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Sample records for rpe65-deficient dogs treated

  1. Regulation of retinal function but nonrescue of vision in RPE65-deficient dogs treated with doxycycline-regulatable AAV vectors.

    PubMed

    Lhériteau, Elsa; Libeau, Lyse; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Provost, Nathalie; Guihal, Caroline; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2010-06-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated that recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene transfer of the doxycycline (Dox)-regulatable system allows for the regulation of erythropoietin (EPO) expression in the retina of nonhuman primates after intravenous or oral administration of Dox. In addition, it was shown that administrating different amounts of Dox resulted in a dose-response dynamic of transgene expression. Adeno-associated viral gene therapy has raised hope for the treatment of patients with Leber congenital amaurosis, caused by mutations in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-specific gene RPE65. The preliminary results of three clinical trials suggest some improvement in visual function. However, further improvements might be necessary to optimize vision recovery and this means developing vectors able to generate transgene expression at physiological levels. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of the Dox-regulatable system to regulate retinal function in RPE65(-/-) Briard dogs. rAAV vectors expressing RPE65 under the control of either the TetOff and TetOn Dox-regulated promoters or the cytomegalovirus (CMV) constitutive promoter were generated and administered subretinally to seven RPE65-deficient dogs. We demonstrate that the induction and deinduction of retinal function, as assessed by electroretinography (ERG), can be achieved using a Dox-regulatable system, but do not lead to any recovery of vision.

  2. RPE65 gene therapy slows cone loss in Rpe65-deficient dogs.

    PubMed

    Mowat, F M; Breuwer, A R; Bartoe, J T; Annear, M J; Zhang, Z; Smith, A J; Bainbridge, J W B; Petersen-Jones, S M; Ali, R R

    2013-05-01

    Recent clinical trials of retinal pigment epithelium gene (RPE65) supplementation therapy in Leber congenital amaurosis type 2 patients have demonstrated improvements in rod and cone function, but it may be some years before the effects of therapy on photoreceptor survival become apparent. The Rpe65-deficient dog is a very useful pre-clinical model in which to test efficacy of therapies, because the dog has a retina with a high degree of similarity to that of humans. In this study, we evaluated the effect of RPE65 gene therapy on photoreceptor survival in order to predict the potential benefit and limitations of therapy in patients. We examined the retinas of Rpe65-deficient dogs after RPE65 gene therapy to evaluate the preservation of rods and cone photoreceptor subtypes. We found that gene therapy preserves both rods and cones. While the moderate loss of rods in the Rpe65-deficient dog retina is slowed by gene therapy, S-cones are lost extensively and gene therapy can prevent that loss, although only within the treated area. Although LM-cones are not lost extensively, cone opsin mislocalization indicates that they are stressed, and this can be partially reversed by gene therapy. Our results suggest that gene therapy may be able to slow cone degeneration in patients if intervention is sufficiently early and also that it is probably important to treat the macula in order to preserve central function.

  3. Successful gene therapy in older Rpe65-deficient dogs following subretinal injection of an adeno-associated vector expressing RPE65.

    PubMed

    Annear, Matthew J; Mowat, Freya M; Bartoe, Joshua T; Querubin, Janice; Azam, Selina A; Basche, Mark; Curran, Paul G; Smith, Alexander J; Bainbridge, James W B; Ali, Robin R; Petersen-Jones, Simon M

    2013-10-01

    Young Rpe65-deficient dogs have been used as a model for human RPE65 Leber congenital amaurosis (RPE65-LCA) in proof-of-concept trials of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene therapy. However, there are relatively few reports of the outcome of rAAV gene therapy in Rpe65-deficient dogs older than 2 years of age. The purpose of this study was to investigate the success of this therapy in older Rpe65-deficient dogs. Thirteen eyes were treated in dogs between 2 and 6 years old. An rAAV2 vector expressing the human RPE65 cDNA driven by the human RPE65 promoter was delivered by subretinal injection. Twelve of the 13 eyes had improved retinal function as assessed by electroretinography, and all showed improvement in vision at low lighting intensities. Histologic examination of five of the eyes was performed but found no correlation between electroretinogram (ERG) rescue and numbers of remaining photoreceptors. We conclude that functional rescue is still possible in older dogs and that the use of older Rpe65-deficient dogs, rather than young Rpe65-deficient dogs that have very little loss of photoreceptors, more accurately models the situation when treating human RPE65-LCA patients.

  4. Gene therapy in the second eye of RPE65-deficient dogs improves retinal function

    PubMed Central

    Annear, MJ; Bartoe, JT; Barker, SE; Smith, AJ; Curran, PG; Bainbridge, JW; Ali, RR; Petersen-Jones, SM

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether immune responses interfered with gene therapy rescue using subretinally delivered recombinant adeno-associated viral vector serotype 2 carrying the RPE65 cDNA gene driven by the human RPE65 promoter (rAAV2.hRPE65p.hRPE65) in the second eye of RPE65−/− dogs that had previously been treated in a similar manner in the other eye. Bilateral subretinal injection was performed in nine dogs with the second eye treated 85–180 days after the first. Electroretinography (ERG) and vision testing showed rescue in 16 of 18 treated eyes, with no significant difference between first and second treated eyes. A serum neutralizing antibody (NAb) response to rAAV2 was detected in all treated animals, but this did not prevent or reduce the effectiveness of rescue in the second treated eye. We conclude that successful rescue using subretinal rAAV2.hRPE65p.hRPE65 gene therapy in the second eye is not precluded by prior gene therapy in the contralateral eye of the RPE65−/− dog. This finding has important implications for the treatment of human LCA type II patients. PMID:20703309

  5. Immuno-histochemical analysis of rod and cone reaction to RPE65 deficiency in the inferior and superior canine retina.

    PubMed

    Klein, Daniela; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Schlegel, Patrice; Rolling, Fabienne; Lorenz, Birgit; Haverkamp, Silke; Stieger, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the RPE65 gene are associated with autosomal recessive early onset severe retinal dystrophy. Morphological and functional studies indicate early and dramatic loss of rod photoreceptors and early loss of S-cone function, while L and M cones remain initially functional. The Swedish Briard dog is a naturally occurring animal model for this disease. Detailed information about rod and cone reaction to RPE65 deficiency in this model with regard to their location within the retina remains limited. The aim of this study was to analyze morphological parameters of cone and rod viability in young adult RPE65 deficient dogs in different parts of the retina in order to shed light on local disparities in this disease. In retinae of affected dogs, sprouting of rod bipolar cell dendrites and horizontal cell processes was dramatically increased in the inferior peripheral part of affected retinae, while central inferior and both superior parts did not display significantly increased sprouting. This observation was correlated with photoreceptor cell layer thickness. Interestingly, while L/M cone opsin expression was uniformly reduced both in the superior and inferior part of the retina, S-cone opsin expression loss was less severe in the inferior part of the retina. In summary, in retinae of young adult RPE65 deficient dogs, the degree of rod bipolar and horizontal cell sprouting as well as of S-cone opsin expression depends on the location. As the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is pigmented similar to the RPE in the inferior part of the canine retina, and the kinetics of photoreceptor degeneration in humans seems to be similar to what has been observed in the inferior peripheral retina in dogs, this area should be studied in future gene therapy experiments in this model.

  6. Eye movement recordings as an effectiveness indicator of gene therapy in RPE65-deficient canines: implications for the ocular motor system.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jonathan B; Dell'Osso, Louis F; Hertle, Richard W; Acland, Gregory M; Bennett, Jean

    2006-07-01

    To perform ocular motility recordings of infantile nystagmus (IN) in RPE65-deficient canines and determine whether they can be used as a motor indicator of restored retinal function to investigate the effects of gene therapy. Treated and untreated canines were comfortably suspended in a custom-built sling and encouraged to fixate on distant targets at gaze angles varying between +/-15 degrees horizontally and +/-10 degrees vertically. Ocular motility recordings were made, using two distinct methods-infrared reflection and high-speed video. The resultant recordings from three untreated, four treated, and three pre- and post-treatment dogs were analyzed for using the eXpanded Nystagmus Acuity Function (NAFX), which yields an objective assessment of best potential visual acuity, based on the duration and repeatable accuracy of foveation and centralisation. During fixation, the untreated dogs exhibited large-amplitude, classic IN waveforms, including pendular and jerk in both the horizontal and vertical planes, which prevented them from keeping the targets within the area centralis (the region of highest receptor density, spanning +/-3 degrees horizontally by +/-1.5 degrees vertically, analogous to the fovea). Some untreated dogs also had small-amplitude (0.5-1 degrees), high-frequency (6-9 Hz) oscillations. Under the same conditions, successfully treated canines no longer exhibited clinically detectable IN. Their IN was converted to waveforms with very low amplitudes that yielded higher NAFX values and allowed target images to remain well within the area centralis. Of note, uniocular treatment appeared to damp the IN in both eyes. Behaviorally, the treated dogs were able to successfully navigate through obstacles more easily without inadvertent contact, a task beyond the untreated dogs' ability. Gene therapy that successfully restored retinal function also reduced the accompanying IN to such a great extent that it was not clinically detectable approximately 90% of the

  7. Treating Cushing's Disease in Dogs

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Treating Cushing's Disease in Dogs Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Disease Treating Cushing's Disease Your 9-year old dog has been drinking a lot more lately and ...

  8. Behavioural changes in dogs treated with corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Notari, Lorella; Burman, Oliver; Mills, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    In human medicine, psychiatric side effects among patients on corticosteroid therapy are widely reported, but this appears to have been largely overlooked in the animal literature despite glucocorticoids being widely used in veterinary medicine. Therefore the aim of the current study was to identify possible psycho-behavioural changes in dogs treated with corticosteroids. Two different methodologies were used. Firstly, dog owners were asked to fill a 12 item questionnaire aimed at further validating the initial results of a previous survey relating to changes seen when their dog was receiving corticosteroid treatment. In a second study, a population of dogs undertook behavioural tests aimed at objectively identifying changes when receiving corticosteroid therapy. In the first study, a sample of owners whose dogs were receiving treatment for dermatological, orthopaedic or other conditions evaluated their dogs' behaviour on and off therapy, using a seven point scale. The survey was completed by 44 dog owners with dogs receiving treatment with a range of corticosteroid preparations (mainly prednisolone and methylprednisolone) and 54 dog owners with dogs receiving treatment with other drugs, mainly antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Dogs under corticosteroid treatment were reported to be significantly less playful, more nervous/restless, more fearful/less confident, more aggressive in the presence of food, more prone to barking, more prone to startle, more prone to reacting aggressively when disturbed, and more prone to avoiding people or unusual situations. In the second study, eleven “treatment” dogs were tested both before and during corticosteroid treatment with either methyl-prednisolone or prednisolone to assess their sensitivity to a potentially aversive sound stimulus. Eleven control dogs were also tested at the same time intervals in the same environment. Dogs were exposed to a brief dog growl while they explored bowls containing food

  9. Kidney allograft survival in dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, R.J.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Lum, C.T.; Lewis, W.I.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1981-02-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) is immunosuppressive and, in rodents, can induce a state where transplantation of allogenic bone marrow results in chimerism and permanent acceptance of organ allografts from the donor strain. Twelve splenectomized dogs were treated with TLI (150 rads per fraction, total dose 1950 to 3000 rads) before bilateral nephrectomy and renal allotransplantation. Eight dogs received bone marrow from the kidney donor. In 13 untreated control dogs renal allografts functioned for a mean +- (SE) of 4.7 +- 0.3 days. In the four TLI treated dogs who did not receive bone marrow the renal allografts functioned for 15 to 76 days (two dogs died with functioning grafts). In the eight TLI treated dogs who received donor bone marrow, two died immediately after transplantation, two rejected at 3 and 13 days, one died at 13 days with a functioning graft, and two have had the grafts function for longer than 500 days. Chimerism was not detected in the one dog tested. The response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to stimulation with phytohemaglutinin and in mixed lymphocyte culture was suppressed for at least one month after TLI. The results confirm the immunosuppressive effect of TLI. The absence of kidney rejection in two recipients of donor bone marrow show the potential of this approach to induce long-term immunologic unresponsiveness as to an organ allograft, but the outcome is unpredictable and further experiments are needed to define the optimal conditions for administration of TLI and bone marrow to the recipients.

  10. Intranasal melanoma treated with radiation therapy in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Davies, Owen; Spencer, Sarah; Necova, Slavomira; Holmes, Emma; Taylor, Angela; Blackwood, Laura; Lara-Garcia, Ana

    2017-10-06

    Three dogs were investigated for chronic unilateral nasal discharge. In all cases CT imaging showed an intranasal mass causing turbinate lysis and no evidence of metastasis. Cytology in cases 1 (a 14-year-old neutered male crossbreed dog) and 2 (a five-year-old neutered male German Shepherd dog) demonstrated a pleomorphic cell population with variable intracellular pigment suspicious of melanocytic neoplasia. Histopathology with immunohistochemistry (Melan-A and vimentin, plus PNL-2 in one case) confirmed the diagnosis of melanoma in all dogs. All dogs were treated with megavoltage radiotherapy using linear accelerators. Cases 1 and 3 (a 9-year-old neutered female beagle dog) received a hypofractionated (4 × 8 Gy) protocol and case 2 received a definitive (12 × 4 Gy) protocol. Complete remission was demonstrated on repeat CT scan 5 months after diagnosis in case 1 and 7 months in case 2. Stable disease was documented on CT at four months for case 3, however, clinical signs in this dog remained controlled for 10 months in total. Case 1 died of unrelated causes 5 months after diagnosis, case 2 was euthanased due to the development of seizures 13 months after diagnosis, and case 3 was lost to follow-up 12 months after diagnosis. Melanoma should be considered as a rare differential diagnosis for primary nasal neoplasia in the dog and radiation therapy can be used as effective local therapy.

  11. Determination of six illegal antibiotics in chicken jerky dog treats.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Robert; Mirabile, Jennifer; Hafler, Kristen

    2014-04-30

    In 2007 chicken jerky dog treats were implicated in causing illnesses and death in dogs in several countries. Affected dogs were diagnosed with acquired Fanconi syndrome, which is characterized by kidney malfunction. Known causes of this condition include a chemical assault by various contaminants including certain drugs. For this reason investigations into possible causes of the illnesses included antibiotics that may be used in animal husbandry. Targeted analyte screens of individual imported chicken jerky dog treats using LC-MS/MS detected six illegal antibiotics in imported products of several brands. Trimethoprim, tilmicosin, enrofloxacin, sulfaclozine, and sulfamethoxazole are not allowed in chicken at any level and were found as high as 2800 ng/g (ppb). Sulfaquinoxaline was found in chicken jerky treats as high as 800 ng/g, which is well above the U.S. FDA tolerance of 100 ng/g. Although there is no evidence these contaminants were responsible for the dog illnesses, their misuse could contribute to antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria.

  12. Olfactory esthesioneuroblastoma treated with orthovoltage radiotherapy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ueno, H; Kobayashi, Y; Yamada, K

    2007-07-01

    A 13-year-old neutered female mongrel dog presented with a 1-year history of stertorous respiration. On computed tomography examination, a mass was demonstrated in the nasal cavity. Open biopsy of the mass was performed and a diagnosis of olfactory esthesioneuroblastoma was made on histological examination. The dog was treated with orthovoltage x-ray radiation (total dose; 53 Gy given in 14 fractions over an 8 week period). Computed tomography after the twelfth irradiation revealed that tumour size had decreased. Although clinical signs were absent in the 4 months after irradiation, re-growth of the tumour was detected by radiographic evaluation and histological examination. The dog was again treated with orthovoltage x-ray radiation (total dose; 30 Gy given in three fractions over a 4-week period), however, tumour regrowth was again detected 3 months later. Clinical treatment of this tumour type has not been previously reported.

  13. Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in Dogs Treated with Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Tina; Mueller, Ralf S.; Dobenecker, Britta; Fischer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders in dogs and life-long treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AED) is frequently required. Adverse events of AED targeting the skin are only rarely reported in veterinary medicine and the true incidence and spectrum of cutaneous reactions in epileptic dogs remains unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that cutaneous reactions commonly occur in epileptic dogs and are related to AED treatment. A retrospective case review of 185 dogs treated for epilepsy identified 20.0% with simultaneous appearance of dermatologic signs. In a subsequent prospective case investigation (n = 137), we identified newly appearing or distinct worsening of skin lesions following initiation of AED therapy in 10.9% of dogs treated for epilepsy (95% CI 6.8–17.7%). Cutaneous lesions were classified as probably drug-induced in 40.0% of these cases. Patch testing and intradermal testing were further investigated as potential diagnostic methods to confirm AED hypersensitivity. They were of high specificity but sensitivity and positive predictive value appeared inappropriate to recommend their routine use in clinical practice. PMID:27148543

  14. Efficacy of nitazoxanide to treat natural Giardia infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Moron-Soto, Mario; Gutierrez, Lilia; Sumano, Héctor; Tapia, Graciela; Alcala-Canto, Yazmin

    2017-01-31

    Giardia parasites cause gastrointestinal disease in humans, dogs, and many other animals worldwide. The treatment of dogs for giardiasis requires further investigation to ascertain levels of drug efficacy and the possibility of adverse side effects. Nitazoxanide (NTZ) has shown good clinical anti-Giardia activity in humans, yet it has not been evaluated for the treatment of giardiasis in dogs. Thirty-five dogs, naturally infected with Giardia were divided into five groups (n = 7): dogs in group NTZ1, NTZ2, and NTZ3 were treated with a single oral dose of 37.5 mg/kg, 75 mg/kg, and 150 mg/kg, respectively, of NTZ on days 0 and 14. The fourth group was treated with a commercially available regimen that includes a combination of pyrantel, praziquantel, and febantel (FEB) administered orally for three consecutive days. Additionally, an untreated control group was established. Giardia cysts from the stool of each dog were quantified on days -3, 0, 5, 7, 9, 11, 14, 18, 25, and 28. Biochemical parameters were evaluated in all dogs, before the first treatment and after concluding the experiment. Shedding of Giardia cysts was reduced in all treated groups when compared to untreated controls (P < 0.01). However, NTZ2, NTZ3, and FEB had a lower risk during the study. Furthermore, NTZ was also effective against another protozoan, Cryptosporidium spp. at doses of 75 mg/kg and 150 mg/kg, in contrast to the combination of febantel + pyrantel + praziquantel. Biochemical parameters of treated animals, namely, aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase enzymes, remained within physiological ranges. Based on these results, the implementation of NTZ as a treatment for giardiasis in dogs is proposed. The administration of a single dose is an important advantage of NTZ because it reduces workload, particularly in animals placed in shelters and kennels, where handling of large numbers of animals is required, and personnel is frequently scarce.

  15. Coenzyme Q10 and Cognition in atorvastatin treated dogs

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sarah B.; Cenini, Giovanna; Barone, Eugenio; Dowling, Amy L.S.; Mancuso, Cesare; Butterfield, D. Allan; Murphy, M. Paul; Head, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Statins have been suggested to protect against Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recently, however, we reported that aged dogs that underwent chronic statin treatment exhibited cognitive deficits compared with age matched controls. In human studies, blood levels of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) decrease with statin use. CoQ10 is important for proper mitochondrial function and is a powerful antioxidant, two important factors for cognitive health in aging. Thus, the current study tested the hypothesis that CoQ10 levels in the serum and/or parietal cortex are decreased in statin treated dogs and are associated with poorer cognition. Six aged beagles (>8 years) were administered 80 mg/day of atorvastatin for 14.5 months and compared with placebo-treated animals. As predicted, serum CoQ10 was significantly lower in statin-treated dogs. Parietal cortex CoQ10 was not different between the two groups. However, poorer cognition was correlated with lower parietal cortex CoQ10. This study in dogs suggests that serum CoQ10 is reduced with atorvastatin treatment. CoQ10 levels in brain may linked to impaired cognition in response to atorvastatin, in agreement with previous reports that statins may have a negative impact on cognition in the elderly. PMID:21763754

  16. Mandibular necrosis in beagle dogs treated with bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Burr, DB; Allen, MR

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To test the effect of bisphosphonate (BP) treatment for up to 3 years on bone necrosis and osteocyte death in the mandible using a canine model. Materials and Methods Dogs were treated with clinical doses of oral alendronate (ALN, 0.2 mg/kg/day or 1.0 mg/kg/day) for 1 or 3 years. In a separate study, dogs were treated with intravenous zoledronate (ZOL) at 0.06 mg/kg/day for 6 months. En bloc staining was used to identify necrotic areas in the mandible; viable osteocytes were identified using lacatate dehydrogenase. Results None of the treatments were associated with exposed bone, but 17–25% of dogs treated for one year and 25–33% of dogs treated for three years with ALN showed pockets of dead bone. Necrotic areas had no viable osteocytes and were void of patent canaliculi. No control animals demonstrated necrotic bone. ZOL treatment for 6 months was associated with osteocyte death greater than that seen in animals treated with ALN or saline. It is not clear whether osteocyte death occurs because of direct toxic effects of BPs, or because suppressed remodeling fails to renew areas that naturally undergo cell death. However, necrotic areas are associated with bone other than the mandible, e.g., the rib, which normally undergo high rates of remodeling. Conclusions Reduced remodeling rate using BPs may contribute to the pathogenesis for bone matrix necrosis. The development of an animal model that mimics important aspects of BP-related osteonecrosis of the jaw is important to understanding the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis. PMID:19627524

  17. Features of Brain MRI in Dogs with Treated and Untreated Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I

    PubMed Central

    Vite, Charles H; Nestrasil, Igor; Mlikotic, Anton; Jens, Jackie K; Snella, Elizabeth M; Gross, William; Shapiro, Elsa G; Kovac, Victor; Provenzale, James M; Chen, Steven; Le, Steven Q; Kan, Shih-hsin; Banakar, Shida; Wang, Raymond Y; Haskins, Mark E; Ellinwood, N Matthew; Dickson, Patricia I

    2013-01-01

    The mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) dog model has been important in the development of therapies for human patients. We treated dogs with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) by various approaches. Dogs assessed included untreated MPS I dogs, heterozygous carrier dogs, and MPS I dogs treated with intravenous ERT as adults (beginning at age 13 to 16 mo), intrathecal and intravenous ERT as adults (beginning at age 13 to 16 mo), or intrathecal ERT as juveniles (beginning at age 4 mo). We then characterized the neuroimaging findings of 32 of these dogs (age, 12 to 30 mo). Whole and midsagittal volumes of the corpus callosum, measured from brain MRI, were significantly smaller in affected dogs compared with unaffected heterozygotes. Corpus callosum volumes in dogs that were treated with intrathecal ERT from 4 mo until 21 mo of age were indistinguishable from those of age-matched carrier controls. Dogs with MPS I showed cerebral ventricular enlargement and cortical atrophy as early as 12 mo of age. Ventricular enlargement was greater in untreated MPS I dogs than in age-matched dogs treated with intrathecal ERT as juveniles or adults. However, treated dogs still showed some ventricular enlargement or cortical atrophy (or both). Understanding the progression of neuroimaging findings in dogs with MPS I and their response to brain-directed therapy may improve preclinical studies for new human-directed therapies. In particular, corpus callosum volumes may be useful quantitative neuroimaging markers for MPS-related brain disease and its response to therapy. PMID:23582423

  18. Hematologic improvement in dogs with parvovirus infection treated with recombinant canine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Duffy, A; Dow, S; Ogilvie, G; Rao, S; Hackett, T

    2010-08-01

    Previously, dogs with canine parvovirus-induced neutropenia have not responded to treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). However, recombinant canine G-CSF (rcG-CSF) has not been previously evaluated for treatment of parvovirus-induced neutropenia in dogs. We assessed the effectiveness of rcG-CSF in dogs with parvovirus-induced neutropenia with a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized clinical trial. Endpoints of our study were time to recovery of WBC and neutrophil counts, and duration of hospitalization. 28 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia were treated with rcG-CSF and outcomes were compared to those of 34 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia not treated with rcG-CSF. We found that mean WBC and neutrophil counts were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the 28 dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to disease-matched dogs not treated with rcG-CSF. In addition, the mean duration of hospitalization was reduced (P = 0.01) in rcG-CSF treated dogs compared to untreated dogs. However, survival times were decreased in dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to untreated dogs. These results suggest that treatment with rcG-CSF was effective in stimulating neutrophil recovery and shortening the duration of hospitalization in dogs with parvovirus infection, but indicate the need for additional studies to evaluate overall safety of the treatment.

  19. Frequency of vomiting during the postoperative period in hydromorphone-treated dogs undergoing orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Stern, Leah C; Palmisano, Matthew P

    2012-08-01

    To determine the frequency of postoperative vomiting in dogs undergoing routine orthopedic surgery that were treated with hydromorphone and whether that frequency would vary on the basis of administration route. Noncontrolled clinical trial. Animals-58 client-owned dogs with cranial cruciate ligament deficiency. Before surgery, all dogs received hydromorphone (0.1 mg/kg [0.045 mg/lb], IM or IV) and 41 dogs also received acepromazine. Anesthesia was induced with diazepam and propofol and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Dogs subsequently underwent surgical stabilization of the stifle joint. After surgery, dogs were randomly assigned to receive hydromorphone (0.1 mg/kg) via one of the following routes: IM, IV quickly (for 1 to 2 seconds), or IV slowly (for approx 1 minute). Dogs were monitored for vomiting. A median of 4 doses of hydromorphone/dog was administered after surgery. One dog was observed to regurgitate once prior to postoperative IM administration of hydromorphone; no dogs vomited at any point during the study period, regardless of the method of hydromorphone administration. The method of hydromorphone administration had no apparent effect on the likelihood of dogs vomiting. Because no dogs vomited, a particular administration method cannot be recommended. However, findings suggested that hydromorphone can be administered to dogs following orthopedic surgery without a clinically important risk of vomiting or regurgitation.

  20. Spinal Arachnoid Diverticula: Outcome in 96 Medically or Surgically Treated Dogs.

    PubMed

    Mauler, D A; De Decker, S; De Risio, L; Volk, H A; Dennis, R; Gielen, I; Van der Vekens, E; Goethals, K; Van Ham, L

    2017-05-01

    Little is reported about the role of medical management in the treatment of spinal arachnoid diverticula (SAD) in dogs. To describe the outcome of 96 dogs treated medically or surgically for SAD. Ninety-six dogs with SAD. Retrospective case series. Medical records were searched for spinal arachnoid diverticula and all dogs with information on treatment were included. Outcome was assessed with a standardized questionnaire. Fifty dogs were managed medically and 46 dogs were treated surgically. Dogs that underwent surgery were significantly younger than dogs that received medical management. No other variables, related to clinical presentation, were significantly different between both groups of dogs. The median follow-up time was 16 months (1-90 months) in the medically treated and 23 months (1-94 months) in the surgically treated group. Of the 38 dogs treated surgically with available long-term follow-up, 82% (n = 31) improved, 3% (n = 1) remained stable and 16% (n = 6) deteriorated after surgery. Of the 37 dogs treated medically with available long-term follow-up, 30% (n = 11) improved, 30% (n = 11) remained stable, and 40% (n = 15) deteriorated. Surgical treatment was more often associated with clinical improvement compared to medical management (P = .0002). The results of this study suggest that surgical treatment might be superior to medical treatment in the management of SAD in dogs. Further studies with standardized patient care are warranted. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  1. S100β Levels in CSF of Nonambulatory Dogs with Intervertebral Disk Disease Treated with Electroacupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Murata Hayashi, Ayne; Fonseca Pinto, Ana Carolina Brandão Campos; Cortopassi, Silvia Renata Gaido; Marvulle, Valdecir; Ruivo Maximino, Jessica; Chadi, Gerson; Matera, Julia Maria

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate S100β levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of nonambulatory dogs with intervertebral disk disease treated with electroacupuncture: 10 dogs with thoracolumbar disk extrusion graded 3 to 5 (EA group) and 7 dogs without neurologic dysfunction (control group). All dogs regained ambulation. S100β was detected by Western blot analysis where EA group dogs were evaluated at two time points (M1 = before EA and M2 = when the dogs return ambulation) and at one time point from control group. In EA group dogs M1-S100β levels were significantly higher than in control group. EA group dogs were divided into subgroups A (n = 7—early motor recovery; 6.7 ± 7.8 days) and B (n = 3—late motor recovery; 76 ± 17.0 days). M1-S100β levels were similar between subgroups A and B. However, M2-S100β levels were significantly higher in subgroup B than in subgroup A. An elevated S100β levels were observed in dogs with late motor recovery. S100β may be associated with neuroplasticity following spinal cord injuries with intervertebral disk extrusion. Further studies with larger numbers of subjects and control group with affected dogs are necessary to investigate the relationship between neurotrophic factors and electroacupuncture stimulation. PMID:26464906

  2. Outcome of 45 dogs with laryngeal paralysis treated by unilateral arytenoid lateralization or bilateral ventriculocordectomy.

    PubMed

    Bahr, Katherine L; Howe, Lisa; Jessen, Carl; Goodrich, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess risk factors and complications affecting postoperative outcome of dogs with laryngeal paralysis treated by either unilateral arytenoid lateralization (UAL) or bilateral ventriculocordectomy (VCC). Medical records of all dogs having either UAL or VCC between 2000 and 2011 were analyzed. Twenty-five dogs had VCC and 20 dogs had UAL. The overall postoperative complications rates for VCC and UAL were similar (52% and 60%, respectively; P = .0887). Dogs that had UAL were more likely to have acute postoperative respiratory distress and aspiration pneumonia (P = .0526). Dogs with VCC were more likely to have chronic postoperative respiratory distress and aspiration pneumonia (P = .0079). Revision surgery was required in 6 dogs (24%) following VCC and 2 dogs (10%) following UAL. Sex, breed, presenting complaint, type of service provided, and concurrent diseases were not significantly associated with higher risk of either death or decreased survival time postoperatively with either procedure. Overall postoperative complication rates, required revision surgeries, and episodes of aspiration pneumonia were similar in dogs undergoing UAL and VCC surgeries. Dogs that had VCC appeared to have an increased risk of lifelong complications postoperatively compared with UAL; therefore, VCC may not be the optimal choice for treatment of laryngeal paralysis.

  3. Clinical signs and outcome of dogs treated medically for degenerative lumbosacral stenosis: 98 cases (2004-2012).

    PubMed

    De Decker, Steven; Wawrzenski, Lauren A; Volk, Holger A

    2014-08-15

    To compare clinical signs of dogs treated medically or surgically for degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) and assess outcome after medical treatment. Retrospective case series. Client-owned dogs treated medically (n = 49) or surgically (49) for DLSS. Medical records from 2004 to 2012 were reviewed. Dogs were included if they had clinical signs, clinical examination findings, and MRI abnormalities consistent with DLSS. Several variables were compared between surgically and medically treated dogs: age, sex, duration of clinical signs, presence or absence of neurologic deficits, urinary and fecal incontinence, concurrent medical conditions, and medical treatment before referral. Medical treatment after obtaining a final diagnosis of DLSS consisted of restricted exercise in combination with anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs. Surgical treatment consisted of dorsal lumbosacral laminectomy. Outcome for medically treated dogs was obtained via a standardized questionnaire. Neurologic deficits were observed significantly more often in surgically treated dogs. Surgically treated dogs had unsuccessful medical treatment before referral significantly more often than did medically treated dogs. Thirty-one of 49 (63.3%) medically treated dogs were available for follow-up evaluation. Of these 31 dogs, 17 (55%) were managed successfully, 10 (32.3%) were managed unsuccessfully and underwent surgical treatment, 3 (9.7%) were euthanized because of progression of clinical signs, and 1 (3.2%) was alive but had an increase in severity of clinical signs after medical management. Clinical signs differed in dogs treated medically or surgically for DLSS. Medical treatment for dogs with DLSS was associated with a fair prognosis.

  4. "Who's been a good dog?" - Owner perceptions and motivations for treat giving.

    PubMed

    White, G A; Ward, L; Pink, C; Craigon, J; Millar, K M

    2016-09-15

    Complex relationships commonly exist between owners and their companion animals, particularly around feeding behaviour with an owner's affection or love for their animal most pronounced through the provision of food. It is notable that the pet food market is experiencing strong year-on-year growth in sales of dog and cat treats. Recognising the impact of treat giving in pet nutrition, the objective of the study was to investigate owner attitudes and motivations towards feeding treats (shop bought and other) to their dogs. A researcher-mediated questionnaire consisting of both quantitative and qualitative questions was used to interview dog owners (n=280) at two locations: an out-of-town retail park and a country park in the East Midlands. Owners almost unanimously viewed the word 'treat' within a nutritional context, as opposed to a new toy or other pleasure. The majority (96%) of owners interviewed reported feeding treats to their dog, with 69% feeding shop-bought treats on a daily basis. A wide range of treats was reportedly given by owners and the majority of owners interviewed fed multiple treat types. No association was found between owner age and frequency of shop-bought treats fed (P=0.659) nor between owner age and frequency of food given to the dog from the owner's plate (P=0.083). A wide range of foods which would not be considered balanced for the animal's nutritional requirements was viewed as a treat by some dog owners. A range of positive and negative views around the feeding of treats were expressed by dog owners, with some citing beneficial effects while others were clearly aware of the association between treat feeding and potential weight gain/obesity. Owner views included themes around positive reinforcement and responsibility but also reflected relational aspects of the human-animal bond. The results of the study show that treat giving is commonplace in feeding regimes and that treats are embedded in the feeding behaviour of many dog owners

  5. Use of lufenuron for treating fungal infections of dogs and cats: 297 cases (1997-1999).

    PubMed

    Ben-Ziony, Y; Arzi, B

    2000-11-15

    To evaluate use of lufenuron for treating cutaneous fungal infections in dogs and cats. Retrospective study. 156 dogs and 201 cats with dermatophytosis or superficial dermatomycoses. Medical records were reviewed for dogs and cats that had been treated for dermatophytosis or other fungal infections by administration of lufenuron and 18 dogs and 42 cats that were not treated and served as a control group. Dogs were treated once by oral administration of lufenuron tablets at doses ranging from 54.2 to 68.3 mg/kg (24.6 to 31.0 mg/lb) of body weight. Samples of skin, scrapings, and hair were obtained daily from 14 dogs with dermatophytosis; mean durations from time of treatment to time of negative fungal culture results and resolution of gross lesions were 14.5 and 20.75 days, respectively. In all treated dogs, gross lesions resolved within approximately 21 days. Cats were treated once by oral administration of lufenuron suspension in doses ranging from 51.2 to 266 mg/kg (23.3 to 120.9 mg/lb). Samples were obtained daily from 23 cats; mean durations from time of treatment to time of negative fungal culture results and resolution of gross lesions were 8.3 and 12 days, respectively. Time to resolution of lesions in most untreated control animals was approximately 90 days. Adverse effects of treatment were not detected. Results of this study suggest that lufenuron provides an effective, convenient, and rapid method for treating fungal infections in dogs and cats.

  6. Dogs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients Infants and Young Children Publications & Materials Announcements Dogs Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Overview Diseases ... and to prevent infectious diseases. Tips for preventing dog-associated diseases Before choosing a dog Certain types ...

  7. Nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in dogs treated with cephalexin monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Fungwithaya, Punpichaya; Chanchaithong, Pattrarat; Phumthanakorn, Nathita; Prapasarakul, Nuvee

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) in dogs treated with oral cephalexin monohydrate. Ten dogs with superficial pyoderma were monitored longitudinally for carriage of MRSP for up to 1 year after treatment; the strains were typed and antibiograms were determined. Methicillin-susceptible S. pseudintermedius (MSSP) was recovered prior to treatment in all dogs and could be isolated after 12 months in 1 dog. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was detected within 1 week of treatment in all dogs, and 3 clones represented by ST45, ST112, and ST181 were consistently present for up to 12 months after treatment. All MRSP isolates were resistant to at least 7 common antimicrobials. Oral cephalexin monohydrate treatment selected for strains of multi-resistant MRSP, which were still present after 1 year.

  8. Chagas disease control: deltamethrin-treated collars reduce Triatoma infestans feeding success on dogs.

    PubMed

    Reithinger, Richard; Ceballos, Leonardo; Stariolo, Raúl; Davies, Clive R; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2005-07-01

    Dogs are domestic reservoir hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease. Using an experimental set-up mimicking rural mud-and-thatch houses, we evaluated the effect of deltamethrin-treated dog collars on the feeding success and survival of Triatoma infestans, the main T. cruzi vector in Latin America. Seven collared and three uncollared control dogs were exposed to colonized T. infestans at day 0 (i.e. before attachment of collars), at 15 days, and then monthly for 3 months post collar attachment. Following overnight exposure to uncollared dogs, 96% (1473/1538) of bugs fed, of which 51% (746/1473) fully engorged. Feeding rates were significantly reduced on collared dogs for up to 1 month post collar attachment with the lowest rates of 91% (551/604) observed at day 30 (P<0.05). Amongst those bugs that fed, engorgement rates were significantly reduced on collared dogs throughout the trial, during which average rates were 31% (543/1768) (P<0.001). No collar effect on individual bug survival was observed. Although observed effects on feeding and engorgement were limited, the strong association between blood-feeding, blood meal size and T. cruzi transmission suggests that deltamethrin-treated dog collars could help to control canine (and possibly human) T. cruzi infection.

  9. Variation of proteinuria in dogs with leishmaniasis treated with meglumine antimoniate and allopurinol: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Pierantozzi, Marco; Roura, Xavier; Paltrinieri, Saverio; Poggi, Marco; Zatelli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed using 53 client owned dogs with leishmaniasis to determine whether the degree of proteinuria, evaluated by the urine protein/creatinine ratio (UP/C), changes following treatment with meglumine antimoniate and allopurinol. Medical records of dogs with leishmaniasis in clinical stage C (according to the Canine Leishmaniasis Working Group staging system) and either proteinuric or borderline proteinuric (according to the International Renal Interest Society [IRIS] staging system) were reviewed. All dogs were treated with meglumine antimoniate and allopurinol for 4-8 wk. After treatment, UP/C, total protein, and total globulin significantly decreased and albumin and the albumin/globulin ratio (A/G) increased. After treatment, 7 of the 53 dogs (13.4%) became nonproteinuric following either a proteinuric or borderline proteinuric stage. Moreover, 12 of the 53 proteinuric dogs (22.6%) changed their stage to borderline proteinuric. The antileishmaniasis treatment with meglumine antimoniate in combination with allopurinol in dogs significantly reduced the degree of proteinuria in a short period of time. The results of the current study may be useful to the veterinary practitioner in the clinical management of canine leishmaniasis (CanL) in dogs with proteinuric chronic kidney disease.

  10. Cardiovascular effects of methamphetamine in dogs treated chronically with the amine.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, H

    1982-01-01

    Methamphetamine is one of a group of sympathomimetic amines that lower blood pressure upon chronic administration to hypertensive dogs. To determine whether tolerance to the cardiovascular effects of these drugs could play a role in their antihypertensive action, acute blood pressure responses to oral d-methamphetamine were determined in trained conscious renal hypertensive dogs at weekly intervals during treatment with the drug for 2 months. Responses were also obtained in similarly treated normotensive dogs and in normotensive and hypertensive animals receiving l-methamphetamine. Pressor responses to d-methamphetamine in hypertensive dogs remained unchanged throughout treatment, while in all other cases they diminished gradually. Only the dextro isomer reduced blood pressure chronically in the hypertensive group. It was concluded that tolerance is not involved in the antihypertensive effect of methamphetamine and that, considering the stereo specificity of this effect, residual lowering of blood pressure might involve formation of a false mediator metabolite of the amine.

  11. Oral chromium picolinate and control of glycemia in insulin-treated diabetic dogs.

    PubMed

    Schachter, S; Nelson, R W; Kirk, C A

    2001-01-01

    Chromium is an essential dietary trace mineral involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Chromium is required for cellular uptake of glucose, and chromium deficiency causes insulin resistance. Chromium supplementation may improve insulin sensitivity and has been used as adjunct treatment of diabetes mellitus in humans. In this study, 13 dogs with naturally acquired diabetes mellitus were treated with insulin for 3 months, then with insulin and chromium picolinate for 3 months. Dogs weighing <15 kg (33 lb: n = 9) were administered 200 microg of chromium picolinate PO once daily for I month, then 200 microg of chromium picolinate twice daily for 2 months. Dogs weighing >15 kg (n = 4) received 200 microg of chromium picolinate once daily for 2 weeks, then 200 microg twice daily for 2 weeks, then 400 microg twice daily for 2 months. Type of insulin, frequency of insulin administration, and diet were kept constant, and insulin dosage was adjusted, as needed, to maintain optimal control of glycemia. Mean body weight, daily insulin dosage, daily caloric intake, 10-hour mean blood glucose concentration, blood glycated hemoglobin concentration, and serum fructosamine concentration were not markedly different when dogs were treated with insulin and chromium picolinate, compared with insulin alone. Adverse effects were not identified with chromium picolinate administration. Results of this study suggest that, at a dosage range of 20-60 microg/kg/d, chromium picolinate caused no beneficial or harmful effects in insulin-treated diabetic dogs.

  12. Cortisol concentration, pain and sedation scale in free roaming dogs treated with carprofen after ovariohysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Nenadović, Katarina; Vučinić, Marijana; Radenković-Damnjanović, Brana; Janković, Ljiljana; Teodorović, Radislava; Voslarova, Eva; Becskei, Zsolt

    2017-08-01

    One of the topic issues in animal welfare activities is the free roaming dog welfare especially in developing countries such as Serbia. The way of controlling population of free roaming dogs is their reproduction with the method of "Catch-Neuter-Release." This complex process consists of capturing free roaming dogs in public areas, sterilizing, and returning them to the public area from which they were temporarily removed. Ovariohysterectomy present the period with a high intensity of stress reaction since many veterinarians in Serbia do not use analgesia for this group of dogs. The aim of this study was to compare the serum cortisol concentration before and after ovariohysterectomy and the level of post-operative pain and sedation in a group of free roaming female dogs treated with carprofen after surgical intervention and in a group with no treatment. The study was performed on a total of 20 female dogs under the program for free roaming dog control. Free-roaming dogs were captured in public areas by the communal animal hygiene service and were transported between 30 and 45 min to the clinic of a veterinary practice. Treatment began at 10:00 h on the next day and the bitches were kept in cages until they were returned to public locations from which they were temporarily removed to be sterilized. The G2 group received before closing the incision line carprofen in one dosage of 4 mg/kg given by subcutaneous injection into the scruff. Rescue protocol with carprofen was provided for G1 after 24 h following ovariohysterectomy same dosage as G2. Blood (2 ml) was collected from the cephalic vein of each dog in disposable plastic syringes, containing heparin (1:1000) 4 times: Before ovariohysterectomy, 30, 120 min and 24 h following ovariohysterectomy. Cortisol concentration was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The multifactorial pain and sedation scale were used for the assessment of pain and sedation. In both groups, the lowest values of serum cortisol

  13. Post-radiotherapy hypothyroidism in dogs treated for thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Amores-Fuster, I; Cripps, P; Blackwood, L

    2017-03-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common adverse event after head and neck radiotherapy in human medicine, but uncommonly reported in canine patients. Records of 21 dogs with histologically or cytologically confirmed thyroid carcinoma receiving definitive or hypofractionated radiotherapy were reviewed. Nine cases received 48 Gy in 12 fractions, 10 received 36 Gy in 4 fractions and 2 received 32 Gy in 4 fractions. Seventeen cases had radiotherapy in a post-operative setting. Ten cases developed hypothyroidism (47.6%) after radiotherapy. The development of hypothyroidism was not associated with the radiotherapy protocol used. Median time to diagnosis of hypothyroidism was 6 months (range, 1-13 months). Hypothyroidism is a common side effect following radiotherapy for thyroid carcinomas. Monitoring of thyroid function following radiotherapy is recommended. No specific risk factors have been identified.

  14. Rectal temperature changes and oxygen toxicity in dogs treated in a monoplace chamber.

    PubMed

    Shmalberg, Justin; Davies, Wendy; Lopez, Stacy; Shmalberg, Danielle; Zilberschtein, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen treatments are increasingly administered to pet dogs, using veterinary-specific monoplace chambers. The basic physiologic responses, chamber performance and oxygen toxicity rates have not yet been evaluated in dogs in a clinical setting. As a result, a series of consecutive 45-minute, 2-atmospheres absolute (atm abs) hyperbaric treatments with 100% oxygen were evaluated in a veterinary rehabilitation center (n = 285). 65 dogs with a mean body weight of 21 ± 15 kg (1.4-71 kg) were treated with an average of four sessions each. The mean rectal temperature of canine patients decreased 0.07 degrees C (0.1 degrees F) during treatments (p = 0.04). Intra-chamber temperature and humidity both increased: +1.0 degrees C (1.7 degrees F, p < 0.0001) and +5.7% (p < 0.0001), respectively. The mean maximal oxygen concentration measured before depressurization of the veterinary-specific commercial chamber was 98.0 ± 0.9%. No strong correlations (r > 0.75) were identified between body weights, body condition scores, maximal oxygen concentrations, starting or ending rectal temperature, chamber humidity and chamber temperature. Oxygen toxicity was not observed during the observational period. Patients were most commonly treated for intervertebral disc disease (n = 16 dogs) and extensive traumatic wounds (n = 10 dogs), which represented a large number of the total study sessions (19% and 16%, respectively).

  15. Owner experiences in treating dogs and cats diagnosed with diabetes mellitus in the United States.

    PubMed

    Aptekmann, Karina P; Armstrong, Jane; Coradini, Marcia; Rand, Jacquie

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to report owner experiences and satisfaction in treating a pet with diabetes mellitus using a descriptive report from an Internet-based survey. Descriptive analysis of results was performed, χ(2) tests were used to detect differences in responses between dog and cat owners, and correlations were assessed using the nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. A total of 834 owners participated in the survey. More diabetic dogs (97%) than cats (82%) were treated with insulin injections. Insulin was administered twice daily in 87% of dogs and 73% of cats. Porcine lente and neutral protamine Hagedorn were the most commonly administered insulins in dogs. In cats, glargine and protamine zinc insulin were the most commonly used insulins. Most pets were not fed a prescribed diabetes diet. More cat (66%) than dog (50%) owners were satisfied with the diabetic control achieved. Cat owners were more likely to use home blood glucose monitoring. Treatment was considered expensive by the majority of owners. Few published reports follow diabetic pets after diagnosis or report owner satisfaction. The results of this study provide useful information that may help veterinarians better educate owners and set expectations regarding diabetes treatment and quality of life for diabetic pets.

  16. Exogenous thyrotoxicosis in dogs attributable to consumption of all-meat commercial dog food or treats containing excessive thyroid hormone: 14 cases (2008-2013).

    PubMed

    Broome, Michael R; Peterson, Mark E; Kemppainen, Robert J; Parker, Valerie J; Richter, Keith P

    2015-01-01

    To describe findings in dogs with exogenous thyrotoxicosis attributable to consumption of commercially available dog foods or treats containing high concentrations of thyroid hormone. Retrospective and prospective case series. 14 dogs. Medical records were retrospectively searched to identify dogs with exogenous thyrotoxicosis attributable to dietary intake. One case was found, and subsequent cases were identified prospectively. Serum thyroid hormone concentrations were evaluated before and after feeding meat-based products suspected to contain excessive thyroid hormone was discontinued. Scintigraphy was performed to evaluate thyroid tissue in 13 of 14 dogs before and 1 of 13 dogs after discontinuation of suspect foods or treats. Seven samples of 5 commercially available products fed to 6 affected dogs were analyzed for thyroxine concentration; results were subjectively compared with findings for 10 other commercial foods and 6 beef muscle or liver samples. Total serum thyroxine concentrations were high (median, 8.8 μg/dL; range, 4.65 to 17.4 μg/dL) in all dogs at initial evaluation; scintigraphy revealed subjectively decreased thyroid gland radionuclide in 13 of 13 dogs examined. At ≥ 4 weeks after feeding of suspect food or treats was discontinued, total thyroxine concentrations were within the reference range for all dogs and signs associated with thyrotoxicosis, if present, had resolved. Analysis of tested food or treat samples revealed a median thyroxine concentration for suspect products of 1.52 μg of thyroxine/g, whereas that of unrelated commercial foods was 0.38 μg of thyroxine/g. Results indicated that thyrotoxicosis can occur secondary to consumption of meat-based products presumably contaminated by thyroid tissue, and can be reversed by identification and elimination of suspect products from the diet.

  17. Preferences of veterinarians for drugs to treat heart disease in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Watson, A D; Church, D B

    1995-11-01

    Responses (473) were collated from a questionnaire sent to 5054 veterinarians in Australia enquiring about drug preferences for treating cardiac disease in dogs and cats. When treating a small breed dog with endocardiosis and mild left congestive heart failure, 74% of 472 respondents used a diuretic, 67% a theophylline derivative, 27% a vasodilator and 20% a positive inotrope. Frusemide was the preferred diuretic and digoxin the preferred inotrope, but vasodilator use varied. Low sodium diets were "often recommended" by 71% of respondents. Propranolol was preferred to diltiazem for treating feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Digoxin was clearly preferred for treating supraventricular dysrhythmias, while lignocaine and digoxin were preferred equally for ventricular dysrhythmias. Respondents appeared more willing than US veterinarians to use theophylline derivatives and prasozin, and less inclined to employ nitrates, hydralazine, inotropes other than digoxin, and low sodium diets.

  18. Relapses in dogs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei and treated with diminazene aceturate or isometamidium chloride.

    PubMed

    Kaggwa, E; Munyua, W K; Mugera, G M

    1988-03-01

    Twenty dogs of mixed local East African breeds were used. Five of the dogs were uninfected controls and 15 were infected with T. brucei (ILRAD 273). Five of the infected dogs were untreated controls, five were treated with a high curative dose of diminazene aceturate, (7 mg kg-1 body weight (wt.), and five were given a subcurative dose of isometamidium chloride (1 mg kg-1 body wt.). The drugs, given at 8 days post infection (d.p.i..), led to apparent recovery. The antibody titres, however, remained high in both groups and at 42-49 d.p.i. there was at least one relapse in each treatment group. Parasite populations from relapsed animals were more resistant to the drugs than the original infecting populations. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  19. Erythrocyte dysplasia in peripheral blood smears from 5 thrombocytopenic dogs treated with vincristine sulfate.

    PubMed

    Collicutt, Nancy B; Garner, Bridget

    2013-12-01

    Secondary dyserythropoiesis has been associated with vincristine administration in dogs. Evaluation of bone marrow aspirates for the presence of morphologic abnormalities in the erythroid lineage aids in the diagnosis. However, morphologic features of circulating erythroid precursors in these cases have not been described previously. The purpose of this report was to describe the cytologic features of dyserythropoiesis in peripheral blood and also bone marrow smears in a case series of dogs with immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (IMT) treated with vincristine sulfate. Nineteen dogs receiving vincristine for treatment of IMT were identified by retrospectively searching a computerized medical record system. There were 5 dogs that had dysplastic erythroid precursors in peripheral blood smears within 7 days of vincristine treatment. Two of those 5 dogs also had evidence for erythrodysplasia in modified Wright's-stained bone marrow smears obtained postvincristine administration. Morphologic changes included bizarre or inappropriate mitotic figures, abnormal nuclear configurations (fragmentation, elongation, indentation, and binucleation), atypical nuclear remnants (Howell-Jolly bodies), or nuclear and cytoplasmic asynchrony within the erythroid precursors. A brief review of the literature with discussion of the etiologies for dyserythropoiesis is provided. The dyserythropoiesis was clinically insignificant in all 5 cases and resolved. However, pathologists and clinicians should be aware of these potential findings to prevent misdiagnosis of other conditions.

  20. Long term follow-up of dogs diagnosed with leishmaniosis (clinical stage II) and treated with meglumine antimoniate and allopurinol.

    PubMed

    Torres, Marta; Bardagí, Mar; Roura, Xavier; Zanna, Giordana; Ravera, Iván; Ferrer, Lluís

    2011-06-01

    Twenty-three dogs with a diagnosis of leishmaniosis (clinical stage II) were treated with meglumine antimoniate and allopurinol and were followed up for 2-9 years. The treatment showed efficacy and the clinical condition of the dogs improved markedly in the first 3 months of treatment. Anti-Leishmania antibody titres declined slowly although most dogs remained seropositive 1 year after beginning treatment. Inter-individual variability in the evolution of the titres was very high. The dogs presented with three types of complications during the follow-up period. (1) Three dogs experienced relapses characterized by clinical signs, high anti-Leishmania titres and high parasitaemia. (2) Eight dogs presented immune-mediated lesions, such as uveitis, arthritis and cutaneous vasculitis; in all of these cases, the dogs had high titres of anti-Leishmania antibodies at diagnosis and during follow-up. (3) Three dogs presented xanthine urolithiasis most likely due to the allopurinol treatment. In one case the xanthine uroliths led to hydronephrosis and nephrectomy. The study demonstrated a long survival for dogs with leishmaniosis treated with the combination of meglumine antimoniate and allopurinol. Clinicians should pay special attention to the appearance of immune-mediated lesions, especially in dogs with sustained high antibody titres, and to urolithiasis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Systemic neosporosis in a dog treated for immune-mediated thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Magaña, Angie; Sánchez, Félix; Villa, Karina; Rivera, Liliana; Morales, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    A 4-year-old male Toy Poodle was presented to the Small Animal Veterinary Hospital of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of the Autonomous University of Mexico (FMVZ, UNAM) because of depression, lethargy, and hemorrhages involving several areas of the skin and around the eyes. Hematology data and a bone marrow analysis suggested hemolytic anemia and immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. The dog was treated with prednisone, and after one month the hematology variables improved. However, the dog's clinical condition inexplicably worsened and it was euthanized. On necropsy, there were no relevant findings. However, in histology, multifocal lymphoplasmacytic and histiocytic meningoencephalitis and necrosis, and a protozoan cyst in the cerebellum were identified. In addition, moderate multifocal lymphoplasmacytic and necrotizing pancreatitis, hepatitis, myocarditis, and diffuse lymphoplasmacytic enteritis were observed. Immunohistochemistry of the cerebellum, liver, pancreas, and intestine with a specific antibody against Neospora caninum confirmed the diagnosis of systemic neosporosis. The systemic neosporosis in this dog was most likely caused by reactivation of latent parasites due to prednisone administration during the one month of treatment. It should be kept in mind that in dogs being treated with immunosuppressants for immune-mediated conditions, opportunistic parasites, such as Toxoplasma gondii and N caninum, can be reactivated from a latent state, as it probably happened in the present case.

  2. Multiple liver abscesses in a dog secondary to the liver fluke Metorchis conjunctus treated by percutaneous transhepatic drainage and alcoholization.

    PubMed

    Lemetayer, Julie D; Snead, Elizabeth C; Starrak, Greg S; Wagner, Brent A

    2016-06-01

    A 1-year-old German shepherd × husky cross dog was diagnosed with multiple liver abscesses and severe cholangitis secondary to the liver fluke Metorchis conjunctus. The dog was successfully treated with 2 percutaneous transhepatic drainage and alcoholization procedures, and a prolonged course of antibiotics and praziquantel.

  3. Multiple liver abscesses in a dog secondary to the liver fluke Metorchis conjunctus treated by percutaneous transhepatic drainage and alcoholization

    PubMed Central

    Lemetayer, Julie D.; Snead, Elizabeth C.; Starrak, Greg S.; Wagner, Brent A.

    2016-01-01

    A 1-year-old German shepherd × husky cross dog was diagnosed with multiple liver abscesses and severe cholangitis secondary to the liver fluke Metorchis conjunctus. The dog was successfully treated with 2 percutaneous transhepatic drainage and alcoholization procedures, and a prolonged course of antibiotics and praziquantel. PMID:27247459

  4. Cortisol concentration, pain and sedation scale in free roaming dogs treated with carprofen after ovariohysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nenadović, Katarina; Vučinić, Marijana; Radenković-Damnjanović, Brana; Janković, Ljiljana; Teodorović, Radislava; Voslarova, Eva; Becskei, Zsolt

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim: One of the topic issues in animal welfare activities is the free roaming dog welfare especially in developing countries such as Serbia. The way of controlling population of free roaming dogs is their reproduction with the method of “Catch-Neuter-Release.” This complex process consists of capturing free roaming dogs in public areas, sterilizing, and returning them to the public area from which they were temporarily removed. Ovariohysterectomy present the period with a high intensity of stress reaction since many veterinarians in Serbia do not use analgesia for this group of dogs. The aim of this study was to compare the serum cortisol concentration before and after ovariohysterectomy and the level of post-operative pain and sedation in a group of free roaming female dogs treated with carprofen after surgical intervention and in a group with no treatment. Materials and Methods: The study was performed on a total of 20 female dogs under the program for free roaming dog control. Free-roaming dogs were captured in public areas by the communal animal hygiene service and were transported between 30 and 45 min to the clinic of a veterinary practice. Treatment began at 10:00 h on the next day and the bitches were kept in cages until they were returned to public locations from which they were temporarily removed to be sterilized. The G2 group received before closing the incision line carprofen in one dosage of 4 mg/kg given by subcutaneous injection into the scruff. Rescue protocol with carprofen was provided for G1 after 24 h following ovariohysterectomy same dosage as G2. Blood (2 ml) was collected from the cephalic vein of each dog in disposable plastic syringes, containing heparin (1:1000) 4 times: Before ovariohysterectomy, 30, 120 min and 24 h following ovariohysterectomy. Cortisol concentration was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The multifactorial pain and sedation scale were used for the assessment of pain and sedation

  5. Composition of gastric mucinous secretion from Heidenhain pouches of dogs treated with aspirin.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, K; Pachkowski, T; Secord, D C

    1979-01-01

    Principal glycoproteins and amino acids of secretions from Heidenhain pouches were studied in control and aspirin-treated dogs in the resting state of fasting and during stimulation with pentagastrin. All samples showed the presence of galactose, galactosamine, glucosamine, glucose, fucose, mannose, uronic acid and sulfate. Galactose and glucosamine were found in equimolar amounts, and the galactose/galactosamine ratio was 2/1. Pentagastrin induced the reduction in concentration of major carbohydrate components and amino acids of gastric mucus. The concentrations of major carbohydrate components and of amino acids of gastric secretions were lower in aspirin-treated animals than in controls.

  6. Prevention of transmission of Babesia canis by Dermacentor reticulatus ticks to dogs treated orally with fluralaner chewable tablets (Bravecto™).

    PubMed

    Taenzler, Janina; Liebenberg, Julian; Roepke, Rainer K A; Heckeroth, Anja R

    2015-06-04

    The preventive effect of fluralaner chewable tablets (Bravecto™) against transmission of Babesia canis by Dermacentor reticulatus ticks was evaluated. Sixteen dogs, tested negative for B. canis by PCR and IFAT, were allocated to two study groups. On day 0, dogs in one group (n = 8) were treated once orally with a fluralaner chewable tablet according to label recommendations and dogs in the control group (n = 8) remained untreated. On days 2, 28, 56, 70 and 84, dogs were infested with 50 (±4) B. canis infected D. reticulatus ticks with tick in situ thumb counts 48 ± 4 h post-infestation. Prior to each infestation, the D. reticulatus ticks were confirmed to harbour B. canis by PCR analysis. On day 90, ticks were counted and removed from all dogs. Efficacy against ticks was calculated for each assessment time point. After treatment, all dogs were physically examined in conjunction with blood collection for PCR every 7 days, blood samples for IFAT were collected every 14 days and the dog's rectal body temperature was measured thrice weekly. From dogs displaying symptoms of babesiosis or were PCR positive, a blood smear was taken, and, if positive, dogs were rescue treated and replaced with a replacement dog. The preventive effect was evaluated by comparing infected dogs in the treated group with infected dogs in the untreated control group. All control dogs became infected with B. canis, as confirmed by PCR and IFAT. None of the 8 treated dogs became infected with B. canis, as IFAT and PCR were negative throughout the study until day 112. Fluralaner chewable tablet was 100 % effective against ticks on days 4, 30, 58, and 90 and an efficacy of 99.6 % and 99.2 % was achieved on day 72 and day 86 after treatment, respectively. Over the 12-week study duration, a 100 % preventive effect against B. canis transmission was demonstrated. A single oral administration of fluralaner chewable tablets effectively prevented the transmission of B. canis by infected

  7. Characterization of Salmonella Associated with Pig Ear Dog Treats in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Clifford; Cunningham, Jane; Ahmed, Rafiq; Woodward, David; Fonseca, Kevin; Isaacs, Sandy; Ellis, Andrea; Anand, Chandar; Ziebell, Kim; Muckle, Anne; Sockett, Paul; Rodgers, Frank

    2001-01-01

    In the summer of 1999, the incidence of Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis infections in Alberta rose dramatically. Subsequent laboratory and epidemiological investigations established that an outbreak of human disease caused by this organism was occurring across Canada and was associated with pet treats for dogs produced from processed pig ears. Laboratory investigations using phage typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) established that isolates of Salmonella serotype Infantis from pig ear pet treats and humans exposed to pig ear pet treats comprised a well-defined subset of all isolates analyzed. Of the 53 subtypes of Salmonella serotype Infantis obtained around the time of the outbreak as defined by PFGE and phage typing, only 6 subtypes were associated with both human infection and isolation from pig ears. Together with information from epidemiological studies, these investigations established pig ear pet treats as the cause of the Salmonella serotype Infantis outbreak. The results are consistent with a model in which contaminated pig ear pet treats constitute a long-term, continuing vehicle for infection of the human population rather than causing temporally delimited point-source outbreaks. During the course of this outbreak, several other Salmonella serotypes were also isolated from pet treats, suggesting these products may be an important source of enteric infection in both humans and dogs. Though isolates of Salmonella serotypes other than Salmonella serotype Infantis from pet treats were also subjected to PFGE and phage typing, no link with human disease could be definitively established, and the contribution of pig ear pet treats to human disease remains unclear. Elimination of bacterial contamination from pet treats is required to reduce the risk of infection from these products. PMID:11682515

  8. Gastrocnemius tendon strain in a dog treated with autologous mesenchymal stem cells and a custom orthosis.

    PubMed

    Case, J Brad; Palmer, Ross; Valdes-Martinez, Alex; Egger, Erick L; Haussler, Kevin K

    2013-05-01

    To report clinical findings and outcome in a dog with gastrocnemius tendon strain treated with autologous mesenchymal stem cells and a custom orthosis. Clinical report. A 4-year-old spayed female Border Collie. Bone-marrow derived, autologous mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the tendon core lesion. A custom, progressive, dynamic orthosis was fit to the tarsus. Serial orthopedic examinations and ultrasonography as well as long-term force-plate gait analysis were utilized for follow up. Lameness subjectively resolved and peak vertical force increased from 43% to 92% of the contralateral pelvic limb. Serial ultrasonographic examinations revealed improved but incomplete restoration of normal linear fiber pattern of the gastrocnemius tendon. Findings suggest that autologous mesenchymal stem cell transplantation with custom, progressive, dynamic orthosis may be a viable, minimally invasive technique for treatment of calcaneal tendon injuries in dogs. © Copyright 2013 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  9. Thoracoscopic foreign body removal and right middle lung lobectomy to treat pyothorax in a dog.

    PubMed

    Peláez, M Jiménez; Jolliffe, C

    2012-04-01

    A three-year-old, 30-kg, spayed female German wirehaired pointer was presented for coughing, pyrexia and lethargy. Thoracic radiographs showed mild right-sided pleural effusion, moderate pneumothorax and a pulmonary lesion in the right middle or caudal lung lobe. A diagnosis of pyothorax was established by fine needle aspiration of the pleural effusion. Thoracoscopic exploration was performed using one-lung ventilation. A vegetal foreign body (grass awn) and an abscess were observed in the distal part of the right middle lung lobe. The foreign body was removed and a right middle lung lobectomy was performed, both thoracoscopically. No complications were noted. The dog was discharged 48 hours after surgery, and no recurrence of the clinical signs was observed during the follow-up time period (three years and three months). Thoracoscopy is a minimally invasive alternative to thoracotomy to explore and successfully treat some non-chronic pyothoraces in dogs, including lesions affecting the right middle lung lobe.

  10. Fipronil washoff to municipal wastewater from dogs treated with spot-on products.

    PubMed

    Teerlink, Jennifer; Hernandez, Jorge; Budd, Robert

    2017-12-01

    Fipronil and fipronil degradates have been reported in treated wastewater effluent at concentrations that exceed USEPA Aquatic Life Benchmarks, posing a potential risk to the surface waters to which they discharge. Fipronil is a common insecticide found in spot-on flea and tick treatment products that have the potential for down-the-drain transport and direct washoff into surface water. Volunteers currently treating their dogs with a fipronil-containing spot-on product were recruited. Dogs were washed either 2, 7, or 28days after product application, and rinsate from 34 discrete bathing events were analyzed by LC-MS/MS for fipronil and fipronil degradates (collectively known as fiproles). Total fipronil application dosage ranged from 67.1-410.0mg per dog following manufacturers' recommendation based on dog body weight. Total mass of fiproles measured in rinsate ranged from 3.6-230.6mg per dog (0.2 ̶ 86.0% of mass applied). Average percentage of fiproles detected in rinsate generally decreased with increasing time from initial application: 21±22, 16±13, and 4±5% respectively for 2, 7, and 28days post application. Fipronil was the dominant fiprole, >63% of total fiproles for all samples and >92% of total fiproles in 2 and 7day samples. Results confirm a direct pathway of pesticides to municipal wastewater through the use of spot-on products on dogs and subsequent bathing by either professional groomers or by pet owners in the home. Comparisons of mass loading calculated using California sales data and recent wastewater monitoring results suggest fipronil-containing spot-on products are a potentially important source of fipronil to wastewater treatment systems in California. This study highlights the potential for other active ingredients (i.e., bifenthrin, permethrin, etofenprox, imidacloprid) contained in spot-on and other pet products (i.e., shampoos, sprays) to enter wastewater catchments through bathing activities, posing a potential risk to the aquatic

  11. Acquired Fanconi syndrome in a dog exposed to jerky treats in Japan

    PubMed Central

    IGASE, Masaya; BABA, Kenji; SHIMOKAWA MIYAMA, Takako; NOGUCHI, Shunsuke; MIZUNO, Takuya; OKUDA, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    A 6-year-old spayed female Jack Russell Terrier presented with a 1-month history of lethargy, anorexia, vomiting and weight loss. The dog was fed beef and chicken jerky treats daily in addition to a commercial diet. Laboratory tests revealed azotemia, hypokalemia, hyperchloremia, metabolic acidosis and glucosuria with normoglycemia. Urine amino acid analysis showed significant amino acid loss into the urine. Thus, Fanconi syndrome was diagnosed, and based on the case history and extensive diagnostic testing, excessive consumption of jerky treats was strongly suspected as the cause. Glucosuria resolved 7 days after the withdrawal of jerky treats and fluid therapy. Aminoaciduria was substantially, but not completely, improved 3 months after diagnosis. Mild azotemia remained, suggesting chronic renal disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Fanconi syndrome following the consumption of jerky treats in Japan. PMID:26062568

  12. Prevention of transmission of Babesia canis by Dermacentor reticulatus ticks to dogs treated with an imidacloprid/flumethrin collar.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Josephus J; Stanneck, Dorothee; Jongejan, Frans

    2013-02-18

    A group of 8 dogs was treated with an imidacloprid/flumethrin collar (Seresto(®)) 28 days prior to infestation with adult Dermacentor reticulatus ticks, infected with Babesia canis. The ability of the collar to prevent transmission of B. canis in the treated group was compared to an untreated control group. All 8 dogs in the untreated control group became infected with B. canis parasites, which were detected in blood smears as early as day 6 post tick-application. All control dogs developed clinical signs of babesiosis and were rescue-treated with imidocarb dipropionate. These dogs also developed specific B. canis antibodies as identified by serology (IFA test) and were confirmed PCR/RLB positive. None of the 8 dogs treated with the imidacloprid/flumethrin collar became infected with B. canis, which was confirmed by the absence of specific B. canis antibodies and babesial DNA as confirmed by PCR/RLB. The collar caused 96.02% of the ticks to die within 48h post challenge and this increased to 100% within 4 days. Although a high percentage of 44% of the Dermacentor ticks were infected with B. canis, they were unable to transmit the infection to the treated group. Hence, the imidacloprid/flumethrin collar effectively prevented transmission of B. canis 1 month after application onto the dogs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of cardiopulmonary and inflammatory markers in dogs with heartworm infection treated using the slow kill method.

    PubMed

    Yoon, W-K; Kim, Y-W; Suh, S-I; Hyun, C

    2017-09-15

    This study evaluated the changes in the levels of cardiac, hemostatic, and inflammatory biomarkers in 12 dogs with different severities of heartworm infection treated using the slow kill protocol, consisting of 6-10μg/kg of ivermectin and 10mg/kg of doxycycline combination. The serum levels of cardiac troponin-I, D-dimer, C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6 were measured on the day of diagnosis (D0), after termination of doxycycline administration (D30), after termination of the slow kill treatment (D180), and 10 months after the initiation of therapy (D300). Heartworm antigenemia was cleared in 4/4 class I dogs, 3/4 class II dogs, and 1/4 class III dogs at the end of the therapy (D180), and in 4/4 class I, 4/4 class II, and 1/4 class III dogs at the end of the study (D300). The serum levels of the markers in class I dogs on the day of diagnosis (D0) were within the reference range, while the levels in class II and III dogs were above the reference range. Further, the serum levels of the markers in all dogs decreased significantly at the end of the study (D300), although some markers in class III dogs remained at pathological levels. This study revealed that the slow kill method should be used only as an alternative therapeutic protocol for dogs with low worm burden (class I and II). As the slow kill method alone may not effectively reduce all pathological changes in dogs with heavy worm burden and severe clinical signs (class III), adjuvant therapies including steroids and anti-thromboembolics should be used to minimize the risk of complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Improved survival associated with postoperative wound infection in dogs treated with limb-salvage surgery for osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Lascelles, B Duncan X; Dernell, William S; Correa, Maria T; Lafferty, Mary; Devitt, Chad M; Kuntz, Charles A; Straw, Rodney C; Withrow, Stephen J

    2005-12-01

    Limb-salvage surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy are performed as a treatment of appendicular osteosarcoma in dogs. Approximately 50% of dogs that undergo limb-salvage surgery develop postoperative surgical wound infections. Postoperative surgical infections may affect survival in cancer patients. The purposes of this study were to examine the effect of surgical wound infection on survival, local recurrence, and metastasis in relation to other prognostic factors for dogs with spontaneous osteosarcoma treated with limb-salvage surgery. Forty-seven client-owned dogs with osteosarcoma of the distal radius were treated with limb-salvage surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy--either carboplatin or carboplatin and doxorubicin. Hazard ratios were estimated by using the Cox proportional hazard model, and survival functions were estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit life-table method. Of the 47 dogs in this study, 32 (68%) developed a postoperative wound infection. Infection, dog weight, and extent of the primary tumor (percentage of length) significantly affected survival, and infection and percentage of length significantly affected time to metastasis. None of the variables considered in this study affected local recurrence. Dogs that were diagnosed with an infection were less likely to die (hazard ratio, .446), and dogs with greater body weight and greater percentage length involvement were more likely to die (hazard ratios of 3.37 and 3.66, respectively). In dogs with osteosarcoma treated with limb-salvage surgery, infection has a positive influence on survival, as does a smaller initial length of radius involved and lower body weight.

  15. OUTCOME OF DOGS WITH INTRANASAL LYMPHOMA TREATED WITH VARIOUS RADIATION AND CHEMOTHERAPY PROTOCOLS: 24 CASES.

    PubMed

    George, Rebecca; Smith, Annette; Schleis, Stephanie; Brawner, William; Almond, Gregory; Kent, Michael; Wypij, Jackie; Borrego, Juan; Moore, Antony; Keyerleber, Michele; Kraiza, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Tumors of the nasal cavity comprise approximately 1% of all neoplasms in dogs. Canine intranasal lymphoma is rare and reports evaluating the outcome of treatment are lacking. The goal of this observational, descriptive, multi-institutional study was to evaluate the overall median survival times (MSTs) in a group of dogs with intranasal lymphoma that were treated with irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Dogs meeting these inclusion criteria were retrospectively recruited from medical archives at multiple institutions. Eighteen cases of intermediate to high grade intranasal lymphoma and six cases of low-grade intranasal lymphoma were identified. The date of diagnosis, method of diagnosis, treatment received (radiation and/or chemotherapy protocols), and date of death were recorded. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed on the intermediate to high grade group to calculate overall MST. Log-rank tests were performed to compare effects of treatment with radiation therapy ± chemotherapy and chemotherapy alone. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed separately on the low-grade group. The overall MST was 375 days for the intermediate to high grade group. Cases treated with radiation ± chemotherapy had an MST of 455 days (n = 12) and those treated with chemotherapy alone (n = 6) had an MST of 157 days in the intermediate to high grade group. The MST was 823 days for the low-grade group. Results support the use of radiation therapy for treatment of canine intranasal lymphoma, however a randomized, controlled, clinical trial would be needed for more definitive recommendations. The role of adjunctive chemotherapy also may require further investigation. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  16. Serum concentrations of cortisol and cortisone in healthy dogs and dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism treated with trilostane.

    PubMed

    Sieber-Ruckstuhl, N S; Boretti, F S; Wenger, M; Maser-Gluth, C; Reusch, C E

    2008-10-18

    The serum concentrations of cortisol and cortisone were measured in 19 healthy dogs and in 13 dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) before and one hour after an injection of synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). In the dogs with pdh, the cortisol and cortisone concentrations were measured before and after one to two weeks and three to seven weeks of treatment with trilostane. The dogs with PDH had significantly higher baseline and poststimulation concentrations of cortisol and cortisone, and higher baseline cortisol:cortisone ratios than the healthy dogs. During the treatment with trilostane, the poststimulation cortisol, the baseline and poststimulation cortisone concentrations, and the baseline and poststimulation cortisol:cortisone ratios decreased significantly. The decrease in poststimulation cortisone was significantly smaller than the decrease in cortisol.

  17. Antibiotic plasma levels in dogs with otitis externa treated routinely with various topical preparations.

    PubMed

    Voget, Michael; Armbruster, Martin; Meyer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to determine whether, and at what levels, topical antibiotics applied to treat Otitis externa in dogs are absorbed systemically, leading to an increased risk of antibiotic resistance. 75 dogs brought to a veterinarian for Otitis externa were recruited for a non-interventional study. Selection criteria included diagnosis of Otitis externa and owner consent.The animals were divided into five groups of 15 dogs each. Each group received one of five commonly prescribed topical medications for up to 14 days according to the labeled instructions. Development and validation of low residue detection methods (HPLC-MS/MS) for all active substances studied was performed. Plasma concentrations were evaluated for gentamicin (Otomax, Easotic), marbofloxacin (Aurizon), orbifloxacin (Posatex) and polymyxin B (Surolan). Low-level plasma concentrations of the topically applied antibiotics were detected after multiple administrations. In several samples, the concentrations detected were less than the limit of detection (LOD) of the corresponding analytical method. However, at the end of the treatment period, mean plasma concentrations were in the low pmol/ml range and exceeded the LOD for gentamicin, marbofloxacin and orbifloxacin. None of the plasma samples examined for polymyxin showed levels above the LOD. After routine topical antibiotic use in the treatment of Otitis externa in dogs, low systemic plasma concentrations are likely to develop.This low-level exposure may facilitate cellular changes that lead to an increased possibility for antibiotic resistance. These findings should provoke veterinary clinicians to optimise therapy for Otitis externa in light of minimising the development of antibiotic resistance.

  18. Clinical use of an herbal-derived compound (Huperzine A) to treat putative complex partial seizures in a dog.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Barbara M; Dodman, Nicholas H; Faissler, Dominik; Ogata, Niwako

    2009-08-01

    A Bernese mountain dog was diagnosed with complex partial seizures that were supported by electroencephalographic findings. Clinical signs of the problem included "star gazing," fly snapping, licking, vacuous chewing, and ongoing anxiety. Treatment with Huperzine A, a compound isolated from Chinese club moss with NMDA receptor blocking activity, anticholinesterase activity, and anticonvulsant properties, produced useful suppression of the abnormal behavior for more than months. A relapse occurred when the dog was treated with tramadol for joint pain and the improvement that had been made was not recaptured with Huperzine A. At this stage, phenobarbital therapy was instituted and the dog improved greatly. The role of Huperzine A in controlling seizures is discussed.

  19. Survival of 4 dogs with persistent atrial standstill treated by pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Justin D; Kraus, Marc S; Fallaw, Tiffany L; Calvert, Clay A

    2016-03-01

    Pacemakers were implanted in 4 client-owned female dogs which had persistent atrial standstill. Three dogs were alive after 14 to 39 months and 1 dog was euthanized after 10.5 years. This report demonstrates that some dogs with persistent atrial standstill can survive for extended time periods.

  20. Cortisol Concentrations in Well-Regulated Dogs with Hyperadrenocorticism Treated with Trilostane.

    PubMed

    Midence, J N; Drobatz, K J; Hess, R S

    2015-01-01

    There are no clear treatment guidelines for dogs with clinically well-regulated hyperadrenocorticism in which serum cortisol concentrations before and after an ACTH stimulation test performed 3-6 hours after trilostane administration are < 2.0 μg/dL. To determine if serum cortisol concentrations measured before (Pre1) and after (Post1) ACTH stimulation at 3-6 hours after trilostane administration are significantly lower than cortisol concentrations measured before (Pre2) and after (Post2) ACTH stimulation 9-12 hours after trilostane administration, in a specific population of dogs with clinically well-regulated hyperadrenocorticism and Pre1 and Post1 <2 μg/dL. Thirteen client-owned dogs with clinically well-regulated hyperadrenocorticism and Pre1 and Post1 serum cortisol concentrations <2.0 μg/dL 3-6 hours after trilostane administration. Prospective study. Dogs had a second ACTH stimulation test performed 9-12 hours after trilostane administration, on the same day of the first ACTH stimulation test. Cortisol concentrations before and after ACTH stimulation were compared using a paired t-test. Cortisol concentrations before (1.4 ± 0.3 μg/dL) and after the first stimulation (1.5 ± 0.3 μg/dL, mean ± SD) were significantly lower than cortisol concentration before the second stimulation (3.3 ± 1.6 μg/dL, P = .0012 each). Cortisol concentration before the first stimulation was also significantly lower than cortisol concentration after the second stimulation (5.3 ± 2.4 μg/dL, P = .0001). In dogs with clinically well-regulated, trilostane-treated, hyperadrenocorticism, and cortisol concentrations <2 μg/dL before and after the first stimulation, a second ACTH stimulation test performed 9-12 hours after treatment can result in higher cortisol concentrations that could support continued trilostane treatment. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary

  1. Long-term follow-up of dogs with leishmaniosis treated with meglumine antimoniate plus allopurinol versus miltefosine plus allopurinol.

    PubMed

    Manna, Laura; Corso, Raffaele; Galiero, Giorgio; Cerrone, Anna; Muzj, Paolo; Gravino, Angelo Elio

    2015-05-28

    Visceral leishmaniosis is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by a protozoan parasite of the genus Leishmania. It is found mainly in areas where both the parasite and its vector are endemic and is one of the most challenging infectious diseases in the world to control. HIV infected patients are vulnerable to Leishmania infections, and the main reservoir hosts of Leishmania infantum parasites are domestic dogs. Here, we evaluated the long-term efficacy of treatment with meglumine antimoniate plus allopurinol (G1) compared to miltefosine plus allopurinol (G2) in dogs naturally infected L. infantum. Eighteen dogs with leishmaniosis were divided into the following two groups: G1 (n = 9) was treated subcutaneously with meglumine antimoniate (100 mg/kg/day/30 days) plus allopurinol (10 mg/kg/per day/30 days), while G2 (n = 9) was treated orally with miltefosine (2 mg/Kg/day/30 days) plus allopurinol (10 mg/kg/day/30 days). Thereafter, the same dose of allopurinol was administered to both groups for 6 years. Leishmania DNA in lymph node aspirates from the G1 and G2 dogs was quantified by real-time quantitative PCR at baseline and every 3 months for 24 months, and then at 28, 36, 48, 60 and 72 months. At each assessment, the dogs were examined for signs of disease, and their clinical scores were recorded. Both combination therapies produced significant clinical improvements in the dogs, with a significant reduction in the parasitic load in the lymph nodes of the dogs from both groups after 3 months of treatment. Clinical relapses were observed in four dogs from G2 (miltefosine/allopurinol), and just one dog from G1 (meglumine antimoniate/allopurinol). All dogs that relapsed had increased clinical scores, and increased anti-Leishmania antibody titers and parasitic loads in their lymph nodes. Long-term, the clinical and laboratory findings of the G1 dogs were more stable than those of the G2 dogs, thus indicating that meglumine antimoniate had

  2. The frequency of urinary tract infection and subclinical bacteriuria in dogs with allergic dermatitis treated with oclacitinib: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Andrew C; Schissler, Jennifer R; Rosychuk, Rod A W; Moore, A Russell

    2017-10-01

    Oclacitinib is a selective Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of canine allergic pruritus and atopic dermatitis in dogs. Glucocorticoids and ciclosporin increase urinary tract infection (UTI) frequency in dogs with inflammatory skin disease. Prospective study to evaluate the frequency of UTI and subclinical bacteriuria in dogs with allergic dermatitis receiving oclacitinib. Client-owned dogs ≥2 years of age with a history of allergic dermatitis without apparent history of urinary tract disease or predisposition to UTI were included. Prior to enrolment, urinalysis and quantitative urine culture were performed after a washout period of at least 14 days from systemic antimicrobial drugs and 28 days for ciclosporin and systemic glucocorticoids. Dogs received oclacitinib at labelled dosing for an intended period of 180-230 days with a follow-up urinalysis and urine culture performed regardless of urinary tract signs. Systemic antimicrobial and immune-modulating drugs were not administered during the study. None of the 55 dogs in this study developed UTI while receiving oclacitinib based on follow-up urinalysis and urine culture performed during a range of 58-280 days (mean 195 days). Two dogs developed self-limiting abnormal urinary tract signs without urine culture or urinalysis findings consistent with UTI. These findings indicate that bacteriuria is not an expected adverse effect in dogs treated with oclacitinib without a prior history of UTI or predisposing condition during this treatment period. Therefore, routine urine culture is not indicated for such dogs in the absence of abnormal urinalysis or clinical signs of urinary tract disease. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  3. Acupoint Injection of Autologous Stromal Vascular Fraction and Allogeneic Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Treat Hip Dysplasia in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Camila; Silveira, Maiele Dornelles; Selbach, Isabel; da Silva, Ariel Silveira; Braga, Luisa Maria Gomes de Macedo; Camassola, Melissa; Nardi, Nance Beyer

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells isolated from adipose tissue show great therapeutic potential in veterinary medicine, but some points such as the use of fresh or cultured cells and route of administration need better knowledge. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF, n = 4) or allogeneic cultured adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs, n = 5) injected into acupuncture points in dogs with hip dysplasia and weak response to drug therapy. Canine ASCs have proliferation and differentiation potential similar to ASCs from other species. After the first week of treatment, clinical evaluation showed marked improvement compared with baseline results in all patients treated with autologous SVF and three of the dogs treated with allogeneic ASCs. On days 15 and 30, all dogs showed improvement in range of motion, lameness at trot, and pain on manipulation of the joints, except for one ASC-treated patient. Positive results were more clearly seen in the SVF-treated group. These results show that autologous SVF or allogeneic ASCs can be safely used in acupoint injection for treating hip dysplasia in dogs and represent an important therapeutic alternative for this type of pathology. Further studies are necessary to assess a possible advantage of SVF cells in treating joint diseases. PMID:25180040

  4. 24-hour evaluation of dental plaque bacteria and halitosis after consumption of a single placebo or dental treat by dogs.

    PubMed

    Jeusette, Isabelle C; Román, Aurora Mateo; Torre, Celina; Crusafont, Josep; Sánchez, Nuria; Sánchez, Maria C; Pérez-Salcedo, Leire; Herrera, David

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether consumption of a single dental treat with specific mechanical properties and active ingredients would provide a 24-hour effect on dental plaque bacteria and halitosis in dogs. ANIMALS 10 dogs of various breeds from a privately owned colony that had received routine dental scaling and polishing 4 weeks before the study began. PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to receive 1 placebo or dental treat first. A 4-week washout period was provided, and then dogs received the opposite treatment. Oral plaque and breath samples were collected before and 0.5, 3, 12, and 24 hours after treat consumption. Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) concentration was measured in breath samples. Total aerobic, total anaerobic, Porphyromonas gulae, Prevotella intermedia-like, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum bacterial counts (measured via bacterial culture) and total live bacterial counts, total live and dead bacterial counts, and bacterial vitality (measured via quantitative real-time PCR assay) were assessed in plaque samples. RESULTS Compared with placebo treat consumption, dental treat consumption resulted in a significant decrease in breath VSCs concentration and all plaque bacterial counts, without an effect on bacterial vitality. Effects of the dental treat versus the placebo treat persisted for 12 hours for several bacterial counts and for 24 hours for breath VSCs concentration. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Although clinical benefits should be investigated in larger scale, longer-term studies, results of this study suggested that feeding the evaluated dental treat may help to decrease oral bacterial growth in dogs for 12 hours and oral malodor for 24 hours. A feeding interval of 12 hours is therefore recommended.

  5. Traditional Mediterranean plants: characterization and use of an essential oils mixture to treat Malassezia otitis externa in atopic dogs.

    PubMed

    Nardoni, Simona; Pistelli, Luisa; Baronti, Ilenia; Najar, Basma; Pisseri, Francesca; Bandeira Reidel, Rose Vanessa; Papini, Roberto; Perrucci, Stefania; Mancianti, Francesca

    2017-08-01

    Several plants extracts from Mediterranean countries are traditionally employed in skin troubles both in humans and in animals. Malassezia pachydermatis is a lipophylic yeast responsible for otitis externa and dermatitis in dogs and for cutaneous and systemic disease in humans. Five mixtures of essential oils obtained from Mediterranean plants (Citrus paradisi, Salvia sclarea, Ocimum basilicum, Rosmarinus officinalis, Citrus limon, Anthemis nobilis, Lavandula hybrida and Thymus vulgaris) provided with antifungal and/or anti-inflammatory action assayed in vitro, were tested in vivo versus M. pachydermatis to treat once daily for 2 weeks 25 atopic dogs with Malassezia otitis externa. Mixture composed by C. limon 1%, S. sclarea 0,5%, R. officinalis 1%, A. nobilis 0,5% yielded excellent results in all treated dogs. Despite of clinical resolution after all treatments the number of blastospores did not decrease. This study confirms recent findings suggesting a multifactorial alternative approach for the management of canine Malassezia otitis.

  6. Successful use of camelid (alpaca) antivenom to treat a potentially lethal tiger snake (Notechis scutatus) envenomation in a dog.

    PubMed

    Padula, Andrew M; Winkel, Kenneth D

    2016-05-01

    This report describes a confirmed clinical case of tiger snake (Notechis scutatus) envenomation in a domestic dog that was successfully treated with a novel polyvalent camelid (alpaca; Llama pacos) antivenom. Samples collected from the dog were assayed for tiger snake venom (TSV) using a highly sensitive and specific ELISA. The TSV concentration in serum and urine at initial presentation was 365 ng/mL and 11,640 ng/mL respectively. At the time of initial presentation whole blood collected from the dog did not clot and the Prothrombin Time was abnormally increased (>300 s). Serum was also visibly hemolysed. The dog was administered antihistamine, dexamethasone and 4000 Units (sufficient to neutralise 40 mg of TSV) of a novel polyvalent alpaca antivenom diluted in 0.9% NaCl. At 4 h post-antivenom treatment the dog's clinical condition had improved markedly with serum TSV concentrations below the limit of detection (<0.015 ng/mL), consistent with complete binding of venom antigens by the alpaca antivenom. Coagulation parameters had begun to improve by 4 h and had fully normalised by 16 h post-antivenom. Venom concentrations in both serum and urine remained undetectable at 16 h post-antivenom. The dog made a complete recovery, without complications, suggesting that the alpaca-based antivenom is both clinically safe and effective.

  7. Compromised Osseous Healing of Dental Extraction Sites in Zoledronic Acid-Treated Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Matthew R.; Kubek, Daniel J.; Burr, David B.; Ruggiero, Salvatore L.; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The goal of this study was to document how treatment with a bisphosphonate affects the bone tissue following dental extraction. METHODS Skeletally mature female beagle dogs were either untreated controls (CON) or treated with intravenous zoledronic acid (ZOL). Following the extraction of the 4th premolars, healing was allowed for 4 or 8 weeks. Properties of the extraction site were assessed using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and dynamic histomorphometry. RESULTS The initial infilling of the extraction socket with bone was not affected by ZOL but subsequent removal of this bone was significantly suppressed compared to CON. After 8-weeks of healing, the alveolar cortical bone adjacent to the extraction socket had a remodeling rate of ~50%/year in CON animals while ZOL-treated animals had a rate of < 1%/year. One ZOL-treated animal developed exposed bone post-extraction which eventually led to the formation of a sequestrum. Assessment of the sequestrum with micro-CT and histology showed that it had features consistent with those reported in humans with osteonecrosis of the jaw. CONCLUSIONS These results, showing significantly compromised post-extraction osseous healing as well as presence of exposed bone and development of a sequestrum in one ZOL animal, provide a building block toward understanding the pathophysiology of osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:20458574

  8. Spontaneous activity in the trachea of dogs treated with indomethacin: an experimental model for aspirin-related asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Y.; Tajima, K.

    1981-01-01

    1 Electrical and mechanical properties of smooth muscle cells or of neuro-effector transmission in the smooth muscle layer of the dog trachea, were studied after treatment with indomethacin, by means of the double sucrose gap, microelectrode or tension recording methods. 2 After several subcutaneous injections of indomethacin (1.0 mg/kg daily), 6 out of 12 dogs were coughing and wheezing. 3 Smooth muscle tissues dissected from the trachea of the coughing dog showed spontaneous electrical and mechanical activities at the frequency of 8-15 per min. These spontaneous electrical and mechanical activities were completely suppressed by treatment with atropine (10(-6) M), isoprenaline (5 X 10(-7) M) or prostaglandin E2 (10(-9) M) but not by tetrodotoxin (1.5 X 10(-6) M). 4 Direct muscle stimulation induced oscillatory potential changes followed by tension development in the trachea of the indomethacin-treated dog. 5 In the indomethacin-treated dog, mean membrane potential of the tracheal smooth muscle cells was -52.4 mV, and in the control trachea, the potential was -59.0 mV. 6 In the trachea from control dogs, the amplitude of test e.j.ps after conditioning e.j.ps was always smaller than the conditioning e.j.p., at any time interval between the two stimuli. In the trachea from indomethacin-treated dogs, facilitation phenomena were observed. 7 In the trachea from the indomethacin-treated dog, prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) or PGE2 (10(-10)-10(-9) M) markedly suppressed the amplitude of the e.j.p. but did not affect the facilitation phenomenon. 8 These results indicate that endogenous prostaglandins play important physiological roles in the feed-back inhibitory mechanisms for acetylcholine release from the nerve terminals during the resting and active states. 9 The results are also discussed in relation to the genesis of aspirin-induced asthma in man. PMID:7237002

  9. Imaging and Clinical Outcomes in 20 Dogs Treated with Thin Film Banding for Extrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nathan C; Nelson, Laura L

    2016-08-01

    To prospectively evaluate the efficacy of thin film band attenuation of congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts (CEPSS) in dogs using clinical, biochemical, and imaging-related outcome measures. Prospective case series. Dogs with CEPSS (n=20). Client-owned dogs with CEPSS were enrolled and thin film banding of the shunting vessel was performed. Before and at least 6 months after surgery, serum bile acids and computed tomography (CT) angiography were performed and owners completed a health questionnaire regarding the dog's clinical signs. Postoperative CT images were assessed for the effectiveness of band closure, change in portal vein/aorta ratio, change in liver volume/weight ratio, and whether the band was placed in the appropriate location. Preoperative and postoperative health questionnaire data and serum bile acids were compared. The band resulted in complete closure of the vessel around which it was placed in 13 dogs. In the remaining 7 dogs, the vessel lumen was narrowed but not completely closed. In 8 dogs the band location was suboptimal, allowing systemic drainage of visceral blood or secondary shunting branches to persist. Liver volume/body weight ratios and portal vein/aorta diameter ratios increased in most dogs. Serum bile acids decreased in all but 1 dog and owners reported improved health in 19 dogs. Thin film banding resulted in complete occlusion of many, but not all vessels around which it was placed. Even in dogs with inappropriate band location or with incomplete closure, clinical improvement can be expected based on our results. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  10. Use of ponazuril paste to treat coccidiosis in shelter-housed cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Litster, A L; Nichols, J; Hall, K; Camp, J; Mohamed, A S

    2014-05-28

    Cystoisospora (synonym Isospora) spp. infections are common in dogs and cats worldwide, especially in crowded or unsanitary environments. Ponazuril (toltrazuril sulfone) is a widely used oral treatment, but protocols that will produce oocyst excretion below the detection limit in shelter-housed animals have not been determined. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of ponazuril paste at each of three dosages (dosage 1, 50mg/kg q24 h for 3 days, dogs n=14, cats n=16; dosage 2, 50mg/kg as a single dose, dogs n=13, cats n=25; or dosage 3, 20mg/kg as a single dose, dogs n=16, cats n=23) in shelter-housed dogs (n=43) and cats (n=64) with confirmed coccidiosis. Fecal oocyst counts and identification and fecal consistency scoring was performed pre-treatment (Day 1) and again at Day 3-4 and Day 8. There were higher proportions of animals with oocyst excretion below the detection limit at both Day 3-4 and Day 8 in the dosage 1 group (dogs 92.9%, cats 87.5%) than in the other two groups (dosage 2, dogs 76.9%, cats 80.0%; dosage 3, dogs 68.8%, cats 47.8%). Animals with high fecal oocyst counts at Day 1 were significantly more likely to be infected at Day 3-4 (dogs, P<0.001; cats, P=0.013). Fecal consistency score at Day 3-4 was not significantly related to infection status (dogs, P=0.898; cats, P=0.136). Further studies are warranted to investigate a ponazuril protocol that can safely reduce fecal oocyst burdens in infected dogs and cats to levels below the detection limit. Environmental decontamination is also important to reduce the likelihood of re-infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Demography of black-tailed prairie dog populations reoccupying sites treated with rodenticide

    Treesearch

    R. P. Cincotta; Daniel W. Uresk; R. M. Hansen

    1987-01-01

    A rodenticide, zinc phosphide, was applied to remove black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) from 6 haofa prairie dog colony in southwestern South Dakota. Another adjacent 6 ha was left untreated. The removal experiment was repeated two consecutive years. Contingency table analysis showed that the resultant population was not homogeneous;...

  12. Primary frontal sinus squamous cell carcinoma in a dog treated with surgical excision.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Janet A; Pagano, Candace J; Boudreaux, Bonnie B

    2017-01-01

    An 8-year-old castrated male mixed breed dog was presented for a squamous cell carcinoma of the left frontal sinus. A partial craniectomy was performed and polytetrafluoroethylene mesh was placed over the craniectomy site. The dog recovered well with a good cosmetic outcome. Histopathology confirmed primary frontal sinus squamous cell carcinoma.

  13. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) to treat a chronic skin wound in a dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hage, Raduan; Plapler, Hélio; Bitar, Renata A.

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is an emerging and promising therapeutic modality for treatment of a wide variety of malignant and nononcologic tumors, as well as in the treatment of infected skin ulcers. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the PDT to treat a chronic skin wound that had been already subjected to several clinical and surgical type treatments in a dog. The animal with an infected chronic skin wound with 8 cm diameter in the left leg received an injection of an aqueous solution of 1% methylene blue (MB) with 2% lidocaine into the lesion. After MB injection the wound was irradiated using a LED (LED-VET MMOptics(r)) with a wavelength between 600 and 700 nm, 2 cm diameter circular light beam, of 150 mW of power, light dose of 50 J/cm2. After 3 and 6 weeks PDT was repeated and the wound was re-evaluated. Complete healing was achieved 10 weeks after the first procedure.

  14. Tracking of Specific Integrant Clones in Dogs Treated with Foamy Virus Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Ohmine, Ken; Li, Yi; Bauer, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vector integration can lead to proto-oncogene activation and malignancies during hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. We previously used foamy virus vectors to deliver the CD18 gene under the control of an internal murine stem cell virus promoter and successfully treated dogs with canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency. Here we have tracked the copy numbers of 11 specific proviruses found in these animals for 36–42 months after transplantation, including examples within or near proto-oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and genes unrelated to cancer. We found no evidence for clonal expansion of any of the clones, including those with proviruses in the MECOM gene (MDS1-EVI1 complex). These results suggest that although foamy virus vectors may integrate near proto-oncogenes, this does not necessarily lead to clonal expansion and malignancies. Additionally, we show that copy number estimates of these specific proviruses based on linker-mediated PCR results are different from those obtained by quantitative PCR, but can provide a qualitative assessment of provirus levels. PMID:20738155

  15. [Dog bite-related injuries treated in a pediatric surgery department:analysis of 654 cases in 10 years].

    PubMed

    Méndez Gallart, R; Gómez Tellado, M; Somoza Argibay, I; Liras Muñoz, J; Pais Piñeiro, E; Vela Nieto, D

    2002-05-01

    Dog bites to children have increasingly come to the forefront of public attention in recent years, especially attacks by certain breeds classified as aggressive. Dog bites account for approximately 1 % of all emergency pediatric department visits and 75 % of these bites occur in children. Although these lesions are rarely serious, 20-45 % of children under the age of 15 years have been bitten. To analyze the reality of this problem in our population in order to determine the ideal prehospital preventive measures that would reduce the incidence of dog bites. A retrospective study of children with dog bites who received emergency treatment in the Hospital Infantil Teresa Herrera of the Complejo Hospitalario Juan Canalejo in La Coruña, Spain, between 1991 and 2000 was undertaken. A register of patients was created that included data on age and sex of the children, the race of the dog, the relationship between the child and the animal, characteristics of the injuries, circumstances of the attack, probable sequelae, need for hospital admission and complications during treatment. Nonparametric data were analyzed using Pearson's 2 test. The Ox ratio was estimated with a 95 % confidence interval (0.05). In the 10-year period between January 1991 and December 2000, 654 patients under the age of 14 years were treated for dog bite-related injuries. The mean age was 5.09 years. A greater number of boys had been bitten than girls (2.75/1). In 79 % of the cases the dogs were known (family, friends, neighbors). Thirty-eight percent of the attacks were made by German Shepherds and 35 % by crossed breeds. Sixty-five percent of the bites were located on the head, face and neck, especially in patients aged less than 4 years. Five percent of the lesions were severe. Thirteen patients were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit and 98 patients required hospitalization due to the characteristics of the injuries. The mean hospital stay was 6 days. Infectious complications

  16. Leishmania-specific lymphoproliferative responses and IgG1/IgG2 immunodetection patterns by Western blot in asymptomatic, symptomatic and treated dogs.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, F J; Gómez-Muñoz, Ma T; Méndez, S; Alunda, J M

    2003-04-01

    Peripheral cell responses against Leishmania infantum and serology by IFAT and WB were determined in 87 untreated dogs from an endemic area (Madrid, Spain) and in 15 treated dogs (antimonials, allopurinol). All untreated symptomatic dogs (nine) did not show any lymphoproliferative response, whereas 21 out of 78 untreated asymptomatic dogs had a positive cellular response. Serum IgG(2) from dogs with clinical signs of patent leishmaniosis reacted with a variety of peptides (26, 29, 34-35.4, 42, 45, 50-57 and 67 kDa), but IgG(1) response was mainly directed against a 67-kDa peptide. Successfully treated dogs displayed a low immunoreactivity of both IgG(1) and IgG(2), particularly against 67 kDa, thus indicating the potential prognostic value of this region. Positive cellular response of dogs treated with good clinical progress was only observed up to 5-12 months post treatment. Untreated asymptomatic dogs with positive cell response showed a clear recognition by IgG(2) of approximately 67 and 45 kDa antigens, whereas IgG(1) did not recognise any antigen.

  17. Synthesis of a highly water-soluble acacetin prodrug for treating experimental atrial fibrillation in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Ya-Jing; Yang, Lei; Zhou, Mei; Jin, Man-Wen; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Yan; Sun, Hai-Ying; Li, Gui-Rong

    2016-05-10

    We previously reported that duodenal administration of the natural flavone acacetin can effectively prevent the induction of experimental atrial fibrillation (AF) in canines; however, it may not be used intravenously to terminate AF due to its poor water-solubility. The present study was to design a water-soluble prodrug of acacetin and investigate its anti-AF effect in beagle dogs. Acacetin prodrug was synthesized by a three-step procedure. Aqueous solubility, bioconversion and anti-AF efficacy of acacetin prodrug were determined with different methodologies. Our results demonstrated that the synthesized phosphate sodium salt of acacetin prodrug had a remarkable increase of aqueous solubility in H2O and clinically acceptable solution (5% glucose or 0.9% NaCl). The acacetin prodrug was effectively converted into acacetin in ex vivo rat plasma and liver microsome, and in vivo beagle dogs. Intravenous infusion of acacetin prodrug (3, 6 and 12 mg/kg) terminated experimental AF without increasing ECG QTc interval in beagle dogs. The intravenous LD50 of acacetin prodrug was 721 mg/kg in mice. Our preclinical study indicates that the synthesized acacetin prodrug is highly water-soluble and safe; it effectively terminates experimental AF in beagle dogs and therefore may be a promising drug candidate for clinical trial to treat patients with acute AF.

  18. Induction of specific unresponsiveness to heart allografts in mongrel dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation and antithymocyte globulin

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.; Modry, D.L.; Hoppe, R.T.; Pennock, J.L.; Bieber, C.P.; Holm, B.I.; Jamieson, S.W.; Stinson, E.B.; Schroder, J.; Suomalainen, H.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1984-02-01

    The survival of heterotopic heart allografts was determined in mongrel dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) alone or in combination with other immunosuppressive agents. TLI alone (total dose, 1800 rad) minimally prolonged graft survival as compared with untreated controls. However, marked synergy was observed when TLI was combined with a 10-day post-transplant course of rabbit anti-dog thymocyte globulin (ATG). Approximately 40% of recipients given TLI and ATG showed specific unresponsiveness, as judged by the lack of rejection on serial biopsies for more than 1 year and the prompt rejection of third party hearts. The addition of post-transplant azathioprine (90 to 180 days) to the TLI and ATG regimen increased the mortality of recipients and reduced the fraction of dogs showing specific unresponsiveness. Infusion of donor bone marrow cells at the time of heart transplantation failed to induced specific unresponsiveness in recipients given TLI alone or TLI in combination with post-transplant methotrexate, cyclosporine A, or ATG. The results indicate that the combination of TLI and a brief course of ATG without marrow transplantation was the most effective regimen for the induction of specific unresponsiveness in mongrel dogs.

  19. Bleomycin/interleukin-12 electrochemogene therapy for treating naturally occurring spontaneous neoplasms in dogs.

    PubMed

    Reed, S D; Fulmer, A; Buckholz, J; Zhang, B; Cutrera, J; Shiomitsu, K; Li, S

    2010-07-01

    On the basis of superior outcomes from electrochemogene therapy (ECGT) compared with electrochemotherapy in mice, we determined the efficacy of ECGT applied to spontaneous canine neoplasms. Intralesional bleomycin and feline interleukin-12 DNA (fIL-12 DNA) injection combined with translesional electroporation resulted in complete cure of two recurrent World Health Organization stage T(2b)N(0)M(0) oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and one T(2)N(0)M(0) acanthomatous ameloblastoma. Three remaining dogs, which had no other treatment options, had partial responses to ECGT; one had mandibular T(3b)N(2b)M(1) melanoma with pulmonary and lymph node metastases; one had cubital T(3)N(0)M(1) histiocytic sarcoma with spleen metastases; and one had soft palate T(3)N(0)M(0) fibrosarcoma. The melanoma dog had decrease in size of the primary tumor before recrudescence and euthanasia. The histiocytic sarcoma dog had resolution of the primary tumor, but was euthanized because of metastases 4 months after the only treatment. The dog with T(3)N(0)M(0) fibrosarcoma had tumor regression with recrudescence. Treatment was associated with minimal side effects and was easy to perform. It was associated with repair of bone lysis in cured dogs, it improved quality of life of dogs with partial responses and extended overall survival time. ECGT seems to be a safe and resulted in complete responses in SCC and acanthomatous ameloblastoma.

  20. Bleomycin/interleukin-12 electrochemogenetherapy for treating naturally occurring spontaneous neoplasms in dogs.

    PubMed

    Reed, S D; Fulmer, A; Buckholz, J; Zhang, B; Cutrera, J; Shiomitsu, K; Li, S

    2010-08-01

    On the basis of superior outcomes from electrochemogenetherapy (ECGT) compared with electrochemotherapy in mice, we determined the efficacy of ECGT applied to spontaneous canine neoplasms. Intralesional bleomycin (BLM) and feline interleukin-12 DNA injection combined with translesional electroporation resulted in complete cure of two recurrent World Health Organization stage T(2b)N(0)M(0) oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and one T(2)N(0)M(0) acanthomatous ameloblastoma. Three remaining dogs, which had no other treatment options, had partial responses to ECGT; one had mandibular T(3b)N(2b)M(1) melanoma with pulmonary and lymph node metastases; one had cubital T(3)N(0)M(1) histiocytic sarcoma with spleen metastases; and one had soft palate T(3)N(0)M(0) fibrosarcoma. The melanoma dog had decrease in the size of the primary tumor before recrudescence and euthanasia. The histiocytic sarcoma dog had resolution of the primary tumor, but was euthanized because of metastases 4 months after the only treatment. The dog with T(3)N(0)M(0) fibrosarcoma had tumor regression with recrudescence. Treatment was associated with minimal side effects and was easy to perform, was associated with repair of bone lysis in cured dogs, improved quality of life for dogs with partial responses and extended overall survival time. ECGT seems to be a safe and resulted in complete responses in SCC and acanthomatous ameloblastoma.

  1. Effects of probiotic bacteria in dogs with food responsive diarrhoea treated with an elimination diet.

    PubMed

    Sauter, S N; Benyacoub, J; Allenspach, K; Gaschen, F; Ontsouka, E; Reuteler, G; Cavadini, C; Knorr, R; Blum, J W

    2006-08-01

    We evaluated whether a probiotic supplementation in dogs with food responsive diarrhoea (FRD) has beneficial effects on intestinal cytokine patterns and on microbiota. Twenty-one client-owned dogs with FRD were presented for clinically needed duodeno- and colonoscopy and were enrolled in a prospective placebo (PL)-controlled probiotic trial. Intestinal tissue samples and faeces were collected during endoscopy. Intestinal mRNA abundance of interleukin (IL)-5, -10, -12p40 and -13, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta1 and interferon (IFN)-gamma were analysed and numbers of Lactobacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Enterococcus spp. and Enterobacteriaceae and supplemented probiotic bacteria were determined in faeces. The Canine Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity Index, a scoring system comprising general attitude, appetite, faecal consistency, defecation frequency, and vomitus, decreased in all dogs (p < 0.0001). Duodenal IL-10 mRNA levels decreased (p = 0.1) and colonic IFN-gamma mRNA levels increased (p = 0.08) after probiotic treatment. Numbers of Enterobacteriaceae decreased in FRD dogs receiving probiotic cocktail (FRD(PC)) and FRD dogs fed PL (FRD(PL)) during treatment (p < 0.05), numbers of Lactobacillus spp. increased in FRD(PC after) when compared with FRD(PC before) (p < 0.1). One strain of PC was detected in five of eight FRD(PC) dogs after probiotic supplementation. In conclusion, all dogs clinically improved after treatment, but cytokine patterns were not associated with the clinical features irrespective of the dietary supplementation.

  2. Efficacy and safety of cefovecin in treating bacterial folliculitis, abscesses, or infected wounds in dogs.

    PubMed

    Six, Robert; Cherni, Judy; Chesebrough, Robert; Cleaver, Dawn; Lindeman, Cindy J; Papp, Georg; Skogerboe, Terry L; Weigel, Daniel J; Boucher, Joseph F; Stegemann, Michael R

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of administration of cefovecin, compared with cefadroxil, for treatment of naturally occurring secondary superficial pyoderma, abscesses, and infected wounds in dogs. Multicenter, randomized, positive-controlled clinical trial. 235 client-owned dogs. Dogs with clinical signs of skin infection confirmed via bacteriologic culture were randomly allocated to receive a single SC injection of cefovecin (8 mg/kg [3.6 mg/lb]) followed by placebo administered PO twice daily for 14 days or cefadroxil (22 mg/kg [10 mg/lb]) administered PO twice daily for 14 days following a placebo injection. Two 14-day treatment courses were permitted. Treatment success was defined as reduction of clinical signs to mild or absent at the final assessment. Clinical efficacy achieved with cefovecin in dogs was equivalent to that observed with cefadroxil. At the final assessment, 14 days following the completion of treatment (on day 28 or 42), 92.4% (109/118) of the cefovecin group and 92.3% (108/117) of the cefadroxil group were treatment successes. There were no serious adverse events or deaths related to treatment. A single cefovecin injection (8 mg/kg) administered SC, which could be repeated once after 14 days, was safe and effective against naturally occurring skin infections in dogs and as effective as cefadroxil administered PO twice daily for 14 or 28 days.

  3. Hemostatic profile and thromboembolic risk in healthy dogs treated with prednisone: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Romão, Felipe Gazza; Campos, Elza Fernanda; Mattoso, Claudio Roberto Scabelo; Takahira, Regina Kiomi

    2013-12-31

    Thrombosis has been associated to some diseases like hyperadrenocorticism (HAC). Several drugs can alter the balance, such as the corticosteroid prednisone, used mainly for its anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. It is known that hypercortisolism can stimulate thrombi formation by increasing coagulation factors and decreasing fibrinolysis. However it is not known how prednisone administration affects hemostasis in dogs and if it is dose dependent. The aim of this study, therefore, was to demonstrate the effects of prednisone administration on dogs' hemostatic profile. Significant decrease of antithrombin levels was observed in both groups (anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive doses) after 15 days of treatment. An increase of platelet aggregation was observed in dogs receiving immunosuppressive doses of prednisone (Group II). From the results obtained in our study, it is not possible to infer that hypercortisolism can increase the thromboembolic risk, despite the decreased anticoagulant factors (antithrombin levels).

  4. Chemotherapy effectiveness and mortality prediction in surgically treated osteosarcoma dogs: A validation study.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A F; Nielen, M; Withrow, S J; Selmic, L E; Burton, J H; Klungel, O H; Groenwold, R H H; Kirpensteijn, J

    2016-03-01

    Canine osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer, and an important cause of mortality and morbidity, in large purebred dogs. Previously we constructed two multivariable models to predict a dog's 5-month or 1-year mortality risk after surgical treatment for osteosarcoma. According to the 5-month model, dogs with a relatively low risk of 5-month mortality benefited most from additional chemotherapy treatment. In the present study, we externally validated these results using an independent cohort study of 794 dogs. External performance of our prediction models showed some disagreement between observed and predicted risk, mean difference: -0.11 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]-0.29; 0.08) for 5-month risk and 0.25 (95%CI 0.10; 0.40) for 1-year mortality risk. After updating the intercept, agreement improved: -0.0004 (95%CI-0.16; 0.16) and -0.002 (95%CI-0.15; 0.15). The chemotherapy by predicted mortality risk interaction (P-value=0.01) showed that the chemotherapy compared to no chemotherapy effectiveness was modified by 5-month mortality risk: dogs with a relatively lower risk of mortality benefited most from additional chemotherapy. Chemotherapy effectiveness on 1-year mortality was not significantly modified by predicted risk (P-value=0.28). In conclusion, this external validation study confirmed that our multivariable risk prediction models can predict a patient's mortality risk and that dogs with a relatively lower risk of 5-month mortality seem to benefit most from chemotherapy.

  5. Intra-articular therapy to treat septic arthritis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Hewes, Christina A; Macintire, Douglass K

    2011-01-01

    A 6 yr old female spayed Labrador retriever was examined for severe pain and a nonweight-bearing right forelimb lameness due to swelling and wounds with direct communication into the elbow joint. The medical management of β hemolytic Streptococcus septic arthritis with needle lavage of the joint, systemic and local antibiotic therapy, and analgesic therapy is described. This case provides information on the need to address septic arthritis in the dog as an emergency situation and the treatment with intra-articular medication. Earlier medical management for septic joints could be considered in dogs to help decrease the long-term complications that can result from septic arthritis.

  6. Prospective evaluation of serum pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity and troponin I concentrations in Leishmania infantum-infected dogs treated with meglumine antimonate.

    PubMed

    Xenoulis, Panagiotis G; Saridomichelakis, Manolis N; Chatzis, Manolis K; Kasabalis, Dimitris; Petanides, Theodoros; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2014-07-14

    Canine leishmaniosis (CanL) caused by Leishmania infantum is an important zoonotic disease. One of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of CanL is meglumine antimonate. Drugs of this class have been associated with pancreatitis and cardiotoxicity in humans infected with Leishmania spp. The aim of this study was to measure serum canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (Spec cPL) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) concentrations in dogs with leishmaniosis during treatment with meglumine antimonate, and to compare them with those of dogs with leishmaniosis not treated with this drug. A total of 30 non-uremic dogs with leishmaniosis, living in Greece, were prospectively enrolled into the study. Of the 30 dogs, 20 (Group A) were treated with a combination of meglumine antimonate (100mg/kg, SC, q24 h) and allopurinol (10mg/kg, PO, q12h) for 28 days, while 10 dogs (Group B) were treated with allopurinol alone (10mg/kg, PO, q12h) for 28 days. Blood samples were collected at timepoint 0 (before treatment) and at 14 and 28 days after the initiation of treatment. None of the dogs treated with meglumine antiomonate had a Spec cPL concentration suggestive of pancreatitis (≥ 400 μg/L) or clinical signs suggestive of pancreatitis at any of the timepoints. Similarly, none of the dogs treated with meglumine antiomonate had a serum cTnI concentration above the upper limit of the reference range (>0.5 ng/mL) or clinical evidence of cardiotoxicity at any of the 3 timepoints. In the present study, meglumine antimonate treatment in dogs with leishmaniosis did not result in clinical or laboratory evidence of either pancreatitis or cardiotoxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving in-kennel presentation of shelter dogs through response-dependent and response-independent treat delivery.

    PubMed

    Protopopova, Alexandra; Wynne, Clive D L

    2015-09-01

    In a sequence of studies, we evaluated 2 behavioral interventions designed to decrease undesirable in-kennel behaviors of shelter dogs. In Experiment 1, we compared the efficacy of a simple pairing of person with food (response-independent treat delivery) to an increasing interval differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior (DRO) procedure and a control condition. Both procedures decreased the median percentage of undesirable behavior from baseline (88.13%, interquartile range [IQR] = 52.78% and 66.43%, IQR = 89.06% respectively), and the control condition increased behavior by 15.13% (IQR = 32.08%), H(2) = 6.49, p = .039. In Experiment 2, we assessed the efficacy of a response-independent procedure on the whole shelter population. We found a 68% decrease from baseline in the number of dogs that behaved undesirably (U = -4.16, p < .001). Our results suggest that a response-independent procedure is equivalent in efficacy to a DRO procedure to decrease undesirable in-kennel behavior of shelter dogs.

  8. Primary pulmonary osteosarcoma treated by thoracoscopy-assisted lung resection in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Dhumeaux, Marc P.; Haudiquet, Philippe. R.

    2009-01-01

    A 6-year-old female, intact boxer presented with acute respiratory distress due to a mass in the left cranial thorax. The tumor, which originated in the left lung and was shown by histology to be an osteosarcoma, was removed by lateral thoracotomy. The dog died from unrelated disease 7 mo later and no tumor was evident at necropsy. PMID:19794873

  9. Intrapericardial cystic hematoma in a dog treated by thoracoscopic subtotal pericardectomy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Ya; Fransson, Boel A; Nylund, Adam M

    2017-04-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 2-year-old castrated male mixed-breed dog was evaluated because of a 1-week history of respiratory distress and abdominal distension. Thoracic radiography and echocardiography at that time revealed an enlarged cardiac silhouette and pericardial effusion; abdominal radiography and ultrasonography revealed ascites. CLINICAL FINDINGS At the initial referral examination 5 weeks later, the dog weighed 37.5 kg (82.5 lb) and appeared clinically normal. The only abnormality detected was a grade I/VI systolic murmur on the left side of the thorax. Echocardiography revealed a large fat- and fluid-filled cystic structure located next to the right ventricle with scant pericardial effusion. Computed tomography revealed a bilobed peripherally contrast-enhancing structure within the right ventral aspect of the pericardium; the right ventricle appeared compressed by the cyst. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Initial treatment consisted of pericardiocentesis and abdominocentesis to alleviate clinical signs. Thoracoscopic subtotal pericardectomy was performed 6 weeks after the initial treatment. The cyst was completely excised, and multiple adhesions between the visceral and parietal pericardium were transected, without surgical or anesthetic complications. Histologic examination of the cyst revealed chronic inflammation with histiocytic infiltration, suggesting possible foreign body reaction or chronic inflammation and hemorrhage. These findings supported a diagnosis of cystic hematoma of the pericardium. The dog remained clinically normal for at least 16 months after surgery. CLINICAL RELEVANCE This report represents a rare case of intrapericardial cystic hematoma in a dog. Minimally invasive surgery was performed without complications, suggesting that thoracoscopic subtotal pericardectomy is a feasible treatment option for affected dogs.

  10. Doxycycline levels and anti-Wolbachia antibodies in sera from dogs experimentally infected with Dirofilaria immitis and treated with a combination of ivermectin/doxycycline.

    PubMed

    Menozzi, A; Bertini, S; Turin, L; Serventi, P; Kramer, L; Bazzocchi, C

    2015-04-30

    Sera from Dirofilaria immitis-experimentally infected dogs treated with a combination of ivermectin/doxycycline were analysed for doxycycline levels by HPLC and anti-Wolbachia Surface Protein (rWSP) antibodies by ELISA and compared with sera from dogs treated with doxycycline alone. Results show that doxycycline levels were not statistically different between the two groups. Circulating anti-WSP antibody titres were markedly lower in both treatment groups when compared to control D. immitis infected dogs, indicating that doxycycline is able to reduce Wolbachia and prevent the immune response against the bacteria. The combination treatment protocol has been shown to be highly adulticidal and further studies are needed to better understand the interaction between doxycycline and ivermectin in D. immitis infected dogs.

  11. Prevention of transmission of Ehrlichia canis by Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks to dogs treated with a combination of fipronil, amitraz and (S)-methoprene (CERTIFECT®).

    PubMed

    Fourie, Josephus J; Ollagnier, Catherine; Beugnet, Frederic; Luus, Herman G; Jongejan, Frans

    2013-03-31

    The ability of CERTIFECT(®) (a combination of fipronil, amitraz and (S)-methoprene) to prevent transmission of Ehrlichia canis was studied in two groups of eight dogs. One group was treated with CERTIFECT while the other group remained untreated. All dogs were exposed to E. canis-infected Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks on Days 7, 14, 21 and again on day 28 post-treatment by releasing ticks into the kennels of the dogs to simulate the natural way of infestation. Animals were examined in situ for ticks on Days 9, 16 and 23 and any ticks present were counted and removed on Day 30. The efficacy of CERTIFECT against R. sanguineus was 100%, since no ticks were found on the treated dogs at any time. Clinical examinations (including monitoring body temperature and blood collections for PCR analysis and serology) were performed at intervals throughout the study until Day 56. Five out of 8 untreated control dogs (62.5%) became infected with E. canis, as demonstrated by detection of specific E. canis antibodies and the presence of E. canis DNA in blood samples by PCR. These dogs displayed fever and thrombocytopenia and were rescue-treated with doxycline. None of the 8 dogs treated with CERTIFECT became infected with E. canis, in comparison to the 5/8 control dogs, as confirmed by the lack of specific antibodies and absence of any ehrlichial DNA in blood samples by PCR. CERTIFECT prevented transmission of E. canis and effectively provided protection against monocytic ehrlichiose for at least 4 weeks post treatment.

  12. Postoperative computed tomography and low-field magnetic resonance imaging findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis treated by dorsal laminectomy.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Martin; Ley, Charles J; Hansson, Kerstin; Sjöström, Lennart

    2017-03-20

    To describe postoperative computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) treated by dorsal laminectomy and partial discectomy. Prospective clinical case study of dogs diagnosed with and treated for DLSS. Surgical and clinical findings were described. Computed tomography and low field MRI findings pre- and postoperatively were described and graded. Clinical, CT and MRI examinations were performed four to 18 months after surgery. Eleven of 13 dogs were clinically improved and two dogs had unchanged clinical status postoperatively despite imaging signs of neural compression. Vacuum phenomenon, spondylosis, sclerosis of the seventh lumbar (L7) and first sacral (S1) vertebrae endplates and lumbosacral intervertebral joint osteoarthritis became more frequent in postoperative CT images. Postoperative MRI showed mild disc extrusions in five cases, and in all cases contrast enhancing non-discal tissue was present. All cases showed contrast enhancement of the L7 spinal nerves both pre- and postoperatively and seven had contrast enhancement of the lumbosacral intervertebral joints and paraspinal tissue postoperatively. Articular process fractures or fissures were noted in four dogs. The study indicates that imaging signs of neural compression are common after DLSS surgery, even in dogs that have clinical improvement. Contrast enhancement of spinal nerves and soft tissues around the region of disc herniation is common both pre- and postoperatively and thus are unreliable criteria for identifying complications of the DLSS surgery.

  13. The matrix components of the epiphyseal growth plate and articular cartilages from dogs treated with ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, a copper antagonist.

    PubMed

    Read, R; Sutherland, J; Ghosh, P

    1986-12-01

    As part of a project to study the effect of copper deficiency (CD) on bone development in young dogs, the composition and metabolism of proteoglycans (PGs) and extractability of collagens in the epiphyseal growth plate cartilage (EGPC) and articular cartilages (AC) were investigated. Copper deficiency was induced by feeding ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (TTM) a copper antagonist. The collagen of cartilages from TTM-treated animals was significantly more soluble in 0.5 saline than control tissues. While no distinction between TTM-treated and control cartilages was evident in terms of PG content or extractability under associative (0.5 M-GuHCl) or dissociative (4.0 M-GuHCl) conditions, the sedimentation behaviour of the PG aggregates following CsCl density gradient ultracentrifugation suggested less polydispersity of PGs in preparations from the TTM-treated animals. Moreover, analysis of the PG monomers from EGPC of TTM animals showed galactosamine/glucosamine ratios higher than control preparations, suggesting a reduced keratan sulphate content in these preparations. Organ culture of EGPC showed a significant reduction in the incorporation of 35S into PGs and of 3H-thymidine into DNA in the tissues of TTM-treated animals relative to controls. From these findings we deduce that the catabolism of PGs and the extent of collagen cross-linking in EGPC of TTM-treated animals may be reduced relative to age-matched control tissues.

  14. Combined preputial advancement and phallopexy as a revision technique for treating paraphimosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Wasik, S M; Wallace, A M

    2014-11-01

    A 7-year-old neutered male Jack Russell terrier-cross was presented for signs of recurrent paraphimosis, despite previous surgical enlargement of the preputial ostium. Revision surgery was performed using a combination of preputial advancement and phallopexy, which resulted in complete and permanent coverage of the glans penis by the prepuce, and at 1 year postoperatively, no recurrence of paraphimosis had been observed. The combined techniques allow preservation of the normal penile anatomy, are relatively simple to perform and provide a cosmetic result. We recommend this combination for the treatment of paraphimosis in the dog, particularly when other techniques have failed.

  15. Canine Pancreas-Specific Lipase and C-reactive Protein in Dogs Treated With Anticonvulsants (Phenobarbital and Potassium Bromide).

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Viviana; Teles, Mariana; Meléndez-Lazo, Antonio; Rodón, Jaume; Pastor, Josep

    2015-06-01

    Animals treated with anticonvulsant drugs may have increased canine pancreas-specific lipase (cPLI) values. Inflammatory conditions and specifically acute pancreatitis are of major concern in these animals. Elevation in C-reactive protein is being associated with inflammatory status in dogs and it has been correlated with the clinical severity of pancreatitis. In the present study, we investigated if there is a correlation between the cPLI increase, changes in C-reactive protein and hepatic enzymes, as well as the incidence of severe acute pancreatitis (AP) in dogs with anticonvulsant treatment (phenobarbital, or potassium bromide or both). Increased values of pancreas-specific lipase were found in 6.8% of the animals in treatment with anticonvulsants, and this increase is correlated with the increase in triglycerides, alkaline phosphatase, and alanine aminotransferase but not with C-reactive protein levels, which suggests a possible induction or release phenomenon rather than a clear severe AP. C-reactive protein levels did not affect cPLI values on the population studied. Only 2 animals had clinical and analytical data suggestive of AP, indicating a low prevalence (0.6%). In conclusion, cPLI may be increased in a low percentage of animals with anticonvulsants treatment and its increase may not be associated with severe AP. It may be induced by the anticonvulsants drugs; however, further studies are advised to rule out other possible causes that increased cPLI.

  16. A resin-modified glass ionomer cement barrier for treating degree II furcation defects: a pilot study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Letícia Algarves; Gomes, Sabrina Carvalho; Soares, Ilson José; Oppermann, Rui Vicente

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in an animal model the healing of degree II furcation defects treated with: an experimental barrier of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (GIC), a polylactic acid barrier (GUI), and flap surgery (CTR). In 3 beagles, 18 class II furcation defects were surgically produced in mandibular and maxillary premolars and exposed to plaque accumulation for 21 days. Following a full flap, notches were made at the base to the bone defect. GIC barriers were prepared immediately before use from a commercial product and fit to place with the same product. The GIC barriers were removed after 30 days and the dogs euthanized after 120 days. Histologic sections were analyzed in a computer-assisted microscope. Epithelium, new cementum with inserting fibers, and connective tissue lining the root surface in-between notches were measured and medians of percentage values calculated. In the GIC, epithelium constituted 3.5% (median values) of the notch-to-notch root area; new cementum was 83.6% and connective tissue 12.9%. These values were 0%, 73.6%, and 26.4% for the GUI group and 35.6%, 43.2%, and 0% for the CTR group. Bone fill median values were 54.3% for GIC, 20.6% for GUI, and 24.6% for CTR. GIC and GUI prevented epithelial migration and promoted the formation of new periodontal tissues in experimentally induced class II furcation defects in dogs.

  17. The role of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in treating formocresol induced oral ulcers in dogs.

    PubMed

    El-Menoufy, H; Aly, L A A; Aziz, M T A; Atta, H M; Roshdy, N K; Rashed, L A; Sabry, D

    2010-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a subpopulation of adult somatic stem cells, are an attractive stem cell source in regenerative medicine because of their multipotentiality. In this study, the effects of MSCs transplantation on oral ulcer healing were examined. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from bone marrow aspirates of dogs by dish adherence and expanded in culture. Oral ulcers were induced by topical application of formocresol in the oral cavity of dogs. Either autologous MSCs or vehicle (saline) was injected around the ulcer. The healing process of the ulcer was monitored clinically and histopathologically. Gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was detected in MSCs by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Expression of VEGF and collagen genes was detected in biopsies from all ulcers. Mesenchymal stem cells expressed mRNA for VEGF MSCs transplantation significantly accelerated oral ulcer healing compared with controls. There was increased expression of both collagen and VEGF genes in MSCs-treated ulcers compared with controls. Mesenchymal stem cells transplantation may help accelerate oral ulcer healing, possibly through the induction of angiogenesis by VEGF together with increased intracellular matrix formation as detected by increased collagen gene expression.

  18. Gene therapy rescues photoreceptor blindness in dogs and paves the way for treating human X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Beltran, William A; Cideciyan, Artur V; Lewin, Alfred S; Iwabe, Simone; Khanna, Hemant; Sumaroka, Alexander; Chiodo, Vince A; Fajardo, Diego S; Román, Alejandro J; Deng, Wen-Tao; Swider, Malgorzata; Alemán, Tomas S; Boye, Sanford L; Genini, Sem; Swaroop, Anand; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2012-02-07

    Hereditary retinal blindness is caused by mutations in genes expressed in photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium. Gene therapy in mouse and dog models of a primary retinal pigment epithelium disease has already been translated to human clinical trials with encouraging results. Treatment for common primary photoreceptor blindness, however, has not yet moved from proof of concept to the clinic. We evaluated gene augmentation therapy in two blinding canine photoreceptor diseases that model the common X-linked form of retinitis pigmentosa caused by mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene, which encodes a photoreceptor ciliary protein, and provide evidence that the therapy is effective. After subretinal injections of adeno-associated virus-2/5-vectored human RPGR with human IRBP or GRK1 promoters, in vivo imaging showed preserved photoreceptor nuclei and inner/outer segments that were limited to treated areas. Both rod and cone photoreceptor function were greater in treated (three of four) than in control eyes. Histopathology indicated normal photoreceptor structure and reversal of opsin mislocalization in treated areas expressing human RPGR protein in rods and cones. Postreceptoral remodeling was also corrected: there was reversal of bipolar cell dendrite retraction evident with bipolar cell markers and preservation of outer plexiform layer thickness. Efficacy of gene therapy in these large animal models of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa provides a path for translation to human treatment.

  19. A case of non-regenerative immune-mediated anemia treated by combination therapy of human immune globulin and mycophenolate mofetil in a dog.

    PubMed

    Yuki, M

    2011-01-01

    A 12-year-old female Shih Tzu dog was referred with diarrhea. Hematological examination indicated severe non-regenerative anemia. Bone marrow aspiration smears and core biopsy specimens revealed normal bone marrow. Based on those results, non-regenerative immune-mediated anemia was diagnosed. The dog was initially treated using prednisolone and cyclosporine. However, this treatment regimen did not prove effective. Nevertheless, the patient achieved a good hematological response after the administration of a combination therapy of human immune globulin and mycophenolate mofetil. Such a combination therapy may prove effective against non-regenerative immune-mediated anemia.

  20. Primary frontal sinus squamous cell carcinoma in three dogs treated with piroxicam combined with carboplatin or toceranib.

    PubMed

    de Vos, J; Ramos Vega, S; Noorman, E; de Vos, P

    2012-09-01

    In human medicine, primary frontal sinus squamous cell carcinoma (pFS-SCC) is not frequently reported. In veterinary medicine, frontal sinus SCC is exclusively described as an extension of nasal cavity SCC. To our knowledge, this is the first publication concerning canine pFS-SCC, diagnosed using histology or cytology and medical imaging, in three dogs. The tumours extended into the orbit or brain cavity, without nasal involvement. Treatment was initiated with piroxicam-carboplatin. Prolongation of carboplatin delivery with a low dose intensity was performed on dogs with a favourable initial response. Dog 1 achieved a complete remission (CR), but was euthanized 344 days after start of therapy. Dog 2, still alive 3 years after start of therapy and in CR, received 14 carboplatin deliveries. In dog 3, after changing the treatment protocol into piroxicam-toceranib, a significant tumour reduction occurred, but the dog was euthanized after 195 days because of a relapse.

  1. Influence of insulin on plasma concentration and renal excretion of sodium and potassium in normal, electrolytes depleted and aldosterone treated dogs.

    PubMed

    Bak, M; Szczepańska-Sadowska, E; Krzymień, J; Kozłowski, S; Czyzyk, A

    1987-10-01

    Effects of insulin on plasma concentration and renal excretion of sodium and potassium were compared in conscious dogs 1) maintained in water and electrolytes balance (Series 1, 10 dogs), 2) depleted of electrolytes by repeated i.v. loading with 20% mannitol (Series 2, 10 dogs), and 3) aldosterone treated (0.8 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 i.v., Series 3, 10 dogs). In each Series intravenous infusion of insulin at a rate of 0.05 U.kg-1.h-1 elicited transient increase in plasma sodium concentration and prolonged hypokalemia. Repeated loading with mannitol in Series 2 elicited significant elevation of plasma sodium, ADH and aldosterone concentrations, as well as decrease in extracellular fluid volume. Infusion of insulin in this Series elicited smaller decrease in plasma potassium concentration and longer lasting hypernatremia than in dogs in water-electrolytes balance. Aldosterone infusion in Series 3 did not change hypokalemic effect of insulin but attenuated hypernatremia. Infusion of insulin in Series 1 elicited increase of sodium excretion and decrease in potassium excretion. These effects were absent in Series 2 and 3. The results indicate that depletion of electrolytes and blood aldosterone elevation modify the effects of insulin on plasma concentration and renal excretion of sodium and potassium.

  2. Development of an ELISA to detect circulating anti-asparaginase antibodies in dogs with lymphoid neoplasia treated with Escherichia coli l-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Kidd, J A; Ross, P; Buntzman, A S; Hess, P R

    2015-06-01

    Resistance to Escherichia coli l-asparaginase in canine lymphoma occurs frequently with repeated administration, a phenomenon often attributed, without substantiation, to the induction of neutralizing antibodies. To test the hypothesis that treated dogs develop antibodies against the drug, we created an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure plasma anti-asparaginase immunoglobulin G responses. Using samples from dogs that had received multiple doses, specific reactivity against l-asparaginase was demonstrated, while naïve patients' samples were negative. The optimized ELISA appeared sensitive, with endpoint titers >1 600 000 in positive control dogs. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were 3.6 and 14.5%. The assay was supported by the observation that ELISA-positive plasma could immunoprecipitate asparaginase activity. When clinical patients were evaluated, 3/10 dogs developed titers after a single injection; with repeated administration, 4/7 dogs were positive. l-asparaginase antibodies showed reduced binding to the PEGylated drug formulation. The ELISA should prove useful in investigating the potential correlation of antibody responses with resistance.

  3. A canine-specific probiotic product in treating acute or intermittent diarrhea in dogs: A double-blind placebo-controlled efficacy study.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gallego, Carlos; Junnila, Jouni; Männikkö, Sofia; Hämeenoja, Pirkko; Valtonen, Elisa; Salminen, Seppo; Beasley, Shea

    2016-12-25

    A double-blind placebo-controlled intervention study on 60 dogs recruited from a pool of canine patients visiting a veterinary practice and diagnosed with acute diarrhea was conducted. The dogs received in randomized manner either a sour-milk product containing three canine-derived Lactobacillus sp. probiotics in combination of Lactobacillus fermentum VET 9A, L. rhamnosus VET 16A, and L. plantarum VET 14A (2×10(9)cfu/ml), or placebo. Stool consistency, general well-being, and the numbers of specific pathogens in stool samples were analyzed. Our results demonstrated that the treatment with the study sour-milk product had a normalizing effect on canine stool consistency. The treatment also enhanced the well-being of the pet by maintaining appetite and may reduce vomiting. In addition, the concentrations of Clostridium perfringens and Enterococcus faecium, which typically increase during diarrhea episodes in dogs, were decreased in probiotic group feces when compared with the placebo group. Taken together, the sour-milk with the specific probiotic combination had a normalizing effect on acute diarrhea in dogs which was associated with decreased numbers of potential pathogens in the feces of probiotic-treated dogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pooled sample strategy in conjunction with high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based background subtraction to identify toxicological markers in dogs treated with ibipinabant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiying; Patrone, Laura; Kozlosky, John; Tomlinson, Lindsay; Cosma, Greg; Horvath, Joseph

    2010-05-01

    Metabolomics with chromatography-mass spectrometry is often challenging and relies on statistical tools to discern changes in a metabolome. A pooled sample strategy was proposed, consisting of (1) identification of potential marker candidates by detecting changes of metabolites in a few pooled samples between treated and control groups and (2) validation of markers of statistically significant changes with a large set of individual samples. This strategy was enabled by applying a thorough background subtraction approach based on high-resolution mass spectrometry. In a proof-of-principle study, plasma samples were generated and pooled in a 6-week investigational study to identify potential toxicological markers for an observed muscle toxicity associated with the treatment of ibipinabant in dogs. With pooled control samples as backgrounds, potential marker candidates were revealed in the background-subtracted profiles of the pooled ibipinabant-treated samples. After further cleaning with the use of mass defect filtering to exclude drug metabolites and the comparison of profiles between pooled treated samples to eliminate inconsistent peaks, the major biomarker candidates in the profiles were identified to be 19 acylcarnitines. A total of 3 of the 19 acylcarnitines were measured on the set of individual samples to allow for statistical analysis. The results confirmed the significance of acylcarnitine elevations in ibipinabant-treated dogs and indicated that the acylcarnitines could be early markers for the dog-specific toxicity. The advantages of the pooled sample strategy and its potential limitations for metabolomics are discussed.

  5. Brain and Optic System Pathology in Hypocholesterolemic Dogs Treated with a Competitive Inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Berry, P. H.; MacDonald, J. S.; Alberts, A. W.; Molon-Noblot, S.; Chen, J. S.; Lo, C.-Y. L.; Greenspan, M. D.; Allen, H.; Durand-Cavagna, G.; Jensen, R.; Bailly, Y.; Delort, P.; Duprat, P.

    1988-01-01

    The cholesterol lowering compound lovastatin, a competitive inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.34 HMG CoA reductase), was given in nine separate experiments to normocholesterolemic dogs at rates up to 180 times the maximum therapeutic dose in man (1 mg/kg/day). Mean serum total cholesterol concentrations were reduced as much as 88% below normal. Clinical evidence of neurotoxicity occurred in up to 37% of animals given 180 mg/kg/day lovastatin for 11 or more days, especially in one laboratory where the dosing regime resulted in higher concentrations of plasma drug levels. Dogs receiving 60 mg/kg/day or less never exhibited neurologic signs. The central nervous system (CNS) of affected dogs exhibited endothelial degeneration and hemorrhagic encephalopathy. Focal extravasation of horseradish peroxidase occurred frequently (6/8) in the retrolaminar optic nerve of asymptomatic or clinically affected dogs given 180 mg/kg/day lovastatin, with endothelial degeneration and discrete optic nerve degenerative lesions interpreted as ischemic. The association between the degree of hypocholesterolemia and occurrence of clinical signs was not exact. Total brain cholesterol was similar in treated and control dogs. Hypocholesterolemic dogs had proportionally lowered serum concentrations of alpha-tocopherol, but oral supplementation of this vitamin did not prevent the neurologic syndrome. Endothelial degeneration in the CNS and optic nerve may have reflected in vitro morphologic effects of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors due to extreme inhibition of nonsterol isoprene synthesis. Retinogeniculate axonal (Wallerianlike) degeneration occurred in ≥12% of dogs given 60 mg/kg/day or more lovastatin, with central chromatolysis of occasional retinal ganglion cells. These neuroaxonal changes may have been secondary to vascular effects, but superimposed direct neurotoxic action at the high dosage levels of lovastatin could not be excluded. There was no

  6. Incidence of injuries caused by dogs and cats treated in emergency departments in a major Italian city.

    PubMed

    Ostanello, F; Gherardi, A; Caprioli, A; La Placa, L; Passini, A; Prosperi, S

    2005-04-01

    This study aimed to estimate the incidence and characteristics of injuries caused by dogs and cats in the population of a major Italian city. The clinical records of all patients attending the emergency department (ED) were obtained from the two main hospitals of the city, covering an estimated population of over half a million. A case was defined as a patient admitted for bite or scratch injuries caused by dogs, cats, or other mammals between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2002. For each case, the information collected included age and sex of the patient, the anatomical site of the injury, and the species of the animal involved. The average yearly incidence of dog and cat bite/scratches was 58.4 and 17.9 cases per 100 000 residents, respectively. Admissions peaked during the summer months. Dogs accounted for 76.9% and cats for 19.7% of cases. Dog injuries were significantly more common in males and younger individuals. Children younger than 9 years had a significantly higher risk of being bitten on the head, face, or neck. Conversely, injuries from cats were significantly more common in females and older people. Surveillance of injuries caused by dogs and cats could provide useful information for planning and evaluating public health interventions. Collection of data from hospital EDs may be an appropriate, simple, and quick tool for monitoring the phenomenon and evaluating the associated risk factors.

  7. Early stellate cell activation and veno-occlusive-disease (VOD)-like hepatotoxicity in dogs treated with AR-H047108, an imidazopyridine proton pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Berg, Anna-Lena; Böttcher, Gerhard; Andersson, Kjell; Carlsson, Enar; Lindström, Anna-Karin; Huby, Russell; Håkansson, Helen; Skånberg-Wilhelmsson, Inger; Hellmold, Heike

    2008-07-01

    Dogs treated with AR-H047108, an imidazopyridine potassium competitive acid blocker (P-CAB), developed clinical signs of hepatic dysfunction as well as morphologically manifest hepatotoxicity in repeat-dose toxicity studies. An investigative one-month study was performed, with interim euthanasia after one and two weeks. A detailed histopathological and immunohistochemical characterization of the liver lesions was conducted, including markers for fibrosis, Kupffer cell activation, apoptosis, and endothelial injury. In addition, hepatic retinoid and procollagen 1alpha2 mRNA levels in livers of dogs treated with AR-H047108 were analyzed. The results showed an early inflammatory process in central veins and centrilobular areas, present after one week of treatment. This inflammatory reaction was paralleled by activation of stellate/Ito cells to myofibroblasts and was associated with sinusoidal and centrivenular fibrosis. The early activation of stellate cells coincided with a significant decrease in retinyl ester levels, and a significant increase in procollagen 1alpha2 mRNA levels, in the liver. At later time points (three and six months), there was marked sinusoidal fibrosis in centrilobular areas, as well as occlusion of central veins resulting from a combination of fibrosis and increased thickness of smooth muscle bundles in the vessel wall. The pattern of lesions suggests a veno-occlusive-disease (VOD)-like scenario, possibly linked to the imidazopyridine chemical structure of the compound facilitated by specific morphological features of the dog liver.

  8. Evaluation of changes in cartilage viability in detergent-treated tracheal grafts for immunosuppressant-free allotransplantation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao; Huang, Yiwei; Qiao, Yulei; Zhang, Yongxing; Liu, Yu

    2017-09-06

    The first tissue-engineered clinical tracheal transplant prepared using the detergent-enzymatic method resulted in graft stenosis, possibly from detergent-enzymatic method-induced graft non-viability. We reported on the transplantation of de-epithelialized tracheal allografts while maintaining cartilage viability in dogs. No lethal stenosis occurred in allografts. Herein, on the basis of previous experimentation, we assessed cartilage viability in detergent-treated cartilages. Six canine tracheal grafts were treated with detergent [1% t-octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-100)] before transplantation. The histoarchitecture was evaluated, and the viable chondrocytes ratio was calculated. Glycosaminoglycan was detected using safranin-O staining. Collagen II was tested using immunohistochemistry. The epithelium was completely removed in 5 grafts. Compared with fresh tracheas, the viable chondrocyte ratio was significantly reduced in the de-epithelialized grafts (100 vs 54.70 ± 8.56%; P  < 0.001). Image analysis revealed that the mean optical density of glycosaminoglycan (0.363 ± 0.027 vs 0.307 ± 0.012; P  = 0.007) and collagen II (0.115 ± 0.013 vs 0.092 ± 0.011; P  = 0.028) was decreased. The observation period ranged from 91 to 792 days. No stenosis occurred in 5 allografts; moderate stenosis developed in 1 allograft during the 4th week after surgery. The chondrocyte nuclei almost completely disappeared. Both glycosaminoglycan (0.307 ± 0.012 vs 0.164 ± 0.104; P  = 0.044) and collagen II (0.092 ± 0.011 vs 0.068 ± 0.022; P  = 0.022) were significantly degraded. This study demonstrated successful tracheal transplantation; about 50% of the viable chondrocytes were retained in the cartilage that could prevent development of a lethal stenosis in tracheal grafts.

  9. [Histopathological studies of periodontal tissue reactions to perforations in the furcation of dogs' teeth treated with cyanoacrylate cement (FH Cement)].

    PubMed

    Morinaga, K; Furusawa, M; Kitamura, M; Sato, H; Watanabe, H; Yokoya, S; Nakagawa, K; Asai, Y

    1989-06-01

    In the previous study (Shikwa Gakuho, 85: 413-451, 1985.), Morinaga reported on the histopathology of furcation perforations treated with ethyl cyanoacrylate and showed that, because of its properties, this material cannot be expected to effect a permanent blockade. It did not, however, irritate the wound. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of a new cyanoacrylate cement (FH Cement) when applied to furcation perforations. Subjects were 25 mandibular and maxilla premolars and molars obtained from 3 adult dogs. The method used in the study was as follows. After administration of pentobarbital-sodium general anesthesia, the pulp chamber was opened by means of a high-speed air turbine fitted with a diamond point. According to usual procedures, the pulp was removed, and the main root canal was filled. Next the floor of the pulp chamber was deliberately perforated by means of a 1mm round bur that had been previously sterilized in advance pouring a physiological sodium chloride solution at the same time. The perforated areas were then washed with a same solution, wiped, and dried with aseptic cotton pellets. They were then stuffed with cyanoacrylate cement. The cavity was lined with gutta-percha temporary stopping, and the remainder of the cavity was filled with silver amalgam. At periods of 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the operation, the animals were sacrificed by means of electricity under general anesthesia. The jaw bones were removed, fixed, decalcified, and embedded in celloidin. Longitudinal sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Results 1. Periodontal tissues around perforated sites were healed by means of scar tissue, though suppuration occurred in a few cases. 2. Hard tissue was appended to the teeth in a small number of cases. 3. Repair of the alveolar bone was observed in the damaged site in about half of all cases. From the result mentioned above, cyanoacrylate cement (FH Cement) was seemed to did not close the site perforation for

  10. Anti-tumor immune response correlates with neurological symptoms in a dog with spontaneous astrocytoma treated by gene and vaccine therapy.

    PubMed

    Pluhar, G Elizabeth; Grogan, Patrick T; Seiler, Charlie; Goulart, Michelle; Santacruz, Karen S; Carlson, Cathy; Chen, Wei; Olin, Mike R; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G; Haines, Stephen J; Ohlfest, John R

    2010-04-26

    Gene therapy and vaccination have been tested in malignant glioma patients with modest, albeit encouraging results. The combination of these therapies has demonstrated synergistic efficacy in murine models but has not been reported in large animals. Gemistocytic astrocytoma (GemA) is a low-grade glioma that typically progresses to lethal malignancy despite conventional therapies. Until now there has been no useful animal model of GemA. Here we report the treatment of a dog with spontaneous GemA using the combination of surgery, intracavitary adenoviral interferon gamma (IFNgamma) gene transfer, and vaccination with glioma cell lysates mixed with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides. Surgical tumor debulking and delivery of Ad-IFNgamma into the resection cavity were performed. Autologous tumor cells grew slowly in culture, necessitating vaccination with allogeneic tumor lysate in four of the five vaccinations. Transient left-sided blindness and hemiparesis occurred following the fourth and fifth vaccinations. These neurological symptoms correlated with a peak in the levels of tumor-reactive IgG and CD8(+) T cells measured in the blood. All symptoms resolved and this dog remains tumor-free over 450 days following surgery. This case report preliminarily demonstrates the feasibility of treating dogs with spontaneous glioma using immune-based therapy and warrants further study using this therapeutic approach. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Serum and urine Blastomyces antigen concentrations as markers of clinical remission in dogs treated for systemic blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Foy, D S; Trepanier, L A; Kirsch, E J; Wheat, L J

    2014-01-01

    Serum and urine Blastomyces antigen concentrations can be used to diagnose blastomycosis in dogs. Blastomyces antigen concentrations correlate with clinical remission in dogs during antifungal treatment, and detect disease relapse after treatment discontinuation. 21 dogs with newly diagnosed blastomycosis monitored until clinical remission (Treatment Phase), and 27 dogs monitored over 1 year from the time of antifungal discontinuation or until clinical relapse (After Treatment Phase). Prospective study. Dogs were monitored monthly during treatment and every 3 months after treatment discontinuation, with a complete history, physical exam, chest radiographs, and ocular exam. Urine and serum Blastomyces antigen concentrations were measured at each visit using a quantitative enzyme immunoassay. At enrollment in the Treatment Phase, Blastomyces antigen was positive in all 21 urine samples (100% sensitivity; 95% CI 85-100%), and in 18 of 20 serum samples (90% sensitivity; 95% CI 70-97%). At 2-4 months of treatment, urine antigen was more sensitive for clinically detectable disease (82%; CI 60-94%) than serum antigen (18%; CI 6-41%). The sensitivity of the urine test for clinical relapse was 71% (CI 36-92%), with close to 100% specificity (CI 84-100%) during after treatment surveillance in this population. Urine Blastomyces antigen testing has high sensitivity for active disease at the time of diagnosis and during treatment, and moderate sensitivity but high specificity for clinical relapse. Urine testing should be useful at the time of diagnosis, when treatment discontinuation is being considered, and anytime there is poor clinical response or suspicion of relapse. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. The effect of platelet-rich plasma on bone healing around implants placed in bone defects treated with Bio-Oss: a pilot study in the dog tibia.

    PubMed

    You, Tae-Min; Choi, Byung-Ho; Li, Jingxu; Jung, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Hyeon-Jung; Lee, Seoung-Ho; Jeong, Seung-Mi

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) used as an adjunct to Bio-Oss for the repair of bone defects adjacent to titanium dental implants. In 6 mongrel dogs, 12 screw-shaped titanium dental implants were inserted into the osteotomy sites in the dogs' tibias. Before implantation, a standardized gap (2.0 mm) was created between the implant surface and the surrounding bony walls. The gaps were filled with either Bio-Oss cancellous granules alone or Bio-Oss cancellous granules mixed with PRP. After 4 months, the Bio-Oss-treated defects revealed a significantly higher percentage of bone-implant contact than the defects treated with Bio-Oss and PRP (60.1% vs. 30.8%; P < .05). The results indicate that when PRP is used as an adjunct to Bio-Oss in the repair of bone defects adjacent to titanium dental implants, PRP may decrease periimplant bone healing.

  13. [Dog bites].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    In Switzerland 10'000 people are bitten by a dog annualy. Dog bites are notifiable incidents. Defensive and offensive aggression of dogs (why does a dog bite?), history, signs, treatment and prevention are discussed. Finally a short psychogram of dog owner and victim emphasizes the role of avoiding any escalation.

  14. Survival and echocardiographic data in dogs with congestive heart failure caused by mitral valve disease and treated by multiple drugs: a retrospective study of 21 cases.

    PubMed

    de Madron, Eric; King, Jonathan N; Strehlau, Günther; White, Regina Valle

    2011-11-01

    This retrospective study reports the survival time [onset of congestive heart failure (CHF) to death from any cause] of 21 dogs with mitral regurgitation (MR) and CHF treated with a combination of furosemide, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI, benazepril, or enalapril), pimobendan, spironolactone, and amlodipine. Baseline echocardiographic data: end-systolic and end-diastolic volume indices (ESVI and EDVI), left atrium to aorta ratio (LA/Ao), and regurgitant fraction (RF) are reported. Median survival time (MST) was 430 d. Initial dosage of furosemide (P = 0.0081) and LA/Ao (P = 0.042) were negatively associated with survival. Baseline echocardiographic indices (mean ± standard deviation) were 40.24 ± 16.76 for ESVI, 161.48 ± 44.49 mL/m(2) for EDVI, 2.11 ± 0.75 for LA/Ao, and 64.71 ± 16.85% for RF. Combining furosemide, ACEI, pimobendan, spironolactone, and amlodipine may result in long survival times in dogs with MR and CHF. Severity of MR at onset of CHF is at least moderate.

  15. Monocytes, endoplasmic reticulum stress and metabolomics in dogs with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome treated by continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yun-Peng; Sui, Xiao-Lu; Zhang, Ai-Sha; Ye, Lei; Gu, Feng-Juan; Chen, Ji-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We tried to investigate the mechanism of continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) treatment in monocytes function, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling pathways, metabolomics and histopathological changes of MODS dogs, and aimed to enhance the understanding of pathogenesis and provide novel avenues to potential therapies. Methods 12 male Beagle dogs were used to develop the stable models of MODS by using hemorrhagic shock plus resuscitation and endotoxemia, and assigned randomly to CVVHDF group (n=6) and MODS group (n=6). The dogs in CVVHDF group were given the typical CVVHDF treatment for 24h after the completion of endotoxin intravenous infusion, while those in MODS group were offered the i.v heparin instead only. Serum sample were collected at five time points, i.e. before anesthesia, 0h, 6h, 12h and 24h after the endotoxin injection (T1˜T5, respectively), and meanwhile, the changes of mRNA, protein and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) apoptosis rates in JNK, CHOP and Caspase-12 were observed before and after interfered by RNA interference technology. Results The levels of DLA-DR, IL-1β and IL-4 were higher than those in MODS group after the CVVHDF treatment, and the early and late apoptosis rates showed downward trend compared with MODS group. In vitro and prior to RNA interference (RNAi), the levels of mRNA and protein expression and HUVECs apoptosis rates of JNK, CHOP and Caspase-12 in CVVHDF group were significantly lower compared to T1 and MODS group respectively. However, the levels of mRNA and protein expression and HUVECs apoptosis rates were significantly lower than those before interfered by RNAi in both two groups. The serum levels of LPCs, ornithine, proline, methionine, etc. were down-regulated while carnitines, FFAs, PC, etc. were increased significantly in MODS (T4), and the serum levels of methionine, proline, arginine and lysine were increased while carnitine, LPCs, PCs, SMs and orthophosporic acid were

  16. A quantitative evaluation of the extent of fluralaner uptake by ticks (Ixodes ricinus, Ixodes scapularis) in fluralaner (Bravecto) treated vs. untreated dogs using the parameters tick weight and coxal index.

    PubMed

    Williams, Heike; Demeler, Janina; Taenzler, Janina; Roepke, Rainer K A; Zschiesche, Eva; Heckeroth, Anja R

    2015-06-30

    Fluralaner is a new antiparasitic drug that was recently introduced as Bravecto chewable tablets for the treatment of tick and flea infestations in dogs. Most marketed tick products exert their effect via topical application and contact exposure to the parasite. In contrast, Bravecto delivers its acaricidal activity through systemic exposure. Tick exposure to fluralaner occurs after attachment to orally treated dogs, which induces a tick-killing effect within 12 h. The fast onset of killing lasts over the entire treatment interval (12 weeks) and suggests that only marginal uptake by ticks is required to induce efficacy. Three laboratory studies were conducted to quantify the extent of uptake by comparison of ticks' weight and coxal index obtained from Bravecto-treated and negative-control dogs. Three studies were conducted using experimental tick infestation with either Ixodes ricinus or Ixodes scapularis after oral administration of fluralaner to dogs. All studies included a treated (Bravecto chewable tablets, MSD Animal Health) and a negative control group. Each study had a similar design for assessing vitality and weighing of ticks collected from dogs of both groups. Additionally, in one study the coxal index (I. ricinus) was calculated as a ratio of tick's ventral coxal gap and dorsal width of scutum. Tick weight data and coxal indices from Bravecto-treated and negative-control groups were compared via statistical analysis. Ticks collected from Bravecto-treated dogs weighed significantly less (p ≤ 0.0108) than ticks collected from negative-control dogs, and their coxal index was also significantly lower (p < 0.0001). The difference in tick weights was demonstrated irrespective of the tick species investigated (I. ricinus, I. scapularis). At some assessments the mean tick weights of Bravecto-treated dogs were significantly lower than those of unfed pre-infestation (baseline) ticks. The demonstrated tick-killing efficacy was in the range of 94.6 - 100

  17. Absence of exposed bone following dental extraction in beagle dogs treated with 9 months of high-dose zoledronic acid combined with dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Allen, Matthew R; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel; Ruggiero, Salvatore L

    2013-06-01

    Factors contributing to osteonecrosis of the jaw with anti-remodeling drug treatment are unclear. Epidemiologic and experimental studies have suggested the combination of bisphosphonates and dexamethasone results in osteonecrosis of the jaw more often than either agent alone. The goal of this study was to assess the combination of these 2 drugs in a large animal model previously shown to be susceptible to exposed bone in the oral cavity when treated with bisphosphonates. Skeletally mature beagle dogs were untreated controls or treated with zoledronic acid (ZOL), dexamethasone (DEX), or ZOL plus DEX. ZOL and DEX were given at doses based on those used in humans. All animals underwent single molar extraction at 7 and 8 months after the start of the study. Extraction sites were obtained at month 9 for assessment of osseous healing using micro-computed tomography and histology. No animals were observed to have exposed bone after dental extraction, yet 1 animal treated with ZOL and 1 treated with ZOL plus DEX had severely disrupted extraction sites as viewed by computed tomography and histology. These 2 animals had an intense periosteal reaction that was less obvious but still present in all ZOL-treated animals and absent from untreated animals. There was no significant difference in bone volume within the socket among groups at 4 or 8 weeks after healing, yet the ratio of surface to volume was significantly higher in animals treated with ZOL plus DEX at 8 weeks compared with control animals. These findings suggest a more complex pathophysiology to osteonecrosis of the jaw than is implied by previous epidemiologic studies and those in rodents and raise questions about the potential role of DEX in its etiology. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Absence of exposed bone following dental extraction in beagle dogs treated with nine-months of high dose zoledronic acid combined with dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Matthew R.; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel; Ruggiero, Salvatore L.

    2012-01-01

    The factors contributing to osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) with anti-remodeling drug treatment are unclear. Both epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested the combination of bisphosphonates and dexamethasone results in ONJ more often than either agent alone. The goal of this study was to assess the combination of these two drugs in a large animal model previously shown to be susceptible to exposed bone in the oral cavity when treated with bisphosphonates. Skeletally mature beagle dogs were either untreated controls, or treated with zoledronic acid (ZOL), dexamethasone (DEX), or ZOL + DEX. Both zoledronic acid and dexamethasone were given at doses based on those used in humans. All animals underwent single molar extraction at both 7 and 8 months following the start of the study. Extraction sites were obtained at month 9 for assessment of osseous healing using micro-computed tomography and histology. No animals were observed to have exposed bone following dental extraction yet one animal treated with ZOL and one with ZOL+DEX had severely disrupted extraction sites as viewed by CT and histology. These two animals had intense periosteal reaction that was less obvious but still present on all ZOL-treated animals and absent from untreated animals. There was no significant difference in bone volume within the socket among groups at either 4 or 8 weeks post-healing yet the surface/volume ratio was significantly higher in animals treated with ZOL+DEX at 8 weeks compared to control animals. These findings suggest a more complex pathophysiology to ONJ than is implied by previous epidemiological studies as well as those in rodents and raise questions about the potential role of dexamethasone in its etiology. PMID:23375897

  19. Can human allergy drug fexofenadine, an antagonist of histamine (H1) receptor, be used to treat dog and cat? Homology modeling, docking and molecular dynamic Simulation of three H1 receptors in complex with fexofenadine.

    PubMed

    Sader, Safaa; Cai, Jun; Muller, Anna C G; Wu, Chun

    2017-08-01

    Fexofenadine, a potent antagonist to human histamine 1 (H1) receptor, is a non-sedative third generation antihistamine that is widely used to treat various human allergic conditions such as allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis. Encouragingly, it's been successfully used to treat canine atopic dermatitis, this supports the notion that it might have a great potential for treating other canine allergic conditions and other mammal pets such as dog. Regrettably, while there is a myriad of studies conducted on the interactions of antihistamines with human H1 receptor, the similar studies on non-human pet H1 are considerably scarce. The published studies using the first and second generation antihistamines drugs have shown that the antihistamine response is varied and unpredictable. Thus, to probe its efficacy on pet, the homology models of dog and cat H1 receptors were built based on the crystal structure of human H1 receptor bound to antagonist doxepin (PDB 3RZE) and fexofenadine was subsequently docked to human, dog and cat H1 receptors. The docked complexes are then subjected to 1000ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with explicit membrane. Our calculated MM/GBSA binding energies indicated that fexofenadine binds comparably to the three receptors; and our MD data also showed the binding poses, structural and dynamic features among three receptors are very similar. Therefore, our data supported the application of fexofenadine to the H1 related allergic conditions of dog and cat. Nonetheless, subtle systemic differences among human, dog and cat H1 receptors were also identified. Clearly, there is still a space to develop a more selective, potent and safe antihistamine alternatives such as Fexofenadine for dog or cat based on these differences. Our computation approach might provide a fast and economic way to predict if human antihistamine drugs can also be safely and efficaciously administered to animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. Long-term restoration of rod and cone vision by single dose rAAV-mediated gene transfer to the retina in a canine model of childhood blindness.

    PubMed

    Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Bennett, Jean; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Bennicelli, Jeannette; Dejneka, Nadine S; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Maguire, Albert M; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2005-12-01

    The short- and long-term effects of gene therapy using AAV-mediated RPE65 transfer to canine retinal pigment epithelium were investigated in dogs affected with disease caused by RPE65 deficiency. Results with AAV 2/2, 2/1, and 2/5 vector pseudotypes, human or canine RPE65 cDNA, and constitutive or tissue-specific promoters were similar. Subretinally administered vectors restored retinal function in 23 of 26 eyes, but intravitreal injections consistently did not. Photoreceptoral and postreceptoral function in both rod and cone systems improved with therapy. In dogs followed electroretinographically for 3 years, responses remained stable. Biochemical analysis of retinal retinoids indicates that mutant dogs have no detectable 11-cis-retinal, but markedly elevated retinyl esters. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 treatment resulted in detectable 11-cis-retinal expression, limited to treated areas. RPE65 protein expression was limited to retinal pigment epithelium of treated areas. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 vector is well tolerated and does not elicit high antibody levels to the vector or the protein in ocular fluids or serum. In long-term studies, wild-type cDNA is expressed only in target cells. Successful, stable restoration of rod and cone photoreceptor function in these dogs has important implications for treatment of human patients affected with Leber congenital amaurosis caused by RPE65 mutations.

  1. Long-Term Restoration of Rod and Cone Vision by Single Dose rAAV-Mediated Gene Transfer to the Retina in a Canine Model of Childhood Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Bennett, Jean; Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Bennicelli, Jeannette; Dejneka, Nadine S.; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Maguire, Albert M.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Hauswirth, William W.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2010-01-01

    The short- and long-term effects of gene therapy using AAV-mediated RPE65 transfer to canine retinal pigment epithelium were investigated in dogs affected with disease caused by RPE65 deficiency. Results with AAV 2/2, 2/1, and 2/5 vector pseudotypes, human or canine RPE65 cDNA, and constitutive or tissue-specific promoters were similar. Subretinally administered vectors restored retinal function in 23 of 26 eyes, but intravitreal injections consistently did not. Photoreceptoral and postreceptoral function in both rod and cone systems improved with therapy. In dogs followed electroretinographically for 3 years, responses remained stable. Biochemical analysis of retinal retinoids indicates that mutant dogs have no detectable 11-cis-retinal, but markedly elevated retinyl esters. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 treatment resulted in detectable 11-cis-retinal expression, limited to treated areas. RPE65 protein expression was limited to retinal pigment epithelium of treated areas. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 vector is well tolerated and does not elicit high antibody levels to the vector or the protein in ocular fluids or serum. In long-term studies, wild-type cDNA is expressed only in target cells. Successful, stable restoration of rod and cone photoreceptor function in these dogs has important implications for treatment of human patients affected with Leber congenital amaurosis caused by RPE65 mutations. PMID:16226919

  2. Healing of periodontal defects treated with enamel matrix proteins and root surface conditioning--an experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sakallioğlu, Umur; Açikgöz, Gökhan; Ayas, Bülent; Kirtiloğlu, Tuğrul; Sakallioğlu, Eser

    2004-05-01

    Application of enamel matrix proteins has been introduced as an alternative method for periodontal regenerative therapy. It is claimed that this approach provides periodontal regeneration by a biological approach, i.e. creating a matrix on the root surfaces that promotes cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone regeneration, thus mimicking the events occurring during tooth development. Although there have been numerous in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrating periodontal regeneration, acellular cementum formation and clinical outcomes via enamel matrix proteins usage, their effects on the healing pattern of soft and hard periodontal tissues are not well-established and compared with root conditioning alone. In the present study, the effects of Emdogain (Biora, Malmö, Sweden), an enamel matrix derivative mainly composed of enamel matrix proteins (test), on periodontal wound healing were evaluated and compared with root surface conditioning (performed with 36% orthophosphoric acid) alone (control) histopathologically and histomorphometrically by means of the soft and hard tissue profile of periodontium. An experimental periodontitis model performed at premolar teeth of four dogs were used in the study and the healing pattern of periodontal tissues was evaluated at days 7, 14, 21, 28 (one dog at each day), respectively. At day 7, soft tissue attachment evaluated by means of connective tissue and/or epithelial attachment to the root surfaces revealed higher connective tissue attachment rate in the test group and the amount of new connective tissue proliferation in the test group was significantly greater than the control group (p<0.01). New bone formation by osteoconduction initiated at day 14 in the test and control group. At day 21, the orientation of supra-alveolar and PDL fibers established, and new cementum formation observed in both groups. At day 28, although regenerated cementum was cellular in all of the roots in the control samples, an

  3. Lessons learned from cloning dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, M J; Oh, H J; Kim, G A; Park, J E; Park, E J; Jang, G; Ra, J C; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review dog cloning research and to suggest its applications based on a discussion about the normality of cloned dogs. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was successfully used for production of viable cloned puppies despite limited understanding of in vitro dog embryo production. Cloned dogs have similar growth characteristics to those born from natural fertilization, with no evidence of serious adverse effects. The offspring of cloned dogs also have similar growth performance and health to those of naturally bred puppies. Therefore, cloning in domestic dogs can be applied as an assisted reproductive technique to conserve endangered species, to treat sterile canids or aged dogs, to improve reproductive performance of valuable individuals and to generate disease model animals. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Outcome of pyometra in female dogs and predictors of peritonitis and prolonged postoperative hospitalization in surgically treated cases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the most common diseases in intact bitches is pyometra– a potentially life-threatening disease associated with a variety of clinical and laboratory findings. The aims of the present study were to describe complications of the disease and to investigate clinically useful indicators associated with peritonitis and/or prolonged postoperative hospitalization. Results A retrospective study was performed using records from 356 bitches diagnosed with pyometra during the years 2006–2007 at the University Animal Hospital, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. Of the 356 bitches, 315 were surgically treated by ovariohysterectomy, 9 were medically treated and 32 were euthanized without treatment. In the surgically treated bitches, univariable associations between clinical and laboratory data, risk for prolonged hospitalization (≥ 3 days) and/or signs of peritonitis, were analyzed by Chi-square and Fisher’s exact test. Logistic regression models were used to assess multivariable associations. The most common complication observed in surgically treated bitches was peritonitis (40 bitches), followed by urinary tract infection (19 bitches), wound infection (8 bitches), uveitis (6 bitches), and cardiac arrhythmia (5 bitches). Leucopenia and fever/hypothermia were associated with increased risk for peritonitis (18-fold and three-fold, respectively). Moderate to severe depression of the general condition, pale mucous membranes and leucopenia were associated with increased risk (seven-fold, three-fold, and over three-point-five-fold, respectively) for prolonged postoperative hospitalization. Conclusions Several clinically useful indicators were identified. Leucopenia was the most important marker, associated with 18-fold increased risk for peritonitis and an over three-point-five increased risk for prolonged hospitalization. Fever/hypothermia, depression and pale mucous membranes were associated with increased risk for peritonitis and

  5. Cutaneous toxoplasmosis in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Aline Rodrigues; Cadieu, Jennifer; Kiupel, Matti; Lim, Ailam; Bolin, Steve R; Mansell, Joanne

    2012-05-01

    Cutaneous toxoplasmosis has been previously reported in human beings, rarely reported in cats, and reported in 1 dog with systemic toxoplasmosis. The present report describes 2 cases of cutaneous toxoplasmosis in 2 dogs treated with immunosuppressive therapy. One of the dogs developed generalized cutaneous pustules and pruritus, and the other dog only had a single subcutaneous nodule. Microscopically, skin biopsies showed moderate to severe pyogranulomatous and necrotizing dermatitis and panniculitis, with multifocal vasculitis and vascular thrombosis. Single or aggregates of protozoal tachyzoites were mostly intracytoplasmic and occasionally extracellular. The etiology was confirmed in both cases by immunohistochemistry and by polymerase chain reaction assays, which were followed by nucleic acid sequencing. Both patients were treated with clindamycin. The dog with generalized lesions developed pulmonary and neurological signs and was euthanized. The dog with a single nodule recovered completely with no remission of cutaneous lesions.

  6. Mammary gland tumors in male dogs.

    PubMed

    Saba, Corey F; Rogers, Kenita S; Newman, Shelley J; Mauldin, Glenna E; Vail, David M

    2007-01-01

    Reports of mammary-gland tumors in male dogs are lacking. To describe the clinical characteristics of mammary-gland tumors in male dogs. Eight male dogs diagnosed with mammary-gland tumors. Retrospective study. Medical databases from 3 institutions were searched. Medical records were abstracted, and owners and referring veterinarians contacted for follow-up information. Tissues were reviewed for histologic type, and immunohistochemical staining for estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER, PR) was performed. Eight dogs with histologically confirmed mammary-gland tumors were included in this retrospective study. Median age at diagnosis was 11.5 years. Four dogs were sexually intact; 4 were neutered. All were purebred. Mammary-gland tumors were incidental findings in 7 of 8 dogs. All dogs were treated with only surgical excision. All but 1 dog had benign epithelial tumors. The dog with the malignant tumor was the only dog to develop possible local recurrence but de novo tumor development cannot be excluded. No dog had evidence of metastatic disease at diagnosis. Based on institutional population data, it was determined that female dogs are 62 times more likely to develop mammary-gland tumors than male dogs (P < .001). Estrogen-receptor expression was strong in the majority of tumors; progesterone-receptor expression, although present in all tumors, was less intense. CONCLUSIONS/CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: This study suggests that mammary-gland tumors in male dogs are rare, usually benign, and surgery alone can provide long-term control in most dogs.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of the ventricular system in the brains of adult and juvenile beagle dogs treated with posaconazole IV Solution.

    PubMed

    Hines, C D G; Song, X; Kuruvilla, S; Farris, G; Markgraf, C G

    2015-01-01

    Noxafil® (posaconazole; POS) is a potent, selective triazole antifungal approved for use in adults as an oral suspension, oral tablet and intravenous (IV) Solution. In support of pediatric administration of POS IV Solution to childrendogs was conducted, which showed enlarged lateral ventricles in the brain at the conclusion of a 6 week dosing period. To evaluate the impact of this finding on older age dogs, which would support administration to children>two years of age, two studies were undertaken using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor brain ventricle size longitudinally during three months administration of POS IV in adult and juvenile dogs. Necropsy was performed on all animals at the end of the studies. From the baseline MRI images, great variability in ventricle size was noted in both the adult and juvenile dogs; these images were used to distribute differently sized ventricles between treatment and vehicle groups as to not skew group means during the course of the study. POS IV Solution had no effect on ventricle volume at any timepoint during dosing in either the adult or the juvenile dogs. Further, no gross or histomorphologic differences between groups were observed in either study. Compared to juvenile dogs, MRI analysis showed that adult dogs had larger ventricles, lower variability in all ventricle volumes, and a greater rate of increase in total ventricle volume. Information on growth and development of brains is one of the few areas in which more detailed information is available about humans than about the standard laboratory animals used to model disease and predict toxicities. The use of MRI helped elucidate large natural variabilities in the dog brain, which could have altered the interpretation of this de-risking study, and provided a valuable noninvasive means to monitor the brain ventricles longitudinally. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact evaluation of two different general anesthesia protocols (TIVA with propofol vs isoflurane) on the total number of interventions to treat cardiovascular depression or arousal/movement episodes in dogs undergoing orthopedic surgery receiving an intrathecal anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    SAROTTI, Diego; RABOZZI, Roberto; FRANCI, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective, randomized clinical trial was to compare the total number of anesthetic interventions (TNAI) performed by the anesthetist to treat cardiovascular depression or arousal/movement episodes in dogs receiving intrathecal and general anesthesia (GA), maintained using propofol-based TIVA (group P) or isoflurane (group I). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) before (T0) and 12 min after intrathecal anesthesia (T1) and intraoperative vasoactive consumption were also compared. The TNAI to deepen the anesthetic plane or to treat hemodynamic depression in the pre-surgical and intra-surgical period was calculated in forty-two client-owned dogs randomly assigned to group P or I. Ten dogs for each group complied with the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. In pre-surgical period, the TNAI was higher in Group I [2 (0–5)] than Group P [0 (0–2)] (P=0.022), and ephedrine consumption was also higher in Group I [75 (0–200) µg/kg)] than Group P [(0 (0–50)] (P=0.016). MAP (mmHg) in Group P was 79 (66–95) at T0 and 65 (59–86) at T1 and 67.5 (50–73) and 57 (53–66) in Group I, respectively. At T0 and T1, MAP was higher in Group P (P=0.005 and P=0.006, respectively). No differences were found between the two groups in the intrasurgical period (P>0.05). This study shows that the GA protocol can have a relevant impact on the TNAI performed by the anesthetist in the pre-surgical period of anesthesia, to treat cardiovascular depression or arousal/movement episodes in dogs receving intrathecal anesthesia. PMID:27334295

  9. Impact evaluation of two different general anesthesia protocols (TIVA with propofol vs isoflurane) on the total number of interventions to treat cardiovascular depression or arousal/movement episodes in dogs undergoing orthopedic surgery receiving an intrathecal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Sarotti, Diego; Rabozzi, Roberto; Franci, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this prospective, randomized clinical trial was to compare the total number of anesthetic interventions (TNAI) performed by the anesthetist to treat cardiovascular depression or arousal/movement episodes in dogs receiving intrathecal and general anesthesia (GA), maintained using propofol-based TIVA (group P) or isoflurane (group I). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) before (T0) and 12 min after intrathecal anesthesia (T1) and intraoperative vasoactive consumption were also compared. The TNAI to deepen the anesthetic plane or to treat hemodynamic depression in the pre-surgical and intra-surgical period was calculated in forty-two client-owned dogs randomly assigned to group P or I. Ten dogs for each group complied with the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. In pre-surgical period, the TNAI was higher in Group I [2 (0-5)] than Group P [0 (0-2)] (P=0.022), and ephedrine consumption was also higher in Group I [75 (0-200) µg/kg)] than Group P [(0 (0-50)] (P=0.016). MAP (mmHg) in Group P was 79 (66-95) at T0 and 65 (59-86) at T1 and 67.5 (50-73) and 57 (53-66) in Group I, respectively. At T0 and T1, MAP was higher in Group P (P=0.005 and P=0.006, respectively). No differences were found between the two groups in the intrasurgical period (P>0.05). This study shows that the GA protocol can have a relevant impact on the TNAI performed by the anesthetist in the pre-surgical period of anesthesia, to treat cardiovascular depression or arousal/movement episodes in dogs receving intrathecal anesthesia.

  10. Recurrence rates and clinical outcome for dogs with grade II mast cell tumours with a low AgNOR count and Ki67 index treated with surgery alone.

    PubMed

    Smith, J; Kiupel, M; Farrelly, J; Cohen, R; Olmsted, G; Kirpensteijn, J; Brocks, B; Post, G

    2017-03-01

    Grade II mast cell tumours (MCT) are tumours with variable biologic behaviour. Multiple factors have been associated with outcome, including proliferation markers. The purpose of this study was to determine if extent of surgical excision affects recurrence rate in dogs with grade II MCT with low proliferation activity, determined by Ki67 and argyrophilic nucleolar organising regions (AgNOR). Eighty-six dogs with cutaneous MCT were evaluated. All dogs had surgical excision of their MCT with a low Ki67 index and combined AgNORxKi67 (Ag67) values. Twenty-three (27%) dogs developed local or distant recurrence during the median follow-up time. Of these dogs, six (7%) had local recurrence, one had complete and five had incomplete histologic margins. This difference in recurrence rates between dogs with complete and incomplete histologic margins was not significant. On the basis of this study, ancillary therapy may not be necessary for patients with incompletely excised grade II MCT with low proliferation activity.

  11. Prolongation of survival of dogs with oral malignant melanoma treated by en bloc surgical resection and adjuvant CSPG4-antigen electrovaccination.

    PubMed

    Piras, L A; Riccardo, F; Iussich, S; Maniscalco, L; Gattino, F; Martano, M; Morello, E; Lorda Mayayo, S; Rolih, V; Garavaglia, F; De Maria, R; Lardone, E; Collivignarelli, F; Mignacca, D; Giacobino, D; Ferrone, S; Cavallo, F; Buracco, P

    2017-09-01

    Reported post-surgery 1-year survival rate for oral canine malignant melanoma (cMM) is around 30%; novel treatments are needed as the role of adjuvant chemotherapy is unclear. This prospective study regards adjuvant electrovaccination with human chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4 (hCSPG4)-encoded plasmid in 23 dogs with resected II/III-staged CSPG4-positive oral cMM compared with 19 dogs with resected only II/III-staged CSPG4-positive oral cMM. Vaccination resulted in 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month survival rate of 95.6, 73.9, 47.8 and 30.4%, respectively [median survival time (MST) 684 days, range 78-1694, 8 of 23 dogs alive] and 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month disease-free interval (DFI) rate of 82.6, 47.8, 26.1 and 17.4%, respectively (DFI 477 days, range 50-1694). Non-vaccinated dogs showed 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month survival rate of 63.2, 26.3, 15.8 and 5.3%, respectively (MST 200 days, range 75-1507, 1 of 19 dogs alive) and 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month DFI rate of 52.6, 26.3, 10.5 and 5.3%, respectively (DFI 180 days, range 38-1250). Overall survival and DFI of vaccinated dogs was longer in those <20 kg. In vaccinated and non-vaccinated dogs local recurrence rate was 34.8 and 42%, respectively while lung metastatic rate was 39 and 79%, respectively. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Treatment of Baylisascaris procyonis infections in dogs with milbemycin oxime.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Dwight D; Ulrich, Michael A; Gregory, Dawn E; Neumann, Norwood R; Legg, Walter; Stansfield, David

    2005-05-15

    An examination was made as to the ability of Sentinel Flavor Tabs (milbemycin oxime/lufenuron) to treat Baylisascaris procyonis infections in dogs. The study was designed as a critical trial and included five naturally infected dogs and two dogs that were experimentally infected. Another dog from a prior clinical trial that was treated with Sentinel Flavor Tabs as part of the original FDA submission package for intestinal nematode infections was also included with the treated dogs. Of the five naturally infected dogs treated as part of the critical trial, three were cleared of their infections. These five dogs passed a total of 52 worms after treatment; one dog retained 23 worms and the other retained 1 worm at necropsy 7 days after treatment. Two of five experimentally infected Beagle dogs that had been given mice that had been fed 200 infectious eggs, developed patent infections with the parasite. These dogs were treated, and one of the dogs passed one worm and the other passed two worms after treatment with no worms being detected at necropsy 7 days after treatment. The one dog that was treated with milbemycin oxime as part of the FDA submission was clear of worms at necropsy. Overall, the mean efficacy of Sentinel Flavor Tabs was found to be 91.0%. Of the eight dogs that were treated, six were totally cleared of their infections, a cure rate of 75%. The two dogs that did not clear their infections had very large numbers of adult B. procyonis within their intestinal tracts at the time of treatment, one dog had 40 worms (23 remaining) and the other had 26 worms (1 remaining). It is suggested that the treatment of dogs with monthly Sentinel Flavor Tabs could markedly reduce the chance of infected dogs contaminating the environment. Also, additional monthly treatments are highly likely to clear dogs of any worms not killed with the initial treatment.

  13. [Juvenile sterile granulomatous dermatitis and lymphadenitis in the dog].

    PubMed

    Weingart, C; Eule, C; Welle, M; Kohn, B

    2011-04-01

    Juvenile sterile granulomatous dermatitis and lymphadenitis is a rare immune-mediated skin disease in young dogs. History, signalment, diagnostics, treatment, and outcome in 10 dogs are described. The age ranged from 8 - 36 weeks. The lymph nodes were enlarged in all dogs, especially the mandibular and prescapular lymph nodes. Systemic signs including fever were present in 8 dogs. Seven dogs suffered from blepharitis and painful edema of the muzzle with hemorrhagic discharge, pustules and papules. Cytology of pustules and lymph node aspirates revealed a pyogranulomatous inflammation. In 7 cases the diagnosis of juvenile sterile granulomatous dermatitis and lymphadenitis was confirmed by histology. Nine dogs were treated with prednisolone (0.5 - 1.25 mg/kg BID), H2-receptor antagonists and analgetics; all dogs were treated with antibiotics. Four dogs were treated with eye ointment containing antibiotics and glucocorticoids. The prednisolone dosage was tapered over 3 - 8 weeks. One dog had a relapse.

  14. Use of streptokinase in four dogs with thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, C C; Burney, D P; Macintire, D K; Finn-Bodner, S

    1996-08-15

    Four dogs with thrombosis were referred for diagnostic testing and were subsequently treated by the use of streptokinase. The range of duration of clinical signs associated with thrombosis was 6 to 120 days. Causes of thrombosis were heart disease (1 dog), protein-losing nephropathy and hyperadrenocorticism (1), hyperadrenocorticism (1), and idiopathic (1). Possible factors that predisposed dogs to hypercoagulability included hypertension (2 dogs) and diabetes mellitus (1). All dogs were treated for underlying disease by use of supportive care. The first dog was treated with a loading dose of 250,000 U of streptokinase, i.v., with a subsequent maintenance dosage of 100,000 U/h, i.v., and also was treated with anticoagulant. The subsequent 3 dogs were treated with a loading dose of 90,000 U of streptokinase, i.v., and maintenance dosage of 45,000 U/ h, i.v., at various intervals. These dogs also were treated with anticoagulant. Three dogs had minor hemorrhage as an adverse effect to streptokinase infusion, but they did not require treatment for the hemorrhage. Complete resolution of the thrombus was observed in 3 dogs, and partial resolution of the thrombus was observed in the other dog. In all dogs, partial or complete resolution of clinical signs associated with thrombosis was seen. Streptokinase may be an effective treatment for dogs with thrombosis.

  15. Resolution of generalized dermatophytosis without treatment in dogs.

    PubMed

    Medleau, L; Chalmers, S A

    1992-12-15

    Natural resolution of generalized dermatophytosis reportedly is common in large-animal species. In dogs with generalized dermatophytosis, antifungal treatment usually is prescribed, because the prevalence of natural resolution of dermatophytosis in dogs is not known. Five dogs, 6 to 18 months old, were diagnosed as having generalized dermatophytosis. Each dog was treated with an inert substance given orally with food, once daily. Signs of disease resolved in 3 of the dogs after 4 to 8 weeks of treatment with the inert substance. Two dogs did not improve, so treatment with ketoconazole was initiated. Resolution was achieved in these 2 dogs after 6 weeks of treatment with ketoconazole.

  16. Porencephaly and hydranencephaly in six dogs.

    PubMed

    Davies, E S S; Volk, H A; Behr, S; Summers, B; de Lahunta, A; Syme, H; Jull, P; Garosi, L

    2012-02-01

    A retrospective study was performed to identify dogs with cerebrospinal fluid-filled cavitatory lesions on MRI. Six dogs were included and the lesions were classified. In the three dogs in the present study with hydranencephaly, unilateral but complete loss of the temporal and parietal lobes was noted and had almost complete loss of the occipital and frontal lobes of a cerebral hemisphere. In the three dogs with porencephaly, there was unilateral incomplete loss of the parietal lobe and one dog had additional partial loss of the temporal and frontal lobes. Two of the dogs with porencephaly had seizures; the third showed no associated clinical signs. The dogs with hydranencephaly had mentation changes and circled compulsively. The two porencephalic dogs with seizures were treated with phenobarbitone. One of the dogs with hydranencephaly showed increased frequency and duration of circling; one dog's clinical signs did not progress and the third dog was euthanased due to increasing aggression. The dog with increased circling had ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement and the circling frequency reduced.

  17. Accelerated recovery of sensorimotor function in a dog submitted to quasi-total transection of the cervical spinal cord and treated with PEG

    PubMed Central

    Kim, C-Yoon; Hwang, In-Kyu; Kim, Hana; Jang, Se-Woong; Kim, Hong Seog; Lee, Won-Young

    2016-01-01

    Background: A case report on observing the recovery of sensory-motor function after cervical spinal cord transection. Case Description: Laminectomy and transection of cervical spinal cord (C5) was performed on a male beagle weighing 3.5 kg. After applying polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the severed part, reconstruction of cervical spinal cord was confirmed by the restoration of sensorimotor function. Tetraplegia was observed immediately after operation, however, the dog showed stable respiration and survival without any complication. The dog showed fast recovery after 1 week, and recovered approximately 90% of normal sensorimotor function 3 weeks after the operation, although urinary disorder was still present. All recovery stages were recorded by video camera twice a week for behavioral analysis. Conclusion: While current belief holds that functional recovery is impossible after a section greater than 50% at C5-6 in the canine model, this case study shows the possibility of cervical spinal cord reconstruction after near-total transection. Furthermore, this case study also confirms that PEG can truly expedite the recovery of sensorimotor function after cervical spinal cord sections in dogs. PMID:27656327

  18. Phase I clinical trial and pharmacodynamic evaluation of combination hydroxychloroquine and doxorubicin treatment in pet dogs treated for spontaneously occurring lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Rebecca A; Wittenburg, Luke A; Amaravadi, Ravi K; Gustafson, Daniel L; Thorburn, Andrew; Thamm, Douglas H

    2014-08-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation process that may act as a mechanism of survival in a variety of cancers. While pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is currently being explored in human clinical trials, it has never been evaluated in canine cancers. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is one of the most prevalent tumor types in dogs and has similar pathogenesis and response to treatment as human NHL. Clinical trials in canine patients are conducted in the same way as in human patients, thus, to determine a maximum dose of HCQ that can be combined with a standard chemotherapy, a Phase I, single arm, dose escalation trial was conducted in dogs with spontaneous NHL presenting as patients to an academic, tertiary-care veterinary teaching hospital. HCQ was administered daily by mouth throughout the trial, beginning 72 h prior to doxorubicin (DOX), which was given intravenously on a 21-d cycle. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells and biopsies were collected before and 3 d after HCQ treatment and assessed for autophagy inhibition and HCQ concentration. A total of 30 patients were enrolled in the trial. HCQ alone was well tolerated with only mild lethargy and gastrointestinal-related adverse events. The overall response rate (ORR) for dogs with lymphoma was 93.3%, with median progression-free interval (PFI) of 5 mo. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed a 100-fold increase in HCQ in tumors compared with plasma. There was a trend that supported therapy-induced increase in LC3-II (the cleaved and lipidated form of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3/LC3, which serves as a maker for autophagosomes) and SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1) after treatment. The superior ORR and comparable PFI to single-agent DOX provide strong support for further evaluation via randomized, placebo-controlled trials in canine and human NHL.

  19. Disseminated histoplasmosis in dogs: 12 cases (1981-1986).

    PubMed

    Clinkenbeard, K D; Cowell, R L; Tyler, R D

    1988-12-01

    Diarrhea, intestinal blood loss, anemia, and lethargy were predominant clinical findings in 12 dogs with disseminated histoplasmosis. Young dogs were affected most commonly, with 6 dogs being 1 to 3 years old. A diagnosis of disseminated histoplasmosis was established on the basis of histologic or cytologic detection of Histoplasma organisms in intestinal or rectal mucosa in 7 dogs, in circulating leukocytes in 5 dogs, in bone marrow in 3 dogs, and in multiple tissues at necropsy in 1 dog (4 dogs had Histoplasma organisms detected in greater than 1 site). Anemia was detected in 10 dogs (PCV less than 20% in 3 dogs), and the anemia was inadequately regenerative or nonregenerative in 7. Hypoalbuminemia was detected in 9 dogs, and serum albumin concentrations were low (less than 1.0 g/dl) in 4 of the 9 dogs. Of 5 dogs treated with ketoconazole, 2 were in remission for greater than or equal to 1 year. Corticosteroid therapy may have exacerbated the disease in 4 dogs. Histoplasma infection of multiple organs was detected in 5 necropsied dogs.

  20. Thrombocytosis associated with a myeloproliferative disorder in a dog

    SciTech Connect

    Degen, M.A.; Feldman, B.F.; Turrel, J.M.; Goding, B.; Kitchell, B.; Mandell, C.P. )

    1989-05-15

    A dog with a myeloproliferative disorder and thrombocytosis had clinical signs that were consistent with a diagnosis of essential thrombocythemia. The dog was treated with aspirin, radioactive phosphorus, and melphalan. Eighteen months after referral, the disorder progressed to chronic granulocytic leukemia, and treatment was switched to hydroxyurea. Fourteen months later, the dog was euthanatized because of uncontrollable atrial fibrillation.

  1. Treatment of T cell lymphoma in dogs.

    PubMed

    Moore, Antony S

    2016-09-17

    Overall, canine lymphoma remains one of the most chemotherapy-responsive cancers in the dog. In addition to the stage and the substage of disease, T cell phenotype is the most consistently important prognostic factor. T cell lymphoma (TCL) in dogs is a heterogeneous disease; dogs with a separate entity of indolent TCL can have a considerably better prognosis than dogs with other forms of lymphoma, and indolent TCL may not always require immediate treatment. In contrast, high-grade TCL is an aggressive disease, and when treated with CHOP-based protocols, dogs with this high-grade TCL have a complete remission rate as low as 40 per cent, relapse earlier and have shorter survival time than dogs with a comparable stage, high-grade B cell lymphoma. This review describes the different disease entities that comprise canine TCL, discusses prognosis for each and treatment options that appear to give the best outcomes.

  2. Thyrotoxicosis in a dog induced by the consumption of feces from a levothyroxine-supplemented housemate

    PubMed Central

    Shadwick, Steven R.; Ridgway, Marcella D.; Kubier, Amy

    2013-01-01

    A 9-year-old golden retriever dog was evaluated for polyuria, polydipsia, weight loss, and elevated serum thyroxine. Targeted questioning revealed that the dog was coprophagic and routinely ingested the feces of a dog that was treated with twice-daily levothyroxine. Clinical signs resolved and serum thyroxine decreased to normal levels in the affected dog with prevention of coprophagy. PMID:24155422

  3. Thyrotoxicosis in a dog induced by the consumption of feces from a levothyroxine-supplemented housemate.

    PubMed

    Shadwick, Steven R; Ridgway, Marcella D; Kubier, Amy

    2013-10-01

    A 9-year-old golden retriever dog was evaluated for polyuria, polydipsia, weight loss, and elevated serum thyroxine. Targeted questioning revealed that the dog was coprophagic and routinely ingested the feces of a dog that was treated with twice-daily levothyroxine. Clinical signs resolved and serum thyroxine decreased to normal levels in the affected dog with prevention of coprophagy.

  4. Long-term outcome of myotonia associated with hyperadrenocorticism in 2 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Noriyuki; Yuki, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Two dogs were diagnosed with myotonia associated with hyperadrenocorticism and treated with trilostane. One dog showed temporary improvement, but the other dog showed no improvement. The dogs survived 2383 and 1902 days, respectively. Findings suggest that myotonia persists despite treatment, but this condition is not associated with a poor prognosis for survival. PMID:26347041

  5. Oral doxycycline, niacinamide and prednisolone used to treat bilateral nodular granulomatous conjunctivitis of the third eyelid in an Australian Kelpie dog.

    PubMed

    Hurn, Simon; Mc Cowan, Christina; Turner, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    A 5-year-old, female neutered, Australian Kelpie presented with a 2-month history of dramatic bilateral erythematous thickening of the third eyelids. Ophthalmic examination demonstrated raised, pink to red, irregular thickening of the entire palpebral surface of both third eyelids. There were no other ocular abnormalities. A surgical biopsy was taken from each third eyelid. Histopathologic examination revealed sheets of macrophages, plasma cells, lymphocytes, and occasional fibroblasts and neutrophils infiltrating the third eyelid stroma. A diagnosis of chronic granulomatous conjunctivitis was made. Grossly and histopathologically this case closely resembles previously described cases of nodular granulomatous conjunctivitis involving the third eyelids of Collie dogs. This report describes an unusual case of nodular granulomatous conjunctivitis isolated to the third eyelids in an Australian Kelpie. Resolution of the condition was achieved with a combination of oral doxycycline, niacinamide and prednisolone.

  6. Dog Fights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2010-01-01

    Bringing service animals into schools raises serious questions about how to meet one student's special needs while ensuring the educational well-being of all. This article discusses how schools grapple with the practical and legal questions involved in allowing service dogs on campus. The author cites a case in 2009 called "Kalbfleisch v. Columbia…

  7. Dog Fights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2010-01-01

    Bringing service animals into schools raises serious questions about how to meet one student's special needs while ensuring the educational well-being of all. This article discusses how schools grapple with the practical and legal questions involved in allowing service dogs on campus. The author cites a case in 2009 called "Kalbfleisch v. Columbia…

  8. [Impacts on repeated common cold for the adults with different constitutions treated by acupoint application in the dog days and the three nine-day periods after the winter solstice].

    PubMed

    Lou, Bi-Dan; Yang, Li-Bai; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jin-Xiang; Li, Xiao-Ping; Li, Wu; Yang, Shu-Quan; Huang, Xiang-Hong; Liu, Xing-Ping; Cao, Yue; Pan, Jiang

    2012-11-01

    To observe the impacts on repeated common cold for the adults with different constitutions treated by acupoint application in the dog days (the three periods of the hottest days) and the three nine-day periods after the winter solstice (the three periods of the coldest days). One hundred and fifty-two cases of repeated common cold were divided into four zones according to the body constitution. Each zone was sub-divided into a group of the dog days + the three nine-day periods of the coldest days (group A), and a simple group of the dog periods (group B). In both groups, Dazhui (GV 14), Feishu (BL 13), Tiantu (CV 22), Danzhong (CV 17), Zhongfu (LU 1) and Shenshu (BL 23) were selected. In group A, the acupoint application was given on the 1st or 2nd day of the first, second and third periods of the hottest days in 2010, as well as the 1st or 2nd day of the first, second and third periods of the coldest days in 2010 separately. In group B, the acupoint application was only given on the 1st or 2nd day of the first, second and third periods of the hottest days in 2010. The follow-up visit was conducted before the acupoint application in the three periods of the coldest days in 2010 and before the acupoint application in the three periods of the hottest days in 2011. Additionally, the frequency of disease attack and the symptom score in sickness were taken as the observation indices for the efficacy assessment in both groups. (1) In both groups, the attack frequency was reduced obviously in half a year after the three periods of the hottest days for the patients of qi deficiency constitution, yang deficiency constitution and qi stagnation constitution and the clinical symptom score were reduced apparently (all P<0.01), which were superior to those for the patients of phlegm damp constitution (P<0.01, P<0.05). For the patients of phlegm damp constitution, only the clinical symptom score was reduced (P<0.01). (2) In group A, the improvements were received in the attack

  9. Dog Bite Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Dog bite emergencies What do I do if I’ ... vaccination records. What do I do if my dog bites someone? Dog bites are scary for everyone ...

  10. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication.

  11. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication. PMID:26664952

  12. The fecal microbiome of dogs with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Isaiah, Anitha; Parambeth, Joseph Cyrus; Steiner, Jörg M; Lidbury, Jonathan A; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2017-02-20

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) in dogs is a syndrome of inadequate synthesis and secretion of pancreatic enzymes. Small intestinal bacterial dysbiosis occurs in dogs with EPI, and is reversed with pancreatic enzyme therapy. However, there are no studies evaluating the fecal microbiome of dogs with EPI. The objective of this study was to evaluate the fecal microbiome of dogs with EPI. Three day pooled fecal samples were collected from healthy dogs (n = 18), untreated (n = 7) dogs with EPI, and dogs with EPI treated with enzyme replacement therapy (n = 19). Extracted DNA from fecal samples was used for Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and analyzed using Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology (QIIME) and PICRUSt was used to predict the functional gene content of the microbiome. Linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEfSe) revealed significant differences in bacterial groups and functional genes between the healthy dogs and dogs with EPI. There was a significant difference in fecal microbial communities when healthy dogs were compared to treated and untreated dogs with EPI (unweighted UniFrac distance, ANOSIM P = 0.001, and 0.001 respectively). Alpha diversity was significantly decreased in untreated and treated EPI dogs when compared to the healthy dogs with respect to Chao1, Observed OTU, and Shannon diversity (P = 0.008, 0.003, and 0.002 respectively). The families Bifidobacteriaceae (P = 0.005), Enterococcaceae (P = 0.018), and Lactobacillaceae (P = 0.001) were significantly increased in the untreated and treated dogs with EPI when compared to healthy dogs. In contrast, Lachnospiraceae (P < 0.001), and Ruminococcaceae (P < 0.01) were significantly decreased in dogs with EPI. Dogs with EPI (before treatment) had significant increases in functional genes associated with secretion system, fatty acid metabolism, and phosphotransferase system. In contrast, healthy dogs had a significant increase in genes related

  13. Zonisamide monotherapy for idiopathic epilepsy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Chung, J Y; Hwang, C Y; Chae, J S; Ahn, J O; Kim, T H; Seo, K W; Lee, S Y; Youn, H Y

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of zonisamide as a monotherapy in dogs with idiopathic epileptic seizure. The experiment was conducted on 10 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy that were treated at the Seoul National University Hospital for Animals. A diagnosis was conducted based on physical and neurologic examination, complete blood count and chemical analysis, magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analyses. Idiopathic epilepsy was diagnosed when all of these examinations were normal. Oral zonisamide was administrated to 10 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy at 5-15 mg/kg per os every 12 h to achieve a concentration of zonisamide in serum of 10-40 μg/mL. The frequency of seizures before and after the administration of zonisamide therapy was recorded and the concentrations of zonisamide in serum were measured. Six (60%) of the dogs were favourable responders to treatment, showing a ≥50% reduction in monthly frequency of seizures. Of the remaining four, two dogs did not show a reduction and the other two showed an increase in frequency of seizures. The mean dosage of zonisamide for favourable responders was 7.92 (SD 3.79) mg/kg, which was administered orally twice a day. Only one dog, which was one of the unfavourable responders in the whole study, experienced mild side effects. Among the dogs treated with oral zonisamide, 60% responded favourably. The effect of zonisamide as an anticonvulsant drug was demonstrated in this study. Based on these results, zonisamide monotherapy is effective in some dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

  14. Azathioprine therapy for acquired myasthenia gravis in five dogs.

    PubMed

    Dewey, C W; Coates, J R; Ducoté, J M; Meeks, J C; Fradkin, J M

    1999-01-01

    Five dogs with acquired myasthenia gravis (MG), verified via positive serum acetylcholine (ACh) receptor antibody concentrations, were treated with a drug protocol including azathioprine (AZA). Four of the five dogs were concurrently treated with pyridostigmine. Azathioprine was used as the sole immunosuppressive agent in four dogs. One dog was temporarily treated with a combination of an immunosuppressive dose of prednisone and AZA, then maintained on AZA as the sole immunosuppressive drug. Three patients experienced complete remission of clinical signs within three months of therapy. In the four dogs for which follow-up serum ACh receptor antibody concentrations were available, initial versus final concentrations decreased substantially (81%), coincident with clinical improvement. One dog died suddenly due to a suspected myasthenic crisis before attaining the target dose of AZA. Two of the four surviving dogs were euthanized approximately one and seven years after diagnosis. One of these two dogs was euthanized because of a rib osteosarcoma, and the other dog was euthanized because of paraparesis of undetermined cause. The remaining two dogs were alive and doing well at the time of final follow-up evaluation, approximately six months and one year after diagnosis. The use of AZA as a therapeutic agent for acquired canine MG has not been investigated. The cases presented in this report suggest a potentially important role for AZA in the treatment of acquired MG in dogs.

  15. Using the NAFX to measure the effectiveness over time of gene therapy in canine LCA.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jonathan B; Dell'Osso, Louis F; Wang, Zhong I; Acland, Gregory M; Bennett, Jean

    2009-10-01

    To use ocular motility recordings to determine the changes over time of infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) in RPE65-deficient canines with Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA) and assess the time course of the recalibration of the ocular motor system (OMS). Nine dogs were treated bilaterally with AAV-RPE65. A second cohort of four dogs was treated with AAV2.RPE65, an optimized vector. Their fixation eye movements were recorded before treatment and at 4-week intervals for 3 months, by using high-speed (500 Hz) digital videography. The dogs were suspended in a sling and encouraged to fixate on distant (57 inches) targets at gaze angles varying between +/-15 degrees horizontally and +/-10 degrees vertically. The records for each eye were examined for qualitative changes in waveform and for quantitative changes in centralisation with the expanded nystagmus acuity function (NAFX) and compared with ERG results for restoration of receptor function. First group: Before treatment, five of the dogs had clinically apparent INS with jerk, pendular, or both waveforms and with peak-to-peak amplitudes as great as 15 degrees . One dog had intermittent nystagmus. At the 1- and 2-month examinations, no change in nystagmus waveform or NAFX was observed in any of the initial dogs, while at 10 weeks, one dog treated bilaterally with the standard dosage showed reduced nystagmus in only one eye. The other eye did not respond to treatment, as confirmed by ERG. This result was unexpected since it was previously documented that unilateral treatment leads to bilateral reduction of INS. The other dog treated with the standard dosage showed no reduction of its small-amplitude, high-frequency pendular nystagmus despite positive ERG responses. Second group: Only one dog of the four had clinically detectable INS, similar in characteristics to that seen in the affected dogs of the first group. Unlike any previous dog studied, this one showed a damping of the nystagmus within the first 4 weeks after

  16. Using the NAFX to Measure the Effectiveness over Time of Gene Therapy in Canine LCA

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Jonathan B.; Dell'Osso, Louis F.; Wang, Zhong I.; Acland, Gregory M.; Bennett, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To use ocular motility recordings to determine the changes over time of infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) in RPE65-deficient canines with Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA) and assess the time course of the recalibration of the ocular motor system (OMS). Methods Nine dogs were treated bilaterally with AAV-RPE65. A second cohort of four dogs was treated with AAV2.RPE65, an optimized vector. Their fixation eye movements were recorded before treatment and at 4-week intervals for 3 months, by using high-speed (500 Hz) digital videography. The dogs were suspended in a sling and encouraged to fixate on distant (57 inches) targets at gaze angles varying between ±15° horizontally and ±10° vertically. The records for each eye were examined for qualitative changes in waveform and for quantitative changes in centralisation with the expanded nystagmus acuity function (NAFX) and compared with ERG results for restoration of receptor function. Results First group: Before treatment, five of the dogs had clinically apparent INS with jerk, pendular, or both waveforms and with peak-to-peak amplitudes as great as 15°. One dog had intermittent nystagmus. At the 1- and 2-month examinations, no change in nystagmus waveform or NAFX was observed in any of the initial dogs, while at 10 weeks, one dog treated bilaterally with the standard dosage showed reduced nystagmus in only one eye. The other eye did not respond to treatment, as confirmed by ERG. This result was unexpected since it was previously documented that unilateral treatment leads to bilateral reduction of INS. The other dog treated with the standard dosage showed no reduction of its small-amplitude, high-frequency pendular nystagmus despite positive ERG responses. Second group: Only one dog of the four had clinically detectable INS, similar in characteristics to that seen in the affected dogs of the first group. Unlike any previous dog studied, this one showed a damping of the nystagmus within the first 4 weeks after

  17. Dog obesity: owner attitudes and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Bland, I M; Guthrie-Jones, A; Taylor, R D; Hill, J

    2009-12-01

    Animal (dog) factors that contribute to obesity are classified into three broad categories: genetic pre-disposition, reproductive management and dietary/exercise (human) management. This paper examined the latter-dietary/exercise (human) management. A quantitative analysis of questionnaire responses from dog owners and veterinarians was used to determine the routine care and obesity management strategies for dogs. A total of 550 questionnaires were distributed to dog owners in Victoria, Australia. Owners were asked to score the body condition of their animal by comparison with photographic images of animals with condition score ranging from 2 to 5. The management routines of 219 dog owners were received, including data on 302 dogs. There were 168 households with normal weight animals (BCS 2 and 3) and 51 with obese animals (BCS 4 and 5). The mean number of people per household (normally involved with caring for the animal(s)) with normal weight dogs was significantly lower than that of households with dogs categorised as overweight or obese (Kruskal-Wallis, Chi; chi(2)=6.28; 2.2 (s=0.79) vs. 2.5 (s=1.66); d.f.=2, P<0.05). Dog owners identified a preference for main meal feeding of 'twice a day' (60%), followed by 'once daily' (33%), 'greater than or equal to three times daily' (2%), and 'always feed available' (5%). There was a significant difference (Chi; chi(2)=6.30; d.f.=1; P<0.05) in the frequency of main meal feeding between households. Normal weight animals had food divided into two portions, whereas obese animals or animals from mixed households were more often fed their meal in either one or three-plus portions. Almost all owners fed treats (99%) in the daily feed. Households with normal weight dogs gave treats significantly less frequently than households with obese or mixed weight dogs (Chi; chi(2)=31.81; d.f.=6; P<0.001). The frequency of exercise differed between households (Chi; chi(2)=9.9; d.f.=1; P<0.01), with normal weight dogs being exercised daily

  18. Surgical management of dorsal scapular luxation in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephen C; Tinga, Selena; Porter, Erin G; Lewis, Daniel

    2017-01-16

    Scapular luxation is an uncommon cause of forelimb lameness in dogs and cats. Traumatic rupture of the serratus ventralis muscle allows the scapula to displace dorsally during weight-bearing. Specific documentation regarding clinical presentation and surgical techniques is limited, with no medium- to long-term results of surgical intervention in dogs described. Presented here are three cases of scapular luxation in dogs, treated with a modified surgical technique. Clinical outcome was considered good to excellent, with resolution of lameness and abnormal scapular motion in all three dogs. Medium- and long-term outcomes were assessed in two of the dogs, with an excellent outcome in both cases.

  19. Use of partial prostatectomy for treatment of prostatic abscesses and cysts in dogs.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, C A; Mahaffey, M B; Barsanti, J A; Quandt, J E; Oliver, J E; Crowell, W A; Downs, M O; Stampley, A R; Allen, S W

    1997-10-01

    To determine whether dogs had prostatic disease, urinary incontinence, or urinary tract infection 1 year after partial prostatectomy to treat prostatic abscesses and cysts. Prospective study. 20 male dogs with prostatic abscesses or cysts. Fifteen dogs had evidence of urinary tract infection. Only 8 dogs urinated normally; the remainder dribbled, had obstructions, or required medical treatment. Partial prostatectomy was performed on each dog. Sexually intact dogs (n = 12) also were castrated. None of the dogs had return of prostatic cystic enlargement or clinical signs of prostatic disease during the first year after surgery. Two dogs were euthanatized within 1 year after surgery, with 1 dog having prostatic enlargement and adenocarcinoma and 1 dog having unrelated lymphosarcoma. Fifteen dogs were continent. The remaining 5 dogs urinated normally but had intermittent and minor incontinence. Eleven dogs had no signs of infection 1 year after surgery, 5 had pyuria or positive urine bacteriologic culture results, 2 did not have urinalysis performed, and 2 were euthanatized. Dogs with severe prostatic abscesses or cysts and infections can be successfully treated by partial prostatectomy with an ultrasonic surgical aspirator and castration, resulting in long-term disease resolution. Although most dogs with severe prostatic disease do not urinate normally before surgery, nearly all dogs resume normal micturition after partial prostatectomy. Postoperative results of partial prostatectomy appear to be better than those of previous drainage techniques for treatment of prostatic cavitary disease.

  20. Selecting shelter dogs for service dog training.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Emily

    2002-01-01

    Service dogs are an essential aid to persons with disabilities, providing independence, mobility, and improved self-esteem. Because of these proven benefits, the growing se of service dogs is creating a demand and supply crisis. One major cause is the 50% verage dropout rate for dogs selected for training. Weiss and Greenber (1997) re-cently found that a dog, successful on the most commonly used selection test items, was as likely to be either a poor or a good candidate for service work. The experiment presented here evaluated test items developed by the author in 15 years of experience with dogs. The test items were administered to 75 dogs from the Kansas Humane So-ciety. Once tested, the dogs received obedience and retrieval training. The experiment assessed each dog on behavior over 5 weeks of training versus performance on each selection test item. A subset of the selection items, combined in a regression analysis, accounted for 36.4% of the variance with R = 0.603. This research also revealed a reli-able test for dog aggression without risking injury to dog or tester. Items for testing in-cluded fear, motivation, and submission. Another set of selection items reliably pre-dicted the trait of "high energy" commonly described as "high strung." Future research should involve investigating the effectiveness of both cortisol levels and blood pressure in predicting traits to help strengthen the predictive value of the tool and then testing on dogs trained to be full service dogs.

  1. Use of pleural access ports for treatment of recurrent pneumothorax in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Cahalane, Alane Kosanovich; Flanders, James A

    2012-08-15

    An 8-year-old castrated male mixed-breed dog (dog 1) and a 13-year-old spayed female mixed-breed dog (dog 2) were evaluated because of spontaneous pneumothorax. Both dogs had decreased bronchovesicular sounds with coughing, tachypnea, cyanosis, lethargy, or a combination of these clinical signs. Radiographic examination revealed pneumothorax in both dogs and consolidation of a lung lobe in dog 2. Pneumothorax was alleviated following thoracocentesis in both dogs but recurred. Dog 1 was initially treated by placement of a thoracostomy tube but underwent thoracotomy when pneumothorax recurred after tube removal; left caudal lung lobectomy was performed because a ruptured bulla was suspected, and a pulmonary bulla was histologically confirmed. Dog 2 underwent thoracotomy with left caudal lung lobectomy and partial removal of the left cranial lung lobe; diffuse pulmonary emphysema was diagnosed. This dog underwent a second surgery for right caudal lung lobectomy because of torsion. When pneumothorax recurred and additional surgery was not considered feasible, pleural access ports were placed in both dogs for repeated removal of air from the thoracic cavity. Ports were used clinically for 17 days in dog 1 and 14 days in dog 2. Dog 1 successfully underwent another surgery when pneumothorax recurred 18 days after port placement but was euthanized 17 months later when dyspnea and tachypnea recurred. Pneumothorax had not recurred further in dog 2 twenty-three months after port placement. Findings suggested that pleural access ports may have a role in the management of spontaneous pneumothorax in dogs.

  2. Dogs' Body Language Relevant to Learning Achievement.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Masashi; Ohtani, Nobuyo; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2014-02-27

    The facial expressions and body postures of dogs can give helpful information about their moods and emotional states. People can more effectively obedience train their dogs if we can identify the mannerisms associated with learning in dogs. The aim of this study was to clarify the dog's body language during operant conditioning to predict achievement in the test that followed by measuring the duration of behaviors. Forty-six untrained dogs (17 males and 26 females) of various breeds were used. Each session consisted of 5 minutes of training with a treat reward followed by 3 minutes of rest and finally an operant conditioning test that consisted of 20 "hand motion" cues. The operant tests were conducted a total of nine times over three consecutive days, and the success numbers were counted. The duration of the dog's behavior, focusing on the dog's eyes, mouth, ears, tail and tail-wagging, was recorded during the operant conditioning sessions before the test. Particular behaviors, including wide-eyes, closed mouth, erect ears, and forward and high tail carriage, without wagging or with short and quick wagging, related to high achievement results. It is concluded that dogs' body language during operant conditioning was related to their success rate.

  3. Bilateral appendicular bone tumors in four dogs.

    PubMed

    Selmic, Laura E; Ryan, Stewart D; Ehrhart, Nicole P; Withrow, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral synchronous appendicular bone tumors, occurring in the same bone and same anatomic site within the bone are very rare. This report describes the clinical presentation and oncologic outcome for four dogs with this rare presentation. All cases presented to the authors following a history of unilateral lameness for several weeks. On presentation, case 1 had pain elicited in the contralateral proximal humerus but all the other cases had no abnormalities detectable on physical examination of the contralateral limb. All dogs had technetium 99m ((99m)Tc) nuclear scintigraphy performed that identified bilateral lesions of the distal radii in two dogs, proximal humeri and distal tibiae in one dog each. Thoracic radiographs performed on all dogs showed no evidence of pulmonary metastases. Three dogs were treated with palliative radiation therapy (two dogs received concurrent bisphosphonates) resulting in survival times from initial presentation of 50 days, 193 days, and 523 days, respectively. One dog had stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) and a surgical limb-salvage performed followed by carboplatin chemotherapy, resulting in a survival time of 926 days from initial presentation. Palliative and curative-intent treatments for the bilateral synchronous appendicular bone tumors resulted in survival times similar to those reported for treatment of a single primary appendicular bone tumor.

  4. Combined carotid artery injury and laryngeal fracture secondary to dog bite: case report.

    PubMed

    Varela, J E; Dolich, M O; Fernandez, L A; Kane, A; Henry, R; Livingston, J; Arnold, D; Namias, N

    2000-11-01

    Approximately 914 new dog bite injuries requiring emergency department visits occur daily in the United States. Attacks by dogs with training and strength to attack should be triaged cautiously because of the possibility of serious internal injury. A high index of suspicion is needed when treating patients with neck injuries secondary to dog bites. We report a case of successfully treated combined carotid artery and laryngeal injury produced by a dog bite.

  5. Tylosin-responsive chronic diarrhea in dogs.

    PubMed

    Westermarck, Elias; Skrzypczak, Teresa; Harmoinen, Jaana; Steiner, Jõrg M; Ruaux, Craig G; Williams, David A; Eerola, Erkki; Sundbäck, Pernilla; Rinkinen, Minna

    2005-01-01

    Fourteen dogs had shown chronic or intermittent diarrhea for more than 1 year. Diarrhea had been successfully treated with tylosin for at least 6 months but recurred when treatment was withdrawn on at least 2 occasions. Tylosin-responsive diarrhea (TRD) affects typically middle-aged, large-breed dogs and clinical signs indicate that TRD affects both the small and large intestine. Treatment with tylosin eliminated diarrhea in all dogs within 3 days and in most dogs within 24 hours. Tylosin administration controlled diarrhea in all dogs, but after it was discontinued, diarrhea reappeared in 12 (85.7%) of 14 dogs within 30 days. Prednisone given for 3 days did not completely resolve diarrhea. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG did not prevent the relapse of diarrhea in any of 9 dogs so treated. The etiology of TRD, a likely form of antibiotic-responsive diarrhea (ARD) is unclear. The following reasons for chronic diarrhea were excluded or found to be unlikely: parasites, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, inflammatory bowel disease, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, enteropathogenic bacteria (Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Yersinia spp., or Lawsoni intracellularis), and Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin and Clostridium difficile A toxin. A possible etiologic factor is a specific enteropathogenic organism that is a common resident in the canine gastrointestinal tract and is sensitive to tylosin but difficult to eradicate. Additional studies are required to identify the specific cause of TRD.

  6. Experimental study of materials for patch graft on right ventricular outflow tract under extracorporeal circulation in dogs--comparison between Denacol EX-313-treated bovine jugular vein graft and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (EPTFE) graft.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, H; Sugiyama, S; Shibazaki, A; Tanaka, R; Takashima, K; Noishiki, Y; Yamane, Y

    2001-09-01

    A comparison between a bovine jugular vein treated with a hydrophilic polyepoxy compound cross-linker (Denacol), and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (EPTFE), an artificial material, as a patch graft for the reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract under extracorporeal circulation in dogs, as if they had pulmonic stenosis, was made. Hemodynamic and histological examinations were conducted two weeks after the transplantation. Hemodynamic problems were not observed in either the Denacol or EPTFE groups. Macroscopically, organization of new tissue on the graft surface was more marked in the EPTFE group than in the Denacol group, and newly-formed tissue was seen surrounding the border of the graft and burying it in the EPTFE group. In the Denacol group, microscopic findings revealed the presence of inflammatory cells and fibroblasts, and an invasion of the graft by collagen fibers and elastic fibers. In the EPTFE group, there was minimal cellular infiltration of the graft and a thick layer consisting of collagen fibers and fibroblasts was observed around the graft. These results indicated that two weeks after transplantation the graft was better assimilated and organized with blood vasculature in the patch graft in the Denacol group than in the EPTFE group.

  7. Dog Models for Blinding Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Komáromy, András M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials. PMID:25671556

  8. Dog models for blinding inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Komáromy, András M

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials.

  9. Efficacy of selamectin against biting lice on dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Shanks, D J; Gautier, P; McTier, T L; Evans, N A; Pengo, G; Rowan, T G

    2003-02-22

    The efficacy of selamectin was evaluated against naturally acquired Trichodectes canis infestations on dogs and against Felicola subrostratus infestations on cats. Twenty dogs and 18 cats were randomly allocated to treatment with either a placebo or selamectin (6 mg/kg), administered topically once only on day 0. The treatment had no adverse effects in either the dogs or the cats. Efficacy was assessed by counting the live lice (adults and nymphs) on each animal by using a coat-parting technique on days -3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 for the dogs, and on days -1, 7, 21, 35 and 42 for the cats. On day 43, the number of live lice on each dog was also assessed by using a whole-body combing technique. Selamectin was 100 per cent effective in killing biting lice on the dogs and cats throughout the period of assessment; the louse counts on the treated dogs and cats were significantly lower than the pretreatment counts (P = 0.0001) and were also significantly lower than on the placebo-treated dogs (P < 0.05) and cats (P = 0.0001). There was a marked reduction in the prevalence of clinical signs associated with ectoparasite infestation in the treated dogs and no clinical signs were observed in any of the treated cats.

  10. [Feeding of dogs and cats in Germany].

    PubMed

    Becker, N; Dillitzer, N; Sauter-Louis, C; Kienzle, E

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine epidemiological data on the feeding of dogs and cats in Germany. A total of 865 dog owners and 243 cat owners were interviewed using standardised questionnaires about their animals (age, sex, weight, body condition, health) and feeding, including treats, additional supplements and reasons for food changes, together with data on the pet owners (age, sex, education, profession). The interviews took place in the waiting rooms of veterinarians, in dog schools, animal shelters and public parks as well as via the internet. Body condition scoring (BCS, scale 1-9) was performed separately by the pet owners and the interviewer. The mean age of dogs was 4.8 years and of cats 6.8 years. The dogs' body weight ranged from 2.2kg (Pomeranian dog) to 95kg (Saint Bernard). The cats had a body weight from 2 to 11kg. Approximately 52% of dogs and cats were overweight (BCS6-9). Differences existed between the assessment by the owner and the interviewer. Many owners underestimated the body condition, in particular, moderate overweight was not recognised (BCS6-7). Commercial food was exclusively used by 58% of dog and 90% of cat owners, while 35% and 10%, respectively, combined these with additional feed. Nearly 8% of dog and <1% of cat owners fed their pets with home-made diets. Elderly (>7 years) and sick dogs received home-made diets more often. Older pet owners (≥ 46 years) fed their pets home-made diets more frequently. The education and profession of owners did not affect the percentage of home-made diets. There was no effect of the type of diet on BCS. Owners with a lower education as well as housewives and pensioners more often had overweight pets. Older owners and working owners gave treats less frequently. However, 95% of dogs and 65% of cats received treats. Being overweight is the biggest dietary problem. In comparison to previous studies, the number of overweight pets has increased. Pet owners should be advised early on excess weight

  11. Intracranial Biodegradable Silica-Based Nimodipine Drug Release Implant for Treating Vasospasm in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in an Experimental Healthy Pig and Dog Model

    PubMed Central

    Koskimäki, Janne; Tarkia, Miikka; Ahtola-Sätilä, Tuula; Saloranta, Lasse; Laakso, Aki; Frantzén, Janek

    2015-01-01

    Nimodipine is a widely used medication for treating delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage. When administrated orally or intravenously, systemic hypotension is an undesirable side effect. Intracranial subarachnoid delivery of nimodipine during aneurysm clipping may be more efficient way of preventing vasospasm and DCI due to higher concentration of nimodipine in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The risk of systemic hypotension may also be decreased with intracranial delivery. We used animal models to evaluate the feasibility of surgically implanting a silica-based nimodipine releasing implant into the subarachnoid space through a frontotemporal craniotomy. Concentrations of released nimodipine were measured from plasma samples and CSF samples. Implant degradation was followed using CT imaging. After completing the recovery period, full histological examination was performed on the brain and meninges. The in vitro characteristics of the implant were determined. Our results show that the biodegradable silica-based implant can be used for an intracranial drug delivery system and no major histopathological foreign body reactions were observed. CT imaging is a feasible method for determining the degradation of silica implants in vivo. The sustained release profiles of nimodipine in CSF were achieved. Compared to a traditional treatment, higher nimodipine CSF/plasma ratios can be obtained with the implant. PMID:25685803

  12. Effects of flunixin meglumine in dogs following experimentally induced endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Stegelmeier, B L; Bottoms, G D; Denicola, D B; Reed, W M

    1988-07-01

    Twelve dogs were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 dogs were given Escherichia coli endotoxin and then treated with flunixin meglumine. Group 2 dogs were given endotoxin as group 1, but untreated. Group 3 dogs were given flunixin meglumine alone. The dogs were monitored clinically and urine and serum samples were collected at regular intervals for 72 hours. All surviving dogs were humanely killed after 72 hours and examined for gross and histologic lesions. Group 1 dogs all survived 72 hours, but showed prerenal azotemia, hepatocellular damage, hemorrhagic enteritis, and numerous gastric ulcerations. Three of the four dogs in group 2 died before 72 hours. Group 2 dogs showed many of the same chemical and hemodynamic changes as group 1. They had severe hemorrhage into the intestinal lumen; however, there were no gastric ulcerations. Group 3 dogs all survived and showed little physical or hematologic change. The study suggested the following: 1) flunixin meglumine was an effective drug in ameliorating the fatal effects of canine endotoxemia, 2) the effects of endotoxin in combination with flunixin meglumine, at 1.1 mg/kg body weight, caused gastric ulcerations, and 3) in normal dogs flunixin meglumine at 1.1 mg/kg body weight did not cause severe side effects or gross lesions.

  13. Clinical and biochemical changes in 53 Swedish dogs bitten by the European adder - Vipera berus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Every year many dogs in Sweden are bitten by Vipera berus, the only venomous viper in Sweden. This prospective study investigated clinical signs, some biochemical parameters, treatment, and progress of disease after snakebite in 53 dogs. Effects of treatment with and without glucocorticoids were evaluated. Methods All fifty-three dogs bitten by Vipera berus were examined the same day the dog was bitten and the next day. Two more examinations during 23 days post snake bite were included. Creatinine, creatine kinase (CK), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bile acid results were followed through 3 to 4 samplings from 34 of the dogs. Results All dogs had variable severity of local swelling in the bite area and 73 per cent had affected mental status. Initial cardiac auscultation examination was normal in all dogs, but six dogs had cardiac abnormalities at their second examination, including cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac murmurs. All dogs received fluid therapy, 36 dogs were given analgesics, 22 dogs were treated with glucocorticoids, and ten dogs were treated with antibiotics. Evidence of transient muscle damage (increased CK) was seen one day after the snake bite in 15 (54%) of 28 sampled dogs. Moderate changes in hepatic test results occurred in 1 dog and several dogs (22 of 34) had transient, minor increases in one or more hepatic test result. No dog died during the observation period as a consequence of the snake bite. Conclusions Snake bite caused local swelling in all dogs and mental depression of short duration in most dogs. Some dogs had transient clinical signs that could be indicative of cardiac injury and some other had transient biochemical signs of liver injury. Treatment with glucocorticoids did not have any clear positive or negative effect on clinical signs and mortality. PMID:20416040

  14. Effect of cefovecin on the fecal flora of healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, M; Kukanich, K; Kukanich, B; Heinrich, E; Coetzee, J F; Grauer, G; Narayanan, S

    2013-10-01

    Cefovecin is an extended-spectrum long-acting third generation cephalosporin used to treat canine infections. The study objective was to determine the effect of cefovecin on the absolute number and antimicrobial susceptibility of fecal enteric bacteria in healthy dogs. Fourteen Beagles were randomly assigned to a treated (n=7, 8 mg/kg cefovecin subcutaneously on day 1) or untreated (n=7) group. LC/MS was used to determine plasma cefovecin concentration on day 14. E. coli, enterococci, and Salmonella were isolated and enumerated from fecal samples collected on days 0, 3, 7, 14, and 28. Antimicrobial resistance was determined using disc diffusion, MIC, and detected using PCR for the blaCMY-2 gene on select isolates. Mean plasma concentration of cefovecin on day 14 was 9.59 μg/mL in treated dogs; untreated dogs had no measurable plasma cefovecin. The absolute number of E. coli was lower in treated dogs on day 3 (P ≤ 0.0001), and the absolute number of cefovecin-resistant E. coli was higher in treated dogs on days 7 (P=0.002), 14 (P=0.004) and 28 (P ≤ 0.0001), compared to untreated dogs. Enterococci increased and were higher in the treatment group on day 7 (P=0.0226). Isolation of Salmonella was rare. After cefovecin treatment, beta-lactam resistance was more common in fecal E. coli from treated dogs than untreated dogs, while resistance of enterococci was not altered. On day 28, treated dogs were 3.25 times more likely to carry the blaCMY-2 gene than untreated dogs (95% CI 1.27 - 8.35). The implications of these findings in clinically ill patients require further research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Failure of papyerine hydrocholoride and doxycycline hyclate as antipruritis agents in pruritic dogs: Results of an open clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Danny W.; Cayatte, Suzanne M.

    1993-01-01

    Papaverine hydrochloride (150 to 300 mg/dog every 12 hours) and doxycycline hyclate (3 mg/kg every 12 hours) were both administered orally as individual agents to 13 dogs with pruritus of allergic or idiopathic origin. No dog improved. Depression, anorexia, and vomiting were seen in one dog treated with papaverine hydrochloride. Under the conditions of the study, papaverine and doxycycline were not useful antipruritic agents for the dog. PMID:17424184

  16. Circovirus in Dogs FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reports Tools for K-12 Educators Circovirus in Dogs FAQ November 22, 2013 Update November 22, 2013: ... information. Canine circovirus infections have been documented in dogs with vomiting and diarrhea. The distribution of the ...

  17. Clinical results of single-session bilateral medial patellar luxation repair in 26 small breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Daniel G; Kramek, Betty

    2016-04-01

    Medical records of 26 small breed dogs treated with single-session bilateral medial patellar luxation repair were reviewed. Excluding dogs with complications associated with cranial cruciate ligament disease, 20/21 dogs with long-term follow-up achieved a complete or acceptable clinical recovery. The complication rate was not increased compared to that previously reported for unilateral patellar luxation repair.

  18. Electrochemotherapy for the treatment of recurring aponeurotic fibromatosis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Spugnini, Enrico P.; Di Tosto, Giovanni; Salemme, Scirin; Pecchia, Luca; Fanciulli, Maurizio; Baldi, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the clinical findings, histopathology, and clinical outcome of a rare case of aponeurotic fibromatosis in a dog. The dog was treated with 4 courses of electrochemotherapy using the drugs cisplatin and bleomycin. There was complete remission and the dog was still disease-free after 18 months. PMID:24155455

  19. Medical management of a patent ductus venosus in a dog

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract A 2.5-year-old dog with signs of weight loss, vomiting, and hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed with a patent ductus venosus, based on serum biochemical analysis, jejunal portography, and biopsies, and treated with lactulose, antibiotics, and a reduced protein diet. Two years after initial presentation, the dog is still being managed medically. PMID:15943124

  20. Lentiviral Gene Transfer of Rpe65 Rescues Survival and Function of Cones in a Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Crippa, Sylvain V; Hauswirth, William W; Lem, Janis; Munier, Francis L; Seeliger, Mathias W; Wenzel, Andreas; Arsenijevic, Yvan

    2006-01-01

    Background RPE65 is specifically expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium and is essential for the recycling of 11-cis-retinal, the chromophore of rod and cone opsins. In humans, mutations in RPE65 lead to Leber congenital amaurosis or early-onset retinal dystrophy, a severe form of retinitis pigmentosa. The proof of feasibility of gene therapy for RPE65 deficiency has already been established in a dog model of Leber congenital amaurosis, but rescue of the cone function, although crucial for human high-acuity vision, has never been strictly proven. In Rpe65 knockout mice, photoreceptors show a drastically reduced light sensitivity and are subject to degeneration, the cone photoreceptors being lost at early stages of the disease. In the present study, we address the question of whether application of a lentiviral vector expressing the Rpe65 mouse cDNA prevents cone degeneration and restores cone function in Rpe65 knockout mice. Methods and Findings Subretinal injection of the vector in Rpe65-deficient mice led to sustained expression of Rpe65 in the retinal pigment epithelium. Electroretinogram recordings showed that Rpe65 gene transfer restored retinal function to a near-normal pattern. We performed histological analyses using cone-specific markers and demonstrated that Rpe65 gene transfer completely prevented cone degeneration until at least four months, an age at which almost all cones have degenerated in the untreated Rpe65-deficient mouse. We established an algorithm that allows prediction of the cone-rescue area as a function of transgene expression, which should be a useful tool for future clinical trials. Finally, in mice deficient for both RPE65 and rod transducin, Rpe65 gene transfer restored cone function when applied at an early stage of the disease. Conclusions By demonstrating that lentivirus-mediated Rpe65 gene transfer protects and restores the function of cones in the Rpe65−/− mouse, this study reinforces the therapeutic value of gene therapy

  1. Dietary hyperthyroidism in dogs.

    PubMed

    Köhler, B; Stengel, C; Neiger, R

    2012-03-01

    Evaluation of dogs with elevated plasma thyroxine concentration fed raw food before and after changing the diet. Between 2006 and 2011 all dogs presented with an elevated plasma thyroxine concentration and a dietary history of feeding raw food were included. Thyroxine (reference interval: 19·3 to 51·5 nmol/L) and in many cases also thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations (reference interval: <0·30 ng/mL) were measured initially and after changing the diet. Twelve dogs were presented with a median age of five years. The median plasma thyroxine concentration was 156·1 (range of 79·7 to 391·9) nmol/L; in six dogs, thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration was measured and was <0·03 ng/mL in five dogs and 0·05 ng/mL in one dog. Six dogs showed clinical signs such as weight loss, aggressiveness, tachycardia, panting and restlessness while six dogs had no clinical signs. After changing the diet eight dogs were examined: thyroxine concentration normalised in all dogs and clinical signs resolved. Dietary hyperthyroidism can be seen in dogs on a raw meat diet or fed fresh or dried gullets. Increased plasma thyroxine concentration in a dog, either with or without signs of hyperthyroidism, should prompt the veterinarian to obtain a thorough dietary history. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  2. The relationship of feeding patterns and obesity in dogs.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, R; Wakshlag, J

    2011-02-01

    The rates of dog obesity are increasing and a greater understanding of feeding patterns is required to combat the problem. This study examined relationships between dietary patterns and caloric intake, and nutrient content of foods fed as it relates to obesity in dogs in the United States. Sixty-one owners and their dogs were enrolled, and lifestyle surveys, food frequencies, and 3-day food records were collected. Significant differences in overall kcal intake per kilogram of body weight were found (p< 0.04). Crude fibre in dog food was positively associated with protein and negatively associated with fat regardless of the dog's weight (p< 0.001). Lean dogs received significantly more crude fibre in relation to overweight dogs regardless of the number of treats they received (p< 0.01), and their diets had greater micronutrient densities (p< 0.03) suggesting that high fibre influences body condition. Additionally, owners who ate nutrient-rich, calorie-poor diets had normal weight dogs, and owners that fed more table scraps had overweight dogs. Regardless of body condition, 59% of dogs received table scraps, which constituted 21% of daily caloric intake. The nutrient density of scraps fed was variable and did not meet National Research Council's recommendations for micronutrient adequacy. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. VAC protocol for treatment of dogs with stage III hemangiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Francisco J; Hosoya, Kenji; Lara-Garcia, Ana; Kisseberth, William; Couto, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Hemangiosarcomas (HSAs) are aggressive tumors with a high rate of metastasis. Clinical stage has been considered a negative prognostic factor for survival. The study authors hypothesized that the median survival time (MST) of dogs with metastatic (stage III) HSA treated with a vincristine, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (VAC) chemotherapy protocol would not be different than those with stage I/II HSA. Sixty-seven dogs with HSA in different anatomic locations were evaluated retrospectively. All dogs received the VAC protocol as an adjuvant to surgery (n = 50), neoadjuvant (n = 3), or as the sole treatment modality (n = 14). There was no significant difference (P = 0.97) between the MST of dogs with stage III and stage I/II HSA. For dogs presenting with splenic HSA alone, there was no significant difference between the MST of dogs with stage III and stage I/II disease (P = 0.12). The overall response rate (complete response [CR] and partial response [PR]) was 86%). No unacceptable toxicities were observed. Dogs with stage III HSA treated with the VAC protocol have a similar prognosis to dogs with stage I/II HSA. Dogs with HSA and evidence of metastases at the time of diagnosis should not be denied treatment.

  4. Clinical and laboratory findings of Babesia infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sudhakara Reddy, B; Sivajothi, S; Varaprasad Reddy, L S S; Solmon Raju, K G

    2016-06-01

    Canine babesiosis is a worldwide tick borne disease. Dogs with fever, in appetence and enlarged lymph nodes were screened for the presence of haemoprotozoan parasites during the one year period of study at T.V.C.C., C.V.Sc., Proddatur. Based on the stained peripheral blood smears examination, six dogs were found to be affected with babesiosis. Clinical examination of the dogs revealed ticks over the body, congested conjunctival mucus membranes, dullness, fever, tachycardia, tachypnoea in all the dogs. Some of the dogs had icterus, lymphadenopathy, haemoglobinuria. Laboratory examination of the clinical samples revealed reduction in haemoglobin concentration, erythrocyte count, platelet count, serum total protein, serum albumin and glucose levels. Increased serum SGPT, creatinine, BUN levels were recorded. Dogs were treated with inj. Diminazene aceturate (Berenil RTU) @ 5 mg/kg body weight, single dose along with supportive and symptomatic therapy in individual cases.

  5. Radiotherapy of metastatic seminoma in the dog. Case reports

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.K.; Walker, M.; Legendre, A.M.; vanEe, R.T.; Gompf, R.E.

    1988-04-01

    Four dogs with metastatic seminoma were treated with cesium 137 teleradiotherapy. Minimum total tumor dose ranged from 17 to 40 gray (Gy) and was usually given through bilateral opposing sublumbar ports in eight to ten fractions, with three fractions given weekly. The tumor regressed in all four dogs. The first dog (case 1) was free of tumor and died of non-tumor related causes at 57 months. The second dog (case 2) was free of tumor but was euthanatized at 37 months for a limb fracture. The third dog (case 3) was euthanatized for undertermined pulmonary disease 43 months after radiotherapy. The fourth dog (case 4) was euthanatized 6 months following radiotherapy because of transitional cell carcinoma and renal failure. No evidence of seminoma was found at necropsy. Radiotherapy was shown to be effective treatment for seminoma with regional metastasis.

  6. Generalized vitiligo in a dog with primary hypoadrenocorticism.

    PubMed

    Malerba, Eleonora; Morini, Maria; Fracassi, Federico

    2015-10-01

    Vitiligo is presumed to be an autoimmune disorder in the dog; primary adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease) is associated with immune-mediated destruction of the adrenal cortex. In this case report we describe a dog with primary hypoadrenocorticism that developed generalized vitiligo. A 4-year-old spayed female cross-bred dog developed signs of Addison's disease and this was confirmed by biochemical testing; the dog was treated with fludrocortisone acetate and then desoxycorticosterone pivalate. Three months after the diagnosis, the dog developed depigmentation of the whole hair coat and of several focal areas of the skin. Histopathological findings were consistent with vitiligo. Dogs with immune-mediated disease may develop other manifestations of immune-mediated disease, including a combination of Addison's disease and vitiligo. The cause in this case was not determined. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  7. Therapeutic neonatal hepatic gene therapy in mucopolysaccharidosis VII dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ponder, Katherine Parker; Melniczek, John R.; Xu, Lingfei; Weil, Margaret A.; O'Malley, Thomas M.; O'Donnell, Patricia A.; Knox, Van W.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Mazrier, Hamutal; Ellinwood, N. Matthew; Sleeper, Meg; Maguire, Albert M.; Volk, Susan W.; Mango, Robert L.; Zweigle, Jean; Wolfe, John H.; Haskins, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Dogs with mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII) were injected intravenously at 2–3 days of age with a retroviral vector (RV) expressing canine β-glucuronidase (cGUSB). Five animals received RV alone, and two dogs received hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) before RV in an attempt to increase transduction efficiency. Transduced hepatocytes expanded clonally during normal liver growth and secreted enzyme with mannose 6-phosphate. Serum GUSB activity was stable for up to 14 months at normal levels for the RV-treated dogs, and for 17 months at 67-fold normal for the HGF/RV-treated dog. GUSB activity in other organs was 1.5–60% of normal at 6 months for two RV-treated dogs, which was likely because of uptake of enzyme from blood by the mannose 6-phosphate receptor. The body weights of untreated MPS VII dogs are 50% of normal at 6 months. MPS VII dogs cannot walk or stand after 6 months, and progressively develop eye and heart disease. RV- and HGF/RV-treated MPS VII dogs achieved 87% and 84% of normal body weight, respectively. Treated animals could run at all times of evaluation for 6–17 months because of improvements in bone and joint abnormalities, and had little or no corneal clouding and no mitral valve thickening. Despite higher GUSB expression, the clinical improvements in the HGF/RV-treated dog were similar to those in the RV-treated animals. This is the first successful application of gene therapy in preventing the clinical manifestations of a lysosomal storage disease in a large animal. PMID:12232044

  8. Dogs catch human yawns.

    PubMed

    Joly-Mascheroni, Ramiro M; Senju, Atsushi; Shepherd, Alex J

    2008-10-23

    This study is the first to demonstrate that human yawns are possibly contagious to domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). Twenty-nine dogs observed a human yawning or making control mouth movements. Twenty-one dogs yawned when they observed a human yawning, but control mouth movements did not elicit yawning from any of them. The presence of contagious yawning in dogs suggests that this phenomenon is not specific to primate species and may indicate that dogs possess the capacity for a rudimentary form of empathy. Since yawning is known to modulate the levels of arousal, yawn contagion may help coordinate dog-human interaction and communication. Understanding the mechanism as well as the function of contagious yawning between humans and dogs requires more detailed investigation.

  9. Dogs recognize dog and human emotions.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Natalia; Guo, Kun; Wilkinson, Anna; Savalli, Carine; Otta, Emma; Mills, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The perception of emotional expressions allows animals to evaluate the social intentions and motivations of each other. This usually takes place within species; however, in the case of domestic dogs, it might be advantageous to recognize the emotions of humans as well as other dogs. In this sense, the combination of visual and auditory cues to categorize others' emotions facilitates the information processing and indicates high-level cognitive representations. Using a cross-modal preferential looking paradigm, we presented dogs with either human or dog faces with different emotional valences (happy/playful versus angry/aggressive) paired with a single vocalization from the same individual with either a positive or negative valence or Brownian noise. Dogs looked significantly longer at the face whose expression was congruent to the valence of vocalization, for both conspecifics and heterospecifics, an ability previously known only in humans. These results demonstrate that dogs can extract and integrate bimodal sensory emotional information, and discriminate between positive and negative emotions from both humans and dogs. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Modular hybrid total hip arthroplasty. Experimental study in dogs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This prospective experimental study evaluated the surgical procedure and results of modular hybrid total hip arthroplasty in dogs. Methods Ten skeletally mature healthy mongrel dogs with weights varying between 19 and 27 kg were used. Cemented modular femoral stems and uncemented porous-coated acetabular cups were employed. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed before surgery and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 360 days post-operation. Results Excellent weight bearing was noticed in the operated limb in seven dogs. Dislocation followed by loosening of the prosthesis was noticed in two dogs, which were therefore properly treated with a femoral head osteotomy. Femoral fracture occurred in one dog, which was promptly treated with full implant removal and femoral osteosynthesis. Conclusions The canine modular hybrid total hip arthroplasty provided excellent functionality of the operated limb. PMID:21736758

  11. Liver biomarker and in vitro assessment confirm the hepatic origin of aminotransferase elevations lacking histopathological correlate in beagle dogs treated with GABA{sub A} receptor antagonist NP260

    SciTech Connect

    Harrill, Alison H.; Eaddy, John S.; Rose, Kelly; Cullen, John M.; Ramanathan, Lakshmi; Wanaski, Stephen; Collins, Stephen; Ho, Yu; Watkins, Paul B.; LeCluyse, Edward L.

    2014-06-01

    NP260 was designed as a first-in-class selective antagonist of α4-subtype GABA{sub A} receptors that had promising efficacy in animal models of pain, epilepsy, psychosis, and anxiety. However, development of NP260 was complicated following a 28-day safety study in dogs in which pronounced elevations of serum aminotransferase levels were observed, although there was no accompanying histopathological indication of hepatocellular injury. To further investigate the liver effects of NP260, we assayed stored serum samples from the 28-day dog study for liver specific miRNA (miR-122) as well as enzymatic biomarkers glutamate dehydrogenase and sorbitol dehydrogenase, which indicate liver necrosis. Cytotoxicity assessments were conducted in hepatocytes derived from dog, rat, and human liver samples to address the species specificity of the liver response to NP260. All biomarkers, except ALT, returned toward baseline by Day 29 despite continued drug treatment, suggesting adaptation to the initial injury. In vitro analysis of the toxicity potential of NP260 to primary hepatocytes indicated a relative sensitivity of dog > human > rat, which may explain, in part, why the liver effects were not evident in the rodent safety studies. Taken together, the data indicate that a diagnostic biomarker approach, coupled with sensitive in vitro screening strategies, may facilitate interpretation of toxicity potential when an adaptive event masks the underlying toxicity. - Highlights: • NP260 caused ALT elevations in dogs without evidence of hepatocellular injury. • SDH, GLDH, and miRNA-122 elevations occurred, confirming hepatocellular necrosis. • NP260 toxicity is greater in dog and human hepatocytes than in rat hepatocytes. • Species sensitivity may explain why the rodent studies failed to indicate risk. • Diagnostic biomarkers and hepatocyte studies aid interpretation of hepatotoxicity.

  12. The attitudes of owners and veterinary professionals in the United Kingdom to the risk of adverse events associated with using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat dogs with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Belshaw, Zoe; Asher, Lucy; Dean, Rachel S

    2016-09-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed by veterinary surgeons for the treatment of canine osteoarthritis, and affected dogs may receive these drugs for long periods of time. Whilst short term administration of NSAIDs to dogs is linked to adverse events such as gastrointestinal haemorrhage and renal injury, reports of adverse events associated with their long-term administration are limited in the veterinary literature. This study aimed to investigate the attitudes towards the long term use of NSAIDs for canine osteoarthritis held by three groups who manage osteoarthritic dogs in the United Kingdom: dog owners, veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses. A qualitative methodology was adopted, using semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Thematic analysis of these data identified three themes: awareness of potential risks; recognition of adverse events; and influence of risk perception on the use of NSAIDs. Awareness of, and concern about, the risk of adverse events associated with NSAID administration to dogs with osteoarthritis was high in all groups, with veterinary surgeons being one of a variety of information sources used by owners to acquire this knowledge. Veterinary surgeons described difficulty in recognising, managing and avoiding adverse events associated with NSAIDs. When adverse events occurred, a wide range of management approaches were adopted ranging from a brief drug respite to permanent cessation of administration of any NSAIDs to that dog. Commonly employed approaches to minimise risk included dose reduction and screening blood tests. This study describes a high level of concern about the risks associated with long term NSAID administration to dogs with osteoarthritis and highlights a diverse range of strategies employed to minimise these risks. The evidence base for these strategies is poor, and this may present a risk to animal welfare if the affected dogs are not receiving adequate analgesia. In order to

  13. Prostatic cavitary lesions containing urine in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bokemeyer, J; Peppler, C; Thiel, C; Failing, K; Kramer, M; Gerwing, M

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the proportion of urine-containing prostatic cavitary lesions ("urinary cysts") in dogs and to describe their clinical management. The study included dogs with clinically relevant prostatic-retention cyst/abscess (n=87) treated initially by percutaneous ultrasound-guided drainage of the prostatic cavity. Based on a prostatic fluid:serum creatinine ratio, the study population was divided into two groups: group 1 (n=16) with and group 2 (n=71) without evidence of urine within the lesion. Medical records of both the groups were reviewed. Cavitary lesions containing urine were observed in 16 of the 87 dogs (18·4%; group 1). In 10 (62·5%) of the group 1 dogs, abdominal surgery was recommended, because of recurrent filling during follow-up. In group 2, abdominal surgery was recommended in only 11 of 71 cases (15·5%). In dogs, 18·4% (95% confidence interval, 10·9 to 28·1%) of the prostatic cavitary lesions contain urine. Measurement of creatinine within the prostatic cavity fluid is a helpful tool in diagnosing a presurgical intra-prostatic urethral fistulation, and these dogs tend to require a more aggressive surgical therapy than percutaneous drainage alone. © 2011 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  14. Efficacy of dog-appeasing pheromone (DAP) for ameliorating separation-related behavioral signs in hospitalized dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Mee; Lee, Jong-Kyung; el-aty, A.M. Abd; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Mok

    2010-01-01

    Dogs hospitalized in veterinary clinics are likely to show signs of separation-induced anxiety from hospitalization. The study assessed the effect of dog-appeasing pheromone (DAP) on 10 typical separation-related behavioral signs in hospitalized dogs. A DAP treated group (n = 24) was compared with a placebo control group (n = 19). There was overall amelioration of the signs without ‘vigilance’ and ‘anorexia’ in the DAP-treated dogs; marked decreases were noted in elimination (P = 0.038), excessive licking (P = 0.005), and pacing (P = 0.017). The results suggest that the use of DAP could decrease separation-induced anxiety, distress, and fear in inpatients, and possibly facilitate recovery in hospitalized dogs. PMID:20592826

  15. Efficacy of dog-appeasing pheromone (DAP) for ameliorating separation-related behavioral signs in hospitalized dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Mee; Lee, Jong-Kyung; Abd el-aty, A M; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Mok

    2010-04-01

    Dogs hospitalized in veterinary clinics are likely to show signs of separation-induced anxiety from hospitalization. The study assessed the effect of dog-appeasing pheromone (DAP) on 10 typical separation-related behavioral signs in hospitalized dogs. A DAP treated group (n = 24) was compared with a placebo control group (n = 19). There was overall amelioration of the signs without 'vigilance' and 'anorexia' in the DAP-treated dogs; marked decreases were noted in elimination (P = 0.038), excessive licking (P = 0.005), and pacing (P = 0.017). The results suggest that the use of DAP could decrease separation-induced anxiety, distress, and fear in inpatients, and possibly facilitate recovery in hospitalized dogs.

  16. Efficacy of afoxolaner in a clinical field study in dogs naturally infested with Sarcoptes scabiei.

    PubMed

    Beugnet, Frédéric; de Vos, Christa; Liebenberg, Julian; Halos, Lénaïg; Larsen, Diane; Fourie, Josephus

    2016-01-01

    The acaricidal efficacy of afoxolaner (NexGard(®), Merial) was evaluated against Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis in a field efficacy study, when administered orally at a minimum dose of 2.5 mg/kg to dogs naturally infested with the mites. Twenty mixed-breed dogs of either sex (6 males and 14 females), aged over 6 months and weighing 4-18 kg, were studied in this randomised controlled field efficacy trial. Dogs, naturally infested with Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis confirmed by skin scrapings collected prior to allocation, were randomly divided into two equal groups. Dogs in Group 1 were not treated. Dogs in Group 2 were treated on Days 0 and 28. On Days 0 (pre-treatment), 28 (pre-treatment) and 56, five skin scrapings of similar size were taken from different sites with lesions suggestive of sarcoptic mange. The extent of lesions was also recorded on Days 0, 28 and 56, and photographs were taken. Dogs treated orally with afoxolaner had significantly (p < 0.001) lower mite counts than untreated control animals at Days 28 and 56 with no mites recovered from treated dogs at these times (100% efficacy based on mite counts). In addition, dogs treated with NexGard had significantly (p < 0.05) better lesion resolution at Day 56 than Day 0; no treated dog showed pruritus compared to 7/10 dogs in the control group, 1/9 treated dogs had crusts compared to 5/10 controls and 8/9 dogs recovered 90% of hairs on lesions compared to 0/10 control dogs.

  17. Efficacy of afoxolaner in a clinical field study in dogs naturally infested with Sarcoptes scabiei

    PubMed Central

    Beugnet, Frédéric; de Vos, Christa; Liebenberg, Julian; Halos, Lénaïg; Larsen, Diane; Fourie, Josephus

    2016-01-01

    The acaricidal efficacy of afoxolaner (NexGard®, Merial) was evaluated against Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis in a field efficacy study, when administered orally at a minimum dose of 2.5 mg/kg to dogs naturally infested with the mites. Twenty mixed-breed dogs of either sex (6 males and 14 females), aged over 6 months and weighing 4–18 kg, were studied in this randomised controlled field efficacy trial. Dogs, naturally infested with Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis confirmed by skin scrapings collected prior to allocation, were randomly divided into two equal groups. Dogs in Group 1 were not treated. Dogs in Group 2 were treated on Days 0 and 28. On Days 0 (pre-treatment), 28 (pre-treatment) and 56, five skin scrapings of similar size were taken from different sites with lesions suggestive of sarcoptic mange. The extent of lesions was also recorded on Days 0, 28 and 56, and photographs were taken. Dogs treated orally with afoxolaner had significantly (p < 0.001) lower mite counts than untreated control animals at Days 28 and 56 with no mites recovered from treated dogs at these times (100% efficacy based on mite counts). In addition, dogs treated with NexGard had significantly (p < 0.05) better lesion resolution at Day 56 than Day 0; no treated dog showed pruritus compared to 7/10 dogs in the control group, 1/9 treated dogs had crusts compared to 5/10 controls and 8/9 dogs recovered 90% of hairs on lesions compared to 0/10 control dogs. PMID:27317462

  18. Factors associated with dog rabies immunisation status in Bamako, Mali.

    PubMed

    Mauti, S; Traoré, A; Hattendorf, J; Schelling, E; Wasniewski, M; Schereffer, J L; Zinsstag, J; Cliquet, F

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional survey in Bamako, Mali, to determine for the first time the seroprevalence of rabies virus antibodies in the dog population and people's knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) towards the disease and its control. Antibody detection was done with the fluorescent antibody virus neutralisation (FAVN) test, with a positivity threshold of 0.25IU/ml. We visited 2956 households in 2010 and 2011 and found 379 dogs in 279 households. Data were collected on 279 dog-owning households, on 1017 non-dog-owning households and on 311 dogs. A serum or plasma sample was collected from 98 dogs. For 26 dogs we had sufficient data to describe the antibody decline over time after rabies vaccination using a quadratic regression. Ninety percent of interviewed persons (95% CI: 85%-91%) knew about rabies. The majority of interviewees knew that rabies is transmitted from dogs to humans, and some of the characteristic clinical signs seen in rabid dogs (change of behaviour, biting, salivation) could be listed by the majority. When asked how people behave regarding a rabid dog, killing the animal was the most frequent answer (>70%). Most (65% of the non-dog-owners and 81% of the dog-owners) were aware that vaccination of dogs can prevent rabies, but only a minority of dog-owners could answer correctly at what age the dog should get a first rabies vaccination (i.e. at 3 months). There was also strong consensus among dog-owners that it is better to protect their dog from becoming rabid by vaccinating it rather than needing to treat a bitten person. Forty-five percent (n=306; 95% CI 38%-52%) of dogs were reported as vaccinated against rabies at least once, but less than half of these (59/136) had a valid vaccination card. When asked for reasons for non-vaccination, cost was the most frequent reason at 31% (95% CI: 21%-43%), while general negligence was mentioned by 15% (95% CI: 10%-24%). Approximately one third of dog-owners would not pay for vaccination. To reach

  19. Ophthalmic corticosteroid therapy: systemic effects in the dog.

    PubMed

    Glaze, M B; Crawford, M A; Nachreiner, R F; Casey, H W; Nafe, L A; Kearney, M T

    1988-01-01

    Degenerative myopathy suggestive of glucocorticoid-induced myopathy was diagnosed in a 10-year-old female Poodle X Pekingese dog with a history of progressive lameness. Electromyography revealed bizarre high-frequency discharges. Evidence of adrenal suppression was obtained in response to exogenous ACTH. The predominant source of corticosteroid was an ophthalmic preparation used in the management of keratoconjunctivitis sicca. Considering the apparent adverse effects of the corticosteroid in this case, a study was undertaken to determine the systemic effects, if any, induced by long-term ophthalmic administration of 0.1% dexamethasone suspension in healthy adult dogs. Dogs in one group (n = 5) were treated 4 times daily for 8 weeks, and dogs in another group (n = 5) were treated 4 times daily for 16 weeks. All dogs remained healthy throughout the study, but dexamethasone-treated dogs developed marked adrenal suppression, beginning the second week of treatment and intensifying throughout the treatment period. Histopathologic changes in the liver of dexamethasone-treated dogs included scattered foci of vacuolated hepatocytes, increased hepatocytic glycogen content, and ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes. Muscle specimens were histologically, histochemically, and electromyographically normal.

  20. Disease Precautions for Dog Walkers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools for K-12 Educators Disease Precautions for Dog Walkers CC by Tomwsulcer Whether you’re walking ... routes or durations may need to be altered. Dog bites Always be careful when walking a dog ...

  1. Lateral patellar luxation in dogs: a retrospective study of 65 dogs.

    PubMed

    Kalff, S; Butterworth, S J; Miller, A; Keeley, B; Baines, S; McKee, W M

    2014-01-01

    To report the signalment and clinical features of dogs with non-traumatic lateral patellar luxation and to report the complications and outcomes following surgery. A multicentre retrospective study was performed. Medical records were reviewed and the signalment, clinical features, and treatment of dogs presenting with lateral patellar luxation were recorded. In dogs treated surgically, the outcome and complications were investigated. Sixty-five dogs (95 stifles) were included; 39 were male and median age at presentation was 10 months. Breeds were classified as small (n = 6), medium (n = 23), large (n = 27), and giant (n = 9). Lateral patellar luxation was classified as grade I (n = 14), II (n = 41), III (n = 29), and IV (n = 11). Conformational abnormalities were noted in 34 stifles; genu valgum was the most common (n = 28). Higher-grade luxation was associated with a younger age at presentation (p = 0.032) and genu valgum (p = 0.01). Surgery was performed on 58 stifles, 22 of which sustained one or more complications; 16 complications were managed conservatively, four with implant removal and six with revision surgery. Surgeon-assessed outcome was good or excellent in 47 of the 51 dogs available for review. Non-traumatic lateral patellar luxation is a disease of predominantly medium and large breed dogs. It has several similar clinical features and can be surgically treated in a similar manner to medial patellar luxation with similar types of complications and outcomes expected.

  2. Comparative efficacy of the combination fipronil-(S)-methoprene and the combination permethrin-imidacloprid against Dermacentor reticulatus, the European dog tick, applied topically to dogs.

    PubMed

    Doyle, V; Beugnet, F; Carithers, D

    2005-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of two of the most widely veterinary-dispensed topical products for control of ticks on dogs: fipronil-(S)-methoprene and imidacloprid-permethrin. Eighteen healthy beagle dogs of both sexes were divided into three groups of six dogs. Group 1 served as the untreated control. Dogs in group 2 were treated with fipronil 10% + (S)-methoprene 9% w/v applied once on day 0, and those in group 3 were treated with imidacloprid 8.8% and permethrin 44% w/v, applied once on day 0. All dogs were infested with approximately 50 unfed Dermacentor reticulatus ticks on days 1, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42, and ticks remaining were counted and removed 48 hours after each infestation. The 48-hour efficacy of the fipronil-(S)-methoprene combination remained at 100% at all assessment points through and including day 37, declining to 95.30% on day 44. The 48-hour efficacy of the imidacloprid-permethrin combination peaked at 86.46% on day 9, decreased to 73.37% by the third week, and fell to 63.53% by the end of the study (day 44). Significantly (P < .05) fewer ticks were recovered from dogs treated with fipronil-(S)-methoprene or imidacloprid-permethrin than from untreated control dogs at each infestation. Notably, the dogs treated with fipronil-(S)-methoprene had significantly (P < .05) lower tick counts at every assessment than the dogs treated with imidacloprid-permethrin.

  3. Partial resection and omentalization: a new technique for management of prostatic retention cysts in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bray, J P; White, R A; Williams, J M

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the results of a new technique for management of prostatic retention cysts in dogs. A retrospective clinical study. Eighteen client-owned dogs. Dogs with prostatic retention cysts were treated by celiotomy and drainage of the cysts. The majority of the cyst wall was resected and residual cyst cavities were packed with omentum. All dogs were castrated. Long-term resolution of clinical signs was achieved in all dogs, with follow-up periods ranging from 6 to 42 months. Five dogs developed urinary incontinence postoperatively. This persisted in two dogs, but was well controlled with phenylpropanolamine. In the remaining dogs, the incontinence was transient and resolved within 2 months of surgery. Partial cyst resection combined with omentalization and castration was a simple and effective means of managing prostatic retention cysts. The incidence of serious complications, including postoperative urinary incontinence, was low.

  4. [Alimentary thyrotoxcicosis in two dogs].

    PubMed

    Kempker, Karsten; Güssow, Arne; Cook, Andrea M; Rick, Markus; Neiger, Reto

    2017-06-20

    Two dogs with increased thyroxin concentrations compatible with hyperthyroidism were referred for further examinations. One dog displayed clinical signs of hyperthyroidism. Based on history, clinical examination, laboratory evaluation and scintigraphy an alimentary thyrotoxicosis was identified. It was caused by feeding a BARF diet containing thyroidal tissue in one dog and by conventional dog food in the other patient. After changing the diet the clinical signs resolved in the affected dog. A control examination revealed thyroxin concentrations within the reference range in both dogs.

  5. Results of irradiation of infiltrative lipoma in 13 dogs.

    PubMed

    McEntee, M C; Page, R L; Mauldin, G N; Thrall, D E

    2000-01-01

    Thirteen dogs with infiltrative lipomas were treated with cobalt 60 radiation. Four of the thirteen dogs also received either whole body (n = 2) or combination local/whole body (n = 2) hyperthermia in conjunction with radiation therapy. Cytoreductive surgery was performed prior to radiation in 10 dogs, although only 3 dogs had microscopic disease at the time of radiation therapy. Dogs received a total dose of 45.6 Gy-63 Gy in 2.5-4 Gy/fraction on either a Monday/Wednesday/Friday schedule or on a daily Monday through Friday schedule. Twelve of the 13 dogs had computed tomography (CT) images acquired prior to irradiation. Survival time was determined from the time of completion of radiation therapy. Survival ranged from 6 months to 94 months, with a median (95% confidence interval) of 40 (18.5-77) months and a mean of 46.4 months. Only one dog was euthanized due to persistent signs related to the infiltrative lipoma at 6 months after the end of radiation therapy. There was no apparent difference in response based on whether or not the dogs received hyperthermia in conjunction with irradiation, although the numbers were too small to make any significant conclusions. It appears that dogs with infiltrative lipomas can benefit from external beam irradiation alone or in combination with surgery to effect long-term local tumor control.

  6. Prostate cancer in dogs: comparative and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Bruce E; Northrup, Nicole

    2009-05-01

    The canine prostate gland shares many morphological and functional similarities with the human prostate and dogs are the only other large mammals that commonly develop spontaneous prostate cancer. However, the incidence of prostate cancer is much lower in dogs and the precise cell of origin is not known. Dogs with prostate cancer usually present with advanced disease that does not respond to androgen deprivation therapy. Similar to humans, affected dogs often develop osteoblastic bone metastases in the pelvis and/or lumbar spine with associated pain and neurological deficits. Other clinical signs include weight loss, lethargy, and abnormal urination and/or defecation. Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation have been used to treat dogs with prostate cancer, but success has been limited by the location and aggressive nature of the disease. It is evident that better methods of early detection and more effective therapies are needed for prostate cancer in dogs and advanced prostate carcinoma in men. Dogs with naturally-occurring prostate cancer are relevant models for the disease in humans and pre-clinical studies of new diagnostics and therapies in dogs may benefit both humans and dogs with prostate cancer.

  7. Apparent tick paralysis by Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Otranto, Domenico; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Tarallo, Viviana Domenica; Ramos, Rafael Antonio do Nascimento; Stanneck, Dorothee; Baneth, Gad; de Caprariis, Donato

    2012-09-10

    Certain tick species including Ixodes holocyclus can inoculate neurotoxins that induce a rapid, ascending flaccid paralysis in animals. Rhipicephalus sanguineus, the most widespread tick of dogs, is recognized as a vector of several pathogens causing diseases in dogs and humans. A single report suggests its role as cause of paralysis in dogs. This study presents the clinical history of 14 young dogs heavily infested by R. sanguineus (intensity of infestation, 63-328) in an endemic area of southern Italy. During May to June of 2011, dogs were presented at the clinical examination with neurological signs of different degrees (e.g., hind limb ataxia, generalized lethargy, and difficulty in movements). All animals were treated with acaricides and by manual tick removal but ten of them died within a day, displaying neurological signs. The other 4 dogs recovered within 3 days with acaricidal and supportive treatment. Twelve dogs were positive by blood smear examination for Hepatozoon canis with a high parasitemia, two also for Babesia vogeli and two were negative for hemoparasites. Low-grade thrombocytopenia, hypoalbuminemia, and pancytopenia were the haematological alterations most frequently recorded. Other causes of neurological disease in dogs were excluded and the diagnosis of tick paralysis by R. sanguineus was confirmed (ex juvantibus) by early and complete recovery of 4 dogs following acaricidal treatment and tick removal.

  8. Hyperammonemic hepatic encephalopathy management through L-ornithin-L-aspartate administration in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin-Ok; Li, Qiang; Lee, Young-Heun; Han, Sei-Myoung; Hwang, Cheol-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Seventeen dogs were treated with L-ornithin-L-aspartate (LOLA; experimental group). Three dogs were treated with lactulose recognized therapy (control group). Following LOLA administration, 15 dogs experienced a significant decrease in ammonia level (p < 0.05) and showed clinical signs of improvement. However, there were no clinical signs of improvement in two dogs, even though the ammonia level decreased. Conversely, the clinical signs of the control group also improved and the ammonia level decreased, although these changes were not significant (p > 0.05). These results suggest that LOLA is an effective drug to treat hyperammonemia in veterinary medicine. PMID:26726023

  9. Tularaemia in Norwegian dogs.

    PubMed

    Nordstoga, Anne; Handeland, Kjell; Johansen, Tone Bjordal; Iversen, Lena; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Mattsson, Roland; Wik-Larssen, Kjersti; Afset, Jan Egil; Næverdal, Rune; Lund, Arve

    2014-10-10

    We describe tularaemia in a Norwegian dog caused by Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica. A Hamilton Hound and his owner developed tulaeremia after hunting an infected mountain hare (Lepus timidus). The dog showed signs of lethargy, anorexia and fever during a period two to four days after hunting and thereafter fully recovered. Its antibody titers increased 32-fold from one to three weeks post exposure. Thereafter, the titer declined and leveled off at moderate positive values up to one year after exposure (end of study). This is believed to be the first case report of clinical F. tularensis subspecies holarctica infection in a European dog. In 2011, enormous numbers of Norway lemmings (Lemmus lemmus) occurred in Finnmark, the northernmost county of Norway and many dogs caught and swallowed lemmings. Some of these dogs developed non-specific signs of disease and the owners consulted a veterinary surgeon, who suspected tularaemia. In order to investigate this hypothesis, serum samples from 33 dogs were examined for antibodies to F. tularensis. The dogs were allocated into three groups: Dogs from Finnmark that became sick (Group 1) or remained healthy following contact with lemmings (Group 2), and healthy control dogs from Oslo without known contact with lemmings (Group 3). All the serum samples were analyzed with a tube agglutination assay. Among dogs exposed to lemmings, 10/11 and 3/12 were antibody positive in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively, whereas none of the control dogs (n=10) were positive for antibodies against F. tularensis. These results strongly indicate that the non-specific disease seen in the dogs in Finnmark was linked to F. tularensis infection acquired through contact with lemmings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ankylosis and pseudoankylosis of the temporomandibular joint in 10 dogs (1993-2015).

    PubMed

    Strøm, Peter C; Arzi, Boaz; Cissell, Derek D; Verstraete, Frank J M

    2016-09-20

    To describe the clinical features and results of treatment of true ankylosis and pseudoankylosis of the temporomandibular joint in dogs. This study was a retrospective case series. Ten client-owned dogs that were presented for inability to open the mouth or a severely decreased range of motion of the temporomandibular joint were included. Information on the surgical procedures performed and the perioperative complications were documented. Three-dimensional printing of the skull was performed in four dogs. Two dogs were diagnosed with temporomandibular joint ankylosis and seven dogs with pseudoankylosis. One dog had evidence of combined temporomandibular joint ankylosis and pseudoankylosis. Of the seven dogs with pseudoankylosis, six had an osseous fusion involving the zygomatic arch and mandible. Surgical treatment was performed in nine dogs and a revision surgery was needed in one dog. Follow-up ranged from five months to eight years (mean: 48.6 months). Eight out of nine dogs that were treated surgically regained the ability to open their mouth, but six dogs never regained a fully normal temporomandibular joint range of motion. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis and pseudoankylosis are uncommon in the dog. Surgical treatment for temporomandibular joint ankylosis or pseudoankylosis in dogs is a successful option and carries a prognosis dependent on patient-specific abnormalities. Computed tomography complemented with three-dimensional printing is valuable for understanding the extent of abnormalities and for preoperative planning.

  11. Service dogs. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-09-05

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations concerning veterans in need of service dogs. Under this final rule, VA will provide to veterans with visual, hearing, or mobility impairments benefits to support the use of a service dog as part of the management of such impairments. The benefits include assistance with veterinary care, travel benefits associated with obtaining and training a dog, and the provision, maintenance, and replacement of hardware required for the dog to perform the tasks necessary to assist such veterans.

  12. Proteinuria in dogs and cats

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Leyenda; Langston, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    Proteinuria is defined as the presence of protein in the urine. Normally, circulating serum proteins are blocked by the glomerulus due to size and/or charge. Any small proteins that pass through a healthy glomerulus are reabsorbed by the renal tubules or broken down by renal tubular epithelial cells. Persistent proteinuria, in the absence of lower urinary tract disease or reproductive tract disease, is usually an indication of renal damage or dysfunction. Less commonly persistent proteinuria can be caused by increased circulating levels of low molecular weight proteins. This article reviews mechanisms of proteinuria in dogs and cats and discusses the importance of screening for and ultimately treating proteinuria. PMID:23204582

  13. Radial shock wave therapy in dogs with hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Alexandre N A; Ferreira, Marcio P; Hagen, Stefano C F; Patrício, Geni C F; Matera, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    The study aims were to evaluate the effects of radial shock wave therapy (RSWT) in dogs with hip osteoarthritis (OA) using clinical assessment and kinetic analysis. Thirty dogs diagnosed with bilateral hip OA and 30 healthy dogs were used. In OA dogs, one limb was randomly selected for treatment with RSWT while the contralateral limb served as an untreated control. Dogs were evaluated while walking on a pressure walkway. Peak vertical force (PVF) and vertical impulse (VI) were documented; symmetry index (SI) was also calculated. Blinded clinical evaluation was performed using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Owner perception data regarding levels of physical activity were also collected. The RSWT protocol (2000 pulses, 10 Hz, 2-3.4 bars) consisted of three weekly treatment sessions (days 1, 8 and 16). Follow-up data were collected 30, 60 and 90 days after the first session. Data were compared between time points, groups and limbs pairs. At the end of the experimental period, mean PVF and VI values had increased (25.9 to 27.6%BW and 2.1 to 12.7%BW × s respectively) in treated limbs, with no significant differences in control limbs; SI values suggest improvement. Mean PVF and VI remained lower in the treated compared to the healthy group following treatment. The VAS scores suggested improvement in pain and lameness in treated dogs. Owner perception data suggested improved levels of physical activity following treatment. Outcomes of this study suggested beneficial effects of RSWT in dogs with hip osteoarthritis.

  14. [Primary hyperparathyroidism in the dog. Diagnosis, therapy and postoperative management in 19 dogs].

    PubMed

    Jores, K; Kessler, M

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective evaluation of diagnosis and outcome in 20 dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism. In 20 dogs primary hyperparathyroidism was diagnosed and 19 patients were treated via parathyroidectomy, 10 additionally with partial thyroidectomy. Medical records of the dogs were reviewed for signalment, clinical features, laboratory findings and results of histopathologic examination. In some cases postsurgical rehabilitation of calcium metabolism required substitution with calcium and vitamin D preparations. Mean age of the dogs was 11.5 years. The most common clinical signs comprised polydipsia, polyuria, reduced activity, and stiff gait. Laboratory findings were moderate to extensive hypercalcaemia, low or low-normal serum phosphorus concentrations and normal or increased serum parathyroid hormone concentrations. None of the dogs had an elevated parathyroid hormone-related polypeptide level. Histological examination revealed 11 adenomas, six carcinomas and two glandular hyperplasias. Postsurgical management of calcium homeostasis was challenging in some cases. Tumours of the parathyroid gland can be easily treated by parathyroidectomy and usually have a good prognosis. With careful interpretation of laboratory findings of a patient presenting with hypercalcaemia and ruling out other causes of hypercalcaemia diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism can be easily achieved and successfully treated byparathyroidectomy.

  15. Pre-operative fibrous osteodystrophy and severe, refractory, post-operative hypocalcemia following parathyroidectomy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Jennifer M; Nuth, Ellie K; Byers, Christopher G; Thoesen, Mike; Armbrust, Laura J; Biller, David S; Harkin, Kenneth R

    2015-08-01

    A 13-year-old dog exhibited dramatic, radiographic osteopenia consistent with fibrous osteodystrophy secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism. Following parathyroidectomy, the dog developed severe, prolonged hypocalcemia, but was successfully treated and discharged 32 d after surgery. A variety of factors may have contributed to this dog's hypocalcemia including hypoparathyroidism and hungry bone syndrome.

  16. High detection rate of dog circovirus in diarrheal dogs.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Han-Siang; Lin, Ting-Han; Wu, Hung-Yi; Lin, Lee-Shuan; Chung, Cheng-Shu; Chiou, Ming-Tang; Lin, Chao-Nan

    2016-06-17

    Diarrhea is one of the most common clinical symptoms reported in companion animal clinics. Dog circovirus (DogCV) is a new mammalian circovirus that is considered to be a cause of alimentary syndromes such as diarrhea, vomiting and hemorrhagic enteritis. DogCV has previously only been identified in the United States, Italy, Germany (GeneBank accession number: KF887949) and China (GeneBank accession number: KT946839). Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of DogCV in Taiwan and to explore the correlation between diarrhea and DogCV infection. Clinical specimens were collected between 2012 and 2014 from 207 dogs suffering from diarrhea and 160 healthy dogs. In this study, we developed a sensitive and specific SYBR Green-based real-time PCR assays to detected DogCV in naturally infected animals. Of the analyzed fecal samples from diarrheal dogs and health dogs, 58 (28.0 %) and 19 (11.9 %), respectively, were DogCV positive. The difference in DogCV prevalence was highly significant (P = 0.0002755) in diarrheal dogs. This is the first study to reveal that DogCV is currently circulating in domestic dogs in Taiwan and to demonstrate its high detection rate in dogs with diarrhea.

  17. Do Dogs Know Bifurcations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minton, Roland; Pennings, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    When a dog (in this case, Tim Pennings' dog Elvis) is in the water and a ball is thrown downshore, it must choose to swim directly to the ball or first swim to shore. The mathematical analysis of this problem leads to the computation of bifurcation points at which the optimal strategy changes.

  18. Do Dogs Know Bifurcations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minton, Roland; Pennings, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    When a dog (in this case, Tim Pennings' dog Elvis) is in the water and a ball is thrown downshore, it must choose to swim directly to the ball or first swim to shore. The mathematical analysis of this problem leads to the computation of bifurcation points at which the optimal strategy changes.

  19. Intranasal administration of oxytocin promotes social play in domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Romero, Teresa; Nagasawa, Miho; Mogi, Kazutaka; Hasegawa, Toshikazu; Kikusui, Takefumi

    2015-01-01

    In a recent paper,(1) we examined whether oxytocin in the domestic dog modulates the maintenance of close social bonds in non-reproductive contexts. We found that exogenous oxytocin promotes positive social behaviors not only toward conspecifics, but also toward human partners. Here we examined in further detail the effect that oxytocin manipulation has on social play. When sprayed with oxytocin, subjects initiated play sessions more often and played for longer periods of time than when sprayed with saline. Furthermore, after oxytocin nasal intake dogs displayed play signals more often than after saline administration, suggesting that oxytocin enhances dogs' play motivation. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that oxytocin promotes social play in the domestic dog. We use these results to hypothesize on the potential therapeutic use of oxytocin for promoting social behaviors and treating social deficits in the domestic dog.

  20. Dog bite injuries to the hand.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Marianne; Dahlin, Lars B

    2011-04-01

    Dog bites to the hand and forearm are common. Although bites are usually minor, aggressive dogs may cause extensive bites developing to a public health problem. In a database review of dog bites to the hand applied to Emergency Department or to the Department of Hand Surgery in Malmö, Sweden 2008-2009, we found 81 cases [42 men and 39 women; median age 45 (range 2-88) years]. Three of 81 (4%) were children younger than 11 years. Six of the 81 (8%) patients included had bilateral injuries. Seventy-five patients were treated at the Department of Hand Surgery, where 31 of 75 (41%) were admitted to hospital in 181 days (median 4, range 1-20). The injuries included lacerations of the skin, muscle, and tendons as well as fractures, arterial and nerve injuries, and traumatic amputations of fingers. Some cases developed infections, necrosis of muscle and skin, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and even sepsis. A total of 96 operations were done for 51 patients (median 1, range 1-8) and the patients had 343 (median 2, range 0-22) outpatient visits. Almost half of the bites occurred when the patients was trying to separate two fighting dogs. The size of the lacerations increased with the size of the dog. Serious infections were found independently of size of dog. We suggest that education of owners and the public, reporting of all bites, and control of animals are some of the actions to reduce the number of attacks. At least one serious case could have been prevented if the dog had been put down after a previous serious attack.

  1. Experimental acute toxicity of xylitol in dogs.

    PubMed

    Xia, Z; He, Y; Yu, J

    2009-10-01

    The Cases of xylitol poisoning in dogs are increasing as a result of ingestion of xylitol-containing products. Eighteen adult, clinically normal Pekingese dogs were orally dosed with 1 or 4 g/kg xylitol in aqueous solution. Blood samples were collected before and after dosing. Plasma insulin concentrations of both treated groups rose sharply from 20 min after xylitol dosing, peaking at 40 min. Hypoglycemia followed the increase in insulin concentration, with blood glucose values started to decrease 30 min after dosing. Other plasma biochemistry changes associated with xylitol administration were increased alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities, hypophosphatemia, hypokalemia, and hypercalcemia. Plasma sodium and chloride concentrations remained normal. This study established a biochemical basis for diagnosis and treatment of xylitol poisoning in dogs.

  2. Magnet ingestion in dogs: two cases.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Kristina; Hottinger, Heidi; Kahn, Tony; Ngo, Mary; Ben-Amotz, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Two dogs that had ingested foreign bodies were presented with vomiting. The foreign bodies appeared as metal and dense on abdominal radiographs. Abdominal exploratory identified intestinal perforation in one case and gastrointestinal tissue trapped between the two foreign bodies adhered to each other in the second case. The foreign bodies were identified as magnets in one case and magnets and other metallic foreign bodies in the second case. Both dogs had excellent outcomes following surgical intervention. These cases demonstrate the danger of tissue entrapment between the foreign bodies as a result of the magnetic attraction between two objects. Dogs that are presented with a history of or are suspect for ingesting multiple magnets or a magnet and metal foreign bodies should be treated with surgical intervention because of the risk of gastrointestinal perforation as a result of magnetic attraction between the foreign bodies.

  3. Dental follicle infection following a dog bite.

    PubMed

    Wright, G; Muir, M L; Bryan, R; Smith, A J; Hosey, M T

    2006-03-01

    Animal bite wounds and their subsequent infection are relatively common. Incidence rates for dog bites are significantly higher among children aged 0-9 years, especially among boys. Although bite wounds may initially look innocuous, they frequently lead to serious infection with a potential for life-threatening complications. The microbiology of dog bite wounds is usually polymicrobial, typically including anaerobes, Staphylococcus aureus and Pasteurella species. A case is described of a 22-month-old boy who, subsequent to a dog bite over the left maxilla, suffered infection of the dental follicle of the primary maxillary canine with Pasteurella multocida. The infection proved difficult to treat, requiring several attempts at incision and drainage of the abscess together with systemic antibiotics, and resulted in the eventual loss of the tooth.

  4. Heartworm in dogs in Canada in 1989

    PubMed Central

    Slocombe, J. Owen D.

    1990-01-01

    In late November 1989, 1732 clinics and institutional veterinarians were sent a questionnaire to assess the status of Dirofilaria immitis, and 51.7% responded. Of 247,716 dogs tested, 394 had D. immitis microfilariae and 51 were amicrofilaremic for a total of 445 cases and heartworm prevalence of 0.17%. Most (408) of these dogs had no preventive medication and the prevalence among dogs tested and unprotected was 1.01%. That prevalence was considerably higher in endemic areas. Thirty-seven dogs with heartworm had preventive medication. Heartworm was most frequent in companion dogs over three years of age maintained outdoors in rural areas. About 75% of the cases had never left Canada, 26% had clinical signs and 125 were not treated. Heartworm was reported from British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, but 383 cases were in Ontario. South-western Ontario was the primary focus of infection. There were 33 cases in Quebec and 24 in Manitoba, mainly found in and around Metropolitan Montreal and Winnipeg respectively. PMID:17423627

  5. Traumatic lung injury attributed to tornadic activity-induced barometric pressure changes in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Cichocki, Brandy N; Dugat, Danielle R; Snider, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 7-year-old castrated male Italian Greyhound (dog 1) and an approximately 1-year-old female Labrador Retriever (dog 2) were evaluated because of respiratory distress 8 and 10 days, respectively, after a tornado. CLINICAL FINDINGS No obvious external injuries were identified auscultation revealed decreased bronchovesicular sounds in the affected hemithorax of both dogs. Clinicopathologic changes were mild, with evidence of inflammation in both dogs. Thoracic radiography of both dogs revealed pneumothorax and pleural effusion with effacement of the diaphragm; findings on CT included severe pulmonary atelectasis of affected lung lobes with normal bronchial tree configurtion and no evidence of diaphragmatic hernia. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Exploratory thoracotomy of both dogs confirmed CT findings Pulmonary parenchymal damage consistent with a large rupture was found in both patients. A large hematoma was adhered to the ruptured lung lobe of dog 1. Grossly affected lung tissue was removed; histologic examination revealed atelectasis, pulmonary fib osis, thrombosis, and minimal (dog 1) to marked (dog 2) inflammation Microbial culture of lung tissue yielded no growth for dog 1 and Streptococcus spp and Escherichia coli susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for dog 2. Dog 1 had a recurrence of pneumothorax treated by drainage with a thoracostomy tube 1 month after surgery. Eighteen months after surgery, both dogs were reportedly doing well. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Development of clinical signs after a tornado, together with clinical, diagnostic imaging, surgical, and histologic findings led to a presumptive diagnosis of pulmonary barotrauma for both dogs. Long-term outcome for these dogs, treated at a referral hospital, was good.

  6. Perioperative morbidity and outcome of esophageal surgery in dogs and cats: 72 cases (1993-2013).

    PubMed

    Sutton, Jessie S; Culp, William T N; Scotti, Katherine; Seibert, Rachel L; Lux, Cassie N; Singh, Ameet; Wormser, Chloe; Runge, Jeffrey J; Schmiedt, Chad W; Corrie, Jessica; Phillips, Heidi; Selmic, Laura E; Nucci, Daniel J; Mayhew, Philipp D; Kass, Philip H

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate perioperative morbidity and outcome in dogs and cats undergoing esophageal surgery. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 63 client-owned dogs and 9 client-owned cats. PROCEDURES Medical records of dogs and cats that underwent esophageal surgery were reviewed for information on signalment, history, results of preoperative diagnostic testing, condition treated, details of surgery, intraoperative complications, and postoperative complications. Long-term follow-up data were obtained via veterinarian and client telephone conversations. The relationship between complications and survival to hospital discharge was evaluated by means of regression analysis. RESULTS The most common indication for surgical intervention was an esophageal foreign body in dogs (50/63 [79%]) and esophageal stricture in cats (3/9). Complications were documented in 54% (34/63) of dogs and 3 of 9 cats. The most common immediate postoperative complications were respiratory in nature (9 dogs, 1 cat). Partial esophagectomy and resection with anastomosis were significantly associated with the development of immediate postoperative complications in dogs. The most common delayed postoperative complications were persistent regurgitation (7 dogs) and esophageal stricture formation (3 dogs, 1 cat). For dogs, a mass lesion and increasing lesion size were significantly associated with the development of delayed postoperative complications. Six dogs (10%) and 1 cat died or were euthanized prior to discharge, and pneumomediastinum and leukopenia were negative prognostic factors for dogs being discharged from the hospital. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this study suggested that the short-term prognosis for dogs and cats that survive surgery for treatment of esophageal lesions is favorable, with 90% of patients discharged from the hospital (57/63 dogs; 8/9 cats). However, dogs treated for more extensive esophageal lesions as well as those undergoing esophagectomy or

  7. Effects of flunixin and flunixin plus prednisone on the gastrointestinal tract of dogs.

    PubMed

    Dow, S W; Rosychuk, R A; McChesney, A E; Curtis, C R

    1990-07-01

    Flunixin meglumine has been reported to induce gastrointestinal lesions in dogs when administered at therapeutic dosages. We administered flunixin meglumine to dogs daily for 10 days to assess the effect of this drug on the gastrointestinal tract. We also evaluated the possibility of corticosteroid potentiation of gastrointestinal toxicosis by concurrent administration of prednisone to 1 group of dogs. Dogs were monitored for gastrointestinal toxicosis by means of serial endoscopic evaluation, measurement of fecal occult blood, PCV, and total solid concentration, and by physical examination. There were 3 treatment groups of 5 dogs each. Group-1 dogs were given 2.2 mg of flunixin meglumine/kg daily, in 2 divided doses IM; group-2 dogs were given 4.4 mg of flunixin meglumine/kg daily, in 2 divided doses IM; and group-3 dogs were given 2.2 mg of flunixin meglumine/kg daily, in 2 divided doses IM plus 1.1 mg of prednisone/kg/d orally, in 2 divided doses. A fourth group of 5 dogs served as a control group. Endoscopically visible gastric mucosal lesions developed in all treated dogs within 4 days of initiating treatment. Lesions first developed in the gastric pylorus and antrum and lesions at these sites were more severe than those observed elsewhere. Dogs treated with flunixin meglumine plus prednisone developed the earliest and most severe lesions; lesion scores in group-2 dogs were higher than those in group-1 dogs. All dogs treated had occult blood in their feces by day 5 and its presence appeared to correlate more closely with endoscopic findings than did physical examination findings or changes in values for PCV or total solids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Technique of, and complications attributable to, repeated hyperosmotic blood-brain barrier disruption in dogs.

    PubMed

    Culver, B; Inzana, K; Jones, J; Troy, G; Kroll, R; Culver, B; Jortner, B

    1998-11-01

    To design a repeatable technique for reversible, hyperosmotic blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) in dogs and evaluate clinical effects of multiple BBBD. 10 healthy adult dogs. Using fluoroscopic guidance, an arterial catheter was directed into the internal carotid artery via the femoral artery of 10 dogs. Blood-brain barrier disruption was achieved in 5 dogs, using intracarotid infusion of mannitol. Five control dogs received only saline solution. After recovery, dogs were monitored for clinical signs of disease before a second, nonsurvival procedure was performed 2 to 3 weeks later. BBBD was estimated, using computed tomographic (CT) densitometry values, as well as Evan's blue dye staining on necropsy specimens. Seven dogs completed the entire study. Two treatment dogs were lost after the first infusion because of deteriorating neurologic function attributed to CNS edema and increased intracranial pressure. One control dog was lost because of vessel wall damage during catheterization. The remaining dogs had only transient neurologic, ocular, and vasculature injuries. Successful BBBD was documented in all treated dogs by use of CT and Evan's blue dye evaluation. Repeated catheterization of the internal carotid artery and disruption of the blood- brain barrier is possible in dogs. Refinement of this technique would be useful not only for improved delivery of chemotherapeutic agents in patients with brain tumors, but also would allow further investigation of new treatments involving genetically engineered retroviruses and monoclonal antibodies.

  9. Brucella canis endophthalmitis in 3 dogs: clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, Eric C; Landry, Matthew P; Stokol, Tracy; Kern, Thomas J; Messick, Joanne B

    2009-01-01

    To describe historical, clinical and diagnostic features of dogs with Brucella canis endophthalmitis and the response to medical therapy. Three dogs with naturally acquired B. canis endophthalmitis. Dogs were treated symptomatically with topical ophthalmic anti-inflammatories and a novel antimicrobial protocol that included doxycycline, enrofloxacin, rifampin and streptomycin. All dogs presented with chronic or recurrent uveitis in the absence of overt systemic disease. Clinical ophthalmologic abnormalities were unilateral in each dog and included mild-to-moderate anterior uveitis, iris hyperpigmentation, marked vitreal infiltrates, and multifocal chorioretinitis. Dogs were diagnosed with canine brucellosis serologically and by blood culture (n = 2 dogs) or polymerase chain reaction of aqueous humor and blood (n = 1 dog). Active ocular inflammation resolved in all dogs during treatment, with preservation of vision in 2 dogs. Following treatment, B. canis could not be cultured from blood samples and serological values declined with seronegativity achieved in all dogs after a median of 96 weeks (range: 36-112 weeks) of therapy. Brucella canis infection should be included in the differential diagnosis for dogs with intraocular inflammation, regardless of previous history or neuter status. This is the first report of apparently successful medical therapy of canine brucellosis with ocular involvement.

  10. Impact of Toceranib/Piroxicam/Cyclophosphamide Maintenance Therapy on Outcome of Dogs with Appendicular Osteosarcoma following Amputation and Carboplatin Chemotherapy: A Multi-Institutional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mathie, Tamra; Stingle, Nicole; Portela, Roberta; Pennell, Michael L.; Clifford, Craig A.; Rosenberg, Mona P.; Vail, David M.; Williams, Laurel E.; Cronin, Kim L.; Wilson-Robles, Heather; Borgatti, Antonella; Henry, Carolyn J.; Bailey, Dennis B.; Locke, Jennifer; Northrup, Nicole C.; Crawford-Jakubiak, Martin; Gill, Virginia L.; Klein, Mary K.; Ruslander, David M.; Thamm, Doug H.; Phillips, Brenda; Post, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that the addition of toceranib to metronomic cyclophosphamide/piroxicam therapy would significantly improve disease-free interval (DFI) and overall survival (OS) in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma (OSA) following amputation and carboplatin chemotherapy. Methods and Findings This was a randomized, prospective clinical trial in which dogs with OSA free of gross metastatic disease (n = 126) received carboplatin chemotherapy (4 doses) following amputation. On study entry, dogs were randomized to receive piroxicam/cyclophosphamide with or without toceranib (n = 63 each) after completing chemotherapy. Patient demographics were not significantly different between both groups. During or immediately following carboplatin chemotherapy, 32 dogs (n = 13 toceranib; n = 19 control) developed metastatic disease, and 13 dogs left the study due to other medical conditions or owner preference. Following carboplatin chemotherapy, 81 dogs (n = 46 toceranib; n = 35 control) received the metronomic treatment; 35 dogs (n = 20 toceranib; n = 15 control) developed metastatic disease during the maintenance therapy, and 26 dogs left the study due to other medical conditions or owner preference. Nine toceranib-treated and 11 control dogs completed the study without evidence of metastatic disease 1-year following amputation. Toceranib-treated dogs experienced more episodes of diarrhea, neutropenia and weight loss than control dogs, although these toxicities were low-grade and typically resolved with supportive care. More toceranib-treated dogs (n = 8) were removed from the study for therapy-associated adverse events compared to control dogs (n = 1). The median DFI for control and toceranib treated dogs was 215 and 233 days, respectively (p = 0.274); the median OS for control and toceranib treated dogs was 242 and 318 days, respectively (p = 0.08). The one year survival rate for control dogs was 35% compared to 38% for dogs receiving toceranib. Conclusions The

  11. Squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal planum in 17 dogs.

    PubMed

    Lascelles, B D; Parry, A T; Stidworthy, M F; Dobson, J M; White, R A

    2000-10-21

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal planum was diagnosed in 17 dogs over a period of 11 years. Ulceration, bleeding and sneezing were the most common clinical signs. One dog had cytological evidence of metastasis to the local lymph node. The dogs were treated by surgical resection, fractionated megavoltage irradiation, or a combination of the two. Surgical resection gave the most favourable results; four of six dogs were cured but a recurrence of the tumour was predicted in the other two on the basis of incomplete or marginal resection. Radiotherapy alone was not as effective; one of four dogs was cured, and the tumour recurred in the others within 24 weeks (median eight weeks). Combined surgical resection and radiotherapy did not produce a cure in any of the seven remaining dogs, and the tumour recurred within 12 weeks (median nine weeks). Three dogs had cytological evidence of lymph node metastasis when the tumour recurred. The dogs' prognosis was adversely affected by the interval between their initial examination and treatment, but there was no apparent association between the histological grade of the tumour and the clinical outcome.

  12. Stereotactic radiosurgery and fracture fixation in 6 dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Covey, Jennifer L; Farese, James P; Bacon, Nicholas J; Schallberger, Sandra P; Amsellem, Pierre; Cavanaugh, Ryan P; Milner, Rowan J

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate clinical outcome of dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma (OSA) treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and subsequent internal fixation of a pathologic fracture. Retrospective case series. Dogs with spontaneous-occurring appendicular OSA (n = 6). Medical records (May 2002-January 2008) of dogs that had SRS for appendicular OSA were reviewed. Dogs were included if they had a pathologic fracture either before or after SRS and were treated with internal fixation. Signalment, history, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, diagnostic imaging findings, biopsy results, surgical complications, number of surgeries, adjuvant therapy, development of metastatic disease and cause of death were recorded. Six dogs met the inclusion criteria. Two dogs had a pathologic fracture at admission and 4 dogs developed a fracture after SRS with a mean ± SD time to fracture development of 6.25 ± 1.65 months. The first 3 fractures were repaired using an open approach and the latter three using minimally invasive percutaneous osteosynthesis (MIPO). Infection occurred in 5 dogs and implant failure in 3. Limb function was subjectively assessed as good in all dogs when the implants were stable and infections were subclinical. Survival times ranged from 364-897 days; 1 dog was lost to follow-up. Fracture repair using internal fixation should be considered a viable limb-sparing alternative for pathologic fractures that have been treated with SRS. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  13. Effect of Metoclopramide on the Incidence of Early Postoperative Aspiration Pneumonia in Dogs with Acquired Idiopathic Laryngeal Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Milovancev, Milan; Townsend, Katy; Spina, Jason; Hurley, Connie; Ralphs, S Christopher; Trumpatori, Brian; Seguin, Bernard; Jermyn, Kieri

    2016-07-01

    Evaluate the effect of a perioperative intravenous continuous rate infusion (CRI) of metoclopramide on the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in the short term postoperative period in dogs undergoing unilateral arytenoid lateralization. Prospective, randomized, multi-center clinical trial. 61 client-owned dogs with idiopathic laryngeal paralysis and normal preoperative thoracic radiographs. All dogs underwent unilateral arytenoid lateralization with a uniform anesthetic, analgesic, and management protocol. Dogs in the treatment group received an intravenous CRI of metoclopramide for 24 hours perioperative. All dogs were assessed for clinical signs of aspiration pneumonia based on the results of physical examination and owner interview up to the point of suture removal (10-14 days postoperative). Any dog with suspected aspiration pneumonia had thoracic radiographs performed. Six dogs developed aspiration pneumonia in the short term postoperative period (2/28 control dogs and 4/33 treated dogs), accounting for an overall frequency of 10% with no significant difference between control and treated dogs. No variables measured in the study were significantly different between control and treated dogs. Perioperative metoclopramide, at the doses used in this study, did not affect the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in the short term postoperative period in dogs with idiopathic laryngeal paralysis undergoing unilateral arytenoid lateralization. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  14. BigDog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Playter, R.; Buehler, M.; Raibert, M.

    2006-05-01

    BigDog's goal is to be the world's most advanced quadruped robot for outdoor applications. BigDog is aimed at the mission of a mechanical mule - a category with few competitors to date: power autonomous quadrupeds capable of carrying significant payloads, operating outdoors, with static and dynamic mobility, and fully integrated sensing. BigDog is about 1 m tall, 1 m long and 0.3 m wide, and weighs about 90 kg. BigDog has demonstrated walking and trotting gaits, as well as standing up and sitting down. Since its creation in the fall of 2004, BigDog has logged tens of hours of walking, climbing and running time. It has walked up and down 25 & 35 degree inclines and trotted at speeds up to 1.8 m/s. BigDog has walked at 0.7 m/s over loose rock beds and carried over 50 kg of payload. We are currently working to expand BigDog's rough terrain mobility through the creation of robust locomotion strategies and terrain sensing capabilities.

  15. Glomerular Lipidosis in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Kohnken, Rebecca A; Amerman, Hayley; Brown, Cathy A; Furrow, Eva; Lees, George E; Cianciolo, Rachel E

    2017-09-01

    Glomerular lipidosis (GL) is characterized by dilated glomerular capillary loops containing lipid-laden cells (foam cells). Previously, GL was considered to be an incidental finding because affected dogs were typically not azotemic. However, the International Renal Interest Society staging system for canine chronic kidney disease has increased the awareness of other clinical parameters (eg, proteinuria and hypertension) that should be included in the assessment of renal function. As such, the aim of this study was to determine clinical abnormalities and concurrent renal lesions in dogs with GL. GL was identified in renal biopsies from 46 dogs evaluated by the International Veterinary Renal Pathology Service. GL was the sole diagnosis in 5 of 46 cases (11%), all of which were proteinuric. All 5 dogs had at least 1 additional clinicopathologic abnormality consistent with renal disease, including hypertension (4), azotemia (3), and/or hypoalbuminemia (2). The remaining 41 dogs had GL in combination with other glomerular lesions, the most common being focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (16, 35%), lesions consistent with juvenile nephropathy (8, 17%), and glomerular amyloidosis (5, 11%). Overall, dogs with severe GL were younger than were those with mild GL ( P < .001). The percentage of glomeruli affected by GL differed by concurrent diagnoses ( P = .034), with the highest percentage of affected glomeruli in dogs with GL alone or those with concurrent juvenile nephropathy. These findings suggest that GL should be a recognized histologic phenotype of glomerular injury associated with clinical renal dysfunction and/or juvenile nephropathies.

  16. Dogs Discriminate Identical Twins

    PubMed Central

    Pinc, Ludvík; Bartoš, Luděk; Reslová, Alice; Kotrba, Radim

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown variation among experimental attempts to establish whether human monozygotic twins that are genetically identical also have identical individual scents. In none of the cases were the dogs able to distinguish all the individual scents of monozygotic twins living in the same environment if the scents were presented to them separately. Ten specially trained police German Shepherd dogs of three Czech Republic Police Regional Headquarters were used for scent identification in our study. The dogs were supposed to match scents of two monozygotic pairs (5 and 7 years old) and two dizygotic twin pairs (8 and 13 years old). Scents were collected on cotton squares stored in glass jars. Dog handlers were blind to the experiment details. In each trial (line-up), one scent was used as a starting scent and the dog was then sent to determine if any of the 7 presented glass jars contained a matching scent. Scents of children of similar ages were used as distractors. In the matching procedure, the dogs matched correctly the scent of one twin with the other, as well as two scents collected from every single identical and non-identical twin to prove their efficacy and likewise, the presence of the matching twin scent in any given glass jar. All dogs in all trials distinguished correctly the scents of identical as well as non-identical twins. All dogs similarly matched positively two scents collected from the same individuals. Our findings indicated that specially trained German Shepherd dogs are able to distinguish individual scents of identical twins despite the fact that they live in the same environment, eat the same food and even if the scents are not presented to them simultaneously. PMID:21698282

  17. Balloon dilation of congenital supravalvular pulmonic stenosis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Treseder, Julia R.

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty is considered the standard of care for treatment of valvular pulmonic stenosis, a common congenital defect in dogs. Supravalvular pulmonic stenosis is a rare form of pulmonic stenosis in dogs and standard treatment has not been established. Although, there have been reports of successful treatment of supravalvular pulmonic stenosis with surgical and stenting techniques, there have been no reports of balloon dilation to treat dogs with this condition. Here, a case of supravalvular pulmonic stenosis diagnosed echocardiographically and angiographically in which a significant reduction in pressure gradient was achieved with balloon dilation alone is presented. PMID:27297421

  18. Major dog attack injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, N E; Chochinov, H; Fraser, V

    1983-10-01

    Children are frequently admitted to a hospital with injuries sustained as a result of being attacked by a dog. Over a 5-year period (1977 to 1981), 57 such patients have been treated at the Winnipeg Children's Hospital. Half of the dog attack victims were 5 years or younger with injuries occurring more often in boys (55%). The majority of patients (95%) sustained puncture wounds and lacerations to the face (77%) and extremities (23%). In three of the cases, the dog attack victims presented with peritonitis secondary to bowel perforation and were treated successfully. A fourth child died as a result of his injuries prior to reaching the hospital. In the past, much attention has been focused on soft tissue injuries and their cosmetic repair. It is also important to recognize that the small child is particularly vulnerable to dog maulings from which the injuries sustained may be life threatening or lethal. Prevention seems to be the only rational approach to solving this problem.

  19. Reduction in accumulation of plaque, stain, and calculus in dogs by dietary means.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L; Logan, E; Finney, O; Lowry, S; Smith, M; Hefferren, J; Simone, A; Richardson, D

    1995-12-01

    We conducted 215 evaluations for plaque, stain, and calculus in 120 dogs at two research sites. Dogs were balanced in groups of five according to baseline plaque index scores; groups were randomly assigned to treatment or control dietary regimens. Dental cleanings were done on Day 0. Dogs in the treatment group were fed a food formulated to reduce accumulation of plaque, stain, and calculus. Control group dogs were fed a commercially available dry dog food. No other foods, treats, or snacks were given to either group. We graded 22 teeth for plaque accumulation on Day 7 and for stain and calculus accumulation on Day 21. Six trials were conducted and the results reported as a combined mean for all treatment and control groups. Dogs fed the treatment food had significantly less plaque, stain, and calculus accumulation (p = 0.001) than dogs fed the control food. Plaque, stain, and calculus accumulation can be reduced by dietary means.

  20. Do domestic dogs show any evidence of being able to count?

    PubMed

    West, Rebecca E; Young, Robert J

    2002-09-01

    Numerical competence has been demonstrated in a wide range of animal species. The level of numerical abilities shown ranges from simple relative numerousness judgements to true counting. In this study we used the preferential looking technique to test whether 11 pet dogs could count. The dogs were presented with three simple calculations: "1+1=2"; "1+1=1"; and "1+1=3". These calculations were performed by presenting the dogs with treats that were placed behind a screen that allowed manipulation of the outcome of the calculation. When the dogs expected the outcome they spent the same amount of time looking at the result of the calculation as they did on the initial presentation. However, when the result was unexpected dogs spent significantly longer looking at the outcome of the calculation. The results suggest that the dogs were anticipating the outcome of the calculations they observed, thus suggesting that dogs may have a rudimentary ability to count.

  1. The diagnostic approach to fever of unknown origin in dogs.

    PubMed

    Flood, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Identifying the cause of a fever of unknown origin (FUO) in dogs presents a considerable diagnostic challenge. The diagnostic workup can be frustrating for veterinarians and clients, especially when it fails to reach a final diagnosis after extensive testing. Fortunately, most causes of FUO can be found or treated successfully. This article discusses FUO in dogs and provides information about common causes, the diagnostic approach, and potential treatments.

  2. North American snake envenomation in the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, Lyndi L; Brunker, Jill

    2011-11-01

    Snake envenomation can be a cause of significant morbidity in dogs and cats in North America. Being familiar with the venomous snakes in your area and understanding the mechanisms of action of their venom will allow for successful treatment of envenomation cases. Treatment of snake envenomation revolves around supportive care in mild to moderate cases and venom neutralization with antivenom in severe cases. Dogs and cats envenomated by North American snakes have a good prognosis if treated appropriately.

  3. [A worm infection in the skin of a dog. First autochthonous Dirofilaria repens infection ofa dog in the Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Overgaauw, P A M; van Dijk, E P

    2009-11-15

    The history of an 18-month-old English bulldog with a painful lump in the skin on its thigh is described. After opening the nodule a few Dirofilaria repens nematodes were found. Oval-shaped transparent eggs with moving larvae were seen microscopically. The dog was treated with milbemycin and made a complete recovery. The dog had never been abroad, but 6 months earlier in early May had been on a campsite in the middle of the Netherlands where many mosquitoes were present. This is the first described case of an autochthonous D. repens infection of a dog in the Netherlands.

  4. Multi-Center Retrospective Evaluation of Screw and Polymethylmethacrylate Constructs for Atlantoaxial Fixation in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Stout Steele, Megan W; Hodshon, Amy W; Hopkins, Andrew L; Tracy, Gaemia M; Cohen, Noah D; Kerwin, Sharon C; Boudreau, C Elizabeth; Thomas, William B; Mankin, Joseph M; Levine, Jonathan M

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate outcome and adverse events following ventral stabilization of the atlantoaxial (AA) joint in dogs with clinical AA subluxation using screw/polymethymethacrylate (PMMA) constructs in a retrospective, multi-center cohort study. Historical cohort study. 35 client-owned dogs. Medical records from 3 institutions were reviewed to identify dogs with AA subluxation treated with ventral screw and PMMA constructs. Data on signalment, pre- and postoperative neurologic status, imaging performed, and adverse events were retrieved. Neurologic examination data were abstracted to generate a modified Frankel score at admission, discharge, and re-examination. Telephone interview of owners >180 days postoperative was conducted. Thirty-five dogs with AA subluxation treated with ventral screw/PMMA constructs were included. Most dogs were young (median age 1 year), small breed dogs with acute onset of neurologic signs (median duration 22.5 hours). Most dogs were non-ambulatory at the time of admission (median modified Frankel score 3). Adverse events were identified in 15/35 dogs including 9 dogs with major adverse events. Four dogs required a second surgery due to vertebral canal violation (n = 2) or implant failure (n = 2). Re-examination at 4-6 weeks postoperative reported 15/28 dogs with improved neurologic status and 19/28 dogs were ambulatory. Telephone follow-up was available for 23/35 dogs with 23/23 reported as ambulatory (median follow-up 390 days). Ventral application of screw and PMMA constructs for AA subluxation, as described here, is associated with clinical improvement in the majority of dog. Major adverse events are infrequent and the technique is considered relatively safe. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  5. Dog and owner demographic characteristics and dog personality trait associations.

    PubMed

    Kubinyi, Eniko; Turcsán, Borbála; Miklósi, Adám

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships between four personality traits (calmness, trainability, dog sociability and boldness) of dogs (Canis familiaris) and dog and owner demographics on a large sample size with 14,004 individuals. German speaking dog owners could characterize their dog by filling out a form on the Internet. There were five demographic variables for dogs and nine for owners. Two statistical methods were used for investigating the associations between personality and demographic traits: the more traditional general linear methods and regression trees that are ideal for analyzing non-linear relationships in the structure of the data. The results showed that calmness is influenced primarily by the dog's age, the neutered status, the number of different types of professional training courses (e.g. obedience, agility) the dog had experienced and the age of acquisition. The least calm dogs were less than 2.5 years old, neutered and acquired after the first 12 weeks of age, while the calmest dogs were older than 6.9 years. Trainability was affected primarily by the training experiences, the dog's age, and the purpose of keeping the dog. The least trainable dogs had not received professional training at all and were older than 3 years. The most trainable dogs were those who participated in three or more types of professional training. Sociability toward conspecifics was mainly determined by the age, sex, training experience and time spent together. The least sociable dogs were older than 4.8 years and the owners spent less than 3h with the dog daily. The most sociable dogs were less than 1.5 years old. Males were less sociable toward their conspecifics than females. Boldness was affected by the sex and age of the dog and the age of acquisition. The least bold were females acquired after the age of 1 year or bred by the owner. The boldest dogs were males, acquired before the age of 12 weeks, and were younger than 2 years old. Other variables

  6. Closed suction drainage for treatment of septic peritonitis of confirmed gastrointestinal origin in 20 dogs.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert J; Doyle, Ronan S; Bray, Jonathan P; Burton, Carolyn A

    2014-10-01

    To determine survival rate in dogs with septic peritonitis of confirmed gastrointestinal origin treated with closed suction drainage. Retrospective case series. Dogs (n = 20) with septic peritonitis. Medical records (2007-2010) of dogs with septic peritonitis of confirmed gastrointestinal origin treated by closed suction drainage were reviewed. Information on signalment, clinicopathologic abnormalities, underlying cause, surgical procedure performed, postoperative management, complications, and outcome was obtained. Dehiscence of a previous anastomosis was the most common source of contamination (80%). Drains remained in place, collecting fluid produced within the abdomen, for a median of 6 days (range, 2-11 days). Eighteen dogs received nutritional support, and 14 received plasma transfusions. Seventeen dogs (85%) survived to discharge. Closed suction drainage together with resolution of the underlying cause of peritonitis and appropriate postoperative management is an effective technique for treatment of septic peritonitis of confirmed gastrointestinal origin in dogs. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  7. Dog Bite Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    IF YOU are bitten • If your own dog bit you, confine it immediately and call your veterinarian to check your dog’s vaccination records. Consult with your veterinarian about your dog’s aggressive ...

  8. How dogs drink water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gart, Sean; Socha, Jake; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2014-11-01

    Animals with incomplete cheeks (i.e. dogs and cats) need to move fluid against gravity into the body by means other than suction. They do this by lapping fluid with their tongue. When a dog drinks, it curls its tongue posteriorly while plunging it into the fluid and then quickly withdraws its tongue back into the mouth. During this fast retraction fluid sticks to the ventral part of the curled tongue and is drawn into the mouth due to inertia. We show several variations of this drinking behavior among many dog breeds, specifically, the relationship between tongue dynamics and geometry, lapping frequency, and dog weight. We also compare the results with the physical experiment of a rounded rod impact onto a fluid surface. Supported by NSF PoLS #1205642.

  9. Jealousy in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Christine R.; Prouvost, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that jealousy is unique to humans, partially because of the complex cognitions often involved in this emotion. However, from a functional perspective, one might expect that an emotion that evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers might exist in other social species, particularly one as cognitively sophisticated as the dog. The current experiment adapted a paradigm from human infant studies to examine jealousy in domestic dogs. We found that dogs exhibited significantly more jealous behaviors (e.g., snapping, getting between the owner and object, pushing/touching the object/owner) when their owners displayed affectionate behaviors towards what appeared to be another dog as compared to nonsocial objects. These results lend support to the hypothesis that jealousy has some “primordial” form that exists in human infants and in at least one other social species besides humans. PMID:25054800

  10. Jealousy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Harris, Christine R; Prouvost, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that jealousy is unique to humans, partially because of the complex cognitions often involved in this emotion. However, from a functional perspective, one might expect that an emotion that evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers might exist in other social species, particularly one as cognitively sophisticated as the dog. The current experiment adapted a paradigm from human infant studies to examine jealousy in domestic dogs. We found that dogs exhibited significantly more jealous behaviors (e.g., snapping, getting between the owner and object, pushing/touching the object/owner) when their owners displayed affectionate behaviors towards what appeared to be another dog as compared to nonsocial objects. These results lend support to the hypothesis that jealousy has some "primordial" form that exists in human infants and in at least one other social species besides humans.

  11. Effects of pimobendan on myocardial perfusion and pulmonary transit time in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Apple, S M; Menciotti, G; Braz-Ruivo, L; Crosara, S; Häggström, J; Borgarelli, M

    2016-09-01

    To describe pulmonary transit time (nPTT) and myocardial perfusion (nMP) normalised to heart rate in dogs with stable ACVIM stage C myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) and to assess short-term effects of pimobendan on these variables. We hypothesised that nPTT and nMP would increase in dogs with MMVD compared with normal dogs. Additionally, we hypothesised that treatment with pimobendan would decrease nMP and nPTT in dogs with MMVD. Prospective, single-blind study involving 6 normal dogs and 12 dogs with MMVD. Dogs with MMVD were treated with enalapril and furosemide for at least 1 month prior to examination. All dogs underwent standard and contrast echocardiographic examinations at the beginning of the study (T0). At this time, MMVD dogs were randomly assigned to receive either pimobendan (0.4-0.6 mg/kg) or not. All dogs with MMVD were re-evaluated by standard and contrast echocardiography after 1 week (T1) and nPTT and nMP were measured. nPTT was significantly increased in dogs with MMVD (P = 0.0063), compared with normal dogs. It was significantly decreased at T1 in dogs receiving pimobendan (P = 0.0250). The nMP was not significantly different in dogs with MMVD, compared with healthy dogs (P = 0.2552), and it was not significantly different at T1 in the treatment group (P = 0.8798). Contrast echocardiography was a valid, complementary tool for echocardiographic analysis of dogs with MMVD. Pimobendan decreased nPTT in dogs affected by MMVD. Myocardial perfusion was not different in dogs with severe MMVD. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  12. Multiple thoracolumbar partial lateral corpectomies in 17 dogs.

    PubMed

    Flegel, Thomas; Münch, Maria; Held, Karina; Salger, Florian; Ziegler, Luisa; Böttcher, Peter

    2016-12-05

    To report feasibility and outcome of multiple thoracolumbar partial lateral corpectomies (TLPLCs) in dogs with predominantly ventral spinal cord compression caused by intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) in the light of reported decreased spinal stability following single TLPLC. Material und methods: In a retrospective study the records of dogs treated by multiple TLPLCs for ventral spinal cord compression caused by Hansen type I or type II IVDD were reviewed. Presurgical spinal cord compression and postsurgical decompression, as well as slot dimensions were determined based on computed tomography (CT)-myelography images. Neurological outcome was assessed based on repetitive examinations applying a modified Frankel Score as well as on an owner questionnaire. Seventeen dogs with a mean body weight of 20.3 kg (range 4.0-49.0 kg) were included. Fourteen dogs had two TLPLCs, two dogs had three TLPLCs and one dog had four TLPLCs performed. The mean slot depth was 63% of entire vertebral body width, the mean slot height was 29% of the entire vertebral body height, the mean slot length was 25% of the entire vertebral body length and the mean residual vertebral interslot length between two adjacent TLPLCs was 55% of the vertebral body length. At reevaluation 4 weeks after surgery, 6/17 dogs (35.3%) had the same modified Frankel Score as before surgery, whereas 11/17 dogs (64.7%) showed a neurological improvement. According to the owners 78.5% of dogs were walking normally within 6 months after surgery. The mean survival time of 16 dogs, where follow-up was available, was 951 days. Multiple spinal cord compressions caused by IVDD can be eliminated by multiple, even consecutive, TLPLCs without the risk of a clinically significant risk of spinal instability.

  13. Clinical characteristics of doxorubicin-associated alopecia in 28 dogs.

    PubMed

    Falk, Elizabeth F; Lam, Andrea T H; Barber, Lisa G; Ferrer, Lluis

    2017-04-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is common in humans, but there are limited reports describing the clinical features of CIA in dogs. To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of doxorubicin-associated alopecia (DAA) in canine patients at a teaching hospital from 2012 to 2014. Signalment, diagnosis, treatment protocols and clinical examination findings were recorded in 150 dogs treated with doxorubicin from 2012 to 2014. Medical records were searched retrospectively for the keywords "alopecia" and "hypotrichosis." Dogs were excluded if the causal link of hair loss was unclear. Doxorubicin-associated alopecia was reported in 28 of 150 dogs (19%). Two parameters were statistically associated with the development of DAA: coat-type and cumulative doxorubicin dose. Dogs with curly or wire-haired coat-type were significantly more likely to develop DAA than dogs with straight-haired coat-type [χ(2) (1, N = 147) = 30, P < 0.0001]. After adjusting for sex, weight and doxorubicin dose, the odds of dogs with curly or wire-haired coat-type developing DAA were 22 times higher than those with straight-haired coat-type (P < 0.0001). Dogs that developed DAA received a significantly higher median cumulative doxorubicin dose (103.0 versus 84.5 mg/m(2) ; P = 0.0039) than those that did not develop DAA. Dogs treated with doxorubicin may be at risk for developing DAA. This risk increases as the cumulative dose of doxorubicin increases, and with a curly or wire-haired coat-type. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  14. Efficacy of a new combination of fipronil and permethrin against Ctenocephalides felis flea infestation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fankhauser, Becky; Dumont, Pascal; Halos, Lénaïg; Hunter, James S; Kunkle, Bruce; Everett, William R; Chester, Theodore S; Fourie, Josephus J; Soll, Mark D

    2015-01-29

    Five studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of a new combination of fipronil and permethrin on cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis, when applied to dogs, including dogs that underwent water exposure or shampooing. In each study, 16 dogs were allocated to two groups. Each dog was infested with 100 unfed adult fleas on Days -1, 7, 14, 21 and 28. Eight dogs were treated with a new topical spot-on formulation containing 6.76% w/v fipronil + 50.48% w/v permethrinon Day 0; and eight dogs served as untreated controls. Twenty-four or 48 h after treatment or subsequent infestation, each dog was combed to remove and count live fleas. In addition, the dogs were subjected to different levels of water or shampoo exposure. In study 1, dogs were not subjected to any water exposure or shampooing; in study 2, dogs were water immersed twice during the month on Days 10 and 24; in study 3, dogs were water immersed three times on Days 10, 17 and 24; and in studies 4 and 5, dogs were shampooed once on Day 17. All groups of dogs administered a single topical treatment with a combination of fipronil and permethrin had significantly (p < 0.005) lower flea counts than untreated controls 24 h and 48 h post-treatment or post-infestation, regardless of whether they underwent water exposure/shampooing or not. The reductions in C. felis counts were between 98.4% and 100% at all time points in all studies. The new topical spot-on formulation of fipronil and permethrin maintains a high level of protection of dogs against C. felis flea infestations even when the dogs are exposed to environmental factors that are believed to adversely affect efficacy, such as water exposure or shampooing.

  15. Global Positioning System Derived Performance Measures Are Responsive Indicators of Physical Activity, Disease and the Success of Clinical Treatments in Domestic Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Elizabeth A.; Guthrie, James W.; Ellwood, Stephen A.; Mellanby, Richard J.; Clements, Dylan N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the use of Global Positioning System receiver (GPS) derived performance measures for differentiating between: 1) different outdoor activities in healthy dogs; 2) healthy dogs and those with osteoarthritis; 3) osteoarthritic dogs before and after treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesia. Design Prospective study. Animals Ten healthy dogs and seven dogs with osteoarthritis of the elbow joint (OA dogs). Procedure Healthy dogs were walked on a standard route on-lead, off-lead and subjected to playing activity (chasing a ball) whilst wearing a GPS collar. Each dog was walked for five consecutive days. Dogs with OA were subjected to a single off-lead walk whilst wearing a GPS collar, and then administered oral Carprofen analgesia daily for two weeks. OA dogs were then subjected to the same walk, again wearing a GPS collar. Results GPS derived measures of physical performance could differentiate between on-lead activity, off-lead activity and playing activity in healthy dogs, and between healthy dogs and OA dogs. Variation in the performance measures analysed was greater between individual dogs than for individual dogs on different days. Performance measures could differentiate healthy dogs from OA dogs. OA Dogs treated with Carprofen analgesia showed improvements in their physical performance, which returned to values indistinguishable from those of healthy dogs on nearly all the measures assessed. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance GPS derived measures of physical performance in dogs are objective, easy to quantify, and can be used to gauge the effects of disease and success of clinical treatments. Specific stimuli can be used to modulate physical performance beyond the self-governed boundaries that dogs will naturally express when allowed to exercise freely without stimulation. PMID:25692761

  16. Procarbazine as adjunctive therapy for treatment of dogs with presumptive antemortem diagnosis of granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis: 21 cases (1998-2004).

    PubMed

    Coates, Joan R; Barone, Georgina; Dewey, Curtis W; Vitale, Christina L; Holloway-Azene, Nicole M; Sessions, John K

    2007-01-01

    Granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis (GME) is an idiopathic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. Remission often is short-lived in dogs treated with glucocorticoids. Procarbazine is T cell-specific and crosses the blood-brain barrier. Dogs with presumptive antemortem diagnosis of GME given procarbazine as adjunctive therapy to prednisone will have improved long-term outcome compared with dogs given no treatment or glucocorticoids alone. Two groups were studied: (1) Dogs with presumptive antemortem diagnosis of GME treated with procarbazine and prednisone (n = 21); (2) Dogs that had a histologic diagnosis of GME at postmortem examination and received no treatment (n = 11). Dogs with presumptive GME treated with procarbazine were identified retrospectively from medical records of 2 veterinary referral hospitals. Selection criteria required all dogs have a neurologic examination, blood work, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and brain imaging (MRI or CT). Median survival time for all dogs studied was 5.0 months. Median survival time for dogs treated with procarbazine was 14.0 months and for untreated dogs, 0.73 months. Treatment with procarbazine was significantly correlated with survival time (P < .001). Procarbazine was the only independent predictor of survival. Prednisone was reduced in dosage or discontinued in 17 dogs. Adverse reactions to procarbazine therapy included myelosuppression in 7 dogs and hemorrhagic gastroenteritis in 3 dogs. These data suggest that procarbazine treatment of presumptive GME may result in greater improved long-term outcome than has been previously reported for glucocorticoid treatment alone and may complement other immunomodulatory therapies. Procarbazine-treated dogs must be monitored for adverse reactions.

  17. Evaluation of a Burdizzo castrator for neutering of dogs.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Pacheco, A; Bolio-González, M E; Colin-Flores, R F; Sauri-Arceo, C H; Gutiérrez-Blanco, E; Jiménez-Coello, M; Linde Forsberg, C

    2006-06-01

    A Burdizzo castrator was evaluated for the neutering of dogs. Histological and morphological changes of spermatic cells and peripheral serum testosterone after challenge with a GnRH-analogue (gonadorelin) were assessed. There was a control group (G1), a surgically castrated group (G2) and a Burdizzo group (G3) divided in two, G3a receiving two crunches in each spermatic cord and G3b receiving one crunch in each spermatic cord. Sixteen days after application of the Burdizzo blood samples were taken from the dogs at 30 min interval during 2 h; after the second sample the dogs were treated with 1 mug/kg body weight of gonadorelin i.v. The same protocol of gonadorelin challenge was performed in G1 and G2 dogs. The G2 dogs were surgically castrated after the second blood sample, before the gonadorelin treatment, and the G1 dogs after the last blood sample. The excised gonads were examined histologically, and sperm smears were prepared from the caudae epididymidis. The testes and plexus pampiniformis of the G1 and G2 dogs had a normal histological appearance, and they had morphologically normal epididymal sperm cells. In all G3 dogs, there was an acute fibrosis with an inflammatory reaction in the plexus pampiniformis. The testes from the G3a dogs showed diffuse areas of infarction and degeneration of the parenchyma. Similar but less diffuse lesions were seen in group 3b dogs. The deferent ducts from all G3 dogs showed vasitis and/or sperm granulomas. Azoospermia or sperm malformations were observed in the epididymal smears from the G3 dogs. Testosterone concentration in the G1 dogs increased after gonadorelin application (p < 0.0001). The G2 dogs had basal testosterone levels after castration (p < 0.001) and did not respond to gonadorelin. Groups 3a and b showed a slight but non-significant increase in testosterone concentration after gonadorelin challenge, supposedly due to the reduction of testicular blood flow and loss of testicular interstitial tissue.

  18. Hybrid vigour in dogs?

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Frank W; Arnott, Elizabeth R; McGreevy, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    Evidence from other species justifies the hypotheses that useful hybrid vigour occurs in dogs and that it can be exploited for improved health, welfare and fitness for purpose. Unfortunately, most of the relevant published canine studies do not provide estimates of actual hybrid vigour because of inadequate specification of the parentage of mixed-bred dogs. To our knowledge, only three published studies have shed any light on actual hybrid vigour in dogs. There are two reports of actual hybrid vigour between Labrador and Golden retrievers, the first ranging from +2.5% to -6.0% for components of a standardised applied-stimulus behavioural test, and the second being at least +12.4% for chance of graduating as a guide dog. The third study provides a minimum estimate of negative actual hybrid vigour: crossbreds between Labrador retrievers and poodles had a higher prevalence of multifocal retinal dysplasia than the average prevalence in their purebred parent breeds. The lack of estimates of actual hybrid vigour can be overcome by including the exact nature of the cross (e.g. F1, F2 or backcross) and their purebred parental breeds in the specification of mixed-bred dogs. Even if only F1 crossbreds can be categorised, this change would enable researchers to conduct substantial investigations to determine whether hybrid vigour has any utility for dog breeding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fungal rhinitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ostrzeszewicz, M; Sapierzyński, R

    2015-01-01

    Fungal rhinitis and sinusitis in dogs are quite common reasons of chronic nasal discharge and rhinoscopy in such cases is commonly suggested. Forty three dogs were examined using rhinoscopy because of the presence of chronic airway symptoms. Clinical examination, routine hematology and serum biochemistry profiles, nasal and frontal sinus radiographs were made in all animals. Additionally, computed tomography in one dog was performed. Samples for histopathology were taken from 9 patients during rhinoscopy, additionally, from 8 of these patients samples for cytopathology were collected by blind nasal swab technique. In 9 of 43 dogs (20,5%), all males aged 1 to 13 years, examinations led to a diagnosis of fungal rhinitis. In 2 cases a diagnosis of fungal rhinitis was obtained based solely on cytopathology, while in 7 cases - mycosis of nasal mucosa was confirmed by histopathology. The present study revealed that cytopathological examination of nasal swabs has a low diagnostic value in the case of nasal infections in dogs. Although, in some dogs cytopathology, together with other widely available diagnostic techniques was sufficient to reliably diagnose fungal rhinitis, histopathology of samples collected during rhinoscopy is still the gold standard in such cases.

  20. [Prevalence of Dog circovirus in healthy and diarrhoeic dogs].

    PubMed

    Gentil, Michaela; Gruber, Achim D; Müller, Elisabeth

    2017-04-19

    In 2012, a Dog circovirus (DogCV) was discovered in the USA, which was followed by further descriptions of the virus in the USA, Italy and Germany. The present study is the first to examine the prevalence of DogCV in faeces of dogs from Germany and other European countries. Faecal samples from 184 dogs with diarrhoea and from 82 clinically healthy dogs (control group) were analysed for the presence of DogCV by PCR. Furthermore, the detection of parvovirus, coronavirus, Giardia and Cryptosporidium was performed in all samples. In the group of dogs with diarrhoea the prevalence of DogCV was 20.1% (37/184), in the healthy control group it was 7.3% (6/82). Therefore, the virus could be detected significantly more frequently in dogs with diarrhoea. The detection frequency of DogCV is comparable with those of the other tested pathogens. In approximately 50% of the DogCV-positive dogs, infections with other enteropathogenic organisms were diagnosed. The role of co-infection in the pathogenesis of the disease remains unclear, but there appears to be an association between co-infection and disease severity. Evidence of DogCV in clinically healthy dogs appears important for the epidemiology and raises questions about its pathogenicity. Further studies are needed to clarify questions regarding the pathogenesis, causal relevance and possible interference by other diarrhoeal pathogens. Nevertheless, the results of this study are an important indication that DogCV should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs with diarrhoea.

  1. Disease control through fertility control: Secondary benefits of animal birth control in Indian street dogs.

    PubMed

    Yoak, Andrew J; Reece, John F; Gehrt, Stanley D; Hamilton, Ian M

    2014-01-01

    We sought to (1) survey sexually intact street dogs for a wide range of diseases in three cities in Rajasthan, India and (2) evaluate links between the health of non-treated dogs and both the presence and duration of animal birth control (ABC) programs. ABC regimes sterilize and vaccinate stray dogs in an attempt to control their population and the spread of rabies. They are commonly suggested to improve the health of those dogs they serve, but here we provide evidence that these benefits also extend to untreated dogs in the community. Viral and bacterial disease seroprevalences were assessed in 240 sexually intact street dogs from Jaipur, Jodhpur, and Sawai Madhopur cities in October and September 2011. Those individuals and 50 additional dogs were assessed for the presence of ticks, fleas, fight wounds, and given body condition scores. Dogs in cities with an ABC program had with significantly (p<0.05) higher overall body condition scores, lower prevalence of open wounds likely caused by fighting, flea infestations, infectious canine hepatitis, Ehrlichia canis, Leptospira interrogans serovars, and canine distemper virus antibodies. However, those same dogs in cities with ABC programs had significantly higher prevalence of Brown Dog Tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) infestations. Canine parvovirus and Brucella canis prevalences were not significantly different between cities. This study is the first to demonstrate the health benefits of ABC on non-vaccinated diseases and non-treated individuals. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Multi-agent chemotherapy for mast cell tumours in the dog.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, R J; Teske, E; Kraus, J S; Rutteman, G R

    1998-01-01

    Seventeen dogs with mast cell tumours received chemotherapy. Fifteen dogs were treated with a vincristine, cyclophosphamide, hydroxyurea, and prednisolone (VCHP) regimen. Seven of these were later switched to doxyrubicin and prednisolone either because they stopped responding or because they did not respond from the start of the treatment. Two dogs received the latter regimen as the primary therapy. All dogs were treated with cimitidine and metoclopramide to minimize the effect of paraneoplastic syndrome associated with histamine release. Ten of the 17 dogs were found to respond (4/17 complete response (CR), 6/17 partial response (PR)). Response duration varied from 39 to 910 days (median 53 days), including 3 dogs with a CR that lasted more than 2 years. Survival time in responders varied from 41 to 910 days (median 97 days) and from 30 to 126 (median 39) in the other 7 dogs. Dogs that became refractory to VCHP did not respond to doxyrubicin and prednisolone. It is concluded that multi-agent chemotherapy has anti-tumour activity in a considerable proportion of dogs with mast cell tumours, but its efficacy is variable. The multivariate analyses showed that significant factors predicting survival in dogs with mast cell tumours were sex (P = 0.009), absence or presence of non-abdominal distant metastases, or abdominal metastases, respectively (P = 0.023), and malignancy grade of the tumours (P = 0.053).

  3. Clinical results of single-session bilateral medial patellar luxation repair in 26 small breed dogs

    PubMed Central

    Balogh, Daniel G.; Kramek, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Medical records of 26 small breed dogs treated with single-session bilateral medial patellar luxation repair were reviewed. Excluding dogs with complications associated with cranial cruciate ligament disease, 20/21 dogs with long-term follow-up achieved a complete or acceptable clinical recovery. The complication rate was not increased compared to that previously reported for unilateral patellar luxation repair. PMID:27041762

  4. Maxillary osteomyelitis in two Scottish terrier dogs with chronic ulcerative paradental stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Boutoille, Florian; Hennet, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Two Scottish terrier dogs were presented for recurrent oral problems. They were diagnosed with refractory chronic ulcerative paradental stomatitis and necrosis of the incisive and maxillary bones. Both dogs were treated with a combination of bilateral rostral maxillectomy and tooth extractions. The ostectomy was performed with a specific cutting device using piezoelectric bone surgery technology. These two cases show that a precise evaluation of dogs is essential for the diagnose of chronic ulcerative paradental stomatitis and its differentiation from mucocutaneous autoimmune diseases.

  5. [Exaggerated breed characteristics in dogs].

    PubMed

    Wilting, M M; Endenburg, N

    2012-01-01

    Dutch dog owners seem to be aware of bad dog breeding practices with regard to exaggerated breed characteristics that are detrimental to the dog's welfare. Yet they do not always look for these features when buying a dog. Most dog owners think that veterinarians could have an important role in preventing these exaggerated physical traits, by providing information about these traits and taking action in their capacity as veterinarian. Articles 36 and 55 of the Dutch GWWD (animal health and welfare law) provide opportunities to act against the breeding of dogs with exaggerated genetic traits.

  6. Familial anthropophobia in pointer dogs?

    PubMed

    Dykman, R A; Murphree, O D; Reese, W G

    1979-08-01

    This article assesses a dog model in terms of a proposed cross-species definition of phobia, the model referring to a strain of unstable dogs that has been produced by selection and inbreeding. The unstable dogs are contrasted with a strain of stable dogs. New findings are presented on approach and activity behavior toward three stimulus objects (man, another dog, and a sheet-covered chair) in a naturalistic setting. The fear response of unstable dogs to objects other than man habituates gradually, whereas the fear response to the sight of man is far more enduring, suggesting a relatively specific fear of man.

  7. Hyperadrenocorticism in 10 dogs with skin lesions as the only presenting clinical signs.

    PubMed

    Zur, Gila; White, Stephen D

    2011-01-01

    Ten dogs that had skin lesions as the only presenting signs of hyperadrenocorticism (HAC) and as the owners' primary complaint are described. Dogs were included if the initial examination was for skin disease, there were no signs of systemic illness on initial presentation and there was a confirmed diagnosis of HAC by specific screening tests. Dogs were excluded if they had a severe disease that might interfere with screening tests for HAC or if the screening tests were not diagnostic. There were five males and five females; six dogs were intact. Nine dogs were diagnosed at ≥7 years. Eight dogs weighed ≤10 kg. Alopecia was present in nine dogs. Eight dogs had bacterial pyoderma, five had hyperpigmentation, and four had thin skin. One dog had unresolved dermatophytosis. Skin lesions resolved after treatment in eight dogs. One dog was not treated and one was lost to follow-up. This study showed that skin lesions may be the only clinical signs of HAC. The presence of the more common clinical signs of HAC, such as a non-pruritic, truncal alopecia and/or thin skin, without any systemic signs of HAC and/or the presence of poorly responsive skin infections warrant screening for this disease.

  8. Comparison of terazosin and prazosin for treatment of vesico-urethral reflex dyssynergia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Haagsman, A N; Kummeling, A; Moes, M E; Mesu, S J; Kirpensteijn, J

    2013-07-13

    Nineteen dogs with vesico-urethral reflex dyssynergia (VURD) were treated with prazosin or terazosin 0.5 mg/kg twice daily to compare efficacy and side effects. Dogs were referred because of signs of (partial) urethral obstruction. Physical examination, abdominal ultrasonography, urinalysis and a radiographic contrast study of bladder and urethra (urethrocystography) were routinely performed. If no mechanical causes of obstruction or disease of the distal urinary tract were observed, the diagnosis VURD was presumed and the dogs were included in our study. Follow-up information was obtained from owners or referring veterinarians. Significantly more side effects were seen in the dogs treated with terazosin (n=14; 93 per cent) compared with the dogs treated with prazosin (n=5; 20 per cent; P=0.002). Effects of the treatment were comparable between prazosin and terazosin. Labradors and dogs that were castrated surgically had a significant better survival (P<0.01) compared with other breeds and animals that were castrated chemically. There was a moderate to good effect in 60 per cent of the dogs treated with prazosin, and in 64 per cent of the dogs treated with terazosin.

  9. Comparison of two treatments for preventing dogs eating their own faeces.

    PubMed

    Wells, D L

    2003-07-12

    Twenty-eight domestic dogs with the behavioural problem of eating their own faeces were treated in two ways. Half of them were treated with a citronella spray collar, and the others were treated with sound therapy. To assess the relative efficacy of the treatments their owners rated the severity of their dog's faeces eating for a week before the study began, during each of three weeks of treatment, and at the end of a fourth week during which they had not been treated. The owners reported a significantly lower incidence of the behavioural problem during the first week of both treatments, but in the dogs treated by sound therapy its incidence subsequently increased. The behavioural problem was reduced most effectively in the dogs treated with the spray collar, and continued to decrease during the period of treatment.

  10. Field evaluations of the efficacy and safety of Emodepside plus toltrazuril (Procox® oral suspension for dogs) against naturally acquired nematode and Isospora spp. infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Altreuther, Gertraut; Gasda, Nadine; Adler, Kerstin; Hellmann, Klaus; Thurieau, Heloise; Schimmel, Annette; Hutchens, Douglas; Krieger, Klemens J

    2011-08-01

    Three controlled, blinded and randomised multicentre field studies evaluated the efficacy and safety of a new formulation containing emodepside plus toltrazuril (Procox® suspension for dogs) against naturally acquired parasite infections in dogs. In two studies dogs positive for gastrointestinal nematodes and/or Isospora spp. were treated with emodepside/toltrazuril suspension (at least 0.45 mg emodepside plus 9 mg toltrazuril per kg body weight) or a reference product containing either milbemycin oxime plus praziquantel (Milbemax®) or sulfadimethoxine (Kokzidiol SD®) at recommended dose rates. The third study investigated efficacy against prepatent natural Isospora spp. infections in comparison to an untreated control group by enrolling Isospora- negative dogs that were at risk to develop a patent infection during the study.No suspected adverse drug reactions were observed in any of the 403 dogs enrolled in the three studies including 234 dogs treated with emodepside/toltrazuril suspension. In dogs treated with emodepside/toltrazuril suspension against nematode infection faecal egg counts were reduced by 100 % (reference product: 99.7 %). Similarly, in the dogs that had been treated against patent Isospora spp. infection, faecal oocyst counts were reduced by 100 % (reference product: 99.0 %). In both studies, statistical analysis demonstrated non-inferiority and even superiority to the reference products (p ≤ 0.009). Dogs treated with emodepside/toltrazuril suspension during suspected prepatent Isospora spp. infection had 98.7 % lower faecal oocyst counts after treatment compared to untreated dogs (p < 0.0001).The studies demonstrated that emodepside/toltrazuril suspension is safe and highly efficacious against nematodes and Isospora spp. under field conditions.

  11. Managing Neuropathic Pain in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of the somatosensory system such as neuropathic pain are common in people with chronic neurologic and musculoskeletal diseases, yet these conditions remain an underappreciated morbidity in veterinary patients. This is likely because assessment of neuropathic pain in people relies heavily on self-reporting, something our veterinary patients are not able to do. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex phenomenon, and concepts related to it are frequently not addressed in the standard veterinary medical curriculum such that veterinarians may not recognize this as a potential problem in patients. The goals of this review are to discuss basic concepts in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, provide definitions for common clinical terms used in association with the condition, and discuss pharmacological treatment options for dogs with neuropathic pain. The development of neuropathic pain involves key mechanisms such as ectopic afferent nerve activity, peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, impaired inhibitory modulation, and pathologic activation of microglia. Treatments aimed at reducing neuropathic pain are targeted at one or more of these mechanisms. Several drugs are commonly used in the veterinary clinical setting to treat neuropathic pain. These include gabapentin, pregabalin, amantadine, and amitriptyline. Proposed mechanisms of action for each drug, and known pharmacokinetic profiles in dogs are discussed. Strong evidence exists in the human literature for the utility of most of these treatments, but clinical veterinary-specific literature is currently limited. Future studies should focus on objective methods to document neuropathic pain and monitor response to therapy in veterinary patients. PMID:26942185

  12. The effects of topical aqueous sirolimus on tear production in normal dogs and dogs with refractory dry eye.

    PubMed

    Spatola, Ronald; Nadelstein, Brad; Berdoulay, Andrew; English, Robert V

    2017-10-03

    To evaluate the effect of twice daily aqueous 0.02% sirolimus drops on tear production in normal dogs and dogs with refractory keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). Two groups of dogs were studied. Ten normal dogs with no signs of ocular disease were administered topical 0.02% sirolimus ophthalmic solution in right eye, and a vehicle control in the left eye twice daily for 4 weeks. Complete ophthalmic examinations, including Schirmer tear test were performed weekly. Eighteen dogs with refractory KCS were randomly assigned to receive 0.02% sirolumus ophthalmic solution or 0.02% tacrolimus ophthalmic solution twice daily. Complete ophthalmic examinations were was performed at 2 and 6 weeks following treatment. Tear production in the sirolimus-treated eyes of normal dogs was greater when compared to vehicle controls with a mean difference over all time points of 3.46 mm (95% CI 1.17, 5.75; P = 0.006). After 4 weeks of treatment, the mean difference was 5 mm (95% CI 1.95, 8.05; P = 0.002). In dogs with refractory dry eye, 37.5% of eyes treated with sirolimus exhibited increased tear production >4 mm/min after 6 weeks of treatment, compared to 20% of eyes receiving tacrolimus (P = 0.433). One normal dog experienced topical irritation to both sirolimus and vehicle-treatment. Side effects were not reported in any treated eyes with chronic KCS. Topical 0.02% sirolimus might be an alternative treatment for canine patients with keratoconjunctivits sicca. The drug appears safe when applied topically in an aqueous suspension for up to 6 weeks. While initial results are promising, further studies are warranted. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  13. Dog Ownership, Dog Walking, and Children's and Parents' Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Jo; Timperio, Anna; Chu, Binh; Veitch, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine cross-sectional associations of dog ownership, dog walking, and physical activity (PA) among children and their parents. Objective measures of PA were obtained for children ages 5-6 and 10-12 years from 19 primary schools across Melbourne, Australia. Parents self-reported their PA, dog ownership, and frequency of dog…

  14. Dog Ownership, Dog Walking, and Children's and Parents' Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Jo; Timperio, Anna; Chu, Binh; Veitch, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine cross-sectional associations of dog ownership, dog walking, and physical activity (PA) among children and their parents. Objective measures of PA were obtained for children ages 5-6 and 10-12 years from 19 primary schools across Melbourne, Australia. Parents self-reported their PA, dog ownership, and frequency of dog…

  15. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome in a dog.

    PubMed

    Dell'Orco, Marta; Bertazzolo, Walter; Pagliaro, Luigi; Roccabianca, Paola; Comazzi, Stefano

    2005-09-01

    A 3-year-old, spayed, female Boxer was presented because of acute onset of anorexia, vomiting, and hemorrhagic diarrhea. Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia with intravascular hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure were detected. The dog was treated with fluids, antiemetics, antibiotics, and diuretics. Despite supportive therapy, the dog's condition worsened, and the owners elected euthanasia. Necropsy revealed disseminated petechiae on the parietal peritoneum and serosal surfaces of the intestinal tract. The histologic lesions were consistent with severe arteritis and microvascular thrombosis involving only the renal and intestinal arterioles. The final diagnosis was hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), a rarely described disorder in dogs. The clinical presentation of primarily gastrointestinal clinical signs was similar to that of typical or diarrhea-associated HUS (D+ HUS) in humans (mainly children), which is caused by gastrointestinal proliferation of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli. Bacterial toxins can be adsorbed and cause endothelial injury, activation of hemostasis, and thrombosis, with lesions confined primarily to the kidneys. Although rare, HUS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of dogs with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia.

  16. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy: Experience in 45 Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Kathryn A.; Stanley, Bryden J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To report experience with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in 45 consecutive dogs admitted with extensive cutaneous wounds and to determine if NPWT is feasible in veterinary hospital practice. Study Design Prospective descriptive study Animals Dogs (n = 45) Methods Collected data were organized into 6 categories: patient data, wound data, NPWT data, adjunctive treatments, complications, and final outcome Results Wounds (53 in 45 dogs) were largely traumatic in origin, and distributed fairly evenly to the trunk, proximal and distal aspects of the limbs. Most wounds (34 dogs, 76%) had no granulation tissue and were treated a mean of 4.2 days after wounding, whereas 11 dogs had granulating wounds that were initially treated a mean of 87 days after wounding. Median NPWT use was 3 days with a mean hospitalization of 7.8 days. Most wounds (33; 62%) were closed surgically after NPWT and were healed by 14 days. The other 18 wounds healed (mean, 21 days) by second intention after hospital discharge. Overall, 96% of the wounds healed; 2 dogs died before definitive closure could be attempted. Conclusion NPWT is applicable to a wide variety of canine wounds is well tolerated, allows for several days between dressing changes, and can used to optimize the wound bed for surgical closure or second intention healing. PMID:24512302

  17. Cervical arthroplasty in two dogs with disk-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Pietro Filippo

    2011-09-15

    A 4-year-old sexually intact male Doberman Pinscher (dog 1) was evaluated for signs of recurrent cervical pain and ataxia, and a 12-year-old neutered male mixed-breed dog (dog 2) was evaluated for a 4-month history of ataxia and tetraparesis. Examination via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed spinal cord compression due to disk-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy at C6-7 in dog 1 and at C5-6 in dog 2. Both dogs were surgically treated with a ventral slot procedure and spinal cord decompression, followed by insertion of a titanium cervical disk prosthesis at the affected site. Evaluation of radiographs obtained immediately after surgery indicated that each prosthesis was appropriately placed and provided adequate distraction. Radiographic and neurologic evaluations were performed 2 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery in both dogs and 18 months after surgery in dog 1. Distraction of the vertebral bodies decreased moderately over time in both dogs. Intervertebral mobility determined via radiographic assessment of the prosthetic disk during neutral positioning, flexion, and traction of the cervical vertebral column was lost over time in dog 1 and was not achieved in dog 2. Eighteen months after surgery, results of MRI in dog 1 indicated adequate spinal cord decompression with no degeneration in other cervical disks. Cervical arthroplasty was well tolerated with no complications, and outcome was excellent in both dogs; prosthesis presence did not affect ability to reassess the area via MRI. Studies of cervical arthroplasty in dogs with disk-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy are warranted.

  18. Evaluation of adverse effects of long-term oral administration of carprofen, etodolac, flunixin meglumine, ketoprofen, and meloxicam in dogs.

    PubMed

    Luna, Stelio P L; Basílio, Ana C; Steagall, Paulo V M; Machado, Luciana P; Moutinho, Flávia Q; Takahira, Regina K; Brandão, Cláudia V S

    2007-03-01

    To evaluate adverse effects of long-term oral administration of carprofen, etodolac, flunixin meglumine, ketoprofen, and meloxicam in dogs. 36 adult dogs. Values for CBC, urinalysis, serum biochemical urinalyses, and occult blood in feces were investigated before and 7, 30, 60, and 90 days after daily oral administration (n = 6 dogs/group) of lactose (1 mg/kg, control treatment), etodolac (15 mg/kg), meloxicam (0.1 mg/kg), carprofen (4 mg/kg), and ketoprofen (2 mg/kg for 4 days, followed by 1 mg/kg daily thereafter) or flunixin (1 mg/kg for 3 days, with 4-day intervals). Gastroscopy was performed before and after the end of treatment. For serum gamma-glutamyltransferase activity, values were significantly increased at day 30 in dogs treated with lactose, etodolac, and meloxicam within groups. Bleeding time was significantly increased in dogs treated with carprofen at 30 and 90 days, compared with baseline. At 7 days, bleeding time was significantly longer in dogs treated with meloxicam, ketoprofen, and flunixin, compared with control dogs. Clotting time increased significantly in all groups except those treated with etodolac. At day 90, clotting time was significantly shorter in flunixin-treated dogs, compared with lactose-treated dogs. Gastric lesions were detected in all dogs treated with etodolac, ketoprofen, and flunixin, and 1 of 6 treated with carprofen. Carprofen induced the lowest frequency of gastrointestinal adverse effects, followed by meloxicam. Monitoring for adverse effects should be considered when nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are used to treat dogs with chronic pain.

  19. Dogs, zoonoses and immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R A; Pugh, R N

    2002-06-01

    Dogs are the source of a wide range of zoonotic infections that pose a significant threat to human health. This is particularly the case for immunocompromised people, although there are few robust studies that determine immunosuppression as a risk factor for transmission of zoonoses from dogs to humans. An increasing proportion of human society is immunodeficient, principally through the advent of HIV infection and through more people, particularly the expanding elderly group, being subjected to immunosuppressive agents. This is happening at a time when more such people are capitalizing on the acknowledged benefits of dog ownership, making for a potentially dangerous mix. Enteric pathogens (for example, Salmonella, Campylobacter and Cryptosporidium species, that may be canine derived) are a frequent risk to the health of immunocompromised persons. Veterinarians and physicians can be criticised for not communicating with each other, and for not providing adequate risk assessment to pet owners. There is scope for voluntary groups to provide information and support for the immunosuppressed who wish to keep their dogs. Key recommendations are to maintain a clean personal environment and intact mucocutaneous barriers. Public health professionals could help rectify the current communications gap between veterinary and medical staff and so facilitate in the appropriate management of dog-owning immunocompromised people.

  20. Breed differences in development of anti-insulin antibodies in diabetic dogs and investigation of the role of dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) genes.

    PubMed

    Holder, Angela L; Kennedy, Lorna J; Ollier, William E R; Catchpole, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Administration of insulin for treatment of diabetes mellitus in dogs can stimulate an immune response, with a proportion of animals developing anti-insulin antibodies (AIA). For an IgG antibody response to occur, this would require B cell presentation of insulin peptides by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, encoded by dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) genes, in order to receive T-cell help for class switching. DLA genes are highly polymorphic in the dog population and vary from breed to breed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate AIA reactivity in diabetic dogs of different breeds and to investigate whether DLA genes influence AIA status. Indirect ELISA was used to determine serological reactivity to insulin in diabetic dogs, treated with either a porcine or bovine insulin preparation. DLA haplotypes for diabetic dogs were determined by sequence-based typing of DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 loci. Significantly greater insulin reactivity was seen in treated diabetic dogs (n=942) compared with non-diabetic dogs (n=100). Relatively few newly diagnosed diabetic dogs (3/109) were found to be AIA positive, although this provides evidence that insulin autoantibodies might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease in some cases. Of the diabetic dogs treated with a bovine insulin preparation, 52.3% (182/348) were AIA positive, compared with 12.6% (75/594) of dogs treated with a porcine insulin preparation, suggesting that bovine insulin is more immunogenic. Breeds such as dachshund, Cairn terrier, miniature schnauzer and Tibetan terrier were more likely to develop AIA, whereas cocker spaniels were less likely to develop AIA, compared with crossbreed dogs. In diabetic dogs, DLA haplotype DRB1*0015--DQA1*006--DQB1*023 was associated with being AIA positive, whereas the haplotype DLA-DRB1*006--DQA1*005--DQB1*007 showed an association with being AIA negative. These research findings suggest that DLA genes influence AIA responses in treated diabetic

  1. Dental wax decreases calculus accumulation in small dogs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark M; Smithson, Christopher W

    2014-01-01

    A dental wax was evaluated after unilateral application in 20 client-owned, mixed and purebred small dogs using a clean, split-mouth study model. All dogs had clinical signs of periodontal disease including plaque, calculus, and/or gingivitis. The wax was randomly applied to the teeth of one side of the mouth daily for 30-days while the contralateral side received no treatment. Owner parameters evaluated included compliance and a subjective assessment of ease of wax application. Gingivitis, plaque and calculus accumulation were scored at the end of the study period. Owners considered the wax easy to apply in all dogs. Compliance with no missed application days was achieved in 8 dogs. The number of missed application days had no effect on wax efficacy. There was no significant difference in gingivitis or plaque accumulation scores when comparing treated and untreated sides. Calculus accumulation scores were significantly less (22.1 %) for teeth receiving the dental wax.

  2. [Bacteriology and mycology of otitis externa in dogs].

    PubMed

    Bornand, V

    1992-01-01

    The bacterial and fungal flora of 1118 ears of dogs with otitis externa and 100 ears of healthy control dogs were studied in order to isolate the causative agents. The yeast Malassezia pachydermatis (56%) was by far the most common organism in otitic dogs followed by the bacteria Staphylococcus intermedius (23%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (12%), Proteus spp. (6%) and Streptococcus canis (5%). A statistical analysis of observed results showed that the incidence of these organisms is significant in otitic dogs. Many strains of S.intermedius, P.aeruginosa and Proteus spp. are resistant to antimicrobial agents commonly used to treat otitis externa. Therefore an antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using "Cobas Bact" for these bacterias. Furthermore, 80 strains of M.pachydermatis were submitted to identification-kits (API 20 CAUX, API STAPH, Cobas Micro). The observed results showed that an identification with these tests was not possible.

  3. Urinary tract infections due to Mycoplasma canis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ulgen, M; Cetin, C; Sentürk, S; Ozel, A E; Ozdemir, U

    2006-09-01

    Urine samples were obtained from 100 dogs with symptoms of lower urinary tract disease by cystocentesis and were examined for mycoplasmas. Urinalysis, haematological and biochemical analyses were also performed. Bacteria were isolated from urine in 41 of 100 dogs; Mycoplasma canis was isolated from four of 100 (4%) urine samples and three were pure culture. Selective mycoplasma media were used for isolation. In growth inhibition test, propagation of the four M. canis isolates was inhibited by their specific hyperimmune sera and there was no cross reactivity between isolates and hyperimmune sera of other mycoplasmas. Dogs in which M. canis was isolated were azotemic. All dogs were treated with enrofloxacin, furosemide, and supportive therapy (fluid therapy, ascorbic acid). In all animals, clinical improvements were observed after treatment.

  4. Child health update. Management of dog bites in children.

    PubMed

    Sabhaney, Vikram; Goldman, Ran D

    2012-10-01

    A 4-year-old girl was playing with her neighbour's dog. The dog became excited and bit the girl on the forearm, leaving a puncture wound. As a result of the injury, she has presented to my office. Should she be treated with antibiotics? If so, which antibiotic should be used and for how long? Initiation of prophylactic antibiotics is indicated if the dog bite has undergone primary closure; if there is a moderate or severe bite wound; for puncture wounds (especially if penetration of bone, tendon sheath, or joint), facial bites, bites to the hands or feet, or genital area bites; or wounds sustained by victims who are immunocompromised or asplenic. The first-line choice of antibiotic is amoxicillin-clavulanate. Appropriate tetanus and rabies prophylaxis as indicated should also be a part of caring for a patient who has sustained a dog bite, as well as local debridement and thorough cleaning of the wound.

  5. Dog saliva – an important source of dog allergens

    PubMed Central

    Polovic, N; Wadén, K; Binnmyr, J; Hamsten, C; Grönneberg, R; Palmberg, C; Milcic-Matic, N; Bergman, T; Grönlund, H; van Hage, M; Crameri, Reto

    2013-01-01

    Background Allergy to dog (Canis familiaris) is a worldwide common cause of asthma and allergic rhinitis. However, dander extract in routine diagnostics is not an optimal predictor of IgE-mediated dog allergy. Our objective was to evaluate saliva as an allergen source for improved diagnostics of allergy to dog. Methods IgE-binding proteins in dog saliva and dander extract were analysed by immunoblot and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using pooled or individual sera from dog-allergic patients (n = 13). Sera from 59 patients IgE positive to dander and 55 patients IgE negative to dander but with symptoms to dog were analysed for IgE against saliva and dander by ELISA. Basophil stimulation with dog saliva and dander extract was measured by flow cytometry among three dog-allergic patients. Additionally, IgE-binding protein profiles of saliva from different breeds were investigated by immunoblot. Results Greater number and diversity of IgE-binding proteins was found in saliva compared to dander extract and varied among dog breeds. In saliva, Can f 1, 2, 3 and 6 were identified but also four new saliva allergen candidates. The majority of the 59 dog dander–positive sera (n = 44) were IgE positive to dog saliva. Among patients IgE negative to dander, but with symptoms to dog, 20% were IgE positive to saliva. The biological activity of saliva was confirmed by basophil degranulation. Conclusions Dog saliva is an allergen source for improved diagnostics of dog allergy. The IgE-binding protein profile of saliva from different dogs varies. PMID:23464525

  6. Radiophosphorus (/sup 32/P) treatment of bone marrow disorders in dogs: 11 cases (1970-1987)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.; Turrel, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Between March 1970 and February 1987, radiophosphorus (/sup 32/P) was used to treat bone marrow disorders in 6 dogs; 4 had polycythemia vera and 2 had essential thrombocythemia. Activities of /sup 32/P given initially ranged from 2.4 to 3.3 mCi/m2. Four dogs responded well to /sup 32/P treatment, with gradual resolution of high RBC or platelet counts. Two of these dogs died of intercurrent disease unrelated to their bone marrow disorder, before blood counts could be stabilized. Two dogs did not respond to the initial /sup 32/P treatment nor to additional treatments with /sup 32/P, and had clinical signs and blood counts stabilized by use of phlebotomy or chemotherapeutic agents. We reviewed and analyzed 5 other cases of bone marrow disorders in dogs treated with /sup 32/P and included the findings from their records with the records of our 6 dogs in this retrospective analysis. Of the 8 dogs with polycythemia vera treated with /sup 32/P, 5 were given a single treatment that controlled clinical signs and blood counts for the remainder of the follow-up period. Of the 3 dogs treated for thrombocytosis with /sup 32/P, 2 had blood counts that responded to a single treatment.

  7. B-cell lymphoma in a dog with ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis) and systemic histoplasmosis (Histoplasma capsulatum)

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Jill D.; Hoover, John P.

    2007-01-01

    A mixed breed dog treated for ehrlichiosis and systemic histoplasmosis developed a refractory thrombocytopenia. When an abdominal mass was detected, exploratory laparotomy and biopsies confirmed lymphoma, which on immunohistochemical stains was determined to be of B-cell origin. Conceivably, the B-cell lymphoma in this dog was associated with chronic inflammation from ehrlichiosis, histoplasmosis, or both. PMID:17436907

  8. B-cell lymphoma in a dog with ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis) and systemic histoplasmosis (Histoplasma capsulatum).

    PubMed

    Brunker, Jill D; Hoover, John P

    2007-03-01

    A mixed breed dog treated for ehrlichiosis and systemic histoplasmosis developed a refractory thrombocytopenia. When an abdominal mass was detected, exploratory laparotomy and biopsies confirmed lymphoma, which on immunohistochemical stains was determined to be of B-cell origin. Conceivably, the B-cell lymphoma in this dog was associated with chronic inflammation from ehrlichiosis, histoplasmosis, or both.

  9. Ability of an oral formulation of afoxolaner to protect dogs from Borrelia burgdorferi infection transmitted by wild Ixodes scapularis ticks.

    PubMed

    Baker, C F; McCall, J W; McCall, S D; Drag, M D; Mitchell, E B; Chester, S T; Larsen, D

    2016-12-01

    A randomized, blinded, negative controlled study was conducted to determine whether treatment with afoxolaner (NexGard(®), Merial, Inc.) would prevent the transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi to dogs by wild caught Ixodes scapularis ticks. Twenty healthy dogs were randomly assigned to two groups of ten dogs each. Ten dogs were treated orally on Day 0 at a dose near the minimum recommended dose of afoxolaner of 2.5mg/kg (actual doses 2.5-3.1mg/kg) and ten control dogs were not treated. On Day 28, each dog was infested with approximately 50 adult unfed wild caught I. scapularis that had a 67% B. burgdorferi infection rate (determined by polymerase chain reaction). On Day 33, live ticks were counted and removed. No ticks were found on treated dogs while control dogs had an average of 21.4 ticks. To detect infection, the B. burgdorferi-specific C6 antibody SNAP(®) 4Dx(®) test (IDEXX) was performed on serum collected before infestation (all dogs seronegative on Days -6 and 27) and on Days 48, 63, 77 and 92. The ten treated dogs remained seronegative through the end of the study (Day 92), while nine out of the ten control dogs were infected, as demonstrated by their seroconversion to being positive for the presence of the B. burgdorferi-specific C6 antibody starting on Day 48. In this study, all dogs treated with NexGard(®) 28days prior to challenge with wild caught I. scapularis ticks were protected from B. burgdorferi infection, while nine out of the ten untreated control dogs were infected.

  10. 77 FR 54368 - Service Dogs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... effects of mental health illnesses, while providing benefits for service dogs that mitigate the effects of... benefits for a dog to mitigate the effects of a mental illness that are not related to visual, hearing, or... determine that these dogs provide a medical benefit to veterans with mental illness. Until such a...

  11. Bartonella quintana Endocarditis in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rolain, Jean-Marc; Maggi, Ricardo; Sontakke, Sushama; Keene, Bruce; Hunter, Stuart; Lepidi, Hubert; Breitschwerdt, Kyle T.; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Raoult, Didier

    2006-01-01

    We provide the first evidence that Bartonella quintana can infect dogs and cause typical signs of endocarditis. Using PCR and sequencing, we identified B. quintana in the blood of a dog from the United States with aortic valve endocarditis and probably also in the mitral valve of a dog from New Zealand with endocarditis. PMID:17326937

  12. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    PubMed

    Piotti, Patrizia; Kaminski, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs' abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human's goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs' behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs' behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs' neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor). The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human's vocal communication and the presence of the

  13. Association of pruritus with anxiety or aggression in dogs.

    PubMed

    Klinck, Mary P; Shofer, Frances S; Reisner, Ilana R

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate the association between pruritus and anxiety-related and aggressive behaviors in dogs. Cross-sectional survey. 238 dogs between 1 and 8 years old. Information including a score for general degree of pruritus (visual analogue scale from 0 to 10) and frequency of anxiety-related and aggressive behaviors was collected via a survey distributed to clients at 3 privately owned practices. Median score for pruritus was 2.4. Dogs were assigned to 2 groups on the basis of pruritus score (nonpruritic [0 to 2.4] and pruritic [2.5 to 10]). There was no significant difference between pruritic and nonpruritic dogs with regard to aggression or with regard to reactivity to being alone; to thunderstorms or noises; or to unfamiliar people, animals, or objects. Post hoc analysis revealed significantly more reactivity to thunderstorms or noises in dogs treated with glucocorticoids (18/37 [49%]) than in those not administered glucocorticoids (57/197 [29%]). An association was not detected between pruritus and aggressive, anxious, or fearful behavior in dogs. There was greater reactivity to thunderstorms or noises in glucocorticoid-treated dogs. These findings do not preclude the possibility of a relationship between certain dermatoses or pruritic conditions and behavior. However, a concurrent behavioral abnormality cannot be assumed to result from a dermatosis and be expected to resolve with treatment of only the skin disease. Dogs with behavioral disorders and pruritic disease require primary treatment of both conditions. Additional studies to examine the effect of disease and glucocorticoids on canine behavior are warranted.

  14. The biological effects of radium-224 injected into dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Muggenburg, B.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Boecker, B.B.

    1996-08-01

    A life-span study was conducted in 128 beagle dogs to determine the biological effects of intravenously injected {sup 224}Ra chloride. The {sup 224}Ra chloride was prepared by the same method used for intravenous injections in humans who were treated for ankylosing spondylitis and tuberculosis. Thus the results obtained from dogs can be compared directly to the population of treated humans, both for the elucidation of the effect of exposure rate and for comparison with other radionuclides for which data for humans are unavailable. Using equal numbers of males and females, the dogs were injected with one of four levels of {sup 224}Ra resulting in initial body burdens of approximately 13, 40, 120 or 350 kBq of {sup 224}Ra kg{sup -1} body mass. A control group of dogs was injected with diluent only. All dogs were divided further into three groups for which the amount of injected {sup 224}Ra (half-life of 3.62 days) or diluent was given in a single injection or divided equally into 10 or 50 weekly injections. As a result of these three injection schedules, the accumulation of dose from the injected {sup 224}Ra was distributed over approximately 1, 3 or 12 months. Each injection schedule included four different injection levels resulting in average absorbed {alpha}-particle doses to bone of 0.1, 0.3, 1 and 3 Gy, respectively. The primary early effect observed was a hematological dyscrasia in the dogs receiving either of the two highest injection levels. The effect was most severe in the dogs receiving a single injection of {sup 224}Ra and resulted in the death of three dogs injected at the highest level. The late-occurring biological effects were tumors. Bone tumors were the most common followed by tumors in the nasal mucosa. 52 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Oral Cobalamin Supplementation in Dogs with Chronic Enteropathies and Hypocobalaminemia.

    PubMed

    Toresson, L; Steiner, J M; Suchodolski, J S; Spillmann, T

    2016-01-01

    Cobalamin deficiency is commonly associated with chronic enteropathies (CE) in dogs and current treatment protocols recommend parenteral supplementation. In humans, several studies have reported equal efficacy of oral and parenteral cobalamin administration of cobalamin. To retrospectively evaluate whether oral cobalamin supplementation can restore normocobalaminemia in dogs with CE and hypocobalaminemia. Fifty-one client-owned dogs with various signs of CE and hypocobalaminemia. Retrospective study based on a computerized database search for dogs treated at Evidensia Specialist Animal Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden during January 2012-March 2014. Inclusion criteria were dogs with signs of CE, an initial serum cobalamin ≤270 ng/L (reference interval: 234-811 ng/L) and oral treatment with cobalamin tablets. Serum cobalamin for follow-up was analyzed 20-202 days after continuous oral cobalamin supplementation started. All dogs became normocobalaminemic with oral cobalamin supplementation. The mean increase in serum cobalamin concentration after treatment was 794 ± 462 ng/L. Serum cobalamin concentrations were significantly higher after supplementation (mean 1017 ± 460 ng/L; P < .0001) than at baseline (mean 223 ± 33 ng/L). Our results suggest that oral cobalamin supplementation is effective in normalizing serum cobalamin concentrations in dogs with CE. Prospective studies comparing cellular cobalamin status in dogs being treated with parenteral versus oral cobalamin supplementation are warranted before oral supplementation can be recommended for routine supplementation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  16. Efficacy of AST-120 in dogs with chronic idiopathic enteropathies.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, M; Wirtherle, N C; Beddies, G F; Kohn, B

    2013-01-01

    Chronic idiopathic enteropathies (CIE) in dogs are complex diseases of unknown origin. AST-120 is a spherical carbon adsorbent preparation with a high adsorption ability for low molecular substances. Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of AST-120 in dogs with CIE. Ten client-owned dogs with mild (n = 7) to moderate (n = 3) CIE. Explorative, prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded pilot study. Dogs with chronic diarrhea and no or insufficient response to an elimination diet were included. The dogs received either AST-120 (n = 5) or placebo (n = 5) for a duration of 21 days. The canine inflammatory bowel disease activity index (CIBDAI) was used to assess disease severity at baseline and clinical outcome after 3 weeks of treatment. Furthermore, changes in body weight and the parameters stool consistency and frequency were compared within and between groups. The mean CIBDAI score decreased from 5.6 (SD 1.5) to 2.0 (SD 1.2) in the AST-120 group (P = .125) and from 4.8 (SD .8) to 3.6 (SD 2.3) in the placebo group (P = .688). Compared with baseline, posttreatment CIBDAI scores decreased more than 60% in 4/5 dogs treated with AST-120 and in 1/5 dogs treated with placebo (P = .206). Changes in CIBDAI scores, body weights, stool consistency, and frequency within and between groups did not achieve statistical significance after 3 weeks of treatment. No adverse effects of AST-120 were noted. This study investigated potential efficacy of AST-120 as an alternative therapy in dogs with mild-to-moderate CIE. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  17. Use of ketoconazole in treatment of dermatophytosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Angarano, D W; Scott, D W

    1987-06-01

    Ketoconazole, an antifungal imidazole derivative, was used successfully to treat Tricophyton mentagrophytes infection in a dog. The drug was administered orally (11 mg/kg of body weight, q 24 h) and continued for 90 days. Though ketoconazole is not licensed currently for veterinary purposes, it has been used successfully to treat dermatophyte infections as well as intermediate and deep fungal diseases in both dogs and cats. In this case, ketoconazole was found to be nontoxic and less expensive than griseofulvin in the treatment of dermatophytosis.

  18. Directionality of dog vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frommolt, Karl-Heinz; Gebler, Alban

    2004-07-01

    The directionality patterns of sound emission in domestic dogs were measured in an anechoic environment using a microphone array. Mainly long-distance signals from four dogs were investigated. The radiation pattern of the signals differed clearly from an omnidirectional one with average differences in sound-pressure level between the frontal and rear position of 3-7 dB depending from the individual. Frequency dependence of directionality was shown for the range from 250 to 3200 Hz. The results indicate that when studying acoustic communication in mammals, more attention should be paid to the directionality pattern of sound emission.

  19. Preliminary findings on the effect of melatonin on the clinical outcome of cataract surgery in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sande, Pablo H; Álvarez, Javier; Calcagno, Javier; Rosenstein, Ruth E

    2016-05-01

    Cataract is the most prevalent cause of blindness in dogs. Phacoemulsification (PE) is currently the surgical treatment of choice to remove the opaque lens; however, it is associated with varying degrees of postoperative inflammation. We assessed the effect of melatonin on postoperative complications of canine cataract surgery. Eleven diabetic and thirteen healthy owned dogs with cataracts. All dogs underwent cataract surgery by PE. The anti-inflammatory effect of melatonin was compared with the reference treatments: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for diabetic dogs, and dexamethasone for nondiabetic dogs. Eyes were examined by means of clinical evaluation and intraocular pressure (IOP). In diabetic dogs, melatonin was more effective than topical and systemic NSAIDs in reducing the clinical score at 2, 7, and 20 days postsurgery, while it showed a similar efficacy to topical dexamethasone in dogs with hereditary cataracts. IOP decreased in all groups at 2 days postsurgery, but this decrease reached statistical significance only in diabetic dogs treated with NSAIDs, and persisted at 7 days postsurgery in this group. Afterward, IOP returned to normal values in all groups. Melatonin decreased the occurrence of surgical sequelae in diabetic and nondiabetic dogs. These results indicate that melatonin might constitute a useful tool for reducing postoperative PE complications in dogs. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  20. Effects of a transdermal lidocaine patch on indicators of postoperative pain in dogs undergoing midline ovariohysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Merema, Danielle K; Schoenrock, Emily K; Le Boedec, Kevin; McMichael, Maureen A

    2017-05-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of a transdermal lidocaine patch (TLP) on indicators of postoperative pain in healthy dogs following ovariohysterectomy. DESIGN Randomized, blinded controlled trial. ANIMALS 40 healthy shelter-owned female dogs admitted to a student surgery program for ovariohysterectomy. PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to receive after ovariohysterectomy a 5-cm-wide strip of TLP applied topically on both sides of the incision, for the full length of the incision and a wound dressing (n = 19) or a placebo patch (nonmedicated wound dressing; 21). All dogs underwent midline ovariohysterectomy. Immediately afterward, dogs received 2 IM morphine injections, carprofen (SC, q 12 h for 2 days), and the assigned patch (left in place for 18 hours). Postoperative comfort was evaluated by use of the short form of the Glasgow Composite Measures Pain Scale and serum cortisol concentrations measured prior to premedication and 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 18 hours after surgery. RESULTS No significant difference in pain scores or serum cortisol concentrations was identified between dogs that received the TLP and dogs that received a placebo patch after ovariohysterectomy. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The TLP provided no additional analgesic benefit to dogs treated concurrently with recommended doses of morphine and carprofen following ovariohysterectomy. Additional studies are needed to investigate whether similar results might be achieved in dogs treated concurrently with other analgesics. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2017;250:1140-1147).

  1. Multiple extrahepatic portosystemic shunts in dogs: 30 cases (1981-1993).

    PubMed

    Boothe, H W; Howe, L M; Edwards, J F; Slater, M R

    1996-06-01

    To describe the long-term outcome in dogs with naturally developing multiple extrahepatic portosystemic shunts (PSS). Retrospective case series. 30 dogs with multiple PSS. Medical records of dogs with multiple PSS were reviewed. Follow-up data were obtained by 1 or more of the following methods: recheck at the veterinary teaching hospital (n = 6) or telephone contact with the referring veterinarian (n = 18) or owner (n = 10). The chi 2 or Mann-Whitney rank sum test was used to determine the association of clinical factors with long-term outcome. Survival curves were generated by the Kaplan-Meier product limit method. Median age at diagnosis was 1 year. Findings on exploratory surgery in 25 dogs included ascites; numerous tortuous vessels connecting the portal vein with systemic veins; a small, misshapen liver; and an enlarged portal vein. The most common lesions on histologic evaluation of hepatic tissue specimens were hepatocellular atrophy, portal vascular duplication, cirrhosis, inflammation, and bile duct proliferation. Twelve dogs were treated surgically with vena caval banding, whereas 13 dogs were treated conservatively with dietary restriction of protein and administration of antibiotics, diuretics, and other drugs. Long-term survival and quality of life were similar in dogs from both treatment groups. Median follow-up interval in dogs that survived hospitalization was 24 months (range, 1 to 54 months). On the basis of these findings, vena caval banding in dogs with multiple PSS is not superior to medical and nutritional treatment.

  2. Escherichia coli-induced lung and liver dysfunction in dogs: effects of flunixin meglumine treatment.

    PubMed

    Hardie, E M; Rawlings, C A; Shotts, E B; Waltman, D W; Rakich, P M

    1987-01-01

    Twelve dogs were infused with 10(10) Escherichia coli/kg of body weight through a portal vein catheter over a 1-hour period; 6 dogs were treated with flunixin meglumine (1 mg/kg) 15 minutes after the infusion had begun. Six dogs (controls) were infused with a comparable volume of sterile saline solution over the same period. Over a 4-hour monitoring period, nontreated septicemic dogs developed systemic hypotension, decreased cardiac output, increased portal pressure, increased serum alanine transaminase values, increased extravascular liver water, increased liver glycogen depletion, and decreased arterial oxygen tension compared with control dogs. Accumulations of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and E coli were found in the livers and lungs of septicemic dogs. Flunixin meglumine treatment prevented systemic hypotension and hypoxemia, reversed the early but not the late stages of portal hypertension, and decreased E coli concentrations in the lungs. Other effects of treatment were not noticed.

  3. Hepatic encephalopathy in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Lidbury, Jonathan A; Cook, Audrey K; Steiner, Jörg M

    2016-07-01

    To comparatively review the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in dogs and cats. The Medline database was searched for articles related to HE in people, dogs, and cats. Articles published within the last 5 years were given special importance. The pathogenesis of HE is complex and incompletely understood, but ammonia appears to play a central role. Hyperammonemia leads to accumulation of glutamine in astrocytes, with subsequent astrocyte swelling and neurological dysfunction. The development of HE in patients with hepatic cirrhosis is a poor prognostic indicator. The fermentable disaccharide lactulose and the antimicrobial rifaximin are US Food and Drug Administration approved treatments for human HE. Severe protein restriction is no longer recommended for patients with this condition. HE is often associated with portosystemic shunting in dogs and cats. Ammonia plays a central role in the pathogenesis of HE in dogs and cats, but other factors such as manganese and endogenous benzodiazepines may also contribute. Recently, a soy protein-based diet was found to be beneficial in treating canine HE. Severe dietary protein restriction is likely to be detrimental in affected animals. There have been no clinical trials of drugs routinely used in the management HE in veterinary medicine, but lactulose and antimicrobials such as metronidazole are well-established treatments. HE is a potentially life-threatening condition that is probably underdiagnosed in companion animals. Although various treatment recommendations have been proposed, there is a lack of evidence in the veterinary literature regarding optimal strategies for the management of this condition. As our understanding of the pathogenesis of HE in dogs and cats evolves, novel diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents may become available. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  4. Clinical effects of vinorelbine administration in the management of various malignant tumor types in dogs: 58 cases (1997–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Wouda, Raelene M.; Miller, Mairin E.; Chon, Esther; Stein, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of vinorelbine in the management of various malignant tumor types in dogs. Design Retrospective case series. Animals 58 dogs with malignant tumors, including pulmonary carcinoma (n = 31), histiocytic sarcoma (9), mast cell tumor (5), lymphoma (4), melanoma (2), and 7 other tumor types (1 each). Procedures Medical records of dogs treated with vinorelbine from December 1997 to December 2012 were reviewed for data regarding signalment, clinical signs, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic test results, diagnostic imaging results, vinorelbine doses and dose frequency, surgery and radiotherapy details when applicable, other chemotherapeutics administered, and outcomes. Descriptive, comparative, and survival statistics were computed for all dogs and for dogs by histologic subgroup of tumors. Results Vinorelbine was administered palliatively to 44 (76%) dogs. One (2%) dog had a complete response for 162 days, 5 (11%) dogs had a partial response for a median duration of 91 days, 19 (43%) dogs had stable disease for a median duration of 68 days, and 19 (43%) dogs developed progressive disease after a median duration of 21 days. Clinical benefit was more difficult to assess in the remaining 14 (24%) dogs that received vinorelbine as an adjuvant treatment. Overall median time to tumor progression was 103 days (range, 5 to 1,533 days). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Vinorelbine appeared to be effective in the treatment of several tumor types in dogs. Follow-up prospective studies of the clinical benefit of the drug in specific clinical scenarios will be necessary to support this conclusion. PMID:25970220

  5. Experimental parvovirus infection in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Potgieter, L N; Jones, J B; Patton, C S; Webb-Martin, T A

    1981-01-01

    Five eight week old dogs were inoculated orally and intranasally with cell culture origin canine parvovirus. Three dogs became depressed and anorectic and developed a mild (one dog) to severe diarrhea five days postinfection. The remaining dogs had subclinical infections but developed a lymphopenia followed by a transient lymphocytosis. The ill dogs developed mild (one dog) to severe neutropenia and a moderate lymphopenia. One died nine days postinfection. Recovery was associated with cessation of viral excretion and with lymphocytosis and antibody production. Two of three dogs challenged intragastrically developed mild clinical signs and a moderate panleukopenia four to eight days postinfection. The pathological changes of the experimental disease were very similar to that of spontaneous disease. Bone marrow changes included a severe granulocytic and mild erythroid depletion. The pathogenesis of canine parvovirus infection is discussed. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:7340906

  6. Vanishing native American dog lineages

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dogs were an important element in many native American cultures at the time Europeans arrived. Although previous ancient DNA studies revealed the existence of unique native American mitochondrial sequences, these have not been found in modern dogs, mainly purebred, studied so far. Results We identified many previously undescribed mitochondrial control region sequences in 400 dogs from rural and isolated areas as well as street dogs from across the Americas. However, sequences of native American origin proved to be exceedingly rare, and we estimate that the native population contributed only a minor fraction of the gene pool that constitutes the modern population. Conclusions The high number of previously unidentified haplotypes in our sample suggests that a lot of unsampled genetic variation exists in non-breed dogs. Our results also suggest that the arrival of European colonists to the Americas may have led to an extensive replacement of the native American dog population by the dogs of the invaders. PMID:21418639

  7. Brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, infestation of susceptible dog hosts is reduced by slow release of semiochemicals from a less susceptible host.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Filho, Jaires Gomes; Ferreira, Lorena Lopes; Sarria, André Lucio Franceschini; Pickett, John A; Birkett, Michael A; Mascarin, Gabriel Moura; de León, Adalberto A Pérez; Borges, Lígia Miranda Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Domestic dog breeds are hosts for the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, but infestation levels vary among breeds. Beagles are less susceptible to tick infestations than English cocker spaniels due to enhanced production of 2-hexanone and benzaldehyde that act as volatile tick repellents. We report the use of prototype slow-release formulations of these compounds to reduce the burden of R. sanguineus s. l. on English cocker spaniel dogs. Twelve dogs were randomly assigned to two groups with six dogs each. The treated group received collars with slow-release formulations of the compounds attached, while the control group received collars with clean formulations attached. Five environmental infestations were performed, with the number of ticks (at all stages) on the dogs being counted twice a day for 45days. The counts on the number of tick stages found per dog were individually fitted to linear mixed effects models with repeated measures and normal distribution for errors. The mean tick infestation in the treated group was significantly lower than in the control group. For larvae and nymphs, a decrease in tick infestation was observed at the fifth count, and for adults, lower average counts were observed in all counts. The compounds did not interfere with the distribution of the ticks on the body of the dogs, as a similar percentage of ticks was found on the anterior half of the dogs (54.5% for the control group and 56.2% for the treated group). The biological and reproductive parameters of the ticks were not affected by the repellents. This study highlights for the first time the potential use of a novel allomone (repellent)-based formulation for reduction of tick infestation on susceptible dogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Is your dog empathic? Developing a Dog Emotional Reactivity Survey.

    PubMed

    Szánthó, Flóra; Miklósi, Ádám; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2017-01-01

    Dogs' seemingly empathic behaviour attracts general and scientific attention alike. Behaviour tests are usually not sufficiently realistic to evoke empathic-like behaviour; therefore we decided to ask owners about their experiences with their dogs in emotionally loaded situations. Owners from Hungary (N = 591) and from Germany (N = 2283) were asked to rate their level of agreement on a 1-5 Likert scale with statements about the reactivity of their dogs to their emotions and to other dogs' behaviour. We created two scales with satisfactory internal reliability: reactivity to the owner's emotion and reactivity to other dogs' behaviour. Based on an owner-dog personality matching theory, we hypothesised that the owner's empathy, as measured by the subscale on the cooperativeness character factor of the human personality, will correlate with their dog's emotional reactivity in emotionally loaded situations. In addition we also examined how anthropomorphism, contagious yawning, attitude toward the dog are related to emotional reactivity in dogs as perceived by the owner. In addition we examined how owners rate dog pictures. We found that the scale scores were largely independent from demographic and environmental variables like breed, sex, age, age at acquiring, keeping practices, training experiences and owner's age. However, anthropomorphic and emotional attitude of the owners probably biased the responses. In the German sample more empathic owners reported to have more emotionally reactive dog, as expected by the personality matching theory. More empathic owners reported to have fewer problems with their dogs and they rated a puppy picture as more cute in both countries. 62% of owners from Hungary and 36% of owner from Germany agreed with the statement "My dog is more important for me than any human being". In Germany, more empathic owners agreed less with this statement and indicated that their dogs have a tendency for contagious yawning. Owners whose attitudes

  9. Evaluation of praziquantel for treatment of experimentally induced paragonimiasis in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Bowman, D D; Frongillo, M K; Johnson, R C; Beck, K A; Hornbuckle, W E; Blue, J T

    1991-01-01

    Praziquantel was used successfully for treatment of a small number of dogs and 1 cat infected with Paragonimus kellicotti. To further evaluate the usefulness of this drug in treating such infections, 7 cats and 7 dogs were inoculated orally with metacercariae (12 and 20 to 22, respectively) obtained from crayfish, then were treated after the infections became patent; 2 cats and 2 dogs served as noninfected controls. Beginning 1 week before infection, and continuing weekly thereafter, physical, hematologic, and fecal examinations were performed on each animal; thoracic radiography was performed every other week. By postinoculation week 6, all dogs given metacercariae had patent infection diagnosed on the basis of positive results of fecal examination. By postinoculation week 7, 5 cats had confirmed patent infection, but 2 cats given metacercariae never had patent infection or had signs of infection. Clinical signs of infection were minor and included increased respiratory tract noise, slight inducible cough, or mild dyspnea. Transient eosinophilia was detected in dogs around postinoculation week 3. Pretreatment radiography revealed cavitated lesions in cats only; pleural lines and patchy infiltrates in cats and dogs; or pneumothorax in dogs only. The treatment regimen consisted of 23 mg of praziquantel/kg of body weight given every 8 hours for 3 days; 1 infected cat and dog were not treated. By 11 days after treatment, eggs had disappeared from the feces of infected animals, and marked resolution of lung lesions was evident radiographically.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Efficacy and safety of cefovecin (Convenia) for the treatment of urinary tract infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Passmore, C A; Sherington, J; Stegemann, M R

    2007-03-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of cefovecin (Convenia); Pfizer Animal Health) in the treatment of urinary tract infections in dogs. A multi-centre, blinded, randomised study was conducted in 129 dogs with urinary tract infections. Cephalexin (Rilexine) administered twice daily at 15 mg/kg bodyweight orally for 14 days was compared with a single, subcutaneous injection of cefovecin (Convenia) in dogs. The primary efficacy parameter assessed was bacterial elimination of the pretreatment uropathogen. One hundred and twenty-nine dogs were included in efficacy assessments. Escherichia coli was eliminated in 90.5 per cent of cefovecin-treated dogs compared with 52.9 per cent of cephalexin-treated dogs (P=0.0004). Overall cure rates for dogs with Escherichia coli infections were 79.1 per cent for cefovecin and 36.4 per cent for cephalexin-treated dogs (P=0.0003). There were no suspected adverse drug reactions attributed to treatment with cefovecin or cephalexin. Cefovecin was shown to be an effective and safe treatment for urinary tract infections.

  11. Effects of radiotherapy on pituitary corticotroph macrotumors in dogs: A retrospective study of 12 cases

    PubMed Central

    de Fornel, Pauline; Delisle, Françoise; Devauchelle, Patrick; Rosenberg, Dan

    2007-01-01

    The efficacy of low doses of radiotherapy for the treatment of pituitary corticotroph macrotumors in dogs is evaluated retrospectively. Twelve dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism and a large pituitary tumor treated with 36 Gy of radiation were included. Radiation was delivered in 12 fractions of 3 Gy over a 4- to 6-week period. Effects of radiation therapy on tumor size were assessed by computed tomography scans; a decrease was observed in 11 dogs (decrease > 50% in 6 dogs). Three dogs were reirradiated due to major tumor regrowth or a lack of tumor decrease (mean total dose: 22 Gy given in 3-Gy fractions over 3 or 4 weeks). The mean and median survival times following the initiation of radiotherapy were 22.6 months (688 days) and 17.7 months (539 days), respectively. These data are consistent with previous findings, based on high-dose radiation, showing that radiotherapy is a useful option for treating pituitary corticotroph macrotumors in dogs. Furthermore, computed tomography follow-up of the treated dogs demonstrates objectively the efficacy of radiotherapy against corticotroph tumors in dogs. PMID:17542365

  12. Protothecosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Vince, Andrew R; Pinard, Chantale; Ogilvie, Adam T; Tan, Emmeline O; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C G

    2014-10-01

    A case of a disseminated algal infection is reported in a young rough-coated collie dog with progressive neurologic deficits, blindness, and hemorrhagic diarrhea. Prototheca zopfii organisms were cultured from feces, urine, and blood. At necropsy, granulomas containing typical organisms were identified within the proximal colon, heart, kidneys, and eyes.

  13. Neosporosis in dogs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Neospora caninum is a protozoan parasite of animals. Until 1988, it was misdiagnosed as Toxoplasma gondii. Since its first recognition in 1984 and the description of a new genus and species Neospora caninum in 1988, neosporosis has emerged as a serious disease of dogs and cattle worldwide. Additiona...

  14. Zen Hot Dog Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Substituted cycloalkanes with one branch illustrating each topic in an instructional unit can serve as summaries or reviews in courses of organic chemistry. The hungry Zen master told the hot dog vendor to make him one with everything. You can do the same for your students.

  15. Automatic imitation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Range, Friederike; Huber, Ludwig; Heyes, Cecilia

    2011-01-22

    After preliminary training to open a sliding door using their head and their paw, dogs were given a discrimination task in which they were rewarded with food for opening the door using the same method (head or paw) as demonstrated by their owner (compatible group), or for opening the door using the alternative method (incompatible group). The incompatible group, which had to counterimitate to receive food reward, required more trials to reach a fixed criterion of discrimination performance (85% correct) than the compatible group. This suggests that, like humans, dogs are subject to 'automatic imitation'; they cannot inhibit online the tendency to imitate head use and/or paw use. In a subsequent transfer test, where all dogs were required to imitate their owners' head and paw use for food reward, the incompatible group made a greater proportion of incorrect, counterimitative responses than the compatible group. These results are consistent with the associative sequence learning model, which suggests that the development of imitation depends on sensorimotor experience and phylogenetically general mechanisms of associative learning. More specifically, they suggest that the imitative behaviour of dogs is shaped more by their developmental interactions with humans than by their evolutionary history of domestication.

  16. Automatic imitation in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Range, Friederike; Huber, Ludwig; Heyes, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    After preliminary training to open a sliding door using their head and their paw, dogs were given a discrimination task in which they were rewarded with food for opening the door using the same method (head or paw) as demonstrated by their owner (compatible group), or for opening the door using the alternative method (incompatible group). The incompatible group, which had to counterimitate to receive food reward, required more trials to reach a fixed criterion of discrimination performance (85% correct) than the compatible group. This suggests that, like humans, dogs are subject to ‘automatic imitation’; they cannot inhibit online the tendency to imitate head use and/or paw use. In a subsequent transfer test, where all dogs were required to imitate their owners' head and paw use for food reward, the incompatible group made a greater proportion of incorrect, counterimitative responses than the compatible group. These results are consistent with the associative sequence learning model, which suggests that the development of imitation depends on sensorimotor experience and phylogenetically general mechanisms of associative learning. More specifically, they suggest that the imitative behaviour of dogs is shaped more by their developmental interactions with humans than by their evolutionary history of domestication. PMID:20667875

  17. Zen Hot Dog Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Dennis

    2009-04-01

    Substituted cycloalkanes with one branch illustrating each topic in an instructional unit can serve as summaries or reviews in courses of organic chemistry. The hungry Zen master told the hot dog vendor to make him one with everything. You can do the same for your students.

  18. Thoracolumbar partial lateral corpectomy for the treatment of chronic intervertebral disc disease in 107 dogs.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, François-Xavier; Moissonnier, Pierre; Filleur, Aurélie; Cachon, Thibaut; Fau, Didier; Viguier, Eric; Carozzo, Claude

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess short-and medium-term outcomes in dogs with chronic ventral thoracolumbar intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) treated by thoracolumbar partial lateral corpectomy (TLPLC). Dogs surgically treated for chronic ventral IVDD by TLPLC were included. For each dog, neurological status evolution and complications were reported. Factors that could have influenced neurological recovery were statistically tested. A total of 107 dogs were included in the study. Before surgery, 67.3 % of the dogs were able to walk, 24.3 % were grade 3, and 8.4 % were grade 4. The median hospitalization time was 3 days, and 82.2 % of the dogs were able to walk at discharge. The medium-term neurological grade was reached at a median time of 2 months. At the medium-term follow-up (median 12 months), 74.3 % of the dogs were neurologically improved, 22.9 % were stable, and 2.8 % were worsened. A total of 91.4 % of dogs were ambulatory, with 58.6 % of dogs having a normal gait. Preoperative neurological grade was significantly associated with the neurological status 24 h after the surgery and at discharge. Dogs with a higher preoperative neurological grade had a better chance of improving but lower odds of walking at 24 h after the surgery and at discharge compared with dogs with a lower preoperative grade. Spinal compression recurrence at the same surgical site was confirmed in 8 cases. Even if TLPLC leads to several intra and postoperative complications, this technique is a viable surgical option to treat chronic ventral IVDD.

  19. Effects of doxycycline on heartworm embryogenesis, transmission, circulating microfilaria, and adult worms in microfilaremic dogs.

    PubMed

    McCall, J W; Kramer, L; Genchi, C; Guerrero, J; Dzimianski, M T; Mansour, A; McCall, S D; Carson, B

    2014-11-15

    Tetracycline treatment of animals or humans infected with filariae that harbor Wolbachia endosymbionts blocks further embryogenesis, and existing microfilariae gradually die. This treatment also kills developing larvae and has a slow-kill effect on adult filariae, all presumably due to elimination of the Wolbachia. Also, Dirofilaria immitis microfilariae in blood collected from dogs up to 25 days after the last dose of doxycycline developed to infective L3 that were normal in appearance and motility in mosquitoes but did not continue to develop or migrate normally after subcutaneous (SC) injection into dogs. The present study was designed to determine whether heartworm microfilariae collected at later times after treatment would regain the ability to continue normal development in a dog. The study also was expected to yield valuable data on the effects of treatment on microfilariae and antigen levels and adult worms. The study was conducted in 16 dogs as two separate replicates at different times. A total of five dogs (two in Replicate A and three in Replicate B) infected either by SC injection of L3 or intravenous transplantation of adult heartworms were given doxycycline orally at 10mg/kg twice daily for 30 days, with three untreated controls. Microfilarial counts in the five treated dogs gradually declined during the 12-13 months after treatment initiation. Two dogs were amicrofilaremic before necropsy and three had 13 or fewer microfilariae/ml. Only one treated dog was negative for heartworm antigen before necropsy. Overall, treated dogs generally had fewer live adult heartworms than controls, and most of their live worms were moribund. All three control dogs remained positive for microfilariae and antigen and had many live worms. L3 from mosquitoes fed on blood collected 73-77 or 161-164 days after initiation of doxycycline treatments were injected SC into five dogs. None of the dogs injected with L3 from mosquitoes fed on blood from doxycycline-treated dogs

  20. Babesia gibsoni infection in a dog from indiana.

    PubMed

    Irizarry-Rovira, Armando R.; Stephens, Julie; Christian, John; Kjemtrup, Anne; DeNicola, Dennis B.; Widmer, William R.; Conrad, Patricia A.

    2001-01-01

    A 10-year-old spayed female mixed-breed dog was presented to the Purdue University Veterinary Teaching Hospital (PUVTH) with complaints of persistent anemia with occasional exacerbations, anorexia, and lethargy. The dog had been presented to the referring veterinarian 2 months prior with multiple bite wounds received during a fight with 3 Pit Bull Terriers. The dog was discharged after the wounds were cleaned and surgically closed. Upon admission to the PUVTH, blood was collected for a complete blood count and biochemical analysis. Microscopic examination of peripheral blood smears revealed intraerythrocytic protozoal parasites consistent with Babesia gibsoni. Molecular analysis confirmed that the organism was B. gibsoni and that its 18S ribosomal RNA sequence was identical to that of other B. gibsoni isolates from Oklahoma, North Carolina, and Okinawa, Japan. Hematologic changes included moderately severe, regenerative, macrocytic, normochromic anemia, with poikilocytosis, polychromasia, anisocytosis, and a marked increase in nucleated RBCs. Biochemical changes included increased serum alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase activities. The dog was treated with imidocarb, but despite initial clinical improvement, the dog died 2 weeks after the first dose. A necropsy was not performed. The infection in this dog is the first reported case of B. gibsoni infection in Indiana. Because of the widespread geographical distribution of the organism, veterinarians and veterinary clinical pathologists throughout the United States should carefully examine Romanowsky-stained blood smears from patients with acute hemolytic anemia for small intraerythrocytic babesial parasites.

  1. Use of an activity monitor to detect response to treatment in dogs with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Dorothy Cimino; Boston, Raymond C.; Farrar, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether an activity monitor (AM) could be used to detect changes in activity in dogs with osteoarthritis treated with carprofen or a placebo. Design Randomized controlled trial. Animals 70 dogs with no clinically important abnormalities other than osteoarthritis for which they were not currently being treated. Procedures Dogs wore an AM continuously for 21 days. On days 8 through 21, the dogs were treated with carprofen (n = 35) or a placebo (35). Total activity counts for days 1 through 7 (baseline) were compared with total activity counts for days 15 through 21 (endpoint). The change in total activity count from baseline to endpoint was assessed within each treatment group as well as between groups. Linear regression analysis was performed to test for an association between treatment and percentage change in activity counts while controlling for other variables. Results For placebo-treated dogs, median baseline total activity count was not significantly different from median endpoint total activity count (1,378,408 vs 1,310,112, respectively). For dogs receiving carprofen, there was a significant increase in median activity count from baseline to endpoint (1,276,427 vs 1,374,133). When age and baseline activity counts were controlled for, dogs in the carpofen-treated group had a 20% increase in activity counts, compared with placebo-treated dogs (95% confidence interval, 10% to 26%). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results suggested that the AM used in the present study may be a valid outcome assessment tool for documenting improved activity associated with treatment in dogs with osteoarthritis. PMID:20590496

  2. Parasites and vector-borne diseases in client-owned dogs in Albania: infestation with arthropod ectoparasites.

    PubMed

    Shukullari, Enstela; Rapti, Dhimitër; Visser, Martin; Pfister, Kurt; Rehbein, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    To establish the diversity and seasonality of ectoparasite infestation in client-owned dogs in Albania, 602 dogs visiting four small animal clinics in Tirana from March 2010 to April 2011 inclusive were examined for ectoparasites by full body search and total body comb. In addition, ear swab specimens collected from all dogs and scrapings taken from skin lesions suspicious of mite infestation were examined for parasitic mites. Overall, 93 dogs (15.4 %, 95%CI 12.6-18.6) were demonstrated to be infested, and nine species of ectoparasites were identified: Ixodes ricinus, 0.8 %; Rhipicephalus sanguineus s. l., 8.1 %; Demodex canis, 0.2 %; Sarcoptes scabiei, 0.7 %; Otodectes cynotis, 2.8 %; Ctenocephalides canis, 4.8 %; Ctenocephalides felis, 3.0 %; Pulex irritans, 0.2 %; and Trichodectes canis, 0.2 %. Single and multiple infestations with up to four species of ectoparasites concurrently were recorded in 67 (11.1 %, 95%CI 8.7-13.9) and 26 dogs (4.3 %, 95%CI 2.8-6.3), respectively. On univariate analysis, the category of breed (pure breed dogs vs. mixed-breed dogs), the dog's purpose (pet, hunting dog, working dog), the housing environment (mainly indoors/indoors with regular outside walking vs. yard plus kennel/run), the history of ectoparasiticide treatment and the season of examination were identified as significant (p < 0.05) factors predisposing dogs to various ectoparasites, while the variables dog's age, gender, the dog's habitat (city, suburban, rural) and the presence/absence of other pets were not significant predictors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis for factors associated with overall ectoparasitism revealed that dogs treated with ectoparasiticides at least once per year (odds ratio [OR] = 0.24; p < 0.001) had a significantly lower risk of infestation compared with dogs not treated against ectoparasite infestation. Dogs examined during spring, summer and autumn (OR = 7.08, 7.43 and 2.48, respectively; all p < 0

  3. Use of imidacloprid-permethrin to prevent transmission of Anaplasma phagocytophilum from naturally infected Ixodes scapularis ticks to dogs.

    PubMed

    Blagburn, Byron L; Spencer, Jennifer A; Billeter, Sarah A; Drazenovich, Nicole L; Butler, Jamie M; Land, Tracey M; Dykstra, Christine C; Stafford, Kirby C; Pough, Margaret B; Levy, Steven A; Bledsoe, David L

    2004-01-01

    One group of eight beagles was treated with a combination of imidacloprid and permethrin 7 days before exposure to Ixodes scapularis ticks that were naturally infected with Anaplasma phagocytophilum. A second group of eight beagles was not treated and was also exposed to infected ticks. Seven of eight non-treated dogs--but none of the treated dogs--developed specific antibodies to A. phagocytophilum. Results of this study indicate that a combination of imidacloprid and permethrin can prevent transmission of A. phagocytophilum to dogs if administered before exposure to infected ticks.

  4. Efficacy of emodepside plus toltrazuril oral suspension for dogs (Procox®, Bayer) against Trichuris vulpis in naturally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Petry, Gabriele; Altreuther, Gertraut; Wolken, Sonja; Swart, Petro; Kok, Dawie J

    2013-08-01

    The efficacy of emodepside plus toltrazuril oral suspension for dogs (Procox®, Bayer) against Trichuris vulpis was evaluated in a controlled, blinded and randomised laboratory study. Twenty naturally infected dogs were included. Dogs in the treatment group received the minimum therapeutic dose of 0.45 mg emodepside and 9 mg toltrazuril per kg body weight, while dogs in the control group were left untreated. Efficacy was calculated based on worm counts after necropsy on Day 7 post treatment. Additionally, all faeces were collected and examined for expelled worms. The treatment was 100 % effective. A total of 233 adult worms (geometric mean 17.0) and 3 immature adult worms were found in the control group at necropsy. Adequacy of infection was demonstrated. The treated group excreted a total of 186 adult worms within 2 days after treatment. Additionally, all dogs were co-infected with Uncinaria stenocephala. Efficacy against this parasite was 99.8 %. No side effects of the treatment were observed. This study demonstrates that in addition to the formerly proven efficacy against Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum and Uncinaria stenocephala, emodepside plus toltrazuril suspension is also effective against T. vulpis and thus represents a convenient treatment option for dogs co-infected with whipworms and coccidia.

  5. Radiographic liver size in Pekingese dogs versus other dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jihye; Keh, Seoyeon; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Junyoung; Yoon, Junghee

    2013-01-01

    Differential diagnoses for canine liver disease are commonly based on radiographic estimates of liver size, however little has been published on breed variations. Aims of this study were to describe normal radiographic liver size in Pekingese dogs and to compare normal measurements for this breed with other dog breeds and Pekingese dogs with liver disease. Liver measurements were compared for clinically normal Pekingese (n = 61), normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic (n = 45), normal nonbrachycephalic (n = 71), and Pekingese breed dogs with liver disease (n = 22). For each dog, body weight, liver length, T11 vertebral length, thoracic depth, and thoracic width were measured on right lateral and ventrodorsal abdominal radiographs. Liver volume was calculated using a formula and ratios of liver length/T11 vertebral length and liver volume/body weight ratio were determined. Normal Pekingese dogs had a significantly smaller liver volume/body weight ratio (16.73 ± 5.67, P < 0.05) than normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic breed dogs (19.54 ± 5.03) and normal nonbrachycephalic breed dogs (18.72 ± 6.52). The liver length/T11 vertebral length ratio in normal Pekingese (4.64 ± 0.65) was significantly smaller than normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic breed dogs (5.16 ± 0.74) and normal nonbrachycephalic breed dogs (5.40 ± 0.74). Ratios of liver volume/body weight and liver length/T11 vertebral length in normal Pekingese were significantly different from Pekingese with liver diseases (P < 0.05). Findings supported our hypothesis that Pekingese dogs have a smaller normal radiographic liver size than other breeds. We recommend using 4.64× the length of the T11 vertebra as a radiographic criterion for normal liver length in Pekingese dogs. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  6. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy and therapeutic exercise for supraspinatus and biceps tendinopathies in 29 dogs.

    PubMed

    Leeman, J J; Shaw, K K; Mison, M B; Perry, J A; Carr, A; Shultz, R

    2016-10-15

    Supraspinatus tendinopathy (ST) and biceps tendinopathy (BT) are common causes of forelimb lameness in large-breed dogs and have historically been treated with conservative management or surgery. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) and therapeutic exercise (TE) are thought to be treatment options for these conditions. The objectives of this study were to report the clinical presentations of dogs treated with ESWT for shoulder tendinopathies, to determine the association between shoulder lesion severity identified on ultrasonography or MRI and outcome, and to compare the outcomes of dogs treated with ESWT with and without TE. Medical records of 29 dogs diagnosed with shoulder tendinopathies and treated with ESWT were reviewed, and 24 dogs were diagnosed with either unilateral BT or BT and ST. None were found to have unilateral ST. Five dogs were diagnosed with bilateral disease. Eighty-five per cent of dogs had good or excellent outcomes determined by owner assessment 11-220 weeks after therapy. Outcomes were found to be better as tendon lesion severity increased (P=0.0497), regardless if ESWT was performed with or without TE (P=0.92). ESWT should be considered a safe primary therapeutic option for canine shoulder tendinopathies. Larger controlled prospective studies are needed to adequately assess these findings.

  7. Xylitol and Your Dog: Danger, Paws Off

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Xylitol and Your Dog: Danger, Paws Off Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... back to top Why is Xylitol Dangerous to Dogs, but Not People? In both people and dogs, ...

  8. Human-dog interactions in a guide-dog training program.

    PubMed

    Koda, N; Shimoju, S

    1999-06-01

    We analyzed dyadic interactions between 12 neutered dogs (6 females and 6 males) and 44 humans (20 women, 14 men, and 10 girls) who were unfamiliar with each other. We also examined the effect of sex differences in dogs and humans as well as age differences in humans on human-dog interactions in a guide-dog training program. Female dogs more actively regulated their distance from humans than male dogs. Dogs made contact with women more frequently than with men, and men made contact with dogs more frequently than women. Girls initiated interactions with dogs more frequently than women; girls formed reciprocal interactions with dogs less frequently than women.

  9. Impact of collaborative care on survival time for dogs with congestive heart failure and revenue for attending primary care veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Lefbom, Bonnie K; Peckens, Neal K

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of in-person collaborative care by primary care veterinarians (pcDVMs) and board-certified veterinary cardiologists (BCVCs) on survival time of dogs after onset of congestive heart failure (CHF) and on associated revenue for the attending pcDVMs. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. ANIMALS 26 small-breed dogs treated for naturally occurring CHF secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease at a multilocation primary care veterinary hospital between 2008 and 2013. PROCEDURES Electronic medical records were reviewed to identify dogs with confirmed CHF secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease and collect information on patient care, survival time, and pcDVM revenue. Data were compared between dogs that received collaborative care from the pcDVM and a BCVC and dogs that received care from the pcDVM alone. RESULTS Dogs that received collaborative care had a longer median survival time (254 days) than did dogs that received care from the pcDVM alone (146 days). A significant positive correlation was identified between pcDVM revenue and survival time for dogs that received collaborative care (ie, the longer the dog survived, the greater the pcDVM revenue generated from caring for that patient). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that collaborative care provided to small-breed dogs with CHF by a BCVC and pcDVM could result in survival benefits for affected dogs and increased revenue for pcDVMs, compared with care provided by a pcDVM alone.

  10. Effects of Trilostane on urinary Catecholamines and their metabolites in dogs with Hypercortisolism.

    PubMed

    Sieber-Ruckstuhl, Nadja; Salesov, Elena; Quante, Saskia; Riond, Barbara; Rentsch, Katharina; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Reusch, Claudia; Boretti, Felicitas

    2017-09-04

    Glucocorticoids influence the synthesis and metabolism of catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine) and metanephrines (metanephrine and normetanephrine). The aim of this study was to measure urinary catecholamines and metanephrines in dogs with hypercortisolism before and during trilostane therapy. Urine samples were collected during initial work up and during therapy with trilostane in 14 dogs with hypercortisolism and in 25 healthy dogs. Epinephrine, norepinephrine, metanephrine and normetanephrine were measured using high-pressure liquid chromatography and expressed as ratios to urinary creatinine concentration. Untreated dogs with hypercortisolism had significantly higher epinephrine, norepinephrine, and normetanephrine:creatinine ratios compared to healthy dogs. During trilostane therapy, urinary catecholamines and their metabolites did not decrease significantly. However, dogs with low post-ACTH cortisol concentrations during trilostane therapy had less increased epinephrine, norepinephrine and normetanephrine:creatinine ratios compared to healthy dogs. There was no correlation of urinary catecholamines and their metabolites with baseline or post-ACTH cortisol or endogenous ACTH concentrations during trilostane therapy. Influences between steroid hormones and catecholamines seem to occur, as dogs with hypercortisolism have significantly higher urinary epinephrine, norepinephrine, and normetanephrine:creatinine ratios. Once-daily trilostane therapy does not lead to a significant decrease in catecholamines and their metabolites. Trilostane-treated dogs still have increased urinary epinephrine, norepinephrine and normetanephrine:creatinine ratios during trilostane therapy.

  11. Conventional bone plate fixation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, J M; Macías, C

    2016-03-01

    To describe the outcome of bone plate fixation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs treated with conventional bone plates. Records of 15 toy breed dogs with distal radius and ulna fractures were retrospectively reviewed for signalment, method of fixation, complications and clinical and radiographic assessments. A telephone-based owner questionnaire was conducted to determine long-term function and client satisfaction. Age ranged from 4 months to 6 years. Body weight ranged from 1 to 4 kg. Dynamic compression plates were used in 13 dogs and veterinary cuttable plates were used in 2 dogs as the means of fixation. Full radiographic and clinical follow-up data were available for 10 dogs and follow-up was performed between 6 and 8 weeks postoperatively. At that time, all fractures had healed and return to function was considered excellent in all 10 dogs. Five dogs did not return for hospital evaluation because they were judged by their owners to be free of lameness. In two cases, owners could not be contacted by telephone, but the referring veterinarians reported the dogs to be asymptomatic. No major complications occurred. Conventional bone plates are suitable choices for stabilisation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs and are not necessarily correlated with high rates of complication. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  12. Disambiguating the "guilty look": salient prompts to a familiar dog behaviour.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Alexandra

    2009-07-01

    Anthropomorphisms are regularly used by owners in describing their dogs. Of interest is whether attributions of understanding and emotions to dogs are sound, or are unwarranted applications of human psychological terms to non-humans. One attribution commonly made to dogs is that the "guilty look" shows that dogs feel guilt at doing a disallowed action. In the current study, this anthropomorphism is empirically tested. The behaviours of 14 domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) were videotaped over a series of trials and analyzed for elements that correspond to an owner-identified "guilty look." Trials varied the opportunity for dogs to disobey an owner's command not to eat a desirable treat while the owner was out of the room, and varied the owners' knowledge of what their dogs did in their absence. The results revealed no difference in behaviours associated with the guilty look. By contrast, more such behaviours were seen in trials when owners scolded their dogs. The effect of scolding was more pronounced when the dogs were obedient, not disobedient. These results indicate that a better description of the so-called guilty look is that it is a response to owner cues, rather than that it shows an appreciation of a misdeed.

  13. Treatment of partial seizures and seizure-like activity with felbamate in six dogs.

    PubMed

    Ruehlmann, D; Podell, M; March, P

    2001-08-01

    Six dogs with partial seizures or partial seizure-like activity were treated with the antiepileptic drug felbamate between 1993 and 1998. All dogs had a history and results of diagnostic testing suggestive of either primary (idiopathic) or occult secondary epilepsy. Dogs ranged between four months and eight years of age at the onset of seizure activity. The median time period between onset of the first seizure and the start of felbamate therapy was 3.8 months (range 0.75 to 36 months). Median duration of therapy was nine months (range two to 22 months). All dogs experienced a reduction in seizure frequency after felbamate administration. Median total number of seizures post-treatment was two (range 0 to 9). Two dogs had an immediate and prolonged cessation of seizure activity. Steady-state trough serum felbamate concentrations measured at two weeks, and one, 12 and 22 months after the commencement of therapy in four dogs ranged between 13 and 55 mg/litre (median 35 mg/litre). Reversible haematological adverse effects were detected in two dogs, with one dog developing concurrent keratoconjunctivitis sicca. These results suggest that felbamate can be an effective antiepileptic drug without life-threatening complications when used as monotherapy for partial seizures in the dog.

  14. Treatment of naturally occurring, asymptomatic Giardia sp. in dogs with Drontal Plus flavour tablets.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Dwight D; Liotta, Janice L; Ulrich, Michael; Charles, Sam D; Heine, Josef; Schaper, Roland

    2009-08-01

    The administration of three consecutive daily doses of the recommended 1x dose of Drontal Plus flavour tablets (Bayer) was examined for its effect on Giardia sp. cyst-shedding in 7 treated and 7 untreated random-source dogs. Dogs were treated on study days 0, 1 and 2. Cysts were quantified using direct immunofluorescent labelling on days -7, -5, -3 and -2, and daily from day 1 through 11. Three treated dogs never shed cysts again during the study, one shed again only on day 4, and the remaining three dogs started to shed again on days 8, 9 and 11. The mean numbers of cysts per gramme in the faeces of the treated dogs were significantly reduced (t-tests using log(10)(counts)) on days 1 and 2 (geometric means: controls = 447,000; treated = 1,050; p = 0.004) and days 3 to 8 (geometric means: controls = 23,400; treated 5.0; p < 0.001). Four controls that had been consistently positive, changed to negative status on day 11, and thus, on the final day of the trial, there were only three positive control and three positive treated dogs. Three consecutive days of treatment with Drontal Plus flavour tablets halted Giardia sp. cyst shedding by dogs. But starting six days post third treatment, some of the dogs started shedding cysts again. Since the prepatent period of Giardia sp. can be as short as 4 days, shedding of Giardia sp. cysts 6 days after treatment could be caused by a reinfection.

  15. [Canine leishmaniosis in Central Europe: retrospective survey and serological study of imported and travelling dogs].

    PubMed

    Mettler, Maik; Grimm, Felix; Naucke, Torsten J; Maasjost, Christiane; Deplazes, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Canine leishmaniosis is a common parasitic disease in Central Europe affecting dogs imported or returning from endemic countries around the Mediterranean basin. Through an internet discussion forum owners of dogs with suspected or proven leishmaniosis living in Central Europe (D, A, CH), were questioned about the dog's history. Additionally, serologic examinations of the dogs for anti-Leishmania antibodies (ELISA using antigen of promastigote stages) were offered to the participants. From February to October 2003, 291 dogs imported or returning from Southern Europe (Spain, Italy, Greece, Turkey, France, Malta, Portugal and others) were analysed. Serologically, 111 dogs (38%) were classified positive; 103 being imported and eight travelling dogs. The majority of seropositive dogs originated from Spain (67%). No significant correlation could be established between race, sex and age and the incidence of the disease. The clinical symptoms in the seropositive dogs varied widely and ranged from mild general symptoms to visceral manifestations with chronic renal failure. Skin disorders were found in 78% of the seropositive, symptomatic animals. In the country of origin or after import or return, 174 out of 291 dogs (60%) had been tested for the presence of anti-Leishmania antibodies by different immunofluorescence antibody tests (IFAT). Discrepancies between the ELISA and the various IFATs used were noted in 55 cases (32%), especially in cases of low IFAT titers. Most of the seropositive dogs (80%) had been treated against leishmaniosis. In 91% of these cases, Allopurinol as monotherapy or in combination with Glucantime had been used. For diagnostics and therapy, dog owners had spent an average of 1,100 euros (median 900 euros, maximum 5,800 euros).

  16. Evaluation of prognostic factors for dogs with synovial sarcoma: 36 cases (1986-1991).

    PubMed

    Vail, D M; Powers, B E; Getzy, D M; Morrison, W B; McEntee, M C; O'Keefe, D A; Norris, A M; Withrow, S J

    1994-11-01

    Medical records of 36 dogs with synovial sarcoma confirmed by microscopic examination of H&E-stained sections of tissue were selected for retrospective analysis from dogs admitted between 1986 and 1991 to participating institutions of the Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group. Metastasis was evident at the time of diagnosis in 8 (22%) dogs, and 15 (41%) dogs ultimately developed metastatic tumors. Median survival time for all dogs, as determined by life-table analysis, was 17 months. For dogs that were subsequently treated and became tumor free, the median disease-free interval was 30 months. Nine dogs had previously had localized excision attempted, but all had recurrence of the tumor locally (median, 4.5 months). Of 29 dogs that underwent amputation, including the 9 with localized recurrence, 2 had tumor recurrence on the amputation stump. Most dogs had survival time and disease-free interval of > 36 months after amputation. Four dogs that had received chemotherapy for tumors of advanced clinical stages did not respond to treatment. One dog that had received locally applied radiotherapy after localized excision did not have evidence of tumor recurrence 2 years after radiotherapy. Clinical stage, histologic grade, and a positive result for tests that used cytokeratin immunohistochemical staining significantly (P < 0.05) influenced survival time and disease-free interval. Analysis of data for the study reported here suggested that histologic criteria can be an excellent predictor of dogs that are likely to have tumor recurrence after amputation and that would most likely benefit from aggressive treatment with adjuvants.

  17. Efficacy of fluralaner against Otodectes cynotis infestations in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Taenzler, Janina; de Vos, Christa; Roepke, Rainer K A; Frénais, Régis; Heckeroth, Anja R

    2017-01-16

    The efficacy of fluralaner for the treatment of Otodectes cynotis infestations in dogs and cats was evaluated after oral (dogs) or topical administration (dogs and cats). Twenty-four dogs and sixteen cats were experimentally infested with O. cynotis and randomly allocated to equal sized groups (n = 8/group). Dog groups were treated once, either orally with fluralaner at a minimum dose of 25 mg/kg body weight, topically with fluralaner at a dose of 25 mg/kg body weight or topically with saline solution (control). Cat groups were treated once, either topically with fluralaner at a dose of 40 mg/kg body weight or topically with saline solution. Ears of all animals were examined otoscopically for live visible mites and the amount of debris and cerumen before, and 14 and 28 days after treatment. Twenty-eight days after treatment, animals were sedated and both ears were flushed to obtain the total number of live mites per animal. The efficacy was calculated, based on the results of the ear flushing, by comparing mean live mite counts in the fluralaner treated groups versus the saline solution treated group. A single topical treatment of cats with fluralaner reduced the mean mite counts by 100% (P < 0.001) at 28 days after treatment. Similarly, a single oral or topical treatment of dogs with fluralaner reduced the mean mite counts by 99.8% (P < 0.001) at 28 days after treatment. Cats treated topically with fluralaner had no mites visible during otoscopic examination at either 14 or 28 days after treatment. All dogs treated orally or topically with fluralaner had no mites visible during otoscopic examination at 28 days after treatment. At 14 days after treatment, only 1-2 mites were visible in three dogs (oral treatment: 2 dogs, topical treatment: 1 dog). All fluralaner-treated animals showed improvement in the amount of cerumen exudation compared with observations performed before treatment. No treatment related adverse events were observed in any

  18. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    PubMed Central

    Piotti, Patrizia; Kaminski, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs’ abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human’s goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs’ behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs’ behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs’ neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor). The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human’s vocal communication and the presence

  19. Efficacy of fipronil, amitraz and (S)-methoprene combination spot-on for dogs against adult dog fleas (Ctenocephalides canis, Curtis, 1826).

    PubMed

    Bouhsira, Emilie; Yoon, Stephen S; Roques, Martine; Manavella, Coralie; Vermot, Solange; Cramer, Luiz G; Ollagnier, Catherine; Franc, Michel

    2011-07-15

    A novel spot-on formulation combining fipronil, amitraz and (S)-methoprene (CERTIFECT™, Merial Limited, GA, USA) was evaluated in adult Beagle dogs in a study to determine its adulticidal efficacy against the dog flea (Ctenocephalides canis, Curtis, 1826). Sixteen dogs were randomly allocated to treatment groups: 8 dogs served as untreated controls, and 8 dogs were treated once. Treatment consisted of applying a new combination formulation to deliver at least 6.7mg fipronil/kg body weight (bw), 8.0mg amitraz/kg bw, and 6.0mg (S)-methoprene/kg bw. The combination was designed to enhance the efficacy against ticks of the original fipronil/(S)-methoprene combination. Each dog was infested with 100 adult unfed dog fleas within 24h prior to treatment and then at weekly intervals for 8 weeks after treatment. At 24h after treatment or after each subsequent infestation, each dog was combed thoroughly to remove live fleas to be counted. A single treatment with CERTIFECT provided excellent knock-down of fleas within 24h after treatment and controlled re-infestations for up to 7 weeks (efficacy ≥96.5%, p<0.05). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Probable essential thrombocythemia in a dog

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, P.E.; Mandell, C.P.; Turrel, J.M.; Jain, N.C.; Tablin, F.; Zinkl, J.G.

    1989-04-01

    Essential thrombocythemia (ET), in an 11-year-old dog was characterized by persistently high platelet counts range, 4.19 X 10(6)/microliters to 4.95 X 10(6)/microliters, abnormal platelet morphology, marked megakaryocytic hyperplasia in the bone marrow, absence of circulating megakaryoblasts, and history of splenomegaly and gastrointestinal bleeding. Increased numbers of megakaryocytes and megakaryoblasts (15% to 20%) in the bone marrow were confirmed by a positive acetylcholinesterase reaction. Another significant finding was the presence of a basophilia in blood (4,836/microliters) and bone marrow. The marked persistent thrombocytosis, absence of reactive (secondary) thrombocytosis, abnormal platelet morphology, and quantitative and qualitative changes in the megakaryocytic series in the bone marrow suggested the presence of a myeloproliferative disease. Cytochemical and ultrastructural findings aided in the diagnosis of ET. The dog was treated with radiophosphorus. The results was a rapid decline in the numbers of megakaryoblasts and megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and platelets and basophils in the peripheral blood. The dog died unexpectedly of acute necrotizing pancreatitis and diabetes mellitus before a complete remission was achieved.

  1. Is your dog empathic? Developing a Dog Emotional Reactivity Survey

    PubMed Central

    Szánthó, Flóra; Miklósi, Ádám; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2017-01-01

    Dogs' seemingly empathic behaviour attracts general and scientific attention alike. Behaviour tests are usually not sufficiently realistic to evoke empathic-like behaviour; therefore we decided to ask owners about their experiences with their dogs in emotionally loaded situations. Owners from Hungary (N = 591) and from Germany (N = 2283) were asked to rate their level of agreement on a 1–5 Likert scale with statements about the reactivity of their dogs to their emotions and to other dogs’ behaviour. We created two scales with satisfactory internal reliability: reactivity to the owner’s emotion and reactivity to other dogs’ behaviour. Based on an owner-dog personality matching theory, we hypothesised that the owner’s empathy, as measured by the subscale on the cooperativeness character factor of the human personality, will correlate with their dog’s emotional reactivity in emotionally loaded situations. In addition we also examined how anthropomorphism, contagious yawning, attitude toward the dog are related to emotional reactivity in dogs as perceived by the owner. In addition we examined how owners rate dog pictures. We found that the scale scores were largely independent from demographic and environmental variables like breed, sex, age, age at acquiring, keeping practices, training experiences and owner's age. However, anthropomorphic and emotional attitude of the owners probably biased the responses. In the German sample more empathic owners reported to have more emotionally reactive dog, as expected by the personality matching theory. More empathic owners reported to have fewer problems with their dogs and they rated a puppy picture as more cute in both countries. 62% of owners from Hungary and 36% of owner from Germany agreed with the statement “My dog is more important for me than any human being”. In Germany, more empathic owners agreed less with this statement and indicated that their dogs have a tendency for contagious yawning. Owners whose

  2. Repellency and efficacy of 65% permethrin and selamectin spot-on formulations against Ixodes ricinus ticks on dogs.

    PubMed

    Endris, Richard G; Cooke, Dara; Amodie, Deborah; Sweeney, Diane L; Katz, Terry L

    2002-01-01

    Two topically applied spot-on products used for flea and tick control on dogs, 65% permethrin (Defend EXspot Treatment for Dogs, Schering-Plough Animal Health Corp., Union, NJ) and selamectin (Revolution [United States] or Stronghold [Europe], Pfizer Animal Health, New York, NY), were evaluated for repellency and efficacy against Ixodes ricinus, the primary vector of Lyme disease in Europe. Eighteen dogs were evenly and randomly allocated to the following treatments: 1) 65% permethrin, 2) selamectin, 3) untreated control. Dogs were treated by topical application of the assigned product in accordance with product label directions on Day 0. At 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days after treatment, each dog was exposed for 2 hours to 50 unfed, adult ticks in a cage with a carpet that covered approximately 70% of the floor area. After the exposure period, dogs were removed from the cages and live and dead ticks were counted on the dogs and in the cages. The number of live ticks recovered was reduced by 90.3% to 99.5% for dogs treated with 65% permethrin (P <.0001 versus controls and selamectin), compared with 10.9% to 31.1% for dogs treated with selamectin (P >.05 versus controls). The repellency of 65% permethrin was 63.4% to 80.2% against I. ricinus ticks (P <.0001 versus controls, P <.0007 versus selamectin), compared with 0% to 10.9% repellency for selamectin (P >.05 versus controls).

  3. Transdiaphragmatic pericardiectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, M; Kitshoff, A; Devriendt, N; Or, M; Rubio-Guzman, A; de Rooster, H

    2017-01-28

    In patients with recurrent pericardial effusions, pericardiectomy is indicated. The purpose of this study was to describe a transdiaphragmatic approach for subtotal pericardiectomy in dogs and to evaluate its feasibility. In total, 20 canine cadavers weighing less than 10 kg (group S) and 20 weighing more than 20 kg (group L) were used. Within each group, half underwent a subphrenic pericardiectomy via an intercostal approach and half via a transdiaphragmatic approach. For each approach and within each weight group, the percentage of resected pericardium was calculated and compared. Additionally, a case series of nine consecutive client-owned dogs that underwent a transdiaphragmatic pericardiectomy for pericardial effusion was reported. Exposure of pericardium and associated phrenic nerves was excellent in cadavers and clinical patients. In group S, the percentage of resected pericardium was not significantly different between the two approaches. In group L, on the other hand, the percentage of resected pericardium was lower with the transdiaphragmatic approach compared with the intercostal approach (P=0.001). In the clinical patients, no intraoperative complications were encountered and no recurrence of pericardial effusion was seen. Subtotal pericardiectomy via a transdiaphragmatic approach is straightforward and a safe surgical procedure to obtain permanent pericardial drainage in small and large breed dogs. British Veterinary Association.

  4. Chronic pancreatitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watson, Penny

    2012-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis used to be considered uncommon in dogs, but recent pathological and clinical studies have confirmed that it is in fact a common and clinically significant disease. Clinical signs can vary from low-grade recurrent gastrointestinal signs to acute exacerbations that are indistinguishable from classical acute pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a significant cause of chronic pain in dogs, which must not be underestimated. It also results in progressive impairment of endocrine and exocrine function and the eventual development of diabetes mellitus or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or both in some affected dogs at end stage. The etiology is unknown in most cases. Chronic pancreatitis shows an increased prevalence in certain breeds, and recent work in English Cocker Spaniels suggests it is part of a polysystemic immune-mediated disease in this breed. The histological and clinical appearance is different in different breeds, suggesting that etiologies may also be different. Diagnosis is challenging because the sensitivities of the available noninvasive tests are relatively low. However, with an increased index of suspicion, clinicians will recognize more cases that will allow them to institute supportive treatment to improve the quality of life of the patient.

  5. Dog Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parker, John C.

    1973-01-01

    Dog red blood cells (RBC) lack a ouabain-sensitive sodium pump, and yet they are capable of volume regulation in vivo. The present study was designed to find in vitro conditions under which dog RBC could transport sodium outward, against an electrochemical gradient. Cells were first loaded with sodium chloride and water by preincubation in hypertonic saline. They were then incubated at 37°C in media containing physiologic concentrations of sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, glucose, and calcium. The cells returned to a normal salt and water content in 16–20 h. Without calcium in the medium the cells continued slowly to accumulate sodium. Removal of glucose caused rapid swelling and lysis, whether or not calcium was present. The net efflux of sodium showed a close relationship to medium calcium over a concentration range from 0 to 5 mM. Extrusion of salt and water was also demonstrated in fresh RBC (no hypertonic preincubation) when calcium levels in the media were sufficiently raised. The ion and water movements in these experiments were not influenced by ouabain or by removal of extracellular potassium. Magnesium could not substitute for calcium. It is concluded that dog RBC have an energy-dependent mechanism for extruding sodium chloride which requires external calcium and is quite distinct from the sodium-potassium exchange pump. PMID:4722565

  6. Effects of trazodone on behavioral signs of stress in hospitalized dogs.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-Gregory, Shana E; Stull, Jason W; Rice, Mary Rose; Herron, Meghan E

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of trazodone treatment on behavioral signs of stress in hospitalized dogs. DESIGN Prospective observational study. ANIMALS 120 client-owned dogs. PROCEDURES Hospitalized dogs administered trazodone (n = 60) were observed for stress-related signs or behaviors ≤ 45 minutes after the drug was administered (time 1) and approximately 90 minutes later (time 2). Dogs that did not receive trazodone (n = 60) were selected to serve as controls for environmental stimuli that could affect behavior and were observed at the same times. Signs or behaviors (scored as present or absent) were assessed individually and grouped into behavioral summation categories (frenetic [lip licking, pacing, panting, spinning, trembling, wet dog shake, whining, and yawning], freeze [averting gaze, pinning back ears, and whale eye sign], or fractious [growling, lunging, showing teeth, and snapping], with lifting of a forelimb and pupil dilation included in all categories). Results were compared between groups and within groups over time. Logistic regression was performed to assess associations between reduction in stress-related signs or behaviors and trazodone administration while controlling for environmental influences. RESULTS Lip licking, panting, and whining were reduced (defined as present at time 1 and absent at time 2) in trazodone-treated but not environmentally matched dogs. The median number of stress-related behaviors and of frenetic and freeze behaviors was significantly lower at time 2, compared with time 1, in trazodone-treated dogs. Odds of reduced panting and reduced frenetic behaviors at time 2 for trazodone-treated dogs were > 2 times those for environmentally matched dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that trazodone administration reduced stress-related signs and behaviors in hospitalized dogs and may thereby improve patient welfare.

  7. The effects of oral selegiline hydrochloride on learning and training in the dog: a psychobiological interpretation.

    PubMed

    Mills, D; Ledger, R

    2001-11-01

    1. Twenty two healthy, non-problem dogs were assessed for their acquisition of three different learning tasks on consecutive days and on the extinction of the response in the third. In Task 1, dogs were trained to walk in a circle on command. In Task 2, dogs were trained to retreat and sit on a mat. In Task 3, dogs were assessed for the acquisition and extinction of an operant response (pawing a panel). 2. Dogs were orally administered a placebo or selegiline hydrochloride at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg for a period of three weeks prior to testing and during the test period. 3. Dog's treated with selegiline tended to perform better at tasks which were clearly lured with a motivationally significant cue, performing a first correct response sooner and requiring fewer reinforcements to reach the success criterion. They were also significantly more likely to walk over a novel object placed on the floor of the test arena. In the absence of a significant lure, the selegiline treated dogs took significantly longer to reach the required performance criterion for the operant task. These dogs also extinguished their response more rapidly than the control group 4. In the third task, selegiline treated dogs were significantly less likely to look away and throughout all tasks these dogs tended to be less distracted than the placebo group. 5. These findings and other reports associated with the effects of selegiline on learning may be explained by reference to the effects of selegiline on dopaminergic structures associated with positive incentive motivation.

  8. Antibiotic-responsive histiocytic ulcerative colitis in 9 dogs.

    PubMed

    Hostutler, Roger A; Luria, Brian J; Johnson, Susan E; Weisbrode, Steven E; Sherding, Robert G; Jaeger, Jordan Q; Guilford, W Grant

    2004-01-01

    Canine histiocytic ulcerative colitis (HUC) is characterized by colonic inflammation with predominantly periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive macrophages. The inflammation results in colonic thickening, ulcerations, and distortion of normal glandular architecture. Resultant clinical signs consist of chronic large bowel diarrhea, tenesmus, and marked weight loss, and the disease frequently results in euthanasia. Conventional therapy consists of some combination of prednisone, azathioprine, sulfasalazine, and metronidazole. Nine dogs (8 Boxers and 1 English Bulldog) with histologic confirmation of HUC were treated with antibiotic therapy (either with enrofloxacin alone or in combination with metronidazole and amoxicillin). Clinical signs, physical examination findings, laboratory abnormalities, and the histologic severity of the disease were evaluated. Four of the 9 dogs had been treated previously with conventional therapy and had failed to respond favorably; then, these dogs were placed on antibiotic therapy (enrofloxacin, n = 1; enrofloxacin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin, n = 3) and had resolution of clinical signs within 3-12 days. Five dogs were treated solely with antibiotic therapy (enrofloxacin, n = 1; enrofloxacin and metronidazole, n = 1; enrofloxacin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin, n = 3), and clinical signs resolved in 2-7 days. Repeated biopsy specimens were obtained from 5 dogs after treatment, and all showed marked histologic improvement. The increase in body weight after treatment was statistically significant (P = .01). Three dogs currently are not on any treatment and have had resolution of clinical signs for up to 14 months. These observations suggest that an infectious agent responsive to antibiotics plays an integral role in the clinical manifestation of canine HUC, and they support the use of antibiotics in its treatment.

  9. Acetaminophen and myocardial infarction in dogs.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Gary F; Rork, Tyler H; Spiler, Norell M; Golfetti, Roseli

    2004-11-01

    The hypothesis that acetaminophen can reduce necrosis during myocardial infarction was tested in male dogs. Two groups were studied: vehicle- (n=10) and acetaminophen-treated (n=10) dogs. All dogs were obtained from the same vendor, and there were no significant differences in their ages (18 +/- 2 mo), weights (24 +/- 1 kg), or housing conditions. Selected physiological data, e.g., coronary blood flow, nonspecific collateral flow, epicardial temperature, heart rate, systemic mean arterial pressure, left ventricular developed pressure, the maximal first derivative of left ventricular developed pressure, blood gases, and pH, were collected at baseline and during regional myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. There were no significant differences in coronary blood flow, nonspecific collateral flow, epicardial temperature, heart rate, systemic mean arterial pressure, or blood gases and pH between the two groups at any of the three time intervals, even though there was a trend toward improved function in the presence of acetaminophen. Infarct size, the main objective of the investigation, was markedly and significantly reduced by acetaminophen. For example, when expressed as a percentage of ventricular wet weight, infarct size was 8 +/- 1 versus 3 +/- 1%(P <0.05) in vehicle- and acetaminophen-treated hearts, respectively. When infarct size was expressed as percentage of the area at risk, it was 35 +/- 3 versus 13 +/- 2% (P <0.05) in vehicle- and acetaminophen-treated groups, respectively. When area at risk was expressed as percentage of total ventricular mass, there were no differences in the two groups. Results reveal that the recently reported cardioprotective properties of acetaminophen in vitro can now be extended to the in vivo arena. They suggest that it is necessary to add acetaminophen to the growing list of pharmaceuticals that possess cardioprotective efficacy in mammals.

  10. Anti-diabetic effect of camel milk in alloxan-induced diabetic dogs: a dose-response experiment.

    PubMed

    Sboui, A; Khorchani, T; Djegham, M; Agrebi, A; Elhatmi, H; Belhadj, O

    2010-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of camel milk in alloxan-induced diabetic dogs and to follow this effect at three doses of milk. Firstly, three groups of dogs were used: two groups composed each of four diabetic dogs and receiving raw camel milk (treatment 1) or cow milk (treatment 2), and four healthy dogs getting raw camel milk (treatment 3) were used as control. Each animal was treated with 500 ml of milk daily. Secondly, we compared the effects of three amounts of camel milk: 100 ml, 250 ml and 500 ml to treat the diabetic dogs. After week 3, the dogs treated with camel milk showed a statistically significant decrease in blood glucose (from 10.88 +/- 0.55 to 6.22 +/- 0.5 mmol/l) and total protein concentrations (from 78.16 +/- 2.61 g/l to 63.63 +/- 4.43 g/l). For cholesterol levels, there was a decrease from week 2 (from 6.17 +/- 0.5 mmol/l to 4.79 +/- 0.5 mmol/l). There were no significant difference in blood glucose, cholesterol or total protein concentrations in dogs drinking 250 and 500 ml of camel milk. The dogs treated with 100 ml of camel milk did not show any significant decrease in blood glucose levels, and cholesterol and total protein concentrations. The investigation was not limited to the improvement in glycemic balance, lipids and proteins control in diabetic dogs getting camel milk, but we also noted a stability of this state after the dogs stopped to drink milk. This effect depended on the quantity of camel milk used to treat diabetic dogs.

  11. RENAL EFFECTS OF HEMOGLOBIN INFUSIONS IN DOGS IN HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Paul B.; Hiller, Alma; Van Slyke, Donald D.

    1947-01-01

    The immediate effects of treating hemorrhagic shock in dogs by replacing lost blood with 7 per cent hemoglobin solution were favorable, both on renal function and on general condition. However, subsequent transitory depression of the urea clearance for several days, shown by some of the treated animals, but not by untreated bled controls, indicates sufficient possibility of renal damage by the hemoglobin solution to prevent its recommendation at present as a blood substitute. PMID:19871692

  12. Efficacy of a combination febantel-praziquantel-pyrantel product, with or without vaccination with a commercial Giardia vaccine, for treatment of dogs with naturally occurring giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Payne, Patricia A; Ridley, Robert K; Dryden, Michael W; Bathgate, Christine; Milliken, George A; Stewart, Patricia W

    2002-02-01

    To determine efficacy of treatment with a combination febantel-praziquantel-pyrantel product, with or without vaccination with a commercial Giardia vaccine, in dogs with naturally occurring giardiasis. Prospective trial. 16 Beagles naturally infected with Giardia duodenalis. During phase 1, 6 dogs were treated with the parasiticide for 3 days (4 were also vaccinated). Four weeks later, all 6 dogs were treated with the parasiticide again for 5 days and were bathed and moved to clean cages after the last treatment (phase 2). Nine dogs were treated with the parasiticide for 3 (n = 4) or 5 (5) days and bathed and moved to clean cages after the last treatment (phase 3). Fecal samples were collected twice weekly for 24 days after treatment and tested for cysts with a quantitative zinc sulfate flotation technique and for Giardia antigen with an immunoassay. Dogs in phase 1 were all shedding cysts again by day 24. In phase 2, only 1 dog shed cysts after treatment, and shedding was transient (day 17). In phase 3, neither cysts nor antigen was detected in fecal samples from 2 of 4 dogs treated for 3 days and 4 of 5 dogs treated for 5 days. In 18 of 57 (31.6%) fecal samples, cysts were seen, but results of the immunoassay were negative. Results suggest that when a combination febantel-praziquantel-pyrantel product is used to treat dogs with giardiasis, bathing and changing the environment after treatment may be more important in preventing recurrence than duration of treatment.

  13. Collection Development "Dog Care & Training": The Well-Behaved Dog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpi, Kristine M.; Sherman, Barbara L.

    2008-01-01

    Dogs are indeed people's best friends. A majority of owners report that their dog is a "member of the family," and that acceptable canine behavior and optimal care are high priorities for them. The human-animal bond, the close connection between people and their pets, is forged by positive interactions, but unacceptable canine behaviors that…

  14. Collection Development "Dog Care & Training": The Well-Behaved Dog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpi, Kristine M.; Sherman, Barbara L.

    2008-01-01

    Dogs are indeed people's best friends. A majority of owners report that their dog is a "member of the family," and that acceptable canine behavior and optimal care are high priorities for them. The human-animal bond, the close connection between people and their pets, is forged by positive interactions, but unacceptable canine behaviors that…

  15. Intrathecal resiniferatoxin in a dog model: efficacy in bone cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dorothy C; Agnello, Kimberly; Iadarola, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Resiniferatoxin (RTX) is the most potent among all known endogenous and synthetic agonists for the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor, which is a calcium-permeable nonselective cation channel, expressed on the peripheral and central terminals of small-diameter sensory neurons. Prolonged calcium influx induced by RTX causes cytotoxicity and death of only those sensory neurons that express the TRPV1 ion channel leading to selective targeting and permanent deletion of the TRPV1-expressing C-fiber neuronal cell bodies in the dorsal root ganglia. The goal of this project was to provide preclinical efficacy data, that intrathecal RTX could provide effective pain relief and improve function in dogs with bone cancer without significant long-term side effects. In a single-blind, controlled study, 72 companion dogs with bone cancer pain were randomized to standard of care analgesic therapy alone (control, n = 36) or 1.2 μg/kg intrathecal RTX in addition to standard of care analgesic therapy (treated, n = 36). Significantly more dogs in the control group (78%) required unblinding and adjustment in analgesic protocol or euthanasia within 6 weeks of randomization, than dogs that were treated with RTX (50%; P < 0.03); and overall, dogs in the control group required unblinding significantly sooner than dogs that had been treated with RTX (P < 0.02). The analgesic effect was documented in these dogs without any evidence of development of deafferentation pain syndrome that can be seen with neurolytic therapies.

  16. The effect of neonatal gene therapy on skeletal manifestations in mucopolysaccharidosis VII dogs after a decade.

    PubMed

    Xing, Elizabeth M; Knox, Van W; O'Donnell, Patricia A; Sikura, Tracey; Liu, Yuli; Wu, Susan; Casal, Margret L; Haskins, Mark E; Ponder, Katherine P

    2013-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) VII is a lysosomal storage disease due to deficient activity of β-glucuronidase (GUSB), and results in glycosaminoglycan accumulation. Skeletal manifestations include bone dysplasia, degenerative joint disease, and growth retardation. One gene therapy approach for MPS VII involves neonatal intravenous injection of a gamma retroviral vector expressing GUSB, which results in stable expression in liver and secretion of enzyme into blood at levels predicted to be similar or higher to enzyme replacement therapy. The goal of this study was to evaluate the long-term effect of neonatal gene therapy on skeletal manifestations in MPS VII dogs. Treated MPS VII dogs could walk throughout their lives, while untreated MPS VII dogs could not stand beyond 6 months and were dead by 2 years. Luxation of the coxofemoral joint and the patella, dysplasia of the acetabulum and supracondylar ridge, deep erosions of the distal femur, and synovial hyperplasia were reduced, and the quality of articular bone was improved in treated dogs at 6 to 11 years of age compared with untreated MPS VII dogs at 2 years or less. However, treated dogs continued to have osteophyte formation, cartilage abnormalities, and an abnormal gait. Enzyme activity was found near synovial blood vessels, and there was 2% as much GUSB activity in synovial fluid as in serum. We conclude that neonatal gene therapy reduces skeletal abnormalities in MPS VII dogs, but clinically-relevant abnormalities remain. Enzyme replacement therapy will probably have similar limitations long-term. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Effect of Neonatal Gene Therapy on Skeletal Manifestations in Mucopolysaccharidosis VII Dogs after a Decade

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Elizabeth M.; Knox, Van W.; O'Donnell, Patricia A.; Sikura, Tracey; Liu, Yuli; Wu, Susan; Casal, Margret L.; Haskins, Mark E.; Ponder, Katherine P.

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) VII is a lysosomal storage disease due to deficient activity of β-glucuronidase (GUSB), and results in glycosaminoglycan accumulation. Skeletal manifestations include bone dysplasia, degenerative joint disease, and growth retardation. One gene therapy approach for MPS VII involves neonatal intravenous injection of a gamma retroviral vector expressing GUSB, which results in stable expression in liver and secretion of enzyme into blood at levels predicted to be similar or higher to enzyme replacement therapy. The goal of this study was to evaluate the long-term effect of neonatal gene therapy on skeletal manifestations in MPS VII dogs. Treated MPS VII dogs could walk throughout their lives, while untreated MPS VII dogs could not stand beyond 6 months and were dead by 2 years. Luxation of the coxofemoral joint and the patella, dysplasia of the acetabulum and supracondylar ridge, deep erosions of the distal femur, and synovial hyperplasia were reduced, and the quality of articular bone was improved in treated dogs at 6 to 11 years of age compared with untreated MPS VII dogs at 2 years or less. However, treated dogs continued to have osteophyte formation, cartilage abnormalities, and an abnormal gait. Enzyme activity was found near synovial blood vessels, and there was 2% as much GUSB activity in synovial fluid as in serum. We conclude that neonatal gene therapy reduces skeletal abnormalities in MPS VII dogs, but clinically-relevant abnormalities remain. Enzyme replacement therapy will probably have similar limitations long-term. PMID:23628461

  18. Efficacy of Drontal Flavour Plus (50 mg praziquantel, 144 mg pyrantel embonate, 150 mg febantel per tablet) against Giardia sp in naturally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Ana; Dado, Diana; Mateo, Marta; Espinosa, Carmen; Miró, Guadalupe

    2008-10-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of praziquantel, pyrantel embonate and febantel (Drontal Flavour Plus) for three and five consecutive days was evaluated for treating naturally acquired giardiasis in dogs. In the study, 24 dogs naturally infected with Giardia were divided into three groups of eight dogs each. Dogs were treated at the recommended dosage for three or five consecutive days, and a control group remained untreated. Faecal samples from each dog were submitted to coprological examination from day-4 to -2 and at days 5, 7, 9 and 11. Faecal consistency was also assessed daily to study end. All dogs in the control group remained positive until study end. Giardia cysts were not detected in faeces of six of the eight dogs in the group treated on three consecutive days, and in faeces of five of the dogs in the group treated on five consecutive days. Unformed to diarrhoeic faeces were more often reported in dogs in the untreated control group than in dogs in both treatment groups. Efficacy of treatment for five consecutive days was not statistically better than treatment for three consecutive days.

  19. Detection of herbicides in the urine of pet dogs following home lawn chemical application.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Deborah W; Peer, Wendy A; Conteh, Abass; Diggs, Alfred R; Cooper, Bruce R; Glickman, Nita W; Bonney, Patty L; Stewart, Jane C; Glickman, Lawrence T; Murphy, Angus S

    2013-07-01

    Exposure to herbicide-treated lawns has been associated with significantly higher bladder cancer risk in dogs. This work was performed to further characterize lawn chemical exposures in dogs, and to determine environmental factors associated with chemical residence time on grass. In addition to concern for canine health, a strong justification for the work was that dogs may serve as sentinels for potentially harmful environmental exposures in humans. Experimentally, herbicides [2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxypropionic acid (MCPP), dicamba] were applied to grass plots under different conditions (e.g., green, dry brown, wet, and recently mowed grass). Chemicals in dislodgeable residues were measured by LC-MS at 0.17, 1, 24, 48, 72 h post treatment. In a separate study, 2,4-D, MCPP, and dithiopyr concentrations were measured in the urine of dogs and in dislodgeable grass residues in households that applied or did not apply chemicals in the preceding 48 h. Chemicals were measured at 0, 24, and 48 h post application in treated households and at time 0 in untreated control households. Residence times of 2,4-D, MCPP, and dicamba were significantly prolonged (P<0.05) on dry brown grass compared to green grass. Chemicals were detected in the urine of dogs in 14 of 25 households before lawn treatment, in 19 of 25 households after lawn treatment, and in 4 of 8 untreated households. Chemicals were commonly detected in grass residues from treated lawns, and from untreated lawns suggesting chemical drift from nearby treated areas. Thus dogs could be exposed to chemicals through contact with their own lawn (treated or contaminated through drift) or through contact with other grassy areas if they travel. The length of time to restrict a dog's access to treated lawns following treatment remains to be defined. Further study is indicated to assess the risks of herbicide exposure in humans and dogs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Treating Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Treating Infertility Home For Patients Search FAQs Treating Infertility Page ... Treating Infertility FAQ137, March 2015 PDF Format Treating Infertility Gynecologic Problems What is infertility? What treatment options ...

  1. Oxytocin content of the cerebrospinal fluid of dogs and its relationship to pain induced by spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Brown, D C; Perkowski, S

    1998-01-01

    To determine whether oxytocin exists in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of dogs and whether the amount of oxytocin in the CSF of dogs with neck or back pain caused by spinal cord compression is significantly different than that in the CSF of clinically normal dogs. Prospective controlled study. A total of 15 purpose-bred beagles and 17 client-owned dogs. CSF was collected by needle puncture of the cerebellar medullary cistern after induction of general anesthesia. Oxytocin levels within the samples were determined through radioimmunoassay. Dogs with spinal cord compression had significantly more oxytocin in their CSF than the clinically normal dogs (13.76 +/- 2.0 pg/mL and 3.61 +/- 0.63 pg/mL, respectively; P < .0001). Dogs with chronic signs (>7 days) had significantly more oxytocin in their CSF than dogs with acute signs (<7 days) (21.60 +/- 0.86 pg/mL and 6.80 +/- 0.81 pg/mL, respectively; P < .0001). Both acutely and chronically affected dogs had significantly more oxytocin in their CSF than the controls (P < .005 and P < .0001 respectively). Dogs with neck and back pain caused by spinal cord compression have significantly more oxytocin in their CSF than clinically normal dogs. Dogs with chronic clinical signs have significantly more oxytocin in their CSF than dogs with acute clinical signs. In humans, intrathecal injection of oxytocin is effective in treating low back pain for up to 5 hours. Intrathecal oxytocin may be a logical choice for perioperative analgesia in dogs undergoing myelography because the intrathecal space is accessed for injection of contrast agent.

  2. Prevalence of serum antibody titers against canine distemper virus and canine parvovirus in dogs hospitalized in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Jennifer L; Rozanski, Elizabeth A; Paul, April L

    2017-06-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of dogs hospitalized in an intensive care unit (ICU) with serum antibody titers against canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine parvovirus (CPV). DESIGN Prospective observational study. ANIMALS 80 dogs. PROCEDURES Dogs hospitalized in an ICU for > 12 hours between February 1 and June 1, 2015, that had at least 0.25 mL of serum left over from diagnostic testing were eligible for study inclusion. Dogs with serum antibody titers > 1:32 (as determined by serum neutralization) and > 1:80 (as determined by hemagglutination inhibition) were considered seropositive for CDV and CPV, respectively. The date of last vaccination was obtained from the medical record of each dog. RESULTS Of the 80 dogs, 40 (50%) and 65 (81%) dogs were seropositive for CDV and CPV, respectively. Of the 40 dogs that were seronegative for CDV, 27 had been vaccinated against CDV within 3 years prior to testing. Of the 15 dogs that were seronegative for CPV, 3 had been vaccinated against CPV within 3 years prior to testing. Ten dogs were seronegative for both CDV and CPV. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated the prevalence of dogs hospitalized in an ICU that were seropositive for CDV and CPV was lower than expected given the high vaccination rate reported for dogs. Although the antibody titer necessary to prevent disease caused by CDV or CPV in critically ill dogs is unknown, adherence to infectious disease control guidelines is warranted when CDV- or CPV-infected dogs are treated in an ICU.

  3. Treatment with gabapentin of 11 dogs with refractory idiopathic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Platt, S R; Adams, V; Garosi, L S; Abramson, C J; Penderis, J; De Stefani, A; Matiasek, L

    Eleven dogs diagnosed with refractory idiopathic epilepsy were treated orally with gabapentin for a minimum of three months at an initial dose of 10 mg/kg every eight hours. They were all experiencing episodes of generalised tonic-clonic seizures and had been treated chronically with a combination of phenobarbital and potassium bromide at doses sufficient to reach acceptable therapeutic serum levels without causing significant side effects. In each dog, the number of seizures per week, the average duration of the seizures and the number of days on which seizures occurred were compared for the three months before and after they were treated with gabapentin. A minimum 50 per cent reduction in the number of seizures per week was interpreted as a positive response to gabapentin, and six of the dogs showed a positive response. After the addition of gabapentin, both the number of seizures per week (P= 0.005) and the number of days with any seizures in a one-week period (P=0.03) were significantly reduced. Mild side effects of ataxia and sedation were observed in five of the dogs, but they were not severe enough to warrant the treatment being discontinued during the trial.

  4. Pre-operative fibrous osteodystrophy and severe, refractory, post-operative hypocalcemia following parathyroidectomy in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, Jennifer M.; Nuth, Ellie K.; Byers, Christopher G.; Thoesen, Mike; Armbrust, Laura J.; Biller, David S.; Harkin, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    A 13-year-old dog exhibited dramatic, radiographic osteopenia consistent with fibrous osteodystrophy secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism. Following parathyroidectomy, the dog developed severe, prolonged hypocalcemia, but was successfully treated and discharged 32 d after surgery. A variety of factors may have contributed to this dog’s hypocalcemia including hypoparathyroidism and hungry bone syndrome. PMID:26246635

  5. A single-blinded phenobarbital-controlled trial of levetiracetam as mono-therapy in dogs with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fredsø, N; Sabers, A; Toft, N; Møller, A; Berendt, M

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of canine epilepsy is problematic. Few antiepileptic drugs have proven efficacy in dogs and undesirable adverse effects and pharmacoresistance are not uncommon. Consequently, the need for investigation of alternative treatment options is ongoing. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of levetiracetam as mono-therapy in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. The study used a prospective single-blinded parallel group design. Twelve client-owned dogs were included and were randomised to treatment with levetiracetam (30 mg/kg/day or 60 mg/kg/day divided into three daily dosages) or phenobarbital (4 mg/kg/day divided twice daily). Control visits were at days 30, 60 and then every 3 months for up to 1 year. Two or more seizures within 3 months led to an increase in drug dosage (levetiracetam: 10 mg/kg/day, phenobarbital: 1 mg/kg/day). Five of six levetiracetam treated dogs and one of six phenobarbital treated dogs withdrew from the study within 2-5 months due to insufficient seizure control. In the levetiracetam treated dogs there was no significant difference in the monthly number of seizures before and after treatment, whereas in the phenobarbital treated dogs there were significantly (P = 0.013) fewer seizures after treatment. Five phenobarbital treated dogs were classified as true responders (≥50% reduction in seizures/month) whereas none of the levetiracetam treated dogs fulfilled this criterion. Adverse effects were reported in both groups but were more frequent in the phenobarbital group. In this study levetiracetam was well tolerated but was not effective at the given doses as mono-therapy in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Homing in on Hot Dogs

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-29

    This image is a portion of the all-sky survey from NASA WISE. It highlights the first of about 1,000 hot DOGs found by the mission magenta circle. Hot DOGs are hot dust-obscured galaxies and are among the most powerful galaxies known.

  7. Dog Mathematics: Exploring Base-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Terri L.; Yanik, H. Bahadir; Lee, Mi Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Using a dog's paw as a basis for numerical representation, sixth grade students explored how to count and regroup using the dog's four digital pads. Teachers can connect these base-4 explorations to the conceptual meaning of place value and regrouping using base-10.

  8. Pancreatic torsion in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Brabson, Tamera L.; Maki, Lynn C.; Newell, Susan M.; Ralphs, S. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A 6-month-old male intact Cane Corso mastiff dog was presented for a recent history of vomiting, abdominal pain, and lethargy. A diagnosis of pancreatic torsion was made during abdominal exploratory surgery and was confirmed with histopathology. The dog underwent partial pancreatectomy and recovered with no complications. PMID:25969579

  9. Dog Mathematics: Exploring Base-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Terri L.; Yanik, H. Bahadir; Lee, Mi Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Using a dog's paw as a basis for numerical representation, sixth grade students explored how to count and regroup using the dog's four digital pads. Teachers can connect these base-4 explorations to the conceptual meaning of place value and regrouping using base-10.

  10. Are dogs just like us?

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael

    2015-08-31

    Dogs have evolved to become the animal species most integrated with human society. Surprisingly, the origins and mechanisms of the remarkable co-evolution are still obscure and provide fuel for debates. Brain imaging studies showing up similarities and recent results implicating the hormone oxytocin also suggest that it makes sense to compare the social mind of dogs to our own. Michael Gross reports.

  11. Closantel intoxication in a dog.

    PubMed

    McEntee, K; Grauwels, M; Clercx, C; Henroteaux, M

    1995-06-01

    A case of overdosage with closantel, a salicynalide derivative, in a dog is described. The dog received 6 times the recommended dosage. Closantel induced optic neuritis, retinal degeneration, partial deafness, hepatotoxicosis and myopathy. Only the blindness was irreversible. The therapy included albumin administration to reduce the acute toxicity of closantel.

  12. Clinico-hemato-biochemical profile of dogs with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Elhiblu, M. A.; Dua, K.; Mohindroo, J.; Mahajan, S. K.; Sood, N. K.; Dhaliwal, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the relevant tools in the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis in dogs. Material and Methods: A total of 140 dogs presented at Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Ludhiana, showing clinical signs of hepatic insufficiency were subjected to clinico-hemato biochemical, urological, ultrasonographic (USG), and USG guided fine-needle biopsy examinations by standard methods. On the basis of these results, 6 dogs out of 140 dogs were found to be suffering from liver cirrhosis. Six clinically healthy dogs constituted the control group. Results: The dogs suffering from liver cirrhosis manifested inappetence, halitosis, abdominal distension, weight loss, melena, icterus, anemia, and neutrophilic leukocytosis with the left shift. Levels of hemoglobin, lymphocytes, packed cell volume, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular Hb (MCH), and platelet count were significantly lower in liver cirrhosis group than control group while total leukocyte count, neutrophils, and MCH concentration were significantly higher. Glucose, total protein, albumin, A/G ratio, and fibrinogen were significantly lower, and creatinine, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, prothrombin time, and APTT were significantly higher than the control values. Ultrasound revealed diffuse increase in echogenicity with rounded and irregular liver margins. Cytological examination of the ascitic fluid and fine-needle aspiration biopsy of liver was not fruitful in the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis. Conclusions: Liver cirrhosis causes clinical and hemo-biochemical alterations, which require special consideration when treating diseased animals. USG, diffuse increase in echogenicity of liver, rounding and irregularity of liver margins and microhepatica were the consistent findings. It is suggested that USG along with hemo-biochemical alterations may be used as a diagnostic tool for liver cirrhosis

  13. Dog bites of the face, head and neck in children.

    PubMed

    Horswell, Bruce B; Chahine, Carol J

    2011-01-01

    Dog bites of the facial region are increasing in children according to the Center for Disease Control. To evaluate the epidemiology of such injuries in our medical provider region, we undertook a retrospective review of those children treated for facial, head and neck dog bite wounds at a level 1 trauma center. Most dog bites occurred in or near the home by an animal known to the child/family. Most injuries were soft tissue related, however more severe bites and injuries were observed in attacks from the pit-bull and Rottweiler breeds. Younger (under five years) children sustained more of the injuries requiring medical treatment. Injury Severity Scales were determined as well as victim and payer mix demographics, type and characteristics of injury, and complications from the attack.

  14. Generalized calcinosis cutis associated with probable leptospirosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; Bergen, David J; Roe, Wendi D

    2005-12-01

    A 6.5-year-old male German Shepherd acutely developed renal and hepatic disease. Serology revealed high concentrations of antibodies against Leptospira copenhageni, and a presumptive diagnosis of leptospirosis was made. The dog was successfully treated with antibiotics and supportive care over a 12-day period. Sixty-two days after the initial presentation, alopecia predominantly involving the dorsum and perineal areas developed. The skin lesions expanded over a 20-day period. Histology revealed generalized calcinosis cutis with follicular atrophy. An injection of 0.01 mg kg-1 dexamethasone suppressed serum cortisol concentrations. No treatment was given and lesions resolved over the following 30 days. This is the third case of generalized calcinosis cutis that has developed in an adult dog after severe systemic disease. Both previous cases developed calcinosis cutis in association with blastomycosis. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of generalized calcinosis cutis in an adult dog in association with a presumptive bacterial infection.

  15. Generalized Microsporum canis dermatophytosis in six Yorkshire terrier dogs.

    PubMed

    Cerundolo, Rosario

    2004-06-01

    Six Yorkshire terrier dogs with generalized, chronic dermatophytosis caused by Microsporum canis were seen over a 3-year period. Specific tests showed that they also had concurrent leishmaniosis (four cases), leishmaniosis and ehrlichiosis (one case) or diabetes mellitus (one case). Although specific therapy for these infectious diseases was instituted and the dogs were treated systemically and topically with appropriate antifungal drugs, only partial clinical resolution of the dermatophytosis was achieved. M. canis infection resolved in the dog with diabetes mellitus after stabilizing the diabetes mellitus. Although immunological studies were not performed in these cases, it is theorized that the immune disregulation caused by leishmaniosis, ehrlichiosis or diabetes mellitus may have favoured generalization of the infection and prevented favourable responses to appropriate treatment of the M. canis infection.

  16. Multiple myeloma with associated polyneuropathy in a German shepherd dog.

    PubMed

    Villiers, E; Dobson, J

    1998-05-01

    A 12-year-old female, neutered German shepherd dog developed progressive hindlimb followed by forelimb ataxia leading to tetraplegia. Neurological examination suggested lower motor dysfunction. Biochemical evaluation revealed a monoclonal hypergammaglobulinaemia, hypoalbuminaemia and hypercalcaemia. Multiple lytic lesions were identified radiographically in numerous bones. A bone marrow aspirate confirmed the diagnosis of multiple myeloma, with large numbers of plasma cells seen in clusters. An electromyogram revealed positive sharp waves and fibrillation potentials in the skeletal muscles of the limbs, suggesting a polyneuropathy. The dog was treated with chemotherapy using melphalan and prednisolone. Both the hypergammaglobulinaemia and the polyneuropathy resolved and the dog had normal motor function four weeks after commencing treatment. Polyneuropathy may occur as a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to myeloma, and in this case was reversible following treatment of the underlying disease.

  17. Streptococcus constellatus-associated pyoderma in a dog.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Luisa; Nizza, Sandra; de Martinis, Claudio; Foglia Manzillo, Valentina; Iovane, Valentina; Paciello, Orlando; Pagnini, Ugo

    2012-03-01

    This report describes a case of chronic and deep pyodermitis in a 4-year-old male dog with a 3-month skin problems history that had been treated unsuccessfully with fluoroquinolone therapy, prescribed by a private medical veterinary practice, without an early diagnosis. Microbiological examination and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed in our laboratory (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine) and a diagnosis of Streptococcus constellatus-associated pyoderma in the dog was made. A new antimicrobial treatment, with tetracyclines, was designed after the definitive diagnosis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing performed by the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. The dog remained free of clinical illness at completion of therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a canine pyoderma caused by S. constellatus, a commensal organism which may also cause pyogenic infections. Furthermore, this study confirms that a fluoroquinolone represents a poor empirical choice for initial therapy of canine pyoderma.

  18. Epitheliotropic cutaneous lymphoma (mycosis fungoides) in a dog.

    PubMed

    Bhang, Dong Ha; Choi, Ul Soo; Kim, Min Kyu; Choi, Eun-Hwa; Kang, Min-Soo; Hwang, Cheol-Yong; Kim, Dae-Yong; Youn, Hwa Young; Lee, Chang Woo

    2006-03-01

    A seven-year-old castrated male Yorkshire terrier dog was presented for a recurrent skin disease. Erythematous skin during the first visit progressed from multiple plaques to patch lesions and exudative erosion in the oral mucosa membrane. Biopsy samples were taken from erythematous skin and were diagnosed with epitheliotropic T cell cutaneous lymphoma by histopathology and immunochemical stain. In serum chemistry, the dog had a hypercalcemia (15.7 mg/dl) and mild increased alkaline phosphatase (417 U/l). Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTH-rP) in epitheliotropic cutaneous lymphoma tissues but the neoplastic cells were not labeled with anti-PTH-rP antibodies. The patient was treated with prednisolone and isotretinoin. However, the dog died unexpectedly.

  19. Do Dog Behavioral Characteristics Predict the Quality of the Relationship between Dogs and Their Owners?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Christy L; Chen, Pan; Serpell, James A; Jacobson, Kristen C

    This paper explores whether dog behavioral characteristics predict the quality of the relationship between dogs and their owners (i.e., owner attachment to dog), and whether relations between dog behavior and owner attachment are moderated by demographic characteristics. In this study, N = 92 children and N = 60 adults from 60 dog-owning families completed questionnaires about their attachment to their pet dog, their level of responsibility for that dog, and their general attitudes toward pets. They also rated their dogs on observable behavioral characteristics. Individuals who held positive attitudes about pets and who provided much of their dog's care reported stronger attachments to their dogs. The strength of owners' attachments to their dogs was associated with dog trainability and separation problems. Relationships between owner attachment and both dog excitability and attention-seeking behavior were further moderated by demographic characteristics: for Caucasians but not for non-Caucasians, dog excitability was negatively associated with owner attachment to dog; and for adults, dog attention-seeking behavior was positively associated with owner attachment, but children tended to be highly attached to their dogs, regardless of their dogs' attention-seeking behaviors. This study demonstrates that certain dog behavioral traits are indeed associated with the strength of owners' attachments to their dogs.

  20. Rhodococcus equi Infections in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Bryan, L K; Clark, S D; Díaz-Delgado, J; Lawhon, S D; Edwards, J F

    2017-01-01

    Five cases of Rhodococcus equi infection in dogs were identified from 2003 to 2014. Three of the dogs had severe, internal lesions attributable to R. equi that have not been previously described: endophthalmitis, endocarditis, and suppurative pleuropneumonia. Isolates from 4 of the dogs were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction for Rhodococcus virulence-associated plasmid (vap) genes. One isolate was vapA-positive, 2 lacked a virulence plasmid, and 1 carried the novel vapN-associated plasmid (pVAPN) recently characterized in bovine isolates. The pVAPN plasmid has not been described in isolates cultured from companion animals. Four of the dogs either were receiving immunosuppressive drugs or had endocrinopathies. R. equi has the potential to cause significant infections in dogs, and immunocompromised animals should be considered at risk for infection.

  1. Retrobulbar chondrosarcoma in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Ralić, M.; Vasić, J.; Jovanović, M.; Cameron, B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a review of a dog, with a retrobulbar chondrosarcoma, which was admitted for surgery for visible changes in his eye during inspection. Orbital neoplasia in dogs may be primary and secondary. Sixty percent of orbital neoplasia in dogs are primary, ninety percent of which are malignant. Retrobulbar neoplasms are rare and in their early stage represent a diagnostic challenge. Chondrosarcoma of the skull is a slow-progressing malignant disease which occurs locally, aggressive with invasion into the surrounding tissues. Dogs with chondrosarcoma of the skull have life expectancy between 210 and 580 days - in our case it was 180 days - after the first alterations on the eye of the dog occurred. PMID:26623338

  2. A service dog in group.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, Brian; Collins, Emily

    2015-04-01

    Service dogs are sanctioned by the Americans with Disabilities Act as having protected rights allowing them to assist owners with disabilities. These dogs are appearing with increasing frequency in healthcare settings, and it is important for healthcare providers to understand the rules and regulations given to service animals and owners. We discuss processes that transpired when a service dog was brought into a psychodynamic psychotherapy group. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the unintended consequences of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 2010 as it concerns service dogs and the impact on the group process. Problems resulting from the introduction of service dogs into therapy groups should be anticipated and explicitly discussed in the course of the group's transactions.

  3. Different but overlapping populations of Strongyloides stercoralis in dogs and humans—Dogs as a possible source for zoonotic strongyloidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Bemm, Felix M.; Schär, Fabian; Khieu, Virak; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter; Lok, James B.

    2017-01-01

    shared with humans. This argues for the strong potential of dogs as reservoirs for zoonotic transmission of S. stercoralis to humans and suggests that in order to reduce the exposure of humans to infective S. stercoralis larvae, dogs should be treated for the infection along with their owners. PMID:28793306

  4. Different but overlapping populations of Strongyloides stercoralis in dogs and humans-Dogs as a possible source for zoonotic strongyloidiasis.

    PubMed

    Jaleta, Tegegn G; Zhou, Siyu; Bemm, Felix M; Schär, Fabian; Khieu, Virak; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter; Lok, James B; Streit, Adrian

    2017-08-01

    shared with humans. This argues for the strong potential of dogs as reservoirs for zoonotic transmission of S. stercoralis to humans and suggests that in order to reduce the exposure of humans to infective S. stercoralis larvae, dogs should be treated for the infection along with their owners.

  5. Eyelid Lacerations Due to Dog Bite in Children.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Mohammad Ali A; Corkin, Frances; Mantagos, Iason S

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the nature and extent of lacrimal apparatus injury in children after eyelid laceration from a dog bite. A retrospective chart review of all eyelid lacerations treated between 1990 and 2012 at Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, was conducted. Seventy-three patients who sustained an eyelid laceration due to dog bite were identified and were matched 5:1 with a randomly selected cohort of 365 patients from the group of 1,177 patients who had sustained eyelid lacerations from other causes during the same time period. Of the 73 patients who sustained an eyelid laceration due to a dog bite, 26 (35.62%) had damage to the lacrimal apparatus. This was statistically significant when compared to patients who sustained eyelid lacerations from other causes, in which 13 (3.56%) patients had damage to the lacrimal apparatus (P < .000001). The inferior canaliculus was the most commonly involved site of lacrimal apparatus trauma as a result of a dog bite. Success was defined as lack of epiphora at the time of the last follow-up. Early surgical management of eyelid lacerations with lacrimal apparatus involvement had a success rate of 82%. Eyelid lacerations due to dog bites have a greater prevalence of involvement of the lacrimal apparatus and especially the inferior canaliculus than lacerations due to other causes in children. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion for lacrimal apparatus involvement and be prepared for surgical repair, if indicated. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Refractory hypoglycaemia in a dog infected with Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Desquesnes, Marc; Dorso, Laetitia; Ravel, Sophie; Bossard, Géraldine; Charbonneau, Morgane; Garand, Annabelle; Roux, Françoise A.

    2016-01-01

    A 20 kg German shepherd dog was presented to a French veterinary teaching hospital for seizures and hyperthermia. The dog had returned 1 month previously from a six-month stay in Senegal and sub-Saharan Africa. Biochemistry and haematology showed severe hypoglycaemia (0.12 g/L), anaemia and thrombocytopenia. Despite administration of large amounts of glucose (30 mL of 30% glucose IV and 10 mL of 70% sucrose by gavage tube hourly), 26 consecutive blood glucose measurements were below 0.25 g/L (except one). Routine cytological examination of blood smears revealed numerous free extracytoplasmic protozoa consistent with Trypanosoma congolense. PCR confirmed a Trypanosoma congolense forest-type infection. Treatment consisted of six injections of pentamidine at 48-hour intervals. Trypanosomes had disappeared from the blood smears four days following the first injection. Clinical improvement was correlated with the normalization of laboratory values. The infection relapsed twice and the dog was treated again; clinical signs and parasites disappeared and the dog was considered cured; however, 6 years after this incident, serological examination by ELISA T. congolense was positive. The status of this dog (infected or non-infected) remains unclear. Hypoglycaemia was the most notable clinical feature in this case. It was spectacular in its severity and in its refractory nature; glucose administration seemed only to feed the trypanosomes, indicating that treatment of hypoglycaemia may in fact have been detrimental. PMID:26795063

  7. Refractory hypoglycaemia in a dog infected with Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Desquesnes, Marc; Dorso, Laetitia; Ravel, Sophie; Bossard, Géraldine; Charbonneau, Morgane; Garand, Annabelle; Roux, Françoise A

    2016-01-01

    A 20 kg German shepherd dog was presented to a French veterinary teaching hospital for seizures and hyperthermia. The dog had returned 1 month previously from a six-month stay in Senegal and sub-Saharan Africa. Biochemistry and haematology showed severe hypoglycaemia (0.12 g/L), anaemia and thrombocytopenia. Despite administration of large amounts of glucose (30 mL of 30% glucose IV and 10 mL of 70% sucrose by gavage tube hourly), 26 consecutive blood glucose measurements were below 0.25 g/L (except one). Routine cytological examination of blood smears revealed numerous free extracytoplasmic protozoa consistent with Trypanosoma congolense. PCR confirmed a Trypanosoma congolense forest-type infection. Treatment consisted of six injections of pentamidine at 48-hour intervals. Trypanosomes had disappeared from the blood smears four days following the first injection. Clinical improvement was correlated with the normalization of laboratory values. The infection relapsed twice and the dog was treated again; clinical signs and parasites disappeared and the dog was considered cured; however, 6 years after this incident, serological examination by ELISA T. congolense was positive. The status of this dog (infected or non-infected) remains unclear. Hypoglycaemia was the most notable clinical feature in this case. It was spectacular in its severity and in its refractory nature; glucose administration seemed only to feed the trypanosomes, indicating that treatment of hypoglycaemia may in fact have been detrimental.

  8. Paracoccidioidomycosis in a dog: case report of generalized lymphadenomegaly.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Marconi Rodrigues; Condas, Larissa Anuska Zeni; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Bosco, Sandra de Moraes Gimenes; Muro, Marisol Dominguez; Werner, Juliana; Theodoro, Raquel Cordeiro; Bagagli, Eduardo; Marques, Sílvio Alencar; Franco, Marcello

    2011-08-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a severe systemic mycosis, endemic in Latin America and highly prevalent in Brazil, where it ranks eighth as a mortality cause among infectious and parasitic diseases in humans. The disease in animals has been little explored. It is observed that armadillos can harbor the fungus at high frequencies, although the active disease has not been well documented in this wild mammal. Dogs are susceptible to experimental infection, and the naturally acquired PCM-disease was reported only recently in a dog from Brazil. The present work reports the second case of naturally acquired PCM in a 6-year-old female dog that presented emaciation, lymphadenomegaly, and hepatosplenomegaly. Biochemical and pulmonary radiographic evaluation did not reveal any abnormalities. PCM was diagnosed by clinical findings, culturing, immunohistochemistry, and histopathology of popliteal lymph node. The fungus was recovered from popliteal lymph node, and the molecular analysis showed respective sequencing similarities of 99 and 100% for 803 nucleotides of the Gp43 gene and 592 nucleotides from the ITS-5.8S region of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Immunohistochemistry revealed severe lymphadenitis and presented numerous yeasts, which reacted against the gp43 antibody. Histopathology revealed a severe granulomatous lymphadenitis associated with numerous single or multiple budding yeasts. After diagnosis, the dog was successfully treated with itraconazol for 2 years. Veterinarians should be aware of the importance of considering PCM for differential diagnosis, especially in dogs from PCM-endemic areas, whose monophagocytic system involvement is evident.

  9. Comparison of intratesticular injection of zinc gluconate versus surgical castration to sterilize male dogs.

    PubMed

    Levy, Julie K; Crawford, P Cynda; Appel, Leslie D; Clifford, Emma L

    2008-01-01

    To compare castration of dogs by use of intratesticular injection of zinc gluconate with traditional surgical procedures in terms of acceptance by pet owners, ease of use, and short-term outcomes on Isabela Island of the Galápagos Islands. 161 privately owned male dogs admitted to a neuter program. Medical records of male dogs neutered during a 4-week animal control campaign were reviewed to collect information regarding signalment, method of castration, complication rate, and treatment outcomes. Of the 161 dogs admitted for castration, 58 were surgically castrated and 103 were treated with zinc gluconate. Dogs were returned to their owners for observation following castration. Wound dehiscence occurred in 2 skin incisions, representing 3.4% of the 58 dogs that underwent bilateral orchiectomy. Necrotizing zinc-gluconate injection-site reactions occurred in 4 dogs receiving injection volumes near the maximum label dose (0.8 to 1.0 mL), representing 3.9% of the zinc-gluconate procedures. Surgical wound complications were treated by superficial wound debridement and resuturing, in contrast to zinc-gluconate injection-site reactions, which all required orchiectomy and extensive surgical debridement, including scrotal ablation in 2 dogs. Low cost, ease of use, and cultural acceptance of a castration technique that does not require removal of the testes make zinc gluconate a valuable option for large-scale use in dogs, particularly in remote locations lacking sophisticated clinical facilities or skilled surgeons and staff. Further investigation is needed to identify risk factors in dogs for adverse reactions to zinc gluconate and to develop strategies for avoidance.

  10. Combination of CCNU and DTIC chemotherapy for treatment of resistant lymphoma in dogs.

    PubMed

    Flory, A B; Rassnick, K M; Al-Sarraf, R; Bailey, D B; Balkman, C E; Kiselow, M A; Autio, K

    2008-01-01

    Pleotropic-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated resistance is the usual cause of relapse in dogs with lymphoma. 1-(2-chloroethyl)3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosurea (CCNU) and 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)-imidazole-4-carboxamide (DTIC) are alkylating agents that are not affected by P-gp and lack cross-resistance to each other. A combination protocol offers the advantage of improved summation dose and synergistic activity. A combination of CCNU and DTIC that is well tolerated can be used to treat dogs with lymphoma that developed resistance or failed to respond to previously administered chemotherapy. Fifty-seven dogs with lymphoma that were resistant to treatment with standard chemotherapy (L-CHOP; L-asparaginase, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone). Prospective phase I and II trials were performed. CCNU was given PO immediately before a 5-h IV infusion of DTIC. Concurrent antiemetics and prophylactic antibiotics were used. Treatments were administered every 4 weeks. Based on the results of 8 dogs in the phase I study, CCNU at 40 mg/m(2) PO combined with DTIC at 600 mg/m(2) IV was used to treat 57 dogs with resistant lymphoma. Thirteen (23%) dogs had a complete response (CR) for a median of 83 days and 7 (12%) had a partial response for a median of 25 days. The median L-CHOP CR duration of the dogs that did not respond to CCNU-DTIC was significantly longer than that of the dogs that did achieve remission with CCNU-DTIC (225 days versus 92 days, P= .02). The principal toxic event was neutropenia; the median neutrophil count 7 days after treatment was 1,275 cells/microL. Increases in alanine transaminase activity, possibly associated with hepatotoxicity, were detected in 7 dogs. A combination of CCNU and DTIC can be an effective option to rescue dogs with resistant lymphoma.

  11. Azithromycin pharmacokinetics in the serum and its distribution to the skin in healthy dogs and dogs with pyoderma.

    PubMed

    Zur, Gila; Soback, Stefan; Weiss, Yfat; Perry, Elad; Lavy, Eran; Britzi, Malka

    2014-04-01

    Serum and skin tissue azithromycin (AZM) concentrations were analysed in healthy and pyoderma affected dogs to determine AZM pharmacokinetics and to establish the effect of disease on AZM skin disposition. AZM was administered orally to two groups of healthy dogs: (1) at 7.02 mg/kg (n=7) and (2) at 11.2mg/kg (n=9). A crossover design was used on five of them. Seven dogs with pyoderma were treated with AZM at 10.7 mg/kg. The two groups of healthy dogs received AZM once daily over three consecutive days and dogs with pyoderma received the same treatment repeated twice with an interval of 1 week. AZM concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. AZM was rapidly absorbed and slowly excreted. In healthy dogs, maximum serum concentrations appeared 2h after administration and were (mean ± standard deviation) 0.60 ± 0.25 μg/mL and 1.03 ± 0.43 μg/mL, and the half-lives were 49.9 ± 5.10 and 51.9 ± 6.69 h for doses of 7.02 and 11.2mg/kg, respectively. Clearance (CL0-24/F) was similar in both dosing groups (1.24 ± 0.24 and 1.29 ± 0.24 L/h/kg) and the respective mean residence time (MRT0-24) was 11.1 ± 0.8 and 8.4 ± 2.2h. The skin concentration in healthy dogs was 3.5-6.5 and 5.0-12.0 times higher than the corresponding serum concentration after the two doses and increased after the cessation of AZM administration. The ratio increased significantly in inflamed tissue (9.5-26.2).

  12. 38 CFR 17.148 - Service dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Service dogs. 17.148..., Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.148 Service dogs. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section: Service dogs are guide or service dogs prescribed for a disabled veteran under this section. (b) Clinical...

  13. 38 CFR 17.148 - Service dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Service dogs. 17.148..., Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.148 Service dogs. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section: Service dogs are guide or service dogs prescribed for a disabled veteran under this section. (b) Clinical...

  14. Hypoadrenocorticism in a kindred of Pomeranian dogs.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Erin T; Hammond, Tara N; Mahony, Orla M

    2015-01-01

    Three adult Pomeranian dogs, full siblings from 2 litters, were diagnosed with primary hypoadrenocorticism following onset of hypoadrenal crisis. Review of the family history revealed the dogs' maternal grandmother also had hypoadrenocorticism. All 4 dogs were pedigree-certified by the American Kennel Club. An inherited basis for hypoadrenocorticism is proposed in these Pomeranian dogs.

  15. When You Meet a Dog Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrey, Pauline

    1994-01-01

    Tips are offered for use in an encounter with a dog guide and its blind owner. Tips include approaching the person from the right side, not taking hold of the dog guide's harness, not offering food to the dog guide, and not petting the dog guide without the owner's permission. (JDD)

  16. Rotary slot dog

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.; Smauley, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A clamp or dog is disclosed which preferably comprises a slotted stepped cylindrical body which is inserted into a hole in a workpiece and then fastened to a base or fixture using a screw which is inserted through the slot. The stepped configuration provides an annular clamping surface which securely clamps the workpiece against the base or fixture. The slotted cylindrical configuration permits adjustment of the workpiece and retaining clamp in any direction, i.e., over 360.degree., relative to the mounting position of the screw in the base or fixture.

  17. Markers of hepatic regeneration associated with surgical attenuation of congenital portosystemic shunts in dogs.

    PubMed

    Tivers, Michael S; Lipscomb, Victoria J; Smith, Kenneth C; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P D; House, Arthur K

    2014-05-01

    Dogs with congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) have liver hypoplasia and hepatic insufficiency. Surgical CPSS attenuation results in liver growth associated with clinical improvement. The mechanism of this hepatic response is unknown, although liver regeneration is suspected. This study investigated whether markers of liver regeneration were associated with CPSS attenuation. Dogs treated with CPSS attenuation were prospectively recruited. Residual liver tissue was collected for gene expression analysis (seven genes) from 24 CPSS dogs that tolerated complete attenuation, 25 dogs that tolerated partial attenuation and seven control dogs. Relative gene expression was measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Blood samples were collected before, 24 h and 48 h post-surgery from 36 CPSS dogs and from 10 control dogs. Serum hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) concentration was measured using a canine specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). HGF mRNA expression was significantly decreased in CPSS compared with control dogs (P = 0.046). There were significant increases in HGF (P = 0.050) and methionine adenosyltransferase 2 A (MAT2A; P = 0.002) mRNA expression following partial CPSS attenuation. Dogs with complete attenuation had significantly greater MAT2A (P = 0.024) mRNA expression compared with dogs with partial attenuation. Serum HGF concentration significantly increased 24 h following CPSS attenuation (P < 0.001). Hepatic mRNA expression of two markers of hepatocyte proliferation (HGF and MAT2A) was associated with the response to surgery in dogs with CPSS, and serum HGF significantly increased following surgery, suggesting hepatocyte proliferation. These findings support the concept that hepatic regeneration is important in the hepatic response to CPSS surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of cystoscopic-guided laser ablation of intramural ectopic ureters in female dogs.

    PubMed

    Berent, Allyson C; Weisse, Chick; Mayhew, Philipp D; Todd, Kimberly; Wright, Monika; Bagley, Demetrius

    2012-03-15

    To describe and evaluate the short- and long-term outcomes in female dogs after cystoscopic-guided laser ablation of ectopic ureters (CLA-EU). Prospective case series. 32 incontinent female dogs with intramural ectopic ureters. A diagnosis of intramural ectopic ureters was made via cystoscopy and fluoroscopy in all patients. Transurethral CLA-EU (via diode laser [n = 27] or Holmium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser [3]) was performed to relocate the ectopic ureteral orifice cranially into the urinary bladder. All vaginal anomalies were treated with the laser concurrently. Follow-up evaluation was standardized and included urinary continence scoring, serial bacteriologic culture of urine samples, and a follow-up cystoscopy 6 to 8 weeks after CLA-EU. Ectopic ureteral orifices of all dogs were initially located in the urethra. Eighteen of 30 dogs had bilateral ectopic ureters, and 12 had unilateral ectopic ureters. All dogs had other concurrent urinary anomalies. At the time of last follow-up (median, 2.7 years after CLA-EU, [range, 12 to 62 months]), 14 of 30 (47%) dogs did not require any additional treatments following CLA-EU to maintain urinary continence. For the 16 residually incontinent dogs, the addition of medical management, transurethral bulking-agent injection, or placement of a hydraulic occluder was effective in 3, 2, and 4 dogs, respectively, improving the overall urinary continence rate to 77% (23/30 dogs). One dog had evidence of polypoid cystitis at the neoureteral orifice 6 weeks after CLA-EU that was resolved at 3 months. CLA-EU provided an effective, safe, and minimally invasive alternative to surgery for intramural ectopic ureters in female dogs.

  19. Public Perceptions of Service Dogs, Emotional Support Dogs, and Therapy Dogs.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina; Hellyer, Peter; Cheung, Louana; Kogan, Lori

    2017-06-15

    As service dogs, emotional support dogs, and therapy dogs have become more prevalent in the USA, so too has the controversy surrounding their legitimacy. Yet, there is a lack of objective data regarding the public's understanding of the role played by each of these types of animals, as well as their perceptions regarding the legitimacy of their integration. An anonymous, online survey was distributed to examine the perceptions of US adults who do not own any type of assistance animal. A total of 505 individuals responded to the online survey, yielding 284 usable responses. Results suggest widespread misconceptions about definitions, rules, regulations, and rights associated with each type of assistance dog. In general, service dogs are more likely to be perceived as helping with a legitimate need, and their access to public spaces is viewed favorably. While there are some concerns about the legitimacy and necessary access rights for emotional support dogs, members of the public correctly identified the roles and rights of therapy dogs. Despite the media's focus on abuses and false representation of these dogs, most participants reported feeling the majority of people are not taking advantage of the system.

  20. Public Perceptions of Service Dogs, Emotional Support Dogs, and Therapy Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina; Hellyer, Peter; Cheung, Louana; Kogan, Lori

    2017-01-01

    As service dogs, emotional support dogs, and therapy dogs have become more prevalent in the USA, so too has the controversy surrounding their legitimacy. Yet, there is a lack of objective data regarding the public’s understanding of the role played by each of these types of animals, as well as their perceptions regarding the legitimacy of their integration. An anonymous, online survey was distributed to examine the perceptions of US adults who do not own any type of assistance animal. A total of 505 individuals responded to the online survey, yielding 284 usable responses. Results suggest widespread misconceptions about definitions, rules, regulations, and rights associated with each type of assistance dog. In general, service dogs are more likely to be perceived as helping with a legitimate need, and their access to public spaces is viewed favorably. While there are some concerns about the legitimacy and necessary access rights for emotional support dogs, members of the public correctly identified the roles and rights of therapy dogs. Despite the media’s focus on abuses and false representation of these dogs, most participants reported feeling the majority of people are not taking advantage of the system. PMID:28617350

  1. Ultrasonographic findings and outcomes of dogs with suspected migrating intrathoracic grass awns: 43 cases (2010-2013).

    PubMed

    Caivano, Domenico; Birettoni, Francesco; Rishniw, Mark; Bufalari, Antonello; De Monte, Valentina; Proni, Alessia; Giorgi, Maria Elena; Porciello, Francesco

    2016-02-15

    To describe ultrasonographic findings and outcomes for dogs with suspected migrating intrathoracic grass awns. Retrospective case series. 43 client-owned dogs. Records for dogs with suspected migrating intrathoracic grass awns examined between 2010 and 2013 were reviewed. Ultrasonographic images and additional information such as signalment and pleural fluid analysis, radiographic, bronchoscopic, and CT findings were collected. Surgical treatments and outcomes were also reviewed. Transthoracic or transesophageal ultrasonography revealed grass awns in the pleural space (n = 13) or pulmonary parenchyma (10) of 23 dogs. Surgical removal of grass awns was successful on the first attempt in 21 of these 23 dogs (including 11/23 that had intraoperative ultrasonography performed to aid localization and removal of the awn). In the remaining 2 dogs, a second surgery was required. Twenty dogs with evidence of migrating intrathoracic grass awns had no foreign body identified on initial ultrasonographic evaluation and were treated medically; 16 developed draining fistulas, and awns identified ultrasonographically at follow-up visits were subsequently removed from the sublumbar region (n = 10) or thoracic wall (6). The remaining 4 dogs had no grass awn visualized. Clinical signs resolved in all dogs. Transthoracic, transesophageal, and intraoperative ultrasonography were useful for localization and removal of migrating intrathoracic grass awns. Ultrasonography may be considered a valuable and readily available diagnostic tool for monitoring dogs with suspected migrating intrathoracic grass awns.

  2. Characteristics of pain and response to analgesic treatment in dogs and cats examined at a veterinary teaching hospital emergency service.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Ashley J; Muir, William W; Wittum, Thomas E

    2005-06-15

    To estimate the prevalence and characteristics of pain in dogs and cats examined by an emergency service at a veterinary teaching hospital and evaluate the response of dogs and cats with signs of pain to analgesic treatment. Cross-sectional study. 317 dogs and 112 cats. A questionnaire was used to categorize the characteristics of pain. The location, cause, and signs of pain were determined by obtaining a thorough history and conducting a physical examination. Pain was categorized by type (superficial somatic, deep somatic, or visceral), mechanism (inflammatory, neuropathic, or both), severity (mild, moderate, or severe), and duration. Evidence for primary or secondary hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity to manipulation was determined. The response to single or multiple analgesic drug administration was assessed. 179 (56%) dogs and 60 (54%) cats had signs of pain. In most of these dogs and cats, pain was classified as acute (< 24 hours' duration) and of moderate severity and was associated with primary hypersensitivity. Most dogs had deep somatic pain; most cats had visceral pain. Inflammation was the most common mechanism. One hundred nineteen (66%) dogs and 41 (68%) cats were treated with analgesic drugs. Analgesic treatment was considered effective in 73 (61%) dogs and 31 (76%) cats. Results suggest that moderate to severe acute somatic pain caused by inflammation is common in dogs and cats examined by an emergency service and that a combination of multiple analgesic drugs is more effective than any single analgesic drug in the treatment of pain in these dogs and cats.

  3. Administration of miltefosine and meglumine antimoniate in healthy dogs: clinicopathological evaluation of the impact on the kidneys.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Paolo; Brovida, Claudio; Valente, Marialuisa; Aresu, Luca; Cavicchioli, Laura; Vischer, Claudia; Giroud, Lucie; Castagnaro, Massimo

    2009-10-01

    In canine leishmaniosis (CanL), kidneys are affected in virtually all dogs. Treatment of CanL is limited in Europe to meglumine antimoniate and miltefosine. This study evaluated the pharmacological, toxicological, and pathological effects of both drugs in healthy beagle dogs. Four male and four female dogs were divided into two groups. The animals in Group 1 were administered an oral solution of 2% of miltefosine at 2 mg/kg b.w. once a day, for twenty-eight days. The animals in Group 2 were administered a preparation of meglumine antimoniate at 100 mg/kg b.w. subcutaneously once a day for twenty-eight days. After treatment, all dogs were followed-up for a further twenty-eight days. Dogs were observed daily and clinically examined ten times throughout the study. On days -1 and 55 a renal biopsy was performed on all dogs and analyzed by light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy. All the examinations failed to demonstrate any lesions in the miltefosine-treated dogs. Conversely, all the meglumine antimoniate-treated dogs demonstrated severe tubular damage, characterized by tubular cell necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, although no clinical signs of renal disease were evident, the use of meglumine antimoniate in the pharmacological treatment approach of CanL-affected dogs should be carefully considered.

  4. Naturally occurring isohexenylnaphthazarins and wound healing: experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Karayannopoulou, Maria; Loukopoulos, Panagiotis; Papazoglou, Lysimachos G; Tsioli, Vassiliki; Anagnostou, Tilemahos L; Assaloumidis, Nikolaos; Constantinidis, Theodocos C; Assimopoulou, Andceana N; Kaldrymidou, Eleni; Papageorgiou, Vassilios P

    2010-01-01

    The healing efficacy of isohexenylnaphthazarins (IHN) has been well proved on chronic or contaminated wounds. To evaluate the wound healing activity of an experimental ointment containing IHN on acute and noncontaminated wounds in dogs. In each of six beagle dogs, four full-thickness skin defects were created bilaterally: one 2 x 2 cm defect on the lateral aspect of each arm for subjective evaluation, laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), and planimetry and three 1.5 x 1.5 cm defects on opposite sides of the dorsal midline for histologic evaluation. Wounds on the left were treated with an ointment based on IHN and on the right with another based on petroleum jelly (Vaseline) and beeswax. Wound size decreased significantly in both sides. The significantly increased percentage of epithelialization was higher (p = .0274) in the petroleum jelly-treated wounds on day 20. Tissue perfusion (LDF) increased significantly bilaterally in the center of the wound but only in the IHN-treated side cranial to the wound. Histologically, angiogenesis was significantly higher (p = .0431) on day 5 in the IHN-treated wounds compared with the petroleum jelly-treated wounds. Collagen production increased significantly bilaterally. The IHN-based ointment promoted some of the proliferative processes, but it did not enhance the overall wound healing of acute, surgically created wounds in dogs.

  5. Characterization of urinary metabolites of testosterone, methyltestosterone, mibolerone and boldebone in greyhound dogs.

    PubMed

    Williams, T M; Kind, A J; Hyde, W G; Hill, D W

    2000-06-01

    Androgenic steroids are used in female greyhound dogs to prevent the onset of estrus; moreover, these steroids also have potent anabolic activity. As anabolic steroids increase muscle mass and aggression in animals, the excessive use of these agents in racing greyhounds gives an unfair performance advantage to treated dogs. The biotransformation of most anabolic steroids has not been determined in greyhound dogs. The objective of the present study was to identify the urinary metabolites of testosterone, methyltestosterone, mibolerone, and boldenone in greyhound dogs. These steroids were administered orally (1 mg/kg) to either male or female greyhound dogs and urine samples were collected pre-administration and at 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 72, and 96 h post-administration. Urine extracts were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) to identify major metabolites and to determine their urinary excretion profiles. Major urinary metabolites, primarily glucuronide, conjugated and free, were detected for the selected steroids. Sulfate conjugation did not appear to be a major pathway for steroid metabolism and excretion in the greyhound dog. Phase I biotransformation was also evaluated using greyhound dog liver microsomes from untreated dogs. The identification of several in vivo steroid metabolites generated in this study will be useful in detecting these steroids in urine samples submitted for drug screening.

  6. Animal-assisted therapy and loneliness in nursing homes: use of robotic versus living dogs.

    PubMed

    Banks, Marian R; Willoughby, Lisa M; Banks, William A

    2008-03-01

    Loneliness is a common problem in long-term care facilities (LTCF) and previous work has shown that animal-assisted therapy (AAT) can to some degree reverse loneliness. Here, we compared the ability of a living dog (Dog) and a robotic dog (AIBO) to treat loneliness in elderly patients living in LTCF. In comparison with a control group not receiving AAT, both the Dog and AIBO groups had statistically significant improvements in their levels of loneliness. As measured by a modified Lexington Attachment to Pets Scale (MLAPS), residents showed high levels of attachment to both the dog and AIBO. Subscale analysis showed that the AIBO group scored lower than the living dog on "animal rights/animal welfare" but not on "general attachment" or "people substituting." However, MLAPS measures did not correlate with changes in loneliness, showing that attachment was not the mechanism by which AAT decreases loneliness. We conclude that interactive robotic dogs can reduce loneliness in residents of LTCF and that residents become attached to these robots. However, level of attachment does not explain the decrease in loneliness associated with AAT conducted with either a living or robotic dog.

  7. Blood Transfusions in Dogs and Cats Receiving Hemodialysis: 230 Cases (June 1997-September 2012).

    PubMed

    Langston, C; Cook, A; Eatroff, A; Mitelberg, E; Chalhoub, S

    2017-03-01

    Multiple factors exist that contribute to anemia in dogs and cats receiving hemodialysis, can necessitate transfusion. To describe blood product usage in dogs and cats with acute and chronic kidney disease that were treated with intermittent hemodialysis to determine risk factors associated with the requirement for blood product transfusion. 83 cats and 147 dogs undergoing renal replacement therapy at the Animal Medical Center for acute or chronic kidney disease. Retrospective medical record review of all dogs and cats receiving renal replacement therapy for kidney disease, from June 1997 through September 2012. Blood products (whole blood, packed RBCs, or stromal-free hemoglobin) were administered to 87% of cats and 32% of dogs. The number of dialysis treatments was associated with the requirement for transfusion in cats (adjusted OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.13, 4.32), but not in dogs (adjusted OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.95, 1.03). Administration of a blood product was associated with a higher likelihood of death in dogs (OR 3.198, 95% CI 1.352, 7.565; P = .0098), but not in cats (OR 1.527, 95% CI 0.5404, 4.317, P = .2). Veterinary hospitals with a hemodialysis unit should have reliable and rapid access to safe blood products in order to meet the needs of dogs and cats receiving dialysis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. IgA containing immune complexes in dogs bearing a spontaneous mammary adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Balint, J; Nagai, T; Ikeda, Y; Meek, K; Terman, D S

    1982-01-01

    Sera from dogs with mammary adenocarcinoma were assessed for the presence of immune complexes (IC) and the physicochemical composition of these complexes was investigated. Employing 125I-anti-canine IgG as indicator, elevated levels of C1q binding IgG were detected in sera of dogs with mammary adenocarcinoma. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis of IC isolated by G-200 fractionation and protein A affinity chromatography revealed the presence of a dense polypeptide band corresponding to the alpha chain of IgA which was present in the mammary adenocarcinoma sera but not in normal dog sera or sera from dogs with other tumours. Employing monospecific radiolabelled anti-canine IgA as indicator in solid phase C1q binding radioimmunoassays, significantly elevated levels of C1q binding IgA were detected in five of eight mammary adenocarcinoma sera but not in sera of normal dogs or other tumour bearing dogs (P less than 0.05). Sera from mammary adenocarcinoma bearing dogs treated with 5% polyethylene glycol (PEG) and subjected to sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation revealed IgA containing IC in fractions greater than 7S to greater than 19S. Findings suggest that IC are present in sera of dogs with mammary adenocarcinoma and that that IgA is a major and unique component of these complexes and, hence, may play a significant role in the development and evolution of the canine immune response to mammary adenocarcinoma. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6982137

  9. Type I immune-mediated polyarthritis in dogs: 39 cases (1997-2002).

    PubMed

    Clements, Dylan N; Gear, Robyn N A; Tattersall, James; Carmichael, Stuart; Bennett, David

    2004-04-15

    To determine clinical signs, laboratory findings, relationship to vaccination, and response to treatment for type I immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA) in dogs. Retrospective study. 39 dogs Clinical records and radiographic reports from 3 university referral hospitals were reviewed. Clinical signs, laboratory and investigative findings, relationship to vaccination, and response to treatment were evaluated. Clinical signs and initial laboratory and clinical investigative findings were frequently abnormal but were nonspecific and not associated with likelihood of recovery. Time of vaccination was not associated with onset of disease. Chemotherapeutic immunosuppression resulted in complete cure in 56% of dogs. Continuous medication was required in 18% (7/39) of dogs, relapses were treated successfully in 13% (5/39) of dogs, and 15% (6/39) of dogs died or were euthanatized as a result of disease. The possible involvement of vaccination in type I IMPA was not made clear from this study because of the small population size. Signalment, clinical signs, and results of diagnostic tests other than multiple synovial fluid analyses were generally nonspecific. Most dogs with type I IMPA responded to initial immunosuppressive treatment, but 31% (12/39) of dogs relapsed, required further treatment, or both.

  10. Afoxolaner against fleas: immediate efficacy and resultant mortality after short exposure on dogs

    PubMed Central

    Beugnet, Frédéric; deVos, Christa; Liebenberg, Julian; Halos, Lénaïg; Fourie, Josephus

    2014-01-01

    The speed of efficacy of afoxolaner (NexGard®) against Ctenocephalides felis fleas was evaluated in two studies. Study A assessed the efficacy against existing fleas whereas study B assessed the efficacy against new infesting fleas. In study A, 12 dogs were allocated to the untreated group and 20 dogs to the treated group. All dogs were infested by 100 fleas each at Day −1, treated at Day 0 and flea combed at 2 h or at 6 h post treatment. In study B, 6 dogs were allocated to the untreated group and 10 to the treated group. They were infested with 100 fleas each on Days 2, 7, 14, 21 and 28. Fleas were removed and counted at 6 h post-infestation. Immediate and persistent efficacies were evaluated by counting fleas on the dogs. To evaluate induced mortality after exposure on dogs, fleas collected alive were placed in an insectarium for 24 h and assessed for viability. The immediate efficacy on dogs was significant at 6 h with 100%. The induced death of the fleas collected live from dogs 2 h after exposure was 99.7%. Concerning new infesting fleas, the observed efficacy at 6 h and the induced mortality were significantly different (p < 0.05) from the control at all time-points. At 6 h, the prophylactic efficacy was > 97% at Day 2 and Day 8 and > 90% at Day 14. The induced mortality after 6 h of exposure on dogs varied between 73.3% and 100% for the whole study. PMID:25148564

  11. Afoxolaner against fleas: immediate efficacy and resultant mortality after short exposure on dogs.

    PubMed

    Beugnet, Frédéric; deVos, Christa; Liebenberg, Julian; Halos, Lénaïg; Fourie, Josephus

    2014-01-01

    The speed of efficacy of afoxolaner (NexGard) against Ctenocephalides felis fleas was evaluated in two studies. Study A assessed the efficacy against existing fleas whereas study B assessed the efficacy against new infesting fleas. In study A, 12 dogs were allocated to the untreated group and 20 dogs to the treated group. All dogs were infested by 100 fleas each at Day -1, treated at Day 0 and flea combed at 2 h or at 6 h post treatment. In study B, 6 dogs were allocated to the untreated group and 10 to the treated group. They were infested with 100 fleas each on Days 2, 7, 14, 21 and 28. Fleas were removed and counted at 6 h post-infestation. Immediate and persistent efficacies were evaluated by counting fleas on the dogs. To evaluate induced mortality after exposure on dogs, fleas collected alive were placed in an insectarium for 24 h and assessed for viability. The immediate efficacy on dogs was significant at 6 h with 100%. The induced death of the fleas collected live from dogs 2 h after exposure was 99.7%. Concerning new infesting fleas, the observed efficacy at 6 h and the induced mortality were significantly different (p < 0.05) from the control at all time-points. At 6 h, the prophylactic efficacy was > 97% at Day 2 and Day 8 and > 90% at Day 14. The induced mortality after 6 h of exposure on dogs varied between 73.3% and 100% for the whole study.

  12. Ability of the Canine Brief Pain Inventory to detect response to treatment in dogs with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Boston, Raymond C.; Coyne, James C.; Farrar, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI) can detect changes in dogs with osteoarthritis treated with an NSAID or a placebo. Design Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Animals 70 dogs with osteoarthritis. Procedures Owners completed the CBPI on day 0. Dogs received carprofen or a placebo on days 1 through 14. Owners completed the CBPI again on day 14. Pain severity and pain interference scores from the CBPI were calculated, and the change from day 0 to day 14 was assessed within each group and between groups. Results No significant differences were detected in median scores for pain severity (3.50 and 3.25 on days 0 and 14, respectively) and pain interference (3.92 and 3.25 on days 0 and 14, respectively) in dogs receiving the placebo. Dogs receiving carprofen had significant changes in median scores for pain severity (4.25 to 2.25 on days 0 and 14, respectively) and pain interference (4.33 to 2.67 on days 0 and 14, respectively). There was a significantly greater improvement in pain severity and pain interference scores in dogs treated with carprofen, compared with improvement in scores for dogs receiving the placebo. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance The CBPI was able to detect improvements in pain scores in dogs with osteoarthritis treated with an NSAID or a placebo. These results, in combination with previous reliability and validity testing, support the use of the CBPI to obtain quantifiable assessments from owners regarding the severity and impact of chronic pain and treatment for dogs with osteoarthritis. PMID:19180716

  13. Use of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Watson, A D; Nicholson, A; Church, D B; Pearson, M R

    1996-09-01

    Responses (486) were collared from a survey of 5054 Australian veterinarians on their use of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs in dogs and cats. Almost all respondents used glucocorticoids (usually prednisolone) to treat allergic, pruritic dermatoses in dogs, while two-thirds also gave fatty acid supplements and one-half used antihistamines. Almost 60% of respondents initially injected a glucocorticoid (frequently a long-acting preparation) when treating inflammatory skin diseases in dogs. More than 90% of respondents used glucocorticoids to treat immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia or thrombocytopenia, and about one-third also gave cytotoxic drugs. Administration of prednisolone on alternate days was generally favoured for long-term enteral steroid therapy. Phenylbutazone was the most preferred treatment for painful or inflammatory musculoskeletal disorders of dogs, but aspirin and pentosan polysulphate were also used widely. Regarding the use of analgesics drugs generally, both narcotic analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were used more widely in dogs than in cats, but alpha-2 agonists were used similarly in both species. The most commonly used narcotic analgesics were pethidine and buprenorphine in both species, while the NSAIDs used most often were flunixin and dipyrone in dogs and ketoprofen in cats. More than 80% of respondents generally used analgesic drugs with potentially painful surgical procedures, with doses given usually before anaesthetic recovery. Analgesic use rates varied with the condition, ranging from 94% for patients with acute severe trauma, through 60% for cruciate ligament repair and 29% for perineal herniorrahphy, to about 5% for ovariohysterectomy and dog castration. The three clinical signs most frequently nominated as indicators of pain in dogs and cats were (in descending order) vocalisation, response to handling or palpating the affected area, and mental depression. Other items mentioned frequently were

  14. Clinical, laboratory and pathological findings in dogs experimentally infected with Angiostrongylus vasorum.

    PubMed

    Schnyder, Manuela; Fahrion, Anna; Riond, Barbara; Ossent, Pete; Webster, Pia; Kranjc, Asja; Glaus, Tony; Deplazes, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this comparative study was to investigate the development of clinical signs and accompanying haematological, coproscopic and pathological findings as a basis for the monitoring of health condition of Angiostrongylus vasorum infected dogs. Six beagles were orally inoculated with 50 (n=3) or 500 (n=3) A. vasorum third stage larvae (L3) obtained from experimentally infected Biomphalaria glabrata snails. Two dogs were treated with moxidectin/imidacloprid spot-on solution and two further dogs with an oral experimental compound 92 days post infection (dpi), and were necropsied 166 dpi. Two untreated control dogs were necropsied 97 dpi. Prepatency was 47-49 days. Dogs inoculated with 500 L3 exhibited earlier (from 42 dpi) and more severe respiratory signs. Clinical signs resolved 12 days after treatment and larval excretion stopped within 20 days in all four treated dogs. Upon necropsy, 10 and 170 adult worms were recovered from the untreated dogs inoculated with 50 and 500 L3, respectively. Adult worms were also found in two treated dogs, in the absence of L1 or eggs. Despite heavy A. vasorum infection load and severe pulmonary changes including vascular thrombosis, only mild haematological changes were observed. Eosinophilia was absent but the presence of plasma cells was observed. Neutrophilic leucocytes showed a transient increase but only after treatment. Signs for coagulopathies were slight; nevertheless coagulation parameters were inoculation dose dependent. Ten weeks after treatment pulmonary fibrosis was still present. Infections starting from 50 L3 of A. vasorum had a massive impact on lung tissues and therefore on the health of affected dogs, particularly after prepatency, although only mild haematological abnormalities were evident.

  15. Relationship Between Scarring and Dog Aggression in Pit Bull-Type Dogs Involved in Organized Dogfighting.

    PubMed

    Miller, Katherine A; Touroo, Rachel; Spain, C Victor; Jones, Kelly; Reid, Pamela; Lockwood, Randall

    2016-11-15

    When pit bull-type dogs are seized in an investigation of organized dogfighting, heavily scarred dogs are often assumed to be highly dog aggressive due to a history of fighting. These dogs may be deemed dangerous and euthanized based on scarring alone. We analyzed our existing data on dogs seized from four dogfighting investigations, examining the relationship between the dogs' scars with aggression towards other dogs. Scar and wound data were tallied in three body zones where dogfighting injuries tend to be concentrated. Dog aggression was assessed using a model dog and a friendly stimulus dog in a standardized behavior evaluation. Scarring and dog aggression were significantly related, more strongly among male (Fisher's Exact p < 0.001) than female dogs (Fisher's Exact p = 0.05). Ten or more scars in the three body zones was a reasonable threshold with which to classify a dog as high risk for dog aggression: 82% of males and 60% of females with such scarring displayed dog aggression. However, because many unscarred dogs were dog aggressive while some highly scarred dogs were not, we recommend collecting behavioral information to supplement scar counts when making disposition decisions about dogs seized in dogfighting investigations.

  16. Complex population structure in African village dogs and its implications for inferring dog domestication history.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Adam R; Boyko, Ryan H; Boyko, Corin M; Parker, Heidi G; Castelhano, Marta; Corey, Liz; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D; Auton, Adam; Hedimbi, Marius; Kityo, Robert; Ostrander, Elaine A; Schoenebeck, Jeffrey; Todhunter, Rory J; Jones, Paul; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2009-08-18

    High genetic diversity of East Asian village dogs has recently been used to argue for an East Asian origin of the domestic dog. However, global village dog genetic diversity and the extent to which semiferal village dogs represent distinct, indigenous populations instead of admixtures of various dog breeds has not been quantified. Understanding these issues is critical to properly reconstructing the timing, number, and locations of dog domestication. To address these questions, we sampled 318 village dogs from 7 regions in Egypt, Uganda, and Namibia, measuring genetic diversity >680 bp of the mitochondrial D-loop, 300 SNPs, and 89 microsatellite markers. We also analyzed breed dogs, including putatively African breeds (Afghan hounds, Basenjis, Pharaoh hounds, Rhodesian ridgebacks, and Salukis), Puerto Rican street dogs, and mixed breed dogs from the United States. Village dogs from most African regions appear genetically distinct from non-native breed and mixed-breed dogs, although some individuals cluster genetically with Puerto Rican dogs or United States breed mixes instead of with neighboring village dogs. Thus, African village dogs are a mosaic of indigenous dogs descended from early migrants to Africa, and non-native, breed-admixed individuals. Among putatively African breeds, Pharaoh hounds, and Rhodesian ridgebacks clustered with non-native rather than indigenous African dogs, suggesting they have predominantly non-African origins. Surprisingly, we find similar mtDNA haplotype diversity in African and East Asian village dogs, potentially calling into question the hypothesis of an East Asian origin for dog domestication.

  17. Complex population structure in African village dogs and its implications for inferring dog domestication history

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, Adam R.; Boyko, Ryan H.; Boyko, Corin M.; Parker, Heidi G.; Castelhano, Marta; Corey, Liz; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D.; Auton, Adam; Hedimbi, Marius; Kityo, Robert; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Schoenebeck, Jeffrey; Todhunter, Rory J.; Jones, Paul; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2009-01-01

    High genetic diversity of East Asian village dogs has recently been used to argue for an East Asian origin of the domestic dog. However, global village dog genetic diversity and the extent to which semiferal village dogs represent distinct, indigenous populations instead of admixtures of various dog breeds has not been quantified. Understanding these issues is critical to properly reconstructing the timing, number, and locations of dog domestication. To address these questions, we sampled 318 village dogs from 7 regions in Egypt, Uganda, and Namibia, measuring genetic diversity >680 bp of the mitochondrial D-loop, 300 SNPs, and 89 microsatellite markers. We also analyzed breed dogs, including putatively African breeds (Afghan hounds, Basenjis, Pharaoh hounds, Rhodesian ridgebacks, and Salukis), Puerto Rican street dogs, and mixed breed dogs from the United States. Village dogs from most African regions appear genetically distinct from non-native breed and mixed-breed dogs, although some individuals cluster genetically with Puerto Rican dogs or United States breed mixes instead of with neighboring village dogs. Thus, African village dogs are a mosaic of indigenous dogs descended from early migrants to Africa, and non-native, breed-admixed individuals. Among putatively African breeds, Pharaoh hounds, and Rhodesian ridgebacks clustered with non-native rather than indigenous African dogs, suggesting they have predominantly non-African origins. Surprisingly, we find similar mtDNA haplotype diversity in African and East Asian village dogs, potentially calling into question the hypothesis of an East Asian origin for dog domestication. PMID:19666600

  18. Rabies Vaccination Targets for Stray Dog Populations

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Tiffany; Davis, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    The role of stray dogs in the persistence of domestic dog rabies, and whether removal of such dogs is beneficial, remains contentious issues for control programs seeking to eliminate rabies. While a community might reach the WHO vaccination target of 70% for dogs that can be handled, the stray or neighborhood dogs that are too wary of humans to be held are a more problematic population to vaccinate. Here, we present a method to estimate vaccination targets for stray dogs when the dog population is made up of stray, free-roaming, and confined dogs, where the latter two types are considered to have an identifiable owner. The control effort required for stray dogs is determined by the type-reproduction number, T1, the number of stray dogs infected by one rabid stray dog either directly or via any chain of infection involving owned dogs. Like the basic reproduction number R0 for single host populations, T1 determines the vaccination effort required to control the spread of disease when control is targeted at one host type, and there is a mix of host types. The application of T1 to rabies in mixed populations of stray and owned dogs is novel. We show that the outcome is sensitive to the vaccination coverage in the owned dog population, such that if vaccination rates of owned dogs were too low then no control effort targeting stray dogs is able to control or eliminate rabies. The required vaccination level also depends on the composition of the dog population, where a high proportion of either stray or free-roaming dogs implies unrealistically high vaccination levels are required to prevent rabies. We find that the required control effort is less sensitive to continuous culling that increases the death rate of stray dogs than to changes in the carrying capacity of the stray dog population. PMID:28451589

  19. Dog and cat bites.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Robert; Ellis, Carrie

    2014-08-15

    Animal bites account for 1% of all emergency department visits in the United States and more than $50 million in health care costs per year. Most animal bites are from a dog, usually one known to the victim. Most dog bite victims are children. Bite wounds should be cleaned, copiously irrigated with normal saline using a 20-mL or larger syringe or a 20-gauge catheter attached to the syringe. The wound should be explored for tendon or bone involvement and possible foreign bodies. Wounds may be closed if cosmetically favorable, such as wounds on the face or gaping wounds. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be considered, especially if there is a high risk of infection, such as with cat bites, with puncture wounds, with wounds to the hand, and in persons who are immunosuppressed. Amoxicillin/clavulanate is the first-line prophylactic antibiotic. The need for rabies prophylaxis should be addressed with any animal bite because even domestic animals are often unvaccinated. Postexposure rabies prophylaxis consists of immune globulin at presentation and vaccination on days 0, 3, 7, and 14. Counseling patients and families about animal safety may help decrease animal bites. In most states, physicians are required by law to report animal bites.

  20. Potential for cloning dogs.

    PubMed

    Westhusin, M E; Burghardt, R C; Ruglia, J N; Willingham, L A; Liu, L; Shin, T; Howe, L M; Kraemer, D C

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether nuclear transplantation could be used to clone a dog using donor nucleus cells collected from an adult female. Fibroblasts obtained from skin biopsies were fused with enucleated bovine or canine oocytes. The resulting cloned embryos were cultured in vitro to monitor embryonic development. A proportion of the resulting embryos was transferred into surrogate bitches for development to term. When canine oocytes were used as recipient ova for canine fibroblasts, 23% of the resulting embryos cleaved at least once after culture in vitro. Five cloned embryos were transferred into three synchronized recipient bitches, but no pregnancies resulted. When bovine oocytes were used as recipinets for canine fibroblasts, 38% cleaved to the two- to four-cell stage and 43% cleaved to the eight- to 16-cell stage. Forty-seven of these embryos were transferred into four recipient females, resulting in a single conceptus that ceased development at about day 20 of gestation. The desire for cloned dogs is considerable and will undoubtedly incite the development of successful methods for cloning companion animals. However, significant investment into additional research is required, especially in the areas of in vitro maturation of oocytes and control of the oestrous cycle of bitches.

  1. Phylogenetic identification of Cystoisospora spp. from dogs, cats, and raccoon dogs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Makoto; Carreno, Ramon A; Tani, Hiroyuki; Yoshiuchi, Ryusaku; Kanai, Takenori; Kimata, Isao; Uni, Shigehiko; Furuya, Masaru; Sasai, Kazumi

    2011-03-10

    Cystoisospora spp. from feces in dogs, cats, and raccoon dogs were isolated, sequenced at the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene locus and compared to other Cystoisospora spp. Cystoisospora oocysts from dogs and raccoon dogs were morphologically similar with those of C. ohioensis, and cat isolates were similar with those of C. felis. The sequences from dogs and raccoon dogs, and cats have a homology with C. ohioensis and C. felis, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the DNA sequences showed that the dog and raccoon dog isolates were nested in a clade with other Cystoisospora spp. including C. ohioensis, C. belli, and C. orlovi. The cat isolate formed a sister group with C. felis that was a separate clade from the dog and raccoon dog group. We report sequence variation in these Cystoisospora sequences and have identified raccoon dogs as another carnivore host for Cystoisospora spp. infecting dogs.

  2. Pharmacokinetic study and evaluation of the safety of taurolidine for dogs with osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma in dogs and humans share many similarities and the dog has been described as an excellent model to study this disease. The median survival in dogs has not improved in the last 25 years. Taurolidine has been shown to be cytotoxic to canine and human osteosarcoma in vitro. The goals of this study were to determine the pharmacokinetics and safety of taurolidine in healthy dogs and the safety of taurolidine in combination with doxorubicin or carboplatin in dogs with osteosarcoma. Methods Two percent taurolidine was infused into six healthy dogs (150 mg/kg) over a period of two hours and blood samples were taken periodically. One dog received taurolidine with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as its carrier and later received PVP-free taurolidine as did all other dogs in this study. Serum taurolidine concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) online coupled to ESI-MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. Subsequently, the same dose of taurolidine was infused to seven dogs with osteosarcoma also treated with doxorubicin or carboplatin. Results Taurolidine infusion was safe in 6 healthy dogs and there were no significant side effects. Maximum taurolidine serum concentrations ranged between 229 to 646 μM. The dog that received taurolidine with PVP had an immediate allergic reaction but recovered fully after the infusion was stopped. Three additional dogs with osteosarcoma received doxorubicin and taurolidine without PVP. Toxicities included dilated cardiomyopathy, protein-losing nephropathy, renal insufficiency and vasculopathy at the injection site. One dog was switched to carboplatin instead of doxorubicin and an additional 4 dogs with osteosarcoma received taurolidine-carboplatin combination. One incidence of ototoxicity occurred with the taurolidine- carboplatin combination. Bone marrow and gastro-intestinal toxicity did not appear increased with taurolidine over doxorubicin or carboplatin alone

  3. Effects of transient increased afterload during experimentally induced acute myocardial infarction in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hammerman, H; Kloner, R A; Alker, K J; Schoen, F J; Braunwald, E

    1985-02-15

    Alterations in afterload may occur during acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but it is unknown whether such alterations cause long-term changes in the left ventricular topography or alter healing of the AMI. AMI was produced by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in open-chest dogs. Eight dogs were randomized to a methoxamine group with an infusion dose of 30 micrograms/kg/min starting 1 hour after ligation for 4 hours to increase systemic systolic pressure by 40 to 50 mm Hg, and 8 were randomized to a saline control group (n = 8). Seven days later the dogs were killed and the hearts examined. The ratio of infarct wall thickness to noninfarct wall thickness was 1.13 +/- 0.03 (mean +/- standard error of the mean) in control dogs and was 0.98 +/- 0.03 in the dogs treated with methoxamine (p less than 0.005). An expansion index was determined as previously reported and expansion was considered to have occurred if this index exceeded 1.09. The expansion index was 0.98 +/- 0.06 in the control group and 1.18 +/- 0.07 in the methoxamine group (p less than 0.05). Histologic analysis suggested a lag in the healing rate in the methoxamine-treated dogs. Thus, early, brief increases in afterload cause infarct expansion and thinning and appears to slow the early healing phase of AMI in dogs.

  4. Dog obesity: veterinary practices' and owners' opinions on cause and management.

    PubMed

    Bland, I M; Guthrie-Jones, A; Taylor, R D; Hill, J

    2010-05-01

    Obesity in dogs is attributed to several factors, including genetic pre-disposition, reproductive management and dietary/exercise (human) management. A quantitative analysis of questionnaire responses from dog owners and veterinary practices in Victoria, Australia was used. A total of 219 dog owner questionnaire and 153 veterinary practice questionnaires were returned. Veterinary practices estimated the prevalence of dog obesity within their practice as 30% on average, ranging from <10 to 100%. Veterinary practices felt that 3% of cases could be attributed to dog specific factors and 97% to human specific factors such as diet, exercise and owner attitudes. Management strategies included reducing food intake, reduced treat feeding and changing diet before recommending more intensive options such as obesity clinics. Of the surveyed veterinary practices, 43% ran obesity clinics and 79% of those believed they were a valuable management tool. Of veterinary practices that did not run obesity clinics, only 46% believed them to be a valuable management tool. Dog owners preferred to try to reduce dog weight through diet manipulation, increasing exercise and elimination of treats prior to consulting the veterinary practice. There is a clear difference in expectations with veterinary practices recommending reduction in dietary intake compared to owners expecting to have to modify the diet itself, which may have a cost and hence psychological implication to the owner. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of two passive warming devices for prevention of perioperative hypothermia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Potter, J; Murrell, J; MacFarlane, P

    2015-09-01

    To compare effects of two passive warming methods combined with a resistive heating mat on perioperative hypothermia in dogs. Fifty-two dogs were enrolled and randomly allocated to receive a reflective blanket (Blizzard Blanket) or a fabric blanket (VetBed). In addition, in the operating room all dogs were placed onto a table with a resistive heating mat covered with a fabric blanket. Rectal temperature measurements were taken at defined points. Statistical analysis was performed comparing all Blizzard Blanket-treated to all VetBed-treated dogs, and VetBed versus Blizzard Blanket dogs within spay and castrate groups, spay versus castrate groups and within groups less than 10 kg or more than 10 kg bodyweight. Data from 39 dogs were used for analysis. All dogs showed a reduction in perioperative rectal temperature. There were no detected statistical differences between treatments or between the different groups. This study supports previous data on prevalence of hypothermia during surgery. The combination of active and passive warming methods used in this study prevented the development of severe hypothermia, but there were no differences between treatment groups. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  6. Extraction of urethral calculi by transabdominal cystoscopy and urethroscopy in nine dogs.

    PubMed

    Libermann, S V; Doran, I C; Bille, C R; Bomassi, E G; Rattez, E P

    2011-04-01

    To describe a minimally invasive technique for treating urethral obstructions in male dogs and to review the postoperative results. All dogs (n=9) had urethral obstruction due to calculi. Obstructions were verified by radiographic and ultrasonographic examinations. Dogs with impaired kidney function were not included in the study. A 5-mm diameter trocar and cannula were placed in the ventral midline, 2 cm cranial to the umbilicus, allowing placement of a 10-mm diameter cannula under visual guidance, adjacent to the apex of the bladder. The bladder was then partially exteriorised and sutured to the skin. A 5-mm diameter cystoscopy sheath was introduced into the bladder lumen and advanced into the urethra. Continuous retrograde flushing was used to dislodge the calculi from the site of obstruction and collect them upstream. The nine dogs were followed up for a minimum of 6 months. No major postoperative complications were identified. One dog exhibited transient macroscopic haematuria (for 3 weeks postoperatively). All urethral calculi were removed in the nine dogs. No recurrence was found during the follow-up period. A minimally invasive approach is used to treat urethral obstructions resulting from calculi in the male dogs. © 2011 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  7. Conditioning shelter dogs to sit.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Judith M; Templeton, Jennifer J; Van Winkle, Kimberly M M; Castillo, Roberto R

    2006-01-01

    Human contact in the shelter may lessen effects of change in environment and smooth transition into a home. Training can increase a dog's interaction with people in a shelter environment. Experiments were conducted to determine how rapidly shelter dogs learn to sit, if the dogs can retain sitting behavior over time, and if sitting transfers to novel locations and people. Two experiments trained shelter dogs (n = 21) to sit when a stranger approached over a 10-trial session. Food and a verbal cue or a clicker reinforced the sit. The experiments measured latency to sit for each trial. Latency to sit decreased significantly over trials. Another experiment included reinforcement given to dogs (n = 20) on a noncontingent basis or for sitting. Five days of the experiment (condition training) were in the same room with the same experimenter. The last 4 days (testing) varied by both experimenter and location (familiar or strange). Results indicate that short training sessions are effective for teaching shelter dogs to sit, that dogs can retain sitting behavior over 2 days, and that training transfers to novel people and situations.

  8. "She's a dog at the end of the day": Guide dog owners' perspectives on the behaviour of their guide dog.

    PubMed

    Craigon, Peter J; Hobson-West, Pru; England, Gary C W; Whelan, Chantelle; Lethbridge, Emma; Asher, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    A guide dog is a domestic dog (Canis familiaris) that is specifically educated to provide mobility support to a blind or visually impaired owner. Current dog suitability assessments focus on behavioural traits, including: trainability, reactivity or attention to environmental stimuli, low aggressiveness, fearfulness and stress behaviour, energy levels, and attachment behaviour. The aim of this study was to find out which aspects of guide dog behaviour are of key importance to guide dog owners themselves. Sixty-three semi-structured interview surveys were carried out with guide dog owners. Topics included the behaviour of their guide dog both within and outside their working role, and also focused on examples of behaviour which might be considered outside a guide dog owner's typical expectations. Both positive and negative examples and situations were covered. This allowed for the discovery of new perspectives and emerging themes on living and working with a guide dog. Thematic analysis of the results reveals that a dog's safe behaviour in the face of traffic was the most important positive aspect of a guide dog's behaviour and pulling or high tension on the lead and /or harness was the most discussed negative aspect. Other aspects of guide dog behaviour were highlighted as particularly pleasing or disappointing by owners including attentiveness to the task, work, environment and owner; confidence in work and decision making (with confident dogs resulting in confident owners) obedience and control; calmness and locating objectives. The results reveal important areas of behaviour that are not currently considered priorities in guide dog assessments; these key areas were consistency of behaviour, the dog's maturity and the dog's behaviour in relation to children. The survey revealed a large range in what owners considered problematic or pleasing behaviours and this highlights the heterogeneity in guide dog owners and the potential multifarious roles of the guide dog

  9. Rate of infection and of reinfection by Echinococcus granulosus in rural dogs of the province of Rio Negro, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Larrieu, E; Costa, M T; Cantoni, G; Labanchi, J L; Bigatti, R; Aquino, A; Araya, D; Herrero, E; Iglesias, L; Mancini, S; Thakur, A S

    2000-02-01

    Hydatidosis (cystic echinococcosis) constitutes a serious public health problem in the Province of Rio Negro, Argentina. In the present work it was intended to evaluate the prevalence of the canine echinococcosis in rural areas of the Province of Rio Negro and studied the reinfection rate in dogs after treatment with Praziquantel during the period 1980-1997. A total of 496 dogs were studied in 18 canine concentrations in order to establish the initial prevalence rate which was 42.3%. From 1980 onward dogs should have been systematically treated with anthelmintic every 2 months in rural areas and every 6 months in urban areas. We estimated that approximately 65% of dogs were treated. To determine the reinfection rate, 476 dogs (1984) and 598 dogs (1996) were studied after anthelmintic treatment during two sequential time periods (0-45; 46-90 days). In both cases treated animals were compared with untreated dogs. Prevalences were 3.5%, 6.7% and 21.3% in 1984 and 0.8%, 4.0% and 10.0% in 1996. For the purpose of surveillance a total number of 21,444 dogs were studied during 18 years. Prevalence of Echinococcus granulosus decreased significantly in the first year from 42.3% to 6.1%.

  10. Gingival hyperplasia associated with the administration of amlodipine to dogs with degenerative valvular disease (2004-2008).

    PubMed

    Thomason, J D; Fallaw, T L; Carmichael, K P; Radlinsky, M A; Calvert, C A

    2009-01-01

    Calcium channel blocking drugs, usually nifedipine and less often amlodipine, have been reported to cause gingival hyperplasia (GH) in humans. Amlodipine, a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocking drug, can cause GH when administered chronically to older small dogs with degenerative valvular disease. From January 2004 to May 2008, 82 client-owned dogs with degenerative valvular disease and left atrial dilatation were treated with amlodipine in combination with spironolactone and enalapril and followed for >6 months. Retrospective study. A chronological observation of GH in 2 dogs treated with amlodipine in 2004 and 2006 prompted the study. Patient histories and medical records of each dog treated with amlodipine for degenerative valvular disease from January 2004 to May 2008 were reviewed. GH was observed by clients and the authors in 7 of 82 (8.5%) dogs. Histologic confirmation of the diagnosis was made in 2 dogs. The minimum duration of treatment before diagnosis of GH was 5 months. GH began to resolve within 2 weeks of discontinuing amlodipine and resolution was complete within 6 months. Amlodipine administration was reinstituted in 1 dog in which GH had resolved, and GH reoccurred within 4 months. Long-term administration of amlodipine to dogs with degenerative valvular disease may cause GH in a small percentage of patients. GH resolves quickly after withdrawal of amlodipine treatment.

  11. Modulation of the Bifidobacterial Communities of the Dog Microbiota by Zeolite

    PubMed Central

    Sabbioni, Alberto; Ferrario, Chiara; Milani, Christian; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Riccardi, Enzo; Di Ianni, Francesco; Beretti, Valentino; Superchi, Paola; Ossiprandi, Maria C.

    2016-01-01

    During last decades canine health and well being is becoming an important issue for human owners. In dogs, several factors including diet, pathogenic bacterial and stress conditions can affect the composition of the gut microbiota. In this study, we evaluated the effect of dietary chabazitic zeolitite (CZ) supplementation on the contribution of bifidobacteria to the fecal microbiota in training hunting dogs. Fecal microbiota cataloging based on 16S rRNA microbial profiling analyses highlighted an increase of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in animals treated with CZ, with a simultaneous decrease of pathogens associated with dog gastrointestinal infections, such as Klebsiella and Enterobacter. A detailed profiling of the bifidobacterial population of dogs receiving CZ based on the ITS-based sequencing approach, revealed an enhancement bifidobacterial of species typical of animals such as Bifidobacterium animalis and B. pseudolongum. Moreover, these analyses identified the occurrence of putative new bifidobacterial taxa in both treated and untreated samples. PMID:27713735

  12. A Human Case of Zoonotic Dog Tapeworm, Dipylidium caninum (Eucestoda: Dilepidiidae), in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Ruo Dan; Wang, Zhong Quan; Cui, Jing

    2017-02-01

    We described a human case of zoonotic dog tapeworm, Dipylidium caninum (Eucestoda: Dilepidiidae), rarely occurring in China. The mother of a 17 month-old boy noted the appearance of small white and active worms over a month period in her son's feces, but the boy was asymptomatic except mild diarrhea. We observed 3 tapeworm proglottids resembling cucumber seeds in his stool sample. Microscopically, each proglottid had 2 genital pores, 1 on each lateral edge, and numerous egg capsules in the uterus. The patient was successfully treated with a single oral dose of praziquantel. Adult worms were recovered in the diarrheic stool after praziquantel treatment and purgation. His family had household pet dogs for several years, and he might have acquired the infection by ingestion of infected fleas of his pet dogs. A history of dog or cat pets and flea bites may be important clues to diagnosis of D. caninum infection. The infected pets should also be treated.

  13. A Human Case of Zoonotic Dog Tapeworm, Dipylidium caninum (Eucestoda: Dilepidiidae), in China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peng; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Ruo Dan; Wang, Zhong Quan; Cui, Jing

    2017-01-01

    We described a human case of zoonotic dog tapeworm, Dipylidium caninum (Eucestoda: Dilepidiidae), rarely occurring in China. The mother of a 17 month-old boy noted the appearance of small white and active worms over a month period in her son’s feces, but the boy was asymptomatic except mild diarrhea. We observed 3 tapeworm proglottids resembling cucumber seeds in his stool sample. Microscopically, each proglottid had 2 genital pores, 1 on each lateral edge, and numerous egg capsules in the uterus. The patient was successfully treated with a single oral dose of praziquantel. Adult worms were recovered in the diarrheic stool after praziquantel treatment and purgation. His family had household pet dogs for several years, and he might have acquired the infection by ingestion of infected fleas of his pet dogs. A history of dog or cat pets and flea bites may be important clues to diagnosis of D. caninum infection. The infected pets should also be treated. PMID:28285500

  14. The effect of an oral probiotic containing lactobacillus, bifidobacterium, and bacillus species on the vaginal microbiota of spayed female dogs.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, R G; Bailey, C S; Jacob, M E; Harris, T L; Wood, M W; Saker, K E; Vaden, S L

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are often difficult to treat. Vaginal colonization with lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) is associated with reduced frequency of recurrent UTIs in women. Oral probiotics might help increase the prevalence of vaginal LAB and decrease the frequency of recurrent UTIs in dogs. Administration of an oral probiotic supplement containing Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Bacillus species will increase the prevalence of LAB in the vagina of dogs. Thirty-five healthy, spayed female dogs without history of recurrent UTIs. Prospective, controlled study. Enrolled dogs received an oral probiotic supplement for 14 or 28 days. A vaginal tract culture was obtained from each dog before and after oral probiotic administration. Twenty-three dogs received the oral probiotic supplement daily for a period of 14 days and 12 dogs received the oral probiotic supplement daily for a period of 28 days. Lactic acid-producing bacteria were isolated from 7 of 35 dogs prior to probiotic administration. After the treatment course, 6 of 35 dogs had LAB isolated. Only one of these dogs had LAB (Enterococcus canintestini) isolated for the first time. Enterococcus canintestini was the most common LAB isolated from all dogs in this study, although it was not included in the probiotic supplement. Lactic acid-producing bacteria are not a common isolate from the vaginal vault of dogs. Administration of this oral probiotic supplement for a 2- or 4-week period did not increase the prevalence of vaginal LAB in dogs. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  15. Evolutionary genomics of dog domestication.

    PubMed

    Wayne, Robert K; vonHoldt, Bridgett M

    2012-02-01

    We review the underlying principles and tools used in genomic studies of domestic dogs aimed at understanding the genetic changes that have occurred during domestication. We show that there are two principle modes of evolution within dogs. One primary mode that accounts for much of the remarkable diversity of dog breeds is the fixation of discrete mutations of large effect in individual lineages that are then crossed to various breed groupings. This transfer of mutations across the dog evolutionary tree leads to the appearance of high phenotypic diversity that in actuality reflects a small number of major genes. A second mechanism causing diversification involves the selective breeding of dogs within distinct phenotypic or functional groups, which enhances specific group attributes such as heading or tracking. Such progressive selection leads to a distinct genetic structure in evolutionary trees such that functional and phenotypic groups cluster genetically. We trace the origin of the nuclear genome in dogs based on haplotype-sharing analyses between dogs and gray wolves and show that contrary to previous mtDNA analyses, the nuclear genome of dogs derives primarily from Middle Eastern or European wolves, a result more consistent with the archeological record. Sequencing analysis of the IGF1 gene, which has been the target of size selection in small breeds, further supports this conclusion. Finally, we discuss how a black coat color mutation that evolved in dogs has transformed North American gray wolf populations, providing a first example of a mutation that appeared under domestication and selectively swept through a wild relative.

  16. Prevalence of food-responsive enteropathy among dogs with chronic enteropathy in Japan

    PubMed Central

    KAWANO, Koji; SHIMAKURA, Hidekatsu; NAGATA, Noriyuki; MASASHI, Yuki; SUTO, Akemi; SUTO, Yukinori; UTO, Shohei; UENO, Hiromichi; HASEGAWA, Takehiro; USHIGUSA, Takahiro; NAGAI, Takashi; ARAWATARI, Yasunori; MIYAJI, Kazuki; OHMORI, Keitaro; MIZUNO, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    There have been limited reports on the prevalence of adverse food reactions among dogs suffering from chronic enteropathy (CE) in Japan. We examined the prevalence and histological features of food-responsive enteropathy (FRE) in a total of 32 dogs with history of CE. Fourteen of 18 cases (56.2%) diagnosed as FRE had lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis or eosinophilic enteritis by histopathological examination. Characteristic histopathological changes indicating FRE were not identified in 18 cases, though 4 cases did not show any abnormalities. Results collected from this study provided important information that can help to change the way dogs with CE are treated in the future. PMID:27150023

  17. Prevalence of food-responsive enteropathy among dogs with chronic enteropathy in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Koji; Shimakura, Hidekatsu; Nagata, Noriyuki; Masashi, Yuki; Suto, Akemi; Suto, Yukinori; Uto, Shohei; Ueno, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Takehiro; Ushigusa, Takahiro; Nagai, Takashi; Arawatari, Yasunori; Miyaji, Kazuki; Ohmori, Keitaro; Mizuno, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    There have been limited reports on the prevalence of adverse food reactions among dogs suffering from chronic enteropathy (CE) in Japan. We examined the prevalence and histological features of food-responsive enteropathy (FRE) in a total of 32 dogs with history of CE. Fourteen of 18 cases (56.2%) diagnosed as FRE had lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis or eosinophilic enteritis by histopathological examination. Characteristic histopathological changes indicating FRE were not identified in 18 cases, though 4 cases did not show any abnormalities. Results collected from this study provided important information that can help to change the way dogs with CE are treated in the future.

  18. Opportunistic Invasive Cutaneous Fungal Infections Associated with Administration of Cyclosporine to Dogs with Immune-mediated Disease.

    PubMed

    McAtee, B B; Cummings, K J; Cook, A K; Lidbury, J A; Heseltine, J C; Willard, M D

    2017-09-09

    Opportunistic invasive fungal infections (OIFIs) occur in dogs administered immunosuppressive medications. However, the epidemiology of OIFIs among dogs undergoing immunosuppressive treatment is poorly understood. The aims of this study were to (1) estimate the incidence of OIFIs among dogs diagnosed with certain immune-mediated diseases and treated with immunosuppressive drugs, and (2) determine if administration of particular drug(s) was a risk factor for OIFIs. Dogs receiving cyclosporine treatment (alone or as part of a multidrug protocol) are at higher risk of developing OIFIs. One hundred and thirteen client-owned dogs diagnosed with select immune-mediated diseases: 42 with IMHA, 29 with ITP, 34 with IMPA, and 8 with Evans syndrome. Retrospective cohort study. Medical records of dogs presenting to the Texas A&M University, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital between January 2008 and December 2015, and treated for 1 or more of IMHA, IMPA, ITP, or Evans syndrome were retrospectively reviewed. Dogs that did not develop an OIFI were excluded if they died, were euthanized, or were lost to follow-up within 120 days of initiation of immunosuppressive treatment. Fifteen dogs of 113 (13%) were diagnosed with an OIFI based on 1 or more of cytology, culture, or histopathology. The odds of developing an OIFI were greater among dogs that were treated with cyclosporine (OR = 7.1, P = 0.017; 95% CI, 1.5-34.4) and among male dogs (OR = 5.1, P = 0.018; 95% CI, 1.4-17.9). OIFIs were significantly more likely in male dogs and those receiving cyclosporine. It is important to consider OIFIs as a potential complication of immunosuppressive treatment, particularly cyclosporine. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  19. Abdominal cryptococcosis in two dogs: diagnosis and medical management.

    PubMed

    Tangeman, Lindsay; Davignon, Danielle; Patel, Reema; Littman, Meryl

    2015-01-01

    Canine cryptococcosis cases are typically reported as neurologic, disseminated, or both. There have been few reports of other parenchymal organ involvement. Dogs infected with Cryptococcus spp. are likely to develop central nervous system involvement, and those that are severely affected are treated aggressively with surgery and/or amphotericin B. This report describes two cases of canine abdominal cryptococcosis: one boxer with primary alimentary cryptococcosis alone and one miniature schnauzer with pancreatic and disseminated cryptococcosis. The boxer is unique in that the dog suffered from primary alimentary cryptococcosis without dissemination, secondary anemia due to gastrointestinal losses, and is the second case to have Cryptococcus spp. identified on fecal examination as part of the diagnostic workup. Unlike previous reports, surgery was not performed in either case, and both dogs were treated with fluconazole alone. Currently, both dogs are free from clinical signs, and Cryptococcus spp. antigen titers are negative at 17 and 15 mo after initial presentation. These cases suggest fluconazole may be effective therapy alone for canine abdominal cryptococcosis, negating the need for high-risk therapy options such as surgery and/or amphotericin B in some cases.

  20. Hypertrophic scar in a dog: histological and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Avallone, Giancarlo; Bonaldi, Martina; Caniatti, Mario; Lombardo, Rocco

    2011-08-01

    An adult male bullmastiff dog was treated for paraparesis and ataxia due to discospondylitis and disc herniation. At this time, the dog had a nonhealing ulcer between the pads of the left hindfoot. At re-evaluation, the dog had developed a large exophitic mass in the previously ulcerated area. Cytological examination revealed occasional spindle cells with mild atypia, and a soft tissue tumour was suspected. The mass was excised and submitted for histology. The lesion was characterized by superficial ulceration, an intermediate layer of granulation tissue and a deep portion containing vertically orientated capillaries and perpendicularly arranged fibroblasts and collagen. The histological features led to a diagnosis of hypertrophic scar. Eight weeks after surgery, the lesion recurred and was treated with an intralesional injection of methylprednisolone acetate. The lesion regressed in 10 days, but recurred after 3 months following severe self-trauma. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are two types of exuberant scarring reported in human beings, the pathogenesis of which is still unclear but seems to involve several cytokines, growth factors and inflammatory cells. The histological features identified in this case paralleled those reported in hypertrophic scars in humans. In this case, intralesional corticosteroid therapy was useful in the management of the lesion, but the severe self-trauma could have influenced the recurrence. Even if uncommon, hypertrophic scar should be included among the differential diagnoses of spindle cell tumours in dogs. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology. © 2011 ESVD and ACVD.

  1. Dog pack attack: hunting humans.

    PubMed

    Avis, S P

    1999-09-01

    Dog bite-related fatalities, although unusual, accounted for 304 deaths in the United States between 1979 and 1996 and 6 fatalities in Canada between 1994 and 1996. Fatal dog pack attacks and attacks involving human predation are less common. The following describes a dog pack attack on a family of four involving 2 fatalities with predation of the victims. Factors previously identified that contribute to pack attacks and predation, including prior group hunting, social feeding, territorial defense, lack of human interaction, and prey stimuli, are discussed.

  2. Pyloro-duodenal hernia with formation of enterocutaneous fistula in a buffalo calf following a dog attack

    PubMed Central

    Kamalakar, G.; Prasad, V. Devi; Devaratnam, J.; Ganeshan, A.

    2015-01-01

    A body wall hernia entrapping abomasum and concurrent duodenal fistula in a buffalo calf aged about 8 months, secondary to a dog bite was successfully treated by closure of fistulous orifice and ventro lateral herniorrhaphy. PMID:26623378

  3. Punch resection alaplasty technique in dogs and cats with stenotic nares: 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Trostel, C Todd; Frankel, Daniel J

    2010-01-01

    Punch resection alaplasty is a previously unreported surgical technique for the management of stenotic nares. Nine dogs underwent the procedure in conjunction with soft palate resection and/or laryngeal sacculectomy. Three dogs and two cats were treated with the novel punch resection alaplasty technique alone. Symmetrical resection was achieved, providing excellent cosmesis. Good to excellent results were achieved in all cases, with owners feeling that their pet's overall well being was improved following surgery.

  4. N-terminal pro-C-natriuretic peptide and cytokine kinetics in dogs with endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Floras, A N K; Holowaychuk, M K; Bienzle, D; Bersenas, A M E; Sharif, S; Harvey, T; Nordone, S K; Wood, G A

    2014-01-01

    Serum N-terminal pro-C-natriuretic peptide (NT-proCNP) concentration at hospital admission has sufficient sensitivity and specificity to differentiate naturally occurring sepsis from nonseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). However, little is known about serum NT-proCNP concentrations in dogs during the course of sepsis. To determine serum NT-proCNP and cytokine kinetics in dogs with endotoxemia, a model of canine sepsis. Eighty canine serum samples. Eight healthy adult Beagles were randomized to receive Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 5 μg/kg) or placebo (0.9% NaCl) as a single IV dose in a randomized crossover study. Serum collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, and 24 hours was stored at -80°C for batch analysis. Serum NT-proCNP was measured by ELISA and 13 cytokines and chemokines by multiplex magnetic bead-based assay. Serum NT-proCNP concentrations did not differ significantly between LPS- and placebo-treated dogs at any time. When comparing serum cytokine concentrations, LPS-treated dogs had higher interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, TNF-α and KC-like at 1, 2, and 4 hours; higher CCL2 at 1, 2, 4, and 24 hours; and higher IL-8 and CXCL10 at 4 hours compared to placebo-treated dogs. There were no differences in serum GM-CSF, IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-7, IL-15 or IL-18 between LPS- and placebo-treated dogs. Serum NT-proCNP concentration does not change significantly in response to LPS administration in healthy dogs. Certain serum cytokine and chemokine concentrations are significantly increased within 1-4 hours after LPS administration and warrant further investigation as tools for the detection and management of sepsis in dogs. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  5. Coccidiosis Caused by Isospora ohioensis-like Organisms in Three Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Olson, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Three dogs with atypical coccidiosis are described. The age and clinical signs were not those normally associated with coccidiosis described in the literature. The ages of the three dogs were twenty-two months, five months and twelve weeks respectively. The clinical signs were recurrent mild to severe diarrhea, depressed growth and poor body condition. Repeated fecal examinations were needed to diagnose the disease. Sulfamethazine and amprolium were used successfully in treating the condition in all cases. PMID:17422514

  6. Cortisol secretion after adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and Dexamethasone tests in healthy female and male dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pessina, Paula; Fernández-Foren, Andrea; Cueto, Enrique; Delucchi, Luis; Castillo, Victor; Meikle, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Background For the conclusive diagnosis of Cushing's Syndrome, a stimulating ACTH test or a low suppressive Dexamethasone test is used. Reports in other species than the dog indicate that plasma cortisol concentration after ACTH administration is affected by gender. We investigated the effect of gender on the cortisol response to ACTH and Dexamethasone tests in dogs. Methods Seven healthy adult Cocker Spaniels (4 females and 3 males) were assigned to a two by two factorial design: 4 dogs (2 females and 2 males) received IV Dexamethasone 0.01 mg/kg, while the other 3 dogs received an IV saline solution (control group). Two weeks later the treatments were reversed. After one month, ACTH was given IV (250 μg/animal) to 4 dogs (2 female and 2 males) while the rest was treated with saline solution (control group). Cortisol concentrations were determined by a direct solid-phase radioimmunoassay and cholesterol and triglycerides by commercial kits. Results and Discussion No effect of treatment was observed in metabolite concentrations, but females presented higher cholesterol concentrations. ACTH-treated dogs showed an increase in cortisol levels in the first hour after sampling until 3 hours post injection. Cortisol concentrations in Dexamethasone-treated dogs decreased one hour post injection and remained low for 3 hours, thereafter cortisol concentrations increased. The increase in cortisol levels from one to two hours post ACTH injection was significantly higher in females than males. In Dexamethasone-treated males cortisol levels decreased one hour post injection up to 3 hours; in females the decrease was more pronounced and prolonged, up to 5 hours post injection. Conclusion We have demonstrated that cortisol response to ACTH and Dexamethasone treatment in dogs differs according to sex. PMID:19686591

  7. Do Dog Behavioral Characteristics Predict the Quality of the Relationship between Dogs and Their Owners?

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Christy L.; Chen, Pan; Serpell, James A.; Jacobson, Kristen C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores whether dog behavioral characteristics predict the quality of the relationship between dogs and their owners (i.e., owner attachment to dog), and whether relations between dog behavior and owner attachment are moderated by demographic characteristics. In this study, N = 92 children and N = 60 adults from 60 dog-owning families completed questionnaires about their attachment to their pet dog, their level of responsibility for that dog, and their general attitudes toward pets. They also rated their dogs on observable behavioral characteristics. Individuals who held positive attitudes about pets and who provided much of their dog’s care reported stronger attachments to their dogs. The strength of owners’ attachments to their dogs was associated with dog trainability and separation problems. Relationships between owner attachment and both dog excitability and attention-seeking behavior were further moderated by demographic characteristics: for Caucasians but not for non-Caucasians, dog excitability was negatively associated with owner attachment to dog; and for adults, dog attention-seeking behavior was positively associated with owner attachment, but children tended to be highly attached to their dogs, regardless of their dogs’ attention-seeking behaviors. This study demonstrates that certain dog behavioral traits are indeed associated with the strength of owners’ attachments to their dogs. PMID:25685855

  8. [A survey on intestinal parasites of livestock guardian dogs and herding dogs in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Frey, C F; Regotz, J; Rosenberg, G; Gottstein, B; Kohler, S

    2010-12-01

    The present study describes the occurrence of intestinal parasite infections in livestock guardian dogs and herding dogs. A total of 71 guardian dogs (more than half of the total number of guardian dogs in Switzerland) and 21 herding dogs were coprologically examined, using a combined sedimentation-flotation method. In 21 (23 %) of the dogs intestinal parasites were detected, and 8 (8.7 %) of these dogs shed either sporocysts of Sarcocystis sp. (n = 6) or taeniid eggs (n = 2). The evaluation of questionnaires providing data on age, origin and deworming schemes of the dogs completed the study.

  9. Prevalence of staphylococcal enterotoxins in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates from dogs with pyoderma and healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Taishi; Toyoguchi, Midori; Hirano, Fumitaka; Chiba, Mei; Onuma, Kenta; Sato, Hisaaki

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the role of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) produced by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in the pathogenesis of pyoderma, isolates from dogs with pyoderma and healthy dogs were analyzed. According to reverse passive latex agglutination, 14/184 isolates (7.6%) from dogs with pyoderma and 9/87 (10.3%) from healthy dogs produced SEs (SEA, SEC or SED). According to multiplex PCR, 99 isolates (53.7%) from dogs with pyoderma and 97 (90.8%) from healthy dogs possessed one or more se genes. There was no significant difference regarding ses between dogs with pyoderma and healthy dogs. Therefore, SEs may not be a direct virulence factor in pyoderma.

  10. Ethics and genetic selection in purebred dogs.

    PubMed

    Meyers-Wallen, V N

    2003-02-01

    . At least initially it may be best to use this new genetic information to avoid mating combinations that we know will produce affected animals, rather than to eliminate whole groups of genes from a population. This is particularly important for breeds with small gene pools, where it is difficult to maintain genetic diversity. Finally, we will eventually have enough information about canine gene function to select for specific genes encoding desirable traits and increase their frequencies in a population. This is similar to breeding practices that have been applied to animals for hundreds of years. The difference is that we will have a large pool of objective data that we can use rapidly on many individuals at a time. This has great potential to improve the health of the dog population as a whole. However, if we or our breeder clients make an error, we can inadvertently cause harm through massive, rapid selection. Therefore, we should probably not be advising clients on polygenic traits or recommend large scale changes in gene frequencies in populations until much more knowledge of gene interaction is obtained. By then it is likely that computer modelling will be available to predict the effect of changing one or several gene frequencies in a dog population over time. And as new mutations are likely to arise in the future, these tools will be needed indefinitely to detect, treat and eliminate genetic disorders from dog populations. Information available from genetic research will only be useful in improving canine health if veterinarians have the knowledge and skills to use it ethically and responsibly. There is not only a great potential to improve overall canine health through genetic selection, but also the potential to do harm if we fail to maintain genetic diversity. Our profession must be in a position to correctly advise clients on the application of this information to individual dogs as well as to populations of dogs, and particularly purebred dogs.

  11. Markers of oxidative stress in dogs with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Verk, Barbara; Nemec Svete, Alenka; Salobir, Janez; Rezar, Vida; Domanjko Petrič, Aleksandra

    2017-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that indirect measures of oxidative stress (vitamin E, glutathione peroxidase, and malondialdehyde) differ in dogs in heart failure resulting from either myxomatous mitral valve disease or dilated cardiomyopathy. Dogs were classified according to the International Small Animal Cardiac Health Council (ISACHC) classification. Additionally, the effect of cardiac therapy on oxidative stress parameters and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in advanced stages of congestive heart failure was investigated. There were no significant differences in oxidative stress parameters between healthy dogs and the individual groups of cardiac patients. Significantly lower malondialdehyde (MDA) was observed in the ISACHC II group in comparison to ISACHC groups III and I. A significant positive correlation in treated patients was observed between NT-proBNP and MDA, NT-proBNP and vitamin E, as well as between MDA and vitamin E (and lipid-standardized vitamin E). No significant differences in any of the measured parameters were found between treated and non-treated cardiac patients. Our results suggest an association between MDA (the extent of lipid peroxidation) and NT-proBNP, vitamin E and NT-proBNP, as well as between MDA and vitamin E in treated canine patients. Plasma vitamin E concentration was maintained in all stages of cardiovascular disease in these canine patients.

  12. Continuous infusion of enzyme replacement therapy is inferior to weekly infusions in MPS I dogs

    PubMed Central

    Passage, M.B.; Krieger, A.W.; Peinovich, M.C.; Lester, T.; Le, S.Q.; Dickson, P.I.; Kakkis, E.D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human α-l-iduronidase (rhIDU) is used weekly to treat mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) I. We tested continuous administration of rhIDU at two dosing levels (0.58 mg/kg/week and 2 mg/kg/week) in MPS I dogs, and compared the efficacy of continuous to the clinically-used 0.58 mg/kg weekly three-hour infusion. Peak plasma concentrations of rhIDU were much higher in weekly-treated dogs (mean 256 units/ml) than steady-state concentrations in dogs treated with continuous infusion (mean 1.97 units/ml at 0.58 mg/kg/week; 10.1 units/ml at 2 mg/kg/week). Dogs receiving continuous IV rhIDU, even at a higher (2 mg/kg/week) dose, had consistently lower iduronidase levels in tissues than dogs receiving a weekly (0.58 mg/kg/week) dose. GAG storage was also less improved by continuous intravenous infusion. Adverse events were similar in all dosing groups. We found that continuous administration of 2 mg/kg/week rhIDU to MPS I dogs was insufficient to achieve GAG storage reduction comparable to 0.58 mg/kg weekly dosing. PMID:19562502

  13. Putative precipitating factors for hepatic encephalopathy in dogs: 118 cases (1991-2014).

    PubMed

    Lidbury, Jonathan A; Ivanek, Renata; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2015-07-15

    To elucidate the relationship between plasma ammonia concentration and severity of hepatic encephalopathy and determine whether factors that precipitate hepatic encephalopathy in humans are associated with the presence of clinical signs of hepatic encephalopathy in dogs previously treated for the disease. Retrospective case series. 118 dogs with hepatic encephalopathy. The medical records database of a veterinary teaching hospital was searched for records of dogs in which hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed between October 1, 1991, and September 1, 2014. Hepatic encephalopathy severity was graded on a 5-point scale, and the correlation between disease severity and plasma ammonia concentration was determined. Respective associations between hepatic encephalopathy and systemic inflammatory response syndrome, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, dietary indiscretion, constipation, furosemide treatment, azotemia, hypokalemia, hyponatremia, alkalosis, and hyperammonemia were assessed by Fisher exact tests followed by multivariable logistic regression. Severity of hepatic encephalopathy at hospital admission was not significantly correlated with plasma ammonia concentration. Dogs treated for hepatic encephalopathy prior to hospital admission were significantly less likely to have clinical signs of the disease at hospital admission, compared with dogs that were not treated for the disease (OR, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.17 to 0.78). None of the putative precipitating factors for hepatic encephalopathy were significantly associated with the presence of clinical signs of the disease at hospital admission. Results indicated that hepatic encephalopathy treatment alleviated clinical signs of the disease. Further investigation is necessary to identify precipitating factors for hepatic encephalopathy in dogs.

  14. Do dogs (Canis familiaris) show contagious yawning?

    PubMed

    Harr, Aimee L; Gilbert, Valerie R; Phillips, Kimberley A

    2009-11-01

    We report an experimental investigation into whether domesticated dogs display contagious yawning. Fifteen dogs were shown video clips of (1) humans and (2) dogs displaying yawns and open-mouth expressions (not yawns) to investigate whether dogs showed contagious yawning to either of these social stimuli. Only one dog performed significantly more yawns during or shortly after viewing yawning videos than to the open-mouth videos, and most of these yawns occurred to the human videos. No dogs showed significantly more yawning to the open-mouth videos (human or dog). The percentage of dogs showing contagious yawning was less than chimpanzees and humans showing this behavior, and considerably less than a recently published report investigating this behavior in dogs (Joly-Mascheroni et al. in Biol Lett 4:446-448, 2008).

  15. Frustration behaviors in domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Jakovcevic, Adriana; Elgier, Angel M; Mustaca, Alba E; Bentosela, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    During extinction a previously learned behavior stops being reinforced. In addition to the decrease in the rate of the instrumental response, it produces an aversive emotional state known as frustration. This state can be assimilated with the fear reactions that occur after aversive stimuli are introduced at both the physiological and behavioral levels. This study evaluated frustration reactions of domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) during a communicative situation involving interactions with a human. The task included the reinforcement and extinction of the gaze response toward the experimenter's face when the dogs tried to obtain inaccessible food. The dog's frustration reactions during extinction involved an increase in withdrawal and side orientation to the location of the human as well as lying down, ambulation, sniffing, and vocalizations compared with the last acquisition trial. These results are especially relevant for domestic dog training situations in which the extinction technique is commonly used to discourage undesirable behaviors.

  16. Endotracheal intubation in the dog.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cyndi

    2007-02-01

    In dogs, endotracheal intubation is often necessary for surgery, dental prophylaxis, or other procedures that require gas anesthesia or ventilation. Following a few simple guidelines can help ensure that the procedure is done safely and effectively.

  17. Primary nodal hemangiosarcoma in four dogs.

    PubMed

    Chan, Catherine M; Zwahlen, Courtney H; de Lorimier, Louis-Philippe; Yeomans, Stephen M; Hoffmann, Karon L; Moore, Antony S

    2016-11-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION 4 dogs with a slow-growing mass in the cervical region were evaluated. CLINICAL FINDINGS All dogs had no clinical signs at the time of the evaluation. There was no apparent evidence of visceral metastases or other primary tumor based on available CT or MRI data for any dog. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME For each dog, surgery to remove the mass was performed. Histologic examination of the excised tissue revealed a completely excised grade 1 or 2 lymph node hemangiosarcoma. All dogs received adjuvant chemotherapy; 2 dogs underwent curative intent chemotherapy, 1 dog underwent metronomic treatment with cyclophosphamide, and 1 dog underwent metronomic treatment with chlorambucil. The survival time was 259 days in 1 dog; 3 dogs were still alive 615, 399, and 365 days after surgery. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Primary nodal hemangiosarcoma in dogs is a rare and, to the authors' knowledge, previously undescribed disease that appears to develop in the cervical lymph nodes as a slow-growing mass or masses. Surgical excision and adjunct treatment resulted in long survival times for 3 of the 4 dogs of the present report. Given the aggressive biologic behavior of hemangiosarcomas in other body locations, adjunct chemotherapy should be considered for affected dogs, although its role in the cases described in this report was unclear. Additional clinical information is required to further characterize the biologic behavior of this tumor type and determine the expected survival times and associated risk factors in dogs.

  18. Detection of a large unnamed Babesia piroplasm originally identified in dogs in North Carolina in a dog with no history of travel to that state.

    PubMed

    Holman, Patricia J; Backlund, Brianna B; Wilcox, Angela L; Stone, Richard; Stricklin, Andrew L; Bardin, Kendall E

    2009-10-01

    A 12-year-old 46-kg (101.2-lb) sexually intact male Labrador Retriever was evaluated because of lymphadenomegaly. The dog resided in Texas, and its travel history included many southeastern and eastern shore states but not North Carolina. Following evaluation of the dog, a diagnosis of stage IVa intermediate- to large-cell lymphoma was made. A cyclophosphamide-hydroxydaunorubicin (doxorubicin)-vincristine-prednisone chemotherapy protocol was initiated. One week after the first chemotherapeutic treatment, a routine blood smear evaluation revealed single and paired intraerythrocytic large piroplasms that resembled Babesia canis. Via molecular testing, the organism was identified as a Babesia sp that had been detected previously in dogs in North Carolina. The dog was administered imidocarb diproprionate (7 mg/kg [3.2 mg/lb], IM) on 2 occasions (3-week interval). At 1, 4, 15, and 50 weeks after the second treatment, blood samples were analyzed specifically for the North Carolina Babesia sp via PCR assay; the result of each assay was positive. Because of the morphologic similarity of the large piroplasm detected in dogs in North Carolina to B canis, molecular testing of large piroplasms detected in dogs is needed to definitively identify the infective Babesia sp. In the dog of this report, the infection was not eliminated following treatment with imidocarb diproprionate, which may have been a result of the immunocompromised state of the dog or the drug's ineffectiveness against this parasite. If imidocarb diproprionate is ineffective against the North Carolina Babesia sp, treated dogs may act as reservoirs of infection.

  19. Clinical efficacy and safety of recombinant canine erythropoietin in dogs with anemia of chronic renal failure and dogs with recombinant human erythropoietin-induced red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Randolph, John E; Scarlett, Janet; Stokol, Tracy; MacLeod, James N

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of recombinant canine erythropoietin (rcEPO) therapy was evaluated in 19 dogs with anemia of chronic renal failure (group 1) and 6 dogs with chronic renal failure and recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO)-induced red cell aplasia (group 2). Hematocrit (Hct) and absolute reticulocyte count (ARC) were monitored weekly for the first 8 weeks, CBC (including ARC) and serum iron profiles were evaluated monthly, and serum biochemical analyses were performed every 2 months for 6 (group 2) to 12 (group 1) months. For group 1 dogs, median Hct and ARC increased significantly during the 1st week of rcEPO treatment, and median Hct was sustained at >35% after week 5. In contrast, median Hct and ARC for group 2 did not change significantly with rcEPO treatment, even with doses greater than those used in group 1. Nevertheless, 2 (33%) of the 6 dogs in group 2 developed erythroid hyperplasia, reticulocytosis, and increases in Hct with rcEPO treatment. Although median systolic blood pressure did not change significantly in either group, 5 dogs developed systolic blood pressures > or = 180 mm Hg during the study. Appetite and energy level improved in most group 1 dogs with increases in Hct. Recombinant cEPO stimulated erythrocyte production in dogs with nonregenerative anemia secondary to chronic renal failure without causing the profound erythroid hypoplasia that can occur in rhEPO-treated dogs. Unfortunately, rcEPO was not as effective in restoring erythrocyte production in dogs that had previously developed rhEPO-induced red cell aplasia.

  20. Treatment of Lactic Acidosis with Dichloroacetate in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Robert; Arieff, Allen I.; Leach, William; Lazarowitz, Virginia C.

    1982-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is a clinical condition due to accumulation of H+ ions from lactic acid, characterized by blood lactate levels >5 mM and arterial pH <7.25. In addition to supportive care, treatment usually consists of intravenous NaHCO3, with a resultant mortality >60%. Dichloroacetate (DCA) is a compound that lowers blood lactate levels under various conditions in both man and laboratory animals. It acts to increase pyruvate oxidation by activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase. We evaluated the effects of DCA in the treatment of two different models of type B experimental lactic acidosis in diabetic dogs: hepatectomy-lactic acidosis and phenformin-lactic acidosis. The metabolic and systemic effects examined included arterial blood pH and levels of bicarbonate and lactate; the intracellular pH (pHi) in liver and skeletal muscle; cardiac index, arterial blood pressure and liver blood flow; liver lactate uptake and extrahepatic splanchnic (gut) lactate production; and mortality. Effects of DCA were compared with those of either NaCl or NaHCO3. The infusion of DCA and NaHCO3, delivered equal amounts of volume and sodium, although the quantity of NaHCO3 infused (2.5 meq/kg per h) was insufficient to normalize arterial pH. In phenformin-lactic acidosis, DCA-treated animals had a mortality of 22%, vs. 89% in those treated with NaHCO3. DCA therapy increased arterial pH and bicarbonate, liver pHi and cardiac index, with increased liver lactate uptake and a fall in blood lactate. With NaHCO3 therapy, there were decrements of cardiac index and liver pHi, with an increase in venous pCO2 and gut production of lactate. Dogs with hepatectomy-lactic acidosis were either treated or pretreated with DCA. Treatment with DCA resulted in stabilization of cardiac index, a fall in blood lactate, and 17% mortality. NaHCO3 was associated with a continuous decline of cardiac index, rise in blood lactate, and 67% mortality. In dogs pretreated with NaCl, mortality was 33%, but all dogs

  1. Why do adult dogs 'play'?

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, John W S; Pullen, Anne J; Rooney, Nicola J

    2015-01-01

    Among the Carnivora, play behaviour is usually made up of motor patterns characteristic of predatory, agonistic and courtship behaviour. Domestic dogs are unusual in that play is routinely performed by adults, both socially, with conspecifics and with humans, and also asocially, with objects. This enhanced playfulness is commonly thought to be a side effect of paedomorphosis, the perpetuation of juvenile traits into adulthood, but here we suggest that the functions of the different types of play are sufficiently distinct that they are unlikely to have arisen through a single evolutionary mechanism. Solitary play with objects appears to be derived from predatory behaviour: preferred toys are those that can be dismembered, and a complex habituation-like feedback system inhibits play with objects that are resistant