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Sample records for rpe cell migration

  1. Lutein Inhibits the Migration of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells via Cytosolic and Mitochondrial Akt Pathways (Lutein Inhibits RPE Cells Migration)

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ching-Chieh; Chan, Chi-Ming; Chen, Han-Min; Wu, Chia-Chun; Hsiao, Chien-Yu; Lee, Pei-Lan; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2014-01-01

    During the course of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells will de-differentiate, proliferate, and migrate onto the surfaces of the sensory retina. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) can induce migration of RPE cells via an Akt-related pathway. In this study, the effect of lutein on PDGF-BB-induced RPE cells migration was examined using transwell migration assays and Western blot analyses. We found that both phosphorylation of Akt and mitochondrial translocation of Akt in RPE cells induced by PDGF-BB stimulation were suppressed by lutein. Furthermore, the increased migration observed in RPE cells with overexpressed mitochondrial Akt could also be suppressed by lutein. Our results demonstrate that lutein can inhibit PDGF-BB induced RPE cells migration through the inhibition of both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Akt activation. PMID:25110866

  2. TNF-{alpha} promotes human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression through activation of Akt/mTORC1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cheng-hu; Cao, Guo-Fan; Jiang, Qin; Yao, Jin

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} induces MMP-9 expression and secretion to promote RPE cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK activation is not critical for TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt and mTORC1 signaling mediate TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIN1 knockdown showed no significant effect on MMP-9 expression by TNF-{alpha}. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) promotes in vitro retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration to initiate proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Here we report that TNF-{alpha} promotes human RPE cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression. Inhibition of MMP-9 by its inhibitor or its neutralizing antibody inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced in vitro RPE cell migration. Reversely, exogenously-added active MMP-9 promoted RPE cell migration. Suppression Akt/mTOR complex 1(mTORC1) activation by LY 294002 and rapamycin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-mediated MMP-9 expression. To introduce a constitutively active Akt (CA-Akt) in cultured RPE cells increased MMP-9 expression, and to block mTORC1 activation by rapamycin inhibited its effect. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), had no effect on MMP-9 expression or secretion. In conclusion, this study suggest that TNF-{alpha} promotes RPE cell migration by inducing MMP-9 expression through activation of Akt/ mTORC1, but not mTORC2 signaling.

  3. Gremlin promotes retinal pigmentation epithelial (RPE) cell proliferation, migration and VEGF production via activating VEGFR2-Akt-mTORC2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Zhijun; Cheng, Haixia; Chen, Juan; Qian, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is characterized by late-phase pathologic retinal vasoproliferation. Gremlin is a novel vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) agonist and promotes angiogenic response. We demonstrated that gremlin expression was significantly increased in retinas of ROP model mice, which was correlated with VEGF upregulation. In retinal pigmentation epithelial (RPE) cells, gremlin activated VEGFR2-Akt-mTORC2 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2) signaling, and promoted cell proliferation, migration and VEGF production. VEGFR inhibition (by SU5416) or shRNA knockdown almost abolished gremlin-mediated pleiotropic functions in RPE cells. Further, pharmacological inhibition of Akt-mTOR, or shRNA knockdown of key mTORC2 component (Rictor or Sin1) also attenuated gremlin-exerted activities in RPE cells. We conclude that gremlin promotes RPE cell proliferation, migration and VEGF production possibly via activating VEGFR2-Akt-mTORC2 signaling. Gremlin could be a novel therapeutic target of ROP or other retinal vasoproliferation diseases. PMID:27894090

  4. A basis for comparison: sensitive authentication of stem cell derived RPE using physiological responses of intact RPE monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Miyagishima, Kiyoharu J.; Wan, Qin; Miller, Sheldon S.; Bharti, Kapil

    2017-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a monolayer of highly specialized cells that help maintain the chemical composition of its surrounding subretinal and choroidal extracellular spaces. Retinal cells (photoreceptors in particular), RPE, and choroidal endothelial cells together help ensure a homeostatically stable metabolic environment with exquisitely sensitive functional responses to light. Aging and disease of the RPE impairs its supportive functions contributing to the progressive loss of photoreceptors and vision. The prevalence of RPE associated retinal degenerations has prompted researchers to develop new therapies aimed at replacing the affected RPE with induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) or embryonic stem cell (ESC) derived RPE. Despite recent attempts to characterize stem cell derived RPE and to truly authenticate RPE for clinical applications, there remains a significant unmet need to explore the heterogeneity resulting from donor to donor variation as well as the variations inherent in the current processes of cell manufacture. Additionally, it remains unknown whether the starting cell type influences the resulting RPE phenotype following reprogramming and differentiation. To address these questions, we performed a comprehensive evaluation (genomic, structural, and functional) of 15 iPSC derived RPE originating from different donors and tissues and compiled a reference data set for the authentication of iPSC-derived RPE and RPE derived from other stem cell sources. PMID:28286868

  5. Human Ribosomal Proteins RPeL27, RPeL43, and RPeL41 Are Upregulated in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kher-Lee

    2016-01-01

    Apart from their canonical role in ribosome biogenesis, there is increasing evidence of ribosomal protein genes' involvement in various cancers. A previous study by us revealed significant differential expression of three ribosomal protein genes (RPeL27, RPeL41, and RPeL43) between cell lines derived from tumor and normal nasopharyngeal epithelium. However, the results therein were based on a semiquantitative assay, thus preliminary in nature. Herein, we provide findings of a deeper analysis of these three genes in the context to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) tumorigenesis. Their expression patterns were analyzed in a more quantitative manner at transcript level. Their protein expression levels were also investigated. We showed results that are contrary to previous report. Rather than downregulation, these genes were significantly overexpressed in NPC cell lines compared to normal control at both transcript and protein levels. Nevertheless, their association with NPC has been established. Immunoprecipitation pulldown assays indicate the plausible interaction of either RPeL27 or RPeL43 with POTEE/TUBA1A and ACTB/ACTBL2 complexes. In addition, RPeL43 is shown to bind with MRAS and EIF2S1 proteins in a NPC cell line (HK1). Our findings support RPeL27, RPeL41, and RPeL43 as potential markers of NPC and provide insights into the interaction targets of RPeL27 and RPeL43 proteins. PMID:28018022

  6. Inhibitory effect of miR-145 on RPE cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ken; Chen, Zhen; Lv, Xu-Dong; Dong, Gang; Xia, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the impact of micro RNA miR-145 on retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis. Methods: A stable culture and passage system of hPNE cells was first established, and its migration ability was determined. Then, miR-145 lentiviral vectors were constructed to transfect hPRE cells. Thereafter, hRPE cell proliferation was detected by MTT assay after they were transfected by lentivirus, cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry, and apoptosis was detected by Annexin V/PI double staining immunofluorescence. Results: Cultured hPRE cells had good migrating and metastatic ability, in which subsequent lentivirus infection experiments can be carried out. After transfection by miR-145 lentiviral vectors, hPRE cell proliferation slowed down and RPE cells in the G1 phase was inhibited; thus, apoptosis rate increased. Conclusion: MiR-145 can slow down retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation and increase their apoptosis rate. This has a certain therapeutic potential for diseases caused by RPE cell proliferation such as PVR. PMID:28078043

  7. Understanding photoreceptor outer segment phagocytosis: use and utility of RPE cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Francesca; Safa, Hussein; Finnemann, Silvia C

    2014-09-01

    RPE cells are the most actively phagocytic cells in the human body. In the eye, RPE cells face rod and cone photoreceptor outer segments at all times but contribute to shedding and clearance phagocytosis of distal outer segment tips only once a day. Analysis of RPE phagocytosis in situ has succeeded in identifying key players of the RPE phagocytic mechanism. Phagocytic processes comprise three distinct phases, recognition/binding, internalization, and digestion, each of which is regulated separately by phagocytes. Studies of phagocytosis by RPE cells in culture allow specifically analyzing and manipulating these distinct phases to identify their molecular mechanisms. Here, we compare similarities and differences of primary, immortalized, and stem cell-derived RPE cells in culture to RPE cells in situ with respect to phagocytic function. We discuss in particular potential pitfalls of RPE cell culture phagocytosis assays. Finally, we point out considerations for phagocytosis assay development for future studies.

  8. Signaling pathways involved in PDGF-evoked cellular responses in human RPE cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hollborn, Margrit . E-mail: hollbm@medizin.uni-leipzig.de; Bringmann, Andreas; Faude, Frank; Wiedemann, Peter; Kohen, Leon

    2006-06-09

    We examined whether PDGF may directly stimulate the expression of VEGF by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro, and the involvement of three signal transduction pathways in the regulation of PDGF-evoked cell proliferation, migration, and production of VEGF-A was investigated. PDGF stimulated the gene and protein expression of VEGF-A by RPE cells, and increased cell proliferation and chemotaxis. PDGF activated all signaling pathways investigated, as determined by increased phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2, p38, and Akt proteins. The three signaling pathways were involved in the mediation of PDGF-evoked cell proliferation, while p38 and PI3K mediated cell migration, and PI3K mediated secretion of VEGF-A. In addition to VEGF-A, the cells expressed mRNAs for various members of the VEGF family and for their receptors, including VEGF-B, -C, -D, flt-1, and KDR. The data indicate that PDGF selectively stimulates the expression of VEGF-A in RPE cells. PDGF evokes at least three signal transduction pathways which are differentially involved in various cellular responses.

  9. RPE cell surface proteins in normal and dystrophic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, V.M.; Hall, M.O.

    1986-02-01

    Membrane-bound proteins in plasma membrane enriched fractions from cultured rat RPE were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Membrane proteins were characterized on three increasingly specific levels. Total protein was visualized by silver staining. A maximum of 102 separate proteins were counted in silver-stained gels. Glycoproteins were labeled with 3H-glucosamine or 3H-fucose and detected by autoradiography. Thirty-eight fucose-labeled and 61-71 glucosamine-labeled proteins were identified. All of the fucose-labeled proteins were labeled with glucosamine-derived radioactivity. Proteins exposed at the cell surface were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination prior to preparation of membranes for two-dimensional analysis. Forty separate 125I-labeled surface proteins were resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis/autoradiography. Comparison with the glycoprotein map showed that a number of these surface labeled proteins were glycoproteins. Two-dimensional maps of total protein, fucose-labeled, and glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins, and 125I-labeled surface proteins of membranes from dystrophic (RCS rdy-p+) and normal (Long Evans or RCS rdy+p+) RPE were compared. No differences in the total protein or surface-labeled proteins were observed. However, the results suggest that a 183K glycoprotein is more heavily glycosylated with glucosamine and fucose in normal RPE membranes as compared to membranes from dystrophic RPE.

  10. Human RPE Stem Cells Grown into Polarized RPE Monolayers on a Polyester Matrix Are Maintained after Grafting into Rabbit Subretinal Space

    PubMed Central

    Stanzel, Boris V.; Liu, Zengping; Somboonthanakij, Sudawadee; Wongsawad, Warapat; Brinken, Ralf; Eter, Nicole; Corneo, Barbara; Holz, Frank G.; Temple, Sally; Stern, Jeffrey H.; Blenkinsop, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Transplantation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is being developed as a cell-replacement therapy for age-related macular degeneration. Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived RPE are currently translating toward clinic. We introduce the adult human RPE stem cell (hRPESC) as an alternative RPE source. Polarized monolayers of adult hRPESC-derived RPE grown on polyester (PET) membranes had near-native characteristics. Trephined pieces of RPE monolayers on PET were transplanted subretinally in the rabbit, a large-eyed animal model. After 4 days, retinal edema was observed above the implant, detected by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and fundoscopy. At 1 week, retinal atrophy overlying the fetal or adult transplant was observed, remaining stable thereafter. Histology obtained 4 weeks after implantation confirmed a continuous polarized human RPE monolayer on PET. Taken together, the xeno-RPE survived with retained characteristics in the subretinal space. These experiments support that adult hRPESC-derived RPE are a potential source for transplantation therapies. PMID:24511471

  11. Allogenic iPSC-derived RPE cell transplants induce immune response in pigs: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Elliott H; Jiao, Chunhua; Kaalberg, Emily; Cranston, Cathryn; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2015-07-03

    Stem cell strategies focused on replacement of RPE cells for the treatment of geographic atrophy are under intense investigation. Although the eye has long been considered immune privileged, there is limited information about the immune response to transplanted cells in the subretinal space of large animals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the survival of allogenic induced pluripotent stem cell-derived RPE cells (iPSC-RPE) delivered to the subretinal space of the pig as well as determine whether these cells induce an immune response in non-diseased eyes. GFP positive iPSC-RPE, generated from outbred domestic swine, were injected into the subretinal space of vitrectomized miniature swine. Control eyes received vehicle only. GFP positive iPSC-RPE cells were identified in the subretinal space 3 weeks after injection in 5 of 6 eyes. Accompanying GFP-negative cells positive for IgG, CD45 and macrophage markers were also identified in close proximity to the injected iPSC-RPE cells. All subretinal cells were negative for GFAP as well as cell cycle markers. We found that subretinal injection of allogenic iPSC-RPE cells into wild-type mini-pigs can induce the innate immune response. These findings suggest that immunologically matched or autologous donor cells should be considered for clinical RPE cell replacement.

  12. The Mitochondrial-Derived Peptide Humanin Protects RPE Cells From Oxidative Stress, Senescence, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sreekumar, Parameswaran G.; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Spee, Chris; Mehta, Hemal H.; Wan, Junxiang; Yen, Kelvin; Cohen, Pinchas; Kannan, Ram; Hinton, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the expression of humanin (HN) in human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells and its effect on oxidative stress–induced cell death, mitochondrial bioenergetics, and senescence. Methods Humanin localization in RPE cells and polarized RPE monolayers was assessed by confocal microscopy. Human RPE cells were treated with 150 μM tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (tBH) in the absence/presence of HN (0.5–10 μg/mL) for 24 hours. Mitochondrial respiration was measured by XF96 analyzer. Retinal pigment epithelial cell death and caspase-3 activation, mitochondrial biogenesis and senescence were analyzed by TUNEL, immunoblot analysis, mitochondrial DNA copy number, SA-β-Gal staining, and p16INK4a expression and HN levels by ELISA. Oxidative stress–induced changes in transepithelial resistance were studied in RPE monolayers with and without HN cotreatment. Results A prominent localization of HN was found in the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial compartments of hRPE. Humanin cotreatment inhibited tBH-induced reactive oxygen species formation and significantly restored mitochondrial bioenergetics in hRPE cells. Exogenous HN was taken up by RPE and colocalized with mitochondria. The oxidative stress–induced decrease in mitochondrial bioenergetics was prevented by HN cotreatment. Humanin treatment increased mitochondrial DNA copy number and upregulated mitochondrial transcription factor A, a key biogenesis regulator protein. Humanin protected RPE cells from oxidative stress–induced cell death by STAT3 phosphorylation and inhibiting caspase-3 activation. Humanin treatment inhibited oxidant-induced senescence. Polarized RPE demonstrated elevated cellular HN and increased resistance to cell death. Conclusions Humanin protected RPE cells against oxidative stress–induced cell death and restored mitochondrial function. Our data suggest a potential role for HN therapy in the prevention of retinal degeneration, including AMD. PMID:26990160

  13. Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in various pathologies. Indeed, as our knowledge of migration increases, we can look forward to, for example, abating the spread of highly malignant cancer cells, retarding the invasion of white cells in the inflammatory process, or enhancing the healing of wounds. This article is organized in two main sections. The first section is devoted to the single-cell migrating in isolation such as occurs when leukocytes migrate during the immune response or when fibroblasts squeeze through connective tissue. The second section is devoted to cells collectively migrating as part of multicellular clusters or sheets. This second type of migration is prevalent in development, wound healing, and in some forms of cancer metastasis. PMID:23720251

  14. Trypan Blue staining method for quenching the autofluorescence of RPE cells for improving protein expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Girish K; Reinoso, Roberto; Singh, Amar K; Fernandez-Bueno, Ivan; Hileeto, Denise; Martino, Mario; Garcia-Gutierrez, Maria T; Merino, Jose M Pigazo; Alonso, Nieves Fernández; Corell, Alfredo; Pastor, J Carlos

    2011-12-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are currently in the "spotlight" of cell therapy approaches to some retinal diseases. The analysis of the expressed proteins of RPE primary cells is an essential step for many of these approaches. But the emission of autofluorescence by RPE cells produces higher background noise interference thereby creating an impediment to this analysis. Trypan Blue (TB), a routinely used counterstain, has the capacity to quench this autofluorescence, if it is used in optimized concentration. The results from the method developed in our study indicate that incubation of the cultured RPE cells with 20 μg/ml of TB after immunolabelling (post-treatment) as well as incubation of the retinal tissue specimens with same concentration before paraffin embedding, sectioning and immunolabelling (pre-treatment) can be applied to effectively quench the autofluorescence of RPE cells. Thus it can facilitate the evaluation of expressed cellular proteins in experimental as well as in pathological conditions, fulfilling the current requirement for developing a method which can serve to eliminate the autofluorescence of the cells, not only in cell cultures but also in tissues samples. This method should significantly increase the quality and value of RPE cell protein analysis, as well as other cell protein analysis performed by Flow cytometry (FC) and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) techniques.

  15. The newt reprograms mature RPE cells into a unique multipotent state for retinal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Rafiqul; Nakamura, Kenta; Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Kunahong, Ailidana; Inami, Wataru; Toyama, Fubito; Maruo, Fumiaki; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2014-01-01

    The reprogramming of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in the adult newt immediately after retinal injury is an area of active research for the study of retinal disorders and regeneration. We demonstrate here that unlike embryonic/larval retinal regeneration, adult newt RPE cells are not directly reprogrammed into retinal stem/progenitor cells; instead, they are programmed into a unique state of multipotency that is similar to the early optic vesicle (embryo) but preserves certain adult characteristics. These cells then differentiate into two populations from which the prospective-neural retina and -RPE layers are formed with the correct polarity. Furthermore, our findings provide insight into the similarity between these unique multipotent cells in newts and those implicated in retinal disorders, such as proliferative vitreoretinopathy, in humans. These findings provide a foundation for biomedical approaches that aim to induce retinal self-regeneration for the treatment of RPE-mediated retinal disorders. PMID:25116407

  16. Antiangiogenic and Neurogenic Activities of Sleeping Beauty-Mediated PEDF-Transfected RPE Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Johnen, Sandra; Djalali-Talab, Yassin; Kazanskaya, Olga; Möller, Theresa; Harmening, Nina; Kropp, Martina; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Walter, Peter; Thumann, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a potent multifunctional protein that inhibits angiogenesis and has neurogenic and neuroprotective properties. Since the wet form of age-related macular degeneration is characterized by choroidal neovascularization (CNV), PEDF would be an ideal candidate to inhibit CNV and support retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. However, its short half-life has precluded its clinical use. To deliver PEDF to the subretinal space, we transfected RPE cells with the PEDF gene using the Sleeping Beauty transposon system. Transfected cells expressed and secreted biologically active recombinant PEDF (rPEDF). In cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, rPEDF reduced VEGF-induced cumulative sprouting by ≥47%, decreased migration by 77%, and increased rate of apoptosis at least 3.4 times. rPEDF induced neurite outgrowth in neuroblastoma cells and protected ganglion and photoreceptor cells in organotypic retinal cultures. In a rat model of CNV, subretinal transplantation of PEDF-transfected cells led to a reduction of the CNV area by 48% 14 days after transplantation and decreased clinical significant lesions by 55% and 40% after 7 and 14 days, respectively. We showed that transplantation of pigment epithelial cells overexpressing PEDF can restore a permissive subretinal environment for RPE and photoreceptor maintenance, while inhibiting choroidal blood vessel growth.

  17. Antiangiogenic and Neurogenic Activities of Sleeping Beauty-Mediated PEDF-Transfected RPE Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Johnen, Sandra; Djalali-Talab, Yassin; Kazanskaya, Olga; Möller, Theresa; Harmening, Nina; Kropp, Martina; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Walter, Peter; Thumann, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a potent multifunctional protein that inhibits angiogenesis and has neurogenic and neuroprotective properties. Since the wet form of age-related macular degeneration is characterized by choroidal neovascularization (CNV), PEDF would be an ideal candidate to inhibit CNV and support retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. However, its short half-life has precluded its clinical use. To deliver PEDF to the subretinal space, we transfected RPE cells with the PEDF gene using the Sleeping Beauty transposon system. Transfected cells expressed and secreted biologically active recombinant PEDF (rPEDF). In cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, rPEDF reduced VEGF-induced cumulative sprouting by ≥47%, decreased migration by 77%, and increased rate of apoptosis at least 3.4 times. rPEDF induced neurite outgrowth in neuroblastoma cells and protected ganglion and photoreceptor cells in organotypic retinal cultures. In a rat model of CNV, subretinal transplantation of PEDF-transfected cells led to a reduction of the CNV area by 48% 14 days after transplantation and decreased clinical significant lesions by 55% and 40% after 7 and 14 days, respectively. We showed that transplantation of pigment epithelial cells overexpressing PEDF can restore a permissive subretinal environment for RPE and photoreceptor maintenance, while inhibiting choroidal blood vessel growth. PMID:26697494

  18. Taurine suppresses the spread of cell death in electrically coupled RPE cells

    PubMed Central

    Udawatte, Chandani; Qian, Haohua; Mangini, Nancy J.; Kennedy, Brian G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether taurine exerts a protective effect on retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells exposed to a cytotoxic agent, cytochrome C (cyC), shown previously to induce apoptosis and produce cell death in electrically coupled neighboring cells. Methods Monolayer cultures of confluent human RPE (ARPE-19) cells, which express gap-junctional proteins, were incubated in culture medium with or without taurine. After scrape loading cyC into the cells, we assayed these cells for caspase 3 activity and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining to determine the spread of apoptosis. Results We found that cyC, too large a molecule to traverse gap junctional channels, produced apoptosis in cells injured by the scrape as well as those distant from the site of the scrape, presumably by the intercellular transmission of a toxic agent through the gap junctions that couple these cells. Incubation in taurine, or the gap-junction blocker, octanol, before application of cyC, reduced significantly the fraction of cells undergoing apoptosis. Voltage clamp recordings from electrically coupled Xenopus oocytes transfected with Cx43 showed that junctional communication was unaffected by taurine. Conclusions Our results indicate that taurine can serve to suppress cell death in RPE cells independent of any effect on gap junctions. We have considered various avenues by which taurine can exert its protective effect, but the precise mechanism involved under these experimental conditions has yet to be identified. PMID:18958305

  19. Accumulation of cholesterol and increased demand for zinc in serum-deprived RPE cells

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sanghamitra; Peterson, Katherine; Yin, Lili; Berger, Alan; Fan, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Having observed that confluent ARPE-19 cells (derived from human RPE) survive well in high-glucose serum-free medium (SFM) without further feeding for several days, we investigated the expression profile of RPE cells under the same conditions. Methods Expression profiles were examined with microarray and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses, followed by western blot analysis of key regulated proteins. The effects of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and zinc supplementation were examined with qPCR. Immunofluorescence was used to localize the LDL receptor and to examine LDL uptake. Cellular cholesterol levels were measured with filipin binding. Expression patterns in primary fetal RPE cells were compared using qPCR. Results Microarray analyses of gene expression in ARPE-19, confirmed with qPCR, showed upregulation of lipid and cholesterol biosynthesis pathways in SFM. At the protein level, the cholesterol synthesis control factor SRBEF2 was activated, and other key lipid synthesis proteins increased. Supplementation of SFM with LDL reversed the upregulation of lipid and cholesterol synthesis genes, but not of cholesterol transport genes. The LDL receptor relocated to the plasma membrane, and LDL uptake was activated by day 5–7 in SFM, suggesting increased demand for cholesterol. Confluent ARPE-19 cells in SFM accumulated intracellular cholesterol, compared with cells supplemented with serum, over 7 days. Over the same time course in SFM, the expression of metallothioneins decreased while the major zinc transporter was upregulated, consistent with a parallel increase in demand for zinc. Supplementation with zinc reversed expression changes for metallothionein genes, but not for other zinc-related genes. Similar patterns of regulation were also seen in primary fetal human RPE cells in SFM. Conclusions ARPE-19 cells respond to serum deprivation and starvation with upregulation of the lipid and cholesterol pathways, accumulation of intracellular cholesterol, and

  20. Appropriately differentiated ARPE-19 cells regain phenotype and gene expression profiles similar to those of native RPE cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Cynthia; Postnikova, Olga. A.; Kutty, R. Krishnan; Duncan, Todd; Tan, Li Xuan; Poliakov, Eugenia; Lakkaraju, Aparna; Redmond, T. Michael

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The RPE cell line ARPE-19 provides a dependable and widely used alternative to native RPE. However, replication of the native RPE phenotype becomes more difficult because these cells lose their specialized phenotype after multiple passages. Compounding this problem is the widespread use of ARPE-19 cells in an undifferentiated state to attempt to model RPE functions. We wished to determine whether suitable culture conditions and differentiation could restore the RPE-appropriate expression of genes and proteins to ARPE-19, along with a functional and morphological phenotype resembling native RPE. We compared the transcriptome of ARPE-19 cells kept in long-term culture with those of primary and other human RPE cells to assess the former’s inherent plasticity relative to the latter. Methods ARPE-19 cells at passages 9 to 12 grown in DMEM containing high glucose and pyruvate with 1% fetal bovine serum were differentiated for up to 4 months. Immunocytochemistry was performed on ARPE-19 cells grown on filters. Total RNA extracted from ARPE-19 cells cultured for either 4 days or 4 months was used for RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis using a 2 × 50 bp paired end protocol. The RNA-Seq data were analyzed to identify the affected pathways and recognize shared ontological classification among differentially expressed genes. RPE-specific mRNAs and miRNAs were assessed with quantitative real-time (RT)–PCR, and proteins with western blotting. Results ARPE-19 cells grown for 4 months developed the classic native RPE phenotype with heavy pigmentation. RPE-expressed genes, including RPE65, RDH5, and RDH10, as well as miR-204/211, were greatly increased in the ARPE-19 cells maintained at confluence for 4 months. The RNA-Seq analysis provided a comprehensive view of the relative abundance and differential expression of the genes in the differentiated ARPE-19 cells. Of the 16,757 genes with detectable signals, nearly 1,681 genes were upregulated, and 1,629 genes were

  1. Hyperglycemia-induced GLP-1R downregulation causes RPE cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Il; Park, Min-Jung; Choi, Joo-Hee; Lim, Seul-Ki; Choi, Hak-Jong; Park, Soo-Hyun

    2015-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is closely associated with the onset of diabetes and its complications. However, its roles in diabetic retinopathy are unknown. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are a crucial component of the outer blood-retina barrier and their death is related to the progression of diabetic retinopathy. Thus, we examined the pathophysiological role of GLP-1R in RPE cell apoptosis. We found that GLP-1R expression was lower in the isolated neuroretina and RPE cells of streptozotocin-treated rats than in vehicle-treated rats. High-glucose treatment also decreased GLP-1R expression in a human RPE cell line (ARPE-19 cells). GLP-1R was silenced in ARPE-19 cells, in order to elucidate the pathophysiological roles of GLP-1R. This increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and activated p53-mediated Bax promoter and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling. We also found that GLP-1R knockdown-mediated p53 expression was regulated by ER stress. Interestingly, antioxidant treatment and peroxiredoxin 1 (Prx1) overexpression attenuated GLP-1R knockdown-induced ER stress signaling and p53 expression. Finally, to confirm that GLP-1R activation has protective effects, ARPE-19 cells were treated with exendin-4, a synthetic GLP-1R agonist. This attenuated high-glucose-induced ROS generation, ER stress signaling, and p53 expression. Collectively, these results indicated that hyperglycemia decreases GLP-1R expression in RPE cells. Such a decrease generates intracellular ROS, which increases ER stress-mediated p53 expression, and subsequently causes apoptosis by increasing Bax promoter activity. Our data suggested that regulation of GLP-1R expression is a promising approach for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy.

  2. Humanin Protects RPE Cells from Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Apoptosis by Upregulation of Mitochondrial Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Douglas; Sreekumar, Parameswaran G.; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Terasaki, Hiroto; Barron, Ernesto; Cohen, Pinchas

    2016-01-01

    Humanin (HN) is a small mitochondrial-encoded peptide with neuroprotective properties. We have recently shown protection of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells by HN in oxidative stress; however, the effect of HN on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has not been evaluated in any cell type. Our aim here was to study the effect of HN on ER stress-induced apoptosis in RPE cells with a specific focus on ER-mitochondrial cross-talk. Dose dependent effects of ER stressors (tunicamycin (TM), brefeldin A, and thapsigargin) were studied after 12 hr of treatment in confluent primary human RPE cells with or without 12 hr of HN pretreatment (1–20 μg/mL). All three ER stressors induced RPE cell apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. HN pretreatment significantly decreased the number of apoptotic cells with all three ER stressors in a dose dependent manner. HN pretreatment similarly protected U-251 glioma cells from TM-induced apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. HN pretreatment significantly attenuated activation of caspase 3 and ER stress-specific caspase 4 induced by TM. TM treatment increased mitochondrial superoxide production, and HN co-treatment resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial superoxide compared to TM treatment alone. We further showed that depleted mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) levels induced by TM were restored with HN co-treatment. No significant changes were found for the expression of several antioxidant enzymes between TM and TM plus HN groups except for the expression of glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), the rate limiting enzyme required for GSH biosynthesis, which is upregulated with TM and TM+HN treatment. These results demonstrate that ER stress promotes mitochondrial alterations in RPE that lead to apoptosis. We further show that HN has a protective effect against ER stress-induced apoptosis by restoring mitochondrial GSH. Thus, HN should be further evaluated for its therapeutic potential in disorders linked to ER stress. PMID

  3. Humanin Protects RPE Cells from Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Apoptosis by Upregulation of Mitochondrial Glutathione.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Douglas; Sreekumar, Parameswaran G; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Terasaki, Hiroto; Barron, Ernesto; Cohen, Pinchas; Kannan, Ram; Hinton, David R

    2016-01-01

    Humanin (HN) is a small mitochondrial-encoded peptide with neuroprotective properties. We have recently shown protection of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells by HN in oxidative stress; however, the effect of HN on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has not been evaluated in any cell type. Our aim here was to study the effect of HN on ER stress-induced apoptosis in RPE cells with a specific focus on ER-mitochondrial cross-talk. Dose dependent effects of ER stressors (tunicamycin (TM), brefeldin A, and thapsigargin) were studied after 12 hr of treatment in confluent primary human RPE cells with or without 12 hr of HN pretreatment (1-20 μg/mL). All three ER stressors induced RPE cell apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. HN pretreatment significantly decreased the number of apoptotic cells with all three ER stressors in a dose dependent manner. HN pretreatment similarly protected U-251 glioma cells from TM-induced apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. HN pretreatment significantly attenuated activation of caspase 3 and ER stress-specific caspase 4 induced by TM. TM treatment increased mitochondrial superoxide production, and HN co-treatment resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial superoxide compared to TM treatment alone. We further showed that depleted mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) levels induced by TM were restored with HN co-treatment. No significant changes were found for the expression of several antioxidant enzymes between TM and TM plus HN groups except for the expression of glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), the rate limiting enzyme required for GSH biosynthesis, which is upregulated with TM and TM+HN treatment. These results demonstrate that ER stress promotes mitochondrial alterations in RPE that lead to apoptosis. We further show that HN has a protective effect against ER stress-induced apoptosis by restoring mitochondrial GSH. Thus, HN should be further evaluated for its therapeutic potential in disorders linked to ER stress.

  4. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial dysfunction and a protective unfolded protein response in RPE cells.

    PubMed

    Cano, Marisol; Wang, Lei; Wan, Jun; Barnett, Bradley P; Ebrahimi, Katayoon; Qian, Jiang; Handa, James T

    2014-04-01

    How cells degenerate from oxidative stress in aging-related disease is incompletely understood. This study's intent was to identify key cytoprotective pathways activated by oxidative stress and determine the extent of their protection. Using an unbiased strategy with microarray analysis, we found that retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells treated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) had overrepresented genes involved in the antioxidant and unfolded protein response (UPR). Differentially expressed antioxidant genes were predominantly located in the cytoplasm, with no induction of genes that neutralize superoxide and H2O2 in the mitochondria, resulting in accumulation of superoxide and decreased ATP production. Simultaneously, CSE induced the UPR sensors IRE1α, p-PERK, and ATP6, including CHOP, which was cytoprotective because CHOP knockdown decreased cell viability. In mice given intravitreal CSE, the RPE had increased IRE1α and decreased ATP and developed epithelial-mesenchymal transition, as suggested by decreased LRAT abundance, altered ZO-1 immunolabeling, and dysmorphic cell shape. Mildly degenerated RPE from early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) samples had prominent IRE1α, but minimal mitochondrial TOM20 immunolabeling. Although oxidative stress is thought to induce an antioxidant response with cooperation between the mitochondria and the ER, herein we show that mitochondria become impaired sufficiently to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition despite a protective UPR. With similar responses in early AMD samples, these results suggest that mitochondria are vulnerable to oxidative stress despite a protective UPR during the early phases of aging-related disease.

  5. Systemic Injection of RPE65-Programmed Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Prevents Progression of Chronic Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaoping; Pay, S Louise; Yan, Yuanqing; Thomas, James; Lewin, Alfred S; Chang, Lung-Ji; Grant, Maria B; Boulton, Michael E

    2017-04-05

    Bone marrow stem and progenitor cells can differentiate into a range of non-hematopoietic cell types, including retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-like cells. In this study, we programmed bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) ex vivo by inserting a stable RPE65 transgene using a lentiviral vector. We tested the efficacy of systemically administered RPE65-programmed BMDCs to prevent visual loss in the superoxide dismutase 2 knockdown (Sod2 KD) mouse model of age-related macular degeneration. Here, we present evidence that these RPE65-programmed BMDCs are recruited to the subretinal space, where they repopulate the RPE layer, preserve the photoreceptor layer, retain the thickness of the neural retina, reduce lipofuscin granule formation, and suppress microgliosis. Importantly, electroretinography and optokinetic response tests confirmed that visual function was significantly improved. Mice treated with non-modified BMDCs or BMDCs pre-programmed with LacZ did not exhibit significant improvement in visual deficit. RPE65-BMDC administration was most effective in early disease, when visual function and retinal morphology returned to near normal, and less effective in late-stage disease. This experimental paradigm offers a minimally invasive cellular therapy that can be given systemically overcoming the need for invasive ocular surgery and offering the potential to arrest progression in early AMD and other RPE-based diseases.

  6. Osmotic regulation of NFAT5 expression in RPE cells: The involvement of purinergic receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sarah; Kuhrt, Heidrun; Wiedemann, Peter; Bringmann, Andreas; Kohen, Leon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Systemic hypertension is a risk factor for age-related neovascular retinal diseases. The major condition that induces hypertension is the intake of dietary salt (NaCl) resulting in increased extracellular osmolarity. High extracellular NaCl was has been shown to induce angiogenic factor production in RPE cells, in part via the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor of activated T cell 5 (NFAT5). Here, we determined the signaling pathways that mediate the osmotic expression of the NFAT5 gene in RPE cells. Methods Cultured human RPE cells were stimulated with high (+100 mM) NaCl. Alterations in gene and protein expression were determined with real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR and western blot analysis, respectively. Results NaCl-induced NFAT5 gene expression was fully inhibited by calcium chelation and blockers of inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptors and phospholipases C and A2. Blockers of phospholipases C and A2 also prevented the NaCl-induced increase of the cellular NFAT5 protein level. Inhibitors of multiple intracellular signaling transduction pathways and kinases, including p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal–regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), protein kinases A and C, Src tyrosine kinases, and calpains, as well as cyclooxygenase inhibitors, decreased the NaCl-induced expression of the NFAT5 gene. In addition, autocrine purinergic signaling mediated by a release of ATP and a nucleoside transporter-mediated release of adenosine, activation of P2X7, P2Y1, P2Y2, and adenosine A1 receptors, but not adenosine A2A receptors, is required for the full expression of the NFAT5 gene under hyperosmotic conditions. NaCl-induced NFAT5 gene expression is in part dependent on the activity of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). The NaCl-induced expression of NFAT5 protein was prevented by inhibitors of phospholipases C and A2 and an inhibitor of NF-κB, but it

  7. [Study of blue light induced DNA damage of retinal pigment epithelium(RPE) cells and the protection of vitamin C].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian Wei; Ren, Guo Liang; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Zhu, Xi; Lin, Hai Yan; Zhou, Ji Lin

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate protection of vitamin C on blue light-induced DNA damage of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. The cultured RPE cells were divided into 3 groups: Control group (no blue light exposure), blue light exposure group (blue light exposure for 20 minutes) and blue light exposure + vitamin C group (blue light exposure + 100 mumol/L vitamin C). Travigen's comet assay kit and Euclid comet assay software were used to assay the DNA damage levels. The DNA percentage in the tail of electrophoretogram in the three groups were 18.44%, 54.42% and 32.43% respectively (p < 0.01). Tail moments were 8.2, 48.3, and 18.4 respectively (p < 0.01). Blue light could induce DNA damage to RPE cells but vitamin C could protect the RPE cells from the blue light-induced DNA damage.

  8. Ginsenoside Rg-1 protects retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells from cobalt chloride (CoCl2) and hypoxia assaults.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke-Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Qing; Yao, Jin; Zhao, Yu-Xia; Duan, Jing; Cao, Cong; Jiang, Qin

    2013-01-01

    Severe retinal ischemia causes persistent visual impairments in eye diseases. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are located near the choroidal capillaries, and are easily affected by ischemic or hypoxia. Ginsenoside Rg-1 has shown significant neuroprotective effects. This study was performed to test the cytoprotective effect of ginsenoside Rg-1 in RPE cells against hypoxia and cobalt chloride (CoCl2) assaults, and to understand the underlying mechanisms. We found that Rg-1 pre-administration significantly inhibited CoCl2- and hypoxia-induced RPE cell death and apoptosis. Reactive oxygen specisis (ROS)-dependent p38 and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases (JNK) MAPK activation was required for CoCl2-induced RPE cell death, and Rg-1 pre-treatment significantly inhibited ROS production and following p38/JNK activation. Further, CoCl2 suppressed pro-survival mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activation in RPE cells through activating of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), while Rg-1 restored mTORC1 activity through inhibiting AMPK activation. CoCl2-induced AMPK activation was also dependent on ROS production, and anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prevented AMPK activation and RPE cell death by CoCl2. Our results indicated that Rg-1 could be further investigated as a novel cell-protective agent for retinal ischemia.

  9. Stimulation of an alpha1-adrenergic receptor downregulates ecto-5' nucleotidase activity on the apical membrane of RPE cells.

    PubMed

    Reigada, David; Zhang, Xiulan; Crespo, Ana; Nguyen, Johnathan; Liu, Ji; Pendrak, Klara; Stone, Richard A; Laties, Alan M; Mitchell, Claire

    2006-09-01

    The purines ATP and adenosine play an important role in the communication between the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). While the RPE is known to release ATP into subretinal space, the source of extracellular adenosine is unclear. In other tissues, ecto-nucleotidases mediate the consecutive dephosphorylation of ATP to AMP, and AMP is converted to adenosine by ecto-5' nucleotidase (CD73). This study identifies ecto-5' nucleotidase on RPE cells and investigates modulation of enzyme activity. The RPE was the most active site of 5'AMP dephosphorylation in the posterior rat eye. The ecto-5' nucleotidase inhibitor alphabetamADP prevented the production adenosine by the apical membrane of the bovine RPE. Cultured human ARPE-19 cells expressed mRNA and protein for ecto-5' nucleotidase. The production of phosphate from 5'AMP by ARPE-19 cells was inhibited by alphabetamADP, but the ecto-alkaline phosphatase inhibitor levamisole had no effect. Degradation of 5'AMP was blocked by norepinephrine, epinephrine and phenylephrine, with inhibition by antagonists prazosin and corynanthine implicating the alpha1 adrenergic receptor. The block of enzyme activity by norepinephrine was rapid, occurring within 1 min, and was similar at both 4 and 37 degrees C, consistent with cleavage of the enzyme from its GPI anchor. HPLC measurements indicated norepinephrine reduced levels of adenosine in the bath. In the apical face of the bovine-RPE eyecup, norepinephrine reduced the production of phosphate from 5'AMP, suggesting that both receptor and enzyme face sub-retinal space. In conclusion, RPE cells express ecto-5' nucleotidase, with activity on the apical membrane, and stimulation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors downregulates activity. As epinephrine is released at light onset, and adenosine can inhibit phagocytosis, the corresponding decrease in subretinal adenosine levels may contribute to the enhanced the phagocytosis of rod outer segments that occurs at this time.

  10. miR-146a is upregulated during retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/choroid aging in mice and represses IL-6 and VEGF-A expression in RPE cells

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yi; Zhou, Qinbo; Ma, Jing; Zhao, Yun; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose MicroRNA-146a (miR-146a) has been proposed as a marker for age-associated inflammation, or “inflammaging”, acting as a negative regulator of cellular senescence and pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. However, the regulation and function of miR-146 during ocular aging remains unclear. Here we propose that miR-146 is regulated during aging of the retina and choroid, and functions in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to regulate key genes involved in inflammation and angiogenesis. Methods The expression of miR-146a and miR-146b was examined in the neuroretina and RPE/choroid in mice aged from 2 months to 24 months. Then, the effect of synthetic miR-146a mimetic on IL-6 and VEGF-A expression was analyzed in RPE cells treated with and without TNF-α. Results miR-146a and miR-146b was upregulated during aging of RPE/choroid but not neuroretina, supporting tissue-specific regulation of aging-related miRNAs in retinal tissues. Overexpression of miR-146a by miRNA mimics inhibited VEGF-A and TNF-α-induced IL-6 expression. Conclusions Elevation of miR-146a and miR-146b in the aging RPE/choroid but not neuroretina suggests a role for miRNAs in inflammaging in the RPE/choroid. miR-146a overexpression inhibits the expression IL-6 and VEGF-A in the RPE cells, supporting a negative feedback regulation mechanism by which inflammatory pathways may be dysregulated in RPE during aging. PMID:27917303

  11. Ion channels in the RPE.

    PubMed

    Wimmers, Sönke; Karl, Mike O; Strauss, Olaf

    2007-05-01

    In close interaction with photoreceptors, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an essential role for visual function. The analysis of RPE functions, specifically ion channel functions, provides a basis to understand many degenerative diseases of the retina. The invention of the patch-clamp technique significantly improved the knowledge of ion channel structure and function, which enabled a new understanding of cell physiology and patho-physiology of many diseases. In this review, ion channels identified in the RPE will be described in terms of their specific functional role in RPE physiology. The RPE expresses voltage- and ligand-gated K(+), Cl(-), and Ca(2+)-conducting channels. K(+) and Cl(-) channels are involved in transepithelial ion transport and volume regulation. Voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels act as regulators of secretory activity, and ligand-gated cation channels contribute to RPE function by providing driving forces for ion transport or by influencing intracellular Ca(2+) homoeostasis. Collectively, activity of these ion channels determines the physiology of the RPE and its interaction with photoreceptors. Furthermore, changes in ion channel function, such as mutations in ion channel genes or a changed regulation of ion channel activity, have been shown to lead to degenerative diseases of the retina. Increasing knowledge about the properties of RPE ion channels has not only provided a new understanding of RPE function but has also provided greater understanding of RPE function in health and disease.

  12. p27KIP1 loss promotes proliferation and phagocytosis but prevents epithelial–mesenchymal transition in RPE cells after photoreceptor damage

    PubMed Central

    ul Quraish, Reeshan; Sudou, Norihiro; Nomura-Komoike, Kaori; Sato, Fumi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose p27KIP1 (p27), originally identified as a cell cycle inhibitor, is now known to have multifaceted roles beyond cell cycle regulation. p27 is required for the normal histogenesis of the RPE, but the role of p27 in the mature RPE remains elusive. To define the role of p27 in the maintenance and function of the RPE, we investigated the effects of p27 deletion on the responses of the RPE after photoreceptor damage. Methods Photoreceptor damage was induced in wild-type (WT) and p27 knockout (KO) mice with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) treatment. Damage-induced responses of the RPE were investigated with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assays, immunofluorescence, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays at different stages after MNU treatment. Subcellular localization of p27 in the WT RPE was also analyzed in vivo and in vitro. Results MNU treatment induced photoreceptor-specific degeneration in the WT and KO retinas. BrdU incorporation assays revealed virtually no proliferation of RPE cells in the WT retinas while, in the KO retinas, approximately 16% of the RPE cells incorporated BrdU at day 2 after MNU treatment. The RPE in the KO retinas developed aberrant protrusions into the outer nuclear layer in response to photoreceptor damage and engulfed outer segment debris, as well as TUNEL-positive photoreceptor cells. Increased phosphorylation of myosin light chains and their association with rhodopsin-positive phagosomes were observed in the mutant RPE, suggesting possible deregulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. In addition, WT RPE cells exhibited evidence of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), including morphological changes, induction of α-smooth muscle actin expression, and attenuated expression of tight junction protein ZO-1 while these changes were absent in the KO retinas. In the normal WT retinas, p27 was localized to the nuclei of RPE cells while nuclear and cytoplasmic p27 was detected in RPE cells

  13. Pulsewidth-dependent nature of laser-induced DNA damage in RPE cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Rebecca M.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Kumar, Neeru; Noojin, Gary D.

    2001-07-01

    Ultrashort pulse laser radiation may produce cellular damage through unique mechanisms. Primary cultures of bovine retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells were exposed to the out put of a Ti:Sapphire laser producing 30 fs (mode-locked) pulses, 44 amplified fs pulses, or continuous wave exposures at 800 nm. Laser exposures at and below the damage threshold were studied. DNA damage was detected using single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Unexposed (control) cells produced short tails with low tail moments. In contrast, all laser-exposed cells showed some degree of DNA fragmentation, but the size and shape of the resulting comets differed among the various modalities. CW-exposed cells produced generally light and relatively compact tails, suggesting fewer and larger DNA fragments, while mode-locked laser exposures (30 fs pulses) resulted in large and diffuse comets, indicating the DNA was fragmented into many very small pieces. Work is continuing to define the relationship of laser pulsewidth and intensity with the degree of DNA fragmentation. These results suggest that DNA damage may result from multiple mechanisms of laser-cell interaction, including multiphoton absorption.

  14. Analysis of the RPE sheet in the rd10 retinal degeneration model

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yi

    2011-01-04

    The normal RPE sheet in the C57Bl/6J mouse is subclassified into two major tiling patterns: A regular generally hexagonal array covering most of the surface and a 'soft network' near the ciliary body made of irregularly shaped cells. Physics models predict these two patterns based on contractility and elasticity of the RPE cell, and strength of cellular adhesion between cells. We hypothesized and identified major changes in RPE regular hexagonal tiling pattern in rdl0 compared to C57BL/6J mice. RPE sheet damage was extensive but occurred in rd10 later than expected, after most retinal degeneration. RPE sheet changes occur in zones with a bullseye pattern. In the posterior zone around the optic nerve RPE cells take on larger irregular and varied shapes to form an intact monolayer. In mid periphery, there is a higher than normal density of cells that progress into involuted layers of RPE under the retina. The periphery remains mostly normal until late stages of degeneration. The number of neighboring cells varies widely depending on zone and progression. RPE morphology continues to deteriorate long after the photoreceptors have degenerated. The RPE cells are bystanders to the rd10 degeneration within photo receptors, and the collateral damage to the RPE sheet resembles stimulation of migration or chemotaxis. Quantitative measures of the tiling patterns and histopathology detected here, scripted in a pipeline written in Perl and Cell Profiler (an open source Matlab plugin), are directly applicable to RPE sheet images from noninvasive fundus autofluorescence (FAF), adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-cSLO), and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) of patients with early stage AMD or RP.

  15. Tetraspanins in Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xupin; Zhang, Jiaping; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins are a superfamily of small transmembrane proteins that are expressed in almost all eukaryotic cells. Through interacting with one another and with other membrane and intracellular proteins, tetraspanins regulate a wide range of proteins such as integrins, cell surface receptors, and signaling molecules, and thereby engage in diverse cellular processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to proliferation and differentiation. In particular, tetraspanins modulate the function of proteins involved in all determining factors of cell migration including cell–cell adhesion, cell–ECM adhesion, cytoskeletal protrusion/contraction, and proteolytic ECM remodeling. We herein provide a brief overview of collective in vitro and in vivo studies of tetraspanins to illustrate their regulatory functions in the migration and trafficking of cancer cells, vascular endothelial cells, skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts), and leukocytes. We also discuss the involvement of tetraspanins in various pathologic and remedial processes that rely on cell migration and their potential value as targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26091149

  16. Cell migration, freshly squeezed.

    PubMed

    Welch, Matthew D

    2015-02-12

    Migrating cells exhibit distinct motility modes and can switch between modes based on chemical or physical cues. Liu et al. and Ruprecht et al. now describe how confinement and contractility influence motility mode plasticity and instigate a mode termed stable bleb migration in embryonic and tumor cells.

  17. Two dietary polyphenols, fisetin and luteolin, reduce inflammation but augment DNA damage-induced toxicity in human RPE cells.

    PubMed

    Hytti, Maria; Szabó, Dora; Piippo, Niina; Korhonen, Eveliina; Honkakoski, Paavo; Kaarniranta, Kai; Petrovski, Goran; Kauppinen, Anu

    2017-01-09

    Plant-derived polyphenols are known to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. In recent years, several studies have investigated their potential benefits for treating chronic diseases associated with prolonged inflammation and excessive oxidative stress, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Previously, two polyphenols, fisetin and luteolin, have been reported to increase the survival of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells suffering from oxidative stress as well as decreasing inflammation but the benefits of polyphenol therapy seem to depend on the model system used. Our aim was to analyze the effects of fisetin and luteolin on inflammation and cellular viability in a model of nonoxidative DNA damage-induced cell death in human RPE (hRPE) cells. Pretreatment of ARPE-19 or primary hRPE cells with the polyphenols augmented etoposide-induced cell death as measured by the lactate dehydrogenase and 3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays. However, the treatment was able to reduce the release of two proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and IL-8, which were determined by enzyme-linked Immunosorbent assay. Analyses of caspase 3 activity, p53 acetylation and SIRT1 protein levels revealed the apoptotic nature of etoposide-evoked cell death and that fisetin and luteolin augmented the etoposide-induced acetylation of p53 and decreased SIRT1 levels. Taken together, our findings suggest that the cytoprotective effects of fisetin and luteolin depend on the stressor they need to combat, whereas their anti-inflammatory potential is sustained over a variety of model systems. Careful consideration of disease pathways will be necessary before fisetin or luteolin can be recommended as therapeutic agents for inflammatory diseases in general and specifically AMD.

  18. Expression of pigment epithelium‐derived factor and thrombospondin‐1 regulate proliferation and migration of retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Farnoodian, Mitra; Kinter, James B.; Yadranji Aghdam, Saeed; Zaitoun, Ismail; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Age‐related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss among elderly. Although the pathogenesis of AMD is associated with retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) dysfunction and abnormal neovascularization the detailed mechanisms remain unresolved. RPE is a specialized monolayer of epithelial cells with important functions in ocular homeostasis. Pathological RPE damage contributes to major ocular conditions including retinal degeneration and irreversible loss of vision in AMD. RPE cells also assist in the maintenance of the ocular angiogenic balance by production of positive and negative regulatory factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thrombospondin‐1 (TSP1), and pigment epithelium‐derived factor (PEDF). The altered production of PEDF and TSP1, as endogenous inhibitors of angiogenesis and inflammation, by RPE cells have been linked to pathogenesis of AMD and choroidal and retinal neovascularization. However, lack of simple methods for isolation and culture of mouse RPE cells has resulted in limited knowledge regarding the cell autonomous role of TSP1 and PEDF in RPE cell function. Here, we describe a method for routine isolation and propagation of RPE cells from wild‐type, TSP1, and PEDF‐deficient mice, and have investigated their impact on RPE cell function. We showed that expression of TSP1 and PEDF significantly impacted RPE cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, oxidative state, and phagocytic activity with minimal effect on their basal rate of apoptosis. Together, our results indicated that the expression of PEDF and TSP1 by RPE cells play crucial roles not only in regulation of ocular vascular homeostasis but also have significant impact on their cellular function. PMID:25602019

  19. Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition of RPE Cells In Vitro Confers Increased β1,6-N-Glycosylation and Increased Susceptibility to Galectin-3 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Priglinger, Claudia S.; Obermann, Jara; Szober, Christoph M.; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Ohmayer, Uli; Behler, Jennifer; Gruhn, Fabian; Kreutzer, Thomas C.; Wertheimer, Christian; Geerlof, Arie; Priglinger, Siegfried G.; Hauck, Stefanie M.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of retinal pigment epithelial cells is a crucial event in the onset of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), the most common reason for treatment failure in retinal detachment surgery. We studied alterations in the cell surface glycan expression profile upon EMT of RPE cells and focused on its relevance for the interaction with galectin-3 (Gal-3), a carbohydrate binding protein, which can inhibit attachment and spreading of human RPE cells in a dose- and carbohydrate-dependent manner, and thus bares the potential to counteract PVR-associated cellular events. Lectin blot analysis revealed that EMT of RPE cells in vitro confers a glycomic shift towards an abundance of Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen, poly-N-acetyllactosamine chains, and complex-type branched N-glycans. Using inhibitors of glycosylation we found that both, binding of Gal-3 to the RPE cell surface and Gal-3-mediated inhibition of RPE attachment and spreading, strongly depend on the interaction of Gal-3 with tri- or tetra-antennary complex type N-glycans and sialylation of glycans but not on complex-type O-glycans. Importantly, we found that β1,6 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (Mgat5), the key enzyme catalyzing the synthesis of tetra- or tri-antennary complex type N-glycans, is increased upon EMT of RPE cells. Silencing of Mgat5 by siRNA and CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing resulted in reduced Gal-3 binding. We conclude from these data that binding of recombinant Gal-3 to the RPE cell surface and inhibitory effects on RPE attachment and spreading largely dependent on interaction with Mgat5 modified N-glycans, which are more abundant on dedifferentiated than on the healthy, native RPE cells. Based on these findings we hypothesize that EMT of RPE cells in vitro confers glycomic changes, which account for high affinity binding of recombinant Gal-3, particularly to the cell surface of myofibroblastic RPE. From a future perspective recombinant Gal-3 may disclose a

  20. The expression and function of vascular endothelial growth factor in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is regulated by 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and glutathione S-transferaseA4-4

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsyayan, Rit; Lelsani, Poorna Chandra Rao; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Kumar, Sushil; Awasthi, Sanjay; Awasthi, Yogesh C.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low concentration of HNE (0.1-1.0 {mu}M) induced secretion of VEGF in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF secreted medium of RPE cells promoted proliferation of endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGFR2 expression was attenuated with increasing concentrations of HNE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These effects of HNE could be blocked by the over expression of GSTA4-4 in cells. -- Abstract: It is well established that 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) plays a major role in oxidative stress-induced signaling and the toxicity of oxidants. Surprisingly our recent studies also demonstrate that low levels of HNE generated during oxidative stress promote cell survival mechanisms and proliferation. Since the expression and secretion of VEGF is known to be affected by Oxidative stress, during present studies, we have examined dose dependent effect of HNE on VEGF expression and secretion in a model of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in culture. Results of these studies showed that while inclusion of 0.1 {mu}M HNE in the medium caused increased secretion of VEGF, its secretion and expression was significantly suppressed in the presence of >5 {mu}M HNE in the media. These concentration dependent hormetic effects of HNE on VEGF secretion could be blocked by the over expression of GSTA4-4 indicating that these effects were specifically attributed to HNE and regulated by GSTA4-4. VEGF secreted into the media showed angiogenic properties as indicated by increased migration and tube formation of HUVEC in matrigel when grown in media from RPE cells treated with 1 {mu}M HNE. The corresponding media from GSTA4-4 over expressing RPE cells had no effect on migration and tube formation of HUVEC in matrigel. These results are consistent with earlier studies showing that at low concentrations, HNE promotes proliferative mechanisms and suggest that HNE induces VEGF secretion from RPE cells that acts in a paracrine fashion to induce

  1. A Novel Inhibitor of 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) Prevents Oxidative Stress–Induced Cell Death of Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Preeti; Mendez, Emily F.; Becerra, S. Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) oxygenates arachidonic acid to form 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, which is further converted into biologically detrimental leukotrienes, such as leukotriene B4 (LTB4). The RPE and retina express the PNPLA2 gene for pigment epithelium–derived factor receptor (PEDF-R), a lipase involved in cell survival. The purpose here was to investigate the role of PEDF-R on the 5-LOX pathway in oxidative stress of RPE. Methods Lipoxygenase activity assays were performed with soybean and potato lipoxygenase. Binding was evaluated by peptide-affinity chromatography and pull-down assays with PEDF-R–derived synthetic peptides or recombinant protein. Oxidative stress was induced in human ARPE-19 and primary pig RPE cells with indicated concentrations of H2O2/TNF-α. Reverse transcription–PCR of ALOX5 and PNPLA2 genes was performed. Cell viability and death rates were determined using respective biomarkers. Leukotriene B4 levels were measured by ELISA. Results Among five peptides spanning between positions Leu159 and Met325 of human PEDF-R polypeptide, only two overlapping peptides, E5b and P1, bound and inhibited lipoxygenase activity. Human recombinant 5-LOX bound specifically to peptide P1 and to His6/Xpress-tagged PEDF-R via ionic interactions. The two inhibitor peptides E5b and P1 promoted cell viability and decreased cell death of RPE cells undergoing oxidative stress. Oxidative stress decreased the levels of PNPLA2 transcripts with no effect on ALOX5 expression. Exogenous additions of P1 peptide or overexpression of the PNPLA2 gene decreased both LTB4 levels and death of RPE cells undergoing oxidative stress. Conclusions A novel peptide region of PEDF-R inhibits 5-LOX, which intersects with RPE cell death pathways induced by oxidative stress. PMID:27635633

  2. Analysing immune cell migration.

    PubMed

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2009-11-01

    The visualization of the dynamic behaviour of and interactions between immune cells using time-lapse video microscopy has an important role in modern immunology. To draw robust conclusions, quantification of such cell migration is required. However, imaging experiments are associated with various artefacts that can affect the estimated positions of the immune cells under analysis, which form the basis of any subsequent analysis. Here, we describe potential artefacts that could affect the interpretation of data sets on immune cell migration. We propose how these errors can be recognized and corrected, and suggest ways to prevent the data analysis itself leading to biased results.

  3. Vitamin A metabolism in benign and malignant melanocytic skin cells: importance of lecithin/retinol acyltransferase and RPE65.

    PubMed

    Amann, Philipp M; Luo, Chonglin; Owen, Robert W; Hofmann, Claudia; Freudenberger, Muriel; Schadendorf, Dirk; Eichmüller, Stefan B; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2012-02-01

    Disturbance in vitamin A metabolism seems to be an important attribute of cancer cells. Retinoids, particularly retinoic acid, have critical regulatory functions and appear to modulate tumor development and progression. The key step of vitamin A metabolism is the esterification of all-trans retinol, catalyzed by lecithin/retinol acyltransferase (LRAT). In this work, we show that malignant melanoma cells are able to esterify all-trans retinol and subsequently isomerize all-trans retinyl esters (RE) into 11-cis retinol, whereas their benign counterparts-melanocytes are not able to catalyze these reactions. Besides, melanoma cell lines express lecithin/retinol acyltranseferase both at the mRNA and protein levels. In contrast, melanocytes do not express this enzyme at the protein level, but mRNA of lecithin/retinol acyltransefrase could still be present at mRNA level. RPE65 is expressed in both melanocytic counterparts, and could be involved in the subsequent isomerization of RE produced by lecithin/retinol acyltransefrase to 11-cis retinol. Cellular retinol-binding protein 2 does not appear to be involved in the regulation of all-trans retinol esterification in these cells. Expression of LRAT and RPE65 can be modulated by retinoids. We propose that the post-transcriptional regulation of lecithin/retinol acyltransefrase could be involved in the differential expression of this enzyme. Besides, activities of LRAT and RPE65 may be important for removal of all-trans retinal which is the substrate for retinoic acid production in skin cells. Consequently, the decreasing cellular amount of retinoic acid and its precursor molecules could result in a change of gene regulation.

  4. DKK1 inhibits proliferation and migration in human retinal pigment epithelial cells via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinzi; Jiang, Jian; Wang, Shuhong; Xia, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells play important roles in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Dickkopf 1 (DKK1) has been reported to be important in the regulation of cell proliferation and migration. However, there are few previous studies regarding DKK1 in RPE cells. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of DKK1 on the proliferation and migration of human RPE cells, and the signaling mechanisms underlying these effects. The results showed that the overexpression of DKK1 significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of ARPE-19 cells. In addition, overexpression of DKK1 markedly inhibited the expression of β-catenin and cyclin D1 in ARPE-19 cells. Collectively, the present findings suggest that the overexpression of DKK1 inhibited the proliferation and migration of RPE cells by suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Therefore, DKK1 are able to augment the growth of human RPE, and further studies are warranted to investigate the effects of DKK1 effects on DR.

  5. TGF-β2 promotes RPE cell invasion into a collagen gel by mediating urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expression.

    PubMed

    Sugioka, Koji; Kodama, Aya; Okada, Kiyotaka; Iwata, Mihoko; Yoshida, Koji; Kusaka, Shunji; Matsumoto, Chota; Kaji, Hiroshi; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2013-10-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is one of the main epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-inducing factors. In general, TGF-β-induced EMT promotes cell migration and invasion. TGF-β also acts as a potent regulator of pericellular proteolysis by regulating the expression and secretion of plasminogen activators. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine protease that binds to its cell surface receptor (uPAR) with high affinity. uPA binding to uPAR stimulates uPAR's interaction with transmembrane proteins, such as integrins, to regulate cytoskeletal reorganization and cell migration, differentiation and proliferation. However, the influence of TGF-β and the uPA/uPAR system on EMT in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of TGF-β2, which is the predominant isoform in the retina, and the uPA/uPAR system on RPE cells. In this study, we first examined the effect of TGF-β2 and/or the inhibitor of uPA (u-PA-STOP(®)) on the proliferation of a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19 cells). Treatment with TGF-β2 or u-PA-STOP(®) suppressed cell proliferation. Combination treatment of TGF-β2 and u-PA-STOP(®) enhanced cell growth suppression. Furthermore, western blot analysis, fibrin zymography and real-time reverse transcription PCR showed that that TGF-β2 induced EMT in ARPE-19 cells and that the expression of uPA and uPAR expression was up-regulated during EMT. The TGF-β inhibitor SB431542 suppressed TGF-β2-stimulated uPA expression and secretion but did not suppress uPAR expression. Furthermore, we seeded ARPE-19 cells onto Transwell chambers and allowed them to invade the collagen matrix in the presence of TGF-β2 alone or with TGF-β2 and u-PA-STOP(®). TGF-β2 treatment induced ARPE-19 cell invasion into the collagen gel. Treatment with a combination of TGF-β2 and the uPA inhibitor strongly inhibited ARPE-19 cell invasion compared with treatment with

  6. Effect of chloride channel activity on retinal pigment cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhong, Wei; Sun, Lixia; Yin, Yuan; Zheng, Yajuan

    2017-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of chloride channels (ClC) on the proliferation and migration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, a primary component of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) membranes. An RPE cell model of phagocytosis was established using fibronectin‑coated latex beads. Cell proliferation was measured by live cell counting. The cell cycle and phagocytosis index was assessed by flow cytometry. Intracellular calcium concentration was quantified using Fura‑2‑acetoxymethyl ester. ClCs were blocked using 5‑nitro‑2‑(3‑phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) and tamoxifen (TAM). NPPB and TAM were identified to inhibit the proliferation of ARPE‑19 human adult RPE cells by arresting them in the G0/G1 phase, inhibit the phagocytosis of fibronectin, and decrease intracellular calcium levels, in a dose‑dependent manner. ClCs serve important roles in mediating human RPE cell proliferation and migration. The underlying mechanisms of action of ClCs are associated with the regulation of calcium. Targeting ClCs may provide a novel strategy to inhibit PVR formation.

  7. Silencing heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibits proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenjie; Zhang, Xiaomei; Lu, Hong; Matsukura, Makoto; Zhao, Jien; Shinohara, Makoto

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •HO-1 is highly induced in RPE cells by hypoxia. •Inhibition of HO-1 activity and knockdown of HO-1 expression inhibit VEGF expression in RPE cells under hypoxia. •Knockdown of HO-1 in RPE cells inhibits angiogenesis of endothelial cells in vitro. -- Abstract: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in the vasculature and in the angiogenesis of tumors, wounds and other environments. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) are the main cells involved in choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a process in which hypoxia plays an important role. Our aim was to evaluate the role of human RPE-cell HO-1 in the angiogenic activities of cocultured endothelial cells under hypoxia. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) for HO-1 was transfected into human RPE cell line ARPE-19, and zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) was used to inhibit HO-1 activity. Knockdown of HO-1 expression and inhibition of HO-1 activity resulted in potent reduction of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) under hypoxia. Furthermore, knockdown of HO-1 suppressed the proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells. These findings indicated that HO-1 might have an angiogenic effect in CNV through modulation of VEGF expression and might be a potential target for treating CNV.

  8. Inflammasomes Induced by 7-Ketocholesterol and Other Stimuli in RPE and in Bone Marrow–Derived Cells Differ Markedly in Their Production of IL-1β and IL-18

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Guangpu; Chen, Siqi; Wandu, Wambui S.; Ogbeifun, Osato; Nugent, Lindsey F.; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Hinshaw, Samuel J. H.; Rodriguez, Ignacio R.; Gery, Igal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The inflammatory process plays a major role in the pathogenesis of AMD, and recent data indicate the involvement of inflammasomes. Inflammasomes are intracellular structures that trigger inflammation by producing mature interleukin-(IL)-1β and IL-18. This study examined the capacity of 7-ketocholesterol (7KCh), an oxysterol that accumulates in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and choroid, to initiate inflammasome formation in RPE and bone marrow–derived cells. Methods. Tested cells included fetal human RPE (fhRPE), human ARPE-19 cells, primary human brain microglia cells, and human THP-1 monocyte cells. 7-Ketocholesterol and other compounds were added to the cell cultures, and their stimulatory effects were determined by quantitative PCR and release of cytokines, measured by ELISA and Western blotting. Results. 7-Ketocholesterol efficiently induced inflammasome formation by all primed cell populations, but secreted cytokine levels were higher in cultures of bone marrow–derived cells (microglia and THP-1 cells) than in RPE cultures. Interestingly, inflammasomes formed in cells of the two populations differed strikingly in their preferential production of the two cytokines. Thus, whereas bone marrow–derived cells produced levels of IL-1β that were higher than those of IL-18, the opposite was found with RPE cells, which secreted higher levels of IL-18. Importantly, Western blot analysis showed that IL-18, but not IL-1β, was expressed constitutively by RPE cells. Conclusions. 7-Ketocholesterol efficiently stimulates inflammasome formation and is conceivably involved in the pathogenesis of AMD. In contrast to bone marrow–derived cells, RPE cells produced higher levels of IL-18 than IL-1β. Further, IL-18, a multifunctional cytokine, was expressed constitutively by RPE cells. These observations provide new information about stimuli and cells and their products assumed to be involved in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25678688

  9. Bestrophinopathy: An RPE-photoreceptor interface disease.

    PubMed

    Guziewicz, Karina E; Sinha, Divya; Gómez, Néstor M; Zorych, Kathryn; Dutrow, Emily V; Dhingra, Anuradha; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Gamm, David M; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2017-01-19

    Bestrophinopathies, one of the most common forms of inherited macular degenerations, are caused by mutations in the BEST1 gene expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Both human and canine BEST1-linked maculopathies are characterized by abnormal accumulation of autofluorescent material within RPE cells and bilateral macular or multifocal lesions; however, the specific mechanism leading to the formation of these lesions remains unclear. We now provide an overview of the current state of knowledge on the molecular pathology of bestrophinopathies, and explore factors promoting formation of RPE-neuroretinal separations, using the first spontaneous animal model of BEST1-associated retinopathies, canine Best (cBest). Here, we characterize the nature of the autofluorescent RPE cell inclusions and report matching spectral signatures of RPE-associated fluorophores between human and canine retinae, indicating an analogous composition of endogenous RPE deposits in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy (BVMD) patients and its canine disease model. This study also exposes a range of biochemical and structural abnormalities at the RPE-photoreceptor interface related to the impaired cone-associated microvillar ensheathment and compromised insoluble interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM), the major pathological culprits responsible for weakening of the RPE-neuroretina interactions, and consequently, formation of vitelliform lesions. These salient alterations detected at the RPE apical domain in cBest as well as in BVMD- and ARB-hiPSC-RPE model systems provide novel insights into the pathological mechanism of BEST1-linked disorders that will allow for development of critical outcome measures guiding therapeutic strategies for bestrophinopathies.

  10. In vitro measurements of oxygen consumption rates in hTERT-RPE cells exposed to low levels of red light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigle, Jeffrey C.; Castellanos, Cherry C.

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to 2.88 J/cm2 of red light induces an adaptive response against a lethal pulse of 2.0 μm laser radiation in hTERT-RPE cells in vitro, but not in a knockdown mutant for vascular endothelial growth factor c (VEGF-C). The generally accepted initiation sequence for photobiomodulation is that absorption of red light by cytochome c oxidase (CCOX) of the electron transport chain increases the binding affinity of CCOX for O2 vs. nitric oxide (NO). This results in displacement of NO by O2 in the active site of CCOX, thereby increasing cellular respiration and intracellular ATP. We've previously reported that red-light exposure induces a small, but consistently reproducible, increase in NO levels in these cells. But the relative importance of NO and oxidative phosphorylation is unclear because little is known about the relative contributions of NO and ATP to the response. However, if NO dissociation from CCOX actually increases oxidative phosphorylation, one should see a corresponding increase in oxygen consumption. A Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer was used to measure oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in normal and mutant cells as a proxy for oxidative phosphorylation. Both basal respiration and maximum respiration rates in normal cells are significantly higher than in the mutant. The normal cells have a significant amount of "excess capacity," whereas the VEGF-C(KD) have little or none. The OCR in exposed normal cells is lower than in unexposed cells when measured immediately after exposure. The exposures used for these experiments had no effect on the OCR in mutant cells.

  11. MicroRNA-182 Suppresses HGF/SF-Induced Increases in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Migration through Targeting c-Met

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihua; Dong, Feng; Reinach, Peter S.; He, Dandan; Zhao, Xiaoting; Chen, Xiaoyan; Hu, Dan-Ning

    2016-01-01

    As increases in hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) induce retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) migration and proliferation into the vitreous cavity and contribute to proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) development, we determined if changes in miR-182 expression affect such behavioral changes. We found that miR-182 expression was less in PVR clinical samples than in primary RPE cells whereas c-Met was upregulated. Ectopic miR-182 inhibited RPE cell proliferation, cell cycle, and migration. Bioinformatic analysis identified c-Met as a miR-182 target, which was confirmed with the luciferase reporter assay. Transfection of miR-182 into RPE cells induced c-Met downregulation, which led to reduced cell proliferation and migration through declines in p-Akt formation. MiR-182 downregulation along with c-Met upregulation in PVR tissues suggest that these two opposing effects play important roles in PVR development. As ectopic miR-182 expression suppressed RPE cell proliferation and migration, strategies to selectively upregulate miR-182 expression in a clinical setting may provide a novel option to treat this disease. PMID:27936052

  12. Cell migration in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Marín, Oscar; Rubenstein, John L R

    2003-01-01

    The forebrain comprises an intricate set of structures that are required for some of the most complex and evolved functions of the mammalian brain. As a reflection of its complexity, cell migration in the forebrain is extremely elaborated, with widespread dispersion of cells across multiple functionally distinct areas. Two general modes of migration are distinguished in the forebrain: radial migration, which establishes the general cytoarchitectonical framework of the different forebrain subdivisions; and tangential migration, which increases the cellular complexity of forebrain circuits by allowing the dispersion of multiple neuronal types. Here, we review the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying each of these types of migrations and discuss how emerging concepts in neuronal migration are reshaping our understanding of forebrain development in normal and pathological situations.

  13. Damage Thresholds for Exposure to NIR and Blue Lasers in an In Vitro RPE Cell System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    experiments, cells received 2 mM ascorbic acid (AA; BP351-500; Fisher Scientific, Fair Lawn, ND or 1 mM A’- acetyl -L- cysteine ( NAC ; A9165, Sigma...death from both cw and ml blue laser exposure, whereas similar treatment with A’- acetyl - L- cysteine (MAC) was less effective. CONCLUSIONS. The in vitro...Laser-Induced Photochemical Death by Overnight Pretreatment with Ascorbic Acid (AA) and A’- acetyl -l- cysteine (NAQ cw Laser Mode-Locked Laser Media

  14. Analysis of RPE morphometry in human eyes

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Shagun K.; Rashid, Alia; Chrenek, Micah A.; Zhang, Qing; Bruce, Beau B.; Klein, Mitchel; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Jiang, Yi; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the RPE morphometry of healthy human eyes regarding age and topographic location using modern computational methods with high accuracy and objectivity. We tested whether there were regional and age-related differences in RPE cell area and shape. Methods Human cadaver donor eyes of varying ages were dissected, and the RPE flatmounts were immunostained for F-actin with AF635-phalloidin, nuclei stained with propidium iodide, and imaged with confocal microscopy. Image analysis was performed using ImageJ (NIH) and CellProfiler software. Quantitative parameters, including cell density, cell area, polygonality of cells, number of neighboring cells, and measures of cell shape, were obtained from these analyses to characterize individual and groups of RPE cells. Measurements were taken from selected areas spanning the length of the temporal retina through the macula and the mid-periphery to the far periphery. Results Nineteen eyes from 14 Caucasian donors of varying ages ranging from 29 to 80 years were used. Along a horizontal nasal to temporal meridian, there were differences in several cell shape and size characteristics. Generally, the cell area and shape was relatively constant and regular except in the far periphery. In the outer third of the retina, the cell area and shape differed from the inner two-thirds statistically significantly. In the macula and the far periphery, an overall decreasing trend in RPE cell density, percent hexagonal cells, and form factor was observed with increasing age. We also found a trend toward increasing cell area and eccentricity with age in the macula and the far periphery. When individuals were divided into two age groups, <60 years and ≥60 years, there was a higher cell density, lower cell area, lower eccentricity, and higher form factor in the younger group in the macula and the far periphery (p<0.05 for all measurements). No statistically significant differences in RPE morphometry between age groups were found

  15. Cell migration in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a protocol for measuring the speed of human neutrophils migrating through small channels, in conditions of mechanical confinement comparable to those experienced by neutrophils migrating through tissues. In such conditions, we find that neutrophils move persistently, at constant speed for tens of minutes, enabling precise measurements at single cells resolution, for large number of cells. The protocol relies on microfluidic devices with small channels in which a solution of chemoattractant and a suspension of isolated neutrophils are loaded in sequence. The migration of neutrophils can be observed for several hours, starting within minutes after loading the neutrophils in the devices. The protocol is divided into four main steps: the fabrication of the microfluidic devices, the separation of neutrophils from whole blood, the preparation of the assay and cell loading, and the analysis of data. We discuss the practical steps for the implementation of the migration assays in biology labs, the adaptation of the protocols to various cell types, including cancer cells, and the supplementary device features required for precise measurements of directionality and persistence during migration.

  16. A Discrete Cell Migration Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J; Kruse, Kara L; Ward, Richard C; O'Quinn, Elizabeth; Woerner, Matthew M; Beckerman, Barbara G

    2007-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells is a fundamental process in the development of intimal hyperplasia, a precursor to development of cardiovascular disease and a potential response to injury of an arterial wall. Boyden chamber experiments are used to quantify the motion of cell populations in response to a chemoattractant gradient (i.e., cell chemotaxis). We are developing a mathematical model of cell migration within the Boyden chamber, while simultaneously conducting experiments to obtain parameter values for the migration process. In the future, the model and parameters will be used as building blocks for a detailed model of the process that causes intimal hyperplasia. The cell migration model presented in this paper is based on the notion of a cell as a moving sensor that responds to an evolving chemoattractant gradient. We compare the results of our three-dimensional hybrid model with results from a one-dimensional continuum model. Some preliminary experimental data that is being used to refine the model is also presented.

  17. Cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Moutasim, Karwan A; Nystrom, Maria L; Thomas, Gareth J

    2011-01-01

    A number of in vitro assays have been developed to study tumor cell motility. Historically, assays have been mainly monocellular, where carcinoma cells are studied in isolation. Scratch assays can be used to study the collective and directional movement of populations of cells, whereas two chamber assays lend themselves to the analysis of chemotactic/haptotactic migration and cell invasion. However, an inherent disadvantage of these assays is that they grossly oversimplify the complex process of invasion, lacking the tumor structural architecture and stromal components. Organotypic assays, where tumor cells are grown at an air/liquid interface on gels populated with stromal cells, are a more physiologically relevant method for studying 3-dimensional tumor invasion.

  18. Force transmission in migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Sauser, Roger; Ambrosi, Davide; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2010-01-01

    During cell migration, forces generated by the actin cytoskeleton are transmitted through adhesion complexes to the substrate. To investigate the mechanism of force generation and transmission, we analyzed the relationship between actin network velocity and traction forces at the substrate in a model system of persistently migrating fish epidermal keratocytes. Front and lateral sides of the cell exhibited much stronger coupling between actin motion and traction forces than the trailing cell body. Further analysis of the traction–velocity relationship suggested that the force transmission mechanisms were different in different cell regions: at the front, traction was generated by a gripping of the actin network to the substrate, whereas at the sides and back, it was produced by the network’s slipping over the substrate. Treatment with inhibitors of the actin–myosin system demonstrated that the cell body translocation could be powered by either of the two different processes, actomyosin contraction or actin assembly, with the former associated with significantly larger traction forces than the latter. PMID:20100912

  19. Characterization of Collective Cell Migration Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Rachel; Yue, Haicen; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Losert, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    During cancer progression, tumor cells invade the surrounding tissue and migrate throughout the body, forming clinically dangerous secondary tumors. This metastatic process begins when cells leave the primary tumor, either as individual cells or collectively migrating groups. Here we present data on the migration dynamics of epithelial sheets composed of many cells. Using quantitative image analysis techniques, we are able to extract motion information from time-lapse images of cell lines with varying malignancy. Adapting metrics originally used to study fluid flows we are able to characterize the migration dynamics of these cell lines. By describing the migration dynamics in great detail, we are able to make a clear comparison of our results to a simulation of collective cell migration. Specifically, we explore whether leader cells are required to describe our expanding sheets of cells and whether the answer depends on individual cell activity.

  20. Lycopene inhibits PDGF-BB-induced retinal pigment epithelial cell migration by suppression of PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Chi-Ming; Fang, Jia-You; Lin, Hsin-Huang; Yang, Chi-Yea; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2009-10-09

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells play a dominant role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), which is the leading cause of failure in retinal reattachment surgery. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) exhibits chemotaxis and proliferation effects on RPE cells in PVR. In this study, the inhibitory effect of lycopene on PDGF-BB-induced ARPE19 cell migration is examined. In electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) and Transwell migration assays, significant suppression of PDGF-BB-induced ARPE19 cell migration by lycopene is observed. Cell viability assays show no cytotoxicity of lycopene on RPE cells. Lycopene shows no effect on ARPE19 cell adhesion and is found to inhibit PDGF-BB-induced tyrosine phosphorylation and the underlying signaling pathways of PI3K, Akt, ERK and p38 activation. However, PDGF-BB and lycopene show no effects on JNK activation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that lycopene inhibits PDGF-BB-induced ARPE19 cell migration through inhibition of PI3K/Akt, ERK and p38 activation.

  1. Migration in action: profiling border cells.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Heinrich

    2006-04-01

    Acquiring the ability to migrate is essential for cells taking part in many developmental and disease processes. Two studies in this issue of Developmental Cell use gene expression profiling of purified border cells from the Drosophila ovary to characterize the molecular changes required in cells to initiate migration in vivo. Their results offer interesting new insights into a moving cell's physiology.

  2. Novel Epigenetic Controlling of Hypoxia Pathway Related to Overexpression and Promoter Hypomethylation of TET1 and TET2 in RPE Cells.

    PubMed

    Alivand, Mohammad Reza; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Pornour, Majid; Solali, Saeed; Sabouni, Farzaneh

    2017-03-02

    CpG methylation of DNA takes part in a specific epigenetic memory that plays crucial roles in the differentiation and abnormality of the cells. The methylation pattern aberration of genomes is affected in three ways, namely DNA methyltransferase(DNMT), Ten-eleven translocation(TET), and methyl-binding Domain(MBD) proteins. Of these, TET enzymes have recently been demonstrated to be master modifier enzymes in the DNA methylation process. Additionally, recent studies emphasize that not only do epigenetic phenomena play a role in controlling hypoxia pathway, but the hypoxia condition also triggers hypomethylation of genomes that may help with the expression of hypoxia pathway genes. In this study, we suggested that TET1 and TET2 could play a role in the demethylation of genomes under chemical hypoxia conditions. Herein, the evaluating methylation status and mRNA expression of mentioned genes were utilized through real-time PCR and methylation-specific PCR (MSP), respectively. Our results showed that TET1 and TET2 genes were overexpressed (p< 0.05) under chemical hypoxia conditions in Retinal Pigment Epithelial(RPE)cells, whereas the promoter methylation status of them were hypomethylated in the same condition. Therefore, chemical hypoxia not only causes overexpression of TET1 and TET2 but also could gradually do promoter demethylation of same genes. This is the first study to show the relationship between epigenetics and the expression of mentioned genes related to hypoxia pathways. Furthermore, it seems that these associations in RPE cells are subjected to chemical hypoxia as a mechanism that could play a crucial role in methylation pattern changes of hypoxia-related diseases such as cancer and ischemia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Focal Adhesion-Independent Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Ewa K; Aspalter, Irene M; Sixt, Michael

    2016-10-06

    Cell migration is central to a multitude of physiological processes, including embryonic development, immune surveillance, and wound healing, and deregulated migration is key to cancer dissemination. Decades of investigations have uncovered many of the molecular and physical mechanisms underlying cell migration. Together with protrusion extension and cell body retraction, adhesion to the substrate via specific focal adhesion points has long been considered an essential step in cell migration. Although this is true for cells moving on two-dimensional substrates, recent studies have demonstrated that focal adhesions are not required for cells moving in three dimensions, in which confinement is sufficient to maintain a cell in contact with its substrate. Here, we review the investigations that have led to challenging the requirement of specific adhesions for migration, discuss the physical mechanisms proposed for cell body translocation during focal adhesion-independent migration, and highlight the remaining open questions for the future.

  4. Transplantation stimulates interstitial cell migration in hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, T.; David, C.N.; Bosch, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Migration of interstitial cells and nerve cell precursors was analyzed in Hydra magnipapillata and Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). Axial grafts were made between ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled donor and unlabeled host tissue. Migration of labeled cells into the unlabeled half was followed for 4 days. The results indicate that the rate of migration was initially high and then slowed on Days 2-4. Regrafting fresh donor tissue on Days 2-4 maintained high levels of migration. Thus, migration appears to be stimulated by the grafting procedure itself.

  5. Random versus directionally persistent cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Ryan J.; Doyle, Andrew D.; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    Directional migration is an important component of cell motility. Although the basic mechanisms of random cell movement are well characterized, no single model explains the complex regulation of directional migration. Multiple factors operate at each step of cell migration to stabilize lamellipodia and maintain directional migration. Factors such as topography of the extracellular matrix, the cellular polarity machinery, receptor signalling, integrin trafficking and co-receptors, and actin–myosin contraction converge on regulation of the Rho family of GTPases and control of lamellipodial protrusions to promote directional migration. PMID:19603038

  6. Microdroplet chain array for cell migration assays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Pan, Jian-Zhang; Zhao, Shi-Ping; Lou, Qi; Zhu, Ying; Fang, Qun

    2016-11-29

    Establishing cell migration assays in multiple different microenvironments is important in the study of tissue repair and regeneration, cancer progression, atherosclerosis, and arthritis. In this work, we developed a miniaturized and massive parallel microfluidic platform for multiple cell migration assays combining the traditional membrane-based cell migration technique and the droplet-based microfluidic technique. Nanoliter-scale droplets are flexibly assembled as building blocks based on a porous membrane to form microdroplet chains with diverse configurations for different assay modes. Multiple operations including in-droplet 2D/3D cell culture, cell co-culture and cell migration induced by a chemoattractant concentration gradient in droplet chains could be flexibly performed with reagent consumption in the nanoliter range for each assay and an assay scale-up to 81 assays in parallel in one microchip. We have applied the present platform to multiple modes of cell migration assays including the accurate cell migration assay, competitive cell migration assay, biomimetic chemotaxis assay, and multifactor cell migration assay based on the organ-on-a-chip concept, for demonstrating its versatility, applicability, and potential in cell migration-related research.

  7. Methodologies for analysis of patterning in the mouse RPE sheet

    PubMed Central

    Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Dalal, Nupur; Chrenek, Micah A.; Gardner, Christopher; Ziesel, Alison; Jiang, Yi; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our goal was to optimize procedures for assessing shapes, sizes, and other quantitative metrics of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and contact- and noncontact-mediated cell-to-cell interactions across a large series of flatmount RPE images. Methods The two principal methodological advances of this study were optimization of a mouse RPE flatmount preparation and refinement of open-access software to rapidly analyze large numbers of flatmount images. Mouse eyes were harvested, and extra-orbital fat and muscles were removed. Eyes were fixed for 10 min, and dissected by puncturing the cornea with a sharp needle or a stab knife. Four radial cuts were made with iridectomy scissors from the puncture to near the optic nerve head. The lens, iris, and the neural retina were removed, leaving the RPE sheet exposed. The dissection and outcomes were monitored and evaluated by video recording. The RPE sheet was imaged under fluorescence confocal microscopy after staining for ZO-1 to identify RPE cell boundaries. Photoshop, Java, Perl, and Matlab scripts, as well as CellProfiler, were used to quantify selected parameters. Data were exported into Excel spreadsheets for further analysis. Results A simplified dissection procedure afforded a consistent source of images that could be processed by computer. The dissection and flatmounting techniques were illustrated in a video recording. Almost all of the sheet could be routinely imaged, and substantial fractions of the RPE sheet (usually 20–50% of the sheet) could be analyzed. Several common technical problems were noted and workarounds developed. The software-based analysis merged 25 to 36 images into one and adjusted settings to record an image suitable for large-scale identification of cell-to-cell boundaries, and then obtained quantitative descriptors of the shape of each cell, its neighbors, and interactions beyond direct cell–cell contact in the sheet. To validate the software, human- and computer

  8. Collective cell migration during inflammatory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Wound scratch healing assays of endothelial cell monolayers is a simple model to study collective cell migration as a function of biological signals. A signal of particular interest is the immune response, which after initial wounding in vivo causes the release of various inflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α is an innate inflammatory cytokine that can induce cell growth, cell necrosis, and change cell morphology. We studied the effects of TNF-α on collective cell migration using the wound healing assays and measured several migration metrics, such as rate of scratch closure, velocities of leading edge and bulk cells, closure index, and velocity correlation functions between migrating cells. We observed that TNF-α alters all migratory metrics as a function of the size of the scratch and TNF-α content. The changes observed in migration correlate with actin reorganization upon TNF-α exposure.

  9. Quantifying modes of 3D cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Meghan K.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    Although it is widely appreciated that cells migrate in a variety of diverse environments in vivo, we are only now beginning to use experimental workflows that yield images with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to study the molecular processes governing cell migration in 3D environments. Since cell migration is a dynamic process, it is usually studied via microscopy, but 3D movies of 3D processes are difficult to interpret by visual inspection. In this review, we discuss the technologies required to study the diversity of 3D cell migration modes with a focus on the visualization and computational analysis tools needed to study cell migration quantitatively at a level comparable to the analyses performed today on cells crawling on flat substrates. PMID:26603943

  10. Quantifying Modes of 3D Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Meghan K; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-12-01

    Although it is widely appreciated that cells migrate in a variety of diverse environments in vivo, we are only now beginning to use experimental workflows that yield images with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to study the molecular processes governing cell migration in 3D environments. Since cell migration is a dynamic process, it is usually studied via microscopy, but 3D movies of 3D processes are difficult to interpret by visual inspection. In this review, we discuss the technologies required to study the diversity of 3D cell migration modes with a focus on the visualization and computational analysis tools needed to study cell migration quantitatively at a level comparable to the analyses performed today on cells crawling on flat substrates.

  11. Multiscale Cues Drive Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Peter; Wood, David K.; Kwon, Sunghoon; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    To investigate complex biophysical relationships driving directed cell migration, we developed a biomimetic platform that allows perturbation of microscale geometric constraints with concomitant nanoscale contact guidance architectures. This permits us to elucidate the influence, and parse out the relative contribution, of multiscale features, and define how these physical inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic signaling. We demonstrate that collective cell migration is profoundly enhanced by the addition of contract guidance cues when not otherwise constrained. However, while nanoscale cues promoted migration in all cases, microscale directed migration cues are dominant as the geometric constraint narrows, a behavior that is well explained by stochastic diffusion anisotropy modeling. Further, oncogene activation (i.e. mutant PIK3CA) resulted in profoundly increased migration where extracellular multiscale directed migration cues and intrinsic signaling synergistically conspire to greatly outperform normal cells or any extracellular guidance cues in isolation. PMID:27460294

  12. Multiscale Cues Drive Collective Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Peter; Wood, David K.; Kwon, Sunghoon; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-07-01

    To investigate complex biophysical relationships driving directed cell migration, we developed a biomimetic platform that allows perturbation of microscale geometric constraints with concomitant nanoscale contact guidance architectures. This permits us to elucidate the influence, and parse out the relative contribution, of multiscale features, and define how these physical inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic signaling. We demonstrate that collective cell migration is profoundly enhanced by the addition of contract guidance cues when not otherwise constrained. However, while nanoscale cues promoted migration in all cases, microscale directed migration cues are dominant as the geometric constraint narrows, a behavior that is well explained by stochastic diffusion anisotropy modeling. Further, oncogene activation (i.e. mutant PIK3CA) resulted in profoundly increased migration where extracellular multiscale directed migration cues and intrinsic signaling synergistically conspire to greatly outperform normal cells or any extracellular guidance cues in isolation.

  13. Centrosome Positioning in 1D Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlerz, Katrina; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    During cell migration, the positioning of the centrosome and nucleus define a cell's polarity. For a cell migrating on a two-dimensional substrate the centrosome is positioned in front of the nucleus. Under one-dimensional confinement, however, the centrosome is positioned behind the nucleus in 60% of cells. It is known that the centrosome is positioned by CDC42 and dynein for cells moving on a 2D substrate in a wound-healing assay. It is currently unknown, however, if this is also true for cells moving under 1D confinement, where the centrosome position is often reversed. Therefore, centrosome positioning was studied in cells migrating under 1D confinement, which mimics cells migrating through 3D matrices. 3 to 5 μm fibronectin lines were stamped onto a glass substrate and cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei and centrosomes migrated on the lines. Our results show that when a cell changes directions the centrosome position is maintained. That is, when the centrosome is between the nucleus and the cell's trailing edge and the cell changes direction, the centrosome will be translocated across the nucleus to the back of the cell again. A dynein inhibitor did have an influence on centrosome positioning in 1D migration and change of directions.

  14. A Customizable Chamber for Measuring Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Aniqa N; Vo, Huu Tri; Olang, Sharon; Mappus, Elliott; Peterson, Brian; Hlavac, Nora; Harvey, Tyler; Dean, Delphine

    2017-03-12

    Cell migration is a vital part of immune responses, growth, and wound healing. Cell migration is a complex process that involves interactions between cells, the extracellular matrix, and soluble and non-soluble chemical factors (e.g., chemoattractants). Standard methods for measuring the migration of cells, such as the Boyden chamber assay, work by counting cells on either side of a divider. These techniques are easy to use; however, they offer little geometric modification for different applications. In contrast, microfluidic devices can be used to observe cell migration with customizable concentration gradients of soluble factors(1)(,)(2). However, methods for making microfluidics based assays can be difficult to learn. Here, we describe an easy method for creating cell culture chambers to measure cell migration in response to chemical concentration gradients. Our cell migration chamber method can create different linear concentration gradients in order to study cell migration for a variety of applications. This method is relatively easy to use and is typically performed by undergraduate students. The microchannel chamber was created by placing an acrylic insert in the shape of the final microchannel chamber well into a Petri dish. After this, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was poured on top of the insert. The PDMS was allowed to harden and then the insert was removed. This allowed for the creation of wells in any desired shape or size. Cells may be subsequently added to the microchannel chamber, and soluble agents can be added to one of the wells by soaking an agarose block in the desired agent. The agarose block is added to one of the wells, and time-lapse images can be taken of the microchannel chamber in order to quantify cell migration. Variations to this method can be made for a given application, making this method highly customizable.

  15. A New Strategy to Identify and Annotate Human RPE-Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Booij, Judith C.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; Swagemakers, Sigrid M. A.; Verkerk, Annemieke J. M. H.; Essing, Anke H. W.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2010-01-01

    Background To identify and functionally annotate cell type-specific gene expression in the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a key tissue involved in age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Methodology RPE, photoreceptor and choroidal cells were isolated from selected freshly frozen healthy human donor eyes using laser microdissection. RNA isolation, amplification and hybridization to 44 k microarrays was carried out according to Agilent specifications. Bioinformatics was carried out using Rosetta Resolver, David and Ingenuity software. Principal Findings Our previous 22 k analysis of the RPE transcriptome showed that the RPE has high levels of protein synthesis, strong energy demands, is exposed to high levels of oxidative stress and a variable degree of inflammation. We currently use a complementary new strategy aimed at the identification and functional annotation of RPE-specific expressed transcripts. This strategy takes advantage of the multilayered cellular structure of the retina and overcomes a number of limitations of previous studies. In triplicate, we compared the transcriptomes of RPE, photoreceptor and choroidal cells and we deduced RPE specific expression. We identified at least 114 entries with RPE-specific gene expression. Thirty-nine of these 114 genes also show high expression in the RPE, comparison with the literature showed that 85% of these 39 were previously identified to be expressed in the RPE. In the group of 114 RPE specific genes there was an overrepresentation of genes involved in (membrane) transport, vision and ophthalmic disease. More fundamentally, we found RPE-specific involvement in the RAR-activation, retinol metabolism and GABA receptor signaling pathways. Conclusions In this study we provide a further specification and understanding of the RPE transcriptome by identifying and analyzing genes that are specifically expressed in the RPE. PMID:20479888

  16. Rho GTPases and cancer cell transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Nicolas; Riou, Philippe; Ridley, Anne J

    2012-01-01

    Small Rho GTPases are major regulators of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and influence cell shape and migration. The expression of several Rho GTPases is often up-regulated in tumors and this frequently correlates with a poor prognosis for patients. Migration of cancer cells through endothelial cells that line the blood vessels, called transendothelial migration or extravasation, is a critical step during the metastasis process. The use of siRNA technology to target specifically each Rho family member coupled with imaging techniques allows the roles of individual Rho GTPases to be investigated. In this chapter we describe methods to assess how Rho GTPases affect the different steps of cancer cell transendothelial cell migration in vitro.

  17. Nitric oxide measurements in hTERT-RPE cells and subcellular fractions exposed to low levels of red light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigle, Jeffrey C.; Castellanos, Cherry C.; Denton, Michael L.; Holwitt, Eric A.

    2014-02-01

    Cells in a tissue culture model for laser eye injury exhibit increased resistance to a lethal pulse of 2.0-μm laser radiation if the cells are first exposed to 2.88 J/cm2 of red light 24 hr prior to the lethal laser exposure. Changes in expression of various genes associated with apoptosis have been observed, but the biochemical link between light absorption and gene expression remains unknown. Cytochome c oxidase (CCOX), in the electron transport chain, is the currentlyhypothesized absorber. Absorption of the red light by CCOX is thought to facilitate displacement of nitric oxide (NO) by O2 in the active site, increasing cellular respiration and intracellular ATP. However, NO is also an important regulator and mediator of numerous physiological processes in a variety of cell and tissue types that is synthesized from l-arginine by NO synthases. In an effort to determine the relative NO contributions from these competing pathways, we measured NO levels in whole cells and subcellular fractions, with and without exposure to red light, using DAF-FM, a fluorescent dye that stoichiometrically reacts with NO. Red light induced a small, but consistently reproducible, increase in fluorescence intensity in whole cells and some subcellular fractions. Whole cells exhibited the highest overall fluorescence intensity followed by (in order) cytosolic proteins, microsomes, then nuclei and mitochondria.

  18. Cell Shape Dynamics: From Waves to Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Meghan; McCann, Colin; Kopace, Rael; Homan, Tess; Fourkas, John; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    We analyzed the dynamic shape of migrating Dictyostelium discoideum cells. We found that regions of high boundary curvature propagate from the front to the back of cells in an organized fashion. These waves of high curvature are stabilized by surface contact, and so, at the sides of cells, are stationary relative to the surface. The initiation of curvature waves, though, which usually occurs at the front of cells, is associated with protrusive motion. The protrusion location shifts rapidly in a ballistic manner at speeds nearly double that of cellular migration. To examine curvature waves in the absence of surface contact, we guided cells to extend over the edge of micro-cliffs. The curvature wave speed of cells extended over a cliff was triple the wave speed of cells migrating on a surface, which is consistent with the higher wave speeds observed near the non-adherent leading edge of cells.

  19. Emergence of oligarchy in collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Linus; Maini, Philip; Baker, Ruth

    Identifying the principles of collective cell migration has the potential to help prevent birth defects, improve regenerative therapies and develop model systems for cancer metastasis. In collaboration with experimental biologists, we use computational simulations of a hybrid model, comprising individual-based stochastic cell movement coupled to a reaction-diffusion equation for a chemoattractant, to explore the role of cell specialisation in the guidance of collective cell migration. In the neural crest, an important migratory cell population in vertebrate embryo development, we present evidence that just a few cells are guiding group migration in a cell-induced chemoattractant gradient that determines the switch between ``leader'' and ``follower'' behaviour in individual cells. This leads us to more generally consider under what conditions cell specialisation might become advantageous for collective migration. Alternatively, individual cell responses to locally different microenvironmental conditions could create the (artefactual) appearance of heterogeneity in a population of otherwise identical cellular agents. We explore these questions using a self-propelled particle model as a minimal description for collective cell migration in two and three dimensions.

  20. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Justus, Calvin R; Leffler, Nancy; Ruiz-Echevarria, Maria; Yang, Li V

    2014-06-01

    Migration is a key property of live cells and critical for normal development, immune response, and disease processes such as cancer metastasis and inflammation. Methods to examine cell migration are very useful and important for a wide range of biomedical research such as cancer biology, immunology, vascular biology, cell biology and developmental biology. Here we use tumor cell migration and invasion as an example and describe two related assays to illustrate the commonly used, easily accessible methods to measure these processes. The first method is the cell culture wound closure assay in which a scratch is generated on a confluent cell monolayer. The speed of wound closure and cell migration can be quantified by taking snapshot pictures with a regular inverted microscope at several time intervals. More detailed cell migratory behavior can be documented using the time-lapse microscopy system. The second method described in this paper is the transwell cell migration and invasion assay that measures the capacity of cell motility and invasiveness toward a chemo-attractant gradient. It is our goal to describe these methods in a highly accessible manner so that the procedures can be successfully performed in research laboratories even just with basic cell biology setup.

  1. Entropy measures of collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, Ariadne; Parrinello, Simona; Faisal, Aldo

    2015-03-01

    Collective cell migration is a critical process during tissue formation and repair. To this end there is a need to develop tools to quantitatively measure the dynamics of collective cell migration obtained from microscopy data. Drawing on statistical physics we use entropy of velocity fields derived from dense optic flow to quantitatively measure collective migration. Using peripheral nerve repair after injury as experimental system, we study how Schwann cells, guided by fibroblasts, migrate in cord-like structures across the cut, paving a highway for neurons. This process of emergence of organised behaviour is key for successful repair, yet the emergence of leader cells and transition from a random to ordered state is not understood. We find fibroblasts induce correlated directionality in migrating Schwann cells as measured by a decrease in the entropy of motion vector. We show our method is robust with respect to image resolution in time and space, giving a principled assessment of how various molecular mechanisms affect macroscopic features of collective cell migration. Finally, the generality of our method allows us to process both simulated cell movement and microscopic data, enabling principled fitting and comparison of in silico to in vitro. ICCS, Imperial College London & MRC Clinical Sciences Centre.

  2. Cell density determines epithelial migration in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, P; Misfeldt, D S

    1980-01-01

    The dog kidney epithelial cell line (MDCK) has been shown to exhibit a density-correlated inhibition of growth at approxmately 6.6 X 10(5) cells per cm2. When a confluent monolayer at its maximal density was wounded by removal of a wide swath of cells, migration of the cell sheet into the denuded area occurred. Precise measurements of the rate of migration for 5 day showed that the cells accelerated at a uniform rate of 0.24 micrometer . hr-2 and, by extrapolation, possessed an apparent initial velocity of 2.8 micrometer . hr-1 at the time of wounding. The apparent initial velocity was considered to be the result of a brief (< 10 hr) and rapid acceleration dependent on cell density. To verify this, wounds were made at different densities below the maximum. In these experiments, the cells did not migrate until a "threshold" density of 2.0 X 10(5) cells per cm2 was reached regardless of the density at the time of wounding. At the threshold density, the cell sheet began to accelerate at the previously measured rate (0.24 micrometer . hr-2). Any increase in density by cell division was balanced by cell migration, so that the same threshold density was maintained by the migrating cells. Each migrating cell sustained the movement of the cell sheet at a constant rate of acceleration. It is proposed that an acceleration is, in general, characteristic of the vectorial movement of an epithelial cell sheet. Images PMID:6933523

  3. Cell migration in the postnatal subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Menezes, J R L; Marins, M; Alves, J A J; Froes, M M; Hedin-Pereira, C

    2002-12-01

    New neurons are constantly added to the olfactory bulb of rodents from birth to adulthood. This accretion is not only dependent on sustained neurogenesis, but also on the migration of neuroblasts and immature neurons from the cortical and striatal subventricular zone (SVZ) to the olfactory bulb. Migration along this long tangential pathway, known as the rostral migratory stream (RMS), is in many ways opposite to the classical radial migration of immature neurons: it is faster, spans a longer distance, does not require radial glial guidance, and is not limited to postmitotic neurons. In recent years many molecules have been found to be expressed specifically in this pathway and to directly affect this migration. Soluble factors with inhibitory, attractive and inductive roles in migration have been described, as well as molecules mediating cell-to-cell and cell-substrate interactions. However, it is still unclear how the various molecules and cells interact to account for the special migratory behavior in the RMS. Here we will propose some candidate mechanisms for roles in initiating and stopping SVZ/RMS migration.

  4. Attraction rules: germ cell migration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Raz, Erez; Reichman-Fried, Michal

    2006-08-01

    The migration of zebrafish primordial germ cell towards the region where the gonad develops is guided by the chemokine SDF-1a. Recent studies show that soon after their specification, the cells undergo a series of morphological alterations before they become motile and are able to respond to attractive cues. As migratory cells, primordial germ cells move towards their target while correcting their path upon exiting a cyclic phase in which morphological cell polarity is lost. In the following stages, the cells gather at specific locations and move as cell clusters towards their final target. In all of these stages, zebrafish germ cells respond as individual cells to alterations in the shape of the sdf-1a expression domain, by directed migration towards their target - the position where the gonad develops.

  5. Dissecting mesenchymal stem cell movement: migration assays for tracing and deducing cell migration.

    PubMed

    Spaeth, Erika L; Marini, Frank C

    2011-01-01

    Targeted migration is a necessary attribute for any gene delivery vehicle. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been used as effective delivery vehicles for treatments against cancer, graft versus host disease, -arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and many other diseases. MSC migrate toward sites of inflammation, however, the true migratory mechanism has yet to be elucidated. There are several receptors and respective chemokines known to be involved in the migration of the MSC. Further insight to MSC migration will be revealed both in vivo and in vitro through the application of migration assays from the most simple, to the more technologically demanding.

  6. A Novel Collagen Dot Assay for Monitoring Cancer Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Alford, Vincent M; Roth, Eric; Zhang, Qian; Cao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is a critical determinant of cancer invasion and metastasis. Drugs targeting cancer cell migration have been hindered due to the lack of effective assays for monitoring cancer cell migration. Here we describe a novel method to microscopically monitor cell migration in a quantitative fashion. This assay can be used to study genes involved in cancer cell migration, as well as screening anticancer drugs that target this cellular process.

  7. Study of cell migration in microfabricated channels.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Pablo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-02-21

    The method described here allows the study of cell migration under confinement in one dimension. It is based on the use of microfabricated channels, which impose a polarized phenotype to cells by physical constraints. Once inside channels, cells have only two possibilities: move forward or backward. This simplified migration in which directionality is restricted facilitates the automatic tracking of cells and the extraction of quantitative parameters to describe cell movement. These parameters include cell velocity, changes in direction, and pauses during motion. Microchannels are also compatible with the use of fluorescent markers and are therefore suitable to study localization of intracellular organelles and structures during cell migration at high resolution. Finally, the surface of the channels can be functionalized with different substrates, allowing the control of the adhesive properties of the channels or the study of haptotaxis. In summary, the system here described is intended to analyze the migration of large cell numbers in conditions in which both the geometry and the biochemical nature of the environment are controlled, facilitating the normalization and reproducibility of independent experiments.

  8. Collective cell migration: guidance principles and hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Haeger, Anna; Wolf, Katarina; Zegers, Mirjam M; Friedl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Collective cell migration results from the establishment and maintenance of collective polarization, mechanocoupling, and cytoskeletal kinetics. The guidance of collective cell migration depends on a reciprocal process between cell-intrinsic multicellular organization with leader-follower cell behavior and results in mechanosensory integration of extracellular guidance cues. Important guidance mechanisms include chemotaxis, haptotaxis, durotaxis, and strain-induced mechanosensing to move cell groups along interfaces and paths of least resistance. Additional guidance mechanisms steering cell groups during specialized conditions comprise electrotaxis and passive drift. To form higher-order cell and tissue structures during morphogenesis and cancer invasion, these guidance principles act in parallel and are integrated for collective adaptation to and shaping of varying tissue environments. We review mechanochemical and electrical inputs and multiparameter signal integration underlying collective guidance, decision making, and outcome.

  9. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nina; Walzl, Angelika; Unger, Christine; Rosner, Margit; Krupitza, Georg; Hengstschläger, Markus; Dolznig, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Determining the migratory and invasive capacity of tumor and stromal cells and clarifying the underlying mechanisms is most relevant for novel strategies in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, drug development and treatment. Here we shortly summarize the different modes of cell travelling and review in vitro methods, which can be used to evaluate migration and invasion. We provide a concise summary of established migration/invasion assays described in the literature, list advantages, limitations and drawbacks, give a tabular overview for convenience and depict the basic principles of the assays graphically. In many cases particular research problems and specific cell types do not leave a choice for a broad variety of usable assays. However, for most standard applications using adherent cells, based on our experience we suggest to use exclusion zone assays to evaluate migration/invasion. We substantiate our choice by demonstrating that the advantages outbalance the drawbacks e.g. the simple setup, the easy readout, the kinetic analysis, the evaluation of cell morphology and the feasibility to perform the assay with standard laboratory equipment. Finally, innovative 3D migration and invasion models including heterotypic cell interactions are discussed. These methods recapitulate the in vivo situation most closely. Results obtained with these assays have already shed new light on cancer cell spreading and potentially will uncover unknown mechanisms.

  10. Engineered Models of Confined Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Colin D.; Hung, Wei-Chien; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Cells in the body are physically confined by neighboring cells, tissues, and the extracellular matrix. Although physical confinement modulates intracellular signaling and the underlying mechanisms of cell migration, it is difficult to study in vivo. Furthermore, traditional two-dimensional cell migration assays do not recapitulate the complex topographies found in the body. Therefore, a number of experimental in vitro models that confine and impose forces on cells in well-defined microenvironments have been engineered. We describe the design and use of microfluidic microchannel devices, grooved substrates, micropatterned lines, vertical confinement devices, patterned hydrogels, and micropipette aspiration assays for studying cell responses to confinement. Use of these devices has enabled the delineation of changes in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell–substrate adhesions, intracellular signaling, nuclear shape, and gene expression that result from physical confinement. These assays and the physiologically relevant signaling pathways that have been elucidated are beginning to have a translational and clinical impact. PMID:27420571

  11. Glial chain migration requires pioneer cells.

    PubMed

    Aigouy, Benoît; Lepelletier, Léa; Giangrande, Angela

    2008-11-05

    The migration of glial chains along the nerve entails directional and coordinated movement. Despite its importance in the formation of the nervous system, this process remains poorly understood, because of the difficulty of manipulating identified cells. Using confocal time-lapse and cell ablation in the whole animal, we provide direct evidence for a discrete number of Drosophila peripheral glial cells acting as pioneers and guiding the rest of the migratory chain. These cells are in direct contact with several follower cells through a very long and stable cytoplasmic extension. The presence of pioneer cells and homotypic interactions at the tip of the chain allows coordinated movement and the formation of a continuous sheath around the nerve. These in vivo data open novel perspectives for understanding the cellular bases of vertebrate glial migration in physiological and pathological conditions.

  12. Chemokine Oligomerization in Cell Signaling and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Sharp, Joshua S.; Handel, Tracy M.; Prestegard, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are small proteins best known for their role in controlling the migration of diverse cells, particularly leukocytes. Upon binding to their G-protein-coupled receptors on the leukocytes, chemokines stimulate the signaling events that cause cytoskeletal rearrangements involved in cell movement, and migration of the cells along chemokine gradients. Depending on the cell type, chemokines also induce many other types of cellular responses including those related to defense mechanisms, cell proliferation, survival, and development. Historically, most research efforts have focused on the interaction of chemokines with their receptors, where monomeric forms of the ligands are the functionally relevant state. More recently, however, the importance of chemokine interactions with cell surface glycosaminoglycans has come to light, and in most cases appears to involve oligomeric chemokine structures. This review summarizes existing knowledge relating to the structure and function of chemokine oligomers, and emerging methodology for determining structures of complex chemokine assemblies in the future. PMID:23663982

  13. Tumor cell migration is a superstatistical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabry, Ben

    2014-03-01

    Over short time scales, cell migration can be well described as a homogeneous correlated random walk with a fixed average step length and a certain degree of directional persistence. On time scales of up to 24 h, however, the migration process is highly inhomogeneous. Superstatistical fluctuations of step length and directional persistence lead to ``anomalous'' features, such as an exponential step width distribution (SWD) and a superdiffusive mean squared displacement (MSD). These features are quantitatively reproduced by a correlated random walk with temporally varying persistence. By comparing cell migration on planar substrates and in a 3D collagen matrix, we demonstrate that the globally averaged MSD and SWD are not sensitive to the microscopic migration mechanism of the cells and can therefore yield identical results in these different environments. By contrast, the temporal fluctuations of step length and directional persistence, and their mutual correlations, provide a characteristic fingerprint of the migration process in different environments. In collaboration with Julian Steinwachs and Claus Metzner, Department of Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.

  14. Sphingolipids inhibit vimentin-dependent cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Claire L; Kemppainen, Kati; Isoniemi, Kimmo O; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Goto, Hidemasa; Inagaki, Masaki; Fazeli, Elnaz; Eriksson, John E; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-06-01

    The sphingolipids, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), can induce or inhibit cellular migration. The intermediate filament protein vimentin is an inducer of migration and a marker for epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Given that keratin intermediate filaments are regulated by SPC, with consequences for cell motility, we wanted to determine whether vimentin is also regulated by sphingolipid signalling and whether it is a determinant for sphingolipid-mediated functions. In cancer cells where S1P and SPC inhibited migration, we observed that S1P and SPC induced phosphorylation of vimentin on S71, leading to a corresponding reorganization of vimentin filaments. These effects were sphingolipid-signalling-dependent, because inhibition of either the S1P2 receptor (also known as S1PR2) or its downstream effector Rho-associated kinase (ROCK, for which there are two isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2) nullified the sphingolipid-induced effects on vimentin organization and S71 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the anti-migratory effect of S1P and SPC could be prevented by expressing S71-phosphorylation-deficient vimentin. In addition, we demonstrated, by using wild-type and vimentin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, that the sphingolipid-mediated inhibition of migration is dependent on vimentin. These results imply that this newly discovered sphingolipid-vimentin signalling axis exerts brake-and-throttle functions in the regulation of cell migration.

  15. Cell migration on ridges and cliffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Meghan; McCann, Colin; Kopace, Rael; Watts, John; Homan, Tess; Losert, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is a model system for the study of cellular migration, an important physiological process that occurs in embryonic development, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. We study the motion of D. discoideum on surfaces with various topographies, particularly those that affect the direction of cellular migration. Topographical features, such as ridges and cliffs, were fabricated using multiphoton absorption polymerization. As the cells encountered these topographical features, we tracked their overall motions and shapes, as well as the locations and intensities of certain intracellular signals. We found that when cells undergoing chemokinesis, random migration in response to a chemical signal, encounter a ridge, they tend to move along that ridge, even if the ridge is shorter than the cell. When cells undergoing chemotaxis, directed migration in response to a chemical signal, are directed off of a cliff, they do not fall off the cliff. Instead, they search for new attachment points, eventually change direction, and continue moving along the edge of the cliff. Both ridges and cliffs affect more than just the motion of a cell; they also affect its shape.

  16. Structure and barrier properties of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells are affected by extracellular matrix protein coating.

    PubMed

    Sorkio, Anni; Hongisto, Heidi; Kaarniranta, Kai; Uusitalo, Hannu; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Skottman, Heli

    2014-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions play a vital role in cell morphology, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of cells. We investigated the role of ECM proteins on the structure and function of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells during their differentiation and maturation from hESCs into RPE cells in adherent differentiation cultures on several human ECM proteins found in native human Bruch's membrane, namely, collagen I, collagen IV, laminin, fibronectin, and vitronectin, as well as on commercial substrates of xeno-free CELLstart™ and Matrigel™. Cell pigmentation, expression of RPE-specific proteins, fine structure, as well as the production of basal lamina by hESC-RPE on different protein coatings were evaluated after 140 days of differentiation. The integrity of hESC-RPE epithelium and barrier properties on different coatings were investigated by measuring transepithelial resistance. All coatings supported the differentiation of hESC-RPE cells as demonstrated by early onset of cell pigmentation and further maturation to RPE monolayers after enrichment. Mature RPE phenotype was verified by RPE-specific gene and protein expression, correct epithelial polarization, and phagocytic activity. Significant differences were found in the degree of RPE cell pigmentation and tightness of epithelial barrier between different coatings. Further, the thickness of self-assembled basal lamina and secretion of the key ECM proteins found in the basement membrane of the native RPE varied between hESC-RPE cultured on compared protein coatings. In conclusion, this study shows that the cell culture substrate has a major effect on the structure and basal lamina production during the differentiation and maturation of hESC-RPE potentially influencing the success of cell integrations and survival after cell transplantation.

  17. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Giampietro, Costanza; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stéphane; Alava, Mikko J.; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media, and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems. PMID:27681632

  18. Basal and apical regulation of VEGF-A and placenta growth factor in the RPE/choroid and primary RPE

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Leyla; Flach, Janina; Lassen, Jens; Treumer, Felix; Roider, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family are strongly involved in pathological processes in the retina, such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) constitutively secrete VEGF-A, and the secretion of placental growth factor (PlGF) has also been described. RPE cells are strongly polarized cells with different secretome at the apical and basal side. In this study, we evaluated the basal and apical regulation of VEGF-A and PlGF secretion in RPE/choroid explants and primary RPE cells. Methods RPE/choroid tissue explants were prepared from porcine eyes and cultivated in modified Ussing chambers, separating apical (RPE) and basal (choroid) supernatant. Primary RPE cells were also prepared from porcine eyes and cultivated on Transwell plates. Explants and cells were treated with inhibitors for VEGFR-2 (SU1498), p38 (SB203580), and the transcription factors nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and SP-1 (mithramycin), respectively. VEGF-A and PlGF content was evaluated with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, western blots were performed. Results In the RPE/choroid, VEGF-A can initially be found on the apical and basal sides with significantly more pronounced secretion on the basal side. VEGF-A secretion is differentially regulated on the apical and basal sides, with the inhibition of SP-1 and NF-κB showing strong effects apically and basally after 24 h and 48 h, the inhibition of p38 displaying its effect mainly on the basal side with some effect apically after 48 h, and the inhibition of VEGFR-2 reducing the secretion of VEGF only on the apical side at 24 h and 48 h. In the RPE cell culture, similar effects were found, with inhibition of NF-κB or SP-1 displaying a strong decrease in VEGF-A on both sides, and p38 inhibition displaying only an inhibitory effect on the basal side. In contrast, an apical effect of VEGFR-2 inhibition was not found. However, the

  19. Impact of jamming on collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnetu, Kenechukwu David; Knorr, Melanie; Pawlizak, Steve; Fuhs, Thomas; Zink, Mareike; KäS, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    Multi-cellular migration plays an important role in physiological processes such as embryogenesis, cancer metastasis and tissue repair. During migration, single cells undergo cycles of extension, adhesion and retraction resulting in morphological changes. In a confluent monolayer, there are inter-cellular interactions and crowding, however, the impact of these interactions on the dynamics and elasticity of the monolayer at the multi-cellular and single cell level is not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of a confluent epithelial monolayer by simultaneously measuring cell motion at the multi-cellular and single cell level for various cell densities and tensile elasticity. At the multi-cellular level, the system exhibited spatial kinetic transitions from isotropic to anisotropic migration on long times and the velocity of the monolayer decreased with increasing cell density. Moreover, the dynamics was spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Interestingly, the dynamics was also heterogeneous in wound-healing assays and the correlation length was fitted by compressed exponential. On the single cell scale, we observed transient caging effects with increasing cage rearrangement times as the system age due to an increase in density. Also, the density dependent elastic modulus of the monolayer scaled as a weak power law. Together, these findings suggest that caging effects at the single cell level initiates a slow and heterogeneous dynamics at the multi-cellular level which is similar to the glassy dynamics of deformable colloidal systems.

  20. Generation of Cre Transgenic Mice with Postnatal RPE-Specific Ocular Expression

    PubMed Central

    Iacovelli, Jared; Zhao, Chen; Wolkow, Natalie; Veldman, Peter; Gollomp, Kandace; Ojha, Pallavi; Lukinova, Nina; King, Ayala; Feiner, Leonard; Esumi, Noriko; Zack, Donald J.; Pierce, Eric A.; Vollrath, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To generate and characterize a constitutively active, RPE-specific, cre-expressing transgenic mouse line. This line can be used to create RPE-specific knockouts by crossing with mice harboring loxP-flanked (floxed) genes. Methods. A transgene construct was assembled with the BEST1 promoter driving cre expression. Transgenic mice were generated on a C57BL/6 background. Cre expression was assessed by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Cre enzymatic activity was tested by crossing to three lines with floxed DNA regions and detecting deletion of the intervening sequences or through histochemical detection of lacZ activity. Potential cre-mediated toxicity was assessed by retinal histology up to 24 months of age and by electroretinography. Results. The BEST1-cre line with expression in the highest percentage of RPE cells displayed a patchy mosaic expression pattern, with 50% to 90% of RPE cells expressing cre. In mice outcrossed to a mixed B6/129 background, expression was consistently found in 90% of RPE cells. Within the eye, only the RPE cells were immunoreactive with an anti-cre antibody. Maximum cre expression quantified by Western blot analysis occurred at P28. Crosses with three lines containing floxed sequences revealed RPE-specific cre activity in the eye and extraocular expression limited to the testes. Histology and electroretinography showed no cre-mediated RPE toxicity. Conclusions. This BEST1-cre transgenic line enables generation of RPE-specific knockout mice. The mosaic expression pattern provides an internal control; the non–cre-expressing RPE cells continue to express the floxed genes. These mice should facilitate study of the multifunctional RPE and the generation of mouse models of human retinal disease. PMID:21212186

  1. Signal Relay During Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Can; Rericha, Erin; Ott, Edward; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    We developed a signal relay model to quantify the effect of intercellular communication in presence of an external signal, during the motion of groups of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. A key parameter is the ratio of amplitude of the cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) a signaling chemical secreted from individual cells versus the external cAMP field, which defines a time scale. Another time scale is set by the degradation rate of the cAMP. In our simulations, the competition between these two time scales results rich dynamics including uniform motion, as well as streaming and clustering instabilities. The simulations are compared to experiments for a wide range of different external signal strengths for both cells that secrete cAMP and a mutant which cannot relay cAMP. Under different strength of external linear cAMP gradient, the wild type cells form streams and exhibit clustering due to the intercellular signaling through individual cAMP secretion. In contrast, cells lacking signal relay move relatively straight. We find that the model captures both independent motion and the formation of aggregates when cells relay the signal.

  2. Myosin IIA dependent retrograde flow drives 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2010-04-21

    Epithelial cell migration is an essential part of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration, yet their migration is least understood. Using our three-dimensional (3D) motility analysis, migrating epithelial cells formed an atypical polarized cell shape with the nucleus leading the cell front and a contractile cell rear. Migrating epithelial cells exerted traction forces to deform both the anterior and posterior extracellular matrix toward the cell body. The cell leading edge exhibited a myosin II-dependent retrograde flow with the magnitude and direction consistent with surrounding network deformation. Interestingly, on a two-dimensional substrate, myosin IIA-deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type cells, but in a 3D gel, these myosin IIA-deficient cells were unpolarized and immobile. In contrast, the migration rates of myosin IIB-deficient cells were similar to wild-type cells. Therefore, myosin IIA, not myosin IIB, is required for 3D epithelial cell migration.

  3. T cell migration, search strategies and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Krummel, Matthew F; Bartumeus, Frederic; Gérard, Audrey

    2016-03-01

    T cell migration is essential for T cell responses; it allows for the detection of cognate antigen at the surface of antigen-presenting cells and for interactions with other cells involved in the immune response. Although appearing random, growing evidence suggests that T cell motility patterns are strategic and governed by mechanisms that are optimized for both the activation stage of the cell and for environment-specific cues. In this Opinion article, we discuss how the combined effects of T cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic forces influence T cell motility patterns in the context of highly complex tissues that are filled with other cells involved in parallel motility. In particular, we examine how insights from 'search theory' can be used to describe T cell movement across an 'exploitation-exploration trade-off' in the context of activation versus effector function and lymph nodes versus peripheral tissues.

  4. Cell Chirality Induces Collective Cell Migration in Epithelial Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsuhiko; Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    During early development, epithelial cells form a monolayer sheet and migrate in a uniform direction. Here, we address how this collective migration can occur without breaking the cell-to-cell attachments. Repeated contraction and expansion of the cell-to-cell interfaces enables the cells to rearrange their positions autonomously within the sheet. We show that when the interface tension is strengthened in a direction that is tilted from the body axis, cell rearrangements occur in such a way that unidirectional movement is induced. We use a vertex model to demonstrate that such anisotropic tension can generate the unidirectional motion of cell sheets. Our results suggest that cell chirality facilitates collective cell migration during tissue morphogenesis.

  5. Thy-1 Regulates VEGF-Mediated Choroidal Endothelial Cell Activation and Migration: Implications in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Kunz, Eric; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study addresses the hypothesis that age-related stresses upregulate Thy-1 in choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) and contribute to CEC activation and migration, processes important in choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Methods Measurements were made of Thy-1 protein (Western blot) in CECs and Thy-1 mRNA (real time quantitative PCR) in CECs treated with VEGF, CCL11, or PBS or in RPE/choroids from young or old donors or lasered or nonlasered mice. Immunolabeled Thy-1 in ocular sections was compared from young versus old human donor eyes or those with or without neovascular AMD or from lasered versus nonlasered mice. Choroidal endothelial cells transfected with Thy-1 or control siRNA or pretreated with Thy-1 blocking peptide or control were stimulated with VEGF or 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC). Choroidal endothelial cell migration, proliferation, cytoskeletal stress fibers, Rac1 activation, and phosphorylated VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), integrin β3, and Src were measured. Statistics were performed using ANOVA. Results Thy-1 was expressed in retinal ganglion cells and in vascular endothelial-cadherin–labeled choroid and localized to human or mouse laser-induced CNV lesions. Thy-1 protein and mRNA were significantly increased in CECs treated with VEGF or CCL11 and in RPE/choroids from aged versus young donor eyes or from lasered mice versus nonlasered controls. Knockdown or inhibition of Thy-1 in CECs significantly reduced VEGF-induced CEC migration and proliferation, stress fiber formation and VEGFR2, Src, integrin β3 and Rac1 activation, and 7-KC–induced Rac1 and Src activation. Conclusions Thy-1 in CECs regulates VEGF-induced CEC activation and migration and links extracellular 7-KC to intracellular signaling. Future studies elucidating Thy-1 mechanisms in neovascular AMD are warranted. PMID:27768790

  6. Cadmium migration in aerospace nickel cadmium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermott, P. P.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of temperature, the nature of separator material, charge and discharge, carbonate contamination, and the mode of storage are studied with respect to the migration of active material from the negative toward the positive plate. A theoretical model is proposed which takes into account the solubility of cadmium in various concentrations of hydroxide and carbonate at different temperatures, the generation of the cadmiate ion, Cd(OH)3(-), during discharge, the migration of the cadmiate ion and particulate Cd(OH)2 due to electrophoretic effects and the movement of electrolyte in and out of the negative plate and, finally, the recrystallization of cadmiate ion in the separator as Cd(OH)2. Application of the theoretical model to observations of cadmium migration in cycled cells is also discussed.

  7. Mutation of key residues of RPE65 abolishes its enzymatic role as isomerohydrolase in the visual cycle.

    PubMed

    Redmond, T Michael; Poliakov, Eugenia; Yu, Shirley; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Lu, Zhongjian; Gentleman, Susan

    2005-09-20

    RPE65 is essential for isomerization of vitamin A to the visual chromophore. Mutations in RPE65 cause early-onset blindness, and Rpe65-deficient mice lack 11-cis-retinal but overaccumulate alltrans-retinyl esters in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). RPE65 is proposed to be a substrate chaperone but may have an enzymatic role because it is closely related to carotenoid oxygenases. We hypothesize that, by analogy with other carotenoid oxygenases, the predicted iron-coordinating residues of RPE65 are essential for retinoid isomerization. To clarify RPE65's role in isomerization, we reconstituted a robust minimal visual cycle in 293-F cells. Only cells transfected with RPE65 constructs produced 11-cis-retinoids, but coexpression with lecithin:retinol acyltransferase was needed for high-level production. Accumulation was significant, amounting to >2 nmol of 11-cis-retinol per culture. Transfection with constructs harboring mutations in residues of RPE65 homologous to those required for interlinked enzymatic activity and iron coordination in related enzymes abolish this isomerization. Iron chelation also abolished isomerization activity. Mutating cysteines implicated in palmitoylation of RPE65 had generally little effect on isomerization activity. Mutations associated with Leber congenital amaurosis/early-onset blindness cause partial to total loss of isomerization activity in direct relation to their clinical effects. These findings establish a catalytic role, in conjunction with lecithin:retinol acyltransferase, for RPE65 in synthesis of 11-cis-retinol, and its identity as the isomerohydrolase.

  8. Nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-09-02

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin(+) cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin(+) cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin(+) cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin(+) stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin(+) cells-but not in endothelial cells only- increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis.

  9. Collective cell migration: leadership, invasion and segregation.

    PubMed

    Kabla, Alexandre J

    2012-12-07

    A number of biological processes, such as embryo development, cancer metastasis or wound healing, rely on cells moving in concert. The mechanisms leading to the emergence of coordinated motion remain however largely unexplored. Although biomolecular signalling is known to be involved in most occurrences of collective migration, the role of physical and mechanical interactions has only been recently investigated. In this study, a versatile framework for cell motility is implemented in silico in order to study the minimal requirements for the coordination of a group of epithelial cells. We find that cell motility and cell-cell mechanical interactions are sufficient to generate a broad array of behaviours commonly observed in vitro and in vivo. Cell streaming, sheet migration and susceptibility to leader cells are examples of behaviours spontaneously emerging from these simple assumptions, which might explain why collective effects are so ubiquitous in nature. The size of the population and its confinement appear, in particular, to play an important role in the coordination process. In all cases, the complex response of the population can be predicted from the knowledge of the correlation length of the velocity field measured in the bulk of the epithelial layer. This analysis provides also new insights into cancer metastasis and cell sorting, suggesting, in particular, that collective invasion might result from an emerging coordination in a system where single cells are mechanically unable to invade.

  10. Paxillin: a crossroad in pathological cell migration.

    PubMed

    López-Colomé, Ana María; Lee-Rivera, Irene; Benavides-Hidalgo, Regina; López, Edith

    2017-02-18

    Paxilllin is a multifunctional and multidomain focal adhesion adapter protein which serves an important scaffolding role at focal adhesions by recruiting structural and signaling molecules involved in cell movement and migration, when phosphorylated on specific Tyr and Ser residues. Upon integrin engagement with extracellular matrix, paxillin is phosphorylated at Tyr31, Tyr118, Ser188, and Ser190, activating numerous signaling cascades which promote cell migration, indicating that the regulation of adhesion dynamics is under the control of a complex display of signaling mechanisms. Among them, paxillin disassembly from focal adhesions induced by extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated phosphorylation of serines 106, 231, and 290 as well as the binding of the phosphatase PEST to paxillin have been shown to play a key role in cell migration. Paxillin also coordinates the spatiotemporal activation of signaling molecules, including Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA GTPases, by recruiting GEFs, GAPs, and GITs to focal adhesions. As a major participant in the regulation of cell movement, paxillin plays distinct roles in specific tissues and developmental stages and is involved in immune response, epithelial morphogenesis, and embryonic development. Importantly, paxillin is also an essential player in pathological conditions including oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial cell barrier dysfunction, and cancer development and metastasis.

  11. Nestin+ cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin+ cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin+ cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin+ cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin+ cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin+ stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin+ cells—but not in endothelial cells only— increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis. PMID:27586429

  12. Dynamic contact guidance of migrating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losert, Wolfgang; Sun, Xiaoyu; Guven, Can; Driscoll, Meghan; Fourkas, John

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the effects of nanotopographical surfaces on the cell migration and cell shape dynamics of the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Amoeboid motion exhibits significant contact guidance along surfaces with nanoscale ridges or grooves. We show quantitatively that nanoridges spaced 1.5 μm apart exhibit the greatest contact guidance efficiency. Using principal component analysis, we characterize the dynamics of the cell shape modulated by the coupling between the cell membrane and ridges. We show that motion parallel to the ridges is enhanced, while the turning, at the largest spatial scales, is suppressed. Since protrusion dynamics are principally governed by actin dynamics, we imaged the actin polymerization of cells on ridges. We found that actin polymerization occurs preferentially along nanoridges in a ``monorail'' like fashion. The ridges then provide us with a tool to study actin dynamics in an effectively reduced dimensional system.

  13. Arf proteins in cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Casalou, Cristina; Faustino, Alexandra; Barral, Duarte C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) family of small GTP-binding (G) proteins regulate several aspects of membrane trafficking, such as vesicle budding, tethering and cytoskeleton organization. Arf family members, including Arf-like (Arl) proteins have been implicated in several essential cellular functions, like cell spreading and migration. These functions are used by cancer cells to disseminate and invade the tissues surrounding the primary tumor, leading to the formation of metastases. Indeed, Arf and Arl proteins, as well as their guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) have been found to be abnormally expressed in different cancer cell types and human cancers. Here, we review the current evidence supporting the involvement of Arf family proteins and their GEFs and GAPs in cancer progression, focusing on 3 different mechanisms: cell-cell adhesion, integrin internalization and recycling, and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. PMID:27589148

  14. The impact of oxidative stress and inflammation on RPE degeneration in non-neovascular AMD.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sayantan; Cano, Marisol; Ebrahimi, Katayoon; Wang, Lei; Handa, James T

    2017-03-20

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a highly specialized, unique epithelial cell that interacts with photoreceptors on its apical side and with Bruch's membrane and the choriocapillaris on its basal side. Due to vital functions that keep photoreceptors healthy, the RPE is essential for maintaining vision. With aging and the accumulated effects of environmental stresses, the RPE can become dysfunctional and die. This degeneration plays a central role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) pathobiology, the leading cause of blindness among the elderly in western societies. Oxidative stress and inflammation have both physiological and potentially pathological roles in RPE degeneration. Given the central role of the RPE, this review will focus on the impact of oxidative stress and inflammation on the RPE with AMD pathobiology. Physiological sources of oxidative stress as well as unique sources from photo-oxidative stress, the phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments, and modifiable factors such as cigarette smoking and high fat diet ingestion that can convert oxidative stress into a pathological role, and the negative impact of impairing the cytoprotective roles of mitochondrial dynamics and the Nrf2 signaling system on RPE health in AMD will be discussed. Likewise, the response by the innate immune system to an inciting trigger, and the potential role of local RPE production of inflammation, as well as a potential role for damage by inflammation with chronicity if the inciting trigger is not neutralized, will be debated.

  15. Cell Shape Dynamics: From Waves to Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Meghan; McCann, Colin; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fourkas, John; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    We observe and quantify wave-like characteristics of amoeboid migration. Using the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, a model system for the study of chemotaxis, we demonstrate that cell shape changes in a wave-like manner. Cells have regions of high boundary curvature that propagate from the leading edge toward the back, usually along alternating sides of the cell. Curvature waves are easily seen in cells that do not adhere to a surface, such as cells that are electrostatically repelled from surfaces or cells that extend over the edge of micro-fabricated cliffs. Without surface contact, curvature waves travel from the leading edge to the back of a cell at ˜35 μm/min. Non-adherent myosin II null cells do not exhibit these curvature waves. At the leading edge of adherent cells, curvature waves are associated with protrusive activity. Like regions of high curvature, protrusive activity travels along the boundary in a wave-like manner. Upon contact with a surface, the waves stop moving relative to the surface, and the boundary shape thus reflects the history of protrusive motion. The wave-like character of protrusions provides a plausible mechanism for the ability of cells to both swim in viscous fluids and to navigate complex 3-D topography.

  16. Cell Shape Dynamics: From Waves to Migration

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Meghan K.; McCann, Colin; Kopace, Rael; Homan, Tess; Fourkas, John T.; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We observe and quantify wave-like characteristics of amoeboid migration. Using the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, a model system for the study of chemotaxis, we demonstrate that cell shape changes in a wave-like manner. Cells have regions of high boundary curvature that propagate from the leading edge toward the back, usually along alternating sides of the cell. Curvature waves are easily seen in cells that do not adhere to a surface, such as cells that are electrostatically repelled from surfaces or cells that extend over the edge of micro-fabricated cliffs. Without surface contact, curvature waves travel from the leading edge to the back of a cell at ∼35 µm/min. Non-adherent myosin II null cells do not exhibit these curvature waves. At the leading edge of adherent cells, curvature waves are associated with protrusive activity. Like regions of high curvature, protrusive activity travels along the boundary in a wave-like manner. Upon contact with a surface, the protrusions stop moving relative to the surface, and the boundary shape thus reflects the history of protrusive motion. The wave-like character of protrusions provides a plausible mechanism for the zig-zagging of pseudopods and for the ability of cells both to swim in viscous fluids and to navigate complex three dimensional topography. PMID:22438794

  17. Force mapping in epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    du Roure, Olivia; Saez, Alexandre; Buguin, Axel; Austin, Robert H.; Chavrier, Philippe; Siberzan, Pascal; Ladoux, Benoit

    2005-01-01

    We measure dynamic traction forces exerted by epithelial cells on a substrate. The force sensor is a high-density array of elastomeric microfabricated pillars that support the cells. Traction forces induced by cell migration are deduced from the measurement of the bending of these pillars and are correlated with actin localization by fluorescence microscopy. We use a multiple-particle tracking method to estimate the mechanical activity of cells in real time with a high-spatial resolution (down to 2 μm) imposed by the periodicity of the post array. For these experiments, we use differentiated Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells. Our data provide definite information on mechanical forces exerted by a cellular assembly. The maximum intensity of the forces is localized on the edge of the epithelia. Hepatocyte growth factor promotes cell motility and induces strong scattering activity of MDCK cells. Thus, we compare forces generated by MDCK cells in subconfluent epithelia versus isolated cells after hepatocyte growth factor treatment. Maximal-traction stresses at the edge of a monolayer correspond to higher values than those measured for a single cell and may be due to a collective behavior. PMID:15695588

  18. Modeling cell migration in 3D: Status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Rajagopal; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2008-01-01

    Cell migration is a multi-scale process that integrates signaling, mechanics and biochemical reaction kinetics. Various mathematical models accurately predict cell migration on 2D surfaces, but are unable to capture the complexities of 3D migration. Additionally, quantitative 3D cell migration models have been few and far between. In this review we look and characterize various mathematical models available in literature to predict cell migration in 3D matrices and analyze their strengths and possible changes to these models that could improve their predictive capabilities.

  19. Alignment of cell division axes in directed epithelial cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Podewitz, Nils; Zorn, Matthias; Oskar Rädler, Joachim; Elgeti, Jens

    2014-11-01

    Cell division is an essential dynamic event in tissue remodeling during wound healing, cancer and embryogenesis. In collective migration, tensile stresses affect cell shape and polarity, hence, the orientation of the cell division axis is expected to depend on cellular flow patterns. Here, we study the degree of orientation of cell division axes in migrating and resting epithelial cell sheets. We use microstructured channels to create a defined scenario of directed cell invasion and compare this situation to resting but proliferating cell monolayers. In experiments, we find a strong alignment of the axis due to directed flow while resting sheets show very weak global order, but local flow gradients still correlate strongly with the cell division axis. We compare experimental results with a previously published mesoscopic particle based simulation model. Most of the observed effects are reproduced by the simulations.

  20. Flow-driven cell migration under external electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yizeng; Mori, Yoichiro; Sun, Sean X.

    2016-01-01

    Electric fields influence many aspects of cell physiology, including various forms of cell migration. Many cells are sensitive to electric fields, and can migrate toward a cathode or an anode, depending on the cell type. In this paper, we examine an actomyosin-independent mode of cell migration under electrical fields. Our theory considers a one-dimensional cell with water and ionic fluxes at the cell boundary. Water fluxes through the membrane are governed by the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Fluxes of cations and anions across the cell membrane are determined by the properties of the ion channels as well as the external electric field. Results show that without actin polymerization and myosin contraction, electric fields can also drive cell migration, even when the cell is not polarized. The direction of migration with respect to the electric field direction is influenced by the properties of ion channels, and are cell-type dependent. PMID:26765031

  1. Flow-Driven Cell Migration under External Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yizeng; Mori, Yoichiro; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-12-01

    Electric fields influence many aspects of cell physiology, including various forms of cell migration. Many cells are sensitive to electric fields, and they can migrate toward a cathode or an anode, depending on the cell type. In this Letter, we examine an actomyosin-independent mode of cell migration under electrical fields. Our theory considers a one-dimensional cell with water and ionic fluxes at the cell boundary. Water fluxes through the membrane are governed by the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Fluxes of cations and anions across the cell membrane are determined by the properties of the ion channels as well as the external electric field. Results show that without actin polymerization and myosin contraction, electric fields can also drive cell migration, even when the cell is not polarized. The direction of migration with respect to the electric field direction is influenced by the properties of ion channels, and are cell-type dependent.

  2. Migrating Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells Swell Prior to Soma Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Happel, Patrick; Möller, Kerstin; Schwering, Nina K.; Dietzel, Irmgard D.

    2013-01-01

    The migration of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) to the white matter is an indispensable requirement for an intact brain function. The mechanism of cell migration in general is not yet completely understood. Nevertheless, evidence is accumulating that besides the coordinated rearrangement of the cytoskeleton, a finetuned interplay of ion and water fluxes across the cell membrane is essential for cell migration. One part of a general hypothesis is that a local volume increase towards the direction of movement triggers a mechano-activated calcium influx that regulates various procedures at the rear end of a migrating cell. Here, we investigated cell volume changes of migrating OPCs using scanning ion conductance microscopy. We found that during accelerated migration OPCs undergo an increase in the frontal cell body volume. These findings are supplemented with time lapse calcium imaging data that hint an increase in calcium content the frontal part of the cell soma. PMID:23657670

  3. Localized RPE Removal with a Novel Instrument Aided by Viscoelastics in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Thieltges, Fabian; Liu, Zengping; Brinken, Ralf; Braun, Norbert; Wongsawad, Warapat; Somboonthanakij, Sudawadee; Herwig, Martina; Holz, Frank G.; Stanzel, Boris V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We developed a surgical method for localized and atraumatic removal of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with a novel instrument. Methods Bleb retinal detachments (bRD) were raised with balanced salt solution (BSS) following vitrectomy in 27 rabbits. The RPE was scraped with 3 loop variants (polypropylene [PP], 0.1 mm; PP, 0.06 mm; metal, 0.1 mm) of a custom-made instrument. Stabilization of bRDs with BSS or various concentrations (0.1%–0.5%) of hyaluronic acid (HA) was video analyzed. Perfusion-fixed samples of scraped areas and controls were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy. Results The bRDs were sufficiently stabilized by ≥0.25% HA. Using the PP 0.1 mm loop with a single forward/backward stroke, an area of ca. 2.5 × 1.5 mm was nearly devoid of RPE, yet did show occasional Bruch's membrane (BM) defects combined with choriocapillaris hemorrhages in 13% of the bRDs. A single scrape with PP 0.06 mm resulted in unsatisfactory RPE denudement, while repeated scraping maneuvers caused more BM defects and hemorrhages. The metal loop resulted in incomplete RPE removal and massive intraoperative subretinal hemorrhages. Histologically, intact photoreceptor outer segments (POS) were observed above the RPE wounds in bRDs. Controls with bRDs alone showed an intact RPE monolayer with microvilli, with few engulfed remains of POS. Conclusions Localized removal of RPE in HA stabilized bRD can be achieved by a PP 0.1 mm loop instrument. Translational Relevance Removal of degenerated RPE may aid RPE cell replacement strategies. PMID:27294010

  4. Differential migration and proliferation of geometrical ensembles of cell clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Girish; Chen, Bo; Co, Carlos C.; Ho, Chia-Chi

    2011-06-10

    Differential cell migration and growth drives the organization of specific tissue forms and plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue morphogenesis, and tumor invasion. Localized gradients of soluble factors and extracellular matrix have been shown to modulate cell migration and proliferation. Here we show that in addition to these factors, initial tissue geometry can feedback to generate differential proliferation, cell polarity, and migration patterns. We apply layer by layer polyelectrolyte assembly to confine multicellular organization and subsequently release cells to demonstrate the spatial patterns of cell migration and growth. The cell shapes, spreading areas, and cell-cell contacts are influenced strongly by the confining geometry. Cells within geometric ensembles are morphologically polarized. Symmetry breaking was observed for cells on the circular pattern and cells migrate toward the corners and in the direction parallel to the longest dimension of the geometric shapes. This migration pattern is disrupted when actomyosin based tension was inhibited. Cells near the edge or corner of geometric shapes proliferate while cells within do not. Regions of higher rate of cell migration corresponded to regions of concentrated growth. These findings demonstrate that multicellular organization can result in spatial patterns of migration and proliferation.

  5. Fine Tuning Cell Migration by a Disintegrin and Metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, K.

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration is an instrumental process involved in organ development, tissue homeostasis, and various physiological processes and also in numerous pathologies. Both basic cell migration and migration towards chemotactic stimulus consist of changes in cell polarity and cytoskeletal rearrangement, cell detachment from, invasion through, and reattachment to their neighboring cells, and numerous interactions with the extracellular matrix. The different steps of immune cell, tissue cell, or cancer cell migration are tightly coordinated in time and place by growth factors, cytokines/chemokines, adhesion molecules, and receptors for these ligands. This review describes how a disintegrin and metalloproteinases interfere with several steps of cell migration, either by proteolytic cleavage of such molecules or by functions independent of proteolytic activity. PMID:28260841

  6. Water permeation drives tumor cell migration in confined microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Stroka, Kimberly M; Jiang, Hongyuan; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Tong, Ziqiu; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-04-24

    Cell migration is a critical process for diverse (patho)physiological phenomena. Intriguingly, cell migration through physically confined spaces can persist even when typical hallmarks of 2D planar migration, such as actin polymerization and myosin II-mediated contractility, are inhibited. Here, we present an integrated experimental and theoretical approach ("Osmotic Engine Model") and demonstrate that directed water permeation is a major mechanism of cell migration in confined microenvironments. Using microfluidic and imaging techniques along with mathematical modeling, we show that tumor cells confined in a narrow channel establish a polarized distribution of Na+/H+ pumps and aquaporins in the cell membrane, which creates a net inflow of water and ions at the cell leading edge and a net outflow of water and ions at the trailing edge, leading to net cell displacement. Collectively, this study presents an alternate mechanism of cell migration in confinement that depends on cell-volume regulation via water permeation.

  7. Inhibition of DNA Methylation and Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2 Suppresses RPE Transdifferentiation: Relevance to Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    He, Shikun; Barron, Ernesto; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Nazari Khanamiri, Hossein; Spee, Chris; Zhou, Peng; Kase, Satoru; Wang, Zhuoshi; Dustin, Laurie Diane; Hinton, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate expression of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) in epiretinal membranes from patients with proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and to investigate effects of inhibition of MeCP2 and DNA methylation on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β–induced retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell transdifferentiation. Methods Expression of MeCP2 and its colocalization with cytokeratin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in surgically excised PVR membranes was studied using immunohistochemistry. The effects of 5-AZA-2′-deoxycytidine (5-AZA-dC) on human RPE cell migration and viability were evaluated using a modified Boyden chamber assay and the colorimetric 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Expression of RASAL1 mRNA and its promoter region methylation were evaluated by real-time PCR and methylation-specific PCR. Effects of 5-AZA-dC on expression of α-SMA, fibronectin (FN), and TGF-β receptor 2 (TGF-β R2) and Smad2/3 phosphorylation were analyzed by Western blotting. Effect of short interfering RNA (siRNA) knock-down of MeCP2 on expression of α-SMA and FN induced by TGFβ was determined. Results MeCP2 was abundantly expressed in cells within PVR membranes where it was double labeled with cells positive for cytokeratin and α-SMA. 5-AZA-dC inhibited expression of MeCP2 and suppressed RASAL1 gene methylation while increasing expression of the RASAL1 gene. Treatment with 5-AZA-dC significantly suppressed the expression of α-SMA, FN, TGF-β R2 and phosphorylation of Smad2/3 and inhibited RPE cell migration. TGF-β induced expression of α-SMA, and FN was suppressed by knock-down of MeCP2. Conclusions MeCP2 and DNA methylation regulate RPE transdifferentiation and may be involved in the pathogenesis of PVR. PMID:26305530

  8. Texture sensing of cytoskeletal dynamics in cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Satarupa; Lee, Rachel; Hourwitz, Matthew J.; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John T.; Losert, Wolfgang

    Migrating cells can be directed towards a target by gradients in properties such as chemical concentration or mechanical properties of the surrounding microenvironment. In previous studies we have shown that micro/nanotopographical features on scales comparable to those of natural collagen fibers can guide fast migrating amoeboid cells by aligning actin polymerization waves to such nanostructures. We find that actin microfilaments and microtubules are aligned along the nanoridge topographies, modulating overall cell polarity and directional migration in epithelial cells. This work shows that topographic features on a biologically relevant length scale can modulate migration outcomes by affecting the texture sensing property of the cytoskeleton.

  9. Inhibition of RPE65 Retinol Isomerase Activity by Inhibitors of Lipid Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Abdulkerim; Gentleman, Susan; Poliakov, Eugenia; Redmond, T. Michael

    2016-01-01

    RPE65 is the isomerase catalyzing conversion of all-trans-retinyl ester (atRE) into 11-cis-retinol in the retinal visual cycle. Crystal structures of RPE65 and site-directed mutagenesis reveal aspects of its catalytic mechanism, especially retinyl moiety isomerization, but other aspects remain to be determined. To investigate potential interactions between RPE65 and lipid metabolism enzymes, HEK293-F cells were transfected with expression vectors for visual cycle proteins and co-transfected with either fatty acyl:CoA ligases (ACSLs) 1, 3, or 6 or the SLC27A family fatty acyl-CoA synthase FATP2/SLCA27A2 to test their effect on isomerase activity. These experiments showed that RPE65 activity was reduced by co-expression of ACSLs or FATP2. Surprisingly, however, in attempting to relieve the ACSL-mediated inhibition, we discovered that triacsin C, an inhibitor of ACSLs, also potently inhibited RPE65 isomerase activity in cellulo. We found triacsin C to be a competitive inhibitor of RPE65 (IC50 = 500 nm). We confirmed that triacsin C competes directly with atRE by incubating membranes prepared from chicken RPE65-transfected cells with liposomes containing 0–1 μm atRE. Other inhibitors of ACSLs had modest inhibitory effects compared with triascin C. In conclusion, we have identified an inhibitor of ACSLs as a potent inhibitor of RPE65 that competes with the atRE substrate of RPE65 for binding. Triacsin C, with an alkenyl chain resembling but not identical to either acyl or retinyl chains, may compete with binding of the acyl moiety of atRE via the alkenyl moiety. Its inhibitory effect, however, may reside in its nitrosohydrazone/triazene moiety. PMID:26719343

  10. The planar cell polarity pathway directs parietal endoderm migration.

    PubMed

    LaMonica, Kristi; Bass, Maya; Grabel, Laura

    2009-06-01

    Parietal endoderm (PE) contributes to the yolk sac and is the first migratory cell type in the mammalian embryo. We can visualize PE migration in vitro using the F9 teratocarcinoma derived embryoid body outgrowth system and, show here that PE migration is directed by the non-canonical Wnt planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway via Rho/ROCK. Based on golgi apparatus localization and microtubule orientation, 68.6% of cells in control outgrowths are oriented in the direction of migration. Perturbation of Wnt signaling via sFRP treatment results in a loss of orientation coupled with an increase in cell migration. Inhibition of the PCP pathway at the level of Daam1 also results in a loss of cell orientation along with an increase in cell migration, as seen with sFRP treatment. Constitutively active Daam can inhibit the loss of orientation that occurs with sFRP treatment. We previously demonstrated that ROCK inhibition leads to an increase in cell migration, and we now show that these cells also lack oriented migration. Canonical Wnt signaling or the Rac arm of the PCP pathway does not appear to play a role in PE oriented migration. These data suggest the PCP pathway via Rho/ROCK modulates migration of PE.

  11. A ring barrier-based migration assay to assess cell migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Das, Asha M; Eggermont, Alexander M M; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2015-06-01

    Cell migration is a key feature of virtually every biological process, and it can be studied in a variety of ways. Here we outline a protocol for the in vitro study of cell migration using a ring barrier-based assay. A 'barrier' is inserted in the culture chamber, which prevents cells from entering a defined area. Cells of interest are seeded around this barrier, and after the formation of a peripheral monolayer the barrier is removed and migration into the cell-free area is monitored. This assay is highly reproducible and convenient to perform, and it allows the deduction of several parameters of migration, including total and effective migration, velocity and cell polarization. An advantage of this assay over the conventional scratch assay is that the cells move over an unaltered and virgin surface, and thus the effect of matrix components on cell migration can be studied. In addition, the cells are not harmed at the onset of the assay. Through computer automation, four individual barrier assays can be monitored at the same time. The procedure can be used in a 12-well standard plate allowing higher throughput, or it can be modified to perform invasion assays. The basic procedure takes 2-3 d to complete.

  12. Proinflammatory cytokines decrease the expression of genes critical for RPE function

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, William; Boyce, Kaifa; Cherukuri, Aswini; Duncan, Todd; Jaworski, Cynthia; Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N.; Redmond, T. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Proinflammatory cytokines interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) secreted by infiltrating lymphocytes or macrophages may play a role in triggering RPE dysfunction associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Binding of these proinflammatory cytokines to their specific receptors residing on the RPE cell surface can activate signaling pathways that, in turn, may dysregulate cellular gene expression. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-1β have an adverse effect on the expression of genes essential for RPE function, employing the RPE cell line ARPE-19 as a model system. Methods ARPE-19 cells were cultured for 3–4 months until they exhibited epithelial morphology and expressed mRNAs for visual cycle genes. The differentiated cells were treated with IFN-γ, TNF-α, and/or IL-1β, and gene expression was analyzed with real-time PCR analysis. Western immunoblotting was employed for the detection of proteins. Results Proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ + TNF-α + IL-1β) greatly increased the expression of chemokines and cytokines in cultured ARPE-19 cells that exhibited RPE characteristics. However, this response was accompanied by markedly decreased expression of genes important for RPE function, such as CDH1, RPE65, RDH5, RDH10, TYR, and MERTK. This was associated with decreased expression of the genes MITF, TRPM1, and TRPM3, as well as microRNAs miR-204 and miR-211, which are known to regulate RPE-specific gene expression. The decreased expression of the epithelial marker gene CDH1 was associated with increased expression of mesenchymal marker genes (CDH2, VIM, and CCND1) and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) promoting transcription factor genes (ZEB1 and SNAI1). Conclusions RPE cells exposed to proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-1β showed decreased expression of key genes involved in the visual cycle, epithelial morphology

  13. 3D cancer cell migration in a confined matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alobaidi, Amani; Sun, Bo

    Cancer cell migration is widely studied in 2D motion, which does not mimic the invasion processes in vivo. More recently, 3D cell migration studies have been performed. The ability of cancer cells to migrate within the extracellular matrix depends on the physical and biochemical features of the extracellular matrix. We present a model of cell motility in confined matrix geometry. The aim of the study is to study cancer migration in collagen matrix, as a soft tissue, to investigate their motility within the confined and surrounding collagen environment. Different collagen concentrations have been used to show the ability of these cancer cells to move through such a complex structure by measuring Cancer cell migration velocity as well as the displacement. Graduate student physics department.

  14. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jo; Gauert, Anton; Briones Montecinos, Luis; Fanlo, Lucía; Alhashem, Zainalabdeen Mohmammed; Assar, Rodrigo; Marti, Elisa; Kabla, Alexandre; Härtel, Steffen; Linker, Claudia

    2016-05-31

    Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC) cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC) cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC) cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration.

  15. Dynamics and detection of laser induced microbubbles in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Andreas; Ptaszynski, Lars; Stoehr, Hardo; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2007-07-01

    Selective Retina Treatment (SRT) is a new method to treat eye diseases associated with disorders of the RPE. Selective RPE cell damage is achieved by applying a train of 1.7 μs laser pulses at 527 nm. The treatment of retinal diseases as e.g. diabetic maculopathy (DMP), is currently investigated within clinical studies, however 200 ns pulse durations are under investigation. Transient micro bubbles in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are expected to be the origin of cell damage due to irradiation with laser pulses shorter than 50 μs. The bubbles emerge at the strongly absorbing RPE melanosomes. Cell membrane disruption caused by the transient associated volume increase is expected to be the origin of the angiographically observed RPE leakage. We investigate micro bubble formation and dynamics in porcine RPE using pulse durations of 150 ns. A laser interferometry system at 830 nm with the aim of an online dosimetry control for SRT was developed. Bubble formation was detected interferometrically and by fast flash photography. A correlation to cell damage observed with a vitality stain is found. A bubble detection algorithm is presented.

  16. Quantitative analysis of cell migration using optical flow.

    PubMed

    Boric, Katica; Orio, Patricio; Viéville, Thierry; Whitlock, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest cells exhibit dramatic migration behaviors as they populate their distant targets. Using a line of zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (sox10:EGFP) in neural crest cells we developed an assay to analyze and quantify cell migration as a population, and use it here to characterize in detail the subtle defects in cell migration caused by ethanol exposure during early development. The challenge was to quantify changes in the in vivo migration of all Sox10:EGFP expressing cells in the visual field of time-lapse movies. To perform this analysis we used an Optical Flow algorithm for motion detection and combined the analysis with a fit to an affine transformation. Through this analysis we detected and quantified significant differences in the cell migrations of Sox10:EGFP positive cranial neural crest populations in ethanol treated versus untreated embryos. Specifically, treatment affected migration by increasing the left-right asymmetry of the migrating cells and by altering the direction of cell movements. Thus, by applying this novel computational analysis, we were able to quantify the movements of populations of cells, allowing us to detect subtle changes in cell behaviors. Because cranial neural crest cells contribute to the formation of the frontal mass these subtle differences may underlie commonly observed facial asymmetries in normal human populations.

  17. Follow-the-leader cell migration requires biased cell-cell contact and local microenvironmental signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynn, Michelle L.; Rupp, Paul; Trainor, Paul A.; Schnell, Santiago; Kulesa, Paul M.

    2013-06-01

    Directed cell migration often involves at least two types of cell motility that include multicellular streaming and chain migration. However, what is unclear is how cell contact dynamics and the distinct microenvironments through which cells travel influence the selection of one migratory mode or the other. The embryonic and highly invasive neural crest (NC) are an excellent model system to study this question since NC cells have been observed in vivo to display both of these types of cell motility. Here, we present data from tissue transplantation experiments in chick and in silico modeling that test our hypothesis that cell contact dynamics with each other and the microenvironment promote and sustain either multicellular stream or chain migration. We show that when premigratory cranial NC cells (at the pre-otic level) are transplanted into a more caudal region in the head (at the post-otic level), cells alter their characteristic stream behavior and migrate in chains. Similarly, post-otic NC cells migrate in streams after transplantation into the pre-otic hindbrain, suggesting that local microenvironmental signals dictate the mode of NC cell migration. Simulations of an agent-based model (ABM) that integrates the NC cell behavioral data predict that chain migration critically depends on the interplay of biased cell-cell contact and local microenvironment signals. Together, this integrated modeling and experimental approach suggests new experiments and offers a powerful tool to examine mechanisms that underlie complex cell migration patterns.

  18. Continuous exposure to non-lethal doses of sodium iodate induces retinal pigment epithelial cell dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Ng, Tsz Kin; Brelén, Mårten Erik; Wu, Di; Wang, Jian Xiong; Chan, Kwok Ping; Yung, Jasmine Sum Yee; Cao, Di; Wang, Yumeng; Zhang, Shaodan; Chan, Sun On; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), characterized by progressive degeneration of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), is the major cause of irreversible blindness and visual impairment in elderly population. We previously established a RPE degeneration model using an acute high dose sodium iodate to induce oxidative stress. Here we report findings on a prolonged treatment of low doses of sodium iodate on human RPE cells (ARPE-19). RPE cells were treated continuously with low doses (2–10 mM) of sodium iodate for 5 days. Low doses (2–5 mM) of sodium iodate did not reduce RPE cell viability, which is contrasting to cell apoptosis in 10 mM treatment. These low doses are sufficient to retard RPE cell migration and reduced expression of cell junction protein ZO-1. Phagocytotic activity of RPE cells was attenuated by sodium iodate dose-dependently. Sodium iodate also increased expression of FGF-2, but suppressed expression of IL-8, PDGF, TIMP-2 and VEGF. Furthermore, HTRA1 and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker proteins were downregulated, whereas PERK and LC3B-II proteins were upregulated after sodium iodate treatment. These results suggested that prolonged exposure to non-lethal doses of oxidative stress induces RPE cell dysfunctions that resemble conditions in AMD. This model can be used for future drug/treatment investigation on AMD. PMID:27849035

  19. Dictyostelium cells migrate similarly on surfaces of varying chemical composition.

    PubMed

    McCann, Colin P; Rericha, Erin C; Wang, Chenlu; Losert, Wolfgang; Parent, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    During cell migration, cell-substrate binding is required for pseudopod anchoring to move the cell forward, yet the interactions with the substrate must be sufficiently weak to allow parts of the cell to de-adhere in a controlled manner during typical protrusion/retraction cycles. Mammalian cells actively control cell-substrate binding and respond to extracellular conditions with localized integrin-containing focal adhesions mediating mechanotransduction. We asked whether mechanotransduction also occurs during non-integrin mediated migration by examining the motion of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, which is thought to bind non-specifically to surfaces. We discovered that Dictyostelium cells are able to regulate forces generated by the actomyosin cortex to maintain optimal cell-surface contact area and adhesion on surfaces of various chemical composition and that individual cells migrate with similar speed and contact area on the different surfaces. In contrast, during collective migration, as observed in wound healing and metastasis, the balance between surface forces and protrusive forces is altered. We found that Dictyostelium collective migration dynamics are strongly affected when cells are plated on different surfaces. These results suggest that the presence of cell-cell contacts, which appear as Dictyostelium cells enter development, alter the mechanism cells use to migrate on surfaces of varying composition.

  20. Regulation of cell migration via the EGFR signaling pathway in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Yuichi; Yasui, Hiroki; Kakudo, Kenji; Nozaki, Masami

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration potency is essential in cancer metastasis and is often regulated by extracellular stimuli. Oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines include those that are sensitive, as well as resistant, to the effects of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor cetuximab on cell migration. In the present study, the molecular differences in the EGFR response to cell migration between the SAS cetuximab-sensitive and HSC4 cetuximab-resistant cell lines was examined. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and cetuximab reduced the migration potency of SAS cells, but not HSC4 cells. The migration of the two cell lines was inhibited under serum-free culture conditions, and the addition of EGF to the serum-free medium promoted the migration of SAS cells, but not HSC4 cells. In addition, SAS cell migration was reduced by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase and protein kinase B (Akt) inhibitors PD98059 and MK2206, whereas HSC4 cell migration was only inhibited by MK2206. EGF induced an increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation levels in HSC4 cells, and stimulated Akt phosphorylation levels in SAS cells. Furthermore, the staining of actin filaments with phalloidin was significantly increased by the inhibition of EGFR in SAS cells, but was not observed as altered in HSC4 cells. Conversely, the addition of EGF to the culture medium decreased the accumulation of actin filaments in SAS cells. The results suggest that the EGF-EGFR signaling pathway has an important role in SAS cell migration via the modulation of actin dynamics, and that HSC4 cell migration is regulated by a serum component other than EGFR.

  1. Effect of Static Magnetic Field on Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Kawasumi, Masashi; Saito, Masao

    The effect of magnetic field on cell has long been investigated, but there are few quantitative investigations of the migration of cells. Cell-migration is important as one of the fundamental activities of the cell. This study proposes a method to evaluate quantitatively the cell-diffusion constant and the effect of static magnetic field on cell migration. The cell-lines are neuroblastoma (NG108-15), fibroblastoma (NIH/3T3) and osteoblastoma (MC3T3-E1). The static magnetic field of 30 mT or 120 mT is impressed by a permanent magnet in vertical or horizontal direction to the dish. It is shown that the cell-diffusion constant can represent the cell migration as the cell activity. It is found that the cell migration is enhanced by exposure to the magnetic field, depending on the kind of cell. It is conjectured that the effect of static magnetic field affects the cell migration, which is at the downstream of the information transmission.

  2. Functional transcriptomics of a migrating cell in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Erich M; Kato, Mihoko; Sternberg, Paul W

    2012-10-02

    In both metazoan development and metastatic cancer, migrating cells must carry out a detailed, complex program of sensing cues, binding substrates, and moving their cytoskeletons. The linker cell in Caenorhabditis elegans males undergoes a stereotyped migration that guides gonad organogenesis, occurs with precise timing, and requires the nuclear hormone receptor NHR-67. To better understand how this occurs, we performed RNA-seq of individually staged and dissected linker cells, comparing transcriptomes from linker cells of third-stage (L3) larvae, fourth-stage (L4) larvae, and nhr-67-RNAi-treated L4 larvae. We observed expression of 8,000-10,000 genes in the linker cell, 22-25% of which were up- or down-regulated 20-fold during development by NHR-67. Of genes that we tested by RNAi, 22% (45 of 204) were required for normal shape and migration, suggesting that many NHR-67-dependent, linker cell-enriched genes play roles in this migration. One unexpected class of genes up-regulated by NHR-67 was tandem pore potassium channels, which are required for normal linker-cell migration. We also found phenotypes for genes with human orthologs but no previously described migratory function. Our results provide an extensive catalog of genes that act in a migrating cell, identify unique molecular functions involved in nematode cell migration, and suggest similar functions in humans.

  3. Molecular signatures of cell migration in C. elegans Q neuroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Guangshuo

    2009-01-01

    Metazoan cell movement has been studied extensively in vitro, but cell migration in living animals is much less well understood. In this report, we have studied the Caenorhabditis elegans Q neuroblast lineage during larval development, developing live animal imaging methods for following neuroblast migration with single cell resolution. We find that each of the Q descendants migrates at different speeds and for distinct distances. By quantitative green fluorescent protein imaging, we find that Q descendants that migrate faster and longer than their sisters up-regulate protein levels of MIG-2, a Rho family guanosine triphosphatase, and/or down-regulate INA-1, an integrin α subunit, during migration. We also show that Q neuroblasts bearing mutations in either MIG-2 or INA-1 migrate at reduced speeds. The migration defect of the mig-2 mutants, but not ina-1, appears to result from a lack of persistent polarization in the direction of cell migration. Thus, MIG-2 and INA-1 function distinctly to control Q neuroblast migration in living C. elegans. PMID:19349580

  4. S-Fms signalobody enhances myeloid cell growth and migration.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Masahiro; Hitomi, Azusa; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2014-07-01

    Since receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) control various cell fates in many types of cells, mimicry of RTK functions is promising for artificial control of cell fates. We have previously developed single-chain Fv (scFv)/receptor chimeras named signalobodies that can mimic receptor signaling in response to a specific antigen. While the RTK-based signalobodies enabled us to control cell growth and migration, further extension of applicability in another cell type would underlie the impact of the RTK-based signalobodies. In this study, we applied the scFv-c-Fms (S-Fms) signalobody in a murine myeloid progenitor cell line, FDC-P1. S-Fms transduced a fluorescein-conjugated BSA (BSA-FL)-dependent growth signal and activated downstream signaling molecules including MEK, ERK, Akt, and STAT3, which are major constituents of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/Akt, and JAK/STAT signaling pathways. In addition, S-Fms transduced a migration signal as demonstrated by the transwell-based migration assay. Direct real-time observation of the cells further confirmed that FDC/S-Fms cells underwent directional cell migration toward a positive gradient of BSA-FL. These results demonstrated the utility of the S-Fms signalobody for controlling growth and migration of myeloid cells. Further extension of our approach includes economical large-scale production of practically relevant blood cells as well as artificial control of cell migration for tissue regeneration and immune response.

  5. Analysis of primary cilia in directional cell migration in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Søren T; Veland, Iben R; Schwab, Albrecht; Cammer, Michael; Satir, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Early studies of migrating fibroblasts showed that primary cilia orient in front of the nucleus and point toward the leading edge. Recent work has shown that primary cilia coordinate a series of signaling pathways critical to fibroblast cell migration during development and in wound healing. In particular, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα) is compartmentalized to the primary cilium to activate signaling pathways that regulate reorganization of the cytoskeleton required for lamellipodium formation and directional migration in the presence of a specific ligand gradient. We summarize selected methods in analyzing ciliary function in directional cell migration, including immunofluorescence microscopy, scratch assay, and chemotaxis assay by micropipette addition of PDGFRα ligands to cultures of fibroblasts. These methods should be useful not only in studying cell migration but also more generally in delineating response pathways in cells with primary cilia.

  6. Cancer cell motility: lessons from migration in confined spaces

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Colin D.; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Time-lapse, deep-tissue imaging made possible by advances in intravital microscopy has demonstrated the importance of tumour cell migration through confining tracks in vivo. These tracks may either be endogenous features of tissues or be created by tumour or tumour-associated cells. Importantly, migration mechanisms through confining microenvironments are not predicted by 2D migration assays. Engineered in vitro models have been used to delineate the mechanisms of cell motility through confining spaces encountered in vivo. Understanding cancer cell locomotion through physiologically relevant confining tracks could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to combat metastasis. PMID:27909339

  7. Cancer cell motility: lessons from migration in confined spaces.

    PubMed

    Paul, Colin D; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse, deep-tissue imaging made possible by advances in intravital microscopy has demonstrated the importance of tumour cell migration through confining tracks in vivo. These tracks may either be endogenous features of tissues or be created by tumour or tumour-associated cells. Importantly, migration mechanisms through confining microenvironments are not predicted by 2D migration assays. Engineered in vitro models have been used to delineate the mechanisms of cell motility through confining spaces encountered in vivo. Understanding cancer cell locomotion through physiologically relevant confining tracks could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to combat metastasis.

  8. Protein kinase Cepsilon is important for migration of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Stensman, Helena; Larsson, Christer

    2008-01-01

    Background Migration is important for the metastatic capacity and thus for the malignancy of cancer cells. There is limited knowledge on regulatory factors that promote the migration of neuroblastoma cells. This study investigates the hypothesis that protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms regulate neuroblastoma cell motility. Methods PKC isoforms were downregulated with siRNA or modulated with activators and inhibitors. Migration was analyzed with scratch and transwell assays. Protein phosphorylation and expression levels were measured with Western blot. Results Stimulation with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced migration of SK-N-BE(2)C neuroblastoma cells. Treatment with the general protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X and the inhibitor of classical isoforms Gö6976 inhibited migration while an inhibitor of PKCβ isoforms did not have an effect. Downregulation of PKCε, but not of PKCα or PKCδ, with siRNA led to a suppression of both basal and TPA-stimulated migration. Experiments using PD98059 and LY294002, inhibitors of the Erk and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways, respectively, showed that PI3K is not necessary for TPA-induced migration. The Erk pathway might be involved in TPA-induced migration but not in migration driven by PKCε. TPA induced phosphorylation of the PKC substrate myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) which was suppressed by the PKC inhibitors. Treatment with siRNA oligonucleotides against different PKC isoforms before stimulation with TPA did not influence the phosphorylation of MARCKS. Conclusion PKCε is important for migration of SK-N-BE(2)C neuroblastoma cells. Neither the Erk pathway nor MARCKS are critical downstream targets of PKCε but they may be involved in TPA-mediated migration. PMID:19077250

  9. Purines in the eye: recent evidence for the physiological and pathological role of purines in the RPE, retinal neurons, astrocytes, Müller cells, lens, trabecular meshwork, cornea and lacrimal gland.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Julie; Dartt, Darlene A; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Pintor, Jesus; Civan, Mortimer M; Delamere, Nicholas A; Fletcher, Erica L; Salt, Thomas E; Grosche, Antje; Mitchell, Claire H

    2014-10-01

    This review highlights recent findings that describ how purines modulate the physiological and pathophysiological responses of ocular tissues. For example, in lacrimal glands the cross-talk between P2X7 receptors and both M3 muscarinic receptors and α1D-adrenergic receptors can influence tear secretion. In the cornea, purines lead to post-translational modification of EGFR and structural proteins that participate in wound repair in the epithelium and influence the expression of matrix proteins in the stroma. Purines act at receptors on both the trabecular meshwork and ciliary epithelium to modulate intraocular pressure (IOP); ATP-release pathways of inflow and outflow cells differ, possibly permitting differential modulation of adenosine delivery. Modulators of trabecular meshwork cell ATP release include cell volume, stretch, extracellular Ca(2+) concentration, oxidation state, actin remodeling and possibly endogenous cardiotonic steroids. In the lens, osmotic stress leads to ATP release following TRPV4 activation upstream of hemichannel opening. In the anterior eye, diadenosine polyphosphates such as Ap4A act at P2 receptors to modulate the rate and composition of tear secretion, impact corneal wound healing and lower IOP. The Gq11-coupled P2Y1-receptor contributes to volume control in Müller cells and thus the retina. P2X receptors are expressed in neurons in the inner and outer retina and contribute to visual processing as well as the demise of retinal ganglion cells. In RPE cells, the balance between extracellular ATP and adenosine may modulate lysosomal pH and the rate of lipofuscin formation. In optic nerve head astrocytes, mechanosensitive ATP release via pannexin hemichannels, coupled with stretch-dependent upregulation of pannexins, provides a mechanism for ATP signaling in chronic glaucoma. With so many receptors linked to divergent functions throughout the eye, ensuring the transmitters remain local and stimulation is restricted to the intended target

  10. Proliferating cells in suborbital tissue drive eye migration in flatfish.

    PubMed

    Bao, Baolong; Ke, Zhonghe; Xing, Jubin; Peatman, Eric; Liu, Zhanjiang; Xie, Caixia; Xu, Bing; Gai, Junwei; Gong, Xiaoling; Yang, Guimei; Jiang, Yan; Tang, Wenqiao; Ren, Daming

    2011-03-01

    The left/right asymmetry of adult flatfishes (Pleuronectiformes) is remarkable given the external body symmetry of the larval fish. The best-known change is the migration of their eyes: one eye migrates from one side to the other. Two extinct primitive pleuronectiformes with incomplete orbital migration have again attracted public attention to the mechanism of eye migration, a subject of speculation and research for over a century. Cranial asymmetry is currently believed to be responsible for eye migration. Contrary to that hypothesis, we show here that the initial migration of the eye is caused by cell proliferation in the suborbital tissue of the blind side and that the twist of frontal bone is dependent on eye migration. The inhibition of cell proliferation in the suborbital area of the blind side by microinjected colchicine was able to prevent eye migration and, thereafter, cranial asymmetry in juvenile Solea senegalensis (right sideness, Soleidae), Cynoglossus semilaevis (left sideness, Cynoglossidae), and Paralichthys olivaceus (left sideness, Paralichthyidae) with a bottom-dwelling lifestyle. Our results correct the current misunderstanding that eye migration is driven by the cranial asymmetry and simplify the explanation for broken left/right eye-symmetry. Our findings should help to focus the search on eye migration-related genes associated with cell proliferation. Finally, a novel model is proposed in this research which provides a reasonable explanation for differences in the migrating eye between, and sometimes within, different species of flatfish and which should aid in our overall understanding of eye migration in the ontogenesis and evolution of Pleuronectiformes.

  11. Propagating Waves of Directionality and Coordination Orchestrate Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zaritsky, Assaf; Kaplan, Doron; Hecht, Inbal; Natan, Sari; Wolf, Lior; Gov, Nir S.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Tsarfaty, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    The ability of cells to coordinately migrate in groups is crucial to enable them to travel long distances during embryonic development, wound healing and tumorigenesis, but the fundamental mechanisms underlying intercellular coordination during collective cell migration remain elusive despite considerable research efforts. A novel analytical framework is introduced here to explicitly detect and quantify cell clusters that move coordinately in a monolayer. The analysis combines and associates vast amount of spatiotemporal data across multiple experiments into transparent quantitative measures to report the emergence of new modes of organized behavior during collective migration of tumor and epithelial cells in wound healing assays. First, we discovered the emergence of a wave of coordinated migration propagating backward from the wound front, which reflects formation of clusters of coordinately migrating cells that are generated further away from the wound edge and disintegrate close to the advancing front. This wave emerges in both normal and tumor cells, and is amplified by Met activation with hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. Second, Met activation was found to induce coinciding waves of cellular acceleration and stretching, which in turn trigger the emergence of a backward propagating wave of directional migration with about an hour phase lag. Assessments of the relations between the waves revealed that amplified coordinated migration is associated with the emergence of directional migration. Taken together, our data and simplified modeling-based assessments suggest that increased velocity leads to enhanced coordination: higher motility arises due to acceleration and stretching that seems to increase directionality by temporarily diminishing the velocity components orthogonal to the direction defined by the monolayer geometry. Spatial and temporal accumulation of directionality thus defines coordination. The findings offer new insight and suggest a basic

  12. Bioengineering paradigms for cell migration in confined microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Stroka, Kimberly M; Gu, Zhizhan; Sun, Sean X; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-10-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental process underlying diverse (patho)physiological phenomena. The classical understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cell migration has been based on in vitro studies on two-dimensional substrates. More recently, mounting evidence from intravital studies has shown that during metastasis, tumor cells must navigate complex microenvironments in vivo, including narrow, pre-existing microtracks created by anatomical structures. It is becoming apparent that unraveling the mechanisms of confined cell migration in this context requires a multi-disciplinary approach through integration of in vivo and in vitro studies, along with sophisticated bioengineering techniques and mathematical modeling. Here, we highlight such an approach that has led to discovery of a new model for cell migration in confined microenvironments (i.e., the Osmotic Engine Model).

  13. Emerging role for nuclear rotation and orientation in cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Maninová, Miloslava; Iwanicki, Marcin P; Vomastek, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Nucleus movement, positioning, and orientation is precisely specified and actively regulated within cells, and it plays a critical role in many cellular and developmental processes. Mutation of proteins that regulate the nucleus anchoring and movement lead to diverse pathologies, laminopathies in particular, suggesting that the nucleus correct positioning and movement is essential for proper cellular function. In motile cells that polarize toward the direction of migration, the nucleus undergoes controlled rotation promoting the alignment of the nucleus with the axis of migration. Such spatial organization of the cell appears to be optimal for the cell migration. Nuclear reorientation requires the cytoskeleton to be anchored to the nuclear envelope, which exerts pulling or pushing torque on the nucleus. Here we discuss the possible molecular mechanisms regulating the nuclear rotation and reorientation and the significance of this type of nuclear movement for cell migration. PMID:24589621

  14. Cell-cell interactions stabilize emerging collective migration modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Joshua; Guven, Can; Wang, Chenlu; Ott, Ed; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    We propose a coarse-grained mechanistic model for simulating the dynamics of the biological model organism Dictyostelium discoideum, incorporating gradient sensing, random motility via actin protrusions, persistent random motion and signal relay. We demonstrate that our simple cell model does result in the macroscopic group migration patterns seen in no-flow gradient chambers, namely a transition from individual motion to multi-cell ``streaming'' to aggregation as the external signal is decreased. We also find that cell-cell adhesion further stabilizes the contact network independent of chemical signaling, suggesting no indirect feedback between mechanical forces and gradient sensing. We discuss further modifications to the model and as well as further applications to quantifying dynamics using spatio-temporal contact networks. Co-first author

  15. Bimodal Analysis of Mammary Epithelial Cell Migration in Two Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Potdar, Alka A.; Lu, Jenny; Jeon, Junhwan; Weaver, Alissa M.; Cummings, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration paths of mammary epithelial cells (expressing different versions of the promigratory tyrosine kinase receptor Her2/Neu) were analyzed within a bimodal framework that is a generalization of the run-and-tumble description applicable to bacterial migration. The mammalian cell trajectories were segregated into two types of alternating modes, namely, the “directional-mode” (mode I, the more persistent mode, analogous to the bacterial run phase) and the “re-orientation-mode” (mode II, the less persistent mode, analogous to the bacterial tumble phase). Higher resolution (more pixel information, relative to cell size) and smaller sampling intervals (time between images) were found to give a better estimate of the deduced single cell dynamics (such as directional-mode time and turn angle distribution) of the various cell types from the bimodal analysis. The bimodal analysis tool permits the deduction of short-time dynamics of cell motion such as the turn angle distributions and turn frequencies during the course of cell migration compared to standard methods of cell migration analysis. We find that the two-hour mammalian cell tracking data do not fall into the diffusive regime implying that the often-used random motility expressions for mammalian cell motion (based on assuming diffusive motion) are invalid over the time steps (fraction of minute) typically used in modeling mammalian cell migration. PMID:18982450

  16. Quantitative evaluation of the transplanted lin(-) hematopoietic cell migration kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kašėta, Vytautas; Vaitkuvienė, Aida; Liubavičiūtė, Aušra; Maciulevičienė, Rūta; Stirkė, Arūnas; Biziulevičienė, Genė

    2016-02-01

    Stem cells take part in organogenesis, cell maturation and injury repair. The migration is necessary for each of these functions to occur. The aim of this study was to investigate the kinetics of transplanted hematopoietic lin(-) cell population (which consists mainly of the stem and progenitor cells) in BALB/c mouse contact hypersensitivity model and quantify the migration to the site of inflammation in the affected foot and other healthy organs. Quantitative analysis was carried out with the real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Spleen, kidney, bone marrow, lung, liver, damaged and healthy foot tissue samples at different time points were collected for analysis. The quantitative data normalization was performed according to the comparative quantification method. The analysis of foot samples shows the significant migration of transplanted cells to the recipient mice affected foot. The quantity was more than 1000 times higher, as compared with that of the untreated foot. Due to the inflammation, the number of donor origin cells migrating to the lungs, liver, spleen and bone marrow was found to be decreased. Our data shows that transplanted cells selectively migrated into the inflammation areas of the foot edema. Also, the inflammation caused a secondary migration in ectopic spleen of hematopoietic stem cell niches and re-homing from the spleen to the bone marrow took place.

  17. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  18. Microscopy assays for evaluation of mast cell migration and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Bambousková, Monika; Hájková, Zuzana; Dráber, Pavel; Dráber, Petr

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to mast cell migration and chemotaxis is the long-term goal in mast cell research and is essential for comprehension of mast cell function in health and disease. Various techniques have been developed in recent decades for in vitro and in vivo assessment of mast cell motility and chemotaxis. In this chapter three microscopy assays facilitating real-time quantification of mast cell chemotaxis and migration are described, focusing on individual cell tracking and data analysis.

  19. RPE65 gene therapy slows cone loss in Rpe65-deficient dogs.

    PubMed

    Mowat, F M; Breuwer, A R; Bartoe, J T; Annear, M J; Zhang, Z; Smith, A J; Bainbridge, J W B; Petersen-Jones, S M; Ali, R R

    2013-05-01

    Recent clinical trials of retinal pigment epithelium gene (RPE65) supplementation therapy in Leber congenital amaurosis type 2 patients have demonstrated improvements in rod and cone function, but it may be some years before the effects of therapy on photoreceptor survival become apparent. The Rpe65-deficient dog is a very useful pre-clinical model in which to test efficacy of therapies, because the dog has a retina with a high degree of similarity to that of humans. In this study, we evaluated the effect of RPE65 gene therapy on photoreceptor survival in order to predict the potential benefit and limitations of therapy in patients. We examined the retinas of Rpe65-deficient dogs after RPE65 gene therapy to evaluate the preservation of rods and cone photoreceptor subtypes. We found that gene therapy preserves both rods and cones. While the moderate loss of rods in the Rpe65-deficient dog retina is slowed by gene therapy, S-cones are lost extensively and gene therapy can prevent that loss, although only within the treated area. Although LM-cones are not lost extensively, cone opsin mislocalization indicates that they are stressed, and this can be partially reversed by gene therapy. Our results suggest that gene therapy may be able to slow cone degeneration in patients if intervention is sufficiently early and also that it is probably important to treat the macula in order to preserve central function.

  20. Retinal pigment epithelium cell alignment on nanostructured collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Stefan; Friedrichs, Jens; Valtink, Monika; Murovski, Simo; Franz, Clemens M; Müller, Daniel J; Funk, Richard H W; Engelmann, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    We investigated attachment and migration of human retinal pigment epithelial cells (primary, SV40-transfected and ARPE-19) on nanoscopically defined, two-dimensional matrices composed of parallel-aligned collagen type I fibrils. These matrices were used non-cross-linked (native) or after riboflavin/UV-A cross-linking to study cell attachment and migration by time-lapse video microscopy. Expression of collagen type I and IV, MMP-2 and of the collagen-binding integrin subunit α(2) were examined by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. SV40-RPE cells quickly attached to the nanostructured collagen matrices and aligned along the collagen fibrils. However, they disrupted both native and cross-linked collagen matrices within 5 h. Primary RPE cells aligned more slowly without destroying either native or cross-linked substrates. Compared to primary RPE cells, ARPE-19 cells showed reduced alignment but partially disrupted the matrices within 20 h after seeding. Expression of the collagen type I-binding integrin subunit α(2) was highest in SV40-RPE cells, lower in primary RPE cells and almost undetectable in ARPE-19 cells. Thus, integrin α(2) expression levels directly correlated with the degree of cell alignment in all examined RPE cell types. Specific integrin subunit α(2)-mediated matrix binding was verified by preincubation with an α(2)-function-blocking antibody, which impaired cell adhesion and alignment to varying degrees in primary and SV40-RPE cells. Since native matrices supported extended and directed primary RPE cell growth, optimizing the matrix production procedure may in the future yield nanostructured collagen matrices serving as transferable cell sheet carriers.

  1. Collective dynamics of cell migration and cell rearrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabla, Alexandre

    Understanding multicellular processes such as embryo development or cancer metastasis requires to decipher the contributions of local cell autonomous behaviours and long range interactions with the tissue environment. A key question in this context concerns the emergence of large scale coordination in cell behaviours, a requirement for collective cell migration or convergent extension. I will present a few examples where physical and mechanical aspects play a significant role in driving tissue scale dynamics.

  1. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi.

    PubMed

    Parker, Aimee; Maclaren, Oliver J; Fletcher, Alexander G; Muraro, Daniele; Kreuzaler, Peter A; Byrne, Helen M; Maini, Philip K; Watson, Alastair J M; Pin, Carmen

    2017-02-01

    The functional integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier relies on tight coordination of cell proliferation and migration, with failure to regulate these processes resulting in disease. It is not known whether cell proliferation is sufficient to drive epithelial cell migration during homoeostatic turnover of the epithelium. Nor is it known precisely how villus cell migration is affected when proliferation is perturbed. Some reports suggest that proliferation and migration may not be related while other studies support a direct relationship. We used established cell-tracking methods based on thymine analog cell labeling and developed tailored mathematical models to quantify cell proliferation and migration under normal conditions and when proliferation is reduced and when it is temporarily halted. We found that epithelial cell migration velocities along the villi are coupled to cell proliferation rates within the crypts in all conditions. Furthermore, halting and resuming proliferation results in the synchronized response of cell migration on the villi. We conclude that cell proliferation within the crypt is the primary force that drives cell migration along the villus. This methodology can be applied to interrogate intestinal epithelial dynamics and characterize situations in which processes involved in cell turnover become uncoupled, including pharmacological treatments and disease models.-Parker, A., Maclaren, O. J., Fletcher, A. G., Muraro, D., Kreuzaler, P. A., Byrne, H. M., Maini, P. K., Watson, A. J. M., Pin, C. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi.

  2. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Aimee; Maclaren, Oliver J.; Fletcher, Alexander G.; Muraro, Daniele; Kreuzaler, Peter A.; Byrne, Helen M.; Maini, Philip K.; Watson, Alastair J. M.; Pin, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    The functional integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier relies on tight coordination of cell proliferation and migration, with failure to regulate these processes resulting in disease. It is not known whether cell proliferation is sufficient to drive epithelial cell migration during homoeostatic turnover of the epithelium. Nor is it known precisely how villus cell migration is affected when proliferation is perturbed. Some reports suggest that proliferation and migration may not be related while other studies support a direct relationship. We used established cell-tracking methods based on thymine analog cell labeling and developed tailored mathematical models to quantify cell proliferation and migration under normal conditions and when proliferation is reduced and when it is temporarily halted. We found that epithelial cell migration velocities along the villi are coupled to cell proliferation rates within the crypts in all conditions. Furthermore, halting and resuming proliferation results in the synchronized response of cell migration on the villi. We conclude that cell proliferation within the crypt is the primary force that drives cell migration along the villus. This methodology can be applied to interrogate intestinal epithelial dynamics and characterize situations in which processes involved in cell turnover become uncoupled, including pharmacological treatments and disease models.—Parker, A., Maclaren, O. J., Fletcher, A. G., Muraro, D., Kreuzaler, P. A., Byrne, H. M., Maini, P. K., Watson, A. J. M., Pin, C. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi. PMID:27811059

  3. Effects of Benzo(e)pyrene on Reactive Oxygen/Nitrogen Species and Inflammatory Cytokines Induction in Human RPE Cells and Attenuation by Mitochondrial-involved Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Estrago-Franco, M. Fernanda; Moustafa, M. Tarek; Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad; Sapkal, Ashish U.; Piche-Lopez, Rhina; Patil, A. Jayaprakash; Sharma, Ashish; Falatoonzadeh, Payam; Chwa, Marilyn; Luczy-Bachman, Georgia; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Kenney, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To identify inhibitors that could effectively lower reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS), complement and inflammatory cytokine levels induced by Benzo(e)pyrene [B(e)p], an element of cigarette smoke, in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) in vitro. Methods: ARPE-19 cells were treated for 24 hours with 200 μM, 100 μM, and 50 μM B(e)p or DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide)-equivalent concentrations. Some cultures were pre-treated with ROS/RNS inhibitors (NG nitro-L-arginine, inhibits nitric oxide synthase; Apocynin, inhibits NADPH oxidase; Rotenone, inhibits mitochondrial complex I; Antimycin A, inhibits mitochondria complex III) and ROS/RNS levels were measured with a fluorescent H2 DCFDA assay. Multiplex bead arrays were used to measure levels of Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-8 (IL-8), Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF), Transforming Growth Factor alpha (TGF-α) and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). IL-6 levels were also measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Real-time qPCR analyses were performed with primers for C3 (component 3), CFH (inhibits complement activation), CD59 (inhibitor of the complement membrane attack complex (MAC)) and CD55/DAF (accelerates decay of target complement target proteins). Results: The ARPE-19 cultures treated with B(e)p showed significantly increased ROS/RNS levels (P < 0.001), which were then partially reversed by 6 μM Antimycin A (19%, P = 0.03), but not affected by the other ROS/RNS inhibitors. The B(e)p treated cultures demonstrated increased levels of IL-6 (33%; P = 0.016) and GM-CSF (29%; P = 0.0001) compared to DMSO-equivalent controls, while the expression levels for components of the complement pathway (C3, CFH, CD59 and CD55/DAF) were not changed. Conclusion: The cytotoxic effects of B(e)p include elevated ROS/RNS levels along with pro-inflammatory IL-6 and GM-CSF proteins. Blocking the Qi site of cytochrome c reductase (complex III) with Antimycin A led to

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Eukaryotic Cell Migration: Insights Beyond Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Danuser, Gaudenz; Allard, Jun; Mogilner, Alex

    2014-01-01

    A migrating cell is a molecular machine made of tens of thousands of short-lived and interacting parts. Understanding migration means understanding the self-organization of these parts into a system of functional units. This task is one of tackling complexity: First, the system integrates numerous chemical and mechanical component processes. Second, these processes are connected in feedback interactions and over a large range of spatial and temporal scales. Third, many processes are stochastic, which leads to heterogeneous migration behaviors. Early on in the research of cell migration it became evident that this complexity exceeds human intuition. Thus, the cell migration community has led the charge to build mathematical models that could integrate the diverse experimental observations and measurements in consistent frameworks, first in conceptual and more recently in molecularly explicit models. The main goal of this review is to sift through a series of important conceptual and explicit mathematical models of cell migration and to evaluate their contribution to the field in their ability to integrate critical experimental data. PMID:23909278

  5. Nanog regulates primordial germ cell migration through Cxcr4b.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, Ana Virginia; Camp, Esther; Leal-Tassias, Aránzazu; Atkinson, Stuart P; Armstrong, Lyle; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; Mullor, José L

    2010-09-01

    Gonadal development in vertebrates depends on the early determination of primordial germ cells (PGCs) and their correct migration to the sites where the gonads develop. Several genes have been implicated in PGC specification and migration in vertebrates. Additionally, some of the genes associated with pluripotency, such as Oct4 and Nanog, are expressed in PGCs and gonads, suggesting a role for these genes in maintaining pluripotency of the germ lineage, which may be considered the only cell type that perpetually maintains stemness properties. Here, we report that medaka Nanog (Ol-Nanog) is expressed in the developing PGCs. Depletion of Ol-Nanog protein causes aberrant migration of PGCs and inhibits expression of Cxcr4b in PGCs, where it normally serves as the receptor of Sdf1a to guide PGC migration. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrates that Ol-Nanog protein binds to the promoter region of Cxcr4b, suggesting a direct regulation of Cxcr4b by Ol-Nanog. Simultaneous overexpression of Cxcr4b mRNA and depletion of Ol-Nanog protein in PGCs rescues the migration defective phenotype induced by a loss of Ol-Nanog, whereas overexpression of Sdf1a, the ligand for Cxcr4b, does not restore proper PGC migration. These results indicate that Ol-Nanog mediates PGC migration by regulating Cxcr4b expression.

  6. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions. PMID:26553933

  7. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander; Ladoux, Benoit; Gauthier, Nils C

    2015-11-09

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions.

  8. Regulator of calcineurin 1 modulates cancer cell migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Allan V; Shinohara, Motoo; Porchia, Leonardo M; Chung, Yun Jae; McCarty, Samantha; Saji, Motoyasu; Ringel, Matthew D

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis suppressors and other regulators of cell motility play an important role in tumor invasion and metastases. We previously identified that activation of the G protein coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) by the metastasis suppressor metastin inhibits cell migration in association with overexpression of Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1), an endogenous regulator of calcineurin. Calcineurin inhibitors also blocked cell migration in vitro and RCAN1 protein levels were reduced in nodal metastases in thyroid cancer. The purpose of the current study was to determine directly if RCAN1 functions as a motility suppressor in vitro. Several cancer cell lines derived from different cancer types with different motility rates were evaluated for RCAN1 expression levels. Using these systems we determined that reduction of endogenous RCAN1 using siRNA resulted in an increase in cancer cell motility while expression of exogenous RCAN1 reduced cell motility. In one cell line with a high migratory rate, the stability of exogenously expressed RCAN1 protein was reduced and was rescued by treatment with a proteasome inhibitor. Finally, overexpression of RCAN1 was associated with an increase in cell adhesion to collagen IV and reduced calcineurin activity. In summary, we have demonstrated that the expression of exogenous RCAN1 reduces migration and alters adhesion; and that the loss of endogenous RCAN1 leads to an increase in migration in the examined cancer cell lines. These results are consistent with a regulatory role for RCAN1 in cancer cell motility in vitro.

  9. Cell collectivity regulation within migrating cell cluster during Kupffer's vesicle formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bessho, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Although cell adhesion is thought to fasten cells tightly, cells that adhere to each other can migrate directionally. This group behavior, called “collective cell migration,” is observed during normal development, wound healing, and cancer invasion. Loss-of-function of cell adhesion molecules in several model systems of collective cell migration results in delay or inhibition of migration of cell groups but does not lead to dissociation of the cell groups, suggesting that mechanisms of cells staying assembled as a single cell cluster, termed as “cell collectivity,” remain largely unknown. During the formation of Kupffer's vesicle (KV, an organ of laterality in zebrafish), KV progenitors form a cluster and migrate together toward the vegetal pole. Importantly, in this model system of collective cell migration, knockdown of cell adhesion molecules or signal components leads to failure of cell collectivity. In this review, we summarize recent findings in cell collectivity regulation during collective migration of KV progenitor cells and describe our current understanding of how cell collectivity is regulated during collective cell migration. PMID:26000276

  10. Action spectrum for photochemical retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) disruption in an in vivo monkey model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Sabarinathan, Ranjani; Bubel, Tracy; Williams, David R.; Hunter, Jennifer J.

    2016-03-01

    Observations of RPE disruption and autofluorescence (AF) photobleaching at light levels below the ANSI photochemical maximum permissible exposure (MPE) (Morgan et al., 2008) indicates a demand to modify future light safety standards to protect the retina from harm. To establish safe light exposures, we measured the visible light action spectrum for RPE disruption in an in vivo monkey model with fluorescence adaptive optics retinal imaging. Using this high resolution imaging modality can provide insight into the consequences of light on a cellular level and allow for longitudinal monitoring of retinal changes. The threshold retinal radiant exposures (RRE) for RPE disruption were determined for 4 wavelengths (460, 488, 544, and 594 nm). The anaesthetized macaque retina was exposed to a uniform 0.5° × 0.5° field of view (FOV). Imaging within a 2° × 2° FOV was performed before, immediately after and at 2 week intervals for 10 weeks. At each wavelength, multiple RREs were tested with 4 repetitions each to determine the threshold for RPE disruption. For qualitative analysis, RPE disruption is defined as any detectable change from the pre exposure condition in the cell mosaic in the exposed region relative to the corresponding mosaic in the immediately surrounding area. We have tested several metrics to evaluate the RPE images obtained before and after exposure. The measured action spectrum for photochemical RPE disruption has a shallower slope than the current ANSI photochemical MPE for the same conditions and suggests that longer wavelength light is more hazardous than other measurements would suggest.

  11. Targeted siRNA Screens Identify ER-to-Mitochondrial Calcium Exchange in Autophagy and Mitophagy Responses in RPE1 Cells.

    PubMed

    MacVicar, Thomas D B; Mannack, Lilith V J C; Lees, Robert M; Lane, Jon D

    2015-06-11

    Autophagy is an important stress response pathway responsible for the removal and recycling of damaged or redundant cytosolic constituents. Mitochondrial damage triggers selective mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy), mediated by a variety of response factors including the Pink1/Parkin system. Using human retinal pigment epithelial cells stably expressing autophagy and mitophagy reporters, we have conducted parallel screens of regulators of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial morphology and function contributing to starvation-induced autophagy and damage-induced mitophagy. These screens identified the ER chaperone and Ca2+ flux modulator, sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1), as a regulator of autophagosome expansion during starvation. Screens also identified phosphatidyl ethanolamine methyl transferase (PEMT) and the IP3-receptors (IP3Rs) as mediators of Parkin-induced mitophagy. Further experiments suggested that IP3R-mediated transfer of Ca2+ from the ER lumen to the mitochondrial matrix via the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU) primes mitochondria for mitophagy. Importantly, recruitment of Parkin to damaged mitochondria did not require IP3R-mediated ER-to-mitochondrial Ca2+ transfer, but mitochondrial clustering downstream of Parkin recruitment was impaired, suggesting involvement of regulators of mitochondrial dynamics and/or transport. Our data suggest that Ca2+ flux between ER and mitochondria at presumed ER/mitochondrial contact sites is needed both for starvation-induced autophagy and for Parkin-mediated mitophagy, further highlighting the importance of inter-organellar communication for effective cellular homeostasis.

  12. Targeted siRNA Screens Identify ER-to-Mitochondrial Calcium Exchange in Autophagy and Mitophagy Responses in RPE1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    MacVicar, Thomas D. B.; Mannack, Lilith V. J. C.; Lees, Robert M.; Lane, Jon D.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important stress response pathway responsible for the removal and recycling of damaged or redundant cytosolic constituents. Mitochondrial damage triggers selective mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy), mediated by a variety of response factors including the Pink1/Parkin system. Using human retinal pigment epithelial cells stably expressing autophagy and mitophagy reporters, we have conducted parallel screens of regulators of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial morphology and function contributing to starvation-induced autophagy and damage-induced mitophagy. These screens identified the ER chaperone and Ca2+ flux modulator, sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1), as a regulator of autophagosome expansion during starvation. Screens also identified phosphatidyl ethanolamine methyl transferase (PEMT) and the IP3-receptors (IP3Rs) as mediators of Parkin-induced mitophagy. Further experiments suggested that IP3R-mediated transfer of Ca2+ from the ER lumen to the mitochondrial matrix via the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU) primes mitochondria for mitophagy. Importantly, recruitment of Parkin to damaged mitochondria did not require IP3R-mediated ER-to-mitochondrial Ca2+ transfer, but mitochondrial clustering downstream of Parkin recruitment was impaired, suggesting involvement of regulators of mitochondrial dynamics and/or transport. Our data suggest that Ca2+ flux between ER and mitochondria at presumed ER/mitochondrial contact sites is needed both for starvation-induced autophagy and for Parkin-mediated mitophagy, further highlighting the importance of inter-organellar communication for effective cellular homeostasis. PMID:26110381

  13. RNase L is a negative regulator of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shuvojit; Li, Geqiang; Li, Yize; Gaughan, Christina; Baskar, Danika; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel J; Weiss, Susan R; Silverman, Robert H

    2015-12-29

    RNase L is a regulated endoribonuclease that functions in the interferon antiviral response. Activation of RNase L by 2', 5'-oligoadenylates has been linked to apoptosis, autophagy and inflammation. Genetic studies have also suggested the possible involvement of the RNase L gene (RNASEL) on chromosome 1q25.3 in several types of cancer. Here we report that ablation of RNase L in human prostate cancer PC3 cells by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology enhanced cell migration as determined both by transwell assays and scratch wound healing assays. In addition, RNase L knockdown by means of RNAi increased migration of PC3 and DU145 cells in response to either fibronectin or serum stimulation, as did homozygous disruption of the RNase L gene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Serum or fibronectin stimulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) autophosphorylation on tyrosine-397 was increased by either knockdown or ablation of RNase L. In contrast, a missense mutant RNase L (R667A) lacking catalytic activity failed to suppress cell migration in PC3 cells. However, a nuclease-inactive mutant mouse RNase L (W630A) was able to partially inhibit migration of mouse fibroblasts. Consistent with a role for the catalytic activity of RNase L, transfection of PC3 cells with the RNase L activator, 2', 5'-oligoadenylate, suppressed cell migration. RNase L knockdown in PC3 cells enhanced tumor growth and metastasis following implantation in the mouse prostate. Our results suggest that naturally occurring mutations in the RNase L gene might promote enhanced cell migration and metastasis.

  14. RNase L is a negative regulator of cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shuvojit; Li, Geqiang; Li, Yize; Gaughan, Christina; Baskar, Danika; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel J.; Weiss, Susan R.; Silverman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    RNase L is a regulated endoribonuclease that functions in the interferon antiviral response. Activation of RNase L by 2′, 5′-oligoadenylates has been linked to apoptosis, autophagy and inflammation. Genetic studies have also suggested the possible involvement of the RNase L gene (RNASEL) on chromosome 1q25.3 in several types of cancer. Here we report that ablation of RNase L in human prostate cancer PC3 cells by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology enhanced cell migration as determined both by transwell assays and scratch wound healing assays. In addition, RNase L knockdown by means of RNAi increased migration of PC3 and DU145 cells in response to either fibronectin or serum stimulation, as did homozygous disruption of the RNase L gene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Serum or fibronectin stimulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) autophosphorylation on tyrosine-397 was increased by either knockdown or ablation of RNase L. In contrast, a missense mutant RNase L (R667A) lacking catalytic activity failed to suppress cell migration in PC3 cells. However, a nuclease-inactive mutant mouse RNase L (W630A) was able to partially inhibit migration of mouse fibroblasts. Consistent with a role for the catalytic activity of RNase L, transfection of PC3 cells with the RNase L activator, 2′, 5′-oligoadenylate, suppressed cell migration. RNase L knockdown in PC3 cells enhanced tumor growth and metastasis following implantation in the mouse prostate. Our results suggest that naturally occurring mutations in the RNase L gene might promote enhanced cell migration and metastasis. PMID:26517238

  15. Multidisciplinary approaches to understanding collective cell migration in developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Linus J; Kulesa, Paul M; McLennan, Rebecca; Baker, Ruth E; Maini, Philip K

    2016-06-01

    Mathematical models are becoming increasingly integrated with experimental efforts in the study of biological systems. Collective cell migration in developmental biology is a particularly fruitful application area for the development of theoretical models to predict the behaviour of complex multicellular systems with many interacting parts. In this context, mathematical models provide a tool to assess the consistency of experimental observations with testable mechanistic hypotheses. In this review, we showcase examples from recent years of multidisciplinary investigations of neural crest cell migration. The neural crest model system has been used to study how collective migration of cell populations is shaped by cell-cell interactions, cell-environmental interactions and heterogeneity between cells. The wide range of emergent behaviours exhibited by neural crest cells in different embryonal locations and in different organisms helps us chart out the spectrum of collective cell migration. At the same time, this diversity in migratory characteristics highlights the need to reconcile or unify the array of currently hypothesized mechanisms through the next generation of experimental data and generalized theoretical descriptions.

  16. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  17. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, N.R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development. PMID:26887292

  18. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humidity cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.

  19. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humiditymore » cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.« less

  20. The Autophagy Machinery: A New Player in Chemotactic Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Coly, Pierre-Michaël; Gandolfo, Pierrick; Castel, Hélène; Morin, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved self-degradative process that plays a key role in diverse cellular processes such as stress response or differentiation. A growing body of work highlights the direct involvement of autophagy in cell migration and cancer metastasis. Specifically, autophagy has been shown to be involved in modulating cell adhesion dynamics as well as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. After providing a general overview of the mechanisms controlling autophagosome biogenesis and cell migration, we discuss how chemotactic G protein-coupled receptors, through the repression of autophagy, may orchestrate membrane trafficking and compartmentation of specific proteins at the cell front in order to support the critical steps of directional migration. PMID:28261054

  1. HMGCR positively regulated the growth and migration of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhihua; Yuan, Wen; Chen, Tao; Zhou, Chenzhi; Liu, Chao; Huang, Yongkai; Han, Deqing; Huang, Qinghui

    2016-01-15

    The metabolic program of cancer cells is significant different from the normal cells, which makes it possible to develop novel strategies targeting cancer cells. Mevalonate pathway and its rate-limiting enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) have shown important roles in the progression of several cancer types. However, their roles in glioblastoma cells remain unknown. In this study, up-regulation of HMGCR in the clinical glioblastoma samples was observed. Forced expression of HMGCR promoted the growth and migration of U251 and U373 cells, while knocking down the expression of HMGCR inhibited the growth, migration and metastasis of glioblastoma cells. Molecular mechanism studies revealed that HMGCR positively regulated the expression of TAZ, an important mediator of Hippo pathway, and the downstream target gene connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), suggesting HMGCR might activate Hippo pathway in glioblastoma cells. Taken together, our study demonstrated the oncogenic roles of HMGCR in glioblastoma cells and HMGCR might be a promising therapeutic target.

  2. Controlled architectural and chemotactic studies of 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Tayalia, Prakriti; Mazur, Eric; Mooney, David J

    2011-04-01

    Chemotaxis plays a critical role in tissue development and wound repair, and is widely studied using ex vivo model systems in applications such as immunotherapy. However, typical chemotactic models employ 2D systems that are less physiologically relevant or use end-point assays, that reveal little about the stepwise dynamics of the migration process. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new model system using microfabrication techniques, sustained drug delivery approaches, and theoretical modeling of chemotactic agent diffusion. This model system allows us to study the effects of 3D architecture and chemotactic agent gradient on immune cell migration in real time. We find that dendritic cell migration is characterized by a strong interplay between matrix architecture and chemotactic gradients, and migration is also influenced dramatically by the cell activation state. Our results indicate that Lipopolysaccharide-activated dendritic cells studied in a traditional transwell system actually exhibit anomalous migration behavior. Such a 3D ex vivo system lends itself for analyzing cell migratory behavior in response to single or multiple competitive cues and could prove useful in vaccine development.

  3. Metformin Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Cholangiocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed

    Trinh, Son Xuan; Nguyen, Huyen Thi Bich; Saimuang, Kween; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Chan On, Waraporn

    2017-02-01

    Background: Metformin is an oral anti-diabetic agent that has been widely prescribed for treatment of type II diabetes. Anti-cancer properties of metformin have been revealed for numerous human malignancies including cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) with anti-proliferative effects in vitro. However, effects on CCA cell migration and invasion have not been fully investigated. The present study aimed to explore the inhibitory effects of metformin on motility, migration and invasion of the CCA cell line HuCCT1, and examine molecular mechanisms underlying metformin effects. Methods: HuCCT1 cells were exposed to increasing doses of metformin. Viability and growth of HuCCT1 cells were assessed by MTS and colony formation assays, respectively. Motility, migration and invasion of metformin-treated HuCCT1 cells were determined in vitro using wound healing, transwell migration and matrigel invasion assays. Expression of signaling molecules and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers was assessed by Western blotting. Results: It was observed that metformin significantly decreased HuCCT1 cell viability and colony formation. The agent also markedly reduced wound closure, migration and invasion of HuCCT1 cells. Furthermore, metformin exposure resulted in decreased STAT3 activation and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 expression. In addition, it upregulated the expression of E-cadherin, while downregulating that of N-cadherin, Snail, and MMP-2. Conclusion: These results demonstrated inhibitory effects of metformin on CCA cell migration and invasion, possibly involving the STAT3 pathway and reversal of EMT markers expression. They further suggest that metformin may be useful for CCA management.

  4. Microtopography and flow modulate the direction of endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Uttayarat, P; Chen, M; Li, M; Allen, F D; Composto, R J; Lelkes, P I

    2008-02-01

    The migration of vascular endothelial cells under flow can be modulated by the addition of chemical or mechanical stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate how topographic cues derived from a substrate containing three-dimensional microtopography interact with fluid shear stress in directing endothelial cell migration. Subconfluent bovine aortic endothelial cells were seeded on fibronectin-coated poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrates patterned with a combinatorial array of parallel and orthogonal microgrooves ranging from 2 to 5 microm in width at a constant depth of 1 microm. During a 4-h time-lapse observation in the absence of flow, the majority of the prealigned cells migrated parallel to the grooves with the distribution of their focal adhesions (FAs) depending on the groove width. No change in this migratory pattern was observed after the cells were exposed to moderate shear stress (13.5 dyn/cm(2)), irrespective of groove direction with respect to flow. After 4-h exposure to high shear stress (58 dyn/cm(2)) parallel to the grooves, the cells continued to migrate in the direction of both grooves and flow. By contrast, when microgrooves were oriented perpendicular to flow, most cells migrated orthogonal to the grooves and downstream with flow. Despite the change in the migration direction of the cells under high shear stress, most FAs and actin microfilaments maintained their original alignment parallel to the grooves, suggesting that topographic cues were more effective than those derived from shear stress in guiding the orientation of cytoskeletal and adhesion proteins during the initial exposure to flow.

  5. Quantitative 3D analysis of complex single border cell behaviors in coordinated collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Cliffe, Adam; Doupé, David P; Sung, HsinHo; Lim, Isaac Kok Hwee; Ong, Kok Haur; Cheng, Li; Yu, Weimiao

    2017-04-04

    Understanding the mechanisms of collective cell migration is crucial for cancer metastasis, wound healing and many developmental processes. Imaging a migrating cluster in vivo is feasible, but the quantification of individual cell behaviours remains challenging. We have developed an image analysis toolkit, CCMToolKit, to quantify the Drosophila border cell system. In addition to chaotic motion, previous studies reported that the migrating cells are able to migrate in a highly coordinated pattern. We quantify the rotating and running migration modes in 3D while also observing a range of intermediate behaviours. Running mode is driven by cluster external protrusions. Rotating mode is associated with cluster internal cell extensions that could not be easily characterized. Although the cluster moves slower while rotating, individual cells retain their mobility and are in fact slightly more active than in running mode. We also show that individual cells may exchange positions during migration.

  6. Paxillin-kinase-linker tyrosine phosphorylation regulates directional cell migration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianxin A; Deakin, Nicholas O; Turner, Christopher E

    2009-11-01

    Directed cell migration requires the coordination of growth factor and cell adhesion signaling and is of fundamental importance during embryonic development, wound repair, and pathological conditions such as tumor metastasis. Herein, we demonstrate that the ArfGAP, paxillin-kinase-linker (PKL/GIT2), is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulation, in an adhesion dependent manner and is necessary for directed cell migration. Using a combination of pharmacological inhibitors, knockout cells and kinase mutants, FAK, and Src family kinases were shown to mediate PDGF-dependent PKL tyrosine phosphorylation. In fibroblasts, expression of a PKL mutant lacking the principal tyrosine phosphorylation sites resulted in loss of wound-induced cell polarization as well as directional migration. PKL phosphorylation was necessary for PDGF-stimulated PKL binding to the focal adhesion protein paxillin and expression of paxillin or PKL mutants defective in their respective binding motifs recapitulated the polarization defects. RNA interference or expression of phosphorylation mutants of PKL resulted in disregulation of PDGF-stimulated Rac1 and PAK activities, reduction of Cdc42 and Erk signaling, as well as mislocalization of betaPIX. Together these studies position PKL as an integral component of growth factor and cell adhesion cross-talk signaling, controlling the development of front-rear cell polarity and directional cell migration.

  7. Nanotopography guides and directs cell migration in amoeboid and epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Rachel; Das, Satarupa; Hourwitz, Matthew; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John; Losert, Wolfgang

    Cell migration plays a critical role in development, angiogenesis, immune response, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. In many cases, cells also move in the context of a matrix of collagen fibers, and the alignment of these fibers can both affect the migration phenotype and guide cells. Here we show that both fast and slow migrating cells - amoeboid HL-60 and epithelial MCF10A - are affected in similar ways by micro/nanostructures with dimensions similar to those of collagen fibers. Cell alignment enhances the efficiency of migration by increasing directional persistence.

  8. The planar polarity pathway promotes coordinated cell migration during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bastock, Rebecca; Strutt, David

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell migration is fundamental in both animal morphogenesis and disease. The migration of individual cells is relatively well-studied, however in vivo cells often remain joined by cell-cell junctions and migrate in cohesive groups. How such groups of cells coordinate their migration is poorly understood. The planar polarity pathway coordinates the polarity of non-migrating cells in epithelial sheets and is required for cell rearrangements during vertebrate morphogenesis. It is therefore a good candidate to play a role in collective migration of groups of cells. Drosophila border cell migration is a well-characterised and genetically tractable model of collective cell migration, during which a group of about 6-10 epithelial cells detaches from the anterior end of the developing egg chamber and migrates invasively towards the oocyte. We find that the planar polarity pathway promotes this invasive migration, acting both in the migrating cells themselves and in the non-migratory polar follicle cells they carry along. Disruption of planar polarity signalling causes abnormalities in actin rich processes on the cell surface and leads to less efficient migration. This is apparently due in part to loss of regulation of Rho GTPase activity by the planar polarity receptor Frizzled, which itself becomes localised to the migratory edge of the border cells. We conclude that during collective cell migration the planar polarity pathway can mediate communication between motile and non-motile cells, which enhances the efficiency of migration via the modulation of actin dynamics. PMID:17652348

  9. The effects of acoustic vibration on fibroblast cell migration.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Taybia; Murphy, Mark F; Lilley, Francis; Burton, David R; Bezombes, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    Cells are known to interact and respond to external mechanical cues and recent work has shown that application of mechanical stimulation, delivered via acoustic vibration, can be used to control complex cell behaviours. Fibroblast cells are known to respond to physical cues generated in the extracellular matrix and it is thought that such cues are important regulators of the wound healing process. Many conditions are associated with poor wound healing, so there is need for treatments/interventions, which can help accelerate the wound healing process. The primary aim of this research was to investigate the effects of mechanical stimulation upon the migratory and morphological properties of two different fibroblast cells namely; human lung fibroblast cells (LL24) and subcutaneous areolar/adipose mouse fibroblast cells (L929). Using a speaker-based system, the effects of mechanical stimulation (0-1600Hz for 5min) on the mean cell migration distance (μm) and actin organisation was investigated. The results show that 100Hz acoustic vibration enhanced cell migration for both cell lines whereas acoustic vibration above 100Hz was found to decrease cell migration in a frequency dependent manner. Mechanical stimulation was also found to promote changes to the morphology of both cell lines, particularly the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia. Overall lamellipodia was the most prominent actin structure displayed by the lung cell (LL24), whereas filopodia was the most prominent actin feature displayed by the fibroblast derived from subcutaneous areolar/adipose tissue. Mechanical stimulation at all the frequencies used here was found not to affect cell viability. These results suggest that low-frequency acoustic vibration may be used as a tool to manipulate the mechanosensitivity of cells to promote cell migration.

  10. Flow and Diffusion in Channel-Guided Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Zorn, Matthias; Klingner, Christoph; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Frey, Erwin; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2014-01-01

    Collective migration of mechanically coupled cell layers is a notable feature of wound healing, embryonic development, and cancer progression. In confluent epithelial sheets, the dynamics have been found to be highly heterogeneous, exhibiting spontaneous formation of swirls, long-range correlations, and glass-like dynamic arrest as a function of cell density. In contrast, the flow-like properties of one-sided cell-sheet expansion in confining geometries are not well understood. Here, we studied the short- and long-term flow of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells as they moved through microchannels. Using single-cell tracking and particle image velocimetry (PIV), we found that a defined averaged stationary cell current emerged that exhibited a velocity gradient in the direction of migration and a plug-flow-like profile across the advancing sheet. The observed flow velocity can be decomposed into a constant term of directed cell migration and a diffusion-like contribution that increases with density gradient. The diffusive component is consistent with the cell-density profile and front propagation speed predicted by the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. To connect diffusion-mediated transport to underlying cellular motility, we studied single-cell trajectories and occurrence of vorticity. We discovered that the directed large-scale cell flow altered fluctuations in cellular motion at short length scales: vorticity maps showed a reduced frequency of swirl formation in channel flow compared with resting sheets of equal cell density. Furthermore, under flow, single-cell trajectories showed persistent long-range, random-walk behavior superimposed on drift, whereas cells in resting tissue did not show significant displacements with respect to neighboring cells. Our work thus suggests that active cell migration manifests itself in an underlying, spatially uniform drift as well as in randomized bursts of short-range correlated motion that lead to a diffusion-mediated transport

  11. Analyzing In Vivo Cell Migration using Cell Transplantations and Time-lapse Imaging in Zebrafish Embryos.

    PubMed

    Giger, Florence A; Dumortier, Julien G; David, Nicolas B

    2016-04-29

    Cell migration is key to many physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer metastasis. The cellular and molecular bases of cell migration have been thoroughly analyzed in vitro. However, in vivo cell migration somehow differs from in vitro migration, and has proven more difficult to analyze, being less accessible to direct observation and manipulation. This protocol uses the migration of the prospective prechordal plate in the early zebrafish embryo as a model system to study the function of candidate genes in cell migration. Prechordal plate progenitors form a group of cells which, during gastrulation, undergoes a directed migration from the embryonic organizer to the animal pole of the embryo. The proposed protocol uses cell transplantation to create mosaic embryos. This offers the combined advantages of labeling isolated cells, which is key to good imaging, and of limiting gain/loss of function effects to the observed cells, hence ensuring cell-autonomous effects. We describe here how we assessed the function of the TORC2 component Sin1 in cell migration, but the protocol can be used to analyze the function of any candidate gene in controlling cell migration in vivo.

  12. Leukotrienes induce the migration of Th17 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonyong; Su Kim, Hyeong; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2015-01-01

    Th17 cell trafficking in response to leukotriene signaling is poorly understood. Here we showed that Th17 cells express high levels of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 (LTB4R1) and cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLTR1). Th17 cells migrated under the guidance of leukotriene B4 and D4. The migration of Th17 cells was more efficient than that of Th1 and Th2 cells, and it was blocked by specific inhibitors of LTB4R1 or CysLTR1. Studies in an animal model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis revealed that treatment with montelukast alleviated disease symptoms and inhibited the recruitment of Th17 cells to the central nervous system. Thus, leukotrienes may act as chemoattractants for Th17 cells.

  13. Plasma-mediated transfection of RPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, D.; Chalberg, T.; Vankov, A.; Huie, P.; Molnar, F. E.; Butterwick, A.; Calos, M.; Marmor, M.; Blumenkranz, M. S.

    2006-02-01

    A major obstacle in applying gene therapy to clinical practice is the lack of efficient and safe gene delivery techniques. Viral delivery has encountered a number of serious problems including immunological reactions and malignancy. Non-viral delivery methods (liposomes, sonoporation and electroporation) have either low efficiency in-vivo or produce severe collateral damage to ocular tissues. We discovered that tensile stress greatly increases the susceptibility of cellular membranes to electroporation. For synchronous application of electric field and mechanical stress, both are generated by the electric discharge itself. A pressure wave is produced by rapid vaporization of the medium. To prevent termination of electric current by the vapor cavity it is ionized thus restoring its electric conductivity. For in-vivo experiments with rabbits a plasmid DNA was injected into the subretinal space, and RPE was treated trans-sclerally with an array of microelectodes placed outside the eye. Application of 250-300V and 100-200 μs biphasic pulses via a microelectrode array resulted in efficient transfection of RPE without visible damage to the retina. Gene expression was quantified and monitored using bioluminescence (luciferase) and fluorescence (GFP) imaging. Transfection efficiency of RPE with this new technique exceeded that of standard electroporation by a factor 10,000. Safe and effective non-viral DNA delivery to the mammalian retina may help to materialize the enormous potential of the ocular gene therapy. Future experiments will focus on continued characterization of the safety and efficacy of this method and evaluation of long-term transgene expression in the presence of phiC31 integrase.

  14. Fibrin glue inhibits migration of ocular surface epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yeung, A M; Faraj, L A; McIntosh, O D; Dhillon, V K; Dua, H S

    2016-10-01

    PurposeFibrin glue has been used successfully in numerous ophthalmic surgical procedures. Recently, fibrin glue has been used in limbal stem cell transplantation to reduce both operative time and to negate the need for sutures. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of fibrin glue on epithelial cell migration in vitro.MethodsCorneoscleral rims were split to retain the epithelial layer, Bowman's layer, and anterior stroma. Rims were cut into eight equal-sized pieces and were placed directly on culture plates or affixed with fibrin glue. Rims were maintained in culture for 25 days and epithelial cell growth was monitored. Cells were photographed to measure area or growth and immunofluorescence staining of explants for fibrin was performed.ResultsExplants that were glued demonstrated significantly delayed epithelial cell growth and migration as compared with explants without glue. By day 16, all fibrin glue had dissolved and coincided with onset of cell growth from glued explants. Cell growth commenced between days 3 and 4 for control explants without glue and around days 14-16 for explants with fibrin glue.ConclusionsFibrin glue delays epithelial cell migration by acting as a physical barrier and can potentially interfere with explant-derived limbal epithelial cell migration on to the corneal surface. We propose that glue should be used to attach the conjunctival frill of the limbal explant but care should be taken to ensure that the glue does not wrap around the explant if used to secure the explant as well. Strategic use of glue, to attach the recessed conjunctiva, can be advantageous in delaying conjunctival cell migration and reducing the need for sequential sector conjunctival epitheliectomy.

  15. Epac Activation Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao-Le; Deng, Ruixia; Chung, Sookja K; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-04-01

    How to enhance the homing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the target tissues remains a clinical challenge nowadays. To overcome this barrier, the mechanism responsible for the hMSCs migration and engraftment has to be defined. Currently, the exact mechanism involved in migration and adhesion of hMSCs remains unknown. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a novel protein discovered in cAMP signaling pathway, may have a potential role in regulating cells adhesion and migration by triggering the downstream Rap family signaling cascades. However, the exact role of Epac in cells homing is elusive. Our study evaluated the role of Epac in the homing of hMSCs. We confirmed that hMSCs expressed functional Epac and its activation enhanced the migration and adhesion of hMSCs significantly. The Epac activation was further found to be contributed directly to the chemotactic responses induced by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) which is a known chemokine in regulating hMSCs homing. These findings suggested Epac is connected to the SDF-1 signaling cascades. In conclusion, our study revealed that Epac plays a role in hMSCs homing by promoting adhesion and migration. Appropriate manipulation of Epac may enhance the homing of hMSCs and facilitate their future clinical applications.

  16. Multidisciplinary approaches to understanding collective cell migration in developmental biology

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Linus J.; Kulesa, Paul M.; McLennan, Rebecca; Baker, Ruth E.; Maini, Philip K.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models are becoming increasingly integrated with experimental efforts in the study of biological systems. Collective cell migration in developmental biology is a particularly fruitful application area for the development of theoretical models to predict the behaviour of complex multicellular systems with many interacting parts. In this context, mathematical models provide a tool to assess the consistency of experimental observations with testable mechanistic hypotheses. In this review, we showcase examples from recent years of multidisciplinary investigations of neural crest cell migration. The neural crest model system has been used to study how collective migration of cell populations is shaped by cell–cell interactions, cell–environmental interactions and heterogeneity between cells. The wide range of emergent behaviours exhibited by neural crest cells in different embryonal locations and in different organisms helps us chart out the spectrum of collective cell migration. At the same time, this diversity in migratory characteristics highlights the need to reconcile or unify the array of currently hypothesized mechanisms through the next generation of experimental data and generalized theoretical descriptions. PMID:27278647

  17. Collisions of deformable cells lead to collective migration

    SciTech Connect

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2015-03-17

    Collective migration of eukaryotic cells plays a fundamental role in tissue growth, wound healing and immune response. The motion, arising spontaneously or in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli, is also important for understanding life-threatening pathologies, such as cancer and metastasis formation. We present a phase-field model to describe the movement of many self-organized, interacting cells. The model takes into account the main mechanisms of cell motility – acto-myosin dynamics, as well as substrate-mediated and cell-cell adhesion. It predicts that collective cell migration emerges spontaneously as a result of inelastic collisions between neighboring cells: collisions lead to a mutual alignment of the cell velocities and to the formation of coherently-moving multi-cellular clusters. Small cell-to-cell adhesion, in turn, reduces the propensity for large-scale collective migration, while higher adhesion leads to the formation of moving bands. Our study provides valuable insight into biological processes associated with collective cell motility.

  18. Collisions of deformable cells lead to collective migration

    DOE PAGES

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2015-03-17

    Collective migration of eukaryotic cells plays a fundamental role in tissue growth, wound healing and immune response. The motion, arising spontaneously or in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli, is also important for understanding life-threatening pathologies, such as cancer and metastasis formation. We present a phase-field model to describe the movement of many self-organized, interacting cells. The model takes into account the main mechanisms of cell motility – acto-myosin dynamics, as well as substrate-mediated and cell-cell adhesion. It predicts that collective cell migration emerges spontaneously as a result of inelastic collisions between neighboring cells: collisions lead to a mutual alignmentmore » of the cell velocities and to the formation of coherently-moving multi-cellular clusters. Small cell-to-cell adhesion, in turn, reduces the propensity for large-scale collective migration, while higher adhesion leads to the formation of moving bands. Our study provides valuable insight into biological processes associated with collective cell motility.« less

  19. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    PubMed

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-07

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing.

  20. Single-cell Migration Chip for Chemotaxis-based Microfluidic Selection of Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Allen, Steven G.; Ingram, Patrick N.; Buckanovich, Ronald; Merajver, Sofia D.; Yoon, Euisik

    2015-05-01

    Tumor cell migration toward and intravasation into capillaries is an early and key event in cancer metastasis, yet not all cancer cells are imbued with the same capability to do so. This heterogeneity within a tumor is a fundamental property of cancer. Tools to help us understand what molecular characteristics allow a certain subpopulation of cells to spread from the primary tumor are thus critical for overcoming metastasis. Conventional in vitro migration platforms treat populations in aggregate, which leads to a masking of intrinsic differences among cells. Some migration assays reported recently have single-cell resolution, but these platforms do not provide for selective retrieval of the distinct migrating and non-migrating cell populations for further analysis. Thus, to study the intrinsic differences in cells responsible for chemotactic heterogeneity, we developed a single-cell migration platform so that individual cells’ migration behavior can be studied and the heterogeneous population sorted based upon chemotactic phenotype. Furthermore, after migration, the highly chemotactic and non-chemotactic cells were retrieved and proved viable for later molecular analysis of their differences. Moreover, we modified the migration channel to resemble lymphatic capillaries to better understand how certain cancer cells are able to move through geometrically confining spaces.

  1. Complementation Test of Rpe65 Knockout and Tvrm148

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Charles B.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Foster, Stephanie L.; Duncan, Todd; Redmond, T. Michael; Pardue, Machelle T.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Nickerson, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. A mouse mutation, tvrm148, was previously reported as resulting in retinal degeneration. Tvrm148 and Rpe65 map between markers D3Mit147 and D3Mit19 on a genetic map, but the physical map places RPE65 outside the markers. We asked if Rpe65 or perhaps another nearby gene is mutated and if the mutant reduced 11-cis-retinal levels. We studied the impact of the tvrm148 mutation on visual function, morphology, and retinoid levels. Methods. Normal phase HPLC was used to measure retinoid levels. Rpe65+/+, tvrm148/+ (T+/−), tvrm148/tvrm148 (T−/−), RPE65KO/KO (Rpe65−/−), and Rpe65T/− mice visual function was measured by optokinetic tracking (OKT) and electroretinography (ERG). Morphology was assessed by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). qRT-PCR was used to measure Rpe65 mRNA levels. Immunoblotting measured the size and amount of RPE65 protein. Results. The knockout and tvrm148 alleles did not complement. No 11-cis-retinal was detected in T−/− or Rpe65−/− mice. Visual acuity in Rpe65+/+ and T+/− mouse was ∼0.382 c/d, but 0.037 c/d in T−/− mice at postnatal day 210 (P210). ERG response in T−/− mice was undetectable except at bright flash intensities. Outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness in T−/− mice was ∼70% of Rpe65+/+ by P210. Rpe65 mRNA levels in T−/− mice were unchanged, yet 14.5% of Rpe65+/+ protein levels was detected. Protein size was unchanged. Conclusions. A complementation test revealed the RPE65 knockout and tvrm148 alleles do not complement, proving that the tvrm148 mutation is in Rpe65. Behavioral, physiological, molecular, biochemical, and histological approaches indicate that tvrm148 is a null allele of Rpe65. PMID:23778877

  2. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    DOEpatents

    Kunz, H.R.; Guthrie, R.J.; Katz, M.

    1987-03-17

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate. 5 figs.

  3. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    DOEpatents

    Kunz, H. Russell; Guthrie, Robin J.; Katz, Murray

    1988-08-02

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate.

  4. Adhesion and migration of cells responding to microtopography.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Maruxa; Martínez, Elena; Yarwood, Stephen J; Dalby, Matthew J; Samitier, Josep

    2015-05-01

    It is known that cells respond strongly to microtopography. However, cellular mechanisms of response are unclear. Here, we study wild-type fibroblasts responding to 25 µm(2) posts and compare their response to that of FAK(-/-) fibroblasts and fibroblasts with PMA treatment to stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) and the small g-protein Rac. FAK knockout cells modulated adhesion number and size in a similar way to cells on topography; that is, they used more, smaller adhesions, but migration was almost completely stalled demonstrating the importance of FAK signaling in contact guidance and adhesion turnover. Little similarity, however, was observed to PKC stimulated cells and cells on the topography. Interestingly, with PKC stimulation the cell nuclei became highly deformable bringing focus on these surfaces to the study of metastasis. Surfaces that aid the study of cellular migration are important in developing understanding of mechanisms of wound healing and repair in aligned tissues such as ligament and tendon.

  5. Study of dendritic cell migration using micro-fabrication.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Pablo; Chabaud, Mélanie; Thiam, Hawa-Racine; Lankar, Danielle; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Dumenil, Ana-Maria

    2016-05-01

    Cell migration is a hallmark of dendritic cells (DCs) function. It is needed for DCs to scan their environment in search for antigens as well as to reach lymphatic organs in order to trigger T lymphocyte's activation. Such interaction leads to tolerance in the case of DCs migrating under homeostatic conditions or to immunity in the case of DCs migrating upon encounter with pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Cell migration is therefore essential for DCs to transfer information from peripheral tissues to lymphoid organs, thereby linking innate to adaptive immunity. This stresses the need to unravel the molecular mechanisms involved. However, the tremendous complexity of the tissue microenvironment as well as the limited spatio-temporal resolution of in vivo imaging techniques has made this task difficult. To bypass this problem, we have developed microfabrication-based experimental tools that are compatible with high-resolution imaging. Here, we will discuss how such devices can be used to study DC migration under controlled conditions that mimic their physiological environment in a robust quantitative manner.

  6. Intravital characterization of tumor cell migration in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beerling, Evelyne; Oosterom, Ilse; Voest, Emile; Lolkema, Martijn; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Curing pancreatic cancer is difficult as metastases often determine the poor clinical outcome. To gain more insight into the metastatic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells, we characterized migratory cells in primary pancreatic tumors using intravital microscopy. We visualized the migratory behavior of primary tumor cells of a genetically engineered pancreatic cancer mouse model and found that pancreatic tumor cells migrate with a mesenchymal morphology as single individual cells or collectively as a stream of non-cohesive single motile cells. These findings may improve our ability to conceive treatments that block metastatic behavior. PMID:28243522

  7. Multimodal Fundus Imaging of Sodium Iodate-Treated Mice Informs RPE Susceptibility and Origins of Increased Fundus Autofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jin; Kim, Hye Jin; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose By multimodal imaging, and the use of mouse and in vitro models, we have addressed changes in fundus autofluorescence (488 and 790 nm) and observed interactions between the photooxidative stress imposed by RPE bisretinoid lipofuscin and the oxidative impact of systemic sodium iodate (NaIO3). Methods Abca4−/−, wild-type, and Rpe65rd12 mice were given systemic injections of NaIO3 (30 mg/kg). Analysis included noninvasive imaging of fundus autofluorescence (short-wavelength [SW-AF]; near-infrared excitation [NIR-AF]), quantitative fundus AF (qAF; 488 nm); light microscopy, RPE flat-mounts and measurements of outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness. NaIO3 also was studied by using in vitro assays. Results In SW-AF and NIR-AF images, fundus mottling was visible 3 and 7 days after NaIO3 injection with changes being more pronounced in Abca4−/− mice that are characterized by an abundance of RPE bisretinoid lipofuscin. In Abca4−/− mice, qAF was elevated 3 and 7 days after NaIO3 administration. In light micrographs and RPE flat-mounts stained to reveal tight junctions (ZO-1) and nuclei, the RPE monolayer was disorganized, and clumping and loss of RPE was visible. ONL thinning was most pronounced in Abca4−/− mice. Treatment of ARPE-19 cells with NaIO3 together with the photooxidation of the bisretinoid A2E by exposure to 430-nm light produced an additive effect whereby loss of cell viability was greater than with either perturbation alone. Conclusions Elevations in SW-AF intensity can occur due to photoreceptor cell dysfunction as induced secondarily by NaIO3. Photooxidative stress associated with RPE cell bisretinoid lipofuscin may confer increased susceptibility to the oxidant NaIO3. PMID:28395299

  8. Uveal melanoma cells utilize a novel route for transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Onken, Michael D; Li, Jinmei; Cooper, John A

    2014-01-01

    Uveal melanoma arises in the eye, and it spreads to distant organs in almost half of patients, leading to a fatal outcome. To metastasize, uveal melanoma cells must transmigrate into and out of the microvasculature, crossing the monolayer of endothelial cells that separates the vessel lumen from surrounding tissues. We investigated how human uveal melanoma cells cross the endothelial cell monolayer, using a cultured cell system with primary human endothelial cell monolayers on hydrogel substrates. We found that uveal melanoma cells transmigrate by a novel and unexpected mechanism. Uveal melanoma cells intercalate into the endothelial cell monolayer and flatten out, assuming a shape and geometry similar to those of endothelial cells in the monolayer. After an extended period of time in the intercalated state, the uveal melanoma cells round up and migrate underneath the monolayer. VCAM is present on endothelial cells, and anti-VCAM antibodies slowed the process of intercalation. Depletion of BAP1, a known suppressor of metastasis in patients, increased the amount of transmigration of uveal melanoma cells in transwell assays; but BAP1 depletion did not affect the rate of intercalation, based on movies of living cells. Our results reveal a novel route of transendothelial migration for uveal melanoma cells, and they provide insight into the mechanism by which loss of BAP1 promotes metastasis.

  9. A lateral signalling pathway coordinates shape volatility during cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Luga, Valbona; Armitage, Sarah K.; Musiol, Martin; Won, Amy; Yip, Christopher M.; Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Wrana, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental for both physiological and pathological processes. Migrating cells usually display high dynamics in morphology, which is orchestrated by an integrative array of signalling pathways. Here we identify a novel pathway, we term lateral signalling, comprised of the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Pk1 and the RhoGAPs, Arhgap21/23. We show that the Pk1–Arhgap21/23 complex inhibits RhoA, is localized on the non-protrusive lateral membrane cortex and its disruption leads to the disorganization of the actomyosin network and altered focal adhesion dynamics. Pk1-mediated lateral signalling confines protrusive activity and is regulated by Smurf2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase in the PCP pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that dynamic interplay between lateral and protrusive signalling generates cyclical fluctuations in cell shape that we quantify here as shape volatility, which strongly correlates with migration speed. These studies uncover a previously unrecognized lateral signalling pathway that coordinates shape volatility during productive cell migration. PMID:27226243

  10. Optimal chemotaxis in intermittent migration of animal cells.

    PubMed

    Romanczuk, P; Salbreux, G

    2015-04-01

    Animal cells can sense chemical gradients without moving and are faced with the challenge of migrating towards a target despite noisy information on the target position. Here we discuss optimal search strategies for a chaser that moves by switching between two phases of motion ("run" and "tumble"), reorienting itself towards the target during tumble phases, and performing persistent migration during run phases. We show that the chaser average run time can be adjusted to minimize the target catching time or the spatial dispersion of the chasers. We obtain analytical results for the catching time and for the spatial dispersion in the limits of small and large ratios of run time to tumble time and scaling laws for the optimal run times. Our findings have implications for optimal chemotactic strategies in animal cell migration.

  11. Optimal chemotaxis in intermittent migration of animal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczuk, P.; Salbreux, G.

    2015-04-01

    Animal cells can sense chemical gradients without moving and are faced with the challenge of migrating towards a target despite noisy information on the target position. Here we discuss optimal search strategies for a chaser that moves by switching between two phases of motion ("run" and "tumble"), reorienting itself towards the target during tumble phases, and performing persistent migration during run phases. We show that the chaser average run time can be adjusted to minimize the target catching time or the spatial dispersion of the chasers. We obtain analytical results for the catching time and for the spatial dispersion in the limits of small and large ratios of run time to tumble time and scaling laws for the optimal run times. Our findings have implications for optimal chemotactic strategies in animal cell migration.

  12. Surface topography during neural stem cell differentiation regulates cell migration and cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Czeisler, Catherine; Short, Aaron; Nelson, Tyler; Gygli, Patrick; Ortiz, Cristina; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Stocker, Ben; Cronin, James; Lannutti, John; Winter, Jessica; Otero, José Javier

    2016-12-01

    We sought to determine the contribution of scaffold topography to the migration and morphology of neural stem cells by mimicking anatomical features of scaffolds found in vivo. We mimicked two types of central nervous system scaffolds encountered by neural stem cells during development in vitro by constructing different diameter electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) fiber mats, a substrate that we have shown to be topographically similar to brain scaffolds. We compared the effects of large fibers (made to mimic blood vessel topography) with those of small-diameter fibers (made to mimic radial glial process topography) on the migration and differentiation of neural stem cells. Neural stem cells showed differential migratory and morphological reactions with laminin in different topographical contexts. We demonstrate, for the first time, that neural stem cell biological responses to laminin are dependent on topographical context. Large-fiber topography without laminin prevented cell migration, which was partially reversed by treatment with rock inhibitor. Cell morphology complexity assayed by fractal dimension was inhibited in nocodazole- and cytochalasin-D-treated neural precursor cells in large-fiber topography, but was not changed in small-fiber topography with these inhibitors. These data indicate that cell morphology has different requirements on cytoskeletal proteins dependent on the topographical environment encountered by the cell. We propose that the physical structure of distinct scaffolds induces unique signaling cascades that regulate migration and morphology in embryonic neural precursor cells. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3485-3502, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Exit Strategies: S1P Signaling and T Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Baeyens, Audrey; Fang, Victoria; Chen, Cynthia; Schwab, Susan R

    2015-12-01

    Whereas the role of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) in T cell egress and the regulation of S1P gradients between lymphoid organs and circulatory fluids in homeostasis are increasingly well understood, much remains to be learned about S1P signaling and distribution during an immune response. Recent data suggest that the role of S1PR1 in directing cells from tissues into circulatory fluids is reprised again and again, particularly in guiding activated T cells from non-lymphoid tissues into lymphatics. Conversely, S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2), which antagonizes migration towards chemokines, confines cells within tissues. Here we review the current understanding of the roles of S1P signaling in activated T cell migration. In this context, we outline open questions, particularly regarding the shape of S1P gradients in different tissues in homeostasis and inflammation, and discuss recent strategies to measure S1P.

  14. The MRL proteins: adapting cell adhesion, migration and growth.

    PubMed

    Coló, Georgina P; Lafuente, Esther M; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    MIG-10, RIAM and Lamellipodin (Lpd) are the founding members of the MRL family of multi-adaptor molecules. These proteins have common domain structures but display distinct functions in cell migration and adhesion, signaling, and in cell growth. The binding of RIAM with active Rap1 and with talin provides these MRL molecules with important regulatory roles on integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration. Furthermore, RIAM and Lpd can regulate actin dynamics through their binding to actin regulatory Ena/VASP proteins. Recent data generated with the Drosophila MRL ortholog called Pico and with RIAM in melanoma cells indicate that these proteins can also regulate cell growth. As MRL proteins represent a relatively new family, many questions on their structure-function relationships remain unanswered, including regulation of their expression, post-translational modifications, new interactions, involvement in signaling and their knockout mice phenotype.

  15. Genistein affects proliferation and migration of bovine oviductal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    García, Daniela C; Valdecantos, Pablo A; Miceli, Dora C; Roldán-Olarte, Mariela

    2017-03-08

    Genistein is one of the most abundant isoflavones in soybean. This molecule induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in different normal and cancer cells. Genistein has been of considerable interest due to its adverse effects on bovine reproduction, altering estrous cycle, implantation and fetal development and producing subfertility or infertility. The objective of this work was to study the effects of genistein on the expression of selected genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis. Primary cultures of bovine oviductal epithelial cells (BOEC) were treated with different genistein concentrations (0.2, 2 and 10μM) to analyze CYCLIN B1, BCL-2 and BAX gene expression by Real-time RT-PCR. Results showed that genistein down-regulated CYCLIN B1 expression, affecting cell cycle progression, and caused a decrease in the BCL-2/BAX ratio starting at 2μM of genistein. In addition, in order to determine if genistein affects BOEC migration, in vitro wound healing assays were performed. A significant reduction in cell migration after 12h of culture was observed at both 0.2 and 10μM genistein concentrations. Also, in the presence of genistein the percentage of mitotic cells decreased, although apoptotic cells percentages were not affected. These findings indicate that genistein has an inhibitory effect on BOEC proliferation and migration, suggesting that it could influence the normal physiology of the oviductal epithelium.

  16. Quantification of hydrodynamic factors influencing cell lateral migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, Stephanie; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-11-01

    The study of the migration of blood cells perpendicular to the direction of blood flow, or lateral migration, is motivated by the differing behavior of the various types of blood cells. In vivo, red blood cells are observed to flow in the central region of the blood vessel, particularly in the microcirculation, while other types of cells in the blood, including white blood cells and platelets, are observed to flow disproportionately near the vessel wall. However, the specifics regarding the effect of hydrodynamic and biological factors are still unknown. Thus, in this study, we aim to quantify the effect of hydrodynamic factors on a cell model numerically using the boundary integral method. By using the boundary integral method, we can isolate the effect of a single hydrodynamic factor, such as a wall or given flow distribution, in an otherwise infinite flow. Then, we can use the obtained numerical results to develop a semi-analytical model describing the cell lateral migration dependent on only the flow geometry and the viscosity ratio between the cell and external fluid.

  17. Plectin deficiency in liver cancer cells promotes cell migration and sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chiung-Chi; Chao, Wei-Ting; Liao, Chen-Chun; Tseng, Yu-Hui; Lai, Yen-Chang Clark; Lai, Yih-Shyong; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Liu, Yi-Hsiang

    2017-02-17

    Plectin involved in activation of kinases in cell signaling pathway and plays important role in cell morphology and migration. Plectin knockdown promotes cell migration by activating focal adhesion kinase and Rac1-GTPase activity in liver cells. Sorafenib is a multi-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitor that improves patient survival on hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the expression of plectin and cell migration as well as the sensitivity of hepatoma cell lines exposing to sorafenib. Hepatoma cell lines PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 were used to examine the level of plectin expression and cell migration in comparison with Chang liver cell line. In addition, sensitivity of the 3 cell lines to sorafenib treatment was also measured. Expression of plectin was lower in PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 hepatoma cells than that of Chang liver cells whereas HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 cells exhibit higher rate of cell migration in trans-well migration assay. Immunohistofluorecent staining on E-cadherin revealed the highest rate of collective cell migration in HepG2 cells and the lowest was found in Chang liver cells. Likewise, HepG2 cell line was most sensitive to sorafenib treatment and Chang liver cells exhibited the least sensitivity. The drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment showed inverse correlation with the expression of plectin. We suggest that plectin deficiency and increased E-cadherin in hepatoma cells were associated with higher rates of cell motility, collective cell migration as well as higher drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

  18. Impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in RPE alters the expression of inflammation related genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) plays an important role in regulating gene expression. Retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) are a major source of ocular inflammatory cytokines. In this work we determined the relationship between impairment of the UPP and expression of inflammation-related f...

  19. Guidance signalling regulates leading edge behaviour during collective cell migration of cardiac cells in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Raza, Qanber; Jacobs, J Roger

    2016-11-15

    Collective cell migration is the coordinated movement of cells, which organize tissues during morphogenesis, repair and some cancers. The motile cell membrane of the advancing front in collective cell migration is termed the Leading Edge. The embryonic development of the vertebrate and Drosophila hearts are both characterized by the coordinated medial migration of a bilateral cluster of mesodermal cells. In Drosophila, the cardioblasts form cohesive bilateral rows that migrate collectively as a unit towards the dorsal midline to form the dorsal vessel. We have characterized the collective cell migration of cardioblasts as an in vivo quantitative model to study the behaviour of the Leading Edge. We investigated whether guidance signalling through Slit and Netrin pathways plays a role in cell migration during heart development. Through time-lapse imaging and quantitative assessment of migratory behaviour of the cardioblasts in loss-of-function mutants, we demonstrate that both Slit and Netrin mediated signals are autonomously and concomitantly required to maximize migration velocity, filopodial and lamellipodial activities. Additionally, we show that another Slit and Netrin receptor, Dscam1, the role of which during heart development was previously unknown, is required for both normal migration of cardioblasts and luminal expansion. Leading edge behaviour analysis revealed a dosage dependent genetic interaction between Slit and Netrin receptors suggesting that downstream signalling through these receptors converge on a common output that increases leading edge activity of the cardioblasts. Finally, we found that guidance signalling maintains the balance between epithelial and mesenchymal characteristics of the migrating cardioblasts.

  20. 25-Hydroxycholesterol promotes migration and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Lishan; Xian, Guozhe; Lv, Yinping; Lin, Yanliang; Wang, Yibing

    2017-03-18

    25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC) is enzymatically produced by cholesterol 25-hydorxylase in various organs and is involved in many processes, including lipid metabolism, inflammation and the immune response. However, the role of 25-HC in the migration and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) cells remains largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that 0.1 μM 25-HC promoted ADC cell migration and invasion without affecting cell proliferation, especially after coculture with THP1-derived macrophages. Further investigation showed that 0.1 μM 25-HC significantly stimulated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion in a coculture system and increased the expression of LXR and Snail. IL-1β also mimicked the effect of 25-HC. LXR knockdown notably blocked the 25-HC-induced Snail expression, migration and invasion in both the monoculture system and the coculture system, but it did not impact the effect of IL-1β, which suggested that IL-1β functioned in an LXR-independent manner. These results suggested that 25-HC promoted ADC cell migration and invasion in an LXR-dependent manner in the monoculture system but that in the coculture system, the 25-HC-induced IL-1β secretion enhanced the effect of 25-HC in an LXR-independent manner.

  1. Cell-Substrate Interactions Feedback to Direct Cell Migration along or against Morphological Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Girish; Ho, Chia-Chi; Co, Carlos C.

    2015-01-01

    In response to external stimuli, cells polarize morphologically into teardrop shapes prior to moving in the direction of their blunt leading edge through lamellipodia extension and retraction of the rear tip. This textbook description of cell migration implies that the initial polarization sets the direction of cell migration. Using microfabrication techniques to control cell morphologies and the direction of migration without gradients, we demonstrate that after polarization, lamelipodia extension and attachment can feedback to change and even reverse the initial morphological polarization. Cells do indeed migrate faster in the direction of their morphologically polarization. However, feedback from subsequent lamellipodia extension and attachment can be so powerful as to induce cells to reverse and migrate against their initial polarization, albeit at a slower speed. Constitutively active mutants of RhoA show that RhoA stimulates cell motility when cells are guided either along or against their initial polarization. Cdc42 activation and inhibition, which results in loss of directional motility during chemotaxis, only reduces the speed of migration without altering the directionality of migration on the micropatterns. These results reveal significant differences between substrate directed cell migration and that induced by chemotactic gradients. PMID:26186588

  2. Endogenous electric fields as guiding cue for cell migration.

    PubMed

    Funk, Richard H W

    2015-01-01

    This review covers two topics: (1) "membrane potential of low magnitude and related electric fields (bioelectricity)" and (2) "cell migration under the guiding cue of electric fields (EF)."Membrane potentials for this "bioelectricity" arise from the segregation of charges by special molecular machines (pumps, transporters, ion channels) situated within the plasma membrane of each cell type (including eukaryotic non-neural animal cells). The arising patterns of ion gradients direct many cell- and molecular biological processes such as embryogenesis, wound healing, regeneration. Furthermore, EF are important as guiding cues for cell migration and are often overriding chemical or topographic cues. In osteoblasts, for instance, the directional information of EF is captured by charged transporters on the cell membrane and transferred into signaling mechanisms that modulate the cytoskeleton and motor proteins. This results in a persistent directional migration along an EF guiding cue. As an outlook, we discuss questions concerning the fluctuation of EF and the frequencies and mapping of the "electric" interior of the cell. Another exciting topic for further research is the modeling of field concepts for such distant, non-chemical cellular interactions.

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Directional Migration of Invasive Breast Cancer Cells through TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    McAndrews, Kathleen M.; McGrail, Daniel J.; Ravikumar, Nithin; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and influence tumor progression; however, how MSCs induce the invasion of cancer cells is not completely understood. Here, we used a 3D coculture model to determine how MSCs affect the migration of invasive breast cancer cells. Coculture with MSCs increases the elongation, directional migration, and traction generation of breast cancer cells. MSC-induced directional migration directly correlates with traction generation and is mediated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the migratory proteins rho-associated kinase, focal adhesion kinase, and matrix metalloproteinases. Treatment with MSC conditioned media or recombinant TGF-β1 elicits a similar migration response to coculture. Taken together, this work suggests TGF-β is secreted by MSCs, leading to force-dependent directional migration of invasive breast cancer cells. These pathways may be potential targets for blocking cancer cell invasion and subsequent metastasis. PMID:26585689

  4. Mapping forces and kinematics during collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Conte, Vito; Sunyer, Raimon; Muñoz, José J; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental biological processes including morphogenesis and tissue repair require cells to migrate collectively. In these processes, epithelial or endothelial cells move in a cooperative manner coupled by intercellular junctions. Ultimately, the movement of these multicellular systems occurs through the generation of cellular forces, exerted either on the substrate via focal adhesions (cell-substrate forces) or on neighboring cells through cell-cell junctions (cell-cell forces). Quantitative measurements of multicellular forces and kinematics with cellular or subcellular resolution have become possible only in recent years. In this chapter, we describe some of these techniques, which include particle image velocimetry to map cell velocities, traction force microscopy to map forces exerted by cells on the substrate, and monolayer stress microscopy to map forces within and between cells. We also describe experimental protocols to perform these measurements. The combination of these techniques with high-resolution imaging tools and molecular perturbations will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying collective cell migration in health and disease.

  5. Regulation of Cell Migration in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    fluorescence using TRlTC-phalloidin, caveolin and integrin antibodies. Nuclei were counterstained with DAPL Task 2.Determine the effect of Rsu-1 and the IPP...phalloidin. Cells were also costained with TRITC phalloidin and viinculin antibodies. Nuclei were counterstained with DAPl . 5 Task 3. Determine the

  6. Senescent fibroblast-derived Chemerin promotes squamous cell carcinoma migration

    PubMed Central

    Gatzka, Martina; Treiber, Nicolai; Schneider, Lars A.; Mulaw, Medhanie A.; Lucas, Tanja; Kochanek, Stefan; Dummer, Reinhard; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a rising incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), an aggressive skin cancer with the potential for local invasion and metastasis. Acquisition of a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in dermal fibroblasts has been postulated to promote skin cancer progression in elderly individuals. The underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unexplored. We show that Chemerin, a previously unreported SASP factor released from senescent human dermal fibroblasts, promotes cSCC cell migration, a key feature driving tumor progression. Whereas the Chemerin abundance is downregulated in malignant cSCC cells, increased Chemerin transcripts and protein concentrations are detected in replicative senescent fibroblasts in vitro and in the fibroblast of skin sections from old donors, indicating that a Chemerin gradient is built up in the dermis of elderly. Using Transwell® migration assays, we show that Chemerin enhances the chemotaxis of different cSCC cell lines. Notably, the Chemerin receptor CCRL2 is remarkably upregulated in cSCC cell lines and human patient biopsies. Silencing Chemerin in senescent fibroblasts or the CCRL2 and GPR1 receptors in the SCL-1 cSCC cell line abrogates the Chemerin-mediated chemotaxis. Chemerin triggers the MAPK cascade via JNK and ERK1 activation, whereby the inhibition impairs the SASP- or Chemerin-mediated cSCC cell migration. Taken together, we uncover a key role for Chemerin, as a major factor in the secretome of senescent fibroblasts, promoting cSCC cell migration and possibly progression, relaying its signals through CCRL2 and GPR1 receptors with subsequent MAPK activation. These findings might have implications for targeted therapeutic interventions in elderly patients. PMID:27907906

  7. Biological characterization of gene response in Rpe65-/- mouse model of Leber's congenital amaurosis during progression of the disease.

    PubMed

    Cottet, Sandra; Michaut, Lydia; Boisset, Gaëlle; Schlecht, Ulrich; Gehring, Walter; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2006-10-01

    RPE65 is the retinal isomerase essential for conversion of all-trans-retinyl ester to 11-cis-retinol in the visual cycle. Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA), an autosomal recessive form of RP resulting in blindness, is commonly caused by mutations in the Rpe65 gene. Whereas the molecular mechanisms by which these mutations contribute to retinal disease remain largely unresolved, affected patients show marked RPE damage and photoreceptor degeneration. We evaluated gene expression in Rpe65-/- mouse model of LCA before and at the onset of photoreceptor cell death in 2, 4, and 6 month old animals. Microarray analysis demonstrates altered expression of genes involved in phototransduction, apoptosis regulation, cytoskeleton organization, and extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents. Cone-specific phototransduction genes are strongly decreased, reflecting early loss of cones. In addition, remaining rods show modified expression of genes encoding components of the cytoskeleton and ECM. This may affect rod physiology and interaction with the adjacent RPE and lead to loss of survival signals, as reflected by the alteration of apoptosis-related genes Together, these results suggest that RPE65 defect triggers an overall remodeling of the neurosensitive retina that may, in turn, disrupt photoreceptor homeostasis and induce apoptosis signaling cascade toward retinal cell death.

  8. Live-cell migration and adhesion turnover assays.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, J; Young, K; Brown, Claire M

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has revolutionized the way live-cell imaging is achieved. At the same time, it is also potentially harmful to a living specimen. Therefore, the specimen must be monitored for viability and health before, during, and after imaging sessions. Methods for monitoring cell viability and health will be discussed in this chapter. Another key to successful live-cell imaging is to minimize light exposure as much as possible. A summary of strategies for minimizing light exposure including maximizing the light throughput of the microscope and the sensitivity of light detection is presented. Various fluorescence microscopy techniques are presented with a focus on how the light is delivered to the sample (i.e., light density) and pros and cons for use with living specimens. The reader is also directed to other publications that go into these topics in more detail. Methods are described on how to prepare samples for single cell migration assays, how to measure cell migration rates (e.g., bright-field, semi-automated, and automated), and how to measure focal adhesion turnover rates. Details of how to correct images for background intensity and field-illumination uniformity artifacts for quantitative imaging are also described. Overall, this chapter will be helpful to scientists who are interested in imaging live specimens using fluorescence microscopy techniques. It will be of particular interest to anyone wanting to perform quantitative fluorescence imaging, and wanting to measure cell migration rates, and focal adhesion dynamics.

  9. Mutant huntingtin impairs immune cell migration in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Wanda; Träger, Ulrike; Davalos, Dimitrios; Chou, Austin; Bouchard, Jill; Andre, Ralph; Miller, Aaron; Weiss, Andreas; Giorgini, Flaviano; Cheah, Christine; Möller, Thomas; Stella, Nephi; Akassoglou, Katerina; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Muchowski, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    In Huntington disease (HD), immune cells are activated before symptoms arise; however, it is unclear how the expression of mutant huntingtin (htt) compromises the normal functions of immune cells. Here we report that primary microglia from early postnatal HD mice were profoundly impaired in their migration to chemotactic stimuli, and expression of a mutant htt fragment in microglial cell lines was sufficient to reproduce these deficits. Microglia expressing mutant htt had a retarded response to a laser-induced brain injury in vivo. Leukocyte recruitment was defective upon induction of peritonitis in HD mice at early disease stages and was normalized upon genetic deletion of mutant htt in immune cells. Migration was also strongly impaired in peripheral immune cells from pre-manifest human HD patients. Defective actin remodeling in immune cells expressing mutant htt likely contributed to their migration deficit. Our results suggest that these functional changes may contribute to immune dysfunction and neurodegeneration in HD, and may have implications for other polyglutamine expansion diseases in which mutant proteins are ubiquitously expressed. PMID:23160193

  10. Migration of amoeba cells in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous and endogenous electric fields play a role in cell physiology as a guiding mechanism for the orientation and migration of cells. Electrotaxis of living cells has been observed for several cell types, e.g. neurons, fibroblasts, leukocytes, neural crest cells, cancer cells. Dictyostelium discoideum (Dd), an intensively investigated chemotactic model organism, also exhibits a strong electrotactic behavior moving toward the cathode under the influence of electric fields. Here we report experiments on the effects of DC electric fields on the directional migration of Dd cells. We apply the electric field to cells seeded into microfluidic devices equipped with agar bridges to avoid any harmful effects of the electric field on the cells (ions formation, pH changes, etc.) and a constant flow to prevent the build-up of chemical gradient that elicits chemotaxis. Our results show that the cells linearly increase their speed over time when a constant electric field is applied for a prolonged duration (2 hours). This novel phenomenon cannot be attributed to mechanotaxis as the drag force of the electroosmotic flow is too small to produce shear forces that can reorient cells. It is independent of the cellular developmental stage and to our knowledge, it was not observed in chemotaxis. This work is supported by MaxSynBio project of the Max Planck Society.

  11. Cell migration and invasion assays as tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hulkower, Keren I; Herber, Renee L

    2011-03-11

    Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screening process. This article will review the effective use of several principle formats for studying cell motility: scratch assays, transmembrane assays, microfluidic devices and cell exclusion zone assays.

  12. Cell proliferation and migration in silk fibroin 3D scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Biman B; Kundu, Subhas C

    2009-05-01

    Pore architecture in 3D polymeric scaffolds is known to play a critical role in tissue engineering as it provides the vital framework for the seeded cells to organize into a functioning tissue. In this report, we investigated the effects of different freezing temperature regimes on silk fibroin protein 3D scaffold pore microstructure. The fabricated scaffolds using freeze-dry technique were used as a 3D model to monitor cell proliferation and migration. Pores of 200-250microm diameter were formed by slow cooling at temperatures of -20 and -80 degrees C but were found to be limited in porosity and pore interconnectivity as observed through scanning electron microscopic images. In contrast, highly interconnected pores with 96% porosity were observed when silk solutions were rapidly frozen at -196 degrees C. A detailed study was conducted to assess the affect of pore size, porosity and interconnectivity on human dermal fibroblast cell proliferation and migration on these 3D scaffolds using confocal microscopy. The cells were observed to migrate within the scaffold interconnectivities and were found to reach scaffold periphery within 28 days of culture. Confocal images further confirmed normal cell attachment and alignment of actin filaments within the porous scaffold matrix with well-developed nuclei. This study indicates rapid freeze-drying technique as an alternative method to fabricate highly interconnected porous scaffolds for developing functional 3D silk fibroin matrices for potential tissue engineering, biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  13. Muc1 promotes migration and lung metastasis of melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoli; Lan, Hongwen; Li, Jun; Su, Yushu; Xu, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    Early stages of melanoma can be successfully treated by surgical resection of the tumor, but there is still no effective treatment once it is progressed to metastatic phases. Although growing family of both melanoma metastasis promoting and metastasis suppressor genes have been reported be related to metastasis, the molecular mechanisms governing melanoma metastatic cascade are still not completely understood. Therefore, defining the molecules that govern melanoma metastasis may aid the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for combating melanoma. In the present study, we found that muc1 is involved in the metastasis of melanoma cells and demonstrated that muc1 disruption impairs melanoma cells migration and metastasis. The requirement of muc1 in the migration of melanoma cells was further confirmed by gene silencing in vitro. In corresponding to this result, over-expression of muc1 significantly promoted the migratory of melanoma cells. Moreover, down-regulation of muc1 expression strikingly inhibits melanoma cellular metastasis in vivo. Finally, we found that muc1 promotes melanoma migration through the protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway. To conclude, our findings suggest a novel mechanism underlying the metastasis of melanoma cells which might serve as a new intervention target for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:26609470

  14. Nonantibestrophin Anti-RPE Antibodies in Paraneoplastic Exudative Polymorphous Vitelliform Maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dalvin, Lauren A.; Johnson, Adiv A.; Pulido, Jose S.; Dhaliwal, Ranjit; Marmorstein, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A previous report demonstrated antibodies to bestrophin in paraneoplastic exudative polymorphous vitelliform maculopathy (PEPVM). Other cases demonstrated antibodies to different proteins in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In this report, serum was analyzed to determine whether a patient with PEPVM and a reduced Arden ratio had developed autoantibodies to human Bestrophin-1 (Best1). Methods: Human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293) were transfected with Best1 and stained with an antibody specific to Best1 (E6-6), or patient serum. Staining patterns were compared with those of untransfected cells stained with E6-6, patient serum, control serum, or secondary antibody alone. Western blots were performed using lysed RPE and stained with E6-6, patient serum, control serum, or secondary antibody alone. Results: Immunofluorescence staining of HEK-293 cells or HEK-293 cells expressing Best1 did not differ between patient and control sera or show a staining pattern consistent with recognition of Best1. Immunoblotting of human RPE lysate with patient serum did not identify Best1 (68 kDa) but did recognize a band at approximately 48 kDa that was absent in blots using control serum. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report of PEPVM with an autoantibody to an approximately 48-kDa RPE protein, but previous reports have demonstrated autoantibodies to other RPE proteins, suggesting that autoantibody formation is an important component of PEPVM. Translational Relevance: This research emphasizes the role that autoantibodies play in PEPVM. The fact that different autoantibodies appear to cause similar patterns demonstrates the heterogeneity of causes of vitelliform lesions. PMID:26046004

  15. T-cell Migration, Search Strategies and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Krummel, Matthew F; Bartumeus, Frederic; Gérard, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    T cell migration is essential for T cell responses, allowing for detection of cognate antigen at the surface of an Antigen-Presenting Cell (APC) and for interactions with other cells involved in the immune response. Although appearing random, growing evidence supports that T cell motility patterns are strategic and governed by mechanisms that are optimized for both activation-stage and environment-specific attributes. In this Opinion Article, we will discuss how to understand the combined effects of T cell- intrinsic and -extrinsic forces upon these motility patterns when viewed in highly complex tissues filled with other cells involved in parallel motility. In particular, we will examine how insights from ‘search theory’ describe T cell movement across exploitation-exploration gradients, in the context of activation versus effector function and in the context of lymph nodes versus peripheral tissues. PMID:26852928

  16. Cell volume regulatory ion transport in the regulation of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Jakab, M; Ritter, M

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration is typically accomplished by the generation of protrusive mechanical forces and is achieved by repeated spatially and temporally coordinated cycles including the formation of a leading edge, the formation of new and disruption of older adhesions to the substratum, actomyosin based contractions and retraction of the trailing edge. Beside the well-described roles of the cytoskeleton and cell adhesions during these processes, a growing body of evidence indicates that the precise regulation of the cell volume is an indispensable prerequisite for coordinated cell migration. On the one hand during cell migration cell volume is continuously tormented by mechanical and morphological alterations, which pose changes to the intracellular hydrostatic pressure, metabolic changes and the formation or degradation of macromolecules like actin, which distort the osmotic equilibrium and the action of chemoattractants, hormones and transmitters, which frequently alter the electrical properties of a cell and thus cause cell swelling or shrinkage, respectively. On the other hand, a migrating cell actively has to govern cell volume regulatory ion transport mechanisms in order to create the appropriate micro- or even nanoenvironment in the intra- and/or extracellular space, which is necessary to guarantee the correct polarity and hence direction of movement of a migrating cell. This chapter will focus on the role of the cell volume regulatory ion transport mechanisms as they participate in the regulation of cell migration and special emphasis is given to their interplay with the cytoskeleton, their meaning for substrate adhesion and to the polarized fashion of their subcellular distribution.

  17. Ion channels in control of pancreatic stellate cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Storck, Hannah; Hild, Benedikt; Schimmelpfennig, Sandra; Sargin, Sarah; Nielsen, Nikolaj; Zaccagnino, Angela; Budde, Thomas; Novak, Ivana; Kalthoff, Holger; Schwab, Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a critical role in the progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Once activated, PSCs support proliferation and metastasis of carcinoma cells. PSCs even co-metastasise with carcinoma cells. This requires the ability of PSCs to migrate. In recent years, it has been established that almost all “hallmarks of cancer” such as proliferation or migration/invasion also rely on the expression and function of ion channels. So far, there is only very limited information about the function of ion channels in PSCs. Yet, there is growing evidence that ion channels in stromal cells also contribute to tumor progression. Here we investigated the function of KCa3.1 channels in PSCs. KCa3.1 channels are also found in many tumor cells of different origin. We revealed the functional expression of KCa3.1 channels by means of Western blot, immunofluorescence and patch clamp analysis. The impact of KCa3.1 channel activity on PSC function was determined with live-cell imaging and by measuring the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). KCa3.1 channel blockade or knockout prevents the stimulation of PSC migration and chemotaxis by reducing the [Ca2+]i and calpain activity. KCa3.1 channels functionally cooperate with TRPC3 channels that are upregulated in PDAC stroma. Knockdown of TRPC3 channels largely abolishes the impact of KCa3.1 channels on PSC migration. In summary, our results clearly show that ion channels are crucial players in PSC physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:27903970

  18. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo . E-mail: vdimarzo@icmib.na.cnr.it; Bifulco, Maurizio . E-mail: maubiful@unina.it

    2006-02-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB{sub 1} antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB{sub 1} receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB{sub 1} receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo.

  19. Endothelial cell migration on surfaces modified with immobilized adhesive peptides.

    PubMed

    Kouvroukoglou, S; Dee, K C; Bizios, R; McIntire, L V; Zygourakis, K

    2000-09-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) migration has been studied on aminophase surfaces with covalently bound RGDS and YIGSRG cell adhesion peptides. The fluorescent marker dansyl chloride was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the peptides on the modified surfaces. Peptides appeared to be distributed in uniformly dispersed large clusters separated by areas of lower peptide concentrations. We employed digital time-lapse video microscopy and image analysis to monitor EC migration on the modified surfaces and to reconstruct the cell trajectories. The persistent random walk model was then applied to analyze the cell displacement data and compute the mean root square speed, the persistence time, and the random motility coefficient of EC. We also calculated the time-averaged speed of cell locomotion. No differences in the speed of cell locomotion on the various substrates were noted. Immobilization of the cell adhesion peptides (RGDS and YIGSRG), however, significantly increased the persistence of cell movement and, thus, the random motility coefficient. These results suggest that immobilization of cell adhesion peptides on the surface of implantable biomaterials may lead to enhanced endothelization rates.

  20. Control of glioma cell migration and invasiveness by GDF-15.

    PubMed

    Codó, Paula; Weller, Michael; Kaulich, Kerstin; Schraivogel, Daniel; Silginer, Manuela; Reifenberger, Guido; Meister, Gunter; Roth, Patrick

    2016-02-16

    Growth and differentiation factor (GDF)-15 is a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family of proteins. GDF-15 levels are increased in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioblastoma patients. Using a TCGA database interrogation, we demonstrate that high GDF-15 expression levels are associated with poor survival of glioblastoma patients. To elucidate the role of GDF-15 in glioblastoma in detail, we confirmed that glioma cells express GDF-15 mRNA and protein in vitro. To allow for a detailed functional characterization, GDF-15 expression was silenced using RNA interference in LNT-229 and LN-308 glioma cells. Depletion of GDF-15 had no effect on cell viability. In contrast, GDF-15-deficient cells displayed reduced migration and invasion, in the absence of changes in Smad2 or Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. Conversely, exogenous GDF-15 stimulated migration and invasiveness. Large-scale expression profiling revealed that GDF-15 gene silencing resulted in minor changes in the miRNA profile whereas several genes, including members of the plasminogen activator/inhibitor complex, were deregulated at the mRNA level. One of the newly identified genes induced by GDF-15 gene silencing was the serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E nexin group 1 (serpine1) which is induced by TGF-β and known to inhibit migration and invasiveness. However, serpine1 down-regulation alone did not mediate GDF-15-induced promotion of migration and invasiveness. Our findings highlight the complex contributions of GDF-15 to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells and suggest anti-GDF-15 approaches as a promising therapeutic strategy.

  1. Control of glioma cell migration and invasiveness by GDF-15

    PubMed Central

    Codó, Paula; Weller, Michael; Kaulich, Kerstin; Schraivogel, Daniel; Silginer, Manuela; Reifenberger, Guido; Meister, Gunter; Roth, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Growth and differentiation factor (GDF)-15 is a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family of proteins. GDF-15 levels are increased in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioblastoma patients. Using a TCGA database interrogation, we demonstrate that high GDF-15 expression levels are associated with poor survival of glioblastoma patients. To elucidate the role of GDF-15 in glioblastoma in detail, we confirmed that glioma cells express GDF-15 mRNA and protein in vitro. To allow for a detailed functional characterization, GDF-15 expression was silenced using RNA interference in LNT-229 and LN-308 glioma cells. Depletion of GDF-15 had no effect on cell viability. In contrast, GDF-15-deficient cells displayed reduced migration and invasion, in the absence of changes in Smad2 or Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. Conversely, exogenous GDF-15 stimulated migration and invasiveness. Large-scale expression profiling revealed that GDF-15 gene silencing resulted in minor changes in the miRNA profile whereas several genes, including members of the plasminogen activator/inhibitor complex, were deregulated at the mRNA level. One of the newly identified genes induced by GDF-15 gene silencing was the serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E nexin group 1 (serpine1) which is induced by TGF-β and known to inhibit migration and invasiveness. However, serpine1 down-regulation alone did not mediate GDF-15-induced promotion of migration and invasiveness. Our findings highlight the complex contributions of GDF-15 to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells and suggest anti-GDF-15 approaches as a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:26741507

  2. HMG-CoA reductase guides migrating primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Van Doren, M; Broihier, H T; Moore, L A; Lehmann, R

    1998-12-03

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is best known for catalysing a rate-limiting step in cholesterol biosynthesis, but it also participates in the production of a wide variety of other compounds. Some clinical benefits attributed to inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase are now thought to be independent of any serum cholesterol-lowering effect. Here we describe a new cholesterol-independent role for HMG-CoA reductase, in regulating a developmental process: primordial germ cell migration. We show that in Drosophila this enzyme is highly expressed in the somatic gonad and that it is necessary for primordial germ cells to migrate to this tissue. Misexpression of HMG-CoA reductase is sufficient to attract primordial germ cells to tissues other than the gonadal mesoderm. We conclude that the regulated expression of HMG-CoA reductase has a critical developmental function in providing spatial information to guide migrating primordial germ cells.

  3. Forces, waves and emergent dynamics during collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepat, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    A broad range of biological processes such as morphogenesis, tissue regeneration, and cancer invasion depend on the collective motion of cell groups. For a group of cells to migrate cohesively, it has long been suspected that each constituent cell must exert physical forces not only upon its extracellular matrix but also upon neighboring cells. I will present novel techniques to measure these distinct force components. Using these techniques, we unveiled an unexpectedly rich physical picture in which the distribution of physical forces is dominated by heterogeneity, cooperativity, and jamming. I will show, moreover, that these essential features of inter-cellular force transmission enable the propagation of a new type of mechanical wave during tissue growth. Finally, I will demonstrate that both in epithelial and endothelial cell sheets, forces and waves are mechanically linked to cell velocities through a newly discovered emergent mechanism of innately collective cell guidance: plithotaxis.

  4. Studying Neutrophil Migration In Vivo Using Adoptive Cell Transfer.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Yoshishige; Kim, Nancy D; Miyabe, Chie; Luster, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer experiments can be used to study the roles of cell trafficking molecules on the migratory behavior of specific immune cell populations in vivo. Chemoattractants and their G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane-spanning receptors regulate migration of cells in vivo, and dysregulated expression of chemoattractants and their receptors is implicated in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Inflammatory arthritides, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), are characterized by the recruitment of inflammatory cells into joints. The K/BxN serum transfer mouse model of inflammatory arthritis shares many similar features with RA. In this autoantibody-induced model of arthritis, neutrophils are the critical immune cells necessary for the development of joint inflammation and damage. We have used adoptive neutrophil transfer to define the contributions of chemoattractant receptors, cytokines, and activation receptors expressed on neutrophils that critically regulate their entry into the inflamed joint. In this review, we describe the procedure of neutrophil adoptive transfer to study the influence of neutrophil-specific receptors or mediators upon the their recruitment into the joint using the K/BxN model of inflammatory arthritis as a model of how adoptive cell transfer studies can be used to study immune cell migration in vivo.

  5. Intermediate filament reorganization dynamically influences cancer cell alignment and migration

    PubMed Central

    Holle, Andrew W.; Kalafat, Melih; Ramos, Adria Sales; Seufferlein, Thomas; Kemkemer, Ralf; Spatz, Joachim P.

    2017-01-01

    The interactions between a cancer cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) have been the focus of an increasing amount of investigation. The role of the intermediate filament keratin in cancer has also been coming into focus of late, but more research is needed to understand how this piece fits in the puzzle of cytoskeleton-mediated invasion and metastasis. In Panc-1 invasive pancreatic cancer cells, keratin phosphorylation in conjunction with actin inhibition was found to be sufficient to reduce cell area below either treatment alone. We then analyzed intersecting keratin and actin fibers in the cytoskeleton of cyclically stretched cells and found no directional correlation. The role of keratin organization in Panc-1 cellular morphological adaptation and directed migration was then analyzed by culturing cells on cyclically stretched polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates, nanoscale grates, and rigid pillars. In general, the reorganization of the keratin cytoskeleton allows the cell to become more ‘mobile’- exhibiting faster and more directed migration and orientation in response to external stimuli. By combining keratin network perturbation with a variety of physical ECM signals, we demonstrate the interconnected nature of the architecture inside the cell and the scaffolding outside of it, and highlight the key elements facilitating cancer cell-ECM interactions. PMID:28338091

  6. The NANIVID: a new device for cancer cell migration studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Waseem K.; Cady, Nathaniel C.; Castracane, James; Gligorijevic, Bojana; van Rheenen, Jacobus W.; Condeelis, John S.

    2008-02-01

    Cancerous tumors are dynamic microenvironments that require unique analytical tools for their study. Better understanding of tumor microenvironments may reveal mechanisms behind tumor progression and generate new strategies for diagnostic marker development, which can be used routinely in histopathological analysis. Previous studies have shown that cell invasion and intravasation are related to metastatic potential and have linked these activities to gene expression patterns seen in migratory and invasive tumor cells in vivo. Existing analytical methods for tumor microenvironments include collection of tumor cells through a catheter needle loaded with a chemical or protein attractant (chemoattractant). This method has some limitations and restrictions, including time constraints of cell collection, long term anesthetization, and in vivo imaging inside the catheter. In this study, a novel implantable device was designed to replace the catheter-based method. The 1.5mm x 0.5mm x 0.24mm device is designed to controllably release chemoattractants for stimulation of tumor cell migration and subsequent cell capture. Devices were fabricated using standard microfabrication techniques and have been shown to mediate controlled release of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Optically transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes have been incorporated into the device for impedance-based measurement of cell density and have been shown to be compatible with in vivo multi-photon imaging of cell migration.

  7. FH535 inhibited migration and growth of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Iida, Joji; Dorchak, Jesse; Lehman, John R; Clancy, Rebecca; Luo, Chunqing; Chen, Yaqin; Somiari, Stella; Ellsworth, Rachel E; Hu, Hai; Mural, Richard J; Shriver, Craig D

    2012-01-01

    There is substantial evidence indicating that the WNT signaling pathway is activated in various cancer cell types including breast cancer. Previous studies reported that FH535, a small molecule inhibitor of the WNT signaling pathway, decreased growth of cancer cells but not normal fibroblasts, suggesting this pathway plays a role in tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we tested FH535 as a potential inhibitor for malignant phenotypes of breast cancer cells including migration, invasion, and growth. FH535 significantly inhibited growth, migration, and invasion of triple negative (TN) breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB231 and HCC38) in vitro. We demonstrate that FH535 was a potent growth inhibitor for TN breast cancer cell lines (HCC38 and MDA-MB-231) but not for other, non-TN breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D or SK-Br3) when cultured in three dimensional (3D) type I collagen gels. Western blotting analyses suggest that treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with FH535 markedly inhibited the expression of NEDD9 but not activations of FAK, Src, or downstream targets such as p38 and Erk1/2. We demonstrated that NEDD9 was specifically associated with CSPG4 but not with β1 integrin or CD44 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Analyses of gene expression profiles in breast cancer tissues suggest that CSPG4 expression is higher in Basal-type breast cancers, many of which are TN, than any other subtypes. These results suggest not only a mechanism for migration and invasion involving the canonical WNT-signaling pathways but also novel strategies for treating patients who develop TN breast cancer.

  8. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Regulates Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Clarissa Coelho; Florentino, Rodrigo Machado; França, Andressa; Matias, Eveline; Guimarães, Paola Bianchi; Batista, Carolina; Freire, Valder; Carmona, Adriana Karaoglanovic; Pesquero, João Bosco; de Paula, Ana Maria; Foureaux, Giselle; Leite, Maria de Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Background The angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) plays a central role in the renin-angiotensin system, acting by converting the hormone angiotensin-I to the active peptide angiotensin-II (Ang-II). More recently, ACE was shown to act as a receptor for Ang-II, and its expression level was demonstrated to be higher in melanoma cells compared to their normal counterparts. However, the function that ACE plays as an Ang-II receptor in melanoma cells has not been defined yet. Aim Therefore, our aim was to examine the role of ACE in tumor cell proliferation and migration. Results We found that upon binding to ACE, Ang-II internalizes with a faster onset compared to the binding of Ang-II to its classical AT1 receptor. We also found that the complex Ang-II/ACE translocates to the nucleus, through a clathrin-mediated process, triggering a transient nuclear Ca2+ signal. In silico studies revealed a possible interaction site between ACE and phospholipase C (PLC), and experimental results in CHO cells, demonstrated that the β3 isoform of PLC is the one involved in the Ca2+ signals induced by Ang-II/ACE interaction. Further studies in melanoma cells (TM-5) showed that Ang-II induced cell proliferation through ACE activation, an event that could be inhibited either by ACE inhibitor (Lisinopril) or by the silencing of ACE. In addition, we found that stimulation of ACE by Ang-II caused the melanoma cells to migrate, at least in part due to decreased vinculin expression, a focal adhesion structural protein. Conclusion ACE activation regulates melanoma cell proliferation and migration. PMID:27992423

  9. Epithelial bridges maintain tissue integrity during collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Hirata, Hiroaki; Nai, Mui Hoon; Brugués, Agustí; Toyama, Yusuke; Trepat, Xavier; Lim, Chwee Teck; Ladoux, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    The ability of skin to act as a barrier is primarily determined by the efficiency of skin cells to maintain and restore its continuity and integrity. In fact, during wound healing keratinocytes migrate collectively to maintain their cohesion despite heterogeneities in the extracellular matrix. Here, we show that monolayers of human keratinocytes migrating along functionalized micropatterned surfaces comprising alternating strips of extracellular matrix (fibronectin) and non-adherent polymer form suspended multicellular bridges over the non-adherent areas. The bridges are held together by intercellular adhesion and are subjected to considerable tension, as indicated by the presence of prominent actin bundles. We also show that a model based on force propagation through an elastic material reproduces the main features of bridge maintenance and tension distribution. Our findings suggest that multicellular bridges maintain tissue integrity during wound healing when cell-substrate interactions are weak and may prove helpful in the design of artificial scaffolds for skin regeneration.

  10. Capturing relevant extracellular matrices for investigating cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Keely, Patricia; Nain, Amrinder

    2015-01-01

    Much progress in understanding cell migration has been determined by using classic two-dimensional (2D) tissue culture platforms. However, increasingly, it is appreciated that certain properties of cell migration in vivo are not represented by strictly 2D assays. There is much interest in creating relevant three-dimensional (3D) culture environments and engineered platforms to better represent features of the extracellular matrix and stromal microenvironment that are not captured in 2D platforms. Important to this goal is a solid understanding of the features of the extracellular matrix—composition, stiffness, topography, and alignment—in different tissues and disease states and the development of means to capture these features PMID:26918156

  11. Migration and Tissue Tropism of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang H.; Hashimoto-Hill, Seika; Kim, Myunghoo

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cell (ILCs) subsets differentially populate various barrier and non-barrier tissues, where they play important roles in tissue homeostasis and tissue-specific responses to pathogen attack. Recent findings have provided insight into the molecular mechanisms that guide ILC migration into peripheral tissues, revealing common features among different ILC subsets as well as important distinctions. Recent studies have also highlighted the impact of tissue-specific cues on ILC migration, and the importance of the local immunological milieu. We review these findings here and discuss how the migratory patterns and tissue tropism of different ILC subsets relate to the development and differentiation of these cells, and to ILC-mediated tissue-specific regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. In this context we outline open questions and important areas of future research. PMID:26708278

  12. Cathepsin L derived from skeletal muscle cells transfected with bFGF promotes endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ji Hyung; Im, Eun Kyoung; Jin, Tae Won; Lee, Seung-Min; Kim, Soo Hyuk; Choi, Eun Young; Shin, Min-Jeong; Lee, Kyung Hye; Jang, Yangsoo

    2011-04-30

    Gene transfer of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) has been shown to induce significant endothelial migration and angiogenesis in ischemic disease models. Here, we investigate what factors are secreted from skeletal muscle cells (SkMCs) transfected with bFGF gene and whether they participate in endothelial cell migration. We constructed replication-defective adenovirus vectors containing the human bFGF gene (Ad/bFGF) or a control LacZ gene (Ad/LacZ) and obtained conditioned media, bFGF-CM and LacZ-CM, from SkMCs infected by Ad/bFGF or Ad/LacZ, respectively. Cell migration significantly increased in HUVECs incubated with bFGF-CM compared to cells incubated with LacZ-CM. Interestingly, HUVEC migration in response to bFGF-CM was only partially blocked by the addition of bFGF-neutralizing antibody, suggesting that bFGF-CM contains other factors that stimulate endothelial cell migration. Several proteins, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and cathepsin L, increased in bFGF-CM compared to LacZ-CM; based on 1-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Their increased mRNA and protein levels were confirmed by RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis. The recombinant human bFGF protein induced MMP-1, PAI-1, and cathepsin L expression in SkMCs. Endothelial cell migration was reduced in groups treated with bFGF-CM containing neutralizing antibodies against MMP-1 or PAI-1. In particular, HUVECs treated with bFGF-CM containing cell-impermeable cathepsin L inhibitor showed the most significant decrease in cell migration. Cathepsin L protein directly promotes endothelial cell migration through the JNK pathway. These results indicate that cathepsin L released from SkMCs transfected with the bFGF gene can promote endothelial cell migration.

  13. Analysis of individual cell trajectories in lattice-gas cellular automaton models for migrating cell populations.

    PubMed

    Mente, Carsten; Voss-Böhme, Anja; Deutsch, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Collective dynamics of migrating cell populations drive key processes in tissue formation and maintenance under normal and diseased conditions. Collective cell behavior at the tissue level is typically characterized by considering cell density patterns such as clusters and moving cell fronts. However, there are also important observables of collective dynamics related to individual cell behavior. In particular, individual cell trajectories are footprints of emergent behavior in populations of migrating cells. Lattice-gas cellular automata (LGCA) have proven successful to model and analyze collective behavior arising from interactions of migrating cells. There are well-established methods to analyze cell density patterns in LGCA models. Although LGCA dynamics are defined by cell-based rules, individual cells are not distinguished. Therefore, individual cell trajectories cannot be analyzed in LGCA so far. Here, we extend the classical LGCA framework to allow labeling and tracking of individual cells. We consider cell number conserving LGCA models of migrating cell populations where cell interactions are regulated by local cell density and derive stochastic differential equations approximating individual cell trajectories in LGCA. This result allows the prediction of complex individual cell trajectories emerging in LGCA models and is a basis for model-experiment comparisons at the individual cell level.

  14. Homing and migration assays of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    He, Xi C; Li, Zhenrui; Sugimura, Rio; Ross, Jason; Zhao, Meng; Li, Linheng

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside mainly in bone marrow; however, under homeostatic and stressed conditions, HSPCs dynamically change their location-either egressing from bone marrow and getting into circulation, a process of mobilization; or coming back to the bone marrow, the homing process. How to analyze these two processes will be critical for understanding the behavior of HSPCs. Here we provide an experimental protocol to monitor and analyze homing and migration of HSPCs.

  15. Lysophosphatidic acid induces cell migration through the selective activation of Akt1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Yun, Sung Ji; Do, Kee Hun; Kim, Min Sung; Cho, Mong; Suh, Dong-Soo; Kim, Chi Dae; Kim, Jae Ho; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    2008-01-01

    Akt plays pivotal roles in many physiological responses including growth, proliferation, survival, metabolism, and migration. In the current studies, we have evaluated the isoform-specific role of akt in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced cell migration. Ascites from ovarian cancer patients (AOCP) induced mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, ascites from liver cirrhosis patients (ALCP) did not induce MEF cell migration. AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely blocked by pre-treatment of cells with LPA receptor antagonist, Ki16425. Both LPA- and AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely attenuated by PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Furthermore, cells lacking Akt1 displayed defect in LPA-induced cell migration. Re-expression of Akt1 in DKO (Akt1-/-Akt2-/-) cells restored LPA-induced cell migration, whereas re-expression of Akt2 in DKO cells could not restore the LPA-induced cell migration. Finally, Akt1 was selectively phosphorylated by LPA and AOCP stimulation. These results suggest that LPA is a major factor responsible for AOCP-induced cell migration and signaling specificity of Akt1 may dictate LPA-induced cell migration. PMID:18779657

  16. Pancreatic tumor cell secreted CCN1/Cyr61 promotes endothelial cell migration and aberrant neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Maity, Gargi; Mehta, Smita; Haque, Inamul; Dhar, Kakali; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K; Banerjee, Snigdha

    2014-05-16

    The complex signaling networks between cancer cells and adjacent endothelial cells make it challenging to unravel how cancer cells send extracellular messages to promote aberrant vascularization or tumor angiogenesis. Here, in vitro and in vivo models show that pancreatic cancer cell generated unique microenvironments can underlie endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. Mechanistically, we find that pancreatic cancer cell secreted CCN1/Cyr61 matricellular protein rewires the microenvironment to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. This event can be overcome by Sonic Hedgehog (SHh) antibody treatment. Collectively, these studies identify a novel CCN1 signaling program in pancreatic cancer cells which activates SHh through autocrine-paracrine circuits to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis and suggests that CCN1 signaling of pancreatic cancer cells is vital for the regulation of tumor angiogenesis. Thus CCN1 signaling could be an ideal target for tumor vascular disruption in pancreatic cancer.

  17. Episomal maintenance of S/MAR-containing non-viral vectors for RPE-based diseases.

    PubMed

    Koirala, Adarsha; Conley, Shannon M; Naash, Muna I

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of non-viral genetic therapies has historically been limited by transient gene expression and vector loss. Scaffold matrix attachment regions (S/MARs) have been shown to augment transcription, promote episomal maintenance, and provide insulator-like function to DNA in in vitro and in vivo systems. Here we explore the ability of S/MAR elements to mediate these effects in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells with the eventual goal of improving the persistence of expression of our non-viral gene delivery tools. We engineered an RPE-specific reporter vector with or without an S/MAR immediately downstream of the eGFP expression cassette. We show that the S/MAR vector is maintained as an episome for up to 1 year. Experiments in which rhodamine-labeled DNA was delivered to the subretinal space of mice show better persistence of the S/MAR-containing vector in the RPE than the non-S/MAR vector. These results suggest that inclusion of the S/MAR region promotes episomal maintenance of plasmid DNA in the RPE after subretinal delivery and that inclusion of this DNA element may be beneficial for non-viral ocular gene transfer.

  18. Common mechanisms regulating cell cortex properties during cell division and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Roubinet, Chantal; Tran, Phong T; Piel, Matthieu

    2012-11-01

    Single cell morphogenesis results from a balance of forces involving internal pressure (also called turgor pressure in plants and fungi) and the plastic and dynamic outer shell of the cell. Dominated by the cell wall in plants and fungi, mechanical properties of the outer shell of animal cells arise from the cell cortex, which is mostly composed of the plasma membrane (and membrane proteins) and the underlying meshwork of actin filaments and myosin motors (and associated proteins). In this review, following Bray and White [1988; Science 239:883-889], we draw a parallel between the regulation of the cell cortex during cell division and cell migration in animal cells. Starting from the similarities in shape changes and underlying mechanical properties, we further propose that the analogy between cell division and cell migration might run deeper, down to the basic molecular mechanisms driving cell cortex remodeling. We focus our attention on how an heterogeneous and dynamic cortex can be generated to allow cell shape changes while preserving cell integrity.

  19. N-cadherin as a key regulator of collective cell migration in a 3D environment.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2012-01-01

    Cell migration is a critical step of normal developmental processes and disease progression. Often, migrating cells interact and maintain contact with neighboring cells. However, the precise roles of cell-cell adhesion in cell migration have thus far been poorly defined. Often in aggressive cancers, N-cadherin is prominently upregulated, yet, these highly motile cells have limited cell-cell adhesion when plated on a stiff 2D substrate. But, the same cells in a 3D matrix migrate as a multicellular cluster. This new observation suggests that N-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion supports cell interactions between migrating cells in a more physiologically relevant 3D matrix, but not on a 2D substrate. While N-cadherin is an integral part of neural synapses, the ectopic expression of N-cadherin in transformed epithelial cells plays an equally important part in initiating pro-migratory signaling, and providing strong yet flexible cell cohesion essential for persistent cell migration in a 3D matrix. The 3D cell migration analysis for studying cell-to-cell interactions exposes the roles of N-cadherin in multicellular migration, and reveals novel insights into cell migration-dependent normal and pathological processes.

  20. Methylene blue modulates transendothelial migration of peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed

    Werner, Isabella; Guo, Fengwei; Bogert, Nicolai V; Stock, Ulrich A; Meybohm, Patrick; Moritz, Anton; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Vasoplegia is a severe complication after cardiac surgery. Within the last years the administration of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor methylene blue (MB) became a new therapeutic strategy. Our aim was to investigate the role of MB on transendothelial migration of circulating blood cells, the potential role of cyclic cGMP, eNOS and iNOS in this process, and the influence of MB on endothelial cell apoptosis. Human vascular endothelial cells (HuMEC-1) were treated for 30 minutes or 2 hours with different concentrations of MB. Inflammation was mimicked by LPS stimulation prior and after MB. Transmigration of PBMCs and T-Lymphocytes through the treated endothelial cells was investigated. The influence of MB upon the different subsets of PBMCs (Granulocytes, T- and B-Lymphocytes, and Monocytes) was assessed after transmigration by means of flow-cytometry. The effect of MB on cell apoptosis was evaluated using Annexin-V and Propidium Iodide stainings. Analyses of the expression of cyclic cGMP, eNOS and iNOS were performed by means of RT-PCR and Western Blot. Results were analyzed using unpaired Students T-test. Analysis of endothelial cell apoptosis by MB indicated a dose-dependent increase of apoptotic cells. We observed time- and dose-dependent effects of MB on transendothelial migration of PBMCs. The prophylactic administration of MB led to an increase of transendothelial migration of PBMCs but not Jurkat cells. Furthermore, HuMEC-1 secretion of cGMP correlated with iNOS expression after MB administration but not with eNOS expression. Expression of these molecules was reduced after MB administration at protein level. This study clearly reveals that endothelial response to MB is dose- and especially time-dependent. MB shows different effects on circulating blood cell-subtypes, and modifies the release patterns of eNOS, iNOS, and cGMP. The transendothelial migration is modulated after treatment with MB. Furthermore, MB provokes apoptosis of endothelial cells in a dose

  1. STRIPAK components determine mode of cancer cell migration and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Chris D.; Hooper, Steven; Tozluoglu, Melda; Bruckbauer, Andreas; Fletcher, Georgina; Erler, Janine T.; Bates, Paul A.; Thompson, Barry; Sahai, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The contractile actomyosin cytoskeleton and its connection to the plasma membrane are critical for control of cell shape and migration. We identify three STRIPAK complex components, FAM40A, FAM40B, and STRN3, as regulators of the actomyosin cortex. We show that FAM40A negatively regulates the MST3 and MST4 kinases, which promote the co-localisation of the contractile actomyosin machinery with the Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin family proteins by phosphorylating the inhibitors of PPP1CB, PPP1R14A-D. Using computational modelling, in vitro cell migration assays and in vivo breast cancer metastasis assays we demonstrate that co-localisation of contractile activity and actin-plasma membrane linkage reduces cell speed on planar surfaces, but favours migration in confined environments similar to those observed in vivo. We further show that FAM40B mutations found in human tumours uncouple it from PP2A and enable it to drive a contractile phenotype, which may underlie its role in human cancer. PMID:25531779

  2. Relative rigidity of cell-substrate effects on hepatic and hepatocellular carcinoma cell migration.

    PubMed

    Yangben, Yanzi; Wang, Hongbing; Zhong, Li; Chiang, Martin Y M; Tan, Qiaoyan; Singh, Gurinder K; Li, Song; Yang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gels with different stiffness and glass were employed as substrates to investigate how substrate stiffness affects the cellular stiffness of adherent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCCLM3) and hepatic (L02) cells. The interaction of how cell-substrate stiffness influences cell migration was also explored. An atom force microscope measured the stiffness of HCCLM3 and L02 cells on different substrates. Further, F-actin assembly was analyzed using immunofluorescence and Western blot. Finally, cell-surface expression of integrin β1 was quantified by flow cytometry. The results show that, while both HCCLM3 and L02 cells adjusted their cell stiffness to comply with the stiffness of the substrate they were adhered to, their tuning capabilities were different. HCCLM3 cell stiffness complied when substrate stiffness was between 1.1 and 33.7 kPa, whereas the analogous stiffness for L02 cells occurred at a higher substrate stiffness, 3.6 kPa up to glass. These ranges correlated with F-actin filament assembly and integrin β1 expression. In a migration assay, HCCLM3 cells migrated faster on a relatively soft substrate, while L02 cells migrated faster on substrates that were relatively rigid. These findings indicate that different tuning capabilities of HCCLM3 and L02 cells may influence cell migration velocity on substrates with different stiffness by regulating cy- toskeleton remodeling and integrin β1 expression.

  3. BMP2 rescues deficient cell migration in Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells and requires Src kinase.

    PubMed

    Allison, Patrick; Espiritu, Daniella; Camenisch, Todd D

    2016-05-03

    During embryogenesis, the epicardium undergoes proliferation, migration, and differentiation into several cardiac cell types which contribute to the coronary vessels. The type III transforming growth factor-β receptor (TGFβR3) is required for epicardial cell invasion and development of coronary vasculature in vivo. Bone Morphogenic Protein-2 (BMP2) is a driver of epicardial cell migration. Utilizing a primary epicardial cell line derived from Tgfbr3(+/+) and Tgfbr3(-/-) mouse embryos, we show that Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells are deficient in BMP2 mRNA expression. Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells are deficient in 2-dimensional migration relative to Tgfbr3(+/+) cells; BMP2 induces cellular migration to Tgfbr3(+/+) levels without affecting proliferation. We further demonstrate that Src kinase activity is required for BMP2 driven Tgfbr3(-/-) migration. BMP2 also requires Src for filamentous actin polymerization in Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells. Taken together, our data identifies a novel pathway in epicardial cell migration required for development of the coronary vessels.

  4. Tumor treating fields inhibit glioblastoma cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Hyo Sook; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with alternating electric fields at an intermediate frequency (100–300 kHz), referred to as tumor treating fields (TTF) therapy, inhibits cancer cell proliferation. In the present study, we demonstrated that TTF application suppressed the metastatic potential of U87 and U373 glioblastoma cell lines via the NF-kB, MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Wound-healing and transwell assays showed that TTF suppressed cell migration and invasion compared with controls. Soft agar and three-dimensional culture assays showed that TTF inhibited both anchorage-dependent (cell proliferation) and anchorage-independent (colony formation) GBM cell growth. TTF dysregulated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-related genes, such as vimentin and E-cadherin, which partially accounted for TTF inhibition of cell migration and invasion. We further demonstrated that TTF application suppressed angiogenesis by downregulating VEGF, HIF1α and matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. TTF also inhibited NF-kB transcriptional activity. Collectively, our findings show that TTF represents a promising novel anti-invasion and anti-angiogenesis therapeutic strategy for use in GBM patients. PMID:27556184

  5. Sensitivity of edge detection methods for quantifying cell migration assays.

    PubMed

    Treloar, Katrina K; Simpson, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative imaging methods to analyze cell migration assays are not standardized. Here we present a suite of two-dimensional barrier assays describing the collective spreading of an initially-confined population of 3T3 fibroblast cells. To quantify the motility rate we apply two different automatic image detection methods to locate the position of the leading edge of the spreading population after 24, 48 and 72 hours. These results are compared with a manual edge detection method where we systematically vary the detection threshold. Our results indicate that the observed spreading rates are very sensitive to the choice of image analysis tools and we show that a standard measure of cell migration can vary by as much as 25% for the same experimental images depending on the details of the image analysis tools. Our results imply that it is very difficult, if not impossible, to meaningfully compare previously published measures of cell migration since previous results have been obtained using different image analysis techniques and the details of these techniques are not always reported. Using a mathematical model, we provide a physical interpretation of our edge detection results. The physical interpretation is important since edge detection algorithms alone do not specify any physical measure, or physical definition, of the leading edge of the spreading population. Our modeling indicates that variations in the image threshold parameter correspond to a consistent variation in the local cell density. This means that varying the threshold parameter is equivalent to varying the location of the leading edge in the range of approximately 1-5% of the maximum cell density.

  6. Cu Migration in Polycrystalline CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Da; Akis, Richard; Brinkman, Daniel; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian; Vasileska, Dragica; Ringhofer, Christian

    2014-03-12

    An impurity reaction-diffusion model is applied to Cu defects and related intrinsic defects in polycrystalline CdTe for a better understanding of Cu’s role in the cell level reliability of CdTe PV devices. The simulation yields transient Cu distributions in polycrystalline CdTe during solar cell processing and stressing. Preliminary results for Cu migration using available diffusivity and solubility data show that Cu accumulates near the back contact, a phenomena that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing or stress conditions.

  7. Comparative mechanisms of cancer cell migration through 3D matrix and physiological microtracks.

    PubMed

    Carey, Shawn P; Rahman, Aniqua; Kraning-Rush, Casey M; Romero, Bethsabe; Somasegar, Sahana; Torre, Olivia M; Williams, Rebecca M; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2015-03-15

    Tumor cell invasion through the stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key feature of cancer metastasis, and understanding the cellular mechanisms of invasive migration is critical to the development of effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Since cancer cell migration is highly adaptable to physiochemical properties of the ECM, it is critical to define these migration mechanisms in a context-specific manner. Although extensive work has characterized cancer cell migration in two- and three-dimensional (3D) matrix environments, the migration program employed by cells to move through native and cell-derived microtracks within the stromal ECM remains unclear. We previously reported the development of an in vitro model of patterned type I collagen microtracks that enable matrix metalloproteinase-independent microtrack migration. Here we show that collagen microtracks closely resemble channel-like gaps in native mammary stroma ECM and examine the extracellular and intracellular mechanisms underlying microtrack migration. Cell-matrix mechanocoupling, while critical for migration through 3D matrix, is not necessary for microtrack migration. Instead, cytoskeletal dynamics, including actin polymerization, cortical tension, and microtubule turnover, enable persistent, polarized migration through physiological microtracks. These results indicate that tumor cells employ context-specific mechanisms to migrate and suggest that selective targeting of cytoskeletal dynamics, but not adhesion, proteolysis, or cell traction forces, may effectively inhibit cancer cell migration through preformed matrix microtracks within the tumor stroma.

  8. Functional screening with a live cell imaging-based random cell migration assay.

    PubMed

    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E; Zovko, Sandra; de Bont, Hans; van de Water, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration, essential in cancer progression, is a complex process comprising a number of spatiotemporally regulated and well-coordinated mechanisms. In order to study (random) cell migration in the context of responses to various external cues (such as growth factors) or intrinsic cell signaling, a number of different tools and approaches have been developed. In order to unravel the key pathways and players involved in the regulation of (cancer) cell migration, a systematical mapping of the players/pathways is required. For this purpose, we developed a cell migration assay based on automatic high-throughput microscopy screen. This approach allows for screening of hundreds of genes, e.g., those encoding various kinases and phosphatases but can also be used for screening of drugs libraries. Moreover, we have developed an automatic analysis pipeline comprising of (a) automatic data acquisition (movie) and (b) automatic analysis of the acquired movies of the migrating cells. Here, we describe various facets of this approach. Since cell migration is essential in progression of cancer metastasis, we describe two examples of experiments performed on highly motile (metastatic) cancer cells.

  9. Cell traction in collective cell migration and morphogenesis: The chase and run mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, András; Mayor, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Directional collective cell migration plays an important role in development, physiology, and disease. An increasing number of studies revealed key aspects of how cells coordinate their movement through distances surpassing several cell diameters. While physical modeling and measurements of forces during collective cell movements helped to reveal key mechanisms, most of these studies focus on tightly connected epithelial cultures. Less is known about collective migration of mesenchymal cells. A typical example of such behavior is the migration of the neural crest cells, which migrate large distances as a group. A recent study revealed that this persistent migration is aided by the interaction between the neural crest and the neighboring placode cells, whereby neural crest chase the placodes via chemotaxis, but upon contact both populations undergo contact inhibition of locomotion and a rapid reorganization of cellular traction. The resulting asymmetric traction field of the placodes forces them to run away from the chasers. We argue that this chase and run interaction may not be specific only to the neural crest system, but could serve as the underlying mechanism for several morphogenetic processes involving collective cell migration. PMID:26267782

  10. The core planar cell polarity gene, Vangl2, directs adult corneal epithelial cell alignment and migration

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Amy S.; Panzica, D. Alessio; Walczysko, Petr; Holt, Amy B.; Henderson, Deborah J.; West, John D.; Rajnicek, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that the core planar cell polarity (PCP) genes direct the aligned cell migration in the adult corneal epithelium, a stratified squamous epithelium on the outer surface of the vertebrate eye. Expression of multiple core PCP genes was demonstrated in the adult corneal epithelium. PCP components were manipulated genetically and pharmacologically in human and mouse corneal epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of VANGL2 reduced the directional component of migration of human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells without affecting speed. It was shown that signalling through PCP mediators, dishevelled, dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis and Rho-associated protein kinase directs the alignment of HCE cells by affecting cytoskeletal reorganization. Cells in which VANGL2 was disrupted tended to misalign on grooved surfaces and migrate across, rather than parallel to the grooves. Adult corneal epithelial cells in which Vangl2 had been conditionally deleted showed a reduced rate of wound-healing migration. Conditional deletion of Vangl2 in the mouse corneal epithelium ablated the normal highly stereotyped patterns of centripetal cell migration in vivo from the periphery (limbus) to the centre of the cornea. Corneal opacity owing to chronic wounding is a major cause of degenerative blindness across the world, and this study shows that Vangl2 activity is required for directional corneal epithelial migration. PMID:27853583

  11. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Morphology and Migration on Microtextured Titanium

    PubMed Central

    Banik, Brittany L.; Riley, Thomas R.; Platt, Christina J.; Brown, Justin L.

    2016-01-01

    The implant used in spinal fusion procedures is an essential component to achieving successful arthrodesis. At the cellular level, the implant impacts healing and fusion through a series of steps: first, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) need to adhere and proliferate to cover the implant; second, the MSCs must differentiate into osteoblasts; third, the osteoid matrix produced by the osteoblasts needs to generate new bone tissue, thoroughly integrating the implant with the vertebrate above and below. Previous research has demonstrated that microtextured titanium is advantageous over smooth titanium and PEEK implants for both promoting osteogenic differentiation and integrating with host bone tissue; however, no investigation to date has examined the early morphology and migration of MSCs on these surfaces. This study details cell spreading and morphology changes over 24 h, rate and directionality of migration 6–18 h post-seeding, differentiation markers at 10 days, and the long-term morphology of MSCs at 7 days, on microtextured, acid-etched titanium (endoskeleton), smooth titanium, and smooth PEEK surfaces. The results demonstrate that in all metrics, the two titanium surfaces outperformed the PEEK surface. Furthermore, the rough acid-etched titanium surface presented the most favorable overall results, demonstrating the random migration needed to efficiently cover a surface in addition to morphologies consistent with osteoblasts and preosteoblasts. PMID:27243001

  12. S/MAR-containing DNA nanoparticles promote persistent RPE gene expression and improvement in RPE65-associated LCA.

    PubMed

    Koirala, Adarsha; Makkia, Rasha S; Conley, Shannon M; Cooper, Mark J; Naash, Muna I

    2013-04-15

    Mutations in genes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cause or contribute to debilitating ocular diseases, including Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA). Genetic therapies, particularly adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), are a popular choice for monogenic diseases; however, the limited payload capacity of AAVs combined with the large number of retinal disease genes exceeding that capacity make the development of alternative delivery methods critical. Here, we test the ability of compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs) containing a plasmid with a scaffold matrix attachment region (S/MAR) and vitelliform macular dystrophy 2 (VMD2) promoter to target the RPE, drive long-term, tissue-specific gene expression and mediate proof-of-principle rescue in the rpe65(-/-) model of LCA. We show that the S/MAR-containing plasmid exhibited reporter gene expression levels several fold higher than plasmid or NPs without S/MARs. Importantly, this expression was highly persistent, lasting up to 2 years (last timepoint studied). We therefore selected this plasmid for testing in the rpe65(-/-) mouse model and observe that NP or plasmid VMD2-hRPE65-S/MAR led to structural and functional improvements in the LCA disease phenotype. These results indicate that the non-viral delivery of hRPE65 vectors can result in persistent, therapeutically efficacious gene expression in the RPE.

  13. Cell migration under ultrasound irradiations in micrometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Shinya; Otsuka, Yo; Oshima, Yusuke; Hikita, Atsuhiko; Mitsui, Toshiyuki

    2013-03-01

    Cell movements, migration play an important role in many physiological processes including cell proliferation and differentiation. C2C12, a line of mouse myoblasts is known to differentiate into osteoblast under appropriate conditions. Therefore, C2C12 cells can be chosen for the differentiation studies. However, the movement of the C2C12's has not been fully investigated although the movements may provide a better understanding of the healing processes of bone repair, regeneration and differentiation. In addition, low intensity ultrasound has been thought and used to promote bone fracture healing although the microscopic mechanism of this healing is not well understood. As a first step, we have investigated single cell migration of C2C12 under optical microscopy with and without ultrasound irradiations. The ultrasound is irradiated from an apex of a sharp needle. The frequency is 1.5 MHz and the power intensity is near 24 mW/cm2. These values were similar to the ultrasound treatment values. In this conference, we will show the influence of the ultrasound irradiation on the cell movement by plotting the mean squared displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function as a function of time.

  14. The effects of laser immunotherapy on cancer cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahavar, Cody F.; Zhou, Feifan; Hasanjee, Aamr M.; Layton, Elivia; Lam, Anh; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2016-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses laser irradiation and immunological stimulation to target all types of metastases and creates a long-term tumor resistance. Glycated chitosan (GC) is the immunological stimulant used in LIT. Interestingly, GC can act as a surfactant for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to immunologically modify SWNTs. SWNT-GC retains the optical properties of SWNTs and the immunological functions of GC to help increase the selectivity of the laser and create a more optimal immune response. One essential aspect of understanding this immune response is knowing how laser irradiation affects cancer cells' ability to metastasize. In this experiment, a cell migration assay was performed. A 2mm circular elastomer plugs were placed at the bottom of multi-well dishes. Pre-cancerous keratinocytes, different tumor cells, and fibroblasts were then plated separately in treated wells. Once the cells reached 100% confluence, they were irradiated by either a 980nm or 805nm wavelength laser. The goal was to determine the effects of laser irradiation and immunological stimulation on cancer cell migration in vitro, paying the way to understand the mechanism of LIT in treating metastatic tumors in cancer patients.

  15. Features specific to retinal pigment epithelium cells derived from three-dimensional human embryonic stem cell cultures — a new donor for cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengya; Li, Qiyou; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) transplantation is a particularly promising treatment of retinal degenerative diseases affecting RPE-photoreceptor complex. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) provide an abundant donor source for RPE transplantation. Herein, we studied the time-course characteristics of RPE cells derived from three-dimensional human ESCs cultures (3D-RPE). We showed that 3D-RPE cells possessed morphology, ultrastructure, gene expression profile, and functions of authentic RPE. As differentiation proceeded, 3D-RPE cells could mature gradually with decreasing proliferation but increasing functions. Besides, 3D-RPE cells could form polarized monolayer with functional tight junction and gap junction. When grafted into the subretinal space of Royal College of Surgeons rats, 3D-RPE cells were safe and efficient to rescue retinal degeneration. This study showed that 3D-RPE cells were a new donor for cell therapy of retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:27009841

  16. AP-2α inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell growth and migration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenhuan; Chen, Cheng; Liang, Zhongheng; Qiu, Junlu; Li, Xinxin; Hu, Xiang; Xiang, Shuanglin; Ding, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Transcription factor AP-2α is involved in many types of human cancers, but its role in hepatocellular carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that expression of AP-2α was low in 40% of human hepatocellular cancers compared with adjacent normal tissues by immunohistochemical analysis. Moreover, AP-2α expression was low or absent in hepatocellular cancer cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, SMMC-7721 and MHHC 97-H). Human liver cancer cell lines SMMC-7721 and Hep3B stably overexpressing AP-2α were established by lentiviral infection and puromycin screening, and the ectopic expression of AP-2α was able to inhibit hepatocellular cancer cell growth and proliferation by cell viability, MTT assay and liquid colony formation in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, AP-2α overexpression decreased liver cancer cell migration and invasion as assessed by wound healing and Transwell assays, increasing the sensitivity of liver cancer cells to cisplatin analyzed by MTT assays. Also AP-2α overexpression suppressed the sphere formation and renewed the ability of cancer stem cells. Finally, we found that AP-2α is epigenetically modified and modulates the levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), β-catenin, p53, EMT, and CD133 expression in liver cancer cell lines. These results suggested that AP-2α expression is low in human hepatocellular cancers by regulating multiple signaling to affect hepatocellular cancer cell growth and migration. Therefore, AP-2α might represent a novel potential target in human hepatocellular cancer therapy.

  17. Cell Image Velocimetry (CIV): boosting the automated quantification of cell migration in wound healing assays.

    PubMed

    Milde, Florian; Franco, Davide; Ferrari, Aldo; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Poulikakos, Dimos; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-11-01

    Cell migration is commonly quantified by tracking the speed of the cell layer interface in wound healing assays. This quantification is often hampered by low signal to noise ratio, in particular when complex substrates are employed to emulate in vivo cell migration in geometrically complex environments. Moreover, information about the cell motion, readily available inside the migrating cell layers, is not usually harvested. We introduce Cell Image Velocimetry (CIV), a combination of cell layer segmentation and image velocimetry algorithms, to drastically enhance the quantification of cell migration by wound healing assays. The resulting software analyses the speed of the interface as well as the detailed velocity field inside the cell layers in an automated fashion. CIV is shown to be highly robust for images with low signal to noise ratio, low contrast and frame shifting and it is portable across various experimental settings. The modular design and parametrization of CIV is not restricted to wound healing assays and allows for the exploration and quantification of flow phenomena in any optical microscopy dataset. Here, we demonstrate the capabilities of CIV in wound healing assays over topographically engineered surfaces and quantify the relative merits of differently aligned gratings on cell migration.

  18. Rapamycin promotes Schwann cell migration and nerve growth factor secretion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Haiwei; Zhang, Kaiming; Wang, Xinyu; Li, Shipu; Yin, Yixia

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, similar to FK506, can promote neural regeneration in vitro. We assumed that the mechanisms of action of rapamycin and FK506 in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration were similar. This study compared the effects of different concentrations of rapamycin and FK506 on Schwann cells and investigated effects and mechanisms of rapamycin on improving peripheral nerve regeneration. Results demonstrated that the lowest rapamycin concentration (1.53 nmol/L) more significantly promoted Schwann cell migration than the highest FK506 concentration (100μmol/L). Rapamycin promoted the secretion of nerve growth factors and upregulated growth-associated protein 43 expression in Schwann cells, but did not significantly affect Schwann cell proliferation. Therefore, rapamycin has potential application in peripheral nerve regeneration therapy. PMID:25206862

  19. Co-culture with Sertoli cells promotes proliferation and migration of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fenxi; Hong, Yan; Liang, Wenmei; Ren, Tongming; Jing, Suhua; Lin, Juntang

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of Sertoli cells (SCs) with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs dramatically increased proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs stimulated expression of Mdm2, Akt, CDC2, Cyclin D, CXCR4, MAPKs. -- Abstract: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been recently used in transplant therapy. The proliferation and migration of MSCs are the determinants of the efficiency of MSC transplant therapy. Sertoli cells are a kind of 'nurse' cells that support the development of sperm cells. Recent studies show that Sertoli cells promote proliferation of endothelial cells and neural stem cells in co-culture. We hypothesized that co-culture of UCMSCs with Sertoli cells may also promote proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated UCMSCs from human cords and Sertoli cells from mouse testes, and co-cultured them using a Transwell system. We found that UCMSCs exhibited strong proliferation ability and potential to differentiate to other cell lineages such as osteocytes and adipocytes. The presence of Sertoli cells in co-culture significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration potential of UCMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, these phenotypic changes were accompanied with upregulation of multiple genes involved in cell proliferation and migration including phospho-Akt, Mdm2, phospho-CDC2, Cyclin D1, Cyclin D3 as well as CXCR4, phospho-p44 MAPK and phospho-p38 MAPK. These findings indicate that Sertoli cells boost UCMSC proliferation and migration potential.

  20. A porous 3D cell culture micro device for cell migration study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Zhou, Changchun; Lin, Biaoyang; Li, Wei

    2010-08-01

    Cell migration under chemoattractant is an important biological step in cancer metastasis that causes the spread of malignant tumor cells. Porous polymeric materials are widely used to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) environment for applications such as three dimensional (3D) cell culturing and tissue engineering. In this paper we report a novel 3D cell culture device based on porous polymeric material to study cancer migration. We fabricated a porous channel on a polymeric chip using a selective ultrasonic foaming method. We demonstrate that a chemical concentration gradient could be established through the porous channel due to the slow diffusion process. We show that significant cell migration could be observed through the porous channel within 1-2 weeks of cell culturing when metastatic M4A4-GFP breast cancer cells were induced by 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS).We also developed a mathematical model to evaluate the diffusivity and concentration gradient through the fabricated porous structure.

  1. Directing cell migration and organization via nanocrater-patterned cell-repellent interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Hojeong; Koo, Sangmo; Reese, Willie Mae; Loskill, Peter; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-09-01

    Although adhesive interactions between cells and nanostructured interfaces have been studied extensively, there is a paucity of data on how nanostructured interfaces repel cells by directing cell migration and cell-colony organization. Here, by using multiphoton ablation lithography to pattern surfaces with nanoscale craters of various aspect ratios and pitches, we show that the surfaces altered the cells’ focal-adhesion size and distribution, thus affecting cell morphology, migration and ultimately localization. We also show that nanocrater pitch can disrupt the formation of mature focal adhesions to favour the migration of cells towards higher-pitched regions, which present increased planar area for the formation of stable focal adhesions. Moreover, by designing surfaces with variable pitch but constant nanocrater dimensions, we were able to create circular and striped cellular patterns. Our surface-patterning approach, which does not involve chemical treatments and can be applied to various materials, represents a simple method to control cell behaviour on surfaces.

  2. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-03

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  3. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S.; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-01

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  4. Anabolic androgens affect the competitive interactions in cell migration and adhesion between normal mouse urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Ping; Hsieh, Teng-Fu; Chen, Chi-Cheng; Hung, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Ai-Lin; Chang, Chawnshang; Shyr, Chih-Rong

    2014-09-26

    The urothelium is constantly rebuilt by normal urothelial cells to regenerate damaged tissues caused by stimuli in urine. However, the urothelial carcinoma cells expand the territory by aberrant growth of tumor cells, which migrate and occupy the damaged tissues to spread outside and disrupt the normal cells and organized tissues and form a tumor. Therefore, the interaction between normal urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells affect the initiation and progression of urothelial tumors if normal urothelial cells fail to migrate and adhere to the damages sites to regenerate the tissues. Here, comparing normal murine urothelial cells with murine urothelial carcinoma cells (MBT-2), we found that normal cells had less migration ability than carcinoma cells. And in our co-culture system we found that carcinoma cells had propensity migrating toward normal urothelial cells and carcinoma cells had more advantages to adhere than normal cells. To reverse this condition, we used anabolic androgen, dihyrotestosterone (DHT) to treat normal cells and found that DHT treatment increased the migration ability of normal urothelial cells toward carcinoma cells and the adhesion capacity in competition with carcinoma cells. This study provides the base of a novel therapeutic approach by using anabolic hormone-enforced normal urothelial cells to regenerate the damage urothelium and defend against the occupancy of carcinoma cells to thwart cancer development and recurrence.

  5. Towing of sensory axons by their migrating target cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Darren; Knaut, Holger; Maischein, Hans-Martin; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2004-05-01

    Many pathfinding axons must locate target fields that are themselves positioned by active migration. A hypothetical method for ensuring that these migrations are coordinated is towing, whereby the extension of axons is entirely dependent on the migration of their target cells. Here we combine genetics and time-lapse imaging in the zebrafish to show that towing by migrating cells is a bona fide mechanism for guiding pathfinding axons in vivo.

  6. Impacts of two point mutations of RPE65 from Leber's congenital amaurosis on the stability, subcellular localization and isomerohydrolase activity of RPE65.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Takahashi, Yusuke; Ma, Jian-Xing

    2006-07-24

    RPE65, a membrane-associated protein in the retinal pigment epithelium, is the isomerohydrolase essential for regenerating 11-cis retinal, the chromophore for visual pigments. RPE65 mutations are associated with inherited retinal dystrophies. Here we report that single point mutations of RPE65, Y144D and P363T, identified in patients with Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA), significantly decreased the stability of RPE65. Moreover, these mutations altered subcellular localization of RPE65 and abolished its isomerohydrolase activity. These observations suggest that the decreased protein stability and altered subcellular localization of RPE65 may represent a mechanism for these mutations to lead to vision loss in LCA patients.

  7. Lymph node topology dictates T cell migration behavior

    PubMed Central

    Beltman, Joost B.; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; Lynch, Jennifer N.; Miller, Mark J.; de Boer, Rob J.

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive immunity is initiated by T cell recognition of foreign peptides presented on dendritic cells (DCs) by major histocompatibility molecules. These interactions take place in secondary lymphoid tissues, such as lymph nodes (LNs) and spleen, and hence the anatomical structure of these tissues plays a crucial role in the development of immune responses. Two-photon microscopy (2PM) imaging in LNs suggests that T cells walk in a consistent direction for several minutes, pause briefly with a regular period, and then take off in a new, random direction. Here, we construct a spatially explicit model of T cell and DC migration in LNs and show that all dynamical properties of T cells could be a consequence of the densely packed LN environment. By means of 2PM experiments, we confirm that the large velocity fluctuations of T cells are indeed environmentally determined rather than resulting from an intrinsic motility program. Our simulations further predict that T cells self-organize into microscopically small, highly dynamic streams. We present experimental evidence for the presence of such turbulent streams in LNs. Finally, the model allows us to estimate the scanning rates of DCs (2,000 different T cells per hour) and T cells (100 different DCs per hour). PMID:17389236

  8. Lymph node topology dictates T cell migration behavior.

    PubMed

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; Lynch, Jennifer N; Miller, Mark J; de Boer, Rob J

    2007-04-16

    Adaptive immunity is initiated by T cell recognition of foreign peptides presented on dendritic cells (DCs) by major histocompatibility molecules. These interactions take place in secondary lymphoid tissues, such as lymph nodes (LNs) and spleen, and hence the anatomical structure of these tissues plays a crucial role in the development of immune responses. Two-photon microscopy (2PM) imaging in LNs suggests that T cells walk in a consistent direction for several minutes, pause briefly with a regular period, and then take off in a new, random direction. Here, we construct a spatially explicit model of T cell and DC migration in LNs and show that all dynamical properties of T cells could be a consequence of the densely packed LN environment. By means of 2PM experiments, we confirm that the large velocity fluctuations of T cells are indeed environmentally determined rather than resulting from an intrinsic motility program. Our simulations further predict that T cells self-organize into microscopically small, highly dynamic streams. We present experimental evidence for the presence of such turbulent streams in LNs. Finally, the model allows us to estimate the scanning rates of DCs (2,000 different T cells per hour) and T cells (100 different DCs per hour).

  9. Hypoxia Increases Breast Cancer Cell-Induced Lymphatic Endothelial Cell Migration12

    PubMed Central

    Mikhaylova, Maria; Mori, Noriko; Wildes, Flonné B; Walczak, Piotr; Gimi, Barjor; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2008-01-01

    Because tumors are characterized by hypoxic environments, we used a novel in vitro noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging assay to examine the influence of invasive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells on the invasion and migration of human dermal lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-dLy) under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Nonmalignant immortalized MCF-12A human mammary epithelial cells instead of cancer cells or chambers with HMVEC-dLy alone were used as controls for comparison. HMVEC-dLy cells were labeled with a T2 contrast agent (Feridex), and their invasion and migration through extracellular matrix under normoxic and hypoxic conditions were monitored using magnetic resonance imaging. A significant increase in the invasion and migration of HMVEC-dLy cells was detected in the presence of cancer cells, which further increased significantly under hypoxic conditions. HMVEC-dLy cells formed interconnecting strands extending toward the cancer cells under normoxic but not under hypoxic conditions. Following reoxygenation, these interconnecting strands, extending from HMVEC-dLy cells toward the cancer cells, were observed. These data demonstrate the importance of hypoxia in lymphatic endothelial cell invasion and migration through extracellular matrix in the presence of cancer cells. PMID:18392137

  10. ERK-dependent and -independent pathways trigger human neural progenitor cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Moors, Michaela . E-mail: moors@uni-duesseldorf.de; Cline, Jason E. . E-mail: jason.cline@uni-duesseldorf.de; Abel, Josef . E-mail: josef.abel@uni-duesseldorf.de; Fritsche, Ellen . E-mail: ellen.fritsche@uni-duesseldorf.de

    2007-05-15

    Besides differentiation and apoptosis, cell migration is a basic process in brain development in which neural cells migrate several centimeters within the developing brain before reaching their proper positions and forming the right connections. For identifying signaling events that control neural migration and are therefore potential targets of chemicals to disturb normal brain development, we developed a human neurosphere-based migration assay based on normal human neural progenitor (NHNP) cells, in which the distance is measured that cells wander over time. Applying this assay, we investigated the role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in the regulation of NHNP cell migration. Exposure to model substances like ethanol or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) revealed a correlation between ERK1/2 activation and cell migration. The participation of phospho-(P-) ERK1/2 was confirmed by exposure of the cells to the MEK inhibitor PD98059, which directly prohibits ERK1/2 phosphorylation and inhibited cell migration. We identified protein kinase C (PKC) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as upstream signaling kinases governing ERK1/2 activation, thereby controlling NHNP cell migration. Additionally, treatments with src kinase inhibitors led to a diminished cell migration without affecting ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Based on these results, we postulate that migration of NHNP cells is controlled via ERK1/2-dependent and -independent pathways.

  11. Tre1, a G Protein-Coupled Receptor, Directs Transepithelial Migration of Drosophila Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bainton, Roland J; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2003-01-01

    In most organisms, germ cells are formed distant from the somatic part of the gonad and thus have to migrate along and through a variety of tissues to reach the gonad. Transepithelial migration through the posterior midgut (PMG) is the first active step during Drosophila germ cell migration. Here we report the identification of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), Tre1, that is essential for this migration step. Maternal tre1 RNA is localized to germ cells, and tre1 is required cell autonomously in germ cells. In tre1 mutant embryos, most germ cells do not exit the PMG. The few germ cells that do leave the midgut early migrate normally to the gonad, suggesting that this gene is specifically required for transepithelial migration and that mutant germ cells are still able to recognize other guidance cues. Additionally, inhibiting small Rho GTPases in germ cells affects transepithelial migration, suggesting that Tre1 signals through Rho1. We propose that Tre1 acts in a manner similar to chemokine receptors required during transepithelial migration of leukocytes, implying an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of transepithelial migration. Recently, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 was shown to direct migration in vertebrate germ cells. Thus, germ cells may more generally use GPCR signaling to navigate the embryo toward their target. PMID:14691551

  12. Interplay of RhoA and mechanical forces in collective cell migration driven by leader cells.

    PubMed

    Reffay, M; Parrini, M C; Cochet-Escartin, O; Ladoux, B; Buguin, A; Coscoy, S; Amblard, F; Camonis, J; Silberzan, P

    2014-03-01

    The leading front of a collectively migrating epithelium often destabilizes into multicellular migration fingers where a cell initially similar to the others becomes a leader cell while its neighbours do not alter. The determinants of these leader cells include mechanical and biochemical cues, often under the control of small GTPases. However, an accurate dynamic cartography of both mechanical and biochemical activities remains to be established. Here, by mapping the mechanical traction forces exerted on the surface by MDCK migration fingers, we show that these structures are mechanical global entities with the leader cells exerting a large traction force. Moreover, the spatial distribution of RhoA differential activity at the basal plane strikingly mirrors this force cartography. We propose that RhoA controls the development of these fingers through mechanical cues: the leader cell drags the structure and the peripheral pluricellular acto-myosin cable prevents the initiation of new leader cells.

  13. Primary mesenchyme cell migration requires a chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Lane, M C; Solursh, M

    1991-02-01

    Primary mesenchyme cell migration in the sea urchin embryo is inhibited by sulfate deprivation and exposure to exogenous beta-D-xylosides, two treatments known to disrupt proteoglycan synthesis. We show that in the developing sea urchin, exogenous xyloside affects the synthesis by the primary mesenchyme cells of a very large, cell surface chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan. This proteoglycan is present in a partially purified fraction that restores migratory ability to defective cells in vitro. The integrity of this chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan appears essential for primary mesenchyme cell migration since treatment of actively migrating cells with chondroitinase ABC reversibly inhibited their migration in vitro.

  14. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-03-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  15. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-01-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:28257035

  16. Notch1-Dll4 signalling and mechanical force regulate leader cell formation during collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Reza; Sun, Jian; Wang, Shue; Long, Min; Zhang, Donna D; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-03-13

    At the onset of collective cell migration, a subset of cells within an initially homogenous population acquires a distinct 'leader' phenotype with characteristic morphology and motility. However, the factors driving the leader cell formation as well as the mechanisms regulating leader cell density during the migration process remain to be determined. Here we use single-cell gene expression analysis and computational modelling to show that the leader cell identity is dynamically regulated by Dll4 signalling through both Notch1 and cellular stress in a migrating epithelium. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that Dll4 is induced in leader cells after the creation of the cell-free region and leader cells are regulated via Notch1-Dll4 lateral inhibition. Furthermore, mechanical stress inhibits Dll4 expression and leader cell formation in the monolayer. Collectively, our findings suggest that a reduction of mechanical force near the boundary promotes Notch1-Dll4 signalling to dynamically regulate the density of leader cells during collective cell migration.

  17. Notch1-Dll4 signaling and mechanical force regulate leader cell formation during collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Reza; Sun, Jian; Wang, Shue; Long, Min; Zhang, Donna D.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-01-01

    At the onset of collective cell migration, a subset of cells within an initially homogenous population acquires a distinct “leader” phenotype with characteristic morphology and motility. However, the factors driving leader cell formation as well as the mechanisms regulating leader cell density during the migration process remain to be determined. Here, we use single cell gene expression analysis and computational modeling to show that leader cell identity is dynamically regulated by Dll4 signaling through both Notch1 and cellular stress in a migrating epithelium. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that Dll4 is induced in leader cells after the creation of the cell-free region and leader cells are regulated via Notch1-Dll4 lateral inhibition. Furthermore, mechanical stress inhibits Dll4 expression and leader cell formation in the monolayer. Collectively, our findings suggest that a reduction of mechanical force near the boundary promotes Notch1-Dll4 signaling to dynamically regulate the density of leader cells during collective cell migration. PMID:25766473

  18. Analysis of CCR7 mediated T cell transfectant migration using a microfluidic gradient generator.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xun; Wu, Jiandong; Li, Hongzhao; Legler, Daniel F; Marshall, Aaron J; Lin, Francis

    2015-04-01

    T lymphocyte migration is crucial for adaptive immunity. Manipulation of signaling molecules controlling cell migration combined with in-vitro cell migration analysis provides a powerful research approach. Microfluidic devices, which can precisely configure chemoattractant gradients and allow quantitative single cell analysis, have been increasingly applied to cell migration and chemotaxis studies. However, there are a very limited number of published studies involving microfluidic migration analysis of genetically manipulated immune cells. In this study, we describe a simple microfluidic method for quantitative analysis of T cells expressing transfected chemokine receptors and other cell migration signaling probes. Using this method, we demonstrated chemotaxis of Jurkat transfectants expressing wild-type or C-terminus mutated CCR7 within a gradient of chemokine CCL19, and characterized the difference in transfectant migration mediated by wild-type and mutant CCR7. The EGFP-tagged CCR7 allows identification of CCR7-expressing transfectants in cell migration analysis and microscopy assessment of CCR7 dynamics. Collectively, our study demonstrated the effective use of the microfluidic method for studying CCR7 mediated T cell transfectant migration. We envision this developed method will provide a useful platform to functionally test various signaling mechanisms at the cell migration level.

  19. Alkylindole-sensitive receptors modulate microglial cell migration and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Susan; Cherry, Allison E.; Xu, Cong; Stella, Nephi

    2015-01-01

    Ligands targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) expressed by microglia have been shown to regulate distinct components of their activation process, including cell proliferation, migration and differentiation into M1 or M2 phenotypes. Cannabinoids, including the active component of the Cannabis plant, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and the synthetic alkylindole (AI) compound, WIN55212-2 (WIN-2), activate two molecularly identified GPCRs: CB1 and CB2. Previous studies reported that WIN-2 activates an additional unknown GPCR that is not activated by plant-derived cannabinoids, and evidence indicates that microglia express these receptors. Detailed studies on the role of AI-sensitive receptors in microglial cell activation were difficult as no selective pharmacological tools were available. Here, three newly-developed AI analogues allowed us to determine if microglia express AI-sensitive receptors and if so, study how they regulate the microglial cell activation process. We found that mouse microglia in primary culture express functional AI-sensitive receptors as measured by radioligand binding and changes in intracellular cAMP levels, and that these receptors control both basal and ATP-stimulated migration. AI analogues inhibit cell proliferation stimulated by macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) without affecting basal cell proliferation. Remarkably, AI analogues do not control the expression of effector proteins characteristic of M1 or M2 phenotypes; yet activating microglia with M1 and M2 cytokines reduces the microglial response to AI analogues. Our results suggest that microglia express functional AI-sensitive receptors that control select components of their activation process. Agonists of these novel targets might represent a novel class of therapeutics to influence the microglial cell activation process. PMID:25914169

  20. Migration dynamics of breast cancer cells in a tunable 3D interstitial flow chamber.

    PubMed

    Haessler, Ulrike; Teo, Jeremy C M; Foretay, Didier; Renaud, Philippe; Swartz, Melody A

    2012-04-01

    The migration of cells such as leukocytes, tumor cells, and fibroblasts through 3D matrices is critical for regulating homeostasis and immunity and for driving pathogenesis. Interstitial flow through the extracellular matrix, which can substantially increase during inflammation and in the tumor microenvironment, can influence cell migration in multiple ways. Leukocytes and tumor cells are heterogeneous in their migration responses to flow, yet most 3D migration studies use endpoint measurements representing average characteristics. Here we present a robust new microfluidic device for 3D culture with live imaging under well-controlled flow conditions, along with a comparison of analytical methods for describing the migration behavior of heterogeneous cell populations. We then use the model to provide new insight on how interstitial flow affects MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell invasion, phenomena that are not seen from averaged or endpoint measurements. Specifically, we find that interstitial flow increases the percentage of cells that become migratory, and increases migrational speed in about 20% of the cells. It also increases the migrational persistence of a subpopulation (5-10% of cells) in the positive or negative flow direction. Cells that migrated upstream moved faster but with less directedness, whereas cells that migrated in the direction of flow moved at slower speeds but with higher directedness. These findings demonstrate how fluid flow in the tumor microenvironment can enhance tumor cell invasion by directing a subpopulation of tumor cells in the flow direction; i.e., towards the draining lymphatic vessels, a major route of metastasis.

  1. Filopodia in cell adhesion, 3D migration and cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Jacquemet, Guillaume; Hamidi, Hellyeh; Ivaska, Johanna

    2015-10-01

    This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of the role filopodia and filopodia-like structures in cell adhesion and three dimensional (3D) cell migration both in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we focus on recent advances demonstrating that filopodia are involved in substrate tethering and environment sensing in vivo. We further discuss the emerging role of filopodia and filopodial proteins in tumor dissemination as mounting in vitro, in vivo and clinical evidence suggest that filopodia drive cancer cell invasion and highlight filopodia proteins as attractive therapeutic targets. Finally, we outline outstanding questions that remain to be addressed to elucidate the role of filopodia during 3D cell migration.

  2. The ciliary GTPase Arl13b regulates cell migration and cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Pruski, Michal; Rajnicek, Ann; Yang, Zhifu; Clancy, Hannah; Ding, Yu-Qiang; McCaig, Colin D.; Lang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The GTPase ARL13B is localized to primary cilia; small cellular protrusions that act as antennae. Its defective ARL13B hennin (HNN) variant is linked causally with Joubert Syndrome, a developmental ciliopathy attributed to poor sensing of extracellular chemical gradients. We tested the hypothesis that impaired detection of extracellular voltage gradients also contributes to the HNN phenotype. In vitro, extracellular electric fields stimulated migration of wild type (WT) and HNN fibroblasts toward the cathode but the field only increased the migration speed of WT cells. Cilia on WT cells did not align to the field vector. HNN cells divided more slowly than WT cells, arresting at the G2/M phase. Mechanistically, HNN cells had reduced phospho-ERK1/2 signaling and elevated levels of Suppressor of Fused protein. These suggest that cells may not be able to read extracellular chemical cues appropriately, resulting in deficits in cell migration and proliferation. Finally, an increase in tubulin stabilization (more detyrosinated tubulin) confirmed the general stagnation of HNN cells, which may further contribute to slower migration and cell cycle progression. We conclude that Arl13b dysfunction resulted in HNN cell stagnation due to poor growth factor signaling and impaired detection of extracellular electrical gradients, and that the role of Arl13b in cell proliferation may be understated. PMID:26963749

  3. Laser-based microfabrication for cell adhesion and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan S.

    Mammalian cell adhesion and migration impact a multitude of cellular behaviors and tissue remodeling processes. Over the past several decades, investigators have methodically improved in vitro systems as mimics of the extracellular microenvironment to study these biologic phenomena. Experiments have progressed from early studies on bifunctional inorganic surfaces to those with purified adhesive proteins against an organic, non-adhesive background. Recently, subcellular geometric patterns of adhesive proteins have proven useful to restrict and direct focal contact formation, cell survival, lamellopodia extension, and the maturation of "supermature" focal contacts. The vast majority of recent studies have involved the construction of hydrophobic patches with adsorbed fibronectin as the adhesive constraint of choice. However, the extracellular matrix (ECM) in which cells operate is a complex and diverse environment where numerous signals interact with a cell simultaneously; signals that the cell must integrate and that directly impact these processes. Microfabrication methods to approximate the extracellular milieu have significant limitations in their potential to be extended to pattern multiple bioactive ligands with high precision. Current techniques require multi-step processes which lose feature fidelity at every pattern transfer step, while simultaneously increasing logistical complexity and the chance of technical missteps. We have developed a family of complementary techniques using the raster-scanning laser of a confocal microscope to address a number of current challenges in improving microfabrication. For our work with thin films of self-assembled organic monolayers, we systematically removed the multi-step processing requirements of conventional photolithographic microfabrication and characterized and verified the technical advantages of our new patterning techniques. For 3D work, we developed and demonstrated micron-scale biochemical and mechanical

  4. Actin-Based Feedback Circuits in Cell Migration and Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinxin

    In this thesis, we study the switch and pulse functions of actin during two important cellular processes, cell migration and endocytosis. Actin is an abundant protein that can polymerize to form a dendritic network. The actin network can exert force to push or bend the cell membrane. During cell migration, the actin network behaves like a switch, assembling mostly at one end or at the other end. The end with the majority of the actin network is the leading edge, following which the cell can persistently move in the same direction. The other end, with the minority of the actin network, is the trailing edge, which is dragged by the cell as it moves forward. When subjected to large fluctuations or external stimuli, the leading edge and the trailing edge can interchange and change the direction of motion, like a motion switch. Our model of the actin network in a cell reveals that mechanical force is crucial for forming the motion switch. We find a transition from single state symmetric behavior to switch behavior, when tuning parameters such as the force. The model is studied by both stochastic simulations, and a set of rate equations that are consistent with the simulations. Endocytosis is a process by which cells engulf extracellular substances and recycle the cell membrane. In yeast cells, the actin network is transiently needed to overcome the pressure difference across the cell membrane caused by turgor pressure. The actin network behaves like a pulse, which assembles and then disassembles within about 30 seconds. Using a stochastic model, we reproduce the pulse behaviors of the actin network and one of its regulatory proteins, Las17. The model matches green fluorescence protein (GFP) experiments for wild-type cells. The model also predicts some phenotypes that modify or diminish the pulse behavior. The phenotypes are verified with both experiments performed at Washington University and with other groups' experiments. We find that several feedback mechanisms are

  5. Cell migration microfluidics for electrotaxis-based heterogeneity study of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaping; Xu, Tao; Zou, Heng; Chen, Xiaomei; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu

    2017-03-15

    Tumor metastasis involves the migration of cells from primary site to a distant location. Recently, it was established that cancer cells from the same tumor were heterogeneous in migratory ability. Numerous studies have demonstrated that cancer cells undergo reorientation and migration directionally under physiological electric field (EF), which has potential implications in metastasis. Microfluidic devices with channel structures of defined dimensions provide controllable microenvironments to enable real-time observation of cell migration. In this study, we developed two polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices for long-term electrotaxis study. In the first chip, three different intensities of EFs were generated in a single channel to study cell electrotactic behavior with high efficiency. We observed that the lung adenocarcinoma H1975 cells underwent cathodal migration with changing cellular orientation. To address the issue of cell electrotactic heterogeneity, we also developed a cell isolation device integrating cell immobilization structure, stable EF generator and cell retrieval module in one microfluidic chip to sort out different cell subpopulations based on electrotactic ability. High electrotactic and low electrotactic cells were harvested separately for colony formation assay and transcriptional analysis of migration-related genes. The results showed that H1975 cell motility was related to EGFR expression in the absence of EF stimulation, while in the presence of EF it was associated with PTEN expression. Up-regulation of RhoA was observed in cells with high motility, regardless of EF. The easy cell manipulation and precise field control of the microfluidic devices may enable further study of tumor heterogeneity in complex electrotactic environments.

  6. Fabrication of microfluidic system for the assessment of cell migration on 3D micropatterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Joong; Hwang, Chang-Mo; Baek, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2009-01-01

    Cell migration and proliferation are major process in wound healing, cancer metastasis and organogenesis during development. Many cells are related to recovery process of wound. Especially, fibroblasts act an important role in wound healing. Various cytokines such as platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) can induce fibroblast migration and widely studied to investigate the cell response under controlled cytokine microenvironments during wound healing. In real tissue healing process, cell microenvironments change with tissue types and anatomical characteristics of organs. With microfluidic system, we tried to mimic the natural microenvironment of wound healing, with gradient of PDGF, a fibroblast migration inducing cytokine, and patterned substrate with different orientation to PDGF gradient. Fibroblasts cultured in PDGF gradient micro fluidic chip showed cell migration under various micro environmental gradient conditions. Cells were cultured under PDGF gradient condition and different substrate pattern. Mouse fibroblast L929 cells were cultured in the microfluidic gradient. The results showed that most cells migrated along the substrate topological patterns under high concentration of PDGF. We developed long range sustaining micro fluidic channel and could analyze cell migration along the gradient of PDGF. Also, the cell migration on patterned extracellular environment shows that cells migrate along the extracellular 3D pattern rather than directly along the cytokine gradient when the pattern height is less than 1 microm. In this study, we could demonstrate that the extracellular pattern is more dominant to cell migration in combination with cytokine gradient in the wounded tissue when the environmental cues are 20 microm.

  7. Quantification of Multicellular Organization, Junction Integrity, and Substrate Features in Collective Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Canver, Adam C; Morss Clyne, Alisa

    2017-02-01

    Quantitative analysis of multicellular organization, cell-cell junction integrity, and substrate properties is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying collective cell migration. However, spatially and temporally defining these properties is difficult within collectively migrating cell groups due to challenges in accurate cell segmentation within the monolayer. In this paper, we present Matlab®-based algorithms to spatially quantify multicellular organization (migration distance, interface roughness, and cell alignment, area, and morphology), cell-cell junction integrity, and substrate features in confocal microscopy images of two-dimensional collectively migrating endothelial monolayers. We used novel techniques, including measuring the migrating front roughness using a parametric curve formulation, automatically binning cells to obtain data as a function of distance from the migrating front, using iterative morphological closings to fully define cell boundaries, quantifying β-catenin localization as a measure of cell-cell junction integrity, and skeletonizing fibronectin to determine fiber length and orientation. These algorithms are widely accessible, as they use common fluorescent markers and Matlab® functions, and provide high-throughput critical feature quantification within collectively migrating cell groups. These image analysis algorithms can help standardize feature quantification among different experimental techniques, cell types, and research groups studying collective cell migration.

  8. Relationship between neuronal migration and cell-substratum adhesion: laminin and merosin promote olfactory neuronal migration but are anti- adhesive

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Regulation by the extracellular matrix (ECM) of migration, motility, and adhesion of olfactory neurons and their precursors was studied in vitro. Neuronal cells of the embryonic olfactory epithelium (OE), which undergo extensive migration in the central nervous system during normal development, were shown to be highly migratory in culture as well. Migration of OE neuronal cells was strongly dependent on substratum- bound ECM molecules, being specifically stimulated and guided by laminin (or the laminin-related molecule merosin) in preference to fibronectin, type I collagen, or type IV collagen. Motility of OE neuronal cells, examined by time-lapse video microscopy, was high on laminin-containing substrata, but negligible on fibronectin substrata. Quantitative assays of adhesion of OE neuronal cells to substrata treated with different ECM molecules demonstrated no correlation, either positive or negative, between the migratory preferences of cells and the strength of cell-substratum adhesion. Moreover, measurements of cell adhesion to substrata containing combinations of ECM proteins revealed that laminin and merosin are anti-adhesive for OE neuronal cells, i.e., cause these cells to adhere poorly to substrata that would otherwise be strongly adhesive. The evidence suggests that the anti- adhesive effect of laminin is not the result of interactions between laminin and other ECM molecules, but rather an effect of laminin on cells, which alters the way in which cells adhere. Consistent with this view, laminin was found to interfere strongly with the formation of focal contacts by OE neuronal cells. PMID:1918163

  9. Putting the brakes on cancer cell migration: JAM-A restrains integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Naik, Ulhas P; Naik, Meghna U

    2008-01-01

    Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A) is a member of the Ig superfamily of membrane proteins expressed in platelets, leukocytes, endothelial cells and epithelial cells. We have previously shown that in endothelial cells, JAM-A regulates basic fibroblast growth factor, (FGF-2)-induced angiogenesis via augmenting endothelial cell migration. Recently, we have revealed that in breast cancer cells, downregulation of JAM-A enhances cancer cell migration and invasion. Further, ectopic expression of JAM-A in highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells attenuates cell migration, and downregulation of JAM-A in low-metastatic T47D cells enhance migration. Interestingly, JAM-A expression is greatly diminished as breast cancer disease progresses. The molecular mechanism of this function of JAM-A is beyond its well-characterized barrier function at the tight junction. Our results point out that JAM-A differentially regulates migration of endothelial and cancer cells.

  10. Dynamic filopodia are required for chemokine-dependent intracellular polarization during guided cell migration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Meyen, Dana; Tarbashevich, Katsiaryna; Banisch, Torsten U; Wittwer, Carolina; Reichman-Fried, Michal; Maugis, Benoît; Grimaldi, Cecilia; Messerschmidt, Esther-Maria; Raz, Erez

    2015-04-15

    Cell migration and polarization is controlled by signals in the environment. Migrating cells typically form filopodia that extend from the cell surface, but the precise function of these structures in cell polarization and guided migration is poorly understood. Using the in vivo model of zebrafish primordial germ cells for studying chemokine-directed single cell migration, we show that filopodia distribution and their dynamics are dictated by the gradient of the chemokine Cxcl12a. By specifically interfering with filopodia formation, we demonstrate for the first time that these protrusions play an important role in cell polarization by Cxcl12a, as manifested by elevation of intracellular pH and Rac1 activity at the cell front. The establishment of this polarity is at the basis of effective cell migration towards the target. Together, we show that filopodia allow the interpretation of the chemotactic gradient in vivo by directing single-cell polarization in response to the guidance cue.

  11. Advances in wound-healing assays for probing collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Reza; Yang, Yongliang; Zhang, Donna D; Wong, Pak Kin

    2012-02-01

    Collective cell migration plays essential roles in a wide spectrum of biological processes, such as embryogenesis, tissue regeneration, and cancer metastasis. Numerous wound-healing assays based on mechanical, chemical, optical, and electrical approaches have been developed to create model "wounds" in cell monolayers to study the collective cell migration processes. These approaches can result in different microenvironments for cells to migrate and possess diverse assay characteristics in terms of simplicity, throughput, reproducibility, and multiplexability. In this review, we provide an overview of advances in wound-healing assays and discuss their advantages and limitations in studying collective cell migration.

  12. Vitreous-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements via the Rac1 GTPase-dependent signaling pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xionggao; Wei, Yantao; Ma, Haizhi; Zhang, Shaochong

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vitreous induces morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac1 is activated in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition prevents morphological changes in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition suppresses cytoskeletal rearrangements in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The vitreous-induced effects are mediated by a Rac1 GTPase/LIMK1/cofilin pathway. -- Abstract: Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is mainly caused by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration, invasion, proliferation and transformation into fibroblast-like cells that produce the extracellular matrix (ECM). The vitreous humor is known to play an important role in PVR. An epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) of human RPE cells induced by 25% vitreous treatment has been linked to stimulation of the mesenchymal phenotype, migration and invasion. Here, we characterized the effects of the vitreous on the cell morphology and cytoskeleton in human RPE cells. The signaling pathway that mediates these effects was investigated. Serum-starved RPE cells were incubated with 25% vitreous, and the morphological changes were examined by phase-contrast microscopy. Filamentous actin (F-actin) was examined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Protein phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, Smad2/3, LIM kinase (LIMK) 1 and cofilin was analyzed by Western blot analysis. Vitreous treatment induced cytoskeletal rearrangements, activated Rac1 and enhanced the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and Smad2/3. When the cells were treated with a Rac activation-specific inhibitor, the cytoskeletal rearrangements were prevented, and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 was blocked. Vitreous treatment also enhanced the phosphorylation of LIMK1 and cofilin and the Rac inhibitor blocked this effect. We propose that vitreous

  13. Identification of Key Residues Determining Isomerohydrolase Activity of Human RPE65*

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Ma, Jian-xing

    2014-01-01

    RPE65 is the retinoid isomerohydrolase that converts all-trans-retinyl ester to 11-cis-retinol, a key reaction in the retinoid visual cycle. We have previously reported that cone-dominant chicken RPE65 (cRPE65) shares 90% sequence identity with human RPE65 (hRPE65) but exhibits substantially higher isomerohydrolase activity than that of bovine RPE65 or hRPE65. In this study, we sought to identify key residues responsible for the higher enzymatic activity of cRPE65. Based on the amino acid sequence comparison of mammalian and other lower vertebrates' RPE65, including cone-dominant chicken, 8 residues of hRPE65 were separately replaced by their counterparts of cRPE65 using site-directed mutagenesis. The enzymatic activities of cRPE65, hRPE65, and its mutants were measured by in vitro isomerohydrolase activity assay, and the retinoid products were analyzed by HPLC. Among the mutants analyzed, two single point mutants, N170K and K297G, and a double mutant, N170K/K297G, of hRPE65 exhibited significantly higher catalytic activity than WT hRPE65. Further, when an amino-terminal fragment (Met1–Arg33) of the N170K/K297G double mutant of hRPE65 was replaced with the corresponding cRPE65 fragment, the isomerohydrolase activity was further increased to a level similar to that of cRPE65. This finding contributes to the understanding of the structural basis for isomerohydrolase activity. This highly efficient human isomerohydrolase mutant can be used to improve the efficacy of RPE65 gene therapy for retinal degeneration caused by RPE65 mutations. PMID:25112876

  14. Guided migration of neural stem cells derived from human embryonic stem cells by an electric field.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun-Feng; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Xiu-Zhen; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Ji-Yao; Nolta, Jan; Zhao, Min

    2012-02-01

    Small direct current (DC) electric fields (EFs) guide neurite growth and migration of rodent neural stem cells (NSCs). However, this could be species dependent. Therefore, it is critical to investigate how human NSCs (hNSCs) respond to EF before any possible clinical attempt. Aiming to characterize the EF-stimulated and guided migration of hNSCs, we derived hNSCs from a well-established human embryonic stem cell line H9. Small applied DC EFs, as low as 16 mV/mm, induced significant directional migration toward the cathode. Reversal of the field polarity reversed migration of hNSCs. The galvanotactic/electrotactic response was both time and voltage dependent. The migration directedness and distance to the cathode increased with the increase of field strength. (Rho-kinase) inhibitor Y27632 is used to enhance viability of stem cells and has previously been reported to inhibit EF-guided directional migration in induced pluripotent stem cells and neurons. However, its presence did not significantly affect the directionality of hNSC migration in an EF. Cytokine receptor [C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)] is important for chemotaxis of NSCs in the brain. The blockage of CXCR4 did not affect the electrotaxis of hNSCs. We conclude that hNSCs respond to a small EF by directional migration. Applied EFs could potentially be further exploited to guide hNSCs to injured sites in the central nervous system to improve the outcome of various diseases.

  15. Polydatin induces bone marrow stromal cells migration by activation of ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Chen, ZhenQiu; Wei, QiuShi; Hong, GuoJu; Chen, Da; Liang, Jiang; He, Wei; Chen, Mei Hui

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have proven to be useful for the treatment of numerous human diseases. However, the reparative ability of BMSCs is limited by their poor migration. Polydatin, widely used in traditional Chinese remedies, has proven to exert protective effects to BMSCs. However, little is known about its role in BMSCs migration. In this study, we studied the effects of polydatin on rat BMSCs migration using the scratch wound healing and transwell migration assays. Our results showed polydatin could promote BMSCs migration. Further experiments showed activation of ERK 1/2, but not JNK, was required for polydatin-induced BMSCs migration, suggesting that polydatin may promote BMSCs migration via the ERK 1/2 signaling pathways. Taken together, our results indicate that polydatin might be beneficial for stem cell replacement therapy by improving BMSCs migration.

  16. Seeds of Locally Aligned Motion and Stress Coordinate a Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zaritsky, Assaf; Welf, Erik S.; Tseng, Yun-Yu; Angeles Rabadán, M.; Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Trepat, Xavier; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    We find how collective migration emerges from mechanical information transfer between cells. Local alignment of cell velocity and mechanical stress orientation—a phenomenon dubbed “plithotaxis”—plays a crucial role in inducing coordinated migration. Leader cells at the monolayer edge better align velocity and stress to migrate faster toward the open space. Local seeds of enhanced motion then generate stress on neighboring cells to guide their migration. Stress-induced motion propagates into the monolayer as well as along the monolayer boundary to generate increasingly larger clusters of coordinately migrating cells that move faster with enhanced alignment of velocity and stress. Together, our analysis provides a model of long-range mechanical communication between cells, in which plithotaxis translates local mechanical fluctuations into globally collective migration of entire tissues. PMID:26682808

  17. Spatial proteomic and phospho-proteomic organization in three prototypical cell migration modes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tight spatio-temporal signaling of cytoskeletal and adhesion dynamics is required for localized membrane protrusion that drives directed cell migration. Different ensembles of proteins are therefore likely to get recruited and phosphorylated in membrane protrusions in response to specific cues. Results Here, we use an assay that allows to biochemically purify extending protrusions of cells migrating in response to three prototypical receptors: integrins, recepor tyrosine kinases and G-coupled protein receptors. Using quantitative proteomics and phospho-proteomics approaches, we provide evidence for the existence of cue-specific, spatially distinct protein networks in the different cell migration modes. Conclusions The integrated analysis of the large-scale experimental data with protein information from databases allows us to understand some emergent properties of spatial regulation of signaling during cell migration. This provides the cell migration community with a large-scale view of the distribution of proteins and phospho-proteins regulating directed cell migration. PMID:24987309

  18. β-Catenin promotes cell proliferation, migration, and invasion but induces apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-ming; Ji, Shan; Li, Yan; Fu, Li-ye; Jiang, Tao; Meng, Fan-dong

    2017-01-01

    β-Catenin (CTNNB1 gene coding protein) is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway that has been shown to play an important role in the formation of certain cancers. Abnormal accumulation of CTNNB1 contributes to most cancers. This research studied the involvement of β-catenin in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis were analyzed by using Cell Counting Kit-8 and by flow cytometry. Migration and invasion assays were measured by transwell analysis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to detect the expression of CTNNB1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CXCR4, and CCL18 in RCC cell lines. It was found that CTNNB1 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and induced apoptosis of A-498 cells. CTNNB1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and inhibited apoptosis of 786-O cells. Moreover, knockdown of CTNNB1 decreased the levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CXCR4, and CCL18 expression, but CTNNB1 overexpression increased the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CXCR4, and CCL18. Further in vivo tumor formation study in nude mice indicated that inhibition of CTNNB1 delayed the progress of tumor formation through inhibiting PCNA and Ki67 expression. These results indicate that CTNNB1 could act as an oncogene and may serve as a promising therapeutic strategy for RCC. PMID:28260916

  19. Contact inhibition of locomotion probabilities drive solitary versus collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Ravi A.; Gopal, Smitha B.; Chen, Sophia; Chen, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) is the process whereby cells collide, cease migrating in the direction of the collision, and repolarize their migration machinery away from the collision. Quantitative analysis of CIL has remained elusive because cell-to-cell collisions are infrequent in traditional cell culture. Moreover, whereas CIL predicts mutual cell repulsion and ‘scattering’ of cells, the same cells in vivo are observed to undergo CIL at some developmental times and collective cell migration at others. It remains unclear whether CIL is simply absent during collective cell migration, or if the two processes coexist and are perhaps even related. Here, we used micropatterned stripes of extracellular matrix to restrict cell migration to linear paths such that cells polarized in one of two directions and collisions between cells occurred frequently and consistently, permitting quantitative and unbiased analysis of CIL. Observing repolarization events in different contexts, including head-to-head collision, head-to-tail collision, collision with an inert barrier, or no collision, and describing polarization as a two-state transition indicated that CIL occurs probabilistically, and most strongly upon head-to-head collisions. In addition to strong CIL, we also observed ‘trains’ of cells moving collectively with high persistence that appeared to emerge from single cells. To reconcile these seemingly conflicting observations of CIL and collective cell migration, we constructed an agent-based model to simulate our experiments. Our model quantitatively predicted the emergence of collective migration, and demonstrated the sensitivity of such emergence to the probability of CIL. Thus CIL and collective migration can coexist, and in fact a shift in CIL probabilities may underlie transitions between solitary cell migration and collective cell migration. Taken together, our data demonstrate the emergence of persistently polarized, collective cell movement

  20. Heterologous cells cooperate to augment stem cell migration, homing, and engraftment.

    PubMed

    Adams, Gregor B; Chabner, Karissa T; Foxall, Russell B; Weibrecht, Kathryn W; Rodrigues, Neil P; Dombkowski, David; Fallon, Robert; Poznansky, Mark C; Scadden, David T

    2003-01-01

    T-lymphocyte depletion of bone marrow grafts compromises engraftment, suggesting a facilitating mechanism provided by the T cells that has been shown to associate with CD8(+) but not CD4(+) T cells. Explanations for this phenomenon have focused on immune targeting of residual host cells or cytokine production. We provide evidence for an alternative mechanism based on cooperative effects on cell motility. We observed that engraftment of CD34(+) cells in a beta(2)-microglobulin-deficient nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (beta(2)m(-/-) NOD/SCID) mouse model paralleled clinical observations in humans, with an enhancing effect noted from the addition of CD8(+) cells but not CD4(+) cells. This correlated with CD8(+) augmentation of CD34(+) cell homing to the bone marrow in vivo and CD8(+) cell-associated increases of CD34(+) cell transmigration through a bone marrow endothelial cell line in vitro. The cooperative interaction was not sensitive to brefeldin A inhibition of protein secretion. However, cytochalasin D-induced inhibition of CD8(+) cytoskeletal rearrangements abrogated CD34(+) transendothelial migration and impaired CD34(+) cell homing in vivo. CD8(+) cells did not migrate in tandem with CD34(+) cells or alter endothelial barrier integrity; rather, they affected phosphotyrosine-mediated signaling in CD34(+) cells in response to the chemokine stromal derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha). These data demonstrate cell-cell cooperativity between different cell types in mediating chemotactic events and provide one potential explanation for the clinically observed effect of CD8(+) cells on bone marrow transplantation. This modification of cell migration by neighboring cells provides broad possibilities for combinatorial effects between cells of different types to influence cell localization.

  1. Overexpression of Selenoprotein SelK in BGC-823 Cells Inhibits Cell Adhesion and Migration.

    PubMed

    Ben, S B; Peng, B; Wang, G C; Li, C; Gu, H F; Jiang, H; Meng, X L; Lee, B J; Chen, C L

    2015-10-01

    Effects of human selenoprotein SelK on the adhesion and migration ability of human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells using Matrigel adhesion and transwell migration assays, respectively, were investigated in this study. The Matrigel adhesion ability of BGC-823 cells that overexpressed SelK declined extremely significantly (p < 0.01) compared with that of the cells not expressing the protein. The migration ability of BGC-823 cells that overexpressed SelK also declined extremely significantly (p < 0.01). On the other hand, the Matrigel adhesion ability and migration ability of the cells that overexpressed C-terminally truncated SelK did not decline significantly. The Matrigel adhesion ability and migration ability of human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells that overexpressed SelK did not show significant change (p > 0.05) with the cells that overexpressed the C-terminally truncated protein. In addition to the effect on Matrigel adhesion and migration, the overexpression of SelK also caused a loss in cell viability (as measured by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay) and induced apoptosis as shown by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The cytosolic free Ca2+ level of these cells was significantly increased as detected by flow cytometry. But the overexpression of SelK in HEK-293 cells caused neither significant loss in cell viability nor apoptosis induction. Only the elevation of cytosolic free Ca2+ level in these cells was significant. Taken together, the results suggest that the overexpression of SelK can inhibit human cancer cell Matrigel adhesion and migration and cause both the loss in cell viability and induction of apoptosis. The release of intracellular Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum might be a mechanism whereby the protein exerted its impact. Furthermore, only the full-length protein, but not C-terminally truncated form, was capable of producing such impact. The embryonic cells were not influenced by the

  2. Novel protein Callipygian defines the back of migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Swaney, Kristen F.; Borleis, Jane; Iglesias, Pablo A.; Devreotes, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric protein localization is essential for cell polarity and migration. We report a novel protein, Callipygian (CynA), which localizes to the lagging edge before other proteins and becomes more tightly restricted as cells polarize; additionally, it accumulates in the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. CynA protein that is tightly localized, or “clustered,” to the cell rear is immobile, but when polarity is disrupted, it disperses throughout the membrane and responds to uniform chemoattractant stimulation by transiently localizing to the cytosol. These behaviors require a pleckstrin homology-domain membrane tether and a WD40 clustering domain, which can also direct other membrane proteins to the back. Fragments of CynA lacking the pleckstrin homology domain, which are normally found in the cytosol, localize to the lagging edge membrane when coexpressed with full-length protein, showing that CynA clustering is mediated by oligomerization. Cells lacking CynA have aberrant lateral protrusions, altered leading-edge morphology, and decreased directional persistence, whereas those overexpressing the protein display exaggerated features of polarity. Consistently, actin polymerization is inhibited at sites of CynA accumulation, thereby restricting protrusions to the opposite edge. We suggest that the mutual antagonism between CynA and regions of responsiveness creates a positive feedback loop that restricts CynA to the rear and contributes to the establishment of the cell axis. PMID:26130809

  3. Three-dimensional traction force distribution in migrating amoeboid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Begona; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Meili, Rudolf; Alonso-Latorre, Baldomero; Firtel, Richard A.; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2011-03-01

    We have studied the 3D traction forces exerted by migrating Dictyostelium cells moving over flat elastic substrates. For that purpose, we have developed a method to calculate both vertical and tangential cell traction forces from measurements of 3D substrate deformation, based on the solution of the elastostatic equation for a linearly elastic medium. 3D substrate deformation is measured by applying correlation techniques to a volume of substrate containing fluorescent markers. We have performed experiments for wild-type (WT) and mutant cell lines with crosslinking defects to study how cytoskeletal organization affects the overall distribution of traction forces. We find that cells push the substrate downwards near their center and pull upwards at their periphery with forces of comparable magnitude. Our initial findings show that the effect of the crosslinking mutations on the tangential forces do not necessarily predict the effect on the vertical forces. For instance, myosin II-null cells show a significant reduction of the front-back organization of the tangential traction forces, while the distribution of vertical forces basically remains unaffected.

  4. A Macroscopic Mathematical Model for Cell Migration Assays Using a Real-Time Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Claudia; Carfora, Maria Francesca; Carriero, Maria Vincenza; Natalini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Experiments of cell migration and chemotaxis assays have been classically performed in the so-called Boyden Chambers. A recent technology, xCELLigence Real Time Cell Analysis, is now allowing to monitor the cell migration in real time. This technology measures impedance changes caused by the gradual increase of electrode surface occupation by cells during the course of time and provide a Cell Index which is proportional to cellular morphology, spreading, ruffling and adhesion quality as well as cell number. In this paper we propose a macroscopic mathematical model, based on advection-reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, describing the cell migration assay using the real-time technology. We carried out numerical simulations to compare simulated model dynamics with data of observed biological experiments on three different cell lines and in two experimental settings: absence of chemotactic signals (basal migration) and presence of a chemoattractant. Overall we conclude that our minimal mathematical model is able to describe the phenomenon in the real time scale and numerical results show a good agreement with the experimental evidences. PMID:27680883

  5. A Macroscopic Mathematical Model for Cell Migration Assays Using a Real-Time Cell Analysis.

    PubMed

    Di Costanzo, Ezio; Ingangi, Vincenzo; Angelini, Claudia; Carfora, Maria Francesca; Carriero, Maria Vincenza; Natalini, Roberto

    Experiments of cell migration and chemotaxis assays have been classically performed in the so-called Boyden Chambers. A recent technology, xCELLigence Real Time Cell Analysis, is now allowing to monitor the cell migration in real time. This technology measures impedance changes caused by the gradual increase of electrode surface occupation by cells during the course of time and provide a Cell Index which is proportional to cellular morphology, spreading, ruffling and adhesion quality as well as cell number. In this paper we propose a macroscopic mathematical model, based on advection-reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, describing the cell migration assay using the real-time technology. We carried out numerical simulations to compare simulated model dynamics with data of observed biological experiments on three different cell lines and in two experimental settings: absence of chemotactic signals (basal migration) and presence of a chemoattractant. Overall we conclude that our minimal mathematical model is able to describe the phenomenon in the real time scale and numerical results show a good agreement with the experimental evidences.

  6. Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Promotes the Migration of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells Through TRPC Channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Teng, Hong-Lin; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Fan; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Huang, Zhi-Hui

    2016-12-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a unique type of glial cells with axonal growth-promoting properties in the olfactory system. Organized migration of OECs is essential for neural regeneration and olfactory development. However, the molecular mechanism of OEC migration remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on OEC migration. Initially, the "scratch" migration assay, the inverted coverslip and Boyden chamber migration assays showed that BDNF could promote the migration of primary cultured OECs. Furthermore, BDNF gradient attracted the migration of OECs in single-cell migration assays. Mechanistically, TrkB receptor expressed in OECs mediated BDNF-induced OEC migration, and BDNF triggered calcium signals in OECs. Finally, transient receptor potential cation channels (TRPCs) highly expressed in OECs were responsible for BDNF-induced calcium signals, and required for BDNF-induced OEC migration. Taken together, these results demonstrate that BDNF promotes the migration of cultured OECs and an unexpected finding is that TRPCs are required for BDNF-induced OEC migration. GLIA 2016;64:2154-2165.

  7. Gene Therapy Rescues Cone Structure and Function in the 3-Month-Old rd12 Mouse: A Model for Midcourse RPE65 Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Li, Wensheng; Dai, Xufeng; Kong, Fansheng; Zheng, Qinxiang; Zhou, Xiangtian; Lü, Fan; Chang, Bo; Rohrer, Bärbel; Hauswirth, William. W.; Qu, Jia; Pang, Ji-jing

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. RPE65 function is necessary in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) to generate chromophore for all opsins. Its absence results in vision loss and rapid cone degeneration. Recent Leber congenital amaurosis type 2 (LCA with RPE65 mutations) phase I clinical trials demonstrated restoration of vision on RPE65 gene transfer into RPE cells overlying cones. In the rd12 mouse, a naturally occurring model of RPE65-LCA early cone degeneration was observed; however, some peripheral M-cones remained. A prior study showed that AAV-mediated RPE65 expression can prevent early cone degeneration. The present study was conducted to test whether the remaining cones in older rd12 mice can be rescued. Methods. Subretinal treatment with the scAAV5-smCBA-hRPE65 vector was initiated at postnatal day (P)14 and P90. After 2 months, electroretinograms were recorded, and cone morphology was analyzed by using cone-specific peanut agglutinin and cone opsin–specific antibodies. Results. Cone degeneration started centrally and spread ventrally, with cells losing cone-opsin staining before that for the PNA-lectin–positive cone sheath. Gene therapy starting at P14 resulted in almost wild-type M- and S-cone function and morphology. Delaying gene-replacement rescued the remaining M-cones, and most important, more M-cone opsin–positive cells were identified than were present at the onset of gene therapy, suggesting that opsin expression could be reinitiated in cells with cone sheaths. Conclusions. The results support and extend those of the previous study that gene therapy can stop early cone degeneration, and, more important, they provide proof that delayed treatment can restore the function and morphology of the remaining cones. These results have important implications for the ongoing LCA2 clinical trials. PMID:21169527

  8. Y-27632 Increases Sensitivity of PANC-1 Cells to EGCG in Regulating Cell Proliferation and Migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Bi, Yongyi

    2016-10-03

    BACKGROUND The study aimed to investigate the inhibitory effect of (1R,4r)-4-((R)-1-aminoethyl)-N-(pyridin-4-yl) cyclohexanecarboxamide (Y-27632) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the proliferation and migration of PANC-1 cells. EGCG, found in green tea, has been previously shown to be one of the most abundant and powerful catechins in cancer prevention and treatment. Y-27632, a selective inhibitor of rho-associated protein kinase 1, is widely used in treating cardiovascular disease, inflammation, and cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS PANC-1 cells, maintained in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium, were treated with dimethyl sulfoxide (control) as well as different concentrations (20, 40, 60, and 80 μg/mL) of EGCG for 48 h. In addition, PANC-1 cells were treated separately with 60 μg/mL EGCG, 20 μM Y-27632, and EGCG combined with Y-27632 (60 μg/mL EGCG + 20 μM Y-27632) for 48 h. The effect of EGCG and Y-27632 on the proliferation and migration of PANC-1 cells was evaluated using Cell Counting Kit-8 and transwell migration assays. The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and Caspase-3 mRNA was determined by Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). RESULTS EGCG (20-80 μg/mL) inhibited cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Y-27632 enhanced the sensitivity of PANC-1 cells to EGCG (by increasing the expression of PPARa and Caspase-3 mRNA) and suppressed cell proliferation. PANC-1 cell migration was inhibited by treatment with a combination of EGCG and Y-27632. CONCLUSIONS Y-27632 increases the sensitivity of PANC-1 cells to EGCG in regulating cell proliferation and migration, which is likely to be related to the expression of PPARa mRNA and Caspase-3 mRNA.

  9. Lumican induces human corneal epithelial cell migration and integrin expression via ERK 1/2 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Seomun, Young; Joo, Choun-Ki

    2008-07-18

    Lumican is a major proteoglycans of the human cornea. Lumican knock-out mice have been shown to lose corneal transparency and to display delayed wound healing. The purpose of this study was to define the role of lumican in corneal epithelial cell migration. Over-expression of lumican in human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells increased both cell migration and proliferation, and increased levels of integrins {alpha}2 and {beta}1. ERK 1/2 was also activated in lumican over-expressed cells. When we treated HCE-T cells with the ERK-specific inhibitor U0126, cell migration and the expression of integrin {beta}1 were completely blocked. These data provide evidence that lumican stimulates cell migration in the corneal epithelium by activating ERK 1/2, and point to a novel signaling pathway implicated in corneal epithelial cell migration.

  10. Analysis of cell migration within a three-dimensional collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Rommerswinkel, Nadine; Niggemann, Bernd; Keil, Silvia; Zänker, Kurt S; Dittmar, Thomas

    2014-10-05

    The ability to migrate is a hallmark of various cell types and plays a crucial role in several physiological processes, including embryonic development, wound healing, and immune responses. However, cell migration is also a key mechanism in cancer enabling these cancer cells to detach from the primary tumor to start metastatic spreading. Within the past years various cell migration assays have been developed to analyze the migratory behavior of different cell types. Because the locomotory behavior of cells markedly differs between a two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) environment it can be assumed that the analysis of the migration of cells that are embedded within a 3D environment would yield in more significant cell migration data. The advantage of the described 3D collagen matrix migration assay is that cells are embedded within a physiological 3D network of collagen fibers representing the major component of the extracellular matrix. Due to time-lapse video microscopy real cell migration is measured allowing the determination of several migration parameters as well as their alterations in response to pro-migratory factors or inhibitors. Various cell types could be analyzed using this technique, including lymphocytes/leukocytes, stem cells, and tumor cells. Likewise, also cell clusters or spheroids could be embedded within the collagen matrix concomitant with analysis of the emigration of single cells from the cell cluster/ spheroid into the collagen lattice. We conclude that the 3D collagen matrix migration assay is a versatile method to analyze the migration of cells within a physiological-like 3D environment.

  11. Endothelial Cell Morphology and Migration are Altered by Changes in Gravitational Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melhado, Caroline; Sanford, Gary; Harris-Hooker, Sandra

    1997-01-01

    Endothelial cell migration is important to vascular wall regeneration following injury or stress. However, the mechanism(s) governing this response is not well understood. The microgravity environment of space may complicate the response of these cells to injury. To date, there are no reports in this area. We examined how bovine aortic (BAEC) and pulmonary (BPEC) endothelial cells respond to denudation injury under hypergravity (HGrav) and simulated microgravity (MGrav), using image analysis. In 10% FBS, the migration of confluent BAEC and BPEC into the denuded area was not affected by HGrav or MGrav. However, in low FBS (0.5%), signficantly retarded migration under MGrav, and increased migration under HGrav was found. MGrav also decreased the migration of postconfluent BPEC while HGrav showed no difference. Both MGrav and HGrav strongly decreased the migration of postconfluent BAEC. Also, both cell lines showed significant morphological changes by scanning electron microscopy. These studies indicate that endothelial cell function is affected by changes in gravity.

  12. Crossing barriers: the new dimension of 2D cell migration assays.

    PubMed

    Van Horssen, Remco; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2011-01-01

    In our body cells move in three dimensions, embedded in an extracellular matrix that varies in composition, density and stiffness, and this movement is fundamental to life. Next to 3D cell migration assays, representing these physiological circumstances, still we need 2D migrations assays to perform detailed studies on the contribution of matrix-components and (extra)cellular proteins to cell movements. Next to the debate on differences between 3D and 2D migration, there also are many new perspectives on the use and development of novel or modified 2D cell migration assays. Of special significance is the introduction of so-called barrier migration assays, methods that avoid cell and matrix damage, as complementation or replacement of scratch/wound healing assays. Here, we discuss the possibilities and limitations of different 2D barrier migration assays.

  13. Inhibition of FAAH confers increased stem cell migration via PPARα.

    PubMed

    Wollank, Yvonne; Ramer, Robert; Ivanov, Igor; Salamon, Achim; Peters, Kirsten; Hinz, Burkhard

    2015-10-01

    Regenerative activity in tissues of mesenchymal origin depends on the migratory potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The present study focused on inhibitors of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which catalyzes the degradation of endocannabinoids (anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol) and endocannabinoid-like substances (N-oleoylethanolamine, N-palmitoylethanolamine). Boyden chamber assays, the FAAH inhibitors, URB597 and arachidonoyl serotonin (AA-5HT), were found to increase the migration of human adipose-derived MSCs. LC-MS analyses revealed increased levels of all four aforementioned FAAH substrates in MSCs incubated with either FAAH inhibitor. Following addition to MSCs, all FAAH substrates mimicked the promigratory action of FAAH inhibitors. Promigratory effects of FAAH inhibitors and substrates were causally linked to activation of p42/44 MAPKs, as well as to cytosol-to-nucleus translocation of the transcription factor, PPARα. Whereas PPARα activation by FAAH inhibitors and substrates became reversed upon inhibition of p42/44 MAPK activation, a blockade of PPARα left p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation unaltered. Collectively, these data demonstrate FAAH inhibitors and substrates to cause p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, which subsequently activates PPARα to confer increased migration of MSCs. This novel pathway may be involved in regenerative effects of endocannabinoids whose degradation could be a target of pharmacological intervention by FAAH inhibitors.

  14. Inhibition of FAAH confers increased stem cell migration via PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Wollank, Yvonne; Ramer, Robert; Ivanov, Igor; Salamon, Achim; Peters, Kirsten; Hinz, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative activity in tissues of mesenchymal origin depends on the migratory potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The present study focused on inhibitors of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which catalyzes the degradation of endocannabinoids (anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol) and endocannabinoid-like substances (N-oleoylethanolamine, N-palmitoylethanolamine). Boyden chamber assays, the FAAH inhibitors, URB597 and arachidonoyl serotonin (AA-5HT), were found to increase the migration of human adipose-derived MSCs. LC-MS analyses revealed increased levels of all four aforementioned FAAH substrates in MSCs incubated with either FAAH inhibitor. Following addition to MSCs, all FAAH substrates mimicked the promigratory action of FAAH inhibitors. Promigratory effects of FAAH inhibitors and substrates were causally linked to activation of p42/44 MAPKs, as well as to cytosol-to-nucleus translocation of the transcription factor, PPARα. Whereas PPARα activation by FAAH inhibitors and substrates became reversed upon inhibition of p42/44 MAPK activation, a blockade of PPARα left p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation unaltered. Collectively, these data demonstrate FAAH inhibitors and substrates to cause p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, which subsequently activates PPARα to confer increased migration of MSCs. This novel pathway may be involved in regenerative effects of endocannabinoids whose degradation could be a target of pharmacological intervention by FAAH inhibitors. PMID:26263913

  15. Loss of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-3 enhances cell migration in rat lung tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Mai; Okabe, Kyoko; Yamawaki, Yasuna; Teranishi, Miki; Honoki, Kanya; Mori, Toshio; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Loss of the Lpar3 expression due to aberrant DNA methylation occurred in rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 inhibited cell migration of rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 may act as a negative regulator of rat lung tumor cells. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) indicates several biological effects, such as cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. LPA interacts with G protein-coupled transmembrane LPA receptors. In our previous report, we detected that loss of the LPA receptor-1 (Lpar1) expression is due to its aberrant DNA methylation in rat tumor cell lines. In this study, to assess an involvement of the other LPA receptor, Lpar3, in the pathogenesis of rat lung tumor cells, we measured the expression levels of the Lpar3 gene and its DNA methylation status by reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and bisulfite sequencing analyses, respectively. RLCNR lung adenocarcinoma cells showed reduced expression of the Lpar3, compared with normal lung tissues. In the 5' upstream region of the Lpar3, normal lung tissues were unmethylated. By contrast, RLCNR cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expressions of the Lpar3. Based on these results, we generated the Lpar3-expressing RLCNR-a3 cells and measured the cell migration ability. Interestingly, the cell migration of RLCNR-a3 cells was significantly lower than that of RLCNR cells. This study suggests that loss of the Lpar3 due to aberrant DNA methylation may be involved in the progression of rat lung tumor cells.

  16. Fast-crawling cell types migrate to avoid the direction of periodic substratum stretching.

    PubMed

    Okimura, Chika; Ueda, Kazuki; Sakumura, Yuichi; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2016-07-03

    To investigate the relationship between mechanical stimuli from substrata and related cell functions, one of the most useful techniques is the application of mechanical stimuli via periodic stretching of elastic substrata. In response to this stimulus, Dictyostelium discoideum cells migrate in a direction perpendicular to the stretching direction. The origins of directional migration, higher migration velocity in the direction perpendicular to the stretching direction or the higher probability of a switch of migration direction to perpendicular to the stretching direction, however, remain unknown. In this study, we applied periodic stretching stimuli to neutrophil-like differentiated HL-60 cells, which migrate perpendicular to the direction of stretch. Detailed analysis of the trajectories of HL-60 cells and Dictyostelium cells obtained in a previous study revealed that the higher probability of a switch of migration direction to that perpendicular to the direction of stretching was the main cause of such directional migration. This directional migration appears to be a strategy adopted by fast-crawling cells in which they do not migrate faster in the direction they want to go, but migrate to avoid a direction they do not want to go.

  17. Cadherin-2 Is Required Cell Autonomously for Collective Migration of Facial Branchiomotor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rebman, Jane K.; Kirchoff, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Collective migration depends on cell-cell interactions between neighbors that contribute to their overall directionality, yet the mechanisms that control the coordinated migration of neurons remains to be elucidated. During hindbrain development, facial branchiomotor neurons (FBMNs) undergo a stereotypic tangential caudal migration from their place of birth in rhombomere (r)4 to their final location in r6/7. FBMNs engage in collective cell migration that depends on neuron-to-neuron interactions to facilitate caudal directionality. Here, we demonstrate that Cadherin-2-mediated neuron-to-neuron adhesion is necessary for directional and collective migration of FBMNs. We generated stable transgenic zebrafish expressing dominant-negative Cadherin-2 (Cdh2ΔEC) driven by the islet1 promoter. Cell-autonomous inactivation of Cadherin-2 function led to non-directional migration of FBMNs and a defect in caudal tangential migration. Additionally, mosaic analysis revealed that Cdh2ΔEC-expressing FBMNs are not influenced to migrate caudally by neighboring wild-type FBMNs due to a defect in collective cell migration. Taken together, our data suggest that Cadherin-2 plays an essential cell-autonomous role in mediating the collective migration of FBMNs. PMID:27716840

  18. Integrin-mediated cell migration is blocked by inhibitors of human neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Jia, Feng; Howlader, Md Amran; Cairo, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Integrins are critical receptors in cell migration and adhesion. A number of mechanisms are known to regulate the function of integrins, including phosphorylation, conformational change, and cytoskeletal anchoring. We investigated whether native neuraminidase (Neu, or sialidase) enzymes which modify glycolipids could play a role in regulating integrin-mediated cell migration. Using a scratch assay, we found that exogenously added Neu3 and Neu4 activity altered rates of cell migration. We observed that Neu4 increased the rate of migration in two cell lines (HeLa, A549); while Neu3 only increased migration in HeLa cells. A bacterial neuraminidase was able to increase the rate of migration in HeLa, but not in A549 cells. Treatment of cells with complex gangliosides (GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) resulted in decreased cell migration rates, while LacCer was able to increase rates of migration in both lines. Importantly, our results show that treatment of cells with inhibitors of native Neu enzymes had a dramatic effect on the rates of cell migration. The most potent compound tested targeted the human Neu4 isoenzyme, and was able to substantially reduce the rate of cell migration. We found that the lateral mobility of integrins was reduced by treatment of cells with Neu3, suggesting that Neu3 enzyme activity resulted in changes to integrin-co-receptor or integrin-cytoskeleton interactions. Finally, our results support the hypothesis that inhibitors of human Neu can be used to investigate mechanisms of cell migration and for the development of anti-adhesive therapies.

  19. Manipulation of neutrophil-like HL-60 cells for the study of directed cell migration.

    PubMed

    Millius, Arthur; Weiner, Orion D

    2010-01-01

    Many cells undergo directed cell migration in response to external cues in a process known as chemotaxis. This ability is essential for many single-celled organisms to hunt and mate, the development of multicellular organisms, and the functioning of the immune system. Because of their relative ease of manipulation and their robust chemotactic abilities, the neutrophil-like cell line (HL-60) has been a powerful system to analyze directed cell migration. In this chapter, we describe the maintenance and transient transfection of HL-60 cells and explain how to analyze their behavior with two standard chemotactic assays (micropipette and EZ-TAXIS). Finally, we demonstrate how to fix and stain the actin cytoskeleton of polarized cells for fluorescent microscopy imaging.

  20. Temsirolimus Inhibits Proliferation and Migration in Retinal Pigment Epithelial and Endothelial Cells via mTOR Inhibition and Decreases VEGF and PDGF Expression

    PubMed Central

    Siedlecki, Jakob; Haritoglou, Christos; Kampik, Anselm; Kernt, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Due to their high prevalence, retinal vascular diseases including age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vein occlusions (RVO), diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema have been major therapeutic targets over the last years. The pathogenesis of these diseases is complex and yet not fully understood. However, increased proliferation, migration and angiogenesis are characteristic cellular features in almost every retinal vascular disease. The introduction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) binding intravitreal treatment strategies has led to great advances in the therapy of these diseases. While the predominant part of affected patients benefits from the specific binding of VEGF by administering an anti-VEGF antibody into the vitreous cavity, a small number of non-responders exist and alternative or additional therapeutic strategies should therefore be evaluated. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central signaling pathway that eventually triggers up-regulation of cellular proliferation, migration and survival and has been identified to play a key role in angiogenesis. In the present study we were able to show that both retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells as wells as human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) are inhibited in proliferating and migrating after treatment with temsirolimus in non-toxic concentrations. Previous studies suggest that the production of VEGF, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and other important cytokines is not only triggered by hypoxia but also by mTOR itself. Our results indicate that temsirolimus decreases VEGF and PDGF expression on RNA and protein levels significantly. We therefore believe that the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus might be a promising drug in the future and it seems worthwhile to evaluate complementary therapeutic effects with anti-VEGF drugs for patients not profiting from mono anti-VEGF therapy alone. PMID:24586308

  1. Selective Impairment of a Subset of Ran-GTP-binding Domains of Ran-binding Protein 2 (Ranbp2) Suffices to Recapitulate the Degeneration of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) Triggered by Ranbp2 Ablation*

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Hemangi; Saha, Arjun; Senda, Eugene; Cho, Kyoung-in; Haque, MdEmdadul; Yu, Minzhong; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Hao, Ying; Peachey, Neal S.; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration underpins diseases triggered by disparate genetic lesions, noxious insults, or both. The pleiotropic Ranbp2 controls the expression of intrinsic and extrinsic pathological stressors impinging on cellular viability. However, the physiological targets and mechanisms controlled by Ranbp2 in tissue homeostasis, such as RPE, are ill defined. We show that mice, RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−, with selective Ranbp2 ablation in RPE develop pigmentary changes, syncytia, hypoplasia, age-dependent centrifugal and non-apoptotic degeneration of the RPE, and secondary leakage of choriocapillaris. These manifestations are accompanied by the development of F-actin clouds, metalloproteinase-11 activation, deregulation of expression or subcellular localization of critical RPE proteins, atrophic cell extrusions into the subretinal space, and compensatory proliferation of peripheral RPE. To gain mechanistic insights into what Ranbp2 activities are vital to the RPE, we performed genetic complementation analyses of transgenic lines of bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 harboring loss of function of selective Ranbp2 domains expressed in a Ranbp2−/− background. Among the transgenic lines produced, only TgRBD2/3*-HA::RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−-expressing mutations, which selectively impair binding of RBD2/3 (Ran-binding domains 2 and 3) of Ranbp2 to Ran-GTP, recapitulate RPE degeneration, as observed with RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−. By contrast, TgRBD2/3*-HA expression rescues the degeneration of cone photoreceptors lacking Ranbp2. The RPE of RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/− and TgRBD2/3*-HA::RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/− share proteostatic deregulation of Ran GTPase, serotransferrin, and γ-tubulin and suppression of light-evoked electrophysiological responses. These studies unravel selective roles of Ranbp2 and its RBD2 and RBD3 in RPE survival and functions. We posit that the control of Ran GTPase by Ranbp2 emerges as a novel therapeutic target in diseases

  2. ERP44 inhibits human lung cancer cell migration mainly via IP3R2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xue; Jin, Meng; Chen, Ying-Xiao; Wang, Jun; Zhai, Kui; Chang, Yan; Yuan, Qi; Yao, Kai-Tai; Ji, Guangju

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cell migration is involved in tumour metastasis. However, the relationship between calcium signalling and cancer migration is not well elucidated. In this study, we used the human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell line to examine the role of endoplasmic reticulum protein 44 (ERP44), which has been reported to regulate calcium release inside of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), in cell migration. We found that the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs/ITPRs) inhibitor 2-APB significantly inhibited A549 cell migration by inhibiting cell polarization and pseudopodium protrusion, which suggests that Ca2+ is necessary for A549 cell migration. Similarly, the overexpression of ERP44 reduced intracellular Ca2+ release via IP3Rs, altered cell morphology and significantly inhibited the migration of A549 cells. These phenomena were primarily dependent on IP3R2 because wound healing in A549 cells with IP3R2 rather than IP3R1 or IP3R3 siRNA was markedly inhibited. Moreover, the overexpression of ERP44 did not affect the migration of the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y, which mainly expresses IP3R1. Based on the above observations, we conclude that ERP44 regulates A549 cell migration mainly via an IP3R2-dependent pathway.

  3. Computational modelling of cell chain migration reveals mechanisms that sustain follow-the-leader behaviour.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Michelle L; Kulesa, Paul M; Schnell, Santiago

    2012-07-07

    Follow-the-leader chain migration is a striking cell migratory behaviour observed during vertebrate development, adult neurogenesis and cancer metastasis. Although cell-cell contact and extracellular matrix (ECM) cues have been proposed to promote this phenomenon, mechanisms that underlie chain migration persistence remain unclear. Here, we developed a quantitative agent-based modelling framework to test mechanistic hypotheses of chain migration persistence. We defined chain migration and its persistence based on evidence from the highly migratory neural crest model system, where cells within a chain extend and retract filopodia in short-lived cell contacts and move together as a collective. In our agent-based simulations, we began with a set of agents arranged as a chain and systematically probed the influence of model parameters to identify factors critical to the maintenance of the chain migration pattern. We discovered that chain migration persistence requires a high degree of directional bias in both lead and follower cells towards the target. Chain migration persistence was also promoted when lead cells maintained cell contact with followers, but not vice-versa. Finally, providing a path of least resistance in the ECM was not sufficient alone to drive chain persistence. Our results indicate that chain migration persistence depends on the interplay of directional cell movement and biased cell-cell contact.

  4. ERP44 inhibits human lung cancer cell migration mainly via IP3R2

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Kui; Chang, Yan; Yuan, Qi; Yao, Kai-Tai; Ji, Guangju

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell migration is involved in tumour metastasis. However, the relationship between calcium signalling and cancer migration is not well elucidated. In this study, we used the human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell line to examine the role of endoplasmic reticulum protein 44 (ERP44), which has been reported to regulate calcium release inside of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), in cell migration. We found that the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs/ITPRs) inhibitor 2-APB significantly inhibited A549 cell migration by inhibiting cell polarization and pseudopodium protrusion, which suggests that Ca2+ is necessary for A549 cell migration. Similarly, the overexpression of ERP44 reduced intracellular Ca2+ release via IP3Rs, altered cell morphology and significantly inhibited the migration of A549 cells. These phenomena were primarily dependent on IP3R2 because wound healing in A549 cells with IP3R2 rather than IP3R1 or IP3R3 siRNA was markedly inhibited. Moreover, the overexpression of ERP44 did not affect the migration of the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y, which mainly expresses IP3R1. Based on the above observations, we conclude that ERP44 regulates A549 cell migration mainly via an IP3R2-dependent pathway. PMID:27347718

  5. Soft Micro-Channels for Cell Culturing and Migration Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasirazgaleh, Sara

    Various techniques and methods have been studied and developed to aid nerve regeneration and repairing nerve injuries. Among all, nerve grafting is the gold standard for bridging the gap between the injured nerve stumps. Despite the advantages of this technique, there are also various drawbacks that have encouraged the exploration of alternative, less invasive methods for promoting nerve regeneration. In this thesis, we have fabricated soft micro-channels for cell culturing and migration studies which could act as an interface capable of long-term, reliable, and high-resolution stimulation device for nerve regeneration. Micro-channels fabrication is performed using a combination of photolithography technique and physical vapor deposition (PVD) methods. Initially, the surfaces of the micro-channels are treated with oxygen plasma to convert the surface of PDMS from hydrophobic to hydrophilic and to further provide an optimal environment for cells to adhere and grow. Next, in vitro studies were performed on the fabricated micro-channels to demonstrate feasibility of the platform to promote adherence and growth of PC12 cells (cell line derived from a pheochromocytomas of the rat adrenal medulla).

  6. Membrane-Binding and Enzymatic Properties of RPE65

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Philip D.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Regeneration of visual pigments is essential for sustained visual function. Although the requirement for non-photochemical regeneration of the visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, was recognized early on, it was only recently that the trans to cis retinoid isomerase activity required for this process was assigned to a specific protein, a microsomal membrane enzyme called RPE65. In this review, we outline progress that has been made in the functional characterization of RPE65. We then discuss general concepts related to protein-membrane interactions and the mechanism of the retinoid isomerization reaction and describe some of the important biochemical and structural features of RPE65 with respect to its membrane-binding and enzymatic properties. PMID:20304090

  7. Silencing of VAMP3 inhibits cell migration and integrin-mediated adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Luftman, Kevin; Hasan, Nazarul; Day, Paul; Hardee, Deborah; Hu Chuan

    2009-02-27

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In cell migration, integrins are endocytosed from the plasma membrane or the cell surface, transported in vesicles and exocytosed actively at the cell front. In the present study, we examined the roles of VAMP3, a SNARE protein that mediates exocytosis, in cell migration and integrin trafficking. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced silencing of VAMP3 inhibited chemotactic cell migration by more than 60% without affecting cell proliferation. VAMP3 silencing reduced the levels of {beta}1 integrin at the cell surface but had no effect on total cellular {beta}1 integrin, indicating that VAMP3 is required for trafficking of {beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, VAMP3 silencing diminished cell adhesion to laminin but not to fibronectin or collagen. Taken together, these data suggest that VAMP3-dependent integrin trafficking is crucial in cell migration and cell adhesion to laminin.

  8. Computational modelling of multi-cell migration in a multi-signalling substrate.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Jamaleddin; Doblaré, Manuel; Doweidar, Mohamed Hamdy

    2014-04-01

    Cell migration is a vital process in many biological phenomena ranging from wound healing to tissue regeneration. Over the past few years, it has been proven that in addition to cell-cell and cell-substrate mechanical interactions (mechanotaxis), cells can be driven by thermal, chemical and/or electrical stimuli. A numerical model was recently presented by the authors to analyse single cell migration in a multi-signalling substrate. That work is here extended to include multi-cell migration due to cell-cell interaction in a multi-signalling substrate under different conditions. This model is based on balancing the forces that act on the cell population in the presence of different guiding cues. Several numerical experiments are presented to illustrate the effect of different stimuli on the trajectory and final location of the cell population within a 3D heterogeneous multi-signalling substrate. Our findings indicate that although multi-cell migration is relatively similar to single cell migration in some aspects, the associated behaviour is very different. For instance, cell-cell interaction may delay single cell migration towards effective cues while increasing the magnitude of the average net cell traction force as well as the local velocity. Besides, the random movement of a cell within a cell population is slightly greater than that of single cell migration. Moreover, higher electrical field strength causes the cell slug to flatten near the cathode. On the other hand, as with single cell migration, the existence of electrotaxis dominates mechanotaxis, moving the cells to the cathode or anode pole located at the free surface. The numerical results here obtained are qualitatively consistent with related experimental works.

  9. Computational modelling of multi-cell migration in a multi-signalling substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaleddin Mousavi, Seyed; Doblaré, Manuel; Hamdy Doweidar, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Cell migration is a vital process in many biological phenomena ranging from wound healing to tissue regeneration. Over the past few years, it has been proven that in addition to cell-cell and cell-substrate mechanical interactions (mechanotaxis), cells can be driven by thermal, chemical and/or electrical stimuli. A numerical model was recently presented by the authors to analyse single cell migration in a multi-signalling substrate. That work is here extended to include multi-cell migration due to cell-cell interaction in a multi-signalling substrate under different conditions. This model is based on balancing the forces that act on the cell population in the presence of different guiding cues. Several numerical experiments are presented to illustrate the effect of different stimuli on the trajectory and final location of the cell population within a 3D heterogeneous multi-signalling substrate. Our findings indicate that although multi-cell migration is relatively similar to single cell migration in some aspects, the associated behaviour is very different. For instance, cell-cell interaction may delay single cell migration towards effective cues while increasing the magnitude of the average net cell traction force as well as the local velocity. Besides, the random movement of a cell within a cell population is slightly greater than that of single cell migration. Moreover, higher electrical field strength causes the cell slug to flatten near the cathode. On the other hand, as with single cell migration, the existence of electrotaxis dominates mechanotaxis, moving the cells to the cathode or anode pole located at the free surface. The numerical results here obtained are qualitatively consistent with related experimental works.

  10. Cinnamtannin B-1 Promotes Migration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Accelerates Wound Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kosuke; Kuge, Katsunori; Ozawa, Noriyasu; Sahara, Shunya; Zaiki, Kaori; Nakaoji, Koichi; Hamada, Kazuhiko; Takenaka, Yukiko; Tanahashi, Takao; Tamai, Katsuto; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Maeda, Akito

    2015-01-01

    Substances that enhance the migration of mesenchymal stem cells to damaged sites have the potential to improve the effectiveness of tissue repair. We previously found that ethanol extracts of Mallotus philippinensis bark promoted migration of mesenchymal stem cells and improved wound healing in a mouse model. We also demonstrated that bark extracts contain cinnamtannin B-1, a flavonoid with in vitro migratory activity against mesenchymal stem cells. However, the in vivo effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on the migration of mesenchymal stem cells and underlying mechanism of this action remain unknown. Therefore, we examined the effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on in vivo migration of mesenchymal stem cells and wound healing in mice. In addition, we characterized cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells pharmacologically and structurally. The mobilization of endogenous mesenchymal stem cells into the blood circulation was enhanced in cinnamtannin B-1-treated mice as shown by flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood cells. Whole animal imaging analysis using luciferase-expressing mesenchymal stem cells as a tracer revealed that cinnamtannin B-1 increased the homing of mesenchymal stem cells to wounds and accelerated healing in a diabetic mouse model. Additionally, the cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells was pharmacologically susceptible to inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, phospholipase C, lipoxygenase, and purines. Furthermore, biflavonoids with similar structural features to cinnamtannin B-1 also augmented the migration of mesenchymal stem cells by similar pharmacological mechanisms. These results demonstrate that cinnamtannin B-1 promoted mesenchymal stem cell migration in vivo and improved wound healing in mice. Furthermore, the results reveal that cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells may be mediated by specific signaling pathways, and the flavonoid skeleton may be relevant to its effects on

  11. Cinnamtannin B-1 Promotes Migration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Accelerates Wound Healing in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kosuke; Kuge, Katsunori; Ozawa, Noriyasu; Sahara, Shunya; Zaiki, Kaori; Nakaoji, Koichi; Hamada, Kazuhiko; Takenaka, Yukiko; Tanahashi, Takao; Tamai, Katsuto; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Maeda, Akito

    2015-01-01

    Substances that enhance the migration of mesenchymal stem cells to damaged sites have the potential to improve the effectiveness of tissue repair. We previously found that ethanol extracts of Mallotus philippinensis bark promoted migration of mesenchymal stem cells and improved wound healing in a mouse model. We also demonstrated that bark extracts contain cinnamtannin B-1, a flavonoid with in vitro migratory activity against mesenchymal stem cells. However, the in vivo effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on the migration of mesenchymal stem cells and underlying mechanism of this action remain unknown. Therefore, we examined the effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on in vivo migration of mesenchymal stem cells and wound healing in mice. In addition, we characterized cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells pharmacologically and structurally. The mobilization of endogenous mesenchymal stem cells into the blood circulation was enhanced in cinnamtannin B-1-treated mice as shown by flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood cells. Whole animal imaging analysis using luciferase-expressing mesenchymal stem cells as a tracer revealed that cinnamtannin B-1 increased the homing of mesenchymal stem cells to wounds and accelerated healing in a diabetic mouse model. Additionally, the cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells was pharmacologically susceptible to inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, phospholipase C, lipoxygenase, and purines. Furthermore, biflavonoids with similar structural features to cinnamtannin B-1 also augmented the migration of mesenchymal stem cells by similar pharmacological mechanisms. These results demonstrate that cinnamtannin B-1 promoted mesenchymal stem cell migration in vivo and improved wound healing in mice. Furthermore, the results reveal that cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells may be mediated by specific signaling pathways, and the flavonoid skeleton may be relevant to its effects on

  12. Inhibition of corneal epithelial cell migration by cadmium and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Ubels, J.L.; Osgood, T.B. Medical Coll. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee )

    1991-02-01

    In a previous comparative study of corneal healing in fish, the authors observed that corneal epithelial healing occurs very rapidly in vivo in the marine teleost Myoxocephalus octodecimspinosus (longhorn sculpin) with a 6-mm diameter wound on the mammalian cornea. This rapid healing which permits prompt restoration of the epithelial barrier is apparently an adaptation to the large ionic and osmotic gradients between the environment and the intraocular fluids of the fish. These observations suggested that epithelial healing in the sculpin cornea might be useful model in aquatic biomedical toxicology if an in vitro method for measurement of healing rates could be developed. In this report the authors demonstrate that sculpin eyes maintained in short-term organ culture have a rapid corneal epithelial healing response and that this model can be used to demonstrate the toxic effects of heavy metals on epithelial cell migration.

  13. Overexpression of Dishevelled-2 contributes to proliferation and migration of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoren; Ye, Jinjun; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Zhi; Feng, Jifeng

    2016-06-01

    Dishevelled-2 (Dvl2) was associated with tumor cell proliferation and migration. We aimed to examine the mechanism of Dvl2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Dvl2 was overexpressed in human ESCC tissues and cell lines ECA109 and TE1 cells. CCK-8 and colony formation assay was performed to evaluate the proliferation in ECA109 cells transfected with Dvl2-shRNA. Wound-healing assay and transwell assay were used to examine the activities of migration and invasion in Dvl2-silenced ESCC cells. Knockdown of Dvl2 significantly reduced ECA109 cell proliferation and migration. Moreover, we demonstrated that the proliferation and migration ability of Dvl2 might through the activation of Wnt pathway by targeting the Cyclin D1 and MMP-9. We came to the conclusion that the proliferation and migration effects of Dvl2 might contribute to malignant development of human ESCC.

  14. Comparative study of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) as a treatment for retinal dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Marina; Fontrodona, Laura; Albert, Silvia; Ramirez, Diana Mora; Seriola, Anna; Salas, Anna; Muñoz, Yolanda; Ramos, David; Villegas-Perez, Maria Paz; Zapata, Miguel Angel; Raya, Angel; Ruberte, Jesus; Veiga, Anna; Garcia-Arumi, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Retinal dystrophies (RD) are major causes of familial blindness and are characterized by progressive dysfunction of photoreceptor and/or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. In this study, we aimed to evaluate and compare the therapeutic effects of two pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-based therapies. We differentiated RPE from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and transplanted them into the subretinal space of the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat. Once differentiated, cells from either source of PSC resembled mature RPE in their morphology and gene expression profile. Following transplantation, both hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells maintained the expression of specific RPE markers, lost their proliferative capacity, established tight junctions, and were able to perform phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments. Remarkably, grafted areas showed increased numbers of photoreceptor nuclei and outer segment disk membranes. Regardless of the cell source, human transplants protected retina from cell apoptosis, glial stress and accumulation of autofluorescence, and responded better to light stimuli. Altogether, our results show that hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells survived, migrated, integrated, and functioned as RPE in the RCS rat retina, providing preclinical evidence that either PSC source could be of potential benefit for treating RD. PMID:27006969

  15. Continual Cell Deformation Induced via Attachment to Oriented Fibers Enhances Fibroblast Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Sisi; Ricotta, Vincent; Simon, Marcia; Clark, Richard A. F.; Rafailovich, Miriam H.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast migration is critical to the wound healing process. In vivo, migration occurs on fibrillar substrates, and previous observations have shown that a significant time lag exists before the onset of granulation tissue. We therefore conducted a series of experiments to understand the impact of both fibrillar morphology and migration time. Substrate topography was first shown to have a profound influence. Fibroblasts preferentially attach to fibrillar surfaces, and orient their cytoplasm for maximal contact with the fiber edge. In the case of en-mass cell migration out of an agarose droplet, fibroblasts on flat surfaces emerged with an enhanced velocity, v = 52μm/h, that decreases to the single cell value, v = 28μm/h within 24 hours and remained constant for at least four days. Fibroblasts emerging on fibrillar surfaces emerged with the single cell velocity, which remained constant for the first 24 hours and then increased reaching a plateau with more than twice the initial velocity within the next three days. The focal adhesions were distributed uniformly in cells on flat surfaces, while on the fibrillar surface they were clustered along the cell periphery. Furthermore, the number of focal adhesions for the cells on the flat surfaces remained constant, while it decreased on the fibrillar surface during the next three days. The deformation of the cell nuclei was found to be 50% larger on the fiber surfaces for the first 24 hours. While the mean deformation remained constant on the flat surface, it increased for the next three days by 24% in cells on fibers. On the fourth day, large actin/myosin fibers formed in cells on fibrillar surfaces only and coincided with a change from the standard migration mechanism involving extension of lamellipodia, and retraction of the rear, to one involving strong contractions oriented along the fibers and centered about the nucleus. PMID:25774792

  16. Impaired SIRT1 promotes the migration of vascular smooth muscle cell-derived foam cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Jie; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xu; Pi, Yan; Long, Chun-Yan; Sun, Meng-Jiao; Chen, Xue; Gao, Chang-Yue; Li, Jing-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Li

    2016-07-01

    The formation of fat-laden foam cells, contributing to the fatty streaks of the plaques of atheroma, is the critical early process in atherosclerosis. The previous study demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contain a much larger burden of the excess cholesterol in comparison with monocyte-derived macrophages in human coronary atherosclerosis, as the main origin of foam cells. It is noteworthy that VSMC-derived foam cells are deposited in subintima but not media, where VSMCs normally deposit in. Therefore, migration from media to intima is an indispensable step for a VSMC to accrue neutral lipids and form foam cell. Whether this migration occurs paralleled with or prior to the formation of foam cell is still unclear. Herein, the present study was designed to test the VSMC migratory capability in the process of foam cell formation induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). In conclusion, we provide evidence that oxLDL induces the VSMC-derived foam cells formation with increased migration ability and MMP-9 expression, which were partly attributed to the impaired SIRT1 and enhanced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity. As activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) has been reported to have anti-atherosclerotic effects, we investigated its role in oxLDL-treated VSMC migration. It is found that activating TRPV1 by capsaicin inhibits VSMC foam cell formation and the accompanied migration through rescuing the SIRT1 and suppressing NF-κB signaling. The present study provides evidence that SIRT1 may be a promising intervention target of atherosclerosis, and raises the prospect of TRPV1 in prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis.

  17. The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyano enone), TBE-31, targets microtubule dynamics and cell polarity in migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eddie; Saito, Akira; Honda, Tadashi; Di Guglielmo, Gianni M

    2016-04-01

    Cell migration is dependent on the microtubule network for structural support as well as for the proper delivery and positioning of polarity proteins at the leading edge of migrating cells. Identification of drugs that target cytoskeletal-dependent cell migration and protein transport in polarized migrating cells is important in understanding the cell biology of normal and tumor cells and can lead to new therapeutic targets in disease processes. Here, we show that the tricyclic compound TBE-31 directly binds to tubulin and interferes with microtubule dynamics, as assessed by end binding 1 (EB1) live cell imaging. Interestingly, this interference is independent of in vitro tubulin polymerization. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we also observed that TBE-31 interferes with the polarity of migratory cells. The polarity proteins Rac1, IQGAP and Tiam1 were localized at the leading edge of DMSO-treated migrating cell, but were observed to be in multiple protrusions around the cell periphery of TBE-31-treated cells. Finally, we observed that TBE-31 inhibits the migration of Rat2 fibroblasts with an IC50 of 0.75 μM. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibition of cell migration by TBE-31 may result from the improper maintenance of cell polarity of migrating cells.

  18. Three-dimensional cell migration does not follow a random walk.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Giri, Anjil; Sun, Sean X; Wirtz, Denis

    2014-03-18

    Cell migration through 3D extracellular matrices is critical to the normal development of tissues and organs and in disease processes, yet adequate analytical tools to characterize 3D migration are lacking. Here, we quantified the migration patterns of individual fibrosarcoma cells on 2D substrates and in 3D collagen matrices and found that 3D migration does not follow a random walk. Both 2D and 3D migration features a non-Gaussian, exponential mean cell velocity distribution, which we show is primarily a result of cell-to-cell variations. Unlike in the 2D case, 3D cell migration is anisotropic: velocity profiles display different speed and self-correlation processes in different directions, rendering the classical persistent random walk (PRW) model of cell migration inadequate. By incorporating cell heterogeneity and local anisotropy to the PRW model, we predict 3D cell motility over a wide range of matrix densities, which identifies density-independent emerging migratory properties. This analysis also reveals the unexpected robust relation between cell speed and persistence of migration over a wide range of matrix densities.

  19. A simple non-perturbing cell migration assay insensitive to proliferation effects.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Honor L; Messner, Jacob; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2016-08-18

    Migration is a fundamental cellular behavior that plays an indispensable role in development and homeostasis, but can also contribute to pathology such as cancer metastasis. Due to its relevance to many aspects of human health, the ability to accurately measure cell migration is of broad interest, and numerous approaches have been developed. One of the most commonly employed approaches, because of its simplicity and throughput, is the exclusion zone assay in which cells are allowed to migrate into an initially cell-free region. A major drawback of this assay is that it relies on simply counting cells in the exclusion zone and therefore cannot distinguish the effects of proliferation from migration. We report here a simple modification to the exclusion zone migration assay that exclusively measures cell migration and is not affected by proliferation. This approach makes use of a lineage-tracing vital stain that is retained through cell generations and effectively reads out migration relative to the original, parental cell population. This modification is simple, robust, non-perturbing, and inexpensive. We validate the method in a panel of cell lines under conditions that inhibit or promote migration and demonstrate its use in normal and cancer cell lines as well as primary cells.

  20. Confinement and low adhesion induce fast amoeboid migration of slow mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Le Berre, Maël; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Heuzé, Mélina; Takaki, Tohru; Voituriez, Raphaël; Piel, Matthieu

    2015-02-12

    The mesenchymal-amoeboid transition (MAT) was proposed as a mechanism for cancer cells to adapt their migration mode to their environment. While the molecular pathways involved in this transition are well documented, the role of the microenvironment in the MAT is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated how confinement and adhesion affect this transition. We report that, in the absence of focal adhesions and under conditions of confinement, mesenchymal cells can spontaneously switch to a fast amoeboid migration phenotype. We identified two main types of fast migration--one involving a local protrusion and a second involving a myosin-II-dependent mechanical instability of the cell cortex that leads to a global cortical flow. Interestingly, transformed cells are more prone to adopt this fast migration mode. Finally, we propose a generic model that explains migration transitions and predicts a phase diagram of migration phenotypes based on three main control parameters: confinement, adhesion, and contractility.

  1. Chemotactic Migration of T Cells towards Dendritic Cells Promotes the Detection of Rare Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Vroomans, Renske M. A.; Marée, Athanasius F. M.; de Boer, Rob J.; Beltman, Joost B.

    2012-01-01

    In many immunological processes chemoattraction is thought to play a role in guiding cells to their sites of action. However, based on in vivo two-photon microscopy experiments in the absence of cognate antigen, T cell migration in lymph nodes (LNs) has been roughly described as a random walk. Although it has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) carrying cognate antigen in some circumstances attract T cells chemotactically, it is currently still unclear whether chemoattraction of T cells towards DCs helps or hampers scanning. Chemoattraction towards DCs could on the one hand help T cells to rapidly find DCs. On the other hand, it could be deleterious if DCs become shielded by a multitude of attracted yet non-specific T cells. Results from a recent simulation study suggested that the deleterious effect dominates. We re-addressed the question whether T cell chemoattraction towards DCs is expected to promote or hamper the detection of rare antigens using the Cellular Potts Model, a formalism that allows for dynamic, flexible cellular shapes and cell migration. Our simulations show that chemoattraction of T cells enhances the DC scanning efficiency, leading to an increased probability that rare antigen-specific T cells find DCs carrying cognate antigen. Desensitization of T cells after contact with a DC further improves the scanning efficiency, yielding an almost threefold enhancement compared to random migration. Moreover, the chemotaxis-driven migration still roughly appears as a random walk, hence fine-tuned analysis of cell tracks will be required to detect chemotaxis within microscopy data. PMID:23166480

  2. Chemotactic migration of T cells towards dendritic cells promotes the detection of rare antigens.

    PubMed

    Vroomans, Renske M A; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J; Beltman, Joost B

    2012-01-01

    In many immunological processes chemoattraction is thought to play a role in guiding cells to their sites of action. However, based on in vivo two-photon microscopy experiments in the absence of cognate antigen, T cell migration in lymph nodes (LNs) has been roughly described as a random walk. Although it has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) carrying cognate antigen in some circumstances attract T cells chemotactically, it is currently still unclear whether chemoattraction of T cells towards DCs helps or hampers scanning. Chemoattraction towards DCs could on the one hand help T cells to rapidly find DCs. On the other hand, it could be deleterious if DCs become shielded by a multitude of attracted yet non-specific T cells. Results from a recent simulation study suggested that the deleterious effect dominates. We re-addressed the question whether T cell chemoattraction towards DCs is expected to promote or hamper the detection of rare antigens using the Cellular Potts Model, a formalism that allows for dynamic, flexible cellular shapes and cell migration. Our simulations show that chemoattraction of T cells enhances the DC scanning efficiency, leading to an increased probability that rare antigen-specific T cells find DCs carrying cognate antigen. Desensitization of T cells after contact with a DC further improves the scanning efficiency, yielding an almost threefold enhancement compared to random migration. Moreover, the chemotaxis-driven migration still roughly appears as a random walk, hence fine-tuned analysis of cell tracks will be required to detect chemotaxis within microscopy data.

  3. Cell-autonomous and environmental contributions to the interstitial migration of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Petravic, Janka; Davenport, Miles P.

    2010-01-01

    A key to understanding the functioning of the immune system is to define the mechanisms that facilitate directed lymphocyte migration to and within tissues. The recent development of improved imaging technologies, most prominently multi-photon microscopy, has enabled the dynamic visualization of immune cells in real-time directly within intact tissues. Intravital imaging approaches have revealed high spontaneous migratory activity of T cells in secondary lymphoid organs and inflamed tissues. Experimental evidence points towards both environmental and cell-intrinsic cues involved in the regulation of lymphocyte motility in the interstitial space. Based on these data, several conceptually distinct models have been proposed in order to explain the coordination of lymphocyte migration both at the single cell and population level. These range from “stochastic” models, where chance is the major driving force, to “deterministic” models, where the architecture of the microenvironment dictates the migratory trajectory of cells. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding naïve and effector T cell migration in vivo. In addition, we discuss some of the contradictory experimental findings in the context of theoretical models of migrating leukocytes. PMID:20623124

  4. Cell-autonomous and environmental contributions to the interstitial migration of T cells.

    PubMed

    Mrass, Paulus; Petravic, Janka; Davenport, Miles P; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2010-09-01

    A key to understanding the functioning of the immune system is to define the mechanisms that facilitate directed lymphocyte migration to and within tissues. The recent development of improved imaging technologies, most prominently multi-photon microscopy, has enabled the dynamic visualization of immune cells in real-time directly within intact tissues. Intravital imaging approaches have revealed high spontaneous migratory activity of T cells in secondary lymphoid organs and inflamed tissues. Experimental evidence points towards both environmental and cell-intrinsic cues involved in the regulation of lymphocyte motility in the interstitial space. Based on these data, several conceptually distinct models have been proposed in order to explain the coordination of lymphocyte migration both at the single cell and population level. These range from "stochastic" models, where chance is the major driving force, to "deterministic" models, where the architecture of the microenvironment dictates the migratory trajectory of cells. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding naïve and effector T cell migration in vivo. In addition, we discuss some of the contradictory experimental findings in the context of theoretical models of migrating leukocytes.

  5. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Rojanasakul, Yon; Liu, Yuxin

    2015-07-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 µg cm-2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  6. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Rojanasakul, Yon; Liu, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 μg cm−2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  7. Spatial and temporal action of chicken primordial germ cells during initial migration.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung Soo; Lee, Hyung Chul; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Hyo Gun; Kim, Young Min; Lee, Hong Jo; Park, Young Hyun; Yang, Seo Yeong; Rengaraj, Deivendran; Park, Tae Sub; Han, Jae Yong

    2015-02-01

    In most animals, primordial germ cells (PGCs) originate from an extragonadal region and migrate across the embryo to the gonads, where they differentiate and function. During their migration, PGCs move passively by morphogenetic movement of the embryo or move actively through signaling molecules. To uncover the underlying mechanism of first-phase PGC migration toward the germinal crescent in chickens, we investigated the spatial and temporal action of PGCs during primitive streak formation. Exogenously transplanted PGCs migrated toward the anterior region of the embryo and the embryonic gonads when they were transplanted into the subgerminal cavity, but not into the posterior marginal zone, in Eyal-Giladi and Kochav stage X embryos. These results indicate that for passive migration toward the anterior region the initial location of PGCs should be the central region. Notably, although PGCs and DF-1 cells migrated passively toward the anterior region, only PGCs migrated to the germinal crescent, where endogenous PGCs mainly reside, by active movement. In a live-imaging experiment with green fluorescence protein-expressing transgenic embryos, exogenous PGCs demonstrated markedly faster migration when they reached the anterior one-third of the embryo, while somatic cells showed epiblast movement with constant speed. Also, migrating PGCs exhibited successive contraction and expansion indicating their active migration. Our results suggest that chicken PGCs use sequential passive and active forces to migrate toward the germinal crescent.

  8. P-cadherin-mediated Rho GTPase regulation during collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellières, Elsa; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This commentary addresses the role of P-cadherin in collective cell migration (CCM), a cooperative and coordinated migration mode, used by cells during normal and pathological migration processes. We discuss how cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions (CCJs) play a critical role in CCM through their ability to regulate Rho GTPase-dependent pathways and how this leads to the generation and orientation of mechanical forces. We will also highlight the key function of P-cadherin (a poor prognostic marker in several tumors) in promoting collective cell movement in epithelial and mesenchymal cells. PMID:27152729

  9. The effects of kisspeptin-10 on migration and proliferation of endothelial cell

    PubMed Central

    Golzar, Fatemeh; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migration, expansion and survival of endothelial cells that are an important cellular component of blood vessels plays an important role in the induction of tumor growth. Kisspeptins (kp), peptides that bind to coupled-G protein receptor (GPR54), inhibit each step of metastatic cascade include invasion, migration and homing, angiogenesis, survival and proliferation. In this study we investigated effects of kisspeptin-10, the most potent member of kisspeptin family, on Migration and proliferation of endothelial cells that are necessary for angiogenesis and tumor metastasis. Materials and Methods: We compared migration of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) were treated with 10-100 or 500 nM kp-10 for 24 hours and no treated cells using an in vitro trans membrane migration assay and HUVEC proliferation of treated endothelial cells with 10-100 or 500 nM kp-10 for 48 hours and no treated cells was measured by MTT Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Analysis of data was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by the Mann-Whitney test. Results: Migration and proliferation of endothelial cells were increased at lower concentration of kp-10 specially at 100 nM while higher concentration reduced both migration and proliferation. Conclusion: Our data showed that different concentrations of kp-10 have distinct effects on migration and proliferation of endothelial cells. PMID:25789267

  10. ProBDNF inhibits collective migration and chemotaxis of rat Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, You-Quan; Li, Xuan-Yang; Xia, Guan-Nan; Ren, Hong-Yi; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Su, Bing-Yin; Qi, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-01

    Schwann cell migration, including collective migration and chemotaxis, is essential for the formation of coordinate interactions between Schwann cells and axons during peripheral nerve development and regeneration. Moreover, limited migration of Schwann cells imposed a serious obstacle on Schwann cell-astrocytes intermingling and spinal cord repair after Schwann cell transplantation into injured spinal cords. Recent studies have shown that mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor, a member of the neurotrophin family, inhibits Schwann cell migration. The precursor form of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, proBDNF, was expressed in the developing or degenerating peripheral nerves and the injured spinal cords. Since "the yin and yang of neurotrophin action" has been established as a common sense, proBDNF would be expected to promote Schwann cell migration. However, we found, in the present study, that exogenous proBDNF also inhibited in vitro collective migration and chemotaxis of RSC 96 cells, a spontaneously immortalized rat Schwann cell line. Moreover, proBDNF suppressed adhesion and spreading of those cells. At molecular level, proBDNF inhibits F-actin polymerization and focal adhesion dynamics in cultured RSC 96 cells. Therefore, our results suggested a special case against the classical opinion of "the yin and yang of neurotrophin action" and implied that proBDNF might modulate peripheral nerve development or regeneration and spinal cord repair through perturbing native or transplanted Schwann cell migration.

  11. Coexpressing shRNA with fluorescence tags for quantification of cell migration studies.

    PubMed

    Koo, Christine Xing'er; Fang, Wanru; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Leong, David Tai

    2012-07-01

    Understanding migration of cells has many implications in human physiology; some examples include developmental biology, healing, immune responses and tissue remodeling. On the other hand, invasive migration by tumor cells is pathological and is a major cause of mortality amongst cancer sufferers. Cell migration assays have been widely used to quantify potentially metastatic genes. In recent years, the use of RNAi has significantly increased the tools available in cell migration research due to its specific gene targeting for knockdown. The inability to ensure 100% transfection/transduction efficiency reduces the sensitivity of cell migration assays because cells not successfully transfected/transduced with the RNAi are also included in the calculations. This study introduces a different experimental setup mathematically expressed in our named normalized relative infected cell count (N-RICC) that analyses cell migration assays by co-expressing retrovirally transduced shRNA with fluorescence tags from a single vector. Vectors transduced into cells are visible under fluorescence, thus alleviating the problems involved with transduction efficiency by individually identifying cells with targeted genes. Designed shRNAs were targeted against a list of potentially metastatic genes in a highly migratory breast cancer cell line model, MDA-MB-231. We have successfully applied N-RICC analysis to show greater sensitivity of integrin alpha5 (ITGA5) and Ras homologue A (RhoA) in cell metastasis over conventional methods in scratch-wound assays and migration chambers assays.

  12. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation.

  13. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant’Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  14. FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis is required for breast cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lan; Jiang, Sufang; Fu, Qiang; Smith, Kelly; Tu, Kailing; Li, Hua; Zhao, Yuhua

    2016-05-01

    Both fatty acid synthase (FASN) and ErbB2 have been shown to promote breast cancer cell migration. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains poorly understood and there is no reported evidence that directly links glycolysis to breast cancer cell migration. In this study, we investigated the role of FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis in breast cancer cell migration. First, we compared lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) protein levels, glycolysis and cell migration between FASN, ErbB2-overexpressing SK-BR-3 cells and FASN, ErbB2-low-expressing MCF7 cells. Then, SK-BR-3 cells were treated with cerulenin (Cer), an inhibitor of FASN, and ErbB2, LDHA protein levels, glycolysis, and cell migration were detected. Next, we transiently transfected ErbB2 plasmid into MCF7 cells and detected FASN, LDHA protein levels, glycolysis and cell migration. Heregulin-β1 (HRG-β1) is an activator of ErbB2 and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) and oxamate (OX) are inhibitors of glycolysis. MCF7 cells were treated with HRG-β1 alone, HRG-β1 plus 2-DG, OX or cerulenin and glycolysis, and cell migration were measured. We found that FASN, ErbB2-high-expressing SK-BR-3 cells displayed higher levels of glycolysis and migration than FASN, ErbB2-low-expressing MCF7 cells. Inhibition of FASN by cerulenin impaired glycolysis and migration in SK-BR-3 cells. Transient overexpression of ErbB2 in MCF7 cells promotes glycolysis and migration. Moreover, 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), oxamate (OX), or cerulenin partially reverses heregulin-β1 (HRG-β1)-induced glycolysis and migration in MCF7 cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis is required for breast cancer cell migration. These novel findings indicate that targeting FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis may be a new approach to reverse breast cancer cell migration.

  15. Nonpolarized signaling reveals two distinct modes of 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2012-04-30

    We search in this paper for context-specific modes of three-dimensional (3D) cell migration using imaging for phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and active Rac1 and Cdc42 in primary fibroblasts migrating within different 3D environments. In 3D collagen, PIP3 and active Rac1 and Cdc42 were targeted to the leading edge, consistent with lamellipodia-based migration. In contrast, elongated cells migrating inside dermal explants and the cell-derived matrix (CDM) formed blunt, cylindrical protrusions, termed lobopodia, and Rac1, Cdc42, and PIP3 signaling was nonpolarized. Reducing RhoA, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), or myosin II activity switched the cells to lamellipodia-based 3D migration. These modes of 3D migration were regulated by matrix physical properties. Specifically, experimentally modifying the elasticity of the CDM or collagen gels established that nonlinear elasticity supported lamellipodia-based migration, whereas linear elasticity switched cells to lobopodia-based migration. Thus, the relative polarization of intracellular signaling identifies two distinct modes of 3D cell migration governed intrinsically by RhoA, ROCK, and myosin II and extrinsically by the elastic behavior of the 3D extracellular matrix.

  16. Retinal stem/progenitor cells in the ciliary marginal zone complete retinal regeneration: a study of retinal regeneration in a novel animal model.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Ayumi; Araki, Masasuke

    2014-07-01

    Our research group has extensively studied retinal regeneration in adult Xenopus laevis. However, X. laevis does not represent a suitable model for multigenerational genetics and genomic approaches. Instead, Xenopus tropicalis is considered as the ideal model for these studies, although little is known about retinal regeneration in X. tropicalis. In the present study, we showed that a complete retina regenerates at approximately 30 days after whole retinal removal. The regenerating retina was derived from the stem/progenitor cells in the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ), indicating a novel mode of vertebrate retinal regeneration, which has not been previously reported. In a previous study, we showed that in X. laevis, retinal regeneration occurs primarily through the transdifferentiation of retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. RPE cells migrate to the retinal vascular membrane and reform a new epithelium, which then differentiates into the retina. In X. tropicalis, RPE cells also migrated to the vascular membrane, but transdifferentiation was not evident. Using two tissue culture models of RPE tissues, it was shown that in X. laevis RPE culture neuronal differentiation and reconstruction of the retinal three-dimensional (3-D) structure were clearly observed, while in X. tropicalis RPE culture neither ßIII tubulin-positive cells nor 3-D retinal structure were seen. These results indicate that the two Xenopus species are excellent models to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms of retinal regeneration, as these animals have contrasting modes of regeneration; one mode primarily involves RPE cells and the other mode involves stem/progenitor cells in the CMZ.

  17. Cell-surface proteoglycan in sea urchin primary mesenchyme cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Early in the development of the sea urchin embryo, the primary mesenchyme cells (PMC) migrate along the basal lamina of the blastocoel. Migration is inhibited in L. pictus embryos cultured in sulfate-free seawater and in S. purpuratus embryos exposed to exogenous {beta}-D-xylosides. An in vitro assay was developed to test the migratory capacity of normal PMC on normal and treated blastocoelic matrix. Sulfate deprivation and exposure to exogenous xyloside render PMC nonmotile on either matrix. Materials removed from the surface of normal PMC by treatment with 1 M urea restored migratory ability to defective cells, whereas a similar preparation isolated from the surface of epithelial cells at the same stage did not. Migration also resumed when cells were removed from the xyloside or returned to normal seawater. The urea extract was partially purified and characterized by radiolabeling, gel electrophoresis, fluorography, ion exchange chromatography, and western blotting. The PMC synthesize a large chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan that is present in an active fraction isolated by chromatography. Chondroitinase ABC digestion of live cells blocked migration reversibly, further supporting the identification of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan as the active component in the urea extract. Much of the incorporated sulfate was distributed along the filopodia in {sup 35}SO{sub 4}-labelled PMC by autoradiography. The morphology of normal and treated S. purpuratus PMC was examined by scanning electron microscopy, and differences in spreading, particularly of the extensive filopodia present on the cells, was observed. A model for the role of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan in cell detachment during migration is proposed.

  18. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  19. Ordered Patterns of Cell Shape and Orientational Correlation during Spontaneous Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Iwaya, Suguru; Sano, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    Background In the absence of stimuli, most motile eukaryotic cells move by spontaneously coordinating cell deformation with cell movement in the absence of stimuli. Yet little is known about how cells change their own shape and how cells coordinate the deformation and movement. Here, we investigated the mechanism of spontaneous cell migration by using computational analyses. Methodology We observed spontaneously migrating Dictyostelium cells in both a vegetative state (round cell shape and slow motion) and starved one (elongated cell shape and fast motion). We then extracted regular patterns of morphological dynamics and the pattern-dependent systematic coordination with filamentous actin (F-actin) and cell movement by statistical dynamic analyses. Conclusions/Significance We found that Dictyostelium cells in both vegetative and starved states commonly organize their own shape into three ordered patterns, elongation, rotation, and oscillation, in the absence of external stimuli. Further, cells inactivated for PI3-kinase (PI3K) and/or PTEN did not show ordered patterns due to the lack of spatial control in pseudopodial formation in both the vegetative and starved states. We also found that spontaneous polarization was achieved in starved cells by asymmetric localization of PTEN and F-actin. This breaking of the symmetry of protein localization maintained the leading edge and considerably enhanced the persistence of directed migration, and overall random exploration was ensured by switching among the different ordered patterns. Our findings suggest that Dictyostelium cells spontaneously create the ordered patterns of cell shape mediated by PI3K/PTEN/F-actin and control the direction of cell movement by coordination with these patterns even in the absence of external stimuli. PMID:19011688

  20. Meiotic germ cells antagonize mesonephric cell migration and testis cord formation in mouse gonads

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Humphrey H.-C.; DiNapoli, Leo; Capel, Blanche

    2014-01-01

    Summary The developmental fate of primordial germ cells in the mammalian gonad depends on their environment. In the XY gonad, Sry induces a cascade of molecular and cellular events leading to the organization of testis cords. Germ cells are sequestered inside testis cords by 12.5 dpc where they arrest in mitosis. If the testis pathway is not initiated, germ cells spontaneously enter meiosis by 13.5 dpc, and the gonad follows the ovarian fate. We have previously shown that some testis-specific events, such as mesonephric cell migration, can be experimentally induced into XX gonads prior to 12.5 dpc. However, after that time, XX gonads are resistant to the induction of cell migration. In current experiments, we provide evidence that this effect is dependent on XX germ cells rather than on XX somatic cells. We show that, although mesonephric cell migration cannot be induced into normal XX gonads at 14.5 dpc, it can be induced into XX gonads depleted of germ cells. We also show that when 14.5 dpc XX somatic cells are recombined with XY somatic cells, testis cord structures form normally; however, when XX germ cells are recombined with XY somatic cells, cord structures are disrupted. Sandwich culture experiments suggest that the inhibitory effect of XX germ cells is mediated through short-range interactions rather than through a long-range diffusible factor. The developmental stage at which XX germ cells show a disruptive effect on the male pathway is the stage at which meiosis is normally initiated, based on the immunodetection of meiotic markers. We suggest that at the stage when germ cells commit to meiosis, they reinforce ovarian fate by antagonizing the testis pathway. PMID:14561636

  1. G protein-coupled receptor signaling through Gq and JNK negatively regulates neural progenitor cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Norikazu; Kokubu, Hiroshi; Sato, Maiko; Nishimura, Akiyuki; Yamauchi, Junji; Kurose, Hitoshi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    In the early development of the central nervous system, neural progenitor cells divide in an asymmetric manner and migrate along the radial glia cells. The radial migration is an important process for the proper lamination of the cerebral cortex. Recently, a new mode of the radial migration was found at the intermediate zone where the neural progenitor cells become multipolar and reduce the migration rate. However, the regulatory signals for the radial migration are unknown. Using the migration assay in vitro, we examined how neural progenitor cell migration is regulated. Neural progenitor cells derived from embryonic mouse telencephalon migrated on laminin-coated dishes. Endothelin (ET)-1 inhibited the neural progenitor cell migration. This ET-1 effect was blocked by BQ788, a specific inhibitor of the ETB receptor, and by the expression of a carboxyl-terminal peptide of Gαq but not Gαi. The expression of constitutively active mutant of Gαq, GαqR183C, inhibited the migration of neural progenitor cells. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of ET-1 was suppressed by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 and the expression of the JNK-binding domain of JNK-interacting protein-1, a specific inhibitor of the JNK pathway. Using the slice culture system of embryonic brain, we demonstrated that ET-1 and the constitutively active mutant of Gαq caused the retention of the neural progenitor cells in the intermediate zone and JNK-binding domain of JNK-interacting protein-1 abrogated the effect of ET-1. These results indicated that G protein-coupled receptor signaling negatively regulates neural progenitor cell migration through Gq and JNK. PMID:16116085

  2. Interleukin-6 stimulates cell migration, invasion and integrin expression in HTR-8/SVneo cell line.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, M; Vićovac, L

    2009-04-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is present in human endometrium throughout menstrual cycle and in pregnancy. Trophoblast also expresses IL-6. IL-6R and its associated signal transducer gp130 were found in trophoblast as well. IL-6 is generally assumed to be relevant for trophoblast invasion. This study was undertaken to determine influence of endogenous and externally added IL-6 on invasion and migration of first trimester of pregnancy trophoblast in vitro. Integrins alpha(5)beta(1) and alpha(1)beta(1) have been shown to play an important role in trophoblast invasion and the effect of IL-6 on the expression of these integrin subunits was studied. We are showing that in both isolated first trimester of pregnancy cytotrophoblast (CTB) and HTR-8/SVneo cell line IL-6 and IL-6R are present. The effect on migration was studied using cell wounding and migration test on HTR-8/SVneo cells. Effect of IL-6 and function blocking anti-IL-6 antibody in Matrigel invasion tests was studied on both cell types. The effect of IL-6 on integrin subunit expression was determined by cell-based ELISA and Western blot on HTR-8/SVneo cells. The results obtained show that exogenous IL-6 has stimulatory effect on cell migration in HTR-8/SVneo and invasion by both cell types. Function blocking anti-IL-6 inhibited unstimulated invasion by isolated first trimester cytotrophoblast and both cell migration and invasion in unstimulated HTR-8/SVneo. Integrin alpha(5) expression was stimulated by IL-6 to 134% (p<0.05), alpha(1) to 135% (p<0.005), and beta(1) to 134% (p<0.001) of control in cell-based ELISA, but also in Western blot. The data obtained show for the first time sensitivity of extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo to IL-6, in addition to isolated first trimester cytotrophoblast. We conclude that both exogenous and endogenous IL-6 stimulate trophoblast cell migration and invasion, which may be partly attributable to stimulation of expression of the studied integrin subunits.

  3. Class 3 semaphorins induce F-actin reorganization in human dendritic cells: Role in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Curreli, Sabrina; Wong, Bin Sheng; Latinovic, Olga; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Stamatos, Nicholas M

    2016-12-01

    Class 3 semaphorins (Semas) are soluble proteins that are well recognized for their role in guiding axonal migration during neuronal development. In the immune system, Sema3A has been shown to influence murine dendritic cell (DC) migration by signaling through a neuropilin (NRP)-1/plexin-A1 coreceptor axis. Potential roles for class 3 Semas in human DCs have yet to be described. We tested the hypothesis that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, each with a unique NRP-1 and/or NRP-2 binding specificity, influence human DC migration. In this report, we find that although NRP-1 and NRP-2 are expressed in human immature DCs (imDCs), NRP-2 expression increases as cells mature further, whereas expression of NRP-1 declines dramatically. Elevated levels of RNA encoding plexin-A1 and -A3 are present in both imDCs and mature DC (mDCs), supporting the relevance of Sema/NRP/plexin signaling pathways in these cells. Sema3A, -3C, and -3F bind to human DCs, with Sema3F binding predominantly through NRP-2. The binding of these Semas leads to reorganization of actin filaments at the plasma membrane and increased transwell migration in the absence or presence of chemokine CCL19. Microfluidic chamber assays failed to demonstrate consistent changes in speed of Sema3C-treated DCs, suggesting increased cell deformability as a possible explanation for enhanced transwell migration. Although monocytes express RNA encoding Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, only RNA encoding Sema3C increases robustly during DC differentiation. These data suggest that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, likely with coreceptors NRP-1, NRP-2, and plexin-A1 and/or -A3, promote migration and possibly other activities of human DCs during innate and adaptive immune responses.

  4. Matrix metalloproteinase 13 mediates nitric oxide activation of endothelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    López-Rivera, Esther; Lizarbe, Tania R.; Martínez-Moreno, Mónica; López-Novoa, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Barbero, Alicia; Rodrigo, José; Fernández, Ana Patricia; Álvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Lamas, Santiago; Zaragoza, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    To explore the mechanisms by which NO elicits endothelial cell (EC) migration we used murine and bovine aortic ECs in an in vitro wound-healing model. We found that exogenous or endogenous NO stimulated EC migration. Moreover, migration was significantly delayed in ECs derived from endothelial NO synthase-deficient mice compared with WT murine aortic EC. To assess the contribution of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 to NO-mediated EC migration, we used RNA interference to silence MMP-13 expression in ECs. Migration was delayed in cells in which MMP-13 was silenced. In untreated cells MMP-13 was localized to caveolae, forming a complex with caveolin-1. Stimulation with NO disrupted this complex and significantly increased extracellular MMP-13 abundance, leading to collagen breakdown. Our findings show that MMP-13 is an important effector of NO-activated endothelial migration. PMID:15728377

  5. Tyrosinase-Cre-Mediated Deletion of the Autophagy Gene Atg7 Leads to Accumulation of the RPE65 Variant M450 in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium of C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sukseree, Supawadee; Chen, Ying-Ting; Laggner, Maria; Gruber, Florian; Petit, Valérie; Nagelreiter, Ionela-Mariana; Mlitz, Veronika; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Pollreisz, Andreas; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Larue, Lionel; Tschachler, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Targeted gene knockout mouse models have helped to identify roles of autophagy in many tissues. Here, we investigated the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of Atg7f/f Tyr-Cre mice (on a C57BL/6 background), in which Cre recombinase is expressed under the control of the tyrosinase promoter to delete the autophagy gene Atg7. In line with pigment cell-directed blockade of autophagy, the RPE and the melanocytes of the choroid showed strong accumulation of the autophagy adaptor and substrate, sequestosome 1 (Sqstm1)/p62, relative to the levels in control mice. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis demonstrated that the RPE, but not the choroid melanocytes, of Atg7f/f Tyr-Cre mice also had strongly increased levels of retinoid isomerohydrolase RPE65, a pivotal enzyme for the maintenance of visual perception. In contrast to Sqstm1, genes involved in retinal regeneration, i.e. Lrat, Rdh5, Rgr, and Rpe65, were expressed at higher mRNA levels. Sequencing of the Rpe65 gene showed that Atg7f/f and Atg7f/f Tyr-Cre mice carry a point mutation (L450M) that is characteristic for the C57BL/6 mouse strain and reportedly causes enhanced degradation of the RPE65 protein by an as-yet unknown mechanism. These results suggest that the increased abundance of RPE65 M450 in the RPE of Atg7f/f Tyr-Cre mice is, at least partly, mediated by upregulation of Rpe65 transcription; however, our data are also compatible with the hypothesis that the RPE65 M450 protein is degraded by Atg7-dependent autophagy in Atg7f/f mice. Further studies in mice of different genetic backgrounds are necessary to determine the relative contributions of these mechanisms. PMID:27537685

  6. Balancing Cell Migration with Matrix Degradation Enhances Gene Delivery to Cells Cultured Three-Dimensionally Within Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Huang, Alyssa; Shikanova, Ariella; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2010-01-01

    In regenerative medicine, hydrogels are employed to fill defects and support the infiltration of cells that can ultimately regenerate tissue. Gene delivery within hydrogels targeting infiltrating cells has the potential to promote tissue formation, but the delivery efficiency of nonviral vectors within hydrogels is low hindering their applicability in tissue regeneration. To improve their functionality, we have conducted a mechanistic study to investigate the contribution of cell migration and matrix degradation on gene delivery. In this report, lipoplexes were entrapped within hydrogels based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) crosslinked with peptides containing matrix metalloproteinase degradable sequences. The mesh size of these hydrogels is substantially less than the size of the entrapped lipoplexes, which can function to retain vectors. Cell migration and transfection were simultaneously measured within hydrogels with varying density of cell adhesion sites (Arg-Gly-Asp peptides) and solids content. Increasing RGD density increased expression levels up to 100-fold, while greater solids content sustained expression levels for 16 days. Increasing RGD density and decreasing solids content increased cell migration, which indicates expression levels increase with increased cell migration. Initially exposing cells to vector resulted in transient expression that declined after 2 days, verifying the requirement of migration to sustain expression. Transfected cells were predominantly located within the population of migrating cells for hydrogels that supported cell migration. Although the small mesh size retained at least 70% of the lipoplexes in the absence of cells after 32 days, the presence of cells decreased retention to 10% after 16 days. These results indicate that vectors retained within hydrogels contact migrating cells, and that persistent cell migration can maintain elevated expression levels. Thus matrix degradation and cell migration are fundamental design

  7. 3D inverted colloidal crystals in realistic cell migration assays for drug screening applications.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Joakim; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Kuo, Cheng-Hwa R; Guck, Jochen; Sivaniah, Easan

    2011-12-01

    Screening drugs for their specific impact on cell mechanics, in addition to targeting adhesion and proteolysis, will be important for successfully moderating migration in infiltrative disorders including cancer metastasis. We present 3D inverted colloidal crystals made of hydrogel as a realistic cell migration assay, where the geometry and stiffness can be set independently to mimic the tissue requirements in question. We show the utility of this 3D assay for drug screening purposes, specifically in contrast to conventional 2D migration studies, by surveying the effects of commonly used cytoskeletal toxins that impact cell mechanics. This assay allows studying large cell numbers for good statistics but at single-cell resolution.

  8. GABA(B) receptors mediate motility signals for migrating embryonic cortical cells.

    PubMed

    Behar, T N; Smith, S V; Kennedy, R T; McKenzie, J M; Maric, I; Barker, J L

    2001-08-01

    During development, postmitotic neurons migrate from germinal regions into the cortical plate (cp), where lamination occurs. In rats, GABA is transiently expressed in the cp, near target destinations for migrating neurons. In vitro GABA stimulates neuronal motility, suggesting cp cells release GABA, which acts as a chemoattractant during corticogenesis. Pharmacological studies indicate GABA stimulates migration via GABA(B)-receptor (GABA(B)-R) activation. Using immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR and Western blotting, we examined embryonic cortical cell expression of GABA(B)-Rs in vivo. At E17, GABA(B)-R1(+) cells were identified in the ventricular zone (vz) and cp. RT-PCR and Western blotting demonstrated the presence of GABA(B)-R1a and GABA(B)-R1b mRNA and proteins. Using immuno- cytochemistry, GABA(B)-R expression was examined in vz and cp cell dissociates before and after migration to GABA in an in vitro chemotaxis assay. GABA-induced migration resulted in an increase of GABA(B)-R(+) cells in the migrated population. While <20% of each starting dissociate was GABA(B)-R(+), >70% of migrated cells were immunopositive. We used a microchemotaxis assay to analyze cp cell release of diffusible chemotropic factor(s). In vitro, cp dissociates induced vz cell migration in a cell density-dependent manner that was blocked by micromolar saclofen (a GABA(B)-R antagonist). HPLC demonstrated cp cells release micromolar levels of GABA and taurine in several hours. Micromolar levels of both molecules stimulated cell migration that was blocked by micromolar saclofen. Thus, migratory cortical cells express GABA(B)-Rs, cp cells release GABA and taurine, and both molecules stimulate cortical cell movement. Together these findings suggest GABA and/or taurine act as chemoattractants for neurons during rat cortical histogenesis via mechanisms involving GABA(B)-Rs.

  9. Oxytocin stimulates migration and invasion in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, M G; Chini, B; Vicentini, L M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: It has recently been reported that oxytocin is produced by some tumour cell types, and that oxytocin receptors, belonging to the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, are expressed in a variety of cell types. Among these, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) respond to oxytocin with an increased proliferation, suggesting a possible role for the hormone in the regulation of angiogenesis. Experimental approach: We employed chemotaxis and chemoinvasion assays to characterize the effect of oxytocin on HUVEC motility, and immunoblot analysis to study its molecular mechanisms of action. Key results: We showed that oxytocin stimulates migration and invasion in HUVECs via oxytocin receptor activation. Searching for the molecular mechanism(s) responsible for oxytocin's pro-migratory effect, we identified the Gq coupling of oxytocin receptors and phospholipase C (PLC) as the main effectors of oxytocin's action in HUVECs. We also found that oxytocin stimulates the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) via the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI-3-K)/AKT pathway, and that the activation of PI-3-K and formation of nitric oxide (NO) are required for the pro-migratory effect of oxytocin. Conclusions and implications: The ability of oxytocin to stimulate HUVEC motility and invasion suggests that the hormone can participate in physiopathological processes where activation of endothelial cells plays an important role, for example, in angiogenesis. Interestingly, both the AKT and eNOS phosphorylation induced by oxytocin receptor activation depended on PLC activity, thus suggesting the existence of a still undefined mechanism connecting PLC to the PI-3-K/AKT pathway, upon oxytocin stimulation. PMID:18059319

  10. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Karki, Surya B; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Ayan, Halim

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy.

  11. Cell-alignment patterns in the collective migration of cells with polarized adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Katsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum (Dd) utilizes inhomogeneities in the distribution of cell-cell adhesion molecules on cell membranes for collective cell migration. A simple example of an inhomogeneity is a front-side (leading-edge) polarization in the distribution at the early streaming stage. Experiments have shown that the polarized cell-cell adhesion induces side-by-side contact between cells [Beug et al., Nature (London) 274, 445 (1978), 10.1038/274445a0]. This result is counterintuitive, as one would expect cells to align front to front in contact with each other on the basis of front-side polarization. In this work, we theoretically examine whether front-side polarization induces side-by-side contact in collective cell migration. We construct a model for expressing cells with this polarization based on the two-dimensional cellular Potts model. By a numerical simulation with this model, we find cell-cell alignment wherein cells form lateral arrays with side-by-side contacts as observed in the experiments.

  12. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy. PMID:28243603

  13. Analysis of Histone Deacetylase-Dependent Effects on Cell Migration Using the Stripe Assay.

    PubMed

    Mertsch, Sonja; Thanos, Solon

    2017-01-01

    For normal embryonic development/morphogenesis, cell migration and homing are well-orchestrated and important events requiring specific cellular mechanisms. In diseases such as cancer deregulated cell migration represents a major problem. Therefore, numerous efforts are under way to understand the molecular mechanisms of tumor cell migration and to generate more efficient tumor therapies. Cell migration assays are one of the most commonly used functional assays. The wound-healing assay or the Boyden chamber assay are variations of these assays. Nearly all of them are two-dimensional assays and the cells can only migrate on one substrate at a time. This is in contrast to the in vivo situation where the cells are faced simultaneously with different surfaces and interact with different cell types. To approach this in vivo situation we used a modified version of the stripe assay designed by Bonhoeffer and colleagues to examine mechanisms of axonal guidance. The design of this assay allows cells to decide between two different substrates offered at the same time. Utilizing alternating neuronal substrates for migration analyses we can partially mimic the complex in vivo situation for brain tumor cells. Here we describe the detailed protocol to perform a modified version of the stripe assay in order to observe substrate-dependent migration effects in vitro, to analyze the effect of Rho-dependent kinases (ROCKS), of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and of other molecules on glioma cells.

  14. Baicalin inhibits PDGF-induced proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Li, Jian-Qiang; Bo, Jian-Ping; Wang, Bei; Tian, Xin-Rui; Liu, Tan-Zhen; Liu, Zhuo-La

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation and migration play important roles in airway remodeling in asthma. In vitro platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) induced ASM cell proliferation and migration. Baicalin is one of flavonoid extracts from Scutellaria baicalensis, which has an anti-asthma effect. However, little is known about its role in PDGF-induced proliferation and migration in rat ASM (RASM) cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of baicalin on PDGF-induced RASM cell proliferation and migration. We also identified the signaling pathway by which baicalin influences RASM cell proliferation and migration. In the current study, we demonstrated that baicalin suppressed PDGF-induced RASM cell proliferation, arrested PDGF-induced cell-cycle progression. It also suppressed PDGF-induced RASM cell migration. Furthermore, baicalin suppressed PDGF-induced expression of phosphorylated p38, ERK1/2 and JNK in RASM cells. In summary, our study is the first to show that baicalin pretreatment can significantly inhibit PDGF-induced RASM cell proliferation and migration by suppressing the MAPK signaling pathway, and baicalin may be a useful chemotherapeutic agent for asthma.

  15. A parallel and quantitative cell migration assay using a novel multi-well-based device.

    PubMed

    Quan, Qianghua; Zhang, Shuwen; Wang, Xudong; Ouyang, Qi; Wang, Yugang; Yang, Gen; Luo, Chunxiong

    2016-12-01

    Cell migration assays for different chemical environments are important for both scientists and clinicians searching for new therapeutics. In this study, we developed a multi-well-based microfluidic chip that has multiple units for different conditions. In each unit, cells can be patterned and then released to observe their migration. Automatic image analysis and model-based data processing were developed to describe the integrated cell migration assay precisely and quickly. As a demonstration, the migration behaviors of two types of cells in eight chemical conditions were studied. The results showed that supplementation with transforming growth factor-β(TGF-β) significantly promoted the migration of MCF-7 and MCF-10 A cells compared to several growth factors, such as Epidermal Growth Factor(EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor(bFGF), as well as a control sample. Cells can migrate particularly fast with two or more mixed supplementary factors, such as TGF-β + bFGF + EGF, which indicated a synergy effect. Thus, this chip could be used to quantitatively observe cancer cell migration and demonstrated great potential for use in quantitative migration studies and chemical screening.

  16. Lipid raft association restricts CD44-ezrin interaction and promotion of breast cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Donatello, Simona; Babina, Irina S; Hazelwood, Lee D; Hill, Arnold D K; Nabi, Ivan R; Hopkins, Ann M

    2012-12-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration.

  17. X-ray microprobe analysis of the retina and RPE in sheep with ovine ceroid-lipofuscinosis

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, D.A.; Armstrong, D.; Jolly, R. )

    1990-11-01

    Ovine ceroid-lipofuscinosis (OCL) is one animal model for the human condition, and because autofluorescent lipopigments are prominent in the brain and eye, it may also prove useful as a model for aging. For example, a progressive decline in electrical recording from brain and retina are observed in both aging and OCL. Samples of retinal and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) tissues were obtained from a young control. 2 animals with OCL and a normal aged sheep. Specimens were cryo-fractured and examined by scanning electron microscopy/x-ray microanalysis. Measurements made of 6 individual cells in the ganglion layer of OCL specimens, the remainder of the retina, and RPE showed age-related changes in zinc, iron, and copper which were associated with lipopigment accumulation in the RPE. There was marked decrease in phosphate, sulfur, and manganese levels, as photoreceptor cells and their outer segments are lost in the disease process. This is the first report of metal analysis in the retina and RPE in a disease entity, and as a function of normal aging.

  18. Regulatory Effects of Urokinase on Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Migration, Proliferation, and Matrix Metalloproteinase Secretion.

    PubMed

    Beloglazova, I B; Zubkova, E S; Tsokolaeva, Z I; Stafeev, Yu S; Dergilev, K V; Ratner, E I; Shestakova, M V; Sukhareva, O Yu; Parfenova, E V; Men'shikov, M Yu

    2016-10-01

    We studied the effect of urokinase, its recombinant forms, and domain fragments on migration and proliferation of adipose tissue mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and MMP secretion by these cells. Urokinase, but not its recombinant forms, slightly induced directed migration of MSCs. Spontaneous migration of MSCs increased under the action of urokinase or its isolated kringle domain. Migration induced by platelet-derived growth factor was inhibited by proteolytically inactive form of urokinase, the kringle domain, and blocking antibody to urokinase receptor. Urokinase, its proteolytically inactive form, and kringle domain produced no effect on MSC proliferation. In contrast to platelet-derived growth factor, all urokinase forms induced secretion of MMP-9 by MSCs.

  19. PLEKHG3 enhances polarized cell migration by activating actin filaments at the cell front

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Thi Thu; Park, Wei Sun; Park, Byung Ouk; Kim, Cha Yeon; Oh, Yohan; Kim, Jin Man; Choi, Hana; Kyung, Taeyoon; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Lee, Gabsang; Hahn, Klaus M.; Meyer, Tobias; Heo, Won Do

    2016-01-01

    Cells migrate by directing Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and cell division control protein 42 (Cdc42) activities and by polymerizing actin toward the leading edge of the cell. Previous studies have proposed that this polarization process requires a local positive feedback in the leading edge involving Rac small GTPase and actin polymerization with PI3K likely playing a coordinating role. Here, we show that the pleckstrin homology and RhoGEF domain containing G3 (PLEKHG3) is a PI3K-regulated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RhoGEF) for Rac1 and Cdc42 that selectively binds to newly polymerized actin at the leading edge of migrating fibroblasts. Optogenetic inactivation of PLEKHG3 showed that PLEKHG3 is indispensable both for inducing and for maintaining cell polarity. By selectively binding to newly polymerized actin, PLEKHG3 promotes local Rac1/Cdc42 activation to induce more local actin polymerization, which in turn promotes the recruitment of more PLEKHG3 to induce and maintain cell front. Thus, autocatalytic reinforcement of PLEKHG3 localization to the leading edge of the cell provides a molecular basis for the proposed positive feedback loop that is required for cell polarization and directed migration. PMID:27555588