decline for the strength events of weightlifting and jumping. There may be real physiological differences for these strength events, or there may be other explanations such as training or competitive considerations or smaller numbers participating.

  17. Data Correction for Gantry-tilted Local CT.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongzhu; Zhang, Cishen; Yan, Ming; Zhou, Jiayin

    2005-01-01

    Gantry-tilted helical multi-slice computed tomography (CT) refers to the helical scanning CT system equipped with multi-row detector operating at some gantry tilting angle. Its purpose is to avoid the area which is vulnerable to the X-ray radiation. The local tomography is to reduce the total radiation dose by only scanning the region of interest for image reconstruction. In this paper we consider the scanning scheme, and incorporate the local tomography technique with the gantry-tilted helical multi-slice CT. The image degradation problem caused by gantry tilting is studied, and a new error correction method is proposed to deal with this problem in the local CT. Computer simulation shows that the proposed method can enhance the local imaging performance in terms of image sharpness and artifacts reduction.

  18. Radiation dose reduction to the breast in thoracic CT: Comparison of bismuth shielding, organ-based tube current modulation, and use of a globally decreased tube current

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jia; Duan Xinhui; Christner, Jodie A.; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate dose performance and image quality in thoracic CT using three techniques to reduce dose to the breast: bismuth shielding, organ-based tube current modulation (TCM) and global tube current reduction. Methods: Semi-anthropomorphic thorax phantoms of four different sizes (15, 30, 35, and 40 cm lateral width) were used for dose measurement and image quality assessment. Four scans were performed on each phantom using 100 or 120 kV with a clinical CT scanner: (1) reference scan; (2) scan with bismuth breast shield of an appropriate thickness; (3) scan with organ-based TCM; and (4) scan with a global reduction in tube current chosen to match the dose reduction from bismuth shielding. Dose to the breast was measured with an ion chamber on the surface of the phantom. Image quality was evaluated by measuring the mean and standard deviation of CT numbers within the lung and heart regions. Results: Compared to the reference scan, dose to the breast region was decreased by about 21% for the 15-cm phantom with a pediatric (2-ply) shield and by about 37% for the 30, 35, and 40-cm phantoms with adult (4-ply) shields. Organ-based TCM decreased the dose by 12% for the 15-cm phantom, and 34-39% for the 30, 35, and 40-cm phantoms. Global lowering of the tube current reduced breast dose by 23% for the 15-cm phantom and 39% for the 30, 35, and 40-cm phantoms. In phantoms of all four sizes, image noise was increased in both the lung and heart regions with bismuth shielding. No significant increase in noise was observed with organ-based TCM. Decreasing tube current globally led to similar noise increases as bismuth shielding. Streak and beam hardening artifacts, and a resulting artifactual increase in CT numbers, were observed for scans with bismuth shields, but not for organ-based TCM or global tube current reduction. Conclusions: Organ-based TCM produces dose reduction to the breast similar to that achieved with bismuth shielding for

  19. MRI-based IMRT planning for MR-linac: comparison between CT- and MRI-based plans for pancreatic and prostate cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, Phil; Chen, Xinfeng; Botros, Maikel; Paulson, Eric S.; Lawton, Colleen; Erickson, Beth; Li, X. Allen

    2016-05-01

    The treatment planning in radiation therapy (RT) can be arranged to combine benefits of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) together to maintain dose calculation accuracy and improved target delineation. Our aim is study the dosimetric impact of uniform relative electron density assignment on IMRT treatment planning with additional consideration given to the effect of a 1.5 T transverse magnetic field (TMF) in MR-Linac. A series of intensity modulated RT (IMRT) plans were generated for two representative tumor sites, pancreas and prostate, using CT and MRI datasets. Representative CT-based IMRT plans were generated to assess the impact of different electron density (ED) assignment on plan quality using CT without the presence of a 1.5 T TMF. The relative ED (rED) values used were taken from the ICRU report 46. Four types of rED assignment in the organs at risk (OARs), the planning target volumes (PTV) and in the non-specified tissue (NST) were considered. Dose was recalculated (no optimization) using a Monaco 5.09.07a research planning system employing Monte Carlo calculations with an option to include TMF. To investigate the dosimetric effect of different rED assignment, the dose-volume parameters (DVPs) obtained from these specific rED plans were compared to those obtained from the original plans based on CT. Overall, we found that uniform rED assignment results in differences in DVPs within 3% for the PTV and 5% for OAR. The presence of 1.5 T TMF on IMRT DVPs resulted in differences that were generally within 3% of the Gold St for both the pancreas and prostate. The combination of uniform rED assignment and TMF produced differences in DVPs that were within 4-5% of the Gold St. Larger differences in DVPs were observed for OARs on T2-based plans. The effects of using different rED assignments and the presence of 1.5 T TMF for pancreas and prostate IMRT plans are generally within 3% and 5% of PTV and OAR Gold St values. There are

  20. MRI-based IMRT planning for MR-linac: comparison between CT- and MRI-based plans for pancreatic and prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Prior, Phil; Chen, Xinfeng; Botros, Maikel; Paulson, Eric S; Lawton, Colleen; Erickson, Beth; Li, X Allen

    2016-05-21

    The treatment planning in radiation therapy (RT) can be arranged to combine benefits of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) together to maintain dose calculation accuracy and improved target delineation. Our aim is study the dosimetric impact of uniform relative electron density assignment on IMRT treatment planning with additional consideration given to the effect of a 1.5 T transverse magnetic field (TMF) in MR-Linac. A series of intensity modulated RT (IMRT) plans were generated for two representative tumor sites, pancreas and prostate, using CT and MRI datasets. Representative CT-based IMRT plans were generated to assess the impact of different electron density (ED) assignment on plan quality using CT without the presence of a 1.5 T TMF. The relative ED (rED) values used were taken from the ICRU report 46. Four types of rED assignment in the organs at risk (OARs), the planning target volumes (PTV) and in the non-specified tissue (NST) were considered. Dose was recalculated (no optimization) using a Monaco 5.09.07a research planning system employing Monte Carlo calculations with an option to include TMF. To investigate the dosimetric effect of different rED assignment, the dose-volume parameters (DVPs) obtained from these specific rED plans were compared to those obtained from the original plans based on CT. Overall, we found that uniform rED assignment results in differences in DVPs within 3% for the PTV and 5% for OAR. The presence of 1.5 T TMF on IMRT DVPs resulted in differences that were generally within 3% of the Gold St for both the pancreas and prostate. The combination of uniform rED assignment and TMF produced differences in DVPs that were within 4-5% of the Gold St. Larger differences in DVPs were observed for OARs on T2-based plans. The effects of using different rED assignments and the presence of 1.5 T TMF for pancreas and prostate IMRT plans are generally within 3% and 5% of PTV and OAR Gold St values. There are

  1. Multidetector row computed tomography evaluation of potential living laparoscopic renal donors: the story so far.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Saravanan; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Small, William C; Torres, William E; Mittal, Pardeep K

    2006-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease. Living related kidney donation is the major source of renal grafts due to limited availability of cadaveric kidneys. Open nephrectomy was used to harvest donor kidneys. However, the laparoscopic approach is associated with less postoperative pain and quick recovery. So, most centers now prefer a laparoscopic approach to explant donor kidneys. Laparoscopic approach is technically challenging due to limited operative visibility. Hence, accurate preoperative detection of renal arterial and venous anomalies is imperative to avoid inadvertent vascular injury and bleeding. The preoperative workup of renal donors includes clinical evaluation, laboratory tests, and imaging. Traditionally, the renal donors were evaluated with conventional imaging techniques, which included renal catheter angiography and intravenous urography. However, conventional imaging is invasive, expensive, and less accurate for evaluation of complex renal venous anomalies, small calculi, and diffuse or focal renal parenchymal lesions. The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) revolutionized the CT technology by enabling isotropic resolution with faster scan coverage in a single, short breath-hold. Consequently, MDCT has now replaced conventional imaging for comprehensive imaging of potential living renal donors. MDCT is a minimally invasive technique that can accurately detect urolithiasis, renal arterial and venous anomalies, renal parenchymal lesions, and urinary tract anomalies. Renal vascular anomalies detected by MDCT can help the surgeon in planning donor nephrectomy. MDCT with three-dimensional CT angiography enables accurate preoperative renal vascular mapping. This article reviews the role of MDCT in preoperative evaluation of potential laparoscopic renal donors.

  2. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... test used to help diagnose—or rule out—spinal column damage in injured patients. CT scanning is fast, ... CT is to detect—or to rule out—spinal column damage in patients who have been injured. CT ...

  4. Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yakun; Li Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated

  5. The effect of nodule segmentation on the accuracy of computerized lung nodule detection on CT scans: comparison on a data set annotated by multiple radiologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Shi, Jiazheng; Way, Ted; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Zhou, Chuan; Wei, Jun

    2007-03-01

    In computerized nodule detection systems on CT scans, many features that are useful for classifying whether a nodule candidate identified by prescreening is a true positive depend on the shape of the segmented object. We designed two segmentation algorithms for detailed delineation of the boundaries for nodule candidates. The first segmentation technique was a three-dimensional (3D) region-growing (RG) method which grew the object across multiple CT sections. The second technique was based on a 3D active contour (AC) model. A training set of 94 CT scans was used for algorithm design. An independent set of 62 scans, each read by multiple radiologists, was used for testing. Thirty-three scans were collected from patient files at the University of Michigan and 29 scans by the Lung Imaging Database Consortium (LIDC). In this study, we concentrated on the detection of internal lung nodules having a size >=3 mm that were not pure ground-glass opacities. Of the lesions marked by one or multiple radiologists, 124 nodules satisfied these criteria and were considered true nodules. The performance of the detection system in the AC feature space, RG feature space, and the combined feature space were compared using free-response receiver operating curves (FROC). The FROC curve using the combined feature space was significantly higher than that using the RG feature space or the AC feature space alone (p=0.02 and 0.03, respectively). At a sensitivity of 70% for internal non-GGO nodules, the FP rates were 2.2, 2.2, and 1.5 per scan, respectively, for the RG, AC, and the combined methods. Our results indicate that the 3D AC algorithm can provide useful features to improve nodule detection on CT scans.

  6. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT and DWI for detection of mediastinal nodal metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kan; Ren, Pengwei; Jia, Zhiyun

    2017-01-01

    Background Accurate clinical staging of mediastinal lymph nodes of patients with lung cancer is important in determining therapeutic options and prognoses. We aimed to compare the diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in detecting mediastinal nodal metastasis of lung cancer. Methods Relevant studies were systematically searched in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, PUBMED, and Cochrane Library databases. Based on extracted data, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios (PLR and NLR) with individual 95% confidence intervals were calculated. In addition, the publication bias was assessed by Deek’s funnel plot of the asymmetry test. The potential heterogeneity was explored by threshold effect analysis and subgroup analyses. Results Forty-three studies were finally included. For PET/CT, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.65 (0.63–0.67) and 0.93 (0.93–0.94), respectively. The corresponding values of DWI were 0.72 (0.68–0.76) and 0.97 (0.96–0.98), respectively. The overall PLR and NLR of DWI were 13.15 (5.98–28.89) and 0.32 (0.27–0.39), respectively. For PET/CT, the corresponding values were 8.46 (6.54–10.96) and 0.38 (0.33–0.45), respectively. The Deek’s test revealed no significant publication bias. Study design and patient enrollment were potential causes for the heterogeneity of DWI studies and the threshold was a potential source for PET/CT studies. Conclusion Both modalities are beneficial in detecting lymph nodes metastases in lung cancer without significant differences between them. DWI might be an alternative modality for evaluating nodal status of NSCLC. PMID:28253364

  7. Comparison of aPTT and CT Parameter of the ROTEM Test to Monitor Heparin Anti-Coagulation Effect in ICU Patients: an Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Atabak; Nikeish, Masoomeh; Etezadi, Farhad; Pourfakhr, Pejman; Imani, Farsad; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Shariat Moharari, Reza

    2015-10-01

    Heparin is frequently used in different clinical settings to reduce the coagulating ability of the blood. Because of probable adverse effects owing to heparin therapy and regarding variability of patients' responses to heparin, which make it very unreliable, it seems prudent to monitor meticulously its effects on the human body. There are a lot of laboratory tests to watch its effects on the body for example; aPTT and ROTEM are the most widely used tests that are performed today. We aimed to compare the aPTT test results against changes of CT parameter of the ROTEM test due to heparin administration. This study was conducted on 45 critically ill patients who needed to receive heparin according to their clinical status. All patients received 550 to 1500 unit heparin per hour (on average 17.5 unit heparin per kilogram weight). While the patients were under infusion of heparin, two blood samples (5 ml) were taken from a newly established cubital vein, just five hours after commencement of heparin therapy. One sample was used for aPTT and the other one for ROTEM. The correlation between aPTT and the changes of CT parameter of the ROTEM with heparin dosage and infusion was the primary outcome. The correlation between heparin therapy and the changes of other parameters like MCF, CFT, and a number of platelets were the secondary outcome of the study. The only significant correlation was between changes of CT and aPTT (P=0.000). The other variables were not correlated. Changes of CT parameter of ROTEM test can be used for monitoring of reduced coagulability during heparin infusion instead of aPTT test.

  8. Patlak plot analysis CT-GFR for the determination of renal function: comparison of normal dogs with autologous kidney transplant dogs.

    PubMed

    Alexander, K; Authier, S; del Castillo, J R E; Arora, V; Qi, S; Guillot, M; Beauchamp, G; Troncy, E

    2010-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) can be determined using Patlak plot analysis with single-slice dynamic computed tomography (CT). Acute autologous graft failure has several causes, all of which induce a measurable decrease in glomerular filtration rate. This study demonstrated in an experimental model of canine autologous renal transplant that CT-derived renal plasma clearance was significantly lower (p = 0.002) in dogs having undergone transplant (0.077 +/- 0.058 ml min(-1) ml renal tissue(-1)) compared with control dogs (0.396 +/- 0.139 ml min(-1) ml renal tissue(-1)). A significant negative curvilinear relationship was seen between serum creatinine and total renal plasma clearance (R(2) = 0.84, p = 0.0001). Alterations in renal time attenuation curve shape in dogs having undergone transplant may have been related to increased renal vascular resistance related to tubular necrosis. CT-GFR may be a useful experimental tool in the evaluation of renal dysfunction in transplant models.

  9. Entrance surface dose measurements using a small OSL dosimeter with a computed tomography scanner having 320 rows of detectors.

    PubMed

    Takegami, Kazuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Yamada, Kenji; Mihara, Yoshiki; Kimoto, Natsumi; Kanazawa, Yuki; Higashino, Kousaku; Yamashita, Kazuta; Hayashi, Fumio; Okazaki, Tohru; Hashizume, Takuya; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2017-03-01

    Entrance surface dose (ESD) measurements are important in X-ray computed tomography (CT) for examination, but in clinical settings it is difficult to measure ESDs because of a lack of suitable dosimeters. We focus on the capability of a small optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter. The aim of this study is to propose a practical method for using an OSL dosimeter to measure the ESD when performing a CT examination. The small OSL dosimeter has an outer width of 10 mm; it is assumed that a partial dose may be measured because the slice thickness and helical pitch can be set to various values. To verify our method, we used a CT scanner having 320 rows of detectors and checked the consistencies of the ESDs measured using OSL dosimeters by comparing them with those measured using Gafchromic™ films. The films were calibrated using an ionization chamber on the basis of half-value layer estimation. On the other hand, the OSL dosimeter was appropriately calibrated using a practical calibration curve previously proposed by our group. The ESDs measured using the OSL dosimeters were in good agreement with the reference ESDs from the Gafchromic™ films. Using these data, we also estimated the uncertainty of ESDs measured with small OSL dosimeters. We concluded that a small OSL dosimeter can be considered suitable for measuring the ESD with an uncertainty of 30 % during CT examinations in which pitch factors below 1.000 are applied.

  10. Strip tillage for single and twin-row peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil degradation and rising production costs have prompted grower interest in conservation tillage with high residue cover crops for peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). The objective was to evaluate single and twin-row peanut production across three different strip tillage implements with and without a c...

  11. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Row Crop Production Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in occupations in the row crop production cluster. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and…

  12. 1. Elevator row at Duluth. Rice's Point showing context of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Elevator row at Duluth. Rice's Point showing context of Peavey Duluth Terminal and Occident Terminal. - Peavey Duluth Terminal Elevator, South side of first slip, north from outer end of Rice's Point, east of Garfield Avenue, Duluth, St. Louis County, MN

  13. 102. VIEW OF WEST ROW OF CABINETS IN LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    102. VIEW OF WEST ROW OF CABINETS IN LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106), LSB (BLDG. 770). LOGIC CONTROL AND MONITOR UNITS BOOSTER AND FUEL SYSTEMS ON LEFT; LANDLINE SIGNAL CONDITIONERS ON RIGHT. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  14. Cotton Response to Herbicide Technologies, Row Patterns, and Tillage Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton producers must make decisions related to cotton varieties, herbicide systems, tillage systems, and row patterns. A study was conducted to compare a conventional variety, a glyphosate tolerant variety, and a glufosinate tolerant variety in both conventional tillage and conservation tillage sys...

  15. Effect of row orientation on energy balance components

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solar irradiance is the primary source of energy that is converted into sensible and latent heat fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The orientation of agricultural crop rows relative to the sun’s zenith angle determines the amount of solar irradiance reaching the plant and soil surfaces...

  16. Relation of baseflow to row crop intensity in Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing baseflow and baseflow percentage over the second half of the 20th century in Iowa has contributed to increasing nitrate-nitrogen concentrations measured in Iowa rivers because nitrate is primarily delivered to streams as baseflow and tile drainage. The relation of baseflow and baseflow percentage to row crop land use was evaluated for 11 Iowa rivers and their watersheds for their period of streamflow record (58-73 years period). Results indicated increasing baseflow in Iowa's rivers is significantly related to increasing row crop intensity. A 13-52% increase in row crop percentage in many Iowa watersheds has contributed to an increase of 33-135 mm increase in baseflow and 7-31% increase in baseflow percentage. Limited historical water quality data from two larger Iowa rivers (Cedar and Raccoon rivers) suggest that increasing row crop land use over the 20th century has produced more baseflow and contributed to increasing nitrate concentrations in Iowa's rivers. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Power, Consent and Resistance: An Autoethnography of Competitive Rowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, Laura; Potrac, Paul; Jones, Robyn

    2008-01-01

    This study builds upon existing socio-cultural work into sports coaching by probing the meanings and varieties of the shared coach-athlete experience. Specifically, the paper utilises an autoethnographic approach in an attempt to chart the complex and dynamic relationship that existed between me, the principal author, as a rowing coxswain and my…

  18. Accuracy of dual-source CT to identify significant coronary artery disease in patients with uncontrolled hypertension presenting with chest pain: comparison with coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Mohamed; Pflederer, Tobias; Schepis, Tiziano; Seltmann, Martin; Klinghammer, Lutz; Muschiol, Gerd; Ropers, Dieter; Daniel, Werner G; Achenbach, Stephan

    2012-06-01

    It has been previously reported that the sensitivity and specificity of multislice CT for detecting significant CAD (coronary artery disease) is high. Chest pain is a common presentation in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. We investigated the sensitivity and specificity of dual-source CT to detect and rule out significant CAD in patients presenting with uncontrolled hypertension accompanied by chest pain. 260 consecutive patients presenting with acute chest pain in the context of stage 2 hypertension (systolic pressure ≥160 and/or diastolic pressure ≥100) were enrolled in the study. After admission, control of blood pressure and risk stratification, 82 patients were excluded due to renal insufficiency, prior coronary revascularisation or refused participation in the study. 90 further patients with low pre-test probability of CAD were also excluded. 88 remaining patients were subjected to CT coronary angiography using dual-source CT (Definition, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) within 24 h before invasive coronary angiography. A contrast-enhanced volume dataset was acquired (120 kV, 400 mAs/rot, collimation 2 × 64 × 0.6 mm, retrospective ECG gating). Data sets were evaluated concerning the presence or absence of significant coronary stenoses and validated against invasive coronary angiography. A significant stenosis was assumed if the diameter reduction was ≥50%. 88 patients (mean age 66 ± 11 years, mean heart rate 61 ± 9 bpm) were evaluated regarding the presence or absence of significant CAD (at least one stenosis ≥50% diameter reduction). Mean systolic blood pressure on presentation was 203 ± 20 mmHg and mean diastolic blood pressure was 103 ± 13 mmHg. On a per patient basis, the sensitivity and specificity for dual-source CT to detect significant CAD in vessels >1.5 mm diameter was 100% (36/36, 95% CI 90-100) and 90% (47/52, 95% CI 79-97), respectively with a negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% (47/47, 95% CI 92-100) and a

  19. Functional Outcomes After Double-Row Versus Single-Row Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Stephen J.; Lee, Steven J.; Mullaney, Michael J.; Tyler, Timothy F.; Fukunaga, Takumi; Johnson, Christopher D.; McHugh, Malachy P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The functional benefits of double-row (DR) versus single-row (SR) rotator cuff repair are not clearly established. Purpose: To examine the effect of DR versus SR rotator cuff repair on functional outcomes and strength recovery in patients with full-thickness tears. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Forty-nine patients were randomized to DR or SR repairs; 36 patients (13 women, 23 men; mean age, 62 ± 7 years; 20 SR, 16 DR) were assessed at a mean 2.2 ± 1.6 years after surgery (range, 1-7 years; tear size: 17 medium, 13 large, 9 massive). The following data were recorded prior to surgery and at follow-up: Penn shoulder score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) results; range of motion (ROM) for shoulder flexion, external rotation (ER) at 0° and 90° of abduction, and internal rotation (IR) at 90° of abduction; and shoulder strength (Lafayette manual muscle tester) in empty- and full-can tests, abduction, and ER at 0° of abduction. Treatment (SR vs DR) × time (pre- vs postoperative) mixed-model analysis of variance was used to assess the effect of rotator cuff repair. Results: Rotator cuff repair markedly improved Penn, ASES, and SST scores (P < .001), with similar improvement between SR and DR repairs (treatment × time, P = .38-.10) and excellent scores at follow-up (DR vs SR: Penn, 91 ± 11 vs 92 ± 11 [P = .73]; ASES, 87 ± 12 vs 92 ± 12 [P = .21]; SST, 11.4 ± 1.0 vs 11.3 ± 1.0 [P = .76]). Patients with DR repairs lost ER ROM at 0° of abduction (preoperative to final follow-up, 7° ± 10° loss [P = .013]). ER ROM did not significantly change with SR repair (5° ± 14° gain, P = .16; treatment by time, P = .008). This effect was not apparent for ER ROM at 90° of abduction (treatment × time, P = .26). IR ROM improved from preoperative to final follow-up (P < .01; SR, 17° ± 27°; DR, 7° ± 21°; treatment × time, P = .23). Rotator cuff repair markedly

  20. Rowing Crew Coordination Dynamics at Increasing Stroke Rates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In rowing, perfect synchronisation is important for optimal performance of a crew. Remarkably, a recent study on ergometers demonstrated that antiphase crew coordination might be mechanically more efficient by reducing the power lost to within-cycle velocity fluctuations of the boat. However, coupled oscillator dynamics predict the stability of the coordination to decrease with increasing stroke rate, which in case of antiphase may eventually yield breakdowns to in-phase. Therefore, this study examined the effects of increasing stroke rate on in- and antiphase crew coordination in rowing dyads. Eleven experienced dyads rowed on two mechanically coupled ergometers on slides, which allowed the ergometer system to move back and forth as one ‘boat’. The dyads performed a ramp trial in both in- and antiphase pattern, in which stroke rates gradually increased from 30 strokes per minute (spm) to as fast as possible in steps of 2 spm. Kinematics of rowers, handles and ergometers were captured. Two dyads showed a breakdown of antiphase into in-phase coordination at the first stroke rate of the ramp trial. The other nine dyads reached between 34–42 spm in antiphase but achieved higher rates in in-phase. As expected, the coordinative accuracy in antiphase was worse than in in-phase crew coordination, while, somewhat surprisingly, the coordinative variability did not differ between the patterns. Whereas crew coordination did not substantially deteriorate with increasing stroke rate, stroke rate did affect the velocity fluctuations of the ergometers: fluctuations were clearly larger in the in-phase pattern than in the antiphase pattern, and this difference significantly increased with stroke rate. Together, these results suggest that although antiphase rowing is less stable (i.e., less resistant to perturbation), potential on-water benefits of antiphase over in-phase rowing may actually increase with stroke rate. PMID:26185987

  1. COMPARISON OF LUNG ATTENUATION AND HETEROGENEITY BETWEEN CATS WITH EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED ALLERGIC ASTHMA, NATURALLY OCCURRING ASTHMA AND NORMAL CATS.

    PubMed

    Masseau, Isabelle; Banuelos, Alina; Dodam, John; Cohn, Leah A; Reinero, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling is a prominent feature of feline allergic asthma but requires biopsy for characterization. Computed tomography (CT) has appeal as a minimally invasive diagnostic test. The purpose of this prospective case-control study was to compare indices of airway remodeling between cats with experimentally induced, spontaneous asthma and healthy unaffected cats using CT. We hypothesized that experimental and spontaneous feline asthma would have similar CT airway remodeling characteristics and that these would be significantly different in healthy cats. Experimentally induced asthmatic research cats (n = 5), spontaneously asthmatic pet cats (n = 6), and healthy research cats (n = 5) were scanned unrestrained using a 64-detector row CT scanner. Inspiratory breath-hold CT scans were also performed in experimentally induced asthmatic and healthy cats. Mean ± extent variation of lung attenuation for each cat was determined using an airway inspector software program and CT images were scored for lung heterogeneity by a board-certified veterinary radiologist who was unaware of cat group status. Groups were compared using one-way ANOVA (unrestrained scans) and the Student's t-test (anesthetized scans) with significance defined as P < 0.10. Experimentally asthmatic and spontaneously asthmatic cats had significantly (P = 0.028 and P = 0.073, respectively) increased lung attenuation compared to healthy cats. Heterogeneity scores were higher in experimentally induced asthmatic cat than in healthy cats. Objective quantification of lung heterogeneity and lung volume did not differ among the three groups (P = 0.311, P = 0.181, respectively). Findings supported our hypothesis. Inspiratory breath-hold anesthetized CT scans facilitated discrimination between asthmatic and healthy cats in comparison to unrestrained CT scans.

  2. Comparison of chest CT findings in nontuberculous mycobacterial diseases vs. Mycobacterium tuberculosis lung disease in HIV-negative patients with cavities

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Cherry; Park, So Hee; Oh, Sang Young; Kim, Sung-Soo; Jo, Kyung-Wook; Shim, Tae Sun

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This article focuses on the differences between CT findings of HIV-negative patients who have cavities with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) disease and those with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections (TB). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 128 NTM disease patients (79 males and 49 females) with cavities in chest CT, matched for age and gender with 128 TB patients in the same period. Sputum cultures of all patients were positive for pathogens. Two independent chest radiologists evaluated the characteristics of the largest cavity and related factors. Results Interobserver agreement was excellent (κ value, 0.853–0.938). Cavity walls in NTM disease were significantly thinner (6.9±4 mm vs 10.9±6 mm, P<0.001) and more even (the ratio of thickness, 2.6±1 vs 3.7±2, P<0.001) than those in TB. The thickening of adjacent pleura next to the cavity was also significantly thicker in NTM than TB (P<0.001). However, in the multivariate analysis, thickening of adjacent pleura was the only significant factor among the representative cavity findings (Odds ratio [OR], 6.49; P<0.001). In addition, ill-defined tree-in-bud nodules (OR, 8.82; P<0.001), number of non-cavitary nodules (≥10mm) (OR, 0.72; P = 0.003), and bronchiectasis in the RUL (OR, 5.3; P = 0.002) were significantly associated ancillary findings with NTM disease in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions The major cavities in NTM disease generally have thinner and more even walls than those in TB. When cavities are associated with adjacent pleural thickening, ill-defined satellite tree-in-bud nodules, or fewer non-cavitary nodules ≥10 mm, these CT findings are highly suggestive of NTM disease rather than TB. PMID:28346488

  3. CT-guided Native Medical Renal Biopsy: Cortical Tangential versus Non-Tangential Approaches-A Comparison of Efficacy and Safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; O'Dell, Matthew; Flores, Miguel; Limback, Joseph; Kendall, Melissa; Pepe, Julie; Burt, Jeremy R; Contreras, Francisco; Lewis, Andrew R; Ward, Thomas J

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To review a single-center experience with the cortical tangential approach during computed tomography (CT)-guided native medical renal biopsy and to evaluate its efficacy and safety compared with those of a non-cortical tangential approach. Materials and Methods This retrospective study received institutional review board approval, with a waiver of the HIPAA requirement for informed consent. The number of cores, glomeruli, and complications were reviewed in 431 CT-guided medical renal biopsies performed between July 2007 and September 2015. A biopsy followed a cortical tangential approach if the needle path was parallel to the renal cortical surface, at a depth closer to the renal capsule than the renal pelvic fat. A sample was considered adequate if the biopsy yielded at least 10 glomeruli at light microscopy, one glomerulus at immunofluorescence microscopy, and one glomerulus at electron microscopy. The χ(2) test, the t test, the Mann-Whitney test, and logistic regression modeling of sample adequacy were performed. Results One hundred fifty-six (36%) of 431 biopsies were performed with the cortical tangential approach. More cores were obtained for the cortical tangential group (2.6 vs 2.4, P = .001); biopsy needle gauge was not significantly different (P = .076). More adequate samples were obtained in the cortical tangential group (66.7% vs 49.8%, P = .001), with more glomeruli (23 vs 16, P = .014). Results were significant after controlling for needle gauge and number of cores (P = .008). The cortical tangential group had fewer complications (1.9% vs 7.3%, P = .018). Conclusion The cortical tangential approach, when applied to CT-guided native medical renal biopsies, results in higher rates of sample adequacy and lower rates of postprocedural complications. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  4. SU-E-T-86: Comparison of Two Commercially Available Programs for the Evaluation of Delivered Daily Dose Using Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Tuohy, R; Bosse, C; Mavroidis, P; Shi, Z; Crownover, R; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, two commercially available programs were compared for the evaluation of delivered daily dose using cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: Thirty (n=30) patients previously treated in our clinic (10 prostate, 10 SBRT lung and 10 abdomen) were used in this study. The patients' plans were optimized and calculated using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. The daily CBCT scans were imported into Velocity and RayStation along with the corresponding planning CTs, structure sets and 3D dose distributions for each patient. The organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on each CBCT by the prescribing physician and were included in the evaluation of the daily delivered dose. Each CBCT was registered to the planning CT, once with rigid registration and then again, separately, with deformable registration. After registering each CBCT, the dose distribution from the planning CT was overlaid and the dose volume histograms (DVH) for the OAR and the planning target volumes (PTV) were calculated. Results: For prostate patients, we observed daily volume changes for the OARs. The DVH analysis for those patients showed variation in the sparing of the OARs while PTV coverage remained virtually unchanged using both Velocity and RayStation systems. Similar results were observed for abdominal patients. In contrast, for SBRT lung patients, the DVH for the OARs and target were comparable to those from the initial treatment plan. Differences in organ volume and organ doses were also observed when comparing the daily fractions using deformable and rigid registrations. Conclusion: By using daily CBCT dose reconstruction, we proved PTV coverage for prostate and abdominal targets is adequate. However, there is significant dosimetric change for the OARs. For lung SBRT patients, the delivered daily dose for both PTV and OAR is comparable to the planned dose with no significant differences.

  5. A mathematical model of the oar blade - water interaction in rowing.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Nicholas; Gardner, Trevor

    2007-07-01

    Our aim was to present a mathematical model of rowing and sculling that allowed for a comparison of oar blade designs. The relative movement between the oar blades and water during the drive phase of the stroke was modelled, and the lift and drag forces generated by this complex interaction were determined. The model was driven by the oar shaft angular velocity about the oarlock in the horizontal plane, and was shown to be valid against measured on-water mean steady-state shell velocity for both a heavyweight men's eight and a lightweight men's single scull. Measured lift and drag force coefficients previously presented by the authors were used as inputs to the model, whichs allowed for the influence of oar blade design on rowing performance to be determined. The commonly used Big Blade, which is curved, and it's flat equivalent were compared, and blade curvature was shown to generate a 1.14% improvement in mean boat velocity, or a 17.1-m lead over 1500 m. With races being won and lost by much smaller margins than this, blade curvature would appear to play a significant role in propulsion.

  6. Hemodynamic Changes Caused by Flow Diverters in Rabbit Aneurysm Models: Comparison of Virtual and Realistic FD Deployments Based on Micro-CT Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinyu; Deng, Benqiang; Fang, Yibin; Yu, Ying; Cheng, Jiyong; Wang, Shengzhang; Wang, Kuizhong; Liu, Jian-Min; Huang, Qinghai

    2013-01-01

    Adjusting hemodynamics via flow diverter (FD) implantation is emerging as a novel method of treating cerebral aneurysms. However, most previous FD-related hemodynamic studies were based on virtual FD deployment, which may produce different hemodynamic outcomes than realistic (in vivo) FD deployment. We compared hemodynamics between virtual FD and realistic FD deployments in rabbit aneurysm models using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. FDs were implanted for aneurysms in 14 rabbits. Vascular models based on rabbit-specific angiograms were reconstructed for CFD studies. Real FD configurations were reconstructed based on micro-CT scans after sacrifice, while virtual FD configurations were constructed with SolidWorks software. Hemodynamic parameters before and after FD deployment were analyzed. According to the metal coverage (MC) of implanted FDs calculated based on micro-CT reconstruction, 14 rabbits were divided into two groups (A, MC >35%; B, MC <35%). Normalized mean wall shear stress (WSS), relative residence time (RRT), inflow velocity, and inflow volume in Group A were significantly different (P<0.05) from virtual FD deployment, but pressure was not (P>0.05). The normalized mean WSS in Group A after realistic FD implantation was significantly lower than that of Group B. All parameters in Group B exhibited no significant difference between realistic and virtual FDs. This study confirmed MC-correlated differences in hemodynamic parameters between realistic and virtual FD deployment.

  7. Retrospective review of image quality of CT in polytrauma patients: comparison of patients scanned using a scoop stretcher and without a scoop stretcher.

    PubMed

    Modi, Sachin; Gadvi, Rakesh; Yeo, David; Galea-Soler, Sandro

    2014-02-01

    Increasingly pre-hospital trauma management involves transfer of patients using a scoop stretcher; a number of computed tomography (CT) compatible scoops have recently appeared on the market. We sought to evaluate any differences in image quality in polytrauma patients scanned in a scoop stretcher. CT studies of 234 consecutive patients presenting between December 2011 and August 2012 at our regional level 1 tertiary trauma centre were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were allocated into two groups: those scanned with a scoop stretcher and without. CTs were reviewed by a consultant radiologist and two senior radiology trainees and graded separately for quality/artefact. A scale of 1-5 was employed: 1-uninterpretable, 2-borderline image quality, 3-acceptable, 4-good, 5-excellent. A total of 128 (54.7 %) patients were scanned in a scoop stretcher and 106 (45.3 %) were scanned without, 183 males and 51 females (average age, 46 (16-94) years; SD, 20). The average quality grading for the patients scanned in the scoop was 4.64 compared to 4.68 in those without the scoop. There was no significant grading difference between the groups, consultant (p = 0.096) and trainees (p = 0.782). No artefacts were attributable to the scoop stretcher 0/128 (0 %). Following our experience, the use of scoop stretchers is recommended for efficient, safe and practical management of trauma patients and in terms of imaging, with no detrimental effect on image quality.

  8. Determining in vivo sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint centre locations from skin markers, CT-scans and intracortical pins: A comparison study.

    PubMed

    Michaud, B; Jackson, M; Arndt, A; Lundberg, A; Begon, M

    2016-03-01

    To describe shoulder motion the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint centres must be accurately located. Within the literature various methods to estimate joint centres of rotation location are proposed, with no agreement of the method best suited to the shoulder. The objective of this study was to determine the most reliable non-invasive method for locating joint centre locations of the shoulder complex. Functional methods using pin mounted markers were compared to anatomical methods, functional methods using skin mounted markers, imaging-based methods using CT-scan data, and regression equations. Three participants took part in the study, that involved insertion of intracortical pins into the clavicle, scapula and humerus, a CT-scan of the shoulder, and finally data collection using a motion analysis system. The various methods to estimate joint centre location did not all agree, however suggestions about the most reliable non-invasive methods could be made. For the sternoclavicular joint, the authors suggest the anatomical method using the most ventral landmark on the sternoclavicular joint, as recommended by the International Society of Biomechanics. For the acromioclavicular joint, the authors suggest the anatomical method using the landmark defined as the most dorsal point on the acromioclavicular joint, as proposed by van der Helm. For the glenohumeral joint, the simple regression equation of Rab is recommended.

  9. Flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, technology, and applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajiv; Cheung, Arnold C; Bartling, Soenke H; Lisauskas, Jennifer; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas; Brady, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (CT) systems have an innovative design that allows coverage of a large volume per rotation, fluoroscopic and dynamic imaging, and high spatial resolution that permits visualization of complex human anatomy such as fine temporal bone structures and trabecular bone architecture. In simple terms, flat-panel volume CT scanners can be thought of as conventional multidetector CT scanners in which the detector rows have been replaced by an area detector. The flat-panel detector has wide z-axis coverage that enables imaging of entire organs in one axial acquisition. Its fluoroscopic and angiographic capabilities are useful for intraoperative and vascular applications. Furthermore, the high-volume coverage and continuous rotation of the detector may enable depiction of dynamic processes such as coronary blood flow and whole-brain perfusion. Other applications in which flat-panel volume CT may play a role include small-animal imaging, nondestructive testing in animal survival surgeries, and tissue-engineering experiments. Such versatility has led some to predict that flat-panel volume CT will gain importance in interventional and intraoperative applications, especially in specialties such as cardiac imaging, interventional neuroradiology, orthopedics, and otolaryngology. However, the contrast resolution of flat-panel volume CT is slightly inferior to that of multidetector CT, a higher radiation dose is needed to achieve a comparable signal-to-noise ratio, and a slower scintillator results in a longer scanning time.

  10. Row-Sum of a Class of M-Bonomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2011-01-01

    Formulae for row-sum of M-bonomial coefficients [image omitted] where G is an mth g-gonal number is developed from a study of the ratio between consecutive terms of the sequence of row-sum. The result generalizes the formula for row-sum of binomial coefficients: [image omitted].

  11. Growth and yield of valencia, spanish, virginia and runner market type peanuts in various row spacings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, the majority of peanuts grown in New Mexico and West Texas are planted in single rows on beds 36 to 40 inches apart. In 2006-2008, several field studies were conducted with Valencia peanuts comparing single row, twin row, and diamond planting patterns in various populations. The basic c...

  12. Effects of stroke resistance on rowing economy in club rowers post-season.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Mackenzie, S J; Jensen, R L; Watts, P B

    2013-02-01

    In the sport of rowing, increasing the impulse applied to the oar handle during the stroke can result in greater boat velocities; this may be facilitated by increasing the surface area of the oar blade and/or increasing the length of the oars. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of different rowing resistances on the physiological response to rowing. 5 male and 7 female club rowers completed progressive, incremental exercise tests on an air-braked rowing ergometer, using either low (LO; 100) or high (HI; 150) resistance (values are according to the adjustable "drag factor" setting on the ergometer). Expired air, blood lactate concentration, heart rate, rowing cadence, and ergometer power output were monitored during the tests. LO rowing elicited significantly greater cadences (P<0.01) and heart rates (P<0.05), whereas rowing economy (J · L O(2) equivalents(-1)) was significantly greater during HI rowing (P<0.05). These results suggest that economically, rowing with a greater resistance may be advantageous for performance. Moreover, biomechanical analysis of ergometer rowing support the notion that the impulse generated during the stroke increases positively as a function of rowing resistance. We conclude that an aerobic advantage associated with greater resistance parallels the empirical trend toward larger oar blades in competitive rowing. This may be explained by a greater stroke impulse at the higher resistance.

  13. Cultural practices to improve in-row weed control with cultivation in organic peanut production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivation is a proven effective means of weed control in organic peanut. However, weeds in-row often escape control. Research trials were conducted in Ty Ty, GA to modify cultural practices to help peanut suppress weed emergence in-row. Modified cultural practices were three row pattern/seeding...

  14. Comparison of internal target volumes defined on 3-dimensional, 4-dimensonal, and cone-beam CT images of non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengxiang; Li, Jianbin; Ma, Zhifang; Zhang, Yingjie; Xing, Jun; Qi, Huanpeng; Shang, Dongping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the positional and volumetric differences of internal target volumes defined on three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT), four-dimensional CT (4DCT), and cone-beam CT (CBCT) images of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods Thirty-one patients with NSCLC sequentially underwent 3DCT and 4DCT simulation scans of the thorax during free breathing. The first CBCT was performed and registered to the planning CT using the bony anatomy registration during radiotherapy. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on the basis of 3DCT, maximum intensity projection (MIP) of 4DCT, and CBCT. CTV3D (clinical target volume), internal target volumes, ITVMIP and ITVCBCT, were defined with a 7 mm margin accounting for microscopic disease. ITV10 mm and ITV5 mm were defined on the basis of CTV3D: ITV10 mm with a 5 mm margin in left–right (LR), anterior–posterior (AP) directions and 10 mm in cranial–caudal (CC) direction; ITV5 mm with an isotropic internal margin (IM) of 5 mm. The differences in the position, size, Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC) and inclusion relation of different volumes were evaluated. Results The median size ratios of ITV10 mm, ITV5 mm, and ITVMIP to ITVCBCT were 2.33, 1.88, and 1.03, respectively, for tumors in the upper lobe and 2.13, 1.76, and 1.1, respectively, for tumors in the middle-lower lobe. The median DSCs of ITV10 mm, ITV5 mm, ITVMIP, and ITVCBCT were 0.6, 0.66, and 0.83 for all patients. The median percentages of ITVCBCT not included in ITV10 mm, ITV5 mm, and ITVMIP were 0.1%, 1.63%, and 15.21%, respectively, while the median percentages of ITV10 mm, ITV5 mm, and ITVMIP not included in ITVCBCT were 57.08%, 48.89%, and 20.04%, respectively. Conclusion The use of the individual ITV derived from 4DCT merely based on bony registration in radiotherapy may result in a target miss. The ITVs derived from 3DCT with isotropic margins have a good coverage of the ITV from CBCT, but the

  15. WE-AB-303-05: Breathing Motion of Liver Segments From Fiducial Tracking During Robotic Radiosurgery and Comparison with 4D-CT-Derived Fiducial Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J; Pantarotto, J; Nair, V; Cook, G; Plourde, M; Vandervoort, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify respiratory-induced motion of liver segments using the positions of implanted fiducials during robotic radiosurgery. This study also compared fiducial motion derived from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) maximum intensity projections (MIP) with motion derived from imaging during treatment. Methods: Forty-two consecutive liver patients treated with liver ablative radiotherapy were accrued to an ethics approved retrospective study. The liver segment in which each fiducial resided was identified. Fiducial positions throughout each treatment fraction were determined using orthogonal kilovoltage images. Any data due to patient repositioning or motion was removed. Mean fiducial positions were calculated. Fiducial positions beyond two standard deviations of the mean were discarded and remaining positions were fit to a line segment using least squares minimization (LSM). For eight patients, fiducial motion was derived from 4D-CT MIPs by calculating the CT number weighted mean position of the fiducial on each slice and fitting a line segment to these points using LSM. Treatment derived fiducial trajectories were corrected for patient rotation and compared to MIP derived trajectories. Results: The mean total magnitude of fiducial motion across all liver segments in left-right, anteroposterior, and superoinferior (SI) directions were 3.0 ± 0.2 mm, 9.3 ± 0.4 mm, and 20.5 ± 0.5 mm, respectively. Differences in per-segment mean fiducial motion were found with SI motion ranging from 12.6 ± 0.8 mm to 22.6 ± 0.9 mm for segments 3 and 8, respectively. Large, varied differences between treatment and MIP derived motion at simulation were found with the mean difference for SI motion being 2.6 mm (10.8 mm standard deviation). Conclusion: The magnitude of liver fiducial motion was found to differ by liver segment. MIP derived liver fiducial motion differed from motion observed during treatment, implying that 4D-CTs may not accurately capture the

  16. High Energy-Efficiency Retrofits to Baltimore's Row Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Chalk, J.; Johnson, A.L.; Lipscomb, L.; Wendt, R.

    1999-04-19

    The purpose of the research project is to develop high-perfommnce, energy-eflicient retrofits of existing row homes in Baltimore, Maryland. These efficiency enhancements are to optimize building envelope improvements, mechanical equipment improvements and operational improvements to the highest cost-effective level. Furthermore, this project is to investigate and demonstrate the impact of high-performance energy-efficiency retrofit improvements on row homes in the Historic East area of Baltimore. Three homes awaiting renovation are planned to receive building envelope, mechanical system, and electrical system improvements that will improve their energy petiormance. An incremental additional cost ceiling of $4000 for the energy eftlciency improvements, beyond those normally installed, has been set by the project.

  17. Optimisation of the mean boat velocity in rowing.

    PubMed

    Rauter, G; Baumgartner, L; Denoth, J; Riener, R; Wolf, P

    2012-01-01

    In rowing, motor learning may be facilitated by augmented feedback that displays the ratio between actual mean boat velocity and maximal achievable mean boat velocity. To provide this ratio, the aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an algorithm calculating an individual maximal mean boat velocity. The algorithm optimised the horizontal oar movement under constraints such as the individual range of the horizontal oar displacement, individual timing of catch and release and an individual power-angle relation. Immersion and turning of the oar were simplified, and the seat movement of a professional rower was implemented. The feasibility of the algorithm, and of the associated ratio between actual boat velocity and optimised boat velocity, was confirmed by a study on four subjects: as expected, advanced rowing skills resulted in higher ratios, and the maximal mean boat velocity depended on the range of the horizontal oar displacement.

  18. A parallel householder tridiagonalization stratagem using scattered row decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H. Y.; Utku, S.; Salama, M.; Rapp, D.

    1988-01-01

    Householder's method for tridiagonalizing a real symmetric matrix, a major step in evaluating eigenvalues of the matrix, is modified into a parallel algorithm for a concurrent machine of message passing type. Each processor of the concurrent machine has its own CPU, communications control and local memory. Messages are passed through connections between processors. Although the basic algorithm is inherently serial, the computations can be spread over all processors by scattering different rows of the matrix into processors, hence the term 'Scattered Row Decomposition'. The steps in the serial and the parallel algorithms are identified. Expressions for efficiency and speedup are given in terms of problem and machine parameters. For a concurrent machine of ring type interconnection, a selected representative problem of large order exhibits efficiency approaching 66 per cent.

  19. Benchmarking a novel ultrasound-CT fusion system for respiratory motion management in radiotherapy: assessment of spatio-temporal characteristics and comparison to 4DCT.

    PubMed

    Molloy, J A; Oldham, S A

    2008-01-01

    Management of respiratory motion during radiation therapy requires treatment planning and simulation using imaging modalities that possess sufficient spatio-temporal accuracy and precision. An investigation into the use of a novel ultrasound (US) imaging system for assessment of respiratory motion is presented, exploiting its good soft tissue contrast and temporal precision. The system dynamically superimposes the appropriate image plane sampled from a reference CT data set with the corresponding US B-mode image. An articulating arm is used for spatial registration. While the focus of the study was to quantify the system's ability to track respiratory motion, certain unique spatial calibration procedures were devised that render the software potentially valuable to the general research community. These include direct access to all transformation matrix elements and image scaling factors, a manual latency correction function, and a three-point spatial registration procedure that allows the system to be used in any room possessing a traditional radiotherapy laser localization system. Counter-intuitively, it was discovered that a manual procedure for calibrating certain transformation matrix elements produced superior accuracy to that of an algorithmic Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method. The absolute spatial accuracy was verified by comparing the physical locations of phantom test objects measured using the spatially registered US system, and using data from a 3DCT scan of the phantom as a reference. The spatial accuracy of the display superposition was also tested in a similar manner. The system's dynamic properties were then assessed using three methods. First, the overall system response time was studied using a programmable motion phantom. This included US video update, articulating arm update, CT data set resampling, and image display. The next investigation verified the system's ability to measure the range of motion of a moving anatomical test phantom that

  20. Comparison of the effect of simple and complex acquisition trajectories on the 2D SPR and 3D voxelized differences for dedicated breast CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Jainil P.; Mann, Steve D.; McKinley, Randolph L.; Tornai, Martin P.

    2014-03-01

    The 2D scatter-to-primary (SPR) ratios and 3D voxelized difference volumes were characterized for a cone beam breast CT scanner capable of arbitrary (non-traditional) 3D trajectories. The CT system uses a 30x30cm2 flat panel imager with 197 micron pixellation and a rotating tungsten anode x-ray source with 0.3mm focal spot, with an SID of 70cm. Data were acquired for two cylindrical phantoms (12.5cm and 15cm diameter) filled with three different combinations of water and methanol yielding a range of uniform densities. Projections were acquired with two acquisition trajectories: 1) simple-circular azimuthal orbit with fixed tilt; and 2) saddle orbit following a +/-15° sinusoidal trajectory around the object. Projection data were acquired in 2x2 binned mode. Projections were scatter corrected using a beam stop array method, and the 2D SPR was measured on the projections. The scatter corrected and uncorrected data were then reconstructed individually using an iterative ordered subsets convex algorithm, and the 3D difference volumes were calculated as the absolute difference between the two. Results indicate that the 2D SPR is ~7-15% higher on projections with greatest tilt for the saddle orbit, due to the longer x-ray path length through the volume, compared to the 0° tilt projections. Additionally, the 2D SPR increases with object diameter as well as density. The 3D voxelized difference volumes are an estimate of the scatter contribution to the reconstructed attenuation coefficients on a voxel level. They help visualize minor deficiencies and artifacts in the volumes due to correction methods.

  1. A review of turbomachinery blade-row interaction research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Todd E.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical and experimental research in the area of unsteady aerodynamics of turbomachinery has conventionally been applied to blading which oscillates when placed in a uniformly flowing fluid. Comparatively less effort has been offered for the study of blading which is subjected to nonuniformities within the flow field. The fluid dynamic environment of a blade-row embedded within multi-stage turbomachines is dominated by such highly unsteady fluid flow conditions. The production of wakes and circumferential pressure variations from adjacent blade-rows causes large unsteady energy transfers between the fluid and the blades. Determination of the forced response of a blade requires the ability to predict the unsteady loads which are induced by these aerodynamic sources. A review of research publications was done to determine recent investigations of the response of turbomachinery blading subjected to aerodynamic excitations. Such excitations are a direct result of the blade-row aerodynamic interaction which occurs between adjacent cascades of blades. The reports and papers reviewed have been organized into areas emphasizing experimental or analytical efforts.

  2. An experimental investigation of turbomachine blade row aeromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiereisen, John Michael

    This research was directed at understanding two major issues in turbomachine unsteady aerodynamics: (1) two-dimensional modeling of the unsteady aerodynamic excitation to a blade row within the constraints of linearized theory, and (2) the resulting unsteady aerodynamic loading of a blade row utilizing linearized theory analysis. These objectives were pursued by means of a series of experiments in the Purdue Annular Cascade Research Facility. This facility experimentally reproduces the fundamental unsteady flow phenomena inherent in axial flow turbomachines. The unsteady periodic flow field generated by rotating rows of perforated plates and airfoil cascades was measured with a two-component hot-wire anemometer and an unsteady total pressure probe and characterized in terms of the two-dimensional unsteady velocity and unsteady static pressure perturbations. The resulting unsteady periodic chordwise surface pressure distributions on a downstream stator row were measured with miniature high-frequency response pressure transducers mounted within the stator airfoils. Thus the unsteady aerodynamic excitation and resulting unsteady aerodynamic response were quantitatively ascertained. The periodic unsteady flow perturbations were analyzed as superpositions of harmonic vortical and potential flow perturbations, with each of these fundamental perturbations modeled as a spatial flow nonuniformity which is temporally steady in an appropriately rotating reference frame. The unsteady velocity associated with an harmonic vortical perturbation was shown to be parallel to the mean velocity vector in the rotating relative reference frame. The unsteady potential perturbations were shown to either propagate or decay axially depending upon flow conditions, with the propagation or decay determined by the mean relative Mach number in the rotating reference frame. Unsteady flow fields generated by rotating rows of perforated plates were found to be almost purely vortical perturbations

  3. Length to diameter ratio and row number effects in short pin fin heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brigham, B. A.; Vanfossen, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The relative effects of pin length to diameter ratio and of pin row geometry on the heat transfer from pin fins, was determined. Array averaged heat transfer coefficients on pin and endwall surfaces were measured for two configurations of staggered arrays of short pin fins (length to diameter ratio of 4). One configuration contained eight streamwise rows of pins, while the other contained only four rows. Results showed that both the 8-row and the 4-row configurations for an L sub p/D of 4, exhibit higher heat transfer than in similar tests on shorter pin fns (L sub p/D of 1/2 and 2). It was also found that for this L sub p/D ratio, the array averaged heat transfer was slightly higher with eight rows of staggered pins than with only four rows.

  4. The effect of including a series of isometric conditioning contractions to the rowing warm-up on 1,000-m rowing ergometer time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Feros, Simon A; Young, Warren B; Rice, Anthony J; Talpey, Scott W

    2012-12-01

    Rowing requires strength, power, and strength-endurance for optimal performance. A rowing-based warm-up could be enhanced by exploiting the postactivation potentiation (PAP) phenomenon, acutely enhancing power output at the beginning of a race where it is needed most. Minimal research has investigated the effects of PAP on events of longer duration (i.e. 1,000-m rowing). The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of PAP on 1,000-m rowing ergometer performance through the use of 2 different warm-up procedures: (a) a rowing warm-up combined with a series of isometric conditioning contractions, known as the potentiated warm-up (PW), and (b) a rowing warm-up only (NW). The isometric conditioning contractions in the PW were performed by "pulling" an immovable handle on the rowing ergometer, consisting of 5 sets of 5 seconds (2 seconds at submaximal intensity, and 3 seconds at maximal intensity), with a 15-second recovery between sets. The 1,000-m rowing ergometer time trial was performed after each warm-up condition, whereby mean power output, mean stroke rate, and split time were assessed every 100 m. Ten Australian national level rowers served as the subjects and performed both conditions in a counterbalanced order on separate days. The PW reduced 1,000-m time by 0.8% (p > 0.05). The PW improved mean power output by 6.6% (p < 0.01) and mean stroke rate by 5.2% (p < 0.01) over the first 500 m; resulting in a reduction of 500-m time by 1.9% (p < 0.01), compared with the NW. It appears that the inclusion of isometric conditioning contractions to the rowing warm-up enhance short-term rowing ergometer performance (especially at the start of a race) to a greater extent than a rowing warm-up alone.

  5. Comparison between CT-based volumetric calculations and ICRU reference-point estimates of radiation doses delivered to bladder and rectum during intracavitary radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pelloski, Christopher E.; Palmer, Matthew B.S.; Chronowski, Gregory M.; Jhingran, Anuja; Horton, John; Eifel, Patricia J. . E-mail: peifel@mdanderson.org

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To compare CT-based volumetric calculations and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) reference-point estimates of radiation doses to the bladder and rectum in patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with definitive low-dose-rate intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT). Methods and Materials: Between November 2001 and March 2003, 60 patients were prospectively enrolled in a pilot study of ICRT with CT-based dosimetry. Most patients underwent two ICRT insertions. After insertion of an afterloading ICRT applicator, intraoperative orthogonal films were obtained to ensure proper positioning of the system and to facilitate subsequent planning. Treatments were prescribed using standard two-dimensional dosimetry and planning. Patients also underwent helical CT of the pelvis for three-dimensional reconstruction of the radiation dose distributions. The systems were loaded with {sup 137}Cs sources using the Selectron remote afterloading system according to institutional practice for low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Three-dimensional dose distributions were generated using the Varian BrachyVision treatment planning system. The rectum was contoured from the bottom of the ischial tuberosities to the sigmoid flexure. The entire bladder was contoured. The minimal doses delivered to the 2 cm{sup 3} of bladder and rectum receiving the highest dose (D{sub BV2} and D{sub RV2}, respectively) were determined from dose-volume histograms, and these estimates were compared with two-dimensionally derived estimates of the doses to the corresponding ICRU reference points. Results: A total of 118 unique intracavitary insertions were performed, and 93 were evaluated and the subject of this analysis. For the rectum, the estimated doses to the ICRU reference point did not differ significantly from the D{sub RV2} (p = 0.561); the mean ({+-} standard deviation) difference was 21 cGy ({+-} 344 cGy). The median volume of the rectum that received at least

  6. Tilted cone-beam reconstruction with row-wise fan-to-parallel rebinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Jiang; Tang, Xiangyang

    2006-10-01

    Reconstruction algorithms for cone-beam CT have been the focus of many studies. Several exact and approximate reconstruction algorithms were proposed for step-and-shoot and helical scanning trajectories to combat cone-beam related artefacts. In this paper, we present a new closed-form cone-beam reconstruction formula for tilted gantry data acquisition. Although several algorithms were proposed in the past to combat errors induced by the gantry tilt, none of the algorithms addresses the scenario in which the cone-beam geometry is first rebinned to a set of parallel beams prior to the filtered backprojection. We show that the image quality advantages of the rebinned parallel-beam reconstruction are significant, which makes the development of such an algorithm necessary. Because of the rebinning process, the reconstruction algorithm becomes more complex and the amount of iso-centre adjustment depends not only on the projection and tilt angles, but also on the reconstructed pixel location. In this paper, we first demonstrate the advantages of the row-wise fan-to-parallel rebinning and derive a closed-form solution for the reconstruction algorithm for the step-and-shoot and constant-pitch helical scans. The proposed algorithm requires the 'warping' of the reconstruction matrix on a view-by-view basis prior to the backprojection step. We further extend the algorithm to the variable-pitch helical scans in which the patient table travels at non-constant speeds. The algorithm was tested extensively on both the 16- and 64-slice CT scanners. The efficacy of the algorithm is clearly demonstrated by multiple experiments.

  7. Prospectively versus Retrospectively ECG-Gated 256-Slice CT Angiography to Assess Coronary Artery Bypass Grafts — Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Wei; Yang, Ching-Ching; Mok, Greta S. P.; Law, Wei-Yip; Su, Cheng-Tau; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Objective In this retrospective non-randomized cohort study, the image quality and radiation dose were compared between prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated axial (PGA) and retrospectively ECG-gated helical (RGH) techniques for the assessment of coronary artery bypass grafts using 256-slice CT. Methods We studied 124 grafts with 577 segments in 64 patients with a heart rate (HR) <85 bpm who underwent CT coronary angiography (CTCA); 34 patients with RGH-CTCA and 30 patients with PGA-CTCA. The image quality of the bypass grafts was assessed by a 5-point scale (1 = excellent to 5 = non-diagnostic) for each segment (proximal anastomosis, proximal, middle, distal course of graft body, and distal anastomosis). Other objective image quality indices such as noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were assessed. Radiation doses were also compared. Results Patient characteristics of the two groups were well matched except HR. The HR of the PGA group was lower than that of the RGH group (62.0±5.0 vs. 65.7±7.4). For both groups, over 90% of segments received excellent or good image quality scores and none was non-evaluative. The image quality generally degraded as graft segment approached to distal anastomosis regardless of techniques and graft types. Image quality scores of the PGA group were better than those of the RGH group (1.51±0.53 vs. 1.73±0.62; p<0.001). There was no significantly difference of objective image quality between two techniques, and the effective radiation dose was significantly lower in the PGA group (7.0±1.2 mSv) than that of the RGH group (20.0±4.6 mSv) (p<0.001), with a 65.0% dose reduction. Conclusions Following bypass surgery, 256-slice PGA-CTCA is superior to RGH-CTCA in limiting the radiation dose and obtaining better image quality for bypass grafts. PMID:23145126

  8. Comparison between real-time intra-operative ultrasound-based dosimetry and CT-based dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy using cesium-131.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, B L; Gibbons, E P; Smith, R P; Beriwal, S; Komanduri, K; Benoit, R M

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between real-time intra-operative ultrasound-based dosimetry (USD) and day 0 post-implant CT dosimetry (CTD) (131)Cs permanent prostate brachytherapy. Fifty-two consecutive patients who underwent prostate brachytherapy with (131)Cs were evaluated. Real time operating room planning was performed using VariSeed 7.1 software. Post-needle placement prostate volume was used for real-time planning. Targets for dosimetry were D(90) >110%, V(100) >90%, V(150) <50%, and V(200) <20%. The CT scan for post-operative dosimetry was obtained on day 0. The mean values for USD, CTD, and the linear correlation, respectively, were, for D(90): 114.0%, 105.61%, and 0.15; for V(100): 95.1%, 91.6%, and 0.22; for V(150): 51.5%, 46.4%, and 0.40; and for V(200): 15.8%, 17.9%, and 0.42. The differences between the mean values for USD and CTD for D(90) (p<0.01), V(100) (p<0.01), and V(150) (p<0.05) were statistically significant. For D(90), 30.8% of patients had a >15% difference between USD and CTD and 51.9% of patients had a >10% difference between these values. In contrast, the USD and CTD for V(100) were within 5% in 55.8% of patients and within 10% in 86.5% of patients. This study demonstrates a correlation between the mean intra-operative USD and post-implant day 0 CTD values only for V(200). Significant variation in D(90), V(150), and V(200) values existed for individual patients between USD and CTD. These results suggest that real-time intra-operative USD does not serve as a surrogate for post-operative CTD, and that post-operative CTD is still necessary.

  9. Comparison on Response and Dissolution Rates Between Ursodeoxycholic Acid Alone or in Combination With Chenodeoxycholic Acid for Gallstone Dissolution According to Stone Density on CT Scan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Min; Hyun, Jong Jin; Choi, In Young; Yeom, Suk Keu; Kim, Seung Young; Jung, Sung Woo; Jung, Young Kul; Koo, Ja Seol; Yim, Hyung Joon; Lee, Hong Sik; Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Chang Duck

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Medical dissolution of gallstone is usually performed on radiolucent gallstones in a functioning gallbladder. However, absence of visible gallstone on plain abdominal x-ray does not always preclude calcification. This study aims to compare the response and dissolution rates between ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) alone or in combination with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) according to stone density on computed tomography (CT) scan. A total of 126 patients underwent dissolution therapy with either UDCA alone or combination of CDCA and UDCA (CNU) from December 2010 to March 2014 at Korea University Ansan Hospital. In the end, 81 patients (CNU group = 44, UDCA group = 37) completed dissolution therapy for 6 months. Dissolution rate (percentage reduction in the gallstone volume) and response to therapy (complete dissolution or partial dissolution defined as reduction in stone volume of >50%) were compared between the 2 groups. Dissolution and response rates of sludge was also compared between the 2 groups. The overall response rate was 50.6% (CNU group 43.2% vs UDCA group 59.5%, P = 0.14), and the overall dissolution rate was 48.34% (CNU group 41.5% vs UDCA group 56.5%, P = 0.13). When analyzed according to stone density, response rate was 33.3%, 87.1%, 30.0%, and 6.2% for hypodense, isodense, hyperdense, and calcified stones, respectively. Response rate (85.7% vs 88.2%, P = 0.83) and dissolution rate (81.01% vs 85.38%, P = 0.17) of isodense stones were similar between CNU and UDCA group. When only sludge was considered, the overall response rate was 87.5% (CNU group 71.4% vs UDCA group 94.1%, P = 0.19), and the overall dissolution rate was 85.42% (CNU group 67.9% vs UDCA group 92.7%, P = 0.23). Patients with isodense gallstones and sludge showed much better response to dissolution therapy with CNU and UDCA showing comparable efficacy. Therefore, CT scan should be performed before medication therapy if stone dissolution is intended

  10. Repositioning accuracy of two different mask systems-3D revisited: Comparison using true 3D/3D matching with cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit . E-mail: judit.boda-heggemann@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Walter, Cornelia; Rahn, Angelika; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Loeb, Iris; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: The repositioning accuracy of mask-based fixation systems has been assessed with two-dimensional/two-dimensional or two-dimensional/three-dimensional (3D) matching. We analyzed the accuracy of commercially available head mask systems, using true 3D/3D matching, with X-ray volume imaging and cone-beam CT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients receiving radiotherapy (intracranial/head-and-neck tumors) were evaluated (14 patients with rigid and 7 with thermoplastic masks). X-ray volume imaging was analyzed online and offline separately for the skull and neck regions. Translation/rotation errors of the target isocenter were analyzed. Four patients were treated to neck sites. For these patients, repositioning was aided by additional body tattoos. A separate analysis of the setup error on the basis of the registration of the cervical vertebra was performed. The residual error after correction and intrafractional motility were calculated. Results: The mean length of the displacement vector for rigid masks was 0.312 {+-} 0.152 cm (intracranial) and 0.586 {+-} 0.294 cm (neck). For the thermoplastic masks, the value was 0.472 {+-} 0.174 cm (intracranial) and 0.726 {+-} 0.445 cm (neck). Rigid masks with body tattoos had a displacement vector length in the neck region of 0.35 {+-} 0.197 cm. The intracranial residual error and intrafractional motility after X-ray volume imaging correction for rigid masks was 0.188 {+-} 0.074 cm, and was 0.134 {+-} 0.14 cm for thermoplastic masks. Conclusions: The results of our study have demonstrated that rigid masks have a high intracranial repositioning accuracy per se. Given the small residual error and intrafractional movement, thermoplastic masks may also be used for high-precision treatments when combined with cone-beam CT. The neck region repositioning accuracy was worse than the intracranial accuracy in both cases. However, body tattoos and image guidance improved the accuracy. Finally, the combination of both mask

  11. Prospective Evaluation of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) Algorithm in Abdominal CT: A comparison of reduced dose with standard dose imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Kim, David H.; Tang, Jie; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively study CT dose reduction using the “prior image constrained compressed sensing” (PICCS) reconstruction technique. Methods Immediately following routine standard dose (SD) abdominal MDCT, 50 patients (mean age, 57.7 years; mean BMI, 28.8) underwent a second reduced-dose (RD) scan (targeted dose reduction, 70-90%). DLP, CTDIvol and SSDE were compared. Several reconstruction algorithms (FBP, ASIR, and PICCS) were applied to the RD series. SD images with FBP served as reference standard. Two blinded readers evaluated each series for subjective image quality and focal lesion detection. Results Mean DLP, CTDIvol, and SSDE for RD series was 140.3 mGy*cm (median 79.4), 3.7 mGy (median 1.8), and 4.2 mGy (median 2.3) compared with 493.7 mGy*cm (median 345.8), 12.9 mGy (median 7.9 mGy) and 14.6 mGy (median 10.1) for SD series, respectively. Mean effective patient diameter was 30.1 cm (median 30), which translates to a mean SSDE reduction of 72% (p<0.001). RD-PICCS image quality score was 2.8±0.5, improved over the RD-FBP (1.7±0.7) and RD-ASIR(1.9±0.8)(p<0.001), but lower than SD (3.5±0.5)(p<0.001). Readers detected 81% (184/228) of focal lesions on RD-PICCS series, versus 67% (153/228) and 65% (149/228) for RD-FBP and RD-ASIR, respectively. Mean image noise was significantly reduced on RD-PICCS series (13.9 HU) compared with RD-FBP (57.2) and RD-ASIR (44.1) (p<0.001). Conclusion PICCS allows for marked dose reduction at abdominal CT with improved image quality and diagnostic performance over reduced-dose FBP and ASIR. Further study is needed to determine indication-specific dose reduction levels that preserve acceptable diagnostic accuracy relative to higher-dose protocols. PMID:24943136

  12. Comparison of proton therapy treatment planning for head tumors with a pencil beam algorithm on dual and single energy CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Hudobivnik, Nace; Dedes, George; Parodi, Katia; Landry, Guillaume; Schwarz, Florian; Johnson, Thorsten; Sommer, Wieland H.; Agolli, Linda; Tessonnier, Thomas; Verhaegen, Frank; Thieke, Christian; Belka, Claus

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) has recently been proposed as an improvement over single energy CT (SECT) for stopping power ratio (SPR) estimation for proton therapy treatment planning (TP), thereby potentially reducing range uncertainties. Published literature investigated phantoms. This study aims at performing proton therapy TP on SECT and DECT head images of the same patients and at evaluating whether the reported improved DECT SPR accuracy translates into clinically relevant range shifts in clinical head treatment scenarios. Methods: Two phantoms were scanned at a last generation dual source DECT scanner at 90 and 150 kVp with Sn filtration. The first phantom (Gammex phantom) was used to calibrate the scanner in terms of SPR while the second served as evaluation (CIRS phantom). DECT images of five head trauma patients were used as surrogate cancer patient images for TP of proton therapy. Pencil beam algorithm based TP was performed on SECT and DECT images and the dose distributions corresponding to the optimized proton plans were calculated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation platform using the same patient geometry for both plans obtained from conversion of the 150 kVp images. Range shifts between the MC dose distributions from SECT and DECT plans were assessed using 2D range maps. Results: SPR root mean square errors (RMSEs) for the inserts of the Gammex phantom were 1.9%, 1.8%, and 1.2% for SECT phantom calibration (SECT{sub phantom}), SECT stoichiometric calibration (SECT{sub stoichiometric}), and DECT calibration, respectively. For the CIRS phantom, these were 3.6%, 1.6%, and 1.0%. When investigating patient anatomy, group median range differences of up to −1.4% were observed for head cases when comparing SECT{sub stoichiometric} with DECT. For this calibration the 25th and 75th percentiles varied from −2% to 0% across the five patients. The group median was found to be limited to 0.5% when using SECT{sub phantom} and the 25th and 75th percentiles

  13. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  14. Body CT (CAT Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and the CT ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  15. Comparison of observer reliability of three-dimensional cephalometric landmark identification on subject images from Galileos and i-CAT cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Katkar, R A; Kummet, C; Dawson, D; Moreno Uribe, L; Allareddy, V; Finkelstein, M; Ruprecht, A

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recently, there has been increasing interest in the use of cone beam CT (CBCT) for three-dimensional cephalometric analysis and craniofacial reconstruction in orthodontic and orthognathic surgical treatment planning. However, there is a need to redefine the cephalometric landmarks in three dimensional cephalometric analysis and to demonstrate the reproducibility of landmark identification on the type of CBCT machine being used. Methods: CBCT images of 20 subjects aged 15–25 years were selected, ten each from Galileos® (Sirona Dental Systems Inc., Bensheim, Germany) and Next Generation i-CAT® (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA). 2 observers located 18 landmarks on each subject twice using Dolphin-3D v. 11 software (Dolphin Imaging and Management Systems, Chatsworth, CA). Inter- and intraobserver reliability was assessed using Euclidean distances and linear mixed models. Results: Overall, the intra- and interobserver reliability was excellent for both machines. The landmarks Gonion, Nasion, Orbitale and Anterior Nasal Spine (ANS) showed the greatest median Euclidean distances for both intra- and interobserver measurements. There were significant observer effects in the unified models for Sella, Menton and all six dental landmarks. For Sella, the distances between the measures were significantly smaller (more closely spaced) on the i-CAT machine than on the Galileos in both intra- and interobserver measurements. Conclusions: The intra- and interobserver reliability was excellent for both machines. Some of the landmarks were not as reproducible as others. Which machine produced the highest reliability depended on the landmark considered. PMID:23833319

  16. CT and MR imaging of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Splendiani, Alessandra; Barile, Antonio; Squillaci, Ettore; Di Cesare, Annamaria; Brunese, Luca; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At present time, both CT and MRI are valuable techniques in the study of the thoracic aorta. Nowadays, CT represents the most widely employed technique for the study of the thoracic aorta. The new generation CTs show sensitivities up to 100% and specificities of 98-99%. Sixteen and wider row detectors provide isotropic pixels, mandatory for the ineludible longitudinal reconstruction. The main limits are related to the X-ray dose expoure and the use of iodinated contrast media. MRI has great potential in the study of the thoracic aorta. Nevertheless, if compared to CT, acquisition times remain longer and movement artifact susceptibility higher. The main MRI disadvantages are claustrophobia, presence of ferromagnetic implants, pacemakers, longer acquisition times with respect to CT, inability to use contrast media in cases of renal insufficiency, lower spatial resolution and less availability than CT. CT is preferred in the acute aortic disease. Nevertheless, since it requires iodinated contrast media and X-ray exposure, it may be adequately replaced by MRI in the follow up of aortic diseases. The main limitation of MRI, however, is related to the scarce visibility of stents and calcifications. PMID:28352783

  17. Effects of row-type, row-spacing, seeding rate, soil-type, and cultivar differences on soybean seed nutrition under US Mississippi Delta conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management practices such as seeding rate (SR), planting date (PD), and row-type (RT: single- and twin-rows) may alter seed nutrition in soybean. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of SR and PD on soybean seed composition (protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars) and mineral...

  18. Evaluation of the cone beam CT for internal target volume localization in lung stereotactic radiotherapy in comparison with 4D MIP images

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lu; Chen, Xiaoming; Lin, Mu-Han; Lin, Teh; Fan, Jiajin; Jin, Lihui; Ma, Charlie M.; Xue, Jun

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether the three-dimensional cone-beam CT (CBCT) is clinically equivalent to the four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstructed images for internal target volume (ITV) localization in image-guided lung stereotactic radiotherapy.Methods: A ball-shaped polystyrene phantom with built-in cube, sphere, and cone of known volumes was attached to a motor-driven platform, which simulates a sinusoidal movement with changeable motion amplitude and frequency. Target motion was simulated in the patient in a superior-inferior (S-I) direction with three motion periods and 2 cm peak-to-peak amplitudes. The Varian onboard Exact-Arms kV CBCT system and the GE LightSpeed four-slice CT integrated with the respiratory-position-management 4DCT scanner were used to scan the moving phantom. MIP images were generated from the 4DCT images. The clinical equivalence of the two sets of images was evaluated by comparing the extreme locations of the moving objects along the motion direction, the centroid position of the ITV, and the ITV volumes that were contoured automatically by Velocity or calculated with an imaging gradient method. The authors compared the ITV volumes determined by the above methods with those theoretically predicted by taking into account the physical object dimensions and the motion amplitudes. The extreme locations were determined by the gradient method along the S-I axis through the center of the object. The centroid positions were determined by autocenter functions. The effect of motion period on the volume sizes was also studied.Results: It was found that the extreme locations of the objects determined from the two image modalities agreed with each other satisfactorily. They were not affected by the motion period. The average difference between the two modalities in the extreme locations was 0.68% for the cube, 1.35% for the sphere, and 0.5% for the cone, respectively. The maximum difference in the

  19. Comparison of linear and angular measurements using two-dimensional conventional methods and three-dimensional cone beam CT images reconstructed from a volumetric rendering program in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Oz, U; Orhan, K; Abe, N

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the linear and angular measurements made on two-dimensional (2D) conventional cephalometric images and three-dimensional (3D) cone beam CT (CBCT) generated cephalograms derived from a 3D volumetric rendering program. Methods Pre-treatment cephalometric digital radiographs of 11 patients and their corresponding CBCT images were randomly selected. The digital cephalometric radiographs were traced using Vista Dent OC (GAC International, Inc Bohemia, NY) and by hand. CBCT and Maxilim® (Medicim, Sint-Niklass, Belgium) software were used to generate cephalograms from the CBCT data set that were then linked to the 3D hard-tissue surface representations. In total, 16 cephalometric landmarks were identified and 18 widely used measurements (11 linear and 7 angular) were performed by 2 independent observers. Intraobserver reliability was assessed by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), interobserver reliability was assessed with Student t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Mann–Whitney U-tests and Kruskal–Wallis H tests were also used to compare the three methods (P < 0.05). Results The results demonstrated no statistically significant difference between interobserver analyses for CBCT-generated cephalograms (P < 0.05), except for Gonion-Menton (Go-Me) and Condylion-Gnathion (Co-Gn). Intraobserver examinations showed low ICCs, which was an indication of poor reproducibility for Go-Me and Sella-Nasion (S-N) in CBCT-generated cephalograms and poor reproducibility for Articulare-Gonion (Ar-Go) in the 2D hand tracing method (P < 0.05). No statistical significance was found for Vista Dent OC measurements (P > 0.05). Conclusions Measurements from in vivo CBCT-generated cephalograms from Maxilim® software were found to be similar to conventional images. Thus, owing to higher radiation exposure, CBCT examinations should only be used when the inherent 3D information could improve the outcome of treatment. PMID

  20. The Energetic Assessment of Frictional Instability Based on Rowe's Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, M.; Muto, J.; Nagahama, H.

    2015-12-01

    Frictional instability that controls the occurrence of unstable slips has been related to (1) rate and state dependent friction law (Dieterich, 1979; Ruina, 1983) and (2) shear localization in a gouge layer (e.g., Byerlee et al., 1978; Logan et al., 1979). Ikari et al. (2011) indicated that the transitions of frictional parameters obtained from the rate and state dependent friction law involve shear localization. However, the underlining theoretical background for their link has been unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigate their relation theoretically and experimentally based on Rowe's theory on constant minimum energy ratio (Rowe, 1962) describing particle deformations quantitatively by energetic analysis. In theoretical analysis using analytical dynamics and irreversible thermodynamics, the energetic criterion about frictional instability is obtained; unstable slip occurs at energy ratios below 1. In friction experiments using a gas medium apparatus, simulated fault gouge deforms obeying the Rowe's theory. Additionally, the energy ratios change gradually with shear and show below 1 before the occurrence of unstable slip. Moreover, energy ratios are derived from volume changes. Transition of energy ratios from increase to decrease, which has been confirmed at the end of compaction, indicates the onset of volume increase toward the occurrence of unstable slip. The volume increases likely correspond to the formation of R1-shears with open mode character, which occurs prior to the unstable slip. Shear localization leads to a change in internal friction angle which is a statistical parameter to constitute a energy ratio. In short, changes in internal friction angle play an important role in evolving from being frictionally stable to unstable. From these results, the physical and energetic background for their link between the frictional parameter and shear localization becomes clear.

  1. Functional results after proximal row carpectomy to salvage a wrist.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Thomas; Sauerbier, Michael; Trankle, Markus; Dragu, Adrian; Germann, Guenter; Baumeister, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    Proximal row carpectomy is a movement-preserving procedure in the treatment of arthrosis of the wrist. We have retrospectively assessed the objective and subjective functional results after proximal row carpectomy. Assessment of outcome included measurement of range of movement (ROM), grip strength and self-assessment of pain relief with a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Disabilities of arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire. Results were graded using the Mayo and Krimmer wrist scores. Fourty-five patients (mean age 48 (30-67) years) were evaluated with a follow-up of 32 (8-115) months. Underlying conditions included: degenerative arthritis secondary to scapholunate advanced collapse deformity, or chronic scaphoid non-union (n=35), Kienbock disease stage III (n=4), chronic perilunate dislocation and fracture-dislocation (n=4), avascular necrosis of the scaphoid (n=1), and severe radiocarpal arthrosis secondary to distal radial fracture (n=1). Active ROM for wrist extension and flexion was 70 degrees and mean radial and ulnar deviation 30.8 degrees . Grip strength was 51% of the unaffected side. The average DASH score was 26. The intensity of the pain, measured by VAS, was reduced by 44% after strenuous activities and by 71% at rest. The Mayo and Krimmer wrist scores were 55 and 62 points indicating good results; 32 patients returned to work and 25 patients to their former occupation. Our results show that proximal row carpectomy is a technically easy operation that preserves a satisfying ROM and pain relief, and is recommended when the head of the capitate and the lunate fossa are not affected by arthrosis.

  2. 9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row of columns indicates the former location of the exterior mill wall before World War II era expansion. The unusual column and beam connection was a key part of the mill structural system patented by Providence, Rhode Island engineers Charles Praray and Charles Makepeace in 1894. Each column was originally located in the apex of triangular window bay, but not connected to the exterior wall. Modifications on the right side of each column support the beams of the addition. - Dixie Cotton Mill, 710 Greenville Street, La Grange, Troup County, GA

  3. Plant, soil, and shadow reflectance components of row crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, A. J.; Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Cuellar, J. A.; Gerbermann, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Data from the first Earth Resource Technology Satellite (LANDSAT-1) multispectral scanner (MSS) were used to develop three plant canopy models (Kubelka-Munk (K-M), regression, and combined K-M and regression models) for extracting plant, soil, and shadow reflectance components of cropped fields. The combined model gave the best correlation between MSS data and ground truth, by accounting for essentially all of the reflectance of plants, soil, and shadow between crop rows. The principles presented can be used to better forecast crop yield and to estimate acreage.

  4. [Value of (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT in clinical decision-making for nasopharyngeal carcinoma and a comparison of the values of different imaging techniques for diagnosing skull-base bone invasion].

    PubMed

    Li, W; Zhang, R S; Zhang, L Q; Lu, B G; Fu, W H

    2017-02-23

    Objective: To analyze the clinical value of SPECT/CT in diagnosis of skull base bone invasion and clinical decision-making for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and to compare their diagnostic value with SPECT/CT, CT, MRI, and MRI combined with SPECT (MRI-SPECT) for skull base bone invasion. Methods: Before treatment, among 348 newly diagnosed NPC patients, CT scan was performed in 186 patients (group A) and the remaining 162 patients received MRI scan (group B). Clinical doctors then made clinical management decisions according to the CT or MRI results. After that, all patients underwent (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT examination for nasopharyngeal local tomography, and the results were provided to the clinical doctors to make clinical management decisions again. The changes between the two clinical management decisions were scored according to diagnosis, range of lesion, staging, treatment regimens, and auxiliary examination. The diagnostic value of CT scan, MRI scan, SPECT/CT and MRI-SPECT for skull base bone invasion was then evaluated and compared. Results: In terms of changes in scores of clinical management decisions, the score of group A was 1.387 and group B was 0.951, showing a significant difference between the two groups by Wilcoxon test (Z=6.570, P<0.001). By χ(2) test, there were correlations between CT and SPECT/CT (χ(2) =98.495, P<0.001), and between MRI and SPECT/CT (χ(2) =32.662, P<0.001). The consistency of CT and SPECT/CT (Kappa=0.713) was greater than MRI and SPECT (Kappa=0.449). The sensitivity of CT, MRI, SPECT/CT and MRI-SPECT was 67.1%, 84.5%, 90.8% and 100%, the specificity was 73.3%, 92.3%, 85.6% and 84.6%, and the area under the ROC curve was 0.702, 0.884, 0.882 and 0.923, respectively. Conclusions: SPECT/CT has important impact on clinical management decision for NPC. In the judgement of skull base invasion, the diagnostic value of SPECT/CT is significantly higher than CT and approximately equal to MRI. SPECT/CT should be one of the routine

  5. Comparison of the effectiveness of using the optic strut and tuberculum sellae as radiological landmarks in diagnosing paraclinoid aneurysms with CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chih-Hsiang; Lin, Chung-Jung; Lin, Chun-Fu; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Min-Hsiung; Hsu, Sanford P C; Shih, Yang-Hsin

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The treatment of paraclinoid aneurysms remains challenging. It is important to determine the exact location of the paraclinoid aneurysm when considering treatment options. The authors herein evaluated the effectiveness of using the optic strut (OS) and tuberculum sellae (TS) as radiographic landmarks for distinguishing between intradural and extradural paraclinoid aneurysms on source images from CT angiography (CTA). METHODS Between January 2010 and September 2013, a total of 49 surgical patients with the preoperative diagnoses of paraclinoid aneurysm and 1 symptomatic cavernous-clinoid aneurysm were retrospectively identified. With the source images from CTA, the OS and the TS were used as landmarks to predict the location of the paraclinoid aneurysm and its relation to the distal dural ring (DDR). The operative findings were examined to confirm the definitive location of the paraclinoid aneurysm. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the diagnostic effectiveness of the landmarks. RESULTS Nineteen patients without preoperative CTA were excluded. The remaining 30 patients comprised the current study. The intraoperative findings confirmed 12 intradural, 12 transitional, and 6 extradural paraclinoid aneurysms, the diagnoses of which were significantly related to the type of aneurysm (p < 0.05) but not factors like sex, age, laterality of aneurysm, or relation of the aneurysm to the ophthalmic artery on digital subtraction angiography. To measure agreement with the correct diagnosis, the OS as a reference point was far superior to the TS (Cohen's kappa coefficients 0.462 and 0.138 for the OS and the TS, respectively). For paraclinoid aneurysms of the medial or posterior type, using the base of the OS as a reference point tended to overestimate intradural paraclinoid aneurysms. The receiver operating characteristic curve indicated that if the aneurysmal neck traverses the axial plane 2 mm above the base of the OS, the aneurysm is most likely to grow

  6. Effect of Stratified Care for Low Back Pain in Family Practice (IMPaCT Back): A Prospective Population-Based Sequential Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Nadine E.; Mullis, Ricky; Hill, Jonathan C.; Lewis, Martyn; Whitehurst, David G. T.; Doyle, Carol; Konstantinou, Kika; Main, Chris; Somerville, Simon; Sowden, Gail; Wathall, Simon; Young, Julie; Hay, Elaine M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to determine the effects of implementing risk-stratified care for low back pain in family practice on physician’s clinical behavior, patient outcomes, and costs. METHODS The IMPaCT Back Study (IMplementation to improve Patient Care through Targeted treatment) prospectively compared separate patient cohorts in a preintervention phase (6 months of usual care) and a postintervention phase (12 months of stratified care) in family practice, involving 64 family physicians and linked physical therapy services. A total of 1,647 adults with low back pain were invited to participate. Stratified care entailed use of a risk stratification tool to classify patients into groups at low, medium, or high risk for persistent disability and provision of risk-matched treatment. The primary outcome was 6-month change in disability as assessed with the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Process outcomes captured physician behavior change in risk-appropriate referral to physical therapy, diagnostic tests, medication prescriptions, and sickness certifications. A cost-utility analysis estimated incremental quality-adjusted life-years and back-related health care costs. Analysis was by intention to treat. RESULTS The 922 patients studied (368 in the preintervention phase and 554 in the postintervention phase) had comparable baseline characteristics. At 6 months follow-up, stratified care had a small but significant benefit relative to usual care as seen from a mean difference in Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire scores of 0.7 (95% CI, 0.1–1.4), with a large, clinically important difference in the high risk group of 2.3 (95% CI, 0.8–3.9). Mean time off work was 50% shorter (4 vs 8 days, P = .03) and the proportion of patients given sickness certifications was 30% lower (9% vs 15%, P = .03) in the postintervention cohort. Health care cost savings were also observed. CONCLUSIONS Stratified care for back pain implemented in family practice leads to significant

  7. Image quality of CT angiography with model-based iterative reconstruction in young children with congenital heart disease: comparison with filtered back projection and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Son, Sung Sil; Choo, Ki Seok; Jeon, Ung Bae; Jeon, Gye Rok; Nam, Kyung Jin; Kim, Tae Un; Yeom, Jeong A; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Jeong, Dong Wook; Lim, Soo Jin

    2015-06-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the image quality of CT angiography (CTA) reconstructed by model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) and to compare this with images obtained by filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) in newborns and infants with congenital heart disease (CHD). Thirty-seven children (age 4.8 ± 3.7 months; weight 4.79 ± 0.47 kg) with suspected CHD underwent CTA on a 64detector MDCT without ECG gating (80 kVp, 40 mA using tube current modulation). Total dose length product was recorded in all patients. Images were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Objective image qualities (density, noise) were measured in the great vessels and heart chambers. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated by measuring the density and noise of myocardial walls. Two radiologists evaluated images for subjective noise, diagnostic confidence, and sharpness at the level prior to the first branch of the main pulmonary artery. Images were compared with respect to reconstruction method, and reconstruction times were measured. Images from all patients were diagnostic, and the effective dose was 0.22 mSv. The objective image noise of MBIR was significantly lower than those of FBP and ASIR in the great vessels and heart chambers (P < 0.05); however, with respect to attenuations in the four chambers, ascending aorta, descending aorta, and pulmonary trunk, no statistically significant difference was observed among the three methods (P > 0.05). Mean CNR values were 8.73 for FBP, 14.54 for ASIR, and 22.95 for MBIR. In addition, the subjective image noise of MBIR was significantly lower than those of the others (P < 0.01). Furthermore, while FBP had the highest score for image sharpness, ASIR had the highest score for diagnostic confidence (P < 0.05), and mean reconstruction times were 5.1 ± 2.3 s for FBP and ASIR and 15.1 ± 2.4 min for MBIR. While CTA with MBIR in newborns and infants with CHD can reduce image noise and

  8. Can Row Spacing Influence Arthropod Communities in Soybean? Implications for Early and Late Planting.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Amanda L; Zobel, Emily; Hinds, Jermaine; Rosario-Lebron, Armando; Hooks, Cerruti R R

    2015-06-01

    Row spacing in agricultural systems can influence crop yield as well as pest and predator abundances. Soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) growers in Maryland typically plant in narrow (∼19 cm), medium (∼38 cm), or wide (∼76 cm)-spaced rows, and there is a general lack of information on how these row-spacing schemes influence arthropod abundance and soybean yields. A study was conducted during two growing seasons to determine the effect of soybean row spacing and planting date (early and late) on soybean arthropods and yield. Despite a great deal of variation in arthropod responses to row spacing, and interactions between row spacing and study year, leaf-feeding herbivores were generally more abundant in narrow-spaced soybeans. All arthropod functional groups were more abundant, and yield was greater in early-planted soybeans relative to late-planted soybeans. Potential causes and implications of these finding are discussed.

  9. Women's religious conversions on death row: theorizing religion and state.

    PubMed

    Cooey, P M

    2002-01-01

    Most scholars of religion who approach the phenomena associated with religious conversion in order to theorize religion tend to ignore the legal and political implications of the actual context in which conversion occurs for theorizing religion itself. Meanwhile, political and legal theorists who attend to the implications of executing convicted murderers who undergo religious conversion on death row err in a different direction. They virtually ignore the significance of the claims made by the converts and their associates about the conversion themselves for theorizing the state. Scholars across disciplines increasingly address issues of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation in respect to theorizing religion and theorizing the state independently of one another. At the same time, they do not seize the opportunity to incorporate their analyses into a wider study of the sociocultural production of religion and state in relation to each other. I examine the religious conversion of Karla Faye Tucker and Wanda Jean Allen on death row, as well as the scholarship that their convictions, conversions, and executions have generated across academic disciplines and fields. Close examination illustrates well the necessity for theorizing religion and the state in relation to one another in order to understand either adequately.

  10. Development of Magnetorheological Resistive Exercise Device for Rowing Machine

    PubMed Central

    Žiliukas, Pranas

    2016-01-01

    Training equipment used by professional sportsmen has a great impact on their sport performance. Most universal exercisers may help only to improve the general physical condition due to the specific kinematics and peculiar resistance generated by their loading units. Training of effective techniques and learning of psychomotor skills are possible only when exercisers conform to the movements and resistance typical for particular sports kinematically and dynamically. Methodology of developing a magnetorheological resistive exercise device for generating the desired law of passive resistance force and its application in a lever-type rowing machine are described in the paper. The structural parameters of a controllable hydraulic cylinder type device were found by means of the computational fluid dynamics simulation performed by ANSYS CFX software. Parameters describing the magnetorheological fluid as non-Newtonian were determined by combining numerical and experimental research of the resistance force generated by the original magnetorheological damper. A structural scheme of the device control system was developed and the variation of the strength of magnetic field that affects the magnetorheological fluid circulating in the device was determined, ensuring a variation of the resistance force on the oar handle adequate for the resistance that occurs during a real boat rowing stroke. PMID:27293479

  11. Optimization of oar blade design for improved performance in rowing.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Nicholas; Gardner, Trevor N

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to find a more optimal blade design for rowing performance than the Big Blade, which has been shown to be less than optimal for propulsion. As well as the Big Blade, a flat Big Blade, a flat rectangular blade, and a rectangular blade with the same curvature and projected area as the Big Blade were tested in a water flume to determine their fluid dynamic characteristics at the full range of angles at which the oar blade might present itself to the water. Similarities were observed between the flat Big Blade and rectangular blades. However, the curved rectangular blade generated significantly more lift in the angle range 0-90 degrees than the curved Big Blade, although it was similar between 90 and 180 degrees. This difference was attributed to the shape of the upper and lower edges of the blade and their influence on the fluid flow around the blade. Although the influence of oar blade design on boat speed was not investigated here, the significant increases in fluid force coefficients for the curved rectangular blade suggest that this new oar blade design could elicit a practically significant improvement in rowing performance.

  12. Directional reflectance factor distributions of a cotton row crop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Newcomb, W. W.; Schutt, J. B.; Pinter, P. J., Jr.; Jackson, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The directional reflectance factor distribution spanning the entire exitance hemisphere was measured for a cotton row crop (Gossypium barbadense L.) with 39 percent ground cover. Spectral directional radiances were taken in NOAA satellite 7 AVHRR bands 1 and 2 using a three-band radiometer with restricted 12 deg full angle field of view at half peak power points. Polar co-ordinate system plots of directional reflectance factor distributions and three-dimensional computer graphic plots of scattered flux were used to study the dynamics of the directional reflectance factor distribution as a function of spectral band, geometric structure of the scene, solar zenith and azimuth angles, and optical properties of the leaves and soil. The factor distribution of the incomplete row crops was highly polymodal relative to that for complete vegetation canopies. Besides the enhanced reflectance for the antisolar point, a reflectance minimum was observed towards the forwardscatter direction in the principle plane of the sun. Knowledge of the mechanics of the observed dynamics of the data may be used to provide rigorous validation for two- or three-dimensional radiative transfer models, and is important in interpreting aircraft and satellite data where the solar angle varies widely.

  13. Complete inclusion of adaptive rowing only 1000 m ahead.

    PubMed

    Smoljanovic, Tomislav; Bojanic, Ivan; Hannafin, Jo A; Urhausen, Axel; Theisen, Daniel; Seil, Romain; Lacoste, Alain

    2013-09-01

    Adaptive rowing (AR) at the Paralympic level is accessible for rowers with physical disability. AR was included for the first time in the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Racing distance for all AR events is currently 1000 m, which impedes public recognition of this sport and leads to many organisational challenges during the inclusive World Rowing Championships. The aim of this report was to discuss the feasibility of increasing AR race distance to 2000 m from a sports injury and athletic health perspective. As limited data on injury and illness risks exist in AR, knowledge and experiences had to be taken from other Paralympic sports. The anticipated duration of 2000 m AR competitions is either comparable or considerably lower than that of the other Paralympic disciplines with similar characteristics. AR has inherent injury and health risks especially within thorax, shoulders and low back region, but they are not expected to be significantly modified by increased racing times. Specific considerations need to be taken into account for athletes with a spinal cord injury, like in other sport disciplines. There are no distinctive contra-indications for AR events of 2000 m based on the current literature review and a 10-year experience in this sport. Long-term follow-ups are needed to understand fully the injury and health risk associated with AR and to develop appropriate prevention strategies.

  14. Changes in Rowing Technique Over a Routine One Hour Low Intensity High Volume Training Session

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Hugh A.M.; Bull, Anthony M.J.; McGregor, Alison H.

    2008-01-01

    High volume low intensity training sessions such as one hour rowing ergometer sessions are frequently used to improve the fitness of elite rowers. Early work has suggested that technique may decline over this time period. This study sought to test the hypothesis that “elite rowers can maintain technique over a one hour rowing ergometer session”. An electromagnetic device, in conjunction with a load cell, was used to assess rowing technique in terms of force generation and spinal kinematics in six male elite sweep oarsmen (two competed internationally and the remainder at a club senior level). All subjects performed one hour of rowing on a Concept II indoor rowing ergometer using a stroke rate of 18-20 strokes per minute and a heart rate ranging between 130-150 beats per minute, following a brief 5 minute warm- up. Recordings of rowing technique and force were made every 10 minutes. The elite group of rowers were able to sustain their rowing technique and force parameters over the hour session. Subtle changes in certain parameters were observed including a fall in force output of approximately 10N after the first seven minutes of rowing, and a change in leg compression of three degrees at the end of the one hour rowing piece which corresponded with a small increase in anterior rotation of the pelvis. However, it is unclear if such changes reflect a “warm-up” effect or if they are indicative of early signs of fatigue. These findings suggest that low intensity high volume ergometer rowing sessions do not have a detrimental effect on the technique of a group of experienced and highly trained rowers. Key pointsElite rowers do not demonstrate changes in rowing kinematics over and hour rowing piece.Rowers require an adequate warm-up to establish their technique. PMID:24149955

  15. SU-E-J-47: Comparison of Online Image Registrations of Varian TrueBeam Cone-Beam CT and BrainLab ExacTrac Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J; Shi, W; Andrews, D; Werner-Wasik, M; Yu, Y; Liu, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To compare online image registrations of TrueBeam cone-beam CT (CBCT) and BrainLab ExacTrac imaging systems. Methods Tests were performed on a Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator (Version 2.0), which is integrated with a BrainLab ExacTrac imaging system (Version 6.0.5). The study was focused on comparing the online image registrations for translational shifts. A Rando head phantom was placed on treatment couch and immobilized with a BrainLab mask. The phantom was shifted by moving the couch translationally for 8 mm with a step size of 1 mm, in vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. At each location, the phantom was imaged with CBCT and ExacTrac x-ray. CBCT images were registered with TrueBeam and ExacTrac online registration algorithms, respectively. And ExacTrac x-ray image registrations were performed. Shifts calculated from different registrations were compared with nominal couch shifts. Results The averages and ranges of absolute differences between couch shifts and calculated phantom shifts obtained from ExacTrac x-ray registration, ExacTrac CBCT registration with default window, ExaxTrac CBCT registration with adjusted window (bone), Truebeam CBCT registration with bone window, and Truebeam CBCT registration with soft tissue window, were: 0.07 (0.02–0.14), 0.14 (0.01–0.35), 0.12 (0.02–0.28), 0.09 (0–0.20), and 0.06 (0–0.10) mm, in vertical direction; 0.06 (0.01–0.12), 0.27 (0.07–0.57), 0.23 (0.02–0.48), 0.04 (0–0.10), and 0.08 (0– 0.20) mm, in longitudinal direction; 0.05 (0.01–0.21), 0.35 (0.14–0.80), 0.25 (0.01–0.56), 0.19 (0–0.40), and 0.20 (0–0.40) mm, in lateral direction. Conclusion The shifts calculated from ExacTrac x-ray and TrueBeam CBCT registrations were close to each other (the differences between were less than 0.40 mm in any direction), and had better agreements with couch shifts than those from ExacTrac CBCT registrations. There were no significant differences between True

  16. Heat Transfer, Adiabatic Effectiveness and Injectant Distributions Downstream of Single Rows and Two Staggered Rows of Film-Cooling Holes with Simple and Compound Angles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    ROWS AND TWO STAGGERED ROWS OF FILM-COOLING HOLES WITH SIMPLE AND COMPOUND ANGLES 92-01241 by DIII l, p111111~ 11I Stephen Mark Jackson DECEMBER 1991...HOLES WITH SIMPLE AND COMPOUND ANGLES 12. PERSONAL AUTHORS STEPHEN MARK JACKSON 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year. A4int, Day...Rows of Film-Cooling Holes with Simple and Compound Angles by Stephen Mark Jackson lieutenant, United States Navy B.S., United States Naval Academy, 1983

  17. Accuracy of Ultrasound-Based Image Guidance for Daily Positioning of the Upper Abdomen: An Online Comparison With Cone Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit Mennemeyer, Philipp; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Riesenacker, Nadja; Kuepper, Beate; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy can improve protection of organs at risk when large abdominal target volumes are irradiated. We estimated the daily positioning accuracy of ultrasound-based image guidance for abdominal target volumes by a direct comparison of daily imaging obtained with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Daily positioning (n = 83 positionings) of 15 patients was completed by using ultrasound guidance after an initial CBCT was obtained. Residual error after ultrasound was estimated by comparison with a second CBCT. Ultrasound image quality was visually rated using a scale of 1 to 4. Results: Of 15 patients, 7 patients had good sonographic imaging quality, 5 patients had satisfactory sonographic quality, and 3 patients were excluded because of unsatisfactory sonographic quality. When image quality was good, residual errors after ultrasound were -0.1 {+-} 3.11 mm in the x direction (left-right; group systematic error M = -0.09 mm; standard deviation [SD] of systematic error, {sigma} = 1.37 mm; SD of the random error, {sigma} = 2.99 mm), 0.93 {+-} 4.31 mm in the y direction (superior-inferior, M = 1.12 mm; {sigma} = 2.96 mm; {sigma} = 3.39 mm), and 0.71 {+-} 3.15 mm in the z direction (anteroposterior; M = 1.01 mm; {sigma} = 2.46 mm; {sigma} = 2.24 mm). For patients with satisfactory image quality, residual error after ultrasound was -0.6 {+-} 5.26 mm in the x (M = 0.07 mm; {sigma} = 5.67 mm; {sigma} = 4.86 mm), 1.76 {+-} 4.92 mm in the y (M = 3.54 mm; {sigma} = 4.1 mm; {sigma} = 5.29 mm), and 1.19 {+-} 4.75 mm in the z (M = 0.82 mm; {sigma} = 2.86 mm; {sigma} = 3.05 mm) directions. Conclusions: In patients from whom good sonographic image quality could be obtained, ultrasound improved daily positioning accuracy. In the case of satisfactory image quality, ultrasound guidance improved accuracy compared to that of skin marks only minimally. If sonographic image quality was unsatisfactory, daily CBCT

  18. Flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT).

    PubMed

    Kalender, Willi A; Kyriakou, Yiannis

    2007-11-01

    Flat-panel detectors or, synonymously, flat detectors (FDs) have been developed for use in radiography and fluoroscopy with the defined goal to replace standard X-ray film, film-screen combinations and image intensifiers by an advanced sensor system. FD technology in comparison to X-ray film and image intensifiers offers higher dynamic range, dose reduction, fast digital readout and the possibility for dynamic acquisitions of image series, yet keeping to a compact design. It appeared logical to employ FD designs also for computed tomography (CT) imaging. Respective efforts date back a few years only, but FD-CT has meanwhile become widely accepted for interventional and intra-operative imaging using C-arm systems. FD-CT provides a very efficient way of combining two-dimensional (2D) radiographic or fluoroscopic and 3D CT imaging. In addition, FD technology made its way into a number of dedicated CT scanner developments, such as scanners for the maxillo-facial region or for micro-CT applications. This review focuses on technical and performance issues of FD technology and its full range of applications for CT imaging. A comparison with standard clinical CT is of primary interest. It reveals that FD-CT provides higher spatial resolution, but encompasses a number of disadvantages, such as lower dose efficiency, smaller field of view and lower temporal resolution. FD-CT is not aimed at challenging standard clinical CT as regards to the typical diagnostic examinations; but it has already proven unique for a number of dedicated CT applications, offering distinct practical advantages, above all the availability of immediate CT imaging in the interventional suite or the operating room.

  19. Prospective study evaluating the relative sensitivity of 18F-NaF PET/CT for detecting skeletal metastases from renal cell carcinoma in comparison to multidetector CT and 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy, using an adaptive trial design

    PubMed Central

    Gerety, E. L.; Lawrence, E. M.; Wason, J.; Yan, H.; Hilborne, S.; Buscombe, J.; Cheow, H. K.; Shaw, A. S.; Bird, N.; Fife, K.; Heard, S.; Lomas, D. J.; Matakidou, A.; Soloviev, D.; Eisen, T.; Gallagher, F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The detection of occult bone metastases is a key factor in determining the management of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC), especially when curative surgery is considered. This prospective study assessed the sensitivity of 18F-labelled sodium fluoride in conjunction with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-NaF PET/CT) for detecting RCC bone metastases, compared with conventional imaging by bone scintigraphy or CT. Patients and methods An adaptive two-stage trial design was utilized, which was stopped after the first stage due to statistical efficacy. Ten patients with stage IV RCC and bone metastases were imaged with 18F-NaF PET/CT and 99mTc-labelled methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) bone scintigraphy including pelvic single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Images were reported independently by experienced radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians using a 5-point scoring system. Results Seventy-seven lesions were diagnosed as malignant: 100% were identified by 18F-NaF PET/CT, 46% by CT and 29% by bone scintigraphy/SPECT. Standard-of-care imaging with CT and bone scintigraphy identified 65% of the metastases reported by 18F-NaF PET/CT. On an individual patient basis, 18F-NaF PET/CT detected more RCC metastases than 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy/SPECT or CT alone (P = 0.007). The metabolic volumes, mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmean and SUVmax) of the malignant lesions were significantly greater than those of the benign lesions (P < 0.001). Conclusions 18F-NaF PET/CT is significantly more sensitive at detecting RCC skeletal metastases than conventional bone scintigraphy or CT. The detection of occult bone metastases could greatly alter patient management, particularly in the context when standard-of-care imaging is negative for skeletal metastases. PMID:26202597

  20. An Unusual Cause of the Ring Artifact on Transaxial CT Images.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ashish Kumar; Purandare, Nilendu C; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-09-01

    Artifacts and image quality are two sides of the same coin. The ring artifact is scanner-based and caused mainly by either a miscalibrated element or a defective element of a detector row. We describe a rare cause of the ring artifact that appeared on a transaxial CT image because of a loose electronic contact. To our knowledge, this particular cause of the ring artifact has not been described in literature.

  1. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  2. PET/CT-Based Dosimetry in 90Y-Microsphere Selective Internal Radiation Therapy: Single Cohort Comparison With Pretreatment Planning on (99m)Tc-MAA Imaging and Correlation With Treatment Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Song, Yoo Sung; Paeng, Jin Chul; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Keon Wook

    2015-06-01

    ⁹⁰Y PET/CT can be acquired after ⁹⁰Y-microsphere selective radiation internal therapy (SIRT) to describe radioactivity distribution. We performed dosimetry using ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT data to evaluate treatment efficacy and appropriateness of activity planning from (99m)Tc-MAA scan and SPECT/CT. Twenty-three patients with liver malignancy were included in the study. (99m)Tc-MAA was injected during planning angiography and whole body (99m)Tc-MAA scan and liver SPECT/CT were acquired. After SIRT using ⁹⁰Y-resin microsphere, ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT was acquired. A partition model (PM) using 4 compartments (tumor, intarget normal liver, out-target normal liver, and lung) was adopted, and absorbed dose to each compartment was calculated based on measurements from (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT and ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT, respectively, to be compared with each other. Progression-free survival (PFS) was evaluated in terms of tumor absorbed doses calculated by (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT and ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT results. Lung shunt fraction was overestimated on (99m)Tc-MAA scan compared with ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT (0.060 ± 0.037 vs. 0.018 ± 0.026, P < 0.01). Tumor absorbed dose exhibited a close correlation between the results from (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT and ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT (r = 0.64, P < 0.01), although the result from (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT was significantly lower than that from ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT (135.4 ± 64.2 Gy vs. 185.0 ± 87.8 Gy, P < 0.01). Absorbed dose to in-target normal liver was overestimated on (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT compared with PET/CT (62.6 ± 38.2 Gy vs. 45.2 ± 32.0 Gy, P = 0.02). Absorbed dose to out-target normal liver did not differ between (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT and ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT (P = 0.49). Patients with tumor absorbed dose >200 Gy on ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT had longer PFS than those with tumor absorbed dose ≤200 Gy (286 ± 56 days vs. 92 ± 20

  3. Design and testing of a tandem row pump inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etter, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The design and testing of a tandem row pump inducer having a supercavitating first stage with a 0.60 hub ratio is presented. The second stage tested was a helical impeller with a 0.70 hub ratio. A cubic arc transition was utilized to accomplish the hub change. The first stage had two blades and the free-vortex design approach was empirically modified based on previous experience. The recommended second stage design having four blades and using cambered blade section is presented but the model was not built or tested. The more simple helix was built instead to reduce cost. Data taken included head generation, cavitation observations and unsteady head fluctuations over the 0-100Hz range.

  4. Transfer of Complex Skill Learning from Virtual to Real Rowing

    PubMed Central

    Rauter, Georg; Sigrist, Roland; Koch, Claudio; Crivelli, Francesco; van Raai, Mark; Riener, Robert; Wolf, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Simulators are commonly used to train complex tasks. In particular, simulators are applied to train dangerous tasks, to save costs, and to investigate the impact of different factors on task performance. However, in most cases, the transfer of simulator training to the real task has not been investigated. Without a proof for successful skill transfer, simulators might not be helpful at all or even counter-productive for learning the real task. In this paper, the skill transfer of complex technical aspects trained on a scull rowing simulator to sculling on water was investigated. We assume if a simulator provides high fidelity rendering of the interactions with the environment even without augmented feedback, training on such a realistic simulator would allow similar skill gains as training in the real environment. These learned skills were expected to transfer to the real environment. Two groups of four recreational rowers participated. One group trained on water, the other group trained on a simulator. Within two weeks, both groups performed four training sessions with the same licensed rowing trainer. The development in performance was assessed by quantitative biomechanical performance measures and by a qualitative video evaluation of an independent, blinded trainer. In general, both groups could improve their performance on water. The used biomechanical measures seem to allow only a limited insight into the rowers' development, while the independent trainer could also rate the rowers' overall impression. The simulator quality and naturalism was confirmed by the participants in a questionnaire. In conclusion, realistic simulator training fostered skill gains to a similar extent as training in the real environment and enabled skill transfer to the real environment. In combination with augmented feedback, simulator training can be further exploited to foster motor learning even to a higher extent, which is subject to future work. PMID:24376518

  5. Intraindividual comparison of gadolinium- and iodine-enhanced 64-slice multidetector CT pulmonary angiography for the detection of pulmonary embolism in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Henes, Frank Oliver Gerhard; Groth, Michael; Begemann, Philipp G C; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2011-06-01

    This study is an evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) for the detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) in comparison with iodine-enhanced CTPA. PE was induced in five anesthetized pigs by administration of blood clots through an 11-F catheter inside the jugular vein. Animals underwent CTPA in breathhold with i.v. bolus injection of 50 ml gadopentetate dimeglumine (0.4 mmol/kg, 4 ml/s). Subsequently, CTPA was performed using the same imaging parameters but under administration of 70 ml nonionic iodinated contrast material (400 mg/ml, 4 ml/s). All images were reconstructed with 1 mm slice thickness. A consensus readout of the iodium-enhanced CTPAs by both radiologists served as reference standard. Gadolinium-enhanced CTPAs were evaluated independently by two experienced radiologists, and differences in detection rate between both contrast agents were assessed on a per embolus basis using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Interobserver agreement was determined by calculation of қ values. PE was diagnosed independently by both readers in all five pigs by the use of gadolinium-enhanced CTPA. Out of 60 pulmonary emboli detected in the iodine-enhanced scans, 47 (78.3%; reader 1) and 44 (62.8%; reader 2) emboli were detected by the use of gadolinium. All 13 (100%) emboli in lobar arteries (by both readers) and 26 (reader 1) and 25 (reader 2) out of 27 emboli (96.3% and 92.6%) in segmental arteries were detected by the use of the gadolinium-enhanced CTPA. In subsegmental arteries, only 8 (40%; reader 1) and 6 (30%; reader 2) out of 20 emboli were detected by the gadolinium-enhanced CTPA. By comparing both scans on a per vessel basis (Wilcoxon test), Gd-enhanced CTPA was significantly inferior in emboli detection on subsegmental level (P < 0.0001). The interobserver agreement was excellent on lobar and segmental level (қ = 1.0 and 0.93, respectively), whereas readers only reached moderate

  6. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a good'' surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  7. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a ``good`` surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  8. Validity of blood flow measurement using 320 multi-detectors CT and first-pass distribution theory: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Yu, Xuefang; Xu, Shaopeng; Zhou, Kenneth J.

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of measuring the myocardial blood flow using 320 row detector CT by first-pass technique. Heart was simulated with a container that was filled with pipeline of 3mm diameter; coronary artery was simulated with a pipeline of 2 cm diameter and connected with the simulated heart. The simulated coronary artery was connected with a big container with 1500 ml saline and 150ml contrast agent. One pump linking with simulated heart will withdraw with a speed of 10 ml/min, 15 ml/min, 20 ml/min, 25 ml/min and 30 ml/min. First CT scan starts after 30 s of pumpback with certain speed. The second CT scan starts 5 s after first CT scans. CT images processed as follows: The second CT scan images subtract first CT scan images, calculate the increase of CT value of simulated heart and the CT value of the unit volume of simulated coronary artery and then to calculate the total inflow of myocardial blood flow. CT myocardial blood flows were calculated as: 0.94 ml/s, 2.09 ml/s, 2.74 ml/s, 4.18 ml/s, 4.86 ml/s. The correlation coefficient is 0.994 and r2 = 0.97. The method of measuring the myocardial blood flow using 320 row detector CT by 2 scans is feasible. It is possible to develop a new method for quantitatively and functional assessment of myocardial perfusion blood flow with less radiation does.

  9. Clinical significance of multidetector-row computed tomography in breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Doihara, Hiroyoshi; Fujita, Takeo; Takabatake, Daisuke; Takahashi, Hirotoshi; Ogasawara, Yutaka; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    Several reports support the association of higher ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence rates with positive or intermediate margins compared with negative pathologic margins. Precise evaluation of tumor extension and adequate surgical margin are important factors affecting tumor recurrence after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Many studies have reported the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosing the tumor extension of breast cancer, but few have evaluated the utility of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). The results of this study show the clinical significance of MDCT for detecting cancer extension and demonstrate the clinical role of MDCT in BCS. Subjects comprised 136 patients grouped into two categories based on whether or not tumor extension was evaluated with MDCT preoperatively. The positive surgical margin rate and breast conservation rate were analyzed in each group and the clinical role of MDCT in BCS was evaluated. Moreover, evaluation of intraductal extension was done both with MDCT and histologically, and computed tomography (CT)-pathologic correlations were examined retrospectively. Finally, the margin-positive cases were analyzed in relation to their clinical characteristics. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for detection of the intraductal component were 71.8%, 85.7%, 82.1%, and 76.9%, respectively. The positive surgical margin rate and conservation rate are 7.46% and 81.9%, respectively, for those who were diagnosed with MDCT preoperatively; their corresponding rates without MDCT were 16.67% and 67.9%. Most margin-positive patients have remarkable lymphatic space invasion. Positive surgical margins were often recognized toward the nipple. For diagnosing the intraductal extension, MDCT shows sufficient diagnosability. Moreover, MDCT can provide appropriate information for the determination of adequate surgical margins and contribute to increases in breast conservation

  10. STS-42 Commander Grabe uses DTO 653 MK1 Rowing Machine on OV-103's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-42 Commander Ronald J. Grabe exercises using MK1 Rowing Machine on the middeck of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. Grabe is using the exercise device as part of Development Test Objective (DTO) 653, Evaluation of MK1 Rowing Machine. The forward lockers appear at Grabe's right and the sleep station behind him.

  11. Plastic Mulches and Row Covers on the grow and production of Summer Squash.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Summer squash [Cucurbita pepo (L) ‘Prelude II’] was grown on an Orangeburg sandy loam soil in Shorter, AL. The summer squash was direct seeded in single rows. The experiment consisted of twelve experimental treatments as follows: (1) Black plastic mulch (BPM) + spunbonded row cover (RC), (2) BPM, (...

  12. Building Generalized Inverses of Matrices Using Only Row and Column Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Most students complete their first and only course in linear algebra with the understanding that a real, square matrix "A" has an inverse if and only if "rref"("A"), the reduced row echelon form of "A", is the identity matrix I[subscript n]. That is, if they apply elementary row operations via the Gauss-Jordan algorithm to the partitioned matrix…

  13. 30 CFR 285.305 - How do I request an ROW grant or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Rights-of-Way Grants and Rights-of-Use and Easement Grants for Renewable Energy Activities Obtaining Row Grants and Rue... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I request an ROW grant or RUE grant?...

  14. 33 CFR 100.724 - Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. 100.724 Section 100.724 Navigation and Navigable Waters... WATERS § 100.724 Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. (a) Definitions. (1) Regulated area. The regulated area is formed by a line drawn directly across the Savannah...

  15. 33 CFR 100.724 - Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. 100.724 Section 100.724 Navigation and Navigable Waters... WATERS § 100.724 Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. (a) Definitions. (1) Regulated area. The regulated area is formed by a line drawn directly across the Savannah...

  16. 33 CFR 100.724 - Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. 100.724 Section 100.724 Navigation and Navigable Waters... WATERS § 100.724 Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. (a) Definitions. (1) Regulated area. The regulated area is formed by a line drawn directly across the Savannah...

  17. 33 CFR 100.724 - Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. 100.724 Section 100.724 Navigation and Navigable Waters... WATERS § 100.724 Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. (a) Definitions. (1) Regulated area. The regulated area is formed by a line drawn directly across the Savannah...

  18. 33 CFR 100.724 - Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. 100.724 Section 100.724 Navigation and Navigable Waters... WATERS § 100.724 Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. (a) Definitions. (1) Regulated area. The regulated area is formed by a line drawn directly across the Savannah...

  19. The effects of color plastic mulches and row covers on the growth and yield of okra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Okra [Abelmoschus esculentus (l.) Moench'Clemson Spineless'] was grown on an Orangeburg sandy loam soil in shorter, AL. Okra was direct seeded in single rows. The experiment consisted of twelve experimental treatments as follows: (1) Black plastic mulch (BPM) + spunbonded row cover (RC), (2) BPM, (3...

  20. Implements and cultivation frequency to improve in-row weed control in organic peanut production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control in organic peanut production is difficult and costly, which limits expansion of the production system. Sweep cultivation in the row middles is effective, but weeds remain in the crop row causing yield loss. Research trials were conducted in Tifton, GA to evaluate implements and freque...

  1. 77 FR 15597 - Special Local Regulation; USAT Triathlon/Race Rowing Competition; Black Warrior River; Tuscaloosa...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... The University of Alabama Women's rowing team is sponsoring a Race Rowing Competition between the... or copying at the Docket Management Facility (M-30), U.S. Department of Transportation, West Building...., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays; and U.S. Coast Guard Sector Mobile (spw), Building...

  2. Rowing increases stroke volume and cardiac output to a greater extent than cycling.

    PubMed

    Horn, P; Ostadal, P; Ostadal, B

    2015-01-01

    Exercise stimulates increases in heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). These adaptive mechanisms are strongly dependent on the type of exercise. Both rowing and cycling are widely used for physical training worldwide; however, evidence regarding the differences in major hemodynamic parameters during rowing and cycling remains insufficient. Ten healthy male volunteers were randomly assigned to perform either a rowing or cycling exercise. After 20 min rest, the group who had rowed first performed the cycling exercise and vice versa. Exercise was performed at a power-to-weight ratio of 2 W/kg for 2 min. HR, SV, CO and blood pressure (BP) were measured noninvasively using pulse-wave analysis at baseline and immediately after each exercise. HR, SV and CO were significantly higher after exercise than at rest. Whereas HR was comparable between rowing and cycling, SV and CO were significantly higher after rowing than after cycling. BP was comparable among all three measurements. Rowing increased SV and CO to a greater extent than cycling, whereas HR and BP were not influenced by the type of exercise. Our data suggest that rowing leads to more extensive stimulation of cardiac contractility and/or decreases in peripheral vascular resistance compared with cycling.

  3. Inter-row evapotranspiration in arid and humid wine-grape vineyards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The architecture of wine-grape vineyards is characterized by tall plants (approx. 1.5 m) and widely spaced rows (approx. 3 m). This wide row spacing, developed to allow sunlight interception, air flow, and field operations, creates a complex system for water and energy budgets. Because of the wide r...

  4. Radiometer footprint model to estimate sunlit and shaded components for row crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes a geometric model for computing the relative proportion of sunlit vegetation, shaded vegetation, sunlit soil, and shaded soil appearing in a circular or elliptical radiometer footprint for row crops, where the crop rows were modeled as continuous ellipses. The model was validate...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

  6. Significance of agricultural row structure on the microwave emissivity of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Promes, P. M.; Jackson, T. J.; O'Neill, P. E.

    1987-01-01

    A series of field experiments was carried out to extend the data base available for verifying agricultural row effect models of emissivity. The row effects model was used to simulate a data base from which an algorithm could be developed to account for row effects when the scene dielectric constant and small-scale roughness are unknown. One objective of the study was to quantify the significance of row structure and to develop a practical procedure for removing the effects of periodic row structure on the microwave emissivity of a soil in order to use the emissivity values to estimate the soil moisture. A second objective was to expand the data set available for model verification through field observations using a truck-mounted 1.4-GHz microwave radiometer.

  7. Positive ions of the first- and second-row transition metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical dissociation energies for the first- and second-row transition metal hydride positive ions are critically compared against recent experimental values obtained from ion beam reactive scattering methods. Theoretical spectroscopic parameters and dipole moments are presented for the ground and several low-lying excited states. The calculations employ large Gaussian basis sets and account for electron correlation using the single-reference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction and coupled-pair-functional methods. The Darwin and mass-velocity contributions to the relativistic energy are included in the all-electron calculations on the first-row systems using first-order perturbation theory, and in the second-row systems using the Hay and Wadt relativistic effective core potentials. The theoretical D(0) values for the second-row transition metal hydride positive ions should provide a critical measure of the experimental values, which are not as refined as many of those in the first transition row.

  8. Coordinated movement of the three rows of outer hair cells is essential for cochlear amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakoshi, Michio; Suzuki, Sho; Wada, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The process known as cochlear amplification is realized by coordinated movement of the outer hair cells (OHCs) in response to changes in their membrane potential. In this process, the displacement amplitude of the basilar membrane (BM) is thought to be increased, thereby leading to the high sensitivity, wide dynamic range and sharp frequency selectivity of our hearing. Unfortunately, however, OHCs are vulnerable to noise exposure, ototoxic acid, aging and so on. Previous studies have shown that exposure to intense noise causes functional loss of OHCs from the innermost row (i.e., close to the modiolus) to the outermost row (i.e., close to the cochlear wall). On the contrary, by other traumatic stimuli such as ototoxic acid, aging and ischemia, such loss of OHCs has been reported to occur from the outermost row toward the innermost row. However, how the cochlear amplification changes when coordinated movement of OHCs is impaired, that is when the OHCs in one, two or all three rows have become dysfunctional, remains unclear. In the present study, therefore, a finite element (FE) model of the gerbil cochlea, which takes the motility of OHCs into account, was developed based on our previous FE model. Using this model, changes in the displacement amplitude of the BM due to the functional loss of OHCs in one, two or all three rows were investigated and the effects of incoordination of the three rows of OHCs on cochlear amplification were estimated. Results showed that the displacement amplitude of the BM significantly decreased when either the innermost row or the outermost row of OHCs lost its function, suggesting that all three rows of OHCs are required for cochlear amplification.

  9. Don't rock the boat: how antiphase crew coordination affects rowing.

    PubMed

    de Brouwer, Anouk J; de Poel, Harjo J; Hofmijster, Mathijs J

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that crew rowing requires perfect synchronization between the movements of the rowers. However, a long-standing and somewhat counterintuitive idea is that out-of-phase crew rowing might have benefits over in-phase (i.e., synchronous) rowing. In synchronous rowing, 5 to 6% of the power produced by the rower(s) is lost to velocity fluctuations of the shell within each rowing cycle. Theoretically, a possible way for crews to increase average boat velocity is to reduce these fluctuations by rowing in antiphase coordination, a strategy in which rowers perfectly alternate their movements. On the other hand, the framework of coordination dynamics explicates that antiphase coordination is less stable than in-phase coordination, which may impede performance gains. Therefore, we compared antiphase to in-phase crew rowing performance in an ergometer experiment. Nine pairs of rowers performed a two-minute maximum effort in-phase and antiphase trial at 36 strokes min(-1) on two coupled free-floating ergometers that allowed for power losses to velocity fluctuations. Rower and ergometer kinetics and kinematics were measured during the trials. All nine pairs easily acquired antiphase rowing during the warm-up, while one pair's coordination briefly switched to in-phase during the maximum effort trial. Although antiphase interpersonal coordination was indeed less accurate and more variable, power production was not negatively affected. Importantly, in antiphase rowing the decreased power loss to velocity fluctuations resulted in more useful power being transferred to the ergometer flywheels. These results imply that antiphase rowing may indeed improve performance, even without any experience with antiphase technique. Furthermore, it demonstrates that although perfectly synchronous coordination may be the most stable, it is not necessarily equated with the most efficient or optimal performance.

  10. Don’t Rock the Boat: How Antiphase Crew Coordination Affects Rowing

    PubMed Central

    de Brouwer, Anouk J.; de Poel, Harjo J.; Hofmijster, Mathijs J.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that crew rowing requires perfect synchronization between the movements of the rowers. However, a long-standing and somewhat counterintuitive idea is that out-of-phase crew rowing might have benefits over in-phase (i.e., synchronous) rowing. In synchronous rowing, 5 to 6% of the power produced by the rower(s) is lost to velocity fluctuations of the shell within each rowing cycle. Theoretically, a possible way for crews to increase average boat velocity is to reduce these fluctuations by rowing in antiphase coordination, a strategy in which rowers perfectly alternate their movements. On the other hand, the framework of coordination dynamics explicates that antiphase coordination is less stable than in-phase coordination, which may impede performance gains. Therefore, we compared antiphase to in-phase crew rowing performance in an ergometer experiment. Nine pairs of rowers performed a two-minute maximum effort in-phase and antiphase trial at 36 strokes min−1 on two coupled free-floating ergometers that allowed for power losses to velocity fluctuations. Rower and ergometer kinetics and kinematics were measured during the trials. All nine pairs easily acquired antiphase rowing during the warm-up, while one pair’s coordination briefly switched to in-phase during the maximum effort trial. Although antiphase interpersonal coordination was indeed less accurate and more variable, power production was not negatively affected. Importantly, in antiphase rowing the decreased power loss to velocity fluctuations resulted in more useful power being transferred to the ergometer flywheels. These results imply that antiphase rowing may indeed improve performance, even without any experience with antiphase technique. Furthermore, it demonstrates that although perfectly synchronous coordination may be the most stable, it is not necessarily equated with the most efficient or optimal performance. PMID:23383024

  11. Comparison of {sup 18}F-Fluorothymidine and {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in Delineating Gross Tumor Volume by Optimal Threshold in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Thoracic Esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Han Dali; Yu Jinming; Yu Yonghua; Zhang Guifang; Zhong Xiaojun; Lu Jie; Yin Yong; Fu Zheng; Mu Dianbin; Zhang Baijiang; He Wei; Huo Zhijun; Liu Xijun; Kong Lei; Zhao Shuqiang; Sun Xiangyu

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the optimal method of using {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) simulation to delineate the gross tumor volume (GTV) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma verified by pathologic examination and compare the results with those using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT. Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients were enrolled and underwent both FLT and FDG PET/CT. The GTVs with biologic information were delineated using seven different methods in FLT PET/CT and three different methods in FDG PET/CT. The results were compared with the pathologic gross tumor length, and the optimal threshold was obtained. Next, we compared the simulation plans using the optimal threshold of FLT and FDG PET/CT. The radiation dose was prescribed as 60 Gy in 30 fractions with a precise radiotherapy technique. Results: The mean +- standard deviation pathologic gross tumor length was 4.94 +- 2.21 cm. On FLT PET/CT, the length of the standardized uptake value 1.4 was 4.91 +- 2.43 cm. On FDG PET/CT, the length of the standardized uptake value 2.5 was 5.10 +- 2.18 cm, both of which seemed more approximate to the pathologic gross tumor length. The differences in the bilateral lung volume receiving >=20 Gy, heart volume receiving >=40 Gy, and the maximal dose received by spinal cord between FLT and FDG were not significant. However, the values for mean lung dose, bilateral lung volume receiving >=5, >=10, >=30, >=40, and >=50 Gy, mean heart dose, and heart volume receiving >=30 Gy using FLT PET/CT-based planning were significant lower than those using FDG PET/CT. Conclusion: A standardized uptake value cutoff of 1.4 on FLT PET/CT and one of 2.5 on FDG PET/CT provided the closest estimation of GTV length. Finally, FLT PET/CT-based treatment planning provided potential benefits to the lungs and heart.

  12. 30 CFR 285.303 - How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING... Renewable Energy Activities Row Grants and Rue Grants § 285.303 How long will my ROW grant or RUE...

  13. Effect of inter-row cultivation on soil CO2 emission in a peach plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, E.; Farkas, Cs.; Gelybó, Gy.; Lagzi, I.

    2012-04-01

    We examined the effect of inter-row cultivation on soil CO2 emission in a peach plantation planted in 1991. The soil is Ramann type brown forest soil /Mollic Cambisol/ developed on sandy loam. Every second row in the orchard is covered with undisturbed grass, and every other row is disked (depth: 12-15cm) with a two-three-week frequency. The humus content varies from 1,69% to 2,28% in the upper 20 cm layer, where the sand, loam and clay contents are 58%, 21% and 19 %, respectively. The average annual precipitation total is 570 mm (330 mm for the growing season) at the site. During the vegetation period of 2009 soil CO2 emission measurements were carried out with static chamber method in the differently managed rows. Parallel with CO2 measurements soil volumetric water content and soil temperature were also determined. Soil microbiological properties water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC) and water-extractable nitrogen (WEN) as well as substrate-induced respiration (SIR) were determined from disturbed soil samples collected on the first measurement day. The measured soil physical properties showed that different soil management practices influence soil water content, bulk density and soil temperature as well. Soil water content was higher in the grass covered row on 10 of the 13 measurement days, the difference - which reached 10 v% - was the highest on the warmest days. Soil temperature is also different in case of disked and grass covered rows, found to be lower in the grass covered rows on every measurement days. SIR, WEOC and WEN were all higher in the grass covered row (19.45 μg CO2-C g-1 soil 36.91 μg g-1 soil, 139.36 μg g-1 soil, respectively) than in the disked row (4.88 μg CO2-C g-1 soil 25.43 μg C g-1 soil, 61.25 μg N g-1 soil, respectively) in 2009. Soil CO2 emission also differed between the two rows, grass covered rows produced higher emission in all measurements days without exemption. The difference between CO2 fluxes from the two cultivation

  14. Pseudopotential-Based Correlation Consistent Composite Approach (rp-ccCA) for First- and Second-Row Transition Metal Thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Manivasagam, Sivabalan; Laury, Marie L; Wilson, Angela K

    2015-07-02

    The relativistic-pseudopotential correlation consistent composite approach (rp-ccCA) was used to determine the enthalpy of formation (ΔHf) of 24 first row (3d) transition metal compounds. The rp-ccCA-derived ΔHf's were compared to ΔHf's previously obtained with an all-electron composite method for transition metals (ccCA-TM). For the 3d metal systems, rp-ccCA achieves transition metal accuracy, within 3 kcal/mol of reliable experimental data, overall. By utilizing pseudopotentials within the rp-ccCA methodology, we observed a significant computational time savings (53%) in comparison to the all-electron basis sets employed within ccCA-TM. With the proven reliability and accuracy of rp-ccCA, the methodology was employed to construct a calibration set of 210 second-row (4d) transition metal compounds and their ΔHf's. The 4d calibration set is referred to as 4dHf-210. Within the 4dHf-210 set, there were 61 molecules with available experimental data. The average experimental uncertainty was 4.05 kcal/mol and the mean absolute deviation of rp-ccCA was 3.64 kcal/mol, excluding outliers (10 total). This study provides a large set of energetics that can be used to gauge existing and future computational methodologies and to aid experimentalists in reaction design.

  15. Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1992-03-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the ``primary acceptance criterion`` in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.

  16. Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K. )

    1992-03-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the primary acceptance criterion'' in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.

  17. Is death row obsolete? A decade of mainstreaming death-sentenced inmates in Missouri.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Mark D; Reidy, Thomas J; Sorensen, Jon R

    2005-01-01

    Death-sentenced inmates in Missouri have been integrated or "mainstreamed" into the general population of the Potosi Correctional Center since 1991. By comparing the rate of violent misconduct among these mainstreamed death-sentenced inmates with that of the life-without-parole and parole eligible inmates under fully integrated conditions of confinement, this study provides the first empirical (statistical) evaluation of this innovative alternative to segregated death row confinement. The mainstreamed death-sentenced inmates committed no inmate or staff homicides, or attempted homicides. Comparison of their rates of institutional violence revealed frequencies that were similar to those of life-without-parole inmates, and well below those of fellow inmates who were sentenced to parole eligible terms. These findings cast serious doubt on the security-driven assumptions that have typified the segregation of death-sentenced inmates and have dictated highly restrictive confinement policies for this group. A conclusion that death-sentenced inmates can be safely integrated into a general prison population has significant implications for allocation of scarce fiscal resources and correctional staff, as well as for inmate mental health, particularly given the extended tenure that death-sentenced inmates typically serve between sentencing and relief/execution.

  18. Theoretical dipole moments for the first-row transition metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, D. P.; Langhoff, S. R.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Partridge, H.; Walch, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (D sub e, r sub e, mu) are determined for the first-row transition metal hydrides using better than DZP basis sets at the modified coupled pair functional (MCPF) level. Extensive comparisons between MCPF and complete-active space self-consistent field (CASSCF)/MRCI calculations with natural orbital iterations, and studies with more extensive basis sets, show this level of treatment to supply an accurate and cost-effective treatment of these systems. For the transition metal hydrides, the bonding can arise from either the 3d(n)4s(2) or 3d(n + 1)4s(1) atomic asymptotes, or a mixture of both. Since the dipole moment arising from these two bonding mechanisms is very different, the dipole moment is found to be directly related to the 3d population. Thus, the magnitude of the dipole moments provides a sensitive test of the wave function, and gives insight into the nature of the bonding.

  19. A Three-Dimensional Linearized Unsteady Euler Analysis for Turbomachinery Blade Rows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Matthew D.; Verdon, Joseph M.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional, linearized, Euler analysis is being developed to provide an efficient unsteady aerodynamic analysis that can be used to predict the aeroelastic and aeroacoustic responses of axial-flow turbo-machinery blading.The field equations and boundary conditions needed to describe nonlinear and linearized inviscid unsteady flows through a blade row operating within a cylindrical annular duct are presented. A numerical model for linearized inviscid unsteady flows, which couples a near-field, implicit, wave-split, finite volume analysis to a far-field eigenanalysis, is also described. The linearized aerodynamic and numerical models have been implemented into a three-dimensional linearized unsteady flow code, called LINFLUX. This code has been applied to selected, benchmark, unsteady, subsonic flows to establish its accuracy and to demonstrate its current capabilities. The unsteady flows considered, have been chosen to allow convenient comparisons between the LINFLUX results and those of well-known, two-dimensional, unsteady flow codes. Detailed numerical results for a helical fan and a three-dimensional version of the 10th Standard Cascade indicate that important progress has been made towards the development of a reliable and useful, three-dimensional, prediction capability that can be used in aeroelastic and aeroacoustic design studies.

  20. The Effect of Row Structure on Soil Moisture Retrieval Accuracy from Passive Microwave Data

    PubMed Central

    Xingming, Zheng; Kai, Zhao; Yangyang, Li; Jianhua, Ren; Yanling, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Row structure causes the anisotropy of microwave brightness temperature (TB) of soil surface, and it also can affect soil moisture retrieval accuracy when its influence is ignored in the inversion model. To study the effect of typical row structure on the retrieved soil moisture and evaluate if there is a need to introduce this effect into the inversion model, two ground-based experiments were carried out in 2011. Based on the observed C-band TB, field soil and vegetation parameters, row structure rough surface assumption (Qp model and discrete model), including the effect of row structure, and flat rough surface assumption (Qp model), ignoring the effect of row structure, are used to model microwave TB of soil surface. Then, soil moisture can be retrieved, respectively, by minimizing the difference of the measured and modeled TB. The results show that soil moisture retrieval accuracy based on the row structure rough surface assumption is approximately 0.02 cm3/cm3 better than the flat rough surface assumption for vegetated soil, as well as 0.015 cm3/cm3 better for bare and wet soil. This result indicates that the effect of row structure cannot be ignored for accurately retrieving soil moisture of farmland surface when C-band is used. PMID:25386626

  1. Single-Versus Double-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Massive Tears

    PubMed Central

    Wang, EnZhi; Wang, Liang; Gao, Peng; Li, ZhongJi; Zhou, Xiao; Wang, SongGang

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons to treat massive rotator cuff tears. The optimal management of massive rotator cuff tears remains controversial. Therefore, the goal of this study was to compare arthroscopic single- versus double-row rotator cuff repair with a larger sample size. Material/Methods Of the subjects with massive rotator cuff tears, 146 were treated using single-row repair, and 102 were treated using double-row repair. Pre- and postoperative functional outcomes and radiographic images were collected. The clinical outcomes were evaluated for a minimum of 2 years. Results No significant differences were shown between the groups in terms of functional outcomes. Regarding the integrity of the tendon, a lower rate of post-treatment retear was observed in patients who underwent double-row repair compared with single-row repair. Conclusions The results suggest that double-row repair is relatively superior in shoulder ROM and the strength of tendon compared with single-row repair. Future studies involving more patients in better-designed randomized controlled trials will be required. PMID:26017641

  2. Closely-spaced double-row microstrip RF arrays for parallel MR imaging at ultrahigh fields

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinqiang; Xue, Rong; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) coil arrays with high count of elements, e.g., closely-spaced multi-row arrays, exhibit superior parallel imaging performance in MRI. However, it is technically challenging and time-consuming to build multi-row arrays due to complex coupling issues. This paper presents a novel and simple method for closely-spaced multi-row RF array designs. Induced current elimination (ICE) decoupling method has shown the capability of reducing coupling between microstrip elements from different rows. In this study, its capability for decoupling array elements from the same row was investigated and validated by bench tests, with an isolation improvement from −8.9 dB to −20.7 dB. Based on this feature, a closely-spaced double-row microstrip array with 16 elements was built at 7T. S21 between any two elements of the 16-channel closely-spaced was better than −14 dB. In addition, its feasibility and performance was validated by MRI experiments. No significant image reconstruction- related noise amplifications were observed for parallel imaging even when reduced factor (R) achieves 4. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed design might be a simple and efficient approach in fabricating closely-spaced multi-row RF arrays. PMID:26508810

  3. Arthroscopic double-row suture anchor fixation of minimally displaced greater tuberosity fractures.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Kim, Weon-Yoo; Ra, Ki-Hang

    2007-10-01

    In cases of displaced greater tuberosity fractures, treatments by arthroscopic-assisted reduction and percutaneous screw fixation have been reported. However, in cases in which there is a comminuted fracture or a minimally displaced fracture combined with concomitant lesions such as rotator cuff tear or labral pathology, it is difficult to reduce the fracture and to treat other pathologies by use of a percutaneous screw. Recently, many surgeons have used the double-row repair method in rotator cuff repair, which provides a tendon-bone interface better suited for biologic healing and restoring normal anatomy. In accordance with this method, we used the arthroscopic technique of double-row suture anchor fixation for a minimally displaced greater tuberosity fracture without additional incision. Initially, debridement was performed on the fracture surface by use of a shaver, and the medial-row anchor was inserted through the anterior portal or the intact cuff. Two lateral-row anchors were inserted just anterior and posterior to the lower margin of the fractured fragment under C-arm guidance. The medial-row sutures and lateral-row sutures were then placed. Arthroscopic double-row suture anchor fixation of a displaced greater tuberosity fracture restores the original footprint of the rotator cuff and normal tendon-bone interface of the displaced greater tuberosity fracture.

  4. The effect of row structure on soil moisture retrieval accuracy from passive microwave data.

    PubMed

    Xingming, Zheng; Kai, Zhao; Yangyang, Li; Jianhua, Ren; Yanling, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Row structure causes the anisotropy of microwave brightness temperature (TB) of soil surface, and it also can affect soil moisture retrieval accuracy when its influence is ignored in the inversion model. To study the effect of typical row structure on the retrieved soil moisture